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Sample records for spray calcination reactor

  1. Spray calcination of nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.F.; Blair, H.T.; Romero, L.S.

    1976-01-01

    The spray calciner is a relatively simple machine; operation is simple and is easily automated. Startup and shutdown can be performed in less than an hour. A wide variety of waste compositions and concentrations can be calcined under easily maintainable conditions. Spray calcination of all commercial fuel reprocessor high-level liquid wastes and mixed high and intermediate-level wastes have been demonstrated. Wastes have been calcined containing over 2M sodium. Thus waste generated during plant startup and shutdown can be blended with normal waste and calcined. Spray calcination of ILLW has also been demonstrated. A remotely replaceable atomizing nozzle has been developed for use in plant scale equipment. The 6 mm (0.25 inch) orifice and ceramic tip offer freedom from plugging and erosion thus nozzle replacement should be required only after several months operation. Calciner capacity of over 75 l/h (20 gal/h) has been demonstrated in pilot scale equipment. Sintered stainless steel filters are effective in deentraining over 99.9 percent of the solids that result from calcining the feedstock. Since such a small amount of radionuclides escape the calciner the volume of recycle required from the effluent treatment system is very small. The noncondensable off-gas volume is also low, less than 0.5 m 3 /min (15 scfm) for a liquid feedrate of 75 l/hr (20 gal/hr). Calcine holdup in the calciner is less than 1 kg, thus the liquid feedrate is directly relatable to calcine flowrate. The calcine produced is very fine and reactive. Successful remote operation and maintenance of a heated wall spray calciner has been demonstrated while processing actual high-level waste. During these operations radionuclide volatilization from the calciner was acceptably low. 8 figures

  2. Reactor container spray device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanai, Ryoichi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To enable decrease in the heat and the concentration of radioactive iodine released from the reactor vessel into the reactor container in the spray device of BWR type reactors. Constitution: A plurality of water receiving trays are disposed below the spray nozzle in the dry well and communicated to a pressure suppression chamber by way of drain pipeways passing through a diaphragm floor. When the recycling system is ruptured and coolants in the reactor vessel and radioactive iodine in the reactor core are released into the dry well, spray water is discharged from the spray nozzle to eliminate the heat and the radioactive iodine in the dry well. In this case, the receiving trays collect the portions of spray water whose absorption power for the heat and radioactive iodine is nearly saturated and falls them into the pool water of the pressure suppression chamber. Consequently, other portions of the spray water that still possess absorption power can be jetted with no hindrance, to increase the efficiency for the removal of the heat and iodine of the spray droplets. (Horiuchi, T.)

  3. Vitrification of radioactive high-level waste by spray calcination and in-can melting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, M. S.; Bjorklund, W. J.

    1980-07-01

    After several nonradioactive test runs, radioactive waste from the processing of 1.5 t of spent, light water reactor fuel was successfully concentrated, dried and converted to a vitreous product. A total of 97 L of waste glass (in two stainless steel canisters) was produced. The spray calcination process coupled to the in-can melting process, as developed at Pacific Northwest Labortory, was used to vitrify the waste. An effluent system consisting of a variety of condensation of scrubbing steps more than adequately decontaminated the process off gas before it was released to the atmosphere.

  4. Design and performance of a full-scale spray calciner for nonradioactive high-level-waste-vitrification studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, F.A.

    1981-06-01

    In the spray calcination process, liquid waste is spray-dried in a heated-wall spray dryer (termed a spray calciner), and then it may be combined in solid form with a glass-forming frit. This mixture is then melted in a continuous ceramic melter or in an in-can melter. Several sizes of spray calciners have been tested at PNL- laboratory scale, pilot scale and full scale. Summarized here is the experience gained during the operation of PNL's full-scale spray calciner, which has solidified approx. 38,000 L of simulated acid wastes and approx. 352,000 L of simulated neutralized wastes in 1830 h of processing time. Operating principles, operating experience, design aspects, and system descriptions of a full-scale spray calciner are discussed. Individual test run summaries are given in Appendix A. Appendices B and C are studies made by Bechtel Inc., under contract by PNL. These studies concern, respectively, feed systems for the spray calciner process and a spray calciner vibration analysis. Appendix D is a detailed structural analysis made at PNL of the spray calciner. These appendices are included in the report to provide a complete description of the spray calciner and to include all major studies made concerning PNL's full-scale spray calciner

  5. Calcine production and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickey, B.R.; Hogg, G.W.; Berreth, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The process technology related to calcination of power reactor wastes is summarized. The primary calcination processes developed are spray calcination, fluidized-bed calcination, and rotary kiln calcination. Calcines from the spray calciner and rotary kiln are fed directly to a glassification process. The fluidized-bed product can either be fed to a waste form conversion process or stored. The major process steps for calcinations are feed preparation, calcination and product handling, and off-gas cleanup. Feed systems for the three processes are basically similar. Gravity flow and pump pressurized systems have been used successfully. The major problems are fatigue failure of feed valve bellows, plugging by undissolved solids, and calibration of flowmeters. Process heat input is by electrical resistance heating for the spray and rotary kiln calciners and in-bed combustion or in-bed heat exchange for the fluidized-bed system. Low-melting solids which can cause scaling or solids agglomeration in any of the processes is a major calcination problem; however, feed blending, process operating conditions, and equipment design have successfully controlled solids agglomeration. Primary off-gas cleanup devices for particulates are cyclones, sintered metal filters, venturi scrubbers, and HEPA filters. Scrubbers, condensers, and solid adsorbents are used successfully for volatile ruthenium removal. The years of pilot-plant and plant-scale calcination testing and operation of the three systems have shown that reactor wastes can be calcined safely and practically. 11 figures, 2 tables

  6. Design and performance of atomizing nozzles for spray calcination of high-level wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, F.A.; Stout, L.A.

    1981-05-01

    A key aspect of high-level liquid-waste spray calcination is waste-feed atomization by using air atomizing nozzles. Atomization substantially increases the heat transfer area of the waste solution, which enhances rapid drying. Experience from the spray-calciner operations has demonstrated that nozzle flow conditions that produce 70-μ median-volume-diameter or smaller spray droplets are required for small-scale spray calciners (drying capacity less than 80 L/h). For large-scale calciners (drying capacity greater than 300 L/h), nozzle flow conditions that produce 100-μ median-volume-diameter or smaller spray droplets are required. Mass flow ratios of 0.2 to 0.4, depending on nozzle size, are required for proper operation of internal-mix atomizing nozzles. Both internal-mix and external-mix nozzles have been tested at PNL. Due to the lower airflow requirements and fewer large droplets produced, the internal-mix nozzle has been chosen for primary development in the spray calciner program at PNL. Several nozzle air-cap materials for internal-mix nozzles have been tested for wear resistance. Results show that nozzle air caps of stainless steel and Cer-vit (a machineable glass ceramic) are suceptible to rapid wear by abrasive slurries, whereas air caps of alumina and reaction-bonded silicon nitride show only slow wear. Longer-term testing is necessary to determine more accurately the actual frequency of nozzle replacement. Atomizing nozzle air caps of alumina are subject to fracture from thermal shock, whereas air caps of silicon nitride and Cer-vit are not. Fractured nozzles are held in place by the air-cap retaining ring and continue to atomize satisfactorily. Therefore, fractures caused by thermal shocking do not necessarily result in nozzle failure

  7. Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter high-level waste solidification technical manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, D.E.

    1980-09-01

    This technical manual summarizes process and equipment technology developed at Pacific Northwest Laboratory over the last 20 years for vitrification of high-level liquid waste by the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process. Pacific Northwest Laboratory experience includes process development and demonstration in laboratory-, pilot-, and full-scale equipment using nonradioactive synthetic wastes. Also, laboratory- and pilot-scale process demonstrations have been conducted using actual high-level radioactive wastes. In the course of process development, more than 26 tonnes of borosilicate glass have been produced in 75 canisters. Four of these canisters contained radioactive waste glass. The associated process and glass chemistry is discussed. Technology areas described include calciner feed treatment and techniques, calcination, vitrification, off-gas treatment, glass containment (the canister), and waste glass chemistry. Areas of optimization and site-specific development that would be needed to adapt this base technology for specific plant application are indicated. A conceptual Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system design and analyses are provided in the manual to assist prospective users in evaluating the process for plant application, to provide equipment design information, and to supply information for safety analyses and environmental reports. The base (generic) technology for the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter process has been developed to a point at which it is ready for plant application

  8. Connecting section and associated systems concept for the spray calciner/in-can melter process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petkus, L.L.; Gorton, P.S.; Blair, H.T.

    1981-06-01

    For a number of years, researchers at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory have been developing processes and equipment for converting high-level liquid wastes to solid forms. One of these processes is the Spray Calciner/In-Can Melter system. To immobilize high-level liquid wastes, this system must be operated remotely, and the calcine must be reliably conveyed from the calciner to the melting furnace. A concept for such a remote conveyance system was developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and equipment was tested under full-scale, nonradioactive conditions. This concept and the design of demonstration equipment are described, and the results of equipment operation during experimental runs of 7 d are presented. The design includes a connecting section and its associated systems - a canister sypport and alignment concept and a weight-monitoring system for the melting furnace. Overall, the runs demonstrated that the concept design is an acceptable method of connecting the two pieces of process equipment together. Although the connecting section has not been optimized in all areas of concern, it provides a first-generation design of a production-oriented system

  9. Investigation of corrosion experienced in a spray calciner/ceramic melter vitrification system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierks, R.D.; Mellinger, G.B.; Miller, F.A.; Nelson, T.A.; Bjorklund, W.J.

    1980-08-01

    After periodic testing of a large-scale spray calciner/ceramic melter vitrification system over a 2-yr period, sufficient corrosion was noted on various parts of the vitrification system to warrant its disassembly and inspection. A majority of the 316 SS sintered metal filters on the spray calciner were damaged by chemical corrosion and/or high temperature oxidation. Inconel-601 portions of the melter lid were attacked by chlorides and sulfates which volatilized from the molten glass. The refractory blocks, making up the walls of the melter, were attacked by the waste glass. This attack was occurring when operating temperatures were >1200 0 C. The melter floor was protected by a sludge layer and showed no corrosion. Corrosion to the Inconel-690 electrodes was minimal, and no corrosion was noted in the offgas treatment system downstream of the sintered metal filters. It is believed that most of the melter corrosion occurred during one specific operating period when the melter was operated at high temperatures in an attempt to overcome glass foaming behavior. These high temperatures resulted in a significant release of volatile elements from the molten glass, and also created a situation where the glass was very fluid and convective, which increased the corrosion rate of the refractories. Specific corrosion to the calciner components cannot be proven to have occurred during a specific time period, but the mechanisms of attack were all accelerated under the high-temperature conditions that were experienced with the melter. A review of the materials of construction has been made, and it is concluded that with controlled operating conditions and better protection of some materials of construction corrosion of these systems will not cause problems. Other melter systems operating under similar strenuous conditions have shown a service life of 3 yr

  10. Reactor Containment Spray Technology Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Row, T. H. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1968-12-15

    The design basis accident in water moderated power reactors is a loss-of-coolant accident in which water sprays are generally employed to control the containment pressure transient by condensing the released steam-air mixture. Additives to the spray have been proposed as a way to increase their usefulness by enhancing the removal of various forms of radioiodine from the containment atmosphere. A program to investigate the gas-liquid systems involved is co-ordinated by ORNL for the US Atomic Energy Commission. A basic part of the program is the search for various chemical additives that will increase the spray affinity for molecular iodine and methyl iodide. A method for evaluating additives was developed that measures equilibrium distribution coefficients for iodine between air and aqueous solutions. Additives selected are used in single drop-wind tunnel experiments where the circulating gas contains iodine or CH{sub 3}I. Mass transfer coefficients and transient distribution coefficients have been determined as a function of relative humidity, temperature, drop size, and solution pH and concentration. Tests have shown that surfactants and organic amines increase the solution ability to getter CH{sub 3}l. Results from single drop tests help in planning spray experiments in the Nuclear Safety Pilot Plant, a large ({approx}38 m{sup 3}) facility, where accident conditions are closely simulated. Iodine and CH{sub 3}I removal rates have been determined for a number of solutions, including 1 wt% Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3} + 3000 ppm B + 0.153 M NaOH and 3000 ppm B + 0.153 M NaOH. The additive has very little effect in removal of I{sub 2} with half-lives of less than 1 mm typical for any aqueous solution. These same solutions remove CH{sub 3}I with a half-life of one hour. Analytical models for the removal processes have been developed. Consideration is also being given to corrosion, thermal and radiation stability of the solutions. Radiation studies have indicated the loss

  11. Head spray nozzle in reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatano, Shun-ichi.

    1990-01-01

    In a reactor pressure vessel of a BWR type reactor, a head spray nozzle is used for cooling the head of the pressure vessel and, in view of the thermal stresses, it is desirable that cooling is applied as uniformly as possible. A conventional head spray is constituted by combining full cone type nozzles. Since the sprayed water is flown down upon water spraying and the sprayed water in the vertical direction is overlapped, the flow rate distribution has a high sharpness to form a shape as having a maximum value near the center and it is difficult to obtain a uniform flow rate distribution in the circumferential direction. Then, in the present invention, flat nozzles each having a spray water cross section of laterally long shape, having less sharpness in the circumferential distribution upon spraying water to the inner wall of the pressure vessel and having a wide angle of water spray are combined, to make the flow rate distribution of spray water uniform in the inner wall of the pressure vessel. Accordingly, the pressure vessel can be cooled uniformly and thermal stresses upon cooling can be decreased. (N.H.)

  12. The flashcal process for the fabrication of fuel-metal oxides using the whiteshell roto-spray calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, T.S.

    1988-01-01

    A one-step, continuous, thermochemical calcination process, called the FLASHCAL (Flash Calcination) process has been developed for the production of single- and mixed-oxide powders of fuel metals (uranium, thorium and plutonium) from the respective nitrate solutions using the Whiteshell Roto-Spray Calciner (RSC). The metal-nitrate feed solution, either by itself or mixed with a suitable chemical reactant or additive, is converted to its oxide powder in the RSC at temperatures between 300 and 600 0 C. Rapid denitration takes place in the calciner, yielding the metal-oxide powders while simultaneously destroying any excess chemical additive and reaction by-products. In the production of precursor oxide powders suitable for fuel fabrication, the FLASHCAL process has advantages over batch calcination and other processes that involve precipitation and filtration steps because fewer processing and handling operations are needed. Results obtained with thorium nitrate and uranium nitrate-thorium nitrate mixtures indicate that some measure of control over the size distribution and morphology of the oxide product powders is possible in this process with the proper selection of chemical additive, as well as the operating parameters of the calciner

  13. Behavior of radioactive iodine and technetium in the spray calcination of high-level waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, C. A.; Farnsworth, R. K.

    1981-08-01

    The Remote Laboratory-Scale Waste Treatment Facility (RLSWTF) was designed and built as a part of the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program (now the High-Level Waste Process Development Program) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. In facility, installed in a radiochemical cell, is described in which installed in a radiochemical cell is described in which small volumes of radioactive liquid wastes can be solidified, the process off gas can be analyzed, and the methods for decontaminating this off gas can be tested. During the spray calcination of commercial high-level liquid waste spiked with Tc-99 and I-131 and 31 wt% loss of I-131 past the sintered-metal filters. These filters and venturi scrubber were very efficient in removing particulates and Tc-99 from the the off-gas stream. Liquid scrubbers were not efficient in removing I-131 as 25% of the total lost went to the building off-gas system. Therefore, solid adsorbents are needed to remove iodine. For all future operations where iodine is present, a silver zeolite adsorber is to be used.

  14. Behavior of radioactive iodine and technetium in the spray calcination of high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, C.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.

    1981-08-01

    The Remote Laboratory-Scale Waste Treatment Facility (RLSWTF) was designed and built as a part of the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program (now the High-Level Waste Process Development Program) at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. In this facility, which is installed in a radiochemical cell, small volumes of radioactive liquid wastes can be solidified, the process off gas can be analyzed, and the methods for decontaminating this off gas can be tested. Initial operations were completed with nonradioactive, simulated waste solutions (Knox, Siemens and Berger 1981). The first radioactive operations in this facility were performed with a simulated, commercial waste composition containing tracer levels of 99 Tc and 131 I. This report describes the facility and test operations and presents the results of the behavior of 131 I and 99 Tc during solidification of radioactive liquid wastes. During the spray calcination of commercial high-level liquid waste spiked with 99 Tc and 131 I, there was a 0.3 wt% loss of particulates, a 0.15 wt% loss of 99 Tc and a 31 wt% loss of 131 I past the sintered-metal filters. These filters and a venturi scrubber were very efficient in removing particulates and 99 Tc from the off-gas stream. Liquid scrubbers were not efficient in removing 131 I, as 25% of the total lost went to the building off-gas system. Therefore, solid adsorbents will be needed to remove iodine. For all future RLSWTF operations where iodine is present, a silver zeolite adsorber will be used

  15. Technology status of spray calcination--vitrification of high-level liquid waste for full-scale application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeley, R.B.; Bonner, W.F.; Larson, D.E.

    1977-01-01

    Spray calcination and vitrification technology for stabilization of high-level nuclear wastes has been developed to the point that initiation of technology transfer to an industrial-sized facility could begin. This report discusses current process and equipment development status together with additional R and D studies and engineering evaluations needed. Preliminary full-scale process and equipment descriptions are presented. Technology application in a full-scale plant would blend three distinct maintenance design philosophies, depending on service life anticipated: (1) totally remote maintenance with limited viewing and handling equipment, (2) totally remote maintenance with extensive viewing and handling equipment, and (3) contact maintenance

  16. Approximate computation of hydrothermal conditions of nuclear reactor spray ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarkho, A.A.; Borshchev, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for determining the evaporation numbers of nuclear reactor spray ponds which provide necessary reactor cooling during its normal operation under given meteorological conditions with account of restrictions on the cooled water temperature at the reactor entrance

  17. Model for the sulfidation of calcined limestone and its use in reactor models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesink, Albertus B.M.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the sulfidation of a single calcined limestone particle was developed and experimentally verified. This model, which includes no fitting parameters, assumes a calcined limestone particle to consist of spherical grains of various sizes that react with H2S according to

  18. Characterization of the full cone pressure swirl spray nozzles for the nuclear reactor containment spray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Manish [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); John, Benny [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Mumbai (India); Iyer, K.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Prabhu, S.V., E-mail: svprabhu@iitb.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India)

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • Full cone spray pressure swirl nozzle with X-Vane is studied. • Laser illuminated imaging technique is used. • Correlations for coefficient of discharge, spray cone angle and SMD are suggested. • Droplet size and mass fraction distribution is measured. • Inviscid theory predicts the coefficient of discharge. - Abstract: The objective of the present study is to characterize a full cone pressure swirl nozzle for the Containment Spray System (CSS) of Indian Pressurized heavy Water reactors (IPHWR). The influence of Reynolds number and geometric parameters on the coefficient of discharge, spray cone angle, mass flux density distribution, droplet size distribution, Sauter mean diameter (SMD is studied for full cone pressure swirl full cone nozzles. The nozzles of orifice diameter range from 1.3 to 7.2 mm are studied. Experiments are conducted with water at room temperature as the working medium. The nozzles are operated with the pressure ranging from 1 to 8 bar. The measurements of the drop size distributions are performed with laser illuminated imaging technique. The spray cone-angle of the full cone nozzles is measured by the evaluation of images recorded with a camera using IMAGE J software. Correlations for coefficient of discharge, spray cone angle and Sauter mean diameter are suggested on the basis of the experimental results. Rosin–Rammler model and Nukiyama–Tanasawa distributions predict the mass fraction distribution reasonably well. However, the droplet size distribution is predicted by Nukiyama-Tanasawa model only.

  19. Retrofit design of remotely removable decontamination spray nozzles for the new waste calcining facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, J.A.

    1988-01-01

    High level radioactive liquid waste is converted to a solid form at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The conversion is done by a fluidized bed combustion process in the calciner vessel. The interior decontamination system for the calciner vessel uses a common header bolted to four decontamination nozzles around the upper head. The retrofit was required to eliminate hands-on maintenance and difficulty in nozzle removal because of nozzle plugging. The retrofit design for this project demonstrates the solution of problems associated with thermal phenomena, structural supports, seismic requirements, remote handling and installations into extremely restricted spaces

  20. Experimental Investigation of Effect on Hydrate Formation in Spray Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of reaction condition on hydrate formation were conducted in spray reactor. The temperature, pressure, and gas volume of reaction on hydrate formation were measured in pure water and SDS solutions at different temperature and pressure with a high-pressure experimental rig for hydrate formation. The experimental data and result reveal that additives could improve the hydrate formation rate and gas storage capacity. Temperature and pressure can restrict the hydrate formation. Lower temperature and higher pressure can promote hydrate formation, but they can increase production cost. So these factors should be considered synthetically. The investigation will promote the advance of gas storage technology in hydrates.

  1. Experiments on the spray nozzles used in the pressurizer of power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao Wentang

    1989-04-01

    The spray nozzle, which is used in the pressurizer of pressurized water reactor system, usually uses a less differential pressure between the reactor inlet and outlet as the spray drive pressure, but its flow rate is relatively larger. It is difficult to obtain a optimum spray performance of such a nozzle. The experimental results of five types of twenty seven spray nozzles in different structures and sizes with the range of the spray drive pressure from 0.127 to 0.245 MPa and the flow rates from 5 to 50 t/h are given. The main factors affecting spray performances and their distribution characteristics have been found. And some relatively suitable spray structures have been recommended, which can be used as references for improving the spray nozzles used in the pressurizers of existing PWRs or of the PWRs to be built

  2. Preparation and properties of Li{sub 1.3}Al{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 1.7}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} by spray-drying and post-calcining method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bo; Li, Xinhai, E-mail: yangbo@csu.edu.cn; Guo, Huajun; Wang, Zhixing; Xiao, Wei

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The spray-drying method is a simple and energy-saving method to prepare LATP. • The compounds with single phase structure of LATP were synthesized at 700–900 °C. • The ionic conductivity of the prepared LATP was maximized at 0.622 mS cm{sup −1} at 800 °C. - Abstract: Solid state electrolyte Li{sub 1.3}Al{sub 0.3}Ti{sub 1.7}(PO{sub 4}){sub 3} is synthesized by spray-drying and post-calcining method. X-ray diffraction is employed to characterize the powders calcined in the range of 700–900 °C for 2 h, which indicates powders are well crystallized. FTIR shows trivalent cation Al{sup 3+} is substituted by Ti{sup 4+}. The composite material appears as 2–5 μm spherical particle. TG–DTA results confirm that the thermal decomposition of precursors obtained by spray-drying method occurred at lower temperature compares with solid phase synthesis method and sol–gel method. The ionic conductivity of the pellets reaches a maximum of 0.622 mS cm{sup −1} at calcining temperature of 800 °C.

  3. Hydrogen generation from aluminium corrosion in reactor containment spray solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frid, W.; Karlberg, G.; Sundvall, S.B.

    1982-01-01

    The aluminium corrosion experiments in reactor containment spray solutions, under the conditions expected to prevail during LOCA in BWR and PWR, were performed in order to investigate relationships between temperature, pH and hydrogen production rates. In order to simulate the conditions in a BWR containment realistic ratios between aluminium surface and water volume and between aluminium surface and oxygen volume were used. Three different aluminium alloys were exposed to spray solutions: AA 1050, AA 5052 and AA 6082. The corrosion rates were measured for BWR solutions (deaerated and aerated) with pH 5 and 9 at 50, 100 and 150 0 C. The pressure was constantly 0.8 MPa. The hydrogen production rate was measured by means of gas chromatography. In deionized BWR water the corrosion rates did not exceed about 0.05 mm/year in all cases, i.e. were practically independent of temperature and pH. Hydrogen concentrations were less than 0.1 vol.% in cooled dry gas. Corrosion rates and hydrogen production in PWR alkaline solution measured at pH 9.7 and 150 0 C were very high. AA 5052 alloy was the best material

  4. Volume reduction of reactor wastes by spray drying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; McKenzie, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Three simulated low-level reactor wastes were dried using a spray dryer-baghouse system. The three aqueous feedstocks were sodium sulfate waste characteristic of a BWR, boric acid waste characteristic of a PWR, and a waste mixture of ion exchange resins and filter aid. These slurries were spiked with nonradioactive iron, cobalt, and manganese (representing corrosion products) and nonradioactive cesium and iodine (representing fission products). The throughput for the 2.1-m-diameter spray dryer and baghouse system was 160-180 kg/h, which is comparable to the requirements for a full-scale commercial installation. A free-flowing, dry product was produced in all of the tests. The volume reduction factor ranged from 2.5 to 5.8; the baghouse decontamination factor was typically in the range of 10 3 to 10 4 . Using an overall system decontamination factor of 10 6 , the activity of the off-gas was calculated to be one to two orders of magnitude less than the nuclide release limit of the major active species, Cs-137

  5. Radiant-heat spray-calcination process for the solid fixation of radioactive waste. Part 1, Non-radioactive pilot unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allemann, R.T.; Johnson, B.M. Jr.

    1960-11-14

    The fixation of radioactive waste in a stable solid media by means of calcination of these aqueous solutions has been the subject of considerable-effort throughout the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission and by atomic energy organizations in other countries. Several methods of doing this on a continuous or semi-continuous basis have been devised, and a fev have been demonstrated to be feasible for the handling of non-radioactive, or low-activity, simulated wastes. Notable among methods currently under development are: (a) batch-operated pot calcination of waste generated from reprocessing stainless steel clad fuel elements (Darex process) and Purex waste, (b) combination rotary kiln and ball mill calcination of aluminum nitrate (TBP-25 and Redox process), and (c) fluidized bed calcination of TBP-25 and Purex wastes. Although a considerable amount of engineering experience has been obtained on the calcination of dissolved salts in a fluidized bed, and the other methods have been the subjects of a great deal of study, none of them have been developed to-the extent which would rule out the desirability of further investigation of other possible methods of calcination.

  6. Heat removal tests for pressurized water reactor containment spray by largescale facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motoki, Y.; Hashimoto, K.; Kitani, S.; Naritomi, M.; Nishio, G.; Tanaka, M.

    1983-01-01

    Heat removal tests for pressurized water reactor (PWR) containment spray were carried out to investigate effectiveness of the depressurization by Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute model containment (7-m diameter, 20 m high, and 708-m 3 volume) with PWR spray nozzles. The depressurization rate is influenced by the spray heat transfer efficiency and the containment wall surface heat transfer coefficient. The overall spray heat transfer efficiency was investigated with respect to spray flow rate, weight ratio of steam/air, and spray height. The spray droplet heat transfer efficiency was investigated whether the overlapping of spray patterns gives effect or not. The effect was not detectable in the range of large value of steam/air, however, it was better in the range of small value of it. The experimental results were compared with the calculated results by computer code CONTEMPT-LT/022. The overall spray heat transfer efficiency was almost 100% in the containment pressure, ranging from 2.5 to 0.9 kg/cm 2 X G, so that the code was useful on the prediction of the thermal hydraulic behavior of containment atmosphere in a PWR accident condition

  7. Hydrogen evolution from aluminium in reactor containment spray solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlberg, G.; Sundvall, S.-B.

    1982-01-01

    Three different aluminium alloys were exposed to conditions similar to BWR and PWR containment spray waters at 50, 100 and 150 0 C. BWR deionized water gives corrosion rates of at most 0.05 mm/year and hydrogen concentrations less than 0.1-1%. On the contrary PWR alkaline solutions give very high corrosion rates and hydrogen contents. (Auth.)

  8. The development of beryllium plasma spray technology for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.; Watson, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Over the past five years, four international parties, which include the European Communities, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States, have been collaborating on the design and development of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the next generation magnetic fusion energy device. During the ITER Engineering Design Activity (EDA), beryllium plasma spray technology was investigated by Los Alamos National Laboratory as a method for fabricating and repairing and the beryllium first wall surface of the ITER tokamak. Significant progress has been made in developing beryllium plasma spraying technology for this application. Information will be presented on the research performed to improve the thermal properties of plasma sprayed beryllium coatings and a method that was developed for cleaning and preparing the surface of beryllium prior to depositing plasma sprayed beryllium coatings. Results of high heat flux testing of the beryllium coatings using electron beam simulated ITER conditions will also be presented

  9. Calcination under negative atmosphere for SYNROC preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambashta, R.D.; Wattal, P.K.; Govindankutty, K.V.

    2006-01-01

    SYNROC-C is a ceramic waste formulation designed to immobilise reprocessing waste from fast breeder reactor. This formulation is capable of incorporating noble metals, other fission products, corrosion products and activation products in its multiphase assemblage. Calcination is an important step of SYNROC preparation for decomposition of nitrates of the radioactive waste and conversion to oxide precursors. This paper presents a comparison between properties of calcine prepared under different calcination procedures to obtain product suitable for compaction

  10. Sodium spray release accident analysis for fast reactor safety studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shire, P.R.

    1976-01-01

    A computer code has been developed to model the effects of postulated sodium spray release from LMFBR piping, although this is an event of extremely low probability. The calculation method utilizes gas convection and droplet combustion theory to calculate the pressure and temperature effects in a range of 0 to 21 mole percent oxygen with humidity. Droplet motion and large aggregate sodium surface area result in rapid release of combustion and sensible heat causing a nearly adiabatic pressure rise which peaks in several seconds. This analytical tool has indicated reasonable agreement with prototypic test data for a range of oxygen and water vapor concentrations, cell volumes and droplet sizes

  11. Sodium spray release accident analysis for fast reactor safety studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shire, P.R.

    1976-10-01

    A computer code has been developed to model the effects of postulated sodium spray release from LMFBR piping. The calculation method utilizes gas convection and droplet combustion theory to calculate the pressure and temperature effects in a range of 0 to 21% oxygen. Droplet motion and large aggregate sodium surface area result in rapid release of combustion and sensible heat causing a nearly adiabtic pressure pulse peaking in a matter of seconds. This analytical tool has indicated good agreement with prototypic test data for a range of oxygen concentrations, cell volumes and droplet sizes

  12. Spray solidification of nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.F.; Blair, H.T.; Romero, L.S.

    1976-08-01

    The spray calciner is a relatively simple machine. Operation is simple and is easily automated. Startup and shutdown can be performed in less than an hour. A wide variety of waste compositions and concentrations can be calcined under easily maintainable conditions. Spray calcination of high-level and mixed high- and intermediate-level liquid wastes has been demonstrated. Waste concentrations of from near infinite dilution to less than 225 liters per tonne of fuel are calcinable. Wastes have been calcined containing over 2M sodium. Feed concentration, composition, and flowrate can vary rapidly by over a factor of two without requiring operator action. Wastes containing mainly sodium cations can be spray calcined by addition of finely divided silica to the feedstock. A remotely replaceable atomizing nozzle has been developed for use in plant-scale equipment. Calciner capacity of over 75 l/h has been demonstrated in pilot-scale equipment. Sintered stainless steel filters are effective in deentraining over 99.9 percent of the solids that result from calcining the feedstock. The volume of recycle required from the effluent treatment system is very small. Vibrator action maintains the calcine holdup in the calciner at less than 1 kg. Successful remote operation and maintenance of a heated-wall spray calciner have been demonstrated while processing high-level waste. Radionuclide volatilization was acceptably low

  13. Development of Cold Spray Coatings for Accident-Tolerant Fuel Cladding in Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Benjamin; Yeom, Hwasung; Johnson, Greg; Dabney, Tyler; Walters, Jorie; Romero, Javier; Shah, Hemant; Xu, Peng; Sridharan, Kumar

    2018-02-01

    The cold spray coating process has been developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison for the deposition of oxidation-resistant coatings on zirconium alloy light water reactor fuel cladding with the goal of improving accident tolerance during loss of coolant scenarios. Coatings of metallic (Cr), alloy (FeCrAl), and ceramic (Ti2AlC) materials were successfully deposited on zirconium alloy flats and cladding tube sections by optimizing the powder size, gas preheat temperature, pressure and composition, and other process parameters. The coatings were dense and exhibited excellent adhesion to the substrate. Evaluation of the samples after high-temperature oxidation tests at temperatures up to 1300°C showed that the cold spray coatings significantly mitigate oxidation kinetics because of the formation of thin passive oxide layers on the surface. The results of the study indicate that the cold spray coating process is a viable near-term option for developing accident-tolerant zirconium alloy fuel cladding.

  14. Failure analysis of cracked head spray piping from the Dresden Unit 2 Boiling Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diercks, D.R.; Dragel, G.M.

    1983-07-01

    Several sections of Type 304 stainless steel head spray piping, 6.25 cm (2.5 in.) in diameter, from the Dresden Unit 2 Boiling Water Reactor were examined to determine the nature and causes of coolant leakages detected during hydrostatic tests. Extensive pitting was observed on the outside surface of the piping, and three cracks, all located at a helical stripe apparently rubbed onto the outer surface of the piping, were also noted. Metallographic examination revealed that the cracking had initiated at the outer surface of the pipe, and showed it to be transgranular and highly branched, characteristic of chloride stress corrosion cracking. The surface pitting also appeared to have been caused by chlorides. A scanning electron microprobe x-ray analysis of the corrosion product in the cracks confirmed the presence of chlorides and also indicated the presence of calcium

  15. Development of chemistry support programme for algae control in spray pond waters of CIRUS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramabhadran, S.; Ghosh, S.; Bose, H.

    2008-01-01

    A major problem in any open recirculating cooling water system, is the growth of micro-organisms, especially algae, which adversely affects the efficient and safe operation of the plant. The algae control depends to a great extent, on the selection of an effective algaecide and on the adoption of proper dose and dosing frequency of the algaecide. The present paper describes the development of (i) a generally applicable analytical method for comparing the algicidal efficacies of available commercial algaecides, for the specific local strains of algae in the spray pond waters of CIRUS reactor at Trombay, and (ii) a procedure for assessing 'algicide demand' in open recirculating cooling water systems, which can be used to establish an effective and efficient algae control programme. (author)

  16. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 deg C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means. (author)

  17. Effects of aging in containment spray injection system of PWR reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, Diogo da S.; Lava, Deise D.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.; Moreira, Maria de L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a contribution to the study of the components aging process in commercial plants of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The analysis is done by applying the method of Fault trees, Monte Carlo Method and Fussell-Vesely Importance Measurement. The study on the aging of nuclear plants, is related to economic factors involved directly with the extent of their operational life, and also provides important data on issues of safety. The most recent case involving the process of extending the life of a PWR plant can be seen in Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant by investing $ 27 million in the installation of a new reactor cover. The corrective action generated an extension of the useful life of Angra 1 estimated in twenty years, and a great savings compared to the cost of building a new plant and the decommissioning of the first, if it had reached the operation time out 40 years. The extension of the lifetime of a nuclear power plant must be accompanied by special attention from the most sensitive components of the systems to the aging process. After the application of the methodology (aging analysis of Containment Spray Injection System (CSIS)) proposed in this paper, it can be seen that increasing the probability of failure of each component, due to the aging process, generate an increased general unavailability of the system that contains these basic components. The final results obtained were as expected and can contribute to the maintenance policy, preventing premature aging in nuclear power systems

  18. Method for calcining radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjorklund, W.J.; McElroy, J.L.; Mendel, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    A method for the preparation of radioactive wastes in a low leachability form involves calcining the radioactive waste on a fluidized bed of glass frit, removing the calcined waste to melter to form a homogeneous melt of the glass and the calcined waste, and then solidifying the melt to encapsulate the radioactive calcine in a glass matrix

  19. Mathematical modeling of an in-line low-NOx calciner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iliuta, Ion; Dam-Johansen, Kim; Jensen, Lars Skaarup

    2002-01-01

    The reduction of the NOx content in in-line-calciner-type kiln systems can be made by optimization of the primary filing in the rotary kiln and of the secondary firing in the calciner. Because the optimization of calciner offers greater opportunities the mathematical modeling of this reactor...

  20. Fluidized bed calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheely, W.F.

    1986-01-01

    A unique way to convert radioactive scrap into useful nuclear fuel products was developed for the Department of Energy at Hanford. An advanced, fluidized bed calciner is used to convert metallic nitrate scrap or waste solutions into benign, solid and gaseous products. There are broad potential applications of this concept beyond those in the nuclear industry

  1. Numerical modeling of spray combustion in DI diesel engine using partially stirred reactor (PaSR) model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleghi, H.; Hosseini, S.M.

    2003-01-01

    In recent years special attention has been paid to the topic of diesel engine combustion. Various combustion models are used in CFD codes. In this paper Partially Stirred Reactor (PaSR) model, one of the newest turbulent combustion models, is introduced. This model has been employed in conjunction with the non-iterative PISO algorithm to calculate spray combustion in an axi-symmetric, direct injection diesel engine. Qualitative consideration of the results shows very good agreement with physical expectations and other numerical and experimental results. (author)

  2. Characterization of silica and titania nanoparticles synthesized in a spray flame reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cignoli, F.; Maffi, S.; Bellomunno, C.; De Iuliis, S.; Zizak, G. [CNR-IENI, Milano (Italy)

    2009-07-01

    Nanostructured materials represent nowadays a wide and largely unexplored field of potential applications. This is a research topic in high and rapid development, both at a basic level and under the point of view of potential practical applications, leaving large space for a thorough scientific analysis, which requires a significant amount of time for ultimate conclusions. This paper dealt with the preliminary work performed in the field of frame spray pyrolysis synthesis for nanoparticles, using an external mixing gas assisted nozzle. An experimental apparatus was designed, realized, and characterized for the synthesis of nanoparticles by the flame spray pyrolysis method. The presentation discussed the advantages of the flame spray pyrolysis technique and the experimental set-up including an image of the water spray and discussion of phase doppler anemometry and visualizations to investigate the flow field and the dimensional distribution of the droplets generated by the atomizer. The presentation also discussed the selection of precursor and dispersion fuel for nanoparticles synthesis through flame spray pyrolysis and transmission electron microscopy for dimensional analysis of nanoparticles. It was concluded that the apparatus demonstrated good stability and reproducibility of the reaction flame and, therefore, of the material produced. figs.

  3. Characterization of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 powders synthesized by spray drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blennow Tullmar, Peter; Chen, Weiwu; Lundberg, Mats

    2009-01-01

    Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 powders were synthesized by spray drying and successive calcinations. The phase purity, BET surface area, and particle morphology of as-sprayed and calcined powders were characterized. After calcination above 300 °C, the powders were single phase and showed a BET surface area of 68...

  4. Checking technical measurements on climatic data during sand blasting and spraying work in the condensation chamber of the boiling water reactor Gundremmingen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rausch, D.; Unte, U.

    1986-01-01

    During sand blasting and spraying work in the condensation chambers of boiling water reactors prescribed climatic data must be adhered to. For this purpose temporary air conditioners are used. The technical measurement examination here should provide information as to whether the air conditioners used were to fulfill the parameter curve specifications. (orig.) [de

  5. Calcination/dissolution residue treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, R.C.; Creed, R.F.; Patello, G.K.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Buehler, M.F.; O'Rourke, S.M.; Visnapuu, A.; McLaughlin, D.F.

    1994-09-01

    Currently, high-level wastes are stored underground in steel-lined tanks at the Hanford site. Current plans call for the chemical pretreatment of these wastes before their immobilization in stable glass waste forms. One candidate pretreatment approach, calcination/dissolution, performs an alkaline fusion of the waste and creates a high-level/low-level partition based on the aqueous solubilities of the components of the product calcine. Literature and laboratory studies were conducted with the goal of finding a residue treatment technology that would decrease the quantity of high-level waste glass required following calcination/dissolution waste processing. Four elements, Fe, Ni, Bi, and U, postulated to be present in the high-level residue fraction were identified as being key to the quantity of high-level glass formed. Laboratory tests of the candidate technologies with simulant high-level residues showed reductive roasting followed by carbonyl volatilization to be successful in removing Fe, Ni, and Bi. Subsequent bench-scale tests on residues from calcination/dissolution processing of genuine Hanford Site tank waste showed Fe was separated with radioelement decontamination factors of 70 to 1,000 times with respect to total alpha activity. Thermodynamic analyses of the calcination of five typical Hanford Site tank waste compositions also were performed. The analyses showed sodium hydroxide to be the sole molten component in the waste calcine and emphasized the requirement for waste blending if fluid calcines are to be achieved. Other calcine phases identified in the thermodynamic analysis indicate the significant thermal reconstitution accomplished in calcination

  6. Experimental investigation of iodine removal and containment depressurization in containment spray system test facility of 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Manish [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Kandar, T.K.; Vhora, S.F.; Mohan, Nalini [Directorate of Technology Development, Nuclear Power Corporation of India Limited, Mumbai (India); Iyer, K.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India); Prabhu, S.V., E-mail: svprabhu@iitb.ac.in [Department of Mechanical Engineering, I.I.T., Bombay, Powai, Mumbai (India)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Depressurization rate in a scaled down vessel filled with air and steam is studied. • Iodine removal rate in a scaled down vessel filled with steam/air is investigated. • Effect of SMD and vessel pressure on depressurization rate is studied. • Depressurization rate decreases with the increase in the droplet size (590 μm – 1 mm) • Decrease in pressure and iodine concentration with time follow exponential trend. - Abstract: As an additional safety measure in the new 700 MWe Indian pressurized heavy water reactors, the first of a kind system called containment Spray System is introduced. The system is designed to cater/mitigate the conditions after design basis accidents i.e., loss of coolant accident and main steam line break. As a contribution to the safety analysis of condition following loss-of-coolant accidents, experiments are carried out to establish the performance of the system. The loss of coolant is simulated by injecting saturated steam and iodine vapors into the containment vessel in which air is enclosed at atmospheric and room temperature, and then the steam-air mixture is cooled by sprays of water. The effect of water spray on the containment vessel pressure and the iodine scrubbing in a scaled down facility is investigated for the containment spray system of Indian pressurized heavy water reactors. The experiments are carried out in the scaled down vessel of the diameter of 2.0 m and height of 3.5 m respectively. Experiments are conducted with water at room temperature as the spray medium. Two different initial vessel pressure i.e. 0.7 bar and 1.0 bar are chosen for the studies as they are nearing the loss of coolant accident & main steam line break pressures in Indian pressurized heavy water reactors. These pressures are chosen based on the containment resultant pressures after a design basis accident. The transient temperature and pressure distribution of the steam in the vessel are measured during the depressurization

  7. Alternative calcination development status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boardman, R.D.

    1997-12-01

    The Programmatic Spent Nuclear Fuel and (INEEL) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, dated June 1, 1995, specifies that high-level waste stored in the underground tanks at the ICPP continue to be calcined while other options to treat the waste are studied. Therefore, the High-Level Waste Program has funded a program to develop new flowsheets to increase the liquid waste processing rate. Simultaneously, a radionuclide separation process, as well as other options, are also being developed, which will be compared to the calcination treatment option. Two alternatives emerged as viable candidates; (1) elevated temperature calcination (also referred to as high temperature calcination), and (2) sugar-additive calcination. Both alternatives were determined to be viable through testing performed in a lab-scale calcination mockup. Subsequently, 10-cm Calciner Pilot Plant scoping tests were successfully completed for both flowsheets. The results were compared to the standard 500 C, high-ANN flow sheet (baseline flowsheet). The product and effluent streams were characterized to help elucidate the process chemistry and to investigate potential environmental permitting issues. Several supplementary tests were conducted to gain a better understanding of fine-particles generation, calcine hydration, scrub foaming, feed makeup procedures, sugar/organic elimination, and safety-related issues. Many of the experiments are only considered to be scoping tests, and follow-up experiments will be required to establish a more definitive understanding of the flowsheets. However, the combined results support the general conclusion that flowsheet improvements for the NWCF are technically viable

  8. Novel Budesonide Particles for Dry Powder Inhalation Prepared Using a Microfluidic Reactor Coupled With Ultrasonic Spray Freeze Drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saboti, Denis; Maver, Uroš; Chan, Hak-Kim; Planinšek, Odon

    2017-07-01

    Budesonide (BDS) is a potent active pharmaceutical ingredient, often administered using respiratory devices such as metered dose inhalers, nebulizers, and dry powder inhalers. Inhalable drug particles are conventionally produced by crystallization followed by milling. This approach tends to generate partially amorphous materials that require post-processing to improve the formulations' stability. Other methods involve homogenization or precipitation and often require the use of stabilizers, mostly surfactants. The purpose of this study was therefore to develop a novel method for preparation of fine BDS particles using a microfluidic reactor coupled with ultrasonic spray freeze drying, and hence avoiding the need of additional homogenization or stabilizer use. A T-junction microfluidic reactor was employed to produce particle suspension (using an ethanol-water, methanol-water, and an acetone-water system), which was directly fed into an ultrasonic atomization probe, followed by direct feeding to liquid nitrogen. Freeze drying was the final preparation step. The result was fine crystalline BDS powders which, when blended with lactose and dispersed in an Aerolizer at 100 L/min, generated fine particle fraction in the range 47.6% ± 2.8% to 54.9% ± 1.8%, thus exhibiting a good aerosol performance. Subsequent sample analysis confirmed the suitability of the developed method to produce inhalable drug particles without additional homogenization or stabilizers. The developed method provides a viable solution for particle isolation in microfluidics in general. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. All rights reserved.

  9. Probabilistic safety analysis of the containment spray system of Angra-1 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibelli, S.M.O.

    1981-02-01

    The calculation of the unavailability of the containment spray system of Angra-1, is done. The referred system has two different modes of operation (injection and recirculation) which were separately studied using the fault tree methodology. Besides equipment and human error failures, the contributions of test, maintenance and common-mode failures have also been considered. The quantitative evaluation was carried out by the computer code SAMPLE, which considers the uncertainties in the failures data and gives a distribution for the top event unavailability. The input data were obtained from the well-known Rasmussen Report. An importance analysis of the basic events of the trees was performed and a study of the viability of some suggestions for system design modification was also conducted. A comparison between the results obtained in this work and the corresponding ones in the Rasmussen Report has shown the fact that the unavailability of both systems are of the same order of magnitude. (Author) [pt

  10. Radiant-Heat Spray Calcination Studies; Calcination par Pulverisation et Chauffage Radiant; 0418 0421 0421 041b 0415 0414 041e 0412 0410 041d 0418 042f 041d 0410 041a 0410 041b 042c 0426 0418 041d 0410 0422 041e 0420 0410 0425 0424 041e 0420 0421 0423 041d 041e 0427 041d 041e 0413 041e 0422 0418 041f 0410 0421 041d 0410 0413 0420 0415 0412 0410 041d 0418 0415 041c 0422 0415 041f 041b 041e 0412 042b 041c 0418 0417 041b 0423 0427 0415 041d 0418 0415 041c ; Estudios de Calcinacion por Pulverizacion y Calentamiento Radiante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allemann, R. T.; Moore, R. L.; Upson, U. L. [Hanford Laboratories General Electric Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1963-02-15

    The radiant-heat spray calcination process for conversion of liquid wastes to solids is described and the design of a one-gallon-per-hour spray calcination unit coupled with a small melt pot, capable of being run separately as a pot calciner, is discussed. The units were designed to test the feasibility of the calcination process with actual Purex plant waste in terms of the process as a unit operation, off-gas treatment, fission-product behaviour, condensate and calcined waste characteristics. The entire system was made to fit into an available 7-1/2 ft x 15 ft x 15 ft tall, manipulator-equipped, shielded cell which is also described. Included in the design discussion are: the resistance heating of the spray calciner column, thermal insulation of the column, spray nozzle, method of nozzle replacement, induction heating of the melt pot, radioactivity scanner for the pot, off-gas processing system including condenser, scrubber and filters, off-gas sampling device, liquid sampling device, wash-down system, feed system, instrumentation and control methods. The experience gained in operating the calciners and associated equipment is discussed. Experimental results presented show the effectiveness of off-gas decontamination and behaviour of gross chemical constituents and some specific fission products. (author) [French] Les auteurs etudient le procede de calcination par pulverisation et chauffage radiant utilise pour transformer les dechets liquides en solides; ils decrivent notamment une installation de calcination par pulverisation (d'une capacite de 1 gallon par heure) accouplee a un petit creuset que l'on peut utiliser separement comme creuset de calcination. Cet ensemble- a ete concu pour etudier la possibilite de calciner des dechets reels resultant du traitement Purex, en tenant compte des facteurs suivants: operations dans un seul appareil, traitement des gaz d'echappement, comportement des produits de fission, caracteristiques du condense et des dechets

  11. Method and apparatus for evaporating radioactive liquid and calcinating the residue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, T.S.

    1984-01-01

    This invention provides an apparatus and a process for evaporating liquid wastes and calcining the residue. The liquid is sprayed against a hollow, rotating heated cylinder within a casing. The dried residue is scraped from the rotating cylinder and released through a valve at the bottom of the casing, while the effluent gas is filtered

  12. Kinetic characterization for hemicellulose hydrolysis of corn stover in a dilute acid cycle spray flow-through reactor at moderate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Qiang; Zhang, Hongman; Yan, Lishi; Qu, Liang; Huang, He

    2011-01-01

    The kinetic characterization of hemicellulose hydrolysis of corn stover was investigated using a new reactor of dilute acid cycle spray flow-through (DCF) pretreatment. The primary purpose was to obtain kinetic data for hemicellulose hydrolysis with sulfuric acid concentrations (10-30 kg m -3 ) at relatively low temperatures (90-100 o C). A simplified kinetic model was used to describe its performance at moderate conditions. The results indicate that the rates of xylose formation and degradation are sensitive to flow rate, temperature and acid concentration. Moreover, the kinetic data of hemicellulose hydrolysis fit a first-order reaction model and the experimental data with actual acid concentration after accounting for the neutralization effect of the substrates at different temperatures. Over 90% of the xylose monomer yield and below 5.5% of degradation product (furfural) yield were observed in this reactor. Kinetic constants for hemicellulose hydrolysis models were analyzed by an Arrhenius-type equation, and the activation energy of xylose formation were 111.6 kJ mol -1 , and 95.7 kJ mol -1 for xylose degradation, respectively. -- Highlights: → Investigating a novel pretreatment reactor of dilute acid cycle spray flow-through. → Xylose yield is sensitive to flow rate, temperature and acid concentration. → Obtaining relatively higher xylose monomer yield and lower fermentation inhibitor. → Lumping hemicellulose and xylan oligmers together in the model is a valid way. → The kinetic model as a guide for reactor design, and operation strategy optimization.

  13. SYNROC production using a fluid bed calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, F.J.; Grens, J.Z.; Ryerson, F.J.; Hoenig, C.L.; Bazan, F.; Campbell, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    SYNROC is a titanate-based ceramic developed for immobilization of high-level nuclear reactor wastes in solid form. Fluid-bed SYNROC production permits slurry drying, calcining and redox to be carried out in a single unit. We present results of studies from two fluid beds; the Idaho Exxon internally-heated unit and the externally-heated unit constructed at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory. Bed operation over a range of temperature, feed rate, fluidizing rate and redox conditions indicate that high density, uniform particle-size SYNROC powders are produced which facilitate the densification step and give HUP parts with dense, well-developed phases and good leaching characteristics. 3 figures, 3 tables

  14. Advanced fluid bed calciner information on IR-100 award

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Druby, M.C.; Owen, T.J.; Klem, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    The advanced fluidized bed calciner provides time, temperature and turbulence to change a liquid slurry such as ammonium diuranate into a uranium dioxide powder. The liquid is sprayed into a hot chamber (up to 700 0 C) which includes thousands of tiny metal beads, about the size of BB's. The constantly moving beads provide an efficient heat transfer media for the immediate transformation of the slurry droplets into dry particles of powder, which are carried out by hot nitrogen gas and recovered in a collector

  15. Sliding wear studies of sprayed chromium carbide-nichrome coatings for gas-cooled reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, C.C.; Lai, G.Y.

    1978-09-01

    Chromium carbide-nichrome coatings being considered for wear protection of some critical components in high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR's) were investigated. The coatings were deposited either by the detonation gun or the plasma-arc process. Sliding wear tests were conducted on specimens in a button-on-plate arrangement with sliding velocities of 7.1 x 10 -3 and 7.9 mm/s at 816 0 C in a helium environment simulates HTGR primary coolant chemistry. The coatings containing 75 or 80 wt % chromium carbide exhibited excellent wear resistance. As the chromium carbide content decreased from either 80 or 75 to 55 wt %, with a concurrent decrease in coating hardness, wear-resistance deteriorated. The friction and wear behavior of the soft coating was similar to that of the bare metal--showing severe galling and significant amounts of wear debris. The friction characteristics of the hard coating exhibited a strong velocity dependence with high friction coefficients in low sliding velocity tests ad vice versa. Both the soft coating and bare metal showed no dependence on sliding velocity. The wear behavior observed in this study is of adhesive type, and the wear damage is believed to be controlled primarily by the delamination process

  16. New Waste Calciner High Temperature Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swenson, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    A new Calciner flowsheet has been developed to process the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) in the INTEC Tank Farm. The new flowsheet increases the normal Calciner operating temperature from 500 C to 600 C. At the elevated temperature, sodium in the waste forms stable aluminates, instead of nitrates that melt at calcining temperatures. From March through May 2000, the new high-temperature flowsheet was tested in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Calciner. Specific test criteria for various Calciner systems (feed, fuel, quench, off-gas, etc.) were established to evaluate the long-term operability of the high-temperature flowsheet. This report compares in detail the Calciner process data with the test criteria. The Calciner systems met or exceeded all test criteria. The new flowsheet is a visible, long-term method of calcining SBW. Implementation of the flowsheet will significantly increase the calcining rate of SBW and reduce the amount of calcine produced by reducing the amount of chemical additives to the Calciner. This will help meet the future waste processing milestones and regulatory needs such as emptying the Tank Farm

  17. Plasma Spraying of Silica-Rich Calcined Clay Shale

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dubský, Jiří; Chráska, Tomáš; Pala, Zdeněk; Nevrlá, Barbara; Chráska, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2014), s. 732-741 ISSN 1059-9630 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP107/12/1922; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1872 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : clay shale * crystallinity * grain size * mullite * water stabilized plasma * x-ray diffraction Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.344, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11666-014-0076-3

  18. Summary of Waste Calcination at INTEC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Barry Henry; Newby, Bill Joe

    2000-10-01

    Fluidized-bed calcination at the Idaho Nuclear Technologies and Engineering Center (INTEC, formally called the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant) has been used to solidify acidic metal nitrate fuel reprocessing and incidental wastes wastes since 1961. A summary of waste calcination in full-scale and pilot plant calciners has been compiled for future reference. It contains feed compositions and operating conditions for all the processing campaigns for the original Waste Calcining Facility (WCF), the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) started up in 1982, and numerous small scale pilot plant tests for various feed types. This summary provides a historical record of calcination at INTEC, and will be useful for evaluating calcinability of future wastes.

  19. Effect of Spray System on Fission Product Distribution in Containment During a Severe Accident in a Two-Loop Pressurized Water Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Dehjourian

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The containment response during the first 24 hours of a low-pressure severe accident scenario in a nuclear power plant with a two-loop Westinghouse-type pressurized water reactor was simulated with the CONTAIN 2.0 computer code. The accident considered in this study is a large-break loss-of-coolant accident, which is not successfully mitigated by the action of safety systems. The analysis includes pressure and temperature responses, as well as investigation into the influence of spray on the retention of fission products and the prevention of hydrogen combustion in the containment.

  20. Development of Concentration and Calcination Technology For High Level Liquid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    The concentrated medium and high-level liquid radio chemicals effluents contain nitric acid, water along with the dissolved chemicals including the nitrates of the radio nuclides. High level liquid waste contain mainly nitrates of cesium, strontium, cerium, zirconium, chromium, barium, calcium, cobalt, copper, pickle, iron etc. and other fission products. This concentrated solution requires further evaporation, dehydration, drying and decomposition in temperature range of 150 to 700 deg. C. The addition of the calcined solids in vitrification pot, instead of liquid feed, helps to avoid low temperature zone because the vaporization of the liquid and decomposition of nitrates do not take place inside the melter. In our work Differential and thermo gravimetric studies has been carried out in the various stages of thermal treatment including drying, dehydration and conversion to oxide forms. Experimental studies were done to characterize the chemicals present in high-level radioactive waste. A Rotary Ball Kiln Calciner was used for development of the process because this is amenable for continuous operation and moderately good heat transfer can be achieved inside the kiln. This also has minimum secondary waste and off gases generation. The Rotary Ball Kiln Calciner Demonstration facility system was designed and installed for the demonstration of calcination process. The Rotary Ball Kiln Calciner is a slowly rotating slightly inclined horizontal tube that is externally heated by means of electric resistance heating. The liquid feed is sprayed onto the moving bed of metal balls in a slowly rotating calciner by a peristaltic type-metering pump. The vaporization of the liquid occurs in the pre-calcination zone due to counter current flow of hot gases. The dehydration and denitration of the solids occurs in the calcination zone, which is externally heated by electrical furnace. The calcined powder is cooled in the post calcination portion. It has been demonstrated that the

  1. The structure and thermal properties of plasma-sprayed beryllium for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, R.G.; Bartlett, A.; Elliott, K.E.; Hollis, K.J.

    1996-01-01

    Plasma spraying is being studied for in situ repair of damaged Be and W plasma facing surfaces for ITER, the next generation magnetic fusion energy device, and is also being considered for fabricating Be and W plasma-facing components for the first wall of ITER. Investigators at LANL's Beryllium Atomization and Thermal Spray Facility have concentrated on investigating the structure-property relation between as-deposited microstructures of plasma sprayed Be coatings and resulting thermal properties. In this study, the effect of initial substrate temperature on resulting thermal diffusivity of Be coatings and the thermal diffusivity at the coating/Be substrate interface (interface thermal resistance) was investigated. Results show that initial Be substrate temperatures above 600 C can improve the thermal diffusivity of the Be coatings and minimize any thermal resistance at the interface between the Be coating and Be substrate

  2. SPRAY CASTING

    OpenAIRE

    SALAMCI, Elmas

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT This paper is designed to provide a basic review of spray casting. A brief overview of the historical development of spray  casting and the description of plant and equipment have been given. Following metallurgical characteristics of spray formed alloys, process parameters and solidification mechanism of spray deposition have been discussed in detail. Finally, microstructure and mechanical properties of the selected spray cast Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys have been presented and comp...

  3. Calcination of calcium acetate and calcium magnesium acetate: effect of the reacting atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adanez, J.; Diego, L.F. de; Garcia-Labiano, F. [Instituto de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain). Dept. of Energy and Environment

    1999-04-01

    The calcination process of the calcium acetate (CA) and calcium magnesium acetate (CMA) was investigated as a previous step for coal gas desulfurisation during sorbent injection at high temperatures because the excellent results demonstrated by these sorbents as sulfur removal agents both in combustion and gasification processes. As pore structure developed during calcination is one of the most important characteristics of the sorbent related with the later reaction with the gaseous pollutants, several calcination tests were conducted in a drop tube reactor at temperatures from 700{degree}C to 1100{degree}C, and residence times from 0.8 to 2.4 s. Four different gas atmospheres were used for comparative purposes: inert, oxidising, reducing, and non-calcining (pure CO{sub 2}). Despite the advantage of the high porous cenospheric structure developed by these sorbents during their injection at high temperature, calcination of the CaCO{sub 3} was not complete even at the longest residence time, 2.4 s, and the highest temperature, 1100{degree}C, tested. An important effect of the reacting atmosphere on the calcination conversion and on the sorbent pore structure was detected. The CO{sub 2} concentration around the particle, both that fed in the reacting gases or that generated by organic material combustion, seems to be responsible for the final calcination conversions obtained in each case, also affecting the sintering suffered by the sorbents. 19 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Stop Smoking—Tube-In-Tube Helical System for Flameless Calcination of Minerals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Haneklaus

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mineral calcination worldwide accounts for some 5–10% of all anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions per year. Roughly half of the CO2 released results from burning fossil fuels for heat generation, while the other half is a product of the calcination reaction itself. Traditionally, the fuel combustion process and the calcination reaction take place together to enhance heat transfer. Systems have been proposed that separate fuel combustion and calcination to allow for the sequestration of pure CO2 from the calcination reaction for later storage/use and capture of the combustion gases. This work presents a new tube-in-tube helical system for the calcination of minerals that can use different heat transfer fluids (HTFs, employed or foreseen in concentrated solar power (CSP plants. The system is labeled ‘flameless’ since the HTF can be heated by other means than burning fossil fuels. If CSP or high-temperature nuclear reactors are used, direct CO2 emissions can be divided in half. The technical feasibility of the system has been accessed with a brief parametric study here. The results suggest that the introduced system is technically feasible given the parameters (total heat transfer coefficients, mass- and volume flows, outer tube friction factors, and –Nusselt numbers that are examined. Further experimental work will be required to better understand the performance of the tube-in-tube helical system for the flameless calcination of minerals.

  5. High-throughput bioconjugation for enhanced 193 nm photodissociation via droplet phase initiated ion/ion chemistry using a front-end dual spray reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotham, Victoria C; Shaw, Jared B; Brodbelt, Jennifer S

    2015-09-15

    Fast online chemical derivatization of peptides with an aromatic label for enhanced 193 nm ultraviolet photodissociation (UVPD) is demonstrated using a dual electrospray reactor implemented on the front-end of a linear ion trap (LIT) mass spectrometer. The reactor facilitates the intersection of protonated peptides with a second population of chromogenic 4-formyl-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid (FBDSA) anions to promote real-time formation of ion/ion complexes at atmospheric pressure. Subsequent collisional activation of the ion/ion intermediate results in Schiff base formation generated via reaction between a primary amine in the peptide cation and the aldehyde moiety of the FBDSA anion. Utilizing 193 nm UVPD as the subsequent activation step in the MS(3) workflow results in acquisition of greater primary sequence information relative to conventional collision induced dissociation (CID). Furthermore, Schiff-base-modified peptides exhibit on average a 20% increase in UVPD efficiency compared to their unmodified counterparts. Due to the efficiency of covalent labeling achieved with the dual spray reactor, we demonstrate that this strategy can be integrated into a high-throughput LC-MS(n) workflow for rapid derivatization of peptide mixtures.

  6. Experimental and modeling study of flash calcination of kaolinite rich clay particles in a gas suspension calciner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    gas suspension calciner, with the aim to derive useful guidelines on smart calcination for obtaining products of the best pozzolanic properties. Calcination tests are performed in the calciner under six different operation conditions. The raw feed and the calcined clay samples are all characterized...

  7. Investigation of temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a simulating pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Koji, E-mail: miyoshi.koj@inss.co.jp; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Ishida, Taisuke; Sugimoto, Katsumi

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Thermal hydraulics phenomena were discussed in a spray pipe of pressurizer. • Temperature fluctuation was investigated in a stratified steam-water two-phase. • Remarkable liquid temperature fluctuations were observed in the liquid layer. • The observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave. • The temperature fluctuations decreased with increasing dissolved oxygen. - Abstract: Temperature fluctuation phenomena in a stratified steam-water two-phase flow in a horizontal rectangular duct, which simulate a pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor, were studied experimentally. Vertical distributions of the temperature and the liquid velocity were measured with water of various dissolved oxygen concentrations. Large liquid temperature fluctuations were observed when the water was deaerated well and dissolved oxygen concentration was around 10 ppb. The large temperature fluctuations were not observed when the oxygen concentration was higher. It was shown that the observed temperature fluctuations were caused by the internal gravity wave since the Richardson numbers were larger than 0.25 and the temperature fluctuation frequencies were around the Brunt-Väisälä frequencies in the present experimental conditions. The temperature fluctuations decreased by the non-condensable gas since the non-condensable gas suppressed the condensation and the temperature difference in the liquid layer was small.

  8. Efecto de la concentración de SO2 en las reacciones de calcinación y sulfatación de calcáreos en reactores de lecho fluidizado. // Effect of the SO2 concentration in the calcinations and sulfatation reactions in a fluidized bed reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Lindo Samaniego

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fue realizado un estudio sobre el efecto de las concentraciones de SO2 en la absorción por calcáreo en hornos de LechoFluidizado. Para observar la influencia del SO2 en los parámetros de diferentes procesos físicos y químicos fueron creadosambientes para cuatro concentraciones diferentes de SO2 : 500, 1000, 2000 y 4000 ppm. Se utilizaron dos tipos decalcáreos: Dolimitico-DP y el Calcítico-CI. El Lecho Fluidizado Burbujeante utilizado tiene 160 mm de diámetro interno yfue fluidizado con aire a la temperatura de 850 °C, con una concentración de SO2 deseada. Como material del lecho fueutilizada la arena de cuarzo (99,9% con diámetro de 385 μm y de masa aproximadamente 3,0 kg. El calcáreo fueadicionado en dosificación de 50 g con el reactor ya pre-calentado. Las variaciones de las concentraciones de SO2, CO2,CO, O2 y las descargas, fueron monitoreadas continuamente a la salida del ciclón que fue utilizado para la retención de lapartícula fina. Para esos dados se desarrolló un programa en LabView. El modelo matemático escogido posibilitó ladeterminación de la conversión.Palabras claves: Lecho fluidizado, dióxido de azufre, absorción de azufre, calcáreo , reactor de lechofluidizado.___________________________________________________________________________Abstract.A Study of the effect of the concentrations of SO2 in its absorption by limestones in fluidized bed furnaces wasconducted. For the determination of the SO2 influence on the different physical and chemical parameters of process,such as calcinations and sulfatation four different atmospheres were used in the reator with concentrations of SO2 of500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 ppm. Two types of limestones were used: Dolomite-DP and Calcitic-CI. The bench scalebubbling fluidized bed reactor had a 160 mm internal diameter and was fluidized with air at 850 °C containing therequired concentration of SO2. Bed material was quartz sand (99,9% , with 385 μm diameter and approximately

  9. XANES analysis of dried and calcined bones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendran, Jayapradhi; Gialanella, Stefano; Aswath, Pranesh B.

    2013-01-01

    The structure of dried and calcined bones from chicken, bovine, deer, pig, sheep and chamois was examined using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The oxygen K-edge absorption edge indicates that the surface of dried bone has a larger proportion of carbonate than the interior that is made up of phosphates. The phosphorus L and K edge clearly indicate that pyrophosphates, α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) and hydrogen phosphates of Ca do not exist in either the dried bone or calcined bone and phosphorus exists as either β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) or hydroxyapatite, both in the dried and calcined conditions. The Ca K-edge analysis indicates that β-TCP is the likely form of phosphate in both the dried and calcined conditions. - Highlights: • For the first time bones of five different species of vertebrates have been compared in both the dried and calcined states. • O, P and Ca edges detail the local coordination of these atoms in dried and calcined bone. • O K-edge shows that the surface of bone has more CO 3 while the interior has more PO 4 . • P and Ca edges eliminate the presence of pyrophosphates and confirmed the presence of HA and β-TCP. • The stability of these phosphates on calcination has been examined using XANES

  10. XANES analysis of dried and calcined bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, Jayapradhi [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington (United States); Gialanella, Stefano [Materials Science and Industrial Technology Department, University of Trento (Italy); Aswath, Pranesh B., E-mail: aswath@uta.edu [Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Texas at Arlington (United States)

    2013-10-15

    The structure of dried and calcined bones from chicken, bovine, deer, pig, sheep and chamois was examined using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The oxygen K-edge absorption edge indicates that the surface of dried bone has a larger proportion of carbonate than the interior that is made up of phosphates. The phosphorus L and K edge clearly indicate that pyrophosphates, α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) and hydrogen phosphates of Ca do not exist in either the dried bone or calcined bone and phosphorus exists as either β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) or hydroxyapatite, both in the dried and calcined conditions. The Ca K-edge analysis indicates that β-TCP is the likely form of phosphate in both the dried and calcined conditions. - Highlights: • For the first time bones of five different species of vertebrates have been compared in both the dried and calcined states. • O, P and Ca edges detail the local coordination of these atoms in dried and calcined bone. • O K-edge shows that the surface of bone has more CO{sub 3} while the interior has more PO{sub 4}. • P and Ca edges eliminate the presence of pyrophosphates and confirmed the presence of HA and β-TCP. • The stability of these phosphates on calcination has been examined using XANES.

  11. Separation of non-hazardous, non-radioactive components from ICPP calcine via chlorination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, L.O.

    1995-05-01

    A pyrochemical treatment method for separating non-radioactive from radioactive components in solid granular waste accumulated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was investigated. The goal of this study was to obtain kinetic and chemical separation data on the reaction products of the chlorination of the solid waste, known as calcine. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were completed to verify that a separation of radioactive and non-radioactive calcine components was possible. Bench-scale chlorination experiments were completed subsequently in a variety of reactor configurations including: a fixed-bed reactor (reactive gases flowed around and not through the particle bed), a packed/fluidized-bed reactor, and a packed-bed reactor (reactive gases flowed through the particle bed). Chemical analysis of the reaction products generated during the chlorination experiments verified the predictions made by the equilibrium calculations. An empirical first-order kinetic rate expression was developed for each of the reactor configurations. 20 refs., 16 figs., 21 tabs

  12. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C.

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a open-quotes Settlement Agreementclose quotes (or open-quotes Batt Agreementclose quotes) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed

  13. Calcined solids storage facility closure study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlmeir, M.M.; Tuott, L.C.; Spaulding, B.C. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The disposal of radioactive wastes now stored at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory is currently mandated under a {open_quotes}Settlement Agreement{close_quotes} (or {open_quotes}Batt Agreement{close_quotes}) between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. Under this agreement, all high-level waste must be treated as necessary to meet the disposal criteria and disposed of or made road ready to ship from the INEEL by 2035. In order to comply with this agreement, all calcined waste produced in the New Waste Calcining Facility and stored in the Calcined Solids Facility must be treated and disposed of by 2035. Several treatment options for the calcined waste have been studied in support of the High-Level Waste Environmental Impact Statement. Two treatment methods studied, referred to as the TRU Waste Separations Options, involve the separation of the high-level waste (calcine) into TRU waste and low-level waste (Class A or Class C). Following treatment, the TRU waste would be sent to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for final storage. It has been proposed that the low-level waste be disposed of in the Tank Farm Facility and/or the Calcined Solids Storage Facility following Resource Conservation and Recovery Act closure. In order to use the seven Bin Sets making up the Calcined Solids Storage Facility as a low-level waste landfill, the facility must first be closed to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) standards. This study identifies and discusses two basic methods available to close the Calcined Solids Storage Facility under the RCRA - Risk-Based Clean Closure and Closure to Landfill Standards. In addition to the closure methods, the regulatory requirements and issues associated with turning the Calcined Solids Storage Facility into an NRC low-level waste landfill or filling the bin voids with clean grout are discussed.

  14. Redox calcination study of Synroc D powder containing simulated SRL waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.

    1982-01-01

    According to Ringwood [A.E. Ringwood, W. Sinclair, and G.M. McLaughlin, Nuclear Waste Immobilization, Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, Rept. UCRL-15147 (1979)], the iron oxidation state is important in controlling, the spinel mineralogy and composition if the amount of titania (TiO 2 ) consumed in spinel formation is to be minimized in favor of the formation of the Synroc phases, zirconolite, perovskite, and nepheline. In our redox calcination studies we observed that the iron oxidation state of FeO/Fe 2 O 3 can be controlled by the redoxcalcining atmosphere. In a CO atmosphere, the oxidation state was reduced to less than 7 wt % Fe 2 O 3 . With appropriate CO 2 /CO gas mixtures the resultant iron oxidation states were in the range of 45 to 59 wt % Fe 2 O 3 . Direct rotary redox calcination of spray dried powder at 600 0 C, without prior air calcination, showed increased redox efficiency when compared to powder that had been previously air calcined at 650 0 C. We believe this is caused by a reduction in particle size. Rotary calcination at 800 0 C in argon has no measurable reduction affect on the iron oxidation state of Synroc D powder

  15. New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) Waste Streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    K. E. Archibald

    1999-01-01

    This report addresses the issues of conducting debris treatment in the New Waste Calcine Facility (NWCF) decontamination area and the methods currently being used to decontaminate material at the NWCF

  16. Activity and structure of calcined coal gangue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong Chenchen; Li Dongxu; Wang Xiaojun; Li Zongjin [Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing (China). College of Materials Science and Engineering

    2007-12-15

    Coal gangue was activated by means of calcination in seven temperature ranges. Systematic research was made about activation mechanism and structural evolution. The glycerin-ethanol method, SEM, MIP and XRD were used to determine the variation of structure and activation of coal gangue during calcination. The experimental results show that because of heat treatment in the range of calcination temperatures, mineral composition and microstructure of coal gangue are changed. In addition, its activity is improved. The amount of lime absorbed by the sample calcined at 700{sup o}C is 2-4 times that by uncalcined coal gangue in the course of hydration. When NaOH is added to coal gangue-lime system, the hydration reaction rate of the system is increased and the microstructure of hydrating samples of coal gangue is improved.

  17. Uranium dioxide calcining apparatus and method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved continuous calcining apparatus for consistently and controllably producing from calcinable reactive solid compounds of uranium, such as ammonium diuranate, uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) having an oxygen to uranium ratio of less than 2.2. The apparatus comprises means at the outlet end of a calciner kiln for receiving hot UO 2 , means for cooling the UO 2 to a temperature of below 100 0 C and conveying the cooled UO 2 to storage or to subsequent UO 2 processing apparatus where it finally comes into contact with air, the means for receiving, cooling and conveying being sealed to the outlet end of the calciner and being maintained full of UO 2 and so operable as to exclude atmospheric oxygen from coming into contact with any UO 2 which is at elevated temperatures where it would readily oxidize, without the use of extra hydrogen gas in said means

  18. Effects of aging in containment spray injection system of PWR reactor containment; Efeitos do envelhecimento no sistema de injecao de borrifo da contencao de reatores a agua pressurizada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, Diogo da S.; Lava, Deise D.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.; Moreira, Maria de L., E-mail: diogosb@outlook.com, E-mail: deise_dy@hotmail.com, E-mail: raoniwa@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: tony@ien.gov.br, E-mail: malu@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a contribution to the study of the components aging process in commercial plants of Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR). The analysis is done by applying the method of Fault trees, Monte Carlo Method and Fussell-Vesely Importance Measurement. The study on the aging of nuclear plants, is related to economic factors involved directly with the extent of their operational life, and also provides important data on issues of safety. The most recent case involving the process of extending the life of a PWR plant can be seen in Angra 1 Nuclear Power Plant by investing $ 27 million in the installation of a new reactor cover. The corrective action generated an extension of the useful life of Angra 1 estimated in twenty years, and a great savings compared to the cost of building a new plant and the decommissioning of the first, if it had reached the operation time out 40 years. The extension of the lifetime of a nuclear power plant must be accompanied by special attention from the most sensitive components of the systems to the aging process. After the application of the methodology (aging analysis of Containment Spray Injection System (CSIS)) proposed in this paper, it can be seen that increasing the probability of failure of each component, due to the aging process, generate an increased general unavailability of the system that contains these basic components. The final results obtained were as expected and can contribute to the maintenance policy, preventing premature aging in nuclear power systems.

  19. Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. D. Adams; S. M. Berry; K. J. Galloway; T. A. Langenwalter; D. A. Lopez; C. M. Noakes; H. K. Peterson; M. I. Pope; R. J. Turk

    1999-10-01

    At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase.

  20. Bin Set 1 Calcine Retrieval Feasibility Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.D.; Berry, S.M.; Galloway, K.J.; Langenwalter, T.A.; Lopez, D.A.; Noakes, C.M.; Peterson, H.K.; Pope, M.I.; Turk, R.J.

    1999-01-01

    At the Department of Energy's Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, as an interim waste management measure, both mixed high-level liquid waste and sodium bearing waste have been solidified by a calculation process and are stored in the Calcine Solids Storage Facilities. This calcined product will eventually be treated to allow final disposal in a national geologic repository. The Calcine Solids Storage Facilities comprise seven ''bit sets.'' Bin Set 1, the first to be constructed, was completed in 1959, and has been in service since 1963. It is the only bin set that does not meet current safe-shutdown earthquake seismic criteria. In addition, it is the only bin set that lacks built-in features to aid in calcine retrieval. One option to alleviate the seismic compliance issue is to transport the calcine from Bin Set 1 to another bin set which has the required capacity and which is seismically qualified. This report studies the feasibility of retrieving the calcine from Bi n Set 1 and transporting it into Bin Set 6 which is located approximately 650 feet away. Because Bin Set 1 was not designed for calcine retrieval, and because of the high radiation levels and potential contamination spread from the calcined material, this is a challenging engineering task. This report presents preconceptual design studies for remotely-operated, low-density, pneumatic vacuum retrieval and transport systems and equipment that are based on past work performed by the Raytheon Engineers and Constructors architectural engineering firm. The designs presented are considered feasible; however, future development work will be needed in several areas during the subsequent conceptual design phase

  1. Properties of radioactive calcine retrieved from the second calcined solids storage facility at ICPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Pomiak, G.S.; Wade, E.L.

    1979-03-01

    The chemical and physical properties of radioactive alumina and zirconia calcine samples retrieved from the storage bins at ICPP were measured. Chemical properties measured include chemical composition, crystalline structure, and radiochemical composition. The physical properties measured and reported include density, size distribution, relative attrition, solubility in 8 M HNO 3 , thermal stability, and flow characteristics. The chemical and physical properties of the retrieved calcine after the 10 to 12 years of storage are very similar to freshly prepared simulated calcine

  2. [Infrared spectral analysis for calcined borax].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Cui; Ren, Li-Li; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Qian; Wang, Bo-Tao

    2011-08-01

    To valuate the quality of calcined borax which is sold in the market, 18 samples of calcined borax were studied using the Fourier transform infrared, and samples with different water content were selected and analyzed. Then, the results of analysis were used to evaluate the quality of calcined borax. Results show that the infrared spectra of calcined borax include OH vibration, BO3(-3) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration absorption bands. The position and width of OH vibration absorption band depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, the wider the absorption band. The number of BO3(3-) vibration and BO4(5-) vibration bands also depend on the level of water content, and the more the water content, and the stronger the hydrogen bond and the lower the symmetry of B atoms, the more the number of infrared absorption peaks. It was concluded that because the quality of calcined borax has direct correlation with water content, the infrared spectroscopy is an express and objective approach to quality analysis and evaluation of calcined borax.

  3. Experimental results: Pilot plant calcine dissolution and liquid feed stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.S.; Fryer, D.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Johnson, C.K.; Todd, T.A.

    1995-02-01

    The dissolution of simulated Idaho Chemical Processing Plant pilot plant calcines, containing none of the radioactive actinides, lanthanides or fission products, was examined to evaluate the solubility of calcine matrix materials in acidic media. This study was a necessary precursor to dissolution and optimization experiments with actual radionuclide-containing calcines. The importance of temperature, nitric acid concentration, ratio of acid volume to calcine mass, and time on the amount, as a weight percentage of calcine dissolved, was evaluated. These parameters were studied for several representative pilot plant calcine types: (1) Run No. 74 Zirconia calcine; (2) Run No. 17 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 64 Zirconia/Sodium calcine; (3) Run No. 1027 Alumina calcine; and (4) Run No. 20 Alumina/Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Statistically designed experiments with the different pilot plant calcines indicated the effect of the studied process variables on the amount of calcine dissolved decreases in the order: Acid/Calcine Ratio > Temperature > HNO 3 Concentration > Dissolution Time. The following conditions are suitable to achieve greater than 90 wt. % dissolution of most Zr, Al, or Na blend calcines: (1) Maximum nitric acid concentration of 5M; (2) Minimum acid/calcine ratio of 10 mL acid/1 gram calcine; (3) Minimum dissolution temperature of 90 degrees C; and (4) Minimum dissolution time of 30 minutes. The formation of calcium sulphate (CaSO 4 ) precipitates was observed in certain dissolved calcine solutions during the dissolution experiments. Consequently, a study was initiated to evaluate if and under what conditions the resulting dissolved calcine solutions would be unstable with regards to precipitate formation. The results indicate that precipitate formation in the calcine solutions prepared under the above proposed dissolution conditions are not anticipated

  4. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville vicinity, Butte County, Idaho -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data. Historical American engineering record

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    This report describes the history of the Old Waste Calcining Facility. It begins with introductory material on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the Materials Testing Reactor fuel cycle, and the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The report then describes management of the wastes from the processing plant in the following chapters: Converting liquid to solid wastes; Fluidized bed waste calcining process and the Waste Calcining Facility; Waste calcining campaigns; WCF gets a new source of heat; New Waste Calcining Facility; Last campaign; Deactivation and the RCRA cap; Significance/context of the old WCF. Appendices contain a photo key map for HAER photos, a vicinity map and neighborhood of the WCF, detailed description of the calcining process, and chronology of WCF campaigns.

  5. Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Old Waste Calcining Facility, Scoville vicinity, Butte County, Idaho -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data. Historical American engineering record

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the history of the Old Waste Calcining Facility. It begins with introductory material on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, the Materials Testing Reactor fuel cycle, and the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. The report then describes management of the wastes from the processing plant in the following chapters: Converting liquid to solid wastes; Fluidized bed waste calcining process and the Waste Calcining Facility; Waste calcining campaigns; WCF gets a new source of heat; New Waste Calcining Facility; Last campaign; Deactivation and the RCRA cap; Significance/context of the old WCF. Appendices contain a photo key map for HAER photos, a vicinity map and neighborhood of the WCF, detailed description of the calcining process, and chronology of WCF campaigns

  6. Spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rollin, Philippe.

    1975-01-01

    Spray cooling - using water spraying in air - is surveyed as a possible system for make-up (peak clipping in open circuit) or major cooling (in closed circuit) of the cooling water of the condensers in thermal power plants. Indications are given on the experiments made in France and the systems recently developed in USA, questions relating to performance, cost and environmental effects of spray devices are then dealt with [fr

  7. Recovery of gold and uranium from calcines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Livesey-Goldblatt, E.

    1981-10-06

    The invention concerns the recovery of non-ferrous metals, such as gold, uranium or the like from iron oxide containing calcines which have the non-ferrous metal present in solid solution and/or encapsulated within the iron oxide. The calcine is reacted, while stirring vigorously, with sulphuric acid or another strong inorganic acid to cause the iron to form the ferric salt. The material obtained is mixed with water and the liquid and solid phases are separated from each other. The non-ferrous metal is then obtained from at least one of these phases by leaching, or the like.

  8. 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Favier, Aurélie

    2015-01-01

    This volume focuses on research and practical issues linked to Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete. The main subjects are geology of clays, hydration and performance of blended systems with calcined clays, alkali activated binders, economic and environmental impacts of the use of calcined clays in cement based materials. Topics addressed in this book include the influence of processing on reactivity of calcined clays, influence of clay mineralogy on reactivity, geology of clay deposits, Portland-calcined clay systems, hydration, durability, performance, Portland-calcined clay-limestone systems, hydration, durability, performance, calcined clay-alkali systems, life cycle analysis, economics and environmental impact of use of calcined clays in cement and concrete, and field applications. This book compiles the different contributions of the 1st International Conference on Calcined Clays for Sustainable Concrete, which took place in Lausanne, Switzerland, June, 23-25, 2015.The papers present the latest  res...

  9. Remotely replaceable fuel and feed nozzles for the new waste calcining facility calciner vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, R.D.; Carter, J.A.; May, K.W.

    1978-01-01

    The development and testing of remotely replaceable fuel and feed nozzles for calcination of liquid radioactive wastes in the calciner vessel of the New Waste Calcining Facility being built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is described. A complete fuel nozzle assembly was fabricated and tested at the Remote Maintenance Development Facility to evolve design refinements, identify required support equipment, and develop handling techniques. The design also provided for remote replacement of the nozzle support carriage and adjacent feed and fuel pipe loops using two pairs of master-slave manipulators

  10. Reaction between Hydrogen Sulfide and Limestone Calcines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hartman, Miloslav; Svoboda, Karel; Trnka, Otakar; Čermák, Jiří

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 10 (2002), s. 2392-2398 ISSN 0888-5885 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4072711; GA AV ČR IAA4072801 Keywords : hydrogen sulfide * limestone calcines * desulfurization Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.247, year: 2002

  11. Evaluation of Calcine Disposition Path Forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birrer, S.A.; Heiser, M.B.

    2003-01-01

    This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward

  12. Characterization of Sodium Spray Aerosols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, C. T.; Koontz, R. L.; Silberberg, M. [Atomics International, North American Rockwell Corporation, Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    1968-12-15

    The consequences of pool and spray fires require evaluation in the safety analysis of liquid metal-cooled fast breeder reactors. Sodium spray fires are characterized by high temperature and pressure, produced during the rapid combustion of sodium in air. Following the initial energy release, some fraction of the reaction products are available as aerosols which follow the normal laws of agglomeration, growth, settling, and plating. An experimental study is underway at Atomics International to study the characteristics of high concentration sprays of liquid sodium in reduced oxygen atmospheres and in air. The experiments are conducted in a 31.5 ft{sup 3} (2 ft diam. by 10 ft high) vessel, certified for a pressure of 100 lb/in{sup 2} (gauge). The spray injection apparatus consists of a heated sodium supply pot and a spray nozzle through which liquid sodium is driven by nitrogen pressure. Spray rate and droplet size can be varied by the injection velocity (nozzle size, nitrogen pressure, and sodium temperature). Aerosols produced in 0, 4, and 10 vol. % oxygen environments have been studied. The concentration and particle size distribution of the material remaining in the air after the spray injection and reaction period are measured. Fallout rates are found to be proportional to the concentration of aerosol which remains airborne following the spray period. (author)

  13. Development and evaluation of alumina calcination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, I.J.

    2000-01-01

    This thesis focuses on a number of aspects governing the transformation of gibbsite, via intermediate phases, to α-alumina. These aspects include the size and morphology of the gibbsite grains, the influence of additions of foreign elements, the effect of a mechanical treatment of the gibbsite prior to calcination, and combinations of these factors. The materials were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and surface area measurements. For some of the calcined materials an attempt was made to sinter the powders to a dense body to investigate if any of the treatments during calcination had an effect on this process. The literature review covers the current state of understanding of the production of bulk alumina powder by the Bayer process and the phase changes seen on calcination of precursors to the stable α-alumina phase. A detailed description of the phase changes is given and the various routes and conditions necessary for the transformations to occur are considered. The transformations are examined in relation to the morphology of the crystals and the variables controlling the phase transformation route are discussed. Calcination in air showed that the size of the gibbsite grain governs the calcination route taken to reach oc-alumina. The standard gibbsites used in this work show a mixed calcination sequence transforming both via the boehmite phase, followed by the γ, δ and θ phases, and via the χ and κ phases. The formation of boehmite is attributed to retention of water vapour within the grain. Differences in morphology of the starting materials showed that for the range of materials seen, the morphology of the grain is less important than its size. The super fine material confirmed that a small grain size transforms via the non-boehmite route only, with the other gibbsites taking intermediate routes as for the standard gibbsites. Of the additions made prior to calcination, aluminium fluoride was found to reduce the

  14. Kinetic Study of Calcination of Jakura Limestone Using Power Rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National Research Institute for Chemical Technology, P.M. B 1052, Zaria, ... calcination of Jakura limestone was also found to be first order reaction with respect to CaCO3 ... Keywords: Jakura, limestone, calcination, kinetics, power law model.

  15. Dissolution studies with pilot plant and actual INTEC calcines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.S.; Garn, T.G.

    1999-01-01

    The dissolution of Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) pilot plant calcines was examined to determine solubility of calcine matrix components in acidic media. Two representatives pilot plant calcine types were studied: Zirconia calcine and Zirconia/Sodium calcine. Dissolution of these calcines was evaluated using lower initial concentrations of nitric acid than used in previous tests to decrease the [H+] concentration in the final solutions. Lower [H+] concentrations contribute to more favorable TRUEX/SREX solvent extraction flowsheet performance. Dissolution and analytical results were also obtained for radioactive calcines produced using high sodium feeds blended with non-radioactive Al(NO 3 ) 3 solutions to dilute the sodium concentration and prevent bed agglomeration during the calcination process. Dissolution tests indicated >95 wt.% of the initial calcine mass can be dissolved using the baseline dissolution procedure, with the exception that higher initial nitric acid concentrations are required. The higher initial acid concentration is required for stoichiometric dissolution of the oxides, primarily aluminum oxide. Statistically designed experiments using pilot plant calcine were performed to determine the effect of mixing rate on dissolution efficiency. Mixing rate was determined to provide minimal effects on wt.% dissolution. The acid/calcine ratio and temperature were the predominate variables affecting the wt.% dissolution, a result consistent with previous studies using other similar types of pilot plant calcines

  16. A parametric study of a solar calcinator using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fidaros, D.K.; Baxevanou, C.A.; Vlachos, N.S.

    2007-01-01

    In this work a horizontal rotating solar calcinator is studied numerically using computational fluid dynamics. The specific solar reactor is a 10 kW model designed and used for efficiency studies. The numerical model is based on the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for the gas flow, and on Lagrangean dynamics for the discrete particles. All necessary mathematical models were developed and incorporated into a computational fluid dynamics model with the influence of turbulence simulated by a two-equation (RNG k-ε) model. The efficiency of the reactor was calculated for different thermal inputs, feed rates, rotational speeds and particle diameters. The numerically computed degrees of calcination compared well with equivalent experimental results

  17. Flash calcination of kaolinite rich clay and impact of process conditions on the quality of the calcines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2016-01-01

    Use of properly calcined kaolinite rich clay (i.e., metakaolin) to offset part of CO2-intensive clinkers not only reduces CO2 footprint from cement industry but also improves the performance of concrete. However, calcination under inappropriately high temperatures or long retention times may...... suspension calciner. The model is validated by the experimental data (e.g., the degree of dehydroxylation and the density of the calcines). Based on the model, the impacts of process conditions and feed properties on the quality of the calcination products are thoroughly examined....

  18. The increase performance BMF-14 calcination unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triyono

    2013-01-01

    The heating element of performance increase BMF-14 calcination unit has been installed. The activity includes: installation and function test heating element step by step. The main component includes: kanthal heating element type with size long 58,2 cm diameter 0,9 cm slot total 28, flexible cable resists heat 30 Amperes, band cable heat resists and flexible clamp. The heating elements installation includes from 3 groups and every groups have 4 heating elements to connectly series. Every group connecting to every phase RST and neutral for getting electric voltage 380 Volts follow contact relay 3 phases to controlling by digital temperature control. The resulting installation of heating element in the BMF-14 calcination unit showed that: BMF-14 calcination unit can be again of the setting temperature step by step. In the step I get optimal temperature 560 °C test time 1068 minutes with rate velocity heat 0 to 18,0 °C/minutes with current between 5,8 to 6,4 Amperes voltage 103 to 123 Volts (phase R and T). In the step II gets optimal temperature 600 °C test time 265 minutes getting rate velocity heat 0 to 40,3 °C/minutes with current 3,8 to 8,5 Amperes voltage 76 to 142 Volts (phase RST). In the step III gets optimal temperature 1000 °C test time 107 minutes getting rate velocity heat 0 to 53,5 °C/minutes with current 9,7 to 12,5 Amperes voltage 215 to 225 Volts (phase RST). (author)

  19. Waste Calcining Facility remote inspection report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, M.W.; Ison, W.M.

    1994-08-01

    The purpose of the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) remote inspections was to evaluate areas in the facility which are difficult to access due to high radiation fields. The areas inspected were the ventilation exhaust duct, waste hold cell, adsorber manifold cell, off-gas cell, calciner cell and calciner vessel. The WCF solidified acidic, high-level mixed waste generated during nuclear fuel reprocessing. Solidification was accomplished through high temperature oxidation and evaporation. Since its shutdown in 1981, the WCFs vessels, piping systems, pumps, off-gas blowers and process cells have remained contaminated. Access to the below-grade areas is limited due to contamination and high radiation fields. Each inspection technique was tested with a mock-up in a radiologically clean area before the equipment was taken to the WCF for the actual inspection. During the inspections, essential information was obtained regarding the cleanliness, structural integrity, in-leakage of ground water, indications of process leaks, indications of corrosion, radiation levels and the general condition of the cells and equipment. In general, the cells contain a great deal of dust and debris, as well as hand tools, piping and miscellaneous equipment. Although the building appears to be structurally sound, the paint is peeling to some degree in all of the cells. Cracking and spalling of the concrete walls is evident in every cell, although the east wall of the off-gas cell is the worst. The results of the completed inspections and lessons learned will be used to plan future activities for stabilization and deactivation of the facility. Remote clean-up of loose piping, hand tools, and miscellaneous debris can start immediately while information from the inspections is factored into the conceptual design for deactivating the facility

  20. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  1. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  2. Design and development of a rotary calciner for radiochemical waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pande, D.P.; Sutar, V.D.; Sengar, P.B.S.

    1997-01-01

    Present experience and knowledge in handling of radioactive waste has led to identification of major thrust areas in the development of the treatment processes. In order to reduce evaporation and volatility losses in the vitrification facility, it is advantageous to carry out evaporation and calcination steps in another equipment like rotary calciner. Efforts have been directed for the engineering development of a Rotary Ball Kiln calciner. This paper highlights the important design features of the Rotary Ball Kiln Calciner for the radioactive waste. In this work, an attempt has been made to systematically evaluate the influence of process and design parameters. The results obtained on calcination will provide a design basis and rational methodology for the optimum utilization of these processes and equipment for volume reduction and calcination of the liquid waste

  3. Calcinating petroleum coke in a furnace with a rotating hearth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akhmetov, M M; Ezhov, B M; Galeeva, Z G; Goriunov, V S; Karpinskaia, N N; Zaitseva, S A

    1980-01-01

    A scheme is described for an industrial device with a bottom furnace for calcinating coke from slow coking. The consumption and operational indicators of the process during the calcination of standard and needle cokes are given, together with data on the quality of dry and calcinated cokes under different conditions. The basic drawbacks in the operation of the device are described, and measures are proposed for increasing its operational effectiveness.

  4. Pilot-plant development of a Rover waste calcination flowsheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birrer, S.A.

    1978-04-01

    Results of eight runs, six using the 10-cm dia and two using the 30-cm dia pilot-plant calciners, in which simulated first-cycle Rover waste was calcined, are described. Results of the tests showed that a feed blend consisting of one volume simulated first-cycle Rover waste and one or two volumes simulated first-cycle zirconium waste could not be successfully calcined. 5 figs., 8 tables

  5. Microwave heating application in calcination and SYNROC formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambashta, R.D.; Wattal, P.K.; Malav, R.K.; Mallik, G.K.

    2006-01-01

    Microwave for calcination of titanate based ceramic wasteform (SYNROC) is being reported for the first time in this paper. Although major constituents in SYNROC were non microwave active, the combination with microwave active constituents rendered the mixture calcinable. Calcine was sintered at 1150 degC under hot uniaxial conditions at an applied pressure of ∼30 MPa. XRD shows presence of major phases of SYNROC in the compacted sample. (author)

  6. Product removal and solids transport from fluidized-bed calciners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimmett, E.S.; Munger, D.H.

    1978-09-01

    Methods of removing the solid product from pilot-plant and production fluidized-bed calciners, and transporting product to underground storage vaults are reported here. Testing of dense-phase solids transport systems in test loops during development of a 15-cm-diam. and 30-cm-diam. calciner are described. A lean-phase solid transport system is used with the Waste Calcining Facility. The results of some recent tests done in a lean-phase transport system connected to the 30-cm-diam. calciner are included in this report

  7. Effect of calcination environments and plasma treatment on structural, optical and electrical properties of FTO transparent thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhav Kafle

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of the structural, optical and electrical properties of the FTO thin films on the film thickness (276 nm - 546 nm, calcination environment, and low temperature plasma treatment were examined. The FTO thin films, prepared by spray pyrolysis, were calcinated under air followed by either further heat treatment under N2 gas or treatment in low temperature atmospheric plasma. The samples before and after calcination under N2, and plasma treatment will be represented by Sair, SN2 and SPl, respectively, hereafter. The thin films were characterized by measuring the XRD spectra, SEM images, optical transmittance and reflectance, and sheet resistance of the films before and after calcination in N2 environment or plasma treatment. The presence of sharp and narrow multiple peaks in XRD spectra hint us that the films were highly crystalline (polycrystalline. The samples Sair with the thickness of 471 nm showed as high as 92 % transmittance in the visible range. Moreover, from the tauc plot, the optical bandgap Eg values of the Sair found to be noticeably lower than that of the samples SN2. Very surprisingly, the electrical sheet resistance (Rsh found to decrease following the trend as Rshair > RshN2 > RshPl. The samples exposed to plasma found to possess the lowest RshPl (for film with thickness 546 nm, the RshPl was 17 Ω/sq..

  8. High-Temperature Release of SO2 from Calcined Cement Raw Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Rooma; Larsen, Morten B.; Glarborg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    During combustion of alternative fuels in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns, local reducing conditions may occur and cause reductive decomposition of sulfates from calcined cement raw materials. Decomposition of sulfates is problematic because it increases the gas-phase SO2...... concentration, which may cause deposit formation in the kiln system. In this study, the release of sulfur from calcined cement raw materials under both oxidizing and reducing conditions is investigated. The investigations include thermodynamic equilibrium calculations in the temperature interval of 800–1500 °C...... and experiments in a tube furnace reactor in the temperature interval of 900–1100 °C. The investigated conditions resemble actual conditions in the material inlet end of cement rotary kilns. It was found that the sulfates CaSO4, K2SO4, and Na2SO4 were all stable under oxidizing conditions but began to decompose...

  9. Calcination of kaolinite clay particles for cement production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    Kaolinite rich clay particles calcined under certain conditions can attain favorable pozzolanic properties and can be used to substitute part of the CO2 intensive clinker in cement production. To better guide calcination of a clay material, a transient one-dimensional single particle model...

  10. Mission Need Statement: Calcine Disposition Project Major Systems Acquisition Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J. T. Beck

    2007-01-01

    This document identifies the need to establish the Calcine Disposition Project to determine and implement the final disposition of calcine including characterization, retrieval, treatment (if necessary), packaging, loading, onsite interim storage pending shipment to a repository or interim storage facility, and disposition of related facilities

  11. Modeling of calcination of single kaolinitic clay particle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay; Yin, Chungen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    The present work aims at modeling of the calcination (dehydroxylation) process of clay particles, specifically kaolinite, and its thermal transformation. For such purpose, 1D single particle calcination model was developed based on the concept of shrinking core model to assess the dehydroxylation...

  12. Practical results of the MESA 1 line calcinator trial operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Sazavsky, P.; Skaba, V.; Zahalka, F.; Vild, J.; Kulovany, J.

    1987-01-01

    Mobile calcination and cementation unit MESA 1 was designed and built by UJV Rez in cooperation with many enterprises, mainly with the Kralovopolske Strojirny Brno. This facility for direct fixation of liquid radioactive wastes was experimentally tested using model non-radioactive solutions and model and actual wastes from the Jaslovske Bohunice nuclear power plant. The calciner was run in trial operation at the Kralovopolske SAtrojirny Brno. A total of 1.3 m 3 of model solutions was processed into 180 kg of calcinate. The fixation of the calcinate in cement, the times of solidification and of hardening and the moisture content of concrete blocks were studied. The application was also tested of the calciner in drying ion exchangers from WWER-440 prior to their bituminization. Following the despatch of the cementation module to the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, the direct calcination module was tested at Dukovany together with an auxiliary module which makes possible self-contained calciner operation. Model non-radioactive solutions from the Dukovany nuclear power plant were treated containing H 3 BO 3 and NaNO 3 as main components. The usability in actual conditions of the mobile calcination and cementation unit for radioactive wastes was tested in a total of about 70 operating hours. (E.S.). 2 figs., 2 refs

  13. Properties of Formula 127 glass prepared with radioactive zirconia calcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Pavlica, D.A.; Cole, H.S.

    1982-09-01

    Formula 127 glass has been developed to immobilize ICPP zirconia calcine. This glass has been prepared remotely on a laboratory scale basis with actual radioactive zirconia calcine retrieved after ten years of storage from Bin Set 2. The aqueous leachability of the glass produced was investigated and compared through application of the MCC-1, MCC-2 and Soxhlet leach tests with that of Formula 127 glass prepared with simulated calcine. The solid state properties of the glasses prepared with actual and simulated calcines were also measured by electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive x-ray (SEM-EDX). Based on the application of these leaching tests and analysis techniques the properties measured in this study are similar for 127 glass prepared with either simulated or radioactive calcine. 13 figures, 16 tables

  14. Energy saving plan for lime calcining kiln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Lime calcining kilns operating in China are of old type, consuming more heat energy by 30% or more than the latest type kilns. For the purpose of the COP3 joint implementation, a renewal plan was discussed taking up Benxi Steel Group Company as the object. The new type kiln is a parallel flow energy regenerating (Maerz) kiln. It has as high thermal efficiency as 900 kcal/kg of product. Annual fuel conservation as converted into crude oil will be 7.49x10{sup 3} tons, annual fuel cost reduction will be 101,200,000 yuan, and annual reduction in CO2 emission will be 23,200 tons. The estimated cost required for the project will be 991 million yen, or 66,070,000 yuan if the exchange rate is assumed to be 15 yen to one yuan. The profitability was discussed based on using bank loans and the special environmental yen loan. The investment recovering period was calculated as 7.9 years. This provides no realizability as a project on the business base. However, China strongly desires renewal of the facilities because of discharge of dust from old type facilities, and inferior quality of lime products. The project could be a candidate without doubt if the CDM system will have been established. (NEDO)

  15. Calcination/dissolution testing for Hanford Site tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colby, S.A.; Delegard, C.H.; McLaughlin, D.F.; Danielson, M.J.

    1994-07-01

    Thermal treatment by calcination offers several benefits for the treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes, including the destruction of organics and ferrocyanides and an hydroxide fusion that permits the bulk of the mostly soluble nonradioactive constituents to be easily separated from the insoluble transuranic residue. Critical design parameters were tested, including: (1) calciner equipment design, (2) hydroxide fusion chemistry, and (3) equipment corrosion. A 2 gal/minute pilot plant processed a simulated Tank 101-SY waste and produced a free flowing 700 C molten calcine with an average calciner retention time of 20 minutes and >95% organic, nitrate, and nitrite destruction. Laboratory experiments using actual radioactive tank waste and the simulated waste pilot experiments indicate that 98 wt% of the calcine produced is soluble in water, leaving an insoluble transuranic fraction. All of the Hanford Site tank wastes can benefit from calcination/dissolution processing, contingent upon blending various tank waste types to ensure a target of 70 wt% sodium hydroxide/nitrate/nitrite fluxing agent. Finally, corrosion testing indicates that a jacketed nickel liner cooled to below 400 C would corrode <2 mil/year (0.05 mm/year) from molten calcine attack

  16. Calcination of the cerium concentrate to be cerium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyanti; MV Purwani

    2016-01-01

    Calcination of the cerium concentrate to be cerium oxide has done. The cerium concentrate were obtained from the Ce making process wear KBrO_3 and without using KBrO_3. The calcination were done with a variation of time 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours with the temperature variations of 700, 800 and 900°C. The easiest calcination of Ce concentrates to be CeO_2 containing majority of Ce(OH)_4 and contains least impurities as Th(OH)_4, (NH_4)_2Y(NO_3), H_4N_5O_1_2La, H_1_2N_3NdO_1_5 and N_3O_9Sm. On the calcination of Ce concentrates process results without using KBrO_3 1, the calcination temperature 900°C was obtained CeO_2 content of 73.53% for calcination time of 4 hours, has little difference when compared with the predictions and calculation result of complete calcination was equal 73.84%. (author)

  17. Volume reduction of low- and medium-level waste by incineration/calcination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzonniere, A. de; Gauthey, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    Nuclear installations generate large quantities of low- and medium-level radwaste. This waste comes from various installations in the fuel cycle, reactor operation, research institute, hospitals, nuclear plate dismantling, etc.. TECHNICATOME did the project development work for the incineration plant of PIERRELATE (France) on behalf of COGEMA (Compagnie Generale des d'Etudes Technique). This plant has been in active service since November 1987. In addition, TECHNICATOME was in charge of the incinerator by a turnkey contract. This incinerator was commissioned in 1992. For a number of years, TECHNICATOME has been examining, developing and producing incineration and drying/calcination installations. They are used for precessing low- and medium-level radwaste

  18. Assessment of soda ash calcination treatment of Turkish trona ore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gezer Sibel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Trona is relatively rare, non-metallic mineral, Na2CO3 · NaHCO3 · 2H2O. The pure material contains 70.3% sodium carbonate and by calcination the excess CO2 and water can be driven off, yielding natural soda ash. The terms soda ash and sodium carbonate are used interchangeably. Trona calcining is a key process step in production of soda ash (sodium carbonate anhydrate from the relatively cheap trona ore. The calcination reaction may proceeds in a sequence of steps. Depending on the conditions, it may result in formation of either sodium carbonate monohydrate (Na2CO3 · H2O, sodium sesquicarbonate or weigschederite (Na2CO3 · 3NaHCO3. The Beypazarı Turkish trona deposit is the second largest deposit in the world with the content of 84% trona. The decomposition of trona appeared to be a single stage process across the temperature range studied (150-200 °C with the representative samples of different size fractions in the draught up metallurgical furnace. The optimum particle size and calcination time were −6.35 mm and 30 minutes, respectively, at calcination temperature of 175 °C in a metallurgical furnace. Microwave-induced dry calcination of trona was possible and 5 minutes of calcination time at a power level of 900 was sufficient for complete calcination of −6.35 mm feed. This includes short time calcinations with the goal of improving economics and simplifying the thermal process.

  19. Calcination, Reduction and Sintering of ADU Spheres for HTGR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Kyung Chai; Eom, Sung Ho; Kim, Yeon Ku; Kim, Woong Ki; Kim, Young Min; Lee, Young Woo; Kim, Ju Hee; Cho, Hyo Jin; Cho, Moon Seoung

    2011-01-01

    The international oil market is again in turmoil in accordance with the increasing of human needs and energy consumption. Soaring oil prices, fears of supply security, and climate change are concerned becoming more concrete make for an uncertain energy future. In this view point, nuclear energy is an important, yet controversial option for energy supply. High Temperature Gas Reactor will play a dominant role in the worldwide fleet of nuclear reactors of the next decade for electricity production and high temperature heat. HTGR have two reactor types which use the basic fuel concept based on the dispersion of TRISO coated particles in graphite in shown Fig.1. The TRISO coated particle for these purposes is prepared with pyro-carbon and silicone carbide coatings on a spherical UO 2 kernel surface as fissile material. The TRISO fuel particle consists of a microsphere (i.e., UO 2 kernel) of nuclear material: encapsulated by multiple layers of pyro-carbon and a SiC layer. This multiple coating layers system has been engineered to retain the fission products generated by fission of the nuclear material in the kernel during normal operation and all licensing basis events over the design lifetime of the fuel. UO 2 kernels are produced by using the modified sol-gel process, a wet process, generally known as the GSP method. Wet chemical processes are flexible in producing kernels of different size and chemical composition with high throughout and yield, good spherical shape, and narrow size distribution. This chemical processing route is well-known to the potential kernel fabrication processes. The principle, as set out in Fig.2, involves first of all preparing a pseudo-sol(also known as a 'broth') from an initial uranyl nitrate solution . This broth solution is obtained through addition of a number of additives, as determined by process know-how, including a soluble organic polymer, that are subsequently gels into droplets and are dispersed for ADU precipitation. The

  20. Reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shah, Vivek; Vaz Salles, Marcos António

    2018-01-01

    The requirements for OLTP database systems are becoming ever more demanding. Domains such as finance and computer games increasingly mandate that developers be able to encode complex application logic and control transaction latencies in in-memory databases. At the same time, infrastructure...... engineers in these domains need to experiment with and deploy OLTP database architectures that ensure application scalability and maximize resource utilization in modern machines. In this paper, we propose a relational actor programming model for in-memory databases as a novel, holistic approach towards......-level function calls. In contrast to classic transactional models, however, reactors allow developers to take advantage of intra-transaction parallelism and state encapsulation in their applications to reduce latency and improve locality. Moreover, reactors enable a new degree of flexibility in database...

  1. Study of as-synthesized and calcined hydrocalumites as possible ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    ments. Finally, these solids were tested as antacids by using a synthetic gastric juice. Results showed that calcined samples were able to neutralize the synthetic gastric juice in more extension as an as-synthesized ..... D 2010 Appl. Clay Sci.

  2. Effect of calcination conditions of pork bone sludge on behaviour

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... bone sludge from meat plant via two essentially different calcination methods using ... tissue and suitability for further investigations intended for medical grafting. ... The Alfred Meissner Higher School of Dental Engineering and Humanities, ...

  3. A simplified model of aerosol removal by containment sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, D.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Burson, S.B. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Safety Issue Resolution)

    1993-06-01

    Spray systems in nuclear reactor containments are described. The scrubbing of aerosols from containment atmospheres by spray droplets is discussed. Uncertainties are identified in the prediction of spray performance when the sprays are used as a means for decontaminating containment atmospheres. A mechanistic model based on current knowledge of the physical phenomena involved in spray performance is developed. With this model, a quantitative uncertainty analysis of spray performance is conducted using a Monte Carlo method to sample 20 uncertain quantities related to phenomena of spray droplet behavior as well as the initial and boundary conditions expected to be associated with severe reactor accidents. Results of the uncertainty analysis are used to construct simplified expressions for spray decontamination coefficients. Two variables that affect aerosol capture by water droplets are not treated as uncertain; they are (1) [open quote]Q[close quote], spray water flux into the containment, and (2) [open quote]H[close quote], the total fall distance of spray droplets. The choice of values of these variables is left to the user since they are plant and accident specific. Also, they can usually be ascertained with some degree of certainty. The spray decontamination coefficients are found to be sufficiently dependent on the extent of decontamination that the fraction of the initial aerosol remaining in the atmosphere, m[sub f], is explicitly treated in the simplified expressions. The simplified expressions for the spray decontamination coefficient are given. Parametric values for these expressions are found for median, 10 percentile, and 90 percentile values in the uncertainty distribution for the spray decontamination coefficient. Examples are given to illustrate the utility of the simplified expressions to predict spray decontamination of an aerosol-laden atmosphere.

  4. CSER 99-001: PFP LAB Dentirating calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MILLER, E.M.; DOBBIN, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    A criticality safety evaluation report was prepared for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) laboratory denigrating calciner, located in Glovebox 188-1, that converts Pu(NO 3 ) 4 solutions to the high fired stable oxide PuO 2 . Fissile mass limits and volume limits are set for the glovebox for testing operations and training operators using only nitric acid feed to a plutonium oxide bed in the calciner

  5. Activity Based Startup Plan for Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    Testing activation on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at PFP were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The restart of testing activities will require a review through an activity based startup process based upon Integrated Safety Management (ISM) principles to verify readiness. The Activity Based Startup Plan for the Prototype vertical Denitration Calciner has been developed for this process

  6. Fixation of calcined waste by bituminization or cementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Kyrs, M.; Ditl, P.

    1983-01-01

    The overall concept is given of the combination of calcination with fixation into bitumen, cement etc. The design is shown of a calciner with the capacity of 10 L/h which was tested on real radioactive wastes for 2000 h. The geometrical and operating parameters of the apparatus have been optimized based on a statistical evaluation of the experiments. Wastes containing nitrates are calcined at 300-550 deg. C, yielding oxides. Wastes containing sulphates, carbonates, KMnO 4 , or borates are calcined at 150-330 deg. C, yielding soluble salts. The content of H 3 BO 4 and Na 2 B 4 O 7 and in some cases of sulphates in the calcinate retards hardening of the mixture with cement. Nitrates and detergents also interfere. The effect of the above components on the products mixed with bitumen is much less. Detergents can be decomposed at 200-300 deg. C; organic acids can be reacted with A1 salts to form insoluble substances lowering the leaching rate of Sr and Cs; small amounts of SiO 2 eliminate the effect of borates on cement hardening. The drawbacks of bituminization with bitumen emulsions are the complicated preparation of the emulsion, higher leaching rate of the product and low stability of the emulsion against breaking. The leachability was determined (1-50 days) of different products containing LWR wastes: 33% of concentrated waste in cement of calcination product stabilized with PVA exhibit approx. 8x10 - 3 g/cm 2 per day, 33% of calcine in cement approx. 3x10 - 3 ; 40% concentrate fixed with bitumen emulsion approx. 9x10 - 4 ; 50% calcine stabilized with PVA in bitumen, pilot-plant scale approx. 2x10 - 5 ; the same but on a laboratory scale approx. 1.10 - 5 . (author)

  7. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  8. Optical fuel spray measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillamo, H.

    2011-07-01

    Diesel fuel sprays, including fuel/air mixing and the physics of two-phase jet formation, are discussed in the thesis. The fuel/air mixing strongly affects emissions formation in spray combustion processes where the local combustion conditions dictate the emission formation. This study comprises optical measurements both in pressurized spray test rigs and in a running engine.The studied fuel injection was arranged with a common rail injection system and the injectors were operated with a solenoid-based injection valve. Both marine and heavy-duty diesel engine injectors were used in the study. Optical fuel spray measurements were carried out with a laser-based double-framing camera system. This kind of equipments is usually used for flow field measurements with Particle Image Velocimetry technique (PIV) as well as for backlight imaging. Fundamental fuel spray properties and spray formation were studied in spray test rigs. These measurements involved studies of mixing, atomization, and the flow field. Test rig measurements were used to study the effect of individual injection parameters and component designs. Measurements of the fuel spray flow field, spray penetration, spray tip velocity, spray angle, spray structure, droplet accumulation, and droplet size estimates are shown. Measurement campaign in a running optically accessible large-bore medium-speed engine was also carried out. The results from engine tests were compared with equivalent test rig measurements, as well as computational results, to evaluate the level of understanding of sprays. It was shown that transient spray has an acceleration and a deceleration phase. Successive flow field measurements (PIV) in optically dense diesel spray resulted in local and average velocity data of diesel sprays. Processing fuel spray generates a flow field to surrounding gas and entrainment of surrounding gas into fuel jet was also seen at the sides of the spray. Laser sheet imaging revealed the inner structure of diesel

  9. High Temperature Calcination - MACT Upgrade Equipment Pilot Plant Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard D. Boardman; B. H. O& #39; Brien; N. R. Soelberg; S. O. Bates; R. A. Wood; C. St. Michel

    2004-02-01

    About one million gallons of acidic, hazardous, and radioactive sodium-bearing waste are stored in stainless steel tanks at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is a major operating facility of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Calcination at high-temperature conditions (600 C, with alumina nitrate and calcium nitrate chemical addition to the feed) is one of four options currently being considered by the Department of Energy for treatment of the remaining tank wastes. If calcination is selected for future processing of the sodium-bearing waste, it will be necessary to install new off-gas control equipment in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) to comply with the Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards for hazardous waste combustors and incinerators. This will require, as a minimum, installing a carbon bed to reduce mercury emissions from their current level of up to 7,500 to <45 {micro}g/dscm, and a staged combustor to reduce unburned kerosene fuel in the off-gas discharge to <100 ppm CO and <10 ppm hydrocarbons. The staged combustor will also reduce NOx concentrations of about 35,000 ppm by 90-95%. A pilot-plant calcination test was completed in a newly constructed 15-cm diameter calciner vessel. The pilot-plant facility was equipped with a prototype MACT off-gas control system, including a highly efficient cyclone separator and off-gas quench/venturi scrubber for particulate removal, a staged combustor for unburned hydrocarbon and NOx destruction, and a packed activated carbon bed for mercury removal and residual chloride capture. Pilot-plant testing was performed during a 50-hour system operability test January 14-16, followed by a 100-hour high-temperature calcination pilot-plant calcination run January 19-23. Two flowsheet blends were tested: a 50-hour test with an aluminum-to-alkali metal molar ratio (AAR) of 2.25, and a 50-hour test with an AAR of 1.75. Results of the testing

  10. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Yoshihiro; Hosomi, Kenji; Otonari, Jun-ichiro.

    1997-01-01

    In the present invention, a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen to be disposed in a reactor container upon rupture of pipelines of a reactor primary coolant system is prevented from deposition of water droplets formed from a reactor container spray to suppress elevation of hydrogen concentration in the reactor container. Namely, a catalytic combustion gas concentration control system comprises a catalyst for oxidizing hydrogen and a support thereof. In addition, there is also disposed a water droplet deposition-preventing means for preventing deposition of water droplets in a reactor pressure vessel on the catalyst. Then, the effect of the catalyst upon catalytic oxidation reaction of hydrogen can be kept high. The local elevation of hydrogen concentration can be prevented even upon occurrence of such a phenomenon that various kinds of mobile forces in the container such as dry well cooling system are lost. (I.S.)

  11. Fixed automated spray technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-19

    This research project evaluated the construction and performance of Boschungs Fixed Automated : Spray Technology (FAST) system. The FAST system automatically sprays de-icing material on : the bridge when icing conditions are about to occur. The FA...

  12. Hair spray poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002705.htm Hair spray poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hair spray poisoning occurs when someone breathes in (inhales) ...

  13. Optimization of Calcine Blending During Retrieval From Binsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.D.; Mohr, C.M.; Nelson, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents a study performed during advanced feasibility studies for the INTEC Technology Development Facility (ITDF). The study was commissioned to provide information about functional requirements for the ITDF related to development of equipment and procedures for retrieving radioactive calcine from binset storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Calcine will be retrieved prior to treating it for permanent disposal in a national repository for high level waste. The objective this study was to estimate the degree of homogenization of the calcine that might be achieved through optimized retrieval and subsequent blending. Such homogenization has the potential of reducing the costs for treatment of the calcine and for qualifying of the final waste forms for acceptance at the repository. Results from the study indicate that optimized retrieval and blending can reduce the peak c oncentration variations of key components (Al, Zr, F) in blended batches of retrieved calcine. During un-optimized retrieval these variations are likely to be 81-138% while optimized retrieval can reduce them to the 5-10% range

  14. Optimization of Calcine Blending During Retrieval From Binsets; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.D.; Mohr, C.M.; Nelson, L.O.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents a study performed during advanced feasibility studies for the INTEC Technology Development Facility (ITDF). The study was commissioned to provide information about functional requirements for the ITDF related to development of equipment and procedures for retrieving radioactive calcine from binset storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Calcine will be retrieved prior to treating it for permanent disposal in a national repository for high level waste. The objective this study was to estimate the degree of homogenization of the calcine that might be achieved through optimized retrieval and subsequent blending. Such homogenization has the potential of reducing the costs for treatment of the calcine and for qualifying of the final waste forms for acceptance at the repository. Results from the study indicate that optimized retrieval and blending can reduce the peak c oncentration variations of key components (Al, Zr, F) in blended batches of retrieved calcine. During un-optimized retrieval these variations are likely to be 81-138% while optimized retrieval can reduce them to the 5-10% range

  15. Optimization of Calcine Blending During Retrieval from Binsets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Lee Orville; Mohr, Charles Milton; Taylor, Dean Dalton

    2000-01-01

    This report documents a study performed during advanced feasibility studies for the INTEC Technology Development Facility (ITDF). The study was commissioned to provide information about functional requirements for the ITDF related to development of equipment and procedures for retrieving radioactive calcine from binset storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Calcine will be retrieved prior to treating it for permanent disposal in a national repository for high level waste. The objective this study was to estimate the degree of homogenization of the calcine that might be achieved through optimized retrieval and subsequent blending. Such homogenization has the potential of reducing the costs for treatment of the calcine and for qualifying of the final waste forms for acceptance at the repository. Results from the study indicate that optimized retrieval and blending can reduce the peak concentration variations of key components (Al, Zr, F) in blended batches of retrieved calcine. During un-optimized retrieval these variations are likely to be 81-138% while optimized retrieval can reduce them to the 5-10% range

  16. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staiger, M. Daniel, Swenson, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

  17. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staiger, M. Daniel; Swenson, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    This comprehensive report provides definitive volume, mass, and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Calcine composition data are required for regulatory compliance (such as permitting and waste disposal), future treatment of the caline, and shipping the calcine to an off-Site-facility (such as a geologic repository). This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins. The Calcined Solids Storage Facilities (CSSFs) were designed by different architectural engineering firms and built at different times. Each CSSF has a unique design, reflecting varying design criteria and lessons learned from historical CSSF operation. The varying CSSF design will affect future calcine retrieval processes and equipment. Revision 4 of this report presents refinements and enhancements of calculations concerning the composition, volume, mass, chemical content, and radioactivity of calcined waste produced and stored within the CSSFs. The historical calcine samples are insufficient in number and scope of analysis to fully characterize the entire inventory of calcine in the CSSFs. Sample data exist for all the liquid wastes that were calcined. This report provides calcine composition data based on liquid waste sample analyses, volume of liquid waste calcined, calciner operating data, and CSSF operating data using several large Microsoft Excel (Microsoft 2003) databases and spreadsheets that are collectively called the Historical Processing Model. The calcine composition determined by this method compares favorably with historical calcine sample data.

  18. Remotely controlled spray gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, William C. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A remotely controlled spray gun is described in which a nozzle and orifice plate are held in precise axial alignment by an alignment member, which in turn is held in alignment with the general outlet of the spray gun by insert. By this arrangement, the precise repeatability of spray patterns is insured.

  19. Total oxidation of toluene over calcined trimetallic hydrotalcites type catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palacio, Luz A. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, IBB - Centro de Engenharia Biologica e Quimica, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Grupo Catalizadores y Adsorbentes, Universidad de Antioquia 1-317, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia); Velasquez, Juliana; Echavarria, Adriana [Grupo Catalizadores y Adsorbentes, Universidad de Antioquia 1-317, A.A. 1226 Medellin (Colombia); Faro, Arnaldo [Departamento de Fisicoquimica, Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, CT bloco A, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Ramoa Ribeiro, F. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, IBB - Centro de Engenharia Biologica e Quimica, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ribeiro, M. Filipa, E-mail: filipa.ribeiro@ist.utl.pt [Instituto Superior Tecnico, IBB - Centro de Engenharia Biologica e Quimica, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-05-15

    Two trimetallic ZnCuAl and MnCuAl hydrotalcites have been successfully synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The manganese based material was identified as a new hydrotalcite phase. Both lamellar precursors were calcined at 450 and 600 deg. C and the resulting catalysts were tested on reaction of total oxidation of toluene. The solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, N{sub 2} adsorption and H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction. It was found that ZnCuAl materials are composed of copper and zinc oxides supported on alumina; while MnCuAl ones comprise basically spinel phases, which were not completely identified. The catalytic behavior of the calcined samples showed that Mn hydrotalcite calcined at 450 deg. C exhibited the best catalytic performance that corresponds to 100% toluene conversion into CO{sub 2} at about 300 deg. C.

  20. Fluidized bed system for calcination of high level radioactive waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pande, D P; Prasad, T L; Yadgiri, N K; Theyyunni, T K [Process Engineering and Systems Development Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    During the operation of nuclear facilities significant quantities of radiochemical liquid effluents of different concentrations and varying chemical compositions are generated. These effluents contain activated radionuclides, corrosion products and fission products. The advantage of feeding the waste in solid form into the vitrifying equipment are multifold. Efforts are therefore made in many countries to calcine the high level waste, and obtain waste in the oxide form before the same is mixed with glass forming additives and fed into the melter unit. An experimental rig for fluidized bed calcination is constructed for carrying out the detailed investigation of this process, in order to adopt the same for plant scale application. To achieve better gas-solid contact and avoid raining down of solids, a distributor of bubble cap type was designed. A review of existing experience at various laboratories and design of new experimental facility for development of calciners are given. (author). 11 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Microstructural changes in porous hematite nanoparticles upon calcination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsen, Rune; Knudsen, Kenneth D.; Molenbroek, Alfons M.

    2011-01-01

    This combined study using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and adsorption isotherm techniques demonstrates radical changes in the microstructure of porous hematite (-Fe2O3) nanoparticles upon calcination in air. TEM....... The change in microstructure also causes a reduction in the surface area as calculated by gaseous adsorption. The XRPD and SANS data show that the crystallite and SANS particle sizes are virtually unchanged by calcination at 623 K. Calcination at 973 K induces a significant alteration of the sample. The XRPD...... data reveal that the crystallite size increases significantly, and the SANS and adsorption isotherm studies suggest that the specific surface area decreases by a factor of 5–6. The TEM images show that the particles are sintered into larger agglomerates, but they also show that parts of the porous...

  2. Total oxidation of toluene over calcined trimetallic hydrotalcites type catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacio, Luz A.; Velasquez, Juliana; Echavarria, Adriana; Faro, Arnaldo; Ramoa Ribeiro, F.; Ribeiro, M. Filipa

    2010-01-01

    Two trimetallic ZnCuAl and MnCuAl hydrotalcites have been successfully synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The manganese based material was identified as a new hydrotalcite phase. Both lamellar precursors were calcined at 450 and 600 deg. C and the resulting catalysts were tested on reaction of total oxidation of toluene. The solids were characterized by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, N 2 adsorption and H 2 temperature-programmed reduction. It was found that ZnCuAl materials are composed of copper and zinc oxides supported on alumina; while MnCuAl ones comprise basically spinel phases, which were not completely identified. The catalytic behavior of the calcined samples showed that Mn hydrotalcite calcined at 450 deg. C exhibited the best catalytic performance that corresponds to 100% toluene conversion into CO 2 at about 300 deg. C.

  3. Letter report: Evaluation of dryer/calciner technologies for testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevigny, G.

    1996-02-01

    This letter report describes some past experiences on the drying and calcination of radioactive materials or corresponding simulants; and the information needed from testing. The report also includes an assessment of informational needs including possible impacts to a full-scale plant. This includes reliability, maintenance, and overall size versus throughput. Much of the material was previously compiled and reported by Mike Elliott of PNL open-quotes Melter Performance Assessmentclose quotes and Larry Eisenstatt of SEG on contract to WHC in a letter to Rod Powell. Also, an annotated bibliography was prepared by Reagan Seymour of WHC. Descriptions of the drying and calciner technologies, development status, advantages and disadvantages of using a WFE or calciner, and recommendations for future testing are discussed in this report

  4. Reactor safety. Annual technical progress report, Government fiscal year 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented on LMFBR reactor safety concerning the energetics effects of sodium spray fires; sodium drop and spray burning; core debris accommodation; attenuation in containment; and attenuation in the environment

  5. Techniques for detection of transition phases in calcined alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandolfelli, V.C.; Folgueras-Dominguez, S.

    1987-01-01

    Detection of transition phases in alumina, is very important in the receiving control and calcination of aluminium hydroxide. The non alfa or transition phases difficults the processability and causes localized shrinkage on sintering compromising the dimensional and mechanical aspects of the product. In this research using refraction index, absorption of dyes, specific density, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, analyses, are done in calcined hydroxides submited to different thermal treatments. The limits and facilities of each technique are discussed and compared. (Author) [pt

  6. Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Staiger

    1999-06-01

    A potential option in the program for long-term management of high-level wastes at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, calls for retrieving calcine waste and converting it to a more stable and less dispersible form. An inventory of calcine produced during the period December 1963 to May 1999 has been prepared based on calciner run, solids storage facilities operating, and miscellaneous operational information, which gives the range of chemical compositions of calcine waste stored at INTEC. Information researched includes calciner startup data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, solids storage bin capacities, calcine storage bin distributor systems, and solids storage bin design and temperature monitoring records. Unique information on calcine solids storage facilities design of potential interest to remote retrieval operators is given.

  7. Spray drying of bead resins: feasibility tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gay, R.L.; Grantham, L.F.; Jones, L.J.

    1984-01-01

    Rockwell International has developed a volume reduction system for low-level reactor wastes based on drying the wastes in a heated-air spray dryer. The drying of slurries of sodium sulfate, boric acid, and powdered ion exchange resins was demonstrated in previous tests. The drying of bead ion exchange resins can be especially difficult due to the relatively large size of bead resins (about 500 to 800 microns) and their natural affinity for water. This water becomes part of the pore structure of the resins and normally comprises 50 t 60 wt % of the resin weight. A 76-cm-diameter spray dryer was used for feasibility tests of spray drying of cation and anion bead resins. These resins were fed to the dryer in the as-received form (similar to dewatered resins) and as slurries. A dry, free-flowing product was produced in all the tests. The volume of the spray-dried product was one-half to one-third the volume of the as-received material. An economic analysis was made of the potential cost savings that can be achieved using the Rockwel spray dryer system. In-plant costs, transportation costs, and burial costs of spray-dried resins were compared to similar costs for disposal of dewatered resins. A typical utility producing 170 m 3 (6,000 ft 3 ) per year of dewatered resins can save $600,000 to $700,000 per year using this volume reduction system

  8. Process Design Concepts for Stabilization of High Level Waste Calcine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. R. Thomas; A. K. Herbst

    2005-06-01

    The current baseline assumption is that packaging ¡§as is¡¨ and direct disposal of high level waste (HLW) calcine in a Monitored Geologic Repository will be allowed. The fall back position is to develop a stabilized waste form for the HLW calcine, that will meet repository waste acceptance criteria currently in place, in case regulatory initiatives are unsuccessful. A decision between direct disposal or a stabilization alternative is anticipated by June 2006. The purposes of this Engineering Design File (EDF) are to provide a pre-conceptual design on three low temperature processes under development for stabilization of high level waste calcine (i.e., the grout, hydroceramic grout, and iron phosphate ceramic processes) and to support a down selection among the three candidates. The key assumptions for the pre-conceptual design assessment are that a) a waste treatment plant would operate over eight years for 200 days a year, b) a design processing rate of 3.67 m3/day or 4670 kg/day of HLW calcine would be needed, and c) the performance of waste form would remove the HLW calcine from the hazardous waste category, and d) the waste form loadings would range from about 21-25 wt% calcine. The conclusions of this EDF study are that: (a) To date, the grout formulation appears to be the best candidate stabilizer among the three being tested for HLW calcine and appears to be the easiest to mix, pour, and cure. (b) Only minor differences would exist between the process steps of the grout and hydroceramic grout stabilization processes. If temperature control of the mixer at about 80„aC is required, it would add a major level of complexity to the iron phosphate stabilization process. (c) It is too early in the development program to determine which stabilizer will produce the minimum amount of stabilized waste form for the entire HLW inventory, but the volume is assumed to be within the range of 12,250 to 14,470 m3. (d) The stacked vessel height of the hot process vessels

  9. Development of design solutions for spray ponds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omel'chenko, M.P.; Minasyan, R.G.; Kranzfeld, Ja.L.; Zaruba, V.C.; Baranov, Yu.A.; Sorokin, M.Ja.; Jegorov, A.V.; Khashchina, M.V.

    1990-01-01

    The principles of process design of spray cooling systems for responsible consumers of up-to-date reactor building are discussed in this paper. Development in design principles with respect to problem solving of operational reliability increase and ecological efficiency of nuclear power equipment is shown. The structural solutions of basin antifiltration shield are spoken in detail. The results of experimental physical-mathematical and climatic studies as well as comparative tests of bituminous asphalt emulsive mastic and mushy asphalt are reported. The directions of up-to-date researches on improvement of concept of spray coolers are indicated

  10. Effects of Composition and Calcination Temperature on Photocatalytic Evolution over from Glycerol and Water Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cancan Fan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of sulfide coupled semiconductors supported on SiO2, (, was prepared by incipient wet impregnation method. The photocatalysts were characterized by XRD, XPS, TPR, and UV/Vis DRS. Characterization results show that the chemical actions between ZnS and CdS resulted in the formation of solid solutions on the surface of the support and the formation of them is affected by the molar ratio of ZnS/CdS and calcination temperature. Performance of photocatalysts was tested in the home made reactor under both UV light and solar-simulated light irradiation by detecting the rate of the photocatalytic H2 evolution from glycerol solution. The hydrogen production rates are related to the catalyst composition, surface structure, photoabsorption property, as well as the amount of solid solution. The maximum rate of hydrogen production, 550 μmol·h−1 under UV light irradiation and 210 μmol·h−1 under solar-simulated light irradiation, was obtained over Cd0.8Zn0.2S/SiO2 solid solution calcined at 723 K.

  11. Restart plan for the prototype vertical denitration calciner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-09-01

    Testing activities on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at PFP were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The Restart Plan will govern the transition of the test program from the completion of the activity based startup review; through equipment checkout and surrogate material runs; to resumption of the testing program and transition to unrestricted testing.

  12. CALCIUM OXIDE CHARACTERISTICS PREPARED FROM AMBUNTEN’S CALCINED LIMESTONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimatul Munawaroh

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium oxide (CaO and calcium carbonate (CaCO3 are widely used in industry. CaO and CaCO3 can be synthesized or derived from limestone. The purpose of this study to determine the characteristics of CaO calcined limestone from Ambunten Sumenep. Lime in calcined at 850 ° C for 6 hours. Characterization of X-ray fluorescence (XRF was conducted to determine the chemical composition of limestone, X-ray diffraction test (XRD to find the lime crystalline phase and FTIR test to determine the absorption of wave number. XRF test results showed that the limestone chemical composition consisted of Ca of 95.37% as the dominant element, Mg of 4.1%, Fe 0.17% and Y by 0.39%. The XRD test results showed that the limestone crystal phase is ankerite (Ca [Fe, Mg] [CO3] 2 and after the calcined phase calcination is vaterite (Ca [OH] 2, calcite (CaO and calcite (CaCO3. While the FTIR test results show that the CaO spectra are seen at 3741.24, 1417.12 and 874.14 cm-1.

  13. Inductive classification of operating data from a fluidized bed calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, B.H.

    1990-01-01

    A process flowsheet expert system for a fluidized bed calciner which solidifies high-level radioactive liquid waste was developed from pilot-plant data using a commercial, inductive classification program. After initial classification of the data, the resulting rules were inspected and adjusted to match existing knowledge of process chemistry. The final expert system predicts performance of process flowsheets based upon the chemical composition of the calciner feed and has been successfully used to identify potential operational problems prior to calciner pilot-plant testing of new flowsheets and to provide starting parameters for pilot-plant tests. By using inductive classification techniques to develop the initial rules from the calciner pilot-plant data and using existing process knowledge to verify the accuracy of these rules, an effective expert system was developed with a minimum amount of effort. This method may be applied for developing expert systems for other processes where numerous operating data are available and only general process chemistry effects are known

  14. Ninth Processing Campaign in the Waste Calcining Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, K.F.; Donovan, R.I.; Swenson, M.C.

    1982-04-01

    This report discusses the Ninth (and final) Processing Campaign at the Waste Calcining Facility. Several processing interruptions were experienced during this campaign and the emphasis of this report is on process and equipment performance with operating problems and corrective actions discussed in detail

  15. Physical and chemical characterization of synthetic calcined sludge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slates, R.V.; Mosley, W.C. Jr.; Tiffany, B.; Stone, J.A.

    1982-03-01

    Calcined synthetic sludge was chemically characterized in support of engineering studies to design a processing plant to solidify highly radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant. An analytical technique is described which provides quantitative data by mass spectrometric analysis of gases evolved during thermogravimetric analysis without measurements of gas flow rates or mass spectrometer sensitivities. Scanning electron microprobe analysis, Mossbauer spectroscopy, and several other common analytical methods were also used. Calcined sludge consists primarily of amorphous particles of hydrous oxides with iron, manganese, nickel, and calcium distributed fairly uniformly throughout the powder. Iron, manganese, nickel, and calcium exist in forms that are highly insoluble in water, but aluminum, sulfate, nitrate, and sodium exhibit relative water solubilities that increase in the given order from 60% to 94%. Evolved gas analysis in a helium atmosphere showed that calcined sludge is completely dehydrated by heating to 400 0 C, carbon dioxide is evolved between 100 to 700 0 C with maximum evolution at 500 0 C, and oxygen is evolved between 400 and 1000 0 C. Evolved gas analyses are also reported for uncalcined sludge. A spinel-type oxide similar to NiFe 2 O 4 was detected by x-ray diffraction analysis at very low-level in calcined sludge

  16. Calcined eggshell (CES): An efficient natural catalyst for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hydes with active methylene compounds using calcined eggshell (CES) as an efficient ... of the important reactions to achieve carbon–carbon ... solid catalyst for biodiesel production,24 as a catalyst ... which supports for adsorption of water on CaO and ... The organic phase .... After extraction of the product with ethylac-.

  17. Kinetic Study of Calcination of Jakura Limestone Using Power Rate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The calcination of Jakura limestone was also found to be first order reaction with respect to CaCO3 concentration having average regression coefficient of 0.99. The temperature dependent terms were found using Arrhenius law and it was observed that the reaction temperature has a direct effect on the rate of reaction.

  18. Effect of Calcination and Reduction Temperatures on the Reduction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2003-12-05

    Dec 5, 2003 ... the catalyst activity. The results obtained by Rathousky et al.,9 however, revealed that the pretreatment conditions had a significant effect on the catalytic properties of Co/Al2O3 and. Co/SiO2 catalysts. Turnover frequency (TOF) for the F-T reaction decreased with increasing calcination temperature for both.

  19. Restart plan for the prototype vertical denitration calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-01-01

    Testing activities on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at PFP were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The Restart Plan will govern the transition of the test program from the completion of the activity based startup review; through equipment checkout and surrogate material runs; to resumption of the testing program and transition to unrestricted testing

  20. Screening Level Risk Assessment for the New Waste Calcining Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. L. Abbott; K. N. Keck; R. E. Schindler; R. L. VanHorn; N. L. Hampton; M. B. Heiser

    1999-05-01

    This screening level risk assessment evaluates potential adverse human health and ecological impacts resulting from continued operations of the calciner at the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The assessment was conducted in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) report, Guidance for Performing Screening Level Risk Analyses at Combustion Facilities Burning Hazardous Waste. This screening guidance is intended to give a conservative estimate of the potential risks to determine whether a more refined assessment is warranted. The NWCF uses a fluidized-bed combustor to solidify (calcine) liquid radioactive mixed waste from the INTEC Tank Farm facility. Calciner off volatilized metal species, trace organic compounds, and low-levels of radionuclides. Conservative stack emission rates were calculated based on maximum waste solution feed samples, conservative assumptions for off gas partitioning of metals and organics, stack gas sampling for mercury, and conservative measurements of contaminant removal (decontamination factors) in the off gas treatment system. Stack emissions were modeled using the ISC3 air dispersion model to predict maximum particulate and vapor air concentrations and ground deposition rates. Results demonstrate that NWCF emissions calculated from best-available process knowledge would result in maximum onsite and offsite health and ecological impacts that are less then EPA-established criteria for operation of a combustion facility.

  1. Criticality safety analysis of a calciner exit chute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haught, C.F.; Basoglu, B.; Brewer, R.W.; Hollenback, D.F.; Wilkinson, A.D.; Dodds, H.L.

    1994-01-01

    Calcination of uranyl nitrate into uranium oxide is part of normal operations of some enrichment plants. Typically, a calciner discharges uranium oxide powder (U 3 O 8 ) into an exit chute that directs the powder into a receiving can located in a glove box. One possible scenario for a criticality accident is the exit chute becoming blocked with powder near its discharge. The blockage restricts the flow of powder causing the exit chute to become filled with the powder. If blockage does occur, the height of the powder could reach a level that would not be safe from a criticality point of view. In this analysis, the subcritical height limit is examined for 98% enriched U 3 O 8 in the exit chute with full water reflection and optimal water moderation. The height limit for ensuring criticality safety during such an accumulation is 28.2 cm above the top of the discharge pipe at the bottom of the chute. Chute design variations are also evaluated with full water reflection and optimal water moderation. Subcritical configurations for the exit chute variation are developed, but the configurations are not safe when combined with the calciner. To ensure criticality safety, modifications must be made to the calciner tube or safety measures must be implemented if these designs are to be utilized with 98% enriched material. A geometrically safe configuration for the exit chute is developed for a blockage of 20% enriched powder with full water reflection and optimal water moderation, and this configuration is safe when combined with the existing calciner

  2. In Vitro Studies Evaluating Leaching of Mercury from Mine Waste Calcine Using Simulated Human Body Fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, John E.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Morman, Suzette A.; Higueras, Pablo L.; Crock, James G.; Lowers, Heather A.; Witten, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro bioaccessibility (IVBA) studies were carried out on samples of mercury (Hg) mine-waste calcine (roasted Hg ore) by leaching with simulated human body fluids. The objective was to estimate potential human exposure to Hg due to inhalation of airborne calcine particulates and hand-to-mouth ingestion of Hg-bearing calcines. Mine waste calcines collected from Hg mines at Almad?n, Spain, and Terlingua, Texas, contain Hg sulfide, elemental Hg, and soluble Hg compounds, which constitute prim...

  3. High-T/sub c/ oxide superconductors prepared by spray-drying method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, N.; Nakano, T.; Goth, S.; Shimotomai, M.

    1988-01-01

    A spray-drying method has been worked out to prepare the superconducting oxide YBa/sub 2/Cu/sub 3/O/sub x/ by using aqueous solution of acetates of the component metals. Spray-dried powders have shown to be very reactive and full calcination has been easily attained at 900 0 C for 12 hrs. The density of the ceramics sintered at 950 0 C for 12 hrs has reached a value of 98% of the theoretical density. The resistivity of the spray-dry processed sample is 150μΩ-cm at the onset temperature and the residual resistivity extrapolated to O K is almost zero. It is also found that degradation of the superconducting state by application of magnetic field is much improved for the spray-dry processed samples

  4. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. D. Staiger

    2007-06-01

    This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

  5. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, K.G.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to auxiliary means of cooling the nuclear fuel clusters used in light or heavy water cooled nuclear reactors. One method is to provide one or more spray cooling tubes. From holes in the side walls of those tubes coolant water may be sprayed laterally into the cluster against the rods. The flow of main coolant may thus be supplemented or even replaced by the auxiliary coolant. A difficulty, however, is that only those fuel rods close to a spray cooling tube can readily be reached by the auxiliary coolant. In the arrangement described, where the fuel rods are spaced apart by transverse grids, at least one of the interspaces between the grids is provided with an axially extending auxiliary coolant conduit having lateral holes through which an auxiliary coolant is sprayed into the cluster. A deflector is provided that extends from a transverse grid into a position in front of the holes and deflects auxiliary coolant on to parts of the fuel rods otherwise inaccessible to the auxiliary coolant. The construction of the deflector is described. (U.K.)

  6. Doped nanocrystalline ZnO powders for non-linear resistor applications by spray pyrolysis method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembram, Kaliyan; Vijay, R; Rao, Y S; Rao, T N

    2009-07-01

    Homogeneous and doped nanocrystalline ZnO powders (30-200 nm) were synthesized by spray pyrolysis technique. The spray pyrolysed powders were calcined in the temperature range of 500-750 degrees C. Formation of insulating pyrochlore phase started from 700 degrees C during the calcination itself. The calcined powders were compacted and sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900-1200 degrees C for 0.5-4 h. The densification behavior was found to be dependent on calcination temperature of the nanopowder. The resulting discs were found to have density (5.34-5.62 g/cc) in the range of 96-99% of theoretical density. The breakdown voltage value obtained for the nanopowder based non-linear resistor is 10.3 kV/cm with low leakage current density of 0.7 microA/cm2 and coefficient of nonlinearity as high as 193. The activation energy for grain growth of the doped ZnO nanopowder powders is 449.4 +/- 15 kJ/mol.

  7. Corrosion monitoring of storage bins for radioactive calcines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, T.L.

    1975-01-01

    Highly radioactive liquid waste produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant is calcined to a granular solid for long term storage in stainless steel bins. Corrosion evaluation of coupons withdrawn from these bins indicates excellent performance for the materials of construction of the bins. At exposure periods of up to six years the average penetration rates are 0.01 and 0.05 mils per year for Types 304 and 405 stainless steels, respectively. (auth)

  8. Improvements in or relating to calcining reducible compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cole, E.A.; Peterson, R.S.

    1974-01-01

    Apparatus is described for calcining compounds of uranium compounds to temperatures of up to about 1000 0 C to produce UO 2 powders of uniform quality and having an oxygen content of less than 2.2 atoms of oxygen per atom of uranium. The apparatus comprises discharge and cooling means having an inlet end operatively joined with an air tight seal to a rotating Kiln to receive hot UO 2 powder therefrom without contact with air. (author)

  9. Leaching properties and chemical compositions of calcines produced at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Paige, B.E.; Rhodes, D.W.; Wilding, M.W.

    1980-01-01

    No significant chemical differences were determined between retrieved and fresh calcine based on chemical and spectrochemical analyses. Little can be derived from the amounts of the radioisotopes present in the retrieved calcine samples other than the ratios of strontium-90 to cesium-137 are typical of aged fission product. The variations in concentrations of radionuclides within the composite samples of each bin also reflect the differences in compositions of waste solutions calcined. In general the leaching characteristics of both calcines by distilled water are similar. In both materials the radionuclides of cesium and strontium were selectively leached at significant rates, although cesium leached much more completely from the alumina calcine than from the zirconia calcine. Cesium and strontium are probably contained in both calcines as nitrate salts and also as fluoride salts in zirconia calcine, all of which are at least slightly soluble in water. Radionuclides of cerium, ruthenium, and plutonium in both calcines were highly resistant to leaching and leached at rates similar to or less than those of the matrix elements. These elements exist as polyvalent metal ions in the waste solutions before calcination and they probably form insoluble oxides and fluorides in the calcine. The relatively slow leaching of nitrate ion from zirconia calcine and radiocesium from both calcines suggests that the calcine matrix in some manner prevents complete or immediate contact of the soluble ions with water. Whether radiostrontium forms slightly fluoride salts or forms nitrate salts which are protected in the same manner as radiocesium is unknown. Nevertheless, selective leaching of cesium and strontim is retarded in some manner by the calcine matrix

  10. Interim status of vertical calciner testing through calendar year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compton, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    A prototype vertical calciner was constructed and tested for use in converting plutonium solutions to dry plutonium dioxide in the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant. Six non-radioactive runs were completed in June and July, 1995. Fourteen runs with plutonium nitrate solutions were completed between September, 1995 and August, 1996. Equipment modifications were made following those runs. The test runs with plutonium have converted 62.3 L of feed solution containing 11.1 kg of plutonium into dry plutonium dioxide containing 8.5 kg of plutonium. The decrease in product plutonium content is primarily due to plutonium accumulation within the calciner powder bed from particle compaction. Nine of the eleven product batches have had Losses On Ignition that met the storage criterion of less than 0.5 weight percent at 950 C. The highest Loss On Ignition found was 0.718 weight percent. Initial problems with agitator shaft binding and breakage of bushings have been eliminated. A feed pump control problem has been found and the pump replaced. Improvement in scrubber efficiency is needed. Future runs are planned to confirm that (1) the remainder of product meets the Loss On Ignition criterion, (2) the replacement feedpump works as needed, and (3) the scrubber efficiency improves. The operating staff for the production calciner may also be observing the prototype's runs to gain familiarity with the process and equipment

  11. Synthesis of type A zeolite from calcinated kaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, E.C.; Neves, R.F.; Souza, J.A.S.; Moraes, C.G.; Macedo, E.N.

    2011-01-01

    The mineral production has caused great concern in environmental and industrial scenario due to the effects caused to the environment. The industries of processing kaolin for paper are important economically for the state of Para, but produce huge quantities of tailings, which depend on large areas to be stocked. This material is rich in silico-aluminates can be recycled and used as raw material for other industries. The objective is to synthesize zeolite A at different temperatures of calcination and synthesis. The starting materials and synthesis of zeolite A have been identified and characterized through analysis of X-ray diffraction (DRX) and scanning electron microscopy (MEV). The synthesis process of zeolite A, using as source of silica and the aluminum metakaolin, which was calcined at temperatures of 700 ° C and 800 ° C for 2 hours of landing in a burning furnace type muffle. Observed in relation to the calcination of kaolin as the main phase, the metakaolin. This is just a removal of water from its structure, so we opted for the lower temperature, less energy consumption. The synthesis process of zeolite A, produced good results for the formation of zeolites type A, which were characterized with high purities. (author)

  12. Cold spray nozzle design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Jeffrey D [Stuart, FL; Sanders, Stuart A [Palm Beach Gardens, FL

    2009-06-09

    A nozzle for use in a cold spray technique is described. The nozzle has a passageway for spraying a powder material, the passageway having a converging section and a diverging section, and at least the diverging section being formed from polybenzimidazole. In one embodiment of the nozzle, the converging section is also formed from polybenzimidazole.

  13. Characterization of norm sources in petroleum coke calcining processes - 16314

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamilton, Ian S.; Halter, Donald A.; Fruchtnicht, Erich H.; Arno, Matthew G.; Haumann, Donald F

    2009-01-01

    Petroleum coke, or 'petcoke', is a waste by-product of the oil refining industry. The majority of petcoke consumption is in energy applications; catalyst coke is used as refinery fuel, anode coke for electricity conduction, and marketable coke for heating cement kilns. Roskill has predicted that long-term growth in petroleum coke production will be maintained, and may continue to increase slightly through 2012. Petcoke must first be calcined to drive off any undesirable petroleum by-products that would shorten the coke product life cycle. As an example, the calcining process can take place in large, rotary kilns heated to maximum temperatures as high as approximately 1400-1540 deg. C. The kilns and combustion/settling chambers, as well as some cooler units, are insulated with refractory bricks and other, interstitial materials, e.g., castable refractory materials, to improve the efficiency of the calcining process. The bricks are typically made of 70-85-percent bauxite, and are slowly worn away by the calcining process; bricks used to line the combustion chambers wear away, as well, but at a slower rate. It has been recognized that the refractory materials contain slight amounts of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) from the uranium- and thorium-decay series. Similarly, low levels of NORM could be present in the petcoke feed stock given the nature of its origin. Neither the petcoke nor the refractory bricks represent appreciable sources of radiation or radioactive waste. However, some of the demolished bricks that have been removed from service because of the aforementioned wearing process have caused portal alarms to activate at municipal disposal facilities. This has lead to the current investigation into whether there is a NORM concentrating mechanism facilitated by the presence of the slightly radioactive feed stock in the presence of the slightly radioactive refractory materials, at calcining-zone temperatures. Research conducted to date has been

  14. The influence of calcination on the physical and chemical properties of petroleum and mixed cokes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, K; Syrek, H

    1980-01-01

    Freshly prepared petroleum and coal-petroleum cokes, before utilization for the production of various materials, are subjected to calcining--thermal treatment in a neutral or reducing atmosphere without the admission of air at less than or equal to 1400/sup 0/. During calcining, stabilization of the physical and chemical properties of the cokes takes place. The properties of the obtained coke depend chiefly on the calcining time and temperature. During calcining, volatile substances are removed almost completely from the coke; the coke density is increased, and its structure is put in order; the electrical conductivity is improved; the mechanical strength is increased; and the reactivity of the coke is decreased. Laboratory studies were conducted on calcining mixed coal-petroleum cokes of two grades at 1200, 1250, and 1300/sup 0/ for 2-6 h. In the calcining products the content of volatile substances, the ash content, S content, and density were determined. It was ascertained that calcining of mixed coal-petroleum cokes goes analogously to calcining of pure petroleum cokes. Raising the temperature and increasing the time of calcining has a substantial effect on improvement of coke physical and chemical properties. For high-quality coke, calcining is to be carried out at greater than or equal to 1300/sup 0/ for 4-6 h, for ordinary coke at > 1200/sup 0/ and greater than or equal to 4 h. The results are regarded as starting data for an industrial study of the calcining process.

  15. Electrostatically atomised hydrocarbon sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yule, A.J.; Shrimpton, J.S.; Watkins, A.P.; Balachandran, W.; Hu, D. [UMIST, Manchester (United Kingdom). Thermofluids Division, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1995-07-01

    A burner using an electrostatic method to produce and control a fuel spray is investigated for non-burning sprays. The burner has a charge injection nozzle and the liquid flow rate and charge injection rate are varied using hydrocarbon liquids of differing viscosities, surface tensions and electrical conductivities (kerosene, white spirit and diesel oil). Droplet size distributions are measured and it is shown how the dropsize, spray pattern, breakup mechanism and breakup length depend on the above variables, and in particular on the specific charge achieved in the spray. The data are valuable for validating two computer models under development. One predicts the electric field and flow field inside the nozzle as a function of emitter potential, geometry and flow rate. The other predicts the effect of charge on spray dispersion, with a view to optimizing spray combustion. It is shown that electrostatic disruptive forces can be used to atomize oils at flow rates commensurate with practical combustion systems and that the charge injection technique is particularly suitable for highly resistive liquids. Possible limitations requiring further research include the need to control the wide spray angle, which may provide fuel-air mixtures too lean near the nozzle, and the need to design for maximum charge injection rate, which is thought to be limited by corona breakdown in the gas near the nozzle orifice. 30 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz Abd Malek, Muhamad; Hayati Saad, Nor; Kiyai Abas, Sunhaji; Mohd Shah, Noriyati

    2013-06-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  17. Thermal Arc Spray Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malek, Muhamad Hafiz Abd; Saad, Nor Hayati; Abas, Sunhaji Kiyai; Shah, Noriyati Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Usage of protective coating for corrosion protection was on highly demand during the past decade; and thermal spray coating played a major part during that time. In recent years, the thermal arc spray coating becomes a popular coating. Many big players in oil and gas such as PETRONAS, EXXON MOBIL and SHELL in Malaysia tend to use the coating on steel structure as a corrosion protection. Further developments in coating processes, the devices, and raw materials have led to expansion of functional coatings and applications scope from conventional coating to specialized industries. It is widely used because of its ability to withstand high process temperature, offer advantages in efficiency, lower cost and acts as a corrosion protection. Previous research also indicated that the thermal arc spray offers better coating properties compared to other methods of spray. This paper reviews some critical area of thermal spray coating by discussing the process/parameter of thermal arc spray technology and quality control of coating. Coating performance against corrosion, wear and special characteristic of coating are also described. The field application of arc spray technology are demonstrated and reviewed.

  18. Proposed Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. 99Mo waste calcination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramey, D.W.; Haas, P.A.; Malkemus, D.W.; McGinnis, C.P.; Meyers, E.S.; Patton, B.D.; Birdwell, J.F.; Jubin, R.T.; Coltharp, K.A.

    1994-10-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), at its Chalk River Laboratory, generates from 3000 to 5000 L/year of high-level fissile waste solution from the production of 99 Mo. In this Mo process, highly enriched uranium (93 wt % 235 U, total uranium basis) contained in uranium-aluminum alloy target rods is irradiated to produce the 99 Mo product. The targets are removed from the reactor and dissolved in a mercury nitrate-catalyzed reaction with nitric acid. The 99 Mo product is then recovered by passing the solution through an alumina (Al 2 O 3 ) column. During discussions with personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 10, 1992, the ORNL-developed technology formerly applied to the solidification of aqueous uranium waste (Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Program or CEUSP) was judged potentially applicable to the AECL 99 Mo waste. Under a Work-for-Others contract (no. ERD-92-1132), which began May 24, 1993, ORNL was tasked to determine the feasibility of applying the CEUSP (or a similar) calcination process to solidify AECL's 99 Mo waste for > 30 years of safe dry storage. This study was to provide sufficient detailed information on the applicability of a CEUSP-type waste solidification process to allow AECL to select the process which best suited its needs. As with the CEUSP process, evaporation of the waste and a simultaneously partial destruction of acid by reaction with formaldehyde followed by in situ waste can thermal denitration waste was chosen as the best means of solidification. Unlike the CEUSP material, the 99 Mo waste has a considerable number of problem volatile and semivolatile constituents which must be recovered in the off-gas treatment system. Mercury removal before calcination was seen as the best option

  19. Role of Mg{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}CO{sub 3} on the physical–chemical properties and cyclic CO{sub 2} capture performance of dolomite by two-step calcination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ke; Han, Dongtai, E-mail: handongtai@cumt.edu.cn; Zhao, Pengfei, E-mail: zhaopfcumt@163.com; Hu, Xiumeng; Yin, Zeguang; Wu, Di

    2015-08-20

    Highlights: • Two-step calcination treated dolomite sorbent was prepared and characterized. • An intermediate phase (Mg{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}CO{sub 3}) was observed by TG and XRD results. • Mg-calcite hindered the de-mixing of Ca and Mg. • Smaller grains, larger specific surface area and pore volume were obtained. • This favorable structure resulted in a high and stable CO{sub 2} capture performance. - Abstract: Two-step calcination (CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} atmospheres) was used to modify the microstructure of natural dolomite for high-temperature CO{sub 2} capture. Two other one-step calcinations (CO{sub 2} or N{sub 2} atmosphere) were provided for comparison. Different morphological characterizations (thermal decomposition, phase composition, morphology, and nitrogen adsorption) were performed, followed by an analysis of 30 carbonation/calcination cycles in a fixed bed reactor. During primary calcination in a CO{sub 2} atmosphere, an intermediate phase (Mg{sub x}Ca{sub 1−x}CO{sub 3}) was observed by TG and XRD results, which hindered the de-mixing of CaO and MgO in the secondary calcination in a N{sub 2} atmosphere. Therefore, two-step calcination produced smaller grains (CaO: 45.2 nm; MgO: 32.6 nm), larger specific surface area (21.08 m{sup 2}/g) and pore volume (0.082 cm{sup 3}/g) and uniform distribution of CaO and MgO, which resulted in a higher and more stable uptake of CO{sub 2} compared to the results from one-step calcinations.

  20. Calcination of Rod-like Hydroxyapatite Nanocrystals with an Anti-sintering Agent Surrounding the Crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, M.; Furuzono, T.

    2007-01-01

    Sintering-free nanocrystals of calcined hydroxyapatite (HAp) having a rod-like morphology were fabricated by calcination at 800 deg. C for 1 h with an anti-sintering agent surrounding original HAp particles and the agent was subsequently removed after calcination. The original HAp particles having a rod-like morphology with a size ranging from 30 to 80 nm (short axis) and 300 to 500 nm (long axis) were prepared by wet chemical process, and poly(acrylic acid, calcium salt) (PAA-Ca) was used as the anti-sintering agent. In the case of calcination without additives, the mean size of HAp crystals dispersed in an ethanol medium increased by about 4 times and the specific surface area of the crystals exhibited a 25% decrease compared to those of the original HAp particles because of calcination-induced sintering among the crystals. On the other hand, the HAp crystals calcined with the anti-sintering agent, PAA-Ca, could be dispersed in an ethanol medium at the same size as the original particles, and they preserved the specific surface area after calcination. These results indicate that PAA-Ca and/or its thermally decomposed product, CaO, surrounded the HAp particles and protected them against calcination-induced sintering during calcination. The HAp crystals calcined with PAA-Ca showed high crystallinity, and no other calcium phosphate phases could be detected after washing with water

  1. Remote process connectors for the new waste calcining facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobs, R.T.; Carter, J.A.; Hohback, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    The remote process connectors developed, used, and tested at the Remote Maintenance Development Facility are described. These connectors, including the three-bolt kinematic-graphite flange and watertight electrical connectors, are assembled on master jigs (holding-welding fixture) to form interchangeable pump and valve loop assemblies. These assemblies, with their guide-in platforms, make possible a method of performing remote maintenance at the New Waste Calcining Facility which is a departure from methods that until now have been the standard of the industry

  2. Dynamics of flare sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hansen, R.T.

    1980-01-01

    During solar cycle No. 20 new insight into the flare-spray phenomenon has been attained due to several innovations in solar optical-observing techniques (higher spatial resolution cinema-photography, tunable pass-band filters, multi-slit spectroscopy and extended angular field coronographs). From combined analysis of 13 well-observed sprays which occured between 1969-1974 we conclude that (i) the spray material originates from a preexisting active region filament which undergoes increased absorption some tens of minutes prior to the abrupt chromospheric brightening at the 'flare-start', and (ii) the spray material is confined within a steadily expanding, loop-shaped (presumably magnetically controlled) envelope with part of the material draining back down along one or both legs of the loop. (orig.)

  3. Triamcinolone Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... class of medications called corticosteroids. It works by blocking the release of certain natural substances that cause ... 5 sprays into the air away from the face. If you have not used it for 2 ...

  4. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... class of medications called corticosteroids. It works by blocking the release of certain natural substances that cause ... your thumb. Point the applicator away from your face. If you are using the spray for the ...

  5. Flunisolide Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... class of medications called corticosteroids. It works by blocking the release of certain natural substances that cause ... your thumb. Point the applicator away from your face. If you are using the spray for the ...

  6. ROTARY SPRAY DUSTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Nechaeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of researches of hydraulic resistance, ablation of splashes and efficiency of dedusting in the rotor spray dust collector are given. Influence of frequency of rotation of the spray, the specified speed of gas and diameter of spattering holes on hydraulic resistance, size ablation of splashes and efficiency of a dedusting the device by diameter 0,25 m is investigated. As model liquid water is used. Results of mathematical processing are presented.

  7. BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yano, Ryoichi; Sato, Takashi; Osaki, Masahiko; Hirayama, Fumio; Watabe, Atsushi.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To effectively eliminate radioactive substances released upon loss of coolant accidents in BWR type reactors. Constitution: A high pressure gas jetting device having a plurality of small aperture nozzles is provided above a spray nozzle, that is, at the top of a dry well. The jetting device is connected to a vacuum breaker provided in a pressure suppression chamber. Upon loss of coolant accident, coolants are sprayed from the spray nozzle and air or nitrogen is jetted from the gas jetting device as well. Then, the gases in the dry well are disturbed, whereby radioactive iodine at high concentration liable to be accumulated in the dry well is forced downwardly, dissolved in the spray water and eliminated. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. Retrieval System for Calcined Waste for the Idaho Cleanup Project - 12104

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eastman, Randy L.; Johnston, Beau A.; Lower, Danielle E. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC. The Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01

    This paper describes the conceptual approach to retrieve radioactive calcine waste, hereafter called calcine, from stainless steel storage bins contained within concrete vaults. The retrieval system will allow evacuation of the granular solids (calcine) from the storage bins through the use of stationary vacuum nozzles. The nozzles will use air jets for calcine fluidization and will be able to rotate and direct the fluidization or displacement of the calcine within the bin. Each bin will have a single retrieval system installed prior to operation to prevent worker exposure to the high radiation fields. The addition of an articulated camera arm will allow for operations monitoring and will be equipped with contingency tools to aid in calcine removal. Possible challenges (calcine bridging and rat-holing) associated with calcine retrieval and transport, including potential solutions for bin pressurization, calcine fluidization and waste confinement, are also addressed. The Calcine Disposition Project has the responsibility to retrieve, treat, and package HLW calcine. The calcine retrieval system has been designed to incorporate the functions and technical characteristics as established by the retrieval system functional analysis. By adequately implementing the highest ranking technical characteristics into the design of the retrieval system, the system will be able to satisfy the functional requirements. The retrieval system conceptual design provides the means for removing bulk calcine from the bins of the CSSF vaults. Top-down vacuum retrieval coupled with an articulating camera arm will allow for a robust, contained process capable of evacuating bulk calcine from bins and transporting it to the processing facility. The system is designed to fluidize, vacuum, transport and direct the calcine from its current location to the CSSF roof-top transport lines. An articulating camera arm, deployed through an adjacent access riser, will work in conjunction with the

  9. Precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and calcination to plutonium oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, A.; Orosco, E.H.; Cassaniti, P.; Greco, L.; Adelfang, P.

    1989-01-01

    The plutonium based fuel fabrication requires the conversion of the plutonium nitrate solution from nuclear fuel reprocessing into pure PuO2. The conversion method based on the precipitation of plutonium (III) oxalate and subsequent calcination has been studied in detail. In this procedure, plutonium (III) oxalate is precipitated, at room temperature, by the slow addition of 1M oxalic acid to the feed solution, containing from 5-100 g/l of plutonium in 1M nitric acid. Before precipitation, the plutonium is adjusted to trivalent state by addition of 1M ascorbic acid in the presence of an oxidation inhibitor such as hydrazine. Finally, the precipitate is calcinated at 700 deg C to obtain PuO2. A flowsheet is proposed in this paper including: a) A study about the conditions to adjust the plutonium valence. b) Solubility data of plutonium (III) oxalate and measurements of plutonium losses to the filtrate and wash solution. c) Characterization of the obtained products. Plutonium (III) oxalate has several potential advantages over similar conversion processes. These include: 1) Formation of small particle sizes powder with good pellets fabrication characteristics. 2) The process is rather insensitive to most process variables, except nitric acid concentration. 3) Ambient temperature operations. 4) The losses of plutonium to the filtrate are less than in other conversion processes. (Author) [es

  10. Chloride Ingress in Chemically Activated Calcined Clay-Based Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Mwiti Marangu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloride-laden environments pose serious durability concerns in cement based materials. This paper presents the findings of chloride ingress in chemically activated calcined Clay-Ordinary Portland Cement blended mortars. Results are also presented for compressive strength development and porosity tests. Sampled clays were incinerated at a temperature of 800°C for 4 hours. The resultant calcined clay was blended with Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC at replacement level of 35% by mass of OPC to make test cement labeled PCC35. Mortar prisms measuring 40 mm × 40 mm × 160 mm were cast using PCC35 with 0.5 M Na2SO4 solution as a chemical activator instead of water. Compressive strength was determined at 28th day of curing. As a control, OPC, Portland Pozzolana Cement (PPC, and PCC35 were similarly investigated without use of activator. After the 28th day of curing, mortar specimens were subjected to accelerated chloride ingress, porosity, compressive strength tests, and chloride profiling. Subsequently, apparent diffusion coefficients (Dapp were estimated from solutions to Fick’s second law of diffusion. Compressive strength increased after exposure to the chloride rich media in all cement categories. Chemically activated PCC35 exhibited higher compressive strength compared to nonactivated PCC35. However, chemically activated PCC35 had the least gain in compressive strength, lower porosity, and lower chloride ingress in terms of Dapp, compared to OPC, PPC, and nonactivated PCC35.

  11. Fluidized-bed calcination of simulated commercial high-level radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeby, W.A.

    1975-11-01

    Work is in progress at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant to verify process flowsheets for converting simulated commercial high-level liquid wastes to granular solids using the fluidized-bed calcination process. Primary emphasis in the series of runs reported was to define flowsheets for calcining simulated Allied-General Nuclear Services (AGNS) waste and to evaluate product properties significant to calcination, solids storage, or post treatment. Pilot-plant studies using simulated high-level acid wastes representative of those to be produced by Nuclear Fuel Services, Inc. (NFS) are also included. Combined AGNS high-level and intermediate-level waste (0.26 M Na in blend) was successfully calcined when powdered iron was added (to result in a Na/Fe mole ratio of 1.0) to the feed to prevent particle agglomeration due to sodium nitrate. Long-term runs (approximately 100 hours) showed that calcination of the combined waste is practical. Concentrated AGNS waste containing sodium at concentrations less than 0.2 M were calcined successfully; concentrated waste containing 1.13 M Na calcined successfully when powdered iron was added to the feed to suppress sodium nitrate formation. Calcination of dilute AGNS waste by conventional fluid-bed techniques was unsuccessful due to the inability to control bed particle size--both particle size and bed level decreased. Fluid-bed solidification of AGNS dilute waste at conditions in which most of the calcined solids left the calciner vessel with the off-gas was successful. In such a concept, the steady-state composition of the bed material would be approximately 22 wt percent calcined solids deposited on inert particles. Calcination of simulated NFS acid waste indicated that solidification by the fluid-bed process is feasible

  12. 46 CFR 148.04-17 - Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above. 148.04-17...-17 Petroleum coke, calcined, at 130 °F or above. (a) The requirements of this part do not apply to bulk shipments of petroleum coke, calcined, on any vessel when the material is less than 130 °F. (b...

  13. Continuous plutonium(IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination process. [From product streams from Redox, Purex, or Recuplex solvent extraction plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beede, R L

    1956-09-27

    A continuous plutonium (IV) oxalate precipitation, filtration, and calcination process has been developed. Continuous and batch decomposition of the oxalate in the filtrates has been demonstrated. The processes have been demonstrated in prototype equipment. Plutonium (IV) oxalate was precipitated continuously at room temperature by the concurrent addition of plutonium (IV) nitrate feed and oxalic acid into the pan of a modified rotary drum filter. The plutonium (IV) oxalate was calcined to plutonium dioxide, which could be readily hydrofluorinated. Continuous decomposition of the oxalate in synthetic plutonium (IV) oxalate filtrates containing plutonium (IV) oxalate solids was demonstrated using co-current flow in a U-shaped reactor. Feeds containing from 10 to 100 g/1 Pu, as plutonium (IV) nitrate, and 1.0 to 6.5 M HNO/sub 3/, respectively, can be processed. One molar oxalic acid is used as the precipitant. Temperatures of 20 to 35/sup 0/C for the precipitation and filtration are satisfactory. Plutonium (IV) oxalate can be calcined at 300 to 400/sup 0/C in a screw-type drier-calciner to plutonium dioxide and hydrofluorinated at 450 to 550/sup 0/C. Plutonium dioxide exceeding purity requirements has been produced in the prototype equipment. Advantages of continuous precipitation and filtration are: uniform plutonium (IV) oxalate, improved filtration characteristics, elimination of heating and cooling facilities, and higher capacities through a single unit. Advantages of the screw-type drier-calciner are the continuous production of an oxide satisfactory for feed for the proposed plant vibrating tube hydrofluorinator, and ease of coupling continuous precipitation and filtration to this proposed hydrofluorinator. Continuous decomposition of oxalate in filtrates offers advantages in decreasing filtrate storage requirements when coupled to a filtrate concentrator. (JGB)

  14. Spray pond piping made from fiberglass-reinforced thermosetting resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    A method is presented for implementing requirements pertaining to the design, fabrication, and testing of fiberglass-reinforced thermosetting resin piping for spray pond applications. These requirements are given in 10 CFR Part 50, Section 50.55a and Apppendix A, Criterion 1. This guide applies to both light-water-cooled and gas-cooled reactors. Input has been provided by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards

  15. In vitro studies evaluating leaching of mercury from mine waste calcine using simulated human body fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, John E.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Morman, Suzette A.; Higueras, Pablo L.; Crock, James G.; Lowers, Heather A.; Witten, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro bioaccessibility (IVBA) studies were carried out on samples of mercury (Hg) mine-waste calcine (roasted Hg ore) by leaching with simulated human body fluids. The objective was to estimate potential human exposure to Hg due to inhalation of airborne calcine particulates and hand-to-mouth ingestion of Hg-bearing calcines. Mine waste calcines collected from Hg mines at Almadén, Spain, and Terlingua, Texas, contain Hg sulfide, elemental Hg, and soluble Hg compounds, which constitute primary ore or compounds formed during Hg retorting. Elevated leachate Hg concentrations were found during calcine leaching using a simulated gastric fluid (as much as 6200 μg of Hg leached/g sample). Elevated Hg concentrations were also found in calcine leachates using a simulated lung fluid (as much as 9200 μg of Hg leached/g), serum-based fluid (as much as 1600 μg of Hg leached/g), and water of pH 5 (as much as 880 μg of Hg leached/g). The leaching capacity of Hg is controlled by calcine mineralogy; thus, calcines containing soluble Hg compounds contain higher leachate Hg concentrations. Results indicate that ingestion or inhalation of Hg mine-waste calcine may lead to increased Hg concentrations in the human body, especially through the ingestion pathway.

  16. Experimental study on the effect of calcination on the volcanic ash activity of diatomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Liguang; Pang, Bo

    2017-09-01

    The volcanic ash activity of diatomite was studied under the conditions of aerobic calcination and vacuum calcination by the combined water rate method, it was characterized by XRD, BET and SEM. The results showed that the volcanic ash activity of diatomite under vacuum conditions was higher than that of aerobic calcination, 600°C vacuum calcination 2h, the combined water rate of diatomite-Ca(OH)2-H2O system was increased from 6.24% to 71.43%, the volcanic ash activity reached the maximum value, the specific surface

  17. Continuous spray forming of functionally gradient materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKechnie, T.N.; Richardson, E.H.

    1995-01-01

    Researchers at Plasma Processes Inc. have produced a Functional Gradient Material (FGM) through advanced vacuum plasma spray processing for high heat flux applications. Outlined in this paper are the manufacturing methods used to develop a four component functional gradient material of copper, tungsten, boron, and boron nitride. The FGM was formed with continuous gradients and integral cooling channels eliminating bondlines and providing direct heat transfer from the high temperature exposed surface to a cooling medium. Metallurgical and x-ray diffraction analyses of the materials formed through innovative VPS (vacuum plasma spray) processing are also presented. Applications for this functional gradient structural material range from fusion reactor plasma facing components to missile nose cones to boilers

  18. Mesoporous high surface area Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 synthesized by spray drying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundberg, Mats; Wang, Hsiang-Jen; Blennow Tullmar, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Mesoporous gadolinium doped cerium dioxide with high surface area was produced by spray drying using Pluronic 123 as surfactant. The powder, when calcined at 400 °C, had a BET surface area of 136 m2 g−1 and was polycrystalline as confirmed by XRD and TEM. XEDS confirmed Ce, Gd and O, as the only......, corresponding to the crystallite size calculated from XRD data. The similar size range of the mesopores and the observed crystallite size indicates that the porosity is partly formed from intergranular mesoporosity. Using the spray drying method of a surfactant assisted liquid precursor solution it can...

  19. Spray boom for selectively spraying a herbicidal composition onto dicots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    There is provided a method and spray boom for discriminating cereal crop (monocot) and weeds (dicots). The spray boom includes means for digitally recording an image of a selected area to be treated by a nozzle on the spray boom, whereby a plant material is identified based on a segmentation proc...

  20. Dissolution of two NWCF calcines: Extent of dissolution and characterization of undissolved solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Tranter, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine the dissolution characteristics of two NWCF calcine types. A two-way blended calcine made from 4 parts nonradioactive aluminum nitrate and one part WM-102 was studied to determine the extent of dissolution for aluminum-type calcines. A two-way blend of 3.5 parts fluorinel waste from WM-187 and 1 part sodium waste from WM-185 was used to determine the extent of dissolution for zirconium-type calcines. This study was necessary to develop suitable aqueous separation flowsheets for the partitioning of actinides and fission products from ICPP calcines and to determine the disposition of the resulting undissolved solids (UDS). The dissolution flowsheet developed by Herbst was used to dissolve these two NWCF calcine types. Results show that greater than 95 wt% of aluminum and zirconium calcine types were dissolved after a single batch contact with 5 M HNO 3 . A characterization of the UDS indicates that the weight percent of TRU elements in the UDS resulting from both calcine type dissolutions increases by approximately an order of magnitude from their concentrations prior to dissolution. Substantial activities of cesium and strontium are also present in the UDS resulting from the dissolution of both calcine types. Multiple TRU, Cs, and Sr analyses of both UDS types show that these solids are relatively homogeneous. From this study, it is estimated that between 63.5 and 635 cubic meters of UDS will be generated from the dissolution of 3800 M 3 of calcine. The significant actinide and fission product activities in these UDS will preclude their disposal as low-level waste. If the actinide and fission activity resulting from the UDS is the only considered source in the dissolved calcine solutions, an estimated 99.9 to 99.99 percent of the solids must be removed from this solution for it to meet non-TRU Class A low-level waste

  1. Droplets and sprays

    CERN Document Server

    Sazhin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Providing a clear and systematic description of droplets and spray dynamic models, this book maximises reader insight into the underlying physics of the processes involved, outlines the development of new physical and mathematical models, and broadens understanding of interactions between the complex physical processes which take place in sprays. Complementing approaches based on the direct application of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), Droplets and Sprays treats both theoretical and practical aspects of internal combustion engine process such as the direct injection of liquid fuel, subcritical heating and evaporation. Includes case studies that illustrate the approaches relevance to automotive applications,  it is also anticipated that the described models can find use in other areas such as in medicine and environmental science.

  2. Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite nanocrystals and substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Masahiro; Furukawa, Keiko; Serizawa, Takeshi; Yanagisawa, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Kawai, Tomoji; Furuzono, Tsutomu

    2009-06-02

    Interfacial interactions between calcined hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals and surface-modified substrates were investigated by measuring adsorption behavior and adhesion strength with a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and a contact-mode atomic force microscope (AFM), respectively. The goal was to develop better control of HAp-nanocrystal coatings on biomedical materials. HAp nanocrystals with rodlike or spherical morphology were prepared by a wet chemical process followed by calcination at 800 degrees C with an antisintering agent to prevent the formation of sintered polycrystals. The substrate surface was modified by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, or graft polymerization with a functional monomer. QCM measurement showed that the rodlike HAp nanocrystals adsorbed preferentially onto anionic COOH-modified substrates compared to cationic NH2- or hydrophobic CH3-modified substrates. On the other hand, the spherical nanocrystals adsorbed onto NH2- and COOH-modified substrates, which indicates that the surface properties of the HAp nanocrystals determined their adsorption behavior. The adhesion strength, which was estimated from the force required to move the nanocrystal in contact-mode AFM, on a COOH-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was almost 9 times larger than that on a COOH-modified substrate prepared by chemical reaction with a low-molecular-weight compound, indicating that the long-chain polymer grafted on the substrate mitigated the surface roughness mismatch between the nanocrystal and the substrate. The adhesion strength of the nanocrystal bonded covalently by the coupling reaction to a Si(OCH3)-grafted substrate prepared by graft polymerization was approximately 1.5 times larger than that when adsorbed on the COOH-grafted substrate.

  3. Process for producing nuclear reactor fuel oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goenrich, H.; Druckenbrodt, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    The waste gases of the calcination process furnace in the AVC or AV/PuC process (manufacture of nuclear reactor fuel dioxides) are returned to the furnace in a closed circuit. The NH 3 produced replaces the hydrogen which would otherwise be required for reduction in this process. (orig.) [de

  4. Water spray interaction with air-steam mixtures under containment spray conditions: experimental study in the TOSQAN facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcheron, E.; Lemaitre, P.; Malet, J.; Nuboer, A.; Brun, P.; Bouilloux, L.; Vendel, J. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Direction de la Surete des Usines, des laboratoires, des transports et des dechets, Saclay, BP 68 - 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: During the course of an hypothetical severe accident in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), hydrogen can be produced by the reactor core oxidation and distributed into the reactor containment according to convection flows and steam wall condensation. In order to assess the risk of detonation generated by a high local hydrogen concentration, hydrogen distribution in the containment has to be known. The TOSQAN experimental program has been created to simulate typical accidental thermal hydraulic flow conditions in the reactor containment. The present work is devoted to study the interaction of a water spray injection used as a mitigation mean in order to reduce containment pressure and to produce a mixing of air, steam and hydrogen induced by spray entrainment and condensation on droplet. In order to have a better understanding of physical phenomena, we need to make a detailed characterization of the spray and the gas. The TOSQAN facility that is highly instrumented with non-intrusive diagnostics consists in a closed cylindrical vessel (7 m{sup 3} volume, 4 m high, 1.5 m i.d.) into which steam is injected. Water droplets size is measured in the vessel by the Interferometric Laser Imaging for Droplet Sizing technique. Droplet velocity is obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Doppler Velocimetry, and droplet temperature is measured by global rainbow refractometry. Gas concentration measurements are performed by Spontaneous Raman Scattering. The walls of the vessel are thermostatically controlled by heated oil circulation. Inner spray system that is located on the top of the enclosure on the vertical axis, is composed of a single nozzle producing a full cone water spray. Spray test scenario consists of water spray injection in TOSQAN that is first pressurized with a steam injection (steam injection is stopped before spray injection). Water spray falling into the sump is removed to avoid accumulation and evaporation

  5. Sprayed concrete linings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hindle, D.

    1999-12-01

    Sprayed concrete, or shotcrete, was invented in the 1920s for preserving dinosaur skeletons and was used underground initially in coalmines for the preservation and fine proofing of timber supports. Its use as a support lining in rock tunnelling was developed in the 1950s and 60s. The article surveys equipment available from major manufacturers and suppliers of concrete spraying equipment (Aliva, Cifa, GIA, Industri, Ingersoll Rand, etc.), specialist cement and additive manufacturers (Castle, Cement, Moria Carbotech). manufacturers of lattice girders and fibre reinforcement, and manufacturers of instrumentation for tunnel linings. 5 tabs., 9 photos.

  6. SPRAY code user's report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shire, P.R.

    1977-03-01

    The SPRAY computer code has been developed to model the effects of postulated sodium spray release from LMFBR piping within containment chambers. The calculation method utilizes gas convection, heat transfer and droplet combustion theory to calculate the pressure and temperature effects within the enclosure. The applicable range is 0-21 mol percent oxygen and .02-.30 inch droplets with or without humidity. Droplet motion and large sodium surface area combine to produce rapid heat release and pressure rise within the enclosed volume

  7. Reactivation properties of carbide slag as a CO{sub 2} sorbent during calcination/carbonation cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yingjie; Sun, Rongyue; Liu, Hongling; Lu, Chunmei [Shandong Univ., Jinan (China). School of Energy and Power Engineering

    2013-07-01

    The carbide slag from polyvinyl chloride production as industry hazardous wastes was proposed as CO{sub 2} sorbent at high temperature in calcium looping cycle. The cyclic CO{sub 2} capture behavior and the microstructure characteristics of the carbide slag as one of the typical calcium-based industrial wastes during the multiple calcination/carbonation cycles. Also, the comparisons between the carbide slag and the natural limestone in cyclic CO{sub 2} capture behavior were made. XRD analysis demonstrates that the predominating constituent of the carbide slag is Ca(OH){sub 2}. The carbonation temperature ranging from 650 to 700 C is favourable to cyclic carbonation of the carbide slag. The cyclic carbonation conversions of the carbide slag is lower than that of the limestone before a certain time, but the situation is converse after that time in a thermogravimetric analyzer. The carbide slag has better cyclic CO{sub 2} capture capacity. The carbonation conversion of the carbide slag retains 0.28 after 100 calcination/carbonation cycles, while the two limestones achieve 0.08 and 0.14 respectively at the same reaction conditions in a dual fixed-bed reactor. The microstructure of the carbide slag by SEM reveals the reason why it possesses better CO{sub 2} capture capacity.

  8. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiyama, Takenori.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns a nuclear reactor container in which heat is removed from a container by external water injection. Heat is removed from the container by immersing the lower portion of the container into water and scattering spary water from above. Thus, the container can be cooled by the spray water falling down along the outer wall of the container to condensate and cool vapors filled in the container upon occurrence of accidents. Further, since the inside of the container can be cooled also during usual operation, it can also serve as a dry well cooler. Accordingly, heat is removed from the reactor container upon occurrence of accidents by the automatic operation of a spray device corresponding to the change of the internal temperature and the pressure in the reactor container. Further, since all of these devices are disposed out of container, maintenance is also facilitated. (I.S.)

  9. Model of fragmentation of limestone particles during thermal shock and calcination in fluidised beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saastamoinen, J.; Pikkarainen, T.; Tourunen, A.; Rasanen, M.; Jantti, T. [VTT Technical Research Center, Jyvaskyla (Finland)

    2008-11-15

    Fragmentation of limestone due to thermal shock and calcination in a fluidised bed was studied through experiments and modelling. The time for heating was estimated by model calculations and the time for calcination by measurements. Fragmentation due to thermal shock was carried out by experiments in a CO{sub 2} atmosphere in order to prevent the effect of calcination. It was found to be much less than fragmentation due to calcination. Average particle sizes before and after fragmentation are presented for several types of limestone. The effects of particle size and gas composition on the primary fragmentation were studied through experiments. Increasing the fluidisation velocity increased the tendency to fragment. The evolution of the particle size distribution (PSD) of limestone particles due to thermal shock and during calcination (or simultaneous calcination and sulphation) were calculated using a population balance model. Fragmentation due to thermal shock is treated as an instantaneous process. The fragmentation frequency during calcination is presented as exponentially decaying over time. In addition to the final PSD, this model also predicts the PSD during the calcination process. The fragmentation was practically found to end after 10 min. Furthermore. a population balance method to calculate the particle size distribution and amount of limestone in fluidised beds in dynamic and steady state, when feeding history is known, is presented.

  10. A conceptual and calculational model for gas formation from impure calcined plutonium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyman, John L.; Eller, P. Gary

    2000-01-01

    Safe transport and storage of pure and impure plutonium oxides requires an understanding of processes that may generate or consume gases in a confined storage vessel. We have formulated conceptual and calculational models for gas formation from calcined materials. The conceptual model for impure calcined plutonium oxides is based on the data collected to date

  11. Calcination effects on CeZrOx geometry and styrene production from ethylbenzene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovacevic, M.; Brunet Espinosa, Roger; Lefferts, Leonardus; Mojet, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    A series of CeZrOx catalysts was prepared by calcination of hydrothermally obtained metal oxide precipitate at increasing temperatures. The samples were characterized by HRSEM, XRD and Raman spectroscopy, showing a change in morphology and particle size as a function of calcination temperature.

  12. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium rich solids. The calciner and some of its associated equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability

  13. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    1999-10-05

    A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium rich solids. The calciner and some of its associated equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability.

  14. Influence of calcination temperature on the structure and morphology of HAp bioceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, C.M.L.; Santos, P.T.A.; Rodrigues, P.A.; Costa, A.C.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of calcination temperature on the structure and morphology of samples of hydroxyapatite (HAp) synthesized by the wet method. For hydroxyapatite was used as precursor solutions of calcium hydroxide and phosphoric acid 1M solution of calcium hydroxide was stirred and heated to 80 ° C and then dropwise with a solution of phosphoric acid. After the liquid was evaporated without an oven at 110 ° C and sieved. The sample of PA as synthesized was submitted to calcination at 900 °C and 1100 °C / 2 hours. The samples as synthesized and after calcination were characterized by XRD, XRF, FTIR, SEM. The XRD showed the presence of phase hydroxyapatite for samples without calcining and both calcination temperatures studied. FTIR spectra showed bands group and PO 4 3- , CO 3 2- . Through the SEM micrograph, there is the formation of agglomerates in the form of porous flakes approximately spherical shape. (author)

  15. LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, G.

    2012-03-06

    The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

  16. Status of emergency spray modelling in the integral code ASTEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plumecocq, W.; Passalacqua, R.

    2001-01-01

    Containment spray systems are emergency systems that would be used in very low probability events which may lead to severe accidents in Light Water Reactors. In most cases, the primary function of the spray would be to remove heat and condense steam in order to reduce pressure and temperature in the containment building. Spray would also wash out fission products (aerosols and gaseous species) from the containment atmosphere. The efficiency of the spray system in the containment depressurization as well as in the removal of aerosols, during a severe accident, depends on the evolution of the spray droplet size distribution with the height in the containment, due to kinetic and thermal relaxation, gravitational agglomeration and mass transfer with the gas. A model has been developed taking into account all of these phenomena. This model has been implemented in the ASTEC code with a validation of the droplets relaxation against the CARAIDAS experiment (IPSN). Applications of this modelling to a PWR 900, during a severe accident, with special emphasis on the effect of spray on containment hydrogen distribution have been performed in multi-compartment configuration with the ASTEC V0.3 code. (author)

  17. Thermal and catalytic cracking of ethylene in presence of CaO, MgO, zeolite and calcined dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taralas, G; Sjoestroem, K; Jaeraas, S; Bjoernbom, E [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    1994-12-31

    The subject of the present work is to study the effect of catalysts such as calcined dolomite (CaO.MgO), CaO (quicklime), MgO and Zeolite (EKZ-4) on the cracking of ethylene in the presence and absence of steam. N-heptane, toluene, naphthalene, thiophene have been some suitable model compounds for studies of the thermal and catalytic decomposition of tar. Previous results showed that the reaction scheme of the thermal decomposition of n-heptane was consistent with the high yield of ethylene observed in thermal decomposition of n-heptane. The effect of the reactor wall and the ferric impurities in the dolomite are also subjects of the research in this study. The results may also throw some additional light on the nature of the gas-phase thermal and catalytic reactions occurring in the use of dolomite as tar cracking catalysts. 28 refs

  18. Thermal spray for commercial shipbuilding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, F. S.

    1997-09-01

    Thermal spraying of steel with aluminum to protect it from corrosion is a technology that has been proven to work in the marine environment. The thermal spray coating system includes a paint sealer that is applied over the thermally sprayed aluminum. This extends the service life of the coating and provides color to the end product. The thermal spray system protects steel both through the principle of isolation (as in painting) and galvanizing. With this dual protection mechanism, steel is protected from corrosion even when the coating is damaged. The thermal- sprayed aluminum coating system has proved the most cost- effective corrosion protection system for the marine environment. Until recently, however, the initial cost of application has limited its use for general application. Arc spray technology has reduced the application cost of thermal spraying of aluminum to below that of painting. Commercial shipbuilders could use this technology to enhance their market position in the marine industry.

  19. Comparative evaluation of glasses reprocessing and reversible conditioning of calcinates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boen, R.

    2000-01-01

    Fission products and minor actinides separated during the spent fuel reprocessing treatment are industrially vitrified on-line and thus confined inside a glass matrix with admittedly durability properties. In the framework of the feasibility of a reversible conditioning, this document examines first the possible alternative ways of conditioning and storage of calcinates before vitrification, which may simplify the reversibility aspect. Such a conditioning must be compatible with the storage process, with a possible extraction of actinides and long-lived fission products, and with the vitrification process if no extraction is performed. Calcinates are pulverulent and comprise an important soluble fraction, a proportion of nitrates of about 30%, and release a high thermal power (17 kW/m 3 ) combined to a low thermal conductivity (0.1 to 0.15 W.m -1 k -1 ). Among the different foreseeable solutions (denitration, mixing with another material, with or without compacting, dissolution inside another material..), the dissolution inside a borate seems to be the most acceptable with respect to the safety, feasibility and vitrification aspects. The thermal aspect of the storage remains complex as a specific container is necessary. In a second part, this report analyzes the possibility to re-extract back the long-lived radionuclides from vitrified wastes. The different possible ways to destroy the glass structure and to transfer the fission products and minor actinides in an aqueous solution compatible with an hydrometallurgical separation process are explored. Two processes are foreseeable: a low temperature dissolution process which requires a preliminary crushing and the handling of huge amounts of acids, and a both high and low temperature process which comprises the following steps: melting, fractionation by water tempering, addition of Na 2 O or sodium tetraborate to make it sensible to hot leaching, separation of fission products and minor actinides, recycling of

  20. Thermal spray deposition and evaluation of low-Z coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seals, R.D.; Swindeman, C.J.; White, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Thermally sprayed low-Z coatings of B 4 C on Al substrates were investigated as candidate materials for first-wall reactor protective surfaces. Comparisons were made to thermally sprayed coatings of B, MgAl 2 O 4 , Al 2 O 3 , and composites. Graded bond layers were applied to mitigate coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch. Microstructures, thermal diffusivity before and after thermal shock loading, steel ball impact resistance, CO 2 pellet cleaning and erosion tolerance, phase content, stoichiometry by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, and relative tensile strengths were measured

  1. Plasma sprayed and electrospark deposited zirconium metal diffusion barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollis, Kendall J.; Pena, Maria I.

    2010-01-01

    Zirconium metal coatings applied by plasma spraying and electrospark deposition (ESD) have been investigated for use as diffusion barrier coatings on low enrichment uranium fuel for research nuclear reactors. The coatings have been applied to both stainless steel as a surrogate and to simulated nuclear fuel uranium-molybdenum alloy substrates. Deposition parameter development accompanied by coating characterization has been performed. The structure of the plasma sprayed coating was shown to vary with transferred arc current during deposition. The structure of ESD coatings was shown to vary with the capacitance of the deposition equipment.

  2. CFD Modelling and Experimental Testing of Thermal Calcination of Kaolinite Rich Clay Particles - An Effort towards Green Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gebremariam, Abraham Teklay

    Cement industry is one of the major industrial emitters of greenhouse gases, generating 5-7% of the total anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Consequently, use of supplementary cementitious materials (SCM) to replace part of the CO2-intensive cement clinker is an attractive way to mitigate CO2 emissions...... from cement industry. SCMs based on industrial byproducts like fly ashes and slags are subject to availability problems. Yet clays are the most ubiquitous material on earth's crust. Thus, properly calcined clays are a very promising candidate for SCMs to produce green cements. Calcination...... property of the calcined clay material, among which is the density of calcines. By using the variation in density of calcines, an optimum residence time has been marked. At this time the calcines display a minimum density that corresponds to the most dehydroxylated calcines. The behavior of flash calcined...

  3. Production of porous titanate microspheres by spray-drying of sols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizgek, E.; Bartlett, J.R.; Woolfrey, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Porous, multi-component titanate microspheres (20 to 50 μm in diameter) have been produced on a 10 kg scale by spray-drying a precursor sol containing titania, zirconia and alumina, and calcining the resulting powders at 723 K. The mixed TiO 2 /ZrO 2 sols were produced by hydrolysing tetraisopropyltitanate and peptising the hydrolysate slurry with zirconyl nitrate solution. TiO 2 /ZrO 2 sols with oxide concentrations in excess of 900 g dm -3 were produced. These sols were subsequently mixed with dispersible δ-Al 2 O 3 to produce well-dispersed TiO 2 /ZrO 2 /Al 2 O 3 (TZA) sols. The rheology and degree of aggregation of the multi-component sols were controlled by the addition of Al(NO 3 ) 3 solution. At relatively low electrolyte concentrations, the sols exhibited Newtonian behaviour, and the viscosity increased with increasing addition of electrolyte. However, at higher electrolyte concentrations, the colloidal dispersions exhibited shear-thinning behaviour. Hollow spheres were produced by spray-drying well-dispersed sols. In contrast, 'solid' spheres were produced by using dilute Al(NO 3 ) 3 to produce partially-aggregated TZA sols, prior to spray-drying. Calcined microspheres produced from partially-aggregated sols had total porosities of ∼ 50 %, with average pore diameters of ∼ 8 nm. These particles exhibited a high sorption capacity for simulated High Level Nuclear Waste

  4. Microwave calcination for plutonium immobilization and residue stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, M.J.; Rising, T.L.; Roushey, W.J.; Sprenger, G.S. [Kaiser-Hill Co., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-12-01

    In the late 1980`s development was begun on a process using microwave energy to vitrify low level mixed waste sludge and transuranic mixed waste sludge generated in Building 374 at Rocky Flats. This process was shown to produce a dense, highly durable waste form. With the cessation of weapons production at Rocky Flats, the emphasis has changed from treatment of low level and TRU wastes to stabilizaiton of plutonium oxide and residues. This equipment is versatile and can be used as a heat source to calcine, react or vitrify many types of residues and oxides. It has natural economies in that it heats only the material to be treated, significantly reducing cycle times over conventional furnaces. It is inexpensive to operate in that most of the working components remain outside of any necessary contamination enclosure and therefore can easily be maintained. Limited testing has been successfully performed on cerium oxide (as a surrogate for plutonium oxide), surrogate electrorefining salts, surrogate residue sludge and residue ash. Future plans also include tests on ion exchange resins. In an attempt to further the usefullness of this technology, a mobile, self-contained microwave melting system is currently under development and expected to be operational at Rocky Flats Enviromental Technology Site by the 4th quarter of FY96.

  5. Microwave calcination for plutonium immobilization and residue stabilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, M.J.; Rising, T.L.; Roushey, W.J.; Sprenger, G.S.

    1995-01-01

    In the late 1980's development was begun on a process using microwave energy to vitrify low level mixed waste sludge and transuranic mixed waste sludge generated in Building 374 at Rocky Flats. This process was shown to produce a dense, highly durable waste form. With the cessation of weapons production at Rocky Flats, the emphasis has changed from treatment of low level and TRU wastes to stabilizaiton of plutonium oxide and residues. This equipment is versatile and can be used as a heat source to calcine, react or vitrify many types of residues and oxides. It has natural economies in that it heats only the material to be treated, significantly reducing cycle times over conventional furnaces. It is inexpensive to operate in that most of the working components remain outside of any necessary contamination enclosure and therefore can easily be maintained. Limited testing has been successfully performed on cerium oxide (as a surrogate for plutonium oxide), surrogate electrorefining salts, surrogate residue sludge and residue ash. Future plans also include tests on ion exchange resins. In an attempt to further the usefullness of this technology, a mobile, self-contained microwave melting system is currently under development and expected to be operational at Rocky Flats Enviromental Technology Site by the 4th quarter of FY96

  6. Calcination/dissolution chemistry development Fiscal year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-09-01

    The task open-quotes IPC Liaison and Chemistry of Thermal Reconstitutionclose quotes is a $300,000 program that was conducted in Fiscal Year (FY) 1995 with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Research and Development (EM-53) Efficient Separations and Processing Crosscutting Program supported under technical task plan (TTP) RL4-3-20-04. The principal investigator was Cal Delegard of the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The task encompassed the following two subtasks related to the chemistry of alkaline Hanford Site tank waste: (1) Technical Liaison with the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Science (IPC/RAS) and its research into the chemistry of transuranic elements (TRU) and technetium (Tc) in alkaline media. (2) Laboratory investigation of the chemistry of calcination/dissolution (C/D) (or thermal reconstitution) as an alternative to the present reference Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment flowsheet, Enhanced Sludge Washing (ESW). This report fulfills the milestone for the C/D subtask to open-quotes Provide End-of-Year Report on C/D Laboratory Test Resultsclose quotes due 30 September 1995. A companion report, fulfilling the milestone to provide an end-of-year report on the IPC/RAS liaison, also has been prepared

  7. Design and performance of a 100-kg/h, direct calcine-fed electric-melter system for nuclear-waste vitrification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dierks, R.D.

    1980-11-01

    This report describes the physical characteristics of a ceramic-lined, joule-heated glass melter that is directly connected to the discharge of a spray calciner and is currently being used to study the vitrification of simulated nuclear-waste slurries. Melter performance characteristics and subsequent design improvements are described. The melter contains 0.24 m 3 of glass with a glass surface area of 0.76 m 2 , and is heated by the flow of an alternating current (ranging from 600 to 1200 amps) between two Inconel-690 slab-type electrodes immersed in the glass at either end of the melter tank. The melter was maintained at operating temperature (900 to 1260 0 C) for 15 months, and produced 62,000 kg of glass. The maximum sustained operating period was 122 h, during which glass was produced at the rate of 70 kg/h

  8. Pyrochemical separation of radioactive components from inert materials in ICPP high-level calcined waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Debbio, J.A.; Nelson, L.O.; Todd, T.A.

    1995-05-01

    Since 1963, calcination of aqueous wastes from reprocessing of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuels has resulted in the accumulation of approximately 3800 m 3 of high-level waste (HLW) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The waste is in the form of a granular solid called calcine and is stored on site in stainless steel bins which are encased in concrete. Due to the leachability of 137 Cs and 90 Sr and possibly other radioactive components, the calcine is not suitable for final disposal. Hence, a process to immobilize calcine in glass is being developed. Since radioactive components represent less than 1 wt % of the calcine, separation of actinides and fission products from inert components is being considered to reduce the volume of HLW requiring final disposal. Current estimates indicate that compared to direct vitrification, a volume reduction factor of 10 could result in significant cost savings. Aqueous processes, which involve calcine dissolution in nitric acid followed by separation of actinide and fission products by solvent extraction and ion exchange methods, are being developed. Pyrochemical separation methods, which generate small volumes of aqueous wastes and do not require calcine dissolution, have been evaluated as alternatives to aqueous processes. This report describes three proposed pyrochemical flowsheets and presents the results of experimental studies conducted to evaluate their feasibility. The information presented is a consolidation of three reports, which should be consulted for experimental details

  9. Reactor core cooling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Masahiro.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To safely and effectively cool down the reactor core after it has been shut down but is still hot due to after-heat. Constitution: Since the coolant extraction nozzle is situated at a location higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the coolant sprayed from the nozzle, is free from sucking immediately from the extraction nozzle and is therefore used effectively to cool the reactor core. As all the portions from the top to the bottom of the reactor are cooled simultaneously, the efficiency of the reactor cooling process is increased. Since the coolant extraction nozzle can be installed at a point considerably higher than the coolant injection nozzle, the distance from the coolant surface to the point of the coolant extraction nozzle can be made large, preventing cavitation near the coolant extraction nozzle. Therefore, without increasing the capacity of the heat exchanger, the reactor can be cooled down after a shutdown safely and efficiently. (Kawakami, Y.)

  10. Numerical modelling of fuel sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, C.

    1999-06-01

    The way the fuel is introduced into the combustion chamber is one of the most important parameters for the power output and the generation of emissions in the combustion of liquid fuels. The interaction between the turbulent gas flow field and the liquid fuel droplets, the vaporisation of them and the mixing of the gaseous fuel with the ambient air that are vital parameters in the combustion process. The use of numerical calculations is an important tool to better understand these complex interacting phenomena. This thesis reports on the numerical modelling of fuel sprays in non-reacting cases using an own developed spray module. The spray module uses the stochastic parcel method to represent the spray. The module was made in such manner that it could by coupled with different gas flow solver. Results obtained from four different gas flow solvers are presented in the thesis, including the use of two different kinds of turbulence models. In the first part the spray module is coupled with a k-{eta} based 2-D cylindrical gas flow solver. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed on the spray and gas flow solver parameters, such as grid size dependence and sensitivity to initial values of k-{eta}. The results of the spray module were also compared to results from other spray codes, e.g. the well known KIVA code. In the second part of this thesis the spray was injected into a turbulent and fully developed crossflow studied. The spray module was attached to a LES (Large Eddy Simulation) based flow solvers enabling the study of the complex structures and time dependent phenomena involved in spray in crossflows. It was found that the spray performs an oscillatory motion and that the Strouhal number in the wake was about 0.1. Different spray breakup models were evaluated by comparing with experimental results 66 refs, 56 figs

  11. Water spray interaction with air-steam mixtures under containment spray conditions: comparison of heat and mass transfer modelling with the TOSQAN spray tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malet, J.; Lemaitre, P.; Porcheron, E.; Vendel, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: During the course of a hypothetical severe accident in a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR), hydrogen can be produced by the reactor core oxidation and distributed into the reactor containment according to convection flows and water steam wall condensation. In order to mitigate the risk of detonation generated by a high local hydrogen concentration, spray systems are used in the containment. The TOSQAN programme has been created to simulate separate-effect tests representative of typical accidental thermal-hydraulic flow conditions in the reactor containment. The present work concerns the interaction of a water spray, used at the top of the containment in order to reduce the steam partial pressure, with air-steam mixtures. The main phenomena occurring when water spray is used are the mixing induced by spray entrainment and the condensation on droplets. In order to improve the latter phenomena, different levels of modelling can be used. The objective of this paper is to analyze experimental results obtained for water spray interaction with air-steam mixtures using different heat and mass transfer modelling. For this purpose, two modelling issues have been used: the first one is devoted for the determination of the gas thermodynamical properties, and the second one concerns the droplets characterization. In the first one, the gas thermodynamical analysis is performed using depressurization, gas temperature variation and humidity decrease during the spray injection. In this modelling, heat and mass transfer between the spray and the surrounding gas is treated in a global way by energy balance between the total amount of water and the gas. In the second one, droplets characterization is obtained by means of droplet size, temperature and velocities evolutions. In this modelling, the spray is considered as a single droplet falling with an initial velocity. Droplet interactions are neglected. Assessment of these two modelling is performed

  12. Sea Spray Aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butcher, Andrew Charles

    emissions produced directly from bubble bursting as the result of air entrainment from breaking waves and particles generated from secondary emissions of volatile organic compounds. In the first paper, we study the chemical properties of particles produced from several sea water proxies with the use...... of a cloud condensation nuclei ounter. Proxy solutions with high inorganic salt concentrations and some organics produce sea spray aerosol particles with little change in cloud condensation activity relative to pure salts. Comparison is made between a frit based method for bubble production and a plunging...... a relationship between plunging jet particle ux, oceanic particle ux, and energy dissipation rate in both systems. Previous sea spray aerosol studies dissipate an order of magnitude more energy for the same particle ux production as the open ocean. A scaling factor related to the energy expended in air...

  13. Flame spraying of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Zeek, D.P.; Couch, K.W.; Benson, D.M.; Kirk, S.M.

    1997-01-01

    Statistical design-of-experiment studies of the thermal spraying of polymer powders are presented. Studies of the subsonic combustion (i.e., Flame) process were conducted in order to determine the quality and economics of polyester and urethane coatings. Thermally sprayed polymer coatings are of interest to several industries for anticorrosion applications, including the chemical, automotive, and aircraft industries. In this study, the coating design has been optimized for a site-specific application using Taguchi-type fractional-factorial experiments. Optimized coating designs are presented for the two powder systems. A substantial range of thermal processing conditions and their effect on the resultant polymer coatings is presented. The coatings were characterized by optical metallography, hardness testing, tensile testing, and compositional analysis. Characterization of the coatings yielded the thickness, bond strength, Knoop microhardness, roughness, deposition efficiency, and porosity. Confirmation testing was accomplished to verify the coating designs

  14. Plasma sprayed thermoregulating coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudinov, V.V.; Puzanov, A.A.; Zambrzhitskij, A.P.; Soboleva, V.V.

    1979-01-01

    Shown is the possibility of plasma spraying application for thermoregulating coating formation. Given are test results of service properties of BeO, Al 2 O 2 plasma coatings on the substrates of the MA2-1 magnesium alloy. Described is a device for studying durability of coating optical parameters under ultraviolet irradiation in deep vacuum. Dynamics of absorption coefficient, growth caused by an increase in absorption centers amount under such irradiation is investigated

  15. Emulsions from Aerosol Sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengelmolen; Vincent; Hassall

    1997-12-01

    An electrostatic emulsification apparatus has been designed for the purpose of studying diffusion from oil droplets which have a mean size in the range of approximately 1.5-3.5 &mgr;m, with standard deviations of 40-50%. The emulsification technique involves the collection of a spray of electrically charged oil droplets onto a rotating water film which is sustained from a reservoir. In this way, emulsions with volume fractions of approximately 10(-3) are produced within several minutes at oil flow rates of around 10(-2) ml min-1. Phase-Doppler anemometry (PDA) was used to assess droplet size distributions for the sprays and emulsions. Results show that the mean emulsion droplet size was smaller than the mean spray droplet size by several orders of magnitude. At flow rates around 10(-2) ml min-1, the spray droplet size distribution was little affected by the applied potential between about -4.20 and -4.65 kV (mean droplet size between approximately 7.6 and 7.8 &mgr;m, with standard deviations of approximately 20%), whereas the mean droplet size of the corresponding emulsion decreased more rapidly with applied potential. Above an applied potential of approximately -4.30 kV, which corresponded to an emulsion droplet size below approximately 2 &mgr;m, the measured volume fraction of the emulsion decreased with respect to the volume fraction as calculated on the basis of total amount of injected oil. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  16. Radiolysis of spray solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habersbergerova, A.; Janovsky, I.

    1985-01-01

    The factors were studied affecting thiosulfate radiolysis in the so-called spray solution for nuclear power plant containments. The reaction mechanism of primary radiolytic reactions leading to thiosulfate decomposition was studied using pulse radiolysis. Also measured was hydrazine loss in the irradiation of the bubbling solution intended for the capture of volatile chemical forms of radioiodine. Pulse radiolysis was used to study the kinetics of hydrazine reaction with elemental iodine. (author)

  17. A Summary of Properties Used to Evaluate INEEL Calcine Disposal in the Yucca Mountain Repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    To support evaluations of the direct disposal of Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory calcines to the repository at Yucca Mountain, an evaluation of the performance of the calcine in the repository environment must be performed. This type of evaluation demonstrates, through computer modeling and analysis, the impact the calcine would have on the ability of the repository to perform its function of containment of materials during the repository lifetime. This report discusses parameters that were used in the scoping evaluation conducted in FY 2003. It provides nominal values for the parameters, with explanation of the source of the values, and how the values were modified for use in repository analysis activities

  18. The effect of calcination conditions on the graphitizability of novel synthetic and coal-derived cokes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Barbara Ellen

    The effects of calcination heating rate and ultimate calcination temperature upon calcined coke and subsequent graphitic material microstructures were studied for materials prepared from three different precursors. The pitch precursors used were Mitsubishi AR pitch (a synthetic, 100% mesophase pitch), the NMP-extracted portion of a raw coal, and the NMP-extracted fraction of a coal liquefaction residue obtained from an HTI pilot plant. These materials were all green-coked under identical conditions. Optical microscopy confirmed that the Mitsubishi coke was very anisotropic and the HTI coke was nearly as anisotropic. The coke produced from the direct coal extract was very isotropic. Crystalline development during calcination heating was verified by high-temperature x-ray diffraction. Experiments were performed to ascertain the effects of varying calcination heating rate and ultimate temperature. It was determined that calcined coke crystallite size increased with increasing temperature for all three materials but was found to be independent of heating rate. The graphene interplanar spacing decreased with increasing temperature for the isotropic NMP-extract material but increased with increasing temperature for the anisotropic materials---Mitsubishi and HTI cokes. Graphene interplanar spacing was also found to be independent of heating rate. Calcined coke real densities were, likewise, found to be independent of heating rate. The anisotropic cokes (Mitsubishi and HTI) exhibited increasing real density with increasing calcination temperature. The NMP-extract coke increased in density up to 1050°C and then suffered a dramatic reduction in real density when heated to 1250°C. This is indicative of puffing. Since there was no corresponding disruption in the crystalline structure, the puffing phenomena was determined to be intercrystalline rather than intracrystalline. After the calcined cokes were graphitized (under identical conditions), the microstructures were re

  19. The nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.; Suleymani, M.; Borudzherdi, A.; Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2011-01-01

    Present article is devoted to nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit of Tajikistan. The obtaining of boric acid from pre backed danburite concentrate by decomposition of nitric acid was studied. The chemical composition of danburite concentrate was determined. The laboratory study of danburite leaching by nitric acid was conducted. The influence of temperature, process duration, nitric acid concentration on nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit was studied as well. The optimal conditions of nitric acid decomposition of calcined danburite concentrate of Ak-Arkhar Deposit, including temperature, process duration, nitric acid concentration and particle size were proposed.

  20. Remotely replaceable fuel and feed nozzles for the NWCF calciner vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, R.D.; Carter, J.A.; May, K.W.

    1978-01-01

    The development and testing of remotely replaceable fuel and feed nozzles for calcination of liquid radioactive wastes in the calciner vessel of the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) being built at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory are described. A complete fuel nozzle assembly was fabricated and tested at the Remote Maintenance Development Facility to evolve design refinements, identify required support equipment, and develop handling techniques. The design also provided for remote replacement of the nozzle support carriage and adjacent feed and fuel pipe loops using two pairs of master-slave manipulators

  1. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Takashi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To allow sufficient removal of radioactive substance released in the reactor containment shell upon loss of coolants accidents thus to sufficiently decrease the exposure dose to human body. Constitution: A clean-up system is provided downstream of a heat exchanger and it is branched into a pipeway to be connected to a spray nozzle and further connected by way of a valve to a reactor container. After the end of sudden transient changes upon loss of coolants accidents, the pool water stored in the pressure suppression chamber is purified in the clean-up system and then sprayed in the dry-well by way of a spray nozzle. The sprayed water dissolves to remove water soluble radioactive substances floating in the dry-well and then returns to the pressure suppression chamber. Since radioactive substances in the dry-well can thus removed rapidly and effectively and the pool water can be reused, public hazard can also be decreased. (Horiuchi, T.)

  2. Physico-chemical aspects of radionuclide removal under accident conditions in nuclear power plants by means of containment-building spray systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alm, M.

    1976-01-01

    A survey is given on industrial spray solutions, their thermal and radiation stability, drop effects, and the corrosion behaviour of reactor and containment materials. From the hitherto known spray experiments it may be concluded that (1) spray solutions can be used for the effective decontamination of the containment atmosphere in the event of a loss-of-coolant accident, (2) the spray efficiency for the removal of gaseous and volatile fission products can be assessed by means of simplified model considerations, (3) further work is necessary to optimize the technology of the spray process. (author)

  3. Calcining natural zeolites to improve their effect on cementitious mixture workability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seraj, Saamiya; Ferron, Raissa D.; Juenger, Maria C.G.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the benefits to long-term concrete durability, the use of natural zeolites as supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs) is uncommon due to their high water demand. The motivation of the research presented here was to better understand how the physical and chemical characteristics of natural zeolites influenced the workability of cementitious mixtures and whether those properties could be modified through calcination to mitigate the high water demand of natural zeolites. In this research, three different natural zeolites were characterized in their original and calcined states using x-ray diffraction (XRD) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area measurements. Rheology experiments were then conducted on cementitious pastes containing these natural zeolites, in their original and calcined states, to assess mixture viscosity and yield stress. Results showed that calcination destabilized the structure of the natural zeolites and reduced their surface area, which led to an improvement in mixture viscosity and yield stress.

  4. Chloride adsorption by calcined layered double hydroxides in hardened Portland cement paste

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Seyoon; Moon, Juhyuk; Bae, Sungchul; Duan, Xiaonan; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Monteiro, Paulo M.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using calcined layered double hydroxides (CLDHs) to prevent chloride-induced deterioration in reinforced concrete. CLDHs not only adsorbed chloride ions in aqueous solution with a memory effect but also had

  5. Design criteria for the new waste calcining facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, F.H.; Bingham, G.E.; Buckham, J.A.; Dickey, B.R.; Slansky, C.M.; Wheeler, B.R.

    1976-01-01

    The New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is being built to replace the existing fluidized-bed, high-level waste calcining facility (WCF). Performance of the WCF is reviewed, equipment failures in WCF operation are examined, and pilot-plant studies on calciner improvements are given in relation to NWCF design. Design features of the NWCF are given with emphasis on process and equipment improvements. A major feature of the NWCF is the use of remote maintenance facilities for equipment with high maintenance requirements, thereby reducing personnel exposures during maintenance and reducing downtime resulting from plant decontamination. The NWCF will have a design net processing rate of 11.36 m 3 of high-level waste per day, and will incorporate in-bed combustion of kerosene for heating the fluidized bed calciner. The off-gas cleaning system will be similar to that for the WCF

  6. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Stored solutions containing plutonium and nitric acid and possibly uranium thorium and minor amounts of other substances will be used for development and demonstration of a vertical calciner direct denitration process for conversion of those to stable storable PuO 2 rich solids. Some of those solutions are quite dilute and very impure these require either pretreatment to make them suitable for calciner feed or an alternate stabilization method. Untreated scrap solutions containing some amounts of sulfate phosphate sodium and/or potassium may also be tested for suitability of direct denitration for conversion directly to PuO 2 -rich solids. A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium-rich solids. The calciner and some of its ancillary equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability

  7. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    Stored solutions containing plutonium and nitric acid and possibly uranium thorium and minor amounts of other substances will be used for development and demonstration of a vertical calciner direct denitration process for conversion of those to stable storable PuO 2 rich solids. Some of those solutions are quite dilute and very impure these require either pretreatment to make them suitable for calciner feed or an alternate stabilization method. Untreated scrap solutions containing some amounts of sulfate phosphate sodium and/or potassium may also be tested for suitability of direct denitration for conversion directly to PuO 2 -rich solids. A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium rich solids. The calciner and some of its associated equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability

  8. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-02-03

    Stored solutions containing plutonium and nitric acid and possibly uranium thorium and minor amounts of other substances will be used for development and demonstration of a vertical calciner direct denitration process for conversion of those to stable storable PuO{sub 2} rich solids. Some of those solutions are quite dilute and very impure these require either pretreatment to make them suitable for calciner feed or an alternate stabilization method. Untreated scrap solutions containing some amounts of sulfate phosphate sodium and/or potassium may also be tested for suitability of direct denitration for conversion directly to PuO{sub 2}-rich solids. A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium-rich solids. The calciner and some of its ancillary equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability.

  9. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    2000-02-03

    Stored solutions containing plutonium and nitric acid and possibly uranium thorium and minor amounts of other substances will be used for development and demonstration of a vertical calciner direct denitration process for conversion of those to stable storable PuO{sub 2} rich solids. Some of those solutions are quite dilute and very impure these require either pretreatment to make them suitable for calciner feed or an alternate stabilization method. Untreated scrap solutions containing some amounts of sulfate phosphate sodium and/or potassium may also be tested for suitability of direct denitration for conversion directly to PuO{sub 2}-rich solids. A vertical calciner will be used to demonstrate the direct denitration process for converting plutonium-bearing liquors to stable plutonium rich solids. The calciner and some of its associated equipment were previously tested with non-radioactive chemicals to demonstrate operability.

  10. 3-Dimensional numerical simulation of sodium spray fire accidents in LMFBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Bin; Zhu Jizhou; Han Lang

    2005-01-01

    In order to estimate and foresee the sequence of sodium spray fires that may occur in the liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs), this paper develops a program to analyze such sodium fire accidents. The present study gives a 3-dimensional numerical analysis code for sodium spray fires. The spatial distributions of gas temperature and chemical species concentrations in the cell that sodium spray fires happened are given. This paper gives detailed explanation of combustion models and heat transfer models that applied in the program. And the calculation procedure and method in solving the fluid field are narrated in detail. Good agreements of an overall transient behavior are obtained in a sodium spray combustion test analysis. The comparison between the analytical and experimental results shows that the program presented in this paper is creditable and reasonable for simulating the sodium spray fires. (author)

  11. Decomposition of pre calcined aluminium silicate ores of Afghanistan by hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khomidi, A.K.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to decomposition of pre calcined aluminium silicate ores of Afghanistan by hydrochloric acid. The physicochemical properties of initial aluminium silicate ores were studied by means of X-ray phase, differential thermal and silicate analysis. The chemical composition of aluminium containing ores was determined. The optimal conditions of interaction of initial and pre calcined siallites with hydrochloric acid were defined. The kinetics of acid decomposition of aluminium silicate ores was studied as well.

  12. Quantitative analysis of calcined fertilizers by X-ray diffraction patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cekinski, E.

    1987-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction pattern method for quantitative analyses of phosphate fertilizers obtained by calcination of a misture of Anitapolis phosphate concentrate and sodium carbonate is described. The method consists in plotting a calibration curve, using spinel (MgAl 2 O 4 ) as internal standard, of the phases that were formed by calcination, sintetized in laboratory. The tests conducted in order to avail the method accuracy showed good correlation between the obtained data and the real values. (author) [pt

  13. Formulation Efforts for Direct Vitrification of INEEL Blend Calcine Waste Simulate: Fiscal Year 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crum, Jarrod V.; Vienna, John D.; Peeler, David K.; Reamer, I. A.

    2001-03-30

    This report documents the results of glass formulation efforts for Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) high level waste (HWL) calcine. Two waste compositions were used during testing. Testing started by using the Run 78 calcine composition and switched to simulated Blend calcine composition when it became available. The goal of the glass formulation efforts was to develop a frit composition that will accept higher waste loading that satisfies the glass processing and product acceptance constraints. 1. Melting temperature of 1125 ? 25?C 2. Viscosity between 2 and 10 Pa?s at the melting temperature 3. Liquidus temperature at least 100?C below the melting temperature 4. Normalized release of B, Li and Na each below 1 g/m2 (per ASTM C 1285-97) Glass formulation efforts tested several frit compositions with variable waste loadings of Run 78 calcine waste simulant. Frit 107 was selected as the primary candidate for processing since it met all process and performance criteria up to 45 mass% waste loading. When the simulated Blend calcine waste composition became available Frits 107 and 108 compositions were retested and again Frit 107 remained the primary candidate. However, both frits suffered a decrease in waste loading when switching from the Run 78 calcine to simulated Blend calcine waste composition. This was due to increase concentrations of both F and Al2O3 along with a decrease in CaO and Na2O in the simulate Blend calcine waste all of which have strong impacts on the glass properties that limit waste loading of this type of waste.

  14. Silicon-Polymer Encapsulation of High-Level Calcine Waste for Transportation or Disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loomis, G.G.; Miller, C.M.; Giansiracusa, J.A.; Kimmel, R.; Prewett, S.V.

    2000-01-01

    This report presents the results of an experimental study investigating the potential uses for silicon-polymer encapsulation of High Level Calcine Waste currently stored within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The study investigated two different applications of silicon polymer encapsulation. One application uses silicon polymer to produce a waste form suitable for disposal at a High Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility directly, and the other application encapsulates the calcine material for transportation to an offsite melter for further processing. A simulated waste material from INTEC, called pilot scale calcine, which contained hazardous materials but no radioactive isotopes was used for the study, which was performed at the University of Akron under special arrangement with Orbit Technologies, the originators of the silicon polymer process called Polymer Encapsulation Technology (PET). This document first discusses the PET process, followed by a presentation of past studies involving PET applications to waste problems. Next, the results of an experimental study are presented on encapsulation of the INTEC calcine waste as it applies to transportation or disposal of calcine waste. Results relating to long-term disposal include: (1) a characterization of the pilot calcine waste; (2) Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing of an optimum mixture of pilot calcine, polysiloxane and special additives; and, (3) Material Characterization Center testing MCC-1P evaluation of the optimum waste form. Results relating to transportation of the calcine material for a mixture of maximum waste loading include: compressive strength testing, 10-m drop test, melt testing, and a Department of Transportation (DOT) oxidizer test

  15. The leaching of base minerals from the calcines produced by the roasting of pyrite concentrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicol, M.J.; Filmer, A.O.

    1985-01-01

    A number of gold and uranium plants in South Africa concentrate the pyrite in the ore residue by flotation and roast the concentrate for the production of sulphuric acid. The calcine produced, which is predominantly hematite, is generally subjected to cyanidation for the recovery of gold and silver. The calcines often contain economically significant quantities of copper, nickel , cobalt and uranium. Prior treatment of the calcine for the recovery of these metals would be desirable in terms of the value of the products. Several processes for the leaching of the base metals from plant calcines have been investigated, and an important general conclusion is that an adequate recovery of the base metals requires that a large proportion of the iron should also be extracted. This observation led to a more extensive investigation of the kinetics of leaching of various iron oxides. The application of electrochemical theory and techniques resulted in a fuller understanding of the various factors that govern the rate of leaching of iron oxides. As a result of this fundamental work, alternative treatment schemes that should yield more efficient extraction from calcines were suggested. Several of these possibilities were investigated, and the most promising were found to require reducing conditions during the leach, or prior partial reduction of the calcine to magnetite or wustite

  16. Origin of Activity and Stability Enhancement for Ag3PO4 Photocatalyst after Calcination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyu Dong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Pristine Ag3PO4 microspheres were synthesized by a co-precipitation method, followed by being calcined at different temperatures to obtain a series of calcined Ag3PO4 photocatalysts. This work aims to investigate the origin of activity and stability enhancement for Ag3PO4 photocatalyst after calcination based on the systematical analyses of the structures, morphologies, chemical states of elements, oxygen defects, optical absorption properties, separation and transfer of photogenerated electron-hole pairs, and active species. The results indicate that oxygen vacancies (VO˙˙ are created and metallic silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs are formed by the reaction of partial Ag+ in Ag3PO4 semiconductor with the thermally excited electrons from Ag3PO4 and then deposited on the surface of Ag3PO4 microspheres during the calcination process. Among the calcined Ag3PO4 samples, the Ag3PO4-200 sample exhibits the best photocatalytic activity and greatly enhanced photocatalytic stability for photodegradation of methylene blue (MB solution under visible light irradiation. Oxygen vacancies play a significantly positive role in the enhancement of photocatalytic activity, while metallic Ag has a very important effect on improving the photocatalytic stability. Overall, the present work provides some powerful evidences and a deep understanding on the origin of activity and stability enhancement for the Ag3PO4 photocatalyst after calcination.

  17. Effects of rapid calcination on properties of calcium-based sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Chang-Feng; Grace, John R.; Lim, C. Jim

    2010-01-01

    The calcination process may influence subsequent fragmentation, sintering and swelling when CaO derived from limestone acts as a CO 2 or SO 2 -sorbent in combustion, gasification and reforming. Sorbent properties are affected by CO 2 partial pressure, total pressure, temperature, heating rate, impurities and sample size. In this study, the effect of calcination heating rate was investigated based on an electrically heated platinum foil. The effects of heating rate (up to 800 C/s), calcination temperature (700-950 C), particle size (90-180 μm) and sweep gas velocity were investigated. Higher initial heating rates led to lower extents of limestone calcination, but the extents of carbonation of the resulting CaO were similar to each other. Calcium utilization declined markedly during carbonation or sulphation of CaO after calcination by rapid heating. Experimental results show that carbonation and calcium utilization were most effective for carbonation temperatures between 503 and 607 C. Increasing the extent of calcination is not the best way to improve overall calcium utilization due to the vast increase in energy consumption. (author)

  18. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project`s scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary.

  19. Characterization of magnetic biochar amended with silicon dioxide prepared at high temperature calcination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baig Shams Ali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Calcination is considered to increase the hardness of composite material and prevent its breakage for the effective applications in environmental remediation. In this study, magnetic biochar amended with silicon dioxide was calcined at high temperature under nitrogen environment and characterized using various techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis revealed elimination of Fe3O4 peaks under nitrogen calcination and formation of Fe3Si and iron as major constituents of magnetic biochar-SiO2 composite, which demonstrated its superparamagnetic behavior (>80 A2·kg−1 comparable to magnetic biochar. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA revealed that both calcined samples generated higher residual mass (>96 % and demonstrated better thermal stability. The presence of various bands in Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR was more obvious and the elimination of H–O–H bonding was observed at high temperature calcination. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM images revealed certain morphological variation among the samples and the presence of more prominent internal and external pores, which then judged the surface area and pore volume of samples. Findings from this study suggests that the selective calcination process could cause useful changes in the material composites and can be effectively employed in environmental remediation measures.

  20. ICPP calcined solids storage facility closure study. Volume III: Engineering design files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-02-01

    The following information was calculated to support cost estimates and radiation exposure calculations for closure activities at the Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF). Within the estimate, volumes were calculated to determine the required amount of grout to be used during closure activities. The remaining calcine on the bin walls, supports, piping, and floor was also calculated to approximate the remaining residual calcine volumes at different stages of the removal process. The estimates for remaining calcine and vault void volume are higher than what would actually be experienced in the field, but are necessary for bounding purposes. The residual calcine in the bins may be higher than was is experienced in the field as it was assumed that the entire bin volume is full of calcine before removal activities commence. The vault void volumes are higher as the vault roof beam volumes were neglected. The estimations that follow should be considered rough order of magnitude, due to the time constraints as dictated by the project's scope of work. Should more accurate numbers be required, a new analysis would be necessary

  1. NACOM - a code for sodium spray fire analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rao, P.M.; Kannan, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBR), leakage of sodium can result in a spray fire. Because of higher burning rates in droplet form combustion of sodium in spray fire, thermal consequences are more severe than that in a sodium pool fire. The code NACOM was developed for the analysis of sodium spray fires in LMFBRs facilities. The code uses the validated model for estimating the falling droplet burning rates in pre-ignition and vapour phase combustion stages. It uses a distribution system to generate the droplet groups of different diameters that represent the spray. The code requires about 20 input parameters like sodium leak rates, sodium temperature, initial cell conditions like oxygen concentration, temperature and dimensions. NACOM is a validated code based on experiments with sodium inventory up to 650 kg in 0 to 21 % O 2 atmospheres. The paper brings out the salient features of the code along with the sensitivity analysis of the main input parameters like spray volume mean diameter, oxygen concentration etc. based on the results obtained. The limitations of the code and the confidence margins applicable to results obtained are also brought out

  2. Spray-formed tooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, K. M.; Key, J. F.

    The United States Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) has formed a partnership with the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) to develop a process for the rapid production of low-cost tooling based on spray forming technology developed at the INEL. Phase 1 of the program will involve bench-scale system development, materials characterization, and process optimization. In Phase 2, prototype systems will be designed, constructed, evaluated, and optimized. Process control and other issues that influence commercialization will be addressed during this phase of the project. Technology transfer to USCAR, or a tooling vendor selected by USCAR, will be accomplished during Phase 3. The approach INEL is using to produce tooling, such as plastic injection molds and stamping dies, combines rapid solidification processing and net-shape materials processing into a single step. A bulk liquid metal is pressure-fed into a de Laval spray nozzle transporting a high velocity, high temperature inert gas. The gas jet disintegrates the metal into fine droplets and deposits them onto a tool pattern made from materials such as plastic, wax, clay, ceramics, and metals. The approach is compatible with solid freeform fabrication techniques such as stereolithography, selective laser sintering, and laminated object manufacturing. Heat is extracted rapidly, in-flight, by convection as the spray jet entrains cool inert gas to produce undercooled and semi-solid droplets. At the pattern, the droplets weld together while replicating the shape and surface features of the pattern. Tool formation is rapid; deposition rates in excess of 1 ton/h have been demonstrated for bench-scale nozzles.

  3. Microplasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    CERN Document Server

    Dey, Arjun

    2015-01-01

    ""This unique book on development of microplasma sprayed HAp coating has been organized in a very compact yet comprehensive manner. This book also highlights the horizons of future research that invites the attention of global community, particularly those in bio-medical materials and bio-medical engineering field. This book will surely act as a very useful reference material for both graduate/post-graduate students and researchers in the field of biomedical, orthopedic and manufacturing engineering and research. I truly believ that this is the first ever effort which covers almost all the

  4. Enhanced Hydrogen Production Integrated with CO2 Separation in a Single-Stage Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahesh Iyer; Himanshu Gupta; Danny Wong; Liang-Shih Fan

    2005-09-30

    Hydrogen production from coal gasification can be enhanced by driving the equilibrium limited Water Gas Shift reaction forward by incessantly removing the CO{sub 2} by-product via the carbonation of calcium oxide. This project aims at using the OSU patented high-reactivity mesoporous precipitated calcium carbonate sorbent for removing the CO{sub 2} product. Preliminary experiments demonstrate the show the superior performance of the PCC sorbent over other naturally occurring calcium sorbents. Gas composition analyses show the formation of 100% pure hydrogen. Novel calcination techniques could lead to smaller reactor footprint and single-stage reactors that can achieve maximum theoretical H{sub 2} production for multicyclic applications. Sub-atmospheric calcination studies reveal the effect of vacuum level, diluent gas flow rate, thermal properties of the diluent gas and the sorbent loading on the calcination kinetics which play an important role on the sorbent morphology. Steam, which can be easily separated from CO{sub 2}, is envisioned to be a potential diluent gas due to its enhanced thermal properties. Steam calcination studies at 700-850 C reveal improved sorbent morphology over regular nitrogen calcination. A mixture of 80% steam and 20% CO{sub 2} at ambient pressure was used to calcine the spent sorbent at 820 C thus lowering the calcination temperature. Regeneration of calcium sulfide to calcium carbonate was achieved by carbonating the calcium sulfide slurry by bubbling CO{sub 2} gas at room temperature.

  5. Aerial spraying to capture released radioactivity from NPP in a severe accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Younus, Irfan; Yim, Man Sung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Medard, Thiphaine [Ecole des Mines de Saint-Etienne, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The proposed strategy in this paper is the use of aqueous spray (water/foam) mixed with suitable chemical additives to capture, dissolve and stabilize the radioactive gases and aerosol particles released from leaked reactor containment and auxiliary building. The spray system can be approached to the leaked reactor building through the use of a truck with high rising cranes, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, such as helicopters), aerostats, or by installing fixed piping structure around the containment building depending on the accident situation. Laboratory-scale experimental system was setup to examine the performance of such systems. The alkaline water (aqueous NaOH.Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and foam-based spray material (sodium lauryl sulphate) were used to examine capture efficiency of gaseous iodine and aerosol particles. The gaseous iodine and aerosol removal efficiency of foam-based spray is higher when compared with alkaline water-based spray. 2. The nozzle producing full cone spray provides the better removal efficiency than nozzle producing hollow cone spray patterns.

  6. Aerial spraying to capture released radioactivity from NPP in a severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Younus, Irfan; Yim, Man Sung; Medard, Thiphaine

    2016-01-01

    The proposed strategy in this paper is the use of aqueous spray (water/foam) mixed with suitable chemical additives to capture, dissolve and stabilize the radioactive gases and aerosol particles released from leaked reactor containment and auxiliary building. The spray system can be approached to the leaked reactor building through the use of a truck with high rising cranes, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, such as helicopters), aerostats, or by installing fixed piping structure around the containment building depending on the accident situation. Laboratory-scale experimental system was setup to examine the performance of such systems. The alkaline water (aqueous NaOH.Na_2S_2O_3) and foam-based spray material (sodium lauryl sulphate) were used to examine capture efficiency of gaseous iodine and aerosol particles. The gaseous iodine and aerosol removal efficiency of foam-based spray is higher when compared with alkaline water-based spray. 2. The nozzle producing full cone spray provides the better removal efficiency than nozzle producing hollow cone spray patterns.

  7. Spray rolling aluminum alloy strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Kevin M.; Delplanque, J.-P.; Johnson, S.B.; Lavernia, E.J.; Zhou, Y.; Lin, Y

    2004-10-10

    Spray rolling combines spray forming with twin-roll casting to process metal flat products. It consists of atomizing molten metal with a high velocity inert gas, cooling the resultant droplets in flight and directing the spray between mill rolls. In-flight convection heat transfer from atomized droplets teams with conductive cooling at the rolls to rapidly remove the alloy's latent heat. Hot deformation of the semi-solid material in the rolls results in fully consolidated, rapidly solidified product. While similar in some ways to twin-roll casting, spray rolling has the advantage of being able to process alloys with broad freezing ranges at high production rates. This paper describes the process and summarizes microstructure and tensile properties of spray-rolled 2124 and 7050 aluminum alloy strips. A Lagrangian/Eulerian poly-dispersed spray flight and deposition model is described that provides some insight into the development of the spray rolling process. This spray model follows droplets during flight toward the rolls, through impact and spreading, and includes oxide film formation and breakup when relevant.

  8. Substrate system for spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Men G. (Export, PA); Chernicoff, William P. (Harrisburg, PA)

    2002-01-01

    A substrate system for receiving a deposit of sprayed metal droplets including a movable outer substrate on which the sprayed metal droplets are deposited. The substrate system also includes an inner substrate disposed adjacent the outer substrate where the sprayed metal droplets are deposited on the outer substrate. The inner substrate includes zones of differing thermal conductivity to resist substrate layer porosity and to resist formation of large grains and coarse constituent particles in a bulk layer of the metal droplets which have accumulated on the outer substrate. A spray forming apparatus and associated method of spray forming a molten metal to form a metal product using the substrate system of the invention is also provided.

  9. Effects of Coke Calcination Level on Pore Structure in Carbon Anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ning; Xue, Jilai; Lang, Guanghui; Bao, Chongai; Gao, Shoulei

    2016-02-01

    Effects of coke calcination levels on pore structure of carbon anodes have been investigated. Bench anodes were prepared by 3 types of cokes with 4 calcination temperatures (800°C, 900°C, 1000°C and 1100°C). The cokes and anodes were characterized using hydrostatic method, air permeability determination, mercury porosimetry, image analysis and confocal microscopy (CSLM). The cokes with different calcination levels are almost the same in LC values (19-20 Å) and real density (1.967-1.985 g/cm3), while the anode containing coke calcined at 900°C has the lowest open porosity and air permeability. Pore size distribution (represented by Anode H sample) can be roughly divided into two ranges: small and medium pores in diameter of 10-400 μm and large pores of 400-580 μm. For the anode containing coke calcined at 800°C, a number of long, narrow pores in the pore size range of 400-580 μm are presented among cokes particles. Formation of these elongated pores may be attributed to coke shrinkages during the anode baking process, which may develop cracking in the anode under cell operations. More small or medium rounded pores with pore size range of 10-400 μm emerge in the anodes with coke calcination temperatures of 900°C, 1000°C and 1100°C, which may be generated due to release of volatiles from the carbon anode during baking. For the anode containing coke calcined at 1100°C, it is found that many rounded pores often closely surround large coke particles, which have potential to form elongated, narrow pores.

  10. Spray deposition and spray drift in orchard spraying by multiple row sprayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wenneker, M.; Zande, van de J.C.; Michielsen, J.G.P.; Stallinga, H.; Velde, van P.

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of the latest data on spray drift in orchard spraying in the Netherlands, and measurements of surface water quality parameters show that the current legislation and measures are insufficient to protect the surface water. To meet the national and European objectives regarding surface

  11. Vacuum-plasma-sprayed silicon coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varacalle, D.J. Jr.; Herman, H.; Bancke, G.A.; Burchell, T.D.; Romanoski, G.R.

    1991-01-01

    Vacuum plasma spraying produces well-bonded dense stress-free coatings for a variety of materials on a wide range of substrates. The process is used in many industries for the excellent wear, corrosion resistance and high temperature behavior of the fabricated coatings. In this study, silicon metal was deposited on graphite to study the feasibility of preventing corrosion and oxidation of graphite components for nuclear reactors. Operating parameters were varied in a Taguchi design of experiments to display the range of the plasma processing conditions and their effect on the measured coating characteristics. The coating attributes evaluated were thickness, porosity, microhardness and phase content. This paper discusses the influence of the processing parameters on as-sprayed coating qualities. The paper also discusses the effect of thermal cycling on silicon samples in an inert helium atmosphere. The diffraction spectrum for a sample that experienced a 1600degC temperature cycle indicated that more than 99% of the coating transformed to β-SiC. The silicon coatings protected the graphite substrates from oxidation in one experiment. (orig.)

  12. Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

    2001-01-01

    The formulation, synthesis, characterization and hydration kinetics of hydroceramic waste forms designed as potential hosts for existing INEEL calcine high-level wastes have been established as functions of temperature and processing time. Initial experimentations were conducted with several aluminosilicate pozzolanic materials, ranging from fly ash obtained from various power generating coal and other combustion industries to reactive alumina, natural clays and ground bottled glass powders. The final selection criteria were based on the ease of processing, excellent physical properties and chemical durability (low-leaching) determined from the PCT test produced in hydroceramic. The formulation contains vermiculite, Sr(NO32), CsC1, NaOH, thermally altered (calcined natural clay) and INEEL simulated calcine high-level nuclear wastes and 30 weight percent of fluorinel blend calcine and zirconia calcine. Syntheses were carried out at 75-200 degree C at autogeneous water pressure (100% relative humidity) at various time intervals. The resulting monolithic compact products were hard and resisted breaking when dropped from a 5 ft height. Hydroceramic host mixed with fluorinel blend calcine and processed at 75 degree C crumbled into rice hull-side grains or developed scaly flakes. However, the samples equally possessed the same chemical durability as their unbroken counterparts. Phase identification by XRD revealed that hydroceramic host crystallized type zeolite at 75-150 degree C and NaP1 at 175-200 degree C in addition to the presence of quartz phase originating from the clay reactant. Hydroceramic host mixed with either fluorinel blend calcine or zirconia calcine crystallized type A zeolite at 75-95 degree C, formed a mixture of type A zeolite and hydroxysodalite at 125-150 degree C and hydroxysodalite at 175-200 degree C. Quartz, calcium fluoride and zirconia phases from the clay reactant and the two calcine wastes were also detected. The PCT test solution

  13. Determination of the Rate of Formation of Hydroceramic Waste Forms made with INEEL Calcined Wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barry Scheetz; Johnson Olanrewaju

    2001-10-15

    The formulation, synthesis, characterization and hydration kinetics of hydroceramic waste forms designed as potential hosts for existing INEEL calcine high-level wastes have been established as functions of temperature and processing time. Initial experimentations were conducted with several aluminosilicate pozzolanic materials, ranging from fly ash obtained from various power generating coal and other combustion industries to reactive alumina, natural clays and ground bottled glass powders. The final selection criteria were based on the ease of processing, excellent physical properties and chemical durability (low-leaching) determined from the PCT test produced in hydroceramic. The formulation contains vermiculite, Sr(NO32), CsC1, NaOH, thermally altered (calcined natural clay) and INEEL simulated calcine high-level nuclear wastes and 30 weight percent of fluorinel blend calcine and zirconia calcine. Syntheses were carried out at 75-200 degree C at autogeneous water pressure (100% relative humidity) at various time intervals. The resulting monolithic compact products were hard and resisted breaking when dropped from a 5 ft height. Hydroceramic host mixed with fluorinel blend calcine and processed at 75 degree C crumbled into rice hull-side grains or developed scaly flakes. However, the samples equally possessed the same chemical durability as their unbroken counterparts. Phase identification by XRD revealed that hydroceramic host crystallized type zeolite at 75-150 degree C and NaP1 at 175-200 degree C in addition to the presence of quartz phase originating from the clay reactant. Hydroceramic host mixed with either fluorinel blend calcine or zirconia calcine crystallized type A zeolite at 75-95 degree C, formed a mixture of type A zeolite and hydroxysodalite at 125-150 degree C and hydroxysodalite at 175-200 degree C. Quartz, calcium fluoride and zirconia phases from the clay reactant and the two calcine wastes were also detected. The PCT test solution

  14. Impact of sophisticated fog spray models on accident analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roblyer, S.P.; Owzarski, P.C.

    1978-01-01

    The N-Reactor confinement system release dose to the public in a postulated accident is reduced by washing the confinement atmosphere with fog sprays. This allows a low pressure release of confinement atmosphere containing fission products through filters and out an elevated stack. The current accident analysis required revision of the CORRAL code and other codes such as CONTEMPT to properly model the N Reactor confinement into a system of multiple fog-sprayed compartments. In revising these codes, more sophisticated models for the fog sprays and iodine plateout were incorporated to remove some of the conservatism of steam condensing rate, fission product washout and iodine plateout than used in previous studies. The CORRAL code, which was used to describe the transport and deposition of airborne fission products in LWR containment systems for the Rasmussen Study, was revised to describe fog spray removal of molecular iodine (I 2 ) and particulates in multiple compartments for sprays having individual characteristics of on-off times, flow rates, fall heights, and drop sizes in changing containment atmospheres. During postulated accidents, the code determined the fission product removal rates internally rather than from input decontamination factors. A discussion is given of how the calculated plateout and washout rates vary with time throughout the analysis. The results of the accident analyses indicated that more credit could be given to fission product washout and plateout. An important finding was that the release of fission products to the atmosphere and adsorption of fission products on the filters were significantly lower than previous studies had indicated

  15. Indoor spray measurement of spray drift potential using a spray drift test bench : effect of drift-reducing nozzle types, spray boom height, nozzle spacing and forward speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno Ruiz, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    In a series of indoor experiments spray drift potential was assessed when spraying over a spray drift testbench with two different driving speeds, 2m/s and 4m/s, two different spray boom heights, 30 cm and 50 cm, and two different nozzle spacing, 25 cm and 50 cm, for six different nozzle types. The

  16. Preparation of plutonium waste forms with ICPP calcined high-level waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, B.A.; Knecht, D.A. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O`Holleran, T.P. [Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1997-05-01

    Glass and glass-ceramic forms developed for the immobilization of calcined high-level wastes generated by Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) fuel reprocessing activities have been investigated for ability to immobilize plutonium and to simultaneously incorporate calcined waste as an anti-proliferation barrier. Within the forms investigated, crystallization of host phases result in an increased loading of plutonium as well as its incorporation into potentially more durable phases than the glass. The host phases were initially formed and characterized with cerium (Ce{sup +4}) as a surrogate for plutonium (Pu{sup +4}) and samarium as a neutron absorber for criticality control. Verification of the surrogate testing results were then performed replacing cerium with plutonium. All testing was performed with surrogate calcined high-level waste. The results of these tests indicated that a potentially useful host phase, based on zirconia, can be formed either by devitrification or solid state reaction in the glass studied. This phase incorporates plutonium as well as samarium and the calcined waste becomes part of the matrix. Its ease of formation makes it potentially useful in excess plutonium dispositioning. Other durable host phases for plutonium and samarium, including zirconolite and zircon have been formed from zirconia or alumina calcine through cold press-sintering techniques and hot isostatic pressing. Host phase formation experiments conducted through vitrification or by cold press-sintering techniques are described and the results discussed. Recommendations are given for future work that extends the results of this study.

  17. Applied laboratory research of high-level waste denitration and calcination technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.

    1977-01-01

    Denitration and calcination processes are assessed for model solutions of high-level radioactive wastes. The kinetics was studied of the reaction of HNO 3 with HCOOH with respect to the final composition of the gaseous product. A survey is presented of used denitration agents and of reaction processes. Calcination was studied both as associated with denitration in a single technological step and separately. Also studied was the pyrolysis and chemical decomposition of sodium nitrate which forms an indecomposable melt in the temperature region of 320 to 850 degC under normal conditions. Based on the experiments a laboratory unit was designed and produced for the denitration and calcination of model solutions of high-level radioactive wastes operating in a temperature range of 100 to 550 degC with a capacity of 1000 ml/h. A boiler type stirred evaporator with electric heating (3 kW) was chosen for the denitration unit while a vertical calcinator modified from a film evaporator with a thermal input of 4 kW was chosen for the calcination unit. (B.S.)

  18. Chemistry of proposed calcination/dissolution processing of Hanford Site tank wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.

    1995-01-01

    Plans exist to separate radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site in south central Washington State into low-level and high-level fractions, and to immobilize the separate fractions in high-integrity vitrified forms for long-term disposal. Calcination with water dissolution has been proposed as a possible treatment for achieving low/high-level separation. Chemistry development activities conducted since 1992 with simulated and genuine tank waste show that calcination/dissolution destroys organic carbon and converts nitrate and nitrite to hydroxide and benign offgases. The process also dissolves significant quantities of bulk chemicals (aluminum, chromium, and phosphate), allowing their redistribution from the high-level to the low-level fraction. Present studies of the chemistry of calcination/dissolution processing of genuine wastes, conducted in the period October 1993 to September 1994, show the importance of sodium fluoride phosphate double salt in controlling phosphate dissolution. Peptization of waste solids is of concern if extensive washing occurs. Strongly oxidizing conditions imposed by calcination reactions were found to convert transition metals to soluble anions in the order chromate > manganate > > ferrate. In analogy with manganese behavior, plutonium dissolution, presumably by oxidation to more soluble anionic species, also occurs by calcination/dissolution. Methods to remove plutonium from the product low-level solution stream must be developed

  19. Design of a hot pilot plant facility for demonstration of the pot calcination process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckham, J A

    1962-01-01

    A facility was designed for demonstration of the pot calcination process with wastes from processing aluminum alloy fuels, Darex or electrolytic processing of stainless-steel fuels, and Purex processes. This facility will also permit determination of procedures required for economical production of low-porosity, relatively nonleachable materials by addition of suitable reagents to the wastes fed to the calciner. The process consists of concentration by evaporation and thermal decomposition in situ in pots which also serve as the final disposal containers. This unit permits determination of pot loading and density, leachability, melting point, volatile material content, heat release, and thermal conductivity of the calcine. Also to be determined are transient calcine temperature distributions, fission product behavior during calcination, deentrainment obtained in the various parts of the system, decontamination achieved on all liquid and gaseous effluent streams, need for venting of stored pots, optimum means of remotely sealing the pots, and methods required for production of a minimum volume of noncondensable off-gas. This facility will employ nominal full-scale pots 8 and 12 in. in diameter and 8 ft long. A unique evaporator design was evolved to permit operation either with close-coupled continuous feed preparation or with bath feed preparation. Provisions were made to circumvent possible explosions due to organic material in feed solutions and other suspected hazards.

  20. Final safety-analysis report for the Fifth Calcined Solids Storage Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Radioactive aqueous wastes generated by the solvent extraction of uranium from expended fuels at ICPP will be calcined in the New Waste Calcining Facility (NWCF). The calcined solids are pneumatically transferred to stainless steel bins enclosed in concrete vaults for interim storage of up to 500 years. The Fifth Calcined Solids Storage Facility (CSSF) provides 1000 m 3 of storage and consists of seven annular stainless steel bins inside a reinforced concrete vault set on bedrock. Storage of calcined solids is essentially a passive operation with very little opportunity for release of radionuclides and with no potential for criticality. There will be no potential for fire or explosion. Shielding has been designed to assure that the radiation levels at the vault exterior surfaces will be limited to less than 0.5 mRem/h. A sump in the vault floor will collect any in-leakage that may occur. Any water that collects in the sump will be sampled then removed with the sump jet. There will be an extremely small chance of release of radioactive particulates into the atmosphere as a result of a bin leak. The Design Basis Accident (DBA) postulates the spill of solids from an eroded fill line into the vault coupled with a failure of the vault cooling air radiation monitor. For the DBA, the maximum calculated radiation dose to an exposed individual near the site boundary is less than 1.2 μRem to the bone and lung

  1. Removal of Dissolved Silica using Calcinated Hydrotalcite in Real-life Applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasan, Koroush [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brady, Patrick Vane. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Krumhansl, James L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nenoff, Tina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sasan, Koroush [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sasan, Koroush [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Water shortages are a growing global problem. Reclamation of industrial and municipal wastewater will be necessary in order to mitigate water scarcity. However, many operational challenges, such as silica scaling, prevent large scale water reuse. Previously, our team at Sandia has demonstrated the use of selective ion exchange materials, such as calcinated hydrotalcite (HTC, (Mg 6 Al 2 (OH) 16 (CO 3 )*4H 2 O)), for the low cost removal of silica from synthetic cooling tower water. However, it is not currently know if calcinated HTC has similar capabilities in realistic applications. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of calcinated HTC to remove silica from real cooling tower water. This was investigated under both batch and continuous conditions, and in the presence of competing ions. It was determined that calcinated HTC behaved similarly in real and synthetic cooling tower water; the HTC is highly selective for the silica even in the presence of competing cations. Therefore, the data concludes that calcinated HTC is a viable anti-scaling pretreatment for the reuse of industrial wastewaters.

  2. Preparation of plutonium waste forms with ICPP calcined high-level waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Knecht, D.A.; O'Holleran, T.P.

    1997-05-01

    Glass and glass-ceramic forms developed for the immobilization of calcined high-level wastes generated by Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) fuel reprocessing activities have been investigated for ability to immobilize plutonium and to simultaneously incorporate calcined waste as an anti-proliferation barrier. Within the forms investigated, crystallization of host phases result in an increased loading of plutonium as well as its incorporation into potentially more durable phases than the glass. The host phases were initially formed and characterized with cerium (Ce +4 ) as a surrogate for plutonium (Pu +4 ) and samarium as a neutron absorber for criticality control. Verification of the surrogate testing results were then performed replacing cerium with plutonium. All testing was performed with surrogate calcined high-level waste. The results of these tests indicated that a potentially useful host phase, based on zirconia, can be formed either by devitrification or solid state reaction in the glass studied. This phase incorporates plutonium as well as samarium and the calcined waste becomes part of the matrix. Its ease of formation makes it potentially useful in excess plutonium dispositioning. Other durable host phases for plutonium and samarium, including zirconolite and zircon have been formed from zirconia or alumina calcine through cold press-sintering techniques and hot isostatic pressing. Host phase formation experiments conducted through vitrification or by cold press-sintering techniques are described and the results discussed. Recommendations are given for future work that extends the results of this study

  3. RECONSTRUCTION OF CALCINED Zn -Al LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES DURING TETRACYCLINE ADSORPSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Starukh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Zn-Al mixed oxides containing ZnO different degree crystallinity were obtained by calcinations of Zn-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs. The reconstruction of calcined Zn-Al LDHs has been performed under stirring in aqueous suspensions. The assynthesized LDHs, its decomposition products, as well as the reconstructed solids upon hydration were characterized by XRD, N2adsorption, differential and thermal gravimetric analysis. It was found that the ability of Zn-Al LDHs to recover a layered structure under the hydration of mixed oxides depends on the degree of ZnO crystallinity. The partial reconstruction of Zn-Al layered structure occurs in tetracycline solutions irrespective to the degree of ZnO crystallinity in calcined LDHs. Calcined Zn-Al LDHs demonstrate the higher adsorption capacity to tetracycline in comparison with as-prepared Zn-Al LDHs. The adsorption of TC on calcined and uncalcined ZnAl LDHs occurs on the centers of one particular type. It is suggested that surface complexation of the A-ring ligand of TC with Al-OH centers takes place.

  4. Modeling of Diesel Fuel Spray Formation and Combustion in OpenFOAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koesters, Anne

    2012-07-01

    Laboratories. The next step was to update the code with a model of the turbulence-chemistry interaction. The volume reactor fraction model (VRFM), a novel partially stirred reactor (PaSR) model, has been implemented in OpenFOAMr. The model defines a reactor fraction based on the mixture fraction, the chemical progress variable, and their variances instead of defining mixing and chemical time scales. The chemistry is described by a reduced n-heptane mechanism with 36 species involved in 81 reactions. The effect of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on n-heptane sprays for Diesel enginelike conditions was studied with the VRFM and results obtained from the calculations are compared to experimental data from the Engine Combustion Network.

  5. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryant, J.W.; Nenni, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, ''Radioactive Waste Management Manual.'' Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  6. Structural Integrity Program for the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffrey Bryant

    2008-01-01

    This report documents the activities of the structural integrity program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center relevant to the high-level waste Calcined Solids Storage Facilities and associated equipment, as required by DOE M 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual'. Based on the evaluation documented in this report, the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities are not leaking and are structurally sound for continued service. Recommendations are provided for continued monitoring of the Calcined Solids Storage Facilities

  7. Modifications Of A Commercial Spray Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Peter B.

    1993-01-01

    Commercial spray gun modified to increase spray rate and make sprayed coats more nearly uniform. Consists of gun head and pneumatic actuator. Actuator opens valves for two chemical components, called "A" and "B," that react to produce foam. Components flow through orifices, into mixing chamber in head. Mixture then flows through control orifice to spray tip. New spray tip tapered to reduce area available for accumulation of foam and makes tip easier to clean.

  8. Calcination of Fluorinel-sodium waste blends using sugar as a feed additive (formerly WINCO-11879)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newby, B.J.; Thomson, T.D.; O'Brien, B.H.

    1992-06-01

    Methods were studied for using sugar as a feed additive for converting the sodium-bearing wastes stored at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant into granular, free flowing solids by fluidized-bed calcination at 500 degrees C. All methods studied blended sodium-bearing wastes with Fluorinel wastes but differed in the types of sugar (sucrose or dextrose) that were added to the blend. The most promising sugar additive was determined to be sucrose, since it is converted more completely to inorganic carbon than is dextrose. The effect of the feed aluminum-to-alkali metal mole ratio on calcination of these blends with sugar was also investigated. Increasing the aluminum-to-alkali metal ratio from 0.6 to 1.0 decreased the calcine product-to-fines ratio from 3.0 to 1.0 and the attrition index from 80 to 15%. Further increasing the ratio to 1.25 had no effect

  9. Ce - promoted catalyst from hydrotalcites for CO2 reforming of methane: calcination temperature effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique Daza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ce-promoted Ni-catalysts from hydrotalcites were obtained. The effect of calcination temperature on the chemical and physical properties of the catalysts was studied. Several techniques were used to determine the chemical and physical characteristics of oxides. The apparent activation energies of reduction were determined. Catalytic experiments at 48 L g-1h-1 without pre-reduction in CO2 reforming of methane were performed. The spinel-like phase in these oxides was only formed at 1000 ºC. The reduction of Ni2+ in the oxides was clearly affected by the calcination temperature which was correlated with catalytic performance. The catalyst calcined at 700 ºC showed the greatest activity.

  10. Pyrochemical treatment of Idaho Chemical Processing Plant high-level waste calcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todd, T.A.; DelDebbio, J.A.; Nelson, L.O.; Sharpsten, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP), located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), has reprocessed irradiated nuclear fuels for the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1951 to recover uranium, krypton-85, and isolated fission products for interim treatment and immobilization. The acidic radioactive high-level liquid waste (HLLW) is routinely stored in stainless steel tanks and then, since 1963, calcined to form a dry granular solid. The resulting high-level waste (HLW) calcine is stored in seismically hardened stainless steel bins that are housed in underground concrete vaults. A research and development program has been established to determine the feasibility of treating ICPP HLW calcine using pyrochemical technology.This technology is described

  11. Stoichiometry of the U3O8 phase formed during calcination of some uranium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fekey, S.A.; Farah, M.Y.; Rofail, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    Although recent work has shown U 3 O 8 phase to be the decomposition product obtained after calcining uranyl nitrate, sulphate or ammonium uranate, neither the necessary conditions for obtaining stoichiometric U 3 O 8 nor the details of the reaction have been established. Presence of sulphate or nitrate ions during preparation greatly affects the O/U of the obtained oxides and the physico-chemical properties of uranium tetrafluoride prepared afterwards from it (1-3). The aim of the present investigation was to study the effect of calcination regimes on the stoichiometry of the U 3 O 8 phase produced by the thermal decomposition of uranyl nitrate, sulphate, and ammonium uranate, which was prepared by precipitation from nuclear-pure uranyl sulphate. Stoichiometry of the U 3 O 8 phase formed during calcination of ammonium uranate precipitated from nuclear pure uranyl nitrate solution was reported before (1)

  12. An Assessment of Using Vibrational Compaction of Calcined HLW and LLW in DWPF Canisters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, Yun-Bo; Amme, Robert C.; Shayer, Zeev

    2008-01-01

    Since 1963, the INEL has calcined almost 8 million gallons of liquid mixed waste and liquid high-level waste, converting it to some 1.1 million gallons of dry calcine (about 4275.0 m3), which consists of alumina-and zirconia-based calcine and zirconia-sodium blend calcine. In addition, if all existing and projected future liquid wastes are solidified, approximately 2,000 m3 of additional calcine will be produced primarily from sodium-bearing waste. Calcine is a more desirable material to store than liquid radioactive waste because it reduces volume, is much less corrosive, less chemically reactive, less mobile under most conditions, easier to monitor and more protective of human health and the environment. This paper describes the technical issue involved in the development of a feasible solution for further volume reduction of calcined nuclear waste for transportation and long term storage, using a standard DWPF canister. This will be accomplished by developing a process wherein the canisters are transported into a vibrational machine, for further volume reduction by about 35%. The random compaction experiments show that this volume reduction is achievable. The main goal of this paper is to demonstrate through computer modeling that it is feasible to use volume reduction vibrational machine without developing stress/strain forces that will weaken the canister integrity. Specifically, the paper presents preliminary results of the stress/strain analysis of the DWPF canister as a function of granular calcined height during the compaction and verifying that the integrity of the canister is not compromised. This preliminary study will lead to the development of better technology for safe compactions of nuclear waste that will have significant economical impact on nuclear waste storage and treatment. The preliminary results will guide us to find better solutions to the following questions: 1) What are the optimum locations and directions (vertical versus horizontal or

  13. Characterisation of sugar cane straw waste as pozzolanic material for construction: Calcining temperature and kinetic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frias, Moises; Villar-Cocina, E.; Valencia-Morales, E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the influence of calcining temperature (800 and 1000 deg. C) on the pozzolanic activation of sugar cane straw (SCS). The reaction kinetics of SCS ash-lime mixtures were inferred from physicochemical characteristics (X-ray diffraction patterns and thermogravimetry analysis. The fitting of a kinetic-diffusive model to the experimental data (fixed lime versus time) allowed the computing of the kinetic parameters (reaction rate constant) of the pozzolanic reaction. Results obtained confirm that the sugar cane straw ash (SCSA) calcined at 800 and 1000 deg. C have properties indicative of very high pozzolanic activity. No influence of calcining temperature on the pozzolanic activity was observed. Also, no crystalline compounds during the pozzolanic reaction were identified up to 90 days of reaction. Environmental durability and strength of the consequential mortars remain to be assessed

  14. Synthesis of well-dispersed ZnO nanomaterials by directly calcining zinc stearate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Guangsheng; Shi Chen; Tao Dongliang; Qian Weizhong; Han Dongmei

    2009-01-01

    Well-dispersed ZnO nanomaterials were synthesized by direct calcination of zinc stearate. Results from Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicated both the decomposition degree of organic ligand and the purity of calcined products were increased with the calcination temperature. The influence of decomposition temperature on the morphology of ZnO nanomaterials was investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experimental results revealed the morphology of ZnO transformed from nanosheets to hexagonal nanopyramids and then to nanoparticles at 573, 673 and 773 K respectively. Finally, a morphology evolution model of ZnO nanomaterials under different temperatures was proposed

  15. Calcinated tea and cellulose composite films and its dielectric and lead adsorption properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaramudu, Tippabattini; Varaprasad, Kokkarachedu; Kim, Hyun Chan; Kafy, Abdullahil; Kim, Jung Woong; Kim, Jaehwan

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, calcinated tea and cellulose composite (CTCC) films were fabricated via solution casting method. Chemical structure, morphology, crystallinity and thermal stability of the fabricated films were characterized by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis. The effect of calcinated tea loading on the properties of the prepared CTCC films was studied. The results suggest that the prepared CTCC films show higher mechanical properties, thermal stability and dielectric constant than the neat cellulose film. In addition, the CTCC films adsorb Pb 2+ ions and its adsorption performance depends on the calcinated tea content and pH level. The CTCC films are useful for sensors, flexible capacitor as well as lead adsorption applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Absorption/desorption in sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naimpally, A.

    1987-01-01

    This survey paper shall seek to present the present state of knowledge concerning absorption and desorption in spray chambers. The first part of the paper presents the theories and formulas for the atomization and break-up of sprays in nozzles. Formulas for the average (sauter-mean) diameters are then presented. For the case of absorption processes, the formulas for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients is in drops. The total; mass transfer is the total of the transfer in individual drops. For the case of desorption of sparingly soluble gases from liquids in a spray chamber, the mass transfer occurs in the spray just at the point of break-up of the jet. Formulas for the desorption of gases are presented

  17. Magnesium Repair by Cold Spray

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Champagne, V. K; Leyman, P.F; Helfritch, D. J

    2008-01-01

    .... Army Research Laboratory has developed a cold spray process to reclaim magnesium components that shows significant improvement over existing methods and is in the process of qualification for use on rotorcraft...

  18. Biodiesel production from waste cooking oil using calcined scallop shell as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirisomboonchai, Suchada; Abuduwayiti, Maidinamu; Guan, Guoqing; Samart, Chanatip; Abliz, Shawket; Hao, Xiaogang; Kusakabe, Katsuki; Abudula, Abuliti

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Calcined scallop shell was used as low-cost and effective catalyst for biodiesel production. • BDF yield from waste cooking oil reached 86% at 65 °C with a catalyst loading amount of 5 wt%. • Calcined scallop shell showed good reusability. • Calcium glyceroxide played an important role on the reusability of calcined scallop shell. • Water in the waste cooking oil had negative effect on the catalytic activity of calcined scallop shell. - Abstract: Transesterification of waste cooking oil (WCO) and methanol by using calcined scallop shell (CSS) as catalyst was carried out in a closed system for biodiesel fuel (BDF) production. It is found that the optimum calcination temperature for the preparation of CSS was 1000 °C. The effects of transesterification temperature, reaction time, methanol/oil molar ratio and catalyst loading amount on the BDF yield were investigated. Compared with the commercial CaO, CSS showed higher catalytic activity and the BDF yield reached 86% at 65 °C with a catalyst loading amount of 5 wt% (WCO basis) and a reaction time of 2 h. The catalyst was reused for 5 cycles whilst the BDF yield decreased 23%. It is found that CaO in CSS was transferred to calcium glyceroxide after the transesterification reaction, and calcium glyceroxide also showed good catalytic activity and reusability. Furthermore, Water content in WCO had negative effect on BDF yield. It is found that BDF yield reduced 15% due to the occurring of saponification when the water content was increased from 0.64% to 2.48%. It is expected that CCS can be used as an alternative and cheap catalyst for the biodiesel production

  19. Study of variation grain size in desulfurization process of calcined petroleum coke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintowantoro, Sungging; Setiawan, Muhammad Arif; Abdul, Fakhreza

    2018-04-01

    Indonesia is a country with abundant natural resources, such as mineral mining and petroleum. In petroleum processing, crude oil can be processed into a source of fuel energy such as gasoline, diesel, oil, petroleum coke, and others. One of crude oil potentials in Indonesia is petroleum coke. Petroleum coke is a product from oil refining process. Sulfur reducing process in calcined petroleum cokes can be done by desulfurization process. The industries which have potential to become petroleum coke processing consumers are industries of aluminum smelting (anode, graphite block, carbon mortar), iron riser, calcined coke, foundry coke, etc. Sulfur reducing process in calcined petroleum coke can be done by thermal desulfurization process with alkaline substance NaOH. Desulfurization of petroleum coke process can be done in two ways, which are thermal desulfurization and hydrodesulphurization. This study aims to determine the effect of various grain size on sulfur, carbon, and chemical bond which contained by calcined petroleum coke. The raw material use calcined petroleum coke with 0.653% sulfur content. The grain size that used in this research is 50 mesh, then varied to 20 mesh and 100 mesh for each desulfurization process. Desulfurization are tested by ICP, UV-VIS, and FTIR to determine levels of sulfur, carbon, chemical bonding and sulfur dissolved water which contained in the residual washing of calcined petroleum coke. From various grain size that mentioned before, the optimal value is on 100 mesh grain size, where the sulfur content in petroleum coke is 0.24% and carbon content reaches the highest level of 97.8%. Meanwhile for grain size 100 mesh in the desulfurization process is enough to break the chemical bonds of organic sulfur in petroleum coke.

  20. Effect of metal ratio and calcination temperature of chromium based mixed oxides catalyst on FAME density from palm fatty acid distillate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Z.; Fatimah, S.; Shahar, S.; Noor, A. C.

    2017-09-01

    Mixed oxides chromium based catalysts were synthesized via sol-gel method for the esterification of palm fatty acid distillate (PFAD) to produce fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). The reactions were conducted in a batch reactor at reaction temperature of 160 °C for 4 h and methanol to PFAD molar ratio of 3:1. The effects of catalyst preparation conditions which are the mixed metal ratio and calcination temperature were studied. The various metal ratio of Cr:Mn (1:0, 0:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1) and Cr:Ti (0:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 2:1) resulted in FAME density ranges from 1.041 g/cm3 to 0.853 g/cm3 and 1.107 g/cm3 to 0.836 g/cm3, respectively. The best condition catalyst was found to be Cr:Ti metal ratio of 1:2 and Cr:Mn metal ratio of 1:1. The calcination temperature of the mixed oxides between 300 °C to 700°C shows effect on the FAME density obtained in the reaction. The calcination at 500°C gave the lowest FAME density of 0.836 g/cm3 and 0.853 g/cm3 for Cr:Ti and Cr:Mn mixed oxides, respectively. The density of FAME is within the value range of the biodiesel fuel property. Thus, mixed oxides of Cr-Ti and Cr-Mn have good potentials as heterogeneous catalyst for FAME synthesis from high acid value oils such as PFAD.

  1. Volatilisation of ruthenium in vitrification. Isothermal calcination studies of 'Magnox' and thermal oxide simulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cains, P.W.; Hay, D.A.

    1982-12-01

    Ru volatilities have been measured for the static, isothermal calcination of ''Magnox'' and Thermal Oxide HAL's (Highly Active Liquors) at temperatures up to 600 0 C. Model solutions containing Ru, HNO 3 , and nitrates of important individual cations have also been investigated. Experimental design was primarily based on the requirements of rotary calcination process development. The results have been interpreted in terms of a reaction model involving competition between the simple degradation of Ru(NO) complexes to RuO 2 and oxidative decomposition to volatile species (e.g. RuO 4 ). (author)

  2. ICPP radioactive liquid and calcine waste technologies evaluation final report and recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    Using a formalized Systems Engineering approach, the Latched Idaho Technologies Company developed and evaluated numerous alternatives for treating, immobilizing, and disposing of radioactive liquid and calcine wastes at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. Based on technical analysis data as of March, 1995, it is recommended that the Department of Energy consider a phased processing approach -- utilizing Radionuclide Partitioning for radioactive liquid and calcine waste treatment, FUETAP Grout for low-activity waste immobilization, and Glass (Vitrification) for high-activity waste immobilization -- as the preferred treatment and immobilization alternative.

  3. Microwave energy for post-calcination treatment of high-level nuclear wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gombert, D.; Priebe, S.J.; Berreth, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    High-level radioactive wastes generated from nuclear fuel reprocessing require treatment for effective long-term storage. Heating by microwave energy is explored in processing of two possible waste forms: (1) drying of a pelleted form of calcined waste; and (2) vitrification of calcined waste. It is shown that residence times for these processes can be greatly reduced when using microwave energy rather than conventional heating sources, without affecting product properties. Compounds in the waste and in the glass frit additives couple very well with the 2.45 GHz microwave field so that no special microwave absorbers are necessary

  4. Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms for immobilization of high- level calcined waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinjamuri, K.

    1993-06-01

    Talc-silicon glass-ceramic waste forms are being evaluated as candidates for immobilization of the high level calcined waste stored onsite at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. These glass-ceramic waste forms were prepared by hot isostatically pressing a mixture of simulated nonradioactive high level calcined waste, talc, silicon and aluminum metal additives. The waste forms were characterized for density, chemical durability, and glass and crystalline phase compositions. The results indicate improved density and chemical durability as the silicon content is increased

  5. Volatilization and trapping of ruthenium during calcination of nitric acid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, M.; Weyers, C.; Goossens, W.R.A.; Smet, M. de; Trine, J.

    1983-01-01

    Solid radioactive aerosols and semi-volatile fission products e.g. Ru, Cs, Sb are generated during high level liquid waste calcination and vitrification processes. The retention of Ruthenium was studied because of its strong tendency to form volatile compounds in oxidative media. Since RuO 4 was the suspected form for high temperature processes, the study was carried out on the behaviour of RuO 4 and its retention on adsorbants and catalysts for various gas compositions. The behaviour of volatilized Ru species obtained by calcination of nitrosyl Ru compounds was then compared with the RuO 4 case

  6. Fuzzy modeling and control of the calcination process in a kiln

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez, M.; Haber, R.

    1999-01-01

    Calcination kilns are strongly nonlinear, multivariable processes, that only can be modeled with great uncertainty. In order to get a quality product and ensure the process efficiency, the controller must keep a prescribed temperature profile optimizing the fuel consumption. In this paper, a design methodology of a multivariable fuzzy controller for a nickel calcination kiln is presented. The controller structure is a classical one, and uses the Mamdani fuzzy inference system. In simulation results the fuzzy controller exhibits a great robustness in presence of several types of disturbances, and a better performance than the PID in same conditions is observed. (author)

  7. Spray Lakes reclamation project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacaruk, M.R.

    1996-01-01

    When the level of the Spray Lakes (Alberta) reservoir was lowered by four metres, 208 ha of shoreline was exposed offering little to no wildlife benefit and only limited recreation potential. A reclamation plan for 128 ha of shoreline was therefore developed. A wild life-palatable, self-sustaining vegetation cover was established. Approximately 90 ha was scarified, and/or had tree stumps removed prior to seeding, while approximately 40 ha was seeded and fertilized only. The remaining 80 ha of shoreline was not revegetated due to limited access; these areas will be allowed to re-establish naturally from the forested edge. The species were selected based on their adaptation to alkaline soils, drought tolerance, persistence in a stand and rooting characteristics, as well as palatability to wildlife. Alfalfa, white clover and fall rye were seeded. In general, all areas of the reclamation plan are successfully revegetated. Areas which were recontoured are stable and non-eroding. Success was most significant in areas which had been scarified, then seeded and trackpacked. Areas that were seeded and fertilized only were less well established at the end of the first year, but showed improvement in the second and third years. The area will be monitored to ensure the reclaimed vegetation is self-sustaining

  8. Brandon mathematical model describing the effect of calcination and reduction parameters on specific surface area of UO{sub 2} powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, Nguyen Trong; Thuan, Le Ba [Institute for Technology of Radioactive and Rare Elements (ITRRE), 48 Lang Ha, Dong Da, Ha Noi (Viet Nam); Van Khoai, Do [Micro-Emission Ltd., 1-1 Asahidai, Nomi, Ishikawa, 923-1211 (Japan); Lee, Jin-Young, E-mail: jinlee@kigam.re.kr [Convergence Research Center for Development of Mineral Resources (DMR), Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Jyothi, Rajesh Kumar, E-mail: rkumarphd@kigam.re.kr [Convergence Research Center for Development of Mineral Resources (DMR), Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM), Daejeon, 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) powder has been widely used to prepare fuel pellets for commercial light water nuclear reactors. Among typical characteristics of the powder, specific surface area (SSA) is one of the most important parameter that determines the sintering ability of UO{sub 2} powder. This paper built up a mathematical model describing the effect of the fabrication parameters on SSA of UO{sub 2} powders. To the best of our knowledge, the Brandon model is used for the first time to describe the relationship between the essential fabrication parameters [reduction temperature (T{sub R}), calcination temperature (T{sub C}), calcination time (t{sub C}) and reduction time (t{sub R})] and SSA of the obtained UO{sub 2} powder product. The proposed model was tested with Wilcoxon's rank sum test, showing a good agreement with the experimental parameters. The proposed model can be used to predict and control the SSA of UO{sub 2} powder.

  9. The influence of calcination temperatures on the acid-based properties and catalytic activity for the 1,3-butadiene synthesis from ethanol/acetaldehyde mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Meixiang; Jiang, Haoxi; Zhang, Minhua

    2018-05-01

    The influences of the calcination temperature on the catalysts' acid-based properties and catalytic activity for the 1,3-butadiene synthesis from ethanol are investigated. The results show that the 2 wt% ZrO2/Nano-SiO2 calcined at 773 K shows the best performance with the selectivity of 93.18% and conversion of 58.52% when reacted at 593 K, a WHSV of 1.8 h-1 and 3.5:1 volume ratio ethanol-to-acetaldehyde in an atmospheric fixed-bed reactor. Prepared catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, temperature-programmed desorption of NH3 and CO2, FTIR spectroscopy of adsorbed pyridine and CO2. Based on the relationship between the catalyst activity and its properties, the fact can be presumed that the formation and strength of Zrsbnd Osbnd Si bond determines the acid-based properties of the catalyst. In addition, moderate-intensity weak acid-basic sites are more suitable for ethanol conversion to BD with the amount of acid and basic sites as close as possible.

  10. Feasibility analysis of As(III) removal in a continuous flow fixed bed system by modified calcined bauxite (MCB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhakat, P.B.; Gupta, A.K.; Ayoob, S.

    2007-01-01

    This study examine the feasibility of As(III) removal from aqueous environment by an adsorbent, modified calcined bauxite (MCB) in a continuous flow fixed bed system. MCB exhibited excellent adsorption capacity of 520.2 mg/L (0.39 mg/g) with an adsorption rate constant 0.7658 L/mg h for an influent As(III) concentration of 1 mg/L. In a 2 cm diameter continuous flow fixed MCB bed, a depth of only 1.765 cm was found necessary to produce effluent As(III) concentration of 0.01 mg/L, from an influent of 1 mg/L at a flow rate of 8 mL/min. Also, bed heights of 10, 20, and 30 cm could treat 427.85, 473.88 and 489.17 bed volumes of water, respectively, to breakthrough. A reduction in adsorption capacity of MCB was observed with increase in flow rates. The theoretical service times evaluated from bed depth service time (BDST) approach for different flow rates and influent As(III) concentrations had shown good correlation with the corresponding experimental values. The theoretical breakthrough curve developed from constantly mixed batch reactor (CMBR) isotherm data also correlated well with experimental breakthrough curve

  11. Slurry spray distribution within a simulated laboratory scale spray dryer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertone, P.C.

    1979-01-01

    It was found that the distribution of liquid striking the sides of a simulated room temperature spray dryer was not significantly altered by the choice of nozles, nor by a variation in nozzle operating conditions. Instead, it was found to be a function of the spray dryer's configuration. A cocurrent flow of air down the drying cylinder, not possible with PNL's closed top, favorably altered the spray distribution by both decreasing the amount of liquid striking the interior of the cylinder from 72 to 26% of the feed supplied, and by shifting the zone of maximum impact from 1.0 to 1.7 feet from the nozzle. These findings led to the redesign of the laboratory scale spray dryer to be tested at the Savannah River Plant. The diameter of the drying chamber was increased from 5 to 8 inches, and a cocurrent flow of air was established with a closed recycle. Finally, this investigation suggested a drying scheme which offers all the advantages of spray drying without many of its limitations

  12. Plasma Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings: Influence of Spraying Power on Microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd, S. M.; Abd, M. Z.; Abd, A. N.

    2010-01-01

    The plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings are used on metallic implants to enhance the bonding between the implant and bone in human body. The coating process was implemented at different spraying power for each spraying condition. The coatings formed from a rapid solidification of molten and partly molten particles that impact on the surface of substrate at high velocity and high temperature. The study was concentrated on different spraying power that is between 23 to 31 kW. The effect of different power on the coatings microstructure was investigated using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and phase composition was evaluated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The coatings surface morphology showed distribution of molten, partially melted particles and some micro-cracks. The produced coatings were found to be porous as observed from the cross-sectional morphology. The coatings XRD results indicated the presence of crystalline phase of HA and each of the patterns was similar to the initial powder. Regardless of different spraying power, all the coatings were having similar XRD patterns.

  13. Waste volume reduction by spray drying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toscano, Rodrigo A.; Tello, Clédola C. O. de, E-mail: Rodrigotoscano1@gmail.com, E-mail: tellocc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The operation of nuclear facilities generates liquid wastes which require treatment to control the chemical compounds and removal of radioactive contaminants. These wastes can come from the cooling of the primary reactor system, from the reactor pool decontamination, washing of contaminated clothing, among others. The ion exchange resin constitutes the largest fraction of this waste, classified as low and intermediate level of radiation. According to CNEN Standard 8.01, the minimization of the volume and activity of the radioactive waste generated in the operation of a nuclear installation, radiative installation, industrial mining installation or radioactive waste deposit should be ensured. In addition, one of the acceptance criteria for wastes in repositories required by CNEN NN 6.09 is that it be solid or solidified. Thus, these wastes must be reduced in volume and solidified to meet the standards and the safety of the population and the environment. The objective of this work is to find a solution that associates the least generation of packaged waste and the acceptance criteria of waste for the deposition in the national repository. This work presents a proposal of reduction of the volume of the liquid wastes generated by nuclear facilities by drying by for reduction of volume for a greater incorporation of wastes in cement. Using spray dryer, an 18% reduction in the production of cemented waste products was observed in relation to the method currently used with compressive strength measurement above the standard, and it is believed that this value may increase in future tests. (author)

  14. Waste volume reduction by spray drying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toscano, Rodrigo A.; Tello, Clédola C. O. de

    2017-01-01

    The operation of nuclear facilities generates liquid wastes which require treatment to control the chemical compounds and removal of radioactive contaminants. These wastes can come from the cooling of the primary reactor system, from the reactor pool decontamination, washing of contaminated clothing, among others. The ion exchange resin constitutes the largest fraction of this waste, classified as low and intermediate level of radiation. According to CNEN Standard 8.01, the minimization of the volume and activity of the radioactive waste generated in the operation of a nuclear installation, radiative installation, industrial mining installation or radioactive waste deposit should be ensured. In addition, one of the acceptance criteria for wastes in repositories required by CNEN NN 6.09 is that it be solid or solidified. Thus, these wastes must be reduced in volume and solidified to meet the standards and the safety of the population and the environment. The objective of this work is to find a solution that associates the least generation of packaged waste and the acceptance criteria of waste for the deposition in the national repository. This work presents a proposal of reduction of the volume of the liquid wastes generated by nuclear facilities by drying by for reduction of volume for a greater incorporation of wastes in cement. Using spray dryer, an 18% reduction in the production of cemented waste products was observed in relation to the method currently used with compressive strength measurement above the standard, and it is believed that this value may increase in future tests. (author)

  15. Use of calcination in exposing the entrapped Fe particles from multi-walled carbon nanotubes grown by chemical vapour deposition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kesavan Pillai, Sreejarani

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available behaviour of the as-prepared and calcined samples was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. Calcination in air, at 400°C for 1 h, was found to be an efficient and simple method to extract metallic impurities from the amorphous carbon shells...

  16. Effect of the rate of calcination of kaolin on the properties of metakaolin-based geopolymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.B. Kenne Diffo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Kaolin samples of the same mass were treated at 700 °C for the same duration of 30 min by varying the rate of calcination (1, 2.5, 5, 10, 15 and 20 °C/min in order to obtain metakaolins which were used to produce geopolymers. Depending on the nature of each type of material, kaolin, metakaolins and geopolymers were characterized using thermal analysis, chemical analysis, XRD, FTIR, particle size distribution, specific surface area, bulk density, setting time and compressive strength. FTIR and XRD analyses showed that metakaolins except at 1 °C/min contained residual kaolinite whose quantity increased with the rate of calcination of kaolin and which influenced the characteristics of geopolymers. Thus as the rate of calcination of kaolin increased, the setting time increased (226 min (rate of 1 °C/min–773 min (rate of 20 °C/min while the compressive strength reduced (49.4 MPa (rate of 1 °C/min–20.8 MPa (rate of 20 °C/min. From the obtained results the production of geopolymers having high compressive strength along with low setting time requires that the calcination of kaolin be carried out at a low rate.

  17. Influence of calcined mud on the mechanical properties and shrinkage of self-compacting concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Taieb

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of SCC has a particular interest in terms of sustainable development. Indeed, their specific formulation leads to a greater volume of dough than for common concretes, thus, a larger quantity of cement. However, for economical, ecological and technical reasons, it is sought to limit their cement content [1]. It is therefore necessary to almost always use mineral additions as a partial replacement for cement because the technology of self-compacting concretes can consume large quantities of fines, in this case calcinated mud issued from dams dredging sediments that can give and/or ameliorate characteristics and performances of this type of concretes. Four SCCs had been formulated from the same composition where the only percentage of calcinated mud of Chorfa (west of Algeria dam changed (0%, 10%, 20% and 30%. The effect of calcinated mud on characteristics at fresh state of SCC according to AFGC was quantified. Mechanical strengths and shrinkage deformation (total, autogenous, drying were evaluated. The results show the possibility to make SCCs with different dosages of calcinated mud having strengths that can defy those of the control SCC. The analysis of free deformations indicates the beneficial impact of the mud by contributing to decrease the amplitudes of the shrinkage compared to those of the control SCC.

  18. Restart Plan for the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner [SD Coversheet has Incorrect Document Number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SUTTER, C.S.

    1999-07-26

    Testing activities on the Prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner at PFP were suspended in January 1997 due to the hold on fissile material handling in the facility. The Restart Plan will govern the transition of the test program from the completion of the activity based startup review; through equipment checkout and surrogate material runs; to resumption of the testing program and transition to unrestricted testing.

  19. Phosphorous removal from aqueous solution can be enhanced through the calcination of lime sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal Krishna, K C; Niaz, Mohamed R; Sarker, Dipok C; Jansen, Troy

    2017-09-15

    Water treatment plants generate an enormous amount of the sludge which is normally treated as waste. In the recent past, many investigations have been focused on developing an economical adsorbent using water treatment sludge to remove phosphorous (P) from aqueous solutions. However, the great extents of the studies have been limited in the use of alum- and iron-based sludges. This study, therefore, investigated the P removal performance of the calcined lime sludge. Calcined lime sludge at 700 °C significantly enhanced the P removal efficiency whereas marginal improvement was noted when the sludge calcined at 400 °C was tested. With increase P removal efficiency, final pH values of the solution also significantly increased. P removal efficiency of the calcined sludge decreased with increasing the initial P concentrations. However, the removal efficiency could be improved by increasing the weight of the sludge. Further analysis demonstrated that P removal trend followed both pseudo-second order and diffusion-chemisorption kinetics signifying the P removal is potentially due to a multi-mechanistic reaction in which, the process is controlled by intra-particle diffusion followed by chemisorptions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Sorption-desorption of antimony species onto calcined hydrotalcite: Surface structure and control of competitive anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Leonel Vinicius; Quirino, Juliana Nunes; Abrão, Taufik; Parreira, Paulo Sérgio; Urbano, Alexandre; Santos, Maria Josefa

    2018-02-15

    Calcined hydrotalcite can be applied to remove anionic contaminants from aqueous systems such as antimony species due to its great anion exchange capacity and high surface area. Hence, this study evaluated antimonite and antimonate sorption-desorption processes onto calcined hydrotalcite in the presence of nitrate, sulfate and phosphate. Sorption and desorption experiments of antimonite and antimonate were carried out in batch equilibrium and the post-sorption solids were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF). Sorption data were better fitted by dual-mode Langmuir-Freundlich model (R 2 >0.99) and desorption data by Langmuir model. High maximum sorption capacities were found for the calcined hydrotalcite, ranging from 617 to 790meqkg -1 . The competing anions strongly affected the antimony sorption. EDXRF analysis and mathematical modelling showed that sulfate and phosphate presented higher effect on antimonite and antimonate sorption, respectively. High values for sorption efficiency (SE=99%) and sorption capacity were attributed to the sorbent small particles and the large surface area. Positive hysteresis indexes and low mobilization factors (MF>3%) suggest very low desorption capacity to antimony species from LDH. These calcined hydrotalcite characteristics are desirable for sorption of antimony species from aqueous solutions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. CO{sub 2} capture behavior of shell during calcination/carbonation cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y.J.; Zhao, C.S.; Chen, H.C.; Duan, L.B.; Chen, X.P. [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Nanjing (China)

    2009-08-15

    The cyclic carbonation performances of shells as CO{sub 2} sorbents were investigated during multiple calcination/carbonation cycles. The carbonation kinetics of the shell and limestone are similar since they both exhibit a fast kinetically controlled reaction regime and a diffusion controlled reaction regime, but their carbonation rates differ between these two regions. Shell achieves the maximum carbonation conversion for carbonation at 680-700 C. The mactra veneriformis shell and mussel shell exhibit higher carbonation conversions than limestone after several cycles at the same reaction conditions. The carbonation conversion of scallop shell is slightly higher than that of limestone after a series of cycles. The calcined shell appears more porous than calcined limestone, and possesses more pores >230 nm, which allow large CO{sub 2} diffusion-carbonation reaction rates and higher conversion due to the increased surface area of the shell. The pores of the shell that are greater than 230 nm do not sinter significantly. The shell has more sodium ions than limestone, which probably leads to an improvement in the cyclic carbonation performance during the multiple calcination/carbonation cycles. (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  2. Studies on the calcination of ammonium uranates with special reference to density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Fekey, S.A.; Rofail, N.H.; Farah, M.Y.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this study was to throw some light on ammonium uranates precipitated from uranyl nitrate solution using ammonia or urea. The effect of washing the uranates, thickness of their layers on the trays during subsequent calcination, temperature and duration, on the densities of powders formed during thermal decomposition was studied. (author)

  3. Synthesis of alumina powder with seeds by Pechini Method using O2 as calcination atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salem, R.E.P.; Guilherme, K.A.; Chinelatto, A.S.A.; Chinelatto, A. L.

    2012-01-01

    Alumina is a very investigated material due to its excellent refractory characteristics and mechanical properties. Its alpha phase, the most stable one, has a formation temperature of about 1200 ° C. Due to its high temperature of formation, many researches have been trying to reduce it through addition of seeds of alpha phase in chemical processes of synthesis. This work aims to synthesize ultrafine powders of alpha-alumina by the Pechini method with seeding, and using an O 2 atmosphere in the pre-calcination (500 ° C) and calcination (1000 ° C and 1100° C) steps. The resulting powders were characterized through X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The results were compared with samples calcined on ai. It was verified that the presence of oxygen in the calcination atmosphere favored the elimination of residual carbon from the precursor powders, forthcoming from the great amount of organic material used on the synthesis, modifying its morphology and favoring reduction of particle size. (author)

  4. Physical, morphological and rheological alterations of properties by the calcination of aluminium hydroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandolfelli, V C; Varela, J A; Longo, E

    1987-03-01

    Evolution of physical, morphological and rheological characteristics resulted from several thermal treatments on national aluminium hydroxide, are evaluated and discussed after mercury porosimetry analysis, scanning electron microscopy, surface area and pressure curve compaction. The results may consider about the Kinetics of the reaction during the aglomerate calcination and to verify the better processing conditions to get products with superior performance. (Autor).

  5. Measurement of the loss on ignition of bulk calcined bauxite samples by neutron moderation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aylmer, J.A.; Borsaru, M.

    1985-01-01

    The production of high-grade calcined bauxite is very dependent on the moisture content of the final product. Existing procedures rely on the ignition of small samples to monitor the effectiveness of the calcination process. The results obtained by this gravimetric technique are several hours behind production and do not permit regular adjustment of the furnace to optimize the control of the chemically bound water content (LOI). To provide rapid and more relevant results, a neutron moderation technique has been developed for measuring the LOI of bulk samples of calcined bauxite while they are still hot. The method uses fast neutrons from an 241 Am-Be neutron source to irradiate the samples, and the backscattered thermal neutrons detected are a measure of bound moisture content. The rms deviation between neutron and conventional determinations of LOI, in 15 calcined bauxite samples, was 0.08 per cent LOI over the range 0.1 to 0.9 per cent LOI. When allowance is made for the rms error in the ignition method, the error in the neutron method is found to be 0.07 per cent LOI

  6. 46 CFR 148.04-15 - Petroleum coke, uncalcined; petroleum coke, uncalcined and calcined (mixture).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Petroleum coke, uncalcined; petroleum coke, uncalcined and calcined (mixture). 148.04-15 Section 148.04-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Requirements for Certain Material § 148.04-15 Petroleum coke, uncalcined; petroleum coke, uncalcined and...

  7. Fault tree analysis on BWR core spray system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Norio

    1982-06-01

    Fault Trees which describe the failure modes for the Core Spray System function in the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant (BWR 1065MWe) were developed qualitatively and quantitatively. The unavailability for the Core Spray System was estimated to be 1.2 x 10 - 3 /demand. It was found that the miscalibration of four reactor pressure sensors or the failure to open of the two inboard valves (FCV 75-25 and 75-53) could reduce system reliability significantly. It was recommended that the pressure sensors would be calibrated independently. The introduction of the redundant inboard valves could improve the system reliability. Thus this analysis method was verified useful for system analysis. The detailed test and maintenance manual and the informations on the control logic circuits of each active component are necessary for further analysis. (author)

  8. Plasma spraying process of disperse carbides for spraying and facing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blinkov, I.V.; Vishnevetskaya, I.A.; Kostyukovich, T.G.; Ostapovich, A.O.

    1989-01-01

    A possibility to metallize carbides in plasma of impulsing capacitor discharge is considered. Powders granulation occurs during plasma spraying process, ceramic core being completely capped. X-ray phase and chemical analyses of coatings did not show considerable changes of carbon content in carbides before and after plasma processing. This distinguishes the process of carbides metallization in impulsing plasma from the similar processing in arc and high-frequency plasma generator. Use of powder composites produced in the impulsing capacitor discharge, for plasma spraying and laser facing permits 2-3 times increasing wear resistance of the surface layer as against the coatings produced from mechanical powders mixtures

  9. Water injection device for reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakaki, Isao.

    1996-01-01

    A pressure vessel incorporating a reactor core is placed and secured on a pedestal in a dry well of a reactor container. A pedestal water injection line is disposed opened at one end in a pedestal cavity passing through the side wall of the pedestal and led at the other end to the outside of the reactor container. A substitution dry well spray line is connected to a spray header disposed at the upper portion of the dry well. When the pressure vessel should be damaged by a molten reactor core and the molten reactor core should drop to the dry well upon occurrence of an accident, the molten reactor core on the floor of the pedestal is cooled by water injection from the pedestal water injection line. At the same time, the elevation of the pressure and the temperature in the reactor container is suppressed by the water injection of the substitution dry well spray line. This can avoid large scaled release of radioactive materials to the environmental circumference. (I.N.)

  10. Effect of calcination temperature on microstructure and electrochemical performance of lithium-rich layered oxide cathode materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Quanxin; Peng, Fangwei; Li, Ruhong; Yin, Shibo; Dai, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A series of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials (Li_1_._2Mn_0_._5_6Ni_0_._1_6Co_0_._0_8O_2) were successfully synthesized via a two-step synthesis method. • The effects of calcination temperature on the cathode materials were researched in detail. • A well-crystallized layered structure was obtained as the calcination temperature increased. • The samples calcined in a range of 850–900 °C exhibited excellent electrochemical performance. - Abstract: Lithium-rich layered oxide cathode materials (Li_1_._2Mn_0_._5_6Ni_0_._1_6Co_0_._0_8O_2 (LLMO)) were synthesized via a two-step synthesis method involving co-precipitation and high-temperature calcination. The effects of calcination temperature on the cathode materials were studied in detail. Structural and morphological characterizations revealed that a well-crystallized layered structure was obtained at a higher calcination temperature. Electrochemical performance evaluation revealed that a cathode material obtained at a calcination temperature of 850 °C delivered a high initial discharge capacity of 266.8 mAh g"−"1 at a 0.1 C rate and a capacity retention rate of 95.8% after 100 cycles as well as excellent rate capability. Another sample calcinated at 900 °C exhibited good cycling stability. It is concluded that the structural stability and electrochemical performance of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials were strongly dependent on calcination temperatures. The results suggest that a calcination temperature in a range of 850–900 °C could promote electrochemical performance of this type of cathode materials.

  11. Effect of calcination temperature on microstructure and electrochemical performance of lithium-rich layered oxide cathode materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Quanxin; Peng, Fangwei; Li, Ruhong; Yin, Shibo; Dai, Changsong, E-mail: changsd@hit.edu.cn

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A series of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials (Li{sub 1.2}Mn{sub 0.56}Ni{sub 0.16}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 2}) were successfully synthesized via a two-step synthesis method. • The effects of calcination temperature on the cathode materials were researched in detail. • A well-crystallized layered structure was obtained as the calcination temperature increased. • The samples calcined in a range of 850–900 °C exhibited excellent electrochemical performance. - Abstract: Lithium-rich layered oxide cathode materials (Li{sub 1.2}Mn{sub 0.56}Ni{sub 0.16}Co{sub 0.08}O{sub 2} (LLMO)) were synthesized via a two-step synthesis method involving co-precipitation and high-temperature calcination. The effects of calcination temperature on the cathode materials were studied in detail. Structural and morphological characterizations revealed that a well-crystallized layered structure was obtained at a higher calcination temperature. Electrochemical performance evaluation revealed that a cathode material obtained at a calcination temperature of 850 °C delivered a high initial discharge capacity of 266.8 mAh g{sup −1} at a 0.1 C rate and a capacity retention rate of 95.8% after 100 cycles as well as excellent rate capability. Another sample calcinated at 900 °C exhibited good cycling stability. It is concluded that the structural stability and electrochemical performance of Li-rich layered oxide cathode materials were strongly dependent on calcination temperatures. The results suggest that a calcination temperature in a range of 850–900 °C could promote electrochemical performance of this type of cathode materials.

  12. Template-assisted electrostatic spray deposition as a new route to mesoporous, macroporous, and hierarchically porous oxide films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, S; Paul, B; Ortel, E; Fischer, A; Kraehnert, R

    2011-03-01

    A novel film coating technique, template-assisted electrostatic spray deposition (TAESD), was developed for the synthesis of porous metal oxide films and tested on TiO(2). Organic templates are codeposited with the titania precursor by electrostatic spray deposition and then removed during calcination. Resultant films are highly porous with pores casted by uniformly sized templates, which introduced a new level of control over the pore morphology for the ESD method. Employing the amphiphilic block copolymer Pluronic P123, PMMA latex spheres, or a combination of the two, mesoporous, macroporous, and hierarchically porous TiO(2) films are obtained. Decoupled from other coating parameters, film thickness can be controlled by deposition time or depositing multiple layers while maintaining the coating's structure and integrity.

  13. Synthesis and property of powders of oxide superconductor by the spray drying and the mist pyrolysis method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awano, M.; Takagi, H.; Torii, Y.; Tsuzuki, A.; Murayama, N.; Ishii, E. (Government Industrial Research Inst., Nagoya (Japan)); Sudo, E. (Tokyo Kokyu Rozai Co. Ltd., Fukuoka (Japan))

    1989-01-01

    Powders of oxide superconductor (Ba-Y-Cu-O and Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O systems) were synthesized by the spray drying and the mist pyrolysis methods. Fine Ba{sub 2}YCu{sub 3}O{sub 7-y} particles with diameter of 0.1-0.3 {mu}m were produced by the spray drying of the oxalates coprecipitated slurry and following calcination at 800deg C. By the pyrolyzing of nitrates mist containing Ba{sup 2+},Y{sup 3+},Cu{sup 2+} ions in the reaction zone heated at 950-980deg C fine particles were also produced. For Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O system, above mentioned methods were effective to produce fine homogeneous particles of compound at intermediate stage to high Tc phase. Sintered body made from these fine homogeneous powders were densified to about 95-98% of theoretical densitiy. (orig.).

  14. Center for Cold Spray Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the only DoD facility capable of cold spray research and development, production, and field-repair. It features three stationary cold spray systems used for...

  15. Spray casting project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Churnetski, S.R.; Thompson, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), along with other participating organizations, has been exploring the feasibility of spray casting depleted uranium (DU) to near-net shape as a waste minimization effort. Although this technology would be useful in a variety of applications where DU was the material of choice, this effort was aimed primarily at gamma-shielding components for use in storage and transportation canisters for high-level radioactive waste, particularly in the Multipurpose Canister (MPC) application. In addition to the waste-minimization benefits, spray casting would simplify the manufacturing process by allowing the shielding components for MPC to be produced as a single component, as opposed to multiple components with many fabrication and assembly steps. In earlier experiments, surrogate materials were used to simulate the properties (specifically reactivity and density) of DU. Based on the positive results from those studies, the project participants decided that further evaluation of the issues and concerns that would accompany spraying DU was warranted. That evaluation occupied substantially all of Fiscal Year 1995, yielding conceptual designs for both an intermediate facility and a production facility and their associated engineering estimates. An intermediate facility was included in this study to allow further technology development in spraying DU. Although spraying DU to near-net shape seems to be feasible, a number of technical, engineering, and safety issues would need to be evaluated before proceeding with a production facility. This report is intended to document the results from the spray-casting project and to provide information needed by anyone interested in proceeding to the next step

  16. Diesel spray characterization; Dieselmoottorin polttoainesuihkujen ominaisuudet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitkaenen, J.; Turunen, R.; Paloposki, T.; Rantanen, P.; Virolainen, T. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Internal Combustion Engine Lab.

    1997-10-01

    Fuel injection of diesel engines will be studied using large-scale models of fuel injectors. The advantage of large-scale models is that the measurement of large-scale diesel sprays will be easier than the measurement of actual sprays. The objective is to study the break-up mechanism of diesel sprays and to measure drop size distributions in the inner part of the spray. The results will be used in the development of diesel engines and diesel fuels. (orig.)

  17. Emergency core cooling system in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizawa, Yoji

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To rapidly recover the water level in the reactor upon occurrence of slight leakages in the reactor coolant pressure boundary, by promoting the depressurization in the reactor to thereby rapidly increase the high pressure core spray flow rate. Constitution: Upon occurrence of reactor water level reduction, a reactor isolation cooling system and a high pressure core spray system are actuated to start the injection of coolants into a reactor pressure vessel. In this case, if the isolation cooling system is failed to decrease the flow rate in a return pipeway, flow rate indicators show a lower value as compared with a predetermined value. The control device detects it and further confirms the rotation of a high pressure spray pump to open a valve. By the above operation, coolants pumped by the high pressure spray pump is flown by way of a communication pipeway to the return pipeway and sprayed from the top of the pressure vessel. This allows the vapors on the water surface in the pressure vessel to be cooled rapidly and increases the depressurization effects. (Horiuchi, T.)

  18. CONCHAS-SPRAY, Reactive Flows with Fuel Sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cloutman, L.D.; Dukowicz, J.K.; Ramshaw, J.D.; Amsden, A.A.

    2001-01-01

    Description of program or function: CONCHAS-SPRAY solves the equations of transient, multicomponent, chemically reactive fluid dynamics, together with those for the dynamics of an evaporating liquid spray. The program was developed with applications to internal combustion engines in mind. The formulation is spatially two-dimensional, and encompasses both planar and axisymmetric geometries. In the latter case, the flow is permitted to swirl about the axis of symmetry. CONCHAS-SPRAY is a time-marching, finite- difference program that uses a partially implicit numerical scheme. Spatial differences are formed with respect to a generalized two- dimensional mesh of arbitrary quadrilaterals whose corner locations are specified functions of time. This feature allows a Lagrangian, Eulerian, or mixed description, and is particularly useful for representing curved or moving boundary surfaces. Arbitrary numbers of species and chemical reactions are allowed. The latter are subdivided into kinetic and equilibrium reactions, which are treated by different algorithms. A turbulent law-of-the-wall boundary layer option is provided. CONCHAS-SPRAY calls a number of LANL system subroutines to display graphic or numerical information on microfiche. These routines are not included, but are described in the reference report. Several routines called from LINPACK and SLATEC1.0 are included

  19. Albendazole Microparticles Prepared by Spray Drying Technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To enhance the dissolution of albendazole (ABZ) using spray-drying technique. Method: ABZ binary mixtures with Kollicoat IR® (KL) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) in various drug to polymer ratios (1: 1, 1: 2 and 1; 4) were prepared by spray-drying. The spray-dried particles were characterized for particle shape, ...

  20. 14 CFR 23.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 23.239 Section 23.239 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... Handling Characteristics § 23.239 Spray characteristics. Spray may not dangerously obscure the vision of...

  1. 14 CFR 29.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 29.239 Section 29... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Ground and Water Handling Characteristics § 29.239 Spray characteristics. If certification for water operation is requested, no spray characteristics...

  2. 14 CFR 27.239 - Spray characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Spray characteristics. 27.239 Section 27... AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Flight Ground and Water Handling Characteristics § 27.239 Spray characteristics. If certification for water operation is requested, no spray characteristics...

  3. A new method for spray deposit assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester M. Himel; Leland Vaughn; Raymond P. Miskus; Arthur D. Moore

    1965-01-01

    Solid fluorescent particles suspended in a spray liquid are distributed in direct proportion to the size of the spray droplets. Use of solid fluorescent particles is the basis of a new method for visual recognition of the size and number of droplets impinging on target and nontarget portions of sprayed areas.

  4. Fluidized-bed calcination of LWR fuel-reprocessing HLLW: requirements and potential for off-gas cleanup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schindler, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Fluidized-bed solidification (calcination) was developed on a pilot scale for a variety of simulated LWR high-level liquid-waste (HLLW) and blended high-level and intermediate-level liquid-waste (ILLW) compositions. It has also been demonstrated with ICPP fuel-reprocessing waste since 1963 in the Waste Calcining Facility (WCF) at gross feed rates of 5 to 12 m 3 /day. A fluidized-bed calciner produces a relatively large volume of off-gas. A calciner solidifying 6 m 3 /day of liquid waste would generate about 13 standard m 3 /min of off-gas containing 10 to 20 g of entrained solids per standard m 3 of off-gas. Use of an off-gas system similar to that of the WCF could provide an overall process decontamination factor for particulates of about 2 x 10 10 . A potential advantage of fluidized-bed calcination over other solidification methods is the ability to control ruthenium volatilization from the calciner at less than 0.01% by calcining at 500 0 C or above. Use of an off-gas system similar to that of the WCF would provide an overall process decontamination factor for volatile ruthenium of greater than 1.6 x 10 7

  5. The variation of cationic microstructure in Mn-doped spinel ferrite during calcination and its effect on formaldehyde catalytic oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiaoliang [CAS Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Mineral Physics and Materials, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Liu, Peng [CAS Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Mineral Physics and Materials, Guangzhou 510640 (China); He, Hongping, E-mail: hehp@gig.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Mineral Physics and Materials, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wei, Gaoling [Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Chen, Tianhu [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Tan, Wei; Tan, Fuding [CAS Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Mineral Physics and Materials, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhu, Jianxi; Zhu, Runliang [CAS Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Mineral Physics and Materials, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Calcination causes the activity variation of Mn-doped ferrites for HCHO oxidation. • The variation of catalytic activity of ferrites by calcination is non-linear. • Mn enriches on the calcinated ferrite surface in the valence of +3 and +4. • The reduction temperature of surface Mn{sup 4+} species is well correlated to T50. - Abstract: In this study, a series of Mn substituted spinel ferrites calcinated at different temperatures were used as catalysts for the oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO). X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction were conducted to characterize the structure and physico-chemical properties of catalysts, which were affected by calcination in the range of 200–600 °C. Results show that all the ferrites were with spinel structure, and those calcinated in the range of 300–600 °C were in the phase of maghemite. The calcination changed the valence and distribution of Mn and Fe on the ferrite surface, and accordingly the reducibility of ferrites. The HCHO catalytic oxidation test showed that with the increase of calcination temperature, the activity was initially improved until 400 °C, but then decreased. The variation of HCHO conversion performance was well positively correlated to the variation of reduction temperature of surface Mn{sup 4+} species. The remarkable effect of calcination on the catalytic activity of Mn-doped spinel ferrites for HCHO oxidation was discussed in view of reaction mechanism and variations in cationic microstructure of Mn-doped ferrites.

  6. The variation of cationic microstructure in Mn-doped spinel ferrite during calcination and its effect on formaldehyde catalytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Peng; He, Hongping; Wei, Gaoling; Chen, Tianhu; Tan, Wei; Tan, Fuding; Zhu, Jianxi; Zhu, Runliang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Calcination causes the activity variation of Mn-doped ferrites for HCHO oxidation. • The variation of catalytic activity of ferrites by calcination is non-linear. • Mn enriches on the calcinated ferrite surface in the valence of +3 and +4. • The reduction temperature of surface Mn"4"+ species is well correlated to T50. - Abstract: In this study, a series of Mn substituted spinel ferrites calcinated at different temperatures were used as catalysts for the oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO). X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and H_2 temperature-programmed reduction were conducted to characterize the structure and physico-chemical properties of catalysts, which were affected by calcination in the range of 200–600 °C. Results show that all the ferrites were with spinel structure, and those calcinated in the range of 300–600 °C were in the phase of maghemite. The calcination changed the valence and distribution of Mn and Fe on the ferrite surface, and accordingly the reducibility of ferrites. The HCHO catalytic oxidation test showed that with the increase of calcination temperature, the activity was initially improved until 400 °C, but then decreased. The variation of HCHO conversion performance was well positively correlated to the variation of reduction temperature of surface Mn"4"+ species. The remarkable effect of calcination on the catalytic activity of Mn-doped spinel ferrites for HCHO oxidation was discussed in view of reaction mechanism and variations in cationic microstructure of Mn-doped ferrites.

  7. Transdermal Spray in Hormone Delivery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    market for the delivery system and ongoing development of transdermal sprays for hormone ... (DOAJ), African Journal Online, Bioline International, Open-J-Gate and Pharmacy Abstracts ... patches and gels have been very popular owing ... This product was developed for ... In a safety announcement, the US Food and.

  8. No Heat Spray Drying Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beetz, Charles [ZoomEssence, Inc., Hebron, KY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    No Heat Spray Drying Technology. ZoomEssence has developed our Zooming™ spray drying technology that atomizes liquids to powders at ambient temperature. The process of drying a liquid into a powder form has been traditionally achieved by mixing a heated gas with an atomized (sprayed) fluid within a vessel (drying chamber) causing the solvent to evaporate. The predominant spray drying process in use today employs air heated up to 400° Fahrenheit to dry an atomized liquid into a powder. Exposing sensitive, volatile liquid ingredients to high temperature causes molecular degradation that negatively impacts solubility, stability and profile of the powder. In short, heat is detrimental to many liquid ingredients. The completed award focused on several areas in order to advance the prototype dryer to a commercial scale integrated pilot system. Prior to the award, ZoomEssence had developed a prototype ‘no-heat’ dryer that firmly established the feasibility of the Zooming™ process. The award focused on three primary areas to improve the technology: (1) improved ability to formulate emulsions for specific flavor groups and improved understanding of the relationship of emulsion properties to final dry particle properties, (2) a new production atomizer, and (3) a dryer controls system.

  9. Enhancement of downward-facing saturated boiling heat transfer by the cold spray technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sohag, Frauk A.; Beck, Faith R.; Mohanta, Lokanath; Cheung, Fan Bill; Segall, Albert E.; Eden, Timothy J.; Potter, John K. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park (United States)

    2017-02-15

    In-vessel retention by passive external reactor vessel cooling under severe accident conditions is a viable approach for retention of radioactive core melt within the reactor vessel. In this study, a new and versatile coating technique known as 'cold spray' that can readily be applied to operating and advanced reactors was developed to form a microporous coating on the outer surface of a simulated reactor lower head. Quenching experiments were performed under simulated in-vessel retention by passive external reactor vessel cooling conditions using test vessels with and without cold spray coatings. Quantitative measurements show that for all angular locations on the vessel outer surface, the local critical heat flux (CHF) values for the coated vessel were consistently higher than the corresponding CHF values for the bare vessel. However, it was also observed for both coated and uncoated surfaces that the local rate of boiling and local CHF limit vary appreciably along the outer surface of the test vessel. Nonetheless, results of this intriguing study clearly show that the use of cold spray coatings could enhance the local CHF limit for downward-facing boiling by > 88%.

  10. Formation of barium strontium titanate powder by solid state reaction using different calcination temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teoh Wah Tzu; Ahmad Fauzi Mohd Noor; Zainal Arifin Ahmad

    2002-01-01

    The unique electrical properties of large permittivity in Barium Strontium Titanate have been widely used to make capacitors; it can be produced by solid state reaction. In this study, the mixture of Barium Carbonate, Strontium Carbonate and Titanium Dioxide was calcined at 500 degree C, 1000 degree C, 1100 degree C , 1150 degree C, 1200 degree C, 1250 degree C and 1300 degree C. The results of the phases change in each stage were investigated via X ay Diffraction. The results show that the formation of Barium Strontium Titanate started at 1100 degree C with the presence of other phases. The mixture is fully reacted to form Barium Strontium Titanate at 1150 degree C. Only Barium Strontium Titanate was formed as the calcination temperature was set higher. (Author)

  11. Bone mineral change during experimental calcination: an X-ray diffraction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galeano, Sergio; García-Lorenzo, Mari Luz

    2014-11-01

    The effects of calcination (400-1200°C) on pig bones have been studied using powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and secondary modifications, such as color change and weight loss. The characterisation by powder XRD confirmed the presence of the crystalline phase of hydroxyapatite, and comparison of the results obtained at different temperatures suggested that at 650°C, all the organic components and carbonate substitutions were completely removed. Accordingly, these samples were white. In addition, the crystallinity degree and the crystallite size progressively increased with the calcination temperature until 650°C, remaining stable until 1200°C. Below 650°C, bone samples presented organic compounds, resulting in background noise in the diffractogram and gray or black color. In addition, impurities in the lattice correspond to low crystallite sizes. © 2014 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  12. Synthesis of zirconium dioxide by ultrasound assisted precipitation: effect of calcination temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Krishnamurthy; Pinjari, D V; Pandit, A B; Mhaske, S T

    2011-09-01

    Nanostructured zirconium dioxide was synthesized from zirconyl nitrate using both conventional and ultrasound assisted precipitation in alkaline medium. The synthesized samples were calcinated at temperatures ranging from 400°C to 900°C in steps of 100°C. The ZrO(2) specimens were characterized using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The thermal characteristics of the samples were studied via Differential Scanning Calorimetry-Thermo-Gravimetry Analysis (DSC-TGA). The influence of the calcination temperature on the phase transformation process from monoclinic to tetragonal to cubic zirconia and its consequent effect on the crystallite size and % crystallinity of the synthesized ZrO(2) was studied and interpreted. It was observed that the ultrasound assisted technique helped to hasten to the phase transformation and also at some point resulted in phase stabilization of the synthesized zirconia. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Conceptual design for remote handling methods using the HIP process in the Calcine Immobilization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, S.M.; Cox, C.G.; Hoover, M.A.

    1994-03-01

    This report recommends the remote conceptual design philosophy for calcine immobilization using the hot isostatic press (HIP) process. Areas of remote handling operations discussed in this report include: (1) introducing the process can into the front end of the HIP process, (2) filling and compacting the calcine/frit mixture into the process can, (3) evacuating and sealing the process can, (4) non-destructive testing of the seal on the process can, (5) decontamination of the process can, (6) HIP furnace loading and unloading the process can for the HIPing operation, (7) loading an overpack canister with processed HIP cans, (8) sealing the canister, with associated non-destructive examination (NDE) and decontamination, and (9) handling canisters for interim storage at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) located on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) site

  14. Evaluation and selection of aqueous-based technology for partitioning radionuclides from ICPP calcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, A.L.; Schulz, W.W.; Burchfield, L.A.; Carlson, C.D.; Swanson, J.L.; Thompson, M.C.

    1993-02-01

    Early in 1993 Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company (WINCO) chartered a Panel of Nuclear Separations Experts. The purpose of this Panel was to assist WINCO scientists and engineers in selecting, evaluating, and ranking candidate aqueous-based processes and technologies for potential use in partitioning selected radionuclides from nitric acid solutions of retrieved Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) calcine. Radionuclides of interest are all transuranium elements, 90 Sr, 99 Tc, 129 I, and 137 Cs. The six man Panel met for 4 days (February 16--19, 1993) on the campus of the Idaho State University in Pocatello, Idaho. Principal topics addressed included: Available radionuclide removal technology; applicability of separations technology and processes to ICPP calcine; and potential integrated radionuclide partitioning schemes. This report, prepared from contributions from all Panel members, presents a comprehensive account of the proceedings and significant findings of the February, 1993 meeting in Pocatello

  15. Influence of calcination temperature in pozolanicity of gray sugar cane bagasse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, T.A.; Argolo, R.A.; Andrade, H.M.C.; Ribeiro, D.V.

    2016-01-01

    BCA (Sugar Cane Bagasse) is burned in boilers in the process of electricity cogeneration causing the generation of CBCA (Gray Sugar Cane Bagasse), which is the final residue of sucroalcooeira industry. Currently, several studies seek alternative materials that can replace Portland cement, promoting discussions on the use of pozzolanic materials in cementitious matrices. Thus, this research seeks to analyze the pozzolanicity the CBCA, obtained by calcining the residue at different temperatures, to be determined by TG / DTG and DTA tests. For analysis of pozzolanicity these ashes were used electrical conductivity techniques, chemical titration NP EN 196-5, chapelle modified NBR 15895/2010 and the IAP method (Activity Index pozzolanic NBR:5752). The results obtained during the study demostraramm no difference between the ash calcined at temperatures of 500 ° C, 600 ° C and 700 ° C. (author)

  16. Fabrication of Semiconducting Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskite Particles by Spray Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian-Yazdi, Mohammad-Reza; Eslamian, Morteza

    2018-01-01

    In this "nano idea" paper, three concepts for the preparation of methylammonium lead halide perovskite particles are proposed, discussed, and tested. The first idea is based on the wet chemistry preparation of the perovskite particles, through the addition of the perovskite precursor solution to an anti-solvent to facilitate the precipitation of the perovskite particles in the solution. The second idea is based on the milling of a blend of the perovskite precursors in the dry form, in order to allow for the conversion of the precursors to the perovskite particles. The third idea is based on the atomization of the perovskite solution by a spray nozzle, introducing the spray droplets into a hot wall reactor, so as to prepare perovskite particles, using the droplet-to-particle spray approach (spray pyrolysis). Preliminary results show that the spray technology is the most successful method for the preparation of impurity-free perovskite particles and perovskite paste to deposit perovskite thin films. As a proof of concept, a perovskite solar cell with the paste prepared by the sprayed perovskite powder was successfully fabricated.

  17. Fabrication of Semiconducting Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskite Particles by Spray Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadian-Yazdi, Mohammad-Reza; Eslamian, Morteza

    2018-01-10

    In this "nano idea" paper, three concepts for the preparation of methylammonium lead halide perovskite particles are proposed, discussed, and tested. The first idea is based on the wet chemistry preparation of the perovskite particles, through the addition of the perovskite precursor solution to an anti-solvent to facilitate the precipitation of the perovskite particles in the solution. The second idea is based on the milling of a blend of the perovskite precursors in the dry form, in order to allow for the conversion of the precursors to the perovskite particles. The third idea is based on the atomization of the perovskite solution by a spray nozzle, introducing the spray droplets into a hot wall reactor, so as to prepare perovskite particles, using the droplet-to-particle spray approach (spray pyrolysis). Preliminary results show that the spray technology is the most successful method for the preparation of impurity-free perovskite particles and perovskite paste to deposit perovskite thin films. As a proof of concept, a perovskite solar cell with the paste prepared by the sprayed perovskite powder was successfully fabricated.

  18. Nuclear reactor fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a cluster of fuel elements supported by transversal grids so that their axes are parallel to and at a distance from each other, in order to establish interstices for the axial flow of a coolant. At least one of the interstices is occupied by an axial duct reserved for an auxiliary cooling fluid and is fitted with side holes through which the auxiliary cooling fluid is sprayed into the cluster. Deflectors extend as from a transversal grid in a position opposite the holes to deflect the cooling fluid jet towards those parts of the fuel elements that are not accessible to the auxiliary coolant. This assembly is intended for reactors cooled by light or heavy water [fr

  19. Cooling nuclear reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.H.L.

    1975-01-01

    Reference is made to water or water/steam cooled reactors of the fuel cluster type. In such reactors it is usual to mount the clusters in parallel spaced relationship so that coolant can pass freely between them, the coolant being passed axially from one end of the cluster in an upward direction through the cluster and being effective for cooling under normal circumstances. It has been suggested, however, that in addition to the main coolant flow an auxiliary coolant flow be provided so as to pass laterally into the cluster or be sprayed over the top of the cluster. This auxiliary supply may be continuously in use, or may be held in reserve for use in emergencies. Arrangements for providing this auxiliary cooling are described in detail. (U.K.)

  20. Screw calciner mechanical direct denitration process for plutonium nitrate to oxide conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souply, K.R.; Sperry, W.E.

    1977-01-01

    This report describes a screw calciner direct-denitration process for converting plutonium nitrate to plutonium oxide. The information should be used when making comparisons of alternative plutonium nitrate-to-oxide conversion processes or as a basis for further detailed studies. The report contains process flow sheets with a material balance; a process description; and a discussion of the process including history, advantages and disadvantages, and additional research required

  1. 3.6. The kinetics of sulfuric acid decomposition of calcined concentrate of borosilicate ore

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to kinetics of sulfuric acid decomposition of calcined concentrate of borosilicate ore. The experimental data of kinetics of extraction of boron oxide from danburite at sulfuric acid decomposition were obtained at 20-90 deg C temperature range and process duration 15-90 minutes. The flowsheet of obtaining of boric acid from borosilicate ores of Ak-Arkhar Deposit by sulfuric acid method was proposed.

  2. Attrition, elutriation, and growth of particles produced in fluidized-bed waste calciners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, F.N.

    1982-09-01

    The Idaho Chemical Processing Plant reduces the volume of high-level liquid radioactive wastes in a fluidized bed to produce a granular calcine product. In the past, difficulties have been experienced in controlling the product's particle size when processing certain blends of sodium-bearing waste. Therefore, experiments in attrition, elutriation, and particle growth were done to characterize how best to control these three parameters. 15 figures, 16 tables

  3. In-situ investigation of the calcination process of mixed oxide xerogels with Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panitz, J C [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The controlled calcination of materials derived by sol-gel reactions is important for the evolution of the final structure. Raman spectroscopy is an ideal tool for the identification of surface species under in-situ conditions, as demonstrated in the following for the example of a molybdenum oxide-silica xerogel. Raman spectra of this particular sample were recorded at temperatures as high as 1173 K, and compared with those of a reference material.(author) 3 figs., 4 refs.

  4. Study on Al2O3 extraction from activated coal gangue under different calcination atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ling; Liang, Xinxing; Song, Qiang; Gao, Gewu; Song, Lihua; Shu, Yuanfeng; Shu, Xinqian

    2017-12-01

    Coal gangue was calcinated under air, nitrogen, carbon dioxide, air-hydrogen, and hydrogen atmospheres. The effects of different calcination temperatures and atmospheres on the mineral composition of activated coal gangue were investigated by X-ray diffraction. Moreover, the acid leaching kinetics of aluminum oxide from coal gangue was investigated with sulfuric acid. It showed that the air atmosphere promoted kaolinite decomposition during coal gangue calcination. The hydrogen atmosphere promoted the activation and decomposition of kaolinite at reaction temperatures exceeding 650°C. The carbon dioxide atmosphere eliminated the influence of residual carbon on coal gangue. When the ratio of acid/coal gangue was 1.5 and reaction temperature was 650°C, the sulfuric acid leaching rate under air, air-hydrogen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen atmospheres were 93.66%, 90.90%, 84.06%, 81.91% and 77.54% respectively. The acid leaching reaction process conformed to unreacted shrinking core model of particle unchanged, and was controlled by the interfacial chemical reaction. The reaction kinetic equation for the leaching process was 1-(1-x)1/3=kt with an apparent activation energy of 48.97 kJ/mol.

  5. Effect of Calcination at Synthesis of Mg-Al Hydrotalcite Using co-Precipitation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niar Kurnia Julianti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of hydrotalcite in catalysis has wide attention in academic research and industrial parties. Based on its utilization, hydrotalcite can be active catalyst or support. This research is focused on the investigation of characteristic like spesific surface area of Mg-Al hydrotalcite which is prepared with different temperature of calcination. Synthesis of Mg-Al hydrotalcites with Mg/Al molar ratio 3:1 were prepared by co-precipitation method. Mg(NO33.6H2O and Al(NO33.9H2O as precursors of Mg-Al hydrotalcite. Na2CO3 was used as precipitant agent and NaOH was used as buffer solution. The solution was mixed and aging for 5 hours at 650oC. The dried precipitate was calcined at 2500oC, 3500oC, 4500oC, 5500oC and 6500oC. The characterization of functional group was determined by Fourier Transform Infra Red (FT-IR. The Identical peaks diffractogram were analyzed by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD. The spesific surface area was determined by adsorption-desorption of nitrogen. The largest surface area that obtained from the calcination temperature of 650oC is 156.252 m2/g.

  6. Effect of calcination temperature on the synthesis of potassium titanate with platy morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, R.; Fredericci, C.; Yoshimura, H.N.

    2011-01-01

    The dramatic increases in the number of pneumoconiosis cases have stimulated the search of new materials for replacement of asbestos fibers. Titanate plates with formula A y Ti 2-x M x O 4 , where A = K, Rb, Cs and M = Li, Mg, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Mn (III), Fe (III) have been studied as an alternative for the use of fibers. The effect of the variation of calcination temperature on the reaction of K 2 CO 3 -TiO 2 -Mg(OH) 2 system was studied with the aim of understanding the relationship of this parameter with the morphology and symmetry of the obtained plates. For this study the samples were calcined for 5 hours at temperatures of 950°C, 1000°C, 1050°C and 1100°C. The powders were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. It was concluded that 1000°C is the better calcination temperature for obtaining more symmetric plates with smaller particle size dispersion. (author)

  7. Mobile calcination and cementation unit for solidification of concentrated radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Sazavsky, P.; Skaba, V.; Skvarenina, R.; Ditl, P.

    1985-01-01

    Mobile experimental unit MESA-1 was developed and manufactured for processing radioactive concentrates by direct cementation. The unit is mainly designed for processing low-level liquid wastes from nuclear power plants and other nuclear installations, in which the level of radioactivity does not exceed 10 10 Bq/m 3 , the salt content of liquid solutions does not exceed 500 kg/m 3 and the maximum amount of boric acid is 130 kg/m 3 . The equipment is built into three modules which may be assembled and dismantled in a short time and transported separately. The unit without the calciner module was tested in non-radioactive mode and in operation with actual radioactive wastes from the V-1 nuclear power plant. The course and results of the tests are described in detail. All project design values were achieved, a total of 18 dm 3 model solutions were processed and 1 m 3 of actual wastes with a salt content of 450 kg/m 3 . The test showed that with regard to the radiation level reached it will be necessary in the process of calcination to increase the shielding of certain exposed points. The calciner module is being assembled for completion. (Z.M.)

  8. Adsorption of basic chromium sulfate used in the tannery industries by calcined hydrotalcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez M, B. E.; Rivera R, R.; Iturbe G, J. L.; Olguin G, M. T.

    2011-01-01

    The sorption behavior of the chemical species of Cr(III) from aqueous solutions by hydrotalcite calcined products was investigated considering the equilibrium ph (5.0 to 8.9) and the chromium concentration in aqueous solution (from 10.6 to 430.0 mmol/L) to obtain the corresponding isotherms. Each solution was prepared from basic Cr(III) sulphate which is a primary tanning agent used in the tannery industries. In this work no previous oxidation treatment was done to form Cr(vi) in order to remove the chromium from aqueous solutions by hydrotalcite. The amount of chromium in the remaining solutions after the sorption processes in a batch system by visible spectroscopy (Vis) was determined. The calcined hydrotalcite before and after the contact with the chromium(III) solutions by X-ray power diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, were characterized. The specific are by Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (Bet) method of each sample was also evaluated. It was found that under the experimental conditions of this work hydrolyzed species of Cr(III) are precipitated on the surface of the calcined hydrotalcite instead other adsorption mechanism, and the sulfate ions were the responsible to regenerated the crystalline structure of hydrotalcite, therefore the results are discussed in terms of both Cr(III) and sulfate chemical species. (Author)

  9. Processing of concentrated radioactive wastes into cement and bitumens following calcination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napravnik, J.; Sazavsky, P.; Ditl, P.; Prikryl, P.

    1985-01-01

    A brief characteristic is presented of the most frequently used processes of solidification of liquid radioactive wastes, viz., bituminization, cementation and their combination with calcination. The effect of individual parameters is assessed on the choice of the type of solidification process as is their importance in the actual process, in temporary storage, during transportation and under conditions of long-term storage. It has been found that a combination of the procedures could lead to a modular system of methods and equipment. This would allow to approach optimal solidification of wastes in the present period and to establish a research reserve for the development of more modern, economically advantageous and safer procedures. A rough estimate is made of the costs of the solidification of 1 m 3 of radioactive concentrate from the V-1 power plant at a production of 380 m 3 /year, this for the cementation-calcination and bituminization-calcination procedures. The said rough economic analysis only serves to identify the major operating components which have the greatest effect on the economic evaluation of the solidification procedures. (Z.M.)

  10. Calcined clay lightweight ceramics made with wood sawdust and sodium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santis, Bruno Carlos de; Rossignolo, Joao Adriano, E-mail: desantis.bruno@gmail.com [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Pirassununga, SP (Brazil); Morelli, Marcio Raymundo [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-11-15

    This paper aims to study the influence of including wood sawdust and sodium silicate in the production process of calcined clay lightweight ceramics. In the production process first, a sample used by a company that produces ceramic products in Brazil was collected. The sample was analysed by techniques of liquidity (LL) and plasticity (LP) limits, particle size analysis, specific mass, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). From the clay, specimens of pure clay and mixtures with wood sawdust (10%, 20% and 30% by mass) and sodium silicate were produced and fired at a temperature of 900 deg C. These specimens were submitted to tests of water absorption, porosity, specific mass and compressive strength. Results of this research indicate that the incorporation of wood sawdust and sodium silicate in the ceramic paste specimens can be useful to make calcined clay lightweight ceramics with special characteristics (low values of water absorption and specific mass and high values of compressive strength), which could be used to produce calcined clay lightweight aggregates to be used in structural concrete. (author)

  11. Adsorption of Anionic Dyes from Aqueous Solutions by Calcined and Uncalcined Mg/ Al Layered Double Hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siti Mariam Sumari; Zaini Hamzah; Kantasamy, N.

    2016-01-01

    The uptake of Acid Blue 29 (AB29), Reactive Orange 16 (RO16) and Reactive Red 120 (RR120) from aqueous solutions by calcined (CLDH) and uncalcined Mg/Al layered double hydroxide (LDH) has been investigated. The adsorption process was conducted in a batch mode at 25 degree Celcius. Anionic dye removal was more efficient using the CLDH rather than LDH. The adsorption process by CLDH involved reconstruction and hydration of the calcined LDH and intercalation of AB29, RO16 and RR120. Physical characterization using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) were used to ascertain the memory effect phenomenon that is structural reconstruction to regain its original LDH after rehydration. To gain insight into the mechanism of adsorption by CLDH, the pseudo-first order (PFO) and pseudo-second order (PSO) and intraparticle diffusion (IPD) kinetic models were used to analyse experimental data. Based on the correlation coefficient (R 2 ), the PSO has better fitting (R 2 =0.987-1.00) compared to PFO (R 2 =0.867-0.990). Furthermore the values of maximum adsorption capacity, (q e ) calculated from PSO model are consistent with the experimental q e indicating that the experimental kinetic data for AB29, RO16 and RR120 adsorption by CLDH are suitable for this model. Recycling of the adsorbent, in cycles of calcination-reconstruction process promised a possibility of regeneration of CLDH. (author)

  12. Selection of a glass-ceramic formulation to immobilize fluorinel- sodium calcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staples, B.A.; Wood, H.C.

    1994-12-01

    One option for immobilizing calcined high level wastes produced by nuclear fuel reprocessing activities at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is conversion to a glass-ceramic form through hot isostatic pressing. Calcines exist in several different chemical compositions, and thus candidate formulations have been developed for converting each to glass-ceramic forms which are potentially resistant to aqueous corrosion and stable enough to qualify for repository storage. Fluorinel/Na, a chemically complex calcine type, is one of the types being stored at ICPP, and development efforts have identified three formulations with potential for immobilizing it. These are a glass forming additive that uses aluminum metal to enhance reactivity, a second glass forming additive that uses titanium metal to enhance reactivity and a third that uses not only a combination of silicon and titanium metals but enough phosphorous pentoxide to form a calcium phosphate host phase in the glass-ceramic product. Glass-ceramics of each formulation performed well in restricted characterization tests. However, none of the three was subjected to rigorous testing that would provide information on whether each was processable, that is able to retain favorable characteristics over a practical range of processing conditions

  13. Adsorption of basic chromium sulfate used in the tannery industries by calcined hydrotalcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez M, B. E.; Rivera R, R.; Iturbe G, J. L.; Olguin G, M. T., E-mail: beatriz.lopez@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2011-07-01

    The sorption behavior of the chemical species of Cr(III) from aqueous solutions by hydrotalcite calcined products was investigated considering the equilibrium ph (5.0 to 8.9) and the chromium concentration in aqueous solution (from 10.6 to 430.0 mmol/L) to obtain the corresponding isotherms. Each solution was prepared from basic Cr(III) sulphate which is a primary tanning agent used in the tannery industries. In this work no previous oxidation treatment was done to form Cr(vi) in order to remove the chromium from aqueous solutions by hydrotalcite. The amount of chromium in the remaining solutions after the sorption processes in a batch system by visible spectroscopy (Vis) was determined. The calcined hydrotalcite before and after the contact with the chromium(III) solutions by X-ray power diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, were characterized. The specific are by Brunauer, Emmett and Teller (Bet) method of each sample was also evaluated. It was found that under the experimental conditions of this work hydrolyzed species of Cr(III) are precipitated on the surface of the calcined hydrotalcite instead other adsorption mechanism, and the sulfate ions were the responsible to regenerated the crystalline structure of hydrotalcite, therefore the results are discussed in terms of both Cr(III) and sulfate chemical species. (Author)

  14. Oxyfuel carbonation/calcination cycle for low cost CO2 capture in existing power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romeo, Luis M.; Abanades, J. Carlos; Escosa, Jesus M.; Pano, Jara; Gimenez, Antonio; Sanchez-Biezma, Andres; Ballesteros, Juan C.

    2008-01-01

    Postcombustion CO 2 capture is the best suitable capture technology for existing coal power plants. This paper focuses on an emerging technology that involves the separation of CO 2 using the reversible carbonation reaction of CaO to capture CO 2 from the flue gas, and the calcination of CaCO 3 to regenerate the sorbent and produce concentrated CO 2 for storage. We describe the application to this concept to an existing (with today's technology) power plant. The added capture system incorporates a new supercritical steam cycle to take advantage of the large amount of heat coming out from the high temperature capture process (oxyfired combustion of coal is needed in the CaCO 3 calciner). In these conditions, the capture system is able to generate additional power (26.7% efficiency respect to LHV coal input to the calciner after accounting for all the penalties in the overall system), without disturbing the steam cycle of the reference plant (that retains its 44.9 efficiency). A preliminary cost study of the overall system, using well established analogues in the open literature for the main components, yields capture cost around 16 Euro /ton CO 2 avoided and incremental cost of electricity of just over 1 Euro /MW h e

  15. Stabilization of As-, Pb-, and Cu-contaminated soil using calcined oyster shells and steel slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Deok Hyun; Wazne, Mahmoud; Cheong, Kyung Hoon; Chang, Yoon-Young; Baek, Kitae; Ok, Yong Sik; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-07-01

    In this study, As-, Pb-, and Cu-contaminated soil was stabilized using calcined oyster shells (COS) and steel slag (SS). The As-contaminated soil was obtained from a timber mill site where chromate copper arsenate (CCA) was used as a preservative. On the other hand, Pb- and Cu-contaminated soil was obtained from a firing range. These two soils were thoroughly mixed to represent As-, Pb-, and Cu-contaminated soil. Calcined oyster shells were obtained by treating waste oyster shells at a high temperature using the calcination process. The effectiveness of stabilization was evaluated by 1-N HCl extraction for As and 0.1-N HCl extraction for Pb and Cu. The treatment results showed that As, Pb, and Cu leachability were significantly reduced upon the combination treatment of COS and SS. The sole treatment of SS (10 wt%) did not show effective stabilization. However, the combination treatment of COS and SS showed a significant reduction in As, Pb, and Cu leachability. The best stabilization results were obtained from the combination treatment of 15 wt% COS and 10 wt% SS. The SEM-EDX results suggested that the effective stabilization of As was most probably achieved by the formation of Ca-As and Fe-As precipitates. In the case of Pb and Cu, stabilization was most probably associated with the formation of pozzolanic reaction products such as CSHs and CAHs.

  16. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    The prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner (VDC) is installed in glovebox 188 in the Plutonium Process Support Laboratory (PPSL). Safety analysis contained in WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 (FSAR) Rev. 0-L and Addendum to WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, ''Laboratory Prototype Calciner'' establishes the prototype VDC needs to be shut down if a seismic event of greater than 0.07 g occurs. Shut down is to be automatic upon detection of the seismic event. This requires tie-in of various valves and power for the prototype VDC into the existing Seismic Shutdown System for the Ventilation Supply Fans described in FSAR 5.4.1.2.4. The proposed changes covered by this USQ evaluation include: (1) the physical tie-in modifications, including drawings and Engineering Change Notice (ECN), (2) the work package for accomplishing the modifications, (3) the changes to the System Description Documents, (4) the changes to the Safety Equipment List necessitated by the modifications, and (5) the changes to the failure modes and effects analysis. WHC-SDCP-OSR-010, Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements Limiting Condition for Operation (LCO) 3.2.3 has been revised to include the requirement for the existing seismic shutdown system to also shut down the laboratory calciner in the event of detection of a greater than 0.07 g seismic event

  17. The effect of calcination on multi-walled carbon nanotubes produced by dc-arc discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillai, Sreejarani K; Augustyn, Willem G; Rossouw, Margaretha H; McCrindle, Robert I

    2008-07-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesized by dc-arc discharge in helium atmosphere and the effect of calcination at different temperatures ranging from 300-600 degrees C was studied in detail. The degree of degradation to the structural integrity of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes during the thermal process was studied by Raman spectroscopy, Scanning electron microscopy and High resolution transmission electron microscopy. The thermal behaviour of the as prepared and calcined samples was investigated by thermogravimetric analysis. Calcination in air at 400 degrees C for 2 hours was found to be an efficient and simple method to eliminate carbonaceous impurities from the nanotube bundles with minimal damage to the tube walls and length. The impurities were oxidized at a faster rate when compared to the nanotubes and gave good yield of about 50%. The nanotubes were observed to be damaged at temperature higher than 450 degrees C. The results show that this method is less destructive when compared liquid phase oxidation with 5 M HNO3.

  18. Test plan for radioactive testing of a vertical direct denitration calciner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    1999-08-31

    The prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner (VDC) is installed in glovebox 188 in the Plutonium Process Support Laboratory (PPSL). Safety analysis contained in WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 (FSAR) Rev. 0-L and Addendum to WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, ''Laboratory Prototype Calciner'' establishes the prototype VDC needs to be shut down if a seismic event of greater than 0.07 g occurs. Shut down is to be automatic upon detection of the seismic event. This requires tie-in of various valves and power for the prototype VDC into the existing Seismic Shutdown System for the Ventilation Supply Fans described in FSAR 5.4.1.2.4. The proposed changes covered by this USQ evaluation include: (1) the physical tie-in modifications, including drawings and Engineering Change Notice (ECN), (2) the work package for accomplishing the modifications, (3) the changes to the System Description Documents, (4) the changes to the Safety Equipment List necessitated by the modifications, and (5) the changes to the failure modes and effects analysis. WHC-SDCP-OSR-010, Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements Limiting Condition for Operation (LCO) 3.2.3 has been revised to include the requirement for the existing seismic shutdown system to also shut down the laboratory calciner in the event of detection of a greater than 0.07 g seismic event.

  19. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    1999-08-31

    The prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner (VDC) is installed in glovebox 188 in the Plutonium Process Support Laboratory (PPSL). Safety analysis contained in WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 (FSAR) Rev. 0-L and Addendum to WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, ''Laboratory Prototype Calciner'' establishes the prototype VDC needs to be shut down if a seismic event of greater than 0.07 g occurs. Shut down is to be automatic upon detection of the seismic event. This requires tie-in of various valves and power for the prototype VDC into the existing Seismic Shutdown System for the Ventilation Supply Fans described in FSAR 5.4.1.2.4. The proposed changes covered by this USQ evaluation include: (1) the physical tie-in modifications, including drawings and Engineering Change Notice (ECN), (2) the work package for accomplishing the modifications, (3) the changes to the System Description Documents, (4) the changes to the Safety Equipment List necessitated by the modifications, and (5) the changes to the failure modes and effects analysis. WHC-SDCP-OSR-010, Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements Limiting Condition for Operation (LCO) 3.2.3 has been revised to include the requirement for the existing seismic shutdown system to also shut down the laboratory calciner in the event of detection of a greater than 0.07 g seismic event.

  20. Test Plan for Radioactive Testing of a Vertical Direct Denitration Calciner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COMPTON, J.A.

    1999-08-13

    The prototype Vertical Denitration Calciner (VDC) is installed in glovebox 188 in the Plutonium Process Support Laboratory (PPSL). Safety analysis contained in WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021 (FSAR) Rev. 0-L and Addendum to WHC-SD-CP-SAR-021, ''Laboratory Prototype Calciner'' establishes the prototype VDC needs to be shut down if a seismic event of greater than 0.07 g occurs. Shut down is to be automatic upon detection of the seismic event. This requires tie-in of various valves and power for the prototype VDC into the existing Seismic Shutdown System for the Ventilation Supply Fans described in FSAR 5.4.1.2.4. The proposed changes covered by this USQ evaluation include: (1) the physical tie-in modifications, including drawings and Engineering Change Notice (ECN), (2) the work package for accomplishing the modifications, (3) the changes to the System Description Documents, (4) the changes to the Safety Equipment List necessitated by the modifications, and (5) the changes to the failure modes and effects analysis. WHC-SDCP-OSR-010, Plutonium Finishing Plant Operational Safety Requirements Limiting Condition for Operation (LCO) 3.2.3 has been revised to include the requirement for the existing seismic shutdown system to also shut down the laboratory calciner in the event of detection of a greater than 0.07 g seismic event.

  1. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  2. Volatilities of ruthenium, iodine, and technetium on calcining fission product nitrate wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimshaw, S.J.; Case, F.N.

    1980-01-01

    Various high-level nitrate wastes were subjected to formic acid denitration. Formic acid reacts with the nitrate anion to yield noncondensable, inert gases according to the following equation: 4 HCOOH + 2 HNO 3 → N 2 O + 4 CO 2 + 5 H 2 O. These gases can be scrubbed free of 106 Ru, 131 I, and 99 Tc radioactivities prior to elimination from the plant by passage through HEPA filters. The formation of deleterious NO/sub x/ is avoided. Moreover, formic acid reduces ruthenium to a lower valence state with a sharp reduction in RuO 4 volatility during subsequent calcination of the pretreated waste. It is shown that a minimum of 3% of RuO 4 in an off-gas stream reacts with Davison silica gel (Grade 40) to give a fine RuO 2 aerosol having a particle size of 0.5 μ. This RuO 2 aerosol passes through water or weak acid scrub solutions but is trapped by a caustic scrub solution. Iodine volatilizes almost completely on calcining an acidic waste, and the iodine volatility increases with increasing calcination temperature. On calcining an alkaline sodium nitrate waste the iodine volatility is about an order of magnitude lower, with a relatively low iodine volatility of 0.39% at a calcination temperature of 250 0 C and a moderate volatility of 9.5% at 600 0 C. Volatilities of 99 Tc were generally 0 C. Data are presented to indicate that 99 Tc concentrates in the alkaline sodium nitrate supernatant waste, with approx. 10 mg 99 Tc being associated with each curie of 137 Cs present in the waste. It is shown that lutidine (2,4 dimethyl-pyridine) extracts Tc(VII) quantitatively from alkaline supernatant wastes. The distribution coefficient (K/sub D/) for Tc(VII) going into the organic phase in the above system is 102 for a simulated West Valley waste and 191 for a simulated Savannah River Plant (SRP) waste

  3. Spray-drying and fabrication of superionic conducting sodium rare-earth silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Kimihiro; Nicholson, P.S.

    1985-01-01

    Fine precursor powders of particle diameter of 0.50-7 μm and high surface area (9 m 2 /g) for superionic conducting Na 5 RESi 4 O 12 (RE = Gd, Y) were successfully produced by spray-drying and an optimised calcination procedure. Using these powders, dense sinters (>98% of theoretical) with f(NGS) or f(NYS) = 1.0 (the proposed parameter for purity) were obtained under normal sintering conditions. 300 0 C ionic resistivities were calculated from ac impedance and had values of 5.6 Ω cm with an activation energy for conduction of 4.5 kcal/mol for Na 5 GdSi 4 O 12 and 7.7 Ω cm and 5.9 kcal/mol for Na 5 YSi 4 O 12 . These values were dependent on the f(NGS) or f(NYS). (orig.)

  4. Improvement of the crystallinity and photocatalytic property of zinc oxide as calcination product of Zn–Al layered double hydroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, Abdullah Ahmed Ali; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Hussein, Mohd Zobir bin; Zakaria, Azmi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ZnO phase and ZnAl 2 O 4 spinel can be formed as Zn–Al–NO 3 –LDH calcination products. ► The crystallinity of ZnO phase increased with an increase of calcination temperature. ► The optical band gaps of ZnO were improved with an increase in temperature. ► The oxygen vacancies in ZnO and ZnAl 2 O 4 generated the ESR signals. - Abstract: Zinc oxide with different degrees of crystallinity can be formed as Zn–Al-layered double hydroxide (Zn–Al–NO 3 –LDH) calcination products. ZnAl 2 O 4 spinel is also formed in a range of calcination temperatures from 600 to 1000 °C from the LDH. X-ray diffraction patterns showed that the crystallinity of the ZnO phase increased as calcination temperatures increased. The LDH structure was fully collapsed at and above 400 °C. The photocatalytic activity was determined by UV–VIS–NIR diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. The band gap of the calcined samples increased as the calcination temperature increased. Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra of the fresh and calcined LDH at room temperature demonstrated that oxygen vacancies in the ZnO and ZnAl 2 O 4 were responsible for the generation of ESR signals. One BET specific surface area increased from 1 m 2 /g for the LDH to a maximum at 400 °C (43 m 2 /g) and decreased thereafter down to 6 m 2 /g at 1000 °C.

  5. 4.2. The kinetics of nitric acid decomposition of calcined borosilicate raw material of Ak-Arkhar Deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirsaidov, U.M.; Kurbonov, A.S.; Mamatov, E.D.

    2015-01-01

    Present article is devoted to kinetics of nitric acid decomposition of calcined borosilicate raw material of Ak-Arkhar Deposit. The dependence of nitric acid decomposition of calcined boric raw material for extraction of boron oxide on temperature (20-100 deg C) and process duration (15-60 minutes) was defined. It was defined that at temperature increasing the extraction rate of boron oxide increases from 20.8 to 78.6%.

  6. Effect of calcination routes on phase formation of BaTiO3 and their electronic and magnetic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Supriyo; Choudhary, R. J.; Tripathi, M.; Phase, D. M.

    2018-05-01

    We have investigated the phase formation and correlation between electronic and magnetic properties of oxygen deficient BaTiO3 ceramics, synthesized by solid state reaction method, following different calcination paths. The phase analysis divulge that a higher calcination temperature above 1000° C is favored for tetragonal phase formation than the cubic phase. The core level X-ray photo electron spectroscopy measurements confirm the presence of oxygen vacancies and oxygen vacancy mediated Ti3+ states. As the calcination temperature and calcination time increases these oxygen vacancies and hence Ti3+ concentrations reduce in the sample. The temperature dependent magnetization curves suggest unexpected magnetic ordering, which may be due to the presence of unpaired electron at the t2g state (d1) of nearest-neighbor Ti atoms. In magnetization vs magnetic field isotherms, the regular decrease of saturation moment value with increasing calcination temperature and calcination time, can be discussed considering the amount of oxygen deficiency induced Ti3+ concentrations, present in the sample.

  7. Role of Calcination Temperature on the Hydrotalcite Derived MgO–Al2O3 in Converting Ethanol to Butanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gray, Michel J.; Job, Heather M.; Santosa, Daniel M.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Devaraj, Arun; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-09

    In the base catalyzed ethanol condensation reactions, the calcined MgO-Al2O3 derived hydrotalcites used broadly as catalytic material and the calcination temperature plays a big role in determining the catalytic activity. The characteristic of the hydrotalcite material treated between catalytically relevant temperatures 450ºC and 800ºC have been studied with respect to the physical, chemical, and structural properties and compared with catalytic activity testing. With the increasing calcination temperature, the total measured catalytic basicity dropped linearly with the calcination temperature and the total measured acidity stayed the same for all the calcination temperatures except 800ºC. However, the catalyst activity testing does not show any direct correlation between the measured catalytic basicity and the catalyst activity to the ethanol condensation reaction to form 1-butanol. The highest ethanol conversion of 44 percent with 1-butanol selectivity of 50 percent was achieved for the 600ºC calcined hydrotalcite material.

  8. Effect of calcination temperature on structural properties and photocatalytic activity of Mn-C-codoped TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Jianbo; Xin, Wei; Liu, Guanglong; Lin, Die; Zhu, Duanwei, E-mail: liugl@mail.hzau.edu.cn [Laboratory of Eco-Environmental Engineering Research, College of Resources and Environment, Huazhong Agricultural University (HZAU), Wuhan (China)

    2016-03-15

    Mn-C-codoped TiO{sub 2} catalysts were synthesized by modified sol-gel method based on the self-assembly technique using polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) as template and carbon precursor and the effect of calcination temperature on their structural properties and photocatalytic activity were investigated. The XRD results showed undoped and Mn-C-codoped TiO{sub 2} calcined at 400 deg C only include anatase phase and the rutile phase appears when the calcination temperature reached to 600 deg C. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy demonstrates that the absorption spectra are strongly modified by the calcination temperature. Moreover, the Mn-C-TiO{sub 2} calcined at 400 deg C showed the lowest PL intensity due to a decrease in the recombination rate of photogenerated electrons and holes under light irradiation. The photocatalytic activity of Mn-C-codoped TiO{sub 2} were evaluated by the degradation of methyl orange (MO) under the simulate daylight irradiation and all the prepared Mn-C-codoped TiO{sub 2} samples exhibited high photocatalytic activities for photocatalytic decolorisation of methyl orange aqueous solution. At 400 deg C, the Mn-C-codoped TiO{sub 2} samples showed the highest photocatalytic activity due to synergetic effects of good crystallize ation, appropriate phase composition and slower recombination rate of photogenerated charge carriers, which further confirms the calcination temperature could affect the properties of Mn-C-codoped TiO2 significantly. (author)

  9. Semi-automatic spray pyrolysis deposition of thin, transparent, titania films as blocking layers for dye-sensitized and perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krýsová, Hana; Krýsa, Josef; Kavan, Ladislav

    2018-01-01

    For proper function of the negative electrode of dye-sensitized and perovskite solar cells, the deposition of a nonporous blocking film is required on the surface of F-doped SnO 2 (FTO) glass substrates. Such a blocking film can minimise undesirable parasitic processes, for example, the back reaction of photoinjected electrons with the oxidized form of the redox mediator or with the hole-transporting medium can be avoided. In the present work, thin, transparent, blocking TiO 2 films are prepared by semi-automatic spray pyrolysis of precursors consisting of titanium diisopropoxide bis(acetylacetonate) as the main component. The variation in the layer thickness of the sprayed films is achieved by varying the number of spray cycles. The parameters investigated in this work were deposition temperature (150, 300 and 450 °C), number of spray cycles (20-200), precursor composition (with/without deliberately added acetylacetone), concentration (0.05 and 0.2 M) and subsequent post-calcination at 500 °C. The photo-electrochemical properties were evaluated in aqueous electrolyte solution under UV irradiation. The blocking properties were tested by cyclic voltammetry with a model redox probe with a simple one-electron-transfer reaction. Semi-automatic spraying resulted in the formation of transparent, homogeneous, TiO 2 films, and the technique allows for easy upscaling to large electrode areas. The deposition temperature of 450 °C was necessary for the fabrication of highly photoactive TiO 2 films. The blocking properties of the as-deposited TiO 2 films (at 450 °C) were impaired by post-calcination at 500 °C, but this problem could be addressed by increasing the number of spray cycles. The modification of the precursor by adding acetylacetone resulted in the fabrication of TiO 2 films exhibiting perfect blocking properties that were not influenced by post-calcination. These results will surely find use in the fabrication of large-scale dye-sensitized and perovskite solar

  10. Sprays and Cartan projective connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, D. J.

    2004-10-01

    Around 80 years ago, several authors (for instance H. Weyl, T.Y. Thomas, J. Douglas and J.H.C. Whitehead) studied the projective geometry of paths, using the methods of tensor calculus. The principal object of study was a spray, namely a homogeneous second-order differential equation, or more generally a projective equivalence class of sprays. At around the same time, E. Cartan studied the same topic from a different point of view, by imagining a projective space attached to a manifold, or, more generally, attached to a `manifold of elements'; the infinitesimal `glue' may be interpreted in modern language as a Cartan projective connection on a principal bundle. This paper describes the geometrical relationship between these two points of view.

  11. The 2016 Thermal Spray Roadmap

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vardelle, A.; Moreau, Ch.; Akedo, J.; Ashrafizadeh, H.; Berndt, C. C.; Berghaus-Oberste, J.; Boulos, M.; Brogan, J.; Bourtsalas, A.C.; Dolatabadi, A.; Dorfman, M.; Eden, T.J.; Fauchais, P.; Fisher, G.; Gaertner, F.; Gindrat, M.; Henne, R.; Hyland, M.; Irissou, E.; Jordan, E.H.; Khor, K.A.; Killinger, A.; Lau, Y.C.; Li, C.-J.; Li, L.; Longtin, J.; Markocsan, N.; Masset, P.J.; Matějíček, Jiří; Mauer, G.; McDonald, A.; Mostaghimi, J.; Sampath, S.; Schiller, G.; Shinoda, K.; Smith, M.F.; Syed, A.A.; Themelis, N.J.; Toma, F.-L.; Trelles, J.P.; Vassen, R.; Vuoristo, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 8 (2016), s. 1376-1440 ISSN 1059-9630 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : anti-wear and anti-corrosion coatings * biomedical * electronics * energy generation * functional coatings * gas turbines * thermal spray processes Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials Impact factor: 1.488, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11666-016-0473-x

  12. Uniform-droplet spray forming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, C.A.; Sikka, V.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chun, Jung-Hoon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ando, T. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The uniform-droplet process is a new method of liquid-metal atomization that results in single droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on to substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructure. The mono-sized powder-production capability of the uniform-droplet process also has the potential of permitting engineered powder blends to produce components of controlled porosity. Metal and alloy powders are commercially produced by at least three different methods: gas atomization, water atomization, and rotating disk. All three methods produce powders of a broad range in size with a very small yield of fine powders with single-sized droplets that can be used to produce mono-size powders or sprayed-on substrates to produce near-net shapes with tailored microstructures. The economical analysis has shown the process to have the potential of reducing capital cost by 50% and operating cost by 37.5% when applied to powder making. For the spray-forming process, a 25% savings is expected in both the capital and operating costs. The project is jointly carried out at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Tuffs University, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Preliminary interactions with both finished parts and powder producers have shown a strong interest in the uniform-droplet process. Systematic studies are being conducted to optimize the process parameters, understand the solidification of droplets and spray deposits, and develop a uniform-droplet-system (UDS) apparatus appropriate for processing engineering alloys.

  13. Pressurizer /Auxiliary Spray Piping Stress Analysis For Determination Of Lead Shielding Maximum Allow Able Load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setjo, Renaningsih

    2000-01-01

    Piping stress analysis for PZR/Auxiliary Spray Lines Nuclear Power Plant AV Unit I(PWR Type) has been carried out. The purpose of this analysis is to establish a maximum allowable load that is permitted at the time of need by placing lead shielding on the piping system on class 1 pipe, Pressurizer/Auxiliary Spray Lines (PZR/Aux.) Reactor Coolant Loop 1 and 4 for NPP AV Unit one in the mode 5 and 6 during outage. This analysis is intended to reduce the maximum amount of radiation dose for the operator during ISI ( In service Inspection) period.The result shown that the maximum allowable loads for 4 inches lines for PZR/Auxiliary Spray Lines is 123 lbs/feet

  14. High quality ceramic coatings sprayed by high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying gun

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Sheng; Xu Binshi; Yao JiuKun

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduced the structure of the high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying gun and the effects of hypersonic plasma jet on the sprayed particles. The optimised spraying process parameters for several ceramic powders such as Al 2 O 3 , Cr 2 O 3 , ZrO 2 , Cr 3 C 2 and Co-WC were listed. The properties and microstructure of the sprayed ceramic coatings were investigated. Nano Al 2 O 3 -TiO 2 ceramic coating sprayed by using the high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying was also studied. Compared with the conventional air plasma spraying, high efficiency hypersonic plasma spraying improves greatly the ceramic coatings quality but at low cost. (orig.)

  15. 1994 Thermal spray industrial applications: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berndt, C.C.; Sampath, S.

    1994-01-01

    The 7th National Thermal Spray Conference met on June 20--24, 1994, in Boston, Massachusetts. The conference was sponsored by the Thermal Spray Division of ASM International and co-sponsored by the American Welding Society, Deutscher Verband fur Schweisstechnik e.V., High Temperature Society of Japan, International Thermal Spray Association, and Japanese Thermal Spraying Society. The conference covered applications for automobiles, aerospace, petrochemicals, power generation, and biomedical needs. Materials included metals, ceramics, and composites with a broad range of process developments and diagnostics. Other sections included modeling and systems control; spray forming and reactive spraying; post treatment; process, structure and property relationships; mechanical properties; and testing, characterization and wear. One hundred and seventeen papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base

  16. Effectiveness of containment sprays in containment management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourbakhsh, H.P.; Perez, S.E.; Lehner, J.R.

    1993-05-01

    A limited study has been performed assessing the effectiveness of containment sprays-to mitigate particular challenges which may occur during a severe accident. Certain aspects of three specific topics related to using sprays under severe accident conditions were investigated. The first was the effectiveness of sprays connected to an alternate water supple and pumping source because the actual containment spray pumps are inoperable. This situation could occur during a station blackout. The second topic concerned the adverse as well as beneficial effects of using containment sprays during severe accident scenario where the containment atmosphere contains substantial quantities of hydrogen along with steam. The third topic was the feasibility of using containment sprays to moderate the consequences of DCH

  17. Multiphysics modelling of the spray forming process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi, J.; Grant, P.S.; Fritsching, U.; Belkessam, O.; Garmendia, I.; Landaberea, A.

    2008-01-01

    An integrated, multiphysics numerical model has been developed through the joint efforts of the University of Oxford (UK), University of Bremen (Germany) and Inasmet (Spain) to simulate the spray forming process. The integrated model consisted of four sub-models: (1) an atomization model simulating the fragmentation of a continuous liquid metal stream into droplet spray during gas atomization; (2) a droplet spray model simulating the droplet spray mass and enthalpy evolution in the gas flow field prior to deposition; (3) a droplet deposition model simulating droplet deposition, splashing and re-deposition behavior and the resulting preform shape and heat flow; and (4) a porosity model simulating the porosity distribution inside a spray formed ring preform. The model has been validated against experiments of the spray forming of large diameter IN718 Ni superalloy rings. The modelled preform shape, surface temperature and final porosity distribution showed good agreement with experimental measurements

  18. Pilot-scale test on electron beam treatment of municipal solid waste flue gas with spraying slaked-lime slurry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Osada; Masahiro Sudo; Koichi Hirota

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous removal of NO x , SO 2 and HCl in flue gas of a municipal solid waste incinerator was studied by using electron beam irradiation technology. The flue gas of around 1000 Nm 3 /h was led to a spray-dryer-type reactor from an inlet of ESP of the municipal waste incinerator by spraying slaked-lime slurry with one or more stoichiometric amount of the pollutants, concentrations of HCl (400 ppm) and SO 2 (50 ppm) decreased almost completely, while concentrations of NO x (100 ppm) were markedly decreased to about 20 ppm by electron beam irradiation with a dose of 10 kGy at 150 o C under spraying slaked-lime slurry of two stoichiometric amounts. The removal of NO x was improved by increasing the dose and the amount of spraying slaked-lime slurry, and by lowering of the irradiation temperature. (Author)

  19. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  20. Cleaning of porous filters in fossilized bed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigo Otero, A.; Sancho Rod, J.

    1965-01-01

    In this report are established the optimum working conditions of a filter cleaning system by blow back. For this purpose it was determined in the first place the blow back air rate necessary to have a good cleaning. The reasons for which it was not possible until now to control the pressure in a fluidized bed calcination reactor are analyzed and a criteria is established to calculate the optimum floe necessary to clean efficiently a porous by this procedures. (Author)

  1. Elimination of the containment spray additive for Vogtle electric generating plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowery, K.G.

    1995-01-01

    This paper discusses the details for elimination of the spray additive portion of the containment spray system (CSS) in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plant. A particular emphasis is placed on nuclear power plant design associated with operation and maintenance (O and M), cost control strategies, and reliability initiatives. The CSS is an engineered safeguard system that functions to reduce reactor containment building pressure and temperature and the quantity of airborne fission products in the containment atmosphere subsequent to a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). Pressure and temperature reduction is accomplished by spraying water into the containment building atmosphere. Sodium hydroxide (NaOH) is added to the containment spray water to increase its pH. Results of recent studies on the behavior of fission products in the post-LOCA containment environment have demonstrated that the iodine removal can be effectively performed by boric acid sprays without the NaOH additive and by deposition on the internal surfaces of the containment building. Thus, the NaOH, the SAT, the chemical injection system (eductor) which delivers the additive to the spray system, and the related testing and maintenance required by the Technical Specifications can be eliminated. The NaOH will be replaced by TSP in baskets in the containment sump area. The TSP is needed for pH control during the recirculation phase following a LOCA. The deletion of the requirement for the SAT will result in a reduction of regulatory requirements in that the level of surveillance will be reduced. The safety analysis acceptance limits will still be met

  2. Potential effects of the fire protection system sprays at Browns Ferry on fission product transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemczyk, S.J.

    1983-01-01

    The fire protection system (FPS) sprays within any nuclear plant are not intended to mitigate radioactive releases to the environment resulting from severe core-damage accidents. However, it has been shown here that during certain postulated severe accident scenarios at the Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, the functioning of FPS sprays could have a significant impact on the radioactive releases. Thus the effects of those sprays need to be taken into account for realistic estimation of source terms for some accident scenarios. The effects would include direct ones such as cooling of the reactor building atmosphere and scrubbing of radioactivity from it, as well as indirect effects such as an altered likelihood of hydrogen burning and flooding of various safety-related pumps in the reactor building basement. Thus some of the impacts of the sprays would be beneficial with respect to mitigating releases to the environment but some others might not be. The effects of the FPS would be very scenario dependent with a wide range of potential effects often existing for a given accident sequence. Any generalization of the specific results presented here for Browns Ferry to other nuclear plants must be done cautiously, as it appears from a preliminary investigation that the relevant physical and operational characteristics of FPS spray systems differ widely among even otherwise apparently similar plants. Likewise the standby gas treatment systems, which substantially impact the effects of the FPS, differ significantly among plants. More work for both Mark I plants and other plants, BWRs and PWRs alike, is indicated so the potential effects of FPS spray systems during severe accidents can be at least ball-parked for more realistic accident analyses

  3. Thermally sprayed coatings: Aluminum on lead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usmani, S.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Zatorski, R.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental program to determine the feasibility of thermally spraying aluminum on a lead substrate was initiated in support of the accelerator production of tritium (APT) Project for the US Department of Energy. The program consisted of two distinct parts: (1) the characterization of the thermally sprayed coatings, including microhardness testing, effects of heating, and microstructure and porosity determinations, and (2) effects of mercury doping and heat treatments on the thermally sprayed composite. The project determined that aluminum could successfully be thermally sprayed onto the lead. The coatings had a dense microstructure, with a Vicker's Pyramid Hardness (VPH) of about 60, and a maximum porosity (found in strips on the samples) of 12%

  4. Synthesis and antibacterial evaluation of calcinated Ag-doped nano-hydroxyapatite with dispersibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuzono, Tsutomu; Motaharul, Mazumder; Kogai, Yasumichi; Azuma, Yoshinao; Sawa, Yoshiki

    2015-05-01

    Dispersible hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanoparticles are very useful for applying a monolayer to implantable medical devices using the nano-coating technique. To improve tolerance to infection on implanted medical devices, silver-doped HAp (Ag-HAp) nanoparticles with dispersiblity and crystallinity were synthesized, avoiding calcination-induced sintering, and evaluated for antibacterial activity. The Ca10-xAgx(PO4)6(OH)2 with x = 0 and 0.2 were prepared by wet chemical processing at 100°C. Before calcination at 700°C for 2 h, two kinds of anti-sintering agents, namely a Ca(NO3)2 (Ca salt) and a polyacrylic acid/Ca salt mixture (PAA-Ca), were used. Escherichia coli was used to evaluate the antibacterial activity of the nanopowder. When PAA-Ca was used as an anti-sintering agent in calcination to prepare the dispersible nanoparticles, strong metallic Ag peaks were observed at 38.1° and 44.3° (2θ) in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile. However, the Ag peak was barely observed when Ca salt was used alone as the anti-sintering agent. Thus, using Ca salt alone was more effective for preparation of dispersible Ag-HAp than PAA-Ca. The particle average size of Ag-HAp with 0.5 mol% of Ag content was found to be 325 ± 70 nm when the formation of large particleaggregations was prevented, as determined by dynamic light scattering instrument. The antibacterial activity of the Ag-HAp nanoparticles possessing 0.5 mol% against E. coli was greater than 90.0%. Dispersible and crystalline nano Ag-HAp can be obtained by using Ca salt alone as an anti-sintering agent. The nanoparticles showed antibacterial activity.

  5. Physical, Chemical and Structural Evolution of Zeolite - Containing Waste Forms Produced from Metakaolinite and Calcined HLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grutzeck, Michael

    2005-01-01

    During the seventh year of the current grant (DE-FG02-05ER63966) we completed an exhaustive study of cold calcination and began work on the development of tank fill materials to fill empty tanks and control residuals. Cold calcination of low and high NOx low activity waste (LAW) SRS Tank 44 and Hanford AN-107 simulants, respectively with metallic Al + Si powders was evaluated. It was found that a combination of Al and Si powders could be used as reducing agents to reduce the nitrate and nitrite content of both low and high NOx LAW to low enough levels to allow the LAW to be solidified directly by mixing it with metakaolin and allowing it to cure at 90 C. During room temperature reactions, NOx was reduced and nitrogen was emitted as N2 or NH3. This was an important finding because now one can pretreat LAW at ambient temperatures which provides a low-temperature alternative to thermal calcination. The significant advantage of using Al and Si metals for denitration/denitrition of the LAW is the fact that the supernate could potentially be treated in situ in the waste tanks themselves. Tank fill materials based upon a hydroceramic binder have been formulated from mixtures of metakaolinite, Class F fly ash and Class C flue gas desulphurization (FGD) ash mixed with various concentrations of NaOH solution. These harden over a period of hours or days depending on composition. A systematic study of properties of the tank fill materials (leachability) and ability to adsorb and hold residuals is under way

  6. A comparison of different spray chemical vapour deposition methods for the production of undoped ZnO thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnier, Jerome; Bouteville, Anne; Hamilton, Jeff; Pemble, Martyn E.; Povey, Ian M.

    2009-01-01

    Two different methods of spray chemical vapour deposition have been used to grow ZnO thin films on glass substrates from zinc acetate solution over the temperature range 400 o C to 550 o C. The first of these is named InfraRed Assisted Spray Chemical Vapour Deposition (IRAS-CVD). This method uses intense IR radiation to heat not only the substrate but also the gaseous species entering the reactor. The second method is a more conventional approach known simply as ultrasonic spray CVD, which utilises IR lamps to heat the substrate only. By way of comparing these two approaches we present data obtained from contact angle measurements, crystallinity and mean crystallite size, photoluminescence, electrical and optical properties. Additionally we have examined the role of annealing within the IRAS-CVD reactor environment.

  7. Effects of nozzle type and spray angle on spray deposition in ivy pot plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foqué, Dieter; Nuyttens, David

    2011-02-01

    Fewer plant protection products are now authorised for use in ornamental growings. Frequent spraying with the same product or a suboptimal technique can lead to resistance in pests and diseases. Better application techniques could improve the sustainable use of the plant protection products still available. Spray boom systems--instead of the still predominantly used spray guns--might improve crop protection management in greenhouses considerably. The effect of nozzle type, spray pressure and spray angle on spray deposition and coverage in ivy pot plants was studied, with a focus on crop penetration and spraying the bottom side of the leaves in this dense crop. The experiments showed a significant and important effect of collector position on deposition and coverage in the plant. Although spray deposition and coverage on the bottom side of the leaves are generally low, they could be improved 3.0-4.9-fold using the appropriate application technique. When using a spray boom in a dense crop, the nozzle choice, spray pressure and spray angle should be well considered. The hollow-cone, the air-inclusion flat-fan and the standard flat-fan nozzle with an inclined spray angle performed best because of the effect of swirling droplets, droplets with a high momentum and droplet direction respectively. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Effect of spray application technique on spray deposition in greenhouse strawberries and tomatoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braekman, Pascal; Foque, Dieter; Messens, Winy; Van Labeke, Marie-Christine; Pieters, Jan G; Nuyttens, David

    2010-02-01

    Increasingly, Flemish greenhouse growers are using spray booms instead of spray guns to apply plant protection products. Although the advantages of spray booms are well known, growers still have many questions concerning nozzle choice and settings. Spray deposition using a vertical spray boom in tomatoes and strawberries was compared with reference spray equipment. Five different settings of nozzle type, size and pressure were tested with the spray boom. In general, the standard vertical spray boom performed better than the reference spray equipment in strawberries (spray gun) and in tomatoes (air-assisted sprayer). Nozzle type and settings significantly affected spray deposition and crop penetration. Highest overall deposits in strawberries were achieved using air-inclusion or extended-range nozzles. In tomatoes, the extended-range nozzles and the twin air-inclusion nozzles performed best. Using smaller-size extended-range nozzles above the recommended pressure range resulted in lower deposits, especially inside the crop canopy. The use of a vertical spray boom is a promising technique for applying plant protection products in a safe and efficient way in tomatoes and strawberries, and nozzle choice and setting should be carefully considered.

  9. Cleaning of porous filters in fossilized bed reactors; Estudio de limpieza de filtros porosos en reactores de lecho fluidizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo Otero, A; Sancho Rod, J

    1965-07-01

    In this report are established the optimum working conditions of a filter cleaning system by blow back. For this purpose it was determined in the first place the blow back air rate necessary to have a good cleaning. The reasons for which it was not possible until now to control the pressure in a fluidized bed calcination reactor are analyzed and a criteria is established to calculate the optimum floe necessary to clean efficiently a porous by this procedures. (Author)

  10. Development of a SREX flowsheet for the separation of strontium from dissolved INEEL zirconium calcine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Law, J.D.; Wood, D.J.; Todd, T.A.

    1999-01-01

    Laboratory experimentation has indicated that the SREX process is effective for partitioning 90 Sr from acidic radioactive waste solutions located at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. These laboratory results were used to develop a flowsheet for countercurrent testing of the SREX process with dissolved pilot plant calcine. Testing was performed using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors which are installed in the Remote Analytical Laboratory hot cell. Dissolved Run No.64 pilot plant calcine spiked with 85 Sr was used as feed solution for the testing. The flowsheet tested consisted of an extraction section (0.15 M 4prime,4prime(5prime)-di-(tert-butylcyclohexo)-18-crown-6 and 1.5 M TBP in Isopar-L.), a 1.0 M NaNO 3 scrub section to remove extracted K from the SREX solvent, a 0.01 M HNO 3 strip section for the removal of Sr from the SREX solvent, a 0.25 M Na2CO 3 wash section to remove degradation products from the solvent, and a 0.1 M HNO 3 rinse section. The behavior of 85 Sr, Na, K, Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr was evaluated. The described flowsheet successfully extracted 85 Sr from the dissolved pilot plant calcine with a removal efficiency of 99.6%. Distribution coefficients for 85 Sr ranged from 3.6 to 4.5 in the extraction section. With these distribution coefficients a removal efficiency of approximately >99.99% was expected. It was determined that the lower than expected removal efficiency can be attributed to a stage efficiency of only 60% in the extraction section. Extracted K was effectively scrubbed from the SREX solvent with the 1.0 M NaNO 3 resulting in only 6.4% of the K in the HLW strip product. Sodium was not extracted from the dissolved calcine by the SREX solvent; however, the use of a 1.0 M NaNO 3 scrub solution resulted in a Na concentration of 70 mg/L (12.3% of the feed concentration) in the HLW strip product. Al, B, Ca, Cr, Fe, Ni, and Zr were determined to be essentially inextractable

  11. Structure and pozzolanic activity of calcined coal gangue during the process of mechanical activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Guo; Dongxu Li; Jianhua Chen; Nanru Yang [Yancheng Institute of Technology, Yancheng (China). Department of Material Engineering

    2009-04-15

    On the basis of analyzing coal gangue's chemical and mineral compositions, the structure change of coal gangue during the mechanical activation was investigated by XRD, FTIR, NMR, and the mechanical strength of the cement doped coal gangue with various specific surface area was tested. The experimental results indicate that the lattice structure of metakaolin in coal gangue samples calcined at 700{sup o}C disorganizes gradually and becomes disordered, and the lattice structure of {alpha}-quartz is distorted slightly. The pozzolanic activity of the coal gangue increases obviously with its structural disorganization.

  12. Aerial electrostatic spray deposition and canopy penetration in cotton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spray deposition on abaxial and adaxial leaf surfaces along with canopy penetration are essential for insect control and foliage defoliation in cotton production agriculture. Researchers have reported that electrostatically charged sprays have increased spray deposit onto these surfaces under widel...

  13. Applicability of fan spray nozzles to stripping insoluble gases from viscous liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, H.H.; Johnson, E.F.

    1983-08-01

    Fan spray nozzle stripping appears to be a practical technique for separating dilute volatile solutes from nonvolatile solvents. In particular this technique can be used to strip molecular tritium and tritium fluoride at extremely small concentration (in the parts per million range) from molten salts used as blanket materials in a fusion reactor. Under adjusted operating conditions of the fan spray as it leaves the nozzle, a high percentage of the theoretically maximum achievable stripping would take place from the expanding sheet of the fan spray as it leaves the nozzle and before it breaks up. Although the only available experimental data are for aqueous solutions, a new theoretical analysis of the fan spray sheet demonstrates the applicability of this technique to nonaqueous liquids. The equation derived from this analysis relates the theoretically achievable mass transfer efficiency to the properties of the liquid flowing through the fan spray nozzle and to the operating conditions of the nozzle. Any fluid with viscosity higher than or equal to that of water would be expected to follow this equation as long as a fan-shaped sheet is formed under the operating conditions of the nozzle

  14. Reduction of spray pressure leads to less emission and better deposition of spray liquid at high-volume spraying in greenhouse tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Os, van E.A.; Michielsen, J.M.G.P.; Corver, F.J.M.; Berg, van den J.V.; Bruins, M.A.; Porskamp, H.A.J.; Zande, van de J.C.

    2005-01-01

    In an experimental greenhouse, growing a tomato crop, it was investigated if a reduction in spray pressure could improve the spray result, while, simultaneously, emission to the ground could be reduced. Spray deposition on the leaves and the emission to the ground was evaluated at different spray

  15. Development and application of the global rainbow refractometry for the study of heat and mass transfers in a spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaitre, P.

    2004-12-01

    During the course of an hypothetical severe accident in a Pressure Water Reactor (PWR), hydrogen produced by the degradation and oxidation of the reactor core and high pressure water vapor can be released into the reactor containment. The repartition of the hydrogen in the reactor containment is then dependent of the forced (mixed or natural) convection flows which will be established. This type of accidental scenario will lead then to the pressurization of the reactor containment and to a potential risk of hydrogen combustion, able to prejudice to the integrity of the reactor. One of the means of PWR safety, called spraying, consists to release cold water sprays in the reactor containment, with the aim to make its internal pressure and its temperature decrease, on account of the condensation of water vapor on the injected water droplets. Moreover, the spraying leads to a mixing of the gaseous mixture containing air, water vapor and hydrogen, and contributes to make the hydrogen local concentration decreased. The TOSQAN experiment, developed at the IRSN, allows to reproduce the thermal-hydraulic conditions which represent accidental sequences able to happen in a PWR. In the frame of the current program consecrated to the spraying study, an innovating optical technique has been implemented on the TOSQAN experiment to finely characterize the mass and heat transfers between a spray and the surrounding atmosphere. This work gives into details the development of the global rainbow technique which allows to measure, in a non intrusive way, the temperature of the droplets during their fall. This technique has been coupled with others optical diagnoses such as the spontaneous Raman diffusion spectrometry, the PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and the implementation imagery, to respectively measure the water vapor parts as well as the velocities and the droplets sizes. The obtained experimental results have led to a global and local analysis of the interaction between the

  16. Conceptual design for vitrification of HLW at West Valley using a rotary calciner/metallic melter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giraud, J.P.; Conord, J.P.; Saverot, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The CEA has had an extensive research program in the field of vitrification technology for over 24 years, and several testing facilities were used throughout all phases of development and engineering: The Vulcain facility comprises a vitrification hot cell and four auxiliary hot cells. Vulcain allows the production of 2-kg samples of active glass. The off-gas treatment system allows testing the DF of each equipment. The auxiliary cells are equipped with leach-rate tests, diffusion tests, and irradiation tests on the glass samples. The Atlas facility is a reproduction of AVM calcination and vitrification furnaces at 1/2 scale enclosed in a glove box. This facility is used for testing ruthenium volatility and containment in the vitrification process. The full-scale AVM inactive pilot facility is used for testing calcination and vitrification of new compositions of high-level waste and for developing new types of vitrification furnaces. The inactive test loop is for testing air cooling of glass containers. The full-scale AVH inactive pilot facility is used for testing AVH technology and has been in operation since late 1981

  17. Removal of acid blue 062 on aqueous solution using calcinated colemanite ore waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atar, Necip [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Dumlupinar, Kuetahya (Turkey); Olgun, Asim [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science, University of Dumlupinar, Kuetahya (Turkey)]. E-mail: aolgun@dumlupinar.edu.tr

    2007-07-19

    Colemanite ore waste (CW) has been employed as adsorbent for the removal of acid blue 062 anionic dye (AB 062) from aqueous solution. The adsorption of AB 062 onto CW was examined with respect to contact time, calcination temperature, particle size, pH, adsorbent dosage and temperature. The physical and chemical properties of the CW, such as particle sizes and calcinations temperature, play important roles in dye adsorption. The dye adsorption largely depends on the initial pH of the solution with maximum uptake occurring at pH 1.Three simplified kinetics models, namely, pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and intraparticle diffusion models were tested to investigate the adsorption mechanisms. The kinetic adsorption of AB 062 on CW follows a pseudo-second order equation. The adsorption data have been analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The results indicate that the Langmuir model provides the best correlation of the experimental data. Isotherms have also been used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters such as free energy, enthalpy and entropy of the adsorption of dye onto CW.

  18. Removal of acid blue 062 on aqueous solution using calcinated colemanite ore waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atar, Necip; Olgun, Asim

    2007-01-01

    Colemanite ore waste (CW) has been employed as adsorbent for the removal of acid blue 062 anionic dye (AB 062) from aqueous solution. The adsorption of AB 062 onto CW was examined with respect to contact time, calcination temperature, particle size, pH, adsorbent dosage and temperature. The physical and chemical properties of the CW, such as particle sizes and calcinations temperature, play important roles in dye adsorption. The dye adsorption largely depends on the initial pH of the solution with maximum uptake occurring at pH 1.Three simplified kinetics models, namely, pseudo-first order, pseudo-second order, and intraparticle diffusion models were tested to investigate the adsorption mechanisms. The kinetic adsorption of AB 062 on CW follows a pseudo-second order equation. The adsorption data have been analyzed using Langmuir and Freundlich isotherms. The results indicate that the Langmuir model provides the best correlation of the experimental data. Isotherms have also been used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters such as free energy, enthalpy and entropy of the adsorption of dye onto CW

  19. Photocatalytic hydrogen evolution of palladium nanoparticles decorated black TiO2 calcined in argon atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Chung; Hsiao, Kai-Chi; Chang, Yin-Hsuan; Chan, Shun-Hsiang

    2018-02-01

    Black TiO2 nanoparticles (BTN) was prepared by sol-gel derived precursor calcined in an argon atmosphere. The synthesized BTN with trivalent titanium ion, structural defect, and oxygen vacancy shows a remarkably high absorbance in the visible light spectrum. BTN thus behaves a higher visible-active nanoreactor than white TiO2 nanoparticles (WTN) in the aqueous solution for organic pollutant degradation. Moreover, palladium decoration on the BTN surface (Pd-BTN) demonstrates a fascinating clean energy application. The obtained Pd-BTN fulfills a satisfied green material demand in the photocatalytic hydrogen production application. Pd-BTN calcined at 400 °C (Pd-BTN-400) shows the high photocatalytic hydrogen generation rate of 5200 μmol/g h under UV-A irradiation and 9300 μmol/g h under UV-B irradiation, respectively. The well-developed material, Pd-BTN-400, could be one of the best solutions in the concern of clean energy and water-purification with regard to the continuous environmental issue.

  20. Synthesis, structure and photocatalytic activity of calcined Mg-Al-Ti-layered double hydroxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosni, Khaled; Abdelkarim, Omar; Srasra, Ezzeddine [Centre National des Recherches en Sciences des Matériaux (CNRSM), Soliman (Turkey); Frini-Srasra, Najoua [Faculté des Sciences de Tunis (FST), Tunis (Turkey)

    2015-01-15

    Mg-Al-Ti layered double hydroxides (LDH), consisting of di-, tri- and tetra-valent cations with different Al{sup 3+}/Ti{sup 4+} ratio, have been synthesized by co-precipitation which was demonstrated as efficient visible-light photocatalysts. The structure and chemical composition of the compound were characterized by PXRD, FT-IR, SAA, N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption isotherms, and DSC techniques. It is found that no hydrotalcites structure were formed for Ti{sup 4+}/(Ti{sup 4+}+ Al{sup 3+})>0.5 and the substitution of Ti(IV) for Al(III) in the layer increases the thermal stability of the resulting LDH materials. The calcined sample containing titanium showed relatively high adsorption capacity for MB as compared to that without titanium. Results show that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model and the Langmuir were found to correlate the experimental data well. The photocatalytic activity was evaluated for the degradation of the methylene blue. The photocatalytic activity increased with the increase of the Al/Ti cationic ratio. 71% of the dye could be removed by the Mg/Al/Ti-LDH with the cationic ratio Al/Ti=0 : 1 and calcined at 500 .deg. C.

  1. Calcined hydrotalcites for the catalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O in simulated process streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armor, J.N.; Braymer, T.A.; Farris, T.S.; Li, Y.; Petrocelli, F.P.; Weist, E.L. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States); Kannan, S.; Swamy, C.S. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras (India)

    1996-01-18

    Various hydrotalcite based catalysts were prepared for testing for the catalytic decomposition of N{sub 2}O. Co-Al, Ni-Al, Co/Pd-Al, Co/Rh-Al, and Co/Mg-Al substituted hydrotalcites and Co-La-Al hydroxides offer very good activity at modest temperatures. Precalcination of these materials at ca. 450-500C, which destroys the hydrotalcite phase, is necessary for optimum activity and life. For Co substituted hydrotalcites, the optimal ratio of Co/Al is 3.0. The temperature for 50% conversion of N{sub 2}O of these calcined cobalt hydrotalcites is ca. 75C lower than for the previous highly active Co-ZSM-5. These calcined cobalt hydrotalcite materials display sustained life at temperatures in excess of 670C in an O{sub 2} rich, wet stream with high levels of N{sub 2}O (10%). Excess O{sub 2} does not seriously impact N{sub 2}O decomposition, but the combination of both water vapor and O{sub 2} does reduce activity by ca. 50%

  2. Implementation of industrial waste ferrochrome slag in conventional and low cement castables: Effect of calcined alumina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pattem Hemanth Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A new class of conventional and low-cement ferrochrome slag-based castables were prepared from 40 wt.% ferrochrome slag and 45 wt.% calcined bauxite. Rest fraction varied between high alumina cement (HAC acting as hydraulic binder and calcined alumina as pore filling additive. Standard ASTM size briquettes were prepared for crushing and bending strengths evaluation, and the samples were then subjected to firing at 800, 1100 and 1300 °C for a soaking period of 3 h. The microstructure and refractory properties of the prepared castables have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, cold crushing strength, modulus of rupture and permanent linear changes (PLCs test. Castables show good volume stability (linear change <0.7% at 1300 °C. The outcomes of these investigations were efficacious and in accordance with previously reported data of similar compositions. High thermo-mechanical and physico-chemical properties were attained pointing out an outstanding potential to increase the refractory lining working life of non-recovery coke oven and reheating furnaces.

  3. Manganese oxide phases and morphologies: A study on calcination temperature and atmospheric dependence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Augustin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Manganese oxides are one of the most important groups of materials in energy storage science. In order to fully leverage their application potential, precise control of their properties such as particle size, surface area and Mnx+ oxidation state is required. Here, Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 nanoparticles as well as mesoporous α-Mn2O3 particles were synthesized by calcination of Mn(II glycolate nanoparticles obtained through an economical route based on a polyol synthesis. The preparation of the different manganese oxides via one route facilitates assigning actual structure–property relationships. The oxidation process related to the different MnOx species was observed by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD measurements showing time- and temperature-dependent phase transformations occurring during oxidation of the Mn(II glycolate precursor to α-Mn2O3 via Mn3O4 and Mn5O8 in O2 atmosphere. Detailed structural and morphological investigations using transmission electron microscopy (TEM and powder XRD revealed the dependence of the lattice constants and particle sizes of the MnOx species on the calcination temperature and the presence of an oxidizing or neutral atmosphere. Furthermore, to demonstrate the application potential of the synthesized MnOx species, we studied their catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction in aprotic media. Linear sweep voltammetry revealed the best performance for the mesoporous α-Mn2O3 species.

  4. Calcination temperature influenced multiferroic properties of Ca-doped BiFeO3 nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, Gitanjali; Uniyal, Poonam; Verma, N. K.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of Ca-doping and particle size on structural, morphological and magnetic properties of BiFeO 3 nanoparticles has been studied. A sol-gel method was employed for the synthesis of nanoparticles and their particle size was tailored by varying the calcination temperature. Structural analysis revealed a rhombohedral distortion induced by Ca-substitution. The broadening of diffraction peaks with decreasing calcination temperature was indicative of reduction in crystallite size. The morphological analysis revealed the formation of agglomerated nanoparticles having average particle size ranging from 10-15 and 50-55 nm for C4 and C6, respectively. The agglomeration is attributed to high surface energy of nanoparticles. Ferromagnetism has been displayed by all the synthesized nanoparticles. Enhancement of saturation magnetization with Ca-substitution is attributed to suppression of spin cycloid structure by the reduction in size, lattice distortion and creation of oxygen vacancies by the substitution of divalent ion at trivalent site. Further, this value increases as a function of decreasing particle size. Strong particle size effects on magnetic properties of the synthesized nanoparticles are owed to increasing surface to volume ratio. All these observations are indicative of strong dependence of multiferroism on particle size

  5. Evaluation of calcination temperature and phase composition ratio for new hyroxyapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salimi, M. N. Ahmad; Chin, H. S.

    2017-10-01

    The demand of production of hydroxyapatite (HA) has been increasing for the purpose of medical and dental application. HA possesses the excellent properties leads to the priority choice for ceramic bone replacement. Synthesis route by wet chemical precipitation is commonly practised in industrial scale. Calcium hydroxide and Orthophosphoric acid are the precursors for production scale. The synthesis of HA is conducted by varying the synthetic condition: stirring rate, calcium-phosphate and calcination temperature. This paper is focused on the properties of HA produced by regulating the synthetic condition so that the qualities of HA can be well performed. Characterization studies were also carried out by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) for functional group identification, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) for surface morphology analysis and X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) for phase composition and crystallinity respectively. Narrow particle size distribution contributed to better quality of hydroxyapatite for bone replacement. Both calcium-phosphate ratio and calcination temperature would affect the phase composition of calcium phosphate.

  6. Mercury removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. C. Ashworth

    2000-02-27

    Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

  7. Mercury Removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calcining Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashworth, Samuel Clay; Wood, R. A.; Taylor, D. D.; Sieme, D. D.

    2000-03-01

    Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended.

  8. Memory effect of calcined layered samarium hydroxy chlorides in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Byung Il; Byeon, Song Ho

    2015-01-01

    The decomposition and recovery behavior of layered samarium hydroxychloride (Sm 2 (OH) 5 Cl·nH 2 O, LSmH) has been closely studied in various conditions. Although the heat treatment of LSmH at 700 °C completely collapsed typical layered structure, the calcined LSmH (c-LSmH) recovered its layered characteristics and consequently its ability to intercalate anions into the interlayer space when it was rehydroxylated and rehydrated in aqueous solutions containing organic and inorganic anions. This phenomenon is similar to the memory effect observed in classical layered double hydroxides (LDHs), where LDHs calcined to a mixture of metal oxides can recover their layered structures in aqueous solutions. In contrast, the recovery reaction of c-LSmH in water without any counter anions was unsuccessful and instead resulted in the formation of Sm(OH) 3 . Such a difference was interpreted on the basis of the salt effect on Sm 2 (OH) 5 Cl·nH 2 O–Sm(OH) 3 phase equilibria in water

  9. Mercury removal at Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's New Waste Calciner Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashworth, S.C.

    2000-01-01

    Technologies were investigated to determine viable processes for removing mercury from the calciner (NWCF) offgas system at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Technologies for gas phase and aqueous phase treatment were evaluated. The technologies determined are intended to meet EPA Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) requirements under the Clean Air Act and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Currently, mercury accumulation in the calciner off-gas scrubbing system is transferred to the tank farm. These transfers lead to accumulation in the liquid heels of the tanks. The principal objective for aqueous phase mercury removal is heel mercury reduction. The system presents a challenge to traditional methods because of the presence of nitrogen oxides in the gas phase and high nitric acid in the aqueous scrubbing solution. Many old and new technologies were evaluated including sorbents and absorption in the gas phase and ion exchange, membranes/sorption, galvanic methods, and UV reduction in the aqueous phase. Process modifications and feed pre-treatment were also evaluated. Various properties of mercury and its compounds were summarized and speciation was predicted based on thermodynamics. Three systems (process modification, NOxidizer combustor, and electrochemical aqueous phase treatment) and additional technology testing were recommended

  10. Influence of calcination process on the formation of selected air pollutants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wydrych Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the study is to analyze the phenomena of thermal flow in the precalcinator chamber of the exchanger's furnace tower including the combustion of coal dust and decarbonisation of raw lime powder. During the research were provided development of a mathematical model of particulate solid fuels combustion, calcining the raw material, NOx and COx formation. Moreover conducting the number for the current and the upgraded design of the precalcinator and analysis of the results. In this study, a mathematical model based on Euler's method to describe the motion of the gas phase and the Lagrange method to describe the motion of particles [1-4]. In the calculations there were assumed fractional particles raw material and fuel, and the following processes: flow of exhaust gases from the rotary kiln through the precalcinator chamber, heat exchange between the particles of raw material and exhaust gases, the additional fuel combustion in the precalcinator, the process of raw material calcination, transformation of gaseous substances, effect of the additional (tertiary air delivery on the processes in the chamber.

  11. Easily recycled Bi2O3 photocatalyst coatings prepared via ball milling followed by calcination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lijun; Hu, Xumin; Hao, Liang

    2017-06-01

    Bi2O3 photocatalyst coatings derived from Bi coatings were first prepared by a two-step method, namely ball milling followed by the calcination process. The as-prepared samples were characterized by XRD, SEM, XPS and UV-Vis spectra, respectively. The results showed that monoclinic Bi2O3 coatings were obtained after sintering Bi coatings at 673 or 773 K, while monoclinic and triclinic mixed phase Bi2O3 coatings were obtained at 873 or 973 K. The topographies of the samples were observably different, which varied from flower-like, irregular, polygonal to nanosized particles with the increase in calcination temperature. Photodegradation of malachite green under simulated solar irradiation for 180 min showed that the largest degradation efficiency of 86.2% was achieved over Bi2O3 photocatalyst coatings sintered at 873 K. The Bi2O3 photocatalyst coatings, encapsulated with Al2O3 ball with an average diameter around 1 mm, are quite easily recycled, which provides an alternative visible light-driven photocatalyst suitable for practical water treatment application.

  12. Pecularities of carrying out radioactive wastes vitrification process without preliminary calcination of wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinovich, A.A.; Kulichenko, V.V.; Bel'tyukov, V.A.; Nikiforov, A.S.; Nikipelov, B.V.; Stepanov, S.E.; Baskov, L.I.; Kulakov, S.I.

    1978-01-01

    Vitrification technology is considered for liquid radioactive wastes by means of electric furnace where heating of glass-paste is done by electric current passing through the melt. Continious process of gehydration, calcination and vitrification is going on in one apparatus. Testing if the method has been performed by use of a model solution, containing sodium and aluminium nitrates. To obtain phosphoric acid has been added into the solution. Lay-out of the device and its description as well as technical parameters of the electric furnace are given. The results are stated for determination of the optimum operation conditions for the device. To reduce entrainment of solid components, molasses has been added in the solution. Parameters are given for the process of the solution containing 80 g/l molasses processing. It has been shown that edding molasses to the solution permitted to reduse power consumption of the process due to the heat generation during oxidation-reduction reaction on the melt surface. The results are given for investigations of the nitrogen oxides catching in scrubbers. These results have shown that introduction of molasses reduces nitrigen oxides concentration. The results of the experimental works have shown the possibility of the continious process of dehydration, calcination and vitrification in single device with application of remote control and monitoring by means of automatics. (I.T.) [ru

  13. Effects of milling method and calcination condition on phase and morphology characteristics of Mg4Nb2O9 powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongmaneerung, R.; Sarakonsri, T.; Yimnirun, R.; Ananta, S.

    2006-01-01

    Magnesium niobate, Mg 4 Nb 2 O 9 , powders has been synthesized by a solid-state reaction. Both conventional ball- and rapid vibro-milling have been investigated as milling methods, with the formation of the Mg 4 Nb 2 O 9 phase investigated as a function of calcination conditions by DTA and XRD. The particle size distribution of the calcined powders was determined by laser diffraction technique, while morphology, crystal structure and phase composition were determined via a combination of SEM, TEM and EDX techniques. The type of milling method together with the designed calcination condition was found to show a considerable effect on the phase and morphology evolution of the calcined Mg 4 Nb 2 O 9 powders. It is seen that optimization of calcination conditions can lead to a single-phase Mg 4 Nb 2 O 9 in both milling methods. However, the formation temperature and dwell time for single-phase Mg 4 Nb 2 O 9 powders were lower with the rapid vibro-milling technique

  14. Holodiscus (K. Koch) Maxim.: ocean-spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nancy L. Shaw; Emerenciana G. Hurd; Peter F. Stickney

    2008-01-01

    Holodiscus is a taxonomically complex genus including about 6 species of western North America and northern South America (Hitchcock and others 1961; Ley 1943). The 2 generally recognized North American species (table 1) - creambush ocean-spray and gland ocean-spray - are deciduous, multistemmed shrubs with simple, alternate, deciduous, toothed to shallowly lobed,...

  15. Spray drying of liquid radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrams, R.F.; Monat, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    Full scale performance tests of a Koch spray dryer were conducted on simulated liquid radioactive waste streams. The liquid feeds simulated the solutions that result from radwaste incineration of DAW an ion exchange resins, as well as evaporator bottoms. The integration of the spray dryer into a complete system is discussed

  16. Summary of the Blackmo 88 spray experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. R. Miller; W. E. Yendol; M. L. McManus; D. E. Anderson; K. Mierzejewski

    1991-01-01

    The Blackmo 88 spray trial experiment was conducted for two primary purposes: To quantify the effects of local micrometeorological processes, in and near the canopy, on the deposition patterns of aerially applied BT in a mature oak forest; To generate a data set containing simultaneous measurements of spray deposition and detailed micrometeorology, in a canopy of known...

  17. Cyclic carbonation calcination studies of limestone and dolomite for CO{sub 2} separation from combustion flue gases - article no. 011801

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthoorselvan, S.; Gleis, S.; Hartmut, S.; Yrjas, P.; Hupa, M. [TUM, Garching (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Naturally occurring limestone and dolomite samples, originating from different geographical locations, were tested as potential sorbents for carbonation/calcination based CO{sub 2} capture from combustion flue gases. Samples have been studied in a thermogravimetric analyzer under simulated flue gas conditions at three calcination temperatures, viz., 750{sup o}C, 875{sup o}C, and 930{sup o}C for four carbonation calcination reaction (CCR) cycles. The dolomite sample exhibited the highest rate of carbonation than the tested limestones. At the third cycle, its CO{sub 2} capture capacity per kilogram of the sample was nearly equal to that of Gotland, the highest reacting limestone tested. At the fourth cycle it surpassed Gotland, despite the fact that the CaCO{sub 3} content of the Sibbo dolomite was only 2/3 of that of the Gotland. Decay coefficients were calculated by a curve fitting exercise and its value is lowest for the Sibbo dolomite. That means, most probably its capture capacity per kilogram of the sample would remain higher well beyond the fourth cycle. There was a strong correlation between the calcination temperature, the specific surface area of the calcined samples, and the degree of carbonation. It was observed that the higher the calcination temperature, the lower the sorbent reactivity. For a given limestone/dolomite sample, sorbents CO{sub 2} capture capacity depended on the number of CCR cycles and the calcination temperature. According to the equilibrium thermodynamics, the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the calciner should be lowered to lower the calcination temperature. This can be achieved by additional steam supply into the calciner. Steam could then be condensed in an external condenser to single out the CO{sub 2} stream from the exit gas mixture of the calciner. A calciner design based on this concept is illustrated.

  18. Spray characteristics and spray cooling heat transfer in the non-boiling regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Wen-Long; Han, Feng-Yun; Liu, Qi-Nie; Fan, Han-Lin

    2011-01-01

    Spray cooling is an effective method for dissipating high heat fluxes in the field of electronics thermal control. In this study, experiments were performed with distilled water as a test liquid to study the spray cooling heat transfer in non-boiling regime. A Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) was used to study the spray characteristics. The effects of spray flow rate, spray height, and inlet temperature on spray cooling heat transfer were investigated. It was found that the parameters affect heat transfer of spray cooling in non-boiling regime by the spray characteristics and working fluid thermophysical properties. Then the corresponding droplet axial velocity and Sauter mean diameter (SMD) were successfully correlated with mean absolute error of 15%, which were based upon the orifice diameter, the Weber and Reynolds numbers of the orifice flow prior to liquid breakup, dimensionless spray height and spray cross-section radius. The heat transfer in non-boiling regime was correlated with a mean absolute error of 7%, which was mainly associated with the working fluid thermophysical properties, the Weber and Reynolds numbers hitting the heating surface, dimensionless heating surface temperature and diameter. -- Highlights: → The spray flow rate, spray height, and inlet temperature affect heat transfer of spray cooling in non-boiling regime by the spray characteristics and the working fluid thermophysical properties. → Then the corresponding droplet axial velocity and Sauer mean diameter (SMD) were successfully correlated with mean absolute error of 15%. → The heat transfer in non-boiling regime was correlated with a mean absolute error of 7%.

  19. BOILER-SUPERHEATED REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckman, T.P.

    1961-05-01

    A nuclear power reactor of the type in which a liquid moderator-coolant is transformed by nuclear heating into a vapor that may be used to drive a turbo- generator is described. The core of this reactor comprises a plurality of freely suspended tubular fuel elements, called fuel element trains, within which nonboiling pressurized liquid moderator-coolant is preheated and sprayed through orifices in the walls of the trains against the outer walls thereof to be converted into vapor. Passage of the vapor ovcr other unwetted portions of the outside of the fuel elements causes the steam to be superheated. The moderatorcoolant within the fuel elements remains in the liqUid state, and that between the fuel elements remains substantiaily in the vapor state. A unique liquid neutron-absorber control system is used. Advantages expected from the reactor design include reduced fuel element failure, increased stability of operation, direct response to power demand, and circulation of a minimum amount of liquid moderatorcoolant. (A.G.W.)

  20. Simulation of the containment spray system test PACOS PX2.2 with the integral code ASTEC and the containment code system COCOSYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risken, Tobias; Koch, Marco K.

    2011-01-01

    The reactor safety research contains the analysis of postulated accidents in nuclear power plants (npp). These accidents may involve a loss of coolant from the nuclear plant's reactor coolant system, during which heat and pressure within the containment are increased. To handle these atmospheric conditions, containment spray systems are installed in various light water reactors (LWR) worldwide as a part of the accident management system. For the improvement and the safety ensurance in npp operation and accident management, numeric simulations of postulated accident scenarios are performed. The presented calculations regard the predictability of the containment spray system's effect with the integral code ASTEC and the containment code system COCOSYS, performed at Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum. Therefore the test PACOS Px2.2 is simulated, in which water is sprayed in the stratified containment atmosphere of the BMC (Battelle Modell-Containment). (orig.)

  1. Effect of calcinations temperature of CuO nanoparticle on the kinetics of decontamination and decontamination products of sulphur mustard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahato, T H; Singh, Beer; Srivastava, A K; Prasad, G K; Srivastava, A R; Ganesan, K; Vijayaraghavan, R

    2011-09-15

    Present study investigates the potential of CuO nanoparticles calcined at different temperature for the decontamination of persistent chemical warfare agent sulphur mustard (HD) at room temperature (30 ± 2 °C). Nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation method and characterized by using SEM, EDAX, XRD, and Raman Spectroscopy. Synthesized nanoparticles were tested as destructive adsorbents for the degradation of HD. Reactions were monitored by GC-FID technique and the reaction products characterized by GC-MS. It was observed that the rate of degradation of HD decreases with the increase in calcination temperature and there is a change in the percentage of product of HD degradation. GC-MS data indicated that the elimination product increases with increase in calcination temperature whereas the hydrolysis product decreases. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Preparation and thermal energy storage properties of paraffin/calcined diatomite composites as form-stable phase change materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhiming; Zhang, Yuzhong; Zheng, Shuilin; Park, Yuri; Frost, Ray L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite. ► The optimum mixed proportion was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry. ► Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC. ► Thermal cycling test showed that the prepared PCMs are thermally reliable and chemically stable. - Abstract: A composite paraffin-based phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite through the fusion adsorption method. In this study, raw diatomite was purified by thermal treatment in order to improve the adsorption capacity of diatomite, which acted as a carrier material to prepare shape-stabilized PCMs. Two forms of paraffin (paraffin waxes and liquid paraffin) with different melting points were blended together by the fusion method, and the optimum mixed proportion with a suitable phase-transition temperature was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Then the prepared composite paraffin was adsorbed in calcined diatomite. The prepared paraffin/calcined diatomite composites were characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) analysis techniques. Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC method. DSC results showed that there was an optimum adsorption ratio between composite paraffin and calcined diatomite and the phase-transition temperature and the latent heat of the composite PCMs were 33.04 °C and 89.54 J/g, respectively. Thermal cycling test of composite PCMs showed that the prepared material is thermally reliable and chemically stable. The obtained paraffin/calcined diatomite composites have proper latent heat and melting temperatures, and show practical significance and good potential application value

  3. Preparation and thermal energy storage properties of paraffin/calcined diatomite composites as form-stable phase change materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhiming [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Zhang, Yuzhong [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Zheng, Shuilin, E-mail: shuilinzh@yahoo.com.cn [School of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083 (China); Park, Yuri [Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Frost, Ray L., E-mail: r.frost@qut.edu.au [Chemistry Discipline, Faculty of Science and Technology, Queensland University of Technology, 2 George Street, GPO Box 2434, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia)

    2013-04-20

    Highlights: ► Composite phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite. ► The optimum mixed proportion was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry. ► Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC. ► Thermal cycling test showed that the prepared PCMs are thermally reliable and chemically stable. - Abstract: A composite paraffin-based phase change material (PCM) was prepared by blending composite paraffin and calcined diatomite through the fusion adsorption method. In this study, raw diatomite was purified by thermal treatment in order to improve the adsorption capacity of diatomite, which acted as a carrier material to prepare shape-stabilized PCMs. Two forms of paraffin (paraffin waxes and liquid paraffin) with different melting points were blended together by the fusion method, and the optimum mixed proportion with a suitable phase-transition temperature was obtained through differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis. Then the prepared composite paraffin was adsorbed in calcined diatomite. The prepared paraffin/calcined diatomite composites were characterized by the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) analysis techniques. Thermal energy storage properties of the composite PCMs were determined by DSC method. DSC results showed that there was an optimum adsorption ratio between composite paraffin and calcined diatomite and the phase-transition temperature and the latent heat of the composite PCMs were 33.04 °C and 89.54 J/g, respectively. Thermal cycling test of composite PCMs showed that the prepared material is thermally reliable and chemically stable. The obtained paraffin/calcined diatomite composites have proper latent heat and melting temperatures, and show practical significance and good potential application value.

  4. Scalable synthesis of mesoporous titania microspheres via spray-drying method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Manas; Wan, Li; Zhu, Yongheng; Liu, Yupu; Liu, Yang; Gao, Wenjun; Li, Yuhui; Zheng, Gengfeng; Elzatahry, Ahmed A; Alghamdi, Abdulaziz; Deng, Yonghui; Zhao, Dongyuan

    2016-10-01

    Mesoporous TiO2 has several potential applications due to its unique electronic and optical properties, although its structures and morphologies are typically difficult to tune because of its uncontrollable and fast sol-gel reaction. In this study we have coupled the template-directed-sol-gel-chemistry with the low-cost, scalable, and environmentally benign aerosol (spray-drying) one-pot preparation technique for the fabrication of hierarchically mesoporous TiO2 microspheres and Fe3O4@mesoporous TiO2-x microspheres in a large scale. Parameters during the pre-hydrolysis and spray-drying treatment were varied to successfully control the bead diameter, morphology, monodispersity, surface area and pore size for improving their effectiveness for better application. Unlike to the previous aerosol synthetic approaches, where mainly quite a high temperature gradient with the strict control of spray-drying precursor concentration is implied, our strategy is lying on comparatively low drying temperature with an additional post-ultrasonication (further hydrolysis and condensation) route of the pre-calcined TiO2 samples. As-synthesized mesoporous microspheres have a size distribution from 500nm to 5μm, specific surface areas ranging from 150 to 162m(2)g(-1) and mean pore sizes of several nanometers (4-6nm). Further Fe3O4@mesoporous TiO2-x microspheres were observed to show remarkable selective phosphopeptide-enrichment activity which might have significant importance in disease diagnosis and other biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised

  6. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  7. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  8. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  9. Physical and chemical characteristics of fluorinel/sodium calcine generated during 30 cm Pilot-Plant Run 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, K.N.; Kessinger, G.F.; Littleton, L.L.; Olson, A.L.

    1993-07-01

    The 30 centimeter (cm) pilot plant calciner Run 17, of March 9, 1987, was performed to study the calcination of fluroinel-sodium blended waste blended at the ratio 3.5:1 fluorinel to sodium, respectively. The product of the run was analyzed by a variety of analytical techniques that included X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICP), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to deduce physical and chemical characteristics. The analytical data, as well as data analyses and conclusions drawn from the data, are presented

  10. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  11. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  12. Transient analysis of intermittent multijet sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panao, Miguel R.O.; Moreira, Antonio Luis N. [Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, IN, Center for Innovation, Technology and Policy Research, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisboa (Portugal); Durao, Diamantino G. [Universidade Lusiada, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2012-07-15

    This paper analyzes the transient characteristics of intermittent sprays produced by the single-point impact of multiple cylindrical jets. The aim is to perform a transient analysis of the intermittent atomization process to study the effect of varying the number of impinging jets in the hydrodynamic mechanisms of droplet formation. The results evidence that hydrodynamic mechanisms underlying the physics of ligament fragmentation in 2-impinging jets sprays also apply to sprays produced with more than 2 jets during the main period of injection. Ligaments detaching from the liquid sheet, as well as from its bounding rim, have been identified and associated with distinct droplet clusters, which become more evident as the number of impinging jets increases. Droplets produced by detached ligaments constitute the main spray, and their axial velocity becomes more uniformly distributed with 4-impinging jets because of a delayed ligament fragmentation. Multijet spray dispersion patterns are geometric depending on the number of impinging jets. Finally, an analysis on the Weber number of droplets suggests that multijet sprays are more likely to deposit on interposed surfaces, thus becoming a promising and competitive atomization solution for improving spray cooling. (orig.)

  13. Plasma sprayed samarium--cobalt permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, M.C.; Janowiecki, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    Samarium--cobalt permanent magnets were fabricated by arc plasma spraying. This process involves the injection of relatively coarse powder particles into a high-temperature gas for melting and spraying onto a substrate. The technique is being investigated as an economical method for fabricating cobalt--rare earth magnets for advanced traveling wave tubes and cross-field amplifiers. Plasma spraying permits deposition of material at high rates over large areas with optional direct bonding to the substrate, and offers the ability to fabricate magnets in a variety of shapes and sizes. Isotropic magnets were produced with high coercivity and good reproducibility in magnetic properties. Post-spray thermal treatments were used to enhance the magnetic properties of sprayed deposits. Samarium--cobalt magnets, sprayed from samarium-rich powder and subjected to post-spray heat treatment, displayed energy products in excess of 9 million gauss-oersteds and coercive forces of approximately 6000 oersteds. Bar magnet arrays were constructed by depositing magnets on ceramic substrates. (auth)

  14. Plasma sprayed samarium--cobalt permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willson, M.C.; Janowiecki, R.J.

    1975-01-01

    Samarium--Co permanent magnets were fabricated by arc plasma spraying. This process involves the injection of relatively coarse powder particles into a high temperature gas for melting and spraying onto a substrate. The technique is being investigated as an economical method for fabricating Co--rare earth magnets for advanced traveling wave tubes and cross-field amplifiers. Plasma spraying permits deposition of material at high rates over large areas with optional direct bonding to the substrate, and offers the ability to fabricate magnets in a variety of shapes and sizes. Isotropic magnets were produced with high coercivity and good reproducibility in magnetic properties. Post-spray thermal treatments were used to enhance the magnetic properties of sprayed deposits. Samarium--Co magnets, sprayed from Sm-rich powder and subjected to post-spray heat treatment, displayed energy products in excess of 9 million G-Oe and coercive forces of approximately 6000 Oe. Bar magnet arrays were constructed by depositing magnets on ceramic substrates

  15. LSPRAY-IV: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, M. S.

    2012-01-01

    LSPRAY-IV is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with parallel computing and unstructured grids. It is designed to be massively parallel and could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The solver accommodates the use of an unstructured mesh with mixed elements of either triangular, quadrilateral, and/or tetrahedral type for the gas flow grid representation. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray. Some important research areas covered as a part of the code development are: (1) the extension of combined CFD/scalar-Monte- Carlo-PDF method to spray modeling, (2) the multi-component liquid spray modeling, and (3) the assessment of various atomization models used in spray calculations. The current version contains the extension to the modeling of superheated sprays. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers.

  16. Simulation of Spray Injection in the Pressurizer Using RELAP5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dibyo

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available A modeling research using Relap5 to assess the pressurizer of a pressurized water reactor(PWR power plant has been performed. The heater and water injection systems in the pressurizer system of the PWRare of greatimportance for system pressure control.The heater is designed to increase the pressure while the water sprayer injection is to perform depressurization. Most of studies conducted in the past mainly focused on determining the effects of nozzle spray design and droplet size using testing loops. The purpose of this simulation is to analyze the spray injection flow rate against the pressure characteristics of the pressurizer using RELAP5. Through this approach, the optimum injection flow rate of full scale plant pressurizer can be analyzed. The parameters investigated are pressure and temperature.In RELAP5, the pressurizer tank wasmodeled with six volume nodes and the heater was modeled by using heat structure. In the model, the sprayer takes water from the cold leg to inject it into the top of tank region.The resultsshowedthat the mass flow of about 4 kg/s is the mosteffectivevalueto limit pressure in the pressurizer to below 15.7 MPa. However, the flow rates of 8 kg/s and more cause overpressure. This simulation is usefulto complement the data related to the water flow rate injection systems of the pressurizer. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Effect of spray angle and spray volume on deposition of a medium droplet spray with air support in ivy pot plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foqué, Dieter; Pieters, Jan G; Nuyttens, David

    2014-03-01

    Spray boom systems, an alternative to the predominantly-used spray guns, have the potential to considerably improve crop protection management in glasshouses. Based on earlier experiments, the further optimization of the deposits of a medium spray quality extended range flat fan nozzle type using easy adjustable spray boom settings was examined. Using mineral chelate tracers and water sensitive papers, the spray results were monitored at three plant levels, on the upper side and the underside of the leaves, and on some off-target collectors. In addition, the deposition datasets of all tree experiments were compared. The data showed that the most efficient spray distribution with the medium spray quality flat fan nozzles was found with a 30° forward angled spray combined with air support and an application rate of 1000 L ha(-1) . This technique resulted in a more uniform deposition in the dense canopy and increased spray deposition on the lower side of the leaves compared with the a standard spray boom application. Applying 1000 L ha(-1) in two subsequent runs instead of one did not seem to show any added value. Spray deposition can be improved hugely simply by changing some spray boom settings like nozzle type, angling the spray, using air support and adjusting the spray volume to the crop. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Twofold role of calcined hydrotalcites in the degradation of methyl parathion pesticide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Sampieri

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Methyl parathion (MP is a very toxic organophosphate pesticide used as a non-systematic insecticide and acaricide on many corps. As MP and its by-products are highly toxic, they have to be retained to avoid pollution of rivers and lakes. Highly efficient sorbents are hydrotalcites (HTs (or anionic clays. We have correlated the degradation of an aqueous solution of MP at room temperature, with the basicity of the adsorbing materials. It was found that the metal composition of hydrotalcites determines both the surface electronic properties (basic or acidic and the sorption capacity. Depending on the basic strength, some calcined hydrotalcites can catalyze the transformation of MP to p-nitrophenol (p-NP and retain its by-products. Such a process has the advantage of being able to be carried out at room temperature and at the pH of the pesticide solution.

  18. Influence of temperature on the synthesis of calcining cement α--tricalcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, R.S.; Thurmer, M.B.; Coelho, W.T.; Fernandes, J.M.; Santos, L.A.

    2011-01-01

    The calcium phosphate cement (CFCs) bone substitutes are of great potential use in medical and dental. However, one of the great difficulties of using this type of cement is its low mechanical strength due to the presence of undesirable phases, such as beta-tricalcium phosphate. The step of obtaining this compound is done at high temperature by solid state reaction. With the aim of obtaining calcium phosphate cements more resistant, we studied the conditions for obtaining an alpha-TCP at temperatures of 1300, 1400 and 1500 ° C with time 2h calcination. The samples were analyzed for crystalline phases, density, porosity and mechanical strength. The results show that the synthesis parameters studied strongly influence the obtained phases and the mechanical properties of cement. (author)

  19. On the modeling of fuel sprays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Christer

    1997-12-01

    This report concerns on the modelling of fuel sprays in a non-combustible case using an own developed fuel spray code module. The spray code is made as an independent module to simplify the use of different gas flow solvers together with the spray module. This enables the possibility to use different turbulence models. In the report two turbulence models has been used, the standard k-{epsilon} and the LES (Large Eddy Simulation) model. The report presents results obtained from a sensitivity study of both numerical and physical parameters on an evaporating spray under diesel like conditions (light duty diesel engine) with the spray code module attached to a cylindrical gas phase flow solver. The results from the sensitivity analysis showed that these effects were not so pronounced as has been reported. It was suggested that this was due to the `easy` nature of the investigated case, where the flow field could be sufficiently resolved without violating the droplet void fraction criteria and break-up, collision and combustion that may increase the grid spacing sensitivity were not modelled. An investigation was performed to valuate the feasibility of using LES as turbulence model. Calculations of the initial phase of a developing jet were made and it was found that in the initial phase of the spray and the flow structure were similar to that of a spatially developing jet flow, which is in agreement with experimental observations. Results from LES calculations on a developing spray jet was also compared with k-{epsilon} based ones. This result showed that the spray-LES approach captured the transition from a laminar to a turbulent flow field with an increase in turbulent kinetic energy k along the injection direction 45 refs, 37 figs, 2 tabs

  1. Chemistry of application of calcination/dissolution to the Hanford tank waste inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delegard, C.H.; Elcan, T.D.; Hey, B.E.

    1994-05-01

    Approximately 330,000 metric tons of sodium-rich radioactive waste originating from separation of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel are stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Fractionation of the waste into low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) streams is envisioned via partial water dissolution and limited radionuclide extraction operations. Under optimum conditions, LLW would contain most of the chemical bulk while HLW would contain virtually all of the transuranic and fission product activity. Calcination at around 850 C, followed by water dissolution, has been proposed as an alternative initial treatment of Hanford Site waste to improve waste dissolution and the envisioned LLW/HLW split. Results of literature and laboratory studies are reported on the application of calcination/dissolution (C/D) to the fractionation of the Hanford Site tank waste inventory. Both simulated and genuine Hanford Site waste materials were used in the lab tests. To evaluation confirmed that C/D processing reduced the amount of several components from the waste. The C/D dissolutions of aluminum and chromium allow redistribution of these waste components from the HLW to the LLW fraction. Comparisons of simple water-washing with C/D processing of genuine Hanford Site waste are also reported based on material (radionuclide and chemical) distributions to solution and solid residue phases. The lab results show that C/D processing yielded superior dissolution of aluminum and chromium sludges compared to simple water dissolution. 57 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs

  2. Synthesis of Cd/(Al+Fe) layered double hydroxides and characterization of the calcination products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, M.R.; Barriga, C.; Fernandez, J.M.; Rives, V.; Ulibarri, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Cd(II), Al(III), and Fe(III) in the brucite-like layers with different starting Fe/Al atomic ratios and with nitrate as counteranion have been prepared following the coprecipitation method at a constant pH value of 8. An additional Cd(II),Al(III)-LDH sample interlayered with hexacyanoferrate(III) ions has been prepared by ionic exchange at pH 9. The samples have been characterized by elemental chemical analysis, powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), and FT-IR spectroscopy. Their thermal stability has been assessed by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses (TG-DTA) and mass spectrometric analysis of the evolved gases. The PXRD patterns of the solids calcined at 800 deg. C show diffraction lines corresponding to Cd(Al)O and spinel-type materials, which precise nature (CdAl 2 O 4 , Cd 1-x Fe 2+x O 4 , or Cd x Fe 2.66 O 4 ) depends on location and concentration of iron in the parent material or precursor. - Graphical abstract: Layered double hydroxides (LDHs) containing Cd(II), Al(III), and Fe(III) in the brucite-like layers with different starting Fe/Al atomic ratios and with nitrate as counteranion have been prepared following the coprecipitation method. An additional Cd(II),Al(III)-LDH sample interlayered with hexacyanoferrate(III) ions has been prepared by ionic exchange. Calcination at 800 deg. C shows diffraction lines corresponding to CdO and to spinel-type materials. SEM micrograph of sample CdAlFe-N-0

  3. Development of mesoporosity in scandia-stabilized zirconia: particle size, solvent, and calcination effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, James T; Ruppert, Jesse N; Wallis, Bryce; Liu, Yanming; Graeve, Olivia A

    2014-05-20

    We present the mechanisms of formation of mesoporous scandia-stabilized zirconia using a surfactant-assisted process and the effects of solvent and thermal treatments on the resulting particle size of the powders. We determined that cleaning the powders with water resulted in better formation of a mesoporous structure because higher amounts of surfactant were preserved on the powders after washing. Nonetheless, this resulted in agglomerate sizes that were larger. The water-washed powders had particle sizes of >5 μm in the as-synthesized state. Calcination at 450 and 600 °C reduced the particle size to ∼1-2 and 0.5 μm, respectively. Cleaning with ethanol resulted in a mesoporous morphology that was less well-defined compared to the water-washed powders, but the agglomerate size was smaller and had an average size of ∼250 nm that did not vary with calcination temperature. Our analysis showed that surfactant-assisted formation of mesoporous structures can be a compromise between achieving a stable mesoporous architecture and material purity. We contend that removal of the surfactant in many mesoporous materials presented in the literature is not completely achieved, and the presence of these organics has to be considered during subsequent processing of the powders and/or for their use in industrial applications. The issue of material purity in mesoporous materials is one that has not been fully explored. In addition, knowledge of the particle (agglomerate) size is essential for powder handling during a variety of manufacturing techniques. Thus, the use of dynamic light scattering or any other technique that can elucidate particle size is essential if a full characterization of the powders is needed for achieving postprocessing effectiveness.

  4. Surface complexation modeling calculation of Pb(II) adsorption onto the calcined diatomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shu-Cui; Zhang, Ji-Lin; Sun, De-Hui; Liu, Gui-Xia

    2015-12-01

    Removal of noxious heavy metal ions (e.g. Pb(II)) by surface adsorption of minerals (e.g. diatomite) is an important means in the environmental aqueous pollution control. Thus, it is very essential to understand the surface adsorptive behavior and mechanism. In this work, the Pb(II) apparent surface complexation reaction equilibrium constants on the calcined diatomite and distributions of Pb(II) surface species were investigated through modeling calculations of Pb(II) based on diffuse double layer model (DLM) with three amphoteric sites. Batch experiments were used to study the adsorption of Pb(II) onto the calcined diatomite as a function of pH (3.0-7.0) and different ionic strengths (0.05 and 0.1 mol L-1 NaCl) under ambient atmosphere. Adsorption of Pb(II) can be well described by Freundlich isotherm models. The apparent surface complexation equilibrium constants (log K) were obtained by fitting the batch experimental data using the PEST 13.0 together with PHREEQC 3.1.2 codes and there is good agreement between measured and predicted data. Distribution of Pb(II) surface species on the diatomite calculated by PHREEQC 3.1.2 program indicates that the impurity cations (e.g. Al3+, Fe3+, etc.) in the diatomite play a leading role in the Pb(II) adsorption and dominant formation of complexes and additional electrostatic interaction are the main adsorption mechanism of Pb(II) on the diatomite under weak acidic conditions.

  5. Chemistry of application of calcination/dissolution to the Hanford tank waste inventory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, C.H.; Elcan, T.D.; Hey, B.E.

    1994-05-01

    Approximately 330,000 metric tons of sodium-rich radioactive waste originating from separation of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel are stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington State. Fractionation of the waste into low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) streams is envisioned via partial water dissolution and limited radionuclide extraction operations. Under optimum conditions, LLW would contain most of the chemical bulk while HLW would contain virtually all of the transuranic and fission product activity. Calcination at around 850 C, followed by water dissolution, has been proposed as an alternative initial treatment of Hanford Site waste to improve waste dissolution and the envisioned LLW/HLW split. Results of literature and laboratory studies are reported on the application of calcination/dissolution (C/D) to the fractionation of the Hanford Site tank waste inventory. Both simulated and genuine Hanford Site waste materials were used in the lab tests. To evaluation confirmed that C/D processing reduced the amount of several components from the waste. The C/D dissolutions of aluminum and chromium allow redistribution of these waste components from the HLW to the LLW fraction. Comparisons of simple water-washing with C/D processing of genuine Hanford Site waste are also reported based on material (radionuclide and chemical) distributions to solution and solid residue phases. The lab results show that C/D processing yielded superior dissolution of aluminum and chromium sludges compared to simple water dissolution. 57 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs.

  6. Calculations of condensed moisture escape from a NPP spray pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratuta, Eh. G.; Yaroshenko, T.I.

    1988-01-01

    A method for calculating water losses due to condensed moisture escape with a wind away from a spray pond used for cooling steam turbine condensator water and emergency nuclear reactor cooling is developed. The method is based on solving a three-dimensional equation of single drop motion, assuming that during the whole flight only gravity and aerodynamic resistance forces act on a drop. The basic parameter variation ranges are the following: 0-18 m/s wind velocity, 0.04-0.12 MPa pressure drop at the nozzle output, 1-2 m height of sprayers above the pond mirror. The given method permits to determine both the amount of circulation water loss and the local liquid flow rate distribution pattern as well as the area around the pond receiving the escaped moisture that is necessary for estimating the ecological situation near a NPP

  7. The influence of substrate temperature and spraying distance on the properties of plasma sprayed tungsten and steel coatings deposited in a shrouding chamber

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějíček, Jiří; Vilémová, Monika; Nevrlá, Barbara; Kocmanová, Lenka; Veverka, Jakub; Halasová, Martina; Hadraba, Hynek

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 318, May (2017), s. 217-223 ISSN 0257-8972. [International Meeting on Thermal Spraying (RIPT)/7./. Limoges, 09.12.2015-11.12.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68081723 Keywords : Tungsten * Steel * Atmospheric plasma spraying * Shrouding * Substrate temperature * Fusion reactor materials * Plasma facing components Subject RIV: JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials; JK - Corrosion ; Surface Treatment of Materials (UFM-A) OBOR OECD: Coating and films; Coating and films (UFM-A) Impact factor: 2.589, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/ article /pii/S0257897216310520

  8. Polydisperse effects in jet spray flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, Noam; Greenberg, J. Barry

    2018-01-01

    A laminar jet polydisperse spray diffusion flame is analysed mathematically for the first time using an extension of classical similarity solutions for gaseous jet flames. The analysis enables a comparison to be drawn between conditions for flame stability or flame blow-out for purely gaseous flames and for spray flames. It is found that, in contrast to the Schmidt number criteria relevant to gas flames, droplet size and initial spray polydispersity play a critical role in determining potential flame scenarios. Some qualitative agreement for lift-off height is found when comparing predictions of the theory and sparse independent experimental evidence from the literature.

  9. Spray drying for processing of nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindeloev, Jesper Saederup; Wahlberg, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Consolidation of nano-particles into micron-sized granules reduces the potential risks associated with handling nano-powders in dry form. Spray drying is a one step granulation technique which can be designed for safe production of free flowing low dusty granules from suspensions of nano-particles. Spray dried granules are well suited for subsequent processing into final products where the superior properties given by the nano-particles are retained. A spray drier with bag filters inside the drying chamber and recycling of drying gas combined with containment valves are proposed as a safe process for granulation of potential hazardous nano-particles.

  10. Spray deposition using impulse atomization technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellendt, N.; Schmidt, R.; Knabe, J.; Henein, H.; Uhlenwinkel, V.

    2004-01-01

    A novel technique, impulse atomization, has been used for spray deposition. This single fluid atomization technique leads to different spray characteristics and impact conditions of the droplets compared to gas atomization technique which is the common technique used for spray deposition. Deposition experiments with a Cu-6Sn alloy were conducted to evaluate the appropriateness of impulse atomization to produce dense material. Based on these experiments, a model has been developed to simulate the thermal history and the local solidification rates of the deposited material. A numerical study shows how different cooling conditions affect the solidification rate of the material

  11. Influence of Cold-Sprayed, Warm-Sprayed, and Plasma-Sprayed Layers Deposition on Fatigue Properties of Steel Specimens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížek, J.; Matejková, M.; Dlouhý, I.; Šiška, Filip; Kay, C.M.; Karthikeyan, J.; Kuroda, S.; Kovařík, O.; Siegl, J.; Loke, K.; Khor, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 5 (2015), s. 758-768 ISSN 1059-9630 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Cold spray * Fatigue * Grit-blast Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2015

  12. Hydrogen-Rich Gas Production by Sorption Enhanced Steam Reforming of Woodgas Containing TAR over a Commercial Ni Catalyst and Calcined Dolomite as CO2 Sorbent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Naso

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was the evaluation of the catalytic steam reforming of a gaseous fuel obtained by steam biomass gasification to convert topping atmosphere residue (TAR and CH4 and to produce pure H2 by means of a CO2 sorbent. This experimental work deals with the demonstration of the practical feasibility of such concepts, using a real woodgas obtained from fluidized bed steam gasification of hazelnut shells. This study evaluates the use of a commercial Ni catalyst and calcined dolomite (CaO/MgO. The bed material simultaneously acts as reforming catalyst and CO2 sorbent. The experimental investigations have been carried out in a fixed bed micro-reactor rig using a slipstream from the gasifier to evaluate gas cleaning and upgrading options. The reforming/sorption tests were carried out at 650 °C while regeneration of the sorbent was carried out at 850 °C in a nitrogen environment. Both combinations of catalyst and sorbent are very effective in TAR and CH4 removal, with conversions near 100%, while the simultaneous CO2 sorption effectively enhances the water gas shift reaction producing a gas with a hydrogen volume fraction of over 90%. Multicycle tests of reforming/CO2 capture and regeneration were performed to verify the stability of the catalysts and sorbents to remove TAR and capture CO2 during the duty cycle.

  13. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  14. Reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawton, H.

    1984-01-01

    A pioneering project on the decommissioning of the Windscale Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor, by the UKAEA, is described. Reactor data; policy; waste management; remote handling equipment; development; and recording and timescales, are all briefly discussed. (U.K.)

  15. Effect of spray on performance of the hydrogen mitigation system during LB-LOCA for CPR1000 NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, X.G.; Yang, Y.H.; Cheng, X.; Al-Hawshabi, N.H.A.; Casey, S.P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This paper presents the spray effect on HMS during LB-LOCA by using GASFLOW. → The positive and negative effects of spray are summarized. → And the combination of DIS and PAR system is suggested as reasonable countermeasures. → This research is an important work aimed at the study of spray and hydrogen mitigation. → The contents of this paper should become a required part of the safety analysis of Chinese NPPs. - Abstract: During the course of the hypothetical large break loss-of-coolant accident (LB-LOCA) in a nuclear power plant (NPP), hydrogen is generated by a reaction between steam and the fuel-cladding inside the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). It is then ejected from the break into the containment along with a large amount of steam. Management of hydrogen safety and prevention of over-pressurization could be implemented through a hydrogen mitigation system (HMS) and spray system in CPR1000 NPP. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code GASFLOW is utilized in this study to analyze the spray effect on the performance of HMS during LB-LOCA. Results show that as a kind of HMS, deliberate igniter system (DIS) could initiate hydrogen combustion immediately after the flammability limit of the gas mixture has been reached. However, it will increase the temperature and pressure drastically. Operating the DIS under spray condition could result in hydrogen combustion being suppressed by suspended droplets inside the containment. Furthermore, the droplets could also mitigate local the temperature rise. Operation of a PAR system, another kind of HMS, consumes hydrogen steadily with a lower recombination rate which is not affected noticeably by the spray system. Numerical results indicate that the dual concept, namely the integrated application of DIS and PAR systems, is a constructive improvement for hydrogen safety under spray condition during LB-LOCA.

  16. RA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-02-01

    In addition to basic characteristics of the RA reactor, organizational scheme and financial incentives, this document covers describes the state of the reactor components after 18 years of operation, problems concerned with obtaining the licence for operation with 80% fuel, problems of spent fuel storage in the storage pool of the reactor building and the need for renewal of reactor equipment, first of all instrumentation [sr

  17. Multiregion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The study of reflected reactors can be done employing the multigroup diffusion method. The neutron conservation equations, inside the intervals, can be written by fluxes and group constants. A reflected reactor (one and two groups) for a slab geometry is studied, aplying the continuity of flux and current in the interface. At the end, the appropriated solutions for a infinite cylindrical reactor and for a spherical reactor are presented. (Author) [pt

  18. Tungsten/copper composite deposits produced by a cold spray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hyun-Ki; Kang, Suk Bong

    2003-01-01

    An agglomerated tungsten/copper composite powder was both cold sprayed and plasma sprayed onto a mild steel substrate for electronic package applications. Most pores resulting from the spraying were found in the vicinity of the tungsten-rich regions of the final product. The levels of porosity varied with the amount of tungsten present. No copper oxidation was found at the cold-sprayed deposit, but relatively high copper oxidation was observed at the plasma-sprayed deposit

  19. Direct morphological comparison of vacuum plasma sprayed and detonation gun sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings for orthopaedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, H C; Turner, I G; Doyle, C

    1999-02-01

    Hydroxyapatite coatings on titanium substrates were produced using two thermal spray techniques vacuum plasma spraying and detonation gun spraying. X-ray diffraction was used to compare crystallinity and residual stresses in the coatings. Porosity was measured using optical microscopy in conjunction with an image analysis system. Scanning electron microscopy and surface roughness measurements were used to characterise the surface morphologies of the coatings. The vacuum plasma sprayed coatings were found to have a lower residual stress, a higher crystallinity and a higher level of porosity than the detonation gun coatings. It is concluded that consideration needs to be given to the significance of such variations within the clinical context.

  20. Layered growth with bottom-spray granulation for spray deposition of drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Er, Dawn Z L; Liew, Celine V; Heng, Paul W S

    2009-07-30

    The gap in scientific knowledge on bottom-spray fluidized bed granulation has emphasized the need for more studies in this area. This paper comparatively studied the applicability of a modified bottom-spray process and the conventional top-spray process for the spray deposition of a micronized drug during granulation. The differences in circulation pattern, mode of growth and resultant granule properties between the two processes were highlighted. The more ordered and consistent circulation pattern of particles in a bottom-spray fluidized bed was observed to give rise to layered granule growth. This resulted in better drug content uniformity among the granule batches and within a granule batch. The processes' sensitivities to wetting and feed material characteristics were also compared and found to differ markedly. Less robustness to differing process conditions was observed for the top-spray process. The resultant bottom-spray granules formed were observed to be less porous, more spherical and had good flow properties. The bottom-spray technique can thus be potentially applied for the spray deposition of drug during granulation and was observed to be a good alternative to the conventional technique for preparing granules.

  1. Stabilized γ-BIMNVOX solid electrolyte: Ethylene glycol–citrate sol–gel synthesis, microwave-assisted calcination, and structural and electrical characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Areqi, Niyazi A.S., E-mail: niyazi.alareqi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Applied Science, Taiz University, Taiz, Republic of Yemen (Yemen); Beg, Saba [Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Al-Alas, Ahlam [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Applied Science, Taiz University, Taiz, Republic of Yemen (Yemen); Hafeez, Shehla [Department of Chemistry, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India)

    2013-12-25

    Highlights: •γ-BIMNVOX was synthesized by ethylene glycol–citrate sol–gel route. •γ-BIMNVOX crystallizes by 25-min microwave-assisted calcination. •Smaller particle sizes for microwave calcined BIMNVOX samples. •Best oxide-ion performance for microwave calcined BIMNVOX samples. -- Abstract: Samples of γ-BIMNVOX (Bi{sub 2}V{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}O{sub 5.5−x/2}; 0.13 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.20) system were synthesized by an ethylene glycol–citrate sol–gel route. The resulting xerogels were then calcined by the microwave heating using a modified domestic microwave oven operated at 2.45 GHz. Microwave-assisted calcination samples in comparison with other conventionally calcined samples were characterized in terms of phase crystallization, stabilization and particle size using simultaneous thermogravimetric–differential thermal analysis (TG–DTA), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The AC impedance spectroscopy was employed for electrical characterization. It was found that the microwave-assisted calcination route successfully produces better crystalline stabilized γ-BIMNVOX samples with appreciably small average particle sizes after only 25 min of microwave heating. The electrical properties of microwave calcined γ-BIMNVOX system make it an advanced low-temperature solid electrolyte suitable for use in oxide-ion based electrochemical applications.

  2. To study the effect of dopant NiO concentration and duration of calcinations on structural and optical properties of MgO-NiO nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Rajesh, E-mail: rkkaushik06@gmail.com [Deptt. of Physics, M.D. University, Rohtak-124001, Haryana (India); Deptt. of Physics,Vaish College of Engineering, Rohtak-124001, Haryana (India); Praveen,; Sharma, Ashwani; Parmar, R.; Dahiya, S. [Deptt. of Physics, M.D. University, Rohtak-124001, Haryana (India); Kishor, N. [Deptt. of Physics, Central University of Haryana (India)

    2016-05-06

    In present work Magnesium oxide (MgO) samples were doped with different concentration of Transition metal Nickel Oxide(NiO) by using Chemical co-precipitation method. The doping levels were varied from NiO (5%, 10%, 15%) and all the samples were calcined at 600°C for 4hrs and 8hrs respectively. Structural analysis of these calcined materials is carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques which reveals that average crystalline sizes are in nano region i.e. 21.77nm-31.13 nm and tabulated in table 1. The powder of calcined samples were also characterized by using various other techniques i.e. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transformation Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), UV-Visible spectroscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) etc. The effects of dopant concentration, calcined temperature, calcinations duration on samples were studied and also investigate the effect of varying dopant concentration on morphology and optical properties of calcined nanomaterials. From results it was observed that the crystallite size of nanocomposites increases with increases dopant concentration or increases calcinations duration. The optical band gap decreases with increases sintering time and increase with increases dopant concentrations. TEM results coincide with XRD results and show that particles are polycrystalline in nature. FTIR spectra show that for all samples particles are pure in composition and transmission rate increases with calcinations duration.

  3. Moessbauer characterization of calcium-ferrite oxides prepared by calcining Fe2O3 and CaO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Sakai, Yoichi; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Kojima, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Kenzi; Ohshita, Kazumasa; Watanabe, Yasuo

    2006-01-01

    Calcium ferrite oxides were prepared by calcining a mixture powder of iron- and calcium oxide. The 57 Fe-Moessbauer spectra of the calcium ferrites oxides were measured, revealing that the products should be Ca 2 Fe 2 O 5 and CaFe 2 O 4 , the ratio of which was dependent of the Fe/Ca atomic ratio of the mixture powder.

  4. Improvement of Gold Leaching from a Refractory Gold Concentrate Calcine by Separate Pretreatment of Coarse and Fine Size Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A total gold extraction of 70.2% could only be reached via direct cyanidation from a refractory As-, S- and C-bearing gold concentrate calcine, and the gold extraction varied noticeably with different size fractions. The reasons for unsatisfactory gold extraction from the calcine were studied through analyses of chemical composition, chemical phase and SEM-EDS of different sizes of particles. It was found that a significant segregation of compositions occurred during the grinding of gold ore before flotation. As a result, for the calcine obtained after oxidative roasting, the encapsulation of gold by iron oxides was easily engendered in finer particles, whilst in coarser particles the gold encapsulation by silicates was inclined to occur likely due to melted silicates blocking the porosity of particles. The improvement of gold leaching from different size fractions was further investigated through pretreatments with alkali washing, acid pickling or sulfuric acid curing-water leaching. Finally, a novel process was recommended and the total gold extraction from the calcine could be increased substantially to 93.6% by the purposeful pretreatment with alkali washing for the relatively coarse size fraction (+37 μm and sulfuric acid curing–water leaching for the fine size fraction (−37 μm.

  5. Influence of calcination temperature on sol-gel synthesized single-phase bismuth titanate for high dielectric capacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiruramanathan, Pandirengan; Marikani, Arumugam [Mepco Schlenk Engineering College, Tamil Nadu (India). Dept. of Physics; Madhavan, Durairaj [Mepco Schlenk Engineering College, Tamil Nadu (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Bharadwaj, Suresh; Awasthi, Anand Mohan [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Indore (India). Thermodynamics Lab.

    2016-05-15

    An inexpensive sol-gel combustion method using citric acid as fuel has been used to synthesize bismuth titanate, Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} nanopowders. Thermogravimetric analysis proved that a calcination temperature of 900 C is sufficient for the preparation of single-phase bismuth titanate. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are used to examine the influence of calcination temperature on the structural growth of the Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} nanopowder. The average crystallite size estimated by using the Scherrer method and the Williamson-Hall method was found to increase with calcination temperature. Photoluminescence behavior as a function of calcination temperature was observed at two different excitation wavelengths of 300 nm and 420 nm. The morphology of the particles analyzed using images obtained from field emission scanning electron microscopy displayed irregular, random sized, and spherical-shaped structures. The stoichiometry and purity of the nanopowder are confirmed by energy-dispersive spectroscopy. The broadband dielectric results established the highest dielectric constant (ε{sub r} = 450) for a frequency of 100 Hz achieved with a potential capacitance of 138 pF m{sup -2}. This establishes Bi{sub 4}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 12} as a promising dielectric material for achieving high energy density capacitors for the next-generation passive devices.

  6. Prediction model of ammonium uranyl carbonate calcination by microwave heating using incremental improved Back-Propagation neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yingwei [Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650093 (China); Key Laboratory of Unconventional Metallurgy, Ministry of Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650093 (China); Peng Jinhui, E-mail: jhpeng@kmust.edu.c [Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650093 (China); Key Laboratory of Unconventional Metallurgy, Ministry of Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650093 (China); Liu Bingguo [Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650093 (China); Key Laboratory of Unconventional Metallurgy, Ministry of Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650093 (China); Li Wei [Key Laboratory of Unconventional Metallurgy, Ministry of Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650093 (China); Huang Daifu [No. 272 Nuclear Industry Factory, China National Nuclear Corporation, Hengyang, Hunan Province 421002 (China); Zhang Libo [Faculty of Metallurgical and Energy Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650093 (China); Key Laboratory of Unconventional Metallurgy, Ministry of Education, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming, Yunnan Province 650093 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Research highlights: The incremental improved Back-Propagation neural network prediction model using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm based on optimizing theory is put forward. The prediction model of the nonlinear system is built, which can effectively predict the experiment of microwave calcining of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC). AUC can accept the microwave energy and microwave heating can quickly decompose AUC. In the experiment of microwave calcining of AUC, the contents of U and U{sup 4+} increased with increasing of microwave power and irradiation time, and decreased with increasing of the material average depth. - Abstract: The incremental improved Back-Propagation (BP) neural network prediction model was put forward, which was very useful in overcoming the problems, such as long testing cycle, high testing quantity, difficulty of optimization for process parameters, many training data probably were offered by the way of increment batch and the limitation of the system memory could make the training data infeasible, which existed in the process of calcinations for ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) by microwave heating. The prediction model of the nonlinear system was built, which could effectively predict the experiment of microwave calcining of AUC. The predicted results indicated that the contents of U and U{sup 4+} were increased with increasing of microwave power and irradiation time, and decreased with increasing of the material average depth.

  7. Prediction model of ammonium uranyl carbonate calcination by microwave heating using incremental improved Back-Propagation neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yingwei; Peng Jinhui; Liu Bingguo; Li Wei; Huang Daifu; Zhang Libo

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The incremental improved Back-Propagation neural network prediction model using the Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm based on optimizing theory is put forward. → The prediction model of the nonlinear system is built, which can effectively predict the experiment of microwave calcining of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC). → AUC can accept the microwave energy and microwave heating can quickly decompose AUC. → In the experiment of microwave calcining of AUC, the contents of U and U 4+ increased with increasing of microwave power and irradiation time, and decreased with increasing of the material average depth. - Abstract: The incremental improved Back-Propagation (BP) neural network prediction model was put forward, which was very useful in overcoming the problems, such as long testing cycle, high testing quantity, difficulty of optimization for process parameters, many training data probably were offered by the way of increment batch and the limitation of the system memory could make the training data infeasible, which existed in the process of calcinations for ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) by microwave heating. The prediction model of the nonlinear system was built, which could effectively predict the experiment of microwave calcining of AUC. The predicted results indicated that the contents of U and U 4+ were increased with increasing of microwave power and irradiation time, and decreased with increasing of the material average depth.

  8. Influence of calcination temperature on the zirconia microstructure synthesized by complex polymerization method (CPM): a comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, R.L.P.; Mota, F.V.; Nascimento, R.M.; Henriques, B.P.; Silva, F.S.; Assis, R. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to accomplish a previous characterization of the zirconia synthesized by Complex Polymerization Method (CPM) using yttria as stabilizing agent and different calcination temperatures. The powders were crystallized at 800, 900 and 1000 °C for 2h. The structural evolution Y-TZP powders were characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Micro-Raman Spectroscopy. The thermal properties of the calcined pre-pyrolyzed (350 °C for 4 h), samples were investigated by simultaneous thermo analysis (TGA/DTA). After heat treatment the phase Y-TZP was obtained of a single-phase, with absence of the deleterious phases. The results show that average crystallite size of the powder synthesized with 3% of Yttria dopant, increased from 11.5 to 27.9 nm when the calcination temperature increased from 800 to 1000 °C. This behavior was observed for all specimens independent of the Yttria content. The micro-Raman indicate the presence of the tetragonal phase for all samples independent of the calcination temperature employed. (author)

  9. Influence of spray parameters on the microstructure and mechanical properties of gas-tunnel plasma sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morks, M.F.; Kobayashi, Akira

    2007-01-01

    For biomedical applications, hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings were deposited on 304 stainless steel substrate by using a gas tunnel type plasma spraying process. The influences of spraying distances and plasma arc currents on the microstructure, hardness and adhesion properties of HA coatings were investigated. Microstructure observation by SEM showed that HA coatings sprayed at low plasma power have a porous structure and poor hardness. HA coatings sprayed at high plasma power and short spraying distance are characterized by good adhesion and low porosity with dense structure. Hardness increased for HA coatings sprayed at shorter spraying distance and higher plasma power, mainly due to the formation of dense coatings

  10. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Sadao; Sato, Morihiko.

    1994-01-01

    Liquid metals such as liquid metal sodium are filled in a reactor container as primary coolants. A plurality of reactor core containers are disposed in a row in the circumferential direction along with the inner circumferential wall of the reactor container. One or a plurality of intermediate coolers are disposed at the inside of an annular row of the reactor core containers. A reactor core constituted with fuel rods and control rods (module reactor core) is contained at the inside of each of the reactor core containers. Each of the intermediate coolers comprises a cylindrical intermediate cooling vessels. The intermediate cooling vessel comprises an intermediate heat exchanger for heat exchange of primary coolants and secondary coolants and recycling pumps for compulsorily recycling primary coolants at the inside thereof. Since a plurality of reactor core containers are thus assembled, a great reactor power can be attained. Further, the module reactor core contained in one reactor core vessel may be small sized, to facilitate the control for the reactor core operation. (I.N.)

  11. High-throughput reactor system with individual temperature control for the investigation of monolith catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellamorte, Joseph C.; Vijay, Rohit; Snively, Christopher M.; Barteau, Mark A.; Lauterbach, Jochen

    2007-07-01

    A high-throughput parallel reactor system has been designed and constructed to improve the reliability of results from large diameter catalysts such as monoliths. The system, which is expandable, consists of eight quartz reactors, 23.5mm in diameter. The eight reactors were designed with separate K type thermocouples and radiant heaters, allowing for the independent measurement and control of each reactor temperature. This design gives steady state temperature distributions over the eight reactors within 0.5°C of a common setpoint from 50to700°C. Analysis of the effluent from these reactors is performed using rapid-scan Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic imaging. The integration of this technique to the reactor system allows a chemically specific, truly parallel analysis of the reactor effluents with a time resolution of approximately 8s. The capabilities of this system were demonstrated via investigation of catalyst preparation conditions on the direct epoxidation of ethylene, i.e., on the ethylene conversion and the ethylene oxide selectivity. The ethylene, ethylene oxide, and carbon dioxide concentrations were calibrated based on spectra from FTIR imaging using univariate and multivariate chemometric techniques. The results from this analysis showed that the calcination conditions significantly affect the ethylene conversion, with a threefold increase in the conversion when the catalyst was calcined for 3h versus 12h at 400°C.

  12. Plasma spray technology process parameters and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreekumar, K.P.; Karthikeyan, J.; Ananthapadmanabhan, P.V.; Venkatramani, N.; Chatterjee, U.K.

    1991-01-01

    The current trend in the structural design philosophy is based on the use of substrate with the necessary mechanical properties and a thin coating to exhibit surface properties. Plasma spray process is a versatile surface coating technique which finds extensive application in meeting advance technologies. This report describes the plasma spray technique and its use in developing coatings for various applications. The spray system is desribed in detail including the different variables such as power input to the torch, gas flow rate, powder properties, powder injection, etc. and their interrelation in deciding the quality of the coating. A brief write-up on the various plasma spray coatings developed for different applications is also included. (author). 15 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Spot Spraying Reduces Herbicide Concentrations in Runoff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melland, Alice R; Silburn, D Mark; McHugh, Allen D; Fillols, Emilie; Rojas-Ponce, Samuel; Baillie, Craig; Lewis, Stephen

    2016-05-25

    Rainfall simulator trials were conducted on sugar cane paddocks across dry-tropical and subtropical Queensland, Australia, to examine the potential for spot spraying to reduce herbicide losses in runoff. Recommended rates of the herbicides glyphosate, 2,4-D, fluoroxypyr, atrazine, and diuron were sprayed onto 0, 20, 40, 50, 70, or 100% of the area of runoff plots. Simulated rainfall was applied 2 days after spraying to induce runoff at one plant cane and three ratoon crop sites. Over 50% of all herbicides were transported in the dissolved phase of runoff, regardless of the herbicide's sediment-water partition coefficient. For most sites and herbicides, runoff herbicide concentrations decreased with decreasing spray coverage and with decreasing herbicide load in the soil and cane residues. Importantly, sites with higher infiltration prior to runoff and lower total runoff had lower runoff herbicide concentrations.

  14. Water Reclamation using Spray Drying, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a new spray drying technology for the recovery and recycle of water while stabilizing the solid wastes or residues as found in advanced life support...

  15. Ventilation Guidance for Spray Polyurethane Foam Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Properly designed ventilation can reduce airborne levels of aerosols, mists, and vapors generated during spray application and can help protect SPF applicators, helpers, and others who may be working in adjacent areas.

  16. Spray drying formulation of amorphous solid dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Van den Mooter, Guy

    2016-05-01

    Spray drying is a well-established manufacturing technique which can be used to formulate amorphous solid dispersions (ASDs) which is an effective strategy to deliver poorly water soluble drugs (PWSDs). However, the inherently complex nature of the spray drying process coupled with specific characteristics of ASDs makes it an interesting area to explore. Numerous diverse factors interact in an inter-dependent manner to determine the final product properties. This review discusses the basic background of ASDs, various formulation and process variables influencing the critical quality attributes (CQAs) of the ASDs and aspects of downstream processing. Also various aspects of spray drying such as instrumentation, thermodynamics, drying kinetics, particle formation process and scale-up challenges are included. Recent advances in the spray-based drying techniques are mentioned along with some future avenues where major research thrust is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Spray drying of beryllium oxide powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sepulveda, J.L.; Kahler, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Forming of beryllia ceramics through dry pressing requires the agglomeration of the powder through spray drying. To produce high quality fired ceramics it is necessary to disperse/grind the primary powder prior to binder addition. Size reduction of the powder is accomplished using an aqueous system in Vibro-Energy mills (VEM) charged with beryllia media to minimize contamination. Two VEM mills of different size were used to characterize the grinding operation. Details of the grinding kinetics are described within the context of the Macroscopic Population Balance Model approach. Spray drying of the ceramic slurry was accomplished with both a centrifugal atomizer and a two fluid nozzle atomizer. Two different spray dryers were used. Important operating parameters affecting the size distribution of the spray dried powder are discussed

  18. LSPRAY-V: A Lagrangian Spray Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    LSPRAY-V is a Lagrangian spray solver developed for application with unstructured grids and massively parallel computers. It is mainly designed to predict the flow, thermal and transport properties of a rapidly vaporizing spray encountered over a wide range of operating conditions in modern aircraft engine development. It could easily be coupled with any existing gas-phase flow and/or Monte Carlo Probability Density Function (PDF) solvers. The manual provides the user with an understanding of various models involved in the spray formulation, its code structure and solution algorithm, and various other issues related to parallelization and its coupling with other solvers. With the development of LSPRAY-V, we have advanced the state-of-the-art in spray computations in several important ways.

  19. Structure of Non-evaporating diesel sprays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mirza, M.R.; Baluch, A.H.; Tahir, Z.R.

    2008-01-01

    Need is always felt of some rational experimental information on fuel spray jet formation, its development and dispersion in the combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine. The latest study uses computational fluid dynamics for the modeling of engine flows. The original experimental work of the present author on non-evaporating sprays produced by a single-hole orifice type nozzle using a distribution type commercial fuel injection pump forms the basis to derive correlations for penetration rates, break up times and lengths of non-evaporating diesel sprays. The correlations derived can be used to do CFD modeling of sprays under variable conditions of injector nozzle hole diameter, fuel injection pressure and combustion chamber pressure. (author)

  20. Development and Testing of the Advanced CHP System Utilizing the Off-Gas from the Innovative Green Coke Calcining Process in Fluidized Bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chudnovsky, Yaroslav [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States); Kozlov, Aleksandr [Gas Technology Inst., Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    2013-08-15

    Green petroleum coke (GPC) is an oil refining byproduct that can be used directly as a solid fuel or as a feedstock for the production of calcined petroleum coke. GPC contains a high amount of volatiles and sulfur. During the calcination process, the GPC is heated to remove the volatiles and sulfur to produce purified calcined coke, which is used in the production of graphite, electrodes, metal carburizers, and other carbon products. Currently, more than 80% of calcined coke is produced in rotary kilns or rotary hearth furnaces. These technologies provide partial heat utilization of the calcined coke to increase efficiency of the calcination process, but they also share some operating disadvantages. However, coke calcination in an electrothermal fluidized bed (EFB) opens up a number of potential benefits for the production enhancement, while reducing the capital and operating costs. The increased usage of heavy crude oil in recent years has resulted in higher sulfur content in green coke produced by oil refinery process, which requires a significant increase in the calcinations temperature and in residence time. The calorific value of the process off-gas is quite substantial and can be effectively utilized as an “opportunity fuel” for combined heat and power (CHP) production to complement the energy demand. Heat recovered from the product cooling can also contribute to the overall economics of the calcination process. Preliminary estimates indicated the decrease in energy consumption by 35-50% as well as a proportional decrease in greenhouse gas emissions. As such, the efficiency improvement of the coke calcinations systems is attracting close attention of the researchers and engineers throughout the world. The developed technology is intended to accomplish the following objectives: - Reduce the energy and carbon intensity of the calcined coke production process. - Increase utilization of opportunity fuels such as industrial waste off-gas from the novel