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Sample records for sporadic-e layer observed

  1. Observation of electron biteout regions below sporadic E layers at polar latitudes

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    G. A. Lehmacher

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The descent of a narrow sporadic E layer near 95 km altitude over Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska was observed with electron probes on two consecutive sounding rockets and with incoherent scatter radar during a 2 h period near magnetic midnight. A series of four trimethyl aluminum chemical releases demonstrated that the Es layer remained just slightly above the zonal wind node, which was slowly descending due to propagating long-period gravity waves. The location of the layer is consistent with the equilibrium position due to combined action of the wind shear and electric fields. Although the horizontal electric field could not be measured directly, we estimate that it was ~ 2 mV m−1 southward, consistent with modeling the vertical ion drift, and compatible with extremely quiet conditions. Both electron probes observed deep biteout regions just below the Es enhancements, which also descended with the sporadic layers. We discuss several possibilities for the cause of these depletions; one possibility is the presence of negatively charged, nanometer-sized mesospheric smoke particles. Such particles have recently been detected in the upper mesosphere, but not yet in immediate connection with sporadic E. Our observations of electron depletions suggest a new process associated with sporadic E.

  2. Common volume coherent and incoherent scatter radar observations of mid-latitude sporadic E-layers and QP echoes

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    D. L. Hysell

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Common-volume observations of sporadic E-layers made on 14-15 June 2002 with the Arecibo incoherent scatter radar and a 30MHz coherent scatter radar imager located on St. Croix are described. Operating in dual-beam mode, the Arecibo radar detected a slowly descending sporadic E-layer accompanied by a series of dense E-region plasma clouds at a time when the coherent scatter radar was detecting quasi-periodic (QP echoes. Using coherent radar imaging, we collocate the sources of the coherent scatter with the plasma clouds observed by Arecibo. In addition to patchy, polarized scattering regions drifting through the radar illuminated volume, which have been observed in previous imaging experiments, the 30MHz radar also detected large-scale electrostatic waves in the E-region over Puerto Rico, with a wavelength of about 30km and a period of about 10min, propagating to the southwest. Both the intensity and the Doppler shifts of the coherent echoes were modulated by the wave.

  3. Multi-layer structure of mid-latitude sporadic-E observed during the SEEK-2 campaign

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    T. Ono

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available In the mid-latitude ionospheric region, sporadic-E layers (Es layers have often been observed, revealing multiple layers. The Es layers observed during the SEEK-2 rocket campaign showed double electron density peaks; namely, there are stable lower peaks and relatively unstable upper peaks. We examined the effects of wind shear and the electric fields on the generation of the multiple layer structure, in comparison with the electron density profile, the neutral wind, and the DC electric field observed by the S310 rocket experiments. The results showed that the neutral wind shear is mainly responsible for the generation of the lower layer, while the DC electric field makes a significant contribution to the formation of the upper layer. The difference between the lower and upper layers was also explained by the enhanced AC electric field observed at about 103–105 km altitude. The external DC electric field intensity is expected to be ~5 mV/m, which is enough to contribute to generate the Es layers in the ionosphere. Keywords. Ionosphere (Electric fields; Ionospheric irregularities, Mid-latitude ionosphere

  4. Electron density and plasma waves in mid-latitude sporadic-E layer observed during the SEEK-2 campaign

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    M. Wakabayashi

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The SEEK-2 campaign was carried out over Kyushu Island in Japan on 3 August 2002, by using the two sounding rockets of S310-31 and S310-32. This campaign was planned to elucidate generation mechanisms of Quasi-Periodic Echoes (QPEs associated with mid-latitude sporadic-E (Es layers. Electron number densities were successfully measured in the Es layers by using the impedance probe on board two rockets. The plasma waves in the VLF and ELF ranges were also observed on board the S310-32 rocket. Results of electron density measurement showed that there were one or two major peaks in the Es layers along the rockets' trajectories near the altitude of about 10km. There were some smaller peaks associated with the main Es layers in the altitude range from 90 to 120 km. These density peaks were distributed in a very large extent during the SEEK-2 campaign. The Es layer structure is also measured by using the Fixed Bias Probe (FBP, which has a high spatial resolution of several meters (the impedance probe has an altitude resolution of about 400 m. The comparison with the total electron content (TEC measured by the Dual Band Beacon revealed that the Es layer was also modulated in the horizontal direction with the scale size of 30–40 km. It was shown that the QP echoes observed by the ground-based coherent radar come from the major density peak of the Es layer. The plasma wave instrument detected the enhancement of VLF and ELF plasma waves associated with the operation of the TMA release, and also with the passage of the Es layers. Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionospheric irregularities; Midlatitude ionosphere; Plasma temeperature and density

  5. The Role of Iron In Sporadic E Layers

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    Vondrak, T.; Woodcock, K. R. I.; Plane, J. M. C.

    Sporadic E layers in the lower thermosphere are mostly composed of metallic ions, of which Fe+ is the most abundant. Because dielectric recombination (Fe+ + elec- tron) is very slow, the lifetime of Fe+ above about 100 km is at least several days. However, below this height molecular ions such as FeO+, FeO2+ and FeN2+ form in- creasingly rapidly through reactions with O3, O2 and N2, respectively. These undergo rapid dissociative recombination with electrons, causing Fe+ to be neutralised increas- ingly rapidly as a sporadic E layer descends. Indeed, this is the most likely mechanism for the formation of the sporadic neutral Fe layers that are observed by lidar. However, atomic O plays a very important role in reducing these molecular ions back to Fe+, competing with dissociative recombination and thus slowing the rate at which Fe+ is neutralised and a sporadic E layer dissipates. This paper will discuss a laboratory and modelling study of the reactions of FeO+, FeO2+ and FeN2+ with atomic O. These reactions were studied (for the first time) in a fast flow tube, using the pulsed laser ablation of a rotating iron rod as the source of Fe+ ions in the upstream section of the tube. Reactants were then added to produce molecular ions, and atomic O further downstream through a movable injector. Fe+ and the molecular ions were detected at the downstream end of the tube using a two-stage quadrupole mass spectrometer. The spectroscopy of the FeO+ ion, observed by laser induced fluorescence, will also be discussed as a candidate for future ground-based lidar studies of the ion chemistry of the lower thermosphere.

  6. Case study of inclined sporadic E layers in the Earth's ionosphere observed by CHAMP/GPS radio occultations: Coupling between the tilted plasma layers and internal waves

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    Gubenko, Vladimir N.; Pavelyev, A. G.; Kirillovich, I. A.; Liou, Y.-A.

    2018-04-01

    We have used the radio occultation (RO) satellite data CHAMP/GPS (Challenging Minisatellite Payload/Global Positioning System) for studying the ionosphere of the Earth. A method for deriving the parameters of ionospheric structures is based upon an analysis of the RO signal variations in the phase path and intensity. This method allows one to estimate the spatial displacement of a plasma layer with respect to the ray perigee, and to determine the layer inclination and height correction values. In this paper, we focus on the case study of inclined sporadic E (Es) layers in the high-latitude ionosphere based on available CHAMP RO data. Assuming that the internal gravity waves (IGWs) with the phase-fronts parallel to the ionization layer surfaces are responsible for the tilt angles of sporadic plasma layers, we have developed a new technique for determining the parameters of IGWs linked with the inclined Es structures. A small-scale internal wave may be modulating initially horizontal Es layer in height and causing a direction of the plasma density gradient to be rotated and aligned with that of the wave propagation vector k. The results of determination of the intrinsic wave frequency and period, vertical and horizontal wavelengths, intrinsic vertical and horizontal phase speeds, and other characteristics of IGWs under study are presented and discussed.

  7. Planetary and tidal wave-type oscillations in the ionospheric sporadic E layers over Tehran region

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    Karami, K.; Ghader, S.; Bidokhti, A. A.; Joghataei, M.; Neyestani, A.; Mohammadabadi, A.

    2012-04-01

    It is believed that in the lower ionosphere, particularly in the ionospheric sporadic E (Es) layers (90-130 km), the planetary and tidal wave-type oscillations in the ionized component indicate the planetary and tidal waves in the neutral atmosphere. In the present work, the presence of wave-type oscillations, including planetary and tidal waves in the ionospheric sporadic E layers over Tehran region is examined. Data measured by a digital ionosonde at the ionospheric station of the Institute of Geophysics, University of Tehran, from July 2006 to June 2007 are used to investigate seasonal variations of planetary and tidal waves activities. For the purpose of accurate comparison between different seasons, wavelet transform is applied to time series of foEs and h‧Es, namely, the critical frequency and virtual height of Es layers, respectively. The results show that the sporadic E layers over Tehran region are strongly under the influence of upward propagation of waves from below. More specifically, among diverse range of periodicities in the sporadic E layers, we found that diurnal (24 hours) and semidiurnal (12 hours) oscillations in all seasons for both parameters. Moreover, terdiurnal (8 hours) tide-like variation is observed during spring and summer for foEs parameter and summer and winter for h‧Es. Furthermore, the results show that diurnal tidal waves obtain their maximum activities during autumn and winter seasons, and their activities decrease during the late spring and summer. In addition, periods of about 2, 4, 6, 10, 14, and 16 days in our observation verifies the hypothesis of upward propagation of planetary waves from lower atmosphere to the ionosphere. Moreover, planetary waves have their maximum activities during equinox.

  8. Radio tomographic imaging of sporadic-E layers during SEEK-2

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    P. A. Bernhardt

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available During the SEEK-2 Rocket Campaign in August 2002, a Dual Band Beacon (DBB transmitting to Ground Receivers provided unique data on E-Region electron densities. Information from two rocket beacons and four ground receivers yielded multiple samples of E-region horizontal and vertical variations. The radio beacon measurements were made at four sites (Uchinoura, Tarumizu, Tanegashima, Takazaki in Japan for two rockets (S310-31 and S310-32 launched by the Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science (ISAS. Analysis was completed for four sets of beacon data to provide electron density images of sporadic-E layers. Signals from the two-frequency beacons on the SEEK-2 rockets were processed to yield total electron content (TEC data that was converted into electron density measurements. Wide variations in layer structures were detected. These included horizontal sporadic-E variations, vertical profiles of double, single, and weak layers. The radio beacon measurements were shown to be in agreement with the in-situ SEEK-2 sensors. The first tomographic image of a sporadic-E layer was produced from the data. The rocket beacon technique was shown to be an excellent tool to study sporadic-E layers because absolute TEC accuracy of 0.01 TEC Units can be easily obtained and, with proper receiver placement, electron density images can be produced using computerized ionospheric tomography with better than 1km horizontal and vertical resolution. Keywords. Ionospheric irregularities – Instruments and techniques – Mid-latitude ionosphere

  9. Magnetic eta index and the ability to forecast sporadic E layer appearance

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    Dziak-Jankowska, Beata; Stanislawska, Iwona; Pozoga, Mariusz; Tomasik, Lukasz; Ernst, Tomasz

    2012-07-01

    We analysed the correlation of the changes of the magnetic vertical component with the ionospheric deviations from monthly median of the E layer characteristics. Promising results indicate that the eta parameter can be used to predict sporadic E layer during magnetically quiet days. Our previous work concern the data from only one year - 2004. During the descending phase of solar cycle in 2004 there was not numerous amount of quiet days. We extend our research to other years starting from 1996 and focusing on 2007 - 2009, years of the prolonged solar minimum. The analysis shows that under magnetically quiet circumstances the magnetic index eta indicates large magnetic disturbance, especially in vertical component when other magnetic indices inform about quiet magnetic conditions. The results indicate that the increase of the magnetic eta index (the ratio of the variations of vertical component of the external magnetic field to the horizontal component) is associated with the emergence of sporadic E layer or with increase of foEs critical frequency of sporadic E layer. The appearance of sporadic E layer followed 1-2 h after growth of magnetic index eta. An important conclusion is that the analysis of the hourly ionospheric data does not give 100% correlation between the increase of eta and the emergence of Es layer, however, studies of dense measurement data show that the correlation is almost 100%. An advantage of the eta index is the fact that after eliminating the effect of currents induced within the Earth, eta index bring independent and meaningful information on the system of current in the ionosphere. Hence, the eta index could be an important element of the ionosphere monitoring and can be used to predict such local phenomenon like the appearance of the sporadic E layer.

  10. Mechanism for the formation of sporadic-E layers in the high-latitude ionosphere

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    Vlasov, M.N.; Mishin, E.V.; Telegin, V.A.

    1980-09-01

    A model of the collective interaction of precipitating electrons and the ionospheric plasma is used to explain the formation of short-duration sporadic-E layers in the high-latitude ionosphere. The changes produced in electron density by this collective interaction mechanism are considered.

  11. Observations of neutral winds, wind shears, and wave structure during a sporadic-E/QP event

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    M. F. Larsen

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available The second Sporadic E Experiment over Kyushu (SEEK-2 was carried out on 3 August 2002, during an active sporadic-E event that also showed quasi-periodic (QP echoes. Two rockets were launched into the event from Kagoshima Space Center in southern Japan 15 min apart. Both carried a suite of instruments, but the second rocket also released a trimethyl aluminum (TMA trail to measure the neutral winds and turbulence structure. In a number of earlier measurements in similar conditions, large winds and shears that were either unstable or close to instability were observed in the altitude range where the ionization layer occurred. The SEEK-2 wind measurements showed similar vertical structure, but unlike earlier experiments, there was a significant difference between the up-leg and down-leg wind profiles. In addition, wave or billow-like fluctuations were evident in the up-leg portion of the trail, while the lower portion of the down-leg trail was found to have extremely strong turbulence that led to a rapid break-up of the trail. The large east-west gradient in the winds and the strong turbulence have not been observed before. The wind profiles and shears, as well as the qualitative characteristics of the strong turbulence are presented, along with a discussion of the implications of the dynamical features. Keywords. Ionosphere (Mid-latitude ionosphere; Ionospheric irregularities; Electric field and currents

  12. Electric field measurements of DC and long wavelength structures associated with sporadic-E layers and QP radar echoes

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    S. Ohtsuki

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Electric field and plasma density data gathered on a sounding rocket launched from Uchinoura Space Center, Japan, reveal a complex electrodynamics associated with sporadic-E layers and simultaneous observations of quasi-periodic radar echoes. The electrodynamics are characterized by spatial and temporal variations that differed considerably between the rocket's upleg and downleg traversals of the lower ionosphere. Within the main sporadic-E layer (95–110 km on the upleg, the electric fields were variable, with amplitudes of 2–4 mV/m that changed considerably within altitude intervals of 1–3 km. The identification of polarization electric fields coinciding with plasma density enhancements and/or depletions is not readily apparent. Within this region on the downleg, however, the direction of the electric field revealed a marked change that coincided precisely with the peak of a single, narrow sporadic-E plasma density layer near 102.5 km. This shear was presumably associated with the neutral wind shear responsible for the layer formation. The electric field data above the sporadic-E layer on the upleg, from 110 km to the rocket apogee of 152 km, revealed a continuous train of distinct, large scale, quasi-periodic structures with wavelengths of 10–15 km and wavevectors oriented between the NE-SW quadrants. The electric field structures had typical amplitudes of 3–5 mV/m with one excursion to 9 mV/m, and in a very general sense, were associated with perturbations in the plasma density. The electric field waveforms showed evidence for steepening and/or convergence effects and presumably had mapped upwards along the magnetic field from the sporadic-E region below. Candidate mechanisms to explain the origin of these structures include the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and the Es-layer instability. In both cases, the same shear that formed the sporadic-E layer would provide the energy to generate the km-scale structures. Other possibilities

  13. Searching for effects caused by thunderstorms in midlatitude sporadic E layers

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    Barta, Veronika; Haldoupis, Christos; Sátori, Gabriella; Buresova, Dalia; Chum, Jaroslav; Pozoga, Mariusz; Berényi, Kitti A.; Bór, József; Popek, Martin; Kis, Árpád; Bencze, Pál

    2017-08-01

    Possible thunderstorm - sporadic E (Es) layer coupling effects are investigated during two measurement periods, one in 2013 and one in 2014. The analysis was based on ionospheric observations obtained from a Digisonde at Pruhonice, the Czech Republic, an ionosonde at Nagycenk, Hungary, and a 3.59 MHz five-point continuous HF Doppler system located in the western part of the Czech Republic. The latter is capable of detecting ionospheric wave-like variations caused by neutral atmospheric waves generated by thunderstorms. The present study searches for possible impacts on Es layers caused by the presence of two active thunderstorms: one passing across the Czech Republic on June 20, 2013 (19:00-01:00 LT), and one through Hungary on July 30, 2014 (11:00-01:00 LT). During these two time periods, presence and parameters of Es layer were inferred from ionograms, recorded every minute at Pruhonice and every two minutes at Nagycenk, whereas concurrent lightning activity was monitored by the LINET detection network. In addition, transient luminous events (TLEs) were also observed during both nights from Sopron, Hungary and from Nýdek, the Czech Republic. A noticeable fact was the reduction and disappearance of the ongoing Es layer activity during part of the time in both of the traversing thunderstorms. The analysis indicated that the critical frequency foEs dropped below ionosonde detection levels in both cases, possibly because of thunderstorm activity effects. This option, however, needs more case studies in order to be further substantiated.

  14. Occurrence of the blanketing sporadic E layer during the recovery phase of the October 2003 superstorm

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    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Resende, Laysa Cristina Araújo; Moro, Juliano; Chen, Sony Su

    2016-05-01

    We have routinely monitored the total frequency ( ftEs) and the blanketing frequency ( fbEs) of sporadic E layers with the digital sounder under the magnetic equator in the Brazilian sector. Sporadic layers appear in the equatorial region (Esq) at heights between 90 and 130 km, mainly due to irregularities in the equatorial electrojet current. However, during the recovery phase of the October 2003 superstorm, an anomalous intensification of the ionospheric density that exceeded the normal ambient background values for local time and location was observed. The parameter fbEs rose to almost 7.5 MHz during this event, due to a type "c" blanketing sporadic layer (Esc), which is driven by wind shear. This result is discussed in terms of the atmosphere dynamics based on magnetic signature of the equatorial electrojet current using magnetometer data. Also, using data measured by sensors onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 10 we analyze the possible influence of the solar flare-associated X-ray flux as an additional source of ionization.

  15. Thunderstorm related variations of the ionospheric sporadic E layer over Rome

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    Barta, Veronika; Scotto, Carlo; Pietrella, Marco

    2013-04-01

    Meteorological events in the lower atmosphere can affect the ionosphere by electromagnetic and mechanical processes. One type of the latter ones is the internal atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs) which can often be generated by thunderstorms. According to a Superposed Epoch Analyses (SEA) using the time series of the critical frequency (foEs) and virtual height (h'Es) of the sporadic E layer and WWLLN (World Wide Lightning Location Network) lightning data over the ionospheric station of Rome (41.9° 12.5°) there is a statistically significant decrease in the foEs of the sporadic E layer after the time of the lightnings. This may indicate a sudden decrease in the electron density of the sporadic E layer associated to lightnings. In order to understand the physical explanation for this phenomenon further studies are performed as follows: a SEA for different seasons and for daytime - nightime lightnings separately. Direction of arrival of thunderstorms is also taken into account.

  16. Seasonal variability and descent of mid-latitude sporadic E layers at Arecibo

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    N. Christakis

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic E layers (Es follow regular daily patterns in variability and altitude descent, which are determined primarily by the vertical tidal wind shears in the lower thermosphere. In the present study a large set of sporadic E layer incoherent scatter radar (ISR measurements are analyzed. These were made at Arecibo (Geog. Lat. ~18° N; Magnetic Dip ~50° over many years with ISR runs lasting from several hours to several days, covering evenly all seasons. A new methodology is applied, in which both weak and strong layers are clearly traced by using the vertical electron density gradient as a function of altitude and time. Taking a time base equal to the 24-h local day, statistics were obtained on the seasonal behavior of the diurnal and semidiurnal tidal variability and altitude descent patterns of sporadic E at Arecibo. The diurnal tide, most likely the S(1,1 tide with a vertical wavelength around 25 km, controls fully the formation and descent of the metallic Es layers at low altitudes below 110 km. At higher altitudes, there are two prevailing layers formed presumably by vertical wind shears associated mainly with semidiurnal tides. These include: 1 a daytime layer starting at ~130 km around midday and descending down to 105 km by local midnight, and 2 a less frequent and weaker nighttime layer which starts prior to midnight at ~130 km, descending downwards at somewhat faster rate to reach 110 km by sunrise. The diurnal and semidiurnal-like pattern prevails, with some differences, in all seasons. The differences in occurrence, strength and descending speeds between the daytime and nighttime upper layers are not well understood from the present data alone and require further study.

  17. Searching for effects caused by thunderstorms in midlatitude sporadic E layers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Barta, V.; Haldoupis, C.; Sátori, G.; Burešová, Dalia; Chum, Jaroslav; Pozoga, M.; Berényi, K. A.; Bór, J.; Popek, Martin; Kis, Á.; Bencze, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 161, August (2017), s. 150-159 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GC15-07281J; GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2440; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-31899S Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : atmospheric gravity waves * ionosphere coupling * lightning * sporadic E layer * sprites * thunderstorm Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology OBOR OECD: Meteorology and atmospheric sciences Impact factor: 1.326, year: 2016 https://arxiv.org/abs/1708.00270

  18. Equatorial E Region Electric Fields and Sporadic E Layer Responses to the Recovery Phase of the November 2004 Geomagnetic Storm

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    Moro, J.; Resende, L. C. A.; Denardini, C. M.; Xu, J.; Batista, I. S.; Andrioli, V. F.; Carrasco, A. J.; Batista, P. P.; Schuch, N. J.

    2017-12-01

    Equatorial E region electric fields (EEFs) inferred from coherent radar data, sporadic-E (Es) layers observed from a digital ionosonde data, and modeling results are used to study the responses of the equatorial E region over São Luís (SLZ, 2.3°S, 44.2°W, -7° dip angle), Brazil, during the super storm of November 2004. The EEF is presented in terms of the zonal (Ey) and vertical (Ez) components in order to analyze the corresponding characteristics of different types of Es seen in ionograms and simulated with the E region ionospheric model. We bring out the variabilities of Ey and Ez components with storm time changes in the equatorial E region. In addition, some aspects of the electric fields and Es behavior in three cases of weak, very weak, and strong Type II occurrences during the recovery phase of the geomagnetic storm are discussed. The connection between the enhanced occurrence and suppressions of the Type II irregularities and the q-type Es (Esq) controlled by electric fields, with the development or disruption of the blanketing sporadic E (Esb) layers produced by wind shear mechanism, is also presented. The mutual presence of Esq along with the Esb occurrences is a clear indicator of the secular drift of the magnetic equator and hence that of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) over SLZ. The results show evidence about the EEJ and Es layer electrodynamics and coupling during geomagnetic disturbance time electric fields.

  19. Analysis of wave-like oscillations in parameters of sporadic E layer and neutral atmosphere

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    Mošna, Z.; Koucká Knížová, P.

    2012-12-01

    The present study mainly concerns the wave-like activity in the ionospheric sporadic E layer (Es) and in the lower lying stratosphere. The proposed analysis involves parameters describing the state of plasma in the sporadic E layer. Critical frequencies foEs and layer heights hEs were measured at the Pruhonice station (50°N, 14.5°E) during summer campaigns 2004, 2006 and 2008. Further, we use neutral atmosphere (temperature data at 10 hPa) data from the same time interval. The analysis concentrates on vertically propagating wave-like structures within distant atmospheric regions. By means of continuous wavelet transform (CWT) we have detected significant wave-like oscillation at periods covering tidal and planetary oscillation domains both in the Es layer parameters (some of them were reported earlier, for instance in works of Abdu et al., 2003; Pancheva and Mitchel, 2004; Pancheva et al., 2003; Šauli and Bourdillon, 2008) and in stratospheric temperature variations. Further analyses using cross wavelet transform (XWT) and wavelet coherence analysis (WTC) show that despite high wave-like activity in a wide period range, there are only limited coherent wave-like bursts present in both spectra. Such common coherent wave bursts occur on periods close to eigen-periods of the terrestrial atmosphere. We suppose that vertical coupling between atmospheric regions realized by vertically propagating planetary waves occurs predominantly on periods close to those of Rossby modes. Analysis of the phase shift between data from distant atmospheric regions reveals high variability and very likely supports the non-linear scenario of the vertical coupling provided by planetary waves.

  20. On the influence of solar activity on the mid-latitude sporadic E layer

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    Pezzopane, Michael; Pignalberi, Alessio; Pietrella, Marco

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the influence of solar cycle variability on the sporadic E layer (Es), hourly measurements of the critical frequency of the Es ordinary mode of propagation, foEs, and of the blanketing frequency of the Es layer, fbEs, recorded from January 1976 to December 2009 at the Rome (Italy) ionospheric station (41.8° N, 12.5° E), were examined. The results are: (1) a high positive correlation between the F10.7 solar index and foEs as well as between F10.7 and fbEs, both for the whole data set and for each solar cycle separately, the correlation between F10.7 and fbEs being much higher than the one between F10.7 and foEs; (2) a decreasing long-term trend of the F10.7, foEs and fbEs time series, with foEs decreasing more rapidly than F10.7 and fbEs; (3) clear and statistically significant peaks at 11 years in the foEs and fbEs time series, inferred from Lomb-Scargle periodograms.

  1. Study of sporadic E layers based on GPS radio occultation measurements and digisonde data over the Brazilian region

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    Resende, Laysa C. A.; Arras, Christina; Batista, Inez S.; Denardini, Clezio M.; Bertollotto, Thainá O.; Moro, Juliano

    2018-04-01

    This work presents new results about sporadic E-layers (Es layers) using GPS (global positioning system) radio occultation (RO) measurements obtained from the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites and digisonde data. The RO profiles are used to study the Es layer occurrence as well as its intensity of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the 50 Hz GPS L1 signal. The methodology was applied to identify the Es layer on RO measurements over Cachoeira Paulista, a low-latitude station in the Brazilian region, in which the Es layer development is not driven tidal winds only as it is at middle latitudes. The coincident events were analyzed using the RO technique and ionosonde observations during the year 2014 to 2016. We used the electron density obtained using the blanketing frequency parameter (fbEs) and the Es layer height (h'Es) acquired from the ionograms to validate the satellite measurements. The comparative results show that the Es layer characteristics extracted from the RO measurements are in good agreement with the Es layer parameters from the digisonde.

  2. Energetics and structure of the lower E region associated with sporadic E layer

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    K.-I. Oyama

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron temperature (Te, electron density (Ne, and two components of the electric field were measured from the height of 90 km to 150 km by one of the sounding rockets launched during the SEEK-2 campaign. The rocket went through sporadic E layer (Es at the height of 102 km–109 km during ascent and 99 km–108 km during decent, respectively. The energy density of thermal electrons calculated from Ne and Te shows the broad maximum in the height range of 100–110 km, and it decreases towards the lower and higher altitudes, which implies that a heat source exists in the height region of 100 km–110 km. A 3-D picture of Es, that was drawn by using Te, Ne, and the electric field data, corresponded to the computer simulation; the main structure of Es is projected to a higher altitude along the magnetic line of force, thus producing irregular structures of Te, Ne and electric field in higher altitude.

  3. Energetics and structure of the lower E region associated with sporadic E layer

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    K.-I. Oyama

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The electron temperature (Te, electron density (Ne, and two components of the electric field were measured from the height of 90 km to 150 km by one of the sounding rockets launched during the SEEK-2 campaign. The rocket went through sporadic E layer (Es at the height of 102 km–109 km during ascent and 99 km–108 km during decent, respectively. The energy density of thermal electrons calculated from Ne and Te shows the broad maximum in the height range of 100–110 km, and it decreases towards the lower and higher altitudes, which implies that a heat source exists in the height region of 100 km–110 km. A 3-D picture of Es, that was drawn by using Te, Ne, and the electric field data, corresponded to the computer simulation; the main structure of Es is projected to a higher altitude along the magnetic line of force, thus producing irregular structures of Te, Ne and electric field in higher altitude.

  4. The formation of sporadic E layers by a vortical perturbation excited in a horizontal wind shear flow

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    G. G. Didebulidze

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The formation of the mid-latitude sporadic E layers (Es layers by an atmospheric vortical perturbation excited in a horizontal shear flow (horizontal wind with a horizontal linear shear is investigated. A three-dimensional atmospheric vortical perturbation (atmospheric shear waves, whose velocity vector is in the horizontal plane and has a vertical wavenumber kz≠0, can provide a vertical shear of the horizontal wind. The shear waves influence the vertical transport of heavy metallic ions and their convergence into thin and dense horizontal layers. The proposed mechanism takes into account the dynamical influence of the shear wave velocity in the horizontal wind on the vertical drift velocity of the ions. It also can explain the multi-layer structure of Es layers. The pattern of the multi-layer structure depends on the value of the shear-wave vertical wavelength, the ion-neutral collision frequency and the direction of the background horizontal wind. The modelling of formation of sporadic E layers with a single and a double peak is presented. Also, the importance of shear wave coupling with short-period atmospheric gravity waves (AGWs on the variations of sporadic E layer ion density is examined and discussed.

  5. Height and critical frequency variations of the sporadic-E layer at midlatitudes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šauli, Petra; Bourdillon, A.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 70, č. 15 (2008), s. 1904-1910 ISSN 1364-6826 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420704 Grant - others:European Union(XE) COST 296 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Sporadic E * Planetary waves * Tidal waves * Mid-latitude ionosphere * Wavelet transform Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.667, year: 2008

  6. Analysis of wave-like oscillations in parameters of sporadic E layer and neutral atmosphere

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mošna, Zbyšek; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    90-91, SI (2012), s. 172-178 ISSN 1364-6826. [IAGA/ICMA/CAWSES-II TG4 Workshop on Vertical Coupling in the Atmosphere-Ionosphere System /4./. Prague, 14.02.2011-18.02.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300420704 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : Sporadic E * Planetary waves * Tidal waves * Mid-latitude ionosphere Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 1.417, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682612001186

  7. Sporadic potassium layers and their connection to sporadic E layers in the mesopause region at Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Jiao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A double-laser beam lidar to measure potassium (K layer at Beijing (40.5° N, 116.2° E was successfully developed in 2010. The parameters of sporadic Ks layers and their distributions were given. The seasonal distribution of Ks occurrence frequency was obtained, with two maxima in July and January. The seasonal distributions of sporadic Es layer occurrence frequency over Beijing differ from those of Ks. However, the good correlation between Es and Ks in the case-by-case studies supports the mechanism of neutralization of metal ions in a descending Es layer.

  8. More evidence for a planetary wave link with midlatitude E region coherent backscatter and sporadic E layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schlegel

    Full Text Available Measurements of midlatitude E region coherent backscatter obtained during four summers with SESCAT, a 50 MHz Doppler system operating in Crete, Greece, and concurrent ionosonde recordings from the same ionospheric volume obtained with a CADI for one of these summers, are used to analyse the long-term variability in echo and Es occurrence. Echo and Es layer occurrences, computed in percent of time over a 12-h nighttime interval, take the form of time sequences. Linear power spectrum analysis shows that there are dominant spectral peaks in the range of 2–9 days, the most commonly observed periods appearing in two preferential bands, of 2–3 days and 4–7 days. No connection with geomagnetic activity was found. The characteristics of these periodicities compare well with similar properties of planetary waves, which suggests the possibility that planetary waves are responsible for the observed long-term periodicities. These findings indicate also a likely close relation between planetary wave (PW activity and the well known but not well understood seasonal Es dependence. To test the PW postulation, we used simultaneous neutral wind data from the mesopause region around 95 km, measured from Collm, Germany. Direct comparison of the long-term periodicities in echo and Es layer occurrence with those in the neutral wind show some reasonable agreement. This new evidence, although not fully conclusive, is the first direct indication in favour of a planetary wave role on the unstable midlatitude E region ionosphere. Our results suggest that planetary waves observation is a viable option and a new element into the physics of midlatitude Es layers that needs to be considered and investigated.Key words: Ionosphere (ionosphere irregularities; mid-latitude ionosphere – Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (waves and tides

  9. Sporadic E S Layers at High Latitudes During a Magnetic Storm of March 17, 2015 According to the Vertical and Oblique Ionospheric Sounding Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoveshchensky, D. V.; Maltseva, O. A.; Anishin, M. M.; Rogov, D. D.

    2017-11-01

    We consider the behavior of the parameters of the ionospheric E s layers according to the vertical sounding at the Sodankylä observatory and oblique sounding at the Lovozero (Murmansk region)—Gor'kovskaya station (Leningrad region) path during a superstorm of March 17, 2015. Temporal and spatial behavior of these parameters is compared. It was found that the storm significantly distorted the normal course of variations of the sporadic E s layer characteristics. Specific behavior of the layers during a storm at points separated by about 300 km was detected. With the help of ray tracing calculations using the IRI model, oblique sounding ionograms were constructed for the radio path analyzed. Primary attention is given to the maximum usable frequency of the F 2 layer—MUF- F 2. Additionally, for the disturbed conditions where there is only a high-power E s layer on the experimental ionograms, the values of MUF- E s and the ratio K =MUF- E s/ f o E s for various cutoff frequencies f o E s of the E s layer and its altitudes {h}_{E_s} are calculated within the framework of the well-known approximations. Calculations for the case of weak disturbance and semitransparent E s layers are carried out with the IRI model adapted to the current diagnostics parameters. It was found that the calculated and experimental values of MUF- F 2 are close to each other or coincide, while this cannot be said about MUF- E s. The calculated and experimental values of MUF- E s can be matched in the model of mirror reflection from a flat layer for intense layers and the model of the E layer for thick E s layers of low intensity.

  10. The influence of tidal winds in the formation of blanketing sporadic e-layer over equatorial Brazilian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Laysa Cristina Araujo; Batista, Inez Staciarini; Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Batista, Paulo Prado; Carrasco, Alexander José; Andrioli, Vânia Fátima; Moro, Juliano

    2018-06-01

    This work analysis the blanketing sporadic layers (Esb) behavior over São Luís, Brazil (2° 31‧ S, 44° 16‧ W, dip: -4.80) which is classified as a transition region between equatorial and low-latitude. Hence, some peculiarities can appear as Esb occurrence instead of the common Esq, which is a non-blanketing irregularity layer. The analysis presented here was obtained using a modified version of a theoretical model for the E region (MIRE), which computes the densities of the metallic ions (Fe+ and Mg+) and the densities of the main molecular ions (NO+, O2+, N2+) by solving the continuity and momentum equations for each one of them. In that model, the Es layer physics driven by both diurnal and semidiurnal tidal winds are taken into account and it was extended in height coverage by adding a novel neutral wind model derived from the all-sky meteor radar measurements. Thus, we provide more trustworthy results related to the Es layer formation in the equatorial region. We verified the contribution of each tidal wind component to the Esb layer formation in this equatorial region. Additionally, we compared the Es layer electron density computed by MIRE with the data obtained by using the blanketing frequency parameter (fbEs) deduced from ionograms. The results show that the diurnal component of the tidal wind is more important in the Esb layer formation whereas the semidiurnal component has a little contribution in our simulations. Finally, it was verified that the modified MIRE presented here can be used to study the Esb layers occurrence over the equatorial region in the Brazilian sector.

  11. Effects of sporadic E-layer characteristics on spread-F generation in the nighttime midlatitude ionosphere: A climatological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. C.; Chen, W. S.

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study is to examine the effects of Es-layer characteristics on spread-F generation in the nighttime midlatitude ionosphere. The Es-layer parameters and spread-F appearance of the 23rd solar cycle (1996-2008) are recorded by the Kokubunji ionosonde. The Es-layer parameters are foEs (critical frequency of Es-layer), fbEs (blanketing frequency of Es-layer), and Δf (≡foEs-fbEs). In order to completely explore the effects, the pre-midnight and post-midnight data are classified by seasons, solar activities, and geomagnetic conditions. Results show that the spread-F occurs more frequently in post-midnight and in summer. And, the occurrence probabilities of spread-F are greater, when the solar activity is lower. For the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus foEs and Δf under geomagnetic quiet-conditions, the trend is increasing, when the associated probabilities are significant. These indicate that the spread-F occurrence increases with increasing foEs and/or Δf. Further, the increasing trends demonstrate that polarization electric fields generated in Es-layer would be helpful to generate spread-F, through the electrodynamical coupling of Es-layer and F-region. Moreover, this electrodynamical coupling is efficient not only under quiet-conditions but under disturbed-conditions, since the significant increasing trend can also be found under disturbed-conditions. Regarding the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus fbEs, the evident trends are not in the majority. This implies that fbEs might not be a major factor for the spread-F formation.

  12. Effects of sporadic E-layer characteristics on spread-F generation in the nighttime ionosphere near a northern equatorial anomaly crest during solar minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C. C.; Chen, W. S.

    2015-06-01

    This study is to know how the characteristics of sporadic E-layer (Es-layer) affect the generation of spread-F in the nighttime ionosphere near the crest of equatorial ionization anomaly during solar minimum. The data of Es-layer parameters and spread-F are obtained from the Chungli ionograms of 1996. The Es-layer parameters include foEs (critical frequency of Es-layer), fbEs (blanketing frequency of Es-layer), and Δf (≡foEs-fbEs). Results show that the nighttime variations of foEs and fbEs medians (Δf medians) are different from (similar to) that of the occurrence probabilities of spread-F. Because the total number of Es-layer events is greater than that of spread-F events, the comparison between the medians of Es-layer parameters and the occurrence probabilities of spread-F might have a shortfall. Further, we categorize the Es-layer and spread-F events into each frequency interval of Es-layer parameters. For the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus foEs, an increasing trend is found in post-midnight of all three seasons. The increasing trend also exists in pre-midnight of the J-months and in post-midnight of all seasons, for the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus Δf. These demonstrate that the spread-F occurrence increases with increasing foEs and/or Δf. Moreover, the increasing trends indicate that polarization electric fields generated in Es-layer assist to produce spread-F, through the electrodynamical coupling of Es-layer and F-region. Regarding the occurrence probabilities of spread-F versus fbEs, the significant trend only appears in post-midnight of the E-months. This implies that fbEs might not be a major factor for the spread-F formation.

  13. A spectral study of the mid-latitude sporadic E layer characteristic oscillations comparable to those of the tidal and the planetary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignalberi, A.; Pezzopane, M.; Zuccheretti, E.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper different spectral analyses are employed to investigate the tidal and planetary wave periodicities imprinted in the following two main characteristics of the sporadic E (Es) layer: the top frequency (ftEs) and the lowest virtual height (h‧Es). The study is based on ionograms recorded during the summertime of 2013, and precisely in June, July, August and September, by the Advanced Ionospheric Sounder by Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (AIS-INGV) ionosondes installed at Rome (41.8°N, 12.5°E) and Gibilmanna (37.9°N, 14.0°E), Italy. It was confirmed that the diurnal and semidiurnal atmospheric tides play a fundamental role in the formation of the mid-latitude Es layers, acting through their vertical wind-shear forcing of the long-living metallic ions in the lower thermosphere, and at the same time it was found that the planetary atmospheric waves might affect the Es layers acting through their horizontal wind-shear forcing with periods close to the normal Rossby modes, that is 2, 5, 10 and 16 days. The wavelet analysis shows also that the ftEs and h‧Es tidal oscillations undergo a strong amplitude modulation with periods of several days and with important differences between the two parameters. This amplitude modulation, characterizing markedly the first thirty days of the ftEs spectrogram, suggests that Es layers are affected indirectly by planetary waves through their nonlinear interaction with the atmospheric tides at lower altitudes. This study wants to be a continuation of the Haldoupis et al. (2004) work in order to verify their results for the foEs characteristic and on the other hand to extend the study also to the h‧Es characteristic not yet shown so far. Anyhow, the study confirms that ionosonde data, especially those registered in summertime, represent a powerful tool for studying tidal and planetary waves properties and their climatology in the mesosphere-low-thermosphere region.

  14. Investigation on the relationship among sporadic Na, sporadic E, Field aligned irregularities and neutral winds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Sridharan; Patra, Amit Kumar; Pant, Tarun; Gurubaran, Subramanian; Raghunath, Karnam

    In the Mesosphere and Lower Thermosphere region (80-100 km), metallic atoms, namely, sodium, potassium, lithium, Iron etc are formed due to ablation of meteors. The lidars based on resonance fluorescence principle has been used to study the vertical distribution of sodium atoms, because of their large abundance than other metals. The profiles of sodium density sometimes show enhancement by a factor of 2 than the normal layer in a narrow altitude region of 2 km and on these occasions, they are called sporadic sodium layer, or briefly Ns. On the other hand, there are observations on sporadic E and radar observations of Field Aligned Irregularities (FAI) associated with these sporadic E. Some investigations have been made to understand the relationship between sporadic E and FAI. Considering that sporadic E is composed of metallic ions and the time of metallic ions are larger compared to other ions, the sodium observations in the same height region would be of significant importance to understand the process involved. Despite a few past observations, no clear picture has emerged due to lack of simultaneous measurements of these parameters. The simultaneous observations of FAI echoes by the Indian MST radar and sodium concentration by the sodium lidar at Gadanki (13.5o N, 79.2o E) are being used to investigate the above mentioned relationship. The Sporadic E and neutral wind information are obtained from the ionosonde, meteor/MF radar observations from Trivandrum (8.5o N, 77E) and Tirunelveli (8.7o N, 77.8o E). The results obtained will be presented during the meeting.

  15. The lunar tide in sporadic E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Stening

    1999-10-01

    Full Text Available It seems that the wind shear theory is accepted for the explanation of sporadic E at mid and low latitudes. Some examples from Arecibo are displayed to show this. The effect of lunar tides should then modify the wind-shear theory in a manner that yields the observed features of the lunar tide in the critical frequency foEs and the height h'Es of the sporadic E. This is shown to imply that the phase of the lunar tide in h'Es should be the same as the phase of the lunar tide in the eastward wind and that the phase of the lunar tide in foEs is three hours later. Hourly values of foEs, f bEs (the blanketing critical frequency and h'Es from several observatories are analysed for the lunar semidiurnal tide. It is found that the phase of the tide in foEs is often about 3 hours later than for h'Es in agreement with the theory. Seasonal variations in the tide are also examined with the statistically most significant results (largest amplitudes usually occurring in summer. After reviewing the many difficulties associated with determining the lunar tide in Es, both experimentally and theoretically, the analysed phase results are compared with what might be expected from Hagan's global scale wave model. Agreement is only fair (a success rate of 69% among the cases examined but probably as good as might be expected.Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere – atmosphere interactions – ionospheric irregularities, Meteorology and atmosphere dynamics (waves and tides

  16. Strong Sporadic E Occurrence Detected by Ground-Based GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjie; Ning, Baiqi; Yue, Xinan; Li, Guozhu; Hu, Lianhuan; Chang, Shoumin; Lan, Jiaping; Zhu, Zhengping; Zhao, Biqiang; Lin, Jian

    2018-04-01

    The ionospheric sporadic E (Es) layer has significant impact on radio wave propagation. The traditional techniques employed for Es layer observation, for example, ionosondes, are not dense enough to resolve the morphology and dynamics of Es layer in spatial distribution. The ground-based Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) technique is expected to shed light on the understanding of regional strong Es occurrence, owing to the facts that the critical frequency (foEs) of strong Es structure is usually high enough to cause pulse-like disturbances in GNSS total electron content (TEC), and a large number of GNSS receivers have been deployed all over the world. Based on the Chinese ground-based GNSS networks, including the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China and the Beidou Ionospheric Observation Network, a large-scale strong Es event was observed in the middle latitude of China. The strong Es shown as a band-like structure in the southwest-northeast direction extended more than 1,000 km. By making a comparative analysis of Es occurrences identified from the simultaneous observations by ionosondes and GNSS TEC receivers over China middle latitude statistically, we found that GNSS TEC can be well employed to observe strong Es occurrence with a threshold value of foEs, 14 MHz.

  17. Studies of sporadic E (Es) associated with the main ionospheric trough

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodger, A.S.; Morrell, C.; Dudeney, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Sporadic E, or E(s) events under the main F region trough have been confirmed on the basis of ionograms from a vertical incidence ionosonde at Halley Bay, Antarctica. Analyses indicate that E(s) is frequently observable under both the equatorward and the poleward edges of the trough, as well as poleward of it. Before magnetic midnight, E(s) layers whose semithickness resembles those of the normal E layer are common, in contrast to layers seen after magnetic midnight which show the characteristics of thin E(s) layers. A possible explanation of the observed change in the E(s) layer characteristics at magnetic midnight is related to differences in the type and spectra of the precipitating particles. It is shown that the redistribution of ionization by the convection electric field may be important. 40 references

  18. Sporadic-E and spread-F in high latitude region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Kazuhiko

    1974-01-01

    The heretofore made morphological studies of sporadic-E and spread-F as the typical irregularities of electron density are reviewed. These phenomena have close correlation with other geophysical phenomena which occur in the atmosphere of superhigh altitude in high latitude region. Many of these phenomena occur from same causes. Although the quantitative data are insufficient, the sporadic-E and spread-F in high latitude region are supposed to be caused by the precipitating charged particles falling from magnetosphere. A system, which can observe such phenomena simultaneously using the measuring instruments carried by satellites in the atmosphere of high altitude over high latitude region, is desirable to solve such problems. In detail, the morphological study on sporadic-E obtained from the observation of vertically projected ionosphere and the morphological study on sporadic-E from the observation of forward scattering and slanting entrance are reviewed. The correlation of the occurrence frequency of sporadic-E with solar activity, geomagnetic activity and other phenomena was studied. The morphological study on spread-F occurrence is reviewed. The observation of the spread-F in high latitude region by the application of top side sounding is reviewed. The correlation of the sporadic-E and spread-F in high latitude region with other geophysical phenomena is discussed. Finally, the discrete phenomenon and the diffuse phenomenon are discussed too. (Iwakiri, K.)

  19. Temporal evolution of the HF-enhanced plasma line in sporadic E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djuth, F.T.; Gonzales, C.A.

    1988-01-01

    The high-power, high-frequency (HF) facility at Arecibo, Puerto Rico, has been used to study the excitation of Langmuir waves in mid-latitude sporadic E. Measurements of the temporal evolution of so-called HF-enhanced plasma line (HFPL) were made using the Arecibo 430-MHz radar. After HF turn-on in the plasma the HFPL exhibits a rapid growth phase followed by a quick overshoot. During periods of strong HFPL excitation the e-folding growth time of the HFPL power is typically approx-lt 20 μs, and the total overshoot period is ∼1 ms. On the basis of the current observations, mode conversion of the HF wave into Langmuir waves near HF reflection appears to be a promising mechanism for the production of Langmuir waves in sporadic E. Caviton formation at the critical layer is expected to accompany this process, and there is some evidence that the 430-MHz radar is probing the plasma in a region where density cavities of this nature form. While no specific explanation is offered for the HFPL overshoot, it appears that this phenomenon is fundamental to the Langmuir wave excitation process

  20. SEEK-2 (Sporadic-E Experiment over Kyushu 2 − Project Outline, and Significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Pfaff

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available SEEK-2 (Sporadic-E Experiment over Kyushu 2 is an observation campaign to study the spatial structure of the field-aligned irregularity (FAI and sporadic-E(Es-layer by means of two sounding rockets and a ground-based observation network with radars and optical instruments. The experiment was successfully conducted on 3 August 2002, with successive launches of two sounding rockets from the Uchinoura Space Center (USC of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA. The timing of the experiment was carefully selected, while intense quasi-periodic (QP echoes were observed with two radars in Tanegashima. The main Es-layer, with its double-layered structure, was observed at altitudes of 103–105 km, the presence of which was well accounted for by the ion accumulation due to neutral-wind shear. Several minor peaks were detected in the electron density profiles at altitudes of up to 130 km. The intensity of the electric field was 5–10 mV/m and showed intense fluctuations below 110 km. Wave-like variation of the electric field was seen above 110 km. From radar experiments, we found that QP echoes appeared around 105 km, which agreed well with the main Es-layer height. The QP echoes propagated to the west-northwest, with frontal structures elongated from north-northeast to south-southwest. Radar observations conduced throughout the SEEK-2 period, on the other hand, showed that frontal structures of the QP echoes were most frequently propagated to the southeast. This result was consistent with the direction of gravity-wave propagation observed with the OH imager during the same period. The rocket beacon experiment with the Es-layers revealed the spatial structure of the plasma densities. On the basis of these results and those from SEEK-1 in 1996, we examined the structures of the nighttime mid-latitude E-region. We concluded that the QP echoes reflect the horizontal structures of the main Es-layers. The source of the structures was not clearly

  1. Sporadic-E associated with the Leonid meteor shower event of November 1998 over low and equatorial latitudes

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    H. Chandra

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Rapid radio soundings were made over Ahmedabad, a low latitude station during the period 16–20 November 1998 to study the sporadic-E layer associated with the Leonid shower activity using the KEL Aerospace digital ionosonde. Hourly ionograms for the period 11 November to 24 November were also examined during the years from 1994 to 1998. A distinct increase in sporadic-E layer occurrence is noticed on 17, 18 and 19 November from 1996 to 1998. The diurnal variations  of  f0Es and fbEs also show significantly enhanced values for the morning hours of 18 and 19 November 1998. The ionograms clearly show strong sporadic-E reflections at times of peak shower activity with multiple traces in the altitude range of 100–140 km in few ionograms. Sporadic-E layers with multiple structures in altitude are also seen in some of the ionograms (quarter hourly at Thumba, situated near the magnetic equator. Few of ionograms recorded at Kodaikanal, another equatorial station, also show sporadic- E reflections in spite of the transmitter power being significantly lower. These new results highlighting the effect of intense meteor showers in the equatorial and low latitude E-region are presented.Key words. Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere – Radio science (ionospheric physics

  2. Sporadic-E associated with the Leonid meteor shower event of November 1998 over low and equatorial latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Chandra

    Full Text Available Rapid radio soundings were made over Ahmedabad, a low latitude station during the period 16–20 November 1998 to study the sporadic-E layer associated with the Leonid shower activity using the KEL Aerospace digital ionosonde. Hourly ionograms for the period 11 November to 24 November were also examined during the years from 1994 to 1998. A distinct increase in sporadic-E layer occurrence is noticed on 17, 18 and 19 November from 1996 to 1998. The diurnal variations 
    of  f0Es and fbEs also show significantly enhanced values for the morning hours of 18 and 19 November 1998. The ionograms clearly show strong sporadic-E reflections at times of peak shower activity with multiple traces in the altitude range of 100–140 km in few ionograms. Sporadic-E layers with multiple structures in altitude are also seen in some of the ionograms (quarter hourly at Thumba, situated near the magnetic equator. Few of ionograms recorded at Kodaikanal, another equatorial station, also show sporadic- E reflections in spite of the transmitter power being significantly lower. These new results highlighting the effect of intense meteor showers in the equatorial and low latitude E-region are presented.

    Key words. Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere – Radio science (ionospheric physics

  3. The interaction between stratospheric monthly mean regional winds and sporadic-E

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Çetin, Kenan; Korlaelçi, Serhat; Özcan, Osman

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, a statistical investigation is carried out to explore whether there is a relationship between the critical frequency (foEs) of the sporadic-E layer that is occasionally seen on the E region of the ionosphere and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) that flows in the east–west direction in the equatorial stratosphere. Multiple regression model as a statistical tool was used to determine the relationship between variables. In this model, the stationarity of the variables (foEs and QBO) was firstly analyzed for each station (Cocos Island, Gibilmanna, Niue Island, and Tahiti). Then, a co-integration test was made to determine the existence of a long-term relationship between QBO and foEs. After verifying the presence of a long-term relationship between the variables, the magnitude of the relationship between variables was further determined using the multiple regression model. As a result, it is concluded that the variations in foEs were explainable with QBO measured at 10 hPa altitude at the rate of 69%, 94%, 79%, and 58% for Cocos Island, Gibilmanna, Niue Island, and Tahiti stations, respectively. It is observed that the variations in foEs were explainable with QBO measured at 70 hPa altitude at the rate of 66%, 69%, 53%, and 47% for Cocos Island, Gibilmanna, Niue Island, and Tahiti stations, respectively. (paper)

  4. A multi-platform investigation of midlatitude sporadic E and its ties to E–F coupling and meteor activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Helmboldt

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results of a multi-platform observing campaign aimed at studying midlatitude sporadic E (Es and associated ionospheric phenomena. The assets used were the digisonde in Boulder, Colorado; the first station of the Long Wavelength Array, LWA1, in New Mexico; the transmitters of the radio station WWV in Colorado; and 61 continuously operating GPS receivers between LWA1 and WWV. The results show that southwestward-directed medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs were substantially more prevalent when Es was detected. The amplitudes of these correlate with a plasma frequency up to about 4.5 MHz. For fp ≳ 5 MHz, the MSTIDs become significantly weaker and basically vanish above  ∼ 6.5 MHz. The prevalence of meteor trail reflections observed with LWA1 also correlates with fp up to about 4.5 MHz; above this limit, the relationship exhibits a significant turnover. The observed intensity of coherent backscatter from Es field-aligned irregularities (FAIs also correlates with inferred plasma frequency. However, this trend continues to higher frequencies with a peak near 6 MHz, followed by a much more subtle turnover. The reflected power from Es structures observed with LWA1 is significantly more correlated on spatial scales between 10 and 40 km. The magnitude of this correlation increases with fp up to  ∼  6 MHz, above which it drops. These results are consistent with the following: (1 southwestward-directed MSTIDs are produced via E–F coupling; (2 this coupling is stronger when the Es layer, seeded by meteor ablation, is more dense; (3 the coupling is substantially diminished for Es layers harboring extremely dense structures (fp ≳ 5 MHz.

  5. Sporadic sodium and E layers observed during the summer 2002 MaCWAVE/MIDAS rocket campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. P. Williams

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available On 5 July 2002, a MaCWAVE (Mountain and Convective Waves Ascending VErtically payload launched from Andøya Rocket Range, Norway, observed narrow enhanced layers of electron density that were nearly coincident with sporadic sodium layers measured by the Weber sodium lidar at the nearby ALOMAR Observatory. We investigate the formation mechanism of these layers using the neutral wind and temperature profiles measured directly by the lidar and the vertical motion deduced from the sodium mixing ratio. Through comparisons of the lidar data to the sporadic E in situ data, we find support for the concentration and downward motion of ions to an altitude where chemical models predict the rapid conversion of sodium ions to neutral sodium.

  6. Solar eclipse effects of 22 July 2009 on Sporadic-E

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    G. Chen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The total solar eclipse of 22 July 2009, was visible from some regions of China and the intense sporadic-E (Es that broke out during the solar eclipse period over the eastern China provided a unique chance to study solar eclipse effects on the Es-layer. The ground based high-frequency (HF vertical-incidence and oblique-incidence backscatter radio systems in Wuhan and an HF oblique receivers located in Suzhou were operated to detect the Es-layer. The vertical, oblique and backscatter ionograms of 22 and 23 July were recorded, processed and analyzed. The analyzing results show that the critical frequency of Es, the hop number and power of the rays transmitted from Wuhan to Suzhou as well as the Doppler frequency shift of the one-hop oblique-incidence waves reflected by the Es-layer all increased during the solar eclipse period. These variations are displayed in the paper and explained to be induced by the wind-field, which is produced by the powerful meridional air flows from the sunshine region to the moon's shadow.

  7. Solar eclipse effects of 22 July 2009 on Sporadic-E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The total solar eclipse of 22 July 2009, was visible from some regions of China and the intense sporadic-E (Es that broke out during the solar eclipse period over the eastern China provided a unique chance to study solar eclipse effects on the Es-layer. The ground based high-frequency (HF vertical-incidence and oblique-incidence backscatter radio systems in Wuhan and an HF oblique receivers located in Suzhou were operated to detect the Es-layer. The vertical, oblique and backscatter ionograms of 22 and 23 July were recorded, processed and analyzed. The analyzing results show that the critical frequency of Es, the hop number and power of the rays transmitted from Wuhan to Suzhou as well as the Doppler frequency shift of the one-hop oblique-incidence waves reflected by the Es-layer all increased during the solar eclipse period. These variations are displayed in the paper and explained to be induced by the wind-field, which is produced by the powerful meridional air flows from the sunshine region to the moon's shadow.

  8. Ground observations of magnetospheric boundary layer phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McHenry, M.A.; Clauer, C.R.; Friis-Christensen, E.; Newell, P.T.; Kelly, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    Several classes of traveling vortices in the dayside ionospheric convection have been detected and tracked using the Greenland magnetometer chain (Friis-Christensen et al., 1988, McHenry et al., 1989). One class observed during quiet times consists of a continuous series of vortices moving generally anti-sunward for several hours at a time. The vortices strength is seen to be approximately steady and neighboring vortices rotate in opposite directions. Sondrestrom radar observations show that the vortices are located at the ionospheric convection reversal boundary. Low altitude DMSP observations indicate the vortices are on field lines which map to the inner edge of the low latitude boundary layer. Because the vortices are conjugate to the boundary layer, repeat in a regular fashion and travel antisunward, the authors argue that this class of vortices is caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability of the inner edge of the magnetospheric boundary layer

  9. Simultaneous lidar observation of peculiar sporadic K and Na layers at São José dos Campos (23.1°S, 45.9°W), Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jing; Yang, Guotao; Cheng, Xuewu; Liu, Zhengkuan; Wang, Jihong; Yan, Zhenzhong; Wang, Chi; Batista, Paulo; Pimenta, Alexandre; Andrioli, Vânia; Denardini, C. M.

    2018-04-01

    We present the first simultaneous observation of mesopause sodium (Na) and potassium (K) layer by a lidar which has Na and K channel simultaneously at the South Hemisphere site, São José dos Campos (23.1°S, 45.9°W). Measurements reported here were conducted on two nights with 3.5 and 8 h of observations in November 2016. On 20 November 2016, sporadic layers in both Na and K layer occurred above 100 km, and the higher layers corresponded well with sporadic E (Es) layer. And the density of Na at 100-105 km is higher than that at main layer around 90 km, but K density around 100 km is at least 3 times smaller compared with the K density around 90 km for the similar period. On 21 November 2016, both sporadic layers occurred in main layer height with obvious descending variations with time, which seems like tidal induced. Notably, the peak K/Na ratio slowly increased with time. And Na layer and K layer showed different processes along with time with K density reaching its maximum 1 h later than that of Na. Correlations of Na/K density, Es, and winds were also discussed.

  10. Morphological study of the field-aligned E-layer irregularities observed by the Gadanki VHF radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Pan

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available We report on the field-aligned irregularities observed in the low-latitude sporadic E-layer (Es with the Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E; geomagnetic latitude 6.3° N VHF radar. The radar was operated intermittently for 15 days during the summer months in 1998 and 1999, for both daytime and nighttime observation. The total observation periods are 161h for the nighttime and 68h for the daytime. The observations were used to study the percentage of occurrence of the E-region echoes for both daytime and nighttime. The statistical characteristics of the mean radial velocity and spectral width are presented for three cases based on the echo occurrence characteristics and the altitude of observations (from 90 to 140km ranges, namely, the lower E-region daytime (90-110km, the lower E-region nighttime (90-105km and the upper E-region nighttime (105-140km echoes. The results are compared with that of Piura, a low-latitude station located at about the same geomagnetic latitude, but to the south of the equator. By comparing the behaviors of the lower E-region radar echoes of the summer months between Gadanki and Piura, we find that the lower altitude echoes below about 100km are rarely reported in Piura but commonly seen in Gadanki. Features of the nighttime echoes observed by these two radars are quite similar but daytime FAI echoes are again seldom detected by Piura.

  11. Characteristics of the magnetospheric boundary layer and magnetopause layer as observed by Imp 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastman, T.E.; Hones, E.W. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Imp 6 observations of the low-latitude magnetospheric boundary layer indicate that the plasma within it is supplied primarily by direct entry of magnetosheath plasma across the magnetopause layer. We define the magnetopause layer as the current layer (separating the magnetosheath from the boundary layer) through which the magnetic field shifts in direction. High temporal resolution (3-s average) data reveal that in a majority of Imp 6 magnetopause crossing, no distinct changes in electron density or energry spectra are observed at the magne opause layer. In all Imp 6 crossings, some magnetosheathlike plasma is observed earthward of the magnetopause layer, implying the existence of a boundary layer. Boundary layer electron energy spectra are often virtually indistinguishable from the adjacent magnetosheath spectra. Low-latitude boundary layer bulk plasma flow as observed by Imp 6 almost always has an antisunward component and often has a significant cross-field component. The boundary layer thickness is highly variable and is generally much larger than the magnetopause layer thickness. Energetic electron pitch angle distributions indicate that the low-latitude boundary layers is normally on closed field lines. We conclude that diffusive as well as nondiffusive processes probably contribute to the entry of magnetosheath plasma into the boundary layer

  12. Atmospheric aerosol layers over Bangkok Metropolitan Region from CALIPSO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridhikitti, Arika

    2013-06-01

    Previous studies suggested that aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Earth Observing System satellite retrievals could be used for inference of ground-level air quality in various locations. This application may be appropriate if pollution in elevated atmospheric layers is insignificant. This study investigated the significance of elevated air pollution layers over the Bangkok Metropolitan Region (BMR) from all available aerosol layer scenes taken from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) for years 2007 to 2011. The results show that biomass burning smoke layers alone were the most frequently observed. The smoke layers accounted for high AOD variations and increased AOD levels. In the dry seasons, the smoke layers alone with high AOD levels were likely brought to the BMR via northeasterly to easterly prevailing winds and found at altitudes above the typical BMR mixing heights of approximately 0.7 to 1.5 km. The smoke should be attributed to biomass burning emissions outside the BMR.

  13. A statistical study of sporadic sodium layer observed by Sodium lidar at Hefei (31.8° N, 117.3° E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-K. Dou

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sodium lidar observations of sporadic sodium layers (SSLs during the past 3 years at a mid-latitude location (Hefei, China, 31.8° N, 117.3° E are reported in this paper. From 64 SSL events detected in about 900 h of observation, an SSL occurrence rate of 1 event every 14 h at our location was obtained. This result, combined with previous studies, reveals that the SSL occurrence can be relatively frequent at some mid-latitude locations. Statistical analysis of main parameters for the 64 SSL events was performed. By examining the corresponding data from an ionosonde, a considerable correlation was found with a Pearson coefficient of 0.66 between seasonal variations of SSL and those of sporadic E (Es during nighttime, which was in line with the research by Nagasawa and Abo (1995. From comparison between observations from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC lidar and from Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics (WIPM lidar (Wuhan, China, 31° N, 114° E, the minimum horizontal range for some events was estimated to be over 500 km.

  14. Observations of propagating double layers in a high current discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindberg, L.

    1988-01-01

    Observations of current disruptions and strong electric fields along the magnetic field in a high-density (2 x 10 19 m - 3 , highly-ionized, moving, and expanding plasma column are reported. The electric field is interpreted in terms of propagating, strong electric double layers (3-5kV). An initial plasma column is formed in an axial magnetic field (0.1T) by means of a conical theta-pinch plasma gun. When an axial current (max 5kA, 3-5 kV) is drawn through the column spontaneous disruptions and double-layer formation occur within a few microseconds. Floating, secondary emitting Langmuir probes are used. They often indicate very high positive potential peaks (1-2 kV above the anode potential during a few μs) in the plasma on the positive side of the double layer. Short, intense bursts of HF radiation are detected at the disruptions

  15. Observations of Flaking of Co-deposited Layers in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; Skinner, C.H.; Young, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    Flaking of co-deposited layers in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has been observed after the termination of plasma operations. This unexpected flaking affects approximately 15% of the tiles and appears on isotropic graphite tiles but not on carbon fiber composite tiles. Samples of tiles, flakes and dust were recently collected from the inside of the vacuum vessel and will be analyzed to better characterize the behavior of tritium on plasma facing components in DT fusion devices

  16. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.

    2013-09-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.; Farrar, J. T.; Weller, R. A.

    2013-01-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves observed in the plasma depletion layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, B. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Murr, D.

    1991-01-01

    Observations from AMPTE/CCE in the earth's magnetosheath on October 5, 1984 are presented to illustrate 0.1 - 4.0 Hz magnetic field pulsations in the subsolar plasma depletion layer (PDL) for northward sheath field during a magnetospheric compression. The PDL is unambiguously identified by comparing CCE data with data from IRM in the upstream solar wind. Pulsations in the PDL are dominated by transverse waves with F/F(H+) 1.0 or less and a slot in spectral power at F/F(H+) = 0.5. The upper branch is left hand polarized while the lower branch is linearly polarized. In the sheath the proton temperature anisotropy is about 0.6 but it is about 1.7 in the PDL during wave occurrence. The properties and correlation of waves with increased anisotropy indicate that they are electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves.

  19. Initializing a Mesoscale Boundary-Layer Model with Radiosonde Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berri, Guillermo J.; Bertossa, Germán

    2018-01-01

    A mesoscale boundary-layer model is used to simulate low-level regional wind fields over the La Plata River of South America, a region characterized by a strong daily cycle of land-river surface-temperature contrast and low-level circulations of sea-land breeze type. The initial and boundary conditions are defined from a limited number of local observations and the upper boundary condition is taken from the only radiosonde observations available in the region. The study considers 14 different upper boundary conditions defined from the radiosonde data at standard levels, significant levels, level of the inversion base and interpolated levels at fixed heights, all of them within the first 1500 m. The period of analysis is 1994-2008 during which eight daily observations from 13 weather stations of the region are used to validate the 24-h surface-wind forecast. The model errors are defined as the root-mean-square of relative error in wind-direction frequency distribution and mean wind speed per wind sector. Wind-direction errors are greater than wind-speed errors and show significant dispersion among the different upper boundary conditions, not present in wind speed, revealing a sensitivity to the initialization method. The wind-direction errors show a well-defined daily cycle, not evident in wind speed, with the minimum at noon and the maximum at dusk, but no systematic deterioration with time. The errors grow with the height of the upper boundary condition level, in particular wind direction, and double the errors obtained when the upper boundary condition is defined from the lower levels. The conclusion is that defining the model upper boundary condition from radiosonde data closer to the ground minimizes the low-level wind-field errors throughout the region.

  20. STS-39 Earth observation of Earth's limb at sunset shows atmospheric layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-39 Earth observation taken aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, shows the Earth's limb at sunset with numerous atmospheric scattering layers highlighted. The layers consist of fine particles suspended in very stable layers of the atmosphere. The layers act as a prism for the sunlight.

  1. Observations on the scattering layers over the continental shelf off Konkan coast (India)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RamaRaju, V.S.

    The echograms obtained by R.V. "varuna" using asdic during the September, 1963 cruise are analysed. Scattering layers observed over the shelf area, off Ratnagiri, are examined and studied in relation to the thermocline layer present. Comparison...

  2. Some observations on simulated molten debris-coolant layer dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene, G.A.; Klein, J.; Klages, J.; Schwarz, E.; Sanborn, Y.

    1983-04-01

    Experiments are being performed to investigate high temperature liquid-liquid film boiling between a pool of liquid metal and an overlying coolant pool of R-11 or water. Film boiling has been observed to be stable for R-11; however, considerable liquid-liquid contact has been observed with water well beyond the minimum film boiling temperature. Unstable liquid-liquid film boiling of water has been observed to escalate into dispersive, non-energetic vapor explosions when the interface contact temperature exceeded the spontaneous nucleation temperature. Other parametric trends in the data are discussed

  3. Midlatitude ionospheric F2-layer response to eruptive solar events-caused geomagnetic disturbances over Hungary during the maximum of the solar cycle 24: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berényi, K. A.; Barta, V.; Kis, Á.

    2018-03-01

    In our study we analyze and compare the response and behavior of the ionospheric F2 and of the sporadic E-layer during three strong (i.e., Dst art digital ionosonde of the Széchenyi István Geophysical Observatory located at midlatitude, Nagycenk, Hungary (IAGA code: NCK, geomagnetic latitude: 46.17° geomagnetic longitude: 98.85°). The local time of the sudden commencement (SC) was used to characterize the type of the ionospheric storm (after Mendillo and Narvaez, 2010). This way two regular positive phase (RPP) ionospheric storms and one no-positive phase (NPP) storm have been analyzed. In all three cases a significant increase in electron density of the foF2 layer can be observed at dawn/early morning (around 6:00 UT, 07:00 LT). Also we can observe the fade-out of the ionospheric layers at night during the geomagnetically disturbed time periods. Our results suggest that the fade-out effect is not connected to the occurrence of the sporadic E-layers.

  4. Boundary layer transition observations on a body of revolution with surface heating and cooling in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, V. H.

    1980-04-01

    Boundary layer flow visualization in water with surface heat transfer was carried out on a body of revolution which had the predicted possibility of laminar separation under isothermal conditions. Flow visualization was by in-line holographic technique. Boundary layer stabilization, including elimination of laminar separation, was observed to take place on surface heating. Conversely, boundary layer destabilization was observed on surface cooling. These findings are consistent with the theoretical predictions of Wazzan et al. (1970).

  5. Benthic boundary layer. IOS observational and modelling programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, P.M.; Richards, K.J.

    1985-01-01

    Near bottom currents, measured at three sites in the N.E. Atlantic, reveal the eddying characteristics of the flow. Eddies develop, migrate and decay in ways best revealed by numerical modelling simulations. Eddies control the thickness of the bottom mixed layer by accumulating and thickening or spreading and thinning the bottom waters. At the boundaries of eddies benthic fronts form providing a path for upward displacement of the bottom water. An experiment designed to estimate vertical diffusivity is performed. The flux of heat into the bottom of the Iberian basin through Discovery Gap is deduced from year long current measurements. The flux is supposed balanced by geothermal heating through the sea floor and diapycnal diffusion in the water. A diffusivity of 1.5 to 4 cm 2 s -1 is derived for the bottom few hundred meters of the deep ocean. Experiments to estimate horizontal diffusivity are described. If a tracer is discharged from the sea bed the volume of sea water in which it is found increases with time and after 20 years will fill an ocean basin of side 1000 km to a depth of only 1 to 2 km. (author)

  6. Ion Demagnetization in the Magnetopause Current Layer Observed by MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shan; Chen, Li-Jen; Hesse, Michael; Gershman, Daniel J.; Dorelli, John; Giles, Barbara; Torbert, Roy B.; Pollock, Craig J.; Lavraud, Benoit; Strangeway, Robert; hide

    2016-01-01

    We report ion velocity distribution functions (VDfs) observed by Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) and present evidence for demagnetized ion Speiser motion during magnetopause reconnection. The demagnetization is observed in the vicinity of the X llne, as well as near the current sheet midlplane about tens of ion skin depths (d(sub 1)) away from the X line. Close to the X line before the outflow is built up, the VDFs are elongated, and the elongated part of VDFs rotates from the out-of-plane current direction toward the outflow directions downstream from the X line. Farther downstream, demagnetized ions exhibit a characteristic half-ring structure in the VDFs, as a result of the mixture of ions that have experienced different amounts of cyclotron turning around the magnetic field normal to the current sheet. Signatures of acceleration by electric fields are more pronounced in the VDFs near the X line than downstream.

  7. Signature of transient boundary layer processes observed with Viking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woch, J.; Lundin, R.

    1992-01-01

    Transient penetration of plasma with magnetosheath origin is frequently observed with the hot plasma experiment on board the Viking satellite at auroral latitudes in the dayside magnetosphere. The injected magnetosheath ions exhibit a characteristic pitch angle/energy dispersion pattern earlier reported for solar wind ions accessing the magnetosphere in the cusp regions. In contrast to the continuous plasma entry in the cusp, the events discussed here show temporal features which suggest a connection to transient processes at or in the vicinity of the magnetospheric boundary. A single event study confirms previously published observations that the injected ions flow essentially tailward with a velocity comparable to the magnetosheath flow and that the energy spectra inferred for the source population resemble magnetosheath spectra. Based on a statistical study, it is found that these events are predominantly observed around 0800 and 1600 MLT, in a region populated by both rung current/plasma sheet particles and by particles whose source is the magnetosheath plasma. Magnetic field line tracing based on the Tsyganenko magnetic field model yields a scatter of the source locations around the mid-latitude region of the magnetospheric boundary. The probability for these events to occur is highest when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is confined to the ecliptic plane. The connection of the events to transient impulsive solar wind/magnetosphere interaction processes, such as transient reconnection (FTE), impulsive plasma transfer, Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities, and solar wind pressure pulses, is discussed. A relation with transient reconnection can be excluded

  8. UAV-borne coherent doppler lidar for marine atmospheric boundary layer observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Songhua; Wang, Qichao; Liu, Bingyi; Liu, Jintao; Zhang, Kailin; Song, Xiaoquan

    2018-04-01

    A compact UAV-borne Coherent Doppler Lidar (UCDL) has been developed at the Ocean University of China for the observation of wind profile and boundary layer structure in Marine Atmospheric Boundary Layer (MABL). The design, specifications and motion-correction methodology of the UCDL are presented. Preliminary results of the first flight campaign in Hailing Island in December 2016 is discussed.

  9. Coherent structures in the Es layer and neutral middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mošna, Zbyšek; Knížová, Petra Koucká; Potužníková, Kateřina

    2015-12-01

    The present paper shows results from the summer campaign performed during geomagnetically quiet period from June 1 to August 31, 2009. Within time-series of stratospheric and mesospheric temperatures at pressure levels 10-0.1 hPa, mesospheric winds measured in Collm, Germany, and the sporadic E-layer parameters foEs and hEs measured at the Pruhonice station we detected specific coherent wave-bursts in planetary wave domain. Permanent wave-like activity is observed in all analyzed data sets. However, the number of wave-like structures persistent in large range of height from the stratosphere to lower ionosphere is limited. The only coherent modes that are detected on consequent levels of the atmosphere are those corresponding to eigenmodes of planetary waves.

  10. Observations and model calculations of an additional layer in the topside ionosphere above Fortaleza, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jenkins

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available Calculations using the Sheffield University plasmasphere ionosphere model have shown that under certain conditions an additional layer can form in the low latitude topside ionosphere. This layer (the F3 layer has subsequently been observed in ionograms recorded at Fortaleza in Brazil. It has not been observed in ionograms recorded at the neighbouring station São Luis. Model calculations have shown that the F3 layer is most likely to form in summer at Fortaleza due to a combination of the neutral wind and the E×B drift acting to raise the plasma. At the location of São Luis, almost on the geomagnetic equator, the neutral wind has a smaller vertical component so the F3 layer does not form.

  11. Remote Sensing Observations and Numerical Simulation for Martian Layered Ejecta Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Yue, Z.; Zhang, C.; Li, D.

    2018-04-01

    To understand past Martian climates, it is important to know the distribution and nature of water ice on Mars. Impact craters are widely used ubiquitous indicators for the presence of subsurface water or ice on Mars. Remote sensing observations and numerical simulation are powerful tools for investigating morphological and topographic features on planetary surfaces, and we can use the morphology of layered ejecta craters and hydrocode modeling to constrain possible layering and impact environments. The approach of this work consists of three stages. Firstly, the morphological characteristics of the Martian layered ejecta craters are performed based on Martian images and DEM data. Secondly, numerical modeling layered ejecta are performed through the hydrocode iSALE (impact-SALE). We present hydrocode modeling of impacts onto targets with a single icy layer within an otherwise uniform basalt crust to quantify the effects of subsurface H2O on observable layered ejecta morphologies. The model setup is based on a layered target made up of a regolithic layer (described by the basalt ANEOS), on top an ice layer (described by ANEOS equation of H2O ice), in turn on top of an underlying basaltic crust. The bolide is a 0.8 km diameter basaltic asteroid hitting the Martian surface vertically at a velocity of 12.8 km/s. Finally, the numerical results are compared with the MOLA DEM profile in order to analyze the formation mechanism of Martian layered ejecta craters. Our simulations suggest that the presence of an icy layer significantly modifies the cratering mechanics, and many of the unusual features of SLE craters may be explained by the presence of icy layers. Impact cratering on icy satellites is significantly affected by the presence of subsurface H2O.

  12. Multistation digisonde observations of equatorial spread F in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Reinisch

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Directional ionogram and F-region drift observations were conducted at seven digisonde stations in South America during the COPEX campaign from October to December 2002. Five stations in Brazil, one in Argentina, and one in Peru, monitored the ionosphere across the continent to study the onset and development of F-region density depletions that cause equatorial spread F (ESF. New ionosonde techniques quantitatively describe the prereversal uplifting of the F layer at the magnetic equator and the eastward motion of the depletions over the stations. Three of the Brazilian stations were located along a field line with a 350-km apex over the equator to investigate the relation of the occurrence of ESF and the presence of sporadic E-layers at the two E-region intersections of the field line. No simple correlation was found.

  13. Observations of the atmospheric boundary layer height over Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: Investigating boundary layer climatology in arid regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzooqi, Mohamed Al; Basha, Ghouse; Ouarda, Taha B. M. J.; Armstrong, Peter; Molini, Annalisa

    2014-05-01

    Strong sensible heat fluxes and deep turbulent mixing - together with marked dustiness and a low substrate water content - represent a characteristic signature in the boundary layer over hot deserts, resulting in "thicker" mixing layers and peculiar optical properties. Beside these main features however, desert ABLs present extremely complex local structures that have been scarcely addressed in the literature, and whose understanding is essential in modeling processes such as the transport of dust and pollutants, and turbulent fluxes of momentum, heat and water vapor in hyper-arid regions. In this study, we analyze a continuous record of observations of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) height from a single lens LiDAR ceilometer operated at Masdar Institute Field Station (24.4oN, 54.6o E, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates), starting March 2013. We compare different methods for the estimation of the ABL height from Ceilometer data such as, classic variance-, gradient-, log gradient- and second derivation-methods as well as recently developed techniques such as the Bayesian Method and Wavelet covariance transform. Our goal is to select the most suited technique for describing the climatology of the ABL in desert environments. Comparison of our results with radiosonde observations collected at the nearby airport of Abu Dhabi indicate that the WCT and the Bayesian method are the most suitable tools to accurately identify the ABL height in all weather conditions. These two methods are used for the definition of diurnal and seasonal climatologies of the boundary layer conditional to different atmospheric stability classes.

  14. Double-layer structure in polar mesospheric clouds observed from SOFIE/AIM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Gao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Double-layer structures in polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs are observed by using Solar Occultation for Ice Experiment (SOFIE data between 2007 and 2014. We find 816 and 301 events of double-layer structure with percentages of 10.32 and 7.25 % compared to total PMC events, and the mean distances between two peaks are 3.06 and 2.73 km for the Northern Hemisphere (NH and Southern Hemisphere (SH respectively. Double-layer PMCs almost always have less mean ice water content (IWC than daily IWC during the core of the season, but they are close to each other at the beginning and the end. The result by averaging over all events shows that the particle concentration has obvious double peaks, while the particle radius exhibits an unexpected monotonic increase with decreasing altitude. By further analysis of the background temperature and water vapour residual profiles, we conclude that the lower layer is a reproduced one formed at the bottom of the upper layer. 56.00 and 47.51 % of all double-layer events for the NH and SH respectively have temperature enhancements larger than 2 K locating between their double peaks. The longitudinal anti-correlation between the gravity waves' (GWs' potential energies and occurrence frequencies of double-layer PMCs suggests that the double-layer PMCs tend to form in an environment where the GWs have weaker intensities.

  15. Observation of negative potential depression on double layer during a phase of current disruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, H.; Matsuo, K.; Yagura, S.

    1984-01-01

    The negative potential depression with a depth of approximately electron temperature is observed on the low potential tail of the double layer just at the moment when the electron current passing through the layer is disrupted. The depression is confirmed to serve as an electron thermal barrier and form an ion hole from phase-space measurements of electrons and ions, respectively. The depth of the depression becomes maximum when the density around the depression becomes most inhomogeneous. (author)

  16. Intermediate layer observed by the impedance probe on board the S-310-3 sounding rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Y; Obayashi, T [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Space and Aeronautical Science

    1977-08-01

    The intermediate layer (or M layer) was detected at the height of 150-170 km in the nighttime ionospheric electron density profile measured by impedance probe on board the S-310-3 sounding rocket. This M layer was interpreted to be generated by the convergence effect of the ionization due to the west-east component of the solar tidal wind as suggested by K.Fujitaka. The altitude variation of the M layer during the course of a night is studied at three other locations with different latitudes. At Boulder (40/sup 0/N, 105/sup 0/W) and Wallops Island (38/sup 0/N, 75/sup 0/W) which have higher latitude than that of KSC(31/sup 0/N, 131/sup 0/E), the altitude of the observed M layers seems to be determined by the north-south component of the wind above about 150 km, by the west-east component of the wind below about 130 km in agreement with the drift theory. The altitude of the observed M layers at Arecibo (19/sup 0/N, 67/sup 0/W) located at lower latitude than that of KSC also coincides with the theoretical estimate when the direction of the north-south wind is assumed to be opposite to that prevailing in middle latitudes. Thus, M layer observations at these stations are consistent with the view that around the latitude range of KSC the north-south wind reverses direction and the west-east component of the wind has the dominant effect on the formation of the M layer.

  17. The intermediate layers and associated tidal motions observed by a digisonde in the equatorial anomaly region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Lee

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available This investigation presents an initial attempt to analyze a full year of daily ionosonde observations relevant to the determination of plasma densities, tidal structures, and ion transports in the equatorial anomaly region of the lower ionosphere. Particular focus is on the intermediate layers, their seasonal and diurnal variations, and cause-effect relationships. The ionogram database was recorded using a digisonde portable sounder (DPS at National Central University (NCU, 24 °58' N, 121°11' E during 1996. Statistical results indicate that the intermediate layers appear primarily during the daytime of the spring/winter months. The monthly median height characteristics reveal that the layers descend from high to low altitudes and different tidal motions control the layers in different months. Generally, the semi-diurnal and quarter-diurnal tides, which cause ionization convergence, are mainly in the spring/winter and summer/autumn months, respectively. Variations in the electron densities of the layers also indicate that the density increases could result from a great number of molecular and metallic ions. Furthermore, a novel approach to ionogram presentation is introduced to investigate the intermediate layers. This approach allows the DPS to characterize the detailed daily information of the intermediate layers.Key words. Ionosphere (equatorial ionosphere; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; ionospheric irregularities

  18. Observation of anisotropic interlayer Raman modes in few-layer ReS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagler, Philipp; Plechinger, Gerd; Schueller, Christian; Korn, Tobias [Institut fuer Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, 93040, Regensburg (Germany)

    2016-02-15

    ReS{sub 2} has recently emerged as a new member in the rapidly growing family of two-dimensional materials. Unlike MoS{sub 2} or WSe{sub 2}, the optical and electrical properties of ReS{sub 2} are not isotropic due to the reduced symmetry of the crystal. Here, we present layer-dependent Raman measurements of ReS{sub 2} samples ranging from monolayers to ten layers in the ultralow frequency regime. We observe layer breathing and shear modes which allow for easy assignment of the number of layers. Polarization-dependent measurements give further insight into the crystal structure and reveal an energetic shift of the shear mode which stems from the in-plane anisotropy of the shear modulus in this material. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. An observational study of the evolution of the atmospheric boundary-layer over Cabo Frio, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. H. Franchito

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of coastal upwelling on the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL in Cabo Frio (Brazil is investigated. For this purpose, radiosounding data collected in two experiments made during the austral summer (upwelling case and austral winter (no upwelling case are analysed. The results show that during the austral summer, cold waters that crop up near the Cabo Frio coast favour the formation of an atmospheric stable layer, which persists during the upwelling episode. Due to the low SSTs, the descending branch of the sea-breeze circulation is located close to the coast, inhibiting the development of a mixed layer mainly during the day. At night, with the reduction of the land-sea thermal contrast the descending motion is weaker, allowing a vertical mixing. The stable ABL favours the formation of a low level jet, which may also contribute to the development of a nocturnal atmospheric mixed layer. During the austral winter, due to the higher SSTs observed near the coast, the ABL is less stable compared with that in the austral summer. Due to warming, a mixed layer is observed during the day. The observed vertical profiles of the zonal winds show that the easterlies at low levels are stronger in the austral summer, indicating that the upwelling modulates the sea-breeze signal, thus confirming model simulations.

  20. Cluster observations of bounday layer structure and a flux transfer event near the cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Fear

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available On the 25th January 2002 between 10:00 and 12:00 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft passed through the northern high-latitude cusp, the dayside magnetosphere and into the magnetosheath in a linear formation. In the magnetosphere the PEACE electron spectrometers on the four spacecraft all observed a series of transient bursts of magnetosheath-like plasma, but without bipolar magnetic signatures in the magnetopause normal component as might be expected if the plasma had been injected by transient reconnection (flux transfer events – FTEs. Reordering the data using the magnetopause transition parameter reveals that these plasma observations, the related variations in the magnetic field and the balance of magnetic and thermal gas pressures are consistent with transient entries into a stable high-latitude boundary layer structure. However, once some of the spacecraft entered the magnetosheath, FTE signatures were observed outside the magnetopause at the same time as some of the boundary layer entries occurred at the other spacecraft inside. Thus, (a the lack of a bipolar BN signature is inconsistent with the traditional picture of a magnetospheric FTE, and (b the cause of the observed entry of the spacecraft into the boundary layer (pressure pulse or passing magnetosheath FTE can only be determined by spacecraft observations in the magnetosheath. Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and bondary layers; Solar wind- magnetosphere interactions; Magnetosheath

  1. Cluster observations of bounday layer structure and a flux transfer event near the cusp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Fear

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available On the 25th January 2002 between 10:00 and 12:00 UT, the four Cluster spacecraft passed through the northern high-latitude cusp, the dayside magnetosphere and into the magnetosheath in a linear formation. In the magnetosphere the PEACE electron spectrometers on the four spacecraft all observed a series of transient bursts of magnetosheath-like plasma, but without bipolar magnetic signatures in the magnetopause normal component as might be expected if the plasma had been injected by transient reconnection (flux transfer events – FTEs. Reordering the data using the magnetopause transition parameter reveals that these plasma observations, the related variations in the magnetic field and the balance of magnetic and thermal gas pressures are consistent with transient entries into a stable high-latitude boundary layer structure. However, once some of the spacecraft entered the magnetosheath, FTE signatures were observed outside the magnetopause at the same time as some of the boundary layer entries occurred at the other spacecraft inside. Thus, (a the lack of a bipolar BN signature is inconsistent with the traditional picture of a magnetospheric FTE, and (b the cause of the observed entry of the spacecraft into the boundary layer (pressure pulse or passing magnetosheath FTE can only be determined by spacecraft observations in the magnetosheath.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Magnetopause, cusp and bondary layers; Solar wind- magnetosphere interactions; Magnetosheath

  2. Tracking atmospheric boundary layer dynamics with water vapor D-excess observations

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    Stable isotope water vapor observations present a history of hydrological processes that have impacted on an air mass. Consequently, there is scope to improve our knowledge of how different processes impact on humidity budgets by determining the isotopic end members of these processes and combining them with in-situ water vapor measurements. These in-situ datasets are still rare and cover a limited geographical expanse, so expanding the available data can improve our ability to define isotopic end members and knowledge about atmospheric humidity dynamics. Using data collected from an intensive field campaign across a semi-arid grassland site in eastern Australia, we combine multiple methods including in-situ stable isotope observations to study humidity dynamics associated with the growth and decay of the atmospheric boundary layer and the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The deuterium-excess (D-excess) in water vapor is traditionally thought to reflect the sea surface temperature and relative humidity at the point of evaporation over the oceans. However, a number of recent studies suggest that land-atmosphere interactions are also important in setting the D-excess of water vapor. These studies have shown a highly robust diurnal cycle for the D-excess over a range of sites that could be exploited to better understand variations in atmospheric humidity associated with boundary layer dynamics. In this study we use surface radon concentrations as a tracer of surface layer dynamics and combine these with the D-excess observations. The radon concentrations showed an overall trend that was inversely proportional to the D-excess, with early morning entrainment of air from the residual layer of the previous day both diluting the radon concentration and increasing the D-excess, followed by accumulation of radon at the surface and a decrease in the D-excess as the stable nocturnal layer developed in the late afternoon and early evening. The stable nocturnal boundary layer

  3. Observed seasonal variability of barrier layer in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Rao, R.R.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Reddy, G.V.; Revichandran, C.

    The observed formation of Barrier Layer (BL) and the seasonal variability of BL thickness (BLT) in the Bay of Bengal are examined utilizing the most comprehensive data set. Thick BL (~50m) first appears in the coastal region of the northeastern bay...

  4. The atmospheric boundary layer in the CSIRO global climate model: simulations versus observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, J. R.; Rotstayn, L. D.; Krummel, P. B.

    2002-07-01

    A 5-year simulation of the atmospheric boundary layer in the CSIRO global climate model (GCM) is compared with detailed boundary-layer observations at six locations, two over the ocean and four over land. Field observations, in the form of surface fluxes and vertical profiles of wind, temperature and humidity, are generally available for each hour over periods of one month or more in a single year. GCM simulations are for specific months corresponding to the field observations, for each of five years. At three of the four land sites (two in Australia, one in south-eastern France), modelled rainfall was close to the observed climatological values, but was significantly in deficit at the fourth (Kansas, USA). Observed rainfall during the field expeditions was close to climatology at all four sites. At the Kansas site, modelled screen temperatures (Tsc), diurnal temperature amplitude and sensible heat flux (H) were significantly higher than observed, with modelled evaporation (E) much lower. At the other three land sites, there is excellent correspondence between the diurnal amplitude and phase and absolute values of each variable (Tsc, H, E). Mean monthly vertical profiles for specific times of the day show strong similarities: over land and ocean in vertical shape and absolute values of variables, and in the mixed-layer and nocturnal-inversion depths (over land) and the height of the elevated inversion or height of the cloud layer (over the sea). Of special interest is the presence climatologically of early morning humidity inversions related to dewfall and of nocturnal low-level jets; such features are found in the GCM simulations. The observed day-to-day variability in vertical structure is captured well in the model for most sites, including, over a whole month, the temperature range at all levels in the boundary layer, and the mix of shallow and deep mixed layers. Weaknesses or unrealistic structure include the following, (a) unrealistic model mixed-layer

  5. Effects of mid-latitude ionosphere observed from ground-based ionosonde data obtained at Alma-Ata station during strong geomagnetic storms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordienko, G.I.; Vodynnikov, V.V.; Yakovets, A.E.

    2006-01-01

    The ionospheric effects of fourteen great geomagnetic storms occurred in the 1986-2005 time period observed over Alma-Ata (43.25 N , 76.92 E ) were studied experimentally using ground-based ionosonde. The observations showed a number of unusual (for the Alma-Ata location) ionospheric phenomena during the active phase of geomagnetic storms, along with a negative phase in the ionospheric F2-layer disturbance an anomalous formation of the E, E2, and F1 layers at nighttime, and the appearance of aurora-type sporadic E layers were found. Processes of interaction of energetic neutrals with the upper atmosphere modeled by Bauske et al. (1997) for magnetically distributed condition seem to explain the phenomena of ionization of F1 and E region at night. (author)

  6. Observational study of atmospheric surface layer and coastal weather in northern Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Dhrubajyoti; Sadr, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Atmospheric surface layer is the interaction medium between atmosphere and Earth's surface. Better understanding of its turbulence nature is essential in characterizing the local weather, climate variability and modeling of turbulent exchange processes. The importance of Middle East region, with its unique geographical, economical and weather condition is well recognized. However, high quality micrometeorological observational studies are rare in this region. Here we show experimental results from micrometeorological observations from an experimental site in the coastal region of Qatar during August-December 2015. Measurements of winds are obtained from three sonic anemometers installed on a 9 m tower placed at Al Ghariyah beach in northern Qatar (26.08 °N, 51.36 °E). Different surface layer characteristics is analyzed and compared with earlier studies in equivalent weather conditions. Monthly statistics of wind speed, wind direction, temperature, humidity and heat index are made from concurrent observations from sonic anemometer and weather station to explore variations with surface layer characteristics. The results also highlights potential impact of sea breeze circulation on local weather and atmospheric turbulence. The observed daily maximum temperature and heat index during morning period may be related to sea breeze circulations. Along with the operational micrometeorological observation system, a camera system and ultrasonic wave measurement system are installed recently in the site to study coastline development and nearshore wave dynamics. Overall, the complete observational set up is going to provide new insights about nearshore wind dynamics and wind-wave interaction in Qatar.

  7. The vertical structure of the Saharan boundary layer: Observations and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Carreras, L.; Parker, D. J.; Marsham, J. H.; Rosenberg, P.; Marenco, F.; Mcquaid, J.

    2012-04-01

    The vertical structure of the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL) is investigated with the use of aircraft data from the Fennec observational campaign, and high-resolution large-eddy model (LEM) simulations. The SABL is one of the deepest on Earth, and crucial in controlling the vertical redistribution and long-range transport of dust in the Sahara. The SABL is typically made up of an actively growing convective region driven by high sensible heating at the surface, with a deep, near-neutrally stratified Saharan residual layer (SRL) above it, which is mostly well mixed in humidity and temperature and reaches a height of ~500hPa. These two layers are usually separated by a weak (≤1K) temperature inversion, making the vertical structure very sensitive to the surface fluxes. Large-eddy model (LEM) simulations initialized with radiosonde data from Bordj Bardji Mokhtar (BBM), southern Algeria, are used to improve our understanding of the turbulence structure of the stratification of the SABL, and any mixing or exchanges between the different layers. The model can reproduce the typical SABL structure from observations, and a tracer is used to illustrate the growth of the convective boundary layer into the residual layer above. The heat fluxes show a deep entrainment zone between the convective region and the SRL, potentially enhanced by the combination of a weak lid and a neutral layer above. The horizontal variability in the depth of the convective layer was also significant even with homogeneous surface fluxes. Aircraft observations from a number of flights are used to validate the model results, and to highlight the variability present in a more realistic setting, where conditions are rarely homogeneous in space. Stacked legs were performed to get an estimate of the mean flux profile of the boundary layer, as well as the variations in the vertical structure of the SABL with heterogeneous atmospheric and surface conditions. Regular radiosondes from BBM put

  8. Inhomogeneous structure of ionospheric emission layers according to photographic observations at the Salyut-7 orbital station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platov, Yu.V.; Vanyarkha, N.Ya.; Vanyarkha, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    Shape of brightness vertical profile for the ionospheric emission layers, observed near the night horizon from space vehicles, depends essentially on structure of luminescence regions. Brightness profiles, obtained from photometry of the first emission layer photons at ∼ 100 km heights, are compared with calculated ones for model distribution of the excited atom concentration to determine typical dimensions of heterogeneities. Luminescence region in the used model was represented by symmetric spot with concentration exponentially decreasing in horizontal direction and with vertical distribution of concentration characterized by rather abrupt maximum at ∼ 10 km height

  9. Modeling the Observed Microwave Emission from Shallow Multi-Layer Tundra Snow Using DMRT-ML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nastaran Saberi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The observed brightness temperatures (Tb at 37 GHz from typical moderate density dry snow in mid-latitudes decreases with increasing snow water equivalent (SWE due to volume scattering of the ground emissions by the overlying snow. At a certain point, however, as SWE increases, the emission from the snowpack offsets the scattering of the sub-nivean emission. In tundra snow, the Tb slope reversal occurs at shallower snow thicknesses. While it has been postulated that the inflection point in the seasonal time series of observed Tb V 37 GHz of tundra snow is controlled by the formation of a thick wind slab layer, the simulation of this effect has yet to be confirmed. Therefore, the Dense Media Radiative Transfer Theory for Multi Layered (DMRT-ML snowpack is used to predict the passive microwave response from airborne observations over shallow, dense, slab-layered tundra snow. Airborne radiometer observations coordinated with ground-based in situ snow measurements were acquired in the Canadian high Arctic near Eureka, NT, in April 2011. The DMRT-ML was parameterized with the in situ snow measurements using a two-layer snowpack and run in two configurations: a depth hoar and a wind slab dominated pack. With these two configurations, the calibrated DMRT-ML successfully predicted the Tb V 37 GHz response (R correlation of 0.83 when compared with the observed airborne Tb footprints containing snow pits measurements. Using this calibrated model, the DMRT-ML was applied to the whole study region. At the satellite observation scale, observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System (AMSR-E over the study area reflected seasonal differences between Tb V 37 GHz and Tb V 19 GHz that supports the hypothesis of the development of an early season volume scattering depth hoar layer, followed by the growth of the late season emission-dominated wind slab layer. This research highlights the necessity to consider the two

  10. The lobe to plasma sheet boundary layer transition: Theory and observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriver, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Treumann, R.; Nakamura, M.; Kistler, L.M.

    1990-01-01

    The lobe and the plasma sheet boundary layer in the Earth's magnetotail are regions of different plasma conditions and share a common interface. The transition from the lobe to the plasma sheet boundary layer is examined here using AMPTE/IRM data. When the satellite crossed from the lobe to the plasma sheet boundary layer, intense narrow banded wave bursts at 1 kHz were observed an d then broadband electrostatic noise (BEN) immediately followed. Simultaneous with the onset of BEN, high energy earthward streaming proton beams at > 40 keV (> 2,700 km/s) were detected. These results are used as input into a numerical simulation to study ion beam instabilities in the PSBL

  11. The Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer: Balloon-Borne Measurements, Satellite Observations and Modeling Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, T. D.; Vernier, J.-P.; Natarajan, M.; Deshler, Terry; Liu, H.; Wegner, T.; Baker, N.; Gadhavi, H.; Jayaraman, A.; Pandit, A.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Satellite observations and numerical modeling studies have demonstrated that the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) can provide a conduit for gas-phase pollutants in south Asia to reach the lower stratosphere. Now, observations from the CALIPSO satellite have revealed the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL), a summertime accumulation of aerosols associated with ASM anticyclone, in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS). The ATAL has potential implications for regional cloud properties, climate, and chemical processes in the UTLS. Here, we show in situ measurements from balloon-borne instrumentation, aircraft and satellite observations, combined with trajectory and chemical transport model (CTM) simulations to explore the origin, composition, physical and optical properties of aerosols in the ATAL. In particular, we show balloon-based observations from our BATAL-2015 field campaign to India and Saudi Arabia in summer 2015, including in situ backscatter measurements from COBALD instruments, and some of the first observations of size and volatility of aerosols in the ATAL layer using optical particle counters (OPCs). Back trajectory calculations initialized from CALIPSO observations point to deep convection over North India as a principal source of ATAL aerosols. Available aircraft observations suggest significant sulfur and carbonaceous contributions to the ATAL, which is supported by simulations using the GEOS-Chem CTM. Source elimination studies conducted with the GEOS-Chem indicate that 80-90% of ATAL aerosols originate from south Asian sources, in contrast with some earlier studies.

  12. Radiative Impact of Observed and Simulated Aerosol Layers Over the East Coast of North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, L. K.; Fast, J. D.; Burton, S. P.; Chand, D.; Comstock, J. M.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, J. W.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hubbe, J. M.; Kassianov, E.; Rogers, R. R.; Sedlacek, A. J., III; Shilling, J. E.; Tomlinson, J. M.; Wilson, J. M.; Zelenyuk, A.

    2014-12-01

    The vertical distribution of particles in the atmospheric column can have a large impact on the radiative forcing and cloud microphysics. A recent climatology constructed using data collected by the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations (CALIPSO) suggests elevated layers of aerosol are quite common near the North American east coast during both winter and summer. The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP), conducted from June 2012 through June 2013, was a unique study utilizing both in situ and remotely sensed measurements designed to provide a comprehensive data set that can be used to investigate science questions related to aerosol radiative forcing and the vertical distribution of aerosol. The study sampled the atmosphere at a number of altitudes within two atmospheric columns; one located near the coast of North America (over Cape Cod, MA) and a second over the Atlantic Ocean several hundred kilometers from the coast. TCAP included the yearlong deployment of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) located at the base of the Cape Cod column, as well as summer and winter aircraft intensive observation periods (IOPs) using the ARM Aerial Facility. One important finding from the TCAP summer IOP is the relatively common occurrence (during four of the six nearly cloud-free flights) of elevated aerosol layers in both the Cape Cod and maritime columns that were detected using the nadir pointing second-generation NASA Langley Research Center High-Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL-2). These elevated layers contributed up to 60% of the total observed aerosol optical depth (AOD). Many of these layers were also intercepted by the aircraft configured for in situ sampling, and the aerosol in the layers was found to have increased amounts of biomass burning material and nitrate compared to aerosol found near the surface. Both the in situ and remote sensing observations have been compared to

  13. Interactions between C and Cu atoms in single-layer graphene: direct observation and modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Emi; Hashimoto, Ayako; Kaneko, Tomoaki; Tajima, Nobuo; Ohno, Takahisa; Takeguchi, Masaki

    2016-01-07

    Metal doping into the graphene lattice has been studied recently to develop novel nanoelectronic devices and to gain an understanding of the catalytic activities of metals in nanocarbon structures. Here we report the direct observation of interactions between Cu atoms and single-layer graphene by transmission electron microscopy. We document stable configurations of Cu atoms in the graphene sheet and unique transformations of graphene promoted by Cu atoms. First-principles calculations based on density functional theory reveal a reduction of energy barrier that caused rotation of C-C bonds near Cu atoms. We discuss two driving forces, electron irradiation and in situ heating, and conclude that the observed transformations were mainly promoted by electron irradiation. Our results suggest that individual Cu atoms can promote reconstruction of single-layer graphene.

  14. Lidar observations of marine boundary-layer winds and heights: a preliminary study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2015-01-01

    the highest data availability (among the three sites) and a very good agreement with the observations of wind speed and direction from cup anemometers and vanes from the platform's tower. The wind lidar was also able to perform measurements under a winter storm where 10-s gusts were observed above 60 m s 1......Here we describe a nearly 1-yr meteorological campaign, which was carried out at the FINO3 marine research platform on the German North Sea, where a pulsed wind lidar and a ceilometer were installed besides the platform's 105-m tower and measured winds and the aerosol backscatter in the entire...... marine atmospheric boundary layer. The campaign was the last phase of a research project, in which the vertical wind profile in the atmospheric boundary layer was firstly investigated on a coastal and a semi-urban site. At FINO3 the wind lidar, which measures the wind speed up to 2000 m, shows...

  15. Multi-Instrument Observations of Prolonged Stratified Wind Layers at Iqaluit, Nunavut

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Zen; Dehghan, Armin; Gascon, Gabrielle; Joe, Paul; Hudak, David; Strawbridge, Kevin; Corriveau, Julien

    2018-02-01

    Data collected between October 2015 and May 2016 at Environment and Climate Change Canada's Iqaluit research site (64°N, 69°W) have revealed a high frequency (40% of all days for which observations were available) of stratified wind layer events that occur from near the surface up to about 7.2 km above sea level. These stratified wind layers are clearly visible as wind shifts (90 to 180°) with height in range-height indicator scans from the Doppler lidar and Ka-band radar and in wind direction profiles from the Doppler lidar and radiosonde. During these events, the vertical structure of the flow appears to be a stack of 4 to 10 layers ranging in vertical width from 0.1 to 4.4 km. The stratification events that were observed occurred predominantly (81%) during light precipitation and lasted up to 27.5 h. The integrated measurement platforms at Iqaluit permitted continuous observations of the evolution of stratification events in different meteorological conditions.

  16. Study of toughening mechanisms through the observations of crack propagation in nanostructured and layered metallic sheet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, A.Y.; Li, D.F.; Zhang, J.B.; Liu, F.; Liu, X.R.; Lu, J.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → A nanostructured and layered steel exhibits high strength and large ductility. → The excellent combination originates from a multiple interlaminar cracking. → The initiation and propagation of cracks are controlled by three aspects. → The cracks are deflected by interface and arrested by compressive residual stress. → Finally, the cracks are blunted by the graded grain size distribution. - Abstract: A layered and nanostructured (LN) 304 SS sheet was produced by combination of surface mechanical attrition treatment (SMAT) with warm co-rolling. The microstructure of LN sheet is characterized by a periodic distribution of nanocrystalline layers and micron-grained layers with a graded transition of grain size. Tensile test results show that exceptional properties of high yield strength and large elongation to fracture are achieved. A multiple interlaminar cracking was observed by scanning electron microscopy, which is induced by repeated crack initiation and propagation. The toughening mechanisms of the LN sheet are proposed to be controlling the crack propagation path by several strategies. The main cracks initiating at interface defects are arrested by large compressive residual stress, deflected by weak interface bonding and blunted by the graded grain size distribution.

  17. Observation of anomalous Stokes versus anti-Stokes ratio in MoTe2 atomic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Thomas; Chen, Shao-Yu; Xiao, Di; Ramasubramaniam, Ashwin; Yan, Jun

    We grow hexagonal molybdenum ditelluride (MoTe2), a prototypical transition metal dichalcogenide (TMDC) semiconductor, with chemical vapor transport methods and investigate its atomic layers with Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman scattering. We report observation of all six types of zone center optical phonons. Quite remarkably, the anti-Stokes Raman intensity of the low energy layer-breathing mode becomes more intense than the Stokes peak under certain experimental conditions, creating an illusion of 'negative temperature'. This effect is tunable, and can be switched from anti-Stokes enhancement to suppression by varying the excitation wavelength. We interpret this observation to be a result of resonance effects arising from the C excitons in the vicinity of the Brillouin zone center, which are robust even for multiple layers of MoTe2. The intense anti-Stokes Raman scattering provides a cooling channel for the crystal and opens up opportunities for laser cooling of atomically thin TMDC semiconductor devices. Supported by the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the National Science Foundation Center for Hierarchical Manufacturing (CMMI-1025020) and Office of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI-1433496).

  18. Magnetic domain observation of FeCo thin films fabricated by alternate monoatomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohtsuki, T., E-mail: ohtsuki@spring8.or.jp; Kotsugi, M.; Ohkochi, T. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kojima, T.; Mizuguchi, M.; Takanashi, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-01-28

    FeCo thin films are fabricated by alternate monoatomic layer deposition method on a Cu{sub 3}Au buffer layer, which in-plane lattice constant is very close to the predicted value to obtain a large magnetic anisotropy constant. The variation of the in-plane lattice constant during the deposition process is investigated by reflection high-energy electron diffraction. The magnetic domain images are also observed by a photoelectron emission microscope in order to microscopically understand the magnetic structure. As a result, element-specific magnetic domain images show that Fe and Co magnetic moments align parallel. A series of images obtained with various azimuth reveal that the FeCo thin films show fourfold in-plane magnetic anisotropy along 〈110〉 direction, and that the magnetic domain structure is composed only of 90∘ wall.

  19. Theory and observations of upward field-aligned currents at the magnetopause boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Simon; Johnson, Jay R

    2015-11-16

    The dependence of the upward field-aligned current density ( J ‖ ) at the dayside magnetopause boundary layer is well described by a simple analytic model based on a velocity shear generator. A previous observational survey confirmed that the scaling properties predicted by the analytical model are applicable between 11 and 17 MLT. We utilize the analytic model to predict field-aligned currents using solar wind and ionospheric parameters and compare with direct observations. The calculated and observed parallel currents are in excellent agreement, suggesting that the model may be useful to infer boundary layer structures. However, near noon, where velocity shear is small, the kinetic pressure gradients and thermal currents, which are not included in the model, could make a small but significant contribution to J ‖ . Excluding data from noon, our least squares fit returns log( J ‖,max_cal ) = (0.96 ± 0.04) log( J ‖_obs ) + (0.03 ± 0.01) where J ‖,max_cal = calculated J ‖,max and J ‖_obs = observed J ‖ .

  20. Observations of high droplet number concentrations in Southern Ocean boundary layer clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Chubb

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cloud physics data collected during the NSF/NCAR High-performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO campaigns provide a snapshot of unusual wintertime microphysical conditions in the boundary layer over the Southern Ocean. On 29 June 2011, the HIAPER sampled the boundary layer in a region of pre-frontal warm air advection between 58 and 48° S to the south of Tasmania. Cloud droplet number concentrations were consistent with climatological values in the northernmost profiles but were exceptionally high for wintertime in the Southern Ocean at 100–200 cm−3 in the southernmost profiles. Sub-micron (0.06  < D <  1 µm aerosol concentrations for the southern profiles were up to 400 cm−3. Analysis of back trajectories and atmospheric chemistry observations revealed that while conditions in the troposphere were more typical of a clean remote ocean airmass, there was some evidence of continental or anthropogenic influence. However, the hypothesis of long-range transport of continental aerosol fails to explain the magnitude of the aerosol and cloud droplet concentration in the boundary layer. Instead, the gale force surface winds in this case (wind speed at 167 m above sea level was  > 25 m s−1 were most likely responsible for production of sea spray aerosol which influenced the microphysical properties of the boundary layer clouds. The smaller size and higher number concentration of cloud droplets is inferred to increase the albedo of these clouds, and these conditions occur regularly, and are expected to increase in frequency, over windy parts of the Southern Ocean.

  1. Additive Routes to Action Learning: Layering Experience Shapes Engagement of the Action Observation Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Louise P; Cross, Emily S

    2015-12-01

    The way in which we perceive others in action is biased by one's prior experience with an observed action. For example, we can have auditory, visual, or motor experience with actions we observe others perform. How action experience via 1, 2, or all 3 of these modalities shapes action perception remains unclear. Here, we combine pre- and post-training functional magnetic resonance imaging measures with a dance training manipulation to address how building experience (from auditory to audiovisual to audiovisual plus motor) with a complex action shapes subsequent action perception. Results indicate that layering experience across these 3 modalities activates a number of sensorimotor cortical regions associated with the action observation network (AON) in such a way that the more modalities through which one experiences an action, the greater the response is within these AON regions during action perception. Moreover, a correlation between left premotor activity and participants' scores for reproducing an action suggests that the better an observer can perform an observed action, the stronger the neural response is. The findings suggest that the number of modalities through which an observer experiences an action impacts AON activity additively, and that premotor cortical activity might serve as an index of embodiment during action observation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Observation-based estimation of aerosol-induced reduction of planetary boundary layer height

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jun; Sun, Jianning; Ding, Aijun; Wang, Minghuai; Guo, Weidong; Fu, Congbin

    2017-09-01

    Radiative aerosols are known to influence the surface energy budget and hence the evolution of the planetary boundary layer. In this study, we develop a method to estimate the aerosol-induced reduction in the planetary boundary layer height (PBLH) based on two years of ground-based measurements at a site, the Station for Observing Regional Processes of the Earth System (SORPES), at Nanjing University, China, and radiosonde data from the meteorological station of Nanjing. The observations show that increased aerosol loads lead to a mean decrease of 67.1 W m-2 for downward shortwave radiation (DSR) and a mean increase of 19.2 W m-2 for downward longwave radiation (DLR), as well as a mean decrease of 9.6 Wm-2 for the surface sensible heat flux (SHF) in the daytime. The relative variations of DSR, DLR and SHF are shown as a function of the increment of column mass concentration of particulate matter (PM2.5). High aerosol loading can significantly increase the atmospheric stability in the planetary boundary layer during both daytime and nighttime. Based on the statistical relationship between SHF and PM2.5 column mass concentrations, the SHF under clean atmospheric conditions (same as the background days) is derived. In this case, the derived SHF, together with observed SHF, are then used to estimate changes in the PBLH related to aerosols. Our results suggest that the PBLH decreases more rapidly with increasing aerosol loading at high aerosol loading. When the daytime mean column mass concentration of PM2.5 reaches 200 mg m-2, the decrease in the PBLH at 1600 LST (local standard time) is about 450 m.

  3. Lidar observation of Eyjafjallajoekull ash layer evolution above the Swiss Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Valentin; Dinoev, Todor; Parlange, Mark; Serikov, Ilya; Calpini, Bertrand; Wienhold, F.; Engel, I.; Brabec, M.; Crisian, A.; Peter, T.; Mitev, Valentin; Matthey, R.

    2010-05-01

    The Iceland volcano Eyjafjallajökull started to emit significant amounts of volcanic ash and SO2 on 15th April 2010, following the initial eruption on 20th March 2010. In the next days, the ash was dispersed over large parts of Europe resulting in the closure of the major part of the European airspace. Information about spatial and temporal evolution of the cloud was needed urgently to define the conditions for opening the airspace. Satellite, airborne and ground observations together with meteorological models were used to evaluate the cloud propagation and evolution. While the horizontal extents of the volcanic cloud were accurately captured by satellite images, it remained difficult to obtain accurate information about the cloud base and top height, density and dynamics. During this event lidars demonstrated that they were the only ground based instruments allowing monitoring of the vertical distribution of the volcanic ash. Here we present observational results showing the evolution of the volcanic layer over the Swiss plateau. The measurements were carried out by one Raman lidar located in Payerne, two elastic lidars located in Neuchatel and Zurich, and a backscatter sonde launched from Zurich. The observations by the lidars have shown very similar time evolution, coherent with the backscatter sonde profiles and characterized by the appearance of the ash layer on the evening of 16th, followed by descend to 2-3 km during the next day and final mixing with the ABL on 19th. Simultaneous water vapor data from the Payerne lidar show low water content of the ash layer. The CSEM and EPFL gratefully acknowledge the financial support by the European Commission under grant RICA-025991.

  4. Rayleigh lidar observation of tropical mesospheric inversion layer: a comparison between dynamics and chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh K.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rayleigh lidar at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E, India operates at 532 nm green laser with ~600 mJ/pulse since 2007. The vertical temperature profiles are derived above ~30 km by assuming the atmosphere is in hydrostatic equilibrium and obeys ideal gas law. A large mesospheric inversion layer (MIL is observed at ~77.4-84.6 km on the night of 22 March 2007 over Gadanki. Although dynamics and chemistry play vital role, both the mechanisms are compared for the occurrence of the MIL in the present study.

  5. Rayleigh lidar observation of tropical mesospheric inversion layer: a comparison between dynamics and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, K.; Sridharan, S.; Raghunath, K.

    2018-04-01

    The Rayleigh lidar at National Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E), India operates at 532 nm green laser with 600 mJ/pulse since 2007. The vertical temperature profiles are derived above 30 km by assuming the atmosphere is in hydrostatic equilibrium and obeys ideal gas law. A large mesospheric inversion layer (MIL) is observed at 77.4-84.6 km on the night of 22 March 2007 over Gadanki. Although dynamics and chemistry play vital role, both the mechanisms are compared for the occurrence of the MIL in the present study.

  6. Lidar observations of stratospheric aerosol layer after the Mt. Pinatubo volcanic eruption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Tomohiro; Uchino, Osamu; Fujimoto, Toshifumi.

    1992-01-01

    The volcano Mt. Pinatubo located on the Luzon Island, Philippines, had explosively erupted on June 15, 1991. The volcanic eruptions such as volcanic ash, SO2 and H2O reached into the stratosphere over 30 km altitude by the NOAA-11 satellite observation and this is considered one of the biggest volcanic eruptions in this century. A grandiose volcanic eruption influences the atmosphere seriously and causes many climatic effects globally. There had been many impacts on radiation, atmospheric temperature and stratospheric ozone after some past volcanic eruptions. The main cause of volcanic influence depends on stratospheric aerosol, that stay long enough to change climate and other meteorological conditions. Therefore it is very important to watch stratospheric aerosol layers carefully and continuously. Standing on this respect, we do not only continue stratospheric aerosol observation at Tsukuba but also have urgently developed another lidar observational point at Naha in Okinawa Island. This observational station could be thought valuable since there is no lidar observational station in this latitudinal zone and it is much nearer to Mt. Pinatubo. Especially, there is advantage to link up these two stations on studying the transportation mechanism in the stratosphere. In this paper, we present the results of lidar observations at Tsukuba and Naha by lidar systems with Nd:YAG laser

  7. Lidar Observations of Stratospheric Aerosol Layer After the Mt. Pinatubo Volcanic Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Tomohiro; Uchino, Osamu; Fujimoto, Toshifumi

    1992-01-01

    The volcano Mt. Pinatubo located on the Luzon Island, Philippines, had explosively erupted on June 15, 1991. The volcanic eruptions such as volcanic ash, SO2 and H2O reached into the stratosphere over 30 km altitude by the NOAA-11 satellite observation and this is considered one of the biggest volcanic eruptions in this century. A grandiose volcanic eruption influences the atmosphere seriously and causes many climatic effects globally. There had been many impacts on radiation, atmospheric temperature and stratospheric ozone after some past volcanic eruptions. The main cause of volcanic influence depends on stratospheric aerosol, that stay long enough to change climate and other meteorological conditions. Therefore it is very important to watch stratospheric aerosol layers carefully and continuously. Standing on this respect, we do not only continue stratospheric aerosol observation at Tsukuba but also have urgently developed another lidar observational point at Naha in Okinawa Island. This observational station could be thought valuable since there is no lidar observational station in this latitudinal zone and it is much nearer to Mt. Pinatubo. Especially, there is advantage to link up these two stations on studying the transportation mechanism in the stratosphere. In this paper, we present the results of lidar observations at Tsukuba and Naha by lidar systems with Nd:YAG laser.

  8. Typhoon 9707 observations with the MU radar and L-band boundary layer radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teshiba

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Typhoon 9707 (Opal was observed with the VHF-band Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, an L-band boundary layer radar (BLR, and a vertical-pointing C-band meteorological radar at the Shigaraki MU Observatory in Shiga prefecture, Japan on 20 June 1997. The typhoon center passed about 80 km southeast from the radar site. Mesoscale precipitating clouds developed due to warm-moist airmass transport from the typhoon, and passed over the MU radar site with easterly or southeasterly winds. We primarily present the wind behaviour including the vertical component which a conventional meteorological Doppler radar cannot directly observe, and discuss the relationship between the wind behaviour of the typhoon and the precipitating system. To investigate the dynamic structure of the typhoon, the observed wind was divided into radial and tangential wind components under the assumption that the typhoon had an axi-symmetric structure. Altitude range of outflow ascended from 1–3 km to 2–10 km with increasing distance (within 80–260 km range from the typhoon center, and in-flow was observed above and below the outflow. Outflow and inflow were associated with updraft and downdraft, respectively. In the tangential wind, the maximum speed of counterclockwise winds was confirmed at 1–2 km altitudes. Based on the vertical velocity and the reflectivity obtained with the MU radar and the C-band meteorological radar, respectively, precipitating clouds, accompanied by the wind behaviour of the typhoon, were classified into stratiform and convective precipitating clouds. In the stratiform precipitating clouds, a vertical shear of radial wind and the maximum speed of counterclockwise wind were observed. There was a strong reflectivity layer called a ‘bright band’ around the 4.2 km altitude. We confirmed strong updrafts and down-drafts below and above it, respectively, and the existence of a relatively dry layer around the bright band level from radiosonde

  9. Typhoon 9707 observations with the MU radar and L-band boundary layer radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Teshiba

    Full Text Available Typhoon 9707 (Opal was observed with the VHF-band Middle and Upper atmosphere (MU radar, an L-band boundary layer radar (BLR, and a vertical-pointing C-band meteorological radar at the Shigaraki MU Observatory in Shiga prefecture, Japan on 20 June 1997. The typhoon center passed about 80 km southeast from the radar site. Mesoscale precipitating clouds developed due to warm-moist airmass transport from the typhoon, and passed over the MU radar site with easterly or southeasterly winds. We primarily present the wind behaviour including the vertical component which a conventional meteorological Doppler radar cannot directly observe, and discuss the relationship between the wind behaviour of the typhoon and the precipitating system. To investigate the dynamic structure of the typhoon, the observed wind was divided into radial and tangential wind components under the assumption that the typhoon had an axi-symmetric structure. Altitude range of outflow ascended from 1–3 km to 2–10 km with increasing distance (within 80–260 km range from the typhoon center, and in-flow was observed above and below the outflow. Outflow and inflow were associated with updraft and downdraft, respectively. In the tangential wind, the maximum speed of counterclockwise winds was confirmed at 1–2 km altitudes. Based on the vertical velocity and the reflectivity obtained with the MU radar and the C-band meteorological radar, respectively, precipitating clouds, accompanied by the wind behaviour of the typhoon, were classified into stratiform and convective precipitating clouds. In the stratiform precipitating clouds, a vertical shear of radial wind and the maximum speed of counterclockwise wind were observed. There was a strong reflectivity layer called a ‘bright band’ around the 4.2 km altitude. We confirmed strong updrafts and down-drafts below and above it, respectively, and the existence of a relatively dry layer around the bright band level from radiosonde

  10. Sporadic and Thermospheric Enhanced Sodium Layers Observed by a Lidar Chain over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, X.

    2013-12-01

    We report the statistical features of sporadic sodium layers (SSLs) and the thermospheric enhanced sodium layers (TeSLs) observed by a lidar chain located at Beijing (40.2N,116.2E), Hefei (31.8N, 117.3E), Wuhan (30.5N, 114.4E), and Haikou (19.5N, 109.1E). The average SSL occurrence rate was approximately 46.0, 12.3, 13.8, and 15.0 hr per SSL at Beijing, Hefei, Wuhan, and Haikou, respectively. However, the TeSLs occurred relatively infrequently and were more likely to appear at low and high latitudinal sites. Both the SSLs and TeSLs at four lidar sites showed evident summer enhancements and correlated well with Es (foEs>4MHz). The co-observations of SSLs at three lidar site pairs, i.e., Hefei -- Beijing, Hefei -- Wuhan and Hefei -- Beijing, indicated that a large-scale SSL extended horizontally for at least a few hundred kilometers and exhibited a tidal-induced modulation. Moreover, the SSLs were better correlated for the Hefei -- Wuhan and Hefei -- Haikou pairs than the Hefei -- Beijing pair, which suggested a difference in the dynamical/chemical process in mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) between the Beijing site and the other sites.

  11. The enhancement of neutral metal Na layer above thunderstorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bingkun; Xue, Xianghui; Lu, Gaopeng; Kuo, Chengling; Dou, Xiankang; Gao, Qi; Qie, Xiushu; Wu, Jianfei; Tang, Yihuan

    2017-04-01

    Na (sodium) exists as layers of atoms in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) at altitudes between 80 and 105 km. It has lower ionization potential of 5.139 eV than atmospheric species, such as O2 (12.06 eV). Tropospheric thunderstorms affect the lower ionosphere and the ionospheric sporadic E (Es) at 100 km can also be influenced by lightning. The mechanism is expected to be associated with transient luminous events (TLE) as red sprites and gigantic jets at upper atmosphere. However, measurements of ionospheric electric fields of 20mV·m-1 above thunderstorms are less than estimated value (>48 0mV·m-1) to excite ionization in the lower ionosphere. We found an enhancement of Na layer above thunderstorms. The increase of Na density in the statistical result can be as much as 500 cm-3 and it will have an impact on ionospheric chemistry and modify the conductivity properties of the MLT region. The ionospheric observations made with two digisondes near the Na lidar, the thunderstorm model, ionosphere model, and Na chemistry model are all used to discuss the possible mechanisms responsible for the enhancement of Na layer after thunderstorms.

  12. Surface layer and bloom dynamics observed with the Prince William Sound Autonomous Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. W.

    2016-02-01

    As part of a recent long term monitoring effort, deployments of a WETLabs Autonomous Moored Profiler (AMP) began Prince William Sound (PWS) in 2013. The PWS AMP consists of a positively buoyant instrument frame, with a winch and associated electronics that profiles the frame from a park depth (usually 55 m) to the surface by releasing and retrieving a thin UHMWPE tether; it generally conducts a daily cast and measures temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a fluorescence, turbidity, and oxygen and nitrate concentrations. Upward and downward looking ADCPs are mounted on a float below the profiler, and an in situ plankton imager is in development and will be installed in 2016. Autonomous profilers are a relatively new technology, and early deployments experienced a number of failures from which valuable lessons may be learned. Nevertheless, an unprecedented time series of the seasonal biogeochemical procession in the surface waters coastal Gulf of Alaska was collected in 2014 and 2015. The northern Gulf of Alaska has experienced a widespread warm anomaly since early 2014, and surface layer temperature anomalies in PWS were strongly positive during winter 2014. The spring bloom observed by the profiler began 2-3 weeks earlier than average, with surface nitrate depleted by late April. Although surface temperatures were still above average in 2015, bloom timing was much later, with a short vigorous bloom in late April and a subsurface bloom in late May that coincided with significant nitrate drawdown. As well as the vernal blooms, wind-driven upwelling events lead to several small productivity pulses that were evident in changes in nitrate and oxygen concentrations, and chlorophyll-a fluorescence. As well as providing a mechanistic understanding of surface layer biogeochemistry, high frequency observations such as these put historical observations in context, and provide new insights into the scales of variability in the annual cycles of the surface ocean in the North

  13. Observational description of the atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers over the Atlantic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Dourado

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Time evolution of atmospheric and oceanic boundary layers are described for an upwelling region in the Atlantic Ocean located in Cabo Frio, Brazil (23°00'S, 42°08'W. The observations were obtained during a field campaign carried out by the "Instituto de Estudos do Mar Almirante Paulo Moreira", on board of the oceanographic ship Antares of the Brazilian Navy, between July 7 and 10 of 1992. The analysis shown here was based on 19 simultaneous vertical soundings of atmosphere and ocean, carried out consecutively every 4 hours. The period of observation was characterized by a passage of a cold front that penetrated in Cabo Frio on July 6. During the cold front passage the vertical extension of atmospheric (and oceanic mixed layer varied from 200 m (and 13 m to 1000 m (and 59 m. These changes occurred in the first day of observation and were followed by an increase of 1.2°C in the oceanic mixed layer temperature and by a decrease of 6 K and 6 g/kg in the virtual potential temperature and specific humidity of the atmospheric mixed layer. The short time scale variations in the ocean can be explained in terms of the substitution of cold upwelling water by warm downwelling water regime, as the surface winds shift from pre-frontal NE to post-frontal SSW during the cold front passage in Cabo Frio. The large vertical extent of the atmospheric mixed layer can be explained in terms of an intensification of the thermal mixing induced by the warming of the oceanic upper layers combined with the cooling of the lower atmospheric layers during the cold front passage. An intensification of the mechanical mixing, observed during the cold front passage, may also be contributing to the observed variations in the vertical extent of both layers.A evolução temporal das camadas limites atmosféricas e oceânicas são descritas para a região de ressurgência do Oceano Atlântico localizada em Cabo Frio. As observações foram obtidas durante a campanha de medidas

  14. Airborne observations of newly formed boundary layer aerosol particles under cloudy conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Altstädter

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the appearance of ultrafine boundary layer aerosol particles under classical non-favourable conditions at the research site of TROPOS (Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research. Airborne measurements of meteorological and aerosol properties of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL were repeatedly performed with the unmanned aerial system ALADINA (Application of Light-weight Aircraft for Detecting IN-situ Aerosol during three seasons between October 2013 and July 2015. More than 100 measurement flights were conducted on 23 different days with a total flight duration of 53 h. In 26 % of the cases, maxima of ultrafine particles were observed close to the inversion layer at altitudes between 400 and 600 m and the particles were rapidly mixed vertically and mainly transported downwards during short time intervals of cloud gaps. This study focuses on two measurement days affected by low-level stratocumulus clouds, but different wind directions (NE, SW and minimal concentrations (< 4.6 µg m−3 of SO2, as a common indicator for precursor gases at ground. Taken from vertical profiles, the onset of clouds led to a non-linearity of humidity that resulted in an increased turbulence at the local-scale and caused fast nucleation e.g., but in relation to rapid dilution of surrounding air, seen in sporadic clusters of ground data, so that ultrafine particles disappeared in the verticality. The typical banana shape of new particle formation (NPF and growth was not seen at ground and thus these days might not have been classified as NPF event days by pure surface studies.

  15. Ground-Based Observations and Modeling of the Visibility and Radar Reflectivity in a Radiation Fog Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boers, R.; Baltink, K.H.; Hemink, H.J.; Bosveld, F.C.; Moerman, M.

    2013-01-01

    The development of a radiation fog layer at the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research(51.97°N, 4.93°E) on 23 March 2011 was observed with ground-based in situ and remote sensing observationsto investigate the relationship between visibility and radar reflectivity. The fog layer thickness

  16. Diagnostics of the Tropical Tropopause Layer from in-situ observations and CCM data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Volk

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A suite of diagnostics is applied to in-situ aircraft measurements and one Chemistry-Climate Model (CCM data to characterize the vertical structure of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL. The diagnostics are based on vertical tracer profiles and relative vertical tracer gradients, using tropopause-referenced coordinates, and tracer-tracer relationships in the tropical Upper Troposphere/Lower Stratosphere (UT/LS.

    Observations were obtained during four tropical campaigns performed from 1999 to 2006 with the research aircraft Geophysica and have been compared to the output of the ECHAM5/MESSy CCM. The model vertical resolution in the TTL (~500 m allows for appropriate comparison with high-resolution aircraft observations and the diagnostics used highlight common TTL features between the model and the observational data.

    The analysis of the vertical profiles of water vapour, ozone, and nitrous oxide, in both the observations and the model, shows that concentration mixing ratios exhibit a strong gradient change across the tropical tropopause, due to the role of this latter as a transport barrier and that transition between the tropospheric and stratospheric regimes occurs within a finite layer. The use of relative vertical ozone and carbon monoxide gradients, in addition to the vertical profiles, helps to highlight the region where this transition occurs and allows to give an estimate of its thickness. The analysis of the CO-O3 and H2O-O3 scatter plots and of the Probability Distribution Function (PDF of the H2O-O3 pair completes this picture as it allows to better distinguish tropospheric and stratospheric regimes that can be identified by their different chemical composition.

    The joint analysis and comparison of observed and modelled data allows to state that the model can represent the background TTL structure and its seasonal variability rather accurately. The model

  17. 30-year lidar observations of the stratospheric aerosol layer state over Tomsk (Western Siberia, Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuev, Vladimir V.; Burlakov, Vladimir D.; Nevzorov, Aleksei V.; Pravdin, Vladimir L.; Savelieva, Ekaterina S.; Gerasimov, Vladislav V.

    2017-02-01

    There are only four lidar stations in the world which have almost continuously performed observations of the stratospheric aerosol layer (SAL) state over the last 30 years. The longest time series of the SAL lidar measurements have been accumulated at the Mauna Loa Observatory (Hawaii) since 1973, the NASA Langley Research Center (Hampton, Virginia) since 1974, and Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany) since 1976. The fourth lidar station we present started to perform routine observations of the SAL parameters in Tomsk (56.48° N, 85.05° E, Western Siberia, Russia) in 1986. In this paper, we mainly focus on and discuss the stratospheric background period from 2000 to 2005 and the causes of the SAL perturbations over Tomsk in the 2006-2015 period. During the last decade, volcanic aerosol plumes from tropical Mt. Manam, Soufrière Hills, Rabaul, Merapi, Nabro, and Kelut and extratropical (northern) Mt. Okmok, Kasatochi, Redoubt, Sarychev Peak, Eyjafjallajökull, and Grímsvötn were detected in the stratosphere over Tomsk. When it was possible, we used the NOAA HYSPLIT trajectory model to assign aerosol layers observed over Tomsk to the corresponding volcanic eruptions. The trajectory analysis highlighted some surprising results. For example, in the cases of the Okmok, Kasatochi, and Eyjafjallajökull eruptions, the HYSPLIT air mass backward trajectories, started from altitudes of aerosol layers detected over Tomsk with a lidar, passed over these volcanoes on their eruption days at altitudes higher than the maximum plume altitudes given by the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program. An explanation of these facts is suggested. The role of both tropical and northern volcanic eruptions in volcanogenic aerosol loading of the midlatitude stratosphere is also discussed. In addition to volcanoes, we considered other possible causes of the SAL perturbations over Tomsk, i.e., the polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) events and smoke plumes from strong forest fires. At least

  18. Observed perturbations of the Earth's Radiation Budget - A response to the El Chichon stratospheric aerosol layer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardanuy, P. E.; Kyle, H. L.

    1986-01-01

    The Earth Radiation Budget experiment, launched aboard the Nimbus-7 polar-orbiting spacecraft in late 1978, has now taken over seven years of measurements. The dataset, which is global in coverage, consists of the individual components of the earth's radiation budget, including longwave emission, net radiation, and both total and near-infrared albedos. Starting some six months after the 1982 eruption of the El Chichon volcano, substantial long-lived positive shortwave irradiance anomalies were observed by the experiment in both the northern and southern polar regions. Analysis of the morphology of this phenomena indicates that the cause is the global stratospheric aerosol layer which formed from the cloud of volcanic effluents. There was little change in the emitted longwave in the polar regions. At the north pole the largest anomaly was in the near-infrared, but at the south pole the near UV-visible anomaly was larger. Assuming an exponential decay, the time constant for the north polar, near-infrared anomaly was 1.2 years. At mid- and low latitudes the effect of the El Chichon aerosol layer could not be separated from the strong reflected-shortwave and emitted-longwave perturbations issuing from the El Nino/Southern Oscillation event of 1982-83.

  19. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  20. Observations of an 11 September Sahelian Squall Line and Saharan Air Layer Outbreak during NAMMA-06

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Smith

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2006 NASA-African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (NAMMA-06 field campaign examined a compact, low-level vortex embedded in the trough of an AEW between 9–12 September. The vortex triggered a squall line (SL in southeastern Senegal in the early morning of 11 September and became Tropical Depression 8 on 12 September. During this period, there was a Saharan Air Layer (SAL outbreak in northwestern Senegal and adjacent Atlantic Ocean waters in the proximity of the SL. Increases in aerosol optical thicknesses in Mbour, Senegal, high dewpoint depressions observed in the Kawsara and Dakar rawinsondes, and model back-trajectories suggest the SAL exists. The close proximity of this and SL suggests interaction through dust entrainment and precipitation invigoration.

  1. Thick Escaping Magnetospheric Ion Layer in Magnetopause Reconnection with MMS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, T.; Kitamura, N.; Hasagawa, H.; Shinohara, I.; Yokota, S.; Saito, Y.; Nakamura, R.; Giles, B. L.; Pollock, C.; Moore, T. E.; hide

    2016-01-01

    The structure of asymmetric magnetopause reconnection is explored with multiple point and high-time-resolution ion velocity distribution observations from the Magnetospheric Multiscale mission. On 9 September 2015, reconnection took place at the magnetopause, which separated the magnetosheath and the magnetosphere with a density ratio of 25:2. The magnetic field intensity was rather constant, even higher in the asymptotic magnetosheath. The reconnected field line region had a width of approximately 540 km. In this region, streaming and gyrating ions are discriminated. The large extension of the reconnected field line region toward the magnetosheath can be identified where a thick layer of escaping magnetospheric ions was formed. The scale of the magnetosheath side of the reconnected field line region relative to the scale of its magnetospheric side was 4.5:1.

  2. Structure of bayerite-based lithium-aluminum layered double hydroxides (LDHs): observation of monoclinic symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto, Sylvia; Kamath, P Vishnu

    2009-12-21

    The double hydroxides of Li with Al, obtained by the imbibition of Li salts into bayerite and gibbsite-Al(OH)(3), are not different polytypes of the same symmetry but actually crystallize in two different symmetries. The bayerite-derived double hydroxides crystallize with monoclinic symmetry, while the gibbsite-derived hydroxides crystallize with hexagonal symmetry. Successive metal hydroxide layers in the bayerite-derived LDHs are translated by the vector ( approximately -1/3, 0, 1) with respect to each other. The exigency of hydrogen bonding drives the intercalated Cl(-) ion to a site with 2-fold coordination, whereas the intercalated water occupies a site with 6-fold coordination having a pseudotrigonal prismatic symmetry. The nonideal nature of the interlayer sites has implications for the observed selectivity of Li-Al LDHs toward anions of different symmetries.

  3. Observations of the atmospheric electric field during two case studies of boundary layer processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piper, I M; Bennett, A J

    2012-01-01

    We present measurements of potential gradient (PG) with associated meteorological variables and cloud profiles for two examples of convective boundary layer processes. Aerosol acts as a tracer layer to show lofting of the convective boundary layer; the rising aerosol layer results in a decrease in PG. In foggy conditions, the PG is seen to increase during the fog and then reduce as the fog lifts, as expected. (letter)

  4. The Helicopter Observation Platform for Marine and Continental Boundary Layer Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avissar, R.; Broad, K.; Walko, R. L.; Drennan, W. M.; Williams, N. J.

    2016-02-01

    The University of Miami has acquired a commercial helicopter (Airbus H125) that was transformed into a one-of-a-kind Helicopter Observation Platform (HOP) that fills critical gaps in physical, chemical and biological observations of the environment. This new research facility is designed to carry sensors and instrument inlets in the undisturbed air in front of the helicopter nose at low airspeed and at various altitudes, from a few feet above the Earth's surface (where much of the climate and weather "action" takes place, and where we live) and up through the atmospheric boundary layer and the mid troposphere. The HOP, with its hovering capability, is also ideal for conducting various types of remote-sensing observations. It provides a unique and essential component of airborne measurement whose purpose, among others, is to quantify the exchanges of gases and energy at the Earth surface, as well as aerosol properties that affect the environment, the climate system, and human health. For its first scientific mission, an eddy-correlation system is being mounted in front of its nose to conduct high-frequency measurements of turbulence variables relevant to atmospheric boundary layer studies.Fully fueled and with both pilot and co-pilot on board, the HOP can carry a scientific payload of up to about 1,000 lbs internally (about 3,000 lbs externally) and fly for nearly 4 hours without refueling at an airspeed of 65 knots ( 30 m/s) that is ideal for in-situ observations. Its fast cruising speed is about 140 knots andits range, at that speed, is about 350 nautical miles. This specific helicopter was chosen because of its flat floor design, which is particularly convenient for installing scientific payload and also because of its high-altitude capability (it is the only commercial helicopter that ever landed at the top of Mt Everest).The HOP is available to the entire scientific community for any project that is feasible from a flight safety point of view and that fulfills

  5. Evaluation of surface layer flux parameterizations using in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jeremy; Zhu, Ping

    2017-09-01

    Appropriate calculation of surface turbulent fluxes between the atmosphere and the underlying ocean/land surface is one of the major challenges in geosciences. In practice, the surface turbulent fluxes are estimated from the mean surface meteorological variables based on the bulk transfer model combined with the Monnin-Obukhov Similarity (MOS) theory. Few studies have been done to examine the extent to which such a flux parameterization can be applied to different weather and surface conditions. A novel validation method is developed in this study to evaluate the surface flux parameterization using in-situ observations collected at a station off the coast of Gulf of Mexico. The main findings are: (a) the theoretical prediction that uses MOS theory does not match well with those directly computed from the observations. (b) The largest spread in exchange coefficients is shown in strong stable conditions with calm winds. (c) Large turbulent eddies, which depend strongly on the mean flow pattern and surface conditions, tend to break the constant flux assumption in the surface layer.

  6. Boundary layer structure observed by Shipborne Doppler Sodar in the Suez Canal zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiocco, G.; Mastrantonio, G.; Ricotta, A.

    1980-01-01

    Observations of the boundary layer with a monostatic Sodar and other instrumentation were carried out in the Suez canal zone in January and March 1979, from the Italian m.v. Salernum on its way to and from a GARP assignment. The Sodar was operated almost continuously throughout the passages. In addition to the intensity records, an off-line Doppler analysis involving the use of the fast Fourier transform of the digitized Sodar echoes has provided the vertical component w of the velocity. In general, because of efficient filtering and of the good quality of the data, a vertical profile of w has been determined for each transmitted pulse. During a prolonged stay in the Bitter lakes vertical profiles of temperature and humidity were also obtained by deploying a tethered balloon. Large temporal and spatial temperature contrasts exist in the canal zone due to the presence of the desert and of large and small bodies of water. The ensuring phenomenology during the time of observation was quite varied. (author)

  7. Boundary layer structure observed by Shipborne Doppler Sonar in the Suez Canal zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiocco, G. (Rome Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica); Mastrantonio, G.; Ricotta, A. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Frascati (Italy). Lab. per il Plasma nello Spazio)

    Observations of the boundary layer with a monostatic Sonar and other instrumentation were carried out in the Suez canal zone in January and March 1979, from the Italian m.v. Salernum on its way to and from a GARP assignment. The Sonar was operated almost continuously throughout the passages. In addition to the intensity records, an off-line Doppler analysis involving the use of the fast Fourier transform of the digitized Sonar echoes has provided the vertical component w of the velocity. In general, because of efficient filtering and of the good quality of the data, a vertical profile of w has been determined for each transmitted pulse. During a prolonged stay in the Bitter lakes vertical profiles of temperature and humidity were also obtained by deploying a tethered balloon. Large temporal and spatial temperature contrasts exist in the canal zone due to the presence of the desert and of large and small bodies of water. The ensuring phenomenology during the time of observation was quite varied.

  8. Summertime observations of elevated levels of ultrafine particles in the high Arctic marine boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkart, Julia; Willis, Megan D.; Bozem, Heiko; Thomas, Jennie L.; Law, Kathy; Hoor, Peter; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Köllner, Franziska; Schneider, Johannes; Herber, Andreas; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.; Leaitch, W. Richard

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by increasing levels of open ocean in the Arctic summer and the lack of prior altitude-resolved studies, extensive aerosol measurements were made during 11 flights of the NETCARE July 2014 airborne campaign from Resolute Bay, Nunavut. Flights included vertical profiles (60 to 3000 m above ground level) over open ocean, fast ice, and boundary layer clouds and fogs. A general conclusion, from observations of particle numbers between 5 and 20 nm in diameter (N5 - 20), is that ultrafine particle formation occurs readily in the Canadian high Arctic marine boundary layer, especially just above ocean and clouds, reaching values of a few thousand particles cm-3. By contrast, ultrafine particle concentrations are much lower in the free troposphere. Elevated levels of larger particles (for example, from 20 to 40 nm in size, N20 - 40) are sometimes associated with high N5 - 20, especially over low clouds, suggestive of aerosol growth. The number densities of particles greater than 40 nm in diameter (N > 40) are relatively depleted at the lowest altitudes, indicative of depositional processes that will lower the condensation sink and promote new particle formation. The number of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN; measured at 0.6 % supersaturation) are positively correlated with the numbers of small particles (down to roughly 30 nm), indicating that some fraction of these newly formed particles are capable of being involved in cloud activation. Given that the summertime marine Arctic is a biologically active region, it is important to better establish the links between emissions from the ocean and the formation and growth of ultrafine particles within this rapidly changing environment.

  9. Ion layers, tides, gravity waves, and electric fields in the upper atmosphere, inferred from Arecibo incoherent scatter radar measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, Y.T.

    1991-01-01

    This thesis uses data accumulated during 1980-1989 by the Arecibo incoherent scatter radar to study the behavior and physics of ionization irregularities. Low latitude ionization irregularities, known as sporadic-E and intermediate layers, undergo a regular daily descent, convergence, and dumping of ion layers controlled by the neutral tidal wind. A useful way of studying ion layers and their motion is by ion layer trajectory maps which consist of points representing the altitude and time of ionization layers. Two types of maps were used which assigned either a uniform layer intensity or a gray level/pseudo-color to indicate different layer intensities. Important aspects of layer formation are revealed by map analysis. During January, intermediate layers consistently appeared four times per day instead of the normal twice per day pattern. Simulation of ion trajectories based on the ion momentum equation, which includes both Lorentzian and collisional forces, shows that a combination of diurnal, semidiurnal, and six-hour tides is necessary for such a feature to exist, whereas only diurnal and semidiurnal tides are needed to create the normal pattern. The six-hour period tide has not been previously reported. Extra or irregular layers appear frequently in layer trajectory maps, which can be simulated by the addition of gravity waves to the regular tidal wind system. Electric field effects are normally not a factor in low latitude ion layer formation because they are relatively weak and not commonly observed. Layer configurations during a geomagnetic storm, however, indicate that the electric field played an important role in controlling ion motion

  10. Observations of mesoscale and boundary-layer scale circulations affecting dust transport and uplift over the Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Marsham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of the Saharan boundary layer, made during the GERBILS field campaign, show that mesoscale land surface temperature variations (which were related to albedo variations induced mesoscale circulations. With weak winds along the aircraft track, land surface temperature anomalies with scales of greater than 10 km are shown to significantly affect boundary-layer temperatures and winds. Such anomalies are expected to affect the vertical mixing of the dusty and weakly stratified Saharan Residual Layer (SRL. Mesoscale variations in winds are also shown to affect dust loadings in the boundary layer.

    Using the aircraft observations and data from the COSMO model, a region of local dust uplift, with strong along-track winds, was identified in one low-level flight. Large eddy model (LEM simulations based on this location showed linearly organised boundary-layer convection. Calculating dust uplift rates from the LEM wind field showed that the boundary-layer convection increased uplift by approximately 30%, compared with the uplift rate calculated neglecting the convection. The modelled effects of boundary-layer convection on uplift are shown to be larger when the boundary-layer wind is decreased, and most significant when the mean wind is below the threshold for dust uplift and the boundary-layer convection leads to uplift which would not otherwise occur.

    Both the coupling of albedo features to the atmosphere on the mesoscale, and the enhancement of dust uplift by boundary-layer convection are unrepresented in many climate models, but may have significant impacts on the vertical transport and uplift of desert dust. Mesoscale effects in particular tend to be difficult to parametrise.

  11. Study of medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTID) with sounding rockets and ground observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Mamoru; Abe, Takumi; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Bernhardt, Paul; Watanabe, Shigeto; Yamamoto, Masa-yuki; Larsen, Miguel; Saito, Susumu; Tsugawa, Takuya; Ishisaka, Keigo; Iwagami, Naomoto; Nishioka, Michi; Kato, Tomohiro; Takahashi, Takao; Tanaka, Makoto; Mr

    Medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID) is an interesting phenomenon in the F-region. The MSTID is frequent in summer nighttime over Japan, showing wave structures with wavelengths of 100-200 km, periodicity of about 1 hour, and propagation toward the southwest. The phenomena are observed by the total electron content (TEC) from GEONET, Japanese dense network of GPS receivers, and 630 nm airglow imagers as horizontal pattern. It was also measured as Spread-F events of ionograms or as field-aligned echoes of the MU radar. MSTID was, in the past, explained by Perkins instability (Perkins, 1973) while its low growth rate was a problem. Recently 3D simulation study by Yokoyama et al (2009) hypothesized a generation mechanism of the MSTID, which stands on electromagnetic E/F-region coupling of the ionosphere. The hypothesis is that the MSTID first grows with polarization electric fields from sporadic-E, then show spatial structures resembling to the Perkins instability. We recently conducted a observation campaign to check this hypothesis. We launched JASA ISAS sounding rockets S-310-42 and S-520-27 at 23:00 JST and 23:57JST on July 20, 2013 while an MSTID event was monitored in real-time by the GPS-TEC from GEONET. We found 1-5mV/m northeastward/eastward electric fields during the flight. Variation of electric fileds were associated with horizontal distribution of plasma density. Wind velocity was measured by the TME and Lithium releases from S-310-42 and S-520-27 rockets, respectively, showing southward wind near the sporadic-E layer heights. These results are consistent to the expected generation mechanism shown above. In the presentation we will discuss electric-field results and its relationship with plasma density variability together with preliminary results from the neutral-wind observations.

  12. Characteristics of Volcanic Stratospheric Aerosol Layer Observed by CALIOP and Ground Based Lidar at Equatorial Atmosphere Radar Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, Makoto; Shibata, Yasukuni; Nagasawa, Chikao

    2018-04-01

    We investigated the relation between major tropical volcanic eruptions in the equatorial region and the stratospheric aerosol data, which have been collected by the ground based lidar observations at at Equatorial Atmosphere Radar site between 2004 and 2015 and the CALIOP observations in low latitude between 2006 and 2015. We found characteristic dynamic behavior of volcanic stratospheric aerosol layers over equatorial region.

  13. Precipitating clouds observed by 1.3-GHz boundary layer radars in equatorial Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Renggono

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Temporal variations of precipitating clouds in equatorial Indonesia have been studied based on observations with 1357.5 MHz boundary layer radars at Serpong (6.4° S, 106.7° E near Jakarta and Bukittinggi (0.2° S, 100.3° E in West Sumatera. We have classified precipitating clouds into four types: stratiform, mixed stratiform-convective, deep convective, and shallow convective clouds, using the Williams et al. (1995 method. Diurnal variations of the occurrence of precipitating clouds at Serpong and Bukittinggi have showed the same characteristics, namely, that the precipitating clouds primarily occur in the afternoon and the peak of the stratiform cloud comes after the peak of the deep convective cloud. The time delay between the peaks of stratiform and deep convective clouds corresponds to the life cycle of the mesoscale convective system. The precipitating clouds which occur in the early morning at Serpong are dominated by stratiform cloud. Concerning seasonal variations of the precipitating clouds, we have found that the occurrence of the stratiform cloud is most frequent in the rainy season, while the occurrence of the deep convective cloud is predominant in the dry season.Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (convective processes; precipitation; tropical meteorology

  14. Estimation of Physical Layer Performance inWSNs Exploiting the Method of Indirect Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Atzori

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs are used in many industrial and consumer applications that are increasingly gaining impact in our day to day lives. Still great efforts are needed towards the definition of methodologies for their effective management. One big issue is themonitoring of the network status, which requires the definition of the performance indicators and methodologies and should be accurate and not intrusive at the same time. In this paper, we present a new process for the monitoring of the physical layer in WSNs making use of a completely passive methodology. From data sniffed by external nodes, we first estimate the position of the nodes by applying the Weighted Least Squares (WLS to the method of indirect observations. The resulting node positions are then used to estimate the status of the communication links using the most appropriate propagation model. We performed a significant number of measurements on the field in both indoor and outdoor environments. From the experiments, we were able to achieve an accurate estimation of the channel links status with an average error lower than 1 dB, which is around 5 dB lower than the error introduced without the application of the proposed method.

  15. Observation of low-frequency acoustic surface waves in the nocturnal boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmadge, Carrick L; Waxler, Roger; Di, Xiao; Gilbert, Kenneth E; Kulichkov, Sergey

    2008-10-01

    A natural terrain surface, because of its porosity, can support an acoustic surface wave that is a mechanical analog of the familiar vertically polarized surface wave in AM radio transmission. At frequencies of several hundred hertz, the acoustic surface wave is attenuated over distances of a few hundred meters. At lower frequencies (e.g., below approximately 200 Hz) the attenuation is much less, allowing surface waves to propagate thousands of meters. At night, a low-frequency surface wave is generally present at long ranges even when downward refraction is weak. Thus, surface waves represent a ubiquitous nighttime transmission mode that exists even when other transmission modes are weak or absent. Data from recent nighttime field experiments and theoretical calculations are presented, demonstrating the persistence of the surface wave under different meteorological conditions. The low-frequency surface wave described here is the "quasiharmonical" tail observed previously in nighttime measurements but not identified by S. Kulichkov and his colleagues (Chunchuzov, I. P. et al. 1990. "On acoustical impulse propagation in a moving inhomogeneous atmospheric layer," J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 88, 455-461).

  16. Anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity observed in few-layer black phosphorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhe; Maassen, Jesse; Deng, Yexin; Du, Yuchen; Garrelts, Richard P.; Lundstrom, Mark S; Ye, Peide D.; Xu, Xianfan

    2015-01-01

    Black phosphorus has been revisited recently as a new two-dimensional material showing potential applications in electronics and optoelectronics. Here we report the anisotropic in-plane thermal conductivity of suspended few-layer black phosphorus measured by micro-Raman spectroscopy. The armchair and zigzag thermal conductivities are ∼20 and ∼40 W m−1 K−1 for black phosphorus films thicker than 15 nm, respectively, and decrease to ∼10 and ∼20 W m−1 K−1 as the film thickness is reduced, exhibiting significant anisotropy. The thermal conductivity anisotropic ratio is found to be ∼2 for thick black phosphorus films and drops to ∼1.5 for the thinnest 9.5-nm-thick film. Theoretical modelling reveals that the observed anisotropy is primarily related to the anisotropic phonon dispersion, whereas the intrinsic phonon scattering rates are found to be similar along the armchair and zigzag directions. Surface scattering in the black phosphorus films is shown to strongly suppress the contribution of long mean-free-path acoustic phonons. PMID:26472191

  17. Seasonal observations of OH and HO2 in the remote tropical marine boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. L. Fleming

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Field measurements of the hydroxyl radical, OH, are crucial for our understanding of tropospheric chemistry. However, observations of this key atmospheric species in the tropical marine boundary layer, where the warm, humid conditions and high solar irradiance lend themselves favourably to production, are sparse. The Seasonal Oxidant Study at the Cape Verde Atmospheric Observatory in 2009 allowed, for the first time, seasonal measurements of both OH and HO2 in a clean (i.e. low NOx, tropical marine environment. It was found that concentrations of OH and HO2 were typically higher in the summer months (June, September, with maximum daytime concentrations of ~9 × 106 and 4 × 108 molecule cm−3, respectively – almost double the values in winter (late February, early March. HO2 was observed to persist at ~107 molecule cm−3 through the night, but there was no strong evidence of nighttime OH, consistent with previous measurements at the site in 2007. HO2 was shown to have excellent correlations (R2 ~ 0.90 with both the photolysis rate of ozone, J(O1D, and the primary production rate of OH, P(OH, from the reaction of O(1D with water vapour. The analogous relations of OH were not so strong (R2 ~ 0.6, but the coefficients of the linear correlation with J(O1D in this study were close to those yielded from previous works in this region, suggesting that the chemical regimes have similar impacts on the concentration of OH. Analysis of the variance of OH and HO2 across the Seasonal Oxidant Study suggested that ~70% of the total variance could be explained by diurnal behaviour, with ~30% of the total variance being due to changes in air mass.

  18. Observational constraints on Arctic boundary-layer clouds, surface moisture and sensible heat fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D. L.; Boisvert, L.; Klaus, D.; Dethloff, K.; Ganeshan, M.

    2016-12-01

    The dry, cold environment and dynamic surface variations make the Arctic a unique but difficult region for observations, especially in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Spaceborne platforms have been the key vantage point to capture basin-scale changes during the recent Arctic warming. Using the AIRS temperature, moisture and surface data, we found that the Arctic surface moisture flux (SMF) had increased by 7% during 2003-2013 (18 W/m2 equivalent in latent heat), mostly in spring and fall near the Arctic coastal seas where large sea ice reduction and sea surface temperature (SST) increase were observed. The increase in Arctic SMF correlated well with the increases in total atmospheric column water vapor and low-level clouds, when compared to CALIPSO cloud observations. It has been challenging for climate models to reliably determine Arctic cloud radiative forcing (CRF). Using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 and assuming a more efficient Bergeron-Findeisen process with generalized subgrid-scale variability for total water content, we were able to produce a cloud distribution that is more consistent with the CloudSat/CALIPSO observations. More importantly, the modified schemes decrease (increase) the cloud water (ice) content in mixed-phase clouds, which help to improve the modeled CRF and energy budget at the surface, because of the dominant role of the liquid water in CRF. Yet, the coupling between Arctic low clouds and the surface is complex and has strong impacts on ABL. Studying GPS/COSMIC radio occultation (RO) refractivity profiles in the Arctic coldest and driest months, we successfully derived ABL inversion height and surface-based inversion (SBI) frequency, and they were anti-correlated over the Arctic Ocean. For the late summer and early fall season, we further analyzed Japanese R/V Mirai ship measurements and found that the open-ocean surface sensible heat flux (SSHF) can explain 10 % of the ABL height variability, whereas mechanisms such as cloud

  19. Wavelength dependence of the linear growth rate of the Es layer instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Cosgrove

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown, by computation of the linear growth rate, that midlatitude sporadic-E (Es layers are subject to a large scale electrodynamic instability. This instability is a logical candidate to explain certain frontal structuring events, and polarization electric fields, which have been observed in Es layers by ionosondes, by coherent scatter radars, and by rockets. However, the original growth rate derivation assumed an infinitely thin Es layer, and therefore did not address the short wavelength cutoff. Also, the same derivation ignored the effects of F region loading, which is a significant wavelength dependent effect. Herein is given a generalized derivation that remedies both these short comings, and thereby allows a computation of the wavelength dependence of the linear growth rate, as well as computations of various threshold conditions. The wavelength dependence of the linear growth rate is compared with observed periodicities, and the role of the zeroth order meridional wind is explored. A three-dimensional paper model is used to explain the instability geometry, which has been defined formally in previous works.

  20. Daytime descending intermediate layers observed over a sub-tropical Indian station Waltair during low-solar activity period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Niranjan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Study on daytime descending intermediate layer over subtropical Indian station Waltair (17.7° N, 83.3° E geographic, 6.4° N, 10° E geomagnetic, 20° N dip located in the equatorial anomaly transition region, using an IPS 42 Digital Ionosonde during the low solar activity year 2004 showed that the layers occur in the altitude range of 140–160 km with maximum occurrence during winter solstice. The layers observed during daytime occur with a double peak variation throughout the year with less occurrence probability and shorter duration presence during forenoon hours. The morning layer descent was associated with a density increase where as during afternoon hours a decrease in density was observed. The downward drift velocity was about 8 km/h during morning hours and between 7–11 km/h during afternoon hours, with a low descent rate of around 4.5 km/h during summer morning hours. The results indicate the presence of a 6 h tide at this location as observed from the characteristics of the descending layers, unlike at majority of locations where a significant semi diurnal trend is observed. The study brings out the complex nature of the tidal interaction at different locations.

  1. Investigating Marine Boundary Layer Parameterizations by Combining Observations with Models via State Estimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delle Monahce, Luca [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Clifton, Andrew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hacker, Joshua [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Kosovic, Branko [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Lee, Jared [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Vanderberghe, Francois [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Wu, Yonghui [University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), Boulder, CO (United States); Hawkins, Sam [Vattenfall, Solna Municipality (Sweden); Nissen, Jesper [Vattenfall, Solna Municipality (Sweden)

    2015-06-30

    In this project we have improved numerical weather prediction analyses and forecasts of low level winds in the marine boundary layer. This has been accomplished with the following tools; The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Weather and Research Forecasting model, WRF, both in his single column (SCM) and three-dimensional (3D) versions; The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Wave Watch III (WWIII); SE algorithms from the Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART, Anderson et al. 2009); and Observations of key quantities of the lower MBL, including temperature and winds at multiple levels above the sea surface. The experiments with the WRF SCM / DART system have lead to large improvements with respect to a standard WRF configuration, which is currently commonly used by the wind energy industry. The single column model appears to be a tool particularly suitable for off-shore wind energy applications given its accuracy, the ability to quantify uncertainty, and the minimal computational resource requirements. In situations where the impact of an upwind wind park may be of interest in a downwind location, a 3D approach may be more suitable. We have demonstrated that with the WRF 3D / DART system the accuracy of wind predictions (and other meteorological parameters) can be improved over a 3D computational domain, and not only at specific locations. All the scripting systems developed in this project (i.e., to run WRF SCM / DART, WRF 3D / DART, and the coupling between WRF and WWIII) and the several modifications and upgrades made to the WRF SCM model will be shared with the broader community.

  2. RACORO Extended-Term Aircraft Observations of Boundary-Layer Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelmann, Andrew M.; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Ogren, John A.; Turner, David D.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Feingold, Graham; Long, Charles N.; Jonsson, Haflidi H.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Collins, Don R.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Small boundary-layer clouds are ubiquitous over many parts of the globe and strongly influence the Earths radiative energy balance. However, our understanding of these clouds is insufficient to solve pressing scientific problems. For example, cloud feedback represents the largest uncertainty amongst all climate feedbacks in general circulation models (GCM). Several issues complicate understanding boundary-layer clouds and simulating them in GCMs. The high spatial variability of boundary-layer clouds poses an enormous computational challenge, since their horizontal dimensions and internal variability occur at spatial scales much finer than the computational grids used in GCMs. Aerosol-cloud interactions further complicate boundary-layer cloud measurement and simulation. Additionally, aerosols influence processes such as precipitation and cloud lifetime. An added complication is that at small scales (order meters to 10s of meters) distinguishing cloud from aerosol is increasingly difficult, due to the effects of aerosol humidification, cloud fragments and photon scattering between clouds.

  3. Observations of transitional tidal boundary layers and their impact on sediment transport in the Great Bay, NH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koetje, K. M.; Foster, D. L.; Lippmann, T. C.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of the vertical structure of tidal flows obtained in 2016 and 2017 in the Great Bay Estuary, NH show evidence of transitional tidal boundary layers at deployment locations on shallow mudflats. High-resolution bottom boundary layer currents, hydrography, turbidity, and bed characteristics were observed with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), an acoustic Doppler velocimeter (ADV), conductivity-depth-temperature (CTD) sensors, optical backscatter sensors, multibeam bathymetric surveys, and sediment grab samples and cores. Over the 2.5 m tidal range and at water depths ranging from 0.3 m to 1.5 m at mean lower low water, peak flows ranged from 10 cm/s to 30 cm/s and were primarily driven by the tides. A downward-looking ADCP captured the velocity profile over the lowest 1 m of the water column. Results consistently show a dual-log layer system, with evidence of a lower layer within 15 cm of the bed, another layer above approximately 30 cm from the bed, and a transitional region where the flow field rotates between that the two layers that can be as much as 180 degrees out of phase. CTD casts collected over a complete tidal cycle suggest that the weak thermohaline stratification is not responsible for development of the two layers. On the other hand, acoustic and optical backscatter measurements show spatial and temporal variability in suspended sediments that are dependant on tidal phase. Current work includes an examination of the relationship between sediment concentrations in the water column and velocity profile characteristics, along with an effort to quantify the impact of rotation and dual-log layers on bed stress.

  4. Observing continental boundary-layer structure and evolution over the South African savannah using a ceilometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gierens, Rosa T.; Henriksson, Svante; Josipovic, Micky; Vakkari, Ville; van Zyl, Pieter G.; Beukes, Johan P.; Wood, Curtis R.; O'Connor, Ewan J.

    2018-05-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (BL) is the atmospheric layer coupled to the Earth's surface at relatively short timescales. A key quantity is the BL depth, which is important in many applied areas of weather and climate such as air-quality forecasting. Studying BLs in climates and biomes across the globe is important, particularly in the under-sampled southern hemisphere. The present study is based on a grazed grassland-savannah area in northwestern South Africa during October 2012-August 2014. Ceilometers are probably the cheapest method for measuring continuous aerosol profiles up to several kilometers above ground and are thus an ideal tool for long-term studies of BLs. A ceilometer-estimated BL depth is based on profiles of attenuated backscattering coefficients from atmospheric aerosols; the sharpest drop often occurs at BL top. Based on this, we developed a new method for layer detection that we call the signal-limited layer method. The new algorithm was applied to ceilometer profiles which thus classified BL into classic regime types: daytime convective mixing, and a double layer at night of surface-based stable with a residual layer above it. We employed wavelet fitting to increase successful BL estimation for noisy profiles. The layer-detection algorithm was supported by an eddy-flux station, rain gauges, and manual inspection. Diurnal cycles were often clear, with BL depth detected for 50% of the daytime typically being 1-3 km, and for 80% of the night-time typically being a few hundred meters. Variability was also analyzed with respect to seasons and years. Finally, BL depths were compared with ERA-Interim estimates of BL depth to show reassuring agreement.

  5. Observations of the Early Evening Boundary-Layer Transition Using a Small Unmanned Aerial System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin, Timothy; Chilson, Phillip; Zielke, Brett; Fedorovich, Evgeni

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of the lower portion of the planetary boundary layer is investigated using the Small Multifunction Research and Teaching Sonde (SMARTSonde), an unmanned aerial vehicle developed at the University of Oklahoma. The study focuses on the lowest 200 m of the atmosphere, where the most noticeable thermodynamic changes occur during the day. Between October 2010 and February 2011, a series of flights was conducted during the evening hours on several days to examine the vertical structure of the lower boundary layer. Data from a nearby Oklahoma Mesonet tower was used to supplement the vertical profiles of temperature, humidity, and pressure, which were collected approximately every 30 min, starting 2 h before sunset and continuing until dusk. From the profiles, sensible and latent heat fluxes were estimated. These fluxes were used to diagnose the portion of the boundary layer that was most affected by the early evening transition. During the transition period, a shallow cool and moist layer near the ground was formed, and as the evening progressed the cooling affected an increasingly shallower layer just above the surface.

  6. The surface layer observed by a high-resolution sodar at DOME C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Argentini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One year field experiment has started on December 2011 at the French - Italian station of Concordia at Dome C, East Antarctic Plateau. The objective of the experiment is the study of the surface layer turbulent processes under stable/very stable stratifications, and the mechanisms leading to the formation of the warming events. A sodar was improved to achieve the vertical/time resolution needed to study these processes. The system, named Surface Layer sodar (SL-sodar, may operate both in high vertical resolution (low range and low vertical resolution (high range modes. In situ turbulence and radiation measurements were also provided in the framework of this experiment. A few preliminary results, concerning the standard summer diurnal cycle, a summer warming event, and unusually high frequency boundary layer atmospheric gravity waves are presented.

  7. Lidar-Observed Stress Vectors and Veer in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Mann, Jakob; Patton, Edward G.

    2013-01-01

    This study demonstrates that a pulsed wind lidar is a reliable instrument for measuring angles between horizontal vectors of significance in the atmospheric boundary layer. Three different angles are considered: the wind turning, the angle between the stress vector and the mean wind direction......, and the angle between the stress vector and the vertical gradient of the mean velocity vector. The latter is assumed to be zero by the often applied turbulent-viscosity hypothesis, so that the stress vector can be described through the vertical gradient of velocity. In the atmospheric surface layer, where...... the Coriolis force is negligible, this is supposedly a good approximation. High-resolution large-eddy simulation data show that this is indeed the case even beyond the surface layer. In contrast, through analysis of WindCube lidar measurements supported by sonic measurements, the study shows that it is only...

  8. Antiferroelectric surface layers in a liquid crystal as observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, E. F.; de Jeu, W. H.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray reflectivity form the surface of a liquid crystal with terminally polar (cyano substituted) molecules has been studied using a high-resolution triple-axis X-ray spectrometer in combination with a synchrotron source. It is demonstrated that at the surface of the smectic Al phase a few...... antiferroelectric double layers develop that can be distinguished from the bulk single layer structure. A model is developed that separates the electron density in a contribution from the molecular form factor, and from the structure factor of the mono- and the bilayers, respectively. It shows that (i) the first...

  9. Significant Atmospheric Boundary Layer Change Observed above an Agulhas Current Warm Cored Eddy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Messager

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The air-sea impact of a warm cored eddy ejected from the Agulhas Retroflection region south of Africa was assessed through both ocean and atmospheric profiling measurements during the austral summer. The presence of the eddy causes dramatic atmospheric boundary layer deepening, exceeding what was measured previously over such a feature in the region. This deepening seems mainly due to the turbulent heat flux anomaly above the warm eddy inducing extensive deep and persistent changes in the atmospheric boundary layer thermodynamics. The loss of heat by turbulent processes suggests that this kind of oceanic feature is an important and persistent source of heat for the atmosphere.

  10. Quiet Time Depression of the Equatorial Electrojet and Dynamics of the F-layer Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, S.; Valladares, C. E.; Doherty, P.

    2017-12-01

    The depression of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) is marked by a westward current due to streaming movement of laterally limited (±3°) charged particles in the ionospheric E region during the day along the magnetic equator. It is a complex low-latitude phenomenon and driven by various sources of electric fields associated with global neutral wind, solar tidal force, Interplanetary magnetic Field (IMF), etc. This unique physical property of the equatorial ionosphere holds a great promise for sorting out the governing mechanism of the dayside ionospheric electrodynamics and the onset of the enigmatic plasma structures in the ionospheric layers. Present study provides an overview of the special sequence of the longitudinal, seasonal, and occurrence rate variability of the depression of the EEJ, including its temporal variation, using data from an excellent chain of magnetic and ionospheric observatories along the low-latitude regions. A case and statistical study of the geomagnetically quiet time depression of EEJ strengths is presented using a pair of magnetometers, one located at the dip equator and another off the dip equator (±6° to ±9° away) in the American low-latitude regions. The significance of the variability of the depression of the EEJ current observed in the scenario of vertical drifts, sporadic E-layer, the equatorial F region plasma fountain, and height of the peak ionization in the F-layer, as well as GPS-TEC distributions, will be investigated.

  11. Daytime dependence of disturbances of ionospheric Es-layers connected to earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liperovskaya, E. V.; Liperovsky, A. V.; Meister, C.-V.; Silina, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    In the present work variations of the semi-transparency of the sporadic E-layer of the ionosphere due to seismic activities are studied. The semi-transparency Q is determined by the blanketing frequency fbEs and the characteristic frequency foEs, Q = (foEs - fbEs)/fbEs. At low values of the blanketing frequency fbEs, the critical frequency foEs does not describe the maximum ionisation density of the Es-layer, as the critical frequencies of regular ionospheric layers (e.g. foF2) do, but it describes the occurrence of small-scall (tenths of meters) inhomogeneities of the ionisation density along the vertical in the layer. The maximum ionisation density of the sporadic layer is proportional to the square of fbEs. In the case of vertical ionospheric sounding, the sporadic layer becomes transparent for signals with frequencies larger than fbEs. Investigations showed that about three days before an earthquake an increase of the semi-transparency interval is observed during sunset and sunrise. In the present work, analogous results are found for data of the vertical sounding stations "Tokyo" and "Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky". Using the method of superposition of epoches, more than 50 earthquakes with magnitudes M > 5, depths h < 40 km, and distances between the station and the epicenter R < 300 km are considered in case of the vertical sounding station "Tokyo". More than 20 earthquakes with such parameters were analysed in case of the station "Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky". Days with strong geomagnetic activity were excluded from the analysis. According to the station "Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky" about 1-3 days before earthquakes, an increase of Es-spread is observed a few hours before midnight. This increase is a sign of large-scale inhomogeneities in the sporadic layers.

  12. Stable boundary-layer regimes at dome C, Antarctica : observation and analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vignon, E.; van de Wiel, B.J.H.; van Hooijdonk, I.G.S.; Genthon, C.; van der Linden, S.J.A.; van Hooft, J.A.; Baas, P.; Maurel, W.; Traullé, O.; Casasanta, G.

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of meteorological measurements along a 45 m tower at Dome C on the high East Antarctic Plateau revealed two distinct stable boundary layer (SBL) regimes at this location. The first regime is characterized by strong winds and continuous turbulence. It results in full vertical coupling

  13. Observed Changes in Atmospheric Boundary Layer Properties at Memphis International Airport During August 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, J. Allen; Rodgers, William G., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    As part of the NASA Terminal Area Productivity Program, Langley Research Center embarked on a series of field measurements of wake vortex characteristics and associated atmospheric boundary layer properties. One measurement period was at the Memphis International Airport in August 1995. Atmospheric temperature, humidity, winds, turbulence, radiation, and soil properties were measured from a variety of sensor systems and platforms including sodars, profilers, aircraft and towers. This research focused on: (1) changes that occurred in tower data during sunrise and sunset transitions, (2) vertical variation of temperature and cross-head winds at selected times utilizing combinations of sensors, and (3) changes measured by an OV-10 aircraft during approaches and level flights. Significant but not unusual changes are documented and discussed in terms of expected boundary layer behavior. Questions on measurement and prediction of these changes from existing and near-term capabilities are discussed in the context of a future Aircraft Vortex Spacing System.

  14. Observation of a current-limited double layer in a linear turbulent-heating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inuzuka, H.; Torii, Y.; Nagatsu, M.; Tsukishima, T.

    1985-01-01

    Time- and space-resolved measurements of strong double layers (DLs) have been carried out for the first time on a linear turbulent-heating device, together with those of fluctuation spectra and precise current measurements. A stable stong DL is formed even when the electric current through the DL is less than the so-called Bohm value. Discussion of the formation and decay processes is given, indicating a transition from an ion-acoustic DL to a monotonic DL

  15. Direct observation of grafting interlayer phosphate in Mg/Al layered double hydroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamura, Akihiro; Kanezaki, Eiji; Jones, Mark I.; Metson, James B.

    2012-01-01

    The grafting of interlayer phosphate in synthetic Mg/Al layered double hydroxides with interlayer hydrogen phosphate (LDH-HPO 4 ) has been studied by XRD, TG/DTA, FT-IR, XPS and XANES. The basal spacing of crystalline LDH-HPO 4 decreases in two stages with increasing temperature, from 1.06 nm to 0.82 nm at 333 K in the first transition, and to 0.722 nm at 453 K in the second. The first stage occurs due to the loss of interlayer water and rearrangement of the interlayer HPO 4 2− . In the second transition, the interlayer phosphate is grafted to the layer by the formation of direct bonding to metal cations in the layer, accompanied by a change in polytype of the crystalline structure. The grafted phosphate becomes immobilized and cannot be removed by anion-exchange with 1-octanesulfonate. The LDH is amorphous at 743 K but decomposes to Mg 3 (PO 4 ) 2 , AlPO 4 , MgO and MgAl 2 O 4 after heated to 1273 K. - Graphical abstract: The cross section of the synthetic Mg, Al layered double hydroxides in Phase 1, with interlayer hydrogen phosphate Phase 2, and with grafted phosphate, Phase 3. Highlights: ► The grafting of hydrogen phosphate intercalated Mg/Al-LDH has been studied. ► The basal spacing of crystalline LDH-HPO 4 decreases in two stages with increasing temperature. ► The first decrease is due to loss of interlayer water, the second is attributed to phosphate grafting. ► The grafted interlayer phosphate becomes immobilized and cannot be removed by anion-exchange.

  16. Sound-scattering layers of the Black Sea based on ADCP observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A. N.; Lemeshko, E. M.; Fedorov, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    The paper discusses the results of expeditions to the northwestern part of the Black Sea carried out in 2004-2008. Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) with an operating frequency of 150 and 300 kHz were used as the echo sounders. The characteristic scales of the spatial variability of sound scattering in the Black Sea were determined; the revealed peculiarities are interpreted. The characteristics of a deep soundscattering layer in the Black Sea are given.

  17. HEOS-2 observations of the boundary layer from the magnetopause to the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formisano, V.

    1980-01-01

    HEOS-2 low energy electron data (10 eV - 3.7 keV) from the LPS Frascati plasma experiment have been used to identify three different magnetospheric electron populations. Magnetosheath-like electron energy spectra (35-50 eV) are characteristic of the plasma mantle, entry layer and cusps from the magnetopause down to 2-3 Rsub(E). Plasma sheet electrons (energy > 1 keV) are found at all local times, with strong intensities in the early morning quadrant and weaker intensities in the afternoon quadrant. The plasma sheet shows a well defined inner edge at all local times and latitudes, the inner edge coinciding probably with the plasmapause. The plasma sheet does not reach the magnetopause, but it is separated from it by a boundary layer electron population that is very distinct from the other two electron populations, most electrons having energies 100-300 eV. These three electron populations are mapped from the magnetopause down to the high latitude near earth regions. The boundary layer extends along the magnetopause up to 5-7 Rsub(E) above the equator; at higher latitudes it follows the magnetic lines of force and it is found closer and closer to the earth. (author)

  18. Experimental observation of the layering and wetting of multilayer liquid helium-4 films on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.

    1987-01-01

    The multilayer adsorption of liquid 4 He on graphite was studied by using third sound, a substrate-induced surface wave in a superfluid film, to probe the 4 He film-vapor interface. The third-sound velocity decreases with increasing film thickness and can be used to monitor the film growth. Graphite, forms of which have large areas of atomic uniformity, is an ideal substrate for the study of film growth and layering. An annular resonator made out of graphite fibers was used for the experiments. Such a resonator avoids problems such as capillary condensation present in earlier resonance experiments with graphite foam and vapor sound interference present in time-of-flight experiments with highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG). Measurements of film growth were made between temperatures of 0.35 and 1.25 K. The third-sound resonance frequency, which is proportional to the third-sound velocity, was used to follow the film growth. Simultaneous measurements of the third-sound velocity on glass provide an independent measure of the film thickness. Results obtained show continuous film growth up to at least 25 to 30 layers on graphite. Oscillations of the third-sound velocity for low film coverages shown evidence of layering of the film

  19. Observation of an unusual mid-stratospheric aerosol layer in the Arctic: possible sources and implications for polar vortex dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerding

    Full Text Available By the beginning of winter 2000/2001, a mysterious stratospheric aerosol layer had been detected by four different Arctic lidar stations. The aerosol layer was observed first on 16 November 2000, at an altitude of about 38 km near Søndre Strømfjord, Greenland (67° N, 51° W and on 19 November 2000, near Andenes, Norway (69°  N, 16°  E. Subsequently, in early December 2000, the aerosol layer was observed near Kiruna, Sweden (68°  N, 21°  E and Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen (79°  N, 12°  E. No mid-latitude lidar station observed the presence of aerosols in this altitude region. The layer persisted throughout the winter 2000/2001, at least up to 12 February 2001. In November 2000, the backscatter ratio at a wavelength of 532 nm was up to 1.1, with a FWHM of about 2.5 km. By early February 2001, the layer had sedimented from an altitude of 38 km to about 26 km. Measurements at several wavelengths by the ALOMAR and Koldewey lidars indicate the particle size was between 30 and 50 nm. Depolarisation measurements reveal that the particles in the layer are aspherical, hence solid. In the mid-stratosphere, the ambient atmospheric temperature was too high to support in situ formation or existence of cloud particles consisting of ice or an acid-water solution. Furthermore, in the year 2000 there was no volcanic eruption, which could have injected aerosols into the upper stratosphere. Therefore, other origins of the aerosol, such as meteoroid debris, condensed rocket fuel, or aerosols produced under the influence of charged solar particles, will be discussed in the paper. Trajectory calculations illustrate the path of the aerosol cloud within the polar vortex and are used to link the observations at the different lidar sites. From the descent rate of  the layer and particle sedimentation rates, the mean down-ward motion of air within the polar vortex was estimated to be about 124 m/d between 35 and 30 km, with higher values at the edge of the

  20. Observation of an unusual mid-stratospheric aerosol layer in the Arctic: possible sources and implications for polar vortex dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gerding

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available By the beginning of winter 2000/2001, a mysterious stratospheric aerosol layer had been detected by four different Arctic lidar stations. The aerosol layer was observed first on 16 November 2000, at an altitude of about 38 km near Søndre Strømfjord, Greenland (67° N, 51° W and on 19 November 2000, near Andenes, Norway (69°  N, 16°  E. Subsequently, in early December 2000, the aerosol layer was observed near Kiruna, Sweden (68°  N, 21°  E and Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen (79°  N, 12°  E. No mid-latitude lidar station observed the presence of aerosols in this altitude region. The layer persisted throughout the winter 2000/2001, at least up to 12 February 2001. In November 2000, the backscatter ratio at a wavelength of 532 nm was up to 1.1, with a FWHM of about 2.5 km. By early February 2001, the layer had sedimented from an altitude of 38 km to about 26 km. Measurements at several wavelengths by the ALOMAR and Koldewey lidars indicate the particle size was between 30 and 50 nm. Depolarisation measurements reveal that the particles in the layer are aspherical, hence solid. In the mid-stratosphere, the ambient atmospheric temperature was too high to support in situ formation or existence of cloud particles consisting of ice or an acid-water solution. Furthermore, in the year 2000 there was no volcanic eruption, which could have injected aerosols into the upper stratosphere. Therefore, other origins of the aerosol, such as meteoroid debris, condensed rocket fuel, or aerosols produced under the influence of charged solar particles, will be discussed in the paper. Trajectory calculations illustrate the path of the aerosol cloud within the polar vortex and are used to link the observations at the different lidar sites. From the descent rate of  the layer and particle sedimentation rates, the mean down-ward motion of air within the polar vortex was estimated to be about 124 m/d between 35 and 30 km, with higher values at the edge of the

  1. An Algorithm to Generate Deep-Layer Temperatures from Microwave Satellite Observations for the Purpose of Monitoring Climate Change. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Fleming, Henry E.

    1994-01-01

    An algorithm for generating deep-layer mean temperatures from satellite-observed microwave observations is presented. Unlike traditional temperature retrieval methods, this algorithm does not require a first guess temperature of the ambient atmosphere. By eliminating the first guess a potentially systematic source of error has been removed. The algorithm is expected to yield long-term records that are suitable for detecting small changes in climate. The atmospheric contribution to the deep-layer mean temperature is given by the averaging kernel. The algorithm computes the coefficients that will best approximate a desired averaging kernel from a linear combination of the satellite radiometer's weighting functions. The coefficients are then applied to the measurements to yield the deep-layer mean temperature. Three constraints were used in deriving the algorithm: (1) the sum of the coefficients must be one, (2) the noise of the product is minimized, and (3) the shape of the approximated averaging kernel is well-behaved. Note that a trade-off between constraints 2 and 3 is unavoidable. The algorithm can also be used to combine measurements from a future sensor (i.e., the 20-channel Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU)) to yield the same averaging kernel as that based on an earlier sensor (i.e., the 4-channel Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU)). This will allow a time series of deep-layer mean temperatures based on MSU measurements to be continued with AMSU measurements. The AMSU is expected to replace the MSU in 1996.

  2. Generation of mesoscale F layer structure and electric fields by the combined Perkins and Es layer instabilities, in simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Cosgrove

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The generic equilibrium configuration of the nighttime midlatitude ionosphere consists of an F layer held up against gravity by winds and/or electric fields, and a sporadic E (Es layer located by a sheared wind field, which experiences the same electric fields as the F layer. This configuration is subject to two large-scale (e.g. >10 km "layer instabilities": one of the F layer known as the Perkins instability, and another of the Es layer which has been called the Es layer instability. Electric fields on scales larger than (about 10 km map very efficiently between the Es and F layers, and the two instabilities have a similar geometry, allowing them to interact with one another. As shown through a linear growth rate analysis, the two most important parameters governing the interaction are the relative horizontal velocity between the Es and F layers, and the integrated conductivity ratio ΣH/ΣPF, where ΣH and ΣPF are the field line integrated Hall conductivity of the Es layer, and the field line integrated Pedersen conductivity of the F layer, respectively. For both large and small relative velocities the growth rate was found to be more than double that of the Perkins instability alone, when ΣHΣPF=1.8. However, the characteristic eigenmode varies considerably with relative velocity, and different nonlinear behavior is expected in these two cases. As a follow up to the linear growth rate analysis, we explore in this article the nonlinear evolution of the unstable coupled system subject to a 200 km wavelength initial perturbation of the F layer, using a two-dimensional numerical solution of the two-fluid equations, as a function of relative horizontal velocity and ΣHΣPF. We find that when ΣHΣPF⪝0.5 the Perkins instability is able to control the dynamics and modulate the F layer altitude in 2 to 3 h time. However, the electric fields remain small until the altitude modulation is extremely large, and even then they are not large enough to

  3. The atmospheric boundary layer evening transitions: an observational and numerical study from two different datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Mariano; Yagüe, Carlos; Román-Cascón, Carlos; Maqueda, Gregorio; Ander Arrillaga, Jon

    2015-04-01

    In this work we study the temporal evolution of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) along the transition period from a diurnal typical convection to a nocturnal more frequently stable situation. This period is known as late afternoon or evening transition, depending on the specific definitions employed by different authors [1]. In order to obtain a proper characterization, we try to learn whether or not the behaviour of these transitional boundary layers is strongly dependent on local conditions. To do so, two sets of evening transitions are studied from data collected at two different experimental sites. These locations correspond to research facilities named CIBA (Spain) and CRA (France), which are the places where atmospheric field campaigns have been conducted during the last years, such as CIBA2008 and BLLAST 2011, respectively. In order to get comparable situations, we focus especially on transitions with weak synoptic forcing, and consider daily astronomical sunset as a reference time. A statistical analysis on main parameters related to the transition is carried out for both locations, and the average behaviour is shown as well as extreme values according to the timing. A similar pattern in the qualitative evolution of many variables is found. Nevertheless, several relevant differences in the progress of key variables are obtained too. Moisture, both from the soil and the air, is thought to have great relevance in explaining many of the differences found between the two sites. Some case studies are explored, focusing on the role played by the atmospheric turbulence. Complementary, numerical experiments are also performed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) mesoscale model, in order to test the role of humidity, by artificially varying it in some of the simulations. [1] Lothon, M. and coauthors (2014): The BLLAST field experiment: Boundary-Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence. Atmos. Chem. Phys., 14, 10931-10960.

  4. Observation of the hypodermic fatty layer of the human torso by computed tomography method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, Yoko; Inokuchi, Seiichiro; Suzuki, Masataka

    1984-01-01

    CT images were taken at 7 different longitudinal levels of the torso, and three different body types, which were defined by the Rohrer Index, were discussed. Differences between the sexes were also discussed. 1) Total cross-sectional area: In males, values showed maximum at 2 levels (mid-point of sternum, xiphoid) among 7 levels; and, for females, 2 maximal values appeared at the mid-point of the sternum level and the level of the pubic symphysis. Values at the umbilicus level were smallest in both sexes. 2) Areas of hypodermic fatty layer: Here, the values for males were maximal at the umbilicus level, next largest were found at the lower abdominal level. For females, however, the maximal values appeared at the pubic symphysis and lower abdominal levels and values for the umbilicus level followed in magnitude. 3) Hypodermic fatty layer area ratios to those of the total cross-sectional area: Values here were largest at the umbilicus level in both sexes. For males, the ratio at the lower abdominal level and at the pubic symphysis level followed in this order: For females, the order of magnitude of values was reversed between those two ratios. The most minimal ratio appeared at the level of the xiphoid in both sexes. A tendency towards higher ratios in females than in males was seen at all 7 levels for bodies of the A-type. This was seen, however, only at levels below the upper abdomen for bodies of the C-type, and at all levels, except the umbilicus and lower abdomen, for bodies of the D-type. 4) Thickness of the hypodermic fatty layer: The maximal values in this layer appeared at point F for the superior border, mid-point and xiphoid of sternum levels. For the upper abdominal level, maximal values appeared at point A, and for the umbilicus level, at point D. They were all found at point C for the lower abdominal level and at point A for the pubic symphysis level. (J.P.N.)

  5. Observations of the Morning Development of the Urban Boundary Layer Over London, UK, Taken During the ACTUAL Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halios, Christos H.; Barlow, Janet F.

    2018-03-01

    The study of the boundary layer can be most difficult when it is in transition and forced by a complex surface, such as an urban area. Here, a novel combination of ground-based remote sensing and in situ instrumentation in central London, UK, is deployed, aiming to capture the full evolution of the urban boundary layer (UBL) from night-time until the fully-developed convective phase. In contrast with the night-time stable boundary layer observed over rural areas, the night-time UBL is weakly convective. Therefore, a new approach for the detection of the morning-transition and rapid-growth phases is introduced, based on the sharp, quasi-linear increase of the mixing height. The urban morning-transition phase varied in duration between 0.5 and 4 h and the growth rate of the mixing layer during the rapid-growth phase had a strong positive relationship with the convective velocity scale, and a weaker, negative relationship with wind speed. Wind shear was found to be higher during the night-time and morning-transition phases than the rapid-growth phase and the shear production of turbulent kinetic energy near the mixing-layer top was around six times larger than surface shear production in summer, and around 1.5 times larger in winter. In summer under low winds, low-level jets dominated the UBL, and shear production was greater than buoyant production during the night-time and the morning-transition phase near the mixing-layer top. Within the rapid-growth phase, buoyant production dominated at the surface, but shear production dominated in the upper half of the UBL. These results imply that regional flows such as low-level jets play an important role alongside surface forcing in determining UBL structure and growth.

  6. The structure of turbulent jets, vortices and boundary layer: laboratory and field observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekula, E.; Redondo, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The main aim of this work is research, understand and describe key aspects of the turbulent jets and effects connected with them such as boundary layer interactions on the effect of a 2D geometry. Work is based principally on experiments but there are also some comparisons between experimental and field results. A series of experiments have been performed consisting in detailed turbulent measurements of the 3 velocity components to understand the processes of interaction that lead to mixing and mass transport between boundaries and free shear layers. The turbulent wall jet configuration occurs often in environmental and industrial processes, but here we apply the laboratory experiments as a tool to understand jet/boundary interactions in the environment. We compare the structure of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) images of coastal jets and vortices and experimental jets (plumes) images searching for the relationship between these two kinds of jets at very different Reynolds numbers taking advantage of the self-similarity of the processes. In order to investigate the structure of ocean surface detected jets (SAR) and vortices near the coast, we compare wall and boundary effects on the structure of turbulent jets (3D and 2D) which are non-homogeneous, developing multifractal and spectral techniques useful for environmental monitoring in space.

  7. Characterizing the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL) Using Satellite Observations, Balloon Measurements and a Chemical Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairlie, T. D.; Vernier, J.-P.; Liu, H.; Deshler, T.; Natarajan, M.; Bedka, K.; Wegner, T.; Baker, N.; Gadhavi, H.; Ratnam, M. V.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Satellite observations and numerical modeling studies have demonstrated that the Asian Summer Monsoon (ASM) provide a conduit for gas-phase pollutants in south Asia to reach the lower stratosphere. Now, observations from the CALIPSO satellite have revealed the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL), a summertime accumulation of aerosols in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), associated with the ASM anticyclone. The ATAL has potential implications for regional cloud properties, climate, and chemical processes in the UTLS. Here, we show in situ measurements from balloon-borne instruments, aircraft, and satellite observations, together with trajectory and chemical transport model (CTM) simulations to explore the origin, composition, physical, and optical properties of aerosols in the ATAL. In particular, we show balloon-data from our BATAL-2015 field campaign to India and Saudi Arabia in summer 2015, which includes in situ backscatter measurements from COBALD instruments, and the first observations of size and volatility of aerosols in the ATAL layer using optical particle counters (OPCs). Back trajectory calculations initialized from CALIPSO observations point to deep convection over North India as a principal source of ATAL aerosols. Available aircraft observations suggest significant sulfur and carbonaceous components to the ATAL, which is supported by simulations using the GEOS-Chem CTM. Source elimination studies conducted with the GEOS-Chem indicate that ATAL aerosols originate primary from south Asian sources, in contrast with some earlier studies.

  8. Observing Boundary-Layer Winds from Hot-Air Balloon Flights

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, de E.I.F.; Haan, de S.; Bosveld, F.C.; Wichers Schreur, B.G.J.; Holtslag, A.A.M.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution upper-air wind observations are sparse, and additional observations are a welcome source of meteorological information. In this paper the potential of applying balloon flights for upper-air wind measurements is explored, and the meteorological content of this information is

  9. Energetic particle beams in the plasma sheet boundary layer following substorm expansion - Simultaneous near-earth and distant tail observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholer, M.; Baker, D. N.; Gloeckler, G.; Ipavich, F. M.; Galvin, A. B.; Klecker, B.; Terasawa, T.; Tsurutani, B. T.

    1986-01-01

    Simultaneous observations of ions and electron beams in the near-earth and deep magnetotail following the onset of substorm are analyzed in terms of the substorm neutral line model. The observations were collected on March 20, 1983 with ISSE 1 and 3. Energy fluxes and intensity-time profiles of protons and electrons are studied. The data reveal that the reconnection at the near-earth neutral line produces ions and electrons for the plasma sheet boundary layer. The maximum electric potential along the neutral line is evaluated.

  10. Observation of nanometer-sized electro-active defects in insulating layers by fluorescence microscopy and electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, Christophe; Marchuk, Kyle; Ahn, Hyun S; Titus, Eric J; Kim, Jiyeon; Willets, Katherine A; Bard, Allen J

    2015-06-02

    We report a method to study electro-active defects in passivated electrodes. This method couples fluorescence microscopy and electrochemistry to localize and size electro-active defects. The method was validated by comparison with a scanning probe technique, scanning electrochemical microscopy. We used our method for studying electro-active defects in thin TiO2 layers electrodeposited on 25 μm diameter Pt ultramicroelectrodes (UMEs). The permeability of the TiO2 layer was estimated by measuring the oxidation of ferrocenemethanol at the UME. Blocking of current ranging from 91.4 to 99.8% was achieved. Electro-active defects with an average radius ranging between 9 and 90 nm were observed in these TiO2 blocking layers. The distribution of electro-active defects over the TiO2 layer is highly inhomogeneous and the number of electro-active defect increases for lower degree of current blocking. The interest of the proposed technique is the possibility to quickly (less than 15 min) image samples as large as several hundreds of μm(2) while being able to detect electro-active defects of only a few tens of nm in radius.

  11. Origin of non-spherical particles in the boundary layer over Beijing, China: based on balloon-borne observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Yamada, Maromu; Iwasaka, Yasunobu; Zhang, Daizhou; Wang, Hong; Wang, Zhenzhu; Lei, Hengchi; Shi, Guangyu

    2015-10-01

    Vertical structures of aerosols from the ground to about 1,000 m altitude in Beijing were measured with a balloon-borne optical particle counter. The results showed that, in hazy days, there were inversions at approximately 500-600 m, below which the particulate matters were well mixed vertically, while the concentration of particles decreased sharply above the mixing layer. Electron microscopic observation of the particles collected with the balloon-borne impactor indicates that the composition of particles is different according to weather conditions in the boundary mixing layer of Beijing city and suggests that dust particles are always dominant in coarse-mode particles. Interestingly, sea-salt particles are frequently identified, suggesting the importance of marine air inflow to the Beijing area even in summer. The Ca-rich spherical particles are also frequently identified, suggesting chemical modification of dust particle by NOx or emission of CaO and others from local emission. Additionally, those types of particles showed higher concentration above the mixing layer under the relatively calm weather condition of summer, suggesting the importance of local-scale convection found in summer which rapidly transported anthropogenic particles above the mixing layer. Lidar extinction profiles qualitatively have good consistency with the balloon-borne measurements. Attenuation effects of laser pulse intensity are frequently observed due to high concentration of particulate matter in the Beijing atmosphere, and therefore quantitative agreement of lidar return and aerosol concentration can be hardly observed during dusty condition. Comparing the depolarization ratio obtained from the lidar measurements with the balloon-borne measurements, the contribution of the dry sea-salt particles, in addition to the dust particles, is suggested as an important factor causing depolarization ratio in the Beijing atmosphere.

  12. AFSC/FMA/North Pacific Observer Debriefed Data Presentation Layer (OBSINT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observer data span more than two decades and multiple database development interations. To facilitate status of stocks authors and other users of these records, a...

  13. Tracking atmospheric boundary layer dynamics with water vapor D-excess observations

    KAUST Repository

    Parkes, Stephen; McCabe, Matthew; Griffiths, Alan; Wang, Lixin

    2015-01-01

    Stable isotope water vapor observations present a history of hydrological processes that have impacted on an air mass. Consequently, there is scope to improve our knowledge of how different processes impact on humidity budgets by determining

  14. In situ observation of carbon nanotube layer growth on microbolometers with substrates at ambient temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svatoš, Vojtěch; Gablech, Imrich; Ilic, B. Robert; Pekárek, Jan; Neužil, Pavel

    2018-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have near unity infrared (IR) absorption efficiency, making them extremely attractive for IR imaging devices. Since CNT growth occurs at elevated temperatures, the integration of CNTs with IR imaging devices is challenging and has not yet been achieved. Here, we show a strategy for implementing CNTs as IR absorbers using differential heating of thermally isolated microbolometer membranes in a C2H2 environment. During the process, CNTs were catalytically grown on the surface of a locally heated membrane, while the substrate was maintained at an ambient temperature. CNT growth was monitored in situ in real time using optical microscopy. During growth, we measured the intensity of light emission and the reflected light from the heated microbolometer. Our measurements of bolometer performance show that the CNT layer on the surface of the microbolometer membrane increases the IR response by a factor of (2.3 ± 0.1) (mean ± one standard deviation of the least-squares fit parameters). This work opens the door to integrating near unity IR absorption, CNT-based, IR absorbers with hybrid complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor focal plane array architectures.

  15. A Vortical Dawn Flank Boundary Layer for Near-Radial IMF: Wind Observations on 24 October 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, C. J.; Gratton, F. T.; Gnavi, G.; Torbert, R. B.; Wilson, Lynn B., III

    2014-01-01

    We present an example of a boundary layer tailward of the dawn terminator which is entirely populated by rolled-up flow vortices. Observations were made by Wind on 24 October 2001 as the spacecraft moved across the region at the X plane approximately equal to -13 Earth radii. Interplanetary conditions were steady with a near-radial interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). Approximately 15 vortices were observed over the 1.5 hours duration of Wind's crossing, each lasting approximately 5 min. The rolling up is inferred from the presence of a hot tenuous plasma being accelerated to speeds higher than in the adjoining magnetosheath, a circumstance which has been shown to be a reliable signature of this in single-spacecraft observations. A blob of cold dense plasma was entrained in each vortex, at whose leading edge abrupt polarity changes of field and velocity components at current sheets were regularly observed. In the frame of the average boundary layer velocity, the dense blobs were moving predominantly sunward and their scale size along the X plane was approximately 7.4 Earth radii. Inquiring into the generation mechanism of the vortices, we analyze the stability of the boundary layer to sheared flows using compressible magnetohydrodynamic Kelvin-Helmholtz theory with continuous profiles for the physical quantities. We input parameters from (i) the exact theory of magnetosheath flow under aligned solar wind field and flow vectors near the terminator and (ii) the Wind data. It is shown that the configuration is indeed Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable. This is the first reported example of KH-unstable waves at the magnetopause under a radial IMF.

  16. Characteristics and limitations of GPS L1 observations from submerged antennas - Theoretical investigation in snow, ice, and freshwater and practical observations within a freshwater layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Ladina; Meindl, Michael; Geiger, Alain

    2018-05-01

    Observations from a submerged GNSS antenna underneath a snowpack need to be analyzed to investigate its potential for snowpack characterization. The magnitude of the main interaction processes involved in the GPS L1 signal propagation through different layers of snow, ice, or freshwater is examined theoretically in the present paper. For this purpose, the GPS signal penetration depth, attenuation, reflection, refraction as well as the excess path length are theoretically investigated. Liquid water exerts the largest influence on GPS signal propagation through a snowpack. An experiment is thus set up with a submerged geodetic GPS antenna to investigate the influence of liquid water on the GPS observations. The experimental results correspond well with theory and show that the GPS signal penetrates the liquid water up to three centimeters. The error in the height component due to the signal propagation delay in water can be corrected with a newly derived model. The water level above the submerged antenna could also be estimated.

  17. Mixed layer heat budget of Kuroshio-Tango Triangle using satellite and ship observations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pankajakshan, T.; Akiyama, M.; Sugimori, Y.; Wuwa, J.; Okada, Y.; Siripong, A.

    heat flux across the air-sea boundary both satellite (NIMBUS-7 SMMR) and ship observations are used. The advective fluxes across the lateral boundaries of the system are derived from sequential images of AVHRR. The net heat divergence of the triangular...

  18. LONGITUDINAL CHANGES IN THICKNESSES OF THE MACULA, GANGLION CELL-INNER PLEXIFORM LAYER, AND RETINAL NERVE FIBER LAYER AFTER VITRECTOMY: A 12-Month Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyung-Bin; Lee, Min-Woo; Kwak, Baek-Soo; Jo, Young-Joon; Kim, Jung-Yeul

    2018-01-01

    To analyze longitudinal changes in the thicknesses of the macula, ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL), and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) after vitrectomy. Thirty-eight patients diagnosed with intraocular lens (IOL) dislocation without evidence of other vitreoretinal diseases were included. They underwent conventional vitrectomy and IOL transscleral fixation, with a follow-up of 12 months. Using spectral domain optical coherence tomography, the thicknesses of the macula, GC-IPL, and peripapillary RNFL in the vitrectomized and fellow control eyes were measured. Various optic nerve head parameters were also determined. Optical coherence tomography showed that there were no significant differences in postoperative central macular thickness compared with baseline values. The average GC-IPL thickness increased 1 month after surgery from baseline (P = 0.038). The average RNFL thickness increased from baseline at 1 month (P = 0.001) and 3 months (P = 0.011) after vitrectomy. The mean foveal, GC-IPL, and RNFL thicknesses of the study eyes compared with the fellow control eyes increased at 1 month (P = 0.034), 1 month (P = 0.048), and 1 month (P = 0.013) to 3 months (P = 0.038), respectively, after surgery. However, no significant differences were found in intraocular pressure or optic nerve head parameters between the study and fellow control eyes at 12 months after surgery. Transient increases in the thickness of the macula and GC-IPL were observed at 1 month after vitrectomy, and the postoperative RNFL thickness increased until 3 months after surgery, after which it returned to preoperative levels. There was no significant change in intraocular pressure or optic nerve head parameters before and after surgery.

  19. Planet gaps in the dust layer of 3D proto-planetary disks: Observability with ALMA

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Jean-François; Pinte, Christophe; Maddison, Sarah T.; Ménard, François

    2013-01-01

    2 pages, 2 figures, to appear in the Proceedings of IAU Symp. 299: Exploring the Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems (Victoria, Canada); International audience; Among the numerous known extrasolar planets, only a handful have been imaged directly so far, at large orbital radii and in rather evolved systems. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) will have the capacity to observe these wide planetary systems at a younger age, thus bringing a better understanding of th...

  20. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition - Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Erik; Lohou, Fabienne; Lothon, Marie; Pardyjak, Eric; Mahrt, Larry; Darbieu, Clara

    2016-07-01

    The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and its budget in the afternoon period from midday until zero-buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) field campaign for 10 intensive observation period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics and mesoscale situation at the site are also described based upon taller tower measurements, radiosoundings and remote sensing instrumentation. Analysis of the TKE budget during the afternoon transition reveals a variety of different surface layer dynamics in terms of TKE and TKE decay. This is largely attributed to variations in the 8 m wind speed, which is responsible for different amounts of near-surface shear production on different afternoons and variations within some of the afternoon periods. The partitioning of near-surface production into local dissipation and transport in neutral and unstably stratified conditions was investigated. Although variations exist both between and within afternoons, as a rule of thumb, our results suggest that about 50 % of the near-surface production of TKE is compensated for by local dissipation near the surface, leaving about 50 % available for transport. This result indicates that it is important to also consider TKE transport as a factor influencing the near-surface TKE decay rate, which in many earlier studies has mainly been linked with the production terms of TKE by buoyancy and wind shear. We also conclude that the TKE tendency is smaller than the other budget terms, indicating a quasi-stationary evolution of TKE in the afternoon transition. Even though the TKE tendency was observed to be small, a strong correlation to mean buoyancy production of -0.69 was found for the afternoon period. For comparison with previous results, the TKE budget terms are normalized with

  1. Turbulence kinetic energy budget during the afternoon transition – Part 1: Observed surface TKE budget and boundary layer description for 10 intensive observation period days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nilsson

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The decay of turbulence kinetic energy (TKE and its budget in the afternoon period from midday until zero-buoyancy flux at the surface is studied in a two-part paper by means of measurements from the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST field campaign for 10 intensive observation period days. Here, in Part 1, near-surface measurements from a small tower are used to estimate a TKE budget. The overall boundary layer characteristics and mesoscale situation at the site are also described based upon taller tower measurements, radiosoundings and remote sensing instrumentation. Analysis of the TKE budget during the afternoon transition reveals a variety of different surface layer dynamics in terms of TKE and TKE decay. This is largely attributed to variations in the 8 m wind speed, which is responsible for different amounts of near-surface shear production on different afternoons and variations within some of the afternoon periods. The partitioning of near-surface production into local dissipation and transport in neutral and unstably stratified conditions was investigated. Although variations exist both between and within afternoons, as a rule of thumb, our results suggest that about 50 % of the near-surface production of TKE is compensated for by local dissipation near the surface, leaving about 50 % available for transport. This result indicates that it is important to also consider TKE transport as a factor influencing the near-surface TKE decay rate, which in many earlier studies has mainly been linked with the production terms of TKE by buoyancy and wind shear. We also conclude that the TKE tendency is smaller than the other budget terms, indicating a quasi-stationary evolution of TKE in the afternoon transition. Even though the TKE tendency was observed to be small, a strong correlation to mean buoyancy production of −0.69 was found for the afternoon period. For comparison with previous results, the TKE

  2. Confronting the WRF and RAMS mesoscale models with innovative observations in the Netherlands: Evaluating the boundary layer heat budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeneveld, G. J.; Tolk, L. F.; Moene, A. F.; Hartogensis, O. K.; Peters, W.; Holtslag, A. A. M.

    2011-12-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) and the Regional Atmospheric Mesoscale Model System (RAMS) are frequently used for (regional) weather, climate and air quality studies. This paper covers an evaluation of these models for a windy and calm episode against Cabauw tower observations (Netherlands), with a special focus on the representation of the physical processes in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In addition, area averaged sensible heat flux observations by scintillometry are utilized which enables evaluation of grid scale model fluxes and flux observations at the same horizontal scale. Also, novel ABL height observations by ceilometry and of the near surface longwave radiation divergence are utilized. It appears that WRF in its basic set-up shows satisfactory model results for nearly all atmospheric near surface variables compared to field observations, while RAMS needed refining of its ABL scheme. An important inconsistency was found regarding the ABL daytime heat budget: Both model versions are only able to correctly forecast the ABL thermodynamic structure when the modeled surface sensible heat flux is much larger than both the eddy-covariance and scintillometer observations indicate. In order to clarify this discrepancy, model results for each term of the heat budget equation is evaluated against field observations. Sensitivity studies and evaluation of radiative tendencies and entrainment reveal that possible errors in these variables cannot explain the overestimation of the sensible heat flux within the current model infrastructure.

  3. Analysis of euv limb-brightening observations from ATM. I. Model for the transition layer and the corona

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariska, J T; Withbroe, G L [Harvard Coll. Observatory, Cambridge, Mass. (USA)

    1975-09-01

    Limb-brightening curves for euv resonance lines of O VI and Mg X have been constructed from spectroheliograms (5 sec resolution) of quiet limb regions observed with the Harvard experiment on Skylab. The observations are interpreted with a simple model for the transition layer and the corona. A comparison of theoretical and observed limb-brightening curves indicates that the lower boundary of the corona, where T/sub e/ = 10/sup 6/K, is at a height of about 8000 km in typical quiet areas. For 1.01 R(sun) approximately = to or < r < 1.25(sun), the corona can be represented by a homogeneous model in hydrostatic equilibrium with a temperature of 10/sup 6/K for 1.01 R(sun) approximately = to or < r < 1.1 R(sun) and 1.1x10/sup 6/K for r > approximately = to 1.1 R(sun). The model for the transition layer is inhomogeneous, with the temperature gradient a factor of 3 shallower in the network than in the intranetwork regions. It appears that spicules should be included in the model in order to account for the penetration into the corona of cool (T/sub e/ < 10/sup 6/K) euv-emitting material to heights up to 20000 km above the limb.

  4. Real-time observation of coadsorption layers on Ru(001) using a temperature-programmed ESDIAD/TOF system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, T.; Itai, Y.; Iwasawa, Y.

    1997-11-01

    For the purpose of utilizing ESDIAD as a real-time probe for surface processes, we have developed an instrument which can measure ESDIAD images and time of flight (TOF) spectra of desorbing ions in temperature-programmed surface processes. TOF measurements are carried out to identify the mass and to determine the kinetic energy distribution of the desorbed ions. This temperature-programmed (TP-) ESDIAD/TOF system was used to observe coadsorption layers of methylamine and CO on Ru(001) which have been previously studied by our group using LEED, TPD and HREELS, also drawing upon a comparison of findings with the coadsorption system of CO and ammonia. ESDIAD images acquired for temperature-programmed surface processes in real time were found to provide new insight into the dynamic behaviour of the coadsorption layers. As to the pure adsorption of ammonia and methylamine, the second and the first (chemisorbed) layers can be easily discriminated in their different ESD detection efficiency due to the difference in neutralization rate. The intensity change of H + ions with temperature shows the process of the decomposition of methylamine to be dependent on CO coverage. The intensity of O + originating from CO changes due to the change of CO adsorption site in the reaction process. The angular distribution of H + ions which correspond to CH2NH…Ru species appears at 250-300 K in the presence of high CO pre-coverage.

  5. Insights into the nature of northwest-to-southeast aligned ionospheric wavefronts from contemporaneous Very Large Array and ionosonde observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmboldt, J. F.

    2012-07-01

    The results of contemporaneous summer nighttime observations of midlatitude medium scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) with the Very Large Array (VLA) in New Mexico and nearby ionosondes in Texas and Colorado are presented. Using 132, 20-minute observations, several instances of MSTIDs were detected, all having wavefronts aligned northwest to southeast and mostly propagating toward the southwest, consistent with previous studies of MSTIDs. However, some were also found to move toward the northeast. It was found that both classes of MSTIDs were only found when sporadic-E (Es) layers of moderate peak density (1.5​ foEs​ foEs > ​3 MHz that was not present when 1.5​ foEs < ​3 MHz. No MSTIDs were observed either before midnight or when the F-region height was increasing at a relatively high rate, even when these Es layers were observed. Combining this result with AE indices which were relatively high at the time (an average of about 300 nT and maximum of nearly 700 nT), it is inferred that both the lack of MSTIDs and the increase in F-region height are due to substorm-induced electric fields. The northeastward-directed MSTIDs were strongest post-midnight during times when the F-region was observed to be collapsing relatively quickly. This implies that these two occurrences are related and likely both caused by rare shifts in F-region neutral wind direction from southwest to northwest.

  6. Observations of the boundary layer, cloud, and aerosol variability in the southeast Pacific coastal marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx

    OpenAIRE

    X. Zheng; B. Albrecht; H. H. Jonsson; D. Khelif; G. Feingold; P. Minnis; K. Ayers; P. Chuang; S. Donaher; D. Rossiter; V. Ghate; J. Ruiz-Plancarte; S. Sun-Mack

    2011-01-01

    Aircraft observations made off the coast of northern Chile in the Southeastern Pacific (20° S, 72° W; named Point Alpha) from 16 October to 13 November 2008 during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study-Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), combined with meteorological reanalysis, satellite measurements, and radiosonde data, are used to investigate the boundary layer (BL) and aerosol-cloud-drizzle variations in this region. The BL at Point Alpha was typical of a non-drizzling stratocumulus-t...

  7. Observational assessment of the role of nocturnal residual-layer chemistry in determining daytime surface particulate nitrate concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Prabhakar

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses an analysis of combined airborne and ground observations of particulate nitrate (NO3−(p concentrations made during the wintertime DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically resolved observations relevant to Air Quality study at one of the most polluted cities in the United States – Fresno, CA – in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV and focuses on developing an understanding of the various processes that impact surface nitrate concentrations during pollution events. The results provide an explicit case-study illustration of how nighttime chemistry can influence daytime surface-level NO3−(p concentrations, complementing previous studies in the SJV. The observations exemplify the critical role that nocturnal chemical production of NO3−(p aloft in the residual layer (RL can play in determining daytime surface-level NO3−(p concentrations. Further, they indicate that nocturnal production of NO3−(p in the RL, along with daytime photochemical production, can contribute substantially to the buildup and sustaining of severe pollution episodes. The exceptionally shallow nocturnal boundary layer (NBL heights characteristic of wintertime pollution events in the SJV intensify the importance of nocturnal production aloft in the residual layer to daytime surface concentrations. The observations also demonstrate that dynamics within the RL can influence the early-morning vertical distribution of NO3−(p, despite low wintertime wind speeds. This overnight reshaping of the vertical distribution above the city plays an important role in determining the net impact of nocturnal chemical production on local and regional surface-level NO3−(p concentrations. Entrainment of clean free-tropospheric (FT air into the boundary layer in the afternoon is identified as an important process that reduces surface-level NO3−(p and limits buildup during pollution episodes. The influence of dry deposition of HNO

  8. Observation of ferroelastic domains in layered magnetic compounds using birefringence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Yoko; Okumura, Kazuya; Manaka, Hirotaka

    2018-03-01

    The two-dimensional Heisenberg antiferromagnet (C2H5NH3)2CuCl4 is a candidate compound for the coexistence of ferroelectricity and ferroelasticity; however, the microscopic observations of multiferroic domains may still be unclear. In-plane birefringence imaging measurements were performed to observe the manner in which the ferroelectric and the ferroelastic domains change during phase transitions between 15 K and 300 K. It was found that 90° ferroelastic domains appeared in the ab-plane at 300 K. As the temperature decreased toward 15 K, each domain inverted at a certain temperature (T a) without structural or magnetic phase transitions. The value of T a was found to be significantly influenced by external stresses; therefore, birefringence imaging techniques are useful for investigating variations in ferroelastic domains with temperature. Furthermore, a structural phase transition from orthorhombic to monoclinic or triclinic occurred at 230 ~ 240 K; however, no spontaneous polarization appeared in the ab-plane over the entire investigated range.

  9. SUMO: A small unmanned meteorological observer for atmospheric boundary layer research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuder, J; Jonassen, M; Mayer, S; Brisset, P; Mueller, M

    2008-01-01

    A new system for atmospheric measurements in the lower troposphere has been developed and successfully tested. The presented Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO) is based on a light-weighted commercially available model airplane, equipped with an autopilot and meteorological sensors for temperature, humidity and pressure. During the 5 week field campaign FLOHOF (Flow over and around HofsjoUkull) in Central Iceland the system has been successfully tested in July/August 2007. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction have been determined up to 3500 m above ground. In addition the applicability of SUMO for horizontal surveys up to 4 km away from the launch site has been approved. During a 3 week campaign on and around Spitsbergen in February/March 2008 the SUMO system also proved its functionality under harsh polar conditions, reaching altitudes above 1500 m at ground temperatures of -20 deg. C and wind speeds up to 15 m s -1 . With its wingspan of 80 cm, its length of 75 cm and its weight of below 600 g, SUMO is easy to transport and operate even in remote areas. The direct material costs for one SUMO unit, including airplane, autopilot and sensors are below 1200 Euro. Assuming at least several tenths of flights for each airframe, SUMO provides a cost-efficient measurement system with a large potential to close the existing observational gap of reasonable atmospheric measurement systems in between meteorological masts/towers and radiosondes

  10. SUMO: A small unmanned meteorological observer for atmospheric boundary layer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuder, J; Jonassen, M; Mayer, S [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Allegaten 70, 5009 Bergen (Norway); Brisset, P [Ecole Nationale de l' Aviation Civile (ENAC), 7 avenue Edouard Belin, 31055 Toulouse (France); Mueller, M [Orleansstrasse 26a, 31135 Hildesheim (Germany)], E-mail: joachim.reuder@gfi.uib.no, E-mail: pascal.brisset@enac.fr, E-mail: marius.jonassen@gfi.uib.no, E-mail: martin@pfump.org, E-mail: stephanie.mayer@gfi.uib.no

    2008-05-01

    A new system for atmospheric measurements in the lower troposphere has been developed and successfully tested. The presented Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer (SUMO) is based on a light-weighted commercially available model airplane, equipped with an autopilot and meteorological sensors for temperature, humidity and pressure. During the 5 week field campaign FLOHOF (Flow over and around HofsjoUkull) in Central Iceland the system has been successfully tested in July/August 2007. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction have been determined up to 3500 m above ground. In addition the applicability of SUMO for horizontal surveys up to 4 km away from the launch site has been approved. During a 3 week campaign on and around Spitsbergen in February/March 2008 the SUMO system also proved its functionality under harsh polar conditions, reaching altitudes above 1500 m at ground temperatures of -20 deg. C and wind speeds up to 15 m s{sup -1}. With its wingspan of 80 cm, its length of 75 cm and its weight of below 600 g, SUMO is easy to transport and operate even in remote areas. The direct material costs for one SUMO unit, including airplane, autopilot and sensors are below 1200 Euro. Assuming at least several tenths of flights for each airframe, SUMO provides a cost-efficient measurement system with a large potential to close the existing observational gap of reasonable atmospheric measurement systems in between meteorological masts/towers and radiosondes.

  11. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO. A new tool for atmospheric boundary layer research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reuder, Joachim; Jonassen, Marius; Mayer, Stephanie [Bergen Univ. (Norway). Geophysical Inst.; Brisset, Pascal [Ecole Nationale de l' Aviation Civile (ENAC), Toulouse (France); Mueller, Martin [Martin Mueller Engineering, Hildesheim (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO has been developed as a cost-efficient measurement system with the aim to close the existing observational gap of atmospheric measurement systems in between meteorological masts/towers and radiosondes. The system is highly flexible and has the capability for in-situ ABL measurements with unique spatial and temporal resolution. SUMO is based on a light-weighted styrofoam model airplane, equipped with an autopilot system for autonomous flight missions and in its recent version with meteorological sensors for temperature, humidity and pressure. With its wingspan of 80 cm, its length of 75 cm and a total lift-off weight of 580 g, SUMO is easy to transport and operate even in remote areas with limited infrastructure. During several field campaigns in 2007 and 2008 the system has been successfully tested and operated. Atmospheric profiles of temperature, humidity, wind speed and wind direction have been determined up to 3500 m above ground during the FLOHOF (FLOw over and around HOFsjoekull) field campaign in Central Iceland in July/August 2007. During a 3 week campaign on and around Spitsbergen in February/March 2008 the SUMO system also proved its functionality under polar conditions, reaching altitudes above 1500 m even at ground temperatures of -20 C and wind speeds up to 15 m s{sup -1}. (orig.)

  12. The Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO: Recent developments and applications of a Micro-UAS for atmospheric boundary layer research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuder, J.; Jonassen, M. O.; Ólafsson, H.

    2012-04-01

    During the last 5 years, the Small Unmanned Meteorological Observer SUMO has been developed as a new and flexible tool for atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) research to be operated as controllable and recoverable atmospheric sounding system for the lowest 4 km above the Earth's surface. In the year 2011 two main technical improvements of the system have been accomplished. The integration of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) into the Paparazzi autopilot system has expanded the environmental conditions for SUMO operation to now even allowing incloud flights. In the field of sensor technology the implementation of a 5-hole probe for the determination of the 3 dimensional flow vector impinging the aircraft with a 100 Hz resolution and of a faster Pt1000 based temperature sensor have distinctly enhanced the meteorological measurement capabilities. The extended SUMO version has recently been operated during two field campaigns. The first one in a wind farm close to Vindeby on Lolland, Denmark, was dedicated to the investigation of the effects of wind turbines on boundary layer turbulence. In spite of a few pitfalls related to configuration and synchronisation of the corresponding data logging systems, this campaign provided promising results indicating the capability and future potential of small UAS for turbulence characterization in and around wind farms. The second one, the international BLLAST (Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Transition) field campaign at the foothills of the Pyrenees in Lannemezan, France was focussing on processes related to the afternoon transition of the convective boundary layer. On a calm sunny day during this experiment, the SUMO soundings revealed an unexpected 2°C cooling in the ABL during morning hours. By a comparison with model simulations this cooling can be associated with thermally-driven upslope winds and the subsequent advection of relatively cool air from the lowlands north of the Pyrenees.

  13. Radar observations of field-aligned plasma irregularities in the SEEK-2 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saito

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available During the Sporadic E Experiment over Kyushu 2 (SEEK-2 campaign, field-aligned irregularities (FAIs associated with midlatitude sporadic-E (Es layers were observed with two backscatter radars, the Lower Thermosphere Profiler Radar (LTPR and the Frequency Agile Radar (FAR, which were located 40 km apart in Tanegashima, Japan. We conducted observations of FAI echoes from 31 July to 24 August 2002, and the radar data were used to determine launch timing of two sounding rockets on 3 August 2002. Our comparison of echoes obtained by the LTPR and the FAR revealed that echoes often appeared at the FAR about 10min earlier than they did at the LTPR and were well correlated. This indicates that echoing regions drift with a southward velocity component that maintains the spatial shape. Interferometry observations that were conducted with the LTPR from 3 to 8 August 2002, revealed that the quasi-periodic (QP striations in the Range-Time-Intensity (RTI plots were due to the apparent motion of echoing regions across the radar beam including both main and side lobes. In most cases, the echo moved to the east-southeast at an almost constant altitude of 100–110 km, which was along the locus of perpendicularity of the radar line-of-sight to the geomagnetic field line. We found that the QP pattern on the RTI plot reflects the horizontal structure and motion of the (Es layer, and that echoing regions seemed to be in one-dimensionally elongated shapes or in chains of patches. Neutral wind velocities from 75 to 105 km altitude were simultaneously derived with meteor echoes from the LTPR. This is the first time-continuous simultaneous observation FAIs and neutral wind with interferometry measurements. Assuming that the echoing regions were drifting with an ambient neutral wind, we found that the echoing region was aligned east-northeast-west-southwest in eight out of ten QP echo events during the SEEK-2 campaign. A range rate was

  14. Ground-based remote sensing observation of the complex behaviour of the Marseille boundary layer during ESCOMPTE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delbarre, H.; Augustin, P.; Saïd, F.; Campistron, B.; Bénech, B.; Lohou, F.; Puygrenier, V.; Moppert, C.; Cousin, F.; Fréville, P.; Fréjafon, E.

    2005-03-01

    Ground-based remote sensing systems have been used during the ESCOMPTE campaign, to continuously characterize the boundary-layer behaviour through many atmospheric parameters (wind, extinction and ozone concentration distribution, reflectivity, turbulence). This analysis is focused on the comparison of the atmospheric stratification retrieved from a UV angular ozone lidar, an Ultra High Frequency wind profiler and a sodar, above the area of Marseille, on June 26th 2001 (Intensive Observation Period 2b). The atmospheric stratification is shown to be very complex including two superimposed sea breezes, with an important contribution of advection. The temporal and spatial evolution of the stratification observed by the UV lidar and by the UHF radar are in good agreement although the origin of the echoes of these systems is quite different. The complexity of the dynamic situation has only partially been retrieved by a non-hydrostatic mesoscale model used with a 3 km resolution.

  15. SYNTHESIS OF MULTI-LAYER SUBSTRATE FOR OBSERVING OF HYDROXYBENZOIC ACIDS MOLECULES BY SERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Yasenko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Subject of study. The paper deals with the results of the multilayer substrate synthesis having an effect of SERS from hydroxybenzoic acid molecules which are adsorbed on its surface. Methods. To produce SERS substrate we have applied colloid chemistry methods: washing of colloids using a laboratory centrifuge OPn-8, carrying out serial chemical reactions for modifying the surface of semiconductor particles of SiO2 in the solution, determining the maximum of the absorption spectrum of the substrate obtained (in the range from 400 to 1000 nm. To observe hydroxybenzoic acids molecules the method of Raman scattering on OPTEC-785 Video-M spectrometer has been used. Main results. A new method of the substrate chemical synthesis is proposed, which has the effect of SERS by radiationexcitation wavelength of 785 nm, based on micron silica particles with immobilized surface of gold and silver. Raman spectra of hydroxybenzoic acids (Gallic and p-hydroxybenzoic in free and adsorbed state have been experimentally obtained and interpreted. It was shown that both acids in a crystalline state are in the form of dimers. Also, the presence of a certain group of characteristic bands indicates that the hydroxybenzoic acid is chemically bonded to the substrate surface through an oxygen bridge of deprotonated hydroxyl groups. However, unlike Gallic acid, p-hydroxybenzoic acid passes into the monomer form. Practical significance. This technique for enhancing substrate preparation is usable in the laboratory without sophisticated technical equipment. Experimental data on the method of securing the hydroxybenzoic acids and form of their existence on the surface of the substrate will be useful in the design of sensor systems based on them. Characteristic bands of undistorted aromatic ring of hydroxybenzoic acids may also be used in developing

  16. Characterizing dust aerosols in the atmospheric boundary layer over the deserts in Northwest China: monitoring network and field observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Q.; Matimin, A.; Yang, X.

    2016-12-01

    TheTaklimakan, Gurbantunggut and BadainJaran Deserts with the total area of 43.8×104 km2 in Northwest China are the major dust emission sources in Central Asia. Understanding Central Asian dust emissions and the interaction with the atmospheric boundary layer has an important implication for regional and global climate and environment changes. In order to explore these scientific issues, a monitoring network of 63 sites was established over the vast deserts (Taklimakan Desert, Gurbantunggut Desert and Badain Jaran Desert) in Northwest China for the comprehensive measurements of dust aerosol emission, transport and deposition as well as the atmospheric boundary layer including the meteorological parameters of boundary layer, surface radiation, surface heat fluxes, soil parameters, dust aerosol properties, water vapor profiles, and dust emission. Based on the monitoring network, the field experiments have been conducted to characterize dust aerosols and the atmospheric boundary layer over the deserts. The experiment observation indicated that depth of the convective boundary layer can reach 5000m on summer afternoons. In desert regions, the diurnal mean net radiation was effected significantly by dust weather, and sensible heat was much greater than latent heat accounting about 40-50% in the heat balance of desert. The surface soil and dust size distributions of Northwest China Deserts were obtained through widely collecting samples, results showed that the dominant dust particle size was PM100within 80m height, on average accounting for 60-80% of the samples, with 0.9-2.5% for PM0-2.5, 3.5-7.0% for PM0-10 and 5.0-14.0% for PM0-20. The time dust emission of Taklimakan Desert, Gurbantunggut Desert and Badain Jaran Desert accounted for 0.48%, 7.3%×10-5and 1.9% of the total time within a year, and the threshold friction velocity for dust emission were 0.22-1.06m/s, 0.29-1.5m/s and 0.21-0.59m/s, respectively.

  17. Some Observational and Modeling Studies of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer at Mississippi Gulf Coast for Air Pollution Dispersion Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjaneyulu Yerramilli

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal atmospheric conditions widely vary from those over inland due to the land-sea interface, temperature contrast and the consequent development of local circulations. In this study a field meteorological experiment was conducted to measure vertical structure of boundary layer during the period 25-29 June, 2007 at three locations Seabee base, Harrison and Wiggins sites in the Mississippi coast. A GPS Sonde along with slow ascent helium balloon and automated weather stations equipped with slow and fast response sensors were used in the experiment. GPS sonde were launched at three specific times (0700 LT, 1300 LT and 1800 LT during the experiment days. The observations indicate shallow boundary layer near the coast which gradually develops inland. The weather research and forecasting (WRF meso-scale atmospheric model and a Lagrangian particle dispersion model (HYSPLIT are used to simulate the lower atmospheric flow and dispersion in a range of 100 km from the coast for 28-30 June, 2007. The simulated meteorological parameters were compared with the experimental observations. The meso-scale model results show significant temporal and spatial variations in the meteorological fields as a result of development of sea breeze flow, its coupling with the large scale flow field and the ensuing alteration in the mixing depth across the coast. Simulated ground-level concentrations of SO2 from four elevated point sources located along the coast indicate diurnal variation and impact of the local sea-land breeze on the direction of the plume. Model concentration levels were highest during the stable morning condition and during the sea-breeze time in the afternoon. The highest concentrations were found up to 40 km inland during sea breeze time. The study illustrates the application of field meteorological observations for the validation of WRF which is coupled to HYSPLIT for dispersion assessment in the coastal region.

  18. Ceilometer observations of aerosol layer structure above the Petit Lubéron during ESCOMPTE's IOP 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zéphoris, Marcel; Holin, Hubert; Lavie, Franck; Cenac, Nadine; Cluzeau, Michel; Delas, Olivier; Eideliman, Françoise; Gagneux, Jacqueline; Gander, Alain; Thibord, Corinne

    2005-03-01

    A modified ceilometer has been used during the second Intensive Observation Period (IOP) of the "Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transport d'Émission" (ESCOMPTE) to perform continuous remote observations of aerosol accumulations in the first 3 km of the atmosphere. These observations encompassed an episode of intense particulate and photochemical pollution. The submicronic particles density, measured at an altitude of 600 m, went from a very low point of a few tens of particles per cubic centimeter (at the end of a Mistral episode in the free atmosphere) to a high point of more than 4500 particles per cubic centimeter (when pollutants were trapped by thermal inversions). The main result is that this instrument enables a fine documentation of the mixing layer height and of aerosol particles stratifications and circulation. Airborne aerosol measurements have been made above the mountainous region of Mérindol in order to validate in situ the remote sensing measurements. Ozone measurements near the summit of the mountains as well as in the valley were performed in order to correlate aerosol accumulation and ozone concentration. As a notable example, the two-layer aerosol stratification seen in the first 2 days of IOP 2b in that part of the ESCOMPTE domain confirms the results of another team which used backtrajectories. The low-altitude pollution for this timeframe had a local origin (the Fos industrial area), whereas above 500 m, the air masses had undergone regional-scale transport (from north-eastern Spain). The second major result is the highlighting of a pattern, in sea breeze conditions and in this part of the ESCOMPTE experiment zone, of nocturnal aerosol accumulation at an altitude of between 500 and 2000 m, followed by high ozone concentration the next day.

  19. Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Property Retrievals from High-Resolution ASTER Observations: Case Studies and Comparison with Terra MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Frank; Wind, Galina; Zhang, Zhibo; Platnick, Steven; Di Girolamo, Larry; Zhao, Guangyu; Amarasinghe, Nandana; Meyer, Kerry

    2016-01-01

    A research-level retrieval algorithm for cloud optical and microphysical properties is developed for the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) aboard the Terra satellite. It is based on the operational MODIS algorithm. This paper documents the technical details of this algorithm and evaluates the retrievals for selected marine boundary layer cloud scenes through comparisons with the operational MODIS Data Collection 6 (C6) cloud product. The newly developed, ASTERspecific cloud masking algorithm is evaluated through comparison with an independent algorithm reported in Zhao and Di Girolamo (2006). To validate and evaluate the cloud optical thickness (tau) and cloud effective radius (r(sub eff)) from ASTER, the high-spatial-resolution ASTER observations are first aggregated to the same 1000m resolution as MODIS. Subsequently, tau(sub aA) and r(sub eff, aA) retrieved from the aggregated ASTER radiances are compared with the collocated MODIS retrievals. For overcast pixels, the two data sets agree very well with Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficients of R greater than 0.970. However, for partially cloudy pixels there are significant differences between r(sub eff, aA) and the MODIS results which can exceed 10 micrometers. Moreover, it is shown that the numerous delicate cloud structures in the example marine boundary layer scenes, resolved by the high-resolution ASTER retrievals, are smoothed by the MODIS observations. The overall good agreement between the research-level ASTER results and the operational MODIS C6 products proves the feasibility of MODIS-like retrievals from ASTER reflectance measurements and provides the basis for future studies concerning the scale dependency of satellite observations and three-dimensional radiative effects.

  20. Numerical simulation of mid-latitude ionospheric E-region based on SEEK and SEEK-2 observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Yokoyama

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Observational campaigns of the mid-latitude ionospheric E-region with sounding rockets and ground-based instruments were conducted in 1996 (SEEK and 2002 (SEEK-2. Both of them were successfully conducted to bring important findings about the mid-latitude E-region and quasi-periodic (QP VHF radar echoes. The observational results in the SEEK and the SEEK-2 are compared with numerical simulations and discussed in this paper. While sporadic-E (Es-layers are actually formed by the observed neutral wind, it is difficult for the constant wind shear to produce the sharp Es-layer gradient. However, once they are formed in the lower E-region, they cannot easily be dissipated by the simple diffusive motion. The polarization electric field, calculated under the condition at the rocket launch time, shows similar amplitude and structure to the measurement around the Es-layer altitude. The structure of the plasma density and the electric field above the Es-layer observed in the SEEK-2 showed a wave-like pattern up to an altitude of 150 km. Considering a mapping of the polarization electric field generated within the Es-layers, gravity waves are the possible source of the wave-like structure of the measured electric fields and sub-peaks of the electron density above the main Es-layers. Fluctuation of the measured magnetic field is reproduced by Hall or field-aligned current driven by the polarization electric field. The current theoretical models for QP echoes and the polarization electric field are basically verified by the discussion in this paper. Keywords. Ionospheric irregularities – Mid-latitude ionosphere – Numerical simulation studies

  1. The role of surface charging during the coadsorption of mercaptohexanol to DNA layers on gold: direct observation of desorption and layer reorientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arinaga, K; Rant, U; Tornow, M; Fujita, S; Abstreiter, G; Yokoyama, N

    2006-06-20

    We study the coadsorption of mercaptohexanol onto preimmobilized oligonucleotide layers on gold. Monitoring the position of the DNA relative to the surface by optical means directly shows the mercaptohexanol-induced desorption of DNA and the reorientation of surface-tethered strands in situ and in real time. By simultaneously recording the electrochemical electrode potential, we are able to demonstrate that changes in the layer conformation are predominantly of electrostatic origin and can be reversed by applying external bias to the substrate.

  2. Atomic-scale observation of structural and electronic orders in the layered compound α-RuCl3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziatdinov, M.; Banerjee, A.; Maksov, A.; Berlijn, T.; Zhou, W.; Cao, H. B.; Yan, J.-Q.; Bridges, C. A.; Mandrus, D. G.; Nagler, S. E.; Baddorf, A. P.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    A pseudospin-1/2 Mott phase on a honeycomb lattice is proposed to host the celebrated two-dimensional Kitaev model which has an elusive quantum spin liquid ground state, and fascinating physics relevant to the development of future templates towards topological quantum bits. Here we report a comprehensive, atomically resolved real-space study by scanning transmission electron and scanning tunnelling microscopies on a novel layered material displaying Kitaev physics, α-RuCl3. Our local crystallography analysis reveals considerable variations in the geometry of the ligand sublattice in thin films of α-RuCl3 that opens a way to realization of a spatially inhomogeneous magnetic ground state at the nanometre length scale. Using scanning tunnelling techniques, we observe the electronic energy gap of ~0.25 eV and intra-unit cell symmetry breaking of charge distribution in individual α-RuCl3 surface layer. The corresponding charge-ordered pattern has a fine structure associated with two different types of charge disproportionation at Cl-terminated surface.

  3. Satellite Sounder Observations of Contrasting Tropospheric Moisture Transport Regimes: Saharan Air Layers, Hadley Cells, and Atmospheric Rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nalli, Nicholas R.; Barnet, Christopher D.; Reale, Tony; Liu, Quanhua; Morris, Vernon R.; Spackman, J. Ryan; Joseph, Everette; Tan, Changyi; Sun, Bomin; Tilley, Frank; Leung, L. Ruby; Wolfe, Daniel

    2016-12-01

    This paper examines the performance of satellite sounder atmospheric vertical moisture proles (AVMP) under tropospheric conditions encompassing moisture contrasts driven by convection and advection transport mechanisms, specifically Atlantic Ocean Saharan air layers (SALs) and Pacific Ocean moisture conveyer belts (MCBs) commonly referred to as atmospheric rivers (ARs), both of these being mesoscale to synoptic meteorological phenomena within the vicinity of subtropical Hadley subsidence zones. Operational AVMP environmental data records retrieved from the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) are collocated with dedicated radiosonde observations (RAOBs) obtained from ocean-based intensive field campaigns; these RAOBs provide uniquely independent correlative truth data not assimilated into numerical weather prediction models for satellite sounder validation over open ocean. Using these marine-based data, we empirically assess the performance of the operational NUCAPS AVMP product for detecting and resolving these tropospheric moisture features over otherwise RAOB-sparse regions.

  4. Direct observation of effective temperature of Ta atom in layer compound TaS2 by neutron resonance absorption spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Koji; Kamiyama, Takashi; Kiyanagi, Yoshiaki; Moreh, R.; Ikeda, Susumu

    2001-01-01

    A neutron resonance absorption spectrometer, DOG has been installed at KENS, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization Neutron Source, which enables us to investigate the motions of a particular element by analyzing the line width of resonance absorption spectrum. We measured the temperature dependence of the effective temperature of Ta motion in TaS 2 as well as in Ta metal using DOG. The effective temperatures extracted from the observed absorption spectrum agree well with the calculated values from the phonon density of states of Ta metal over a wide temperature range of 10 to 300 K. We also succeeded in measuring both the angular dependence and the temperature dependence of effective temperatures of Ta in a layer compound TaS 2 . Based on the temperature dependence of the effective temperature, the partial phonon density of states of Ta in TaS 2 was discussed. (author)

  5. Observations of the vertical concentrations of aerosol particles in the boundary layer by means of tethered balloon method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishioka, Futoshi; Lee, D.I; Taniguchi, Takashi; Kikuchi,Katsuhiro

    1988-09-30

    In general, it is difficult to accurately understand the behavior of aerosol particles in the boundary layer above urban areas because aerosol sources are influenced by time-dependent factors and local climate. To overcome this difficulty, a particle counter which can count Mie particles with diameters of 0.3 /mu/m or more in five diameter ranges was installed on a large tehered balloon. With this method, the vertical distribution of aerosol concentration was measured in several areas different in meteorological condition, and the dependence of the particle behavior on particle diameter was studied. As a result, it has been revealed that the results of the observations explained above agree with the results of studies conducted in the past, but that dependence on particle diameter is not significant. 37 references, 21 figures, 1 table.

  6. The effect of entrainment through atmospheric boundary layer growth on observed and modeled surface ozone in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaser, L.; Patton, E. G.; Pfister, G. G.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Flocke, F.; Thompson, A. M.; Stauffer, R. M.; Halliday, H. S.

    2017-06-01

    Ozone concentrations at the Earth's surface are controlled by meteorological and chemical processes and are a function of advection, entrainment, deposition, and net chemical production/loss. The relative contributions of these processes vary in time and space. Understanding the relative importance of these processes controlling surface ozone concentrations is an essential component for designing effective regulatory strategies. Here we focus on the diurnal cycle of entrainment through atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) growth in the Colorado Front Range. Aircraft soundings and surface observations collected in July/August 2014 during the DISCOVER-AQ/FRAPPÉ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality/Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Éxperiment) campaigns and equivalent data simulated by a regional chemical transport model are analyzed. Entrainment through ABL growth is most important in the early morning, fumigating the surface at a rate of 5 ppbv/h. The fumigation effect weakens near noon and changes sign to become a small dilution effect in the afternoon on the order of -1 ppbv/h. The chemical transport model WRF-Chem (Weather Research and Forecasting Model with chemistry) underestimates ozone at all altitudes during this study on the order of 10-15 ppbv. The entrainment through ABL growth is overestimated by the model in the order of 0.6-0.8 ppbv/h. This results from differences in boundary layer growth in the morning and ozone concentration jump across the ABL top in the afternoon. This implicates stronger modeled fumigation in the morning and weaker modeled dilution after 11:00 LT.

  7. First observations of elevated ducts associated with intermittent turbulence in the stable boundary layer over Bosten Lake, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zheng; Ning, Hui; Song, Shihui; Yan, Dongmei

    2016-10-01

    Nocturnal radiative cooling is a main driver for atmospheric duct formation. Within this atmospheric process, the impacts of intermittent turbulence on ducting have seldom been studied. In this paper, we reported two confusing ducting events observed in the early morning in August 2014 over Bosten Lake, China, when a stable boundary layer (SBL) still survived, by using tethered high-resolution GPS radiosondes. Elevated ducts with strong humidity inversions were observed during the balloon ascents but were absent during observations made upon the balloon descents several minutes later. This phenomenon was initially hypothesized to be attributable to turbulence motions in the SBL, and the connection between the turbulence event and the radar duct was examined by the statistical Thorpe method. Turbulence patches were detected from the ascent profiles but not from the descent profiles. The possible reasons for the duct formation and elimination were discussed in detail. The turbulent transport of moisture in the SBL and the advection due to airflows coming from the lake are the most probable reasons for duct formation. In one case, the downward transport of moisture by turbulence mixing within a Kelvin-Helmholtz billow at the top of the low-level jet resulted in duct elimination. In another case, the passage of density currents originating from the lake may have caused the elimination of the duct. Few studies have attempted to associate intermittent turbulence with radar ducts; thus, this work represents a pioneering study into the connection between turbulent events and atmospheric ducts in a SBL.

  8. Improved SAGE II cloud/aerosol categorization and observations of the Asian tropopause aerosol layer: 1989–2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. W. Thomason

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe the challenges associated with the interpretation of extinction coefficient measurements by the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment (SAGE II in the presence of clouds. In particular, we have found that tropospheric aerosol analyses are highly dependent on a robust method for identifying when clouds affect the measured extinction coefficient. Herein, we describe an improved cloud identification method that appears to capture cloud/aerosol events more effectively than early methods. In addition, we summarize additional challenges to observing the Asian Tropopause Aerosol Layer (ATAL using SAGE II observations. Using this new approach, we perform analyses of the upper troposphere, focusing on periods in which the UTLS (upper troposphere/lower stratosphere is relatively free of volcanic material (1989–1990 and after 1996. Of particular interest is the Asian monsoon anticyclone where CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar Pathfinder Satellite Observations has observed an aerosol enhancement. This enhancement, called the ATAL, has a similar morphology to observed enhancements in long-lived trace gas species like CO. Since the CALIPSO record begins in 2006, the question of how long this aerosol feature has been present requires a new look at the long-lived SAGE II data sets despite significant hurdles to its use in the subtropical upper troposphere. We find that there is no evidence of ATAL in the SAGE II data prior to 1998. After 1998, it is clear that aerosol in the upper troposphere in the ATAL region is substantially enhanced relative to the period before that time. In addition, the data generally supports the presence of the ATAL beginning in 1999 and continuing through the end of the mission, though some years (e.g., 2003 are complicated by the presence of episodic enhancements most likely of volcanic origin.

  9. Nocturnal Boundary-Layer Phenomena Observed at a Complex Site During the Perdigão Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, T.; Klein, P. M.; Smith, E.; Gebauer, J.; Turner, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Perdigão Field Experiment set out to study atmospheric flows in complex terrain and to collect a high-quality dataset for the validation of meso- and micro-scale models. An Intensive Observation Period (IOP) was conducted from May 1, 2017 through June 15, 2017 where a multitude of instruments were deployed in and around two nearly parallel ridges. The Collaborative Lower Atmospheric Mobile Profiling System (CLAMPS) was deployed and operated in the valley between the ridges. The CLAMPS facility, which was developed as a joint effort between the School of Meteorology at OU and NOAA's National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL), takes advantage of a microwave radiometer (MWR), an atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI), and a scanning doppler Lidar to profile the boundary layer with a high temporal and spatial resolution. Optimized Lidar scanning strategies and joint retrievals for the MWR and ARI data provide detailed information about the wind, turbulence and thermodynamic structure from the surface up to 1000 m AGL on most nights; sometimes the max height is even higher. Over the course of the IOP, CLAMPS observed many different phenomena. During some nights, when stronger background prevailed and was directed perpendicular to the valley, waves were observed at the ridges and in the valley. At the same time, radiational cooling led to drainage flows in the valley, particularly during nights when the mesoscale forcing was weak. At first, CLAMPS profile observations and data collected with radiosondes released at a near-by site are compared to assess the data quality. The radiosonde observations are also being used to document and classify the upper-level flow during the IOP. Additionally, CLAMPS data from a few selected nights will be presented and analyzed in terms of turbulence and its impact on mixing inside and above the valley. June 1-2 represents a good base-state case. Winds at ridge height were generally less than 5ms-1 after 0Z and valley flows

  10. Impact of deep convection in the tropical tropopause layer in West Africa: in-situ observations and mesoscale modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Fierli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the analysis of the impact of convection on the composition of the tropical tropopause layer region (TTL in West-Africa during the AMMA-SCOUT campaign. Geophysica M55 aircraft observations of water vapor, ozone, aerosol and CO2 during August 2006 show perturbed values at altitudes ranging from 14 km to 17 km (above the main convective outflow and satellite data indicates that air detrainment is likely to have originated from convective cloud east of the flights. Simulations of the BOLAM mesoscale model, nudged with infrared radiance temperatures, are used to estimate the convective impact in the upper troposphere and to assess the fraction of air processed by convection. The analysis shows that BOLAM correctly reproduces the location and the vertical structure of convective outflow. Model-aided analysis indicates that convection can influence the composition of the upper troposphere above the level of main outflow for an event of deep convection close to the observation site. Model analysis also shows that deep convection occurring in the entire Sahelian transect (up to 2000 km E of the measurement area has a non negligible role in determining TTL composition.

  11. CWEX: Crop/wind-energy experiment: Observations of surface-layer, boundary-layer and mesoscale interactions with a wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Large wind turbines perturb mean and turbulent wind characteristics, which modify fluxes between the vegetated surface and the lower boundary layer. While simulations have suggested that wind farms could create significant changes in surface fluxes of heat, momentum, moisture, and CO2 over hundreds ...

  12. Crop/Wind-energy Experiment (CWEX): Observations of surface-layer, boundary-layer and mesoscale interactions with a wind farm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perturbations of mean and turbulent wind characteristics by large wind turbines modify fluxes between the vegetated surface and the lower boundary layer. While simulations have suggested that wind farms could significantly change surface fluxes of heat, momentum, moisture, and CO2 over hundreds of s...

  13. Spatial distribution analysis of the OMI aerosol layer height: a pixel-by-pixel comparison to CALIOP observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimot, Julien; Pepijn Veefkind, J.; Vlemmix, Tim; Levelt, Pieternel F.

    2018-04-01

    A global picture of atmospheric aerosol vertical distribution with a high temporal resolution is of key importance not only for climate, cloud formation, and air quality research studies but also for correcting scattered radiation induced by aerosols in absorbing trace gas retrievals from passive satellite sensors. Aerosol layer height (ALH) was retrieved from the OMI 477 nm O2 - O2 band and its spatial pattern evaluated over selected cloud-free scenes. Such retrievals benefit from a synergy with MODIS data to provide complementary information on aerosols and cloudy pixels. We used a neural network approach previously trained and developed. Comparison with CALIOP aerosol level 2 products over urban and industrial pollution in eastern China shows consistent spatial patterns with an uncertainty in the range of 462-648 m. In addition, we show the possibility to determine the height of thick aerosol layers released by intensive biomass burning events in South America and Russia from OMI visible measurements. A Saharan dust outbreak over sea is finally discussed. Complementary detailed analyses show that the assumed aerosol properties in the forward modelling are the key factors affecting the accuracy of the results, together with potential cloud residuals in the observation pixels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the physical meaning of the retrieved ALH scalar corresponds to the weighted average of the vertical aerosol extinction profile. These encouraging findings strongly suggest the potential of the OMI ALH product, and in more general the use of the 477 nm O2 - O2 band from present and future similar satellite sensors, for climate studies as well as for future aerosol correction in air quality trace gas retrievals.

  14. Spatial distribution analysis of the OMI aerosol layer height: a pixel-by-pixel comparison to CALIOP observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chimot

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A global picture of atmospheric aerosol vertical distribution with a high temporal resolution is of key importance not only for climate, cloud formation, and air quality research studies but also for correcting scattered radiation induced by aerosols in absorbing trace gas retrievals from passive satellite sensors. Aerosol layer height (ALH was retrieved from the OMI 477 nm O2 − O2 band and its spatial pattern evaluated over selected cloud-free scenes. Such retrievals benefit from a synergy with MODIS data to provide complementary information on aerosols and cloudy pixels. We used a neural network approach previously trained and developed. Comparison with CALIOP aerosol level 2 products over urban and industrial pollution in eastern China shows consistent spatial patterns with an uncertainty in the range of 462–648 m. In addition, we show the possibility to determine the height of thick aerosol layers released by intensive biomass burning events in South America and Russia from OMI visible measurements. A Saharan dust outbreak over sea is finally discussed. Complementary detailed analyses show that the assumed aerosol properties in the forward modelling are the key factors affecting the accuracy of the results, together with potential cloud residuals in the observation pixels. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the physical meaning of the retrieved ALH scalar corresponds to the weighted average of the vertical aerosol extinction profile. These encouraging findings strongly suggest the potential of the OMI ALH product, and in more general the use of the 477 nm O2 − O2 band from present and future similar satellite sensors, for climate studies as well as for future aerosol correction in air quality trace gas retrievals.

  15. The Observed Relationship Between Water Vapor and Ozone in the Tropical Tropopause Saturation Layer and the Influence of Meridional Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, Henry B.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Olsen, M. A.; Douglass, A. R.

    2011-01-01

    We examine balloonsonde observations of water vapor and ozone from three Ticosonde campaigns over San Jose, Costa Rica [10 N, 84 W] during northern summer and a fourth during northern winter. The data from the summer campaigns show that the uppermost portion of the tropical tropopause layer between 360 and 380 K, which we term the tropopause saturation layer or TSL, is characterized by water vapor mixing ratios from proximately 3 to 15 ppmv and ozone from approximately 50 ppbv to 250 ppbv. In contrast, the atmospheric water vapor tape recorder at 380 K and above displays a more restricted 4-7 ppmv range in water vapor mixing ratio. From this perspective, most of the parcels in the TSL fall into two classes - those that need only additional radiative heating to rise into the tape recorder and those requiring some combination of additional dehydration and mixing with drier air. A substantial fraction of the latter class have ozone mixing ratios greater than 150 ppbv, and with water vapor greater than 7 ppmv this air may well have been transported into the tropics from the middle latitudes in conjunction with high-amplitude equatorial waves. We examine this possibility with both trajectory analysis and transport diagnostics based on HIRDLS ozone data. We apply the same approach to study the winter season. Here a very different regime obtains as the ozone-water vapor scatter diagram of the sonde data shows the stratosphere and troposphere to be clearly demarcated with little evidence of mixing in of middle latitude air parcels.

  16. Application of remotely piloted aircraft systems in observing the atmospheric boundary layer over Antarctic sea ice in winter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius O. Jonassen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to explore the potential of combining measurements from fixed- and rotary-wing remotely piloted aircraft systems (RPAS to complement data sets from radio soundings as well as ship and sea-ice-based instrumentation for atmospheric boundary layer (ABL profiling. This study represents a proof-of-concept of RPAS observations in the Antarctic sea-ice zone. We present first results from the RV Polarstern Antarctic winter expedition in the Weddell Sea in June–August 2013, during which three RPAS were operated to measure temperature, humidity and wind; a fixed-wing small unmanned meteorological observer (SUMO, a fixed-wing meteorological mini-aerial vehicle, and an advanced mission and operation research quadcopter. A total of 86 RPAS flights showed a strongly varying ABL structure ranging from slightly unstable temperature stratification near the surface to conditions with strong surface-based temperature inversions. The RPAS observations supplement the regular upper air soundings and standard meteorological measurements made during the campaign. The SUMO and quadcopter temperature profiles agree very well and, excluding cases with strong temperature inversions, 70% of the variance in the difference between the SUMO and quadcopter temperature profiles can be explained by natural, temporal, temperature fluctuations. Strong temperature inversions cause the largest differences, which are induced by SUMO's high climb rates and slow sensor response. Under such conditions, the quadcopter, with its slower climb rate and faster sensor, is very useful in obtaining accurate temperature profiles in the lowest 100 m above the sea ice.

  17. Dispersive O+ conics observed in the plasma-sheet boundary layer with CRRES/LOMICS during a magnetic storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wüest

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available We present initial results from the Low-energy magnetospheric ion composition sensor (LOMICS on the Combined release and radiation effects satellite (CRRES together with electron, magnetic field, and electric field wave data. LOMICS measures all important magnetospheric ion species (H+, He++, He+, O++, O+ simultaneously in the energy range 60 eV to 45 keV, as well as their pitch-angle distributions, within the time resolution afforded by the spacecraft spin period of 30 s. During the geomagnetic storm of 9 July 1991, over a period of 42 min (0734 UT to 0816 UT the LOMICS ion mass spectrometer observed an apparent O+ conic flowing away from the southern hemisphere with a bulk velocity that decreased exponentially with time from 300 km/s to 50 km/s, while its temperature also decreased exponentially from 700 to 5 eV. At the onset of the O+ conic, intense low-frequency electromagnetic wave activity and strong pitch-angle scattering were also observed. At the time of the observations the CRRES spacecraft was inbound at L~7.5 near dusk, magnetic local time (MLT, and at a magnetic latitude of –23°. Our analysis using several CRRES instruments suggests that the spacecraft was skimming along the plasma sheet boundary layer (PSBL when the upward-flowing ion conic arrived. The conic appears to have evolved in time, both slowing and cooling, due to wave-particle interactions. We are unable to conclude whether the conic was causally associated with spatial structures of the PSBL or the central plasma sheet.

  18. Observations of the boundary layer, cloud, and aerosol variability in the southeast Pacific coastal marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X.; Albrecht, B.; Jonsson, H. H.; Khelif, D.; Feingold, G.; Minnis, P.; Ayers, K.; Chuang, P.; Donaher, S.; Rossiter, D.; Ghate, V.; Ruiz-Plancarte, J.; Sun-Mack, S.

    2011-05-01

    Aircraft observations made off the coast of northern Chile in the Southeastern Pacific (20° S, 72° W; named Point Alpha) from 16 October to 13 November 2008 during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study-Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), combined with meteorological reanalysis, satellite measurements, and radiosonde data, are used to investigate the boundary layer (BL) and aerosol-cloud-drizzle variations in this region. The BL at Point Alpha was typical of a non-drizzling stratocumulus-topped BL on days without predominately synoptic and meso-scale influences. The BL had a depth of 1140 ± 120 m, was well-mixed and capped by a sharp inversion. The wind direction generally switched from southerly within the BL to northerly above the inversion. The cloud liquid water path (LWP) varied between 15 g m-2 and 160 g m-2. From 29 October to 4 November, when a synoptic system affected conditions at Point Alpha, the cloud LWP was higher than on the other days by around 40 g m-2. On 1 and 2 November, a moist layer above the inversion moved over Point Alpha. The total-water specific humidity above the inversion was larger than that within the BL during these days. Entrainment rates (average of 1.5 ± 0.6 mm s-1) calculated from the near cloud-top fluxes and turbulence (vertical velocity variance) in the BL at Point Alpha appeared to be weaker than those in the BL over the open ocean west of Point Alpha and the BL near the coast of the northeast Pacific. The accumulation mode aerosol varied from 250 to 700 cm-3 within the BL, and CCN at 0.2 % supersaturation within the BL ranged between 150 and 550 cm-3. The main aerosol source at Point Alpha was horizontal advection within the BL from south. The average cloud droplet number concentration ranged between 80 and 400 cm-3, which was consistent with the satellite-derived values. The relationship of cloud droplet number concentration and CCN at 0.2 % supersaturation from 18 flights is Nd =4.6 × CCN0.71. While the mean LWP

  19. Observation of layered antiferromagnetism in self-assembled parallel NiSi nanowire arrays on Si(110) by spin-polarized scanning tunneling spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ie-Hong; Hsu, Hsin-Zan

    2018-03-01

    The layered antiferromagnetism of parallel nanowire (NW) arrays self-assembled on Si(110) have been observed at room temperature by direct imaging of both the topographies and magnetic domains using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (SP-STM/STS). The topographic STM images reveal that the self-assembled unidirectional and parallel NiSi NWs grow into the Si(110) substrate along the [\\bar{1}10] direction (i.e. the endotaxial growth) and exhibit multiple-layer growth. The spatially-resolved SP-STS maps show that these parallel NiSi NWs of different heights produce two opposite magnetic domains, depending on the heights of either even or odd layers in the layer stack of the NiSi NWs. This layer-wise antiferromagnetic structure can be attributed to an antiferromagnetic interlayer exchange coupling between the adjacent layers in the multiple-layer NiSi NW with a B2 (CsCl-type) crystal structure. Such an endotaxial heterostructure of parallel magnetic NiSi NW arrays with a layered antiferromagnetic ordering in Si(110) provides a new and important perspective for the development of novel Si-based spintronic nanodevices.

  20. Rocket in situ observation of equatorial plasma irregularities in the region between E and F layers over Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Savio Odriozola

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A two-stage VS-30 Orion rocket was launched from the equatorial rocket launching station in Alcântara, Brazil, on 8 December 2012 soon after sunset (19:00 LT, carrying a Langmuir probe operating alternately in swept and constant bias modes. At the time of launch, ground equipment operated at equatorial stations showed rapid rise in the base of the F layer, indicating the pre-reversal enhancement of the F region vertical drift and creating ionospheric conditions favorable for the generation of plasma bubbles. Vertical profiles of electron density estimated from Langmuir probe data showed wave patterns and small- and medium-scale plasma irregularities in the valley region (100–300 km during the rocket upleg and downleg. These irregularities resemble those detected by the very high frequency (VHF radar installed at Jicamarca and so-called equatorial quasi-periodic echoes. We present evidence suggesting that these observations could be the first detection of this type of irregularity made by instruments onboard a rocket.

  1. Observation and modeling of mixing-layer development in high-energy-density, blast-wave-driven shear flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Stefano, C. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Klein, S. R.; Drake, R. P.; Malamud, G.; Henry de Frahan, M. T.; Johnsen, E.; Shimony, A.; Shvarts, D.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Martinez, D.

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we examine the hydrodynamics of high-energy-density (HED) shear flows. Experiments, consisting of two materials of differing density, use the OMEGA-60 laser to drive a blast wave at a pressure of ∼50 Mbar into one of the media, creating a shear flow in the resulting shocked system. The interface between the two materials is Kelvin-Helmholtz unstable, and a mixing layer of growing width develops due to the shear. To theoretically analyze the instability's behavior, we rely on two sources of information. First, the interface spectrum is well-characterized, which allows us to identify how the shock front and the subsequent shear in the post-shock flow interact with the interface. These observations provide direct evidence that vortex merger dominates the evolution of the interface structure. Second, simulations calibrated to the experiment allow us to estimate the time-dependent evolution of the deposition of vorticity at the interface. The overall result is that we are able to choose a hydrodynamic model for the system, and consequently examine how well the flow in this HED system corresponds to a classical hydrodynamic description

  2. Global significance of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) deduced from high-resolution seismic observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, K.; Tittgemeyer, M.; Ryberg, T.; Wenzel, F.; Mooney, W.

    2002-01-01

    We infer the fine structure of a sub-Moho boundary layer (SMBL) at the top of the lithospheric mantle from high-resolution seismic observations of Peaceful Nuclear Explosions (PNE) on superlong-range profiles in Russia. Densely recorded seismograms permit recognition of previously unknown features of teleseismic propagation of the well known Pn and Sn phases, such as a band of incoherent, scattered, high-frequency seismic energy, developing consistently from station to station, apparent velocities of sub-Moho material, and high-frequency energy to distances of more than 3000 km with a coda band, incoherent at 10 km spacing and yet consistently observed to the end of the profiles. Estimates of the other key elements of the SMBL were obtained by finite difference calculations of wave propagation in elastic 2D models from a systematic grid search through parameter space. The SMBL consists of randomly distributed, mild velocity fluctuations of 2% or schlieren of high aspect ratios (???40) with long horizontal extent (???20 km) and therefore as thin as 0.5 km only; SMBL thickness is 60-100 km. It is suggested that the SMBL is of global significance as the physical base of the platewide observed high-frequency phases Pn and Sn. It is shown that wave propagation in the SMBL waveguide is insensitive to the background velocity distribution on which its schlieren are superimposed. This explains why the Pn and Sn phases traverse geological provinces of various age, heat flow, crustal thickness, and tectonic regimes. Their propagation appears to be independent of age. temperature, pressure, and stress. Dynamic stretching of mantle material during subduction or flow, possibly combined with chemical differentiation have to be considered as scale-forming processes in the upper mantle. However, it is difficult to distinguish with the present sets of Pn/Sn array data whether (and also where) the boundary layer is a frozen-in feature of paleo-processes or whether it is a response to

  3. Observing the morphology of single-layered embedded silicon nanocrystals by using temperature-stable TEM membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Gutsch

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We use high-temperature-stable silicon nitride membranes to investigate single layers of silicon nanocrystal ensembles by energy filtered transmission electron microscopy. The silicon nanocrystals are prepared from the precipitation of a silicon-rich oxynitride layer sandwiched between two SiO2 diffusion barriers and subjected to a high-temperature annealing. We find that such single layers are very sensitive to the annealing parameters and may lead to a significant loss of excess silicon. In addition, these ultrathin layers suffer from significant electron beam damage that needs to be minimized in order to image the pristine sample morphology. Finally we demonstrate how the silicon nanocrystal size distribution develops from a broad to a narrow log-normal distribution, when the initial precipitation layer thickness and stoichiometry are below a critical value.

  4. A case study on generation mechanisms of a sporadic sodium layer above Tromsø (69.6° N during a night of high auroral activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Takahashi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available We have quantitatively evaluated generation mechanisms of a sporadic sodium layer (SSL based on observational data obtained by multiple instruments at a high-latitude station: Ramfjordmoen, Tromsø, Norway (69.6° N, 19.2° E. The sodium lidar observed an SSL at 21:18 UT on 22 January 2012. The SSL was observed for 18 min, with a maximum sodium density of about 1.9 × 1010 m−3 at 93 km with a 1.1 km thickness. The European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT UHF radar observed a sporadic E layer (Es layer above 90 km from 20:00 to 23:00 UT. After 20:00 UT, the Es layer gradually descended and reached 94 km at 21:18 UT when the SSL appeared at the same altitude. In this event, considering the abundance of sodium ions (10 % or less, the Es layer could provide only about 37 % or less of the sodium atoms to the SSL. We have investigated a temporal development of the normal sodium ion layer with a consideration of chemical reactions and the effect of the (southwestward electric field using observational values of the neutral temperature, electron density, horizontal neutral wind, and electric field. This calculation has shown that those processes, including contributions of the Es layer, would provide about 88 % of sodium atoms of the SSL. The effects of meteor absorption and auroral particle sputtering appear to be less important. Therefore, we have concluded that the major source of the SSL was sodium ions in a normal sodium ion layer. Two processes – namely the downward transportation of sodium ions from a normal sodium ion layer due to the electric field and the additional supply of sodium ions from the Es layer under relatively high electron density conditions (i.e., in the Es layer – played a major role in generating the SSL in this event. Furthermore, we have found that the SSL was located in a lower-temperature region and that the temperature inside the SSL did not show any remarkable temperature enhancements.

  5. Ozone Laminae and Their Entrainment Into a Valley Boundary Layer, as Observed From a Mountaintop Monitoring Station, Ozonesondes, and Aircraft Over California's San Joaquin Valley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faloona, I. C.; Conley, S. A.; Caputi, D.; Trousdell, J.; Chiao, S.; Eiserloh, A. J., Jr.; Clark, J.; Iraci, L. T.; Yates, E. L.; Marrero, J. E.; Ryoo, J. M.; McNamara, M. E.

    2016-12-01

    The San Joaquin Valley of California is wide ( 75 km) and long ( 400 km), and is situated under strong atmospheric subsidence due, in part, to the proximity of the midlatitude anticyclone of the Pacific High. The capping effect of this subsidence is especially prominent during the warm season when ground level ozone is a serious air quality concern across the region. While relatively clean marine boundary layer air is primarily funneled into the valley below the strong subsidence inversion at significant gaps in the upwind Coast Range mountains, airflow aloft also spills over these barriers and mixes into the valley from above. Because this transmountain flow occurs under the influence of synoptic subsidence it tends to present discrete, laminar sheets of differing air composition above the valley boundary layer. Meanwhile, although the boundary layers tend to remain shallow due to the prevailing subsidence, orographic and anabatic venting of valley boundary layer air around the basin whips up a complex admixture of regional air masses into a "buffer layer" just above the boundary layer (zi) and below the lower free troposphere. We present scalar data of widely varying lifetimes including ozone, methane, NOx, and thermodynamic observations from upwind and within the San Joaquin Valley to better explain this layering and its subsequent erosion into the valley boundary layer via entrainment. Data collected at a mountaintop monitoring station on Chews Ridge in the Coast Range, by coastal ozonesondes, and aircraft are analyzed to document the dynamic layering processes around the complex terrain surrounding the valley. Particular emphasis will be made on observational methods whereby distal ozone can be distinguished from the regional ozone to better understand the influence of exogenous sources on air quality in the valley.

  6. Airborne observations and simulations of three-dimensional radiative interactions between Arctic boundary layer clouds and ice floes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M.; Bierwirth, E.; Ehrlich, A.; Jäkel, E.; Wendisch, M.

    2015-07-01

    Based on airborne spectral imaging observations, three-dimensional (3-D) radiative effects between Arctic boundary layer clouds and highly variable Arctic surfaces were identified and quantified. A method is presented to discriminate between sea ice and open water under cloudy conditions based on airborne nadir reflectivity γλ measurements in the visible spectral range. In cloudy cases the transition of γλ from open water to sea ice is not instantaneous but horizontally smoothed. In general, clouds reduce γλ above bright surfaces in the vicinity of open water, while γλ above open sea is enhanced. With the help of observations and 3-D radiative transfer simulations, this effect was quantified to range between 0 and 2200 m distance to the sea ice edge (for a dark-ocean albedo of αwater = 0.042 and a sea-ice albedo of αice = 0.91 at 645 nm wavelength). The affected distance Δ L was found to depend on both cloud and sea ice properties. For a low-level cloud at 0-200 m altitude, as observed during the Arctic field campaign VERtical Distribution of Ice in Arctic clouds (VERDI) in 2012, an increase in the cloud optical thickness τ from 1 to 10 leads to a decrease in Δ L from 600 to 250 m. An increase in the cloud base altitude or cloud geometrical thickness results in an increase in Δ L; for τ = 1/10 Δ L = 2200 m/1250 m in case of a cloud at 500-1000 m altitude. To quantify the effect for different shapes and sizes of ice floes, radiative transfer simulations were performed with various albedo fields (infinitely long straight ice edge, circular ice floes, squares, realistic ice floe field). The simulations show that Δ L increases with increasing radius of the ice floe and reaches maximum values for ice floes with radii larger than 6 km (500-1000 m cloud altitude), which matches the results found for an infinitely long, straight ice edge. Furthermore, the influence of these 3-D radiative effects on the retrieved cloud optical properties was investigated

  7. Airborne observations and simulations of three-dimensional radiative interactions between Arctic boundary layer clouds and ice floes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schäfer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on airborne spectral imaging observations, three-dimensional (3-D radiative effects between Arctic boundary layer clouds and highly variable Arctic surfaces were identified and quantified. A method is presented to discriminate between sea ice and open water under cloudy conditions based on airborne nadir reflectivity γλ measurements in the visible spectral range. In cloudy cases the transition of γλ from open water to sea ice is not instantaneous but horizontally smoothed. In general, clouds reduce γλ above bright surfaces in the vicinity of open water, while γλ above open sea is enhanced. With the help of observations and 3-D radiative transfer simulations, this effect was quantified to range between 0 and 2200 m distance to the sea ice edge (for a dark-ocean albedo of αwater = 0.042 and a sea-ice albedo of αice = 0.91 at 645 nm wavelength. The affected distance Δ L was found to depend on both cloud and sea ice properties. For a low-level cloud at 0–200 m altitude, as observed during the Arctic field campaign VERtical Distribution of Ice in Arctic clouds (VERDI in 2012, an increase in the cloud optical thickness τ from 1 to 10 leads to a decrease in Δ L from 600 to 250 m. An increase in the cloud base altitude or cloud geometrical thickness results in an increase in Δ L; for τ = 1/10 Δ L = 2200 m/1250 m in case of a cloud at 500–1000 m altitude. To quantify the effect for different shapes and sizes of ice floes, radiative transfer simulations were performed with various albedo fields (infinitely long straight ice edge, circular ice floes, squares, realistic ice floe field. The simulations show that Δ L increases with increasing radius of the ice floe and reaches maximum values for ice floes with radii larger than 6 km (500–1000 m cloud altitude, which matches the results found for an infinitely long, straight ice edge. Furthermore, the influence of these 3-D radiative effects on the retrieved cloud optical

  8. Electrostatic solitary waves in current layers: from Cluster observations during a super-substorm to beam experiments at the LAPD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, J. S.; Chen, L.-J.; Santolík, O.; Grimald, S.; Lavraud, B.; Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Lefebvre, B.; Fazakerley, A.; Lakhina, G. S.; Ghosh, S. S.; Grison, B.; Décréau, P. M. E.; Gurnett, D. A.; Torbert, R.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Dandouras, I.; Lucek, E.

    2009-06-01

    Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs) have been observed by several spacecraft in the current layers of Earth's magnetosphere since 1982. ESWs are manifested as isolated pulses (one wave period) in the high time resolution waveform data obtained on these spacecraft. They are thus nonlinear structures generated out of nonlinear instabilities and processes. We report the first observations of ESWs associated with the onset of a super-substorm that occurred on 24 August 2005 while the Cluster spacecraft were located in the magnetotail at around 18-19 RE and moving northward from the plasma sheet to the lobes. These ESWs were detected in the waveform data of the WBD plasma wave receiver on three of the Cluster spacecraft. The majority of the ESWs were detected about 5 min after the super-substorm onset during which time 1) the PEACE electron instrument detected significant field-aligned electron fluxes from a few 100 eV to 3.5 keV, 2) the EDI instrument detected bursts of field-aligned electron currents, 3) the FGM instrument detected substantial magnetic fluctuations and the presence of Alfvén waves, 4) the STAFF experiment detected broadband electric and magnetic waves, ion cyclotron waves and whistler mode waves, and 5) CIS detected nearly comparable densities of H+ and O+ ions and a large tailward H+ velocity. We compare the characteristics of the ESWs observed during this event to those created in the laboratory at the University of California-Los Angeles Plasma Device (LAPD) with an electron beam. We find that the time durations of both space and LAPD ESWs are only slightly larger than the respective local electron plasma periods, indicating that electron, and not ion, dynamics are responsible for generation of the ESWs. We have discussed possible mechanisms for generating the ESWs in space, including the beam and kinetic Buneman type instabilities and the acoustic instabilities. Future studies will examine these mechanisms in more detail using the space

  9. Electrostatic solitary waves in current layers: from Cluster observations during a super-substorm to beam experiments at the LAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Pickett

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Electrostatic Solitary Waves (ESWs have been observed by several spacecraft in the current layers of Earth's magnetosphere since 1982. ESWs are manifested as isolated pulses (one wave period in the high time resolution waveform data obtained on these spacecraft. They are thus nonlinear structures generated out of nonlinear instabilities and processes. We report the first observations of ESWs associated with the onset of a super-substorm that occurred on 24 August 2005 while the Cluster spacecraft were located in the magnetotail at around 18–19 RE and moving northward from the plasma sheet to the lobes. These ESWs were detected in the waveform data of the WBD plasma wave receiver on three of the Cluster spacecraft. The majority of the ESWs were detected about 5 min after the super-substorm onset during which time 1 the PEACE electron instrument detected significant field-aligned electron fluxes from a few 100 eV to 3.5 keV, 2 the EDI instrument detected bursts of field-aligned electron currents, 3 the FGM instrument detected substantial magnetic fluctuations and the presence of Alfvén waves, 4 the STAFF experiment detected broadband electric and magnetic waves, ion cyclotron waves and whistler mode waves, and 5 CIS detected nearly comparable densities of H+ and O+ ions and a large tailward H+ velocity. We compare the characteristics of the ESWs observed during this event to those created in the laboratory at the University of California-Los Angeles Plasma Device (LAPD with an electron beam. We find that the time durations of both space and LAPD ESWs are only slightly larger than the respective local electron plasma periods, indicating that electron, and not ion, dynamics are responsible for generation of the ESWs. We have discussed possible mechanisms for generating the ESWs in space, including the beam and kinetic Buneman type instabilities and the acoustic instabilities. Future studies will examine these mechanisms in

  10. Temperature properties in the tropical tropopause layer and their correlations with Outgoing Longwave Radiation: FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaiti; Wu, Yi-chao; Lin, Jia-Ting; Tan, Pei-Hua

    2018-06-01

    The properties of temperature at the level of lapse rate minimum (LRM) in the tropical tropopause layer between 20°S and 20°N are investigated using 3-year radio occultation observations based on the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC mission from November of 2006 to October of 2009. The correlations between this LRM temperature and Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) are analyzed by 5° × 5° grids in longitude and latitude. Two primary regions, one from 60°E to 180°E and the other from 90°W to 30°E, are found to have higher correlations and can be associated with regions of lower OLR values. The patterns of this spatial distributions of regions with higher correlations begin to change more obviously when the altitude ascends to the level of Cold Point Tropopause (CPT). This correlation at the LRM altitude in annual and seasonal scales also shows spatial distributions associated with OLR intensities. The altitudinal dependence of the correlations between temperature and OLR is further analyzed based on grids of high correlations with significance at LRM altitude, for the two primary regions. The results show that for the different time scales in this analysis (3-year, annual, and seasonal), the correlations all gradually decrease above the LRM levels but maintain a significant level to as high as 2.5-3.5 km. Below the LRM level, the correlation decreases with a slower rate as the altitude descends and still keeps significant at the deep 5 km level. These suggest that the vertical temperature profiles could be affected by the convection mechanism for a wide range of altitudes in the troposphere even above LRM altitude. Applying the same analysis on one complete La Niña event during the survey period also reveals similar features.

  11. Direct in situ transmission electron microscopy observation of Al push up during early stages of the Al-induced layer exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birajdar, B.I.; Antesberger, T.; Butz, B.; Stutzmann, M.; Spiecker, E.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanism of Al transport during Al-induced layer exchange and crystallization of amorphous Si (a-Si) has been investigated by in situ and analytical transmission electron microscopy. Significant grain boundary realignment and coarsening of Al grains close to the Si crystallization growth front as well as push up of excess Al into the a-Si layer at distances even a few micrometers away from the crystallization front were observed. Stress-mediated diffusion of Al is postulated to explain the experimental observations.

  12. Strength and Deformability of Light-toned Layered Deposits Observed by MER Opportunity: Eagle to Erebus Craters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, C. H.; Schultz, R. A.; Nahm, A. L.

    2007-07-01

    The strength and deformability of light-toned layered deposits are estimated based on measurements of porosity from Microscopic Imager data acquired by MER Opportunity during its traverse from Eagle Crater to Erebus Crater.

  13. Observations and simulations of three-dimensional radiative interactions between Arctic boundary layer clouds and ice floes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, M.; Bierwirth, E.; Ehrlich, A.; Jäkel, E.; Wendisch, M.

    2015-01-01

    Based on airborne spectral imaging observations three-dimensional (3-D) radiative effects between Arctic boundary layer clouds and ice floes have been identified and quantified. A method is presented to discriminate sea ice and open water in case of clouds from imaging radiance measurements. This separation simultaneously reveals that in case of clouds the transition of radiance between open water and sea ice is not instantaneously but horizontally smoothed. In general, clouds reduce the nadir radiance above bright surfaces in the vicinity of sea ice - open water boundaries, while the nadir radiance above dark surfaces is enhanced compared to situations with clouds located above horizontal homogeneous surfaces. With help of the observations and 3-D radiative transfer simulations, this effect was quantified to range between 0 and 2200 m distance to the sea ice edge. This affected distance Δ L was found to depend on both, cloud and sea ice properties. For a ground overlaying cloud in 0-200 m altitude, increasing the cloud optical thickness from τ = 1 to τ = 10 decreases Δ L from 600 to 250 m, while increasing cloud base altitude or cloud geometrical thickness can increase Δ L; Δ L(τ = 1/10) = 2200 m/1250 m for 500-1000 m cloud altitude. To quantify the effect for different shapes and sizes of the ice floes, various albedo fields (infinite straight ice edge, circles, squares, realistic ice floe field) were modelled. Simulations show that Δ L increases by the radius of the ice floe and for sizes larger than 6 km (500-1000 m cloud altitude) asymptotically reaches maximum values, which corresponds to an infinite straight ice edge. Furthermore, the impact of these 3-D-radiative effects on retrieval of cloud optical properties was investigated. The enhanced brightness of a dark pixel next to an ice edge results in uncertainties of up to 90 and 30% in retrievals of cloud optical thickness and effective radius reff, respectively. With help of Δ L quantified here, an

  14. Ionospheric F2-layer Perturbations Observed After the M8.8 Chile Earthquake on February 27, 2010, at Long Distance from the Epicenter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery V. Hegai

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The F2-layer critical frequency (foF2 data from several ionosondes are employed to study the long-distance effect of the M8.8 Chile Earthquake of February 27, 2010, on the F2 layer. Significant perturbations of the peak F2-layer electron density have been observed following the earthquake at two South African stations, Hermanus and Madimbo, which are located at great circle distances of ~8,000 and ~10,000 km from the earthquake epicenter, respectively. Simplified estimates demonstrate that the observed ionospheric perturbations can be caused by a long-period acoustic gravity wave produced in the F-region by the earthquake.

  15. Counter electrojet features in the Brazilian sector: simultaneous observation by radar, digital sounder and magnetometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Denardini

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present work we show new results regarding equatorial counter electrojet (CEJ events in the Brazilian sector, based on the RESCO radar, two set of fluxgate magnetometer systems and a digital sounder. RESCO radar is a 50 MHz backscatter coherent radar installed in 1998 at São Luís (SLZ, 2.33° S, 44.60° W, an equatorial site. The Digital sounder routinely monitors the electron density profile at the radar site. The magnetometer systems are fluxgate-type installed at SLZ and Eusébio (EUS, 03.89° S, 38.44° W. From the difference between the horizontal component of magnetic field at SLZ station and the same component at EUS (EEJ ground strength several cases of westward morning electrojet and its normal inversion to the eastward equatorial electrojet (EEJ have been observed. Also, the EEJ ground strength has shown some cases of CEJ events, which been detected with the RESCO radar too. Detection of these events were investigated with respect to their time and height of occurrence, correlation with sporadic E (Es layers at the same time, and their spectral characteristics as well as the radar echo power intensity.

  16. Observation of Dynamic Interfacial Layers in Li-Ion and Li-O_2 Batteries by Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bülter, Heinz; Schwager, Patrick; Fenske, Daniela; Wittstock, Gunther

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Imaging changes of solid electrolyte interphases on rinsed lithiated graphite. • Strongly non-uniform changes of SEI passivation properties. • In situ imaging of clogged gas diffusion electrodes of Li/O_2 batteries. - Abstract: The requirements of high energy density in modern batteries dictate the use of very high (oxidizing) or very low (reducing) potential for negative and positive electrode materials. These extreme potentials can cause molecular compounds to undergo electron transfer reactions at the interfaces. This is well documented for lithium-ion batteries, where a solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) between the lithiated graphite electrode and the electrolyte is formed by the decomposition of electrolyte components mainly during the first charging process. Characterization of the SEI is a challenge because of the variety of chemically similar components and enclosed electrolyte species. Furthermore, ex situ analysis of the SEI requires separation and isolation of the SEI, which may change the content and the structure of the SEI. Scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) provides in situ analysis of passivating layers formed at battery electrodes. Such approaches must deal with continuous changes of the studied interfaces. This is illustrated for the in situ investigation of the electron transport at SEI-covered lithiated graphite using 2,5-di-tert-butyl-1,4-dimethoxy benzene as SECM mediator in an inert atmosphere. With this setup, the influence of rinsing protocols on the passivating properties of the SEI was studied. An extensive rinsing compared to our previous studies [DOI 10.1002/anie.201403935] leads to much higher local variation of the SEI passivation properties which continue over the entire observation time of 54 h. The second example uses a SECM generation-collection experiment to detect gas permeation through a gas-diffusion electrode (GDE) of a Li-O_2 cell into a Li"+-containing organic electrolyte. The passivation of the

  17. Study of midlatitude ionospheric irregularities and E- and F-region coupling based on rocket and radar observations from Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, M.

    2015-12-01

    We have been studying ionspheric irregularities in mid-latitude region by using radars, sounding rockets, etc. The mid-latitude ionosphere was considered much stable than those in the equatorial or polar region in the past, but our studies for years have revealed that there are much active variabilities. We found variety of wave-like structures that are specific in the mid-latitudes. One of the phenomena is quasi-periodic echoes (QP echoes) first observed by the MU radar that reflects horizontal plasma-density structures associated to sporadic-E layers. Another phenomenon is medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID) in the F-region. In the generation mechanism we think that Ionospheric E- and F-region coupling process is important. In this presentation, we will discuss nature of mid-latitude ionosphere based on our observations; the MU radar, sounding rocket campaigns of SEEK-1/2, and recent MSTID rocket experiment from JAXA Uchinoura Space Center in July 2013.

  18. Aspect sensitive E- and F-region SPEAR-enhanced incoherent backscatter observed by the EISCAT Svalbard radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. S. Dhillon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies of the aspect sensitivity of heater-enhanced incoherent radar backscatter in the high-latitude ionosphere have demonstrated the directional dependence of incoherent scatter signatures corresponding to artificially excited electrostatic waves, together with consistent field-aligned signatures that may be related to the presence of artificial field-aligned irregularities. These earlier high-latitude results have provided motivation for repeating the investigation in the different geophysical conditions that obtain in the polar cap ionosphere. The Space Plasma Exploration by Active Radar (SPEAR facility is located within the polar cap and has provided observations of RF-enhanced ion and plasma line spectra recorded by the EISCAT Svalbard UHF incoherent scatter radar system (ESR, which is collocated with SPEAR. In this paper, we present observations of aspect sensitive E- and F-region SPEAR-induced ion and plasma line enhancements that indicate excitation of both the purely growing mode and the parametric decay instability, together with sporadic E-layer results that may indicate the presence of cavitons. We note consistent enhancements from field-aligned, vertical and also from 5° south of field-aligned. We attribute the prevalence of vertical scatter to the importance of the Spitze region, and of that from field-aligned to possible wave/irregularity coupling.

  19. A New Observational Strategy for Monitoring the Tropical Cyclone Outflow Layer and its Relationship to Intensity and Structure Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    vertical structure of outflow layer jets for Hurricanes Leslie and Nadine in 2012 and Invest 97L in 2013 has been conducted using NCAR- EOL /Vaisala mini...generation of dropsonde, the Yankee, Inc HDSS and XDD sonde was intercompared during CIRPAS Twin Otter test flights on 24-25 June, 2011 with NCAR- EOL

  20. Direct observation of strain in InAs quantum dots and cap layer during molecular beam epitaxial growth using in situ X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, Kenichi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Kamiya, Itaru; Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Sasaki, Takuo; Takahasi, Masamitu

    2015-01-01

    Direct measurements on the growth of InAs quantum dots (QDs) and various cap layers during molecular beam epitaxy are performed by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The evolution of strain induced both in the QDs and cap layers during capping is discussed based on the XRD intensity transients obtained at various lattice constants. Transients with different features are observed from those obtained during InGaAs and GaAs capping. The difference observed is attributed to In-Ga intermixing between the QDs and the cap layer under limited supply of In. Photoluminescence (PL) wavelength can be tuned by controlling the intermixing, which affects both the strain induced in the QDs and the barrier heights. The PL wavelength also varies with the cap layer thickness. A large redshift occurs by reducing the cap thickness. The in situ XRD observation reveals that this is a result of reduced strain. We demonstrate how such information about strain can be applied for designing and preparing novel device structures

  1. Direct observation of strain in InAs quantum dots and cap layer during molecular beam epitaxial growth using in situ X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimomura, Kenichi; Ohshita, Yoshio; Kamiya, Itaru, E-mail: kamiya@toyota-ti.ac.jp [Toyota Technological Institute, 2-12-1 Hisakata, Tempaku, Nagoya 468-8511 (Japan); Suzuki, Hidetoshi [Faculty of Engineering, University of Miyazaki, 1-1 Gakuen Kibanadai-nishi, Miyazaki 889-2192 (Japan); Sasaki, Takuo; Takahasi, Masamitu [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Koto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)

    2015-11-14

    Direct measurements on the growth of InAs quantum dots (QDs) and various cap layers during molecular beam epitaxy are performed by in situ X-ray diffraction (XRD). The evolution of strain induced both in the QDs and cap layers during capping is discussed based on the XRD intensity transients obtained at various lattice constants. Transients with different features are observed from those obtained during InGaAs and GaAs capping. The difference observed is attributed to In-Ga intermixing between the QDs and the cap layer under limited supply of In. Photoluminescence (PL) wavelength can be tuned by controlling the intermixing, which affects both the strain induced in the QDs and the barrier heights. The PL wavelength also varies with the cap layer thickness. A large redshift occurs by reducing the cap thickness. The in situ XRD observation reveals that this is a result of reduced strain. We demonstrate how such information about strain can be applied for designing and preparing novel device structures.

  2. An overview of the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer during the West African monsoon season: results from the 2016 observational campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalthoff, Norbert; Lohou, Fabienne; Brooks, Barbara; Jegede, Gbenga; Adler, Bianca; Babić, Karmen; Dione, Cheikh; Ajao, Adewale; Amekudzi, Leonard K.; Aryee, Jeffrey N. A.; Ayoola, Muritala; Bessardon, Geoffrey; Danuor, Sylvester K.; Handwerker, Jan; Kohler, Martin; Lothon, Marie; Pedruzo-Bagazgoitia, Xabier; Smith, Victoria; Sunmonu, Lukman; Wieser, Andreas; Fink, Andreas H.; Knippertz, Peter

    2018-03-01

    A ground-based field campaign was conducted in southern West Africa from mid-June to the end of July 2016 within the framework of the Dynamics-Aerosol-Chemistry-Cloud Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA) project. It aimed to provide a high-quality comprehensive data set for process studies, in particular of interactions between low-level clouds (LLCs) and boundary-layer conditions. In this region missing observations are still a major issue. During the campaign, extensive remote sensing and in situ measurements were conducted at three supersites: Kumasi (Ghana), Savè (Benin) and Ile-Ife (Nigeria). Daily radiosoundings were performed at 06:00 UTC, and 15 intensive observation periods (IOPs) were performed during which additional radiosondes were launched, and remotely piloted aerial systems were operated. Extended stratiform LLCs form frequently in southern West Africa during the nighttime and persist long into the following day. They affect the radiation budget and hence the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer and regional climate. The relevant parameters and processes governing the formation and dissolution of the LLCs are still not fully understood. This paper gives an overview of the diurnal cycles of the energy-balance components, near-surface temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction as well as of the conditions (LLCs, low-level jet) in the boundary layer at the supersites and relates them to synoptic-scale conditions (monsoon layer, harmattan layer, African easterly jet, tropospheric stratification) in the DACCIWA operational area. The characteristics of LLCs vary considerably from day to day, including a few almost cloud-free nights. During cloudy nights we found large differences in the LLCs' formation and dissolution times as well as in the cloud-base height. The differences exist at individual sites and also between the sites. The synoptic conditions are characterized by a monsoon layer with south-westerly winds, on average about 1.9 km

  3. An overview of the diurnal cycle of the atmospheric boundary layer during the West African monsoon season: results from the 2016 observational campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Kalthoff

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A ground-based field campaign was conducted in southern West Africa from mid-June to the end of July 2016 within the framework of the Dynamics–Aerosol–Chemistry–Cloud Interactions in West Africa (DACCIWA project. It aimed to provide a high-quality comprehensive data set for process studies, in particular of interactions between low-level clouds (LLCs and boundary-layer conditions. In this region missing observations are still a major issue. During the campaign, extensive remote sensing and in situ measurements were conducted at three supersites: Kumasi (Ghana, Savè (Benin and Ile-Ife (Nigeria. Daily radiosoundings were performed at 06:00 UTC, and 15 intensive observation periods (IOPs were performed during which additional radiosondes were launched, and remotely piloted aerial systems were operated. Extended stratiform LLCs form frequently in southern West Africa during the nighttime and persist long into the following day. They affect the radiation budget and hence the evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer and regional climate. The relevant parameters and processes governing the formation and dissolution of the LLCs are still not fully understood. This paper gives an overview of the diurnal cycles of the energy-balance components, near-surface temperature, humidity, wind speed and direction as well as of the conditions (LLCs, low-level jet in the boundary layer at the supersites and relates them to synoptic-scale conditions (monsoon layer, harmattan layer, African easterly jet, tropospheric stratification in the DACCIWA operational area. The characteristics of LLCs vary considerably from day to day, including a few almost cloud-free nights. During cloudy nights we found large differences in the LLCs' formation and dissolution times as well as in the cloud-base height. The differences exist at individual sites and also between the sites. The synoptic conditions are characterized by a monsoon layer with south-westerly winds, on

  4. Strength and deformability of light-toned layered deposits observed by MER Opportunity: Eagle to Erebus craters, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Chris H.

    2007-10-01

    Quantifying host rock deformation is vital to understanding the geologic evolution and productivity of subsurface fluid reservoirs. In support of on-going characterization of fracture controlled fluid flow through the light-toned layered deposits on Mars, key parameters of strength and deformability are derived from Microscopic Imager and Rock Abrasion Tool data collected by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in Meridiani Planum. Analysis of 21 targets of light-toned layered deposits yields a median apparent porosity of 0.25. Additional physical parameters for each target are derived from these porosity measurements. The median value of unconfined compressive strength is 11.23 MPa, Young's modulus is 1.86 GPa, and the brittle-ductile transition pressure is 8.77 MPa.

  5. Electron microscopy observation of TiO2 nanocrystal evolution in high-temperature atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jian; Li, Zhaodong; Kvit, Alexander; Krylyuk, Sergiy; Davydov, Albert V; Wang, Xudong

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the evolution of amorphous and crystalline phases during atomic layer deposition (ALD) is essential for creating high quality dielectrics, multifunctional films/coatings, and predictable surface functionalization. Through comprehensive atomistic electron microscopy study of ALD TiO2 nanostructures at designed growth cycles, we revealed the transformation process and sequence of atom arrangement during TiO2 ALD growth. Evolution of TiO2 nanostructures in ALD was found following a path from amorphous layers to amorphous particles to metastable crystallites and ultimately to stable crystalline forms. Such a phase evolution is a manifestation of the Ostwald-Lussac Law, which governs the advent sequence and amount ratio of different phases in high-temperature TiO2 ALD nanostructures. The amorphous-crystalline mixture also enables a unique anisotropic crystal growth behavior at high temperature forming TiO2 nanorods via the principle of vapor-phase oriented attachment.

  6. High-frequency internal waves and thick bottom mixed layers observed by gliders in the Gulf Stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Robert E.

    2017-06-01

    Autonomous underwater gliders are conducting high-resolution surveys within the Gulf Stream along the U.S. East Coast. Glider surveys reveal two mechanisms by which energy is extracted from the Gulf Stream as it flows over the Blake Plateau, a portion of the outer continental shelf between Florida and North Carolina where bottom depths are less than 1000 m. Internal waves with vertical velocities exceeding 0.1 m s-1 and frequencies just below the local buoyancy frequency are routinely found over the Blake Plateau, particularly near the Charleston Bump, a prominent topographic feature. These waves are likely internal lee waves generated by the subinertial Gulf Stream flow over the irregular bathymetry of the outer continental shelf. Bottom mixed layers with O(100) m thickness are also frequently encountered; these thick bottom mixed layers likely form in the lee of topography due to enhanced turbulence generated by O(1) m s-1 near-bottom flows.

  7. Atomic-scale observation of structural and electronic orders in the layered compound ?-RuCl3

    OpenAIRE

    Ziatdinov, M.; Banerjee, A.; Maksov, A.; Berlijn, T.; Zhou, W.; Cao, H. B.; Yan, J.-Q.; Bridges, C. A.; Mandrus, D. G.; Nagler, S. E.; Baddorf, A. P.; Kalinin, S. V.

    2016-01-01

    A pseudospin-1/2 Mott phase on a honeycomb lattice is proposed to host the celebrated two-dimensional Kitaev model which has an elusive quantum spin liquid ground state, and fascinating physics relevant to the development of future templates towards topological quantum bits. Here we report a comprehensive, atomically resolved real-space study by scanning transmission electron and scanning tunnelling microscopies on a novel layered material displaying Kitaev physics, ?-RuCl3. Our local crystal...

  8. Evaluating Models Of The Neutral, Barotropic Planetary Boundary Layer Using Integral Measures: Part Ii. Modelling Observed Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, G. D.; Garratt, J. R.

    The steady-state, horizontally homogeneous, neutral, barotropiccase forms the foundation of our theoretical understanding of the planetary boundary layer (PBL).While simple analytical models and first-order closure models simulate atmospheric observationsof this case well, more sophisticated models, in general, do not. In this paperwe examine how well three higher-order closure models, E - - l, E - l, and LRR - l,which have been especially modified for PBL applications, perform in predicting the behaviour of thecross-isobaric angle 0, the geostrophic drag coefficient Cg, and the integral of the dissipationrate over the boundary layer, as a function of the surface Rossby number Ro. For comparison we alsoexamine the performance of three first-order closure mixing-length models, two proposed byA. K. Blackadar and one by H. H. Lettau, and the performance of the standard model forsecond-order closure and a modification of it designed to reduce the overprediction of turbulence inthe upper part of the boundary layer.

  9. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multifrequency EM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppmann, Mario; Hunkeler, Priska A.; Hendricks, Stefan; Kalscheuer, Thomas; Gerdes, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise, accumulate beneath nearby sea ice, and subsequently form a several meter thick, porous sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator of the health of an ice shelf. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions within the platelet layer using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drillhole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction yielded results comparable to other studies. Both parameters together enable an estimation of the total ice volume within the platelet layer, which was found to be comparable to the volume of landfast sea ice in this region, and corresponded to more than a quarter of the annual basal melt volume of the nearby Ekström Ice Shelf. Our findings show that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties, with important implications for research into ocean/ice-shelf/sea-ice interactions. However, a successful application of this

  10. Characterization of the Cloud-Topped Boundary Layer at the Synoptic Scale Using AVHRR Observations during the SEMAPHORE Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, A.; Sèze, G.; Lahellec, A.; Guerin, C.; Weill, A.

    2003-12-01

    Satellite platforms NOAA-11 and -12 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data are used during the daytime to study large sheets of stratocumulus over the North Atlantic Ocean. The application concerns an anticyclonic period of the Structure des Echanges Mer Atmosphère, Propriétés des Hétérogénéités Océaniques: Recherché Expérimentale (SEMAPHORE) campaign (10 17 November 1993). In the region of interest, the satellite images are recorded under large solar zenith angles. Extending the SEMAPHORE area, a region of about 3000 × 3000 km2 is studied to characterize the atmospheric boundary layer. A statistical cloud classification method is applied to discriminate for low-level and optically thick clouds. For AVHRR pixels covered with thick clouds, brightness temperatures are used to evaluate the boundary layer cloud-top temperature (CTT). The objective is to obtain accurate CTT maps for evaluation of a global model. In this application, the full-resolution fields are reduced to match model grid size. An estimate of overall temperature uncertainty associated with each grid point is also derived, which incorporates subgrid variability of the fields and quality of the temperature retrieval. Results are compared with the SEMAPHORE campaign measurements. A comparison with “DX” products obtained with the same dataset, but at lower resolution, is also presented. The authors claim that such instantaneous CTT maps could be as intensively used as classical SST maps, and both could be efficiently complemented with gridpoint error-bar maps. They may be used for multiple applications: (i) to provide a means to improve numerical weather prediction and climatological reanalyses, (ii) to represent a boundary layer global characterization to analyze the synoptic situation of field experiments, and (iii) to allow validation and to test development of large-scale and mesoscale models.

  11. Optical properties of mixed phase boundary layer clouds observed from a tethered balloon platform in the Arctic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikand, M.; Koskulics, J.; Stamnes, K.; Hamre, B.; Stamnes, J.J.; Lawson, R.P.

    2010-01-01

    A tethered balloon system was used to collect data on radiometric and cloud microphysical properties for mixed phase boundary layer clouds, consisting of ice crystals and liquid water droplets during a May-June 2008 experimental campaign in Ny-Alesund, Norway, located high in the Arctic at 78.9 o N, 11.9 o E. The balloon instrumentation was controlled and powered from the ground making it possible to fly for long durations and to profile clouds vertically in a systematic manner. We use a radiative transfer model to analyze the radiometric measurements and estimate the optical properties of mixed-phase clouds. The results demonstrate the ability of instruments deployed on a tethered balloon to provide information about optical properties of mixed-phase clouds in the Arctic. Our radiative transfer simulations show that cloud layering has little impact on the total downward irradiance measured at the ground as long as the total optical depth remains unchanged. In contrast, the mean intensity measured by an instrument deployed on a balloon depends on the vertical cloud structure and is thus sensitive to the altitude of the balloon. We use the total downward irradiance measured by a ground-based radiometer to estimate the total optical depth and the mean intensity measured at the balloon to estimate the vertical structure of the cloud optical depth.

  12. Effects of Strong Local Sporadic E on ELF Propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-15

    Huygens diffraction model (e.g., Marcuse , 1972). The model is similar to that used by Crombie. Unlike Crombie’s work however , the Fresnel approximation...40. Marcuse , D., “Light transmission optics ,” Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., New York , 1972. Papper t , R. A. & Moler , W. F., “A theoretica’ study of...ATTN Donald Dubbert O1 CY ATTN Herbert Rend University of IllinoisDepartment of Electrical Engineering Develco Urbana , IL 61803 530 Logue Avenue O2CY

  13. Slow relaxation of the magnetization observed in an antiferromagnetically ordered phase for SCM-based two-dimensional layered compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagesawa, Koichi; Nishimura, Yuki; Yoshida, Hiroki; Breedlove, Brian K; Yamashita, Masahiro; Miyasaka, Hitoshi

    2017-03-07

    Two-dimensional layered compounds with different counteranions, [{Mn(salen)} 4 C6](BF 4 ) 2 ·2(CH 3 OH) (1) and [{Mn(salen)} 4 C6](PF 6 ) 2 ·2(CH 3 OH) (2) (salen 2- = N,N'-bis(salicylideneiminato), C6 2- = C 6 H 12 (COO) 2 2- ), were synthesized by assembling [Mn(salen)(H 2 O)]X (X - = BF 4 - and PF 6 - ) and C 6 H 12 (CO 2 - ) 2 (C6 2- ) in a methanol/2-propanol medium. The compounds have similar structures, which are composed of Mn(salen) out-of-plane dimers bridged by μ 4 -type C6 2- ions, forming a brick-wall-type network of [-{Mn 2 }-OCO-] chains alternately connected via C 6 H 12 linkers of C6 2- moieties. The counteranions for 1 and 2, i.e., BF 4 - and PF 6 - , respectively, are located between layers. Since the size of BF 4 - is smaller than that of PF 6 - , intra-layer inter-chain and inter-plane nearest-neighbor MnMn distances are shorter in 1 than in 2. The zigzag chain moiety of [-{Mn 2 }-OCO-] leads to a canted S = 2 spin arrangement with ferromagnetic coupling in the Mn III out-of-plane dimer moiety and antiferromagnetic coupling through -OCO- bridges. Due to strong uniaxial anisotropy of the Mn III ion, the [-{Mn 2 }-OCO-] chains could behave as a single-chain magnet (SCM), which exhibits slow relaxation of magnetization at low temperatures. Nevertheless, these compounds fall into an antiferromagnetic ground state at higher temperatures of T N = 4.6 and 3.8 K for 1 and 2, respectively, than active temperatures for SCM behavior. The spin flip field at 1.8 K is 2.7 and 1.8 kOe for 1 and 2, respectively, which is attributed to the inter-chain interactions tuned by the size of the counteranions. The relaxation times of magnetization become longer at the boundary between the antiferromagnetic phase and the paramagnetic phase.

  14. Observations of the atmospheric surface layer parameters during the total solar eclipse of March 29th, in Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Founda, Dimitra; Lykoudis, Spyridon; Psiloglou, Basil E.; Petrakis, Michael; Zerefos, Christos [Inst. for Environmental Research and Sustainable Development, National Observatory of Athens (Greece)

    2009-10-15

    This study examines the effect of the total solar eclipse of March 29{sup th} 2006, on some parameters of the atmospheric surface layer. The eclipse effects on the mean, but also turbulent parameters of the wind were studied at Kastelorizo, a small island of southeastern Greece situated within the totality path of the eclipse. Although the eclipse effect on the mean flow was partly masked by the synoptic situation, the analysis of the intensive (high frequency) wind measurements showed a decrease of the turbulent processes with reduced values of the turbulent kinetic energy and shear stress for a short period around the maximum phase of the eclipse. The buoyancy flux decreased by one order of magnitude during the phenomenon. The power spectra of the three wind components were found to be lower by almost one order of magnitude near the total phase when compared to spectra after the end of the eclipse. (orig.)

  15. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

  16. Effect of rapid thermal annealing observed by photoluminescence measurement in GaAs1-xN x layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bousbih, F.; Bouzid, S.B.; Hamdouni, A.; Chtourou, R.; Harmand, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    A set of GaAs 1-x N x samples with small nitrogen content were investigated by photoluminescence (PL) measurements as function of irradiance in order to investigate the effect of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) on photoluminescence (PL) properties. The analysis of PL spectra as function of irradiance and nitrogen content shows that the PL spectra associated to the GaAs 1- x N x layers are the result of the nitrogen localized state recombination. The results are examined as a consequence of a rapid thermal annealing (RTA). The variation of the emission band peak energy (E p ), at 10 K as a function of irradiance, is fitted by a theoretical model taking into account two types of nitrogen localized states. The variation of the PL intensity versus irradiance in the range from 1.59 to 159 W/cm 2 for different GaAs 1-x N x samples confirm that the PL spectra result from the nitrogen localized state recombination

  17. Ship Observations and Numerical Simulation of the Marine Atmosphericboundary Layer over the Spring Oceanic Front in the Northwestern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Shi, R.; Chen, J.; Guo, X.; Zeng, L.; Li, J.; Xie, Q.; Wang, X.

    2017-12-01

    The response of the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL) structure to an oceanic front is analyzed using Global Positioning System (GPS) sounding data obtained during a survey in the northwestern South China Sea (NSCS) over a period of about one week in April 2013. The Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is used to further examine the thermodynamical mechanisms of the MABL's response to the front. The WRF model successfully simulates the change in the MABL structure across the front, which agrees well with the observations. The spatially high-pass-filtered fields of sea surface temperature (SST) and 10-m neutral equivalent wind from the WRF model simulation show a tight, positive coupling between the SST and surface winds near the front. Meanwhile, the SST front works as a damping zone to reduce the enhancement of wind blowing from the warm to the cold side of the front in the lower boundary layer. Analysis of the momentum budget shows that the most active and significant term affecting horizontal momentum over the frontal zone is the adjustment of the pressure gradient. It is found that the front in the NSCS is wide enough for slowly moving air parcels to be affected by the change in underlying SST. The different thermal structure upwind and downwind of the front causes a baroclinic adjustment of the perturbation pressure from the surface to the mid-layer of the MABL, which dominates the change in the wind profile across the front.

  18. Observations of the boundary layer, cloud, and aerosol variability in the southeast Pacific near-coastal marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, X.; Albrecht, B.; Jonsson, H. H; Khelif, D.; Feingold, G.; Minnis, P.; Ayers, K.; Chuang, P.; Donaher, S.; Rossiter, D.; Ghate, V.; Ruiz-Plancarte, J.; Sun-Mack, S.

    2011-01-01

    The article of record as published may be found at http://dx.doi.org/10.5194/acp-11-9943-2011 Aircraft observations made off the coast of northern Chile in the Southeastern Pacific (20° S, 72° W; named Point Alpha) from 16 October to 13 November 2008 during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud- Atmosphere-Land Study- Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), combined with meteorological reanalysis, satellite measurements, and radiosonde data, are used to investigate the boundary layer (BL) ...

  19. The Influence of Synoptic Meteorology on Convective Boundary Layer Characteristics and the Observed Chemical Response During PROPHET 2000 and 2001 Summer Intensives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, M. A.; Moody, J. L.; Carroll, M.; Brown, W. O.; Cohn, S. A.

    2002-12-01

    PROPHET conducted atmospheric chemistry intensives that were coordinated with continuous measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer at the University of Michigan Biological Station (UMBS) during July and August of 2000 and 2001. Observations of ozone and trace gas precursors were made on a 31-meter tower within a mixed hardwood forest. A National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) integrated sounding system (915-MHz Doppler wind profiler, radio acoustic sounder, surface meteorological tower, and rawinsonde system) was deployed in a nearby clearing. This facility provided detailed measurements of atmospheric boundary layer structure. The site is located at the northern tip of the Michigan's lower peninsula. Typically, a contaminated maritime-subtropical air mass lies to the south, while a relatively clean continental-polar air mass lies to the north, resulting in two distinct synoptic transport regimes. Published work, based on analyses of back trajectories and 1998 chemical data, has shown the influence of air mass origin on trace gas mixing ratios and the same trends are observed in 2000 and 2001 chemical data. Besides directly affecting the chemistry observed at the site, the large-scale synoptic meteorology has a major influence on convective boundary layer (CBL) characteristics. CBL data were obtained from the range corrected signal-to-noise ratio, derived from the Doppler spectra measured by the wind profiler. Distinct differences between CBL characteristics, such as growth rates, time period of maximum growth, average height throughout evolution, and maximum height, are illustrated for differing synoptic patterns. Typically, dry northerly flow results when UMBS is positioned on the leading edge of surface anticyclones moving out of Canada after frontal passages. The dry air mass accompanied with relatively clear skies allows intense solar radiation to go directly into surface heating; the result is rapid CBL development. By contrast, warm, moist air

  20. Direct observation of electrothermal instability structures on intensely Ohmically heated aluminum with current flowing in a surface skin layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awe, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Implosions on the Z Facility assemble high-energy-density plasmas for radiation effects and ICF experiments, but achievable stagnation pressures and temperatures are degraded by the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. While the beryllium liners (tubes) used in Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) experiments are astonishingly smooth (10 to 50 nm RMS roughness), they also contain distributed micron-scale resistive inclusions, and large MRT amplitudes are observed. Early in the implosion, an electrothermal instability (ETI) may provide a perturbation which greatly exceeds the initial surface roughness of the liner. Resistive inhomogeneities drive nonuniform current density and Joule heating, resulting in locally higher temperature, and thus still higher resistivity. Such unstable temperature and pressure growth produce density perturbations which seed MRT. For MagLIF liners, ETI seeding of MRT has been inferred by evaluating late-time MRT, but a direct observation of ETI is not made. ETI is directly observed on the surface of 1.0-mm-diameter solid Al rods pulsed to 1 MA in 100 ns via high resolution gated optical imaging (2 ns temporal and 3 micron spatial resolution). Aluminum 6061 alloy rods, with micron-scale resistive inclusions, consistently first demonstrate overheating from distinct, 10-micron-scale, sub-eV spots, which 5-10 ns later merge into azimuthally stretched elliptical spots and discrete strata (40-100 microns wide by 10 microns tall). Axial plasma filaments form shortly thereafter. Surface plasma can be suppressed for rods coated with dielectric, enabling extended study of the evolution of stratified ETI structures, and experimental inference of ETI growth rates. This fundamentally new and highly 3-dimensional dataset informs ETI physics, including when the ETI seed of MRT may be initiated.

  1. Observations of nitryl chloride and modeling its source and effect on ozone in the planetary boundary layer of southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Tham, Yee Jun; Xue, Likun; Li, Qinyi; Zha, Qiaozhi; Wang, Zhe; Poon, Steven C. N.; Dubé, William P.; Blake, Donald R.; Louie, Peter K. K.; Luk, Connie W. Y.; Tsui, Wilson; Brown, Steven S.

    2016-03-01

    Nitryl chloride (ClNO2) plays potentially important roles in atmospheric chemistry, but its abundance and effect are not fully understood due to the small number of ambient observations of ClNO2 to date. In late autumn 2013, ClNO2 was measured with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) at a mountain top (957 m above sea level) in Hong Kong. During 12 nights with continuous CIMS data, elevated mixing ratios of ClNO2 (>400 parts per trillion by volume) or its precursor N2O5 (>1000 pptv) were observed on six nights, with the highest ever reported ClNO2 (4.7 ppbv, 1 min average) and N2O5 (7.7 ppbv, 1 min average) in one case. Backward particle dispersion calculations driven by winds simulated with a mesoscale meteorological model show that the ClNO2/N2O5-laden air at the high-elevation site was due to transport of urban/industrial pollution north of the site. The highest ClNO2/N2O5 case was observed in a later period of the night and was characterized with extensively processed air and with the presence of nonoceanic chloride. A chemical box model with detailed chlorine chemistry was used to assess the possible impact of the ClNO2 in the well-processed regional plume on next day ozone, as the air mass continued to downwind locations. The results show that the ClNO2 could enhance ozone by 5-16% at the ozone peak or 11-41% daytime ozone production in the following day. This study highlights varying importance of the ClNO2 chemistry in polluted environments and the need to consider this process in photochemical models for prediction of ground-level ozone and haze.

  2. Effectiveness and Value of Prophylactic 5-Layer Foam Sacral Dressings to Prevent Hospital-Acquired Pressure Injuries in Acute Care Hospitals: An Observational Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness and value of prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings to prevent hospital-acquired pressure injury rates in acute care settings. Retrospective observational cohort. We reviewed records of adult patients 18 years or older who were hospitalized at least 5 days across 38 acute care hospitals of the University Health System Consortium (UHC) and had a pressure injury as identified by Patient Safety Indicator #3 (PSI-03). All facilities are located in the United States. We collected longitudinal data pertaining to prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings purchased by hospital-quarter for 38 academic medical centers between 2010 and 2015. Longitudinal data on acute care, hospital-level patient outcomes (eg, admissions and PSI-03 and pressure injury rate) were queried through the UHC clinical database/resource manager from the Johns Hopkins Medicine portal. Data on volumes of dressings purchased per UHC hospital were merged with UHC data. Mixed-effects negative binomial regression was used to test the longitudinal association of prophylactic foam sacral dressings on pressure injury rates, adjusted for hospital case-mix and Medicare payments rules. Significant pressure injury rate reductions in US acute care hospitals between 2010 and 2015 were associated with the adoption of prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings within a prevention protocol (-1.0 cases/quarter; P = .002) and changes to Medicare payment rules in 2014 (-1.13 cases/quarter; P = .035). Prophylactic 5-layer foam sacral dressings are an effective component of a pressure injury prevention protocol. Hospitals adopting these technologies should expect good value for use of these products.

  3. Meteorological observations of the coastal boundary layer structure by remote measurement methods for determining the impact of meteorological conditions on the breeze circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barantiev, D.

    2010-09-01

    Continuous measurements of the characteristics of atmospheric boundary layer and the characteristics of breeze circulation were initiated at the meteorological observatory of Ahtopol on the Black Sea coast (south-east Bulgaria) under a Bulgarian-Russian collaborative programme. Research observations started in July 2008 and go on. These observations are the start of high resolution atmospheric boundary layer vertical structure climatology at a Bulgarian Black Sea coastal site. Automatic weather station «MK-15» with an acoustic anemometer (mounted at 4,5m height) and Flat Array Sodar without RASS extension «Scintec» were installed on polygon of Ahtopol. A preliminary analysis was made of the experimental data on the thermodynamic structure of the atmospheric boundary layer in the coastal zone. Vertical profiles of wind speed, direction and spatio-temporal sectional were constructed according to the sodar data. Graphs of temporal variations of the direction and modulus of wind velocity, vertical velocity, the standard deviation of the acoustic temperature and time variation of air temperature (at a height of 2m - standard synoptic measurements) were constructed according MK-15. The momentum u* = " - w-'u' and sensible heat H = w'T' surface turbulent fluxes were calculated from MK-15 raw data. Prevailing weather conditions contributing to breeze circulation in the area were investigated. Blurred pressure field of high pressure with warm air mass, clear and (or) the overcast weather was characterized for treatment cases. The average wind speed near the ground was did not exceed 3 m/s, with a ripple rate of up to 4 m/s according to MK-15. The nature of the wind changed direction during the day has been practically the same (i.e., diurnal repeats) in all cases. The breeze front location was also detected based on standard measurements in the surface layer (mean values of temperature at 2 m and wind speed and direction from MK-15). In the zone of the front the wind

  4. Investigation of subsurface fatigue crack in PEEK shaft under one-point rolling contact by using 2.5D layer observation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KOIKE Hitonobu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface fatigue cracks under rolling contact area of the PEEK shaft against an alumina bearing’s ball were investigated for application of frictional part in mechanical element in special situations such as chemical environments. In order to explore the flaking process of the PEEK shaft, the rolling contact fatigue tests were carried out by using a one-point radial loading rolling contact machine. The flaking occurred on the rolling track of the PEEK shaft at approximate 4⨉105 fatigue cycles. The subsurface fatigue crack propagation was investigated by using 2.5-Dimension layer observation method. The flaking was caused by the propagations of surface cracks and subsurface shear cracks, and the flaking shape was half-ellipse. Moreover, beach marks as fatigue crack propagation in the flaking were observed.

  5. In-situ observation of the chemical erosion of graphite in the scrape-off-layer of TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, V.; Vietzke, E.; Erdweg, M.

    1989-01-01

    A sniffer probe system has been used to investigate the chemical erosion during interaction of the TEXTOR scrape-off plasma with a pyrolytic graphite plate at temperatures up to 1400 0 C. Floating potential conditions as well as 200 V bias has been applied at plasma ion fluxes of about 10 18 ions/cm 2 sec. Methane formation was found to be 8x10 -3 CH 4 /H and 1.5x10 -2 CD 4 /D + for room temperature graphite and floating potential increasing by a factor of two at temperature around 500 0 C. Biasing the graphite decreases the methane yield at room temperature and increase it in the maximum temperature range. CO formation due to chemical interaction of oxygen ions with the graphite reaches ratios between 3 and 6x10 -2 CO/D(H) near the limiter edge under normal TEXTOR scrape-off conditions and exceeds the chemical hydro-(deutero-)carbon formation significantly. The results are discussed in view of the present status of hydro-(deutero-)carbon formation on graphite and carbon impurity observations made in fusion experiments. (orig.)

  6. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, S A; McCoy, R B; Morrison, H; Ackerman, A; Avramov, A; deBoer, G; Chen, M; Cole, J; DelGenio, A; Golaz, J; Hashino, T; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; Luo, Y; McFarquhar, G; Menon, S; Neggers, R; Park, S; Poellot, M; von Salzen, K; Schmidt, J; Sednev, I; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Spangenberg, D; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Falk, M; Foster, M; Fridlind, A; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xie, S; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

    2008-02-27

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics indicate that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is some evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics. This case study, which has been well observed from both aircraft and ground-based remote sensors, could be a benchmark for model simulations of mixed-phase clouds.

  7. Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part I: Single layer cloud

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Stephen A.; McCoy, Renata B.; Morrison, Hugh; Ackerman, Andrew S.; Avramov, Alexander; de Boer, Gijs; Chen, Mingxuan; Cole, Jason N.S.; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Falk, Michael; Foster, Michael J.; Fridlind, Ann; Golaz, Jean-Christophe; Hashino, Tempei; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Khairoutdinov, Marat F.; Larson, Vincent E.; Liu, Xiaohong; Luo, Yali; McFarquhar, Greg M.; Menon, Surabi; Neggers, Roel A. J.; Park, Sungsu; Poellot, Michael R.; Schmidt, Jerome M.; Sednev, Igor; Shipway, Ben J.; Shupe, Matthew D.; Spangenberg, Douglas A.; Sud, Yogesh C.; Turner, David D.; Veron, Dana E.; von Salzen, Knut; Walker, Gregory K.; Wang, Zhien; Wolf, Audrey B.; Xie, Shaocheng; Xu, Kuan-Man; Yang, Fanglin; Zhang, Gong

    2009-02-02

    Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a cold-air outbreak mixed-phase stratocumulus cloud observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. The observed cloud occurred in a well-mixed boundary layer with a cloud top temperature of -15 C. The observed average liquid water path of around 160 g m{sup -2} was about two-thirds of the adiabatic value and much greater than the average mass of ice crystal precipitation which when integrated from the surface to cloud top was around 15 g m{sup -2}. The simulations were performed by seventeen single-column models (SCMs) and nine cloud-resolving models (CRMs). While the simulated ice water path is generally consistent with the observed values, the median SCM and CRM liquid water path is a factor of three smaller than observed. Results from a sensitivity study in which models removed ice microphysics suggest that in many models the interaction between liquid and ice-phase microphysics is responsible for the large model underestimate of liquid water path. Despite this general underestimate, the simulated liquid and ice water paths of several models are consistent with the observed values. Furthermore, there is evidence that models with more sophisticated microphysics simulate liquid and ice water paths that are in better agreement with the observed values, although considerable scatter is also present. Although no single factor guarantees a good simulation, these results emphasize the need for improvement in the model representation of mixed-phase microphysics.

  8. Observation of dopant-profile independent electron transport in sub-monolayer TiO{sub x} stacked ZnO thin films grown by atomic layer deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, D., E-mail: sahaphys@gmail.com, E-mail: pmisra@rrcat.gov.in; Misra, P., E-mail: sahaphys@gmail.com, E-mail: pmisra@rrcat.gov.in; Joshi, M. P.; Kukreja, L. M. [Laser Materials Processing Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India); Das, Gangadhar [Indus Synchrotrons Utilisation Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India)

    2016-01-18

    Dopant-profile independent electron transport has been observed through a combined study of temperature dependent electrical resistivity and magnetoresistance measurements on a series of Ti incorporated ZnO thin films with varying degree of static-disorder. These films were grown by atomic layer deposition through in-situ vertical stacking of multiple sub-monolayers of TiO{sub x} in ZnO. Upon decreasing ZnO spacer layer thickness, electron transport smoothly evolved from a good metallic to an incipient non-metallic regime due to the intricate interplay of screening of spatial potential fluctuations and strength of static-disorder in the films. Temperature dependent phase-coherence length as extracted from the magnetotransport measurement revealed insignificant role of inter sub-monolayer scattering as an additional channel for electron dephasing, indicating that films were homogeneously disordered three-dimensional electronic systems irrespective of their dopant-profiles. Results of this study are worthy enough for both fundamental physics perspective and efficient applications of multi-stacked ZnO/TiO{sub x} structures in the emerging field of transparent oxide electronics.

  9. Origin of the 2.45 eV luminescence band observed in ZnO epitaxial layers grown on c-plane sapphire by chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saroj, R K; Dhar, S

    2014-01-01

    Zinc oxide epitaxial layers have been grown on c-plane sapphire substrates by the chemical vapour deposition (CVD) technique. A structural study shows (0001)-oriented films with good crystalline quality. The temperature and excitation power dependence of the photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of these layers is studied as a function of various growth parameters, such as the growth temperature, oxygen flow rate and Zn flux, which suggest that the origin of the broad visible luminescence (VL), which peaks at 2.45 eV, is the transition between the conduction band and the Zn vacancy acceptor states. A bound excitonic transition observed at 3.32 eV in low temperature PL has been identified as an exciton bound to the neutral Zn vacancy. Our study also reveals the involvement of two activation processes in the dynamics of VL, which has been explained in terms of the fluctuation of the capture barrier height for the holes trapped in Zn vacancy acceptors. The fluctuation, which might be a result of the inhomogeneous distribution of Zn vacancies, is found to be associated with an average height of 7 and 90 meV, respectively, for the local and global maxima. (paper)

  10. Layering and Ordering in Electrochemical Double Layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yihua [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Kawaguchi, Tomoya [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States; Pierce, Michael S. [Rochester Institute of Technology, School of Physics and Astronomy, Rochester, New York 14623, United States; Komanicky, Vladimir [Faculty of Science, Safarik University, 041 54 Kosice, Slovakia; You, Hoydoo [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States

    2018-02-26

    Electrochemical double layers (EDL) form at electrified interfaces. While Gouy-Chapman model describes moderately charged EDL, formation of Stern layers was predicted for highly charged EDL. Our results provide structural evidence for a Stern layer of cations, at potentials close to hydrogen evolution in alkali fluoride and chloride electrolytes. Layering was observed by x-ray crystal truncation rods and atomic-scale recoil responses of Pt(111) surface layers. Ordering in the layer is confirmed by glancing-incidence in-plane diffraction measurements.

  11. Observation of interior and boundary-layer mixing processes due to near-inertial waves in a stratified basin without tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Lee, Eefke; Umlauf, Lars

    2010-05-01

    Near-inertial waves form an important contribution to oceanic energy and shear spectra, and thus play a major role in mixing the ocean's interior. Here, we compare internal-wave mixing processes in the interior of a stratified basin to those occurring on the sloping boundaries. We use the virtually tideless Baltic Sea as a natural laboratory, allowing us to isolate the effect of near-inertial waves that is otherwise (often) overshadowed by internal tides. The measurements presented here consist of moored ADCPs and CTD loggers in the center of the basin and on the slopes, combined with densely spaced shear-microstructure and ADCP cross-slope transects. During summer stratification, a three-layer density structure, with a thermocline and a deeper halocline, was observed with clear signals of downward near-inertial energy propagation after a short wind event. These motions are interpreted as near-inertial wave modes interacting with the sloping topography. Dissipation rates observed in the center of the basin scale with shear and stratification parameters in the way suggested by MacKinnon and Gregg (2003) for the shelf. On the slopes, microstructure transects reveal a periodic near-bed dissipation rate signal and a growing and decaying bottom boundary layer (BBL) thickness; both signals are triggered by near-bottom currents oscillating with a near-inertial frequency. Near-bottom dissipation rates are greatly enhanced compared to the interior, and, due to the straining of lateral density gradients by the cross-slope velocity, mixing is rather efficient, and contributes significantly to the basin-scale mixing.

  12. Bi-layered zirconia/fluor-apatite bridges supported by ceramic dental implants: a prospective case series after thirty months of observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, Benedikt Christopher; Witkowski, Siegbert; Butz, Frank; Vach, Kirstin; Kohal, Ralf-Joachim

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the success and survival rate of all-ceramic bi-layered implant-supported three-unit fixed dental prostheses (IS-FDPs) 3 years after implant placement. Thirteen patients (seven males, six females; age: 41-78 years) received two one-piece ceramic implants (alumina-toughened zirconia) each in the region of the premolars or the first molar and were finally restored with adhesively cemented bi-layered zirconia-based IS-FDPs (3 in the maxilla, 10 in the mandible) composed of CAD/CAM-fabricated zirconia frameworks pressed-over with fluor-apatite glass-ceramic ingots. At prosthetic delivery and the follow-ups after 1, 2 and 3 years, the restorations were evaluated using modified United States Public Health Service (USPHS) criteria. Restorations with minor veneer chippings, a small-area occlusal roughness, slightly soundable restoration margins, minimal contour deficiencies and tolerable color deviations were regarded as success. In case of more distinct defects that could, however, be repaired to a clinically acceptable level, IS-FDPs were regarded as surviving. Kaplan-Meier plots were used for the success/survival analyses. To verify an impact on subjective patients' perceptions, satisfaction was evaluated by visual analog scales (VAS). All patients were seen 3 years after implant installation. No IS-FDP had to be replaced, resulting in 100% survival after a mean observation period of 29.5 months (median: 30.7). At the 3-year follow-up, 7/13 IS-FDPs showed a veneer chipping, 13/13 an occlusal roughness and 12/13 minimal deficiencies of contour/color. Since six restorations showed a major chipping and/or a major occlusal roughness, the Kaplan-Meier success rate was 53.8%. However, patients' significantly improved perceptions of function, esthetics, sense, and speech at prosthetic delivery remained stable over time. Bi-layered zirconia/fluor-apatite IS-FDPs entirely survived the observation period but showed a high frequency of

  13. An Evaluation of Marine Boundary Layer Cloud Property Simulations in the Community Atmosphere Model Using Satellite Observations: Conventional Subgrid Parameterization versus CLUBB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hua [Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland; Zhang, Zhibo [Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, and Physics Department, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, Maryland; Ma, Po-Lun [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Ghan, Steven J. [Atmospheric Sciences and Global Change Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington; Wang, Minghuai [Institute for Climate and Global Change Research, and School of Atmospheric Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, China

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a two-step evaluation of the marine boundary layer (MBL) cloud properties from two Community Atmospheric Model (version 5.3, CAM5) simulations, one based on the CAM5 standard parameterization schemes (CAM5-Base), and the other on the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB) scheme (CAM5-CLUBB). In the first step, we compare the cloud properties directly from model outputs between the two simulations. We find that the CAM5-CLUBB run produces more MBL clouds in the tropical and subtropical large-scale descending regions. Moreover, the stratocumulus (Sc) to cumulus (Cu) cloud regime transition is much smoother in CAM5-CLUBB than in CAM5-Base. In addition, in CAM5-Base we find some grid cells with very small low cloud fraction (<20%) to have very high in-cloud water content (mixing ratio up to 400mg/kg). We find no such grid cells in the CAM5-CLUBB run. However, we also note that both simulations, especially CAM5-CLUBB, produce a significant amount of “empty” low cloud cells with significant cloud fraction (up to 70%) and near-zero in-cloud water content. In the second step, we use satellite observations from CERES, MODIS and CloudSat to evaluate the simulated MBL cloud properties by employing the COSP satellite simulators. We note that a feature of the COSP-MODIS simulator to mimic the minimum detection threshold of MODIS cloud masking removes much more low clouds from CAM5-CLUBB than it does from CAM5-Base. This leads to a surprising result — in the large-scale descending regions CAM5-CLUBB has a smaller COSP-MODIS cloud fraction and weaker shortwave cloud radiative forcing than CAM5-Base. A sensitivity study suggests that this is because CAM5-CLUBB suffers more from the above-mentioned “empty” clouds issue than CAM5-Base. The COSP-MODIS cloud droplet effective radius in CAM5-CLUBB shows a spatial increase from coastal St toward Cu, which is in qualitative agreement with MODIS observations. In contrast, COSP-MODIS cloud droplet

  14. Study on the development of coating technology for UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel pellet and the microstructural observation of the coated layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong; Song, Moon Sup; Cho, In Sik; Kim Yu Sin; Lim Young Kyun [Sunmoon University, Asan (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    In order to enhance inherent safety of UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel pellet and develop future nuclear fuel technology, a coating method for the preparation multi-layers of pyrolytic carbon and silicon carbide on the fuel was developed. Inner pyrolytic carbon layer and outer silicon layer were prepared by thermal decomposition of propane in a fluidized bed type CVD unit and silane in ECR PECVD, respectively. Combustion reaction between two layers resulted in forming silicon carbide layer. The morphology depended on the initial carbon shape. Phase identification and microstructural analysis of the combustion product with XRD, AES, SEM and TEM showed that final products of inner layer and outer layer were pyrolytic carbon with isotropic structure and fine crystalline {beta}-SiC, respectively. This coating process is very useful for the fabrication of coated UO{sub 2} nuclear fuel pellet an future nuclear fuel fabrication technology. (author). 45 refs., 47 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Evidence of horizontal and vertical transport of water in the Southern Hemisphere tropical tropopause layer (TTL from high-resolution balloon observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Khaykin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution in situ balloon measurements of water vapour, aerosol, methane and temperature in the upper tropical tropopause layer (TTL and lower stratosphere are used to evaluate the processes affecting the stratospheric water budget: horizontal transport (in-mixing and hydration by cross-tropopause overshooting updrafts. The obtained in situ evidence of these phenomena are analysed using satellite observations by Aura MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder and CALIPSO (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation together with trajectory and transport modelling performed using CLaMS (Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere and HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory model. Balloon soundings were conducted during March 2012 in Bauru, Brazil (22.3° S in the frame of the TRO-Pico campaign for studying the impact of convective overshooting on the stratospheric water budget. The balloon payloads included two stratospheric hygrometers: FLASH-B (Fluorescence Lyman-Alpha Stratospheric Hygrometer for Balloon and Pico-SDLA instrument as well as COBALD (Compact Optical Backscatter Aerosol Detector sondes, complemented by Vaisala RS92 radiosondes. Water vapour vertical profiles obtained independently by the two stratospheric hygrometers are in excellent agreement, ensuring credibility of the vertical structures observed. A signature of in-mixing is inferred from a series of vertical profiles, showing coincident enhancements in water vapour (of up to 0.5 ppmv and aerosol at the 425 K (18.5 km level. Trajectory analysis unambiguously links these features to intrusions from the Southern Hemisphere extratropical stratosphere, containing more water and aerosol, as demonstrated by MLS and CALIPSO global observations. The in-mixing is successfully reproduced by CLaMS simulations, showing a relatively moist filament extending to 20° S. A signature of local cross-tropopause transport of water is observed in

  16. Observations of the boundary layer, cloud, and aerosol variability in the southeast Pacific near-coastal marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, X.; Albrecht, B.; Jonsson, H. H.; Khelif, D.; Feingold, G.; Minnis, P.; Ayers, K.; Chuang, P.; Donaher, S.; Rossiter, D.; Ghate, V.; Ruiz-Plancarte, J.; Sun-Mack, S.

    2011-09-01

    Aircraft observations made off the coast of northern Chile in the Southeastern Pacific (20° S, 72° W; named Point Alpha) from 16 October to 13 November 2008 during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud- Atmosphere-Land Study-Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx), combined with meteorological reanalysis, satellite measurements, and radiosonde data, are used to investigate the boundary layer (BL) and aerosol-cloud-drizzle variations in this region. On days without predominately synoptic and meso-scale influences, the BL at Point Alpha was typical of a non-drizzling stratocumulus-topped BL. Entrainment rates calculated from the near cloud-top fluxes and turbulence in the BL at Point Alpha appeared to be weaker than those in the BL over the open ocean west of Point Alpha and the BL near the coast of the northeast Pacific. The cloud liquid water path (LWP) varied between 15 g m-2 and 160 g m-2. The BL had a depth of 1140 ± 120 m, was generally well-mixed and capped by a sharp inversion without predominately synoptic and meso-scale influences. The wind direction generally switched from southerly within the BL to northerly above the inversion. On days when a synoptic system and related mesoscale costal circulations affected conditions at Point Alpha (29 October-4 November), a moist layer above the inversion moved over Point Alpha, and the total-water mixing ratio above the inversion was larger than that within the BL. The accumulation mode aerosol varied from 250 to 700 cm-3 within the BL, and CCN at 0.2 % supersaturation within the BL ranged between 150 and 550 cm-3. The main aerosol source at Point Alpha was horizontal advection within the BL from south. The average cloud droplet number concentration ranged between 80 and 400 cm-3. While the mean LWP retrieved from GOES was in good agreement with the in situ measurements, the GOES-derived cloud droplet effective radius tended to be larger than that from the aircraft in situ observations near cloud top. The aerosol and cloud LWP

  17. Observations of the boundary layer, cloud, and aerosol variability in the southeast Pacific near-coastal marine stratocumulus during VOCALS-REx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Zheng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Aircraft observations made off the coast of northern Chile in the Southeastern Pacific (20° S, 72° W; named Point Alpha from 16 October to 13 November 2008 during the VAMOS Ocean-Cloud- Atmosphere-Land Study-Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx, combined with meteorological reanalysis, satellite measurements, and radiosonde data, are used to investigate the boundary layer (BL and aerosol-cloud-drizzle variations in this region. On days without predominately synoptic and meso-scale influences, the BL at Point Alpha was typical of a non-drizzling stratocumulus-topped BL. Entrainment rates calculated from the near cloud-top fluxes and turbulence in the BL at Point Alpha appeared to be weaker than those in the BL over the open ocean west of Point Alpha and the BL near the coast of the northeast Pacific. The cloud liquid water path (LWP varied between 15 g m−2 and 160 g m−2. The BL had a depth of 1140 ± 120 m, was generally well-mixed and capped by a sharp inversion without predominately synoptic and meso-scale influences. The wind direction generally switched from southerly within the BL to northerly above the inversion. On days when a synoptic system and related mesoscale costal circulations affected conditions at Point Alpha (29 October–4 November, a moist layer above the inversion moved over Point Alpha, and the total-water mixing ratio above the inversion was larger than that within the BL. The accumulation mode aerosol varied from 250 to 700 cm−3 within the BL, and CCN at 0.2 % supersaturation within the BL ranged between 150 and 550 cm−3. The main aerosol source at Point Alpha was horizontal advection within the BL from south. The average cloud droplet number concentration ranged between 80 and 400 cm−3. While the mean LWP retrieved from GOES was in good agreement with the in situ measurements, the GOES-derived cloud droplet effective radius tended to be larger than that from the

  18. Double layers in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-07-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. We briefly discuss the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Author)

  19. Double layers in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlqvist, P.

    1982-01-01

    For more than a decade it has been realised that electrostatic double layers are likely to occur in space. The author briefly discusses the theoretical background of such double layers. Most of the paper is devoted to an account of the observational evidence for double layers in the ionosphere and magnetosphere of the Earth. Several different experiments are reviewed including rocket and satellite measurements and ground based observations. It is concluded that the observational evidence for double layers in space is very strong. The experimental results indicate that double layers with widely different properties may exist in space. (Auth.)

  20. Observation Of Electron-beam-induced Phase Evolution Mimicking The Effect Of Charge-discharge Cycle In Li-rich Layered Cathode Materials Used For Li-ion Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ping; Yan, Pengfei; Romero, Eric; Spoerke, Erik D.; Zhang, Jiguang; Wang, Chong M.

    2015-02-24

    Capacity loss, and voltage fade upon electrochemical charge-discharge cycling observed in lithium-rich layered cathode oxides (Li[LixMnyTM1-x-y]O2 , TM = Ni, Co or Fe) have recently been identified to be correlated to the gradual phase transformation, featuring the formation of a surface reconstructed layer (SRL) that evolves from a thin (<2 nm), defect spinel layer upon the first charge, to a relatively thick (~5 nm), spinel or rock-salt layer upon continuous charge-discharge cycling. Here we report observations of a SRL and structural evolution of the SRL on the Li[Li0.2Ni0.2Mn0.6]O2 (LMR) particles, which are identical to those reported due to the charge-discharge cycle but are a result of electron-beam irradiation during scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging. Sensitivity of the lithium-rich layered oxides to high-energy electrons leads to the formation of thin, defect spinel layer on surfaces of the particles when exposed to a 200 kV electron beam for as little as 30 seconds under normal high-resolution STEM imaging conditions. Further electron irradiation produces a thicker layer of the spinel phase, ultimately producing a rock-salt layer at a higher electron exposure. Atomic-scale chemical mapping by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in STEM indicates the electron-beam-induced SRL formation on LMR is accomplished by migration of the transition metal ions to the Li sites without breaking down the lattice. This study provides an insight for understanding the mechanism of forming the SRL and also possibly a mean to study structural evolution in the Li-rich layered oxides without involving the electrochemistry.

  1. Global investigation of the Mg atom and ion layers using SCIAMACHY/Envisat observations between 70 and 150 km altitude and WACCM-Mg model results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Langowski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mg and Mg+ concentration fields in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere (UMLT region are retrieved from SCIAMACHY/Envisat limb measurements of Mg and Mg+ dayglow emissions using a 2-D tomographic retrieval approach. The time series of monthly mean Mg and Mg+ number density and vertical column density in different latitudinal regions are presented. Data from the limb mesosphere–thermosphere mode of SCIAMACHY/Envisat are used, which cover the 50 to 150 km altitude region with a vertical sampling of ≈3.3 km and latitudes up to 82°. The high latitudes are not observed in the winter months, because there is no dayglow emission during polar night. The measurements were performed every 14 days from mid-2008 until April 2012. Mg profiles show a peak at around 90 km altitude with a density between 750 cm−3 and 1500 cm−3. Mg does not show strong seasonal variation at latitudes below 40°. For higher latitudes the density is lower and only in the Northern Hemisphere a seasonal cycle with a summer minimum is observed. The Mg+ peak occurs 5–15 km above the neutral Mg peak altitude. These ions have a significant seasonal cycle with a summer maximum in both hemispheres at mid and high latitudes. The strongest seasonal variations of Mg+ are observed at latitudes between 20 and 40° and the density at the peak altitude ranges from 500 cm−3 to 4000 cm−3. The peak altitude of the ions shows a latitudinal dependence with a maximum at mid latitudes that is up to 10 km higher than the peak altitude at the equator. The SCIAMACHY measurements are compared to other measurements and WACCM model results. The WACCM results show a significant seasonal variability for Mg with a summer minimum, which is more clearly pronounced than for SCIAMACHY, and globally a higher peak density than the SCIAMACHY results. Although the peak density of both is not in agreement, the vertical column density agrees well, because SCIAMACHY and WACCM profiles have different

  2. Observation of turnover of spontaneous polarization in ferroelectric layer of pentacene/poly-(vinylidene-trifluoroethylene) double-layer capacitor under photo illumination by optical second-harmonic generation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhemin; Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa

    2016-04-01

    The details of turnover process of spontaneous polarization and associated carrier motions in indium-tin oxide/poly-(vinylidene-trifluoroethylene)/pentacene/Au capacitor were analyzed by coupling displacement current measurement (DCM) and electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement. A model was set up from DCM results to depict the relationship between electric field in semiconductor layer and applied external voltage, proving that photo illumination effect on the spontaneous polarization process lied in variation of semiconductor conductivity. The EFISHG measurement directly and selectively probed the electric field distribution in semiconductor layer, modifying the model and revealing detailed carrier behaviors involving photo illumination effect, dipole reversal, and interfacial charging in the device. A further decrease of DCM current in the low voltage region under illumination was found as the result of illumination effect, and the result was argued based on the changing of the total capacitance of the double-layer capacitors.

  3. Observation of turnover of spontaneous polarization in ferroelectric layer of pentacene/poly-(vinylidene-trifluoroethylene) double-layer capacitor under photo illumination by optical second-harmonic generation measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Zhemin [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Taguchi, Dai; Manaka, Takaaki; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa, E-mail: iwamoto@pe.titech.ac.jp [Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 O-okayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan)

    2016-04-28

    The details of turnover process of spontaneous polarization and associated carrier motions in indium-tin oxide/poly-(vinylidene-trifluoroethylene)/pentacene/Au capacitor were analyzed by coupling displacement current measurement (DCM) and electric-field-induced optical second-harmonic generation (EFISHG) measurement. A model was set up from DCM results to depict the relationship between electric field in semiconductor layer and applied external voltage, proving that photo illumination effect on the spontaneous polarization process lied in variation of semiconductor conductivity. The EFISHG measurement directly and selectively probed the electric field distribution in semiconductor layer, modifying the model and revealing detailed carrier behaviors involving photo illumination effect, dipole reversal, and interfacial charging in the device. A further decrease of DCM current in the low voltage region under illumination was found as the result of illumination effect, and the result was argued based on the changing of the total capacitance of the double-layer capacitors.

  4. Internal deformation in layered Zechstein-III K-Mg salts. Structures formed by complex deformation and high contrasts in viscosity observed in drill cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raith, Alexander; Urai, Janos L.

    2016-04-01

    During the evaporation of a massive salt body, alternations of interrupted and full evaporation sequences can form a complex layering of different lithologies. Viscosity contrasts of up to five orders of magnitude between these different lithologies are possible in this environment. During the late stage of an evaporation cycle potassium and magnesium (K-Mg) salts are precipitated. These K-Mg salts are of economic interest but also a known drilling hazard due to their very low viscosity. How up to 200m thick layers of these evaporites affect salt deformation at different scales is not well known. A better understanding of salt tectonics with extreme mechanical stratification is needed for better exploration and production of potassium-magnesium salts and to predict the internal structure of potential nuclear waste repositories in salt. To gain a better understanding of the internal deformation of these layers we analyzed K-Mg salt rich drill cores out of the Zechstein III-1b subunit from the Veendam Pillow 10 km southeast of Groningen, near the city Veendam in the NE Netherlands. The study area has a complex geological history with multiple tectonic phases of extension and compression forming internal deformation in the pillow but also conserving most of the original layering. Beside halite the most common minerals in the ZIII-1b are carnallite, kieserite, anhydrite and bischofite alternating in thin layers of simple composition. Seismic interpretation revealed that the internal structure of the Veendam Pillow shows areas, in which the K-Mg salt rich ZIII 1b layer is much thicker than elsewhere, as a result of salt deformation. The internal structure of the ZIII-1b on the other hand, remains unknown. The core analysis shows a strong strain concentration in the weaker Bischofite (MgCl2*6H20) and Carnallite (KMgCl3*6H20) rich layers producing tectonic breccias and highly strained layers completely overprinting the original layering. Layers formed by alternating beds

  5. Study of swelling behavior in ArF resist during development by the QCM method (3): observations of swelling layer elastic modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Atsushi

    2013-03-01

    The QCM method allows measurements of impedance, an index of swelling layer viscosity in a photoresist during development. While impedance is sometimes used as a qualitative index of change in the viscosity of the swelling layer, it has to date not been used quantitatively, for data analysis. We explored a method for converting impedance values to elastic modulus (Pa), a coefficient expressing viscosity. Applying this method, we compared changes in the viscosity of the swelling layer in an ArF resist generated during development in a TMAH developing solution and in a TBAH developing solution. This paper reports the results of this comparative study.

  6. Possibility of a quasi-liquid layer of As on GaAs substrate grown by MBE as observed by enhancement of Ga desorption at high As pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, K.; Feng, J. M.; Vaccaro, P. O.; Fujita, K.; Ohachi, T.

    2000-06-01

    The As vapor pressure dependence of the Ga desorption rate during molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth on GaAs( n11)A ( n=1-4 hereafter) substrates was studied by photoluminescence (PL) measurements at 12 K for undoped AlGaAs/GaAs asymmetric double quantum wells (ADQWs). Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) oscillation measurements on a GaAs(100) surface were also used. Two K-cells of As solid sources (corresponding to beam equivalent pressures (BEPs) of 9.0×10 -6 and 4.5×10 -5 Torr) were used to change the As pressure rapidly. The Ga flux and substrate temperature were kept constant at 0.76 ML/s and 12 K, respectively, while the As flux changed from 7.6 (BEP 9.0×10 -6 Torr) to 32 ML/s (4.5×10 -5 Torr). With increasing As pressure, two separated PL peaks for the wide well (WW) of high index substrates were observed. This peak separation is attributed to a reduced well depth from an increasing Ga desorption rate. The energy differences of the PL peak depending on the off-angle from (111)A to (100) plane indicates an orientation-dependent Ga desorption rate. Moreover, amongst all ( n11)A and (100) planes, the Ga desorption rate was smallest from the (111)A surface. The increase of Ga desorption from the surface at high As pressures probably arose from an increasing coverage with a quasi-liquid layer (QLL).

  7. In situ observation of the growth of biofouling layer in osmotic membrane bioreactors by multiple fluorescence labeling and confocal laser scanning microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Bo; Wang, Xinhua; Tang, Chuyang; Li, Xiufen; Yu, Guanghui

    2015-05-15

    Since the concept of the osmotic membrane bioreactor (OMBR) was introduced in 2008, it has attracted growing interests for its potential applications in wastewater treatment and reclamation; however, the fouling mechanisms of forward osmosis (FO) membrane especially the development of biofouling layer in the OMBR are not yet clear. Here, the fouled FO membranes were obtained from the OMBRs on days 3, 8 and 25 in sequence, and then the structure and growing rule of the biofouling layer formed on the FO membrane samples were in-situ characterized by multiple fluorescence labeling and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). CLSM images indicated that the variations in abundance and distribution of polysaccharides, proteins and microorganisms in the biofouling layer during the operation of OMBRs were significantly different. Before the 8th day, their biovolume dramatically increased. Subsequently, the biovolumes of β-d-glucopyranose polysaccharides and proteins continued increasing and leveled off after 8 days, respectively, while the biovolumes of α-d-glucopyranose polysaccharides and microorganisms decreased. Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) played a significant role in the formation and growth of biofouling layer, while the microorganisms were seldom detected on the upper fouling layer after 3 days. Based on the results obtained in this study, the growth of biofouling layer on the FO membrane surface in the OMBR could be divided into three stages. Initially, EPS was firstly deposited on the FO membrane surface, and then microorganisms associated with EPS located in the initial depositing layer to form clusters. After that, the dramatic increase of the clusters of EPS and microorganisms resulted in the quick growth of biofouling layer during the flux decline of the OMBR. However, when the water flux became stable in the OMBR, some microorganisms and EPS would be detached from the FO membrane surface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterisation of boundary layer turbulent processes by the Raman lidar BASIL in the frame of HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Cacciani, Marco; Summa, Donato; Scoccione, Andrea; De Rosa, Benedetto; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Measurements carried out by the University of Basilicata Raman lidar system (BASIL) are reported to demonstrate the capability of this instrument to characterise turbulent processes within the convective boundary layer (CBL). In order to resolve the vertical profiles of turbulent variables, high-resolution water vapour and temperature measurements, with a temporal resolution of 10 s and vertical resolutions of 90 and 30 m, respectively, are considered. Measurements of higher-order moments of the turbulent fluctuations of water vapour mixing ratio and temperature are obtained based on the application of autocovariance analyses to the water vapour mixing ratio and temperature time series. The algorithms are applied to a case study (11:30-13:30 UTC, 20 April 2013) from the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE), held in western Germany in the spring 2013. A new correction scheme for the removal of the elastic signal crosstalk into the low quantum number rotational Raman signal is applied. The noise errors are small enough to derive up to fourth-order moments for both water vapour mixing ratio and temperature fluctuations.To the best of our knowledge, BASIL is the first Raman lidar with a demonstrated capability to simultaneously retrieve daytime profiles of water vapour turbulent fluctuations up to the fourth order throughout the atmospheric CBL. This is combined with the capability of measuring daytime profiles of temperature fluctuations up to the fourth order. These measurements, in combination with measurements from other lidar and in situ systems, are important for verifying and possibly improving turbulence and convection parameterisation in weather and climate models at different scales down to the grey zone (grid increment ˜ 1 km; Wulfmeyer et al., 2016).For the considered case study, which represents a well-mixed and quasi-stationary CBL, the mean boundary layer height is found to

  9. Direct observation of nanometer-scale amorphous layers and oxide crystallites at grain boundaries in polycrystalline Sr1−xKxFe2As2 superconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Lei

    2011-06-01

    We report here an atomic resolution study of the structure and composition of the grain boundaries in polycrystallineSr0.6K0.4Fe2As2superconductor. A large fraction of grain boundaries contain amorphous layers larger than the coherence length, while some others contain nanometer-scale crystallites sandwiched in between amorphous layers. We also find that there is significant oxygen enrichment at the grain boundaries. Such results explain the relatively low transport critical current density (Jc) of polycrystalline samples with respect to that of bicrystal films.

  10. The first coordinated observations of mid-latitude E-region quasi-periodic radar echoes and lower thermospheric 557.7-nm airglow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ogawa

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available We present the first coordinated observations of quasi-periodic (QP radar echoes from sporadic-E (Es field-aligned irregularities (FAIs, OI 557.7-nm airglow, and neutral winds in a common volume over Shigaraki, Japan (34.9° N, 136.1° E on the night of 5 August 2002 during the SEEK-2 campaign. QP echo altitudes of 90-110 km were lower than usual by 10 km, enabling us to make a detailed comparison among QP echoes, airglow intensity, and neutral wind at around 96 km altitude. Eastward movement of the QP echo regions is consistent with the motions of neutral winds, airglow structures, and FAIs, suggesting that the electrodynamics of Es-layers is fundamentally controlled by the neutral atmospheric dynamics. During the QP echo event, the echo altitudes clearly went up (down in harmony with an airglow enhancement (subsidence that also moved to the east. This fact suggests that the eastward-moving enhanced airglow region included an upward (downward component of neutral winds to raise (lower the altitude of the wind-shear node responsible for the Es formation. The airglow intensity, echo intensity, and Doppler velocity of FAIs at around 96 km altitude fluctuated with periods from 10 min to 1h, indicating that these parameters were modulated with short-period atmospheric disturbances. Some QP echo regions below 100km altitude contained small-scale QP structures in which very strong neutral winds exceeding 100 m/s existed. The results are compared with recent observations, theories, and simulations of QP echoes. Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; Ionospheric irregularities; Mid-latitude ionosphere

  11. In situ TEM observation of the Boudouard reaction: Multi-layered graphene formation from CO on cobalt nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bremmer, G.M.; Zacharaki, E.; Sjåstad, A.O.; Navarro, V.; Frenken, J.W.M.; Kooyman, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Using a MEMS nanoreactor in combination with a specially designed in situ Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) holder and gas supply system, we imaged the formation of multiple layers of graphene encapsulating a cobalt nanoparticle, at 1 bar CO:N2 (1:1) and 500 °C. The cobalt nanoparticle was

  12. In situ transmission electron microscopy observation of pulverization of aluminum nanowires and evolution of the thin surface Al2O3 layers during lithiation-delithiation cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Hudak, Nicholas S; Huber, Dale L; Limmer, Steven J; Sullivan, John P; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-10-12

    Lithiation-delithiation cycles of individual aluminum nanowires (NWs) with naturally oxidized Al(2)O(3) surface layers (thickness 4-5 nm) were conducted in situ in a transmission electron microscope. Surprisingly, the lithiation was always initiated from the surface Al(2)O(3) layer, forming a stable Li-Al-O glass tube with a thickness of about 6-10 nm wrapping around the NW core. After lithiation of the surface Al(2)O(3) layer, lithiation of the inner Al core took place, which converted the single crystal Al to a polycrystalline LiAl alloy, with a volume expansion of about 100%. The Li-Al-O glass tube survived the 100% volume expansion, by enlarging through elastic and plastic deformation, acting as a solid electrolyte with exceptional mechanical robustness and ion conduction. Voids were formed in the Al NWs during the initial delithiation step and grew continuously with each subsequent delithiation, leading to pulverization of the Al NWs to isolated nanoparticles confined inside the Li-Al-O tube. There was a corresponding loss of capacity with each delithiation step when arrays of NWs were galvonostatically cycled. The results provide important insight into the degradation mechanism of lithium-alloy electrodes and into recent reports about the performance improvement of lithium ion batteries by atomic layer deposition of Al(2)O(3) onto the active materials or electrodes.

  13. Direct observation of nanometer-scale amorphous layers and oxide crystallites at grain boundaries in polycrystalline Sr1−xKxFe2As2 superconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Lei; Ma, Yanwei; Wang, Qingxiao; Li, Kun; Zhang, Xixiang; Qi, Yanpeng; Gao, Zhaoshun; Zhang, Xianping; Wang, Dongliang; Yao, Chao; Wang, Chunlei

    2011-01-01

    We report here an atomic resolution study of the structure and composition of the grain boundaries in polycrystallineSr0.6K0.4Fe2As2superconductor. A large fraction of grain boundaries contain amorphous layers larger than the coherence length, while

  14. Simulation of barotropic wind-driven circulation in the upper layers of Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea during the southwest and northeast monsoon seasons using observed winds

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bahulayan, N.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    A two-dimensional, nonlinear, vertically integrated model was used to simulate depth-mean wind-driven circulation in the upper Ekman layers of the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea. The model resolution was one third of a degree in the latitude...

  15. CARINA Satellite Mission to Investigate the Upper Atmosphere below the F-Layer Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siefring, C. L.; Bernhardt, P. A.; Briczinski, S. J., Jr.; Huba, J.; Montgomery, J. A., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    A new satellite design permits broad science measurements from the ocean to the ionosphere by flying below the F-Layer. The satellite called CARINA for Coastal-Ocean, Assimilation, Radio, Ionosphere, Neutral-Drag, and Atmospherics. The unique system capabilities are long duration orbits below the ionosphere and a HF receiver to measure broadband signals. The CARINA science products include recording the ocean surface properties, data for assimilation into global ionosphere models, radio wave propagation measurements, in-situ observations of ionospheric structures, validating neutral drag models and theory, and broadband atmospheric lightning characterization. CARINA will also measure nonlinear wave-generation using ionospheric modification sites in Alaska, Norway, Puerto Rico, and Russia and collaborate with geophysics HF radars (such as Super-DARN) for system calibration. CARINA is a linear 6-U CubeSat with a long antenna extended in the wake direction. The CARINA science mission is supported by three instruments. First, the Electric Field Instrument (EFI) is a radio receiver covering the 2 to 18 MHz range. The receiver can capture both narrow and wide bandwidths for up to 10 minutes. EFI is designed to provide HF signal strength and phase, radar Doppler shift and group delay, and electron plasma density from photoelectron excited plasma waves. Second a Ram Langmuir Probe (RLP) measures high-resolution ion currents at a 10 kHz rate. These measurements yield electron and ion density at the spacecraft. Finally, the Orbiting GPS Receiver (OGR) provides dual frequency GPS position with ionosphere correction. OGR also measures total electron content above the spacecraft and L-Band scintillations. CARINA will be the lowest satellite in orbit at 250 km altitude, <0.01 eccentricity, and up to 4-month lifetime. The design supports unique capabilities with broad applications to the geosciences. Remote sensing of the ocean will sample the HF signals scattered from the rough

  16. A glimpse beneath Antarctic sea ice: observation of platelet-layer thickness and ice-volume fraction with multi-frequency EM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, S.; Hoppmann, M.; Hunkeler, P. A.; Kalscheuer, T.; Gerdes, R.

    2015-12-01

    In Antarctica, ice crystals (platelets) form and grow in supercooled waters below ice shelves. These platelets rise and accumulate beneath nearby sea ice to form a several meter thick sub-ice platelet layer. This special ice type is a unique habitat, influences sea-ice mass and energy balance, and its volume can be interpreted as an indicator for ice - ocean interactions. Although progress has been made in determining and understanding its spatio-temporal variability based on point measurements, an investigation of this phenomenon on a larger scale remains a challenge due to logistical constraints and a lack of suitable methodology. In the present study, we applied a lateral constrained Marquardt-Levenberg inversion to a unique multi-frequency electromagnetic (EM) induction sounding dataset obtained on the ice-shelf influenced fast-ice regime of Atka Bay, eastern Weddell Sea. We adapted the inversion algorithm to incorporate a sensor specific signal bias, and confirmed the reliability of the algorithm by performing a sensitivity study using synthetic data. We inverted the field data for sea-ice and sub-ice platelet-layer thickness and electrical conductivity, and calculated ice-volume fractions from platelet-layer conductivities using Archie's Law. The thickness results agreed well with drill-hole validation datasets within the uncertainty range, and the ice-volume fraction also yielded plausible results. Our findings imply that multi-frequency EM induction sounding is a suitable approach to efficiently map sea-ice and platelet-layer properties. However, we emphasize that the successful application of this technique requires a break with traditional EM sensor calibration strategies due to the need of absolute calibration with respect to a physical forward model.

  17. Observation of red electroluminescence from an Eu2O3/ p +-Si device and improved performance by introducing a Tb2O3 layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Xue; Wang, Shenwei; Mu, Guangyao; Wan, Guangmiao; Huang, Miaoling; Yi, Lixin

    2017-01-01

    We report red electroluminescence (EL) from an Eu 2 O 3 / p + -Si device with Eu 2 O 3 film annealed in oxygen ambient at 700 °C. The red EL is ascribed to the characteristic emissions of Eu 3+ ions in Eu 2 O 3 film and the luminescence mechanism is discussed in detail. In order to optimize the device performance, Eu 2 O 3 /Tb 2 O 3 multiple films were deposited on Si wafer, and the result showed EL intensity of the device was obviously enhanced and the turn-on voltage was reduced to about 10 V. Moreover, intensity ratio I ( 5 D 0 – 7 F 2 )/ I ( 5 D 0 – 7 F 1 ) was also significantly increased with the hypersensitive transition 5 D 0 – 7 F 2 as the most prominent group at about 611 nm. The improved performance was attributed to the added Tb 2 O 3 film that it can be served as the hole-injection layer to afford extra holes injected into the Eu 2 O 3 layer. (paper)

  18. Investigation of the spatio-temporal variability of atmospheric boundary layer depths over mountainous terrain observed with a suite of ground-based and airborne instruments during the MATERHORN field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, S.; De Wekker, S.; Emmitt, G. D.

    2013-12-01

    We present first results of the spatio-temporal variability of atmospheric boundary layer depths obtained with a suite of ground-based and airborne instruments deployed during the first field phase of The Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program (http://www3.nd.edu/~dynamics/materhorn/index.php) at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG, Utah, USA) in Fall 2012. We mainly use high-resolution data collected on selected intensive observation periods obtained by Doppler lidars, ceilometer, and in-situ measurements from an unmanned aerial vehicle for the measurements of atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) depths. In particular, a Navy Twin Otter aircraft flew 6 missions of about 5 hours each during the daytime, collecting remotely sensed (Doppler lidar, TODWL) wind data in addition to in-situ turbulence measurements which allowed a detailed investigation of the spatial heterogeneity of the convective boundary layer turbulence features over a steep isolated mountain of a horizontal and vertical scale of about 10 km and 1 km, respectively. Additionally, we use data collected by (1) radiosonde systems at two sites of Granite Mountain area in DPG (Playa and Sagebrush), (2) sonic anemometers (CSAT-3D) for high resolution turbulence flux measurements near ground, (3) Pyranometer for incoming solar radiation, and (4) standard meteorological measurements (PTU) obtained near the surface. In this contribution, we discuss and address (1) composites obtained with lidar, ceilometer, micro-meteorological measurements, and radiosonde observations to determine the quasi-continuous regime of ABL depths, growth rates, maximum convective boundary layer (CBL) depths, etc., (2) the temporal variability in the ABL depths during entire diurnal cycle and the spatial heterogeneity in the daytime ABL depths triggered by the underlying orography in the experimental area to investigate the most possible mechanisms (e.g. combined effect of diurnal cycle and orographic trigger

  19. Two years observations on the diurnal evolution of coastal atmospheric boundary layer features over Thiruvananthapuram (8.5∘ N, 76.9∘ E), India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anurose, T. J.; Subrahamanyam, D. Bala; Sunilkumar, S. V.

    2018-01-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over a given coastal station is influenced by the presence of mesoscale sea breeze circulation, together with the local and synoptic weather, which directly or indirectly modulate the vertical thickness of ABL ( z ABL). Despite its importance in the characterization of lower tropospheric processes and atmospheric modeling studies, a reliable climatology on the temporal evolution of z ABL is not available over the tropics. Here, we investigate the challenges involved in determination of the ABL heights, and discuss an objective method to define the vertical structure of coastal ABL. The study presents a two year morphology on the diurnal evolution of the vertical thickness of sea breeze flow ( z SBF) and z ABL in association with the altitudes of lifting condensation level ( z LCL) over Thiruvananthapuram (8.5∘ N, 76.9∘ E), a representative coastal station on the western coastline of the Indian sub-continent. We make use of about 516 balloon-borne GPS sonde measurements in the present study, which were carried out as part of the tropical tropopause dynamics field experiment under the climate and weather of the sun-earth system (CAWSES)-India program. Results obtained from the present study reveal major differences in the temporal evolution of the ABL features in relation to the strength of sea breeze circulation and monsoonal wind flow during the winter and summer monsoon respectively. The diurnal evolution in z ABL is very prominent in the winter monsoon as against the summer monsoon, which is attributed to the impact of large-scale monsoonal flow over the surface layer meteorology. For a majority of the database, the z LCL altitudes are found to be higher than that of the z ABL, indicating a possible decoupling of the ABL with the low-level clouds.

  20. Observations of the vertical structure of turbulent oscillatory boundary layers above fixed roughness beds using a prototype wideband coherent Doppler profiler: 1. The oscillatory component of the flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Alex E.; Zedel, Len; Cheel, Richard; Dillon, Jeremy

    2012-03-01

    Results are presented from an experimental investigation of rough turbulent oscillatory boundary layers using a prototype wideband bistatic coherent Doppler profiler. The profiler operates in the 1.2 MHz to 2.3 MHz frequency band and uses software-defined radio technologies for digital control of the frequency content and shape of the transmit pulse and for digital complex demodulation of the received signals. Velocity profiles are obtained at sub-millimeter range resolution and 100 Hz profiling rates (each profile being an ensemble average of 10 pulse pairs). The measurements were carried out above beds of fixed sand or gravel particles, with median grain diameters of 0.37 mm and 3.9 mm, respectively, oscillating sinusoidally at a 10 s period through excursions of 0.75 m to 1.5 m. The resulting vertical profiles of horizontal velocity magnitude and phase, with the vertical axis scaled by ℓ = κu∗m/ω, are comparable to similarly scaled profiles obtained using laser Doppler anemometry by Sleath (1987) and Jensen (1988). A key objective of the comparisons between the previous experiments and those reported here was to establish how close to the bed reliable velocity measurements can be made with the sonar. This minimum distance above the bed is estimated to be 5 ± 1 mm, a value approaching the 3 to 4 mm limit set by the path of least time.

  1. Spatial distribution of 40K, 228Ra, 226Ra, 238U and 137Cs in surface soil layer observed at small areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barisic, D.; Lulic, S.; Prohic, E.; Culinovic, M.

    1997-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to give a more detailed insight into spatial radionuclide distribution in soils. It has been necessary in order to plant the future soil sampling procedure that would assure the representative soil samples for broader areas that are usually covered by in situ gamma-spectrometry measurements or aerial gamma-ray spectrometry. The spatial distributions of natural radionuclides and 137 Cs activity in surface soil layer were studed in five regular grids, consisting of 9 points each. The distances between sampled points were 30 cm (A grid), 2.45 m (B grid), 19.5 m (C grid), 156 m (D grid) and 213 m (E grid), respectively. Soil samples were dominantly taken at agricultural ploughed fields from areas of ca. 315 cm 2 (circle of a. 20 cm diameter), from surface up to 15 cm depth. The results indicate that representative soil sample must cover the broader area to provide data that could be compared with data collected by aerial gamma-spectrometry. The average sample on each locality must be prepared from several point samples. It seems that the central point and four points, each at approximately 50-100 m N, S, E, and W from the central point, could be enough

  2. Modelling Regional Surface Energy Exchange and Boundary Layer Development in Boreal Sweden — Comparison of Mesoscale Model (RAMS Simulations with Aircraft and Tower Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meelis Mölder

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Simulation of atmospheric and surface processes with an atmospheric model (RAMS during a period of ten days in August 2001 over a boreal area in Sweden were compared to tower measurements and aircraft measurements of vertical profiles as well as surface fluxes from low altitude flights. The shape of the vertical profiles was simulated reasonably well by the model although there were significant biases in absolute values. Surface fluxes were less well simulated and the model showed considerable sensitivity to initial soil moisture conditions. The simulations were performed using two different land cover databases, the original one supplied with the RAMS model and the more detailed CORINE database. The two different land cover data bases resulted in relatively large fine scale differences in the simulated values. The conclusion of this study is that RAMS has the potential to be used as a tool to estimate boundary layer conditions and surface fluxes and meteorology over a boreal area but also that further improvement is needed.

  3. Lidar observations of sodium layer over low latitude, Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E): seasonal and nocturnal variations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Prasanth, PV

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available , Dordrecht, Holland, 200 pp, 1970. Clemesha, B. R., Kirchhoff, V. W. J. H., Kirchhoff, D. M., Taka- hashi, H., and Batista, P. P.: Simultaneous observations of sodium density and the NaD, OH(8,3), and OI5577- Ao night- glow emissions, J. Geophys. Res., 84....: Nighttime Na-D Emission observed from a Polar-Orbiting DMSP Satellite – Comment, J. Geophys. Res., 95, 6601–6606, 1990. Clemesha, B. R., Simonich, D. M., Takahasi, H., Melo, S. M. L., and Plane, J. M. C.: Experimental evidence for photochemical control...

  4. Direct observation of the near-surface layer in Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 using neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlon, K.H.; Whan, T.; Fox, J.H.; Luo, H.; Viehland, D.; Li, J.F.; Stock, C.; Shirane, G.

    2004-01-01

    Spatially resolved neutron diffraction as a function of crystal depth in Pb(Mg 1/3 Nb 2/3 )O 3 reveals the presence of a distinct near-surface region where a strong distortion in the lattice exists. A dramatic change in both the lattice constant and the Bragg peak intensity as a function of crystal depth is observed to occur in this region over a length scale ∼100 μm. This confirms a previous assertion, based on a comparison between high-energy x rays and neutrons, that such a near surface region exists in the relaxors. Consequences to both single crystal and powder diffraction measurements and previous bulk neutron diffraction measurements on large single crystals are discussed

  5. Isoprene and monoterpene emissions in south-east Australia: comparison of a multi-layer canopy model with MEGAN and with atmospheric observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Emmerson

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available One of the key challenges in atmospheric chemistry is to reduce the uncertainty of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC emission estimates from vegetation to the atmosphere. In Australia, eucalypt trees are a primary source of biogenic emissions, but their contribution to Australian air sheds is poorly quantified. The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN has performed poorly against Australian isoprene and monoterpene observations. Finding reasons for the MEGAN discrepancies and strengthening our understanding of biogenic emissions in this region is our focus. We compare MEGAN to the locally produced Australian Biogenic Canopy and Grass Emissions Model (ABCGEM, to identify the uncertainties associated with the emission estimates and the data requirements necessary to improve isoprene and monoterpene emissions estimates for the application of MEGAN in Australia. Previously unpublished, ABCGEM is applied as an online biogenic emissions inventory to model BVOCs in the air shed overlaying Sydney, Australia. The two models use the same meteorological inputs and chemical mechanism, but independent inputs of leaf area index (LAI, plant functional type (PFT and emission factors. We find that LAI, a proxy for leaf biomass, has a small role in spatial, temporal and inter-model biogenic emission variability, particularly in urban areas for ABCGEM. After removing LAI as the source of the differences, we found large differences in the emission activity function for monoterpenes. In MEGAN monoterpenes are partially light dependent, reducing their dependence on temperature. In ABCGEM monoterpenes are not light dependent, meaning they continue to be emitted at high rates during hot summer days, and at night. When the light dependence of monoterpenes is switched off in MEGAN, night-time emissions increase by 90–100 % improving the comparison with observations, suggesting the possibility that monoterpenes emitted from Australian

  6. Global Investigation of the Mg Atom and ion Layers using SCIAMACHY/Envisat Observations between 70 km and 150 km Altitude and WACCM-MG Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langowski, M.; vonSavigny, C.; Burrows, J. P.; Feng, W.; Plane, J. M. C.; Marsh, D. R.; Janches, Diego; Sinnhuber, M.; Aikin, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Mg and Mg+ concentration fields in the upper mesosphere/lower thermosphere (UMLT) region are retrieved from SCIAMACHY/Envisat limb measurements of Mg and Mg+ dayglow emissions using a 2-D tomographic retrieval approach. The time series of monthly means of Mg and Mg+ for number density as well as vertical column density in different latitudinal regions are shown. Data from the limb mesosphere-thermosphere mode of SCIAMACHY/Envisat are used, which covers the 50 km to 150 km altitude region with a vertical sampling of 3.3 km and a highest latitude of 82 deg. The high latitudes are not covered in the winter months, because there is no dayglow emission during polar night. The measurements were performed every 14 days from mid-2008 until April 2012. Mg profiles show a peak at around 90 km altitude with a density between 750 cm(exp-3) and 2000 cm(exp-3). Mg does not show strong seasonal variation at mid-latitudes. The Mg+ peak occurs 5-15 km above the neutral Mg peak at 95-105 km. Furthermore, the ions show a significant seasonal cycle with a summer maximum in both hemispheres at mid- and high-latitudes. The strongest seasonal variations of the ions are observed at mid-latitudes between 20-40 deg and densities at the peak altitude range from 500 cm(exp-3) to 6000 cm(exp-3). The peak altitude of the ions shows a latitudinal dependence with a maximum at mid-latitudes that is up to 10 km higher than the peak altitude at the equator. The SCIAMACHY measurements are compared to other measurements and WACCM model results. In contrast to the SCIAMACHY results, the WACCM results show a strong seasonal variability for Mg with a winter maximum, which is not observable by SCIAMACHY, and globally higher peak densities. Although the peak densities do not agree the vertical column densities agree, since SCIAMACHY results show a wider vertical profile. The agreement of SCIAMACHY and WACCM results is much better for Mg+, showing the same seasonality and similar peak densities. However

  7. Simulation of plume rise: Study the effect of stably stratified turbulence layer on the rise of a buoyant plume from a continuous source by observing the plume centroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhimireddy, Sudheer Reddy; Bhaganagar, Kiran

    2016-11-01

    Buoyant plumes are common in atmosphere when there exists a difference in temperature or density between the source and its ambience. In a stratified environment, plume rise happens until the buoyancy variation exists between the plume and ambience. In a calm no wind ambience, this plume rise is purely vertical and the entrainment happens because of the relative motion of the plume with ambience and also ambient turbulence. In this study, a plume centroid is defined as the plume mass center and is calculated from the kinematic equation which relates the rate of change of centroids position to the plume rise velocity. Parameters needed to describe the plume are considered as the plume radius, plumes vertical velocity and local buoyancy of the plume. The plume rise velocity is calculated by the mass, momentum and heat conservation equations in their differential form. Our study focuses on the entrainment velocity, as it depicts the extent of plume growth. This entrainment velocity is made up as sum of fractions of plume's relative velocity and ambient turbulence. From the results, we studied the effect of turbulence on the plume growth by observing the variation in the plume radius at different heights and the centroid height reached before loosing its buoyancy.

  8. A Study of the Oklahoma City Urban Heat Island Effect Using a WRF/Single-Layer Urban Canopy Model, a Joint Urban 2003 Field Campaign, and MODIS Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengyue Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island effect (UHI for inner land regions was investigated using satellite data, ground observations, and simulations with an Single-Layer Urban Canopy Parameterization (SLUCP coupled into the regional Weather Research Forecasting model (WRF, http://wrf-model.org/index.php. Specifically, using the satellite-observed surface skin temperatures (Tskin, the intensity of the UHI was first compared for two inland cities (Xi’an City, China, and Oklahoma City (OKC, which have different city populations and building densities. The larger population density and larger building density in Xi’an lead to a stronger skin-level UHI by 2 °C. However, the ground observed 2 m surface air temperature (Tair observations showed an urban cooling island effect (UCI over the downtown region in OKC during the daytime of 19 July 2003, from a DOE field campaign (Joint Urban 2003. To understand this contrast between satellite-based Tskin and ground-based Tair, a sensitivity study using WRF/SLUCP was analyzed. The model reproduced a UCI in OKC. Furthermore, WRF/Noah/SLUCM simulations were also compared with the Joint Urban 2003 ground observations, including wind speeds, wind directions, and energy fluxes. Although the WRF/SLUCM model failed to simulate these variables accurately, it reproduced the diurnal variations of surface temperatures, wind speeds, wind directions, and energy fluxes reasonably well.

  9. Association of radiowave absorption with E(sporadic)-activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.

    1975-01-01

    Noontime radiowave absorption data for frequencies which are reflected below the height of sporadic-E layers show a strong positive correlation with the sporadic-E layer activity. The possibilities of atmospheric waves affecting both the sporadic-E activity as well as mesospheric ionization are suggested to explain this association

  10. Using In Situ Observations and Satellite Retrievals to Constrain Large-Eddy Simulations and Single-Column Simulations: Implications for Boundary-Layer Cloud Parameterization in the NASA GISS GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remillard, J.

    2015-12-01

    Two low-cloud periods from the CAP-MBL deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility at the Azores are selected through a cluster analysis of ISCCP cloud property matrices, so as to represent two low-cloud weather states that the GISS GCM severely underpredicts not only in that region but also globally. The two cases represent (1) shallow cumulus clouds occurring in a cold-air outbreak behind a cold front, and (2) stratocumulus clouds occurring when the region was dominated by a high-pressure system. Observations and MERRA reanalysis are used to derive specifications used for large-eddy simulations (LES) and single-column model (SCM) simulations. The LES captures the major differences in horizontal structure between the two low-cloud fields, but there are unconstrained uncertainties in cloud microphysics and challenges in reproducing W-band Doppler radar moments. The SCM run on the vertical grid used for CMIP-5 runs of the GCM does a poor job of representing the shallow cumulus case and is unable to maintain an overcast deck in the stratocumulus case, providing some clues regarding problems with low-cloud representation in the GCM. SCM sensitivity tests with a finer vertical grid in the boundary layer show substantial improvement in the representation of cloud amount for both cases. GCM simulations with CMIP-5 versus finer vertical gridding in the boundary layer are compared with observations. The adoption of a two-moment cloud microphysics scheme in the GCM is also tested in this framework. The methodology followed in this study, with the process-based examination of different time and space scales in both models and observations, represents a prototype for GCM cloud parameterization improvements.

  11. Observation of hole injection boost via two parallel paths in Pentacene thin-film transistors by employing Pentacene: 4, 4″-tris(3-methylphenylphenylamino triphenylamine: MoO3 buffer layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingrui Yan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Pentacene organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs were prepared by introducing 4, 4″-tris(3-methylphenylphenylamino triphenylamine (m-MTDATA: MoO3, Pentacene: MoO3, and Pentacene: m-MTDATA: MoO3 as buffer layers. These OTFTs all showed significant performance improvement comparing to the reference device. Significantly, we observe that the device employing Pentacene: m-MTDATA: MoO3 buffer layer can both take advantage of charge transfer complexes formed in the m-MTDATA: MoO3 device and suitable energy level alignment existed in the Pentacene: MoO3 device. These two parallel paths led to a high mobility, low threshold voltage, and contact resistance of 0.72 cm2/V s, −13.4 V, and 0.83 kΩ at Vds = − 100 V. This work enriches the understanding of MoO3 doped organic materials for applications in OTFTs.

  12. Observation of hole injection boost via two parallel paths in Pentacene thin-film transistors by employing Pentacene: 4, 4″-tris(3-methylphenylphenylamino) triphenylamine: MoO{sub 3} buffer layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Pingrui; Liu, Ziyang; Liu, Dongyang; Wang, Xuehui; Yue, Shouzhen; Zhao, Yi, E-mail: yizhao@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Zhang, Shiming, E-mail: zhangshimingjlu@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Département of Chemical Engineering, École Polytechnique de Montréal, Montréal, Québec H3C3J7 (Canada)

    2014-11-01

    Pentacene organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) were prepared by introducing 4, 4″-tris(3-methylphenylphenylamino) triphenylamine (m-MTDATA): MoO{sub 3}, Pentacene: MoO{sub 3}, and Pentacene: m-MTDATA: MoO{sub 3} as buffer layers. These OTFTs all showed significant performance improvement comparing to the reference device. Significantly, we observe that the device employing Pentacene: m-MTDATA: MoO{sub 3} buffer layer can both take advantage of charge transfer complexes formed in the m-MTDATA: MoO{sub 3} device and suitable energy level alignment existed in the Pentacene: MoO{sub 3} device. These two parallel paths led to a high mobility, low threshold voltage, and contact resistance of 0.72 cm{sup 2}/V s, −13.4 V, and 0.83 kΩ at V{sub ds} = − 100 V. This work enriches the understanding of MoO{sub 3} doped organic materials for applications in OTFTs.

  13. New observations concerning Kulychivka site, Layer IV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škrdla, Petr; Sytnyk, O.; Koropets'kyi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 1 (2016), s. 15-25 ISSN 2223-1218 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-19170S Keywords : Levallois * Upper Paleolithic * Kulychivka * Bohunice * flint artifacts * refitting * radiocarbon dating Subject RIV: AC - Archeology, Anthropology, Ethnology

  14. Layered materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David; Clarke, Simon; Wiley, John; Koumoto, Kunihito

    2014-06-01

    Layered compounds, materials with a large anisotropy to their bonding, electrical and/or magnetic properties, have been important in the development of solid state chemistry, physics and engineering applications. Layered materials were the initial test bed where chemists developed intercalation chemistry that evolved into the field of topochemical reactions where researchers are able to perform sequential steps to arrive at kinetically stable products that cannot be directly prepared by other approaches. Physicists have used layered compounds to discover and understand novel phenomena made more apparent through reduced dimensionality. The discovery of charge and spin density waves and more recently the remarkable discovery in condensed matter physics of the two-dimensional topological insulating state were discovered in two-dimensional materials. The understanding developed in two-dimensional materials enabled subsequent extension of these and other phenomena into three-dimensional materials. Layered compounds have also been used in many technologies as engineers and scientists used their unique properties to solve challenging technical problems (low temperature ion conduction for batteries, easy shear planes for lubrication in vacuum, edge decorated catalyst sites for catalytic removal of sulfur from oil, etc). The articles that are published in this issue provide an excellent overview of the spectrum of activities that are being pursued, as well as an introduction to some of the most established achievements in the field. Clusters of papers discussing thermoelectric properties, electronic structure and transport properties, growth of single two-dimensional layers, intercalation and more extensive topochemical reactions and the interleaving of two structures to form new materials highlight the breadth of current research in this area. These papers will hopefully serve as a useful guideline for the interested reader to different important aspects in this field and

  15. New global electron density observations from GPS-RO in the D- and E-Region ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dong L.

    2018-06-01

    A novel retrieval technique is developed for electron density (Ne) in the D- and E-region (80-120 km) using the high-quality 50-Hz GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) phase measurements. The new algorithm assumes a slow, linear variation in the F-region background when the GPS-RO passes through the D- and E-region, and extracts the Ne profiles at 80-130 km from the phase advance signal caused by Ne. Unlike the conventional Abel function, the new approach produces a sharp Ne weighting function in the lower ionosphere, and the Ne retrievals are in good agreement with the IRI (International Reference Ionosphere) model in terms of monthly maps, zonal means and diurnal variations. The daytime GPS-RO Ne profiles can be well characterized by the α-Chapman function of three parameters (NmE, hmE and H), showing that the bottom of E-region is deepening and sharpening towards the summer pole. At high latitudes the monthly GPS-RO Ne maps at 80-120 km reveal clear enhancement in the auroral zones, more prominent at night, as a result of energetic electron precipitation (EEP) from the outer radiation belt. The D-/E-region auroral Ne is strongly correlated with Kp on a daily basis. The new Ne data allow further comprehensive analyses of the sporadic E (Es) phenomena in connection with the background Ne in the E-region. The layered (2-10 km) and fluctuated (Layer than Ne_Pert, are extracted with respect to the background Ne_Region on a profile-by-profile basis. The Ne_Layer component has a strong but highly-refined peak at ∼105 km, with an amplitude smaller than Ne_Region approximately by an order of magnitude. The Ne_Pert component, which was studied extensively in the past, is ∼2 orders of magnitude weaker than Ne_Layer. Both Ne_Layer and Ne_Pert are subject to significant diurnal and semidiurnal variations, showing downward progression with local time in amplitude. The 11-year solar cycle dominates the Ne interannual variations, showing larger Ne_Region and Ne_Layer but smaller

  16. Layer-Cake Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedford, Rebecca; Warny, Sophie

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors offer a safe, fun, effective way to introduce geology concepts to elementary school children of all ages: "coring" layer cakes. This activity introduces the concepts and challenges that geologists face and at the same time strengthens students' inferential, observational, and problem-solving skills. It also addresses…

  17. 一次冬季锋面暴风雪天气过程的斜压边界层特征的观测分析%Observational Analyses of Baroclinic Boundary Layer Characteristics during One Frontal Winter Snowstorm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许吟隆; 钱粉兰; 陈陟; 李诗明; 周明煜

    2002-01-01

    The evolution and characteristics of the baroclinic boundary layer for one frontal winter snowstorm were analyzed by using the well-documented dataset during Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 17 of STORM-FEST. It is found that when the warm moist air was lifted across the front, a great amount of la tent heat release because of snowing increased the frontal temperature contrast to intensify frontogenesis. Itis shown in the zig-zag section diagram of potential temperature that when the frontogenesis got stronger, a cold trough was formed and both low-level jet (LLJ) and upper-level jet (ULJ) emerged ahead of the front.In the strongest stage of frontogenesis, the frontal contrast of potential temperature of cold trough reached as high as 20 K. Hereafter the LLJ ahead of the front tended to weaken and the LLJ behind the front tended to strengthen. The frontal circulation system was dominated by the cold air advection behind the front,which transported the cold air behind the front forward to the warm area ahead of the front to weaken the cold trough and finally frontolysis occurred. It is shown by the analyses of turbulent characteristics of front al baroclinic boundary-layer that the vertical shear (wv) above the boundary layer was very large, and the pumping of the strong wind shear in turbulent energy budget made the characteristic variables within the PBL well mixed. Sufficient moisture carried by southerly flow from the Mexico Gulf, and the strong baroclinity of the frontal boundary layer played key roles in this frontal winter snowstorm, and the large-scale ULJ behind the cold front is also advantageous to the development of the convective boundary layer.%对STORM-FEST IOP 1 7一次冬季锋面暴风雪天气过程的斜压边界层结构演变及特征进行了分析.发现:暖湿空气沿锋面抬升凝结成云,产生降水过程中释放的大量潜热显著增加锋两侧的水平温度差异,产生锋生.与锋生相伴,在锋前产生低空急流和高

  18. Columnar modelling of nucleation burst evolution in the convective boundary layer – first results from a feasibility study Part IV: A compilation of previous observations for valuation of simulation results from a columnar modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Hellmuth

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the preceding Papers I, II and III a revised columnar high-order modelling approach to model gas-aerosol-turbulence interactions in the convective boundary layer (CBL was proposed, and simulation results of two synthetic nucleation scenarios (binary vs. ternary on new particle formation (NPF in the anthropogenically influenced CBL were presented and discussed. The purpose of the present finishing Paper IV is twofold: Firstly, an attempt is made to compile previous observational findings on NPF bursts in the CBL, obtained from a number of field experiments. Secondly, the scenario simulations discussed in Paper III will be evaluated with respect to the role of CBL turbulence in NPF burst evolution. It was demonstrated, that completely different nucleation mechanisms can lead to the occurrence of NPF bursts in the surface layer, but the corresponding evolution patterns strongly differ with respect to the origin, amplitude and phase of the NPF burst as well as with respect to the time-height evolution of turbulent vertical fluxes and double correlation terms of physicochemical and aerosoldynamical variables. The large differences between the binary and ternary case scenario indicate, that ammonia (NH3 can not be considered as a time-independent tuning parameter in nucleation modelling. Its contribution to the evolution of the NPF burst pattern is much more complicated and reflects the influence of CBL turbulence as well as the strong non-linearity of the ternary nucleation rate. The impact of water (H2O vapour on the nucleation rate is quite varying depending on the considered nucleation mechanism. According to the classical theory of binary nucleation involving H2O and sulphuric acid (H2SO4, H2O vapour favours NPF, according to the classical theory of ternary nuncleation involving H2O, H2SO4 and NH3 and according to organic nucleation via chemical reactions involving stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCIs, H2O vapour disfavours nucleation, and

  19. Fast heterogeneous N2O5 uptake and ClNO2 production in power plant and industrial plumes observed in the nocturnal residual layer over the North China Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Wang, Weihao; Tham, Yee Jun; Li, Qinyi; Wang, Hao; Wen, Liang; Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Tao

    2017-10-01

    Dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) and nitryl chloride (ClNO2) are key species in nocturnal tropospheric chemistry and have significant effects on particulate nitrate formation and the following day's photochemistry through chlorine radical production and NOx recycling upon photolysis of ClNO2. To better understand the roles of N2O5 and ClNO2 in the high-aerosol-loading environment of northern China, an intensive field study was carried out at a high-altitude site (Mt. Tai, 1465 m a.s.l.) in the North China Plain (NCP) during the summer of 2014. Elevated ClNO2 plumes were frequently observed in the nocturnal residual layer with a maximum mixing ratio of 2.1 ppbv (1 min), whilst N2O5 was typically present at very low levels (coal-fired industry and power plants in the NCP. The heterogeneous N2O5 uptake coefficient (γ) and ClNO2 yield (ϕ) were estimated from steady-state analysis and observed growth rate of ClNO2. The derived γ and ϕ exhibited high variability, with means of 0.061 ± 0.025 and 0.28 ± 0.24, respectively. These values are higher than those derived from previous laboratory and field studies in other regions and cannot be well characterized by model parameterizations. Fast heterogeneous N2O5 reactions dominated the nocturnal NOx loss in the residual layer over this region and contributed to substantial nitrate formation of up to 17 µg m-3. The estimated nocturnal nitrate formation rates ranged from 0.2 to 4.8 µg m-3 h-1 in various plumes, with a mean of 2.2 ± 1.4 µg m-3 h-1. The results demonstrate the significance of heterogeneous N2O5 reactivity and chlorine activation in the NCP, and their unique and universal roles in fine aerosol formation and NOx transformation, and thus their potential impacts on regional haze pollution in northern China.

  20. Metodologia para observação da camada de cera em maçãs, utilizando microscopia eletrônica de varredura Methodology for observation of the wax layer in apples, using scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Antônio Suita de Castro

    2002-12-01

    sample preparation. The usual procedures cause serious damages to the wax layer or even eliminate it because of its solubilization by some of the reagents. Several researchers have kept the samples at very low temperature (-90ºC during the preparation. Wax observations in Brazil by using electronic scanning microscope have been performed, however in some of them results were not consistent. A relatively simple procedure at the Laboratory of Electron Microscopy at Embrapa Temperate Climate has been tried to overcome such difficulties. Such procedure consists of collecting a small piece of the fruit epidermis (1cm² taken from the equatorial part of the apples. After sampling it the piece of epidermis is placed on a glass slide hold by the extremes with a sticky tape. The sample on glass slide is kept for 72 hours into a dessicator containing drierite for the sample dehydration. Then, small pieces of the sample (2 mm² were taken and hold on stubs followed by metalization in gold. Following that, the sample is observed using a Zeiss (DSM - 940A electronic microscope at a working distance of 15 mm and acceleration voltage of 10 KV. The obtained images made possible to evaluate the action of some experimental treatments which have been used on apples during cold storage.

  1. Boosting water oxidation layer-by-layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Acosta, Jonnathan C; Scanlon, Micheál D; Méndez, Manuel A; Amstutz, Véronique; Vrubel, Heron; Opallo, Marcin; Girault, Hubert H

    2016-04-07

    Electrocatalysis of water oxidation was achieved using fluorinated tin oxide (FTO) electrodes modified with layer-by-layer deposited films consisting of bilayers of negatively charged citrate-stabilized IrO2 NPs and positively charged poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA) polymer. The IrO2 NP surface coverage can be fine-tuned by controlling the number of bilayers. The IrO2 NP films were amorphous, with the NPs therein being well-dispersed and retaining their as-synthesized shape and sizes. UV/vis spectroscopic and spectro-electrochemical studies confirmed that the total surface coverage and electrochemically addressable surface coverage of IrO2 NPs increased linearly with the number of bilayers up to 10 bilayers. The voltammetry of the modified electrode was that of hydrous iridium oxide films (HIROFs) with an observed super-Nernstian pH response of the Ir(III)/Ir(IV) and Ir(IV)-Ir(IV)/Ir(IV)-Ir(V) redox transitions and Nernstian shift of the oxygen evolution onset potential. The overpotential of the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) was essentially pH independent, varying only from 0.22 V to 0.28 V (at a current density of 0.1 mA cm(-2)), moving from acidic to alkaline conditions. Bulk electrolysis experiments revealed that the IrO2/PDDA films were stable and adherent under acidic and neutral conditions but degraded in alkaline solutions. Oxygen was evolved with Faradaic efficiencies approaching 100% under acidic (pH 1) and neutral (pH 7) conditions, and 88% in alkaline solutions (pH 13). This layer-by-layer approach forms the basis of future large-scale OER electrode development using ink-jet printing technology.

  2. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...

  3. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...

  4. Role of residual layer and large-scale phenomena on the evolution of the boundary layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blay, E.; Pino, D.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Boer, van de A.; Coster, de O.; Faloona, I.; Garrouste, O.; Hartogensis, O.K.

    2012-01-01

    Mixed-layer theory and large-eddy simulations are used to analyze the dynamics of the boundary layer on two intensive operational periods during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) campaign: 1st and 2nd of July 2011, when convective boundary layers (CBLs) were observed.

  5. Features of 3–7-day planetary-wave-type oscillations in F-layer vertical drift and equatorial spread F observed over two low-latitude stations in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Zhu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on the equatorial atmosphere–ionosphere coupling system have shown that planetary-wave-type oscillations, as an important seeding mechanism for equatorial spread F (ESF, play an important role in ESF irregularity development and its day-to-day variability in the equatorial latitudes. In this study, ionosonde virtual height and ESF measurements over Sanya (18.4° N, 109.6° E; 12.8° N dip latitude and meteor radar neutral-wind measurements over Fuke (19.5° N, 109.1° E; 14° N dip latitude during 2013 are used to investigate the features of planetary-wave-type oscillations in both the lower atmosphere and the ionosphere and their possible influences on ESF occurrence under the weak solar maximum year. The ∼ 3-day and ∼ 7-day planetary-wave-type oscillations have been observed in the neutral zonal winds and the time rate of change in F-layer virtual heights. According to the propagation characteristics, the 3-day and 7-day planetary-wave-type oscillations are basically recognized as ultrafast and fast Kelvin waves, respectively. With increasing heights, the 3-day wave oscillations are gradually amplified, while the 7-day wave oscillations are generally constant. By performing a cross-wavelet transform on the onsets of ESF and the vertical drifts of the F layer, we found that there are simultaneously occurring 7-day and 3-day common wave oscillations between them. The 7-day waves are mainly in the inversion phase, while the 3-day waves are mostly in an in-phase state, indicating that the 7-day waves may play a main role in ESF initiation. Approximate delays of 6 days for the 7-day waves and 5 days for the 3-day waves in their propagation upward from the lower atmosphere to the ionosphere are evaluated with wavelet power spectrum analysis. The estimated upward velocities from these time delays provide consistent evidence that the 7-day and 3-day waves propagate vertically upward with typical Kelvin wave

  6. A depleted ozone layer absorbs less UV-B, cooling the ozone layer, increasing the amount of UV-B observed to reach Earth, heating air by dissociating tropospheric and ground-level ozone, and heating oceans very efficiently by penetrating tens of meters into the mixed layer. UV-B is 48 times more energetic ("hotter") than IR absorbed by greenhouse gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, P. L.

    2017-12-01

    This new insight into the physics of radiation shows why changes in stratospheric ozone are observed to cause changes in global temperature. By 1970, manufactured CFC gases and ozone depletion began increasing. By 1993, increases in CFCs stopped as mandated by the Montreal Protocol. By 1995, increases in ozone depletion stopped. By 1998, increases in temperature stopped until 2014. Ozone is also depleted by halogen gases emitted from major basaltic lava flows, the largest of which, since 1783, occurred at Bardarbunga in Iceland in 2014, causing 2015 and 2016 to be the hottest years on record. Throughout Earth history, the largest basaltic lava flows were contemporaneous with periods of greatest warming and greatest levels of mass extinctions. Planck's empirical law shows that temperature of matter results from oscillation of all the bonds holding matter together. The higher the temperature, the higher the frequencies and amplitudes of oscillation. Thus, radiation from a nearby hotter body will make the absorbing body hotter than radiation from a cooler body. According to the Planck-Einstein relation, thermal energy (E) in matter and in radiation equals frequency of oscillation (ν) times the Planck constant (h), E=hν—the energy of a frictionless atomic oscillator. Since frequency is observed to be a very broad continuum extending from radio signals through visible light to gamma rays, thermal energy (E=hν) must also be a very broad continuum. Thermal flux cannot be represented properly by a single number of watts per square meter, as commonly assumed throughout the physical sciences, because all frequencies coexist and the number of watts increases with frequency. Thus, UV-B solar radiation is 48 times more energetic than IR terrestrial radiation absorbed by greenhouse gases and can make the absorbing body 48 times hotter. UV-B causes sunburn; no amount of IR can cause sunburn. Furthermore, in a basic experiment, I show that air containing more than 23 times

  7. Magnetic properties of layered superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansky, P.A.

    1993-01-01

    The organic superconductors (BEDT-TTF) 2 Cu(SNC) 2 and (TMTSF) 2 ClO 4 , with T c = 10K and 1.2K, have layered and highly anisotropic crystal structures. This thesis describes AC magnetic susceptibility measurements on these materials which illustrate the consequences of the discrete layered structure for the magnetic properties of the superconducting state. A DC magnetic field applied parallel to the layers of either material causes the rapid suppression of the AC screening response, and this indicates that the pinning restoring force for vortex motion parallel to the layers is anomalously weak in this orientation. This is believed to be due to the small size of the interlayer coherence length relative to the layer spacing. A simple estimate based on the energy and length scales relevant to Josephson coupled layers gives the correct order of magnitude for the pinning force. Pinning for vortices oriented perpendicular to the layers is larger by a factor of 500 for BEDT and 25 for TMTSF. When the DC field is applied at an angle to the layers, the initial suppression of the susceptibility is identical to that for a field parallel to the layers; when the field component normal to the layers exceeds a threshold, a sharp recovery of screening occurs. These observations indicate that the field initially enters the sample only in the direction parallel to the layers. The recovery of screening signals field penetration in the perpendicular direction at higher field strength, and is due to the onset of pinning by in-plane vortex cores. This magnetic open-quotes lock-inclose quotes effect is a qualitatively new behavior and is a direct consequence of weak interlayer coupling. The London penetration depth associated with interlayer currents is found to be on the order of hundreds of microns, comparable to that of a Josephson junction, and two to three orders of magnitude larger than for conventional superconductors

  8. Removing Boundary Layer by Suction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackeret, J

    1927-01-01

    Through the utilization of the "Magnus effect" on the Flettner rotor ship, the attention of the public has been directed to the underlying physical principle. It has been found that the Prandtl boundary-layer theory furnishes a satisfactory explanation of the observed phenomena. The present article deals with the prevention of this separation or detachment of the flow by drawing the boundary layer into the inside of a body through a slot or slots in its surface.

  9. Peeling Back the Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit took this panoramic camera image of the rock target named 'Mazatzal' on sol 77 (March 22, 2004). It is a close-up look at the rock face and the targets that will be brushed and ground by the rock abrasion tool in upcoming sols. Mazatzal, like most rocks on Earth and Mars, has layers of material near its surface that provide clues about the history of the rock. Scientists believe that the top layer of Mazatzal is actually a coating of dust and possibly even salts. Under this light coating may be a more solid portion of the rock that has been chemically altered by weathering. Past this layer is the unaltered rock, which may give scientists the best information about how Mazatzal was formed. Because each layer reveals information about the formation and subsequent history of Mazatzal, it is important that scientists get a look at each of them. For this reason, they have developed a multi-part strategy to use the rock abrasion tool to systematically peel back Mazatzal's layers and analyze what's underneath with the rover's microscopic imager, and its Moessbauer and alpha particle X-ray spectrometers. The strategy began on sol 77 when scientists used the microscopic imager to get a closer look at targets on Mazatzal named 'New York,' 'Illinois' and 'Arizona.' These rock areas were targeted because they posed the best opportunity for successfully using the rock abrasion tool; Arizona also allowed for a close-up look at a range of tones. On sol 78, Spirit's rock abrasion tool will do a light brushing on the Illinois target to preserve some of the surface layers. Then, a brushing of the New York target should remove the top coating of any dust and salts and perhaps reveal the chemically altered rock underneath. Finally, on sol 79, the rock abrasion tool will be commanded to grind into the New York target, which will give scientists the best chance of observing Mazatzal's interior. The Mazatzal targets were named after the home states of

  10. Observing the semiconducting band-gap alignment of MoS2 layers of different atomic thicknesses using a MoS2/SiO2/Si heterojunction tunnel diode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishiguchi, K.; Castellanos-Gomez, A.; Yamaguchi, H.; Fujiwara, A.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.; Steele, G.A.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate a tunnel diode composed of a vertical MoS2/SiO2/Si heterostructure. A MoS2 flake consisting four areas of different thicknesses functions as a gate terminal of a silicon field-effect transistor. A thin gate oxide allows tunneling current to flow between the n-type MoS2 layers and

  11. Thin pentacene layer under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srnanek, R.; Jakabovic, J.; Kovac, J.; Donoval, D.; Dobrocka, E.

    2011-01-01

    Organic semiconductors have got a lot of interest during the last years, due to their usability for organic thin film transistor. Pentacene, C 22 H 14 , is one of leading candidates for this purpose. While we obtain the published data about pressure-induced phase transition only on single crystal of pentacene we present pressure-induced phase transition in pentacene thin layers for the first time. Changes in the pentacene structure, caused by the pressure, were detected by micro-Raman spectroscopy. Applying the defined pressure to the pentacene layer it can be transformed from thin phase to bulk phase. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was found as useful method for detection of changes and phases identification in the pentacene layer induced by mechanical pressure. Such a pressure-induced transformation of pentacene thin layers was observed and identified for the first time. (authors)

  12. Observing the semiconducting band-gap alignment of MoS{sub 2} layers of different atomic thicknesses using a MoS{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si heterojunction tunnel diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiguchi, Katsuhiko, E-mail: nishiguchi.katsuhiko@lab.ntt.co.jp; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Akira [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan); Castellanos-Gomez, Andres; Zant, Herre S. J. van der; Steele, Gary A. [Kavli Institute of Nanoscience, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-08-03

    We demonstrate a tunnel diode composed of a vertical MoS{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si heterostructure. A MoS{sub 2} flake consisting four areas of different thicknesses functions as a gate terminal of a silicon field-effect transistor. A thin gate oxide allows tunneling current to flow between the n-type MoS{sub 2} layers and p-type Si channel. The tunneling-current characteristics show multiple negative differential resistance features, which we interpret as an indication of different conduction-band alignments of the MoS{sub 2} layers of different thicknesses. The presented tunnel device can be also used as a hybrid-heterostructure device combining the advantages of two-dimensional materials with those of silicon transistors.

  13. Boundary layer heights derived from velocity spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejstrup, J.; Barthelmie, R.J. [Risoe National Lab., Roskilde (Denmark); Kaellstrand, B. [Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1997-10-01

    It is a well-known fact that the height of the mixed layer determines the size of the largest and most energetic eddies that can be observed in the unstable boundary layer, and consequently a peak can be observed in the power spectra of the along-wind velocity component at scales comparable to the mixed layer depth. We will now show how the mixed layer depth can be derived from the u-specta and the results will be compared with direct measurements using pibal and tethersonde measurements. (au)

  14. Mixing in straight shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasso, P. S.; Mungal, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements were performed in a liquid plane mixing layer to extract the probability density function (pdf) of the mixture fraction of a passive scalar across the layer. Three Reynolds number (Re) cases were studied, 10,000, 33,000 and 90,000, with Re based on velocity difference and visual thickness. The results show that a non-marching pdf (central hump invariant from edge to edge of the layer) exists for Re = 10,000 but that a marching type pdf characterizes the Re = 33,000 and Re = 90,000 cases. For all cases, a broad range of mixture fraction values is found at each location across the layer. Streamwise and spanwise ramps across the layer, and structure-to-structure variation were observed and are believed to be responsible for the above behavior of the composition field. Tripping the boundary layer on the high-speed side of the splitter plate for each of the above three cases resulted in increased three-dimensionality and a change in the composition field. Average and average mixed fluid compositions are reported for all cases.

  15. Assembly of 1D nanofibers into a 2D bi-layered composite nanofibrous film with different functionalities at the two layers via layer-by-layer electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zijiao; Ma, Qianli; Dong, Xiangting; Li, Dan; Xi, Xue; Yu, Wensheng; Wang, Jinxian; Liu, Guixia

    2016-12-21

    A two-dimensional (2D) bi-layered composite nanofibrous film assembled by one-dimensional (1D) nanofibers with trifunctionality of electrical conduction, magnetism and photoluminescence has been successfully fabricated by layer-by-layer electrospinning. The composite film consists of a polyaniline (PANI)/Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticle (NP)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) tuned electrical-magnetic bifunctional layer on one side and a Tb(TTA) 3 (TPPO) 2 /polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) photoluminescent layer on the other side, and the two layers are tightly combined face-to-face together into the novel bi-layered composite film of trifunctionality. The brand-new film has totally different characteristics at the double layers. The electrical conductivity and magnetism of the electrical-magnetic bifunctional layer can be, respectively, tunable via modulating the PANI and Fe 3 O 4 NP contents, and the highest electrical conductivity can reach up to the order of 10 -2 S cm -1 , and predominant intense green emission at 545 nm is obviously observed in the photoluminescent layer under the excitation of 357 nm single-wavelength ultraviolet light. More importantly, the luminescence intensity of the photoluminescent layer remains almost unaffected by the electrical-magnetic bifunctional layer because the photoluminescent materials have been successfully isolated from dark-colored PANI and Fe 3 O 4 NPs. By comparing with the counterpart single-layered composite nanofibrous film, it is found that the bi-layered composite nanofibrous film has better performance. The novel bi-layered composite nanofibrous film with trifunctionality has potential in the fields of nanodevices, molecular electronics and biomedicine. Furthermore, the design conception and fabrication technique for the bi-layered multifunctional film provide a new and facile strategy towards other films of multifunctionality.

  16. The Keck keyword layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, A. R.; Lupton, W. F.

    1992-01-01

    Each Keck instrument presents a consistent software view to the user interface programmer. The view consists of a small library of functions, which are identical for all instruments, and a large set of keywords, that vary from instrument to instrument. All knowledge of the underlying task structure is hidden from the application programmer by the keyword layer. Image capture software uses the same function library to collect data for the image header. Because the image capture software and the instrument control software are built on top of the same keyword layer, a given observation can be 'replayed' by extracting keyword-value pairs from the image header and passing them back to the control system. The keyword layer features non-blocking as well as blocking I/O. A non-blocking keyword write operation (such as setting a filter position) specifies a callback to be invoked when the operation is complete. A non-blocking keyword read operation specifies a callback to be invoked whenever the keyword changes state. The keyword-callback style meshes well with the widget-callback style commonly used in X window programs. The first keyword library was built for the two Keck optical instruments. More recently, keyword libraries have been developed for the infrared instruments and for telescope control. Although the underlying mechanisms used for inter-process communication by each of these systems vary widely (Lick MUSIC, Sun RPC, and direct socket I/O, respectively), a basic user interface has been written that can be used with any of these systems. Since the keyword libraries are bound to user interface programs dynamically at run time, only a single set of user interface executables is needed. For example, the same program, 'xshow', can be used to display continuously the telescope's position, the time left in an instrument's exposure, or both values simultaneously. Less generic tools that operate on specific keywords, for example an X display that controls optical

  17. Curvilinear crack layer propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Alexander; Chaoui, Kamel; Moet, Abdelsamie

    1987-01-01

    An account is given of an experiment designed to allow observation of the effect of damage orientation on the direction of crack growth in the case of crack layer propagation, using polystyrene as the model material. The direction of crack advance under a given loading condition is noted to be determined by a competition between the tendency of the crack to maintain its current direction and the tendency to follow the orientation of the crazes at its tip. The orientation of the crazes is, on the other hand, determined by the stress field due to the interaction of the crack, the crazes, and the hole. The changes in craze rotation relative to the crack define the active zone rotation.

  18. Boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, T. E.; Frank, L. A.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetospheric boundary layer and the plasma-sheet boundary layer are the primary boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere. Recent satellite observations indicate that they provide for more than 50 percent of the plasma and energy transport in the outer magnetosphere although they constitute less than 5 percent by volume. Relative to the energy density in the source regions, plasma in the magnetospheric boundary layer is predominantly deenergized whereas plasma in the plasma-sheet boundary layer has been accelerated. The reconnection hypothesis continues to provide a useful framework for comparing data sampled in the highly dynamic magnetospheric environment. Observations of 'flux transfer events' and other detailed features near the boundaries have been recently interpreted in terms of nonsteady-state reconnection. Alternative hypotheses are also being investigated. More work needs to be done, both in theory and observation, to determine whether reconnection actually occurs in the magnetosphere and, if so, whether it is important for overall magnetospheric dynamics.

  19. Boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eastman, T.E.; Frank, L.A.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetospheric boundary layer and the plasma-sheet boundary layer are the primary boundary layers of the earth's outer magnetosphere. Recent satellite observations indicate that they provide for more than 50 percent of the plasma and energy transport in the outer magnetosphere although they constitute less than 5 percent by volume. Relative to the energy density in the source regions, plasma in the magnetospheric boundary layer is predominantly deenergized whereas plasma in the plasma-sheet boundary layer has been accelerated. The reconnection hypothesis continues to provide a useful framework for comparing data sampled in the highly dynamic magnetospheric environment. Observations of flux transfer events and other detailed features near the boundaries have been recently interpreted in terms of nonsteady-state reconnection. Alternative hypotheses are also being investigated. More work needs to be done, both in theory and observation, to determine whether reconnection actually occurs in the magnetosphere and, if so, whether it is important for overall magnetospheric dynamics. 30 references

  20. Layer-specific morphological and molecular differences in neocortical astrocytes and their dependence on neuronal layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanjakornsiripan, Darin; Pior, Baek-Jun; Kawaguchi, Daichi; Furutachi, Shohei; Tahara, Tomoaki; Katsuyama, Yu; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fukazawa, Yugo; Gotoh, Yukiko

    2018-04-24

    Non-pial neocortical astrocytes have historically been thought to comprise largely a nondiverse population of protoplasmic astrocytes. Here we show that astrocytes of the mouse somatosensory cortex manifest layer-specific morphological and molecular differences. Two- and three-dimensional observations revealed that astrocytes in the different layers possess distinct morphologies as reflected by differences in cell orientation, territorial volume, and arborization. The extent of ensheathment of synaptic clefts by astrocytes in layer II/III was greater than that by those in layer VI. Moreover, differences in gene expression were observed between upper-layer and deep-layer astrocytes. Importantly, layer-specific differences in astrocyte properties were abrogated in reeler and Dab1 conditional knockout mice, in which neuronal layers are disturbed, suggesting that neuronal layers are a prerequisite for the observed morphological and molecular differences of neocortical astrocytes. This study thus demonstrates the existence of layer-specific interactions between neurons and astrocytes, which may underlie their layer-specific functions.

  1. The double layers in the plasma sheet boundary layer during magnetic reconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, J.; Yu, B.

    2014-11-01

    We studied the evolutions of double layers which appear after the magnetic reconnection through two-dimensional electromagnetic particle-in-cell simulation. The simulation results show that the double layers are formed in the plasma sheet boundary layer after magnetic reconnection. At first, the double layers which have unipolar structures are formed. And then the double layers turn into bipolar structures, which will couple with another new weak bipolar structure. Thus a new double layer or tripolar structure comes into being. The double layers found in our work are about several ten Debye lengths, which accords with the observation results. It is suggested that the electron beam formed during the magnetic reconnection is responsible for the production of the double layers.

  2. VSWI Wetlands Advisory Layer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — This dataset represents the DEC Wetlands Program's Advisory layer. This layer makes the most up-to-date, non-jurisdictional, wetlands mapping avaiable to the public...

  3. Parsing polarization squeezing into Fock layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mueller, Christian R.; Madsen, Lars Skovgaard; Klimov, Andrei B.

    2016-01-01

    photon number do the methods coincide; when the photon number is indefinite, we parse the state in Fock layers, finding that substantially higher squeezing can be observed in some of the single layers. By capitalizing on the properties of the Husimi Q function, we map this notion onto the Poincare space......, providing a full account of the measured squeezing....

  4. 'Blueberry' Layers Indicate Watery Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    This microscopic image, taken at the outcrop region dubbed 'El Capitan' near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, reveals millimeter-scale (.04 inch-scale) layers in the lower portion. This same layering is hinted at by the fine notches that run horizontally across the sphere-like grain or 'blueberry' in the center left. The thin layers do not appear to deform around the blueberry, indicating that these geologic features are concretions and not impact spherules or ejected volcanic material called lapilli. Concretions are balls of minerals that form in pre-existing wet sediments. This image was taken by the rover's microscopic imager on the 29th martian day, or sol, of its mission. The observed area is about 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across.

  5. Layer-by-layer cell membrane assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matosevic, Sandro; Paegel, Brian M.

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic subcellular membrane systems, such as the nuclear envelope or endoplasmic reticulum, present a rich array of architecturally and compositionally complex supramolecular targets that are as yet inaccessible. Here we describe layer-by-layer phospholipid membrane assembly on microfluidic droplets, a route to structures with defined compositional asymmetry and lamellarity. Starting with phospholipid-stabilized water-in-oil droplets trapped in a static droplet array, lipid monolayer deposition proceeds as oil/water-phase boundaries pass over the droplets. Unilamellar vesicles assembled layer-by-layer support functional insertion both of purified and of in situ expressed membrane proteins. Synthesis and chemical probing of asymmetric unilamellar and double-bilayer vesicles demonstrate the programmability of both membrane lamellarity and lipid-leaflet composition during assembly. The immobilized vesicle arrays are a pragmatic experimental platform for biophysical studies of membranes and their associated proteins, particularly complexes that assemble and function in multilamellar contexts in vivo.

  6. Benthic boundary layer modelling studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, K.J.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical model has been developed to study the factors which control the height of the benthic boundary layer in the deep ocean and the dispersion of a tracer within and directly above the layer. This report covers tracer clouds of horizontal scales of 10 to 100 km. The dispersion of a tracer has been studied in two ways. Firstly, a number of particles have been introduced into the flow. The trajectories of these particles provide information on dispersion rates. For flow conditions similar to those observed in the abyssal N.E. Atlantic the diffusivity of a tracer was found to be 5 x 10 6 cm 2 s -1 for a tracer within the boundary layer and 8 x 10 6 cm 2 s -1 for a tracer above the boundary layer. The results are in accord with estimates made from current meter measurements. The second method of studying dispersion was to calculate the evolution of individual tracer clouds. Clouds within and above the benthic boundary layer often show quite different behaviour from each other although the general structure of the clouds in the two regions were found to have no significant differences. (author)

  7. Electronic spectra of anions intercalated in layered double hydroxides

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    groups of the layers and interlayer water through the termi- nal atom symmetry ... results in a reaction with the metal hydroxide layers lead- ing to the ..... List of band positions observed for potassium salts of anion and LDH samples. Salts.

  8. Diffusive boundary layers over varying topography

    KAUST Repository

    Dell, R.  W.; Pratt, L.  J.

    2015-01-01

    Diffusive bottom boundary layers can produce upslope flows in a stratified fluid. Accumulating observations suggest that these boundary layers may drive upwelling and mixing in mid-ocean ridge flank canyons. However, most studies of diffusive bottom

  9. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota

    2012-12-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Visualization of deuterium dead layer by atom probe tomography

    KAUST Repository

    Gemma, Ryota; Al-Kassab, Talaat; Kirchheim, Reiner; Pundt, Astrid A.

    2012-01-01

    The first direct observation, by atom probe tomography, of a deuterium dead layer is reported for Fe/V multilayered film loaded with D solute atoms. The thickness of the dead layers was measured to be 0.4-0.5 nm. The dead layers could be distinguished from chemically intermixed layers. The results suggest that the dead layer effect occurs even near the interface of the mixing layers, supporting an interpretation that the dead layer effect cannot be explained solely by electronic charge transfer but also involves a modulation of rigidity. © 2012 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hopping absorption edge in silicon inversion layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostadinov, I.Z.

    1983-09-01

    The low frequency gap observed in the absorption spectrum of silicon inversion layers is related to the AC variable range hopping. The frequency dependence of the absorption coefficient is calculated. (author)

  12. A POROUS, LAYERED HELIOPAUSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swisdak, M.; Drake, J. F. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Opher, M., E-mail: swisdak@umd.edu, E-mail: drake@umd.edu, E-mail: mopher@bu.edu [Department of Astronomy, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    The picture of the heliopause (HP)-the boundary between the domains of the Sun and the local interstellar medium (LISM)-as a pristine interface with a large rotation in the magnetic field fails to describe recent Voyager 1 (V1) data. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the global heliosphere reveal that the rotation angle of the magnetic field across the HP at V1 is small. Particle-in-cell simulations, based on cuts through the MHD model at V1's location, suggest that the sectored region of the heliosheath (HS) produces large-scale magnetic islands that reconnect with the interstellar magnetic field while mixing LISM and HS plasma. Cuts across the simulation reveal multiple, anti-correlated jumps in the number densities of LISM and HS particles, similar to those observed, at the magnetic separatrices. A model is presented, based on both the observations and simulations, of the HP as a porous, multi-layered structure threaded by magnetic fields. This model further suggests that contrary to the conclusions of recent papers, V1 has already crossed the HP.

  13. Instability limits for spontaneous double layer formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carr, J. Jr.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Sears, S.; VanDervort, R. W.; Magee, R. M.; Reynolds, E.

    2013-01-01

    We present time-resolved measurements that demonstrate that large amplitude electrostatic instabilities appear in pulsed, expanding helicon plasmas at the same time as particularly strong double layers appear in the expansion region. A significant cross-correlation between the electrostatic fluctuations and fluctuations in the number of ions accelerated by the double layer electric field is observed. No correlation is observed between the electrostatic fluctuations and ions that have not passed through the double layer. These measurements confirm that the simultaneous appearance of the electrostatic fluctuations and the double layer is not simple coincidence. In fact, the accelerated ion population is responsible for the growth of the instability. The double layer strength, and therefore, the velocity of the accelerated ions, is limited by the appearance of the electrostatic instability

  14. Inter-Layer Energy Transfer through Wetting-Layer States in Bi-layer InGaAs/GaAs Quantum-Dot Structures with Thick Barriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Zhang-Cheng; Zhang, Ya-Ting; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2009-01-01

    The inter-layer energy transfer in a bi-layer InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot structure with a thick GaAs barrier is studied using temperature-dependent photoluminescence. The abnormal enhancement of the photoluminescence of the QDs in the layer with a larger amount of coverage at 110K is observed, which...

  15. Magnetism in layered Ruthenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffens, Paul C.

    2008-07-01

    In this thesis, the magnetism of the layered Ruthenates has been studied by means of different neutron scattering techniques. Magnetic correlations in the single-layer Ruthenates of the series Ca{sub 2-x}Sr{sub x}RuO{sub 4} have been investigated as function of Sr-concentration (x=0.2 and 0.62), temperature and magnetic field. These inelastic neutron scattering studies demonstrate the coexistence of ferromagnetic paramagnon scattering with antiferromagnetic fluctuations at incommensurate wave vectors. The temperature dependence of the amplitudes and energies of both types of excitations indicate the proximity to magnetic instabilities; their competition seems to determine the complex behavior of these materials. In Ca{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 4}, which shows a metamagnetic transition, the ferromagnetic fluctuations are strongly suppressed at low temperature, but appear at higher temperature or application of a magnetic field. In the high-field phase of Ca{sub 1.8}Sr{sub 0.2}RuO{sub 4} above the metamagnetic transition, a ferromagnetic magnon dominates the excitation spectrum. Polarized neutron scattering revealed the existence of a very broad signal around the zone centre, in addition to the well-known incommensurate excitations at Q=(0.3,0.3,0) in the unconventional superconductor Sr{sub 2}RuO{sub 4}. With this additional contribution, it is possible to set up a general model for the Q-dependent magnetic susceptibility, which is well consistent with the results of other measurement methods that do not resolve the Q-dependence. Upon doping with Ti, the incommensurate fluctuations are enhanced, in particular near the critical concentration for the onset of magnetic order, but no divergence down to very low temperature is observed. In the bilayer Ti-doped Ca{sub 3}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, the existence of magnetic order with a propagation vector of about ((1)/(4),(1)/(4),0) has been discovered and characterized in detail. Above and below T{sub N}, excitations at this

  16. Magnetism in layered Ruthenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steffens, Paul C.

    2008-01-01

    In this thesis, the magnetism of the layered Ruthenates has been studied by means of different neutron scattering techniques. Magnetic correlations in the single-layer Ruthenates of the series Ca 2-x Sr x RuO 4 have been investigated as function of Sr-concentration (x=0.2 and 0.62), temperature and magnetic field. These inelastic neutron scattering studies demonstrate the coexistence of ferromagnetic paramagnon scattering with antiferromagnetic fluctuations at incommensurate wave vectors. The temperature dependence of the amplitudes and energies of both types of excitations indicate the proximity to magnetic instabilities; their competition seems to determine the complex behavior of these materials. In Ca 1.8 Sr 0.2 RuO 4 , which shows a metamagnetic transition, the ferromagnetic fluctuations are strongly suppressed at low temperature, but appear at higher temperature or application of a magnetic field. In the high-field phase of Ca 1.8 Sr 0.2 RuO 4 above the metamagnetic transition, a ferromagnetic magnon dominates the excitation spectrum. Polarized neutron scattering revealed the existence of a very broad signal around the zone centre, in addition to the well-known incommensurate excitations at Q=(0.3,0.3,0) in the unconventional superconductor Sr 2 RuO 4 . With this additional contribution, it is possible to set up a general model for the Q-dependent magnetic susceptibility, which is well consistent with the results of other measurement methods that do not resolve the Q-dependence. Upon doping with Ti, the incommensurate fluctuations are enhanced, in particular near the critical concentration for the onset of magnetic order, but no divergence down to very low temperature is observed. In the bilayer Ti-doped Ca 3 Ru 2 O 7 , the existence of magnetic order with a propagation vector of about ((1)/(4),(1)/(4),0) has been discovered and characterized in detail. Above and below T N , excitations at this wave vector and another one, related to Sr 3 Ru 2 O 7 , have been

  17. Multi-layers castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Szajnar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In paper is presented the possibility of making of multi-layers cast steel castings in result of connection of casting and welding coating technologies. First layer was composite surface layer on the basis of Fe-Cr-C alloy, which was put directly in founding process of cast carbon steel 200–450 with use of preparation of mould cavity method. Second layer were padding welds, which were put with use of TIG – Tungsten Inert Gas surfacing by welding technology with filler on Ni matrix, Ni and Co matrix with wolfram carbides WC and on the basis on Fe-Cr-C alloy, which has the same chemical composition with alloy, which was used for making of composite surface layer. Usability for industrial applications of surface layers of castings were estimated by criterion of hardness and abrasive wear resistance of type metal-mineral.

  18. Observation of spin reorientation in layered manganites La1.2Sr1.8(Mn1-yRuy)2O7 (0.0=

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, X.Z.; Uchida, M.; Onose, Y.; He, J.P.; Kaneko, Y.; Asaka, T.; Kimoto, K.; Matsui, Y.; Arima, T.; Tokura, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Ru substitution for Mn in bilayered oxides La 1.2 Sr 1.8 (Mn 1-y Ru y ) 2 O 7 (0= for the y=0 crystal to the c-axis for y=0.2, and it rotates away from the c-axis for the y=0.05 and y=0.07 crystals with decreasing temperature. Furthermore, maze-shaped magnetic domain structures were observed in the (001) thin crystals with 0.05=< y=<0.2. Changes in domain size and structure indicate that the uniaxial magnetic anisotropy becomes stronger as Ru content y increases

  19. A double layer review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, L.P.

    1977-06-01

    A review of the main results on electrostatic double layers (sometimes called space charge layers or sheaths) obtained from theory, and laboratory and space experiments up to the spring of 1977 is given. By means of barium jets and satellite probes, double layers have now been found at the altitudes, earlier predicted theoretically. The general potential distribution above the auroral zone, suggested by inverted V-events and electric field reversals, is corroborated. (author)

  20. Two layer powder pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiner, H.

    1979-01-01

    First, significance and advantages of sintered materials consisting of two layers are pointed out. By means of the two layer powder pressing technique metal powders are formed resulting in compacts with high accuracy of shape and mass. Attributes of basic powders, different filling methods and pressing techniques are discussed. The described technique is supposed to find further applications in the field of two layer compacts in the near future

  1. Economical Atomic Layer Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Richard; Davis, Robert; Linford, Matthew

    2010-10-01

    Atomic Layer Deposition is a self limiting deposition process that can produce films at a user specified height. At BYU we have designed a low cost and automated atomic layer deposition system. We have used the system to deposit silicon dioxide at room temperature using silicon tetrachloride and tetramethyl orthosilicate. Basics of atomic layer deposition, the system set up, automation techniques and our system's characterization are discussed.

  2. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The development of robust stable boundary layer parameterizations for use in NWP and climate models is hampered by the multiplicity of processes and their unknown interactions. As a result, these models suffer ...

  3. Layered plasma polymer composite membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Walter C.

    1994-01-01

    Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is .gtoreq.2 and is the number of selective layers.

  4. Formation of double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, P.; Wong, A.Y.; Quon, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on both stationary and propagating double layers and a related analytical model are described. Stationary double layers were produced in a multiple plasma device, in which an electron drift current was present. An investigation of the plasma parameters for the stable double layer condition is described. The particle distribution in the stable double layer establishes a potential profile, which creates electron and ion beams that excite plasma instabilities. The measured characteristics of the instabilities are consistent with the existence of the double layer. Propagating double layers are formed when the initial electron drift current is large. Ths slopes of the transition region increase as they propagate. A physical model for the formation of a double layer in the experimental device is described. This model explains the formation of the low potential region on the basis of the space charge. This space charge is created by the electron drift current. The model also accounts for the role of ions in double layer formation and explains the formation of moving double layers. (Auth.)

  5. Electroless atomic layer deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David Bruce; Cappillino, Patrick J.; Sheridan, Leah B.; Stickney, John L.; Benson, David M.

    2017-10-31

    A method of electroless atomic layer deposition is described. The method electrolessly generates a layer of sacrificial material on a surface of a first material. The method adds doses of a solution of a second material to the substrate. The method performs a galvanic exchange reaction to oxidize away the layer of the sacrificial material and deposit a layer of the second material on the surface of the first material. The method can be repeated for a plurality of iterations in order to deposit a desired thickness of the second material on the surface of the first material.

  6. Variations in the magnetopause current layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakso, H. E.; Middleton, H. R.

    2017-12-01

    We use multi-point observations from the Cluster spacecraft to investigate the variations in the magnetopause current layer. With help of the curlometer technique one can determine the magnetopause current and its variability. Most of the time the magnetopause location is moving back and forth, so during any given pass the current layer is crossed several times. We use such crossings to investigate the characteristics of the current layer as the solar wind pressure varies (and the magnetopause moves accordingly). In addition we take an advantage of the ambient electron measurements from the EDI experiment which have been calibrated against the PEACE electron spectrometer data. These data can be used to detect fast variations of 1 keV electrons at resolution of 1-100 ms. Overall, Cluster observations are highly complimentary to the MMS observations due to the polar orbit of the Cluster spacecraft which provide fast vertical profiles of the magnetopause current layer.

  7. The turning of the wind in the atmospheric boundary layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Here we use accurate observations of the wind speed vector to analyze the behavior with height of the wind direction. The observations are a combination of tall meteorological mast and long-range wind lidar measurements covering the entire atmospheric boundary layer. The observations were performed...... winds underpredict the turning of the wind and the boundary-layer winds in general....

  8. Multi-layer monochromator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoenborn, B.P.; Caspar, D.L.D.

    1975-01-01

    This invention provides an artificial monochromator crystal for efficiently selecting a narrow band of neutron wavelengths from a neutron beam having a Maxwellian wavelength distribution, by providing on a substrate a plurality of germanium layers, and alternate periodic layers of a different metal having tailored thicknesses, shapes, and volumetric and neutron scattering densities. (U.S.)

  9. Ozone Layer Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Research Centers Contact Us Share Ozone Layer Protection The stratospheric ozone layer is Earth’s “sunscreen” – protecting ... GreenChill Partnership Responsible Appliance Disposal (RAD) Program Ozone Protection vs. Ozone Pollution This website addresses stratospheric ozone ...

  10. Skin layer mechanics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerligs, M.

    2010-01-01

    The human skin is composed of several layers, each with an unique structure and function. Knowledge about the mechanical behavior of these skin layers is important for clinical and cosmetic research, such as the development of personal care products and the understanding of skin diseases. Until

  11. Stable Boundary Layer Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steeneveld, G.J.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and prediction of the stable atmospheric boundary layer is a challenging task. Many physical processes are relevant in the stable boundary layer, i.e. turbulence, radiation, land surface coupling, orographic turbulent and gravity wave drag, and land surface heterogeneity. The

  12. Development of boundary layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herbst, R.

    1980-01-01

    Boundary layers develop along the blade surfaces on both the pressure and the suction side in a non-stationary flow field. This is due to the fact that there is a strongly fluctuating flow on the downstream blade row, especially as a result of the wakes of the upstream blade row. The author investigates the formation of boundary layers under non-stationary flow conditions and tries to establish a model describing the non-stationary boundary layer. For this purpose, plate boundary layers are measured, at constant flow rates but different interferent frequency and variable pressure gradients. By introducing the sample technique, measurements of the non-stationary boundary layer become possible, and the flow rate fluctuation can be divided in its components, i.e. stochastic turbulence and periodical fluctuation. (GL) [de

  13. Improved electron transport layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides: a method of preparing a coating ink for forming a zinc oxide electron transport layer, comprising mixing zinc acetate and a wetting agent in water or methanol; a coating ink comprising zinc acetate and a wetting agent in aqueous solution or methanolic solution......; a method of preparing a zinc oxide electron transporting layer, which method comprises: i) coating a substrate with the coating ink of the present invention to form a film; ii) drying the film; and iii) heating the dry film to convert the zinc acetate substantially to ZnO; a method of preparing an organic...... photovoltaic device or an organic LED having a zinc oxide electron transport layer, the method comprising, in this order: a) providing a substrate bearing a first electrode layer; b) forming an electron transport layer according to the following method: i) coating a coating ink comprising an ink according...

  14. Exploring Scintillometry in the Stable Atmospheric Surface Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartogensis, O.K.

    2006-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to investigate observation methods of heat and momentum exchange and key variables that characterise turbulence in the atmospheric stable surface layer (SSL), a layer defined as the lower part of the stable boundary layer (SBL) where surface fluxes do not change

  15. Modeling the summertime Arctic cloudy boundary layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curry, J.A.; Pinto, J.O. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); McInnes, K.L. [CSIRO Division of Atmospheric Research, Mordialloc (Australia)

    1996-04-01

    Global climate models have particular difficulty in simulating the low-level clouds during the Arctic summer. Model problems are exacerbated in the polar regions by the complicated vertical structure of the Arctic boundary layer. The presence of multiple cloud layers, a humidity inversion above cloud top, and vertical fluxes in the cloud that are decoupled from the surface fluxes, identified in Curry et al. (1988), suggest that models containing sophisticated physical parameterizations would be required to accurately model this region. Accurate modeling of the vertical structure of multiple cloud layers in climate models is important for determination of the surface radiative fluxes. This study focuses on the problem of modeling the layered structure of the Arctic summertime boundary-layer clouds and in particular, the representation of the more complex boundary layer type consisting of a stable foggy surface layer surmounted by a cloud-topped mixed layer. A hierarchical modeling/diagnosis approach is used. A case study from the summertime Arctic Stratus Experiment is examined. A high-resolution, one-dimensional model of turbulence and radiation is tested against the observations and is then used in sensitivity studies to infer the optimal conditions for maintaining two separate layers in the Arctic summertime boundary layer. A three-dimensional mesoscale atmospheric model is then used to simulate the interaction of this cloud deck with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics. An assessment of the improvements needed to the parameterizations of the boundary layer, cloud microphysics, and radiation in the 3-D model is made.

  16. The Application of Layer Theory to Design: The Control Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, Andrew S.; Langton, Matthew B.

    2016-01-01

    A theory of design layers proposed by Gibbons ("An Architectural Approach to Instructional Design." Routledge, New York, 2014) asserts that each layer of an instructional design is related to a body of theory closely associated with the concerns of that particular layer. This study focuses on one layer, the control layer, examining…

  17. Diamagnetic boundary layers: a kinetic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemaire, J.; Burlaga, L.F.

    1976-01-01

    A kinetic theory for boundary layers associated with MHD tangential 'discontinuities' in a collisionless magnetized plasma such as those observed in the solar wind is presented. The theory consists of finding self-consistent solutions of Vlasov's equation and Maxwell's equation for stationary, one-dimensional boundary layers separating two Maxwellian plasma states. Layers in which the current is carried by electrons are found to have a thickness of the order of a few electron gyroradii, but the drift speed of the current-carrying electrons is found to exceed the Alfven speed, and accordingly such layers are not stable. Several types of layers, in which the current is carried by protons are discussed; in particular, cases in which the magnetic field intensity and/or direction changed across the layer were considered. In every case, the thickness was of the order of a few proton gyroradii and the field changed smoothly , although the characteristics depended somewhat on the boundary conditions. The drift speed was always less than the Alfven speed, consistent with stability of such structures. The results are consistent with the observations of boundary layers in the solar wind near 1 AU. (Auth.)

  18. Topologically nontrivial quantum layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carron, G.; Exner, P.; Krejcirik, D.

    2004-01-01

    Given a complete noncompact surface Σ embedded in R 3 , we consider the Dirichlet Laplacian in the layer Ω that is defined as a tubular neighborhood of constant width about Σ. Using an intrinsic approach to the geometry of Ω, we generalize the spectral results of the original paper by Duclos et al. [Commun. Math. Phys. 223, 13 (2001)] to the situation when Σ does not possess poles. This enables us to consider topologically more complicated layers and state new spectral results. In particular, we are interested in layers built over surfaces with handles or several cylindrically symmetric ends. We also discuss more general regions obtained by compact deformations of certain Ω

  19. A variable K - planetary boundary layer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, P.K.

    1976-07-01

    The steady-state, homogeneous and barotropic equations of motion within the planetary boundary layer are solved with the assumption that the coefficient of eddy viscosity varies as K(Z) = K 0 (1-Z/h)sup(p), where h is the height of the boundary layer and p a parameter which depends on the atmospheric stability. The solutions are compared with the observed velocity profiles based on the Wangara data. They compare favourably. (author)

  20. Multiple Layers of Credit and Mortgage Crises

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Hernandez-Verme

    2011-01-01

    I examine a production economy with a financial sector that contains multiple layers of credit. Such layers are designed to constitute credit chains which are inclusive of a simple mortgage market. The focus is on the nature and contagion properties of credit chains in an economy where the financial sector plays a real allocative role and agents have a nontrivial choice of whether to default on mortgages or not. Multiple equilibria with different rates of default are observed, due to the pres...

  1. Synchronization of coupled metronomes on two layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yu, Yi-Zhen; Wang, Xin-Gang

    2017-12-01

    Coupled metronomes serve as a paradigmatic model for exploring the collective behaviors of complex dynamical systems, as well as a classical setup for classroom demonstrations of synchronization phenomena. Whereas previous studies of metronome synchronization have been concentrating on symmetric coupling schemes, here we consider the asymmetric case by adopting the scheme of layered metronomes. Specifically, we place two metronomes on each layer, and couple two layers by placing one on top of the other. By varying the initial conditions of the metronomes and adjusting the friction between the two layers, a variety of synchronous patterns are observed in experiment, including the splay synchronization (SS) state, the generalized splay synchronization (GSS) state, the anti-phase synchronization (APS) state, the in-phase delay synchronization (IPDS) state, and the in-phase synchronization (IPS) state. In particular, the IPDS state, in which the metronomes on each layer are synchronized in phase but are of a constant phase delay to metronomes on the other layer, is observed for the first time. In addition, a new technique based on audio signals is proposed for pattern detection, which is more convenient and easier to apply than the existing acquisition techniques. Furthermore, a theoretical model is developed to explain the experimental observations, and is employed to explore the dynamical properties of the patterns, including the basin distributions and the pattern transitions. Our study sheds new lights on the collective behaviors of coupled metronomes, and the developed setup can be used in the classroom for demonstration purposes.

  2. Arctic Mixed Layer Dynamics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Morison, James

    2003-01-01

    .... Over the years we have sought to understand the heat and mass balance of the mixed layer, marginal ice zone processes, the Arctic internal wave and mixing environment, summer and winter leads, and convection...

  3. Layered inorganic solids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čejka, Jiří; Morris, R. E.; Nachtigall, P.; Roth, Wieslaw Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 43, č. 27 (2014), s. 10274-10275 ISSN 1477-9226 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : layered inorganic solids * physical chemistry * catalysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.197, year: 2014

  4. Addressing Ozone Layer Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Access information on EPA's efforts to address ozone layer depletion through regulations, collaborations with stakeholders, international treaties, partnerships with the private sector, and enforcement actions under Title VI of the Clean Air Act.

  5. Layered Fault Management Architecture

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sztipanovits, Janos

    2004-01-01

    ... UAVs or Organic Air Vehicles. The approach of this effort was to analyze fault management requirements of formation flight for fleets of UAVs, and develop a layered fault management architecture which demonstrates significant...

  6. The Bottom Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H; Lentz, Steven J

    2018-01-03

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  7. The Bottom Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, John H.; Lentz, Steven J.

    2018-01-01

    The oceanic bottom boundary layer extracts energy and momentum from the overlying flow, mediates the fate of near-bottom substances, and generates bedforms that retard the flow and affect benthic processes. The bottom boundary layer is forced by winds, waves, tides, and buoyancy and is influenced by surface waves, internal waves, and stratification by heat, salt, and suspended sediments. This review focuses on the coastal ocean. The main points are that (a) classical turbulence concepts and modern turbulence parameterizations provide accurate representations of the structure and turbulent fluxes under conditions in which the underlying assumptions hold, (b) modern sensors and analyses enable high-quality direct or near-direct measurements of the turbulent fluxes and dissipation rates, and (c) the remaining challenges include the interaction of waves and currents with the erodible seabed, the impact of layer-scale two- and three-dimensional instabilities, and the role of the bottom boundary layer in shelf-slope exchange.

  8. Review: the atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1994-10-01

    An overview is given of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) over both continental and ocean surfaces, mainly from observational and modelling perspectives. Much is known about ABL structure over homogeneous land surfaces, but relatively little so far as the following are concerned, (i) the cloud-topped ABL (over the sea predominantly); (ii) the strongly nonhomogeneous and nonstationary ABL; (iii) the ABL over complex terrain. These three categories present exciting challenges so far as improved understanding of ABL behaviour and improved representation of the ABL in numerical models of the atmosphere are concerned.

  9. In situ observation techniques of protective oxide layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doi, Takashi; Adachi, Takeharu; Usuki, Noriaki

    2015-01-01

    In situ analyzing techniques for investigating a surface and interface change during corrosion and oxidation of metals by using Raman scattering spectroscopy (Raman), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) are present. The Raman spectra revealed that a crystal structure and distribution of corrosion products varied during corrosion progress at elevated temperature and high pressure electrolyte. Time dependent XRD measurements made clear the behavior of the electrochemical reduction of a rust and the iso thermal transformation of a scale on a steel. It was demonstrated that XPS was capable of the in-situ measurements for initial stage of high temperature oxidation. (author)

  10. Observations of the atmospheric surface layer parameters over a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    1999-08-11

    Aug 11, 1999 ... of radiation, field experiments were conducted over a semi arid region, ... surements of wind, temperature and soil tempera- ture were made using cup ... sampling frequency of fast measurements is 1Hz, giving 3600 data ...

  11. Observation of the reversed current effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, I.R.; Silawatshananai, C.

    1979-05-01

    The paper describes an observation of the reversed current effect, and its consequences, in a 'stabilized' Z-pinch. Magnetic probe measurements and holographic interferometry were used to follow the development of a reversed current layer and to pinpoint its location in the outer region of the pinched plasma column. The subsequent ejection of the outer plasma layer was observed using fast photography

  12. Stability of mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Christopher; Krothapalli, A

    1993-01-01

    The research program for the first year of this project (see the original research proposal) consists of developing an explicit marching scheme for solving the parabolized stability equations (PSE). Performing mathematical analysis of the computational algorithm including numerical stability analysis and the determination of the proper boundary conditions needed at the boundary of the computation domain are implicit in the task. Before one can solve the parabolized stability equations for high-speed mixing layers, the mean flow must first be found. In the past, instability analysis of high-speed mixing layer has mostly been performed on mean flow profiles calculated by the boundary layer equations. In carrying out this project, it is believed that the boundary layer equations might not give an accurate enough nonparallel, nonlinear mean flow needed for parabolized stability analysis. A more accurate mean flow can, however, be found by solving the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations. The advantage of the parabolized Navier-Stokes equations is that its accuracy is consistent with the PSE method. Furthermore, the method of solution is similar. Hence, the major part of the effort of the work of this year has been devoted to the development of an explicit numerical marching scheme for the solution of the Parabolized Navier-Stokes equation as applied to the high-seed mixing layer problem.

  13. Simulation of plasma double-layer structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borovsky, J.E.; Joyce, G.

    1982-01-01

    Electrostatic plasma double layers are numerically simulated by means of a magnetized 2 1/2-dimensional particle-in-cell method. The investigation of planar double layers indicates that these one-dimensional potential structures are susceptible to periodic disruption by instabilities in the low-potential plasmas. Only a slight increase in the double-layer thickness with an increase in its obliqueness to the magnetic field is observed. Weak magnetization results in the double-layer electric-field alignment of accelerated particles and strong magnetization results in their magnetic-field alignment. The numerial simulations of spatially periodic two-dimensional double layers also exhibit cyclical instability. A morphological invariance in two-dimensional double layers with respect to the degree of magnetization implies that the potential structures scale with Debye lengths rather than with gyroradii. Electron-beam excited electrostatic electron-cyclotron waves and (ion-beam driven) solitary waves are present in the plasmas adjacent to the double layers

  14. MFM study of magnetic interaction between recording and soft magnetic layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, Yukio; Tanahashi, Kiwamu; Hirayama, Yoshiyuki; Kikukawa, Atsushi; Futamoto, Masaaki

    2001-01-01

    Magnetic force microscopy was used to study the magnetic interaction between the recording and the soft magnetic layers in double-layer perpendicular media by observing the magnetization structure from the soft magnetic layer side. There was a strong magnetic interaction between the recording and the soft magnetic layers. Introducing a thin nonmagnetic intermediate layer between the two layers greatly reduced the magnetic interaction and drastically reduced the medium noise

  15. Three-layer magnetoconvection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, M.-K.; Silvers, L.J.; Proctor, M.R.E.

    2008-01-01

    It is believed that some stars have two or more convection zones in close proximity near to the stellar photosphere. These zones are separated by convectively stable regions that are relatively narrow. Due to the close proximity of these regions it is important to construct mathematical models to understand the transport and mixing of passive and dynamic quantities. One key quantity of interest is a magnetic field, a dynamic vector quantity, that can drastically alter the convectively driven flows, and have an important role in coupling the different layers. In this Letter we present the first investigation into the effect of an imposed magnetic field in such a geometry. We focus our attention on the effect of field strength and show that, while there are some similarities with results for magnetic field evolution in a single layer, new and interesting phenomena are also present in a three layer system

  16. Layered tin dioxide microrods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Junhong; Huang Hongbo; Gong Jiangfeng; Zhao Xiaoning; Cheng Guangxu; Yang Shaoguang

    2007-01-01

    Single-crystalline layered SnO 2 microrods were synthesized by a simple tin-water reaction at 900 deg. C. The structural and optical properties of the sample were characterized by x-ray powder diffraction, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. High resolution transmission electron microscopy studies and selected area electron diffraction patterns revealed that the layered SnO 2 microrods are single crystalline and their growth direction is along [1 1 0]. The growth mechanism of the microrods was proposed based on SEM, TEM characterization and thermodynamic analysis. It is deduced that the layered microrods grow by the stacking of SnO 2 sheets with a (1 1 0) surface in a vapour-liquid-solid process. Three emission peaks at 523, 569 and 626 nm were detected in room-temperature PL measurements

  17. Superfluid Boundary Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagg, G W; Parker, N G; Barenghi, C F

    2017-03-31

    We model the superfluid flow of liquid helium over the rough surface of a wire (used to experimentally generate turbulence) profiled by atomic force microscopy. Numerical simulations of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation reveal that the sharpest features in the surface induce vortex nucleation both intrinsically (due to the raised local fluid velocity) and extrinsically (providing pinning sites to vortex lines aligned with the flow). Vortex interactions and reconnections contribute to form a dense turbulent layer of vortices with a nonclassical average velocity profile which continually sheds small vortex rings into the bulk. We characterize this layer for various imposed flows. As boundary layers conventionally arise from viscous forces, this result opens up new insight into the nature of superflows.

  18. Weak layer fracture: facets and depth hoar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Reiweger

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding failure initiation within weak snow layers is essential for modeling and predicting dry-snow slab avalanches. We therefore performed laboratory experiments with snow samples containing a weak layer consisting of either faceted crystals or depth hoar. During these experiments the samples were loaded with different loading rates and at various tilt angles until fracture. The strength of the samples decreased with increasing loading rate and increasing tilt angle. Additionally, we took pictures of the side of four samples with a high-speed video camera and calculated the displacement using a particle image velocimetry (PIV algorithm. The fracture process within the weak layer could thus be observed in detail. Catastrophic failure started due to a shear fracture just above the interface between the depth hoar layer and the underlying crust.

  19. Optical and Electrical Characteristics of Graphene Double Layer Formed by a Double Transfer of Graphene Single Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Jun; Bae, Gi Yoon; Chun, Sungwoo; Park, Wanjun

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate formation of double layer graphene by means of a double transfer using two single graphene layers grown by a chemical vapor deposition method. It is observed that shiftiness and broadness in the double-resonance of Raman scattering are much weaker than those of bilayer graphene formed naturally. Transport characteristics examined from transmission line measurements and field effect transistors show the similar behavior with those of single layer graphene. It indicates that interlayer separation, in electrical view, is large enough to avoid correlation between layers for the double layer structure. It is also observed from a transistor with the double layer graphene that molecules adsorpted on two inner graphene surfaces in the double layered structure are isolated and conserved from ambient environment.

  20. Layered semiconductor neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Samuel S; Perry, Dale L

    2013-12-10

    Room temperature operating solid state hand held neutron detectors integrate one or more relatively thin layers of a high neutron interaction cross-section element or materials with semiconductor detectors. The high neutron interaction cross-section element (e.g., Gd, B or Li) or materials comprising at least one high neutron interaction cross-section element can be in the form of unstructured layers or micro- or nano-structured arrays. Such architecture provides high efficiency neutron detector devices by capturing substantially more carriers produced from high energy .alpha.-particles or .gamma.-photons generated by neutron interaction.

  1. Spacer layer effect and microstructure on multi-layer [NdFeB/Nb]n films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, J.-L.; Yao, Y.-D.; Chin, T.-S.; Kronmueller, H.

    2002-01-01

    Spacer layer effect on multi-layer [NdFeB/Nb] n films has been investigated from the variation of magnetic properties and microstructure of the films. From a HRTEM cross-section view observation, the average grain size of [NdFeB/Nb] n multi-layers was controlled by both annealing temperature and thickness of NdFeB layer. Selected area diffraction pattern indicated that the structure of Nb spacer layer was amorphous. The grain size and coercivity of [NdFeB x /Nb] n films change from 50 nm and 16.7 kOe to 167 nm and 9 kOe for films with x=40 nm, n=10 and x=200 nm, n=2, respectively

  2. Observing nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book enables anyone with suitable instruments to undertake an examination of nebulae and see or photograph them in detail. Nebulae, ethereal clouds of gas and dust, are among the most beautiful objects to view in the night sky. These star-forming regions are a common target for observers and photographers. Griffiths describes many of the brightest and best nebulae and includes some challenges for the more experienced observer. Readers learn the many interesting astrophysical properties of these clouds, which are an important subject of study in astronomy and astrobiology. Non-mathematical in approach, the text is easily accessible to anyone with an interest in the subject. A special feature is the inclusion of an observational guide to 70 objects personally observed or imaged by the author. The guide also includes photographs of each object for ease of identification along with their celestial coordinates, magnitudes and other pertinent information. Observing Nebulae provides a ready resource to allow an...

  3. Physical layer network coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukui, Hironori; Popovski, Petar; Yomo, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has been proposed to improve throughput of the two-way relay channel, where two nodes communicate with each other, being assisted by a relay node. Most of the works related to PLNC are focused on a simple three-node model and they do not take into account...

  4. Thin layer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweickert, H.; Fehsenfeld, P.

    1995-01-01

    The reliability of industrial equip ment is substantially influenced by wear and corrosion; monitoring can prevent accidents and avoid down-time. One powerful tool is thin layer activation analysis (TLA) using accelerator systems. The information is used to improve mechanical design and material usage; the technology is used by many large companies, particularly in the automotive industry, e.g. Daimler Benz. A critical area of a machine component receives a thin layer of radioactivity by irradiation with charged particles from an accelerator - usually a cyclotron. The radioactivity can be made homogeneous by suitable selection of particle, beam energy and angle of incidence. Layer thickness can be varied from 20 microns to around 1 mm with different depth distributions; the position and size of the wear zone can be set to within 0.1 mm. The machine is then reassembled and operated so that wear can be measured. An example is a combustion engine comprising piston ring, cylinder wall, cooling water jacket and housing wall, where wear measurements on the cylinder wall are required in a critical zone around the dead-point of the piston ring. Proton beam bombardment creates a radioactive layer whose thickness is known accurately, and characteristic gamma radiation from this radioactive zone penetrates through the engine and is detected externally. Measurements can be made either of the activity removed from the surface, or of the (reduced) residual activity; wear measurement of the order of 10 -9 metres is possible

  5. Our Shrinking Ozone Layer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Depletion of the ozone layer is therefore having significant effects on life on .... but there is always a net balance between the rate of formation and destruction ..... award of Commonwealth Fellowship during the present work and also being an ...

  6. Layered double hydroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López Rayo, Sandra; Imran, Ahmad; Hansen, Hans Chr. Bruun

    2017-01-01

    A novel zinc (Zn) fertilizer concept based on Zn doped layered double hydroxides (Zn-doped Mg-Fe-LDHs) has been investigated. Zn-doped Mg-Fe-LDHs were synthetized, their chemical composition was analyzed and their nutrient release was studied in buffered solutions with different pH values. Uptake...

  7. In situ observation of surface reactions with synchrotron radiation induced semiconductor processes by infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy using buried metal layer substrates; Umekomi kinzokuso kiban wo mochiita sekigai hansha kyushu supekutoruho ni yoru hoshako reiki handotai process hanno no sonoba kansatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshigoe, A.; Hirano, S. [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Yokohama (Japan); Mase, K.; Urisu, T. [Institute for Molecular Science, Aichi (Japan)

    1996-11-20

    It is known that infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) on semiconductor or insulator surfaces becomes practicable by using buried metal layer (BML) substrates, in which the metal thin film is buried order semiconductor or insulator films. In this work, IRAS has been measured for Langmuir-Blodgett films deposited on the BML substrate with SiO2/Al/Si(100) structure and the observed spectrum intensity has been quantitatively compared with the calculation assuming the ideal multilayer structure for the BML substrate. The BML-IRAS using CoSi2 has been adopted to the detection of SiHn on the Si (100) substrate during synchrotron radiation (SR) stimulated Si2H6 gas source molecular beam epitaxy. It has been found that SiH2 and SiH3 on the Si (100) surface are easily decomposed by SR, but SiH can`t be decomposed. From these experiments, it has been concluded that the BML-IRAS is an useful in situ observation technique for the photo-stimulated surface reactions. 26 refs., 9 figs.

  8. MITRE sensor layer prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, Francis; McGarry, Donald; Zasada, David; Foote, Scott

    2009-05-01

    The MITRE Sensor Layer Prototype is an initial design effort to enable every sensor to help create new capabilities through collaborative data sharing. By making both upstream (raw) and downstream (processed) sensor data visible, users can access the specific level, type, and quantities of data needed to create new data products that were never anticipated by the original designers of the individual sensors. The major characteristic that sets sensor data services apart from typical enterprise services is the volume (on the order of multiple terabytes) of raw data that can be generated by most sensors. Traditional tightly coupled processing approaches extract pre-determined information from the incoming raw sensor data, format it, and send it to predetermined users. The community is rapidly reaching the conclusion that tightly coupled sensor processing loses too much potentially critical information.1 Hence upstream (raw and partially processed) data must be extracted, rapidly archived, and advertised to the enterprise for unanticipated uses. The authors believe layered sensing net-centric integration can be achieved through a standardize-encapsulate-syndicateaggregate- manipulate-process paradigm. The Sensor Layer Prototype's technical approach focuses on implementing this proof of concept framework to make sensor data visible, accessible and useful to the enterprise. To achieve this, a "raw" data tap between physical transducers associated with sensor arrays and the embedded sensor signal processing hardware and software has been exploited. Second, we encapsulate and expose both raw and partially processed data to the enterprise within the context of a service-oriented architecture. Third, we advertise the presence of multiple types, and multiple layers of data through geographic-enabled Really Simple Syndication (GeoRSS) services. These GeoRSS feeds are aggregated, manipulated, and filtered by a feed aggregator. After filtering these feeds to bring just the type

  9. Relative Humidity in the Tropopause Saturation Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selkirk, H. B.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Pfister, L.; Thornberry, T. D.; Bui, T. V.

    2017-12-01

    The tropical tropopause separates two very different atmospheric regimes: the stable lower stratosphere where the air is both extremely dry and nearly always so, and a transition layer in the uppermost tropical troposphere, where humidity on average increases rapidly downward but can undergo substantial temporal fluctuations. The processes that control the humidity in this layer below the tropopause include convective detrainment (which can result in either a net hydration or dehydration), slow ascent, wave motions and advection. Together these determine the humidity of the air that eventually passes through the tropopause and into the stratosphere, and we refer to this layer as the tropopause saturation layer or TSL. We know from in situ water vapor observations such as Ticosonde's 12-year balloonsonde record at Costa Rica that layers of supersaturation are frequently observed in the TSL. While their frequency is greatest during the local rainy season from June through October, supersaturation is also observed in the boreal winter dry season when deep convection is well south of Costa Rica. In other words, local convection is not a necessary condition for the presence of supersaturation. Furthermore, there are indications from airborne measurements during the recent POSIDON campaign at Guam that if anything deep convection tends to `reset' the TSL locally to a state of just-saturation. Conversely, it may be that layers of supersaturation are the result of slow ascent. To explore these ideas we take Ticosonde water vapor observations from the TSL, stratify them on the basis of relative humidity and report on the differences in the the history of upstream convective influence between supersaturated parcels and those that are not.

  10. Black layers on historical architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toniolo, Lucia; Zerbi, Carlotta M; Bugini, Roberto

    2009-03-01

    The external surface of any building in urban polluted environment is unavoidably destined to be covered with layers that assume a grey to black colour and are generally called 'black crusts'. These, according to standard protocols and glossary, are deteriorated surface layers of stone material; they can have variable thickness, are hard and fragile and can detach spontaneously from the substrate, which, in general, is quite decayed. Plain visual examination may lead to consider 'black crusts' all similar, whilst only a careful diagnostic investigation can distinguish 'black crusts' and the consequences of their formation on stone substrates. In this paper, various black layers on marble are studied and compared and the morphological and compositional characteristics discussed according to the related mechanisms of formation. Differences between old (hundred years) and recent crusts (30 years) are investigated and pointed out. Samples of black crusts collected from the Milan Cathedral façade (Candoglia Marble) have been studied and compared with the careful and synergic employ of traditional techniques: optical (transmission and reflected VIS light) and electron microscopy, X-ray spectrometry and micro-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Visual examination of loose fragments does not allow to point out outstanding differences amongst the various samples; black layers have similar main mineral components, gypsum and airborne particles, with different spatial distribution. The microscopic studies allowed to point out the porosity differences, the gypsum crystallisation habit, different amount of embedded particles, level and progress of marble decay. The observations lead to define three main types of black crusts: black crust deriving from marble sulphation, compact deposit and encrustation due to exogenic materials deposition. Black crusts show evidence of sulphation in progress, without a clear continuity solution between crust and marble; the lack of

  11. On the porosity of barrier layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Mignot

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Barrier layers are defined as the layer between the pycnocline and the thermocline when the latter are different as a result of salinity stratification. We present a revisited 2-degree resolution global climatology of monthly mean oceanic Barrier Layer (BL thickness first proposed by de Boyer Montégut et al. (2007. In addition to using an extended data set, we present a modified computation method that addresses the observed porosity of BLs. We name porosity the fact that barrier layers distribution can, in some areas, be very uneven regarding the space and time scales that are considered. This implies an intermittent alteration of air-sea exchanges by the BL. Therefore, it may have important consequences for the climatic impact of BLs. Differences between the two computation methods are small for robust BLs that are formed by large-scale processes. However, the former approach can significantly underestimate the thickness of short and/or localized barrier layers. This is especially the case for barrier layers formed by mesoscale mechanisms (under the intertropical convergence zone for example and along western boundary currents and equatorward of the sea surface salinity subtropical maxima. Complete characterisation of regional BL dynamics therefore requires a description of the robustness of BL distribution to assess the overall impact of BLs on the process of heat exchange between the ocean interior and the atmosphere.

  12. Establishment of the Vertebrate Germ Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Wei-Chia; Munisha, Mumingjiang; Gutierrez, Juan B; Dougan, Scott T

    2017-01-01

    The process of germ layer formation is a universal feature of animal development. The germ layers separate the cells that produce the internal organs and tissues from those that produce the nervous system and outer tissues. Their discovery in the early nineteenth century transformed embryology from a purely descriptive field into a rigorous scientific discipline, in which hypotheses could be tested by observation and experimentation. By systematically addressing the questions of how the germ layers are formed and how they generate overall body plan, scientists have made fundamental contributions to the fields of evolution, cell signaling, morphogenesis, and stem cell biology. At each step, this work was advanced by the development of innovative methods of observing cell behavior in vivo and in culture. Here, we take an historical approach to describe our current understanding of vertebrate germ layer formation as it relates to the long-standing questions of developmental biology. By comparing how germ layers form in distantly related vertebrate species, we find that highly conserved molecular pathways can be adapted to perform the same function in dramatically different embryonic environments.

  13. Physical Layer Network Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukui, Hironori; Yomo, Hironori; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    of interfering nodes and usage of spatial reservation mechanisms. Specifically, we introduce a reserved area in order to protect the nodes involved in two-way relaying from the interference caused by neighboring nodes. We analytically derive the end-to-end rate achieved by PLNC considering the impact......Physical layer network coding (PLNC) has the potential to improve throughput of multi-hop networks. However, most of the works are focused on the simple, three-node model with two-way relaying, not taking into account the fact that there can be other neighboring nodes that can cause....../receive interference. The way to deal with this problem in distributed wireless networks is usage of MAC-layer mechanisms that make a spatial reservation of the shared wireless medium, similar to the well-known RTS/CTS in IEEE 802.11 wireless networks. In this paper, we investigate two-way relaying in presence...

  14. Crack layer theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, A.

    1987-01-01

    A damage parameter is introduced in addition to conventional parameters of continuum mechanics and consider a crack surrounded by an array of microdefects within the continuum mechanics framework. A system consisting of the main crack and surrounding damage is called crack layer (CL). Crack layer propagation is an irreversible process. The general framework of the thermodynamics of irreversible processes are employed to identify the driving forces (causes) and to derive the constitutive equation of CL propagation, that is, the relationship between the rates of the crack growth and damage dissemination from one side and the conjugated thermodynamic forces from another. The proposed law of CL propagation is in good agreement with the experimental data on fatigue CL propagation in various materials. The theory also elaborates material toughness characterization.

  15. Gravitational double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senovilla, José M M

    2014-01-01

    I analyze the properties of thin shells through which the scalar curvature R is discontinuous in gravity theories with Lagrangian F(R) = R − 2Λ + αR 2 on the bulk. These shells/domain walls are of a new kind because they possess, in addition to the standard energy–momentum tensor, an external energy flux vector, an external scalar pressure/tension and, most exotic of all, another energy–momentum contribution resembling classical dipole distributions on a shell: a double layer. I prove that all these contributions are necessary to make the entire energy–momentum tensor divergence-free. This is the first known occurrence of such a type of double layer in a gravity theory. I present explicit examples in constant-curvature five-dimensional bulks, with a brief study of their properties: new physical behaviors arise. (fast track communications)

  16. The theory of double layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schamel, H.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical and in some degree laboratory experiments suggest the existence of at least two different kinds of time-independent double layers: a strictly monotonic transition of the electrostatic potential and a transition accompanied by a negative spike at the low potential side (ion acoustic DL). An interpretation of both is presented in terms of analytic BGK modes. The first class of DLs commonly observed in voltage- or beam-driven plasmas needs for its existence beam-type distributions satisfying a Bohm criterion. The potential drop is at least of the order of Tsub(e), and stability arguments favour currents which satisfy the Langmuir condition. The second class found in current-driven plasma simulations is correlated with ion holes. This latter kind of nonlinear wave-solutions is linearly based on the slow ion-acoustic mode and exists due to a vortex-like distortion of the ion distribution in the thermal range. During the growth of an ion hole which is triggered by ion-acoustic fluctuations, the partial reflection of streaming electrons causes different plasma states on both sides of the potential dip and makes the ion hole asymmetric giving rise to an effective potential drop. This implies that the amplitude of this second type of double layers has an upper limit of 1-2 Tsub(e) and presumes a temperature ratio of Tsub(e)/Tsub(i) > or approximately 3 in coincidence with the numerical results. (Auth.)

  17. Boundary-layer theory

    CERN Document Server

    Schlichting (Deceased), Hermann

    2017-01-01

    This new edition of the near-legendary textbook by Schlichting and revised by Gersten presents a comprehensive overview of boundary-layer theory and its application to all areas of fluid mechanics, with particular emphasis on the flow past bodies (e.g. aircraft aerodynamics). The new edition features an updated reference list and over 100 additional changes throughout the book, reflecting the latest advances on the subject.

  18. Effect of duration and severity of migraine on retinal nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, and choroidal thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellatif, Mona K; Fouad, Mohamed M

    2018-03-01

    To investigate the factors in migraine that have the highest significance on retinal and choroidal layers' thickness. Ninety patients with migraine and 40 age-matched healthy participants were enrolled in this observational, cross-sectional study. After full ophthalmological examination, spectral domain-optical coherence tomography was done for all patients measuring the thickness of ganglion cell layer and retinal nerve fiber layer. Enhanced depth imaging technique was used to measure the choroidal thickness. There was significant thinning in the superior and inferior ganglion cell layers, all retinal nerve fiber layer quadrants, and all choroidal quadrants (except for the central subfield) in migraineurs compared to controls. The duration of migraine was significantly correlated with ganglion cell layer, retinal nerve fiber layer, and all choroidal quadrants, while the severity of migraine was significantly correlated with ganglion cell layer and retinal nerve fiber layer only. Multiregression analysis showed that the duration of migraine is the most important determinant factor of the superior retinal nerve fiber layer quadrant (β = -0.375, p = 0.001) and in all the choroidal quadrants (β = -0.531, -0.692, -0.503, -0.461, -0.564, respectively, p  layer quadrants (β = -0.256, -0.335, -0.308; p  = 0.036, 0.005, 0.009, respectively) and the inferior ganglion cell layer hemisphere (β = -0.377 and p = 0.001). Ganglion cell layer, retinal nerve fiber layer, and choroidal thickness are significantly thinner in patients with migraine. The severity of migraine has more significant influence in the thinning of ganglion cell layer and retinal nerve fiber layer, while the duration of the disease affected the choroidal thickness more.

  19. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Léna, Pierre; Lebrun, François; Mignard, François; Pelat, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This is the updated, widely revised, restructured and expanded third edition of Léna et al.'s successful work Observational Astrophysics. It presents a synthesis on tools and methods of observational astrophysics of the early 21st century. Written specifically for astrophysicists and graduate students, this textbook focuses on fundamental and sometimes practical limitations on the ultimate performance that an astronomical system may reach, rather than presenting particular systems in detail. In little more than a decade there has been extraordinary progress in imaging and detection technologies, in the fields of adaptive optics, optical interferometry, in the sub-millimetre waveband, observation of neutrinos, discovery of exoplanets, to name but a few examples. The work deals with ground-based and space-based astronomy and their respective fields. And it also presents the ambitious concepts behind space missions aimed for the next decades. Avoiding particulars, it covers the whole of the electromagnetic spec...

  20. Observable supertranslations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousso, Raphael; Porrati, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    We show that large gauge transformations in asymptotically flat spacetime can be implemented by sandwiching a shell containing the ingoing hard particles between two finite-width shells of soft gauge excitations. Integration of the graviton Dirac bracket implies that our observable soft degrees of freedom obey the algebra imposed by Strominger et al. on unobservable boundary degrees of freedom. Thus, we provide both a derivation and an observable realization of this algebra. We recently showed that soft charges fail to constrain the hard scattering problem, and so cannot be relevant to the black hole information paradox. By expressing the Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) algebra in terms of observable quantities, the present work shows that this conclusion was not an artifact of working with strictly zero frequency soft modes. The conservation laws associated with asymptotic symmetries are seen to arise physically from free propagation of infrared modes.

  1. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Robert C

    1995-01-01

    Combining a critical account of observational methods (telescopes and instrumentation) with a lucid description of the Universe, including stars, galaxies and cosmology, Smith provides a comprehensive introduction to the whole of modern astrophysics beyond the solar system. The first half describes the techniques used by astronomers to observe the Universe: optical telescopes and instruments are discussed in detail, but observations at all wavelengths are covered, from radio to gamma-rays. After a short interlude describing the appearance of the sky at all wavelengths, the role of positional astronomy is highlighted. In the second half, a clear description is given of the contents of the Universe, including accounts of stellar evolution and cosmological models. Fully illustrated throughout, with exercises given in each chapter, this textbook provides a thorough introduction to astrophysics for all physics undergraduates, and a valuable background for physics graduates turning to research in astronomy.

  2. Prediction of boundary-layer transition caused by crossflow disturbances

    OpenAIRE

    Nomura, Toshiyuki; 野村 聡幸

    1999-01-01

    A prediction system for boundary layer transition is developed which consists of the Navier-Stokes code computing a compressible boundary layer, the linear PSE (Parabolized Stability Equations) code computing the spatial growth of a disturbance, and the N-factor code integrating the growth rate. The system is applied to the case that the transition of the compressible boundary layer on a swept cylinder is caused by cross flow disturbances which have the same spanwise wavelength as observed in...

  3. Double layers formed by beam driven ion-acoustic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Ferreira, J.L.; Montes, A.

    1987-01-01

    Small amplitude steady-state ion-acoustic layers are observed to form in a plasma traversed by a beam of cold electrons. The importance of turbulence in maintaining the double layer is demonstrated. The measured wave spectrum is in approximate agrreement with models derived from renormalized turbulence theory. The general features of the double layer are compared with results from particle simulation studies. (author) [pt

  4. Double layer formed by beam driven ion-acoustic turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Ferreira, J.L.; Montes, A.

    1987-08-01

    Small amplitudes steady-state ion-acoustic double layers are observed to form in a plasma transversed by a beam of cold electrons. The importance of turbulence in maintaining the double layer is demonstrated. The measured wave spectrum is in approximate agreement with models deriveted from renornalized turbulence theory. The general features of the double layer are compared with results from particle simulation studies. (author) [pt

  5. Barrier layer arrangement for conductive layers on silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hung, L.S.; Agostinelli, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a circuit element comprised of a silicon substrate and a conductive layer located on the substrate. It is characterized in that the conductive layer consists essentially of a rare earth alkaline earth copper oxide and a barrier layer triad is interposed between the silicon substrate and the conductive layer comprised of a first triad layer located adjacent the silicon substrate consisting essentially of silica, a third triad layer remote from the silicon substrate consisting essentially of a least one Group 4 heavy metal oxide, and a second triad layer interposed between the first and third triad layers consisting essentially of a mixture of silica and at lease one Group 4 heavy metal oxide

  6. Novel Electrospun Dual-Layered Composite Nanofibrous Membrane Endowed with Electricity-Magnetism Bifunctionality at One Layer and Photoluminescence at the Other Layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zijiao; Ma, Qianli; Dong, Xiangting; Li, Dan; Xi, Xue; Yu, Wensheng; Wang, Jinxian; Liu, Guixia

    2016-10-05

    Dual-layered composite nanofibrous membrane equipped with electrical conduction, magnetism and photoluminescence trifunctionality is constructed via electrospinning. The composite membrane consists of a polyaniline (PANI)/Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (NPs)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) tuned electrical-magnetic bifunctional nanofibrous layer at one side and a Eu(TTA) 3 (TPPO) 2 /polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) photoluminescent nanofibrous layer at the other side, and the two layers are tightly combined face-to-face together into the novel dual-layered composite membrane with trifunctionality. The electric conductivity and magnetism of electrical-magnetic bifunctionality can be respectively tunable via modulating the respective PANI and Fe 3 O 4 NPs contents, and the highest electric conductivity approaches the order of 1 × 10 -2 S cm -1 . Predominant red emission at 615 nm can be obviously observed in the photoluminescent layer under 366 nm excitation. Moreover, the luminescent intensity of photoluminescent layer is almost unaffected by the electrical-magnetic bifunctional layer because of the fact that the photoluminescent materials have been successfully isolated from dark-colored PANI and Fe 3 O 4 NPs. The novel dual-layered composite nanofibrous membrane with trifunctionality has potentials in many fields. Furthermore, the design philosophy and fabrication method for the dual-layered multifunctional membrane provide a new and facile strategy toward other membranes with multifunctionality.

  7. Observational cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partridge, R.B.

    1977-01-01

    Some sixty years after the development of relativistic cosmology by Einstein and his colleagues, observations are finally beginning to have an important impact on our views of the Universe. The available evidence seems to support one of the simplest cosmological models, the hot Big Bang model. The aim of this paper is to assess the observational support for certain assumptions underlying the hot Big Bang model. These are that the Universe is isobaric and homogeneous on a large scale; that it is expanding from an initial state of high density and temperature; and that the proper theory to describe the dynamics of the Universe is unmodified General Relativity. The properties of the cosmic microwave background radiation and recent observations of the abundance of light elements, in particular, support these assumptions. Also examined here are the data bearing on the related questions of the geometry and the future of the Universe (is it ever-expanding, or fated to recollapse). Finally, some difficulties and faults of the standard model are discussed, particularly various aspects of the 'initial condition' problem. It appears that the simplest Big Bang cosmological model calls for a highly specific set of initial conditions to produce the presently observed properties of the Universe. (Auth.)

  8. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benz Arnold O.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  9. Flare Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2017-12-01

    Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays beyond 1 GeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, SOHO, and more recently Hinode and SDO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s) of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting magnetic reconnection as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth's ionosphere. Flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, but every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  10. Boundary-Layer Characteristics Over a Coastal Megacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melecio-Vazquez, D.; Ramamurthy, P.; Arend, M.; Moshary, F.; Gonzalez, J.

    2017-12-01

    Boundary-layer characteristics over New York City are analyzed for various local and synoptic conditions over several seasons. An array of vertical profilers, including a Doppler LiDAR, a micro-pulse LiDAR and a microwave radiometer are used to observe the structure and evolution of the boundary-layer. Additionally, an urbanized Weather Research and Forecasting (uWRF) model coupled to a high resolution landcover/land-use database is used to study the spatial variability in boundary layer characteristics. The summer daytime averaged potential temperature profile from the microwave radiometer shows the presence of a thermal internal boundary layer wherein a superadiabatic layer lies underneath a stable layer instead of a mixed-layer. Both the winter daytime and nighttime seasonal averages show that the atmosphere remains unstable near the surface and does not reach stable conditions during the nighttime. The mixing ratio seasonal averages show peaks in humidity near 200-m and 1100-m, above instrument level, which could result from sea breeze and anthropogenic sources. Ceilometer measurements show a high degree of variability in boundary layer height depending on wind direction. Comparison with uWRF results show that the model tends to overestimate convective efficiency for selected summer and winter cases and therefore shows a much deeper thermal boundary layer than the observed profiles. The model estimates a less humid atmosphere than seen in observations.

  11. Macular Choroidal Small-Vessel Layer, Sattler's Layer and Haller's Layer Thicknesses: The Beijing Eye Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jing; Wang, Ya Xing; Zhang, Qi; Wei, Wen Bin; Xu, Liang; Jonas, Jost B

    2018-03-13

    To study macular choroidal layer thickness, 3187 study participants from the population-based Beijing Eye Study underwent spectral-domain optical coherence tomography with enhanced depth imaging for thickness measurements of the macular small-vessel layer, including the choriocapillaris, medium-sized choroidal vessel layer (Sattler's layer) and large choroidal vessel layer (Haller's layer). In multivariate analysis, greater thickness of all three choroidal layers was associated (all P  0.05) associated with the prevalence of open-angle glaucoma or diabetic retinopathy. There was a tendency (0.07 > P > 0.02) toward thinner choroidal layers in chronic angle-closure glaucoma. The ratio of small-vessel layer thickness to total choroidal thickness increased (P layer and Haller's layer thickness to total choroidal thickness decreased. A higher ratio of small-vessel layer thickness to total choroidal thickness was significantly associated with a lower prevalence of AMD (early type, intermediate type, late geographic type). Axial elongation-associated and aging-associated choroidal thinning affected Haller's and Sattler's layers more markedly than the small-vessel layer. Non-exudative and exudative AMD, except for geographic atrophy, was associated with slightly increased choroidal thickness.

  12. Spin-Assisted Layer-by-Layer Assembly: Variation of Stratification as Studied with Neutron Reflectivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Kozlovskaya, Veronika; Chan, Jennifer; Ankner, John Francis; Tsukruk, Vladimir V.

    2009-01-01

    We apply neutron reflectivity to probe the internal structure of spin-assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) films composed of electrostatically assembled polyelectrolytes. We find that the level of stratification and the degree of layer intermixing can be controlled by varying the type and concentration of salt during LbL assembly. We observe well-defined layer structure in spin-assisted LbL films when deposited from salt-free solutions. These films feature 2-nm-thick bilayers, which are ∼3-fold thicker than those in dipped LbL films assembled under similar conditions. Addition of a 10mM phosphate buffer promotes progressive layer inter-diffusion with increasing distance from the substrate. However, adding 0.1M NaCl to the phosphate buffer solution restores the layer stratification. We also find that spin-assisted LbL films obtained from buffer solutions are more highly stratified as compared to the highly intermixed layers seen in dipped LbL films assembled from buffer. Our results yield new insight into the mechanism of spin-assisted LbL assembly that should prove useful for biotechnological applications.

  13. Spontaneous layering of porous silicon layers formed at high current densities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkhutik, Vitali; Curiel-Esparza, Jorge; Millan, Mari-Carmen [R and D Center MTM, Technical University of Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Albella, Jose [Institute of Materials Science (ICMM CSIC) Madrid (Spain)

    2005-06-01

    We report here a curious effect of spontaneous fracturing of the silicon layers formed in galvanostatic conditions at medium and high current densities. Instead of formation of homogeneous p-Si layer as at low currents, a stack of thin layers is formed. Each layer is nearly separated from others and possesses rather flat interfaces. The effects is observed using p{sup +}-Si wafers for the p-Si formation and starts being noticeable at above 100 mA/cm{sup 2}. We interpret these results in terms of the porous silicon growth model where generation of dynamic mechanical stress during the p-Si growth causes sharp changes in Si dissolution mechanism from anisotropic etching of individual needle-like pores in silicon to their branching and isotropic etching. At this moment p-Si layer loses its adhesion to the surface of Si wafer and another p-Si layer starts growing. One of the mechanisms triggering on the separation of p-Si layers from one another is a fluctuation of local anodic current in the pore bottoms associated with gas bubble evolution during the p-Si formation. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Protecting the ozone layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munasinghe, M; King, K

    1992-06-01

    Stratospheric ozone layer depletion has been recognized as a problem by the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the 1987 Montreal Protocol (MP). The ozone layer shields the earth from harmful ultraviolet radiation (UV-B), which is more pronounced at the poles and around the equator. Industrialized countries have contributed significantly to the problem by releasing chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and halons into the atmosphere. The effect of these chemicals, which were known for their inertness, nonflammability, and nontoxicity, was discovered in 1874. Action to deal with the effects of CFCs and halons was initiated in 1985 in a 49-nation UN meeting. 21 nations signed a protocol limiting ozone depleting substances (ODS): CFCs and halons. Schedules were set based on each country's use in 1986; the target phaseout was set for the year 2000. The MP restricts trade in ODSs and weights the impact of substances to reflect the extent of damage; i.e., halons are 10 times more damaging than CFCs. ODS requirements for developing countries were eased to accommodate scarce resources and the small fraction of ODS emissions. An Interim Multilateral Fund under the Montreal Protocol (IMFMP) was established to provide loans to finance the costs to developing countries in meeting global environmental requirements. The IMFMP is administered by the World Bank, the UN Environmental Program, and the UN Development Program. Financing is available to eligible countries who use .3 kg of ODS/person/year. Rapid phaseout in developed countries has occurred due to strong support from industry and a lower than expected cost. Although there are clear advantages to rapid phaseout, there were no incentives included in the MP for rapid phaseout. Some of the difficulties occur because the schedules set minimum targets at the lowest possible cost. Also, costs cannot be minimized by a country-specific and ODS-specific process. The ways to improve implementation in scheduling and

  15. High frequency ground temperature fluctuation in a Convective Boundary Layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garai, A.; Kleissl, J.; Lothon, M.; Lohou, F.; Pardyjak, E.; Saïd, F.; Cuxart, J.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Yaguë, C.; Derrien, S.; Alexander, D.; Villagrasa, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    To study influence of the turbulent structures in the convective boundary layer (CBL) on the ground temperature, during the Boundary Layer Late Afternoon and Sunset Turbulence (BLLAST) observational campaign, high frequency ground temperature was recorded through infra-red imagery from 13 June - 8

  16. Microstructure in electrodeposited copper layers; the role of the substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Anette Alsted; Jensen, Jens Dahl; Horsewell, Andy

    2001-01-01

    -crystalline Ni-P layer. The evolutions of surface topography, morphology and crystallographic texture in the layers were investigated with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction analysis, respectively. Distinct surface topographies were observed for Cu...

  17. Friedel Transition in Layered Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzierzawa, M.; Zamora, M.; Baeriswyl, D.; Bagnoud, X.

    1996-01-01

    Weakly coupled superconducting layers are described by the anisotropic 3D XY model. A low-temperature layer decoupling due to a proliferation of fluxons between planes, as proposed by Friedel, does not occur. The same is true for a periodic superlattice of high and low T c layers, although the interplane coherence can become extremely weak. On the other hand a true layer decoupling is found for a random stack. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  18. Cooperating systems: Layered MAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochowiak, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Distributed intelligent systems can be distinguished by the models that they use. The model developed focuses on layered multiagent system conceived of as a bureaucracy in which a distributed data base serves as a central means of communication. The various generic bureaus of such a system is described and a basic vocabulary for such systems is presented. In presenting the bureaus and vocabularies, special attention is given to the sorts of reasonings that are appropriate. A bureaucratic model has a hierarchy of master system and work group that organizes E agents and B agents. The master system provides the administrative services and support facilities for the work groups.

  19. Layered double hydroxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López Rayo, Sandra; Imran, Ahmad; Hansen, Hans Chr. Bruun

    2017-01-01

    A novel zinc (Zn) fertilizer concept based on Zn doped layered double hydroxides (Zn-doped Mg-Fe-LDHs) has been investigated. Zn-doped Mg-Fe-LDHs were synthetized, their chemical composition was analyzed and their nutrient release was studied in buffered solutions with different pH values. Uptake...... equation showing maximum release at pH 5.2, reaching approximately 45% of the total Zn content. The Zn concentrations in the plants receiving the LDHs were between 2- and 9.5-fold higher than those in plants without Zn addition. A positive effect of the LDHs was also found in soil. This work documents...

  20. Earth's ozone layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lasa, J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper contain the actual results of investigations of the influence of the human activity on the Earth's ozone layer. History of the ozone measurements and of the changes in its concentrations within the last few years are given. The influence of the trace gases on both local and global ozone concentrations are discussed. The probable changes of the ozone concentrations are presented on the basis of the modelling investigations. The effect of a decrease in global ozone concentration on human health and on biosphere are also presented. (author). 33 refs, 36 figs, 5 tabs

  1. Fabrication of three-dimensional polymer quadratic nonlinear grating structures by layer-by-layer direct laser writing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bich Do, Danh; Lin, Jian Hung; Diep Lai, Ngoc; Kan, Hung-Chih; Hsu, Chia Chen

    2011-08-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of a three-dimensional (3D) polymer quadratic nonlinear (χ(2)) grating structure. By performing layer-by-layer direct laser writing (DLW) and spin-coating approaches, desired photobleached grating patterns were embedded in the guest--host dispersed-red-1/poly(methylmethacrylate) (DR1/PMMA) active layers of an active-passive alternative multilayer structure through photobleaching of DR1 molecules. Polyvinyl-alcohol and SU8 thin films were deposited between DR1/PMMA layers serving as a passive layer to separate DR1/PMMA active layers. After applying the corona electric field poling to the multilayer structure, nonbleached DR1 molecules in the active layers formed polar distribution, and a 3D χ(2) grating structure was obtained. The χ(2) grating structures at different DR1/PMMA nonlinear layers were mapped by laser scanning second harmonic (SH) microscopy, and no cross talk was observed between SH images obtained from neighboring nonlinear layers. The layer-by-layer DLW technique is favorable to fabricating hierarchical 3D polymer nonlinear structures for optoelectronic applications with flexible structural design.

  2. Basis reduction for layered lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torreão Dassen, Erwin

    2011-01-01

    We develop the theory of layered Euclidean spaces and layered lattices. We present algorithms to compute both Gram-Schmidt and reduced bases in this generalized setting. A layered lattice can be seen as lattices where certain directions have infinite weight. It can also be

  3. Basis reduction for layered lattices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.L. Torreão Dassen (Erwin)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractWe develop the theory of layered Euclidean spaces and layered lattices. With this new theory certain problems that usually are solved by using classical lattices with a "weighting" gain a new, more natural form. Using the layered lattice basis reduction algorithms introduced here these

  4. Formation and properties of porous silicon layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vitanov, P.; Kamenova, M.; Dimova-Malinovska, D.

    1993-01-01

    Preparation, properties and application of porous silicon films are investigated. Porous silicon structures were formed by an electrochemical etching process resulting in selective dissolution of the silicon substrate. The silicon wafers used with a resistivity of 5-10Ω.cm were doped with B to concentrations 6x10 18 -1x10 19 Ω.cm -3 in the temperature region 950 o C-1050 o C. The density of each porous films was determined from the weight loss during the anodization and it depends on the surface resistivity of the Si wafer. The density decreases with decreasing of the surface resistivity. The surface of the porous silicon layers was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy which indicates the presence of SiF 4 . The kinetic dependence of the anode potential and the porous layer thickness on the time of anodization in a galvanostatic regime for the electrolytes with various HF concentration were studied. In order to compare the properties of the resulting porous layers and to establish the dependence of the porosity on the electrolyte, three types of electrolytes were used: concentrated HF, diluted HF:H 2 O=1:1 and ethanol-hydrofluoric solutions HF:C 2 H 5 OH:H 2 O=2:1:1. High quality uniform and reproducible layers were formed using aqueous-ethanol-hydrofluoric electrolyte. Both Kikuchi's line and ring patterns were observed by TEM. The porous silicon layer was single crystal with the same orientation as the substrate. The surface shows a polycrystalline structure only. The porous silicon layers exhibit visible photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature under 480 nm Ar + laser line excitation. The peak of PL was observed at about 730 nm with FWHM about 90 nm. Photodiodes was made with a W-porous silicon junction. The current voltage and capacity voltage characteristics were similar to those of an isotype heterojunction diode. (orig.)

  5. Structure of the low-latitude boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sckopke, N.; Paschmann, G.; Haerendel, G.; Sonnerup, B.U.O.; Bame, S.J.; Forbes, T.G.; Hones, E.W. Jr.; Russell, C.T.

    1981-01-01

    Observations at high temporal resolution of the frontside magnetopause and plasma boundary layer, made with the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory/Max-Planck-Institut, Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, fast plasma analyzer on board the Isee 1 and 2 spacecraft, have revealed a complex quasi-periodic structure of some of the observed boundary layers: cool tailward streaming boundary layer plasma is seen intermittently, with intervening periods of hot tenuous plasma which has properties similar to the magnetospheric population. While individual encounters with the boundary layer plasma last only a few minutes, the total observation time may extend over 1 hour or more. One such crossing, at 0800 hours local time and 40 0 northern GSM latitude, is examined in detail, including a quantitative comparison of the boundary layer entry and exit times of the two spacecraft. The data are found to be compatible with a boundary layer that is always attached to the magnetopause but where the layer thickness has a large-scale spatial modulation pattern which travels tailward past the spacecraft. Included are periods when the thickness is essentially zero and others when it is of the order of 1 R/sub E/. The duration of these periods is highly variable but is typically in the range of 2--5 min, corresponding to a distance along the magnetopause of the order of 3--8 R/sub E/. The observed boundary layer features include a steep density gradient at the magnetopause, with an approximately constant boundary layer plasma density amounting to about 25% of the magnetosheath density, and a second abrupt density decrease at the inner edge of the layer. It also appears that the purely magnetospheric plasma is ocassionally separated from the boundary layer by a halo region in which the plasma density is somewhat higher, and the temperature somewhat lower, than in the magnetosphere. A tentative model is proposed

  6. S-layer architectures : extending the morphogenetic potential of S-layer protein self-assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuster, D.

    2013-01-01

    Self-assembly of molecular building blocks is a common principle for bottom up based building principles in nature. One example are crystalline bacterial surface layers, termed S-layers, which are the most commonly observed cell surface structures in prokaryotic organisms. They recrystallize into highly ordered, porous protein meshworks with unit cell sizes of 3 to 30 nm and pore sizes of 2 to 8 nm. In this work, S-layers were self-assembled on various three dimensional scaffolds in order to fabricate novel S-layer architectures. Exploiting the stabilizing effect of silica deposited on the S-layer protein meshwork led to the construction of hollow S-layer nano-containers derived from coated liposomes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques and release experiments with fluorescent dyes confirmed the dissolution of the supporting lipids. Silica deposition on different spherical particles in solution, as well as on planar S-layer coated surfaces, could be monitored by measuring the ζ-potential, the decline of monosilicic acid in solution, by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis or by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). Both, ζ-potential and release experiments showed differences between silicified plain liposomes and silicified S-layer coated liposomes. In addition, nanocapsules with calcium carbonate cores served as another template for the construction of silica supported S-layer architectures. These were investigated by SEM and fluorescence microscopy after fluorescence labeling. Additional coating with polyelectrolytes increased the stability of the nanocapsules. Their mechanical properties were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The influence of silica deposition was investigated by AFM and SEM. Further on, emulsomes and gas filled lipid supported microbubbles may serve as other templates for the design of spherical protein constructs although extraction of the

  7. The Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1994-05-01

    A comprehensive and lucid account of the physics and dynamics of the lowest one to two kilometers of the Earth's atmosphere in direct contact with the Earth's surface, known as the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). Dr. Garratt emphasizes the application of the ABL problems to numerical modeling of the climate, which makes this book unique among recent texts on the subject. He begins with a brief introduction to the ABL before leading to the development of mean and turbulence equations and the many scaling laws and theories that are the cornerstone of any serious ABL treatment. Modeling of the ABL is crucially dependent for its realism on the surface boundary conditions, so chapters four and five deal with aerodynamic and energy considerations, with attention given to both dry and wet land surfaces and the sea. The author next treats the structure of the clear-sky, thermally stratified ABL, including the convective and stable cases over homogeneous land, the marine ABL, and the internal boundary layer at the coastline. Chapter seven then extends this discussion to the cloudy ABL. This is particularly relevant to current research because the extensive stratocumulus regions over the subtropical oceans and stratus regions over the Arctic have been identified as key players in the climate system. In the final chapters, Dr. Garratt summarizes the book's material by discussing appropriate ABL and surface parameterization schemes in general circulation models of the atmosphere that are being used for climate stimulation.

  8. Air Layer Drag Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccio, Steven; Elbing, Brian; Winkel, Eric; Dowling, David; Perlin, Marc

    2008-11-01

    A set of experiments have been conducted at the US Navy's Large Cavitation Channel to investigate skin-friction drag reduction with the injection of air into a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer. Testing was performed on a 12.9 m long flat-plate test model with the surface hydraulically smooth and fully rough at downstream-distance-based Reynolds numbers to 220 million and at speeds to 20 m/s. Local skin-friction, near-wall bulk void fraction, and near-wall bubble imaging were monitored along the length of the model. The instrument suite was used to access the requirements necessary to achieve air layer drag reduction (ALDR). Injection of air over a wide range of air fluxes showed that three drag reduction regimes exist when injecting air; (1) bubble drag reduction that has poor downstream persistence, (2) a transitional regime with a steep rise in drag reduction, and (3) ALDR regime where the drag reduction plateaus at 90% ± 10% over the entire model length with large void fractions in the near-wall region. These investigations revealed several requirements for ALDR including; sufficient volumetric air fluxes that increase approximately with the square of the free-stream speed, slightly higher air fluxes are needed when the surface tension is reduced, higher air fluxes are required for rough surfaces, and the formation of ALDR is sensitive to the inlet condition.

  9. Wave energy input into the Ekman layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the wave energy input into the Ekman layer, based on 3 observational facts that surface waves could significantly affect the profile of the Ekman layer. Under the assumption of constant vertical diffusivity, the analytical form of wave energy input into the Ekman layer is derived. Analysis of the energy balance shows that the energy input to the Ekman layer through the wind stress and the interaction of the Stokes-drift with planetary vorticity can be divided into two kinds. One is the wind energy input, and the other is the wave energy input which is dependent on wind speed, wave characteristics and the wind direction relative to the wave direction. Estimates of wave energy input show that wave energy input can be up to 10% in high-latitude and high-wind speed areas and higher than 20% in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current, compared with the wind energy input into the classical Ekman layer. Results of this paper are of significance to the study of wave-induced large scale effects.

  10. Intrinsic and extrinsic magnetic properties of the naturally layered manganites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, A.; Mitchell, J. F.; Miller, D. J.; Jiang, J. S.; Bader, S. D.

    1999-01-01

    Structural and magnetic properties of the two-layered Ruddlesden-Popper phase SrO(La 1-x Sr x MnO 3 ) 2 with x = 0.3--0.5 are highlighted. Intrinsic properties of these naturally layered manganites include a colossal magnetoresistance, a composition-dependent magnetic anisotropy, and almost no remanence. Above the Curie temperature there is a non-vanishing extrinsic magnetization attributed to intergrowths (stacking faults in the layered structure). These lattice imperfections consist of additional or missing manganite layers, as observed in transmission electron microscopy. Their role in influencing the properties of the host material is highlighted

  11. Simulated seasonal and interannual variability of mixed layer heat budget in the northern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeBoyer Montegut, C.; Vialard, J.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Shankar, D.; Durand, F.; Ethe, C.; Madec, G.

    A global Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) is used to investigate the mixed layer heat budget of the Northern Indian Ocean (NIO). The model is validated against observations and shows a fairly good agreement with mixed layer depth data...

  12. Observational astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Léna, P.; Lebrun, F.; Mignard, F.

    This book is the 2nd edition of an English translation published in 1988 (45.003.105) of the French original "Astrophysique: Méthodes physiques de l'observation" published in 1986 (42.003.048). Written specifically for physicists and graduate students in astronomy, this textbook focuses on astronomical observation and on the basic physical principles that astronomers use to conceive, build and exploit their instruments at their ultimate limits in sensitivity or resolution. This second edition has been entirely restructured and almost doubled in size, in order to improve its clarity and to account for the great progress achieved in the last 15 years. It deals with ground-based and space-based astronomy and their respective fields. It presents the new generation of giant ground-based telescopes, with the new methods of optical interferometry and adaptive optics, and also the ambitious concepts behind planned space missions for the next decades. Avoiding particulars, it covers the whole of the electromagnetic spectrum and touches upon the "new astronomies" becoming possible with gravitational waves and neutrinos.

  13. The Adobe Photoshop layers book

    CERN Document Server

    Lynch, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Layers are the building blocks for working in Photoshop. With the correct use of the Layers Tool, you can edit individual components of your images nondestructively to ensure that your end result is a combination of the best parts of your work. Despite how important it is for successful Photoshop work, the Layers Tool is one of the most often misused and misunderstood features within this powerful software program. This book will show you absolutely everything you need to know to work with layers, including how to use masks, blending, modes and layer management. You'll learn professional tech

  14. Buried oxide layer in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadana, Devendra Kumar; Holland, Orin Wayne

    2001-01-01

    A process for forming Silicon-On-Insulator is described incorporating the steps of ion implantation of oxygen into a silicon substrate at elevated temperature, ion implanting oxygen at a temperature below 200.degree. C. at a lower dose to form an amorphous silicon layer, and annealing steps to form a mixture of defective single crystal silicon and polycrystalline silicon or polycrystalline silicon alone and then silicon oxide from the amorphous silicon layer to form a continuous silicon oxide layer below the surface of the silicon substrate to provide an isolated superficial layer of silicon. The invention overcomes the problem of buried isolated islands of silicon oxide forming a discontinuous buried oxide layer.

  15. Layered Ultrathin Coherent Structures (LUCS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuller, I.K.; Falco, C.M.

    1979-01-01

    A new class of superconducting materials, Layered Ultrathin Coherent Structures (LUCS) are described. These materials are produced by sequentially depositing ultrathin layers of materials using high rate magnetron sputtering or thermal evaporation. Strong evidence is presented that layers as thin as 10 A can be prepared in this fashion. Resistivity data indicates that the mean free path is layer thickness limited. A strong disagreement is found between the experimentally measured transition temperatures T/sub c/ and the T/sub c/'s calculated using the Cooper limit approximation. This is interpreted as a change in the band structure or the phonon structure of the material due to layering or to surfaces

  16. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers

    CERN Document Server

    Cebeci, Tuncer

    1974-01-01

    Analysis of Turbulent Boundary Layers focuses on turbulent flows meeting the requirements for the boundary-layer or thin-shear-layer approximations. Its approach is devising relatively fundamental, and often subtle, empirical engineering correlations, which are then introduced into various forms of describing equations for final solution. After introducing the topic on turbulence, the book examines the conservation equations for compressible turbulent flows, boundary-layer equations, and general behavior of turbulent boundary layers. The latter chapters describe the CS method for calculati

  17. Extraordinary Photoluminescence and Strong Temperature/Angle-Dependent Raman Responses in Few-Layer Phosphorene

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Jiong; Xu, Renjing; Wang, Fan; Li, Weifeng; Ghufran, Muhammad; Zhang, Yong-wei; Yu, Zongfu; Zhang, Gang; Qin, Qinghua; Lu, Yuerui

    2014-01-01

    Phosphorene is a new family member of two-dimensional materials. We observed strong and highly layer-dependent photoluminescence in few-layer phosphorene (2 to 5 layers). The results confirmed the theoretical prediction that few-layer phosphorene has a direct and layer-sensitive band gap. We also demonstrated that few-layer phosphorene is more sensitive to temperature modulation than graphene and MoS2 in Raman scattering. The anisotropic Raman response in few-layer phosphorene has enabled us ...

  18. Evaluation of tile layer productivity in construction project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Hamidi Abdul; Hassan, Siti Hafizan; Rosly, Noorsyalili; Ul-Saufie, Ahmad Zia

    2017-10-01

    Construction is a key sector of the national economy for countries all over the world. Until today, construction industries are still facing lots of problems concerning the low productivity, poor safety and insufficient quality. Labour productivity is one of the factors that will give impact to the quality of projects. This study is focusing on evaluating the tile layer productivity in the area of Seberang Perai, Penang. The objective of this study is to determine the relationship of age and experience of tile layers with their productivity and to evaluate the effect of nationality to tile layers productivity. Interview and site observation of tile layers has been conducted to obtain the data of age, experience and nationality of tile layers. Site observation is made to obtain the number of tiles installed for every tile layer for the duration of 1 hour, and the data were analysed by using Statistical Package for Social Science (IBM SPSS Statistic 23) software. As a result, there is a moderate linear relationship between age and experience of tile layers with their productivity. The age of 30 and the experience of 4 years give the highest productivity. It also can be concluded that the tile layers from Indonesia tend to have higher productivity compared to tile layers from Myanmar.

  19. A streptavidin linker layer that functions after drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Nan; Shumaker-Parry, Jennifer S; Zareie, M Hadi; Campbell, Charles T; Castner, David G

    2004-04-27

    The ability of streptavidin (SA) to simultaneously bind four biotins is often used in linker layers, where a biotinylated molecule is linked to a biotin-functionalized surface via SA. For biosensor and array applications, it is desirable that the SA linker layer be stable to drying and rehydration. In this study it was observed that a significant decrease in binding capacity of a SA layer occurred when that layer was dried. For this study a SA linker layer was constructed by binding SA to a biotin-containing alkylthiolate monolayer (BAT/OEG) self-assembled onto gold. Its stability after drying was investigated using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Approximately a quarter of the SA layer was removed from the BAT/OEG surface upon drying and rehydration, suggesting disruption of SA-biotin binding when dry. This resulted in the dried SA layer losing approximately 40% of its biotinylated ferritin (BF) binding capacity. Coating the layer with trehalose before drying was found to inhibit the loss of SA from the BAT/OEG surface. SPR showed that the trehalose-protected SA linker layer retained approximately 91% of its original BF binding capacity after drying and rehydration. Atomic force microscopy, which was used to image individual surface-bound SA and BF molecules, qualitatively confirmed these observations.

  20. Crack Growth along Interfaces in Porous Ceramic Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Horsewell, Andy

    2001-01-01

    Crack growth along porous ceramic layers was studied experimentally. Double cantilever beam sandwich specimens were loaded with pure bending moments to obtain stable crack growth. The experiments were conducted in an environmental scanning electron microscope enabling in situ observations...

  1. Layer-dependent surface potential of phosphorene and anisotropic/layer-dependent charge transfer in phosphorene-gold hybrid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Renjing; Yang, Jiong; Zhu, Yi; Yan, Han; Pei, Jiajie; Myint, Ye Win; Zhang, Shuang; Lu, Yuerui

    2016-01-07

    The surface potential and the efficiency of interfacial charge transfer are extremely important for designing future semiconductor devices based on the emerging two-dimensional (2D) phosphorene. Here, we directly measured the strong layer-dependent surface potential of mono- and few-layered phosphorene on gold, which is consistent with the reported theoretical prediction. At the same time, we used an optical way photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy to probe charge transfer in the phosphorene-gold hybrid system. We firstly observed highly anisotropic and layer-dependent PL quenching in the phosphorene-gold hybrid system, which is attributed to the highly anisotropic/layer-dependent interfacial charge transfer.

  2. Investigation of Tank 241-AW-104 Composite Floating Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meznarich, H. K. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States); Bolling, S. D. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States); Lachut, J. S. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States); Cooke, G. A. [Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS), Richland, WA (United States)

    2018-02-27

    Seven grab samples and one field blank were taken from Tank 241-AW-104 (AW-104) on June 2, 2017, and received at 222-S Laboratory on June 5, 2017. A visible layer with brown solids was observed floating on the top of two surface tank waste samples (4AW-17-02 and 4AW 17 02DUP). The floating layer from both samples was collected, composited, and submitted for chemical analyses and solid phase characterization in order to understand the composition of the floating layer. Tributyl phosphate and tridecane were higher in the floating layer than in the aqueous phase. Density in the floating layer was slightly lower than the mean density of all grab samples. Sodium nitrate and sodium carbonate were major components with a trace of gibbsite and very small size agglomerates were present in the solids of the floating layer. The supernate consisted of organics, soluble salt, and particulates.

  3. The layers of subtitling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Di Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The study of subtitling, although widely practiced over the past 20 years, has generally been confined to comparative studies focusing on the product of subtitle translation, with little or no consideration of the conditions of creation and reception. Focusing on the process of subtitle production, occasional studies have touched upon the cognitive processes accompanying it, but no study so far has related these processes, and the resulting products, to various degrees of translators’ competence. This is precisely what this essay does, focusing on the different layers of subtitle translation provided for two different films and in two different contexts. By analysing the first and second versions of subtitle translations, we shall reflect on the acquisition, and application, of different subtitling competences.

  4. Wireless physical layer security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poor, H. Vincent; Schaefer, Rafael F.

    2017-01-01

    Security in wireless networks has traditionally been considered to be an issue to be addressed separately from the physical radio transmission aspects of wireless systems. However, with the emergence of new networking architectures that are not amenable to traditional methods of secure communication such as data encryption, there has been an increase in interest in the potential of the physical properties of the radio channel itself to provide communications security. Information theory provides a natural framework for the study of this issue, and there has been considerable recent research devoted to using this framework to develop a greater understanding of the fundamental ability of the so-called physical layer to provide security in wireless networks. Moreover, this approach is also suggestive in many cases of coding techniques that can approach fundamental limits in practice and of techniques for other security tasks such as authentication. This paper provides an overview of these developments.

  5. Multiple Temporalities, Layered Histories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Pearson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In Quotational Practices: Repeating the Future in Contemporary Art, Patrick Greaney asserts, “the past matters not only because of what actually happened but also because of the possibilities that were not realized and that still could be. Quotation evokes those possibilities. By repeating the past, artists and writers may be attempting to repeat that past’s unrealized futures.”[1]  In the information age, the Internet, for instance, provides us an expanded collection of visual information—quite literally available at our fingertips—summoning together aspects of the past and possibilities of the future into a boundless present. Sketchbook Revisions (2014–2015, a series of mixed-media paintings, represents my attempt to communicate the ways in which I experience my contemporary moment constructed from multiple temporalities excavated from my past. This body of work combines fragments of representational paintings created between 1995 and 2003 and nonrepresentational renderings produced between 2003 and 2014. Using traditional tracing paper and graphic color, I randomly select moments of my previous work to transfer and layer over selected areas of already-filled pages of a sketchbook I used from 2003 to 2004. These sketches depict objects I encountered in studio art classrooms and iconic architecture on the campus of McDaniel College, and often incorporate teaching notes. The final renditions of fragmented and layered histories enact the ways that we collectively experience multiple temporalities in the present. Quoting my various bodies of work, Sketchbook Revisions challenges both material and conceptual boundaries that determine fixed notions of artistic identity.

  6. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  7. The Plasmasphere Boundary Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Carpenter

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available As an inner magnetospheric phenomenon the plasmapause region is of interest for a number of reasons, one being the occurrence there of geophysically important interactions between the plasmas of the hot plasma sheet and of the cool plasmasphere. There is a need for a conceptual framework within which to examine and discuss these interactions and their consequences, and we therefore suggest that the plasmapause region be called the Plasmasphere Boundary Layer, or PBL. Such a term has been slow to emerge because of the complexity and variability of the plasma populations that can exist near the plasmapause and because of the variety of criteria used to identify the plasmapause in experimental data. Furthermore, and quite importantly in our view, a substantial obstacle to the consideration of the plasmapause region as a boundary layer has been the longstanding tendency of textbooks on space physics to limit introductory material on the plasmapause phenomenon to zeroth order descriptions in terms of ideal MHD theory, thus implying that the plasmasphere is relatively well understood. A textbook may introduce the concept of shielding of the inner magnetosphere from perturbing convection electric fields, but attention is not usually paid to the variety of physical processes reported to occur in the PBL, such as heating, instabilities, and fast longitudinal flows, processes which must play roles in plasmasphere dynamics in concert with the flow regimes associated with the major dynamo sources of electric fields. We believe that through the use of the PBL concept in future textbook discussions of the plasmasphere and in scientific communications, much progress can be made on longstanding questions about the physics involved in the formation of the plasmapause and in the cycles of erosion and recovery of the plasmasphere. Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; plasma convection; MHD waves and instabilities

  8. Numerical simulations of the stratified oceanic bottom boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, John R.

    Numerical simulations are used to consider several problems relevant to the turbulent oceanic bottom boundary layer. In the first study, stratified open channel flow is considered with thermal boundary conditions chosen to approximate a shallow sea. Specifically, a constant heat flux is applied at the free surface and the lower wall is assumed to be adiabatic. When the surface heat flux is strong, turbulent upwellings of low speed fluid from near the lower wall are inhibited by the stable stratification. Subsequent studies consider a stratified bottom Ekman layer over a non-sloping lower wall. The influence of the free surface is removed by using an open boundary condition at the top of the computational domain. Particular attention is paid to the influence of the outer layer stratification on the boundary layer structure. When the density field is initialized with a linear profile, a turbulent mixed layer forms near the wall, which is separated from the outer layer by a strongly stable pycnocline. It is found that the bottom stress is not strongly affected by the outer layer stratification. However, stratification reduces turbulent transport to the outer layer and strongly limits the boundary layer height. The mean shear at the top of the boundary layer is enhanced when the outer layer is stratified, and this shear is strong enough to cause intermittent instabilities above the pycnocline. Turbulence-generated internal gravity waves are observed in the outer layer with a relatively narrow frequency range. An explanation for frequency content of these waves is proposed, starting with an observed broad-banded turbulent spectrum and invoking linear viscous decay to explain the preferential damping of low and high frequency waves. During the course of this work, an open-source computational fluid dynamics code has been developed with a number of advanced features including scalar advection, subgrid-scale models for large-eddy simulation, and distributed memory

  9. Layer-by-layer modification of thin-film metal-semiconductor multilayers with ultrashort laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romashevskiy, S. A.; Tsygankov, P. A.; Ashitkov, S. I.; Agranat, M. B.

    2018-05-01

    The surface modifications in a multilayer thin-film structure (50-nm alternating layers of Si and Al) induced by a single Gaussian-shaped femtosecond laser pulse (350 fs, 1028 nm) in the air are investigated by means of atomic-force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and optical microscopy (OM). Depending on the laser fluence, various modifications of nanometer-scale metal and semiconductor layers, including localized formation of silicon/aluminum nanofoams and layer-by-layer removal, are found. While the nanofoams with cell sizes in the range of tens to hundreds of nanometers are produced only in the two top layers, layer-by-layer removal is observed for the four top layers under single pulse irradiation. The 50-nm films of the multilayer structure are found to be separated at their interfaces, resulting in a selective removal of several top layers (up to 4) in the form of step-like (concentric) craters. The observed phenomenon is associated with a thermo-mechanical ablation mechanism that results in splitting off at film-film interface, where the adhesion force is less than the bulk strength of the used materials, revealing linear dependence of threshold fluences on the film thickness.

  10. Processes for multi-layer devices utilizing layer transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Kim, Bongsang; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2015-02-03

    A method includes forming a release layer over a donor substrate. A plurality of devices made of a first semiconductor material are formed over the release layer. A first dielectric layer is formed over the plurality of devices such that all exposed surfaces of the plurality of devices are covered by the first dielectric layer. The plurality of devices are chemically attached to a receiving device made of a second semiconductor material different than the first semiconductor material, the receiving device having a receiving substrate attached to a surface of the receiving device opposite the plurality of devices. The release layer is etched to release the donor substrate from the plurality of devices. A second dielectric layer is applied over the plurality of devices and the receiving device to mechanically attach the plurality of devices to the receiving device.

  11. Trampoline Effect: Observations and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyer, R.; Larmat, C. S.; Ulrich, T. J.

    2009-12-01

    The Iwate-Miyagi earthquake at site IWTH25 (14 June 2008) had large, asymmetric at surface vertical accelerations prompting the sobriquet trampoline effect (Aoi et. al. 2008). In addition the surface acceleration record showed long-short waiting time correlations and vertical-horizontal acceleration correlations. A lumped element model, deduced from the equations of continuum elasticity, is employed to describe the behavior at this site in terms of a surface layer and substrate. Important ingredients in the model are the nonlinear vertical coupling between the surface layer and the substrate and the nonlinear horizontal frictional coupling between the surface layer and the substrate. The model produces results in qualitative accord with observations: acceleration asymmetry, Fourier spectrum, waiting time correlations and vertical acceleration-horizontal acceleration correlations. [We gratefully acknowledge the support of the U. S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program for this work].

  12. Rocket observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    The Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) sounding rocket experiments were carried out during the periods of August to September, 1982, January to February and August to September, 1983 and January to February, 1984 with sounding rockets. Among 9 rockets, 3 were K-9M, 1 was S-210, 3 were S-310 and 2 were S-520. Two scientific satellites were launched on February 20, 1983 for solar physics and on February 14, 1984 for X-ray astronomy. These satellites were named as TENMA and OHZORA and designated as 1983-011A and 1984-015A, respectively. Their initial orbital elements are also described. A payload recovery was successfully carried out by S-520-6 rocket as a part of MINIX (Microwave Ionosphere Non-linear Interaction Experiment) which is a scientific study of nonlinear plasma phenomena in conjunction with the environmental assessment study for the future SPS project. Near IR observation of the background sky shows a more intense flux than expected possibly coming from some extragalactic origin and this may be related to the evolution of the universe. US-Japan cooperative program of Tether Experiment was done on board US rocket.

  13. Self-organization in circular shear layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergeron, K.; Coutsias, E.A.; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    1996-01-01

    Experiments on forced circular shear layers performed in both magnetized plasmas and in rotating fluids reveal qualitatively similar self-organization processes leading to the formation of patterns of coherent vortical structures with varying complexity. In this paper results are presented from...... both weakly nonlinear analysis and full numerical simulations that closely reproduce the experimental observations. Varying the Reynolds number leads to bifurcation sequences accompanied by topological changes in the distribution of the coherent structures as well as clear transitions in the total...

  14. Nitrite reduction on a multimetallic porphyrin/polyoxotungstate layer-by-layer modified electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    García, Macarena; Honores, Jessica; Quezada, Diego; Díaz, Carlos; Dreyse, Paulina; Celis, Freddy; Kubiak, Clifford P.; Canzi, Gabriele; Guzmán, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Electro and photoelectrochemical reduction of nitrite in aqueous solution was studied using a multielectrocatalysts modified ITO electrode. ITO modification was carried out using the layer-by-layer (LBL) method, where sequential electrostatic assemblies were formed using a μ-(meso-5,10,15,20-tetra(pirydil)porphyrin)tetrakis{bis(bipyridine)chloride ruthenium (II)} [MTRP] n+ , coordinated in its central cavity with Mn(III), Zn(II) or Ni(II) as a cationic layer, and polyoxotungstate [SiW 12 O 40 ] 4− as the anionic layer. Electrochemical measurements and UV–vis spectroscopy were used to monitor the modification process. Optimal results were obtained when three layers were deposited onto the ITO surface and were stable in aqueous solution. The order of the multilayer formation was explored by comparing a modified electrode where [Zn(II)TRP] 4+ was the outermost layer with an electrode where [SiW 12 O 40 ] 4− was the outer layer. Results show that the best performing electrode is one with [SiW 12 O 40 ] 4− as the outer layer. Nitrite reduction on these electrode surfaces was studied in dark conditions and under light irradiation. Potential controlled electrolysis experiments were also performed, finding hydroxylamine, hydrazine and ammonia as the reduction products in dark conditions. Under light irradiation, only hydrazine and ammonia were found and, we observed an increase in the amount of obtained product. In this case, the electrolysis was carried out 150 mV less and half of time than in dark conditions. These results show that the combination of light and potential give rise to an improvement in the electrocatalytic properties of the modified electrodes. Continuous photolysis and IR spectroelectrochemical experiments were carried out to determinate the nature of this phenomena, evidencing the formation of an intermediary species between nitrite and [Mn(III)TRP] 5+.

  15. 4 GHz ionospheric scintillations observed at Taipei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.N.; Jeng, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    In a study of ionospheric scintillations 3950 MHz beacon signals from geostationary communication satellites Intelsat-IV-F8 and Intelsat-IV-F1 were recorded on a strip chart and magnetic tape at the Taipei Earth Station. While the strip charts were used to monitor the occurrence of the scintillation, the magnetic tape output was digitized and processed by a computerized system to yield a detailed analysis of scintillation events. It was found that diurnal variations were similar to the diurnal patterns of sporadic E at greater than 5 MHz and VHF band ionospheric scintillations during daytime as reported by Huang (1978). Eight typical scintillation events were selected for the calculation of the scintillation index, S4, and other parameters. The mean S4 index for the 8 events was found to be 0.15. Numerical and graphic results are presented for the cumulative amplitude distributions, message reliability, autocorrelation functions and power spectra

  16. Excited waves in shear layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechert, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    The generation of instability waves in free shear layers is investigated. The model assumes an infinitesimally thin shear layer shed from a semi-infinite plate which is exposed to sound excitation. The acoustical shear layer excitation by a source further away from the plate edge in the downstream direction is very weak while upstream from the plate edge the excitation is relatively efficient. A special solution is given for the source at the plate edge. The theory is then extended to two streams on both sides of the shear layer having different velocities and densities. Furthermore, the excitation of a shear layer in a channel is calculated. A reference quantity is found for the magnitude of the excited instability waves. For a comparison with measurements, numerical computations of the velocity field outside the shear layer were carried out.

  17. Neocortical layer 6, a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex M Thomson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This review attempts to summarise some of the major areas of neocortical research as it pertains to layer 6. After a brief summary of the development of this intriguing layer, the major pyramidal cell classes to be found in layer 6 are described and compared. The connections made and received by these different classes of neurones are then discussed and the possible functions of these connections, with particular reference to the shaping of responses in visual cortex and thalamus. Inhibition in layer 6 is discussed where appropriate, but not in great detail. Many types of interneurones are to be found in each cortical layer and layer 6 is no exception, but the functions of each type remain to be elucidated.

  18. Eroded Layered Material in Southwest Utopia Planitia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Images from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC)dramatically illustrate that many places on the red planet have outcrops of layered geologic materials. The two pictures above show the remains of layered material inside craters in southwestern Utopia Planitia (see inset for detailed view). These remnant layers indicate that the craters--and perhaps the plains that surround them--were once buried beneath a deposit that has since been eroded away. This theme of layered outcrops and exhumed craters appears to be one of the dominant observations that MGS MOC has made--to date--about Mars. The origin and composition of the layered material--and its ultimate fate once it was largely eroded away--are unknown. Each of the two pictures shown here covers an area about 4 kilometers (2.5 miles)by 6.3 kilometers (3.9 miles). Illumination is from the lower right. These are subframes of a single MOC image acquired in July 1998 during the MGS Science Phasing Orbits imaging campaign. This figure was presented at the 30th Lunar and Planetary Science Conference in Houston, Texas, March 1999. Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego, CA. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Mars Surveyor Operations Project operates the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft with its industrial partner, Lockheed Martin Astronautics, from facilities in Pasadena, CA and Denver, CO.

  19. Boundary-Layer & health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigliola, V.

    2010-09-01

    It has long been known that specific atmospheric processes, such as weather and longer-term climatic fluctuations, affect human health. The biometeorological literature refers to this relationship as meteorotropism, defined as a change in an organism that is correlated with a change in atmospheric conditions. Plenty of (patho)physiological functions are affected by those conditions - like the respiratory diseases - and currently it is difficult to put any limits for pathologies developed in reply. Nowadays the importance of atmospheric boundary layer and health is increasingly recognised. A number of epidemiologic studies have reported associations between ambient concentrations of air pollution, specifically particulate pollution, and adverse health effects, even at the relatively low concentrations of pollution found. Since 1995 there have been over twenty-one studies from four continents that have explicitly examined the association between ambient air pollutant mixes and daily mortality. Statistically significant and positive associations have been reported in data from various locations around the world, all with varying air pollutant concentrations, weather conditions, population characteristics and public health policies. Particular role has been given to atmospheric boundary layer processes, the impact of which for specific patient-cohort is, however, not well understood till now. Assessing and monitoring air quality are thus fundamental to improve Europe's welfare. One of current projects run by the "European Medical Association" - PASODOBLE will develop and demonstrate user-driven downstream information services for the regional and local air quality sectors by combining space-based and in-situ data with models in 4 thematic service lines: - Health community support for hospitals, pharmacies, doctors and people at risk - Public information for regions, cities, tourist industry and sporting event organizers - Compliance monitoring support on particulate

  20. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Dennis P [Maplewood, MN; Schmoeckel, Alison K [Stillwater, MN; Vernstrom, George D [Cottage Grove, MN; Atanasoski, Radoslav [Edina, MN; Wood, Thomas E [Stillwater, MN; Yang, Ruizhi [Halifax, CA; Easton, E Bradley [Halifax, CA; Dahn, Jeffrey R [Hubley, CA; O'Neill, David G [Lake Elmo, MN

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  1. Sub-Transport Layer Coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jonas; Krigslund, Jeppe; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani

    2014-01-01

    Packet losses in wireless networks dramatically curbs the performance of TCP. This paper introduces a simple coding shim that aids IP-layer traffic in lossy environments while being transparent to transport layer protocols. The proposed coding approach enables erasure correction while being...... oblivious to the congestion control algorithms of the utilised transport layer protocol. Although our coding shim is indifferent towards the transport layer protocol, we focus on the performance of TCP when ran on top of our proposed coding mechanism due to its widespread use. The coding shim provides gains...

  2. Concentric layered Hermite scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astheimer, Jeffrey P.; Parker, Kevin J.

    2018-05-01

    The long wavelength limit of scattering from spheres has a rich history in optics, electromagnetics, and acoustics. Recently it was shown that a common integral kernel pertains to formulations of weak spherical scatterers in both acoustics and electromagnetic regimes. Furthermore, the relationship between backscattered amplitude and wavenumber k was shown to follow power laws higher than the Rayleigh scattering k2 power law, when the inhomogeneity had a material composition that conformed to a Gaussian weighted Hermite polynomial. Although this class of scatterers, called Hermite scatterers, are plausible, it may be simpler to manufacture scatterers with a core surrounded by one or more layers. In this case the inhomogeneous material property conforms to a piecewise continuous constant function. We demonstrate that the necessary and sufficient conditions for supra-Rayleigh scattering power laws in this case can be stated simply by considering moments of the inhomogeneous function and its spatial transform. This development opens an additional path for construction of, and use of scatterers with unique power law behavior.

  3. CHARGE-TRANSFER BETWEEN LAYERS IN MISFIT LAYER COMPOUNDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WIEGERS, GA

    1995-01-01

    Electron donation from MX double layers to TX(2) sandwiches, the interlayer bonding and the localization of conduction electrons in misfit layer compounds (MX)(p)(TX(2))(n) (M=Sn, Pb, Sb, Bi, rare earth metals; T=Ti, V, Cr, Nb, Ta; X=S, Se; 1.08

  4. Automatic settlement analysis of single-layer armour layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofland, B.; van gent, Marcel

    2016-01-01

    A method to quantify, analyse, and present the settlement of single-layer concrete armour layers of coastal structures is presented. The use of the image processing technique for settlement analysis is discussed based on various modelling
    studies performed over the years. The accuracy of the

  5. On the modeling of electrical boundary layer (electrode layer) and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the first part of the paper, equations and methodology are discussed and in the second, we discuss results. 2. Methodology. In the atmospheric electricity, the earth's surface is one electrode and electrode layer or electrical boundary layer is a region near the surface of the earth in which profiles of atmospheric electrical.

  6. Gastroesophageal anastomosis: single-layer versus double-layer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, V.A.; Bilal, A.; Khan, A.; Ahmed, M.

    2008-01-01

    Considerable controversy exists regarding the optimum technique for gastroesophageal anastomosis. Double layer technique has long been considered important for safe healing but there is evidence that single layer technique is also safe and can be performed in much shorter time. The purpose of this study was to compare the outcome of single layer and double layer techniques for gastroesophageal anastomosis. A prospective randomized study was conducted in cardiothoracic unit, Lady Reading Hospital from Jan 2006 to Jan 2008. Fifty patients with oesophageal carcinoma undergoing subtotal oesophagectomy were randomized to have the anastomosis by single layer continuous or double layer continuous technique (group A (n=24) and B (n=26) respectively). The demographic data, operative and anastomosis time, postoperative complications and hospital mortality were recorded on a proforma and analyzed on SPSS 10. There was no significant difference between group A and B in terms of age, gender, postoperative complications and duration of hospital stay. Anastomotic leak occurred in 4.2% patients in group A and 7.7% in group B (p=NS). Mean anastomosis time was 10.04 minutes in group A and 19.2 minutes in group B (p=0.0001). Mean operative time was 163.83 minutes and 170.96 minutes in group A and B respectively. Overall hospital mortality was 2%; no deaths occurred due to anastomotic leak. Single layer continuous technique is equally safe and can be performed in shorter time and at a lower cost than the double layer technique. (author)

  7. Tunneling spin injection into single layer graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wei; Pi, K; McCreary, K M; Li, Yan; Wong, Jared J I; Swartz, A G; Kawakami, R K

    2010-10-15

    We achieve tunneling spin injection from Co into single layer graphene (SLG) using TiO₂ seeded MgO barriers. A nonlocal magnetoresistance (ΔR(NL)) of 130  Ω is observed at room temperature, which is the largest value observed in any material. Investigating ΔR(NL) vs SLG conductivity from the transparent to the tunneling contact regimes demonstrates the contrasting behaviors predicted by the drift-diffusion theory of spin transport. Furthermore, tunnel barriers reduce the contact-induced spin relaxation and are therefore important for future investigations of spin relaxation in graphene.

  8. Natural melanin composites by layer-by-layer assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Taesik; Shim, Bong Sub

    2015-04-01

    Melanin is an electrically conductive and biocompatible material, because their conjugated backbone structures provide conducting pathways from human skin, eyes, brain, and beyond. So there is a potential of using as materials for the neural interfaces and the implantable devices. Extracted from Sepia officinalis ink, our natural melanin was uniformly dispersed in mostly polar solvents such as water and alcohols. Then, the dispersed melanin was further fabricated to nano-thin layered composites by the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly technique. Combined with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), the melanin nanoparticles behave as an LBL counterpart to from finely tuned nanostructured films. The LBL process can adjust the smart performances of the composites by varying the layering conditions and sandwich thickness. We further demonstrated the melanin loading degree of stacked layers, combination nanostructures, electrical properties, and biocompatibility of the resulting composites by UV-vis spectrophotometer, scanning electron microscope (SEM), multimeter, and in-vitro cell test of PC12, respectively.

  9. Coevolution of Cooperation and Layer Selection Strategy in Multiplex Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuki Hayashi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the emergent dynamics in multiplex networks, composed of layers of multiple networks, has been discussed extensively in network sciences. However, little is still known about whether and how the evolution of strategy for selecting a layer to participate in can contribute to the emergence of cooperative behaviors in multiplex networks of social interactions. To investigate these issues, we constructed a coevolutionary model of cooperation and layer selection strategies in which each an individual selects one layer from multiple layers of social networks and plays the Prisoner’s Dilemma with neighbors in the selected layer. We found that the proportion of cooperative strategies increased with increasing the number of layers regardless of the degree of dilemma, and this increase occurred due to a cyclic coevolution process of game strategies and layer selection strategies. We also showed that the heterogeneity of links among layers is a key factor for multiplex networks to facilitate the evolution of cooperation, and such positive effects on cooperation were observed regardless of the difference in the stochastic properties of network topologies.

  10. Diffusion processes in the magnetopause boundary layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsurutani, B.T.; Thorne, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    Anomalous cross-field diffusion of magnetosheath ions and electrons is a direct consequence of cyclotron-resonant scattering by electrostatic and electromagnetic emissions which are continuously present within the magnetopause boundary layer. Expressions for the rate of cross-field diffusion involving either type of wave are developed and expressed in terms of the absolute upper limit referred to as Bohm diffusion. For the typical average intensity of waves observed in the boundary layer, resonant electron cross-field diffusion is always insignificant. However, magnetosheath ions, resonant with low frequency electrostatic waves, may be transported inward at a rate approaching one tenth the Bohm rate (D/sub perpendiculartsperpendicular/roughly-equal10 3 km 2 /s). While this is not the only mechanism capable of explaining the presence of the low latitude boundary layer it is adequate to account for the typical boundary layer thickness and it should occur at all local times and under all interplanetary conditions. It consequently provides a continuous mechanism for significant mass and momentum transfer across the magnetopause under conditions when field merging is inoperative

  11. Impermeable layers in landfill design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karanac Milica

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Landfills are complex systems which could potentially contaminate the environment. It should be prevented by providing impermeability during the landfill design. In that aim related regulations should be followed and adequate materials that provide impermeability should be used. The first part of the paper presents review of the current regulations, interpretations, and recommendations from U.S., EU and Republic of Serbia. Knowing that the Serbian regulation should fully follow related European Directive, in analyses some inadequate formulations and terms were observed related to the Directive Annex I, 3.2. Request of the Regulation that deals with the bottom of the landfill leakage is formulated differently than in Directive as well. Mentioned problems enable some design solutions which are not among the best available techniques. In the second part the paper presents comparative analysis of possible alternatives in impermeable layer design, both for the bottom and landfill cover. Some materials like clay, CCL, GCL might not be able to satisfy prescribed requirements. The longest lifetime and the lowest coefficient of permeability, as well as excellent mechanical, chemical and thermal stability, show the mixture of sand, bentonite and polymers (PEBSM. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR 34009

  12. Characterization of cryogenic direct-drive ICF targets during layering studies and just prior to shot time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgell, D.H.; Seka, W.; Craxton, R.S.; Elasky, L.M.; Harding, D.R.; Keck, R.L.; Lund, L.D.; Wittman, M.D.

    2006-07-13

    The characterization of OMEGA cryogenic targets is based on shadowgraphs obtained from multiple angular views taken with the target in the layering sphere. The D2 ice has been observed to re-layer during slow rotations, leading to procedural changes that avoid re-layering thus ensuring high-quality, spherical-harmonic, 3-D ice layer reconstructions.

  13. [Single-layer colonic anastomoses using polyglyconate (Maxon) vs. two-layer anastomoses using chromic catgut and silk. Experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Osogobio, Sandra Minerva; Takahashi-Monroy, Takeshi; Velasco, Liliana; Gaxiola, Miguel; Sotres-Vega, Avelina; Santillán-Doherty, Patricio

    2006-01-01

    The safety of an intestinal anastomosis is usually measured by its complication rate, especially the incidence of anastomotic leakage. A wide variety of methods have been described to reestablish intestinal continuity including single-layer continuous or two-layer interrupted anastomosis. To evaluate if the single-layer continuous anastomosis using polygluconate is safer and reliable than two-layer interrupted anastomosis with chromic catgut and silk. A prospective, experimental, randomized and comparative analysis was conducted in 20 dogs. They were divided in two groups; group 1 underwent two-layer interrupted anastomosis and group 2 underwent sigle-layer continuous technique. Anastomoses were timed. Both groups were under observation. Anastomotic leakage, and other complications were evaluated. The animals were sacrified and the anastomosis was taken out together with 10 cm of colon on both sides of the anastomosis. Breaking strength, histologic evaluation and hydroxyproline determination were performed. Ten two-layer anastomosis and ten single-layer anastomosis were performed. A median of 25 minutes (range: 20-30 minutes) was required to construct the anastomoses in group 1 versus 20 minutes (range: 12-25 minutes) in group 2. All animals survived and no leakage was observed. Wound infection ocurred in four dogs (20%). Median breaking strength was 230 mm Hg in group 1 and 210 mm Hg in group 2. Hydroxyproline concentration was 8.94 mg/g in group 1 (range: 5.33-16.71) and 9.94 mg/g in group 2 (range: 2.96-21.87). There was no difference among groups about the inflammatory response evaluated by pathology. There was no statistical significance in any variable evaluated. CONCLUIONS: This study demonstrates that a single-layer continuous is similar in terms of safety to the two-layer technique, but because of its facility to perform, the single-layer technique could be superior.

  14. Fast biosensor with reagent layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2008-01-01

    A detection system and a sensor chip for detecting target mols., and thus corresponding analytes in a sample is described. Typically the detection system includes a sensor chip. The sensor chip (1) comprises on its detection surface a dissolvable reagent layer. When the dissolvable reagent layer is

  15. Sublayer of Prandtl Boundary Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenier, Emmanuel; Nguyen, Toan T.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the stability of Prandtl boundary layers in the vanishing viscosity limit {ν \\to 0} . In Grenier (Commun Pure Appl Math 53(9):1067-1091, 2000), one of the authors proved that there exists no asymptotic expansion involving one of Prandtl's boundary layer, with thickness of order {√{ν}} , which describes the inviscid limit of Navier-Stokes equations. The instability gives rise to a viscous boundary sublayer whose thickness is of order {ν^{3/4}} . In this paper, we point out how the stability of the classical Prandtl's layer is linked to the stability of this sublayer. In particular, we prove that the two layers cannot both be nonlinearly stable in L^∞. That is, either the Prandtl's layer or the boundary sublayer is nonlinearly unstable in the sup norm.

  16. Estimates of the height of the boundary layer using SODAR and rawinsoundings in Amazonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, G [Instituto de Aeronautica e Espaco (IAE/CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, 12228-904 (Brazil); Santos, L A R dos [Instituto Nacional de Meteorologia (INMET), BrasIlia, 70680-900 (Brazil)], E-mail: gfisch@iae.cta.br, E-mail: landre@inmet.gov.br