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Sample records for spontaneity training storytelling

  1. Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Heidi

    2015-01-01

    Dette kapitel introducerer til storytelling som kommunikationsdisciplin. Der præsenteres dels en teoretisk forståelse af, hvordan mennesket tænker i og skaber mening gennem historier, dels en række praktiske værktøjer til arbejdet med storytelling.......Dette kapitel introducerer til storytelling som kommunikationsdisciplin. Der præsenteres dels en teoretisk forståelse af, hvordan mennesket tænker i og skaber mening gennem historier, dels en række praktiske værktøjer til arbejdet med storytelling....

  2. Spontaneous tetraplegia during weight training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clewer, G; Carmont, M; Jaffray, D

    2006-01-01

    A case of tetraplegia due to weight training is presented. Emergency surgery revealed a huge C5/6 disc sequestration trapped within the canal by the posterior longitudinal ligament. The disc was removed and C5–C7 were fused using an iliac crest tricortical graft and stabilised. The patient made a good recovery and returned to sporting activity. PMID:16980532

  3. Graphic Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John

    2009-01-01

    Graphic storytelling is a medium that allows students to make and share stories, while developing their art communication skills. American comics today are more varied in genre, approach, and audience than ever before. When considering the impact of Japanese manga on the youth, graphic storytelling emerges as a powerful player in pop culture. In…

  4. Digital storytelling and teacher education: an experience in initial teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lazzari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A group of pre-service teachers experienced the digital storytelling as part of their e-learning duties. We describe the structure of the project-work carried out by the students and discuss the results of a questionnaire they filled out after the end of the course, aiming to gather their opinions. The students claim to have enjoyed the proposal and most of them are likely to repeat it in their school, either by developing digital stories themselves or by involving their future students as designers and developers. By questionnaire and interviews with the participants, it is clear that the development experience has changed their attitude towards educational technology, enhanced their digital skills, and increased their self-esteem.Digital storytelling nella formazione iniziale degli insegnanti: un’esperienza nel Tirocinio Formativo AttivoUn gruppo di aspiranti insegnanti iscritti al Tirocinio Formativo Attivo ha affrontato un’esperienza di digital storytelling come parte dei compiti di didattica a distanza. Viene qui descritta la struttura del lavoro svolto dai corsisti e si riflette sui risultati di un questionario sottoposto al termine del corso per rilevarne le opinioni. I corsisti dichiarano di aver gradito la proposta e buona parte di loro ritiene probabile ripeterla a scuola, anche coinvolgendo gli studenti nel progetto e nella realizzazione di narrazioni digitali multimediali. Da questionario e colloqui con i corsisti si deduce che l’esperienza di sviluppo ha mutato il loro atteggiamento verso le tecnologie didattiche, aumentato la loro efficacia come comunicatori digitali e accresciuto la loro autostima.

  5. Interactive Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenau-Fog, Henrik; Reng, Lars

    2015-01-01

    This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Interactive Digital Storytelling, ICIDS 2015, held in Copenhagen, Denmark, in November/December 2015. The 18 revised full papers and 13 short papers presented together with 9 posters, 9 workshop descriptions, an...

  6. Designing and delivering facilitated storytelling interventions for chronic disease self-management: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucciardi, Enza; Jean-Pierre, Nicole; Karam, Grace; Sidani, Souraya

    2016-07-11

    Little is known about how to develop and deliver storytelling as an intervention to support those managing chronic illnesses. This scoping review aims to describe the core elements of storytelling interventions in order to help facilitate its implementation. A scoping review was conducted in seven databases for articles published up to May 2014 to identify interventions that describe in detail how storytelling was used to support people in disease self-management interventions. Ten articles met all inclusion criteria. Core elements consistently observed across the storytelling interventions were: reflection and interactive meaning-making of experiences; principles of informality and spontaneity; non-directional and non-hierarchical facilitation; development of group norms and conduct to create a community among participants; and both an individual and collective role for participants. Differences were also observed across interventions, such as: the conceptual frameworks that directed the design of the intervention; the type and training of facilitators; intervention duration; and how session topics were selected and stories delivered. Furthermore, evaluation of the intervention and outcome assessment varied greatly across studies. The use of storytelling can be a novel intervention to enhance chronic disease self-management. The core elements identified in the review inform the development of the intervention to be more patient-centred by guiding participants to take ownership of and lead the intervention, which differs significantly from traditional support groups. Storytelling has the potential to provide patients with a more active role in their health care by identifying their specific needs as well as gaps in knowledge and skills, while allowing them to form strong bonds with peers who share similar disease-related experiences. However, measures of impact differed across interventions given the variation in chronic conditions. Our findings can guide future

  7. Resistance Training in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with Severe Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vanerson Passos Neves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Resistance training (RT has been recommended as a non-pharmacological treatment for moderate hypertension. In spite of the important role of exercise intensity on training prescription, there is still no data regarding the effects of RT intensity on severe hypertension (SH. Objective: This study examined the effects of two RT protocols (vertical ladder climbing, performed at different overloads of maximal weight carried (MWC, on blood pressure (BP and muscle strength of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR with SH. Methods: Fifteen male SHR ENT#091;206 ± 10 mmHg of systolic BP (SBPENT#093; and five Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY; 119 ± 10 mmHg of SBP were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SED-WKY and SHR (SED-SHR; RT1-SHR training relative to body weight (~40% of MWC; and RT2-SHR training relative to MWC test (~70% of MWC. Systolic BP and heart rate (HR were measured weekly using the tail-cuff method. The progression of muscle strength was determined once every fifteen days. The RT consisted of 3 weekly sessions on non-consecutive days for 12-weeks. Results: Both RT protocols prevented the increase in SBP (delta - 5 and -7 mmHg, respectively; p > 0.05, whereas SBP of the SED-SHR group increased by 19 mmHg (p 0.05. Conclusions: Our data indicated that both RT protocols were effective in preventing chronic elevation of SBP in SH. Additionally, a higher RT overload induced a greater increase in muscle strength.

  8. Personaliseret storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Følelsesmarkedet er både nyt og gammelt. Nyt, fordi mikroøkonomien først i det seneste årti har fået øjnene op for følelsers rolle i almindelige beslutningsprocesser. Ældgammelt, fordi markedsføring i mere end hundrede år har handlet om at kommunikere og iscenesætte, så det appellerer til følelse...... følelserne. Artiklen forklarer, hvordan denne velkendte appel kan få et nyt virkemiddel: nemlig ved at spille ind på forbrugeres ønske om at være medproducent af ikke kun mening, men også varen. Der gives et eksempel på "personlig storytelling".    ...

  9. Using Storytelling to Establish Justice: A Narrative Study on the Efficacy of Teaching Police Recruits Individual Rights through Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sautner, Kerry

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the narrative of new Philadelphia Police recruits' experiences within a training program that used storytelling techniques to positively influence their knowledge and assumptions about social justice and fairness. Prior research has suggested that storytelling can be an effective way to engage learners in understanding…

  10. Storytelling and Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doecke, Brenton

    2015-01-01

    This essay explores the role that storytelling might play in the professional learning of English teachers. It begins by reflecting on the ways that stories shape our everyday lives, and then considers how the meaning-making potential of storytelling might enable us to gain insights into our work as educators. This is in contradistinction to the…

  11. Storytelling met Social Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    René Boonstra

    2011-01-01

    In dit hoofdstuk (7) kijkt René Boonstra naar de rol van social media binnen transmedia storytelling. Vooral de participatiecultuur speelt daarin een belangrijke rol. De vraag waar hij in dit hoofdstuk antwoord op geeft is hoe een communicatieprofessional transmedia storyteling kan gebruiken om het

  12. Storytelling as Research/Research as Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Patrick J.

    2011-01-01

    If story is central to human meaning why, in the research world, is there not more storytelling? Walter Benjamin (1973) noted that, "a story is different. It does not expend itself. It preserves and concentrates its strength and is capable of releasing it even after a long time" (p. 90). How might research not expend itself, but preserve and…

  13. Apprendere con il digital storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Petrucco

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Discussion deli 'narrative storytelling approach in terms of support that this teaching strategy can' deliver on the cognitive and emotional. The authors report a 'laboratory experience of Digital Storytelling made in a university course of Education.

  14. Inhibition of spontaneous recovery of fear by mGluR5 after prolonged extinction training.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chun Mao

    Full Text Available Fear behavior is vital for survival and involves learning contingent associations of non-threatening cues with aversive stimuli. In contrast, excessive levels of fear can be maladaptive and lead to anxiety disorders. Generally, extensive sessions of extinction training correlates with reduced spontaneous recovery. The molecular mechanisms underlying the long-term inhibition of fear recovery following repeated extinction training are not fully understood. Here we show that in rats, prolonged extinction training causes greater reduction in both fear-potentiated startle and spontaneous recovery. This effect was specifically blocked by metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5, but not by mGluR1 antagonists and by a protein synthesis inhibitor. Similar inhibition of memory recovery following prolonged extinction training was also observed in mice. In agreement with the instrumental role of mGluR5 in the prolonged inhibition of fear recovery, we found that FMR1-/- mice which exhibit enhanced mGluR5-mediated signaling exhibit lower spontaneous recovery of fear after extinction training than wild-type littermates. At the molecular level, we discovered that prolonged extinction training reversed the fear conditioning-induced increase in surface expression of GluR1, AMPA/NMDA ratio, postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95 and synapse-associated protein-97 (SAP97. Accordingly, delivery of Tat-GluR2(3Y, a synthetic peptide that blocks AMPA receptor endocytosis, inhibited prolonged extinction training-induced inhibition of fear recovery. Together, our results demonstrate that prolonged extinction training results in the mGluR5-dependent long-term inhibition of fear recovery. This effect may involve the degradation of original memory and may explain the beneficial effects of prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of phobias.

  15. A discourse on organizational storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nymark, Søren R.

    This dissertation is concerned with organizational storytelling. It focuses on both formal and informal stories' role and function in the organization. It provides a framework for working with storytelling in organizations. Storytelling is seen as an important part of valuebased management...

  16. Art Education Technology: Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Sheng Kuan

    2007-01-01

    The application of digital storytelling to art education is an interdisciplinary, inquiry-based, hands-on project that integrates the arts, education, local communities, technology, and storytelling. Through digital storytelling, students develop and apply multiliteracy skills, aesthetic sensitivities, and critical faculties to address greater…

  17. Storytelling intervention for patients with cancer: part 2--pilot testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crogan, Neva L; Evans, Bronwynne C; Bendel, Robert

    2008-03-01

    To evaluate symptom reports and the impact of a nurse-led storytelling intervention in a supportive group setting on mood, stress level, coping with stress, pain, self-efficacy, and satisfaction with life in patients with cancer. Descriptive pilot project using a pretest/post-test control group. Local regional medical center in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States. Convenience sample of 10 patients with various cancer diagnoses; 7 completed the intervention. Participants were randomly assigned to a storytelling or control group. Using a tool kit generated for this project, a nurse facilitator guided storytelling group participants in 12 1.5-hour sessions. Six instruments, symptom assessments, and a retrospective physician chart review were completed for each group. Data were analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance. Mood, stress, coping, pain, self-efficacy, and satisfaction with life. Comparison of changes in group mean scores revealed a significant decrease in anxiety in the storytelling group despite disease progression. Documentation of psychosocial symptomatology by physicians is limited; however, nursing assessments were useful in determining psychosocial status before and after the intervention. Results can be viewed only in context of a feasibility study and are not generalizable because of a limited sample size. A trained oncology nurse was able to use the storytelling intervention. Initial results are promising and warrant further study. After additional testing, the intervention could be used to enhance storytelling groups for patients with cancer or for individuals who are uncomfortable in or do not have access to storytelling groups.

  18. Aerobic Swim Training Restores Aortic Endothelial Function by Decreasing Superoxide Levels in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila P. Jordão

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine whether aerobic training decreases superoxide levels, increases nitric oxide levels, and improves endothelium-dependent vasodilation in the aortas of spontaneously hypertensive rats. METHODS: Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY were distributed into 2 groups: sedentary (SHRsd and WKYsd, n=10 each and swimming-trained (SHRtr, n=10 and WKYtr, n=10, respectively. The trained group participated in training sessions 5 days/week for 1 h/day with an additional work load of 4% of the animal’s body weight. After a 10-week sedentary or aerobic training period, the rats were euthanized. The thoracic aortas were removed to evaluate the vasodilator response to acetylcholine (10-10 to 10-4 M with or without preincubation with L-NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (L-NAME; 10-4 M in vitro. The aortic tissue was also used to assess the levels of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase subunit isoforms 1 and 4 proteins, as well as the superoxide and nitrite contents. Blood pressure was measured using a computerized tail-cuff system. RESULTS: Aerobic training significantly increased the acetylcholine-induced maximum vasodilation observed in the SHRtr group compared with the SHRsd group (85.9±4.3 vs. 71.6±5.2%. Additionally, in the SHRtr group, superoxide levels were significantly decreased, nitric oxide bioavailability was improved, and the levels of the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase subunit isoform 4 protein were decreased compared to the SHRsd group. Moreover, after training, the blood pressure of the SHRtr group decreased compared to the SHRsd group. Exercise training had no effect on the blood pressure of the WKYtr group. CONCLUSIONS: In SHR, aerobic swim training decreased vascular superoxide generation by nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide oxidase subunit isoform 4 and increased nitric oxide bioavailability, thereby improving

  19. Data-driven storytelling

    CERN Document Server

    Henry Riche, Nathalie

    2018-01-01

    This book is an accessible introduction to data-driven storytelling, resulting from discussions between data visualization researchers and data journalists. This book will be the first to define the topic, present compelling examples and existing resources, as well as identify challenges and new opportunities for research.

  20. Indigenous Storytelling in Namibia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Winschiers-Theophilus, Heike

    2016-01-01

    to understand indigenous youths’ own conception of storytelling the paper presents empirical data from a study with indigenous Khoisan children in Namibia. This is followed by a discussion of an effort of digitizing indigenous intangible cultural heritage in relation to technologies’ embodied bias...

  1. Professional storytelling in clinical dental anatomy teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieser, Jules; Livingstone, Vicki; Meldrum, Alison

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to see if storytelling in a clinical dental anatomy course would increase student satisfaction. We enhanced teaching by spontaneous storytelling in problem-based learning, in half of the third-year dentistry class. At the end of the course, we administered an anonymous questionnaire to the students in the class, consisting of 12 questions that students had to answer on a Likert scale of 1-5. An overall satisfaction score was obtained and we used a linear mixed model to compare differences in satisfaction between the two groups, with "group" as the fixed effect. We also conducted an exploratory factor analysis of the responses to investigate whether there were distinct constructs within the data. Overall satisfaction is high, with students "with stories" having higher satisfaction than those "without stories." The former group consistently gives higher satisfaction scores, regardless of which question is being asked. Factor analysis provides evidence that storytelling nurtures reflective learning, while students work on their clinical anatomy problems.

  2. Storytelling and Innovative Behavior: An Empirical Study in a Brazilian Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Arrigo, Fernanda Pauletto; Robini, Eduardo; Larentis, Fabiano; Camargo, Maria Emilia; Schmiedgen, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The paper aims to identify the relationship between the use of storytelling and innovative work behavior (IWB) in organizations. Design/methodology/approach: The research took place in a human resource development (HRD) training session for leaders of Alpha Group. In this session, storytelling was adopted to discuss innovation and IWB.…

  3. Storytelling to Enhance Teaching and Learning: The Systematic Design, Development, and Testing of Two Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirumi, Atsusi; Sivo, Stephen; Pounds, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Storytelling may be a powerful instructional approach for engaging learners and facilitating e-learning. However, relatively little is known about how to apply story within the context of systematic instructional design processes and claims for the effectiveness of storytelling in training and education have been primarily anecdotal and…

  4. EXERCISE TRAINING IMPROVES CARDIOVASCULAR AUTONOMIC ACTIVITY AND ATTENUATES RENAL DAMAGE IN SPONTANEOUSLY HYPERTENSIVE RATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octávio Barbosa Neto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were performed to determine the influence of exercise training by swimming on cardiovascular autonomic control and renal morphology in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and Wystar-Kyoto (WKY rats. Sedentary normotensive (SN, trained normotensive (TN, sedentary hypertensive (SH, and trained hypertensive (TH rats were included in this study. Arterial pressure (AP, heart rate (HR, means of power spectral analysis of HR (HRV and systolic AP variability (SAPV were recorded in baseline conditions. Following, the HR baroreflex and autonomic tonus control were assessed. At the end, all animals were euthanized and their kidneys were excised to evaluate renal damage. Resting bradycardia was observed in TH and TN rats compared with their respective sedentary animals (p < 0.05. Exercise training attenuated AP in TH vs. SH (p < 0.001. The LF component of HRV and SAPV were lower in TH than SH (p < 0.05. The LF/HF relation was lower in TH than SH and SN (p < 0.05. TN and TH rats showed a sympathetic tonus reduction in comparison to SN and SH rats (p < 0.001. The TH presented an increased vagal tonus compared to SH (p < 0.05. Exercise training improved baroreflex control of HR in TH group versus SH (p < 0.05. The TH showed a lower number of sclerotic glomeruli compared to SH (p < 0.005. The exercise training decrease the glomerular indexes in TN and TH (p < 0.05. Further analysis showed a significant correlation between sympathetic nervous activity and AP levels (p < 0.05. A positive association was also found between sympathetic nervous activity and glomerular index (p < 0.05. Therefore, the exercise training reduces AP and attenuates renal damage. In addition, the attenuation of renal injury was associated with lower sympathetic activity. These findings strongly suggest that exercise training may be a therapeutic tool for improving structure and renal function in hypertensive individuals.

  5. Storytelling for Ordinary, Practical Purposes (Walter Benjamin's "The Storyteller")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Íris Susana Pires; Doecke, Brenton

    2016-01-01

    This essay explores the role that storytelling can play in teachers' learning. Walter Benjamin's "The Storyteller" provides a theoretical framework that enables us to highlight the complexity of the professional learning of teachers when they share stories about their everyday lives. We develop our argument by presenting two instances of…

  6. The anthropology of storytelling and the storytelling of anthropology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Maggio

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available These research notes concern what anthropologists currently do, and can do, with stories. Although pleas for narrative have become increasingly widespread in contemporary anthropology, an anthropologist of storytelling cannot but recognise that all anthropological production is to a certain extent a story. A question ensues: what kind of story is an ethnography? These research notes propose an answer by providing, first, a working definition of story tailored to this specific purpose. Secondly, they propound a brief illustration of the three main thematic interests of the anthropology of storytelling: the relational dynamics between the people involved in the storytelling situation; the content of the story, and the storytelling techniques. Thirdly, these aspects are examined in order to claim that an anthropology of storytelling among contemporary anthropologists is a necessary condition to respond concretely to the above-mentioned plea for narrative.

  7. Assassin's Creed and Transmedia Storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veugen, J.I.L.

    2016-01-01

    Although, the term itself was coined more than ten years ago by Henry Jenkins, transmedia storytelling still needs to be researched as the terminology has proven to be multi-interpretable. Transmedia storytelling involving computer games is even less-well researched. This article will look into both

  8. Do writing and storytelling skill influence assessment of reflective ability in medical students' written reflections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Louise; Niehaus, Brian; DeVries, Charlie D; Siegel, Jennifer R; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2010-10-01

    Increasingly, students are asked to write reflections as part of their medical education, but some question the influence of other factors on the evaluation of these reflections. In this pilot study, the investigators determined whether scores from a validated rubric to measure reflective ability were affected by irrelevant variance resulting from writing or storytelling ability. Students in clerkships wrote reflections on professionalism. All were given identical prompts, with half receiving additional structured guidelines on reflection. Sixty reflections, 30 from each group, were randomly chosen and scored for reflection, writing, and storytelling by trained raters using validated rubrics. There was no correlation between reflection and either writing (r = 0.049, P = .35) or storytelling (r = 0.14, P = .13). The guidelines increased reflection, but not writing or storytelling scores. Reflection is a distinct construct unaffected by learners' writing or storytelling skills. These findings support reflective ability as a distinct skill.

  9. Swimming training prevents coronary endothelial dysfunction in ovariectomized spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R.G. Claudio

    Full Text Available Estrogen deficiency and hypertension are considered major risk factors for the development of coronary heart disease. On the other hand, exercise training is considered an effective form to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. However, the effects of swimming training (SW on coronary vascular reactivity in female ovariectomized hypertensive rats are not known. We aimed to evaluate the effects of SW on endothelium-dependent coronary vasodilation in ovariectomized hypertensive rats. Three-month old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR, n=50 were divided into four groups: sham (SH, sham plus swimming training (SSW, ovariectomized (OVX, and ovariectomized plus swimming training (OSW. The SW protocol (5 times/week, 60 min/day was conducted for 8 weeks. The vasodilatory response was measured in isolated hearts in the absence and presence of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME, 100 µM. Cardiac oxidative stress was evaluated in situ by dihydroethidium fluorescence, while the expression of antioxidant enzymes (SOD-2 and catalase and their activities were assessed by western blotting and spectrophotometry, respectively. Vasodilation in SHR was significantly reduced by OVX, even in the presence of L-NAME, in conjunction with an increased oxidative stress. These effects were prevented by SW, and were associated with a decrease in oxidative stress. Superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD-2 and catalase expression increased only in the OSW group. However, no significant difference was found in the activity of these enzymes. In conclusion, SW prevented the endothelial dysfunction in the coronary bed of ovariectomized SHR associated with an increase in the expression of antioxidant enzymes, and therefore may prevent coronary heart disease in hypertensive postmenopausal women.

  10. Training and Spontaneous Reinforcement of Neuronal Assemblies by Spike Timing Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocker, Gabriel Koch; Doiron, Brent

    2018-02-03

    The synaptic connectivity of cortex is plastic, with experience shaping the ongoing interactions between neurons. Theoretical studies of spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) have focused on either just pairs of neurons or large-scale simulations. A simple analytic account for how fast spike time correlations affect both microscopic and macroscopic network structure is lacking. We develop a low-dimensional mean field theory for STDP in recurrent networks and show the emergence of assemblies of strongly coupled neurons with shared stimulus preferences. After training, this connectivity is actively reinforced by spike train correlations during the spontaneous dynamics. Furthermore, the stimulus coding by cell assemblies is actively maintained by these internally generated spiking correlations, suggesting a new role for noise correlations in neural coding. Assembly formation has often been associated with firing rate-based plasticity schemes; our theory provides an alternative and complementary framework, where fine temporal correlations and STDP form and actively maintain learned structure in cortical networks. © The Author(s) 2018. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Storytelling in Korean Online Games

    OpenAIRE

    Bišková, Lucie

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to analyse storytelling in Korean online games, mainly represented by MMORPG genre. The first chapter introduces five essential Korean MMORPGs that will be subjected to the analyses throughout the thesis. Next chapters research storytelling in MMORPGs and its instruments, which are used to anchor the story inside the game. Main practical part then analyses mentioned online games and searches for motives based on Asian mythology, history and culture. For better co...

  12. Flaws in current human training protocols for spontaneous Brain-Computer Interfaces: lessons learned from instructional design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien eLotte

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available While recent research on Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI has highlighted their potential for many applications, they remain barely used outside laboratories. The main reason is their lack of robustness. Indeed, with current BCI, mental state recognition is usually slow and often incorrect. Spontaneous BCI (i.e., mental imagery-based BCI often rely on mutual learning efforts by the user and the machine, with BCI users learning to produce stable EEG patterns (spontaneous BCI control being widely acknowledged as a skill while the computer learns to automatically recognize these EEG patterns, using signal processing. Most research so far was focused on signal processing, mostly neglecting the human in the loop. However, how well the user masters the BCI skill is also a key element explaining BCI robustness. Indeed, if the user is not able to produce stable and distinct EEG patterns, then no signal processing algorithm would be able to recognize them. Unfortunately, despite the importance of BCI training protocols, they have been scarcely studied so far, and used mostly unchanged for years.In this paper, we advocate that current human training approaches for spontaneous BCI are most likely inappropriate. We notably study instructional design literature in order to identify the key requirements and guidelines for a successful training procedure that promotes a good and efficient skill learning. This literature study highlights that current spontaneous BCI user training procedures satisfy very few of these requirements and hence are likely to be suboptimal. We therefore identify the flaws in BCI training protocols according to instructional design principles, at several levels: in the instructions provided to the user, in the tasks he/she has to perform, and in the feedback provided. For each level, we propose new research directions that are theoretically expected to address some of these flaws and to help users learn the BCI skill more efficiently.

  13. Flaws in current human training protocols for spontaneous Brain-Computer Interfaces: lessons learned from instructional design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotte, Fabien; Larrue, Florian; Mühl, Christian

    2013-01-01

    While recent research on Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI) has highlighted their potential for many applications, they remain barely used outside laboratories. The main reason is their lack of robustness. Indeed, with current BCI, mental state recognition is usually slow and often incorrect. Spontaneous BCI (i.e., mental imagery-based BCI) often rely on mutual learning efforts by the user and the machine, with BCI users learning to produce stable ElectroEncephaloGraphy (EEG) patterns (spontaneous BCI control being widely acknowledged as a skill) while the computer learns to automatically recognize these EEG patterns, using signal processing. Most research so far was focused on signal processing, mostly neglecting the human in the loop. However, how well the user masters the BCI skill is also a key element explaining BCI robustness. Indeed, if the user is not able to produce stable and distinct EEG patterns, then no signal processing algorithm would be able to recognize them. Unfortunately, despite the importance of BCI training protocols, they have been scarcely studied so far, and used mostly unchanged for years. In this paper, we advocate that current human training approaches for spontaneous BCI are most likely inappropriate. We notably study instructional design literature in order to identify the key requirements and guidelines for a successful training procedure that promotes a good and efficient skill learning. This literature study highlights that current spontaneous BCI user training procedures satisfy very few of these requirements and hence are likely to be suboptimal. We therefore identify the flaws in BCI training protocols according to instructional design principles, at several levels: in the instructions provided to the user, in the tasks he/she has to perform, and in the feedback provided. For each level, we propose new research directions that are theoretically expected to address some of these flaws and to help users learn the BCI skill more

  14. Digital Storytelling and the Nature of Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Michael; Lee, Shu-Shing; Hung, David W.

    2014-01-01

    While storytelling pedagogy presents novel perspectives and affordances to educators, a fundamental question that bears attention is the match between storytelling pedagogy and the nature of knowledge. Quite simply, the problem may be posed thus: is storytelling the optimum means for teaching all forms of knowledge? While rather obvious matches…

  15. Using Digital Storytelling to Engage Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwardy, Themin; Pan, Gary; Seow, Poh-Sun

    2013-01-01

    No one really knows what the first story ever told in human history was, but storytelling is an art that spans many civilizations and cultures, and continues to be a major part of our modern lives. More recently, storytelling has gone digital with advances in technology and connectivity. Educators have also rediscovered how storytelling can be an…

  16. Effects of losartan combined with exercise training in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.F. Azevedo

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate whether combined treatment with losartan, an angiotensin II receptor blocker, and exercise training (ET in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR would have an additive effect in reducing hypertension and improving baroreflex sensitivity when compared with losartan alone. Male SHR (8 weeks old were assigned to 3 groups: sedentary placebo (SP, N = 16, sedentary under losartan treatment (SL, N = 11; 10 mg kg-1 day-1, by gavage, and ET under losartan treatment (TL, N = 10. ET was performed on a treadmill 5 days/week for 60 min at 50% of peak VO2, for 18 weeks. Blood pressure (BP was measured with a catheter inserted into the carotid artery, and cardiac output with a microprobe placed around the ascending aorta. The baroreflex control of heart rate was assessed by administering increasing doses of phenylephrine and sodium nitroprusside (iv. Losartan significantly reduced mean BP (178 ± 16 vs 132 ± 12 mmHg and left ventricular hypertrophy (2.9 ± 0.4 vs 2.5 ± 0.2 mg/g, and significantly increased baroreflex bradycardia and tachycardia sensitivity (1.0 ± 0.3 vs 1.7 ± 0.5 and 2.0 ± 0.7 vs 3.2 ± 1.7 bpm/mmHg, respectively in SL compared with SP. However, losartan combined with ET had no additional effect on BP, baroreflex sensitivity or left ventricular hypertrophy when compared with losartan alone. In conclusion, losartan attenuates hypertension and improves baroreflex sensitivity in SHR. However, ET has no synergistic effect on BP in established hypertension when combined with losartan, at least at the dosage used in this investigation.

  17. STORYTELLING AND UNIVERSITY BRANDING IDENTITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREEA MONICA STATE

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present article sets out to clarify the concepts of storytelling and branding, with a focus on university branding and visual identity – the latter being a vital element to a brand’s uniqueness. Storytelling is an important method of brand construction, and it entails a strong power of seduction. Branding is increasingly more about storytelling. Practically, a story is an image made up of facts, feelings and interpretations, which are often told to us solely by the university itself. As such, the brand appears on the market accompanied by its identity. Identity is what we aim to express with help of the brand. Implementing a system of visual identity that would help to harmoniously develop a university brand requires a handbook of visual identity. The present article aims to be a starting point for such a handbook serving the University of Bucharest, which currently does not own such a handbook

  18. Storytelling: A Guided Reflection Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Pamela L; Butell, Sue S; Epeneter, Beverly Jean; Langford, Cheryl Anne; Taylor, Jana Doughty

    2016-03-01

    Reflective practice is a mode of inquiry in the authors' baccalaureate nursing program. To increase students' ability to "think like a nurse," the Reflective Practice Storytelling Guide was developed to facilitate discussion during weekly clinical seminars in the students' final clinical course. To evaluate the effectiveness of this guided activity, students were asked to provide feedback to specific questions following each seminar when the reflective presence activity was utilized. Common themes emerged from the storytellers and the members of the group. Themes identified in the responses of the storytellers included role development and formation and the value of team support. Learning themes that emerged from the participants included communication, teamwork, clinical judgment, patient-centered care, use of resources, ethical and legal parameters in practice, and patient safety. Utilizing a guided reflection activity resulted in the students experiencing a broader, deeper understanding of reflective professional practice. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Storytelling in dementia: embodiment as a resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydén, Lars-Christer

    2013-05-01

    In narrative research about persons with dementia, much research focuses on individual storytellers and their stories often stressing the discursive or textual aspects of stories. As persons with Alzheimer's disease generally have difficulties in telling stories according to often implicit narrative norms, they may appear to be less competent and agentive than what is actually the case. In the article, I argue for a change of focus from the textual aspects of narratives and the story as a product, to a focus on performative aspects and the embodied aspects of storytelling. A focus on the storytelling activity implies a change from the individual storyteller to the interaction with other participants in the storytelling situation. Drawing on two particular cases of storytelling, I stress the collaborative and embodied aspects of storytelling and argue that embodiment is less an individual expressive phenomenon than it is an interactive resource.

  20. Effects of a robotic storyteller's moody gestures on storytelling perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xu, J.; Broekens, J.; Hindriks, K.; Neerincx, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    A parameterized behavior model was developed for robots to show mood during task execution. In this study, we applied the model to the coverbal gestures of a robotic storyteller. This study investigated whether parameterized mood expression can 1) show mood that is changing over time; 2) reinforce

  1. Cybernated Storytelling: Revitalising Storytelling Activities for Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosli, Roziana M.; Idrus, Faizah

    2017-01-01

    Storytelling is one of the most common activities used in teaching English proficiency to language students. It is widely accepted as a teaching technique by many educators because it engages students in learning. This study seeks to examine students' readiness in using technology-aided applications in telling their stories. It also investigates…

  2. The Power of Digital Storytelling as a Culturally Relevant Health Promotion Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briant, Katherine J; Halter, Amy; Marchello, Nathan; Escareño, Monica; Thompson, Beti

    2016-11-01

    Digital storytelling is an emergent method in health promotion. It addresses health inequities by combining technology with the voices of members of vulnerable, often underrepresented populations. The overall goal of this pilot project was to explore if digital storytelling could be a culturally relevant health promotion tool for Hispanics/Latinos to share their experiences with cancer, or other diseases. Promotores participated in a train-the-trainer workshop. Community members worked with trained promotores to create digital stories through community workshops. We conducted one-on-one interviews with digital story creators to elicit perspectives and assess their experience. One overarching theme among storytellers was the power of storytelling. Supporting subthemes that emerged in the interviews were (1) connection and communication, (2) lack of opportunities and barriers to telling stories, and (3) potential for disease prevention awareness and education. This study found digital storytelling to be culturally relevant for Hispanics/Latinos of Mexican origin. For these storytellers it was a uniquely valuable tool for sharing personal stories of overcoming or managing health issues. Participants found the digital story experience to be positive and beneficial. It provided a healing outlet to reflect on a difficult experience and find support within one's own community. © 2016 Society for Public Health Education.

  3. Transmedia storytelling : Stappenplan voor communicatieprojecten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    René Boonstra

    2015-01-01

    Met transmedia storytelling kun je een breed publiek op uiteenlopende manieren betrekken bij een verhaal. In dit boek leer je aan de hand van een stappenplan een communicatieboodschap transmediaal over te brengen. De volgende onderwerpen staan centraal: het verhaal afstemmen op de identiteit van je

  4. Storytelling machines for video search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habibian, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study a fundamental question for developing storytelling machines: what vocabulary is suited for machines to tell the story of a video? We start by manually specifying the vocabulary concepts and their annotations. In order to effectively handcraft the vocabulary, we empirically study what are

  5. Digital Storytelling – Special issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yngve Nordkvelle

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Since the inception of Seminar.net the phenomenon of Digital Storytelling has often been suggested as a promising genre for teaching and learning in a variety of areas. Academically, the genre has attracted interest from scholars in media studies, political science, social work, health and education. In this issue we have sought attention from a huge number of academically inclined persons who either use the genre to teach with media, for teaching and learning about media, or studying how this specific way of working with media offers new possibilities for the articulation of the voice of the common people.When we invited authors for this special issue we did so expecting – and hoping for – contributions from a wide field of interests. We have landed 11 different manuscripts and have organised them according to a tentative order of themes they address: “Teaching and learning with Digital Storytelling”, “Community building”, “Genres of communication” and “Practical papers”.  Being a journal for lifelong learning, the educational use has gained the most interest. But also emerging new areas of use related to health, leisure, recreation, activism, community building, planning, professional communication, and reflection are reflected in the papers. We think the contributions together support our efforts for building the knowledge about digital storytelling as a genre and its potential in the media society. Scholarly publications in this field are generally mediated on paper. And there has been no shortage of superb exemplars of scholarly work these last couple of years: Story Circle: Digital Storytelling around the World, edited by John Hartley and Kelly McWilliams and Digital Storytelling, Mediatized Stories: Self-representations in New Media, edited by Knut Lundby, as well as a conference report, “Storytelling – Reflections in the Age of Digitalization” edited by Yvonne Gächter, Heike Ortner, Claudia Scwartz, Andreas

  6. Neural substrates of spontaneous narrative production in focal neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gola, Kelly A; Thorne, Avril; Veldhuisen, Lisa D; Felix, Cordula M; Hankinson, Sarah; Pham, Julie; Shany-Ur, Tal; Schauer, Guido P; Stanley, Christine M; Glenn, Shenly; Miller, Bruce L; Rankin, Katherine P

    2015-12-01

    Conversational storytelling integrates diverse cognitive and socio-emotional abilities that critically differ across neurodegenerative disease groups. Storytelling patterns may have diagnostic relevance and predict anatomic changes. The present study employed mixed methods discourse and quantitative analyses to delineate patterns of storytelling across focal neurodegenerative disease groups, and to clarify the neuroanatomical contributions to common storytelling characteristics. Transcripts of spontaneous social interactions of 46 participants (15 behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 7 semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), 12 Alzheimer's disease (AD), and 12 healthy older normal controls (NC)) were analyzed for storytelling frequency and characteristics, and videos of the interactions were rated for patients' level of social attentiveness. Compared to controls, svPPAs told more stories and autobiographical stories, and perseverated on aspects of self during the interaction, whereas ADs told fewer autobiographical stories than NCs. svPPAs and bvFTDs were rated as less attentive to social cues. Aspects of storytelling were related to diverse cognitive and socio-emotional functions, and voxel-based anatomic analysis of structural magnetic resonance imaging revealed that temporal organization, narrative evaluations patterns, and social attentiveness correlated with atrophy corresponding to known intrinsic connectivity networks, including the default mode, limbic, salience, and stable task control networks. Differences in spontaneous storytelling among neurodegenerative groups elucidated diverse cognitive, socio-emotional, and neural contributions to narrative production, with implications for diagnostic screening and therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. What Our Ancestors Knew: Teaching and Learning through Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Randee Lipson; Paige, Dennis Swiftdeer

    2016-01-01

    The art of storytelling is traced from its roots in indigenous cultural societies. Storytelling in education is described as a participatory learning process that promotes community and understanding.

  8. Training Teaching Staff to Facilitate Spontaneous Communication in Children with Autism: Adult Interactive Style Intervention (AISI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossyvaki, Lila; Jones, Glenys; Guldberg, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Previous research has demonstrated that the way adults interact with children with autism can have a great impact on their spontaneous communication. However, to date, few studies have focused on modifying adults' behaviour and even fewer have been conducted in school settings which actively involve teaching staff in designing the intervention.…

  9. Time course of training-induced microcirculatory changes and of vegf expression in skeletal muscles of spontaneously hypertensive female rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L. Amaral

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Exercise-induced vessel changes modulate arterial pressure (AP in male spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF is important for angiogenesis of skeletal muscle. The present study evaluated the time course of VEGF and angiogenesis after short- and long-term exercise training of female SHR and Wistar Kyoto (WKY rats, 8-9 weeks (200-250 g. Rats were allocated to daily training or remained sedentary for 3 days (N = 23 or 13 weeks (N = 23. After training, the carotid artery was catheterized for AP measurements. Locomotor (tibialis anterior and gracilis and non-locomotor skeletal muscles (temporalis were harvested and prepared for histologic and protein expression analyses. Training increased treadmill performance by all groups (SHR = 28%, WKY = 64%, 3 days and (SHR = 141%, WKY = 122%, 13 weeks. SHR had higher values of AP than WKY (174 ± 4 vs 111 ± 2 mmHg that were not altered by training. Three days of running increased VEGF expression (SHR = 28%, WKY = 36% simultaneously with an increase in capillary-to-fiber ratio in gracilis muscle (SHR = 19%, WKY = 15%. In contrast, 13 weeks of training increased gracilis capillary-to-fiber ratio (SHR = 18%, WKY = 19%, without simultaneous changes in VEGF expression. Training did not change VEGF expression and capillarity of temporalis muscle. We conclude that training stimulates time- and tissue-dependent VEGF protein expression, independent of pressure levels. VEGF triggers angiogenesis in locomotor skeletal muscle shortly after the exercise starts, but is not involved in the maintenance of capillarity after long-term exercise in female rats.

  10. Transmedia storytelling on travel stories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Baltar Moreno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Travel stories form part of a great tradition inside Western Culture which has served historically to describe, to understand and to imagine other cul - tures and communities, far or near, being constituted into a real narra - tive genre. This type of story has been and is a reflection of the perception of the world based on the imaginary worlds created by the travelling narrators. How do modern authors of travel stories take advantage of the opportunities offered by transmedia storytelling? The present article explores the potential of these types of stories as a privileged object of study for transmedia storytelling studies, from the analysis of a sample of 80 narrative productions based on experiences of travel and presented in diverse editions of the Festival Le Grand Bivouac (France. It also shows the existence of a new contemporary trend inside this narrative form that transcends its literary nature.

  11. Association of exercise training and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activator improves baroreflex sensitivity of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, P R; Moreira, M C S; Marques, S M; Pinto, I S J; Macedo, L M; Silva, C C; Freiria-Oliveira, A H; Rebelo, A C S; Reis, A A S; Rosa, D A; Ferreira-Neto, M L; Castro, C H; Pedrino, G R

    2016-08-01

    The present study sought to determine cardiovascular effects of aerobic training associated with diminazene aceturate (DIZE), an activator of the angiotensin converting enzyme 2, in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Male SHRs (280-350 g) were either subjected to exercise training or not (sedentary group). The trained group was subjected to 8 weeks of aerobic training on a treadmill (five times a week, lasting 60 min at an intensity of 50-60% of maximum aerobic speed). In the last 15 days of the experimental protocol, these groups were redistributed into four groups: i) sedentary SHRs with daily treatment of 1 mg/kg DIZE (S+D1); ii) trained SHRs with daily treatment of 1 mg/kg DIZE (T+D1); iii) sedentary SHRs with daily treatment of vehicle (S+V); and iv) trained SHRs with daily treatment of vehicle (T+V). After treatment, SHRs were anesthetized and subjected to artery and femoral vein cannulation prior to the implantation of ECG electrode. After 24 h, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were recorded; the baroreflex sensitivity and the effect of double autonomic blockade (DAB) were evaluated in non-anesthetized SHRs. DIZE treatment improved baroreflex sensitivity in the T+D1 group as compared with the T+V and S+D1 groups. The intrinsic heart rate (IHR) and MAP were reduced in T+D1 group as compared with T+V and S+D1 groups. Hence, we conclude that the association of exercise training with DIZE treatment improved baroreflex function and cardiovascular regulation.

  12. Storytelling: Language Experience for Meaning Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Olga

    1989-01-01

    Describes how storytelling can enhance both literal and inferential comprehension, motivate oral discussion, increase perceptual knowledge of metaphor, explain and promote interesting language usage, instill deeper meaning to children's personal experiences, and excite children about literature, storytelling, and creative interpretations of story.…

  13. Interactive Storytelling: Opportunities for Online Course Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Sally; Ching, Yu-Hui

    2017-01-01

    Compelling interactive stories can be used to get and keep learners' interest in online courses. Interactive storytelling presents information in a manner that involves learners by allowing them to connect with the content. Incorporating interactive storytelling into online education offers the potential to increase student interest and knowledge…

  14. Digital Storytelling for Transformative Global Citizenship Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong-White, Hoa; McLean, Lorna

    2015-01-01

    This article explores how digital storytelling offers the potential to support transformative global citizenship education (TGCE) through a case study of the Bridges to Understanding program that connected middle and high school students globally using digital storytelling. Drawing on a TGCE framework, this research project probed the curriculum…

  15. Promoting Culturally Respectful Cancer Education Through Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Melany; Kuhnley, Regina; Lanier, Anne; Dignan, Mark; Revels, Laura; Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Cueva, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of mortality among Alaska Native people. Over half of Alaska Native people live in rural communities where specially trained community members called Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps) provide health care. In response to CHA/Ps’ expressed desire to learn more about cancer, four 5-day cancer education and digital storytelling courses were provided in 2014. Throughout each course, participants explored cancer information, reflected on their personal experiences, and envisioned how they might apply their knowledge within their communities. Each course participant also created a personal and authentic digital story, a methodology increasingly embraced by Indigenous communities as a way to combine storytelling traditions with modern technology to promote both individual and community health. Opportunities to learn of CHA/Ps’ experiences with cancer and digital storytelling included a 3-page end-of-course written evaluation, a weekly story-showing log kept for 4 weeks post-course, a group teleconference held 1–2 weeks post-course, and a survey administered 6 months post-course. Participants described digital storytelling as a culturally respectful way to support cancer awareness and education. Participants described the process of creating digital stories as supporting knowledge acquisition, encouraging personal reflection, and sparking a desire to engage in cancer risk reduction activities for themselves and with their families and patients. As a result of creating a personalized digital story, CHA/Ps reported feeling differently about cancer, noting an increase in cancer knowledge and comfort to talk about cancer with clients and family. Indigenous digital stories have potential for broad use as a culturally appropriate health messaging tool. PMID:27429956

  16. Promoting Culturally Respectful Cancer Education Through Digital Storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Melany; Kuhnley, Regina; Lanier, Anne; Dignan, Mark; Revels, Laura; Schoenberg, Nancy E; Cueva, Katie

    Cancer is the leading cause of mortality among Alaska Native people. Over half of Alaska Native people live in rural communities where specially trained community members called Community Health Aides/Practitioners (CHA/Ps) provide health care. In response to CHA/Ps' expressed desire to learn more about cancer, four 5-day cancer education and digital storytelling courses were provided in 2014. Throughout each course, participants explored cancer information, reflected on their personal experiences, and envisioned how they might apply their knowledge within their communities. Each course participant also created a personal and authentic digital story, a methodology increasingly embraced by Indigenous communities as a way to combine storytelling traditions with modern technology to promote both individual and community health. Opportunities to learn of CHA/Ps' experiences with cancer and digital storytelling included a 3-page end-of-course written evaluation, a weekly story-showing log kept for 4 weeks post-course, a group teleconference held 1-2 weeks post-course, and a survey administered 6 months post-course. Participants described digital storytelling as a culturally respectful way to support cancer awareness and education. Participants described the process of creating digital stories as supporting knowledge acquisition, encouraging personal reflection, and sparking a desire to engage in cancer risk reduction activities for themselves and with their families and patients. As a result of creating a personalized digital story, CHA/Ps reported feeling differently about cancer, noting an increase in cancer knowledge and comfort to talk about cancer with clients and family. Indigenous digital stories have potential for broad use as a culturally appropriate health messaging tool.

  17. Storytelling in drug treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ditte

    2014-01-01

    Professionals who provide drug treatment to young people regularly encounter what they conceive to be inauthentic client claims, that is, claims not in accordance with reality. Earlier research demonstrates how authenticity remains a key concern within drug treatment, but it has not sufficiently...... of ulterior motives, clients are interpreted as making inauthentic claims because they want to obtain something externally from drug treatment (e.g., avoid prison or work training programs), and (3) the story of disorders explains inauthenticity as a result of pathology. The study illuminates how...

  18. Dementia: involving patients in storytelling--a caring intervention. A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Ann-Kristin; Lepp, Margret; Ringsberg, Karin C

    2005-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the potential therapeutic role of storytelling in patients with dementia and, if so, to formulate pedagogic implications for the field of nursing with the focus on dementia care. The present study is part of a larger project, Drama-Ger (Lepp et al. 2003: Journal of Clinical Nursing 12, 873-881), consisting of a cultural drama programme designed for patients with dementia and their caregivers. The programme consisted of two groups (A and B). Group A focused on dance, rhythm and songs, group B focused on storytelling and conversations. The present pilot study deals with group B. The study was an intervention study. Six strategically selected patients, five women and one man, with intermediate and severe dementia, and their three female paid caregivers participated in the programme. They met on six occasions for 1.5 hours once a week for two months. The leader of the group, a Registered Nurse, who was also trained as a symbol pedagogue/teacher, told stories that were related to Erikson's development theory. She continuously kept a reflective diary which was qualitatively analysed. This pilot study clearly indicates that storytelling invited the patients to take part in associative conversations. The storytelling appeared to help them to remember and make associations with situations they had previously experienced in their lives. Erikson's stages of development could be traced in the conversations. The patients interacted with each other, their caregivers and the leader. A drama programme using storytelling appears to stimulate patients with dementia to communicate and interact with other people. Ten implications four statements about storytelling as a pedagogic tool and six statements to facilitate a pedagogic approach have been drawn from this study. The implications can be used as a guide when using storytelling for caring intervention with the focus on dementia care.

  19. Effect of exercise training on Ca{sup 2+} release units of left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro-Júnior, M.A. [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Laboratório de Biologia do Exercício, Departamento de Educação Física, Viçosa, MG (Brazil); Quintão-Júnior, J.F.; Drummond, L.R.; Lavorato, V.N.; Drummond, F.R. [Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Laboratório de Biologia do Exercício, Departamento de Educação Física, Viçosa, MG (Brazil); Amadeu, M.A.; Oliveira, E.M. [Universidade de São Paulo, Laboratório de Bioquímica e Biologia Molecular do Exercício, Escola de Educação Física e Esportes, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Felix, L.B. [Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Departamento de Engenharia Elétrica, Viçosa, MG (Brazil); Cruz, J.S. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Laboratório de Membranas Excitáveis e Biologia Cardiovascular, Departamento de Bioquímica e Imunologia, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Mill, J.G. [Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Departamento de Ciências Fisiológicas, Vitória, ES (Brazil); Natali, A.J.; Prímola-Gomes, T.N. [Universidade Federal de Viçosa, Laboratório de Biologia do Exercício, Departamento de Educação Física, Viçosa, MG (Brazil)

    2014-08-29

    In cardiomyocytes, calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) release units comprise clusters of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} release channels located on the sarcoplasmic reticulum, and hypertension is well established as a cause of defects in calcium release unit function. Our objective was to determine whether endurance exercise training could attenuate the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release unit components and Ca{sup 2+} sparks in left ventricular myocytes of spontaneously hypertensive rats. Male Wistar and spontaneously hypertensive rats (4 months of age) were divided into 4 groups: normotensive (NC) and hypertensive control (HC), and normotensive (NT) and hypertensive trained (HT) animals (7 rats per group). NC and HC rats were submitted to a low-intensity treadmill running protocol (5 days/week, 1 h/day, 0% grade, and 50-60% of maximal running speed) for 8 weeks. Gene expression of the ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP12.6) increased (270%) and decreased (88%), respectively, in HC compared to NC rats. Endurance exercise training reversed these changes by reducing RyR2 (230%) and normalizing FKBP12.6 gene expression (112%). Hypertension also increased the frequency of Ca{sup 2+} sparks (HC=7.61±0.26 vs NC=4.79±0.19 per 100 µm/s) and decreased its amplitude (HC=0.260±0.08 vs NC=0.324±0.10 ΔF/F{sub 0}), full width at half-maximum amplitude (HC=1.05±0.08 vs NC=1.26±0.01 µm), total duration (HC=11.51±0.12 vs NC=14.97±0.24 ms), time to peak (HC=4.84±0.06 vs NC=6.31±0.14 ms), and time constant of decay (HC=8.68±0.12 vs NC=10.21±0.22 ms). These changes were partially reversed in HT rats (frequency of Ca{sup 2+} sparks=6.26±0.19 µm/s, amplitude=0.282±0.10 ΔF/F{sub 0}, full width at half-maximum amplitude=1.14±0.01 µm, total duration=13.34±0.17 ms, time to peak=5.43±0.08 ms, and time constant of decay=9.43±0.15 ms). Endurance exercise training attenuated the deleterious effects of hypertension on calcium release units of

  20. The development of storytelling in early childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Marjanovič Umek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Storytelling is an important aspect of child's language competence, which largely depends on her/his understanding and expression of a decontextualised content and develops rapidly in the period between the second and sixth year of life. The purpose of this study was to examine age differences in children's storytelling in the period between the third and sixth year of age. In addition, we considered the effect of gender on storytelling of children of different ages. The sample included 156 children aged from 3 to 6 years, who were divided into 3 age groups, namely children, aged 3, 4 and 5 years. Child's storytelling competence was assessed with the Little Glove Storytelling Test. Children's stories told by a standard set of illustrations, were analyzed in terms of criteria, designed to assess the developmental level of the stories. The criteria refer to the words, included in the story, the grammatical structure and the content of the story. The obtained results suggested that several important changes in the development of storytelling occur within the period of early childhood. The 5-years-old children told longer stories with a more complex grammatical structure and a coherent content as the 3-years-old children. Children's achievements on the individual criteria for assessing the developmental level of the stories progressed relatively steadily through all three age groups. The results also showed that gender had no significant effect on the storytelling of children of different ages.

  1. Enhancing Sequential Time Perception and Storytelling Ability of Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, Sara; Eden, Sigal

    2011-01-01

    A 3-month intervention was conducted to enhance the sequential time perception and storytelling ability of young children with hearing loss. The children were trained to arrange pictorial episodes of temporal scripts and tell the stories they created. Participants (N = 34, aged 4-7 years) were divided into 2 groups based on whether their…

  2. Creating Community Engagements Between People with Disability and the Local Community Through Digital Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinsuke Funaki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The International Federation of Social Workers adopted a new global definition of social work in 2014. Although promotion of social cohesion and respect for diversities was included in the new definition, social work practices for promoting cultural citizenship were still under-developed in Japan. Since the 1990s, community arts organizations in Australia have developed community engagement projects for people with disabilities through digital media production, such as digital storytelling, film making etc. It is important to develop collaborative methods between social workers and artists to promote cultural citizenship as social inclusion for minority groups such as immigrants and people with disabilities. With the aid of social workers and artists working in disability care fields, iPad digital storytelling workshops for people with intellectual disabilities were organized in Fukui, Japan, from 2013 to 2014. The digital media training programs for human service professionals and social work students were organized in Sydney, Australia, and Fukui, Japan, prior to these workshops. During this research project, we conducted interviews with participants to understand the ways in which people with disabilities and the local community interact with each other through digital storytelling. This paper explores two key questions. Firstly, we examine how digital storytelling can be employed for community engagement between people with disabilities and the local community and how it can help them achieve cultural citizenship. Secondly, we investigate how we can develop social work practices for people with disabilities through digital storytelling.

  3. Time-Dependent Effects of Training on Cardiovascular Control in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats: Role for Brain Oxidative Stress and Inflammation and Baroreflex Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Masson, Gustavo S.; Costa, Tassia S. R.; Yshii, Lidia; Fernandes, Denise C.; Soares, Pedro Paulo Silva; Laurindo, Francisco R.; Scavone, Cristoforo; Michelini, Lisete C.

    2014-01-01

    Baroreflex dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation, important hallmarks of hypertension, are attenuated by exercise training. In this study, we investigated the relationships and time-course changes of cardiovascular parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-oxidant profiles within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Basal values and variability of arterial pressure and heart rate and baroreflex sensitivity were measured in traine...

  4. Storytelling: a leadership and educational tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Karren

    2015-06-01

    A powerful tool that leaders and educators can use to engage the listeners-both staff and learners-is storytelling. Stories demonstrate important points, valuable lessons, and the behaviors that are preferred by the leader. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Signs, Systems and Complexity of Transmedia Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renira Rampazzo Gambarato

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses key concepts such as sign, system and complexity in order to approach transmedia storytelling and better understand its intricate nature. The theoretical framework chosen to investigate transmedia storytelling meanders is Semiotics by Charles Sanders Peirce (1839-1914 and General Systems Theory by Mario Bunge (1919-. The complexity of transmedia storytelling is not simply the one of the signs of the works included in a transmedia franchise. It also includes the complexity of the dispositions of users/consumers/players as interpreters of semiotic elements (e.g. characters, themes, environments, events and outcomes presented by transmedia products. It extends further to the complexity of social, cultural, economical and political constructs. The German transmedia narrative The Ultimate SuperHero-Blog by Stefan Gieren and Sofia’s Diary, a Portuguese multiplatform production by BeActive, are presented as examples of closed and open system transmedia storytelling respectively.

  6. Integrating Systems Thinking and Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie Ollove

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the role of design in conflict resolution when doing so means balancing burdened pasts with present uncertainties. To prove its relevance in today’s complex problem spaces, design cannot remain stagnant; it must evolve alongside the pace of development. Designing within complexity is unprecedented. Yet, design can define structures that guide an understanding of this complexity. The methodology and case study described in this paper explore how systems thinking, storytelling and grounded theory can contribute to this understanding. The methodology aims to combine subjective perspectives with systemic analyses to create a collective narrative that reveals the multitude of individual understandings of conflicts. Ultimately, this methodology does not attempt to resolve conflict; instead, it  aims to provide an in-depth diagnosis of a wicked problem and question the role of design therein.

  7. A Comparative Analysis of Pausing in Child and Adult Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redford, Melissa A.

    2012-01-01

    The goals of the current study were (1) to assess differences in child and adult pausing, and (2) to determine whether characteristics of child and adult pausing can be explained by the same language variables. Spontaneous speech samples were obtained from ten 5-year-olds and their accompanying parent using a storytelling/retelling task. Analyses of pause frequency, duration, variation in durations, and pause location indicated that pause time decreased with retelling, but not with age group except when child and adult pausing was considered in its speech and language context. The results suggest that differences in child and adult pausing reflect differences in child and adult language, not in the cognitive resources allocated to language production PMID:23772097

  8. Better Learning of Chinese Idioms through Storytelling: Current Trend of Multimedia Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ee Hui; Hew, Soon Hin

    2017-01-01

    Storytelling plays a vital role to impart a nation's tradition, cultural beliefs and history to future generation. It is frequently used for the purpose of sharing or exchanging information as it enables the messages to be conveyed to the audience easily. Storytelling acts as a tool of human social interaction and is commonly used in education for…

  9. Storytelling in the Early Bereavement Period to Reduce Emotional Distress Among Surrogates Involved in a Decision to Limit Life Support in the ICU: A Pilot Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnato, Amber E; Schenker, Yael; Tiver, Greer; Dew, Mary Amanda; Arnold, Robert M; Nunez, Eduardo R; Reynolds, Charles F

    2017-01-01

    Surrogate decision makers involved in decisions to limit life support for an incapacitated patient in the ICU have high rates of adverse emotional health outcomes distinct from normal processes of grief and bereavement. Narrative self-disclosure (storytelling) reduces emotional distress after other traumatic experiences. We sought to assess the feasibility, acceptability, and tolerability of storytelling among bereaved surrogates involved in a decision to limit life support in the ICU. Pilot single-blind trial. Five ICUs across three hospitals within a single health system between June 2013 and November 2014. Bereaved surrogates of ICU patients. Storytelling and control conditions involved printed bereavement materials and follow-up assessments. Storytelling involved a single 1- to 2-hour home or telephone visit by a trained interventionist who elicited the surrogate's story. The primary outcomes were feasibility (rates of enrollment, intervention receipt, 3- and 6-mo follow-up), acceptability (closed and open-ended end-of-study feedback at 6 mo), and tolerability (acute mental health services referral). Of 53 eligible surrogates, 32 (60%) consented to treatment allocation. Surrogates' mean age was 55.5 (SD, 11.8), and they were making decisions for their parent (47%), spouse (28%), sibling (13%), child (3%), or other relation (8%). We allocated 14 to control and 18 to storytelling, 17 of 18 (94%) received storytelling, 14 of 14 (100%) and 13 of 14 (94%) control subjects and 16 of 18 (89%) and 17 of 18 (94%) storytelling subjects completed their 3- and 6-month telephone assessments. At 6 months, nine of 13 control participants (69%) and 16 of 17 storytelling subjects (94%) reported feeling "better" or "much better," and none felt "much worse." One control subject (8%) and one storytelling subject (6%) said that the study was burdensome, and one control subject (8%) wished they had not participated. No subjects required acute mental health services referral. A

  10. Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouton, Nicolaas T.O.; Kjærbeck, Susanne; Rasmussen, Rasmus Kjærgaard

    2017-01-01

    This entry explicates the notion of a strategic narrative by describing the development of the concept, by delineating its core features, and by discussing its central functions. Its beginnings can be traced to a broader narrative turn within the humanities and social sciences. As the concept tra...

  11. The Power of Organizational Storytelling: A Management Development Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Sandra; Dennehy, Robert F.

    1997-01-01

    Based on the premise that storytelling is a powerful tool, a model of good organizational storytelling is outlined. The use of stories in management development as a way of understanding organizations as well as ways to enhance managerial storytelling skills are addressed. (SK)

  12. Using Storytelling to Increase Interest and Recollection in Finance Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Lonnie; Harris, Renard

    2011-01-01

    The use of storytelling allows lecturers to engage students in a dynamic and enthusiastic way while encouraging students to develop a higher order of thinking and recollection. Storytelling allows the lecturer to show their interest in the material and in the students. Lectures can utilize the art of storytelling to communicate expertise and…

  13. Storytelling in Mexican Homes: Connections between Oral and Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    The study focuses on storytelling among Mexican families, documenting the frequency of storytelling in the homes of working- and middle-class Mexican families, the range of topics of the stories, characteristics and genres of stories, and intergenerational continuity of storytelling practices. Also examined are potential associations between…

  14. Digital Storytelling: A New Player on the Narrative Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossiter, Marsha; Garcia, Penny A.

    2010-01-01

    Digital storytelling is a dynamic and beautiful marriage of narrative and technology that is proving to be a potent force in educational practice. Interest in the multiple applications of digital storytelling has burgeoned in recent years. A growing body of literature has explored the ways in which digital storytelling is being employed in various…

  15. Language, Literacy, Literature: Using Storytelling in the Languages Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    Stories and storytelling have been used for millennia to entertain, challenge and educate. As a shared form of language interaction, storytelling has engaged communities in developing and perpetuating common understandings of both language and culture, as critical foundations to harmonious societies. Stories and storytelling provide a rich source…

  16. Storytelling for Fluency and Flair: A Performance-Based Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Terry; Hlusek, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    In the classroom experiences described in this article, grade three students were introduced to storytelling through the interactive read aloud of a mentor text and a storytelling demonstration, followed by daily collaborative activities involving listening, speaking, reading, and writing, culminating in dramatic storytelling performances. The…

  17. Organizational Storytelling for Librarians: Using Stories for Effective Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Just as literature can be used for learning, the power of storytelling can be very effective when applied to leadership and management. Library expert and author Marek shows readers how they can use storytelling to communicate vision and values with: (1) A primer on how to develop storytelling skills; (2) Tips on how to use narratives to navigate…

  18. The Art of Storytelling: Reshaping and Preserving Traditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Barbara Ellen

    2012-01-01

    According to Simon Ortiz (Acoma Pueblo), storytelling is as much about education as entertainment. It is through storytelling that each tribe's history, moral precepts, and spirituality are passed down from one generation to the next. This attention to the holistic value of storytelling and its link to community is understood by Kevin "Hoch"…

  19. Digital Storytelling: An Alternative Way of Expressing Oneself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartsell, Taralynn

    2017-01-01

    Digital storytelling has many implications in teaching and learning. As a way to communicate ideas, experiences, beliefs, and topics to an audience through the use of technology and multimedia, digital stories help storytellers acquire many different skills and literacies. The most important aspect is that the storyteller learns to create stories…

  20. "The Storyteller: Reflections on the Works of Nikolai Leskov."

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Journal of Oral History, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Presents 11 selections from Walter Benjamin's essay "The Storyteller" which illustrate how the work milieu and the significance of death are incorporated into stories. Benjamin compares historiography to traditional storytelling, and discusses the effect of the storyteller's need to maintain the listener's interest upon the story's style…

  1. Using Digital Storytelling to Teach Psychology: A Preliminary Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheafer, Vicki

    2017-01-01

    Digital storytelling is a technology application that has emerged as a powerful teaching and learning tool that engages both teachers and students. Digital storytelling allows students to become creative storytellers through selecting a topic, conducting research, writing a script, and developing the story. However, the use of digital storytelling…

  2. Getting Started: A Call for Storytelling in Family Medicine Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventres, William; Gross, Paul

    2016-10-01

    In this article we introduce family medicine educators to storytelling as an important teaching tool. We describe how stories are a critical part of the work of family physicians. We review the rationales for family medicine educators to become skilled storytellers. We present the components of effective stories, proposing two different perspectives on how to imagine, construct, and present them. We provide a list of resources for getting started in storytelling and offer two personal vignettes that articulate the importance of storytelling in the authors' respective professional developments. We point the way forward for family medicine educators interested in integrating storytelling into their repertoire of teaching skills.

  3. Storytelling: a care technology in continuing education for active ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Nadia Pinheiro da; Polaro, Sandra Helena Isse; Vahl, Eloá Aparecida Caliari; Gonçalves, Lucia Hisako Takase

    2016-01-01

    assessing relevance and effectiveness of care/educational technology in the form of "storytelling" as a strategy in the cultivation of active ageing (AA) for elderly users of a Basic Health Unit (BHU), from the Amazon region. convergent care research (CCR) held in a BHU in Belém, state of Pará, with eight elderly ladies for testing this technology. An active ageing assessment questionnaire and WHOQOL-BREF - quality of life assessment were applied. After training with a view to continuing education, elderly ladies told stories for an audience that addressed the question: "What did you learn from it for your life?" tThe popular stories elicited reactions from which the following categories emerged: solidarity; respect for the other; imagination, dreams, hopes and culture of the Amazonian. This practice had a positive result, producing changes in the quality of life of the elderly, particularly in the psychological domain. "storytelling" proved to be an innovative technology, a relevant and effective resource in health education, especially for active ageing.

  4. Empowering the Learner through Digital Animated Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjedde, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    . Storytelling and narrative is fundamental to the process of meaning making according to the seminal works of cultural psychologist Jerome Bruner [2]. .As the Canadian educational theorist Kieran Egan [3] suggests, there is an important relationship between storytelling and imagination because it is ”central...... to the general ability to make meaning out of experience.” One way to design for narrative multimodal learning is to introduce the learners to the tools to make digital animated stories as a way to work with literacies in the classroom. In this way it may offer the learners a platform for meaningful involvement...

  5. Art, Storytelling, and the Digital Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohier, Jason

    2007-01-01

    A digital story can be anything that uses digital technology to construct narrative. It comes in many forms, including short movies and documentaries, using still images, voice-over narration, and music. It can be academic, abstract, or highly personal. Digital storytelling provides a powerful media literacy opportunity, as students are required…

  6. 2011 "Cour des Contes" storytelling festival

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The "Cour des Contes" storytelling festival will take place in Plan-les-Ouates (Geneva) from 6 to 15 May 2011. This year, for the first time, stories will be told in English at 11 a.m. on Sunday, 15 May, at the "La Julienne" arts and culture centre.   More information  

  7. Use of Digital Storytelling in Biology Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoyun, Ferit; Yapici, I. Ümit

    2016-01-01

    With the technological developments in the 21st century, it is now necessary to integrate technological renovations effectively into teaching-learning environments. There are several approaches that allow integration of technology into teaching-learning environments. One of these approaches is digital storytelling. The purpose of this study was to…

  8. The Effectiveness of Storytelling on Adult Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminotti, Enzo; Gray, Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: As two doctoral students and adult learners, the authors strongly believe that story telling can be a great tool for educators working with adult learners. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of how effective storytelling can be for adult learners. Design/methodology/approach: The approach of this paper is one of gathering…

  9. Teaching Storytelling as a Leadership Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleverley-Thompson, Shannon

    2018-01-01

    The ability to tell stories can be an important leadership attribute and skill to master in order to be a successful leader (Baldoni, 2003; Denning, 2004; Kouzes & Posner, 2012). Storytelling is a central component of effective communication for leaders and a skill to master for future leadership success. This paper supports active learning,…

  10. Generating Expressive Speech for Storytelling Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailly, G.; Theune, Mariet; Meijs, Koen; Campbell, N.; Hamza, W.; Heylen, Dirk K.J.; Ordelman, Roeland J.F.; Hoge, H.; Jianhua, T.

    Work on expressive speech synthesis has long focused on the expression of basic emotions. In recent years, however, interest in other expressive styles has been increasing. The research presented in this paper aims at the generation of a storytelling speaking style, which is suitable for

  11. Crew Resource Management (CRM) video storytelling project: a team-based learning activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Maggie Jiao; Denando, John

    2011-01-01

    This Crew Resource Management (CRM) video storytelling project asks students to work in a team (4-5 people per team) to create (write and produce) a video story. The story should demonstrate lacking and ill practices of CRM knowledge and skills, or positive skills used to create a successful scenario in aviation (e. g. , flight training, commercial aviation, airport management). The activity is composed of two parts: (1) creating a video story of CRM in aviation, and (2) delivering a group pr...

  12. Making a difference? A comparison between multi-sensory and regular storytelling for persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Brug, A; Van der Putten, A A J; Penne, A; Maes, B; Vlaskamp, C

    2016-11-01

    Multi-sensory storytelling (MSST) was developed to include persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities in storytelling culture. In order to increase the listeners' attention, MSST stories are individualised and use multiple sensory stimuli to support the verbal text. In order to determine the value of MSST, this study compared listeners' attention under two conditions: (1) being read MSST books and (2) being read regular stories. A non-randomised control study was executed in which the intervention group read MSST books (n = 45) and a comparison group (n = 31) read regular books. Books were read 10 times during a 5-week period. The 1st, 5th and 10th storytelling sessions were recorded on video in both groups, and the percentage of attention directed to the book and/or stimuli and to the storyteller was scored by a trained and independent rater. Two repeated measure analyses (with the storytelling condition as a between-subject factor and the three measurements as factor) were performed to determine the difference between the groups in terms of attention directed to the book/stimuli (first analysis) and storyteller (second analysis). A further analysis established whether the level of attention changed between the reading sessions and whether there was an interaction effect between the repetition of the book and the storytelling condition. The attention directed to the book and/or the stimuli was significantly higher in the MSST group than in the comparison group. No significant difference between the two groups was found in the attention directed to the storyteller. For MSST stories, most attention was observed during the fifth reading session, while for regular stories, the fifth session gained least attentiveness from the listener. The persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities paid more attention to the book and/or stimuli in the MSST condition compared with the regular story telling group. Being more attentive towards

  13. Storytelling in Mexican Homes: Connections Between Oral and Literacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    The study focuses on storytelling among Mexican families, documenting the frequency of storytelling in the homes of working and middle class Mexican families, the range of topics of the stories, characteristics and genres of stories, and intergenerational continuity of storytelling practices. Also examined are potential associations between storytelling practices and children’s performance on language and early reading tasks. This qualitative study draws from interview data with 30 families, supplemented with survey and outcome data from the larger mixed method project of which it forms a part. Storytelling continues to be a widespread but not frequent activity, including genres of family anecdotes, horror stories, folktales, and historical recounts. Storytelling as a cultural resource is discussed. PMID:23565052

  14. Storytelling: A Qualitative Tool to Promote Health Among Vulnerable Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Janelle F; Salem, Benissa; Hodge, Felicia Schanche; Albarrán, Cyndi R; Anaebere, Ann; Hayes-Bautista, Teodocia Maria

    2015-09-01

    Storytelling is a basic cultural phenomenon that has recently been recognized as a valuable method for collecting research data and developing multidisciplinary interventions. The purpose of this article is to present a collection of nursing scholarship wherein the concept of storytelling, underpinned by cultural phenomena, is explored for data collection and intervention. A conceptual analysis of storytelling reveals key variables. Following a brief review of current research focused on storytelling used within health care, three case studies among three vulnerable populations (American Indian teen mothers, American Indian cancer survivors, and African American women at risk for HIV/AIDS) demonstrate the uses of storytelling for data collection and intervention. Implications for transcultural nursing regarding storytelling are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. NARRATIVE KNOWINGNarrative and Storytelling Resources in Art Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Harpaz, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    International audience; As professor Amia Lieblich has said, "People are story tellers by nature" (Lieblich et al., 1988). Storytelling technique is well-founded in narrative theory, phenomenology, psychoanalytic theory, trauma studies and aesthetics. Both my own research and my Art Therapy practice have been enriched by the use of narrative and storytelling as therapy interventions. Storytelling ability emanates from narrative knowledge. Notably, it is reframed as the patient's ability to us...

  16. Digital storytelling: an innovative tool for practice, education, and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Shalini; Donnelly, Catherine; Shin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Digital storytelling is a method of using storytelling, group work, and modern technology to facilitate the creation of 2-3 minute multi-media video clips to convey personal or community stories. Digital storytelling is being used within the health care field; however, there has been limited documentation of its application within occupational therapy. This paper introduces digital storytelling and proposes how it can be applied in occupational therapy clinical practice, education, and research. The ethical and methodological challenges in relation to using the method are also discussed.

  17. Bridging storytelling traditions with digital technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Melany; Kuhnley, Regina; Revels, Laura J; Cueva, Katie; Dignan, Mark; Lanier, Anne P

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to learn how Community Health Workers (CHWs) in Alaska perceived digital storytelling as a component of the "Path to Understanding Cancer" curriculum and as a culturally respectful tool for sharing cancer-related health messages. A pre-course written application, end-of-course written evaluation, and internet survey informed this project. Digital storytelling was included in seven 5-day cancer education courses (May 2009-2012) in which 67 CHWs each created a personal 2-3 minute cancer-related digital story. Participant-chosen digital story topics included tobacco cessation, the importance of recommended cancer screening exams, cancer survivorship, loss, grief and end-of-life comfort care, and self-care as patient care providers. All participants completed an end-of-course written evaluation. In July 2012, contact information was available for 48 participants, of whom 24 completed an internet survey. All 67 participants successfully completed a digital story which they shared and discussed with course members. On the written post-course evaluation, all participants reported that combining digital storytelling with cancer education supported their learning and was a culturally respectful way to provide health messages. Additionally, 62 of 67 CHWs reported that the course increased their confidence to share cancer information with their communities. Up to 3 years post-course, all 24 CHW survey respondents reported they had shown their digital story. Of note, 23 of 24 CHWs also reported change in their own behavior as a result of the experience. All CHWs, regardless of computer skills, successfully created a digital story as part of the cancer education course. CHWs reported that digital stories enhanced their learning and were a culturally respectful way to share cancer-related information. Digital storytelling gave the power of the media into the hands of CHWs to increase their cancer knowledge, facilitate patient and community cancer

  18. Bridging storytelling traditions with digital technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melany Cueva

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this project was to learn how Community Health Workers (CHWs in Alaska perceived digital storytelling as a component of the “Path to Understanding Cancer” curriculum and as a culturally respectful tool for sharing cancer-related health messages. Design. A pre-course written application, end-of-course written evaluation, and internet survey informed this project. Methods. Digital storytelling was included in seven 5-day cancer education courses (May 2009–2012 in which 67 CHWs each created a personal 2–3 minute cancer-related digital story. Participant-chosen digital story topics included tobacco cessation, the importance of recommended cancer screening exams, cancer survivorship, loss, grief and end-of-life comfort care, and self-care as patient care providers. All participants completed an end-of-course written evaluation. In July 2012, contact information was available for 48 participants, of whom 24 completed an internet survey. Results. All 67 participants successfully completed a digital story which they shared and discussed with course members. On the written post-course evaluation, all participants reported that combining digital storytelling with cancer education supported their learning and was a culturally respectful way to provide health messages. Additionally, 62 of 67 CHWs reported that the course increased their confidence to share cancer information with their communities. Up to 3 years post-course, all 24 CHW survey respondents reported they had shown their digital story. Of note, 23 of 24 CHWs also reported change in their own behaviour as a result of the experience. Conclusions. All CHWs, regardless of computer skills, successfully created a digital story as part of the cancer education course. CHWs reported that digital stories enhanced their learning and were a culturally respectful way to share cancer-related information. Digital storytelling gave the power of the media into the hands of CHWs

  19. Digital Storytelling: The Arts and Preservice Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito M. Dipinto

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this presentation, the authors describe a journey of teachers in a graduate Fine Arts Methods course. The journey began with conversations about what art is and the nature of collections in exploring this question. Elements of visual literacy, storytelling and music were investigated. The final product was a Digital Story incorporating all of these elements into a teaching artifact that integrated the Arts into other content areas for K-8 students.

  20. Visual Analytics and Storytelling through Video

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Pak C.; Perrine, Kenneth A.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Foote, Harlan P.; Thomas, Jim

    2005-10-31

    This paper supplements a video clip submitted to the Video Track of IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization 2005. The original video submission applies a two-way storytelling approach to demonstrate the visual analytics capabilities of a new visualization technique. The paper presents our video production philosophy, describes the plot of the video, explains the rationale behind the plot, and finally, shares our production experiences with our readers.

  1. PENGARUH STORYTELLING TERHADAP PERILAKU EMPATI ANAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Diah Ayuni

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Social relationship with others is important when the child enters middle childhood. Empathy behavior is the individual act to put herself or himself in others' feel. Empathy is influenced by individual perspective, gender, intelligence, similarity, experience, innate, discipline methods, and bonding. Through storytelling, children are expected to understand the differences of thoughts and feelings between them and others. This study aims to determine the effect of storytelling on the empathy behavior in the second grade students. A 35 students of Hj. Isriati Baiturrahman 1 elementary school Semarang which selected using nonrandomized pretest-posttest control group design. Measurements were made in lego game setting with 3-4 children per group. The data is collected using observation checklist that consists of 15 behavior indicators and conducted by two observers. The observation supported by audio-video recordings. Independent Sample t-Test and Paired Sample t-Test is used to analyzed the data. The result showed that was not difference between experiment group and control group in empathy behavior. On another hand, used aspect analysis, found that there was difference in fantasy between two groups. Keywords: Children’s empathy behavior, storytelling

  2. Sites of Possibility: Applied Theatre and Digital Storytelling with Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrutz, Megan

    2013-01-01

    As a process for engaging marginalised voices in the social/cultural economy of the media, digital storytelling has garnered much attention from media artists, community organisers and scholars since the early 1990s. The practice of digital storytelling, or the making and sharing of personal narratives through recorded voice-overs, digital…

  3. Storytelling as a creative activity in the classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catala, Alejandro; Theune, Mariët; Gijlers, Hannie; Heylen, Dirk

    2017-01-01

    In our ongoing research, we argue that storytelling activities can be used as creative tasks to stimulate creativity in children, one of the so-called 21st century skills. In this paper, we lay the foundations for our project on digitally supported storytelling, by gathering the viewpoints on

  4. Let's share a story : socially enhanced multimedia storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mu, M.; Simpson, S.; Race, N.; Niamut, O.A.; Koot, G.; Kaptein, A.M.; Taal, J.; Mori, L.

    2015-01-01

    An online multimedia storytelling ecosystem comprised of user applications, a collaborative storyauthoring engine, social context integration, and socially aware media services offers a mdium for inormation sharing and social storytelling about live events. User-generated audio-visual content is

  5. Storymaking: Combining Making and Storytelling in a School Makerspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Glen; Schmidt-Crawford, Denise A.; McKenna, Michael C.; Cohoon, Jim

    2017-01-01

    "Storymaking" makes use of school makerspaces to combine making and storytelling. Constructing a diorama is a common storytelling activity in schools. This exploratory study describes preliminary efforts that explored the feasibility of extending "Make to Learn" activities with elementary and middle school students from two…

  6. The Utility of Storytelling Strategies in the Biology Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csikar, Elizabeth; Stefaniak, Jill E.

    2018-01-01

    Conveying scientific information with high intrinsic cognitive load to students is a challenge. Often, students do not have the existing schema to incorporate the information in a comprehensive manner. One method that has shown promise is storytelling. Storytelling has been successfully used to convey public health information to non-experts.…

  7. The IRIS network of excellence : Integrating research in interactive storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cavazza, Marc; Donikian, Stéphane; Christie, Marc; Spierling, Ulrike; Szilas, Nicolas; Vorderer, Peter; Hartmann, Tilo; Klimmt, Christoph; André, Elisabeth; Champagnat, Ronan; Petta, Paolo; Olivier, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    Interactive Storytelling is a major endeavour to develop new media which could offer a radically new user experience, with a potential to revolutionise digital entertainment. European research in Interactive Storytelling has played a leading role in the development of the field, and this creates a

  8. Cooperation and the evolution of hunter-gatherer storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel; Schlaepfer, Philip; Major, Katie; Dyble, Mark; Page, Abigail E; Thompson, James; Chaudhary, Nikhil; Salali, Gul Deniz; Mace, Ruth; Astete, Leonora; Ngales, Marilyn; Vinicius, Lucio; Migliano, Andrea Bamberg

    2017-12-05

    Storytelling is a human universal. From gathering around the camp-fire telling tales of ancestors to watching the latest television box-set, humans are inveterate producers and consumers of stories. Despite its ubiquity, little attention has been given to understanding the function and evolution of storytelling. Here we explore the impact of storytelling on hunter-gatherer cooperative behaviour and the individual-level fitness benefits to being a skilled storyteller. Stories told by the Agta, a Filipino hunter-gatherer population, convey messages relevant to coordinating behaviour in a foraging ecology, such as cooperation, sex equality and egalitarianism. These themes are present in narratives from other foraging societies. We also show that the presence of good storytellers is associated with increased cooperation. In return, skilled storytellers are preferred social partners and have greater reproductive success, providing a pathway by which group-beneficial behaviours, such as storytelling, can evolve via individual-level selection. We conclude that one of the adaptive functions of storytelling among hunter gatherers may be to organise cooperation.

  9. Socializing English-Speaking Navajo Children to Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vining, Christine B.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how young children are socialized to the process and products of storytelling as part of everyday family life is important for language and literacy instruction. A language socialization framework was used to understand storytelling practices on the Navajo Nation. This study examined how three young English-speaking Navajo children,…

  10. Digital Storytelling in Australia: Academic Perspectives and Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Robert; Adam, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This project explored the experiences of a small sample (N = 6) of Australian academics with the use of digital storytelling as a pedagogical tool in higher education contexts. This article describes two case studies of academic uses of digital storytelling, along with interpretive analysis of six semi-structured interviews of academics working…

  11. Coaxing an intimate public : Life narrative in digital storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poletti, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the practice of digital storytelling in light of contemporary theories of autobiography and affect. Using the concept of coaxed life narrative developed by Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson, I analyse the role of digital storytelling in diversifying the voices in the public

  12. Storytelling to access social context and advance health equity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, JoAnne

    2012-11-01

    Increased understanding of individual and social determinants of health is crucial to moving toward health equity. This essay examines storytelling as a vehicle for advancing health equity research. Contemplative examination of storytelling as a research strategy. An overview of story theory is provided. This is followed by an examination of storytelling as a tool for increasing understanding about the contexts in which people negotiate health, strengthening participation of communities in addressing health issues, and building bridges between researchers and target populations. Storytelling can be a powerful tool for advancing health equity research. However, its effective use requires a renegotiation of relationships between researchers and target communities, as well as setting aside routine time to attend storytelling events and read a variety of stories. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fifth Annual Oswego County Storytelling Contest. District Liaison's Packet; Librarian's Packet; Checklist for Teachers; 1985 Student Storytelling Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswego County School Library System, Mexico, NY.

    This document comprises the materials used in the administration of the fifth annual Oswego County (New York) storytelling contest for students in grades 3-8. The District Liaison's Packet contains copies of all materials used, including contest guidelines; a contest timetable; judging criteria; hints on storytelling; a bibliography; checklists…

  14. Spontaneous pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davari R

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available A case with bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax was presented. Etiology, mechanism, and treatment were discussed on the review of literature. Spontaneous Pneumothorax is a clinical entity resulting from a sudden non traumatic rupture of the lung. Biach reported in 1880 that 78% of 916 patients with spontaneous pneumothorax had tuberculosis. Kjergaard emphasized 1932 the primary importance of subpleural bleb disease. Currently the clinical spectrum of spontaneous pneumothorax seems to have entered a third era with the recognition of the interstitial lung disease and AIDS as a significant etiology. Standard treatment is including: observation, thoracocentesis, tube thoracostomy. Chemical pleurodesis, bullectomy or wedge resection of lung with pleural abrasion and occasionally pleurectomy. Little information has been reported regarding the efficacy of such treatment in spontaneous pneumothorax secondary to non bleb disease

  15. Intergroup Contact: Using Storytelling to Increase Awareness of Lesbian and Gay Older Adults in Long-Term Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelts, Michael D; Galambos, Colleen

    2017-01-01

    Due to societally imposed stigmatization, lesbian and gay (LG) older adults fear and prolong accessing long-term care (LTC) even though they need LTC at higher rates. Interventions that decrease negative attitudes toward LG older adults among LTC staff are a first step in addressing this problem. In this study, the influence of intergroup contact (IGC) on LTC staff members' attitudes toward LG was explored through the use of storytelling as a training mechanism. An embedded mixed-method approach was employed to collect and analyze responses of 60 LTC staff who participated in a storytelling event. Participants completed pretests, posttests, and participated in audio-recorded group discussions. The findings showed that storytelling had a significant (p =0.001) and positive effect (d =0.57) on participants attitudes toward LG. Qualitative analysis revealed 90 codes, 13 process codes, and 4 themes: making meaning of stories, seeking understanding, application to LTC setting, and debating. When guided by IGC theory, storytelling has potential for positively influencing attitudes of LTC staff members toward LG older adults. There is a need for longitudinal work to further test this model.

  16. Storytelling and Repetitive Narratives for Design Empathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritsch, Jonas; Judice, Andrea; Soini, Katja

    2007-01-01

    Today it is widely established in design research that empathy is an important part of creating a true understanding of user experience as a resource for design. A typical challenge is how to transmit the feeling of empathy acquired by user studies to designers who have not participated in the user...... study. In this paper, we show how we attained an empathic understanding through storytelling and aroused empathy to others using repetitive narratives in an experimental presentation bringing forth factual, reflective and experiential aspects of the user information. Taking as a starting point our...... experiences with the design project Suomenlinna Seclusive, we conclude with the potential of using narratives for invoking design empathy....

  17. Strategic Spatial Planning as Persuasive Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kristian

    The paper analyses how the spatial vision of the Loop City for the Øresund Region has played an important persuasive role in legitimizing and mobilizing local and national political support for a light rail project along the outer ring road in the Greater Copenhagen Area. The paper discusses...... the persuasive power of spatial concepts in bringing transport infrastructure projects onto the national political agenda. In conclusion, the paper calls for critical attention to the rationalities underpinning practices of persuasive storytelling in contemporary strategic spatial planning....

  18. Towards an Empathizing and Adaptive Storyteller System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bae, Byung Chull; Brunete, Alberto; Malik, Usman

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes our ongoing effort to build an empathizing and adaptive storyteller system. The system under development aims to utilize emotional expressions generated from an avatar or a humanoid robot in addition to the listener’s responses which are monitored in real time, in order...... to deliver a story in an effective manner. We conducted a pilot study and the results were analyzed in two ways: first, through a survey questionnaire analysis based on the participant’s subjective ratings; second, through automated video analysis based on the participant’s emotional facial expression...

  19. Time-dependent effects of training on cardiovascular control in spontaneously hypertensive rats: role for brain oxidative stress and inflammation and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo S Masson

    Full Text Available Baroreflex dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation, important hallmarks of hypertension, are attenuated by exercise training. In this study, we investigated the relationships and time-course changes of cardiovascular parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-oxidant profiles within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. Basal values and variability of arterial pressure and heart rate and baroreflex sensitivity were measured in trained (T, low-intensity treadmill training and sedentary (S SHR at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8. Paraventricular nucleus was used to determine reactive oxygen species (dihydroethidium oxidation products, HPLC, NADPH oxidase subunits and pro-inflammatory cytokines expression (Real time PCR, p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 expression (Western blotting, NF-κB content (electrophoretic mobility shift assay and cytokines immunofluorescence. SHR-S vs. WKY-S (Wistar Kyoto rats as time control showed increased mean arterial pressure (172±3 mmHg, pressure variability and heart rate (358±7 b/min, decreased baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability, increased p47phox and reactive oxygen species production, elevated NF-κB activity and increased TNF-α and IL-6 expression within the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus. Two weeks of training reversed all hypothalamic changes, reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and normalized baroreflex sensitivity (4.04±0.31 vs. 2.31±0.19 b/min/mmHg in SHR-S. These responses were followed by increased vagal component of heart rate variability (1.9-fold and resting bradycardia (-13% at the 4th week, and, by reduced vasomotor component of pressure variability (-28% and decreased mean arterial pressure (-7% only at the 8th week of training. Our findings indicate that independent of the high pressure levels in SHR, training promptly restores baroreflex function by disrupting the positive feedback between high oxidative stress and increased pro

  20. Time-dependent effects of training on cardiovascular control in spontaneously hypertensive rats: role for brain oxidative stress and inflammation and baroreflex sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Gustavo S; Costa, Tassia S R; Yshii, Lidia; Fernandes, Denise C; Soares, Pedro Paulo Silva; Laurindo, Francisco R; Scavone, Cristoforo; Michelini, Lisete C

    2014-01-01

    Baroreflex dysfunction, oxidative stress and inflammation, important hallmarks of hypertension, are attenuated by exercise training. In this study, we investigated the relationships and time-course changes of cardiovascular parameters, pro-inflammatory cytokines and pro-oxidant profiles within the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus of the spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). Basal values and variability of arterial pressure and heart rate and baroreflex sensitivity were measured in trained (T, low-intensity treadmill training) and sedentary (S) SHR at weeks 0, 1, 2, 4 and 8. Paraventricular nucleus was used to determine reactive oxygen species (dihydroethidium oxidation products, HPLC), NADPH oxidase subunits and pro-inflammatory cytokines expression (Real time PCR), p38 MAPK and ERK1/2 expression (Western blotting), NF-κB content (electrophoretic mobility shift assay) and cytokines immunofluorescence. SHR-S vs. WKY-S (Wistar Kyoto rats as time control) showed increased mean arterial pressure (172±3 mmHg), pressure variability and heart rate (358±7 b/min), decreased baroreflex sensitivity and heart rate variability, increased p47phox and reactive oxygen species production, elevated NF-κB activity and increased TNF-α and IL-6 expression within the paraventricular nucleus of hypothalamus. Two weeks of training reversed all hypothalamic changes, reduced ERK1/2 phosphorylation and normalized baroreflex sensitivity (4.04±0.31 vs. 2.31±0.19 b/min/mmHg in SHR-S). These responses were followed by increased vagal component of heart rate variability (1.9-fold) and resting bradycardia (-13%) at the 4th week, and, by reduced vasomotor component of pressure variability (-28%) and decreased mean arterial pressure (-7%) only at the 8th week of training. Our findings indicate that independent of the high pressure levels in SHR, training promptly restores baroreflex function by disrupting the positive feedback between high oxidative stress and increased pro

  1. Tales of resistance and other emancipatory functions of storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassley, Jane S; Nelms, Tommie P

    2009-11-01

    Tales of resistance and other emancipatory functions of storytelling. This paper is the report of a study to explore how the process of storytelling might facilitate women's emancipatory knowing, using examples from women's breastfeeding stories. Storytelling, as an interactive process, can give women a way to explain pivotal life events, justify choices, examine reality and find meaning in experiences. Emancipatory functions of storytelling have been identified as contextual grounding, bonding with others, validating and affirming experiences, venting and catharsis, resisting oppression and educating others. Secondary data analysis was conducted in 2008 on breastfeeding stories originally gathered from 13 women from 2002 to 2004 for a feminist hermeneutic study of maternal breastfeeding confidence. The stories were re-examined through the lens of the emancipatory functions of storytelling. Illustrations of contextual grounding, validating and affirming experiences, venting and catharsis and acts of resistance were found in the breastfeeding stories and presented as exemplars of emancipatory knowing. Women revealed the difficulties they encountered breastfeeding, transforming these experiences as they discovered their meaning. They described collisions that occurred when personal, familial, healthcare professionals' or cultural expectations differed from their experience. The stories suggested possible liberation from old ideologies about breastfeeding as women redefined the difficulties they encountered. Storytelling has potential as a simple, yet profound, and powerful emancipatory intervention which nurses can use to help women in their care make sense of and transform experiences of health and illness. Storytelling may have global implications for nursing practice and research.

  2. Medieval Storytelling and Analogous Oral Traditions Today: Two Digital Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Birge Vitz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This essay presents two open-access digital databases of video clips of modern performances of medieval narratives and analogous living oral storytelling traditions: Performing Medieval Narrative Today: A Video Showcase and Arthurian Legend in Performance. To help people recognize the performability of medieval narratives, these websites offer examples of medieval-type storytelling that are still alive today in various parts of the world, as well as clips from performances of medieval narrative created by a new generation of storytellers.

  3. RESEARCHING AND EVALUATING DIGITAL STORYTELLING AS A DISTANCE EDUCATION TOOL IN PHYSICS INSTRUCTION: AN APPLICATION WITH PRE-SERVICE PHYSICS TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nihat KOTLUK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in information and communication technology in 21st century have led to changes in education trends and today new concepts such as computer, multimedia, audio, video, animation and internet have become an indispensable part of life. The storytelling is the one of approach which is allowed to using technology in educational field. The aim of this study is to define the use of digital storytelling in physics instruction as a distance education tool. In this respect, the literature related to digital storytelling was analyzed and for applying it in practice, 13 pre-service teachers from department of physic education were trained on digital storytelling for 6 weeks in spring term of 2013- 2014 academic year. Following the process of instruction, pre-service teachers created and shared digital stories in YouTube and evaluated all of them. Furthermore, opinions of the pre-service teachers were asked on digital story telling As a result of the analysing the DST videos and opinions of pre-service teacher, it is expected that using digital storytelling as distance education tool will be efficacious.

  4. Continuous Aerobic Training in Individualized Intensity Avoids Spontaneous Physical Activity Decline and Improves MCT1 Expression in Oxidative Muscle of Swimming Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Menezes Scariot

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Although aerobic training has been shown to affect the lactate transport of skeletal muscle, there is no information concerning the effect of continuous aerobic training on spontaneous physical activity (SPA. Because every movement in daily life (i.e. SPA is generated by skeletal muscle, we think that it is possible that an improvement of SPA could affect the physiological properties of muscle with regard to lactate transport. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 12 weeks of continuous aerobic training in individualized intensity on SPA of rats and their gene expressions of monocarboxylate transporters (MCT 1 and 4 in soleus (oxidative and white gastrocnemius (glycolytic muscles. We also analyzed the effect of continuous aerobic training on aerobic and anaerobic parameters using the lactate minimum test (LMT. 60-day-old rats were randomly divided into three groups: a baseline group in which rats were evaluated prior to initiation of the study; a control group (Co in which rats were kept without any treatment during 12 weeks; and a chronic exercise group (Tr in which rats swam for 40min/day, 5 days/week at 80% of anaerobic threshold during 12 weeks. After the experimental period, SPA of rats was measured using a gravimetric method. Rats had their expression of MCTs determined by RT-PCR analysis. In essence, aerobic training is effective in maintaining SPA, but did not prevent the decline of aerobic capacity and anaerobic performance, leading us to propose that the decline of SPA is not fully attributed to a deterioration of physical properties. Changes in SPA were concomitant with changes in MCT1 expression in the soleus muscle of trained rats, suggestive of an additional adaptive response toward increased lactate clearance. This result is in line with our observation showing a better equilibrium on lactate production-remotion during the continuous exercise (LMT. We propose an approach to combat the decline of SPA of rats in their

  5. Transcriptome of the NTS in exercise-trained spontaneously hypertensive rats: implications for NTS function and plasticity in regulating blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waki, Hidefumi; Gouraud, Sabine S; Bhuiyan, Mohammad E R; Takagishi, Miwa; Yamazaki, Toshiya; Kohsaka, Akira; Maeda, Masanobu

    2013-01-07

    The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) controls the cardiovascular system during exercise, and alteration of its function may underlie exercise-induced cardiovascular adaptation. To understand the molecular basis of the NTS's plasticity in regulating blood pressure (BP) and its potential contribution to the antihypertensive effects, we characterized the gene expression profiles at the level of the NTS after long-term daily wheel running in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs). Genome-wide microarray analysis was performed to screen for differentially expressed genes in the NTS between exercise-trained (12 wk) and control SHRs. Pathway analysis using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database revealed that daily exercise altered the expression levels of NTS genes that are functionally associated with metabolic pathways (5 genes), neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions (4 genes), cell adhesion molecules (3 genes), and cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions (3 genes). One of the genes that belonged to the neuroactive ligand-receptor interactions category was histamine receptor H(1). Since we confirmed that the pressor response induced by activation of this receptor is increased after long-term daily exercise, it is suggested that functional plasticity in the histaminergic system may mediate the facilitation of blood pressure control in response to exercise but may not be involved in the lowered basal BP level found in exercise-trained SHRs. Since abnormal inflammatory states in the NTS are known to be prohypertensive in SHRs, altered gene expression of the inflammatory molecules identified in this study may be related to the antihypertensive effects in exercise-trained SHRs, although such speculation awaits functional validation.

  6. DISCRN: A Distributed Storytelling Framework for Intelligence Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Manu; Dos Santos, Raimundo; Chen, Feng; Lu, Chang-Tien

    2017-09-01

    Storytelling connects entities (people, organizations) using their observed relationships to establish meaningful storylines. This can be extended to spatiotemporal storytelling that incorporates locations, time, and graph computations to enhance coherence and meaning. But when performed sequentially these computations become a bottleneck because the massive number of entities make space and time complexity untenable. This article presents DISCRN, or distributed spatiotemporal ConceptSearch-based storytelling, a distributed framework for performing spatiotemporal storytelling. The framework extracts entities from microblogs and event data, and links these entities using a novel ConceptSearch to derive storylines in a distributed fashion utilizing key-value pair paradigm. Performing these operations at scale allows deeper and broader analysis of storylines. The novel parallelization techniques speed up the generation and filtering of storylines on massive datasets. Experiments with microblog posts such as Twitter data and Global Database of Events, Language, and Tone events show the efficiency of the techniques in DISCRN.

  7. Digital Storytelling: Bringing Humanistic Inquiry to Management Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesteruk, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    This essay recounts how a teaching experiment with digital storytelling unexpectedly revealed how this humanistic genre enabled by contemporary technology might contribute to a more creative integration of business study with the liberal arts.

  8. Storytelling, behavior planning, and language evolution in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Glen

    2014-01-01

    An attempt is made to specify the structure of the hominin bands that began steps to language. Storytelling could evolve without need for language yet be strongly subject to natural selection and could provide a major feedback process in evolving language. A storytelling model is examined, including its effects on the evolution of consciousness and the possible timing of language evolution. Behavior planning is presented as a model of language evolution from storytelling. The behavior programming mechanism in both directions provide a model of creating and understanding behavior and language. Culture began with societies, then family evolution, family life in troops, but storytelling created a culture of experiences, a final step in the long process of achieving experienced adults by natural selection. Most language evolution occurred in conversations where evolving non-verbal feedback ensured mutual agreements on understanding. Natural language evolved in conversations with feedback providing understanding of changes.

  9. Designing attractive gamification features for collaborative storytelling websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shang Hwa; Chang, Jen-Wei; Lee, Chun-Chia

    2013-06-01

    Gamification design is considered as the predictor of collaborative storytelling websites' success. Although aforementioned studies have mentioned a broad range of factors that may influence gamification, they neither depicted the actual design features nor relative attractiveness among them. This study aims to identify attractive gamification features for collaborative storytelling websites. We first constructed a hierarchical system structure of gamification design of collaborative storytelling websites and conducted a focus group interview with eighteen frequent users to identify 35gamification features. After that, this study determined the relative attractiveness of these gamification features by administrating an online survey to 6333 collaborative storytelling websites users. The results indicated that the top 10 most attractive gamification features could account for more than 50% of attractiveness among these 35 gamification features. The feature of unpredictable time pressure is important to website users, yet not revealed in previous relevant studies. Implications of the findings were discussed.

  10. Interactive Digital Storytelling: Towards a Hybrid Conceptual Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Spierling, Ulrike

    2005-01-01

    1 Introduction In this contribution, Interactive Digital Storytelling is viewed as a hybrid form of game design and cinematic storytelling for the understanding and making of future learning and entertainment applications. The paper shall present formal design models that provide a conceptual bridge between both traditional linear narrative techniques as well as agent-based emergent conversations with virtual characters. In summary, a theoretical classification of thinking models for authors ...

  11. CSR – more than corporate storytelling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Braendle

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the subject of corporate social responsibility (CSR gained sufficient attention of the researchers over the last 25 years, numerous attempts were globally made to examine the nature of the relationship between the corporate social responsibility of company and its financial performance (FP. The literature in this area is scattered, the findings are heterogeneous and do not provide a clear answer if CSR goes beyond corporate storytelling. In our meta-analysis of more than 135 studies we try to bring a structure in this discussion. In analyzing the literature over the last decades we find a strong correlation between CSR and financial performance. Based on our findings we present implications in discussing how “good CSR” can be fostered. We focus on the financial sector.

  12. Time and Space in Digital Game Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaxin Wei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and representation of time and space are important in any narrative form. Not surprisingly there is an extensive literature on specific considerations of space or time in game design. However, there is less attention to more systematic analyses that examine both of these key factors—including their dynamic interrelationship within game storytelling. This paper adapts critical frameworks of narrative space and narrative time drawn from other media and demonstrates their application in the understanding of game narratives. In order to do this we incorporate fundamental concepts from the field of game studies to build a game-specific framework for analyzing the design of narrative time and narrative space. The paper applies this framework against a case analysis in order to demonstrate its operation and utility. This process grounds the understanding of game narrative space and narrative time in broader traditions of narrative discourse and analysis.

  13. Indigenous Storytelling and Participatory Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Storytelling, in its various forms, has often been described as a practice with great emancipatory potential. In turn, Indigenous knowledge shows great promise in guiding a participatory action research (PAR) methodology. Yet these two approaches are rarely discussed in relation to one another, nor, has much been written in terms of how these two approaches may work synergistically toward a decolonizing research approach. In this article, I report on a community-driven knowledge translation activity, the Peoples’ International Health Tribunal, as an exemplar of how narrative and PAR approaches, guided by local Indigenous knowledge, have great potential to build methodologically and ethically robust research processes. Implications for building globally relevant research alliances and scholarship are further discussed, particularly in relation to working with Indigenous communities. PMID:28462305

  14. Conservation beyond science: scientists as storytellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Veríssimo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available As scientists we are often unprepared and unwilling to communicate our passion for what we do to those outside our professional circles. Scientific literature can also be difficult or unattractive to those without a professional interest in research. Storytelling can be a successful approach to enable readers to engage with the challenges faced by scientists. In an effort to convey to the public what it means to be a field biologist, 18 Portuguese biologists came together to write a book titled “BIOgraphies: The lives of those who study life”, in the original Portuguese “BIOgrafias: Vidas de quem estuda a vida”. This book is a collection of 35 field stories that became career landmarks for those who lived them. We discuss the obstacles and opportunities of the publishing process and reflect on the lessons learned for future outreach efforts.

  15. Channeling Identity: A Study of Storytelling in Conversations Between Introverted and Extraverted Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Avril; Korobov, Neill; Morgan, Elizabeth M.

    2009-01-01

    This narrative study examined the process of personal storytelling between college-age friends who were similarly introverted or extraverted. Participants were 19 introverted and 20 extraverted same-sex pairs (49 percent female) who had been friends for an average of 18 months. Stories emerged spontaneously during 10-minute catch-up conversations. Extraverted friends more often told stories that changed the topic, and more often co-constructed story plots. Introverted friends more often told stories that were embedded in a developing theme, and constructed story plots solo. With regard to content, extraverted friends told stories about romance more so than introverted friends, whose stories more often concerned family/hometown, and older events. The findings suggest that the traits of extraversion and introversion channel the identity-making process. PMID:19325709

  16. How Does a Company Communicate Through Storytelling? - a study of the storytelling techniques used in two companies

    OpenAIRE

    Hermansson, Elisabeth; Na, Jia

    2008-01-01

    Storytelling, an improtant part of human communication, is being increasingly used by companies to communicate their values and build trust and connection with employees and customers. A good story can create emotions and feelings among the audience, can simplify and transmit complex messages. In contrast to the conventional informative and lecture-style of communication, which are likely to evoke counter arguments; storytelling is more likely to inspire people to take independent actions. Ho...

  17. Spontaneous deregulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edelman, Benjamin; Geradin, Damien

    Platform businesses such as Airbnb and Uber have risen to success partly by sidestepping laws and regulations that encumber their traditional competitors. Such rule flouting is what the authors call “spontaneous private deregulation,” and it’s happening in a growing number of industries. The authors

  18. Technology-enhanced storytelling stimulating parent-child interaction and preschool children's vocabulary knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teepe, R.C.; Molenaar, I.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2017-01-01

    Preschool children's vocabulary mainly develops verbal through interaction. Therefore, the technology-enhanced storytelling (TES) activity Jeffy's Journey is developed to support parent-child interaction and vocabulary in preschool children. TES entails shared verbal storytelling supported by a

  19. Technology-enhanced storytelling stimulating parent–child interaction and preschool children's vocabulary knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teepe, R.C.; Molenaar, I.; Verhoeven, L.

    2016-01-01

    Preschool children's vocabulary mainly develops verbal through interaction. Therefore, the technology-enhanced storytelling (TES) activity Jeffy's Journey is developed to support parent–child interaction and vocabulary in preschool children. TES entails shared verbal storytelling supported by a

  20. Storytelling as an Active Learning Tool to Engage Students in a Genetics Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Storytelling is an ancient art that originated long before the written word. Storytelling interspersed with traditional lectures has been used as a teaching tool in an Introductory Genetics course. Students have eagerly responded to the storytelling pedagogy, suggesting that it can be leveraged to help students grasp complicated theories, engage students, and help improve student retention in STEM fields.

  1. Meta matters in interactive storytelling and serious gaming (a play on worlds)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, Johannes Maria

    2017-01-01

    In this dissertation, I investigate the use of storytelling techniques in the domains of interactive storytelling and serious gaming. The field of interactive storytelling attempts to create and analyse systems that allow users to influence the plots of stories. Serious games provide experiences not

  2. Acting, playing, or talking about the story: an annotation scheme for communication during interactive digital storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theune, Mariet; Linssen, Johannes Maria; Alofs, Thijs

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the communication of children playing with an interactive digital storytelling system. What users say during their interaction with a digital storytelling system can tell us much about how they relate to the characters and how engrossed they are in the storytelling

  3. Digital Storytelling as Arts-Inspired Inquiry for Engaging, Understanding, and Supporting Indigenous Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglinton, Kristen Ali; Gubrium, Aline; Wexler, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we examine digital storytelling as a mode of arts-inspired inquiry: in particular we consider digital storytelling as a powerful arts-inspired approach that can help researchers, practitioners, and communities understand and support indigenous and marginalized youth. Our two-fold focus is on: (1) a digital storytelling initiative…

  4. Storytelling Leadership: A Semiotics Theories Qualitative Inquiry into the Components Forming an Oral Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Earl F.

    2015-01-01

    Using semiotics theories as a guide, the qualitative examination of storytelling literature and current storytelling practitioners provides research support for a list of storytelling components. Analysis of story building components discovered from literature in comparison to the results from research questionnaire responses by current…

  5. Engaging Post-Secondary Students and Older Adults in an Intergenerational Digital Storytelling Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, Jennifer; Danbrook, Claire; Sieppert, Jackie

    2015-01-01

    A five day Digital Storytelling course was offered to Social Work students, integrating a three day workshop with older adult storytellers who shared stories related to the theme stories of home. A course evaluation was conducted exploring the Digital Storytelling experience and learning in an intergenerational setting. Findings from surveys…

  6. It's Story Time!: Exploring the Potential of Multimodality in Oral Storytelling to Support Children's Vocabulary Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, Soe Marlar

    2016-01-01

    Although many studies have been done on the benefits of parent/teacher-child interactions during shared storybook reading or read'aloud sessions, very few have examined the potential of professional storytellers' oral discourse to support children's vocabulary learning. In those storytelling sessions conducted by professional storytellers, the…

  7. The first Malay language storytelling text-to-speech (TTS) corpus for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    speech annotations are described in detail in accordance to baseline work. The stories were recorded in two speaking styles that are neutral and storytelling speaking style. The first. Malay language storytelling corpus is not only necessary for the development of a storytelling text-to-speech (TTS) synthesis. It is also ...

  8. Introduction of Digital Storytelling in Preschool Education: A Case Study from Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preradovic, Nives Mikelic; Lesin, Gordana; Boras, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Our case study from Croatia showed the benefits of digital storytelling in a preschool as a basis for the formal ICT education. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences between children aged 6-7 who learned mathematics by traditional storytelling compared to those learning through digital storytelling. The experimental group that…

  9. Effect of storytelling on hopefulness in girl students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafieyan, Shima; Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Samouei, Raheleh; Afshar, Mina

    2017-01-01

    One of the methods that help students in learning critical thinking and decision-making skills is storytelling. Story helps the students to place themselves in the same situation as the main protagonist and try different ways and finally select and implement the best possible method. The goal of this study is to investigate the effect of storytelling on hopefulness of students, age 8-11 in Isfahan's 2 nd educational district. This is an applied, quasi-experimental study. The study population comprised of 34 randomly selected students attending one of the schools in Isfahan's 2 nd educational district. The data gathering tool was the standard Kazdin hopefulness scale (α = 0.72) and data were gathered before and after 8 storytelling sessions for the intervention group. The gathered data were analyzed using descriptive and analytical (paired and independent t -test) with the help of SPSS Version 18 software. The study's findings showed a significant difference in the average hopefulness score of students in study group in pre- and posttest ( P = 0.04). Furthermore, independent t -test results showed a significant difference in hopefulness score of intervention and control ( P = 0.001). The average hopefulness score of the control group after storytelling sessions was higher than that of the intervention and control. The results show the effectiveness of storytelling as a method for improving hopefulness in students.

  10. Geohazards storytelling between reality and representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musacchio, Gemma; Candela, Andrea; Canel, Samanta; Roi, Cinzia

    2015-04-01

    Ethics towards geohazards might start at early age and it might radicate on narratives occuring in the media, as disfuctional ideas and perception are passed from school or society to children. In this paper we study the representations and imaginaries of natural hazards as they are in the media and how they are passed on chidren and laypeople. The investigation is led on an experimental basis on primary schools in Northern Italy (Varese province), where data concerning school education are collected. The approach is that of the storytelling that allow evaluation of children perception of hazard and risk. Narratives (news, rhetorics, images and pictures, symbols, metaphores and interpretations) that mass media and education generally used in order to explain and represent geohazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, hydrogeological instability, climate change and so on) are also analysed. They are responsible for certain individual and collective perceptions, indeed. The research has attempted to analyze how imaginaries and common "wrong" ideas can influence environmental education and public communication of natural hazards. A better understanding of feelings (fears and hopes), and all cultural behaviours included in the social construction of collective narratives and representations of environmental emergencies could be useful in order to re-orient education and communication strategies on the basis of more targeted and participatory approaches.

  11. The 3D Digital Story-telling Media on Batik Learning in Vocational High Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widiaty, I.; Achdiani, Y.; Kuntadi, I.; Mubaroq, S. R.; Zakaria, D.

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this research is to make 3D digital Story-telling Media on Batik Learning in Vocational High School. The digital story-telling developed in this research is focused on 3D-based story-telling. In contrast to the digital story-telling that has been developed in existing learning, this research is expected to be able to improve understanding of vocational students about the value of local wisdom batik more meaningful and “live”. The process of making 3D digital story-telling media consists of two processes, namely the creation of 3D objects and the creation of 3D object viewer.

  12. Innovation in preregistration midwifery education: Web based interactive storytelling learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scamell, Mandie; Hanley, Thomas

    2017-07-01

    through a critical description of the implementation of a web based interactive storytelling learning activity introduced into an undergraduate, preregistration midwifery education programme, this paper will explore how low-cost, low-fidelity online storytelling, designed using Moodle, can be used to enhance students' understanding of compassion and empathy in practice. cross sectional sample of first year undergraduate Midwifery students (n111) METHOD: drawing from both research and audit data collected in an Higher Education Institution in London England, the paper presents the case for using web based technology to create a sustainable model for midwifery education. initial results indicate that it is both the low cost and positive student evaluations of web based interactive storytelling, which make this approach to preregistration midwifery education which suggests that this approach has significant potential for learning and teaching in midwifery education in diverse settings around the world. Or how about: global relevance? . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Instructional Storytelling: Application of the Clinical Judgment Model in Nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbrell, Jessica

    2017-05-01

    Little is known about the teaching and learning implications of instructional storytelling (IST) in nursing education or its potential connection to nursing theory. The literature establishes storytelling as a powerful teaching-learning method in the educational, business, humanities, and health sectors, but little exploration exists that is specific to nursing. An example of a story demonstrating application of the domains of Tanner's clinical judgment model links storytelling with learning outcomes appropriate for the novice nursing student. Application of Tanner's clinical judgment model offers consistency of learning experience while preserving the creativity inherent in IST. Further research into student learning outcomes achievement using IST is warranted as a step toward establishing best practices with IST in nursing education. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(5):305-308.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Utilizing Traditional Storytelling to Promote Wellness in American Indian Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    HODGE, FELICIA SCHANCHE; PASQUA, ANNA; MARQUEZ, CAROL A.; GEISHIRT-CANTRELL, BETTY

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing storytelling to transmit educational messages is a traditional pedagogical method practiced by many American Indian tribes. American Indian stories are effective because they present essential ideas and values in a simple, entertaining form. Different story characters show positive and negative behaviors. The stories illustrate consequences of behaviors and invite listeners to come to their own conclusions after personal reflection. Because stories have been passed down through tribal communities for generations, listeners also have the opportunity to reconnect and identify with past tribal realities. This article reports on a research intervention that is unique in promoting health and wellness through the use of storytelling. The project utilized stories to help motivate tribal members to once more adopt healthy, traditional lifestyles and practices. The authors present and discuss the stories selected, techniques used in their telling, the preparation and setting for the storytelling, and the involvement and interaction of the group. PMID:11776018

  15. Helping older adults find meaning and purpose through storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Katie; DeBrew, Jacqueline Kayler

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a storytelling project that was designed to help community-dwelling older adults find meaning and purpose in their lives through reminiscing about the past. The storytelling project was successful not only for the older adults who participated but also for the nursing students, who were given an opportunity to learn about interviewing and communicating with older adults. The value of life review and storytelling as a nursing intervention became evident from this project. When time is taken to listen to the valuable stories and life lessons of the older population, nurses create a better understanding of their patients while their patients recall special memories and feel proud of their lives. Copyright 2009, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Storytelling for project knowledge management across the project life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Farzaneh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Project organizations face the problems to manage knowledge embedded in various projects because of the uniqueness and short-term orientation of most projects. Therefore, project knowledge management is regarded as an important approach to building competitive advantages. This paper aimed to examine the application of storytelling as an effective and inexpensive mechanism for managing project knowledge. The study was conducted with the project management office from the Tax Administration and Reform Automation (TARA program in Iran. A questionnaire survey was used to analyze the storytelling applications in the projects of the TARA program. Based on the result, a conceptual framework of storytelling was proposed for integration into the project management lifecycle.

  17. Facebook storytelling: Implications for expression of coping behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj Kumar Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Social networking sites are commonly used for self-disclosure. It provides the user the opportunity for catharsis. The present case is going to highlight the implications of Facebook storytelling. Clinical interview and NIMHANS psychiatric morbidity screening tool were used to assess the pattern of Facebook usage and psychiatric caseness. Facebook storytelling helps in coping with psychiatric distress. It implies the need to screen and encourage the users to use offline method receiving psychological support as well as develop the offline healthy coping behaviors.

  18. What educators should know about teaching digital storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard R. Robin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the authors present some of the most important lessons they havelearned from teaching courses, conducting workshops, writing articles, andsupervising graduate student research on the educational uses of digitalstorytelling. The guidelines described here are categorized within the ADDIEinstructional design framework and are presented as starting points thateducators should consider when they begin to integrate digital storytelling in theirclassrooms. The guidelines provide useful information that will help educatorsteach students all phases of the digital storytelling process, including analysis,design, development, implementation and evaluation of digital storytellingprojects that focus on educationally meaningful topics.

  19. Evaluating a Personal Learning Environment for Digital Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos Marianos

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of flexible and personal learning environments is extremely challenging. It should not be limited to the assessment of products, but should address the quality of educative experience with close monitoring. The evaluation of a PLE using digital storytelling is even more complicated, due to the unpredictability of the usage scenarios. This paper presents an evaluation methodology for PLEs using digital storytelling, using a participatory design approach. The results from an open validation trial indicate that this methodology is able to incorporate all necessary factors and that the selected evaluation tools are appropriate for addressing the quality of educative experience.

  20. Storytelling and the healing of sexual violence survivors among

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As Sogol (2014) notes, through the act of telling their stories, survivors of sexual violence and rape 'engage in a dialectic way, with their past and also exchange information and perspectives, externalize grief, loss, and anger, and try to reach some form of consensus as to a way forward'. In addition, storytelling creates 'a.

  1. Resilience in language learners and the relationship to storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Nguyen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available International students, who study a foreign language abroad, experience more adversities than their domestic peers. The social challenges they face include problems with immigration status, isolation, difficulty speaking a new language, and learning unfamiliar customs. There is limited research focused on the coping strategies of these individuals. A growing body of research suggests storytelling may provide an important role in promoting resilience, defined as an individual’s ability to bounce back or recover from stress. The study investigated possible relationships between experiencing storytelling as a child and adult resilience. The sample consisted of 21 international college students studying Chinese or English. Students were examined with a survey, a narrative interview, and the brief resilience scale. Data were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The quantitative results produced significant correlations between resilience scores and the survey scores for adults who reported using storytelling in their own teaching of a second language to peers and children. Qualitative results identified five protective factors for resilience: (1 social competence, (2 problem-solving skills, (3 autonomy, (4 sense of purpose, and (5 use of storytelling. Implications of the findings for research and intervention are discussed.

  2. Story-telling strategies employed in three Northern Sotho detective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A short introduction will be given to the history of literary writing in Northern Sotho until the 1950s when the first example of detective writing appeared in Ramaila's volume of short stories, Molomatsebe. Subsequently, the story-telling strategies used by three Northern Sotho authors, namely Ramaila, Matlala and Lebopa ...

  3. The Ancestor Project: Aboriginal Computer Education through Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Marla; Biin, Dianne

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the ANCESTOR program is to use digital storytelling as a means of promoting an interest in technology careers for Aboriginal learners, as well as increasing cultural literacy. A curriculum was developed and first tested with Aboriginal students at the LÁU,WELNEW Tribal School near Victoria, British Columbia, Canada. Based on feedback…

  4. Rule-Based Storytelling Text-to-Speech (TTS Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramli Izzad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, various real life applications such as talking books, gadgets and humanoid robots have drawn the attention to pursue research in the area of expressive speech synthesis. Speech synthesis is widely used in various applications. However, there is a growing need for an expressive speech synthesis especially for communication and robotic. In this paper, global and local rule are developed to convert neutral to storytelling style speech for the Malay language. In order to generate rules, modification of prosodic parameters such as pitch, intensity, duration, tempo and pauses are considered. Modification of prosodic parameters is examined by performing prosodic analysis on a story collected from an experienced female and male storyteller. The global and local rule is applied in sentence level and synthesized using HNM. Subjective tests are conducted to evaluate the synthesized storytelling speech quality of both rules based on naturalness, intelligibility, and similarity to the original storytelling speech. The results showed that global rule give a better result than local rule

  5. Telling Tales: The Value of Storytelling for Early Career Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, Andrea C.; Doecke, Brenton

    2017-01-01

    This article examines how early career teachers, participants in a research project, make sense of their experiences through storytelling. The teachers' stories provide a significant counterpoint to the way standards-based reforms construct their professional development, prompting us as teacher educators to think again about what it means for our…

  6. Using Storytelling Strategies to Improve Student Comprehension in Online Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Rasby Marlene; Murray, Ottis

    2012-01-01

    Previous research shows that presenting class material in story formats can improve student learning in lecture classes. This pilot study of eight sociology classes investigates the efficacy of using storytelling as a means to improve student comprehension in online classes. Our findings show that when material is presented in story format rather…

  7. What Educators Should Know about Teaching Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Bernard R.; McNeil, Sara G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the authors present some of the most important lessons they have learned from teaching courses, conducting workshops, writing articles, and supervising graduate student research on the educational uses of digital storytelling. The guidelines described here are categorized within the ADDIE instructional design framework and are…

  8. Timelines Revisited: A Design Space and Considerations for Expressive Storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brehmer, Matthew; Lee, Bongshin; Bach, Benjamin; Riche, Nathalie Henry; Munzner, Tamara

    2017-09-01

    There are many ways to visualize event sequences as timelines. In a storytelling context where the intent is to convey multiple narrative points, a richer set of timeline designs may be more appropriate than the narrow range that has been used for exploratory data analysis by the research community. Informed by a survey of 263 timelines, we present a design space for storytelling with timelines that balances expressiveness and effectiveness, identifying 14 design choices characterized by three dimensions: representation, scale, and layout. Twenty combinations of these choices are viable timeline designs that can be matched to different narrative points, while smooth animated transitions between narrative points allow for the presentation of a cohesive story, an important aspect of both interactive storytelling and data videos. We further validate this design space by realizing the full set of viable timeline designs and transitions in a proof-of-concept sandbox implementation that we used to produce seven example timeline stories. Ultimately, this work is intended to inform and inspire the design of future tools for storytelling with timelines.

  9. The Power of Digital Storytelling to Support Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Although the term "digital storytelling" may not be familiar to all readers, over the last twenty years, an increasing number of educators, students and others around the world have created short movies by combining computer-based images, text, recorded audio narration, video clips and music in order to present information on various…

  10. Theorizing the Self: Digital Storytelling, Applying Theory, and Multimodal Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortegast, Carrie; Davis, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the use of digital storytelling, a pedagogical tool, to enhance student learning and meaning-making. During the process of creating and sharing their digital stories, students engaged in self-reflexivity and demonstrated the ability to apply theories of student development to their personal experiences. Findings have…

  11. Educational Uses of Transmedia Storytelling: "The Ancestral Letter"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Illera, Jose Luis; Castells, Nuria Molas

    2014-01-01

    The idea that different media can work in conjunction to transmit a story, understood as a distributed narrative, is a new one and has partly been developed as a result of the technological evolution of media. On a basic level, it has been applied in education in a similar way for a long time. However, transmedia storytelling based on digital…

  12. Reframing the Praxis of School Leadership Preparation through Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo, Miguel; Oliver, John A.; Rodriguez, Gregory; Valadez, Monica M.; Cantu, Yvette; Guajardo, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces a social innovation that contributes to the formation of educational leaders. Digital storytelling is employed as a process for data creation, analysis, and synthesis. Emerging educational leaders are guided through a process to better understand the experiences and social constructs that inform their identity. Through a…

  13. Effect of combined teaching method (role playing and storytelling ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of combined teaching method (role playing and storytelling) on creative thinking of fourthgrade female students in the course of Heaven Gifts. Research Method: This quasi-experimental study was conducted with pretest-posttest design with control group on 60 fourth-grade female ...

  14. DIGITAL STORYTELLING: AN OUTLET FOR EXPRESSION IN EFL CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin TİMUÇİN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available By the help of innovative teaching practices, practitioners of education try to effectively amalgamate innovative media technologies into students` learning processes and activities. The best practices can be found in the cases where traditional ways of teaching and new media available are blended by transforming pedagogy and enabling productive ways for students to express themselves. In this respect, English as a Foreign Language (EFL Teaching is no exception and, over the last few years, digital storytelling has entered into the agenda of language teaching practitioners as a powerful teaching and learning tool that enables both teachers and students to communicate in a digitally rich environment. Throughout the paper it is argued that digital storytelling has the potential of reaching far beyond the field of communication and that digital storytelling can be exploited as a versatile device to enable students to dwell on their creativity by making them involved in a digitally rich environment. The present paper also reports the findings of a qualitative study designed to explore how students weave fictional stories into a media enriched environment, and how the use of a particular software sparks the creative writing among EFL students. The findings through archival documents and semi-structured interviews revealed that the use of digital storytelling is very likely to improve the EFL students’ writing skills.

  15. Storytelling: A Strategy for Providing Context for Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Diane M

    2016-03-01

    Storytelling--a narrative of events related to nursing and linked to evidence--provides a context for learning, particularly for learners who require a rich context to understand and integrate concepts related to patient care. This article offers suggestions for developing and using stories in nursing education. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Digital Literacy Learning in Higher Education through Digital Storytelling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Banny S. K.; Churchill, Daniel; Chiu, Thomas K. F.

    2017-01-01

    It is necessary to develop digital literacy skills with which students can communicate and express their ideas effectively using digital media. The educational sectors around the world are beginning to incorporate digital literacy into the curriculum. Digital storytelling, one of the possible classroom activities, is an approach which may help…

  17. Storytelling, behavior planning and language evolution in context.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen eMcbride

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available An attempt is made to specify the structure of the hominin bands that began steps to language. 8 Storytelling could evolve without need for language yet be strongly subject to natural selection 9 and could provide a major feedback process in evolving language. A storytelling model is 10 examined, including its effects on the evolution of consciousness and the possible timing of 11 language evolution. Behavior planning is presented as a model of language evolution from 12 storytelling. The behavior programming mechanism in both directions provide a model of 13 creating and understanding behavior and language. Culture began with societies, then family 14 evolution, family life in troops, but storytelling created a culture of experiences, a final step in 15 the long process of achieving experienced adults by natural selection. Most language evolution 16 occurred in conversations where evolving non-verbal feedback ensured mutual agreements on 17 understanding. Natural language evolved in conversations with feedback providing 18 understanding of changes.

  18. Towards a Postcolonial-storytelling Theory of Management and Organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kenneth Mølbjerg; Strand, Anete Mikkala Camille; Boje, David

    2013-01-01

    representationalism over material storytelling practices. Implications are two-fold. First, this dissolves inherent dualisms presumed in the concept of interaction among entities like actor–structure, subject–object and discursive–nondiscursive in favour of a profound ontology of entanglement and intra...

  19. Oral storytelling and national kinship: Reflections on the oral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim is to understand the reorientations of oral storytelling and its scripted machinations of multi-ethnicity woven into the narrative as part of its contemporarily requisite features; the question is whether or not these reorientations enable the ideological adoption of some form of kinship across the diverse ethnic groups in ...

  20. History, Dreams and Reality: Storytelling Programs in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Mohd Sharif Mohd

    Storytelling, a powerful means of providing children and adults with life-enhancing mental images, has been a tradition practiced by most cultures throughout the world. Passed on from one generation to another, the stories freed the imagination and stretched the capacity for such feelings of joy, sorrow, sympathy, and hope. The stories usually…

  1. Don't Break the Memory Line: Social Memory, Digital Storytelling and Local Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferri, Paolo; Mangiatordi, Andrea; Pozzali, Andrea

    In this paper we present and analyze some of the main results obtained by the empirical research carried out within the scope of the Socrates Grundtvig Project "Memory Line", that aimed at developing instruments and methodologies in order to help overcoming the intergenerational divide. The project aimed at training groups of elderly and young citizens, resident in the project partner countries, to collect records (stories, songs, poems, experiences, etc.) and to save them in a digital form, mainly by using the methodology of digital storytelling. Focus groups and interviews with people involved in the intergenerational ateliers have been carried out in order to gather a series of first hand evidences directly from the voices of people who were actively involved in the project, and to enable an ongoing monitoring and self evaluation of the project itself.

  2. Explicit Disassociation of a Conditioned Stimulus and Unconditioned Stimulus during Extinction Training Reduces Both Time to Asymptotic Extinction and Spontaneous Recovery of a Conditioned Taste Aversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickley, G. Andrew; DiSorbo, Anthony; Wilson, Gina N.; Huffman, Jennifer; Bacik, Stephanie; Hoxha, Zana; Biada, Jaclyn M.; Kim, Ye-Hyun

    2009-01-01

    Conditioned taste aversions (CTAs) may be acquired when an animal consumes a novel taste (CS) and then experiences the symptoms of poisoning (US). This aversion may be extinguished by repeated exposure to the CS alone. However, following a latency period in which the CS is not presented, the CTA will spontaneously recover (SR). In the current…

  3. Storytelling as a model of conversation for people with dementia and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fels, Deborah I; Astell, Arlene J

    2011-11-01

    Storytelling is an important method of communication at all stages of life. Sharing narratives about lived events and experiences provides topics of conversation and opportunities for connecting with other people. In this article, we apply a conventional model of storytelling to the verbal reminiscences of older people with a dementia diagnosis. Their stories retain the conventional structure, suggesting that storytelling, which is an enjoyable and engaging social activity, can provide a conversation model for people with dementia.

  4. Tell me a story--a conceptual exploration of storytelling in healthcare education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Carol; Hardy, Pip

    2011-05-01

    The importance of storytelling as the foundation of human experiences cannot be overestimated. The oral traditions focus upon educating and transmitting knowledge and skills and also evolved into one of the earliest methods of communicating scientific discoveries and developments. A wide ranging search of the storytelling, education and health-related literature encompassing the years 1975-2007 was performed. Evidence from disparate elements of education and healthcare were used to inform an exploration of storytelling. This conceptual paper explores the principles of storytelling, evaluates the use of storytelling techniques in education in general, acknowledges the role of storytelling in healthcare delivery, identifies some of the skills learned and benefits derived from storytelling, and speculates upon the use of storytelling strategies in nurse education. Such stories have, until recently been harvested from the experiences of students and of educators, however, there is a growing realization that patients and service users are a rich source of healthcare-related stories that can affect, change and benefit clinical practice. The use of technology such as the Internet discussion boards or digitally-facilitated storytelling has an evolving role in ensuring that patient-generated and experiential stories have a future within nurse education. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A preliminary study on the application of storytelling among hospice care interest group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Liu

    2014-03-01

    Conclusions: Students reflected that the storytelling helped them recognize the importance of relieving the suffering, respecting and understanding, communicating, team working, and family supporting in the hospice care.

  6. Explicating Positionality: A Journey of Dialogical and Reflexive Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina Carter MN

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Qualitative researchers must be aware of and explicit about their social background as well as political and ideological assumptions. To facilitate this awareness, we believe that researchers need to begin with their own story as they seek to understand the stories of others. Taking into account the vulnerable act of storytelling, it is salient to consider how to share personal narratives in an authentic way within academic settings. In this article, we share our process and reflections of engaging in reflexive and dialogical storytelling. The focus of the article is the re-storying of one researcher's experience as she and her research team explore her emotions and positionality prior to conducting research on First Nations men's narratives of identity. We integrate a series of methodological lessons concerning reflexivity throughout the re-storying.

  7. Arts-based methods for storylistening and storytelling with prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    - there is no “final word” (Bakhtin 1981). Storytelling and issues of listening are exemplified through written texts produced by young prisoners, and subsequent reflexive narrative interviews I conducted at a Danish prison for youth. The texts are poetry and prose from a collaborate creative writing workshop......, Wordquake in Prison. The texts were published in an edited book (Frølunde, Søgaard, and Weise 2016). The analysis of texts and reflexive narrative interviews is inspired by arts-based, dialogic, narrative methods on the arts and storytelling (Cole and Knowles 2008; Reiter 2014; Boje 2001), storylistening...... in narrative medicine (DasGupta 2014), and aesthetic reflection on artistic expression in arts therapy and education. In my analysis, I explore active listening as in terms of reflection and revision of stories with the young prisoners. I reflect on the tensions involved in listening in a sensitive prison...

  8. Storytelling in Interactive 3D Geographic Visualization Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Thöny

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of interactive geographic maps is to provide geographic information to a large audience in a captivating and intuitive way. Storytelling helps to create exciting experiences and to explain complex or otherwise hidden relationships of geospatial data. Furthermore, interactive 3D applications offer a wide range of attractive elements for advanced visual story creation and offer the possibility to convey the same story in many different ways. In this paper, we discuss and analyze storytelling techniques in 3D geographic visualizations so that authors and developers working with geospatial data can use these techniques to conceptualize their visualization and interaction design. Finally, we outline two examples which apply the given concepts.

  9. PROMOTING DIGITAL STORYTELLING AND DICTIONARY TO IMPROVE STUDENTS’ VOCABULARY MASTERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogi Setia Samsi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was aimed at finding whether or not the use of digital storytelling and dictionary can improve students’ vocabulary mastery. To get the answer of the defined research questions, the researcher used quantitative approach and quasi experimental design. The research had been done in SMPN 1 Cilamaya Wetan, and took two classes as sample, namely, 8G and 8H with 40 respondents in each class. There were three steps in this research, namely pre-test, treatment, and post-test. Pre-test was held in both classes to know students’ vocabulary mastery before the treatment. After doing pretest, treatment was held in experimental class by using digital storytelling and dictionary, that used the technology such as infocus, projector, speaker, and LCD in which the materials were taken from youtube, while control class only used song lyrics. In the next step, posttest was held in both classes to know the improvement after the treatment in experimental class. The data of the study were analyzed by using SPSS version 22 for windows. This research findings showed that experimental group had higher vocabulary score than control group. It can be seen from the posttest mean of experimental group was 74.75 , while the mean of control group was 60,62. Meanwhile, the average of normality gained in experimental group was 0.37 and the average of normality gained in control group was 0.075. Thus, the improvement of students’ vocabulary mastery by using digital storytelling and dictionary in experiemental group is greater than using song in control group. It can be concluded that digital storytelling and dictionary improves vocabulary mastery of eight grader of SMPN 1 Cilamaya Wetan.

  10. Digital Storytelling: Families' Search for Meaning after Child Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolbiecki, Abigail J; Washington, Karla; Bitsicas, Katina

    2017-01-01

    Bereaved families that collectively make meaning of their grief experiences often function better than those that do not, yet most social work bereavement interventions target individuals rather than family units. In this article, authors describe an innovative social work intervention that employs digital storytelling. This is a narrative technique that combines photography, music, and spoken word to help families bereaved by child death make meaning of their loss and envision a future without their deceased child.

  11. Storytelling technique in Turkish rap music : a music video

    OpenAIRE

    Karakurluk, Bedirhan

    2012-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Graphic Design, İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2012. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2012. Includes bibliographical references leaves 60-63. This thesis analyzes the storytelling technique in Turkish rap music in the context of hip-hop culture’s content and history, argues its narrative background, seeks answer to what are the mainstream components of Turkish rap music videos, and examines the music video created for this thesis as...

  12. The power of social media storytelling in destination branding.

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Niels Frederik; Cohen, S.A.; Scarles, C.

    2017-01-01

    A large part of the global population is now connected in online social networks in social media where they share experiences and stories and consequently influence each other’s perceptions and buying behaviour. This poses a distinct challenge for destination management organisations, who must cope with a new reality where destination brands are increasingly the product of people’s shared tourism experiences and storytelling in social networks, rather than marketing strategies. This article s...

  13. Engaging Design Pitches: Storytelling Approaches and their Impacts

    OpenAIRE

    Parkinson, David

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the findings of a doctoral research study that builds an understanding of the relationship between storytelling approaches and their impacts at the design pitch. Determined through a literature review, the following desirable impacts were used to focus conversation during a series of semi-structured interviews conducted with employees from Unilever and Accenture: ‘Delivering Understanding’, ‘Demonstrating Value’, ‘Stimulating Critique’, and ‘Encouraging more Holistic Thin...

  14. Prophetic Visions, Quality Serials: Twin Peaks’ new mode of storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail L. Skoptsov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Following the April 1990 debut of Twin Peaks on ABC, the vision - a sequence of images that relates information of the narrative future or past – has become a staple of numerous network, basic cable and premium cable serials, including Buffy the Vampire Slayer (WB, Battlestar Galactica (SyFy and Game of Thrones (HBO. This paper argues that Peaks in effect had introduced a mode of storytelling called “visio-narrative,” which draws on ancient epic poetry by focusing on main characters that receive knowledge from enigmatic, god-like figures that control his world. Their visions disrupt linear storytelling, allowing a series to embrace the formal aspects of the medium and create the impression that its disparate episodes constitute a singular whole. This helps them qualify as ‘quality TV’, while disguising instances of authorial manipulation evident within the texts as products of divine internal causality.As a result, all narrative events, no matter how coincidental or inconsequential, become part of a grand design. Close examination of Twin Peaks and Carnivàle will demonstrate how the mode operates, why it is popular among modern storytellers and how it can elevate a show’s cultural status.

  15. Digital storytelling a creator's guide to interactive entertainment

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Carolyn Handler

    2014-01-01

    Digital Storytelling shows you how to create immersive, interactive narratives across a multitude of platforms, devices, and media. From age-old storytelling techniques to cutting-edge development processes, this book covers creating stories for all forms of New Media, including transmedia storytelling, video games, mobile apps, and second screen experiences. The way a story is told, a message is delivered, or a narrative is navigated has changed dramatically over the last few years. Stories are told through video games, interactive books, and social media. Stories are told on all sorts of different platforms and through all sorts of different devices. They're immersive, letting the user interact with the story and letting the user enter the story and shape it themselves.This book features case studies that cover a great spectrum of platforms and different story genres. It also shows you how to plan processes for developing interactive narratives for all forms of entertainment and non-fiction purposes: educat...

  16. Oral Storytelling as Evidence of Pedagogy in Forager Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalise Sugiyama, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    Teaching is reportedly rare in hunter-gatherer societies, raising the question of whether it is a species-typical trait in humans. A problem with past studies is that they tend to conceptualize teaching in terms of Western pedagogical practices. In contrast, this study proceeds from the premise that teaching requires the ostensive manifestation of generalizable knowledge: the teacher must signal intent to share information, indicate the intended recipient, and transmit knowledge that is applicable beyond the present context. Certain features of human communication appear to be ostensive in function (e.g., eye contact, pointing, contingency, prosodic variation), and collectively serve as "natural pedagogy." Tellingly, oral storytelling in forager societies typically employs these and other ostensive behaviors, and is widely reported to be an important source of generalizable ecological and social knowledge. Despite this, oral storytelling has been conspicuously overlooked in studies of teaching in preliterate societies. Accordingly, this study presents evidence that oral storytelling involves the use of ostension and the transmission of generic knowledge, thereby meeting the criteria of pedagogy.

  17. Carlos Scolari, Paolo Bertetti and Matthew Freeman. Transmedia Archaeology: Storytelling in the Borderlines of Science Fiction, Comics and Pulp Magazines

    OpenAIRE

    Achouche, Mehdi

    2017-01-01

    According to the authors of Transmedia Archaeology: Storytelling in the Borderlines of Science Fiction, Comics and Pulp Magazines, transmedia storytelling is not quite new after all. They concur with Henry Jenkins, who coined the phrase and the concept in 2003, to deny technological determinism and the central importance of digital technologies behind the advent of transmedia storytelling. Yet they are also driven to the conclusion that, “if we consider transmedia storytelling as an experienc...

  18. Uses of oral history and digital storytelling in public health research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, E K; Starecheski, A

    2018-01-01

    Oral history (OH) and digital storytelling (DST) have been used in a range of ways in public health, including educating populations about health-protecting practices, advocating for improved clinical care and reflecting on public health efforts to combat infectious disease. Yet, these methods are rarely recognized for their potential to contribute to public health research and practice. The aim of this article is to assess how OH and DST have been used in the health fields and to provide examples of ways that these methods have contributed to work in several domains of public health. Narrative review. We conducted a narrative review of articles gathered from PubMed using the search terms 'oral history' and 'digital storytelling', which resulted in 102 articles relevant to public health. We then conducted a thematic analysis to create a typology of article topics and to examine cross-cutting themes. OH and DST have been used for both research and interventions in public health. Specifically, they have been used to 1) examine health risks and experiences; 2) engage and educate populations; 3) educate clinical professionals and organizations; and 4) inform public health practice. Despite the time, resources, and training required to do OH and DST well, we argue that these methods have substantial potential for supplementing public health activities, allowing the field to glean additional lessons from its experiences, to educate its practitioners further, and to better learn from the experiences of communities affected by public health problems. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimenting with Visual Storytelling in Students' Portfolios: Narratives of Visual Pedagogy for Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifa-Valls, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    This article interprets the repercussions of visual storytelling for art education and arts-based narrative research and, particularly, it approaches visual storytelling as a critical tool for pre-service teacher education. After reinterpreting storytelling from the perspective of visual critical pedagogy, I will narratively reconstruct the use of…

  20. Engaging Students in Traditional and Digital Storytelling to Make Connections between Pedagogy and Children's Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisenbee, Peggy S.; Ford, Carol M.

    2018-01-01

    Traditional and digital storytelling is a powerful literacy tool which engage students in making connections between pedagogy and academic content. Definitions of traditional and digital storytelling, pedagogical methods aligned with curriculum standards, and examples of literacy centers associated with storytelling in early childhood classrooms…

  1. Hybrid E-Learning Tool TransLearning: Video Storytelling to Foster Vicarious Learning within Multi-Stakeholder Collaboration Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Marjoleine G.; Kupper, Frank; Beers, Pieter J.; Broerse, Jacqueline E. W.

    2016-01-01

    E-learning and storytelling approaches can support informal vicarious learning within geographically widely distributed multi-stakeholder collaboration networks. This case study evaluates hybrid e-learning and video-storytelling approach "TransLearning" by investigation into how its storytelling e-tool supported informal vicarious…

  2. Training-induced inversion of spontaneous exchange bias field on La{sub 1.5}Ca{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufaiçal, L., E-mail: lbufaical@ufg.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74001-970 Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Finkler, R.; Coutrim, L.T. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Goiás, 74001-970 Goiânia, GO (Brazil); Pagliuso, P.G. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin”, UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Grossi, C.; Stavale, F.; Baggio-Saitovitch, E.; Bittar, E.M. [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rua Dr. Xavier Sigaud 150, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • La{sub 1.5}Ca{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6} exhibits spontaneous exchange bias effect at low temperature. • For successive hysteresis cycles it inverts the shift sign from negative to positive. • For a field cooled hysteresis cycle, the exchange bias effect greatly enhances. • Our results are compared to those of the analogue compound La{sub 1.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6}. - Abstract: In this work we report the synthesis and structural, electronic and magnetic properties of La{sub 1.5}Ca{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6} double-perovskite. This is a re-entrant spin cluster material which exhibits a non-negligible negative exchange bias effect when it is cooled in zero magnetic field from an unmagnetized state down to low temperature. X-ray powder diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and magnetometry results indicate mixed valence state at Co site, leading to competing magnetic phases and uncompensated spins at the magnetic interfaces. We compare the results for this Ca-doped material with those reported for the resemblant compound La{sub 1.5}Sr{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6}, and discuss the much smaller spontaneous exchange bias effect observed for the former in terms of its structural and magnetic particularities. For La{sub 1.5}Ca{sub 0.5}CoMnO{sub 6}, when successive magnetization loops are carried, the spontaneous exchange bias field inverts its sign from negative to positive from the first to the second measurement. We discuss this behavior based on the disorder at the magnetic interfaces, related to the presence of a glassy phase. This compound also exhibits a large conventional exchange bias, for which there is no sign inversion of the exchange bias field for consecutive cycles.

  3. Resilience through Storytelling in the EAL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geres, Koreen

    2016-01-01

    English as an Additional Language (EAL) teachers often become the trusted confidants of students who experienced forced migration. Although teachers are not typically trained to be counsellors or encouraged to take that role, what they do in the classroom can have a great influence on their students' well-being (Pipher, 2002). In fact, teachers…

  4. When Prototyping Meets Storytelling. Practices and Malpractices in Innovating Software Firms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciriello, Raffaele; Richter, Alexander; Schwabe, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    to persuade decision makers. Based on a two-year qualitative case study in two innovating software firms, we identify and dialectically examine practices of storytelling and prototyping. Our study implies that storytelling and prototyping should be integrated together into software engineering methods....

  5. Behind Closed Doors: The Pedagogy and Interventionist Practice of Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhauer, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Through arts-based research and digital storytelling, the author investigates the representation of psychiatric disabilities in this article and proposes that digital storytelling can be an interventionist artistic and pedagogical process through which to challenge dominant stigmatizing representations of psychiatric disability.

  6. Surrealism, Subversion, and Storytelling in Véronique Tadjo's As the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper seeks to examine Tadjo's art of storytelling in As the crow flies, focusing on her approach which is partly surrealistic and partly traditional in blending several artistic modes, such as poetry, narration, drama, myth-making, and imagistic symbols. The examination establishes Tadjo's style in the art of storytelling as ...

  7. Telling With, Not Telling To: Interactive Storytelling and At-Risk Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallant, Carole

    Although the value of reading to children has been well established, the merit of storytelling has only recently been recognized as a powerful means of developing language skills, self-concept, and self-esteem in children. Interactive, or participative storytelling, enables participants to tap into their creativity, enhance their powers of memory,…

  8. Multicultural Young Adult Literature as a Form of Counter-Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes-Hassell, Sandra

    2013-01-01

    Counter-storytelling is defined by critical race theory scholars as a method of telling the stories of those people whose experiences are not often told, including people of color, the poor, and members of the LGBTQ community. This article discusses multicultural young adult literature as a form of counter-storytelling, with an emphasis on how…

  9. User Study of a New Smart Toy for Children's Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Nuri; Aydin, Cansu Cigdem; Cagiltay, Kursat

    2014-01-01

    This article introduces StoryTech, a smart storytelling toy that offers children a mixed reality environment in which to tell imaginative stories. During usability testing, an empirical study was carried out with 90 child participants. The findings indicated that StoryTech creates a rich storytelling experience, especially for ages five and six.

  10. Everybody Has a Story: Storytelling as a Community Building Exploration of Equity and Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baloche, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Utilizing the voices of students in an undergraduate teacher preparation program, this article describes the use of a collaborative storytelling experience. Situated within the context of cooperative base groups, this collaborative storytelling has been designed to help pre-service teachers examine their own experiences in school in an effort to…

  11. More than One Way to Tell a Story: Integrating Storytelling into Your Law Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steslow, Donna M.; Gardner, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Storytelling has been used in diverse educational settings. It is employed at all educational levels, from elementary schools to graduate schools. Approximately twenty years ago, law school professors began writing about the application of storytelling to various law school subjects as an alternative to the traditional case method. Legal scholars…

  12. We Cannot Call Back Colonial Stories: Storytelling and Critical Land Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Rosalind; DeMartini, Ashley

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the role of stories and storytelling in both shaping and revealing pre-service teachers' understandings of land. The authors conducted a study using digital storytelling as a participatory method of inquiry examining participants' conceptions of land. Participants' narratives reflect stories they have been told about their…

  13. A Phenomenological Study: Teachers' Experiences of Using Digital Storytelling in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel-Arslan, Pelin; Yildirim, Soner; Robin, Bernard Ross

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how early childhood education (ECE) teachers incorporated digital storytelling in their classrooms and the challenges and successes that they faced in the process. After the teachers attended a digital storytelling workshop, in-depth phenomenological interview, observation and focus group interviews were used to collect…

  14. The Psychosocial Benefits of Oral Storytelling in School: Developing Identity and Empathy through Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbin, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The oral re-telling of traditional tales, modelled by a storyteller and taught to children in school, can be understood as 'non-instrumental' practice in speaking and listening that emphasises oral language over the reading and writing of stories. While oral storytelling has significant benefits to children's education and development, it is…

  15. The Baby and the Bathwater: A Tale of Standards and Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Storytelling is a craft that takes "talking" to the level of "telling." The cleverest of teachers know these tricks. In this article the author presents the art of storytelling and why it is so important, especially in the educational environment of national standards and standardized testing.

  16. A Comparative Study on Storytelling Perceptions of Chinese, Vietnamese, American, and German Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kate; Stanley, Nile; Stanley, Laurel; Rank, Astrid; Wang, Yonghui

    2016-01-01

    The study compared the perceptions of adults from four countries about storytelling. Americans (N = 153), Germans (N = 163), Chinese (N = 324), and Vietnamese (N = 356) completed a survey. Americans' scores on measures of storytelling experiences were the highest overall. Americans and Germans reported having significantly more childhood…

  17. The Edge of Messy: Interplays of Daily Storytelling and Grand Narratives in Teacher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selland, Makenzie K.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the interplay of daily storytelling and societal narratives of teaching in one student teacher's experience. Drawing on narrative and post-structural theories, I conducted a case study using narrative inquiry and ethnographic methods to examine the moment-to-moment storytelling of one student teacher across a range of teaching…

  18. Digital Storytelling: A Method for Engaging Students and Increasing Cultural Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Natalie S.; Bolin, Brien L.

    2016-01-01

    Digital storytelling is explored as a method of engaging students in the development of media literacy and cultural competency. This paper describes the perceptions and experiences of 96 undergraduate students at a large Midwestern university, after completing a digital storytelling project in a semester-long diversity course. Digital storytelling…

  19. The Effect of Digital Storytelling in Improving the Third Graders' Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamac, Ahmet; Ulusoy, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this action research was to investigate the effects of digital storytelling in improving the writing skills of third grade students enrolled in rural primary schools. The writing performances of the students were measured before and after the teaching procedures of digital storytelling. Then, the process of narrative writing with…

  20. Life Planning by Digital Storytelling in a Primary School in Rural Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duveskog, Marcus; Tedre, Matti; Sedano, Carolina Islas; Sutinen, Erkki

    2012-01-01

    Storytelling is one of the earliest forms of knowledge transfer, and parents often use it for teaching their children values and knowledge. Formal schooling, however, is less inclined to use storytelling as a vehicle for knowledge transfer, and even less as a vehicle for modern self-directed, student-centered, and constructionist pedagogy.…

  1. Storytelling, Values and Perceived Resilience among Chinese, Vietnamese, American and German Prospective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nile; Nguyen, Kate; Wilson, Hope; Stanley, Laurel; Rank, Astrid; Wang, Yonghui

    2015-01-01

    Numerous qualitative studies, mostly with English speaking Westerners, have shown the important role of storytelling and values in promoting resilience. However, this quantitative study helps fill the gaps in the research, by investigating the mediator effects of storytelling on values and resilience of American, German, Chinese, and Vietnamese…

  2. Interaction in Storytelling in Japanese Conversations: An Analysis of Story Recipients' Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koike, Chisato

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates how "unknowing" story recipients (C. Goodwin, 1979) use different types of questions in order to actively participate in storytelling and collaboratively construct a story when a storyteller is relaying his or her past experience, by examining grammar, intonation, gaze, body movements, and sequence organization in Japanese…

  3. Preschoolers' Causal Reasoning during Shared Picture Book Storytelling: A Cross-Case Comparison Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Helen C.; Hurks, Petra P. M.; Kirschner, Paul A.; Jolles, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how shared picture book storytelling within a peer-group setting could stimulate causal reasoning in children aged 4½ to 6 years. Twenty-eight children from preschool classes of three schools were allocated to one of six groups (four to five children per group). Each group participated in six storytelling sessions over a…

  4. Storytelling as a Means of Peacemaking: A Case Study of Christian Education in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitch, Russell; Miller, Donald

    2006-01-01

    This article explores how storytelling can help create a space for transformational learning. In particular it looks at the role of storytelling in education for peace in Africa. It also touches on related issues, including the role of historic peace churches, the role of women, and the role of faith convictions, in the process of moving from…

  5. Technology-Enhanced Storytelling Stimulating Parent-Child Interaction and Preschool Children's Vocabulary Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teepe, R. C.; Molenaar, I.; Verhoeven, L.

    2017-01-01

    Preschool children's vocabulary mainly develops verbal through interaction. Therefore, the technology-enhanced storytelling (TES) activity Jeffy's Journey is developed to support parent-child interaction and vocabulary in preschool children. TES entails shared verbal storytelling supported by a story structure and real-time visual, auditory and…

  6. The Politics of Storytelling: Unfolding the Multiple Layers of Politics in (P)AR Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Doris

    2012-01-01

    In the social sciences, inquiry into the relationship between storytelling and politics is based on a notion of historical continuity. One problem is the possible trap of inevitability inherent in this notion--that something which happened "had to happen". Hannah Arendt's conception of political theory as storytelling overcomes this trap,…

  7. The Use of Digital Storytelling for ESP in a Technical English Course for Aerospace Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevilla-Pavón, Ana; Serra-Cámara, Belén; Gimeno-Sanz, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Digital Storytelling is a powerful pedagogical tool for both students and educators, which started to be used for teaching and learning purposes a few years ago, becoming more and more popular over time. The use of digital storytelling in non-specific language learning contexts has been widely explored, as shown in the literature. However, its use…

  8. Storytelling/narrative theory to address health communication with minority populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeok; Fawcett, Jacqueline; DeMarco, Rosanna

    2016-05-01

    To explain the development and application of storytelling/narrative theory in health disparities intervention research as a way to promote health communication and behavior change among racial, ethnic, and minority populations. The proposed storytelling theory helps explain that storytelling affects changes in attitude and health behavior of the viewer through realism, identification, and transportation. The proposed storytelling/narrative theory can be a guide to develop culturally grounded narrative interventions that have the ability to connect with hard-to-reach populations. Narrative communication is context-dependent because it derives meaning from the surrounding situation and provides situation-based stories that are a pathway to processing story content. Although storytelling is grounded in nursing practice and education, it is underutilized in nursing interventional research. Future efforts are needed to extend theory-based narrative intervention studies designed to change attitude and behaviors that will reduce health disparities among minorities. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neostigmine Administration after Spontaneous Recovery to a Train-of-Four Ratio of 0.9 to 1.0: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Effect on Neuromuscular and Clinical Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Glenn S; Szokol, Joseph W; Avram, Michael J; Greenberg, Steven B; Shear, Torin D; Deshur, Mark A; Benson, Jessica; Newmark, Rebecca L; Maher, Colleen E

    2018-01-01

    When a muscle relaxant is administered to facilitate intubation, the benefits of anticholinesterase reversal must be balanced with potential risks. The aim of this double-blinded, randomized noninferiority trial was to evaluate the effect of neostigmine administration on neuromuscular function when given to patients after spontaneous recovery to a train-of-four ratio of 0.9 or greater. A total of 120 patients presenting for surgery requiring intubation were given a small dose of rocuronium. At the conclusion of surgery, 90 patients achieving a train-of-four ratio of 0.9 or greater were randomized to receive either neostigmine 40 μg/kg or saline (control). Train-of-four ratios were measured from the time of reversal until postanesthesia care unit admission. Patients were monitored for postextubation adverse respiratory events and assessed for muscle strength. Ninety patients achieved a train-of-four ratio of 0.9 or greater at the time of reversal. Mean train-of-four ratios in the control and neostigmine groups before reversal (1.02 vs. 1.03), 5 min postreversal (1.05 vs. 1.07), and at postanesthesia care unit admission (1.06 vs. 1.08) did not differ. The mean difference and corresponding 95% CI of the latter were -0.018 and -0.046 to 0.010. The incidences of postoperative hypoxemic events and episodes of airway obstruction were similar for the groups. The number of patients with postoperative signs and symptoms of muscle weakness did not differ between groups (except for double vision: 13 in the control group and 2 in the neostigmine group; P = 0.001). Administration of neostigmine at neuromuscular recovery was not associated with clinical evidence of anticholinesterase-induced muscle weakness. An online visual overview is available for this article.(Figure is included in full-text article.).

  10. AGENT: Awareness Game Environment for Natural Training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, Johannes Maria; de Groot, Thomas

    We propose AGENT, the Awareness Game Environment for Natural Training, as a virtual environment in which serious games can be enacted. AGENT combines research on interactive storytelling, game design, turn-taking and social signal processing with a multi-modal UI in a modular fashion. Current work

  11. The Effectiveness of Storytelling on Improving Auditory Memory of Students with Reading Disabilities in Marivan City, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Ghaderi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Students with learning disabilities often encounter problems with their lessons due to the disorder in reading and writing and face to some challenging situation such as auditory and visual memory problem, sustaining attention, inhibiting impulses, motor coordination, auditory and visual perception and discrimination. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of storytelling on auditory memory of students with reading disabilities of Marivan city, Iran. Materials and Methods: The research method was quasi-experimental with pretest-posttest design with a control group. Sampling method was replaced in this study using an available sampling method on 30 students in two groups (15 experimental and 15 control people. The experimental group test abilities were trained in 12 one-hour session. Inclusion criteria were having a learning disorder (only dyslexic, third grade elementary school and having no other abnormalities and exclusion criteria were students who did not attend the regular sessions. Digit span subtest the Wechsler figures Fourth Edition were used to collect data. Collected data were analyzed by using SPSS version 21.0 software in two levels of descriptive and inferential statistics (ANCOVA. Results: The results showed that 66% of participants were female, also, according to the parents' literacy level, the results showed that the highest level of fathers’ literacy was between high school and diploma (46.7% as well as the highest level of mothers’ literacy was under diploma (50%. The results showed that storytelling had a significant impact on improving dyslexic students’ auditory memory (P

  12. The challenges of being an insider in storytelling research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, Stacy; Wilkes, Lesley; Jackson, Debra; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    To describe the challenges related to being an 'insider' researcher in a study that uses a feminist-informed storytelling research design and to discuss practical strategies to manage these challenges. The positioning of the researcher in qualitative research has numerous methodological implications. Often, qualitative researchers share similar experiences or characteristics with their participants. Such an 'insider' position provides challenges for the researcher in conducting the research. Understanding these challenges and planning how to manage them is beneficial for the researcher and for the conduct of the project. This paper is based on the research team's experience of undertaking a feminist-informed storytelling study exploring the experiences of Australian women providing long-term foster care. This paper provides a discussion of the methodology used in the investigation. Four challenges resulting from the insider status of the primary researcher were identified as affecting the research: assumed understanding, ensuring analytic objectivity, dealing with emotions and participants' expectations. Strategies to address these challenges include: 'participant probing', 'researcher reflexivity', review by an 'outsider' researcher, identifying the risk, debriefing, making the aims and use of study outcomes clear, and acknowledging participants' expectations. Methods to implement these strategies are described. The use of an insider researcher was beneficial to our study design and helped with recruitment and rapport, enabling collaboration and the generation of stories rich in content. By identifying the challenges associated with insider research and using strategies to mitigate them, researchers can effectively use an insider position in conjunction with a storytelling research design. ImplicaTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH/PRACTICE: Further investigation of the insider in different qualitative research designs would be useful in identifying challenges and benefits

  13. Using narratives and storytelling to communicate science with nonexpert audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Although storytelling often has negative connotations within science, narrative formats of communication should not be disregarded when communicating science to nonexpert audiences. Narratives offer increased comprehension, interest, and engagement. Nonexperts get most of their science information from mass media content, which is itself already biased toward narrative formats. Narratives are also intrinsically persuasive, which offers science communicators tactics for persuading otherwise resistant audiences, although such use also raises ethical considerations. Future intersections of narrative research with ongoing discussions in science communication are introduced. PMID:25225368

  14. Learning in the Classroom: Telling and Creating Digital Storytelling

    OpenAIRE

    Londoño Monroy, Gloria

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a qualitative research from an interpretive and participatory vision. It analyzes five cases developed between 2008 and 2011 with students of secondary school in Catalonia, Spain, for: (a) describe and understand the process and the resulting products' characteristics, conditions and limitations of use and educational benefits that it can offer when the Digital Storytelling are made as practical projects in formal learning; and (b) to design, implement and improve a teachi...

  15. Digital Storytelling for Historical Understanding: Treaty Education for Reconciliation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Hildebrandt

    2016-03-01

    Il saggio riporta un percorso di due anni con insegnanti di scuola elementare che hanno usato lo storytelling digitale per fare l'educazione ai trattati nelle loro classi. Presentiamo una panoramica del progetto di ricerca ed i racconti di un insegnante, di un ricercatore, e un guardiano Cree della conoscenza, i quali sono stati coinvolti nella ricerca e riflettono sul percorso svolto. Consideriamo i risultati dell’indagine insieme a questi racconti, al fine di esplorare le possibilità che la narrazione digitale potrebbe offrire dato che noi, come nazione canadese, procediamo verso la riconciliazione con gli aborigeni in un contesto canadese di colonialismo in corso.

  16. PERANCANGAN PURWARUPA KOMIK INTERAKTIF SAFETY RIDING BERKONSEP DIGITAL STORYTELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Godham Eko Saputro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak Di Indonesia khususnya kota besar, kecelakaan yang disebabkan kendaraan bermotor menjadi persoalan yang serius. Salah satunya disebabkan kurangnya pemahaman tentang safety riding. Berbagai upaya kampanye safety riding pun telah dilaksanakan oleh polisi lalu lintas melalui talkshow, siaran radio, serta media leaflet bagi masyarakat yang dilakukan berulang-ulang. Hal itu mendorong peneliti dalam upaya menemukan strategi baru, salah satunya memanfaatkan perkembangan teknologi yang sangat pesat guna mengembangkan media pendukung kampanye safety riding yang tidak hanya dapat menyampaikan pesan, tetapi juga disukai dan bersifat menghibur. Data diperoleh melalui wawancara, observasi, serta studi literatur sebagai sumber konten purwarupa komik interaktif. Melalui pendekatan digital storytelling dan model komunikasi SMCR serta mengacu pada Penelitian Pengembangan, konsep purwarupa komik interaktif bisa dijabarkan lebih detail serta dapat diimplementasikan dalam perangkat mobile khususnya tablet PC. Diharapkan purwarupa ini dapat dikembangkan lebih lanjut sehingga benar-benar dapat dipublish secara umum sebagai media pendukung kampanye safety riding. Kata Kunci: komik, interaktif, safety riding, digital storytelling Abstract In Indonesia especially in big cities, the accident which caused by rider is still become serious issue. One factor which cause accident is the lack of knowledge about safety riding. A lot of efforts which have been carried by traffic policeman are talkshow, radio broadcast, and leaflet media for public society. On the other hand, it courage the researchers in effort to find new startegy, one of them is using the advance of technology to develop another media campaign which not only can deliver the messages, but also can entertain user. This research is an effort to find unconventional media for safety riding campaign. Data was obtained through interview, observation, and study of literature as sources of content for

  17. Conversas sobre transmedia storytelling: alternativas produtivas - Entrevista com Rafael Nunes

    OpenAIRE

    Castilho, Fernanda

    2014-01-01

    Rafael Antunes realizou recentemente em Portugal projetos de ficção orientados pela lógica transmedia aplicada ao storytelling. Tanto Lápis Azul como Mutter conseguiram ter impacto na mídia portuguesa, mas o produtor admite que ainda existe um grande abismo entre os projetos transmídia e a lógica de produção tradicional do cinema e da televisão. Rafael Antunes integra o projeto CIAKL, European course in entrepreneurship for the creative industries, que envolve várias Universidades Europeias e...

  18. Acquisition of Sign Language by Autistic Children II: Spontaneity and Generalization Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Edward G.; Kologinsky, Eileen

    1983-01-01

    Six autistic children were trained to use their sign repertoire to make spontaneous requests of adults. Training consisted of imitative prompting, fading, and differential reinforcement, with aspects of incidental teaching. Ss displayed increased rate and variety of spontaneous sign requests and generalization of spontaneity across different…

  19. Spontaneous pneumothorax in weightlifters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnejon, T; Sarac, S; Cropp, A J

    1995-06-01

    Spontaneous pneumothorax is infrequently caused by strenuous exertion. To our knowledge there has only been one case of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with weightlifting reported in the medical literature. We describe three consecutive cases of spontaneous pneumothorax associated with weightlifting. We postulate that spontaneous pneumothorax in these patients may be secondary to improper breathing techniques. It is important that physicians and weight trainers be aware of the association between weight lifting and spontaneous pneumothorax and assure that proper instruction is given to athletes who work with weights.

  20. Storytelling by community-dwelling older adults: perspectives of home care workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastel-Smith, Beth; Binder, Brenda; Hersch, Gayle; Davidson, Harriett A; Walsh, Teresa

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this exploratory, qualitative study was to investigate storytelling by home care clients to their home care workers (HCWs). Specific research questions were: (a) When does storytelling by a care recipient occur during usual care?; (b) How do HCWs engage older clients in storytelling?; (c) How do HCWs respond to the stories told by clients?; and (d) What is the perceived effect of storytelling by older clients on the relationship between the client and the HCW? Two focus groups consisting of 10 HCWs each were conducted. Verbatim transcripts of both focus groups were analyzed using the constant comparative analysis method. Categories and concepts were identified. Characteristics of the HCW and client set the stage for storytelling. The process of storytelling included context, triggers, and temporal aspects. HCWs also shared the content of stories, the impact on their relationship with the client, and the perceived effect on each individual. A visual model depicting the nature of storytelling in association with the care of older clients is presented. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. The Effect of Digital Storytelling in Improving the Third Graders' Writing Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YAMAÇ

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this action research was to investigate the effects of digital storytelling in improving the writing skills of third grade students enrolled in rural primary schools. The writing performances of the students were measured before and after the teaching procedures of digital storytelling. Then, the process of narrative writing with digital storytelling was profoundly and carefully explored through observation and field notes, interviews, audio and video records, student diaries and documents, and student products. The results indicated that digital storytelling enhanced students’ ideas, organization, word choice, sentence fluency, and conventions in terms of writing quality. Similarly, the digital storytelling improved story elements and word counts in stories. In terms of the quality of students’ digital stories, the results demonstrated a steady progress in the elements of digital stories, and the technology literacy and competency of students throughout the process. Besides, the digital storytelling modified the process of narrative writing, and emerged as a beneficial tool to overcome the digital divide by developing students’ new literacy perception, competency, and skills. The digital storytelling also created learning community by improving interactions among students in the classroom, and increased their motivation to write.

  2. The Hadia Story: Digital Storytelling in Election Campaigns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Bakøy

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Digital storytelling in election campaigns is a relatively recent phenomenon, which needs to be investigated in order to enhance our understanding of changes and developments in modern political communication. This article is an analysis of how the Norwegian-Pakistani Labour politician, Hadia Tajik, has used digital storytelling to construct her political identity, and a discussion of the consequences of her experiments with this genre. The focus is on the five video stories she released during the 2009 parliamentary election campaign and the reactions they evoked on the net and in the traditional media during the same (time period. During the 2009 electoral campaign Tajik moved from being a relatively unknown politician to becoming a political household name and the only member of the new Parliament with a migrant background. The digital stories were instrumental in this development for numerous reasons, the most important probably being that they gave her prime time television coverage. Norwegian news media have in general been very concerned with Web 2.0 and Tajik’s videos were regarded as an innovative kind of political communication. The videos also functioned as an effective marketing tool on the net. As an integral part of her extensive viral network, they attracted numerous views and they were with a few exceptions met with positive reactions. This was probably due to their relatively high production values and their catch-all communication strategy that downplayed her ethnic, educational and political background and emphasized her universal human qualities.

  3. DIGITAL STORYTELLING, EDUCAÇÃO SUPERIOR E LITERACIA DIGITAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josias Ricardo Hack

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available O texto revisa e dialoga com autores de artigos e livros em Língua Inglesa e Língua Portuguesa sobre fundamentos técnicos da produção audiovisual, como o Digital Storytelling, a ser utilizada na educação superior e produzida pelos próprios interlocutores do processo de aprendizagem. O intuito é refletir sobre algumas características necessárias para se desenvolver uma experiência contextualizada com curtas histórias audiovisuais pessoais na aprendizagem de adultos. A metodologia de investigação é pautada em pesquisa bibliográfica nas bases de dados da Nottingham Trent University (Inglaterra e da Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brasil. Os resultados do estudo apontam que certas habilidades, como a capacidade de construir uma narrativa e editar imagem, vídeo e som são requeridas dos envolvidos em educação superior em razão da inserção de múltiplas tecnologias digitais no cotidiano. Assim, a experiência prática de produção audiovisual educativa pode trazer a possibilidade de literacia digital pela realização de peças audiovisuais no processo de aprendizagem colaborativa de adultos. Palavras-chave: Histórias digitais. Digital Storytelling. Educação superior. Literacia digital. Aprendizagem de adultos.

  4. Neural substrates of spontaneous narrative production in focal neurodegenerative disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.A. Gola (Kelly A.); A. Thorne (Avril); L.D. Veldhuisen (Lisa D.); C.M. Felix (Cordula M.); S. Hankinson (Sarah); J. Pham (Julie); T. Shany-Ur (Tal); G.F. Schauer (Guido); C.M. Stanley (Christine); S. Glenn (Shenly); B.L. Miller (Bruce L.); K.P. Rankin (Katherine P.)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractConversational storytelling integrates diverse cognitive and socio-emotional abilities that critically differ across neurodegenerative disease groups. Storytelling patterns may have diagnostic relevance and predict anatomic changes. The present study employed mixed methods discourse and

  5. The new community anthology: digital storytelling as a community development strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Mamie Marcuss

    2003-01-01

    Telling their tale through digital media, digital storytellers harness technology to share their experiences and communicate their values. Three community groups in Massachusetts are employing this concept and using digital stories to support their larger community building efforts.

  6. The experience of Interactive Storytelling: Comparing „Fahrenheit“ with „Facade“.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roth, C.; Klimmt, C.; Vermeulen, I.E.; Vorderer, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    At the intersection of multimedia, artificial intelligence, and gaming technology, new visions of future entertainment media arise that approximate the "Holodeck" ® idea of interactive storytelling. We report exploratory experiments on the user experience in a 'classic', foundational application of

  7. Talk to the hand: strategic spatial planning as persuasive storytelling of the Loop City

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Kristian

    2017-01-01

    the persuasive power of spatial concepts and supportive storylines in bringing transport infrastructure projects onto the national policy agenda. In conclusion, the paper calls for critical attention to the rationalities underpinning practices of persuasive storytelling in contemporary strategic spatial planning....

  8. The problematization of transmediation in the journalistic context: an analysis of transmedia storytelling from feature articles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Borges de Araújo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of transmedia storytelling (JENKINS, 2009a has been gaining acceptance and application in the most diverse fields of communication, including journalism. However, such uses do not often take into account the characteristics of the area studied. This paper aims to problematize the transmedia storytelling (TS within the field of journalism through three sources: the concept developed by Fechine et al. (2011, 2012, 2013 throughout a much wider phenomenon, the transmediation; studies that aim to characterize the journalistic discourse (CHARAUDEAU, 2009a, 2009b; and the theoretical tradition about newsmaking. Therefore, we propose the concepts of “transmedia journalistic content” and “transmedia journalism”, which subsume transmedia storytelling itself. Lastly, it will be presented an analysis on how transmedia storytelling takes place in two specific journalistic productions in order to characterize its place in a broader problematization of transmediation in journalism.

  9. Transmedia storytelling and the new era of media convergence in higher education, by Stavroula Kalogeras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine E. Morrissey

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Stavroula Kalogeras. Transmedia Storytelling and the New Era of Media Convergence in Higher Education. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014, hardcover, $100 (276p ISBN 978-1137388360.

  10. Presidential Storytelling as Argument: The Functions and Characteristics of Presidential Stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Rachel L.

    Noting the persistence of presidential "story" despite its critics, this paper maintains that presidential storytelling involves rhetorical skill and yields rhetorical benefits, and thus qualifies as strategic discourse. Initially examining presidential stories disguised as reports, termed "presidential episodes," the paper…

  11. Storytellers as partners in developing a genetics education resource for health professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Maggie; Tonkin, Emma; Skirton, Heather; McDonald, Kevin; Cope, Buddug; Morgan, Rhian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Advances in genetics are bringing unprecedented opportunities for understanding health and disease, developing new therapies and changes in healthcare practice. Many nurses and midwives lack competence and confidence in integrating genetics into professional practice. One approach to enhance understanding of genetics is to simulate clinical exposure through storytelling. Stories are acknowledged as a powerful learning tool, being understandable and memorable, stimulating critical thinking, and linking theory to practice. Telling Stories, Understanding Real Life Genetics is a freely accessible website that sets people's stories within an education framework. The links between the stories and professional practice are made explicit and additional features support learning and teaching. Care of the storytellers within an ethical framework is of paramount importance. Storytellers are viewed as partners in the project. The challenges encountered include preserving the authentic voice and dignity of the storyteller. Project team members have also experienced ‘professional shame’ when negative experiences have been recounted, and the stories have had an impact on the team. The experience of working with storytellers has been positive. The storytellers want to be heard so that others will benefit from their stories. They serve as a reminder of why this work is important. PMID:22197414

  12. AN EXPLORATION OF THE CONCEPT OF TRANSMEDIA STORYTELLING IN THE UNITED STATES AND SOUTH KOREA: A SYSTEMATIC ANALYSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Young-Sung Kwon; Daniel H Byun

    2016-01-01

    This research study sought to investigate how the concept of transmedia storytelling had been studied in both the United States and South Korea. The general objective of this research was to discover whether researches in the United States and South Korea studied the concept of transmedia storytelling differently and whether researchers in both the United States and South Korea have focused on different aspects of transmedia storytelling. Qualitative methods were used in the study. A syste...

  13. Spontaneous uterine rupture

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Rupture of a gravid uterus is a surgical emergency. Predisposing factors include a scarred uterus. Spontaneous rupture of an unscarred uterus during pregnancy is a rare occurrence. We hereby present the case of a spontaneous complete uterine rupture at a gestational age of 34 weeks in a 35 year old patient ...

  14. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fullam, L

    2012-01-31

    INTRODUCTION: Spontaneous\\/primary intracranial hypotension is characterised by orthostatic headache and is associated with characteristic magnetic resonance imaging findings. CASE REPORT: We present a case report of a patient with typical symptoms and classical radiological images. DISCUSSION: Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is an under-recognised cause of headache and can be diagnosed by history of typical orthostatic headache and findings on MRI brain.

  15. TPR-STORYTELLING. A key to speak fluently in english

    OpenAIRE

    NIDIA ROCÍO BERNAL NUMPAQUE; MIGUEL ARCÁNGEL GARCÍA ROJAS

    2010-01-01

    El propósito de este artículo es dar a conocer una idea general de lo que trata el método de Respuesta Física Total basada en narración de historias, los principios sobre los cuales éste se fundamenta y de cómo éste funciona en un salón de clase, donde se enseña una lengua extranjera. El artículo, por una parte, presenta una revisión histórica del método TPR_Storytelling, puesto que ésta contextualiza y permite entender su enfoque, al igual que su influencia en la producción oral en la lengua...

  16. Computational Psychometrics Meets Hollywood: The Complexity in Emotional Storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipresso, Pietro; Riva, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Expressions of emotions are pervasive in media, especially in movies. In this article, we focus on the emotional relationships of movie characters in narrative thought and emotional storytelling. Several studies examine emotion elicitation through movies, but there is a gap in scientific literature and in the practice to quantitatively consider emotions among the characters of a movie story, which in turn provide the basis of spectator emotion elicitation. Some might argument that the ultimate purpose of a movie is to elicit emotions in the viewers; however, we are highlighting that the path to emotional stimulation entails emotions among the characters composing a narrative and manipulating to enable the effective elicitation of viewers' emotions. Here we provided and tested an effective quantitative method for analyzing these relationships in emotional networks, which allow for a clear understanding of the effects of story changes on movie perceptions and pleasantness.

  17. Computational psychometrics meets Hollywood: The complexity in emotional storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Cipresso

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Expressions of emotions are pervasive in media, especially in movies. In this article, we focus on the emotional relationships of movie characters in narrative thought and emotional storytelling. Several studies examine emotion elicitation through movies, but there is a gap in scientific literature and in the practice to quantitatively consider emotions among the characters of a movie story, which in turn provide the basis of spectator emotion elicitation. Some might argument that the ultimate purpose of a movie is to elicit emotions in the viewers; however, we are highlighting that the path to emotional stimulation entails emotions among the characters composing a narrative and manipulating to enable the effective elicitation of viewers’ emotions. Here we provided and tested an effective quantitative method for analyzing these relationships in emotional networks, which allow for a clear understanding of the effects of story changes on movie perceptions and pleasantness.

  18. Data visualization a guide to visual storytelling for libraries

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Data Visualization: A Guide to Visual Storytelling for Libraries is a practical guide to the skills and tools needed to create beautiful and meaningful visual stories through data visualization. Learn how to sift through complex datasets to better understand a variety of metrics, such as trends in user behavior and electronic resource usage, return on investment (ROI) and impact metrics, and learning and reference analytics. Sections include: .Identifying and interpreting datasets for visualization .Tools and technologies for creating meaningful visualizations .Case studies in data visualization and dashboards Understanding and communicating trends from your organization s data is essential. Whether you are looking to make more informed decisions by visualizing organizational data, or to tell the story of your library s impact on your community, this book will give you the tools to make it happen."

  19. Quantum Organizational World-Making through Material Emobided Storytelling Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Marita

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the social construction approach to strategy, organization, culture, management and learning has increasingly been criticized for ignoring the active role of the materiality of the social world (Barad 2007, Ingold 2012, Nicolini 2012, Taguchi 2009). Thus in the aftermath of the lin......-guistic, discursive, and narrative turn, the quantum, material turn has emerged as one of the most recent research approaches to the study of organizational life. However, the quantum approach to organizational studies still needs scholarly discussions of the active agential role of body and of materiality in world......-making phenomena. In this article, organizational development and change are viewed as world-making phenomena that emerge from material, embodied, storytelling practices and are dissipated in the organization through the living story web in fractal, rhizomatic organizing processes. Diffractively reading pri...

  20. Digital Storytelling and Employer Branding. An Exploratory Connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia CRIȘAN

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Our paper aims at explaining what is digital storytelling and its particular methodology, and how its use in the organizational settings could influence the employer branding. For such purpose, the authors have conducted an exploratory research, where a group of participants has been asked to rate their interest in a company, after viewing solely the online commercial communication (website and Facebook account, while another group has viewed two digital stories produced by two employees of the company. The results of the analysis showed that participants had more positive words to describe the company after viewing the stories, but there were not differences in perception for those who were searching for a job and those who were not searching for the job when exposed solely to the web communication or digital stories.

  1. Storytelling in videogames: a cultural space to learn emocional habilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Alicia ESNAOLA HORACEK

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We want to analyze the characteristics of nowadays learning and the construction of the social identity through the storytelling of videogames. We recognize these technologies as an “homogeneous culture discourse” that can only be understood searching the keys that move the world beyond the walls of the school. From this perspective we are interested in the new spaces of power and authority that these technologies introduce in the institutions. To understand these processes we organize the analysis around certain aspects that operate in the interaction between children and this object. These reasons will guide us in the analyses. The problem of our investigation is defined by stating that videogames are involved in the construction of the social identity of the users facilitating archetypes of identification models. These discourses, also, design learning modes that generate a microculture of practices and meanings with a particular logic different from the school culture. As educators, we are interested in understanding how students organize their behaviours and identifications once immersed in this technological culture. Furthermore, we aim at comprehending the communicative strategies developed by users when utilizing this technology. We claim that these cultural behaviours bring about consequences in academic learning. This investigation presents basic aspects of the theoretical background, underpinning the construction of the social identity in the context of the global condition and the hybridization of cultures. We point out the characteristics of the cultural scenario linking the students and the Informational Society. It also studies in depth the characteristics of the digitalization of the narrative space and the ludic area, which offer us the possibility to analyze videogames from a complex perspective. To sum up, our main interest is to ascertain the characteristics of learning within the storytelling and game narrative generated

  2. Digital storytelling as a method in health research: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Kendra L; West, Christina H; Kenny, Amanda; Chooniedass, Rishma; Demczuk, Lisa; Mitchell, Kim M; Chateau, Joanne; Scott, Shannon D

    2018-03-05

    Digital storytelling is an arts-based research method with potential to elucidate complex narratives in a compelling manner, increase participant engagement, and enhance the meaning of research findings. This method involves the creation of a 3- to 5-min video that integrates multimedia materials including photos, participant voices, drawings, and music. Given the significant potential of digital storytelling to meaningfully capture and share participants' lived experiences, a systematic review of its use in healthcare research is crucial to develop an in-depth understanding of how researchers have used this method, with an aim to refine and further inform future iterations of its use. We aim to identify and synthesize evidence on the use, impact, and ethical considerations of using digital storytelling in health research. The review questions are as follows: (1) What is known about the purpose, definition, use (processes), and contexts of digital storytelling as part of the research process in health research? (2) What impact does digital storytelling have upon the research process, knowledge development, and healthcare practice? (3) What are the key ethical considerations when using digital storytelling within qualitative, quantitative, and mixed method research studies? Key databases and the grey literature will be searched from 1990 to the present for qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods studies that utilized digital storytelling as part of the research process. Two independent reviewers will screen and critically appraise relevant articles with established quality appraisal tools. We will extract narrative data from all studies with a standardized data extraction form and conduct a thematic analysis of the data. To facilitate innovative dissemination through social media, we will develop a visual infographic and three digital stories to illustrate the review findings, as well as methodological and ethical implications. In collaboration with national

  3. Storytelling som marknadsföringsverktyg : en studie om användandet av storytelling inom hotellbranchen

    OpenAIRE

    Alsing, Camilla; Bergman, Åsa

    2009-01-01

    Dagens samhälle brukar betecknas som en upplevelseindustri där kundens drömmar, fantasier och upplevelser står i fokus. I flertalet turism- och resetidningar syns reportage där unika koncept ökat för att uppfylla den efterfrågan som råder på upplevelser. Idag krävs något utöver det vanliga för att utmärka sig på marknaden och de senaste tio åren har begreppet storytelling intagit folks medvetande och beskrivs som ett effektivt marknadsföringsverktyg, vilket handlar om att berätta en historia ...

  4. Primer on spontaneous heating and pyrophoricity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-12-01

    This primer was prepared as an information resource for personnel responsible for operation of DOE nuclear facilities. It has sections on combustion principles, spontaneous heating/ignition of hydrocarbons and organics, pyrophoric gases and liquids, pyrophoric nonmetallic solids, pyrophoric metals (including Pu and U), and accident case studies. Although the information in this primer is not all-encompassing, it should provide the reader with a fundamental knowledge level sufficient to recognize most spontaneous combustion hazards and how to prevent ignition and widespread fires. This primer is provided as an information resource only, and is not intended to replace any fire protection or hazardous material training.

  5. Spontaneous sensorimotor coupling with multipart music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Brian K; Martens, Peter A; Janata, Petr

    2014-08-01

    Music often evokes spontaneous movements in listeners that are synchronized with the music, a phenomenon that has been characterized as being in "the groove." However, the musical factors that contribute to listeners' initiation of stimulus-coupled action remain unclear. Evidence suggests that newly appearing objects in auditory scenes orient listeners' attention, and that in multipart music, newly appearing instrument or voice parts can engage listeners' attention and elicit arousal. We posit that attentional engagement with music can influence listeners' spontaneous stimulus-coupled movement. Here, 2 experiments-involving participants with and without musical training-tested the effect of staggering instrument entrances across time and varying the number of concurrent instrument parts within novel multipart music on listeners' engagement with the music, as assessed by spontaneous sensorimotor behavior and self-reports. Experiment 1 assessed listeners' moment-to-moment ratings of perceived groove, and Experiment 2 examined their spontaneous tapping and head movements. We found that, for both musically trained and untrained participants, music with more instruments led to higher ratings of perceived groove, and that music with staggered instrument entrances elicited both increased sensorimotor coupling and increased reports of perceived groove. Although untrained participants were more likely to rate music as higher in groove, trained participants showed greater propensity for tapping along, and they did so more accurately. The quality of synchronization of head movements with the music, however, did not differ as a function of training. Our results shed new light on the relationship between complex musical scenes, attention, and spontaneous sensorimotor behavior.

  6. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Using Storytelling to Communicate Science to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderazzo, J.

    2014-12-01

    "Science is the greatest of all adventure stories," says physicist Brian Greene, author of The Elegant Universe. "It's been unfolding for thousands of years as we have sought to understand ourselves and our surroundings . . . and needs to be communicated in a manner that captures this drama." Carl Sagan and Neil deGrasse Tyson, the old and new storytelling hosts of Cosmos, would agree. So would Rachel Carson, who used one of the oldest and simplest of all story forms, the fable, to coax her readers into a complicated tale of pesticides, chemistry, and ecological succession. Silent Spring may well be the most influential science book of the last fifty years. More than ever, scientists need to communicate clearly and passionately to the public, the media, and decision-makers. Not everyone can be as articulate as a Jane Goodall or an Alan Rabinowitz. But humans are storytelling animals, and recent communications research suggests that information conveyed in story form activates more parts of the brain than when it is conveyed by bullet point or other non-narrative ways. Even a shy and retiring researcher can easily learn to use, at minimum, small and subtle techniques to find common ground with an audience who will not forget the message. Additionally, much recent communications research suggests strongly that the most memorable and effective way to coomunicate with the public is by conveying shared values or common ground. Stories--common to virtually every human society over time--inherently do that. As a literary and nonfiction writer for 40 years, and a university teacher of nonfiction and science/nature wiritng for the last 30, I know this first hand as well as through core scholarship about literature and narrative theory. Among other things, my talk will explore how some of the above science communication stars have used these sometimes-buried communication strategies--and how others can, too. Not crucial, but a brief interactive excerise I could conduct would

  8. The Use of Humor and Storytelling with African American Men: Innovative Therapeutic Strategies for Success in Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereen, Linwood G.; Hill, Nicole R.; Butler, S. Kent

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of culturally appropriate humor as a tool for change within the parameters of counseling has grown within the literature. In comparison, the art of storytelling has had little attention within the literature as a tool for strategic change. This article outlines a framework for the use of humor and storytelling as…

  9. Design, Implementation, and Lessons Learned from a Digital Storytelling Project in an Undergraduate Health Promotion Theory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimando, Marylen; Smalley, K. Bryant; Warren, Jacob C.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the design, implementation and lessons learned from a digital storytelling project in a health promotion theory course. From 2011-2012, 195 health promotion majors completed a digital storytelling project at a Midwestern university. The instructor observed students' understanding of theories and models. This article adds to…

  10. Effectiveness of storytelling interventions on psychosocial outcomes in adult patients with a life-threatening illness: a systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenau, Mai Nanna; Jackson, Inger Marie

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this review is to identify the effectiveness of storytelling interventions on psychosocial outcomes. In this review, storytelling is where adult patients with a life-threatening illness tell their illness story, facilitated by a healthcare professional.Specifically the review questions are.

  11. Digital Storytelling: Conveying the Essence of a Face-to-Face Lecture in an Online Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baim, Susan A

    2015-01-01

    As the percentage of university-level courses delivered online continues to increase, instructors who rely on storytelling approaches to convey key concepts in lecture-based coursework will likely face the need to translate their oral storytelling modules into one or more formats that are suitable for use in an online learning environment. While…

  12. Exploring the Use of Interactive Digital Storytelling Video: Promoting Student Engagement and Learning in a University Hybrid Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Catharyn C.; Warren, Annie E.; Archambault, Leanna M.

    2016-01-01

    This study explores interactive digital storytelling in a university hybrid course. Digital stories leverage imagery and narrative-based content to explore concepts, while appealing to millennials. When digital storytelling is used as the main source of course content, tensions arise regarding how to engage and support student learning while…

  13. "Relaaax, I Remember the Recession in the Early 1980s...": Organizational Storytelling as a Crisis Management Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, David M.; Nikolovska, Irena; Desiderio, Katie P.; Guterman, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, we consider organizational storytelling as a communications tool in which stories are used to reduce the stress and anxiety of organizational members during a crisis. While there is much consensus among organizational scholars detailing storytelling's active role in such processes as organizational learning and…

  14. 2008-2009 Davis Digital Storytelling Challenge: Showcasing 21st-Century Learning in the Art Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcheson, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Digital storytelling is the art of using digital content--still images, video clips, voiceovers, sound effects and music--to create short and compelling narrative movies. As an expressive medium in the art classroom, digital storytelling can be used to integrate subject matter knowledge and skills from many years of the school curriculum. If one…

  15. The use of storytelling in quantitative research reports: A marketing research firm perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Maritz

    2014-07-01

    Research purpose: This article investigates the use of storytelling as a tool for actionable reporting by South African marketing research firms Motivation for the study: Clients of marketing research firms often criticise research reports as being too technical and lacking in strategic value. Storytelling is a reporting technique that can be used to develop actionable research and provide clients with more strategic value. Research design, approach and method: A total of 26 in-depth qualitative interviews were conducted with client service directors and managers of marketing research firms that deliver quantitative research reports to clients. Main findings: Results indicated that all marketing research firms but one use storytelling. Barriers that impede more regular use are inexperienced research executives and the time intensity associated with creating stories. Practical/managerial implications: Storytelling should be used by marketing research firms to provide clients with more actionable research. Contribution/value-add: The study provides marketing research firms in South Africa with recommendations as to how to implement storytelling as a reporting technique, which will add value to clients and enable marketing research firms to remain competitive and develop relationships with clients.

  16. Poetic reflection through digital storytelling – a methodology to foster professional health worker identity in students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grete Jamissen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the field of digital storytelling research there is a focus on personal narratives, multimedia and the creative process in developing identity and voice. The project introduced in this paper has identified contexts in higher education where digital storytelling may be used as a promising tool to support students’ learning, assisting them to combine theory and practical experience in their field of study. Students in the health professions need to develop a professional identity based on both social and technical competencies. Technical competencies concord with what students expect to be taught in a university college. The development of social competence and professional identity, however, requires a different approach, involving students reflecting on their experiences from working in health institutions. We suggest that a particular mode of reflection, a poetic mode, exemplified by digital storytelling, may serve as a tool for students in this process of learning from practice. Three characteristics of digital storytelling are discussed: the narrative approach, multimodality and creativity, all in search of defining characteristics of a personal professional story. A model is described through a three cycle development project, illustrated by the terms pioneers and pathfinders for the first two cohorts of students and digital storytellers for the changes planned for the third cohort in the light of our experiences.

  17. Storytelling as an approach to evaluate the child's level of speech development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Marjanovič Umek

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Both in developmental psychology and in linguistics, the child's storytelling is an interesting topic of research from the point of view of evaluating the child's level of speech development, especially of its pragmatic component, and from the point of view of teaching and learning in the preschool period. In the present study, children's storytelling in different situational contexts was analyzed and evaluated: with a picture book without any text, after listening to a text from a picture book, and after a suggested story beginning (ie., with the introductory sentence given to them. The sample included children of three age groups, approximately 4, 6 and 8 years; each age group had approximately the same numbers of boys and girls. A total of over 300 stories were collected, which were subsequently analyzed and evaluated using a set of story developmental level criteria. Two key criteria were used: story coherence and cohesion. Comparisons by age and gender, as well as by context of storytelling, show significant developmental differences in story content and structure for different age groups, and the important role of storytelling context. Differences in storytelling between boys and girls did not prove statistically significant. The findings also suggest new options and approaches for further stimulations of speech development within preschool and primary school curricula might be considered.

  18. Forensic fictions: science, television production, and modern storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, David A

    2013-03-01

    This essay uses interviews with television creators, writers, and producers to examine how media practitioners utilise, negotiate and transform forensic science in the production of televisual stories including the creation of unique visuals, character exploration, narrative progression, plot complication, thematic development, and adding a sense of authenticity. Television as a medium has its own structures and conventions, including adherence to a show's franchise, which put constraints on how stories are told. I demonstrate how television writers find forensic science to be an ideal tool in navigating television's narrative constraints by using forensics to create conflicts, new obstacles, potential solutions, and final solutions in their stories. I show how television writers utilise forensic science to provide the scientific certainty their characters require to catch the criminal, but also how uncertainty is introduced in a story through the interpretation of the forensics by the show's characters. I also argue that televisual storytellers maintain a flexible notion of scientific realism based on the notion of possibility that puts them at odds with scientists who take a more demanding conception of scientific accuracy based on the concept of probability. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Conversas sobre transmedia storytelling: alternativas produtivas - Entrevista com Rafael Nunes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Castilho

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rafael Antunes realizou recentemente em Portugal projetos de ficção orientados pela lógica transmedia aplicada ao storytelling. Tanto Lápis Azul como Mutter conseguiram ter impacto na mídia portuguesa, mas o produtor admite que ainda existe um grande abismo entre os projetos transmídia e a lógica de produção tradicional do cinema e da televisão. Rafael Antunes integra o projeto CIAKL, European course in entrepreneurship for the creative industries, que envolve várias Universidades Europeias e empresas do ramo na procura de novos modelos de negócio para as indústrias criativas. Para além disso, desenvolve o seu doutoramento em Ciências da Comunicação na Universidade Lusófona de Humanidades e Tecnologias, instituição que tem apoiado o desenvolvimento dos seus projetos em conjunto com a emissora SIC (Sociedade Independente de Comunicação, na qual trabalha desde 2001. O seu currículo ainda conta com a realização de curtas-metragens premiados por festivais portugueses.

  20. Crew Resource Management (CRM video storytelling project: a team-based learning activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma, Maggie Jiao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This Crew Resource Management (CRM video storytelling project asks students to work in a team (4-5 people per team to create (write and produce a video story. The story should demonstrate lacking and ill practices of CRM knowledge and skills, or positive skills used to create a successful scenario in aviation (e. g. , flight training, commercial aviation, airport management. The activity is composed of two parts: (1 creating a video story of CRM in aviation, and (2 delivering a group presentation. Each tem creates a 5-8 minute long video clip of its story. The story must be originally created by the team to educate pilot and/or aviation management students on good practices of CRM in aviation. Accidents and incidents can be used as a reference to inspire ideas. However, this project is not to re-create any previous CRM accidents/incidents. The video story needs to be self-contained and address two or more aspects of CRM specified in the Federal Aviation Administration’s Advisory Circular 120-51. The presentation must include the use of PowerPoint or similar software and additional multimedia visual aids. The presentation itself will last no more than 17 minutes in length; including the actual video story (each group has additional 3 minutes to set up prior to the presentation. During the presentation following the video each team will discuss the CRM problems (or invite audience to identify CRM problems and explain what CRM practices were performed, and should have been performed. This presentation also should describe how each team worked together in order to complete this project (i. e. , good and bad CRM practiced

  1. Digital storytelling as a tool for teaching: Perceptions of pre-service teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tiba

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that teachers are reluctant to use technology despite the South African (SA government’s huge expenditure on technological equipment. This might be the result of teachers being unable to select appropriate technology that will yield positive learning outcomes as well as being ill-equipped to integrate technology into their pedagogy. To this end, pre-service teachers at a University were trained on how to integrate digital storytelling (DST effectively into their teaching. The aim of this study is to gain insight into the potential benefits of DST for teaching and learning and to determine factors that may prevent pre-service teachers’ uptake of DST during in-service practice. This is a qualitative study in which fifty pre-service teachers were divided into five groups for focus group interviews. Data were analysed, and the results show that pre- service teachers perceived DST to be beneficial in the classroom as it has the potential to (i motivate and engage learners, (ii promote voice/self-expression, and (iii promote collaborative learning and acquisition of multiple skills. Pre-service teachers are of the opinion that a lack of resources, self-confidence and time owing to restrictive curricula may prevent uptake of DST during in-service teaching. It was recommended that school stakeholders create a balance between intrinsic and extrinsic factors that will promote the adoption and integration of DST into teaching. Also, the education institution concerned strives to balance all three strands of knowledge: technology, pedagogy and content.

  2. TV journalism in the digital age: aspects of transmedia storytelling on paper television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaide Martins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a reflection on audiovisual journalism from the perspective of transmedia storytelling (NT, a term coined by Henry Jenkins (2009a in his research on the culture of convergence. How has media convergence affected the language and aesthetics of audiovisual journalism? And what of the routine and profile of its professionals? Or the relationship with the audience? What are the new paradigms and what has changed in their production processes as regards the use of new media? To reflect on these and other issues, it is necessary to identify and analyze aspects of transmedia storytelling on TV Folha, an audiovisual program inspired by printing, which began as a private channel on the web and is today shown by a public broadcaster. It is a product which seems to indicate that transmedia storytelling is beginning to establish a firm place in Brazilian audiovisual journalism based on its relationship with new information platforms.

  3. Storytelling in community intervention research: lessons learned from the walk your heart to health intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeBron, Alana M; Schulz, Amy J; Bernal, Cristina; Gamboa, Cindy; Wright, Conja; Sand, Sharon; Valerio, Melissa; Caver, Deanna

    2014-01-01

    Contextually and culturally congruent interventions are urgently needed to reduce racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic inequities in physical activity and cardiovascular disease. To examine a community-based participatory research (CBPR) process that incorporated storytelling into a physical activity intervention, and consider implications for reducing health inequities. We used a CBPR process to incorporate storytelling in an existing walking group intervention. Stories conveyed social support and problem-solving intervention themes designed to maintain increases in physical activity over time, and were adapted to the walking group context, group dynamics, challenges, and traditions. After describing of the CBPR process used to adapt stories to walking group sites, we discuss challenges and lessons learned regarding the adaptation and implementation of stories to convey key intervention themes. A CBPR approach to incorporating storytelling to convey intervention themes offers an innovative and flexible strategy to promote health toward the elimination of health inequities.

  4. TV JOURNALISM IN THE DIGITAL AGE: ASPECTS OF TRANSMEDIA STORYTELLING ON PAPER TELEVISION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaide Martins

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a reflection on audiovisual journalism from the perspective of transmedia storytelling (NT, a term coined by Henry Jenkins (2009a in his research on the culture of convergence. How has media convergence affected the language and aesthetics of audiovisual journalism? And what of the routine and profile of its professionals? Or the relationship with the audience? What are the new paradigms and what has changed in their production processes as regards the use of new media? To reflect on these and other issues, it is necessary to identify and analyze aspects of transmedia storytelling on TV Folha, an audiovisual program inspired by printing, which began as a private channel on the web and is today shown by a public broadcaster. It is a product which seems to indicate that transmedia storytelling is beginning to establish a firm place in Brazilian audiovisual journalism based on its relationship with new information platforms.

  5. [Storytelling in Health Journalism: Online Survey of Health Journalists on Definition and Use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimes, S

    2016-12-01

    Background: Although health information is of great interest and plays an important role in almost all media, there are very few studies on the actual work of health journalists. Methods: A quantitative online survey with qualitative elements on the definition and use of storytelling in health journalism was carried out among members of various professional journalists' associations (n=86). Results: The results suggest that health journalists understand storytelling especially as a term used when an article has a dramatic construction, and the story is about real people. As reasons for using storytelling, health journalists primarily name the understandable and clear presentation of medical issues. They see better chances for identification and establishing a relationship to the readers' lives. Of particular importance seems to be that narrative elements do not distort the facts and protect the privacy rights of persons mentioned in case reports. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Exploring the use of storytelling in quantitative research fields using a multiple case study method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Lori N. Hamlet

    The purpose of this study was to explore the emerging use of storytelling in quantitative research fields. The focus was not on examining storytelling in research, but rather how stories are used in various ways within the social context of quantitative research environments. In-depth interviews were conducted with seven professionals who had experience using storytelling in their work and my personal experience with the subject matter was also used as a source of data according to the notion of researcher-as-instrument. This study is qualitative in nature and is guided by two supporting theoretical frameworks, the sociological perspective and narrative inquiry. A multiple case study methodology was used to gain insight about why participants decided to use stories or storytelling in a quantitative research environment that may not be traditionally open to such methods. This study also attempted to identify how storytelling can strengthen or supplement existing research, as well as what value stories can provide to the practice of research in general. Five thematic findings emerged from the data and were grouped under two headings, "Experiencing Research" and "Story Work." The themes were found to be consistent with four main theoretical functions of storytelling identified in existing scholarly literature: (a) sense-making; (b) meaning-making; (c) culture; and (d) communal function. The five thematic themes that emerged from this study and were consistent with the existing literature include: (a) social context; (b) quantitative versus qualitative; (c) we think and learn in terms of stories; (d) stories tie experiences together; and (e) making sense and meaning. Recommendations are offered in the form of implications for various social contexts and topics for further research are presented as well.

  7. Spontaneous Atraumatic Mediastinal Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morkos Iskander BSc, BMBS, MRCS, PGCertMedEd

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous atraumatic mediastinal hematomas are rare. We present a case of a previously fit and well middle-aged lady who presented with acute breathlessness and an increasing neck swelling and spontaneous neck bruising. On plain chest radiograph, widening of the mediastinum was noted. The bruising was later confirmed to be secondary to mediastinal hematoma. This life-threatening diagnostic conundrum was managed conservatively with a multidisciplinary team approach involving upper gastrointestinal and thoracic surgeons, gastroenterologists, radiologists, intensivists, and hematologists along with a variety of diagnostic modalities. A review of literature is also presented to help surgeons manage such challenging and complicated cases.

  8. Storytelling and Videogames. An interdisciplinary appro- ach to interactive multimedia models for children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Antoniazzi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although scientific literature, since long time, underlines the importance of storytelling and games as essential cognitive and educational moments, current studies and researches are largely resting over a separate analysis of games and storytelling, establishing a hierarchy among them which crowns one or the other likewise from time to time. It is therefore necessary developing and tuning up methods and educational model that will allow us to develop the natural attitude of human mind to place all information inside one context and one set.

  9. Raymond Andrews as Griot: Privileging Southern Black Communities through Oral Storytelling and Cultural History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brennan Collins

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Raymond Andrews’ novels celebrate rural Black life by focusing on the customs and traditions of Southern African American communities. Critical to this celebration are the rhetorical strategies Andrews uses that privilege oral over literary storytelling. Using Geneva Smitherman’s discussion of the griot and Henry Louis Gates, Jr.’s concept of the speakerly text in the context of John Miles Foley’s work on comparative oral traditions, this essay explores the possibility and implications of describing Andrews’ written work as a form of oral storytelling.

  10. Transforming Students into Digital Hakawati: Digital Storytelling in the AFL Classroom: Learners’ Attitudes and Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaby Semaan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In a small exploratory pilot study, Digital Storytelling was used to enhance language learning and engagement as part of an Arabic as a Foreign Language (AFL program. Twenty-three AFL learners studying in a seven-week intensive Arabic summer program participated in the pilot study. Participants took a self-administered online survey that rated their experience creating digital stories in Arabic using three computer software programs and two iPad apps. The results of the pilot study suggest that Digital Storytelling (DS can be an effective tool for enhancing Arabic instruction at multiple proficiency levels.

  11. Storytelling: A Path to Imagination and Creativity in the Primary English Class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barreto Correa Gloria

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Storytelling has been used as a means to help students of a private school improve their communicative skills. To achieve this goal, we have designed activities that enable students to use English actively and at the same time get in touch with literature. We expect to change students¿ attitudes towards English and to motivate them to develop proficiency in the foreign language through storytelling. In doing so, we are innovating our teaching practices by incorporating a tool that can provide students with both the means and the motivation for using the language and thus develop their communicative skills.

  12. Spontaneous Appendicocutaneous Fistula I

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    M T0k0de* MB, BS and. Dr 0. A. AWOj0bi+ FMCS (Nig). ABSTRACT. Ruptured appendicitis is not a common cause of spontaneous enterocutaneous fistula. A case of ruptured retrocaecal appendicitis presenting as an enterocutaneous fistula in a Nigerian woman is presented. The literature on this disorder is also reviewed.

  13. [Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Edna; Caly, Wanda Regina

    2003-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis occurs in 30% of patients with ascites due to cirrhosis leading to high morbidity and mortality rates. The pathogenesis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is related to altered host defenses observed in end-stage liver disease, overgrowth of microorganisms, and bacterial translocation from the intestinal lumen to mesenteric lymph nodes. Clinical manifestations vary from severe to slight or absent, demanding analysis of the ascitic fluid. The diagnosis is confirmed by a number of neutrophils over 250/mm3 associated or not to bacterial growth in culture of an ascites sample. Enterobacteriae prevail and Escherichia coli has been the most frequent bacterium reported. Mortality rates decreased markedly in the last two decades due to early diagnosis and prompt antibiotic treatment. Third generation intravenous cephalosporins are effective in 70% to 95% of the cases. Recurrence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is common and can be prevented by the continuous use of oral norfloxacin. The development of bacterial resistance demands the search for new options in the prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis; probiotics are a promising new approach, but deserve further evaluation. Short-term antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended for patients with cirrhosis and ascites shortly after an acute episode of gastrointestinal bleeding.

  14. Spontaneous Grammar Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoo, Hong Sing; Lewis, Marilyn

    1998-01-01

    Describes one New Zealand university language teacher's reflection on her own grammar explanations to university-level students of Bahasa Indonesian. Examines form-focused instruction through the teacher's spontaneous answers to students' questions about the form of the language they are studying. The teacher's experiences show that it takes time…

  15. EDITORIAL SPONTANEOUS BACTERIAL PERITONITIS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) frequent]y occurs in patients with liver cirrhosis and ascites. It is defined as an infection of previously sterile ascitic fluid without any demonstrable intrabdominal source of infection. It is now internationally agreed that a polymorphonuclear (PMN) cell count in the ascitic fluid of over 250 ...

  16. Spontaneous dimensional reduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlip, Steven

    2012-10-01

    Over the past few years, evidence has begun to accumulate suggesting that spacetime may undergo a "spontaneous dimensional reduction" to two dimensions near the Planck scale. I review some of this evidence, and discuss the (still very speculative) proposal that the underlying mechanism may be related to short-distance focusing of light rays by quantum fluctuations.

  17. The Function of Native American Storytelling as Means of Education in Luci Tapahonso’s Selected Poems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widad Allawi Saddam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Native American storytelling has become a very vital issue in education. It preserves Native American history for the next generation and teaches them important lessons about the Native American culture. It also conveys moral meanings, knowledge and social values of the Native American people to the universe. More importantly, Native American storytelling teaches people not to be isolated, and the key issues discussed in this paper are borrowed from the selected poems of Native American Luci Tapahonso: ‘The Holy Twins’ and ‘Remember the Things that you told.’   Keywords:  folklore, narrating, Native American, oral tradition, storytelling

  18. Storytelling to Teach Cultural Awareness: The Right Story at the Right Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldasaro, Mary McCullum; Maldonado, Nancy; Baltes, Beate

    2014-01-01

    Stories contain the wisdom of the world, teaching cultural values. Story builds community, celebrates cultural diversity, and preserves cultural identity. Where truth has been suppressed, story is an instrument of epiphany; story builds literacy skills and develops metaphorical understanding. A storytelling center in Ontario, Canada, had been a…

  19. Storytelling on Social Media: The Motives for Telling the Tourist Experience to the Connected Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Selin Yilmaz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of the Internet and improvements in information and communication technologies (ICTs allow consumers to share their opinions and experiences of products and services with other consumers through electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM, word-of-mouse communication. The main aim of this study is to explore the motives underlying travellers’ sharing their holiday experiences with their connected others. In this study, following a theoretical discussion based on a review of the relevant literature, the role and importance of sharing the tourist experience with connected others in social media is demonstrated based on the results of structured interviews (online and offline with 38 people who were chosen based on their holiday experience sharing habits. The qualitative research in the form of interviews conducted with 38 people who were accustomed to widely sharing their travel experiences revealed that storytelling played a serious role in addition to the holiday experience itself, and sharing experiences with connected others was seen as a vital tool for a fulfilling holiday experience. Exploring reasons behind tourists’ storytelling provide a better understanding of the tourist behaviour in social media, and the impact of eWOM on the tourist experience. The results demonstrate the contribution of storytelling to the tourist experience, and provide a basis for further research on scale development for assessing the impact of storytelling on the tourist experience.

  20. Implementing Digital Storytelling as a Technology Integration Approach with Primary School Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuala Sweeney-Burt

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Irish educational policy acknowledges the importance of integrating technology meaningfully into teaching and learning at the primary level. Much remains to be done, however, in terms of developing, practically implementing and evaluating the use of technology in the Irish primary classroom. This paper describes a study on the use of a structured approach to digital storytelling as a tool for meaningful technology integration with children at primary level. In this study, the researcher developed a structured approach for implementing digital storytelling with primary school children, and collaborated with a class teacher in an Irish primary school to prepare to implement the approach. Multiple qualitative methods were used to evaluate the implementation, including interviews with the teacher, classroom observation, and focus group interviews with participating children. The results suggested that this structured approach to digital storytelling has the potential to be used successfully as a meaningful technology integration approach with this cohort. The findings also explored implications for the implementation of digital storytelling at primary level, and identified aspects on which further research should be undertaken to enhance and extend the approach that was used.

  1. Liberating the Arts: Promoting IT Fluency through the Pedagogy of Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Kenneth Xavier, Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Fluency in information technology (IT Fluency) is a component of life-long learning necessary for a Liberal Arts student's post-graduate success in the global and digital economy. While challenging, promoting IT fluency at Liberal Arts colleges can be achieved through the integration of digital storytelling pedagogy in existing humanities…

  2. Meshing the Personal with the Professional: Digital Storytelling in Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary F. Wright

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper chronicles a yearlong journey of learning about digital storytelling and leading the creation of five digital stories within a higher education community. We bring two complementary perspectives to guide this inquiry: as a faculty member in teacher education and as the University of Wisconsin system representative for the Learning Technology Development Council as well as director of our educational technology center. Our passion for the arts, aesthetics and education bring us to extend an inquiry into teacher identity and reflection by connecting our colleagues’ stories with the art of digital storytelling. We see its place and value in an academic environment; although not always currently clear, the roots of personal insight permeate the lives of professionals within the academy. Digital storytelling spans the artificial divide between the experiences of the past and our professional identities. The myriad uses of digital storytelling in higher education are explored as a reflective tool for practice, to highlight academic projects, interests or initiatives, and most importantly, to simply reflect on how we are shaped by the stories we live and how we in turn share our diverse identities.

  3. Digital Storytelling: A Case Study of the Creation, and Narration of a Story by EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler Pardo, Betlem

    2014-01-01

    The use of technology to teach English as a Foreign Language (EFL) has been greatly expanded in recent decades, and has also been construed by educators as a fresh alternative to traditional pedagogy. Digital Storytelling can offer this alternative as, without neglecting the target of improving teaching quality, it has been proved to be a…

  4. Storying energy consumption: Collective video storytelling in energy efficiency social marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Ross; Waitt, Gordon; Cooper, Paul; Butler, Katherine

    2018-05-01

    Despite calls for more socio-technical research on energy, there is little practical advice to how narratives collected through qualitative research may be melded with technical knowledge from the physical sciences such as engineering and then applied in energy efficiency social action strategies. This is despite established knowledge in the environmental management literature about domestic energy use regarding the utility of social practice theory and narrative framings that socialise everyday consumption. Storytelling is positioned in this paper both as a focus for socio-technical energy research, and as one potential practical tool that can arguably enhance energy efficiency interventions. We draw upon the literature on everyday social practices, and storytelling, to present our framework called 'collective video storytelling' that combines scientific and lay knowledge about domestic energy use to offer a practical tool for energy efficiency management. Collective video storytelling is discussed in the context of Energy+Illawarra, a 3-year cross-disciplinary collaboration between social marketers, human geographers, and engineers to target energy behavioural change within older low-income households in regional NSW, Australia. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Real story interaction: The role of global agency in interactive storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roth, C.; Vermeulen, I.E.

    2012-01-01

    Interactive Storytelling (IS) is a promising new entertainment technology synthesizing pre-authored narrative with dynamic user interaction. Research on user experiences in IS is sparse. The current experiment tested whether different player expectations regarding the impact of their actions yield

  6. Teaching Introduction to Psychology: Promoting Student Learning Using Digital Storytelling and Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, Christina; Miller, Antoinette

    2018-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how partnering with digital storytelling initiatives, like the StoryCorps project, can yield fruitful service-learning opportunities, while also supporting innovative approaches for teaching students from a range of disciplines who are enrolled in Introduction to Psychology (PSYC 1101). While various pedagogical tools for…

  7. Essentials of TAT and Other Storytelling Techniques Assessment. Essentials of Psychological Assessment Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teglasi, Hedwig

    This book provides guidance into the use of storytelling techniques as an approach to personality assessment and explains how to administer, score, and interpret such tests. The tests discussed include the Thematic Apperception Test (TAT), the Roberts Apperception Test for Children, and the TEMAS (Tell-Me-a-Story). Each chapter contains callout…

  8. Using stories to assist storytelling in a pastoral setting: Four female ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using stories to assist storytelling in a pastoral setting: Four female pastors in dialogue with Mary Magdalene. S de Beer, J Müller. Abstract. Sometimes we need a source of encouragement for restoring our own lives, to help us re-create ourselves. Using text as narrative texts opens up a multitude of possibilities in the work ...

  9. Joan Aiken's Armitage Family Stories: Place and Storytelling as a Way into the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackett, Hannah

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the importance of place and story in the life and work of Joan Aiken (1924-2004), with a focus on the Armitage Family short stories. It explores the fluid relationship between books, storytelling and place in Joan Aiken's childhood and looks at her close relationship with the landscape of the Sussex Downs. Particular…

  10. Making Learning Active with Interactive Whiteboards, Podcasts, and Digital Storytelling in ELL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jung Won; Suh, Suhyun

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine effective ways to integrate an interactive whiteboard, podcast, and digital storytelling for language proficiency development in English language learners. Researchers integrated these three technologies into a 60-hour intensive summer English program and investigated their impacts on student vocabulary…

  11. Aporia – Exploring Continuation Desire in a Game focused on Environmental Storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bevensee, S.H.; Boisen, Kasper Alexander Dahlsgaard; Olsen, Mikael Peter

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a reflective description of the development and the evaluation of the experimental game ‘Aporia’. The project demonstrates an exploration of interactive environmental storytelling and an evaluation of engagement as measured by continuation desire in a non-violent first-person comput...

  12. "Tales from the Brazilian Jungle": Antonio Rocha, Storyteller. Cue Sheet for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Elizabeth

    This performance guide is designed for teachers to use with students before and after a performance of "Tales from the Brazilian Jungle" with storyteller Antonio Rocha. The guide, called a "Cuesheet," contains four sheets for use in class. The first, "About the Performance," prepares students for understanding…

  13. Stimulating parent-child interaction through storytelling activities of a family literacy program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teepe, R.C.; Molenaar, I.; Oostdam, R.J.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2017-01-01

    Preschool vocabulary knowledge develops mainly informally via parent-child interaction. Family literacy programs (FLP’s) aim to promote children's vocabulary by supporting parent-child interaction quantity and quality. In addition to traditional storytelling activities that are part of FLP's

  14. The Investigation of Preservice Teachers' and Primary School Students' Views about Online Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakoyun, Ferit; Kuzu, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the views held by preservice teachers from the department of Computer Education and Instructional Technology (CEIT) and those of 6th grade students about the process of online digital storytelling activities as it applies to the students' education. The study was designed as a case study. The data were…

  15. 'There's no thing as a whole story': Storytelling and the healing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Storytelling has become an acceptable intervention tool among transitional justice promoters and peace-builders because of its cathartic nature and ability to help society in transition to come to terms with a traumatic past. It has played a significant role in the area of truth finding and accountability and has been widely used ...

  16. Online Inclusive Pedagogy: A Call-and-Response Dialogue on Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, Janet Ceja; Austin, Megan; Granroth, Mona; Hewitt, Breanne

    2016-01-01

    We propose digital storytelling as a pedagogical tool for online Library and Information Science education that recognizes diversity and fosters reflection among students and teacher. In a course titled Documenting Diverse Cultures and Communities, students contemplated their role as future information professionals and produced a short digital…

  17. Bringing Digital Storytelling to the Elementary Classroom: Video Production for Preservice Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Catharyn C.; Archambault, Leanna M.; Hale, Annie E.

    2017-01-01

    This study presents and evaluates a 7-week learning experience embedded in a required content-area course in a teacher preparation program, in which 31 preservice elementary teachers produced digital storytelling videos and considered how this approach may apply to their future classrooms. Qualitative and quantitative data from preservice…

  18. Putting Multiliteracies into Practice: Digital Storytelling for Multilingual Adolescents in a Summer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angay-Crowder, Tuba; Choi, Jayoung; Yi, Youngjoo

    2013-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate how we created a context in which digital storytelling was designed and implemented to teach multilingual middle school students in the summer program sponsored by a local nonprofit organization, the Latin American Association, in a city in the southeastern United States. While implementing the notion of…

  19. Our Stories Matter: Storytelling and Social Justice in the Hollaback! Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wånggren, Lena

    2016-01-01

    As feminist and anti-racist scholars and activists have long known, which stories predominate and which are marginalised is always a question of power and authority--about who is entitled to speak, and who has the authority to decide the meanings of words and actions. Storytelling can be used as a tool for social justice, as exemplified by the…

  20. The Dialectical Development of "Storytelling" Learning Organizations: A Case Study of a Public Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillon, Yue Cai; Boje, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Calls for dialectical learning process model development in learning organizations have largely gone unheeded, thereby limiting conceptual understanding and application in the field. This paper aims to unify learning organization theory with a new understanding of Hegelian dialectics to trace the development of the storytelling learning…

  1. Bringing Together Interactive Digital Storytelling with Tangible Interaction : Challenges and Opportunities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Catala, Alejandro; Theune, Mariët; Sylla, Cristina; Ribeiro, Pedro; Nunes, Nuno; Oakley, Ian; Nisi, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    This workshop aims to explore challenges and potential opportunities in bringing interactive digital storytelling into the realm of tangible and embodied interaction. To this end, experts from both fields are invited to present and discuss their ideas. Besides fostering discussion and potential

  2. How digital storytelling is used in mental health: A scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vecchi, Nadia; Kenny, Amanda; Dickson-Swift, Virginia; Kidd, Susan

    2016-06-01

    The creative arts can be used to support stakeholders of mental health services to communicate and share their lived experience. Digital storytelling is one method that has been used to capture people's lived experience. In this scoping review, we were interested in mapping how digital storytelling has been used in mental health, and to identify gaps in the literature. Nine databases were searched to identify peer reviewed literature published between January 2000 and August 2015; 15 articles were included in the review. The articles were categorized across four broad areas: educational interventions, learning skills, learning about other people's lived experience, and learning about personal lived experience. We identify that while digital storytelling has potential as a participatory process to promote mutual understanding of and empathy towards lived experiences in mental health, there is a dearth of research in this area. More research is needed on the use of digital storytelling in mental health to determine its effectiveness in progressing a recovery orientation in service provision that is built on solidarity and a social justice agenda. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Peering into a Chilean black box: parental storytelling in pediatric genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, Jessica; Margarit, Sonia; Downs, Katy; Yashar, Beverly M

    2013-12-01

    While genetic counseling has expanded to multiple international settings, research about providing culturally sensitive services to non-U.S. patients is limited. To gain insights, we utilized a process study to explore parental communication in pediatric genetics clinics in Chile. We utilized a phenomenological hermeneutic approach to assess storytelling in six pediatric sessions that were conducted in Spanish, and translated into English. The majority of the sessions focused on information gathering (35 %), and providing medical (20 %) and genetics education (18 %). The 14 instances of storytelling we identified usually emerged during information gathering, genetics education, and the closing of the session. Stories illustrated parental efforts to create a cognitive and emotional context for their child's genetic diagnosis. Parents emerged as competent caregivers who discussed the role of the child as a social being in the family and the larger community. Our analysis found that genetic counseling sessions in the U.S. and Chile are structured similarly and although communication is not a balanced process, parents use storytelling to participate as active agents in the session. Via storytelling, we learned that parents are working to understand and gain control over their child's genetic diagnosis by relying on mechanisms that extend beyond the genetics appointment.

  4. Moms Supporting Moms: Digital Storytelling With Peer Mentors in Recovery From Substance Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterno, Mary T; Fiddian-Green, Alice; Gubrium, Aline

    2018-01-01

    Substance use disorder (SUD) is a growing issue nationally, and SUD in pregnancy has significant consequences for mothers and their children. This article describes findings from a pilot project that used digital storytelling as a mechanism for understanding substance use and recovery from the perspective of women in recovery from SUD in pregnancy who worked as peer mentors with pregnant women currently experiencing SUD. Research on peer mentorship has primarily focused on outcomes for mentees but not the experience of the peer mentors themselves. In this qualitative study, a 3-day digital storytelling workshop was conducted with five women in recovery serving as peer mentors in their community. Each mentor also participated in an individual, in-depth interview. The digital storytelling workshop process helped peer mentors make linkages between their past substance use experiences to their present work of recovery, and fostered deep social connections between mentors through the shared experience. The workshop process also elicited a sense of hope among participants, which served as groundwork for developing advocacy-based efforts. Digital storytelling may be therapeutic for women in recovery and has the potential to be integrated into recovery programs to bolster hope and social support among participants.

  5. The Effect of Aural and Visual Storytelling on Vocabulary Retention of Iranian EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin Afshar, Maryam; Mojavezi, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    EFL learners at all ages and proficiency levels are usually confronted with various problems in vocabulary learning and retention. This study sought to introduce strategies for improvement of vocabulary learning and retention. Therefore, the effects of using aural/visual storytelling on Iranian EFL learners' vocabulary learning and retention were…

  6. Stories of change in drug treatment: a narrative analysis of 'whats' and 'hows' in institutional storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Ditte

    2015-06-01

    Addiction research has demonstrated how recovering individuals need narratives that make sense of past drug use and enable constructions of future, non-addict identities. However, there has not been much investigation into how these recovery narratives actually develop moment-to-moment in drug treatment. Building on the sociology of storytelling and ethnographic fieldwork conducted at two drug treatment institutions for young people in Denmark, this article argues that studying stories in the context of their telling brings forth novel insights. Through a narrative analysis of both 'the whats' (story content) and 'the hows' (storying process) the article presents four findings: (1) stories of change function locally as an institutional requirement; (2) professional drug treatment providers edit young people's storytelling through different techniques; (3) the narrative environment of the drug treatment institution shapes how particular stories make sense of the past, present and future; and (4) storytelling in drug treatment is an interactive achievement. A fine-grained analysis illuminates in particular how some stories on gender and drug use are silenced, while others are encouraged. The demonstration of how local narrative environments shape stories contributes to the general understanding of interactive storytelling in encounters between professionals and clients in treatment settings. © 2015 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. on behalf of Foundation for Sociology of Health & Illness.

  7. The Historical Ideal-Type as a Heuristic Device for Academic Storytelling by Sport Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutka, Patrick; Seifried, Chad

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this research endeavor is to take the previous calls of sport scholars to expand into alternative research approaches (e.g., history, case study, law reviews, philosophy, etc.) and to show how storytelling can be an effective tool through the use of a heuristic device. The present analysis attempts to focus on the usage of the…

  8. The Function of Native American Storytelling as Means of Education in Luci Tapahonso's Selected Poems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddam, Widad Allawi; Ya, Wan Roselezam Wan

    2015-01-01

    Native American storytelling has become a very vital issue in education. It preserves Native American history for the next generation and teaches them important lessons about the Native American culture. It also conveys moral meanings, knowledge and social values of the Native American people to the universe. More importantly, Native American…

  9. Truthful or engaging? Surpassing the dilemma of reality versus storytelling in journalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot Kormelink, T.; Costera Meijer, I.

    2015-01-01

    Storytelling is hyped as an instrument to attract audiences, but its potential to engage simultaneously makes it a source of criticism and concern. The debate seems stuck between what the profession of journalism is supposed to be about (facts, objectivity, truth-telling), and the way these ideals

  10. Using Out-of-Character Reasoning to Combine Storytelling and Education in a Serious Game

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linssen, Johannes Maria; Theune, Mariet; Bocconi, Stefano; Klamma, Ralf; Bachvarova, Y.S.

    To reconcile storytelling and educational meta-goals in the context of a serious game, we propose to make use of out-of-character reasoning in virtual agents. We will implement these agents in a serious game of our design, which will focus on social interaction in conflict scenarios with the

  11. Making time for storytelling; the challenges of community building and activism in a rural locale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Copeland

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The uneven projection of voices from or within a community can be addressed, in part, by methods such as digital storytelling in a technology and media-savvy society. Whilst the use of digital storytelling to facilitate constructive dialogue has proved successful for those who participate, instilling a sense of motivation to become involved at the outset can pose a challenge. Members of different types of community groups, whether geo-physical or practice-based, will not necessarily be drawn to involvement in social action through group workshops without prior personal engagement. This paper considers which other participatory media techniques can be employed to encourage involvement in community digital storytelling workshops to inspire activism, and examines barriers to participation, with emphasis on the necessity of mandate, for project success. To help answer these issues, one particular workshop in a case study in North Yorkshire, UK will be used to identify the importance of place and incorporation of methods when undertaking community digital storytelling.

  12. Resisting and Redirecting: Agentive Practices within an African American Parent-Child Dyad during Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis Ellison, Tisha; Wang, Huan

    2018-01-01

    This article examines the digital storytelling practices between an African American mother and son. We used agency as a theoretical framework to explore how the two exercised their own power to collaborate on their digital story. As digital technologies became part of their practice, challenges and tensions arose when both participants attempted…

  13. The Man Who Could Have Been King: A Storyteller's Guide for Character Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Tony R.

    2006-01-01

    This article focuses upon the need for character education through examining and promoting the values demonstrated by historical storytelling and encouraging the adoption of values for citizenship development. It is noted that historical figures should not be chosen by political correctness but should be examined instead for their transcending…

  14. Motivating Programming: Using Storytelling to Make Computer Programming Attractive to Middle School Girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Dystopia, Dysphoria , and Difference. From Barbie to Mortal Kombat: Gender and Computer Games. J. Cassell and H. Jenkins. Catlin, D. (1989... gender , computer science education, motivation, storytelling, Alice, Stencils Abstract Women are currently under-represented in computer science...Girls................................................................................ 7 1.4.1 Gender Expectations

  15. Scientizing with "ScienceKit": Social Media and Storytelling Mobile Apps for Developing Playful Scientist Dispositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegg, Tamara; Ahn, June; Yip, Jason C.; Bonsignore, Elizabeth; Pauw, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of several studies in which the authors draw on social media, storytelling, and mobile apps to help children playfully develop their own approaches to science. The authors detail their efforts to strike a balance between the structure needed to promote science learning and the flexibility needed to nurture…

  16. Preschoolers’ causal reasoning during shared picture book storytelling: A cross-case comparison descriptive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, Helen; Hurks, Petra; Kirschner, Paul A.; Jolles, Jelle

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how shared picture book storytelling within a peer-group setting could stimulate causal reasoning in children aged 4 1/2 to 6 years. Twenty-eight children from preschool classes of three schools were allocated to one of six groups (four to five children per group). Each group

  17. Preschoolers’ causal reasoning during shared picture-book storytelling. A cross-case comparison descriptive study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, H.C.; Hurks, P.P.M.; Kirschner, P.A.; Jolles, J.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates how shared picture book storytelling within a peer-group setting could stimulate causal reasoning in children aged 4 1/2 to 6 years. Twenty-eight children from preschool classes of three schools were allocated to one of six groups (four to five children per group). Each group

  18. The Impact of Storytelling Techniques through Virtual Instruction on English Students' Speaking Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodabandeh, Farzaneh

    2018-01-01

    This study examines the effect of storytelling through the use of Telegram on oral language of English foreign language (EFL) students. To this end, thirty English students aged 18 to 21 took part in the research. Before the treatment, they were interviewed by two instructors and were graded as low-proficient speakers of English. The selected…

  19. Storytelling as a Strategy for Understanding Concepts of Electricity and Electromagnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkotas, Panos; Rizaki, Aikaterini; Malamitsa, Katerina

    2010-01-01

    In our research, we investigated whether students will develop inquiry skills, such as hypothesis exploration and formulation and interpretation, and metacognitive skills, such as comprehension of new knowledge, as a result of a storytelling strategy employed during teaching. We also investigated whether students will utilize the skills and…

  20. Storytelling for Empowerment: Decreasing At-Risk Youth's Alcohol and Marijuana Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Annabelle; Arthur, Brian

    2003-01-01

    Research compared Storytelling for Empowerment Program participants' pre and posttest responses on drug use. High contact participants had the most marked changes with a decrease in their alcohol and marijuana use. All participants in the last year of the program, regardless of contact hours, decreased their alcohol use and increased in their…

  1. Negotiating Story Entry: A Micro-Analytic Study of Storytelling Projection in English and Japanese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasui, Eiko

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation offers a micro-analytic study of the use of language and body during storytelling in American English and Japanese conversations. Specifically, I focus on its beginning and explore how a story is "projected." A beginning of an action or activity is where an incipient speaker negotiates the floor with co-participants; they…

  2. When Clients Die: Using Storytelling, Journaling and Correspondence in Times of Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, Thomas R.

    2005-01-01

    The contexts of loss are as numerous as they are varied. This article reflects upon loss within the context of the helping relationship and illustrates how storytelling, journaling, and correspondence can be used to process the experience of a counselor's loss. The richness of personal accounts, interwoven and connected, provides voice and place…

  3. Collaborative Storytelling Experiences in Social Media: Influence of Peer-Assistance Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chen-Chung; Liu, Kuo-Ping; Chen, Wei-Hong; Lin, Chiu-Pin; Chen, Gwo-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Collaborative storytelling activities in social media environments are generally developed in a linear way in which all participants collaborate on a shared story as it is passed from one to another in a relay form. Difficulties with this linear approach arise when collecting the contributions of participants in to a coherent story. This study…

  4. A Mirror of Voices: A Collaborative Learning Community of Culturally Responsive Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kim Diann

    2013-01-01

    This action research study acknowledged the possibilities of culturally responsive pedagogy by examining digital storytelling via online workshops that were facilitated for a group of educators and educational leaders. The presence of cultural biases and cultural discontinuities in Pre-K-12 education has the propensity to contribute to the…

  5. Community Arts as Public Pedagogy: Disruptions into Public Memory through Aboriginal Counter-Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quayle, Amy; Sonn, Christopher; Kasat, Pilar

    2016-01-01

    Community Arts and Cultural Development (CACD) is a form of public pedagogy that seeks to intervene into the reproduction of meaning in public spaces. In this article, we explore the Bush Babies and Elders portrait project that sought to contribute to the empowerment of Aboriginal participants through counter-storytelling. Drawing on interview and…

  6. Effects of Storytelling to Facilitate EFL Speaking Using Web-Based Multimedia System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Shadiev, Rustam; Hsu, Jung-Lung; Huang, Yueh-Min; Hsu, Guo-Liang; Lin, Yi-Chun

    2016-01-01

    This study applied storytelling in the English as a foreign language (EFL) classroom in order to promote speaking skills. Students were asked to practice speaking EFL through producing individual and interactive stories with a Web-based multimedia system. We aimed to investigate an effectiveness of applying individual and interactive storytelling…

  7. Storytelling for Empowerment for Latino Teens: Increasing HIV Prevention Knowledge and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Annabelle; Cordova, David; Walters, Andrew S.; Szecsy, Elsie

    2016-01-01

    Latino adolescents are disproportionately impacted by HIV, but researchers have documented few programs to prevent and reduce HIV risk. The Storytelling for Empowerment (SFE) "HIV StoryBook" was designed with an innovative ecodevelopment approach combining empowerment, family communication, and positive cultural identity. A mixed method…

  8. The Simultaneity of Experience: Cultural Identity, Magical Realism and the Artefactual in Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeyford, Michelle A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores how students, as multimodal storytellers, can weave powerful narratives blending modes, genres, artefacts and literary conventions to represent the real and imagined in their lives. Part of a larger ethnographic case study of student writing in a middle years class for immigrant students learning English as an additional…

  9. Humanizing the Teaching of Physics through Storytelling: The Case of Current Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadzigeorgiou, Yannis

    2006-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to discuss the potential role of storytelling in the teaching and learning of physics. I first present the main historical events concerning the discovery of current electricity by focusing on the Galvani-Volta controversy and the work of Michael Faraday. Then I outline a planning framework for teaching through…

  10. The Effect of Story Grammars on Creative Self-Efficacy and Digital Storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C.-C.; Wu, L. Y.; Chen, Z.-M.; Tsai, C.-C.; Lin, H.-M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have proposed that the grammars may serve as a rule-based scaffolding to facilitate story comprehension in storytelling activities. Such scaffoldings may inform students of crucial story elements and possible transitions among different elements. However, how these scaffoldings may influence story creation/writing activities is…

  11. Spontaneous healing of spontaneous coronary artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almafragi, Amar; Convens, Carl; Heuvel, Paul Van Den

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous coronary artery dissection (SCAD) is a rare cause of acute coronary syndrome and sudden cardiac death. It should be suspected in every healthy young woman without cardiac risk factors, especially during the peripartum or postpartum periods. It is important to check for a history of drug abuse, collagen vascular disease or blunt trauma of the chest. Coronary angiography is essential for diagnosis and early management. We wonder whether thrombolysis might aggravate coronary dissection. All types of treatment (medical therapy, percutaneous intervention or surgery) improve the prognosis without affecting survival times if used appropriately according to the clinical stability and the angiographic features of the involved coronary arteries. Prompt recognition and targeted treatment improve outcomes. We report a case of SCAD in a young female free of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, who presented six hours after thrombolysis for ST elevation myocardial infarction. Coronary angiography showed a dissection of the left anterior descending and immediate branch. She had successful coronary artery bypass grafting, with complete healing of left anterior descending dissection.

  12. Using second life to facilitate peer storytelling for grieving oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Karen L; Bennett, Marsha J; Billingsley, Luanne

    2014-01-01

    Oncology nurses often experience intense emotional reactions to patient deaths but may be forced to ignore or hide their feelings because of work-related responsibilities. The complexity of nurses' work and personal lives creates obstacles for participating in traditional support groups where grieving nurses can bond and share. We hypothesized that using a web-based, three-dimensional (3-D) virtual world technology (Second Life) may provide a venue to facilitate peer storytelling to support nurses dealing with grief. We used a mixed-methods approach involving focus groups and surveys to explore the use of peer storytelling for grieving oncology nurses. Nine acute and ambulatory oncology nurses in groups of 3 participated using avatars in 5 group moderator-guided sessions lasting 1 hour each in a private 3-D outdoor virtual meeting space within Second Life. Baseline information was collected using a 12-item demographic and professional loss survey. At the end of the study, a 20-item survey was administered to measure professional losses during the study, exchange of support during sessions, and meaning-making and to evaluate peer storytelling using Second Life. Overall, nurses reported peer storytelling sessions in Second Life were helpful in making sense of and in identifying a benefit of their grief experience. They felt supported by both the group moderator and group members and were able to personally support group members during storytelling. Although nurses reported Second Life was helpful in facilitating storytelling sessions and expressed overall satisfaction with using Second Life, open-ended comments registered difficulties encountered, mostly with technology. Three central themes emerged in sessions, representing a dynamic relationship between mental, spiritual, and emotional-behavioral responses to grief: cognitive readiness to learn about death, death really takes death experience, and emotional resilience. This study suggests a potential benefit in

  13. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  14. Comparison of the effects of storytelling and creative drama methods on children's awareness about personal hygiene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleymani, Mohammad Reza; Hemmati, Soheila; Ashrafi-Rizi, Hassan; Shahrzadi, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining and improving the health situation of children requires them to become more aware about personal hygiene through proper education. Based on several studies, teachings provided through informal methods are fully understandable for children. Therefore, the goal of this study is to compare the effects of creative drama and storytelling education methods on increasing the awareness of children regarding personal hygiene. This is an applied study conducted using semiempirical method in two groups. The study population consisted of 85 children participating in 4 th center for Institute for the Intellectual Development of Children and Young Adults in Isfahan, 40 of which were randomly selected and placed in storytelling and creative drama groups with 20 members each. The data gathering tool was a questionnaire created by the researchers whose content validity was confirmed by health education experts. The gathered information were analyzed using both descriptive (average and standard deviation) and analytical (independent t -test and paired t -test) statistical methods. The findings showed that there was a meaningful difference between the awareness score of both groups before and after intervention. The average awareness score of storytelling group was increased from 50.69 to 86.83 while the average score of creative drama group was increased from 57.37 to 85.09. Furthermore, according to paired t -test results, there was no significant difference between average scores of storytelling and creative drama groups. The results of the current study showed that although both storytelling and creative drama methods are effective in increasing the awareness of children regarding personal hygiene, there is no significant difference between the two methods.

  15. TPR-STORYTELLING. A key to speak fluently in english

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIDIA ROCÍO BERNAL NUMPAQUE

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito de este artículo es dar a conocer una idea general de lo que trata el método de Respuesta Física Total basada en narración de historias, los principios sobre los cuales éste se fundamenta y de cómo éste funciona en un salón de clase, donde se enseña una lengua extranjera. El artículo, por una parte, presenta una revisión histórica del método TPR_Storytelling, puesto que ésta contextualiza y permite entender su enfoque, al igual que su influencia en la producción oral en la lengua extranjera, así como el desarrollo de la fluidez en los aprendientes de la misma, quienes pueden ser indistintamente niños o adultos. Por otra parte, éste muestra un contraste en su desarrollo metodológico, en el que se destaca algunos hallazgos parciales logrados hasta ahora en la investigación en curso, particularmente en relación con los pasos didácticos que se siguen en los contextos de enseñanza norteamericano y colombiano una lengua extranjera. El artículo se basa en la investigación adelantada por los autores de este artículo, tanto con niños como con adultos, entre los que se cuenta a estudiantes universitarios, cuya área mayor de interés es el inglés, en el programa de Licenciatura de Idiomas, y en particular a profesores de inglés en la escuela primaria, quienes por mandato legal deben enseñarlo, pese a que no estén cualificados para ello. La revisión teórica hace parte del proyecto de investigación en mención e incluye la consideración tanto del factor afectivo como del cognoscitivo en el aprendizaje.

  16. TV as storyteller: how exposure to television narratives impacts at-risk preschoolers' story knowledge and narrative skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linebarger, D.L.; Piotrowski, J.

    2009-01-01

    Educational media serve as informal educators within the home by supplementing young children's development. Substantial evidence documents the contributions of educational television to preschoolers' acquisition of a variety of skills; however, television's natural capacity as storyteller and the

  17. The Function of Native American Storytelling as Means of Education in Luci Tapahonso’s Selected Poems

    OpenAIRE

    Widad Allawi Saddam; Wan Roselezam Wan Yahya

    2015-01-01

    Native American storytelling has become a very vital issue in education. It preserves Native American history for the next generation and teaches them important lessons about the Native American culture. It also conveys moral meanings, knowledge and social values of the Native American people to the universe. More importantly, Native American storytelling teaches people not to be isolated, and the key issues discussed in this paper are borrowed from the selected poems of Native American Luci ...

  18. Interactional convergence in conversational storytelling: when reported speech is a cue of alignment and/or affiliation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiola, Mathilde; Bertrand, Roxane

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates how and when interactional convergence is established by participants in conversation. We analyze sequences of storytelling using an original method that combines Conversation Analysis and a corpus-based approach. In storytelling, the participant in the position of "listener" is expected to produce either generic or specific responses adapted to the storyteller's narrative. The listener's behavior produced within the current activity is a cue of his/her interactional alignment. We show here that the listener can produce a specific type of (aligned) response, which we term a reported speech utterance in echo. The participant who is not telling the story is nonetheless able to animate the characters, while reversing the usual asymmetric roles of storyteller and listener. The use of this device is a way for the listener to display his/her stance toward the events told by the storyteller. If the listener's stance is congruent with that of the storyteller, this reveals a high degree of affiliation between the participants. We present seventeen excerpts from a collection of 94 instances of Echo Reported Speech (ERS) which we examined using the concepts of alignment and affiliation in order to show how different kinds of convergent sequences are constructed. We demonstrate that this phenomenon is mainly used by the listener to align and affiliate with the storyteller by means of reformulative, enumerative, or overbidding ERS. We also show that in affiliative sequences, reported speech can be used by the listener in a humorous way in order to temporarily disalign. This disalignment constitutes a potential starting point for an oblique sequence, which, if accepted and continued by the storyteller, gives rise to a highly convergent sequence.

  19. How a creative storytelling intervention can improve medical student attitude towards persons with dementia: a mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Daniel R; Stuckey, Heather L; Whitehead, Megan M

    2014-05-01

    The creative arts can integrate humanistic experiences into geriatric education. This experiential learning case study evaluated whether medical student participation in TimeSlips, a creative storytelling program with persons affected by dementia, would improve attitudes towards this patient population. Twenty-two fourth-year medical students participated in TimeSlips for one month. The authors analyzed pre- and post-program scores of items, sub-domains for comfort and knowledge, and overall scale from the Dementia Attitudes Scale using paired t-tests or Wilcoxon Signed-rank tests to evaluate mean change in students' self-reported attitudes towards persons with dementia. A case study approach using student reflective writing and focus group data was used to explain quantitative results. Twelve of the 20 items, the two sub-domains, and the overall Dementia Attitudes Scale showed significant improvement post-intervention. Qualitative analysis identified four themes that added insight to quantitative results: (a) expressions of fear and discomfort felt before storytelling, (b) comfort experienced during storytelling, (c) creativity and openness achieved through storytelling, and (d) humanistic perspectives developed during storytelling can influence future patient care. This study provides preliminary evidence that participation in a creative storytelling program improves medical student attitudes towards persons with dementia, and suggests mechanisms for why attitudinal changes occurred.

  20. Spontaneous Thigh Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan, Sameer K

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available A young man presented with a painful and swollen thigh, without any history of trauma, illness, coagulopathic medication or recent exertional exercise. Preliminary imaging delineated a haematoma in the anterior thigh, without any fractures or muscle trauma. Emergent fasciotomies were performed. No pathology could be identified intra-operatively, or on follow-up imaging. A review of thigh compartment syndromes described in literature is presented in a table. Emergency physicians and traumatologists should be cognisant of spontaneous atraumatic presentations of thigh compartment syndrome, to ensure prompt referral and definitive management of this limb-threatening condition. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(1:134-138].

  1. Spontaneous Tumor Lysis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia C. Weeks MD

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS is a known complication of malignancy and its treatment. The incidence varies on malignancy type, but is most common with hematologic neoplasms during cytotoxic treatment. Spontaneous TLS is thought to be rare. This case study is of a 62-year-old female admitted with multisystem organ failure, with subsequent diagnosis of aggressive B cell lymphoma. On admission, laboratory abnormalities included renal failure, elevated uric acid (20.7 mg/dL, and 3+ amorphous urates on urinalysis. Oliguric renal failure persisted despite aggressive hydration and diuretic use, requiring initiation of hemodialysis prior to chemotherapy. Antihyperuricemic therapy and hemodialysis were used to resolve hyperuricemia. However, due to multisystem organ dysfunction syndrome with extremely poor prognosis, the patient ultimately expired in the setting of a terminal ventilator wean. Although our patient did not meet current TLS criteria, she required hemodialysis due to uric acid nephropathy, a complication of TLS. This poses the clinical question of whether adequate diagnostic criteria exist for spontaneous TLS and if the lack of currently accepted guidelines has resulted in the underestimation of its incidence. Allopurinol and rasburicase are commonly used for prevention and treatment of TLS. Although both drugs decrease uric acid levels, allopurinol mechanistically prevents formation of the substrate rasburicase acts to solubilize. These drugs were administered together in our patient, although no established guidelines recommend combined use. This raises the clinical question of whether combined therapy is truly beneficial or, conversely, detrimental to patient outcomes.

  2. Video Installation, Memory and Storytelling: the viewer as narrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane Charleson

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract: Much has been written about memory and its link with the visual where memory is likened to our recollection of vignettes or visual traces. Conway (1999 tells us that the brain takes in experience as word and image.  Gibson (2002 suggests that “imagistic cognition” is a process whereby we run image sequences through our heads while trying to make sense of experience. He links this psychological phenomenon with notions of film editing theory and practice. He goes on to suggest that the power of the cinema is linked to this primal experience of remembering that elicits the intense pleasures of childhood and access to a means of navigating the self. This paper will explore the role video installation can play in creating an open, enticing, non-threatening and immersive environment, where viewers can transcend the everyday, reflect on their own memories and recall their personal stories. I will argue that there is a symbiotic link between what I will call the viewer as flâneur and the producer of the work such that a new form of storytelling can be created through this relationship.

    Résumé: Il existe une littérature abondante sur les liens entre la mémoire et l'image, notamment en ce qui concerne le traitement de traces visuelles par les fonctions mémorielles. Conway (1999 insiste quant à lui sur le fait que le

  3. DIGITAL STORYTELLING: Kizoa, Animoto, and Photo Story 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin YEE

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Educators know that students create better projects when they are personally invested in the material (Brookhart, Bronowicz 2003; McInerney 2008; Braxton 2008. The rewards are particularly significant when students can exercise some degree of creativity in the process of developing their projects (Su 2009. Possibly this is a result of engaging both hemispheres of the brain (Tatar 2009, or otherwise simply a reflection of the human preference to employ creativity in any endeavor, including “work” related ones.One tried-and-true avenue for creative expression is through the use of stories or narratives. Simply including a narrative component may provide enough creative ammunition for students to feel that a particular assignment can be more interesting (Clark 2010, if their work is to be wrapped around a narrative format, such as a short story in favor of an essay or formal writing. But there are numerous free technology tools available today that take the process one step further, by injecting different editing options and high-end production values. Students do not merely assemble a story in words. They can now do it primarily with images, and many of the slideshow services online allow for text captions, dynamic transitions, special effects, and relevant animations. Students become videographers and directors as much as they function as storytellers. The slideshow builders thus do a better job than “old fashioned” essay/short story assignments at meeting the need of 21st century students, many of whom arrive at institutions of higher learning with at least an already-ingrained interest in such tools, if not explicit experience.Kizoa (www.kizoa.com offers a simple menu-driven, Flash-based interface for users to craft slideshows with uploaded images, added text, transitions, animations, special effects, and music selected from their limited online repository or uploaded in mp3 format. Users drag images and any desired effects onto a

  4. Digital storytelling in sex education. Avoiding the pitfalls of building a ‘haram’ website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Borghuis

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses a participant design research project. The project aimed to provide information about sex and sexuality to groups considered to be vulnerable due to lack of knowledge and cultural barriers. The researchers worked with their students (from highly diverse cultural background to gather interview material that in turn was used by these students to write ‘life stories’. Although not digital storytelling as it is usually defined, the group for whom the website was built did not author their own stories directly, participant design can be understood as a form of ‘digital storytelling light’. In regard of presenting information about sexuality in an acceptable manner, this combined design and research method worked well. The article provides examples from the interview material, the life stories and reactions posted on the websites that were built on internet for a for Moroccan and Turkish-Dutch youngsters, the intended audience.

  5. Notes on Narrative as Medium and a Media Ecology Approach to the Study of Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lance Strate

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Storytelling, as a distinctively human characteristic, is a product of our capacity for language and symbolic communication. Just as language is considered a medium within the field of media ecology, so too can narrative be understood as a medium of communication, as well as a kind of language, and as a fundamentally social phenomenon. As a medium, narrative interacts with and is modified by other media, undergoing significant change as it is expressed through oral tradition, dramatic performance, written documents, and audiovisual media. In particular, major changes in the nature of character and plot accompany the shift from orality to literacy, and writing and especially printing make possible new forms of tragedy as opposed to comedy, prose as opposed to poetry, and fiction as opposed to nonfiction. Storytelling continues to mutate through the introduction of new media, with increasingly greater emphasis on narrative as an environment, especially one associated with social interaction and gaming.

  6. Digital storytelling in study abroad: toward a counter-catalogic experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Rodríguez

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This article examines a pilot project incorporating digital storytelling into a short-term study abroad program in the small city of Guanajuato, Mexico. After contextualizing the project’s pedagogical and theoretical concerns, the article examines the resulting stories, underscoring their potential for helping students pay attention to specific sites, to think beyond the usual images one is bombarded with and to spark critical thought. It argues that digital storytelling allows both students and host community members to become authors and representers of their experiences, thus creating a “counter-catalogic” study abroad experience, i.e. one that goes beyond the staid images used to market these experiences abroad. Digital stories afford an exciting mode for thinking about how to create critical, intimate and dialogic encounters with others.

  7. Transmedia Storytelling and the Creation of a Converging Space of Educational Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As the media landscape evolves, educators are tapping into learning opportunities that meet the needs of 21st century learners. This paper provides an entry point to a relevant social problem related to education with Transmedia Storytelling, a story that crosses multiple forms of media, and each delivers a unique or specific contribution to the story experience. This study aims to contribute to the development and application of Transmedia Storytelling in educational settings. For this purpose a set of frameworks and educational models were selected based on research that points to the widespread use of transmedia learning experiences that are authentic, engaging, immersive, as well as support the development of new literacies. Ultimately, we attempt to demonstrate how the creation of a transmedia learning environment will allow the learner to develop and thrive in the digital age.

  8. Development of a digital storytelling resource to support children's nursing students in neonatal care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, Julia; Treves, Richard

    2017-03-06

    A digital storytelling resource focusing on the experience of nursing in neonatal care was developed using the narratives of six undergraduate children's nursing students who had undergone a practice placement on a neonatal unit. An evaluation of the resource in relation to its contribution to learning for students in a new, specialised area of practice revealed that storytelling based on peers' experiences is a valuable and insightful approach to learning. This is particularly important in a specialty such as neonatal care where the unfamiliarity of the environment and patient group can cause anxiety and uncertainty among students. Overall, the resource was seen to be useful to children's nursing students who are preparing for a practice placement in an unfamiliar clinical area.

  9. Is Storytelling Effective in Improving the English Vocabulary Learning among Iranian Children in Kindergartens?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maasumeh Abasi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of storytelling in improving English vocabulary learning among children in kindergarten. Twenty Iranian children (9 boys and 11 girls in a private kindergarten in Kerman, Iran, were the participants of the study. All of the children were five years old and were taught English with the same teacher in a class in a kindergarten. The design of the study was one group pre-test post-test quasi experimental design. Both pre and post-tests included 20 vocabulary picture items taken from a story book teaching in the kindergarten. The statistical analysis revealed that storytelling was effective in increasing vocabulary learning among kindergarten children.

  10. Storytelling as part of cancer rehabilitation to support cancer patients and their relatives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    la Cour, K.; Ledderer, L.; Hansen, H. P.

    2016-01-01

    observations, informal conversations and follow-up interviews conducted one month after completing the intervention. Analysis was performed drawing on narrative theory combined with social practice theory. The results demonstrate that the use of storytelling and metaphors intertwined with other course......Previous research on psychosocial support for cancer-related concerns has primarily focused on either patients or their relatives, although limited research is available on how patients and their relatives can be supported together. The aim of this article is to explore the use of storytelling...... as a part of a residential cancer rehabilitation intervention for patients together with their relatives, with a specific focus on their management of cancer-related concerns. Ten pairs participated in the intervention and data were generated through ethnographic fieldwork, including participant...

  11. Narrative Influences on "Desire to Act in My Community" in Digital Storytelling Workshops for Latina Teens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkey, Linda; Del Toro-Mejías, Lizbeth; DiFulvio, Gloria; Gubrium, Aline

    2018-04-01

    Digital storytelling workshops are increasingly being used to capture lived experiences and develop/disseminate health promotion messages for vulnerable and marginalized populations. Thirty female Latina teens of varied sexual/parity status produced digital stories of significant life experiences in a group context and then viewed and evaluated them using the Narrative Quality Assessment Tool. This tool was used to examine participants' experience of emotional engagement and identification with each story as well as a single-item indicator of desire to "do something in my community" related to the story. Emotional engagement was moderately strong; identification scores were neutral relative to the stories. Emotional engagement was strongly, significantly related to "desire to act in my community," while identification was not related. Emotional engagement should be considered an important factor to incorporate in the production of digital stories for purposes of developing interest in social action beyond the digital storytelling workshop.

  12. Teens calling for help on YouTube: storytelling on flashcard videos

    OpenAIRE

    Hamel-Lavigne, Johanie

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how teenagers self-represent through flashcard storytelling video on YouTube. 30 videos were analysed through narrative analysis to enlighten the characteristics of this genre of confessional videos. Since the flashcard confessional videos of Ben Breedlove, Kait, and Amanda Todd went viral, a style emerged and have been applied as a standard within the YouTube’s community. The results of the study revealed that teenagers disclose intimate and person...

  13. The Effects of Storytelling on Worldview and Attitudes toward Sustainable Agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Grace, Patricia Elizabeth

    2011-01-01

    The Effects of Storytelling on Worldview and Attitudes toward Sustainable Agriculture Patricia E. Grace ABSTRACT There is evidence that the American agrifood system is a significant contributor to environmental, economic, social, and ethical-animal welfare damage to the earth and to society and is unsustainable, yet the worldview of a substantial percentage of the population conflicts with this assessment. A significant number of researchers, non-governmental organizations, and gove...

  14. Story and science: How providers and parents can utilize storytelling to combat anti-vaccine misinformation

    OpenAIRE

    Shelby, Ashley; Ernst, Karen

    2013-01-01

    With little or no evidence-based information to back up claims of vaccine danger, anti-vaccine activists have relied on the power of storytelling to infect an entire generation of parents with fear of and doubt about vaccines. These parent accounts of perceived vaccine injury, coupled with Andrew Wakefield’s fraudulent research study linking the MMR vaccine to autism, created a substantial amount of vaccine hesitancy in new parents, which manifests in both vaccine refusal and the adoption of ...

  15. The language of feelings: A reading and storytelling group in an adolescent unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killick, Steve; Bowkett, Steve

    2015-10-01

    This article describes a "Reading and Storytelling Group" that ran at an adolescent inpatient unit and outlines how fictional stories, both read and told, can develop psychological insights such as mentalization and emotional literacy. The structure of the group is described, and some of the activities and responses of the young people are illustrated. How activities such as this can have therapeutic benefits without being ostensibly "therapy" are discussed. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Narração e Storytelling em Mysterious Object at Noon, de Apichatpong Weerasethakul

    OpenAIRE

    José Bértolo

    2014-01-01

    This essay is a close analysis of Mysterious Object at Noon, directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul, in which are considered questions of narration motivated by the central place the act of storytelling holds in the film structure. Problems such as the nonexistence of a script and the way the film seems structured by oral narration, in loco, as if the film were being written as it is told, will be analyzed. Finally, I describe how, through this structure, the film reflects upon the specificity...

  17. How individuals with dementia in nursing homes maintain their dignity through life storytelling - a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggestad, Anne Kari Tolo; Slettebø, Åshild

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this article was to present and discuss findings on what individuals with dementia do by themselves to maintain or promote their dignity of identity when they live in a nursing home. The majority of residents living in Norwegian nursing homes suffer from dementia. Individuals who suffer from dementia are particularly vulnerable, and their dignity of identity is at risk. It is therefore of great importance to explore how we can maintain their dignity of identity. The study builds on a phenomenological and hermeneutic design. The article reports three cases or life stories based on participant observation in two different nursing homes and interviews with five residents with dementia living in these nursing homes. Fifteen residents with dementia from these nursing home wards were included in the overall study. Individuals with dementia living in nursing homes may use life storytelling or narratives to manage chaos and to find safety in their lives. Storytelling is also used as a way to present and maintain identity. We can see this as a way of maintaining dignity of identity or social dignity. Life storytelling can be seen as an important way of preserving dignity for people with dementia. It is of great importance that health care professionals are open to and listen to the life stories people with dementia tell. As nurses we have an obligation to ensure that dignity is enhanced in care for people with dementia. Knowledge about how residents with dementia use life storytelling as a way to maintain dignity is therefore of great importance to health care workers in nursing homes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joash, Dr.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiology is not only rare but an important cause of new daily persistent headaches among young & middle age individuals. The Etiology & Pathogenesis is generally caused by spinal CSF leak. Precise cause remains largely unknown, underlying structural weakness of spinal meninges is suspected. There are several MR Signs of Intracranial Hypotension that include:- diffuse pachymeningeal (dural) enhancement; bilateral subdural, effusion/hematomas; Downward displacement of brain; enlargement of pituitary gland; Engorgement of dural venous sinuses; prominence of spinal epidural venous plexus and Venous sinus thrombosis & isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The sum of volumes of intracranial blood, CSF & cerebral tissue must remain constant in an intact cranium. Treatment in Many cases can be resolved spontaneously or by use Conservative approach that include bed rest, oral hydration, caffeine intake and use of abdominal binder. Imaging Modalities for Detection of CSF leakage include CT myelography, Radioisotope cisternography, MR myelography, MR imaging and Intrathecal Gd-enhanced MR

  19. Spontaneous wave packet reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghirardi, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    There are taken into account the main conceptual difficulties met by standard quantum mechanics in dealing with physical processes involving macroscopic system. It is stressed how J.A.Wheeler's remarks and lucid analysis have been relevant to pinpoint and to bring to its extreme consequences the puzzling aspects of quantum phenomena. It is shown how the recently proposed models of spontaneous dynamical reduction represent a consistent way to overcome the conceptual difficulties of the standard theory. Obviously, many nontrivial problems remain open, the first and more relevant one being that of generalizing the model theories considered to the relativistic case. This is the challenge of the dynamical reduction program. 43 refs, 2 figs

  20. Digital Storytelling as Poetic Reflection in Occupational Therapy Education: An Empirical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisebet S. Skarpaas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Stories are powerful aids to reflection. Thus, the use of stories may be a pathway to enhanced reflective practice and clinical reasoning skills. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether and how digital storytelling can contribute to occupational therapy (OT students’ learning through reflections on experiences from placement education. A cohort of OT students (n = 57 participated in a 2-day workshop to create digital stories. Data were generated through a questionnaire with a response rate of 100% of students who completed the workshop (n = 34. Quantitative analysis methods were used to reveal a level of agreement in the questionnaire statements, and qualitative content analysis was performed for the open-ended questions. The results show that the students learned through reflection on placement experiences in the digital storytelling process as they emphasized reflection as a main outcome. They highlighted the importance of sharing thoughts and reflections with peers. The students confirmed that this happens through the creative process and the use of multimodality in poetic reflection, but they were less convinced by the use of the narrative approach as a dramatic structure. The students experienced reflection and sharing as important elements in the digital storytelling process. However, investigations are needed into the use of a narrative approach to enhance reflection with larger cohorts as well as more thematic analyses.

  1. Embodying Critical and Corporeal Methodology: Digital Storytelling With Young Women in Eating Disorder Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea LaMarre

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Digital storytelling is as an arts-based research method that offers researchers an opportunity to engage deeply with participants, speak back to dominant discourses, and re-imagine bodily possibilities. In this article, we describe the process of developing a research-based digital storytelling curriculum exploring eating disorder recovery. We have built this curriculum around research interviews with young women in recovery as well as research and popular literature on eating disorder recovery. Here, we highlight how the curriculum acted as a scaffolding device for the participants' artistic creation around their lived experiences of recovery. The participants' stories crystallize what resonated for them in the workshop process: they each have an open-ended narrative arc, emphasize the intercorporeality of recovery, and focus on recovery as process. The nuances within each story reveal unique embodied experiences that contextualize their recoveries. Using the example of eating disorder recovery, we offer an illustration of the possibilities of digital storytelling as a critical arts-based research method and what we gain from doing research differently in terms of participant-researcher relationships and the value of the arts in disrupting dominant discourses. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs160278

  2. Triumph and adversity: Exploring the complexities of consumer storytelling in mental health nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Bennetts, Wanda

    2016-12-01

    Consumer participation in the education of health professionals is increasing, particularly in mental health nursing education and storytelling remains the most frequent approach to consumer involvement. The use of story has tended to be accepted as a legitimate educational tool with limited critique or consideration of its potential consequences presented within the academic literature. A qualitative exploratory research study was undertaken with mental health nurse academics (n = 34) and consumer educators and academics (n = 12), to investigate the perceptions and experiences of mental health nurses and consumers regarding the involvement of consumers in mental health nursing education. Data were analysed thematically. Story was a major theme to emerge from consumer participants and received some attention from nurse academics. Consumers and nurses both referred to the power of story to convey the human experience of mental illness diagnosis and service use; and the vulnerability that can result from storytelling. Consumers also described: story as expectation; preparation and support; and the politics of story. All participants supported the value of storytelling in mental health nursing education. Consumers had considered the complexities in far greater detail. The ongoing value of story as an educational technique requires further research. Equally important is considering a broader range of educational roles for mental health consumers. © 2016 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Authoring experience: the significance and performance of storytelling in Socratic dialogue with rehabilitating cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Jeanette Bresson Ladegaard; Svendsen, Mette Nordahl

    2015-08-01

    This article examines the storytelling aspect in philosophizing with rehabilitating cancer patients in small Socratic dialogue groups (SDG). Recounting an experience to illustrate a philosophical question chosen by the participants is the traditional point of departure for the dialogical exchange. However, narrating is much more than a beginning point or the skeletal framework of events and it deserves more scholarly attention than hitherto given. Storytelling pervades the whole Socratic process and impacts the conceptual analysis in a SDG. In this article we show how the narrative aspect became a rich resource for the compassionate bond between participants and how their stories cultivated the abstract reflection in the group. In addition, the aim of the article is to reveal the different layers in the performance of storytelling, or of authoring experience. By picking, poking and dissecting an experience through a collaborative effort, most participants had their initial experience existentially refined and the chosen concept of which the experience served as an illustration transformed into a moral compass to be used in self-orientation post cancer.

  4. Massage and Storytelling Reduce Aggression and Improve Academic Performance in Children Attending Elementary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Lopes Gonçalves

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Aggressive behaviors must be addressed in elementary schools. Massage and storytelling can be strategies to deal with aggression because both involve experience exchange and social interaction. Both can decrease stress and anxiety and increase self-esteem. Objective. To evaluate the effect of two interventions (massage and storytelling on aggressive behaviors and academic performance of elementary school children. Method. Three groups (n=35 children in each group of the second grade participated (aged 6.5–8.1 years. One group received ten extra classes of massage (MG, another group received extra classes of storytelling (SG, and the control group received extra classes of random subjects (CG. Extra classes lasted for 50 minutes, once a week. Aggressive behaviors were recorded on diaries, by the teachers and the coordinator. The frequency of aggressive behaviors and the academic performance of MG, SG, and CG were observed for six months and the groups were compared. Findings. ANOVAs evidenced that MG and SG, but not CG, showed a reduction in aggressive behaviors registered by the teachers and coordinator, after the intervention. Academic performance of MG and SC improved after the intervention (p<0.05.

  5. Massage and Storytelling Reduce Aggression and Improve Academic Performance in Children Attending Elementary School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Lia Lopes; Voos, Mariana Callil; de Almeida, Maria Helena Morgani; Caromano, Fátima Aparecida

    2017-01-01

    Aggressive behaviors must be addressed in elementary schools. Massage and storytelling can be strategies to deal with aggression because both involve experience exchange and social interaction. Both can decrease stress and anxiety and increase self-esteem. To evaluate the effect of two interventions (massage and storytelling) on aggressive behaviors and academic performance of elementary school children. Three groups ( n = 35 children in each group) of the second grade participated (aged 6.5-8.1 years). One group received ten extra classes of massage (MG), another group received extra classes of storytelling (SG), and the control group received extra classes of random subjects (CG). Extra classes lasted for 50 minutes, once a week. Aggressive behaviors were recorded on diaries, by the teachers and the coordinator. The frequency of aggressive behaviors and the academic performance of MG, SG, and CG were observed for six months and the groups were compared. ANOVAs evidenced that MG and SG, but not CG, showed a reduction in aggressive behaviors registered by the teachers and coordinator, after the intervention. Academic performance of MG and SC improved after the intervention ( p < 0.05).

  6. Efektivitas Teknik Storytelling Menggunakan Media Wayang Topeng Malang untuk Meningkatkan Karakter Fairness Siswa Sekolah Dasar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanita Dwi Krisphianti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effectiveness of storytelling technique using Malang mask puppets media to enhance the fairness of elementary school students’ character. The research design is true experiment with pretest-posttest one-group designs. The subject of research was ten students of grade VI Elementary School in Malang determined through the random assignment technique. Data collection instruments used questionnaires of character fairness and observation guidelines. Data analysis technique was used to test the effectiveness of the Storytelling technique using Wilcoxon test. The results of data analysis shows significant value (sig 0.005> 0.05, which means that the hypothesis is accepted. So we can conclude that storytelling technique using a Malang mask media can improve effectively the character of fairness of grade VI elementary school students. The results of this study is useful for elementary school teachers and guidance and counseling teachers as an alternative to an effective technique to develop character fairness of elementary school students.

  7. Promoting positive youth development and highlighting reasons for living in Northwest Alaska through digital storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wexler, Lisa; Gubrium, Aline; Griffin, Megan; DiFulvio, Gloria

    2013-07-01

    Using a positive youth development framework, this article describes how a 3-year digital storytelling project and the 566 digital stories produced from it in Northwest Alaska promote protective factors in the lives of Alaska Native youth and serve as digital "hope kits," a suicide prevention approach that emphasizes young people's reasons for living. Digital stories are short, participant-produced videos that combine photos, music, and voice. We present process data that indicate the ways that digital stories serve as a platform for youth to reflect on and represent their lives, important relationships and achievements. In so doing, youth use the digital storytelling process to identify and highlight encouraging aspects of their lives, and develop more certain and positive identity formations. These processes are correlated with positive youth health outcomes. In addition, the digital stories themselves serve as reminders of the young people's personal assets--their reasons for living--after the workshop ends. Young people in this project often showed their digital stories to those who were featured positively within as a way to strengthen these interpersonal relationships. Evaluation data from the project show that digital storytelling workshops and outputs are a promising positive youth development approach. The project and the qualitative data demonstrate the need for further studies focusing on outcomes related to suicide prevention.

  8. Telling stories with digital technologies in corporative training context

    OpenAIRE

    Hack, Josias Ricardo; Ramos, Fernando; Santos, Arnaldo

    2012-01-01

    The art of telling stories in digital format is currently widely available due to the popularization of digital cameras, computers and other mobile devices. In this paper we discuss the use of collaborative learning strategies based on Digital Storytelling in corporative training. The text includes a concise review on theoretical and technical foundations about educational communication through the use of audiovisual products based on disciplines such as Communication, Educatio...

  9. Spontaneous compactification to homogeneous spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mourao, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The spontaneous compactification of extra dimensions to compact homogeneous spaces is studied. The methods developed within the framework of coset space dimensional reduction scheme and the most general form of invariant metrics are used to find solutions of spontaneous compactification equations

  10. Screening for spontaneous preterm birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Os, M.A.; van Dam, A.J.E.M.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm birth is the most important cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. In this thesis studies on spontaneous preterm birth are presented. The main objective was to investigate the predictive capacity of mid-trimester cervical length measurement for spontaneous preterm birth in a

  11. Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum: Hamman Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushank Chadha, BS

    2018-04-01

    significant fat stranding. The image also showed an intraluminal stent traversing the gastric antrum and gastric pylorus with no indication of obstruction. Circumferential mural thickening of the gastric antrum and body were consistent with the patient’s history of gastric adenocarcinoma. The shotty perigastric lymph nodes with associated fat stranding, along the greater curvature of the distal gastric body suggested local regional nodal metastases and possible peritoneal carcinomatosis. The thoracic CT scans showed extensive pneumomediastinum that tracked into the soft tissues of the neck, which given the history of vomiting also raised concern for esophageal perforation. There was still no evidence of mediastinal abscess or fat stranding. Additionally, a left subclavian vein port catheter, which terminates with tip at the cavoatrial junction of the superior vena cava can also be seen on the image. Discussion: Spontaneous Pneumomediastinum, also known as Hamman syndrome, is defined by the uncommon incidence of free air in the mediastinum due to the bursting of alveoli, as a result of extended spells of shouting, coughing, or vomiting.1,2 The condition is diagnosed when a clear cause (aerodigestive rupture, barotrauma, infection secondary to gas-forming organisms3 for pneumomediastinum cannot be clearly identified on diagnostic studies. Macklin and Macklin were the first to note the pathogenesis of the syndrome and explained that the common denominator to spontaneous pneumomediastinum was that increased alveolar pressure leads to alveolar rupture.3 Common clinical findings for spontaneous pneumomediastinum include: chest pain, dyspnea, cough, and emesis.4 The condition is not always readily recognized on initial presentation in part for its rare incidence, estimated to be approximately 1 in every 44,500 ED patients3and also because of the non-specific presenting symptoms. For this patient, there was no clear singular cause, and therefore she received care for spontaneous

  12. Digital storytelling to engage postgraduates in reflective practice in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many emerging economies are just beginning to consume digital content meaningfully. In the field of education in particular, such technology could help to narrow the gap between teacher training and the expectations of a post-colonial, post-apartheid education system in an emerging economy. However, it is important that ...

  13. Digital Storytelling: A Tool for Identifying and Developing Cultural Competence with Preservice Teachers in an Introduction to Middle Level Education Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, Nancy; Adcock, Lee T.; Crave, Jared

    2017-01-01

    Using five themes associated with a diversity intensive undergraduate course, preservice teachers in an upper level introduction to middle grade course described their knowledge of cultural competence using digital storytelling as the tool. Findings suggest digital storytelling provides a tool to explore and describe how cultural competence is…

  14. Silence, Voice, and "Other Languages": Digital Storytelling as a Site for Resistance and Restoration in a South African Higher Education Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kristian D.; Ivala, Eunice

    2017-01-01

    In order to investigate the composing practices of digital storytellers in a South African context, a qualitative case study, set within a university of technology in South Africa and framed by literature stemming from the disciplines of digital storytelling and composition and rhetoric, was implemented as part of a larger dissertation project…

  15. Look Closer: The Alertness of People with Profound Intellectual and Multiple Disabilities during Multi-Sensory Storytelling, a Time Sequential Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten Brug, Annet; Munde, Vera S.; van der Putten, Annette A.J.; Vlaskamp, Carla

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Multi-sensory storytelling (MSST) is a storytelling method designed for individuals with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). It is essential that listeners be alert during MSST, so that they become familiar with their personalised stories. Repetition and the presentation of stimuli are likely to affect the…

  16. Oral Storytelling, Speaking and Listening and the Hegemony of Literacy: Non-Instrumental Language Use and Transactional Talk in the Primary Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibbin, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    The oral re-telling of traditional tales, modelled by a storyteller and taught to children in school, can be understood as "non-instrumental" practice in speaking and listening that emphasises oral language over the reading and writing of stories. While oral storytelling has significant benefits to children's education and development,…

  17. Storytelling Slide Shows to Improve Diabetes and High Blood Pressure Knowledge and Self-Efficacy: Three-Year Results among Community Dwelling Older African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertera, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    This study combined the African American tradition of oral storytelling with the Hispanic medium of "Fotonovelas." A staggered pretest posttest control group design was used to evaluate four Storytelling Slide Shows on health that featured community members. A total of 212 participants were recruited for the intervention and 217 for the…

  18. The Player as Author: Exploring the Effects of Mobile Gaming and the Location-Aware Interface on Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Hetland

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The mobile internet expands the immersive potential of storytelling by introducing electronic games powered by portable, location-aware interfaces. Mobile gaming has become the latest iteration in a decades-long evolution of electronic games that seek to empower the player not just as an avatar in a gameworld but also as a co-author of that gameworld, alongside the game’s original designers. Location-aware interfaces allow players to implicate places in the physical world as part of their gameworld (and vice versa for the first time. In addition to empowering the player as a co-author in the process of constructing a compelling gameworld, then, mobile games eschew linear narrative structures in favor of a cooperative storytelling process that is reliant in part on the player’s experience of place. While such an author-player “worldmaking” approach to storytelling is not new, mobile games evolve the process beyond what has yet been possible within the technical and physical constraints of the traditional video gaming format. Location-aware interfaces allow mobile games to extend the worldmaking process beyond the screen and into the physical world, co-opting the player’s sensory experiences of real-world places as potential storytelling tools. In our essay, we theorize the unique storytelling potential of mobile games while describing our experience attempting to harness that potential through the design and implementation of our hybrid-reality game University of Death.

  19. Yarning/Aboriginal storytelling: towards an understanding of an Indigenous perspective and its implications for research practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geia, Lynore K; Hayes, Barbara; Usher, Kim

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing recognition of Indigenous perspectives from various parts of the world in relation to storytelling, research and its effects on practice. The recent emergence of storytelling or yarning as a research method in Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island studies and other Indigenous peoples of the world is gaining momentum. Narratives, stories, storytelling and yarning are emerging methods in research and has wide ranging potential to shape conventional research discourse making research more meaningful and accessible for researchers. In this paper we argue for the importance of Indigenous research methods and Indigenous method(ology), within collaborative respectful partnerships with non-Indigenous researchers. It is imperative to take these challenging steps together towards better outcomes for Indigenous people and their communities. In the Australian context we as researchers cannot afford to allow the gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and mainstream Australia health outcomes to grow even wider. One such pathway is the inclusion of Aboriginal storytelling or yarning from an Aboriginal and Torres Strait perspective within Indigenous and non-Indigenous research paradigms. Utilising Aboriginal storytelling or yarning will provide deeper understanding; complementing a two-way research paradigm for collaborative research. Furthermore, it has significant social implications for research and clinical practice amongst Indigenous populations; thus complementing the biomedical medical paradigm.

  20. “I Thought We Had No Rights” – Challenges in Listening, Storytelling, and Representation of LGBT Refugees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Fobear

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Storytelling serves as a vital resource for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans* (LGBT refugees’ access to asylum. It is through telling their personal stories to the Canadian Immigration and Refugee Board that LGBT refugees’ claims for asylum are accessed and granted. Storytelling also serves as a mechanism for LGBT refugees to speak about social injustice within and outside of Canada. In this article, I explore the challenges of storytelling and social justice as an activist and scholar. I focus on three contexts where justice and injustice interplay in LGBT refugee storytelling: the Canadian Immigration and Refugee Board, public advocacy around anti-queer violence and refugee rights, and oral history research. I describe how in each arena storytelling can be a powerful tool of justice for LGBT refugees to validate their truths and bring their voices to the forefront in confronting state and public violence. I investigate how these areas can also inflict their own injustices on LGBT refugees by silencing their voices and reproducing power hierarchies.

  1. Spontaneous breaking of supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zumino, B.

    1981-12-01

    There has been recently a revival of interest in supersymmetric gauge theories, stimulated by the hope that supersymmetry might help in clarifying some of the questions which remain unanswered in the so called Grand Unified Theories and in particular the gauge hierarchy problem. In a Grand Unified Theory one has two widely different mass scales: the unification mass M approx. = 10/sup 15/GeV at which the unification group (e.g. SU(5)) breaks down to SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) and the mass ..mu.. approx. = 100 GeV at which SU(2) x U(1) is broken down to the U(1) of electromagnetism. There is at present no theoretical understanding of the extreme smallness of the ratio ..mu../M of these two numbers. This is the gauge hierarchy problem. This lecture attempts to review the various mechanisms for spontaneous supersymmetry breaking in gauge theories. Most of the discussions are concerned with the tree approximation, but what is presently known about radiative correction is also reviewed.

  2. Spontaneous intracranial hypotension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haritanti, A.; Karacostas, D.; Drevelengas, A.; Kanellopoulos, V.; Paraskevopoulou, E.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Economou, I.; Dimitriadis, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an uncommon but increasingly recognized syndrome. Orthostatic headache with typical findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are the key to diagnosis. Delayed diagnosis of this condition may subject patients to unnecessary procedures and prolong morbidity. We describe six patients with SIH and outline the important clinical and neuroimaging findings. They were all relatively young, 20-54 years old, with clearly orthostatic headache, minimal neurological signs (only abducent nerve paresis in two) and diffuse pachymeningeal gadolinium enhancement on brain MRI, while two of them presented subdural hygromas. Spinal MRI was helpful in detecting a cervical cerebrospinal fluid leak in three patients and dilatation of the vertebral venous plexus with extradural fluid collection in another. Conservative management resulted in rapid resolution of symptoms in five patients (10 days-3 weeks) and in one who developed cerebral venous sinus thrombosis, the condition resolved in 2 months. However, this rapid clinical improvement was not accompanied by an analogous regression of the brain MR findings that persisted on a longer follow-up. Along with recent literature data, our patients further point out that SIH, to be correctly diagnosed, necessitates increased alertness by the attending physician, in the evaluation of headaches

  3. Spontaneous lateral temporal encephalocele.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncbilek, Gokhan; Calis, Mert; Akalan, Nejat

    2013-01-01

    A spontaneous encephalocele is one that develops either because of embryological maldevelopment or from a poorly understood postnatal process that permits brain herniation to occur. We here report a rare case of lateral temporal encephalocele extending to the infratemporal fossa under the zygomatic arch. At birth, the infant was noted to have a large cystic mass in the right side of the face. After being operated on initially in another center in the newborn period, the patient was referred to our clinic with a diagnosis of temporal encephalocele. He was 6 months old at the time of admission. Computerized tomography scan and magnetic resonance imaging studies revealed a 8 × 9 cm fluid-filled, multiloculated cystic mass at the right infratemporal fossa. No intracranial pathology or connection is seen. The patient was operated on to reduce the distortion effect of the growing mass. The histopathological examination of the sac revealed well-differentiated mature glial tissue stained with glial fibrillary acid protein. This rare clinical presentation of encephaloceles should be taken into consideration during the evaluation of the lateral facial masses in the infancy period, and possible intracranial connection should be ruled out before surgery to avoid complications.

  4. Bilateral spontaneous carotid artery dissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townend, Bradley Scott; Traves, Laura; Crimmins, Denis

    2005-06-01

    Bilateral internal carotid artery dissections have been reported, but spontaneous bilateral dissections are rare. Internal carotid artery dissection can present with a spectrum of symptoms ranging from headache to completed stroke. Two cases of spontaneous bilateral carotid artery dissection are presented, one with headache and minimal symptoms and the other with a stroke syndrome. No cause could be found in either case, making the dissections completely spontaneous. Bilateral internal carotid artery dissection (ICAD) should be considered in young patients with unexplained head and neck pain with or without focal neurological symptoms and signs. The increasing availability of imaging would sustain the higher index of suspicion.

  5. Development of a post-intensive care unit storytelling intervention for surrogates involved in decisions to limit life-sustaining treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Yael; Dew, Mary Amanda; Reynolds, Charles F; Arnold, Robert M; Tiver, Greer A; Barnato, Amber E

    2015-06-01

    Surrogates involved in decisions to limit life-sustaining treatment for a loved one in the intensive care unit (ICU) are at increased risk for adverse psychological outcomes that can last for months to years after the ICU experience. Post-ICU interventions to reduce surrogate distress have not yet been developed. We sought to (1) describe a conceptual framework underlying the beneficial mental health effects of storytelling, and (2) present formative work developing a storytelling intervention to reduce distress for recently bereaved surrogates. An interdisciplinary team conceived the idea for a storytelling intervention based on evidence from narrative theory that storytelling reduces distress from traumatic events through emotional disclosure, cognitive processing, and social connection. We developed an initial storytelling guide based on this theory and the clinical perspectives of team members. We then conducted a case series with recently bereaved surrogates to iteratively test and modify the guide. The storytelling guide covered three key domains of the surrogate's experience of the patient's illness and death: antecedents, ICU experience, and aftermath. The facilitator focused on the parts of a story that appeared to generate strong emotions and used nonjudgmental statements to attend to these emotions. Between September 2012 and May 2013, we identified 28 eligible surrogates from a medical ICU and consented 20 for medical record review and recontact; 10 became eligible, of whom 6 consented and completed the storytelling intervention. The single-session storytelling intervention lasted from 40 to 92 minutes. All storytelling participants endorsed the intervention as acceptable, and five of six reported it as helpful. Surrogate storytelling is an innovative and acceptable post-ICU intervention for recently bereaved surrogates and should be evaluated further.

  6. Using Motion Tracking to Detect Spontaneous Movements in Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Mikkel Damgaard; Herskind, Anna; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2015-01-01

    We study the characteristics of infants’ spontaneous movements, based on data obtained from a markerless motion tracking system. From the pose data, the set of features are generated from the raw joint-angles of the infants and different classifiers are trained and evaluated using annotated data....... Furthermore, we look at the importance of different features and outline the most significant features for detecting spontaneous movements of infants. Using these findings for further analysis of infants’ movements, this might be used to identify infants in risk of cerebral palsy....

  7. Spontaneous intraorbital hematoma: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinodan Paramanathan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Vinodan Paramanathan, Ardalan ZolnourianQueen's Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Burton on Trent, Staffordshire DE13 0RB, UKAbstract: Spontaneous intraorbital hematoma is an uncommon clinical entity seen in ophthalmology practice. It is poorly represented in the literature. Current evidence attributes it to orbital trauma, neoplasm, vascular malformations, acute sinusitis, and systemic abnormalities. A 65-year-old female presented with spontaneous intraorbital hematoma manifesting as severe ocular pains, eyelid edema, proptosis, and diplopia, without a history of trauma. Computer tomography demonstrated a fairly well defined extraconal lesion with opacification of the paranasal sinuses. The principal differential based on all findings was that of a spreading sinus infection and an extraconal tumor. An unprecedented finding of a spontaneous orbital hematoma was discovered when the patient was taken to theater. We discuss the rarity of this condition and its management.Keywords: hemorrhage, ophthalmology, spontaneous, intra-orbital, hematoma

  8. Stories for change: development of a diabetes digital storytelling intervention for refugees and immigrants to minnesota using qualitative methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njeru, Jane W; Patten, Christi A; Hanza, Marcelo M K; Brockman, Tabetha A; Ridgeway, Jennifer L; Weis, Jennifer A; Clark, Matthew M; Goodson, Miriam; Osman, Ahmed; Porraz-Capetillo, Graciela; Hared, Abdullah; Myers, Allison; Sia, Irene G; Wieland, Mark L

    2015-12-29

    Immigrants and refugees are affected by diabetes-related health disparities, with higher rates of incident diabetes and sub-optimal diabetes outcomes. Digital storytelling interventions for chronic diseases, such as diabetes may be especially powerful among immigrants because often limited English proficiency minimizes access to and affects the applicability of the existing health education opportunities. Community-based participatory research (CBPR), whereby community members and academia partner in an equitable relationship through all phases of the research, is an intuitive approach to develop these interventions. The main objective of this study was to develop a diabetes digital storytelling intervention with and for immigrant and refugee populations. We used a CBPR approach to develop a diabetes digital storytelling intervention with and for immigrant and refugee Somali and Latino communities. Building on an established CBPR partnership, we conducted focus groups among community members with type II diabetes for a dual purpose: 1) to inform the intervention as it related to four domains of diabetes self-management (medication management, glucose self-monitoring, physical activity, and nutrition); 2) to identify champion storytellers for the intervention development. Eight participants attended a facilitated workshop for the creation of the digital stories. Each of the eight storytellers, from the Somali and Latino communities with diabetes (four from each group), created a powerful and compelling story about their struggles and accomplishments related to the four domains of diabetes self-management. This report is on a systematic, participatory process for the successful development of a diabetes storytelling intervention for Somali and Latino adults. Processes and products from this work may inform the work of other CBPR partnerships.

  9. Spontaneous ischaemic stroke in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gredal, Hanne Birgit; Skerritt, G. C.; Gideon, P.

    2013-01-01

    Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms.......Translation of experimental stroke research into the clinical setting is often unsuccessful. Novel approaches are therefore desirable. As humans, pet dogs suffer from spontaneous ischaemic stroke and may hence offer new ways of studying genuine stroke injury mechanisms....

  10. Spontaneity and international marketing performance

    OpenAIRE

    Souchon, Anne L.; Hughes, Paul; Farrell, Andrew M.; Nemkova, Ekaterina; Oliveira, Joao S.

    2016-01-01

    The file attached to this record is the author's final peer reviewed version. The Publisher's final version can be found by following the DOI link. Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to ascertain how today’s international marketers can perform better on the global scene by harnessing spontaneity. Design/methodology/approach – The authors draw on contingency theory to develop a model of the spontaneity – international marketing performance relationship, and identify three potential m...

  11. African American Veterans Storytelling: A Multisite Randomized Trial to Improve Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Thomas K; Fix, Gemmae M; Shimada, Stephanie L; Long, Judith A; Gordon, Howard S; Pope, Charlene; Volkman, Julie; Allison, Jeroan J; DeLaughter, Kathryn; Orner, Michelle; Bokhour, Barbara G

    2017-09-01

    Disparities in hypertension control persist for African American Veterans. To enhance cultural relevance of hypertension control self-management education, in a multisite, stratified randomized trial, we tested an interactive Veteran-to-Veteran storytelling digital video disk (DVD) intervention created with Veteran partners, versus an education-only DVD comparison. At 3 VA facilities, African American Veterans with uncontrolled hypertension were randomized to storytelling DVD intervention or didactic comparison DVD and followed for 6 months. We hypothesized that follow-up blood pressure (BP) would be lower among Veterans in the intervention group. African American Veterans (N=619) were 92% male, 39% over age 65, most had a high-school education, over 50% of both the intervention and comparison group reported a household income of 0.3). Site differences were large; at one, the intervention group improved while the comparison groups deteriorated, resulting in 6.3 and 3.9 mm Hg more improvement for the intervention group in SBP and diastolic BP (P=0.06 and 0.04), respectively; at the other 2 sites, there were positive and negative changes, all small, in the 2 measures, with minimal differences-one site favored the comparison group and the other, the intervention (these comparisons did not approach statistical significance (all P>0.20). In a secondary analysis stratified by baseline BP, there was no intervention effect among those with uncontrolled BP, but intervention patients who were in control at baseline were more likely to stay in control, compared with comparison [SBP increase by 6.3 mm Hg (SD=14.4) among intervention, and by 10.9 mm Hg (SD=16.9) in comparison, P=0.02]. In this multisite trial, we did not find a significant overall storytelling intervention effect (Clinicaltrials.gov Reg. #NCT01276197).

  12. From Tabletop RPG to Interactive Storytelling: Definition of a Story Manager for Videogames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmas, Guylain; Champagnat, Ronan; Augeraud, Michel

    Adding narrative in computer game is complicated because it may restrict player interactivity. Our aim is to design a controller that dynamically built a plot, through the game execution, centred on player's actions. Tabletop Role-playing games manage to deal with this goal. This paper presents a study of role-playing games, their organization, and the models commonly used for narrative generation. It then deduces a proposition of components and data structures for interactive storytelling in videogames. A prototype of a social game has been developed as example.

  13. Psychoanalysis and detective fiction: a tale of Freud and criminal storytelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Much has been written about Freud's influence on popular culture. This article addresses the influence of literature on Freud's psychoanalytical theory, specifically the role that modern detective fiction played in shaping Freudian theory. Edgar Allan Poe gave Freud the literary precedent; Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's creation Sherlock Holmes gave him the analytical model. In turn, the world of crime story-telling embedded Freudian theories in subsequent forms, spinning the tales of crime into a journey into the human mind. As these tales were popularized on the silver screen in the early 20th century, psychoanalytical ideas moved from the lecture halls into the cultural mainstream.

  14. Spatiotemporal Aspects of Engagement during Dialogic Storytelling Child–Robot Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Heath

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The success of robotic agents in close proximity of humans depends on their capacity to engage in social interactions and maintain these interactions over periods of time that are suitable for learning. A critical requirement is the ability to modify the behavior of the robot contingently to the attentional and social cues signaled by the human. A benchmark challenge for an engaging social robot is that of storytelling. In this paper, we present an exploratory study to investigate dialogic storytelling—storytelling with contingent responses—using a child-friendly robot. The aim of the study was to develop an engaging storytelling robot and to develop metrics for evaluating engagement. Ten children listened to an illustrated story told by a social robot during a science fair. The responses of the robot were adapted during the interaction based on the children’s engagement and touches of the pictures displayed by the robot on a tablet embedded in its torso. During the interaction the robot responded contingently to the child, but only when the robot invited the child to interact. We describe the robot architecture used to implement dialogic storytelling and evaluate the quality of human–robot interaction based on temporal (patterns of touch, touch duration and spatial (motions in the space surrounding the robot metrics. We introduce a novel visualization that emphasizes the temporal dynamics of the interaction and analyze the motions of the children in the space surrounding the robot. The study demonstrates that the interaction through invited contingent responses succeeded in engaging children, although the robot missed some opportunities for contingent interaction and the children had to adapt to the task. We conclude that (i the consideration of both temporal and spatial attributes is fundamental for establishing metrics to estimate levels of engagement in real-time, (ii metrics for engagement are sensitive to both the group and

  15. Entanglements of storytelling and power in the enactment of organizational subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kenneth Mølbjerg

    2017-01-01

    . It captures the ways spaces of appearance—the spaces where human subjects appear to each other and are mutually recognized—are prescribed and regulated. How people enact their subjectivity is theorized through Arendt’s concept of storytelling as action, which through the work of Butler is reworked...... certain stories possible and permissible. At the same time, however, stories always establish a new beginning and reshape reality. The framework is illustrated by analysing stories from a management learning project. The analysis provides a window into a complex and dynamic social world and illuminates...

  16. Entanglements of Storytelling and Power in the Enactment of Organizational Subjectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Kenneth Mølbjerg

    2017-01-01

    . It captures the ways spaces of appearance in organizations are prescribed and regulated—the spaces where human subjects appear to each other and are mutually recognized. How people become subjects is theorized through Arendt’s concept of storytelling as action, which through the work of Butler is reworked....... At the same time however the enactment of subjectivity establishes always a new beginning and a reshaping of reality. The framework is illustrated by analysing stories from a management learning project. The analysis provides a window into a complex and dynamic social world and illuminates the subjects...

  17. Narração e Storytelling em Mysterious Object at Noon, de Apichatpong Weerasethakul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Bértolo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay is a close analysis of Mysterious Object at Noon, directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul, in which are considered questions of narration motivated by the central place the act of storytelling holds in the film structure. Problems such as the nonexistence of a script and the way the film seems structured by oral narration, in loco, as if the film were being written as it is told, will be analyzed. Finally, I describe how, through this structure, the film reflects upon the specificity of cinema as a way of telling/showing stories.

  18. Transmedia storytelling in the NGO communication. Sí me importa by Oxfam Intermón

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura MARTÍNEZ VALERO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, transmedia storytelling has been used for spreading fiction narrative worlds, such as films and TV series. However, it was a matter of time that its ability for explaining the reality was discovered and utilised by social organizations to explain their causes and to reach new audiences. Moreover, the new mobile environment challenges the creativity of the organizations to develop products that make use of this new form of consumption. The Sí me importa campaign, a transmedia project of the Spanish NGO Oxfam Intermón, reclaimed the importance of the in-ternational cooperation through social networks, comic, theatre, contemporary art and cinema.

  19. TEACHING SPEAKING THROUGH THE IMPLEMENTATION OF STORY TELLING TECHNIQUE BY USING STORY-TELLING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwatiningsih Purwatiningsih

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning a language especially English is expected to help students to be able to use it as a means of communication. Communicating is understanding and expressing information, thought and feeling, and expanding science, technology and culture. Communicating ability means being able to understand a discourse, namely being able to understand and produce spoken and written texts through the four language skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing this classroom action research was conducted to solve the students’ problems in speaking. It is to improve the students’ ability in speaking through story-telling technique using picture series in terms of content and delivery of the story. The design of this study is classroom action research which was conducted in two cycles consisting of six meetings. The subjects of this study were students of grade x-9 of MAN 2 Madiun in 2012/2013 academic year. The instruments to collect the data were observation checklists, field notes, speaking task measured using scoring rubrics, and questionnaire. The criteria of success were determined on the basis of the students’ participation in the teaching-learning process, the students’ speaking achievement in terms of score (telling a story individually, and the students’ responses to the implementation of story-telling technique using picture series. The finding of the study indicated that the implementation of the technique was successful in improving the students’ speaking ability, since the criteria of success were achieved. The first criterion was if 70% of the students participate or are actively involved in the teaching and learning process, and the data analysis confirmed that 84% of students were actively involved. Concerning the second criterion was if 70% of the students achieve the score greater than or equal to 75, the finding showed that 81% of the students already achieved scores greater than 75. The last criterion, if 70% of students

  20. Patient Storytelling in the Classroom: A Memorable Way to Teach Spiritual Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Shelby L

    2016-01-01

    Storytelling is an evidence-based teaching and learning strategy that engages students and promotes critical thinking. Although most nursing textbooks incorporate spiritual nursing care, the texts lack examples of how to tie evidence-based spiritual interventions to specific medical-suigical content. Stories told from the patient's perspective can communicate insights that nurses and students can use when planning spiritual carefor patients. Stories shared by patients with undergraduate nursing students were effective in promoting learning and offered concrete examples of supportive spiritual resources for patients.

  1. A case of spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Kanji; Yoshimoto, Hisanori; Harada, Kiyoshi; Uozumi, Tohru; Kuwabara, Satoshi.

    1983-01-01

    The authors experienced a case of spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy diagnosed by CT scan with metrizamide and Conray. Patient was 23-year-old male who had been in good health until one month before admission, when he began to have headache and tinnitus. He noticed bilateral visual acuity was decreased about one week before admission and vomiting appeared two days before admission. He was admitted to our hospital because of bilateral papilledema and remarkable hydrocephalus diagnosed by CT scan. On admission, no abnormal neurological signs except for bilateral papilledema were noted. Immediately, right ventricular drainage was performed. Pressure of the ventricle was over 300mmH 2 O and CSF was clear. PVG and PEG disclosed an another cavity behind the third ventricle, which was communicated with the third ventricle, and occlusion of aqueduct of Sylvius. Metrizamide CT scan and Conray CT scan showed a communication between this cavity and quadrigeminal and supracerebellar cisterns. On these neuroradiological findings, the diagnosis of obstructive hydrocephalus due to benign aqueduct stenosis accompanied with spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy was obtained. Spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy was noticed to produce arrest of hydrocephalus, but with our case, spontaneous regression of such symptoms did not appeared. By surgical ventriculocisternostomy (method by Torkildsen, Dandy, or Scarff), arrest of hydrocephalus was seen in about 50 to 70 per cent, which was the same results as those of spontaneous ventriculocisternostomy. It is concluded that VP shunt or VA shunt is thought to be better treatment of obstructive hydrocephalus than the various kinds of surgical ventriculocisternostomy. (J.P.N.)

  2. Optical antenna enhanced spontaneous emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggleston, Michael S; Messer, Kevin; Zhang, Liming; Yablonovitch, Eli; Wu, Ming C

    2015-02-10

    Atoms and molecules are too small to act as efficient antennas for their own emission wavelengths. By providing an external optical antenna, the balance can be shifted; spontaneous emission could become faster than stimulated emission, which is handicapped by practically achievable pump intensities. In our experiments, InGaAsP nanorods emitting at ∼ 200 THz optical frequency show a spontaneous emission intensity enhancement of 35 × corresponding to a spontaneous emission rate speedup ∼ 115 ×, for antenna gap spacing, d = 40 nm. Classical antenna theory predicts ∼ 2,500 × spontaneous emission speedup at d ∼ 10 nm, proportional to 1/d(2). Unfortunately, at d antenna efficiency drops below 50%, owing to optical spreading resistance, exacerbated by the anomalous skin effect (electron surface collisions). Quantum dipole oscillations in the emitter excited state produce an optical ac equivalent circuit current, I(o) = qω|x(o)|/d, feeding the antenna-enhanced spontaneous emission, where q|x(o)| is the dipole matrix element. Despite the quantum-mechanical origin of the drive current, antenna theory makes no reference to the Purcell effect nor to local density of states models. Moreover, plasmonic effects are minor at 200 THz, producing only a small shift of antenna resonance frequency.

  3. Delicious words – Assessing the impact of short storytelling messages on consumer preferences for variations of a new processed meat product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Morten H. J.; Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; Hansen, Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Continuous food product improvements require communication that induces consumers to test the new products. The paper presents an experiment that investigated the characteristics of consumers who reacted positively to variations of a new meat product, and explores the effect of short storytelling...... related to stimulation seeking and hedonism and with a tendency towards variety seeking – reacted positively to the new product, others were less interested. The introduction of elements of storytelling, however, had a favorable effect on choice for the segment previously less interested. Thus......, the results suggest that consumers who otherwise were not open for the new food product became more positive when storytelling was introduced....

  4. Some notes on the pantun storytelling of the Baduy minority group its written and audiovisual documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wim van Zanten

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Baduy pantun stories are part of the larger Sundanese oral tradition of pantun storytelling in west Java. The stories recount the deeds of the nobility of such old Sundanese kingdoms as Pajajaran and Galuh. Although the Baduy still recite the pantun stories in their rituals, in the larger cities to the east of the Baduy village Kanékés pantun recitation almost disappeared. On the basis of short periods of fieldwork in and around Kanékés village between 1976 and 2014, in this essay I shall discuss Baduy pantun storytelling. I shall summarize earlier major publications and analyse some performance aspects of two Baduy pantun stories which I recorded. Although I do not concentrate on the text, I do discuss a few cultural issues arising from the texts. Baduy oral literature also includes children’s and women’s songs, as well as fables and myths of origin (dongéng which do not involve music. These will not be discussed here.

  5. Story and science: how providers and parents can utilize storytelling to combat anti-vaccine misinformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Ashley; Ernst, Karen

    2013-08-01

    With little or no evidence-based information to back up claims of vaccine danger, anti-vaccine activists have relied on the power of storytelling to infect an entire generation of parents with fear of and doubt about vaccines. These parent accounts of perceived vaccine injury, coupled with Andrew Wakefield's fraudulent research study linking the MMR vaccine to autism, created a substantial amount of vaccine hesitancy in new parents, which manifests in both vaccine refusal and the adoption of delayed vaccine schedules. The tools used by the medical and public health communities to counteract the anti-vaccine movement include statistics, research, and other evidence-based information, often delivered verbally or in the form of the CDC's Vaccine Information Statements. This approach may not be effective enough on its own to convince vaccine-hesitant parents that vaccines are safe, effective, and crucial to their children's health. Utilizing some of the storytelling strategies used by the anti-vaccine movement, in addition to evidence-based vaccine information, could potentially offer providers, public health officials, and pro-vaccine parents an opportunity to mount a much stronger defense against anti-vaccine messaging.

  6. Storytelling as part of cancer rehabilitation to support cancer patients and their relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    la Cour, Karen; Ledderer, Loni; Hansen, Helle Ploug

    2016-01-01

    Previous research on psychosocial support for cancer-related concerns has primarily focused on either patients or their relatives, although limited research is available on how patients and their relatives can be supported together. The aim of this article is to explore the use of storytelling as a part of a residential cancer rehabilitation intervention for patients together with their relatives, with a specific focus on their management of cancer-related concerns. Ten pairs participated in the intervention and data were generated through ethnographic fieldwork, including participant observations, informal conversations and follow-up interviews conducted one month after completing the intervention. Analysis was performed drawing on narrative theory combined with social practice theory. The results demonstrate that the use of storytelling and metaphors intertwined with other course activities, such as dancing and arts & crafts, provided the patients and their relatives with strategies to manage cancer-related concerns, which they were later able to apply in their everyday lives. The study results may be useful to other professionals in clinical practice for rehabilitation purposes for addressing issues of fear and worry.

  7. Digital storytelling: a tool for health promotion and cancer awareness in rural Alaskan communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva, Melany; Kuhnley, Regina; Revels, Laura; Schoenberg, Nancy E; Dignan, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn community members' perspectives about digital storytelling after viewing a digital story created by a Community Health Aide/Practitioner (CHA/P). Using a qualitative research design, we explored digital storytelling likeability as a health-messaging tool, health information viewers reported learning and, if viewing, cancer-related digital stories facilitated increased comfort in talking about cancer. In addition, we enquired if the digital stories affected how viewers felt about cancer, as well as if viewing the digital stories resulted in health behaviour change or intent to change health behaviour. A total of 15 adult community members participated in a 30-45 minute interview, 1-5 months post-viewing of a CHA/P digital story. The majority (13) of viewers interviewed were female, all were Alaska Native and they ranged in age from 25 to 54 years with the average age being 40 years. Due to the small size of communities, which ranged in population from 160 to 2,639 people, all viewers knew the story creator or knew of the story creator. Viewers reported digital stories as an acceptable, emotionally engaging way to increase their cancer awareness and begin conversations. These conversations often served as a springboard for reflection, insight, and cancer-prevention and risk-reduction activities.

  8. Transmedia Storytelling in Science Communication: One Subject, Multiple Media, Multiple Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, M.; Moloney, K.

    2012-12-01

    Each communication medium has particular storytelling strengths. For example, video is particularly good at illustrating a progression of events, text at background and context, and games at describing systems. In what USC's Prof. Henry Jenkins described as "transmedia storytelling," multiple media are used simultaneously, in an expansive rather than repetitive way, to better tell a single, complex story. The audience is given multiple entry points to the story, and the story is exposed to diverse and dispersed audiences, ultimately engaging a broader public. We will examine the effectiveness of a transmedia approach to communicating scientific and other complex concepts to a broad and diverse audience. Using the recently developed Educational Visitor Center at the NCAR-Wyoming Supercomputing Center as a case study, we will evaluate the reach of various means of presenting information about the geosciences, climate change and computational science. These will include an assessment of video, mechanical and digital interactive elements, animated movie segments, web-based content, photography, scientific visualizations, printed material and docent-led activities.

  9. Playing with the team: The Development of Communities of Practice in a Digital Storytelling Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter John Westman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Since its emergence in the early 1990's, digital storytelling has been variouslyidentified as a new media practice, a consumer and community-led movement,and a textual system. However, given its relative nascent status, there remainsthe need for further academic research focusing on the different forms it hasassumed. During the spring/summer of 2011, I conducted an examination ofTaking the Field (TTF, a digital storytelling project that aims to celebrategrassroots cricket in the UK through the construction of stories by village andcounty-level clubs. In contrast to most previous projects that aim to have theparticipants “speak” by constructing their own stories, TTF stories are researchedand constructed by project staff with the assistance of the clubs.My research centers on the experiences of two clubs in the project, Blaina CC andSpondon CC, through interviews and elicitation techniques with club andcommunity members using the completed stories and the artifacts used in theirconstruction. Through the theoretical framework of Gell's anthropology of art, Iconsider how digital stories act as objects that mediate social agency during theircreation and how the structure of this type of project contributes to the formationof communities of practice in the 'performance' of collective identity.

  10. Creating Legitimacy across International Contexts: The Role of Storytelling for International New Ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Rask, Morten

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the legitimacy-creating efforts of Better Place, an international new venture (INV) providing infrastructure services linking electrical vehicles and power grid networks. We analyze the debate on Better Place’s attempts to communicate its business idea to constituents in Denm...... to the growing literature on INVs and on institutions in international business. For practice, our aim is to improve managers’ awareness and understanding of the importance of storytelling in the market contexts they seek to enter.......This paper considers the legitimacy-creating efforts of Better Place, an international new venture (INV) providing infrastructure services linking electrical vehicles and power grid networks. We analyze the debate on Better Place’s attempts to communicate its business idea to constituents...... in Denmark, Israel, Canada, and Australia using expert interviews as well as content analysis of newspaper articles and other secondary sources. Storytelling, which is found to be central to the legitimacy-creating efforts of international business ventures, interacts with existing discourses in the diverse...

  11. The Power of Storytelling: A Native Hawaiian Approach to Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, K. L.

    2016-12-01

    Generational assimilation of observational data enabled Native Hawaiians to preserve a holistic understanding of the connectivity, structure and function - from mountain to sea - within their island ecosystems. Their intimate understandings of the geographic and temporal variability in winds, rains, and currents, and how these factors governed the extent and distribution of biodiversity were perpetuated through stories, songs and chants. Many of these oral histories - which conveyed information via anthropomorphized characters in entertaining and engaging plots - preserved the scientific integrity of traditional phenomenological observations and remain shockingly consistent with contemporary biogeochemical and geophysical observations. These indigenous methods of communicating scientific knowledge are clear models for contemporary best practices in geoscience communication. Storytelling is a tried and true mechanism that both engages and teaches diverse audiences of all ages, ethnicities and skill levels. Scientific storytelling - which can either be examinations of indigenous stories through scientific lenses, or generations of new stories based on scientific observation - enables multiple layers of meaning and levels of knowledge acquisition that bridge cultural and historical place-based knowledge with contemporary knowledge systems. Here, I will share my journey of optimizing the engagement of Native Hawaiian communities (students, land managers, stewards, practitioners, etc…) with my biogeochemical research on a Native Hawaiian coastal estuarine environment (Héeia Fishpond). I will speak about the importance and effectiveness of disseminating research in culturally accessible formats by framing research in the context of traditional knowledge to help elevate the perception of "science" in the Hawaiian community.

  12. The power of videogame-like experiences for explanatory storytelling in science, education, and healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarno, D. A.; Hayes, J.

    2016-12-01

    In the last forty years, videogames have gone from a dot bouncing between two lines ("PONG", 1972), to sprawling $150 million enterprises that teams of hundreds work on for years, with fully-developed, novelistic stories and graphics that can be arrestingly realistic and engrossing. Video games - and now virtual reality - conjure superhero sagas, alien wars, and historic battlefields. Yet the game industry has given little thought to using this powerful storytelling medium to explain the many wondrous facets of regular old reality. The techniques and technologies of game design are offering an ever-more potent tool for explaining the processes of science. Want to explain fracking to someone unfamiliar with its strange mechanics? We did - we built a game-like graphic that asks learners to frack a well themselves, on an iPad. They use their fingergs to drill the well, inject the water and solvents, and gather the resulting oil and gas - not to mention seeing the potential environmental ramifications. How about explaining heart or brain surgery on a 3-month old child? Or showing students how a nerve cell works by allowing them to fly into it and build the proteins that enable the nerve to fire? We've done all these, and are continuing to add new dimensions to immersive teaching and explanatory storytelling. We'll share insights we've gathered along the way.

  13. "All Stories Bring Hope Because Stories Bring Awareness": Students' Perceptions of Digital Storytelling for Social Justice Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachago, Daniela; Condy, Janet; Ivala, Eunice; Chigona, Agnes

    2014-01-01

    Although becoming a more racially-integrated society, the legacy of Apartheid still affects learners' social engagements in and outside their classrooms. Adopting Nussbaum's (2010) capabilities framework for a socially just democracy, this paper examines 27 pre-service teacher education students' perceptions of a digital storytelling project and…

  14. Beyond Silence and Rumor: Storytelling as an Educational Tool to Reduce the Stigma around HIV/AIDS in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeelen, Jacques; Wijbenga, Hieke; Vintges, Marga; de Jong, Gideon

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to explore the role of a small-scale project around storytelling as a form of informal education in five health clinics in rural areas of the Limpopo Province in South Africa. The aim of the project is to decrease the stigma around HIV/AIDS and to start an open dialogue in local communities about the disease.…

  15. Effects of Offline vs. Online Digital Storytelling on the Development of EFL Learners' Literacy Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Mehrak; Yadollahi, Samaneh

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of offline vs. online digital storytelling on the development of EFL learners' literacy skills (reading and writing). Forty-two lower intermediate language learners participated in the study as the experimental (n = 21) and control groups (n = 21). The Reading-Writing section of the Key English Test was…

  16. Storytelling as Academic Discourse: Bridging the Cultural-Linguistic Divide in the Era of the Common Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching Ching

    2014-01-01

    Bakhtin's dialogism provides a sociocultural approach that views language as a social practice informed by the complex interaction between discourse and meaning. Drawing on this theoretical framework, I argue that a dialogized version of storytelling can be helpful in creating a reflective form of academic discourse that bridges the gap between…

  17. The Effects of Digital Storytelling on Student Achievement, Social Presence, and Attitude in Online Collaborative Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Chang Woo

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of digital storytelling on student achievement, social presence, and attitude in online collaborative learning environments. Students in one middle school course were randomly assigned to one of the two treatment groups after they received initial general instruction regarding teamwork skills. The "digital…

  18. Enhancing Peer Acceptance of Children with Learning Difficulties: Classroom Goal Orientation and Effects of a Storytelling Programme with Drama Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Yin-kum; Lam, Shui-fong; Law, Wilbert; Tam, Zoe W. Y.

    2017-01-01

    Peer acceptance is an important facilitator for the success of inclusive education. The aim of the current study is twofold: (1) to examine how classroom goal orientation is associated with children's acceptance of peers with learning difficulties; and (2) to evaluate the effectiveness of a storytelling programme with drama techniques on…

  19. Historical imagination, narrative learning and nursing practice: graduate nursing students' reader-responses to a nurse's storytelling from the past.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Pamela J

    2014-09-01

    Storytelling and narrative are widely used in nurse education and the value of narrative-based curricula, such as those governed by narrative pedagogy, is well recognised. Storytelling stimulates students' imagination, a central feature of narrative learning. One form of story and imagination yet to be fully considered by educators is the historical story and historical imagination. The use of historical storytelling creates a temporal dissonance between the story and reader that stimulates readers' imagination and response, and enables them to gain rich insights which can be applied to the present. Reader-response theory can support educators when using narrative and storytelling. This article presents an analysis of graduate nursing students' reader-responses to a nurse's story from the past. This narrative learning group used their historical imagination in responding to the story and prompted and challenged each other in their interpretation and in translating their responses to their current nursing practice. The article discusses this analysis within the context of reader-response theory and its potential application to narrative-based learning in nurse education. Historical stories stimulate historical imagination and offer a different frame of reference for students' development of textual competence and for applying insights to the present. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Ordinary and the Fabulous: An Introduction to Myths, Legends, and Fairy Tales for Teachers and Storytellers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Elizabeth

    Written for teachers, librarians, students, parents, and other storytellers, this book emphasizes the value and enchantment which children can find in the fabulous stories of four main European traditions--Greek myths and legends, Northern myths and legends, Arthurian Romances, and fairy tales. The four chapters contain (1) discussions of myths,…

  1. Architecture as spatial–textile storytelling: Metamorphosis of frieze as a narrative medium mediating the Panathenaia festival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangqing Lu

    2016-12-01

    The paper concludes that the significance of the religious Panathenaia festival is not merely depicted by the peplos identified on the central east Ionic frieze, but is also expressed in the entire representational scheme of the Ionic frieze, along with the overall spatial configuration of the Parthenon. Architecture, instantiated by the Parthenon, is regarded as spatial–textile storytelling to communicate meanings.

  2. PA12 Is digital storytelling ka pai for new zealand māori? using digital storytelling as a method to explore whānau end of life caregiving experiences: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lisa; Moeke-Maxwell, Tess; Kothari, Shuchi; Pearson, Sarina; Gott, Merryn; Black, Stella; Frey, Rosemary; Wharemate, Rawiri; Hansen, Whio

    2015-04-01

    Māori regard stories as a preferred method for imparting knowledge through waiata (song), moteatea (poetry), kauwhau (moralistic tale), pakiwaitara (story) and purakau (myths). Storytelling is also an expression of tinorangatiratanga (self-determination); Māori have the right to manage their knowledge, which includes embodiment in forms transcending typical western formulations. Digital storytelling is a process by which 'ordinary people' create short autobiographical videos. It has found application in numerous disciplines including public health and has been used to articulatethe experiences of those often excluded from knowledge production. To explore the use of digital storytelling as a research method for learning about whānau (family) experiences providing end of life care for kaumātua (older people). Eight Māori and their nominated co-creators attended a three-day digital story telling workshop led by co-researchers Shuchi Kothari and Sarina Pearson. They were guided in the creation of first-person digital stories about caring for kaumātua. The videos were shared at a group screening, and participants completed questionnaires about the workshop and their videos. A Kaupapa Māori narrative analysis was applied to their stories to gain new perspectives on Māori end of life caregiving practices. (Kaupapa Maori research privileges Maori worldviews and indigenous knowledge systems.) Digital storytelling is an appropriate method as Māori is an oral/aural society. It allows Māori to share their stories with others, thus promoting community support at the end of life, befitting a public health approach. Digital storytelling can be a useful method for Māori to express their experiences providing end of life caregiving. © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuster, M.J.; Saez, J.; Perez-Paya, F.J.; Fernandez, F.

    1997-01-01

    To assess the role of CT in the etiologic diagnosis of spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage. The CT findings are described in 13 patients presenting subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage. Those patients in whom the bleeding was not spontaneous were excluded. Surgical confirmation was obtained in nine cases. In 11 of the 13 cases (84.6%), involving five adenocarcinomas, five angiomyolipoma, two complicated cysts and one case of panarterities nodosa, CT disclosed the underlying pathology. In two cases (15.4%), it only revealed the extension of the hematoma, but gave no clue to its origin. CT is the technique of choice when spontaneous subcapsular and perirrenal hemorrhage is suspected since, in most cases, it reveals the underlying pathology. (Author)

  4. Spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Cimilli Ozturk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Dyspepsia with mild, stabbing epigastric discomfort without history of trauma is a very common symptom that emergency physicians see in their daily practice. Vascular emergencies, mostly the aortic dissection and aneurysm, are always described in the differential diagnosis with persistent symptoms. Isolated celiac artery dissection occurring spontaneously is a very rare diagnosis. The involvement of branch vessels is generally observed and patients show various clinical signs and symptoms according to the involved branch vessel. Here we are presenting a case with spontaneous isolated celiac artery dissection, without any branch vessel involvement or visceral damage, detected by computed tomography scans taken on admission.

  5. Spontaneous waves in muscle fibres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, Stefan; Kruse, Karsten [Department of Theoretical Physics, Saarland University, 66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, Noethnitzer Street 38, 01187 Dresden (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Mechanical oscillations are important for many cellular processes, e.g. the beating of cilia and flagella or the sensation of sound by hair cells. These dynamic states originate from spontaneous oscillations of molecular motors. A particularly clear example of such oscillations has been observed in muscle fibers under non-physiological conditions. In that case, motor oscillations lead to contraction waves along the fiber. By a macroscopic analysis of muscle fiber dynamics we find that the spontaneous waves involve non-hydrodynamic modes. A simple microscopic model of sarcomere dynamics highlights mechanical aspects of the motor dynamics and fits with the experimental observations.

  6. Culturally adaptive storytelling intervention versus didactic intervention to improve hypertension control in Vietnam: a cluster-randomized controlled feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoa L; Allison, Jeroan J; Ha, Duc A; Chiriboga, Germán; Ly, Ha N; Tran, Hanh T; Nguyen, Cuong K; Dang, Diem M; Phan, Ngoc T; Vu, Nguyen C; Nguyen, Quang P; Goldberg, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Vietnam is experiencing an epidemiologic transition with an increased prevalence of non-communicable diseases. Novel, large-scale, effective, and sustainable interventions to control hypertension in Vietnam are needed. We report the results of a cluster-randomized feasibility trial at 3 months follow-up conducted in Hung Yen province, Vietnam, designed to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of two community-based interventions to improve hypertension control: a "storytelling" intervention, "We Talk about Our Hypertension," and a didactic intervention. The storytelling intervention included stories about strategies for coping with hypertension, with patients speaking in their own words, and didactic content about the importance of healthy lifestyle behaviors including salt reduction and exercise. The didactic intervention included only didactic content. The storytelling intervention was delivered by two DVDs at 3-month intervals; the didactic intervention included only one installment. The trial was conducted in four communes, equally randomized to the two interventions. The mean age of the 160 study patients was 66 years, and 54% were men. Most participants described both interventions as understandable, informative, and motivational. Between baseline and 3 months, mean systolic blood pressure declined by 8.2 mmHg (95% CI 4.1-12.2) in the storytelling group and by 5.5 mmHg (95% CI 1.4-9.5) in the didactic group. The storytelling group also reported a significant increase in hypertension medication adherence. Both interventions were well accepted in several rural communities and were shown to be potentially effective in lowering blood pressure. A large-scale randomized trial is needed to compare the effectiveness of the two interventions in controlling hypertension. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02483780.

  7. Human Papillomavirus Infection as a Possible Cause of Spontaneous Abortion and Spontaneous Preterm Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambühl, Lea Maria Margareta; Baandrup, Ulrik; Dybkær, Karen

    2016-01-01

    , and 10.9% (95% CI; 10.1–11.7) for umbilical cord blood. Summary estimates for HPV prevalence of spontaneous abortions and spontaneous preterm deliveries, in cervix (spontaneous abortions: 24.5%, and pretermdeliveries: 47%, resp.) and placenta (spontaneous abortions: 24.9%, and preterm deliveries: 50......%, resp.), were identified to be higher compared to normal full-term pregnancies (푃 spontaneous abortion, spontaneous preterm...

  8. Spontaneous emission by moving atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meystre, P.; Wilkens, M.

    1994-01-01

    It is well known that spontaneous emission is not an intrinsic atomic property, but rather results from the coupling of the atom to the vacuum modes of the electromagnetic field. As such, it can be modified by tailoring the electromagnetic environment into which the atom can radiate. This was already realized by Purcell, who noted that the spontaneous emission rate can be enhanced if the atom placed inside a cavity is resonant with one of the cavity is resonant with one of the cavity modes, and by Kleppner, who discussed the opposite case of inhibited spontaneous emission. It has also been recognized that spontaneous emission need not be an irreversible process. Indeed, a system consisting of a single atom coupled to a single mode of the electromagnetic field undergoes a periodic exchange of excitation between the atom and the field. This periodic exchange remains dominant as long as the strength of the coupling between the atom and a cavity mode is itself dominant. 23 refs., 6 figs

  9. Spontaneous Development of Moral Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, M.

    1975-01-01

    Moral competence is more difficult to attain than scientific competence. Since language comprehension plays a central role in conceptual development, and moral language is difficult to learn, there is a common deficiency in moral conceptual development. This suggests a theory of non-spontaneous solutions to moral problems. (Author/MS)

  10. Shell theorem for spontaneous emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Philip Trøst; Mortensen, Jakob Egeberg; Lodahl, Peter

    2013-01-01

    and therefore is given exactly by the dipole approximation theory. This surprising result is a spontaneous emission counterpart to the shell theorems of classical mechanics and electrostatics and provides insights into the physics of mesoscopic emitters as well as great simplifications in practical calculations....

  11. Prediction of Spontaneous Preterm Birth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Karolien

    2002-01-01

    Preterm birth is a leading cause of neonatal morbidity and mortality. It is a major goal in obstetrics to lower the incidence of spontaneous preterm birth (SPB) and related neonatal morbidity and mortality. One of the principal objectives is to discover early markers that would allow us to identify

  12. EAMJ Dec. Spontaneous.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-12-12

    Dec 12, 2008 ... surgical abortion at one month gestation without any complication. The second pregnancy which was a year prior resulted in a spontaneous miscarriage at two months followed by evacuation of retained products of conception with no post abortion complications. Antibiotics were taken following both.

  13. Spontaneous fission of superheavy nuclei

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    the Yukawa-plus-exponential potential. The microscopic shell and pairing corrections are obtained using the Strutinsky and BCS approaches and the cranking formulae yield the inertia tensor. Finally, the WKB method is used to calculate penetrabilities and spontaneous fission half-lives. Calculations are performed for the ...

  14. Bowery to Broadway. The American Irish in Classic Hollywood Cinema (Christopher Shannon & New Irish Storytellers. Narrative Strategies in Film (Díóg O’Connell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Menéndez-Otero

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Reseñas de los libros de cine Bowery to Broadway. The American Irish in Classic Hollywood Cinema (Christopher Shannon 2010 & New Irish Storytellers. Narrative Strategies in Film (Díóg O’Connell 2010

  15. STORYTELLING AS A COMMUNICATIVE ACT / LA NARRACIÓN ORAL COMO ACTO DE COMUNICACIÓN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Nela Barba Téllez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The material presented discloses a topic of great value and current importance in the context of Pedagogy and Educative Psychology: the storytelling for children. It is intended for those teachers, who before the imminence and fast pace of daily life, are aware of the value of the communication, participation and conversation as resources that enhance the imagination. The purpose of this material is to stimulate the reflection and creativity of teachers to enable the development of storytelling skill in groups of boys and girls, based on the communicative approach, through which is acknowledged that in the storytelling, as a communicative act, the communicative elements that are involved in communication are present. They are essentially a code, a message, a channel, a transmitter, a receiver and the communicative situation. RESUMEN: El material que se presenta se adentra en un tema de gran valor y actualidad en el contexto actual de la Pedagogía y la Psicología Educativa: la narración (oral para/con niñas y niños. Va dirigido a aquellos maestros que ante la inmediatez y el ritmo acelerado de la vida cotidiana, toman conciencia del valor de la comunicación, la participación y el diálogo, como recursos que potencian la dinámica de la narración oral. La intención es despertar la reflexividad y la creatividad de los maestros para favorecer el desarrollo de la narración en grupos de niñas y niños, desde la óptica del enfoque comunicativo, donde se reconoce que en la narración oral como acto de comunicación están presentes los elementos que intervienen en el acto comunicativo. Estos son esencialmente un código, un mensaje, un canal; un emisor, un interlocutor y la situación comunicativa.

  16. Utilization of the developed cell story eBook through storytelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecson, Christine Mae B.; Soleria, Honey Joy B.; Taranza, Victoria; Tabudlong, Josefina M.; Salic-Hairulla, Monera

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to develop a Cell story eBook and utilize it through storytelling and find out how it impacts the conceptual knowledge of Grade 7 students about the Cell organelles and their functions. A total of one hundred twenty-nine respondents (129) were involved in the study, one hundred twenty-four (124) of the respondents were Grade 7 students, two (2) biology in-service teachers from Integrated Developmental School, MSUIIT, two (2) ICT experts from MSU-IIT, and one in-service biology teacher from Iligan City National High School. The study employed was a Quasi-experimental design with two-group (experimental and control groups) pre-test-post-test design. The instruments used were a 20-item multiple choice tests for the pre-test and post-test and a rubric for the evaluation of the Cell Story eBook. The researchers developed the Cell story eBook through a pre-assessment, identification of the topic, formulation of objectives, making of the story, making of the storyboard, designing of the Cell story eBook, evaluation of the Cell story eBook, final revision and publication in PDF format. During the utilization stage, the experimental group was presented with the Cell story eBook through storytelling while the control group was taught using traditional lecture method. Findings show that the developed Cell story eBook was rated Excellent by the panel of experts. Moreover, there is a statistically significant difference between the post-tests of the two groups. Results signifies that there is a distinction between the performances of the two groups which means that there is an existing impact after the utilization of the developed Cell story eBook through storytelling inside the classroom. The said developed instructional material and the way it was utilized therefore, affects the conceptual knowledge of the learners. The developed Cell story eBook can also be utilized even in the absence of technology due to its flexibility. It can be

  17. Spontaneous Retropharyngeal Emphysema: A Case Report | Chi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... is a rare clinical condition in pediatric otolaryngology. The predominant symptoms are sore throat, odynophagia, dysphagia, and neck pain. Here, we report a case of spontaneous retropharyngeal emphysema. Keywords: Iatrogenic injury, retropharyngeal emphysema, spontaneous retropharyngeal emphysem, trauma ...

  18. La maladie de Grisel : Spontaneous atlantoaxial subluxation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meek, MF; Robinson, PH; Hermens, RAEC

    Objective: "La maladie de Grisel" (Grisel's syndrome) is a spontaneously occurring atlantoaxial subluxation with torticollis. We present a case of atlantoaxial subluxation occurring in a 20-year period of pharyngoplasty surgery. The occurrence of a "spontaneous" atlantoaxial subluxation after oral

  19. The Language of Revolution and the Power of Storytelling in The Pregnant Widow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Alghamdi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Martin Amis uses the language of revolution to describe the newly altered social circumstances at the height of the sexual revolution in his semi-autobiographical novel The Pregnant Widow. The concept of a ‘language of revolution’ as well as second- and third-wave feminist scholarship is applied to a textual analysis of the novel. Amis’s brand of satire creates a sense of displacement and challenges existing perceptions about gender, culture and sexuality, exposing them as constructed and changeable norms. Moreover, it becomes clear that the author is skeptical about the benefits of the sexual revolution for either gender, and that he views its liberating aspects as unfulfilled, particularly for women. Given that Amis names one of his characters Scheherazade, evoking the legendary heroine of The Arabian Nights, the importance of storytelling in the novel is also examined and found to be a potentially redeeming force.

  20. Recontextualizing social practices and globalization: Multimodal metaphor and fictional storytelling in printed and internet ads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Hidalgo Downing

    Full Text Available This article presents a study of ongoing global and local changing practices by exploring the interaction between multimodal metaphor and narrative in advertising discourse. Thus, we make use of Conceptual Metaphor Theory (CMT and Conceptual Integration Theory to compare how social changes and continuities are represented and re-contextualized in advertising discourse, across time, genres and cultures. Changes in time and across genres are addressed through the analysis of printed ads from 2000-2002 and internet ads from 2001-2009. Second, we compare the interaction between transformation and magic metaphors and storytelling frames in both genres and periods. Finally, we pay particular attention to the variation in a global brand campaign (Coca-Cola in three different cultures, thus revealing competing changes in global and local social practices.

  1. Storytelling som marknadsföringsmetod : Case: Restaurang Pub Niska Åbo

    OpenAIRE

    Olin, Christa

    2014-01-01

    Detta examensarbete handlar om storytelling som markadsföringsmetod. Syftet med examensarbetet är att marknadsföra restaurang Pub Niska Åbo samt förmedla dess historia. Pub Niska är ett pizzakoncept som bygger sin verksamhet runt den kände smugglaren Algoth Niskas livshistoria. Michael Björklund, som skapat konceptet, är bland annat känd från TV- programmen ”Strömsö”, ”Mat så in i Norden” och ”Strandhugg” och har utsetts till Årets Kock i både Finland och Sverige. Som metod att marknadsfö...

  2. Data Visualization and Storytelling: Students Showcasing Innovative Work on the NASA Hyperwall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hankin, E. R.; Hasan, M.; Williams, B. M.; Harwell, D. E.

    2017-12-01

    Visual storytelling can be used to quickly and effectively tell a story about data and scientific research, with powerful visuals driving a deeper level of engagement. In 2016, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) launched a pilot contest with a grant from NASA to fund students to travel to the AGU Fall Meeting to present innovative data visualizations with fascinating stories on the NASA Hyperwall. This presentation will discuss the purpose of the contest and provide highlights. Additionally, the presentation will feature Mejs Hasan, one of the 2016 contest grand prize winners, who will discuss her award-winning research utilizing Landsat visual data, MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index data, and NOAA nightlight data to study the effects of both drought and war on the Middle East.

  3. Wildcard: A wearable virtual reality storytelling tool for children with intellectual developmental disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelsomini, Mirko; Garzotto, Franca; Montesano, Daniele; Occhiuto, Daniele

    2016-08-01

    Our research aims at supporting existing therapies for children with intellectual and developmental disorders (IDD). The personal and social autonomy is the desired end state to be achieved to enable a smooth integration in the real world. We developed and tested a framework for storytelling and learning activities that exploits an immersive virtual reality viewer to interact with target users. We co-designed our system with experts from the medical sector, identifying features that allow patients to stay focused on exercises to perform. Our approach triggers a learning process for a seamless assimilation of common behavioral skills useful in every day's life. This paper highlights the technologic challenges in healthcare and discusses cutting-edge interaction paradigms.

  4. Relay for Life as a Storytelling Occasion: Building Community in the Midst of Suffering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo Weller, Melissa

    2018-04-01

    In this essay, I reflect on my experiences with Relay for Life (RFL), the American Cancer Society's walking event focused on raising awareness and donations for research and patient support programs. I share stories of relationships built within this context and how those relationships are fostered by storytelling. I also draw on literature that brings to light the neoliberal effects of fundraising for health-related causes. In spite of the consumerism that is inherent in fundraising events such as RFL, those of us affected by cancer benefit from the connections created and nurtured in those spaces. We turn to similarly situated others and share stories that unite us into one community. These stories serve as powerful sources of support, healing, and strength. We relay. We story. We build community.

  5. Measuring Down: Evaluating Digital Storytelling as a Process for Narrative Health Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubrium, Aline C; Fiddian-Green, Alice; Lowe, Sarah; DiFulvio, Gloria; Del Toro-Mejías, Lizbeth

    2016-05-15

    Digital storytelling (DST) engages participants in a group-based process to create and share narrative accounts of life events. We present key evaluation findings of a 2-year, mixed-methods study that focused on effects of participating in the DST process on young Puerto Rican Latina's self-esteem, social support, empowerment, and sexual attitudes and behaviors. Quantitative results did not show significant changes in the expected outcomes. However, in our qualitative findings we identified several ways in which the DST made positive, health-bearing effects. We argue for the importance of "measuring down" to reflect the locally grounded, felt experiences of participants who engage in the process, as current quantitative scales do not "measure up" to accurately capture these effects. We end by suggesting the need to develop mixed-methods, culturally relevant, and sensitive evaluation tools that prioritize process effects as they inform intervention and health promotion. © The Author(s) 2016.

  6. Indigenous Storytelling and Participatory Action Research: Allies Toward Decolonization? Reflections From the Peoples' International Health Tribunal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caxaj, C Susana

    2015-01-01

    Storytelling, in its various forms, has often been described as a practice with great emancipatory potential. In turn, Indigenous knowledge shows great promise in guiding a participatory action research (PAR) methodology. Yet these two approaches are rarely discussed in relation to one another, nor, has much been written in terms of how these two approaches may work synergistically toward a decolonizing research approach. In this article, I report on a community-driven knowledge translation activity, the Peoples' International Health Tribunal, as an exemplar of how narrative and PAR approaches, guided by local Indigenous knowledge, have great potential to build methodologically and ethically robust research processes. Implications for building globally relevant research alliances and scholarship are further discussed, particularly in relation to working with Indigenous communities.

  7. The Impact of Digital Storytelling on EFL Learners' Oracy Skills and Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdorreza Tahriri

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to investigate the impact of digital storytelling (DST on EFL learners' oracy skills and their motivation towards the use of DST instruction. Thirty intermediate EFL learners were selected based on their performance on an Oxford Placement Test (OPT and were randomly assigned into two groups (one control and one experimental group each containing 15 participants. Three instruments, listening and speaking tests as pre-post tests, and a motivation questionnaire, were utilized to assess the participants’ oracy skills prior to and after the experiment. To analyze the data, Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA and multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA were run. According to the findings of the study, DST participants outperformed the control group in terms of oracy skills and motivation after the treatment. The findings highlighted the need for instruction through the implementation of digital software as a vital component of language instruction that is recommended to be taken into consideration in EFL curriculum.

  8. IReport for CNN Transmedia Storytelling On The Brazilian Protests in 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geane Alzamora

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the limits and potentials of the concept of transmedia storytelling to describe citizen coverage of the 2013 protests in Brazil in the collaborative section iReport for CNN on CNN.com. The section is characteristically intermedia because it connects to online social networks and doubles as a monthly television program with the same name. But to what extent could it also be characterized as transmedia? Systematic observation of the citizen coverage between June and July 2013 revealed a restructuring of certain editorial spaces on the site aimed at user-proposed perspectives as well as communicational activity across online social networks; both important aspects for its transmedia characterization. Furthermore, the visible hierarchical differentiation of journalistic reporting puts the transmediatic potential of the collaborative experiment into perspective by reducing the importance of expanding the narrative horizontally despite the study showing regular social scheduling for journalistic coverage as evidence of the dynamics of transmedia.

  9. Creative stories: Modelling the principal components of human creativity over texts in a storytelling game

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonis Koukourikos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The process of effectively applying techniques for fostering creativity in educational settings is – by nature – multifaceted and not straightforward, as it pertains to several fields such as cognitive theory and psychology. Furthermore, the quantification of the impact of different activities on creativity is a challenging and not yet thoroughly investigated task. In this paper, we present the process of applying the Semantic Lateral Thinking technique for fostering creativity in Creative Stories, a digital storytelling game, via the introduction of the appropriate stimuli in the game’s flow. Furthermore, we present a formalization for a person’s creativity as a derivative of his/her creations within the game, by transitioning from traditional computational creativity metrics over the produced stories to a space that adheres to the core principles of creativity as perceived by humans.

  10. Designing for Suburban Social Inclusion: A Case of Geo-Located Storytelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anette Bengs

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article showcases a digital solution for strengthening social inclusion and well-being of senior suburban residents of a socially diverse Finnish town. The study is framed as design research where research is conducted in order to feed into a design process. A background study was first conducted in order to identify the target group’s needs, abilities, and attitudes towards the neighbourhood. The results revealed positive attitudes towards the area and the need for relatedness, autonomy, competence, pleasure and stimulation, physical thriving and security. Following a User-Centered Design process we based our design choices on these results and developed a local geocaching solution incorporating storytelling. The aim was to encourage senior citizens to socialize, be physically active and to experience the local urban place. An interview-based evaluation with older adults (n=6 combined with an analysis of online cache log data, showed positive experiences of the solution.

  11. An Elective Course Exploring Occupational Justice Through Occupational Storytelling and Story Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Bednarski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine whether second-year Master of Occupational Therapy (MOT students who enroll in the elective course “Occupation in Long-Term Care (LTC” would be able to apply concepts of occupational justice in the nursing home environment through engaging residents in occupational storytelling and story making in order to facilitate resident self-advocacy for participation in a valued occupation. The occupational therapy elective course was developed and implemented with students alternating between the classroom and the nursing home environments. Outcome evaluation measurements included analysis of student reflective journaling to obtain qualitative data. The researcher found that students are able to understand the concepts and issues of occupational justice in the nursing home population and apply knowledge to facilitate the resident’s participation in meaningful occupations.

  12. Convergence And Transmedia Storytelling in Journalism: Transformations in Professional Practices and Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaide Martins

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As the focus of research developed by Jenkins (2009, convergence culture brings changes to journalism; it affects the practices, routines and profiles of its professionals and their relations with the public. One example is TV Folha from Brazil, a program made by professionals in different areas using press equipment and objectives. Their convergent nature affects production processes and favours hybridization of languages and multiplatform production, accentuating the presence of transmedia storytelling; a term adopted by Jenkins to refer to a model which emerged out of media convergence. This study adopted a qualitative methodology using interviews and observational analysis in order to understand the effects convergence culture has on the way journalism is done and the profile of its professionals. This discussion leads us to believe that the challenge is more than just multiplatform production; it is in the relationships developed out of convergence.as the focus of research developed by Jenkins (2009, convergence culture brings changes to journalism; it affects the practices, routines and profiles of its professionals and their relations with the public. One example is TV Folha from Brazil, a program made by professionals in different areas using press equipment and objectives. Their convergent nature affects production processes and favours hybridization of languages and multiplatform production, accentuating the presence of transmedia storytelling; a term adopted by Jenkins to refer to a model which emerged out of media convergence. This study adopted a qualitative methodology using interviews and observational analysis in order to understand the effects convergence culture has on the way journalism is done and the profile of its professionals. This discussion leads us to believe that the challenge is more than just multiplatform production; it is in the relationships developed out of convergence.

  13. Pilot Feasibility Study of a Digital Storytelling Intervention for Immigrant and Refugee Adults With Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Mark L; Njeru, Jane W; Hanza, Marcelo M; Boehm, Deborah H; Singh, Davinder; Yawn, Barbara P; Patten, Christi A; Clark, Matthew M; Weis, Jennifer A; Osman, Ahmed; Goodson, Miriam; Porraz Capetillo, Maria D; Hared, Abdullah; Hasley, Rachel; Guzman-Corrales, Laura; Sandler, Rachel; Hernandez, Valentina; Novotny, Paul J; Sloan, Jeff A; Sia, Irene G

    2017-08-01

    Purpose The purpose of this pilot feasibility project was to examine the potential effectiveness of a digital storytelling intervention designed through a community-based participatory research (CBPR) approach for immigrants and refugees with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods The intervention was a 12-minute culturally and linguistically tailored video consisting of an introduction, 4 stories, and a concluding educational message. A structured interview was used to assess the intervention for acceptability, interest level, and usefulness among 25 participants with T2DM (15 Latino, 10 Somali) across 5 primary care clinical sites. After watching the video, participants rated their confidence and motivation about managing T2DM as a result of the intervention. Baseline A1C and follow-up values (up to 6 months) were abstracted from medical records. Results All participants reported that the intervention got their attention, was interesting, and was useful; 96% reported that they were more confident about managing their T2DM than before they watched the video, and 92% reported that the video motivated them to change a specific behavior related to T2DM self-management. The mean baseline A1C level for the intervention participants was 9.3% (78 mmol/mol). The change from baseline to first follow-up A1C level was -0.8% (-10 mmol/mol) ( P storytelling intervention for T2DM among immigrant populations in primary care settings is feasible and resulted in self-rated improvement in psychosocial constructs that are associated with healthy T2DM self-management behaviors, and there was some evidence of improvement in glycemic control. A large-scale efficacy trial of the intervention is warranted.

  14. Memory storytelling between heritage and tourism in the age of the converging culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Crippa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This papers reflects on the establishment of new heritages and on the attribution of new meanings ato the existing ones. Our hypothesis is that the converging culture is transforming the relationship we establish with memory records, in all their material and intangible manifestations. In a society like ours, where we think of the “web”, we can’t separate information spaces such as libraries – and their primary materials – and, more generally, the sources of information from their reconfiguration on the many digital platforms, to understand how to draw the emerging manifestations of memory and their materialization. Basically, we want to talk about how we elaborate the narratives of memory which necessarily must be accompanied by phenomena related to digital technologies and globalization, both of markets and culture. We will try, then, to show how the converging culture produces a kind of transformation of “hierarchies” of the traditional library. Will design, initially, one of the aspects of the new order of “global” information, based on the idea of storytelling and, most importantly, transmedia storytelling, analyzing how it tends to occupy all the possible sources of accessible information for everyone who have an internet connection, such as Wikipedia. In order to understand this phenomena, we will observe some examples of how it is built today the information, including encyclopedia and fiction, starting from the story by Borges Tlön, Uqbar, orbis tertius. Finally, we focus our attention on “materials” events of the new narratives of memory elaborated on these premises. We will confront, therefore, with some examples of offers of heritage and tourist sites that make tangible these paths of knowledge.

  15. Storytelling Permutations in the Performance of Life Narrative Betty Roland's Caviar for Breakfast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Clark

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Throughout her life, Australian storyteller and playwright Betty Roland (1903-1996 was haunted by the lure of travel. Roland's extensive body of work reflects experiences in Joseph Stalin's Soviet Union in the 1930s, the UK in the 1950s and Greece in the 1960s and charts the evolution of a personal and political philosophy marked by world-wide social upheaval. Caviar for Breakfast (1979 revised 1989, the second volume of Roland's autobiographical trilogy, is the subject of this paper. When taken together, the three books provide a fascinating insight into the values and ideas of the mushrooming modern cultures in which Roland travelled, worked and lived. Caviar for Breakfast retraces Roland's adventures in Joseph Stalin's Soviet Union where she spent fifteen months during 1933-34 with her then lover, Guido Baracchi, a wealthy Marxist scholar. The narrative takes its life from the contents of a diary maintained by Roland during that time and her introductory remarks convey the notion that, what follows, is not a literary enterprise of the imagination. The author insists that Caviar for Breakfast is a first-hand account of past realities and not only does her diary hold the ordering of events together, but is the purveyor of truth. The truth status of the diary as a mode of representation is widely accepted in Western culture. This paper argues, however, that it is impossible for any transcription of a life to enjoy a one-to-one ratio with 'what actually happened' as it is for a ghost to re-enter a world which fully resembles the one it left. It is well within the capacity of any imaginative storyteller to construct a counterfeit, or simulated, sense of reality whether or not s/he works with the diary mode of representation.

  16. Systematics of spontaneous positron lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.; Reus, T. de; Reinhardt, J.; Mueller, B.; Greiner, W.

    1985-08-01

    Dynamical and spontaneous positron emission are investigated for heavy-ion collisions with long time delay using a semiclassical description. Numerical results and analytical expressions for the characteristic quantities of the resulting spontaneous positron line, i.e., its position, width, and cross section, are compared. The expected behaviour of the line position and cross section and its visibility against the spectrum of dynamically created positrons is discussed in dependence of the united charge Zsub(u) of projectile and target nucleus in a range of systems from Zsub(u)=180 up to Zsub(u)=188. The results are confronted with presently available experimental data, and possible implications on further experiments are worked out. (orig.)

  17. Spontaneous Rotational Inversion in Phycomyces

    KAUST Repository

    Goriely, Alain

    2011-03-01

    The filamentary fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus undergoes a series of remarkable transitions during aerial growth. During what is known as the stagea IV growth phase, the fungus extends while rotating in a counterclockwise manner when viewed from above (stagea IVa) and then, while continuing to grow, spontaneously reverses to a clockwise rotation (stagea IVb). This phase lasts for 24-48Ah and is sometimes followed by yet another reversal (stageAIVc) before the overall growth ends. Here, we propose a continuum mechanical model of this entire process using nonlinear, anisotropic, elasticity and show how helical anisotropy associated with the cell wall structure can induce spontaneous rotation and, under appropriate circumstances, the observed reversal of rotational handedness. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  18. Spontaneous regression of colon cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Kyoichi; Fujita, Shin; Ohshiro, Taihei; Yamamoto, Seiichiro; Sekine, Shigeki

    2015-01-01

    A case of spontaneous regression of transverse colon cancer is reported. A 64-year-old man was diagnosed as having cancer of the transverse colon at a local hospital. Initial and second colonoscopy examinations revealed a typical cancer of the transverse colon, which was diagnosed as moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma. The patient underwent right hemicolectomy 6 weeks after the initial colonoscopy. The resected specimen showed only a scar at the tumor site, and no cancerous tissue was proven histologically. The patient is alive with no evidence of recurrence 1 year after surgery. Although an antitumor immune response is the most likely explanation, the exact nature of the phenomenon was unclear. We describe this rare case and review the literature pertaining to spontaneous regression of colorectal cancer. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Management of intractable spontaneous epistaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudmik, Luke

    2012-01-01

    Background: Epistaxis is a common otolaryngology emergency and is often controlled with first-line interventions such as cautery, hemostatic agents, or anterior nasal packing. A subset of patients will continue to bleed and require more aggressive therapy. Methods: Intractable spontaneous epistaxis was traditionally managed with posterior nasal packing and prolonged hospital admission. In an effort to reduce patient morbidity and shorten hospital stay, surgical and endovascular techniques have gained popularity. A literature review was conducted. Results: Transnasal endoscopic sphenopalatine artery ligation and arterial embolization provide excellent control rates but the decision to choose one over the other can be challenging. The role of transnasal endoscopic anterior ethmoid artery ligation is unclear but may be considered in certain cases when bleeding localizes to the ethmoid region. Conclusion: This article will focus on the management of intractable spontaneous epistaxis and discuss the role of endoscopic arterial ligation and embolization as it pertains to this challenging clinical scenario. PMID:22391084

  20. Spontaneous baryogenesis in warm inflation

    OpenAIRE

    Brandenberger, Robert H.; Yamaguchi, Masahide

    2003-01-01

    We discuss spontaneous baryogenesis in the warm inflation scenario. In contrast with standard inflation models, radiation always exists in the warm inflation scenario, and the inflaton must be directly coupled to it. Also, the transition to the post-inflationary radiation dominated phase is smooth and the entropy is not significantly increased at the end of the period of inflation. In addition, after the period of warm inflation ends, the inflaton does not oscillate coherently but slowly roll...

  1. Spontaneous Splenic Rupture in Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Mirfazaelian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous rupture of spleen due to malignant melanoma is a rare situation, with only a few case reports in the literature. This study reports a previously healthy, 30-year-old man who came with chief complaint of acute abdominal pain to emergency room. On physical examination, abdominal tenderness and guarding were detected to be coincident with hypotension. Ultrasonography revealed mild splenomegaly with moderate free fluid in abdominopelvic cavity. Considering acute abdominal pain and hemodynamic instability, he underwent splenectomy with splenic rupture as the source of bleeding. Histologic examination showed diffuse infiltration by tumor. Immunohistochemical study (positive for S100, HMB45, and vimentin and negative for CK, CD10, CK20, CK7, CD30, LCA, EMA, and chromogranin confirmed metastatic malignant melanoma. On further questioning, there was a past history of a nasal dark skin lesion which was removed two years ago with no pathologic examination. Spontaneous (nontraumatic rupture of spleen is an uncommon situation and it happens very rarely due to neoplastic metastasis. Metastasis of malignant melanoma is one of the rare causes of the spontaneous rupture of spleen.

  2. Analysis and Modeling of the Galvanic Skin Response Spontaneous Component in the context of Intelligent Biofeedback Systems Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unakafov, A.

    2009-01-01

    The paper presents an approach to galvanic skin response (GSR) spontaneous component analysis and modeling. In the study a classification of biofeedback training methods is given, importance of intelligent methods development is shown. The INTENS method, which is perspective for intellectualization, is presented. An important problem of biofeedback training method intellectualization - estimation of the GSR spontaneous component - is solved in the main part of the work. Its main characteristics are described; results of GSR spontaneous component modeling are shown. Results of small research of an optimum material for GSR probes are presented.

  3. Personaliseret storytelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Følelsesmarkedet er både nyt og gammelt. Nyt, fordi mikroøkonomien først i det seneste årti har fået øjnene op for følelsernes rolle i almindelige beslutningsprocesser. Ældgammelt, fordi markedsføring i mere en hundrede år har handlet om at kommunikere og iscenesætte, så det appellerer til følels...

  4. Effectiveness of Storytelling Therapy on the Reduction of Aggression and Stubbornness in Children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samaneh Hosseini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of the present study was to determine the effectiveness of storytelling therapy on the reduction of aggression and stubbornness among children (age 7 to 9 suffering from oppositional defiant disorder who were attending junior high schools in Shiraz. Materials and Methods: From among available schools, Khansari school was chosen as the convenience sample. Thus 14 were chosen as the sample of the study. The instrument applied in this study included Behavioural Assessment Disorder questionnaire, Aggression questionnaire, Stubbornness questionnaire and Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Results: Data analysis showed that there was a significant reduction of aggression among children suffering from oppositional defiant disorder. Conclusion: Finally storytelling therapy could be considered as one of the effective therapies in these kinds of disorders, such as aggression, stubbornness and oppositional defiant in children.

  5. Storytelling, narrativas de campaña. Campañas electorales para la presidencia en Colombia, 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugénie Richard

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available El artículo presenta el storytelling como una nueva herramienta de comunicación estratégica para los candidatos en campaña, que permite conectar y convencer a los votantes mediante la narración de una historia que se basa en los imaginarios colectivos y los invita a compartirla mediante las redes sociales. Hace un análisis de la historia que contó el expresidente Uribe y que sentó las bases de las narraciones que se iban a contar durante la campaña presidencial de 2010 en Colombia. Se muestra cómo Antanas Mockus fue el candidato que mejor supo aprovechar los recursos del storytelling, con una utilización adecuada de la storyline de su historia, del framing y del networking, pero que presentó déficit en el timing de la narración.

  6. Architecture as spatial–textile storytelling: Metamorphosis of frieze as a narrative medium mediating the Panathenaia festival

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Fangqing

    2017-01-01

    Classical temples constructed by an entire class are considered as a democratic artifact that symbolizes social and communal beliefs and embodies religious significance. In contrast with these meanings that existing scholars have addressed, this paper investigates the extent to which architecture, as both shelter and artwork, serve as a medium of spatial–textile storytelling, providing a rich sensory context that represents and mediates culture. This study is drawn from a case study of the...

  7. Spontaneous synchronized tapping to an auditory rhythm in a chimpanzee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Yuko; Tomonaga, Masaki; Matsuzawa, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    Humans actively use behavioral synchrony such as dancing and singing when they intend to make affiliative relationships. Such advanced synchronous movement occurs even unconsciously when we hear rhythmically complex music. A foundation for this tendency may be an evolutionary adaptation for group living but evolutionary origins of human synchronous activity is unclear. Here we show the first evidence that a member of our closest living relatives, a chimpanzee, spontaneously synchronizes her movement with an auditory rhythm: After a training to tap illuminated keys on an electric keyboard, one chimpanzee spontaneously aligned her tapping with the sound when she heard an isochronous distractor sound. This result indicates that sensitivity to, and tendency toward synchronous movement with an auditory rhythm exist in chimpanzees, although humans may have expanded it to unique forms of auditory and visual communication during the course of human evolution.

  8. Connecting the Stars: Chinese Star Stories and the Art of Storytelling through a Cultural and Personal Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldern, Mary Hsi

    This thesis explores the role of auto ethnography in researching and analyzing Chinese cosmology myths. Star stories are more than entertainment; they provide a visual means of recognizing and honoring cultural traditions from around the world. While Chinese myths told in America are disconnected from the original contexts from which they emerged, Chinese cosmologies are still connected through stars and constellations to the celestial part of their original setting. These star stories are largely unfamiliar to American audiences, including outdoor and experiential educators and cultural Chinese American groups, who will find it to be of interest. The material will also appeal to the various cultural entities and social mediated communities who engage in global interactions that influence one another in their intercultural exchanges. I use phenomenological data from this research to develop and enrich my personal storytelling style, reflecting on my heritage and examining my identity in the personal, cultural, and spiritual dimensions. I then perform the collected star lore tales at outdoor youth camps for under served youth and communities in California. In this way, I test oral storytelling as a means of engendering new learning about environmental sustainability. The results reveal meaningful ways that these stories and storytelling help participants cultivate awareness and caring for personal and cultural sustainable relationships with the environment and each other.

  9. Spontaneous oscillations in microfluidic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Daniel; Angilella, Jean-Regis; Motter, Adilson

    2017-11-01

    Precisely controlling flows within microfluidic systems is often difficult which typically results in systems being heavily reliant on numerous external pumps and computers. Here, I present a simple microfluidic network that exhibits flow rate switching, bistablity, and spontaneous oscillations controlled by a single pressure. That is, by solely changing the driving pressure, it is possible to switch between an oscillating and steady flow state. Such functionality does not rely on external hardware and may even serve as an on-chip memory or timing mechanism. I use an analytic model and rigorous fluid dynamics simulations to show these results.

  10. General features of spontaneous baryogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuzova, Elena

    2017-04-01

    The classical version of spontaneous baryogenesis is studied in details. It is shown that the relation between the time derivative of the (pseudo)goldstone field and the baryonic chemical potential essentially depends upon the representation chosen for the fermionic fields with non-zero baryonic number (quarks). The kinetic equation, used for the calculations of the cosmological baryon asymmetry, is generalized to the case of non-stationary background. The effects of the finite interval of the integration over time are also included into consideration.

  11. Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kattapuram, Taj M. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States); Kattapuram, Susan V. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)], E-mail: skattapuram@partners.org

    2008-07-15

    Spontaneous osteonecrosis of the knee presents with acute onset of severe, pain in elderly patients, usually female and usually without a history of trauma. Originally described as idiopathic osteonecrosis, the exact etiology is still debated. Evidence suggests that an acute fracture occurs as a result of chronic stress or minor trauma to a weakened subchondral bone plate. The imaging characteristics on MR reflect the age of the lesion and the symptoms. More appropriate terminology may be ' subchondral insufficiency fracture of the knee' or 'focal subchondral osteonecrosis'.

  12. Enhancement of Pleasure during Spontaneous Dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò F. Bernardi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dancing emphasizes the motor expression of emotional experiences. The bodily expression of emotions can modulate the subjective experience of emotions, as when adopting emotion-specific postures and faces. Thus, dancing potentially offers a ground for emotional coping through emotional enhancement and regulation. Here we investigated the emotional responses to music in individuals without any prior dance training while they either freely danced or refrained from movement. Participants were also tested while imitating their own dance movements but in the absence of music as a control condition. Emotional ratings and cardio-respiratory measures were collected following each condition. Dance movements were recorded using motion capture. We found that emotional valence was increased specifically during spontaneous dance of groovy excerpts, compared to both still listening and motor imitation. Furthermore, parasympathetic-related heart rate variability (HRV increased during dance compared to motor imitation. Nevertheless, subjective and physiological arousal increased during movement production, regardless of whether participants were dancing or imitating. Significant correlations were found between inter-individual differences in the emotions experienced during dance and whole-body acceleration profiles. The combination of movement and music during dance results in a distinct state characterized by acutely heightened pleasure, which is of potential interest for the use of dance in therapeutic settings.

  13. Enhancement of Pleasure during Spontaneous Dance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Nicolò F.; Bellemare-Pepin, Antoine; Peretz, Isabelle

    2017-01-01

    Dancing emphasizes the motor expression of emotional experiences. The bodily expression of emotions can modulate the subjective experience of emotions, as when adopting emotion-specific postures and faces. Thus, dancing potentially offers a ground for emotional coping through emotional enhancement and regulation. Here we investigated the emotional responses to music in individuals without any prior dance training while they either freely danced or refrained from movement. Participants were also tested while imitating their own dance movements but in the absence of music as a control condition. Emotional ratings and cardio-respiratory measures were collected following each condition. Dance movements were recorded using motion capture. We found that emotional valence was increased specifically during spontaneous dance of groovy excerpts, compared to both still listening and motor imitation. Furthermore, parasympathetic-related heart rate variability (HRV) increased during dance compared to motor imitation. Nevertheless, subjective and physiological arousal increased during movement production, regardless of whether participants were dancing or imitating. Significant correlations were found between inter-individual differences in the emotions experienced during dance and whole-body acceleration profiles. The combination of movement and music during dance results in a distinct state characterized by acutely heightened pleasure, which is of potential interest for the use of dance in therapeutic settings. PMID:29238298

  14. Radiological evaluation of spontaneous pneumoperitoneum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. D.; Rhee, H. S.

    1982-01-01

    112 cases of spontaneous penumoperitoneum, the causes of which were confirmed by clinical and surgical procedure at Presbyterian Medical Center from January, 1977 to July, 1981 were reviewed radiologically. The results were as follows: 1. Perforation of duodenal ulcer (46/112: 41.1%), stomach ulcer (22/112: 19.6%), and stomach cancer (11/112: 9.8%) were the three most common causes of spontaneous penumoperitoneum. These were 70.5% of all causes. 2. The most common site of free gas was both subdiaphragmatic areas (46: 41.1%). Others were Rt. subdiaphragmatic only (31: 27.7%), both subdiaphragmatic with subhepatic (16: 14.3%), Rt. subdiaphragmatic with subhepatic (7: 6.2%), Rt. subdiaphragmatic only (5: 4.4%), diffuse in abdomen (4: 3.6%), and subhepatic only (3: 2.7%). So 92.0% (103/112) were located in RUQ. 3. The radiological shape of free gas was classified: crescent (52: 46.4%) of small amount; half-moon (21: 18.8%) of moderate amount; large or diffuse (39: 34.8%) of large amount.4. The age between 31 and 60 occupied 69.1% (77/112), and male was predominant (5.2 times). 5. The patient's position showing free air most frequently was erect

  15. A Case of Multiple Spontaneous Keloid Scars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhadi Jfri

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Keloid scars result from an abnormal healing response to cutaneous injury or inflammation that extends beyond the borders of the original wound. Spontaneous keloid scars forming in the absence of any previous trauma or surgical procedure are rare. Certain syndromes have been associated with this phenomenon, and few reports have discussed the evidence of single spontaneous keloid scar, which raises the question whether they are really spontaneous. Here, we present a 27-year-old mentally retarded single female with orbital hypertelorism, broad nasal bridge, repaired cleft lip and high-arched palate who presented with progressive multiple spontaneous keloid scars in different parts of her body which were confirmed histologically by the presence of typical keloidal collagen. This report supports the fact that keloid scars can appear spontaneously and are possibly linked to a genetic factor. Furthermore, it describes a new presentation of spontaneous keloid scars in the form of multiple large lesions in different sites of the body.

  16. Spontaneity of communication in individuals with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hsu-Min; Carter, Mark

    2008-04-01

    This article provides an examination of issues related to spontaneity of communication in children with autism. Deficits relating to spontaneity or initiation are frequently reported in individuals with autism, particularly in relation to communication and social behavior. Nevertheless, spontaneity is not necessarily clearly conceptualized or measured. Several approaches to conceptualization of communicative spontaneity are examined with a particular focus on the continuum model and how it might be practically applied. A range of possible explanations for deficits in spontaneity of communication in children with autism is subsequently explored, including external factors (highly structured teaching programs, failure to systematically instruct for spontaneity) and intrinsic characteristics (intellectual disability, stimulus overselectivity, weak central coherence). Possible implications for future research are presented.

  17. Storytelling and Technology Combine to Create Student Engagement Around Locally Relevant Climate Change Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckey, E.; Littrell-Baez, M.; Tayne, K.; Gold, A. U.; Okochi, C.; Oonk, D.; Smith, L. K.; Lynds, S. E.

    2017-12-01

    Storytelling is a powerful way for students to engage with science topics, particularly topics that may initially seem too broad to impact their lives, like climate change. Empowering students to telling a personal story about climate change's effects and helping them turn their story into a film is powerful approach. Especially because these films can be shared globally and gives students a voice around a complex topic like climate change. Here, we present impacts of the Lens on Climate Change program (LOCC), which engages middle and high school students in producing short films featuring how climate change impacts their communities. LOCC is offered as an intensive week-long summer program and as an extracurricular program during the school year. The majority of student participants are recruited from historically underserved communities and come from ethnical and socioeconomically diverse backgrounds. Survey data revealed that LOCC participants had a significant increase in their belief in the reality of climate change after participation in their program relative to students in a demographically-matched control groups. Furthermore, participant responses on reflection surveys given after the program included statements that suggest that students had begun thinking more deeply about climate change as a serious global challenge and felt empowered to take actions to mitigate climate change and/or spread awareness in their communities. The majority of students in the LOCC program also reported being very proud of their film and intended to share their film with their friends and family. Additionally, we explored the long-term impacts of participation by interviewing students a year after the program and offered them the opportunity to make a subsequent film. Students in this "advanced group" reported being more aware of climate change in their community following making their films and were enthusiastic to increase their filmmaking skills through producing additional

  18. Digital storytelling in teacher education: A meaningful way of integrating ICT in ESL teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fredrik Mørk Røkenes

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Hensikten med denne studien er å utforske hvordan bruken av digitale fortellinger i lærerutdanningen kan bidra til å utvikle lektorstudenters digitale kompetanse og fremme innovativ bruk av IKT i engelskundervisningen. Gjennom bruken av kasusstudie og en design-basert forskningstilnærming beskriver denne studien to gjennomføringer og design-sykluser av et verksted med bruk av digitale fortellinger ved en norsk lærerutdanning hvor det overordnede målet var å vise innovative og hensiktsmessige måter å integrere IKT i engelskundervisningen. En digital kompetansemodell er brukt som linse i dataanalysen hvor datamaterialet kommer fra en kvantitativ spørre-undersøkelse, feltobservasjoner, refleksjonslogger, digitale artefakter og semi-strukturerte intervjuer. Studiens funn viser en rekke tilnærmingsmåter som kan tas i bruk i gjennomføringen av verksted i digitale fortellinger, slik som modellering av integrering av IKT og vurdering med IKT, stillasbygging ved studentaktive læringsopplevelser med IKT, og brobygging mellom teori og praksis gjennom refleksjon. Implikasjoner for lærerutdanningen blir diskutert.Nøkkelord: profesjonsfaglig digital kompetanse, digitale fortellinger, lærer-studenter, lærerutdannere, lærerutdanning, engelsk fagdidaktikkAbstractThe purpose of this study is to examine how the use of digital storytelling (DST in teacher education can help develop digital competence in secondary school English as a second language (ESL student teachers, and promote the innovative use of information and communications technology (ICT in ESL teaching. Following a case methodology and a design-based research approach, the study reports on two iterative design cycles of a DST workshop held at a Norwegian teacher education program where the aim was to promote secondary ESL student teachers’ digital competence and showcase innovative ways of integrating ICT into ESL teaching. A digital competence model is used as a research lens

  19. Spontaneous cryptococcal peritonitis in cirrhotic patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungkanuparph S

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a common complication in patients with cirrhosis and ascites. However, spontaneous peritonitis caused by Cryptococcus neoformans is uncommon. Delayed diagnosis of cryptococcal peritonitis often results in death. We describe three cases of spontaneous cryptococcal peritonitis in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. One case had associated symptomatic human immunodeficiency virus infection. Clinical awareness of this entity may lead to the early diagnosis and proper treatment.

  20. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension without Orthostatic Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Kansu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We report 2 cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension that presented with unilateral abducens nerve palsy, without orthostatic headache. While sixth nerve palsies improved without any intervention, subdural hematoma was detected with magnetic resonance imaging. We conclude that headache may be absent in spontaneous intracranial hypotension and spontaneous improvement of sixth nerve palsy can occur, even after the development of a subdural hematoma