WorldWideScience

Sample records for spokespersons visual communication

  1. 09 September 2013 - Japanese Members of Internal Affairs and Communications Committee House of Representatives visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton. T. Kondo and K. Yoshida present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    09 September 2013 - Japanese Members of Internal Affairs and Communications Committee House of Representatives visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton. T. Kondo and K. Yoshida present.

  2. Perception of spokespersons' performance and characteristics in crisis communication: experience of the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome outbreak in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Shu-Yu; Chen, Ruey-Yu; Wang, Shih-fan Steve; Weng, Ya-Ling; Peng, Eugene Yu-Chang; Lee, Ming-Been

    2013-10-01

    To explore perception of spokespersons' performance and characteristics in response to the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak. This study was conducted from March to July, 2005, using semi-structured in-depth interviews to collect data. All interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. A qualitative content analysis was employed to analyze the transcribed data. Interviewees included media reporters, media supervisors, health and medical institution executives or spokespersons, and social observers. Altogether, 35 interviewees were recruited for in-depth interviews, and the duration of the interview ranged from 1 hour to 2 hours. Results revealed that the most important characteristics of health/medical institutions spokespersons are professional competence and good interaction with the media. In contrast, the most important behaviors they should avoid are concealing the truth and misreporting the truth. Three major flaws of spokespersons' performance were identified: they included poor understanding of media needs and landscape; blaming the media to cover up a mistake they made in an announcement; and lack of sufficient participation in decision-making or of authorization from the head of organization. Spokespersons of health and medical institutions play an important role in media relations during the crisis of a newly emerging infectious disease. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. The Accidental Spokesperson - Science Communication during the 2010-2011 Christchurch, NZ Earthquake Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, K. P.

    2015-12-01

    Beginning September 4, 2010, with a Mw 7.1 earthquake, a multi-year earthquake sequence changed life in Canterbury NZ. Information communicated by a core group of university-based earthquake scientists provided accessible information to the general public, the press, and policy makers. Although at the start of this prolonged sequence, no one anticipated its longevity nor its impact, this initial (and largest) event did catalyze a demand from the public and policy makers for information and led to some important lessons in how to communicate science to a broad audience as an event unfolds and when it is personally important to the general public. Earthquakes are neither new nor rare to New Zealand, but the Christchurch area was seen as likely suffering only from the far-field effects of a major earthquake on the Alpine Fault or Marlborough fault system. Policy makers had planned and expected that another city such as Wellington would be where they would need to respond. As a visiting faculty at the University of Canterbury, with expertise in earthquake science, I was entrained and engaged in the response - both the scientific and communication aspects. It soon became clear that formal press releases and statements from government ministries and agencies did little to address the questions and uncertainties that the public, the press, and even the policy makers had. Rather, a series of public lectures, broad ranging discussions with the media (both print and radio/television), and OpEd pieces provided by this small group of earthquake focused faculty at the University of Canterbury provided the background information, best estimates of what could occur in the future, and why Earth was acting as it was. This filled a critical gap in science information going to the public, and helped build a level of trust in the public that became critically needed after the situation escalated with subsequent damaging events through early-mid 2011, and onward.

  4. Visual communication and terminal equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Cheol Hui

    1988-06-01

    This book is divided two parts about visual communication and terminal equipment. The first part introduces visual communication, which deals with foundation of visual communication, technique of visual communication, equipment of visual communication, a facsimile and pictorial image system. The second part contains terminal equipment such as telephone, terminal equipment for data transmission on constitution and constituent of terminal equipment for data transmission, input device and output device, terminal device and up-to-date terminal device.

  5. Visual Information Communications International Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Quang Vinh; Zhang, Kang; VINCI'09

    2010-01-01

    Visual Information Communication is based on VINCI'09, The Visual Information Communications International Conference, September 2009 in Sydney, Australia. Topics covered include The Arts of Visual Layout, Presentation & Exploration, The Design of Visual Attributes, Symbols & Languages, Methods for Visual Analytics and Knowledge Discovery, Systems, Interfaces and Applications of Visualization, Methods for Multimedia Data Recognition & Processing. This cutting-edge book addresses the issues of knowledge discovery, end-user programming, modeling, rapid systems prototyping, education, and design activities. Visual Information Communications is an edited volume whose contributors include well-established researchers worldwide, from diverse disciplines including architects, artists, engineers, and scientists. Visual Information Communication is designed for a professional audience composed of practitioners and researchers working in the field of digital design and visual communications. This volume i...

  6. Handbook of visual communications

    CERN Document Server

    Hang, Hseuh-Ming

    1995-01-01

    Handbook of Visual Communications explores the latest developments in the field, such as model-based image coding, and provides readers with insight into possible future developments.Key Features* Displays comprehensive coverage from fundamental theory to international standards and VLSI design* Includes 518 pages of contributions from well-known experts* [please keep this feature current with the page count]* Presents state-of-the-art knowledge--the most up-to-date and accurate information on various topics in the field* Provides an extensive overview of international standards for industrial

  7. Information efficiency in visual communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Rahman, Zia-Ur

    1993-01-01

    This paper evaluates the quantization process in the context of the end-to-end performance of the visual-communication channel. Results show that the trade-off between data transmission and visual quality revolves around the information in the acquired signal, not around its energy. Improved information efficiency is gained by frequency dependent quantization that maintains the information capacity of the channel and reduces the entropy of the encoded signal. Restorations with energy bit-allocation lose both in sharpness and clarity relative to restorations with information bit-allocation. Thus, quantization with information bit-allocation is preferred for high information efficiency and visual quality in optimized visual communication.

  8. Visual Communication: Integrating Visual Instruction into Business Communication Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, William H.

    2006-01-01

    Business communication courses are ideal for teaching visual communication principles and techniques. Many assignments lend themselves to graphic enrichment, such as flyers, handouts, slide shows, Web sites, and newsletters. Microsoft Publisher and Microsoft PowerPoint are excellent tools for these assignments, with Publisher being best for…

  9. Student Visual Communication of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Cook, Kristin

    2017-06-01

    Despite growing recognition of the importance of visual representations to science education, previous research has given attention mostly to verbal modalities of evolution instruction. Visual aspects of classroom learning of evolution are yet to be systematically examined by science educators. The present study attends to this issue by exploring the types of evolutionary imagery deployed by secondary students. Our visual design analysis revealed that students resorted to two larger categories of images when visually communicating evolution: spatial metaphors (images that provided a spatio-temporal account of human evolution as a metaphorical "walk" across time and space) and symbolic representations ("icons of evolution" such as personal portraits of Charles Darwin that simply evoked evolutionary theory rather than metaphorically conveying its conceptual contents). It is argued that students need opportunities to collaboratively critique evolutionary imagery and to extend their visual perception of evolution beyond dominant images.

  10. How Scientists Develop Competence in Visual Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergren, Marilyn

    2013-01-01

    Visuals (maps, charts, diagrams and illustrations) are an important tool for communication in most scientific disciplines, which means that scientists benefit from having strong visual communication skills. This dissertation examines the nature of competence in visual communication and the means by which scientists acquire this competence. This…

  11. 9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    9 April 2013 - Minister for Universities and Science United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland D. Willetts in the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton and in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Beams Department Head P. Collier. Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Editor at the Communication Group K. Kahle and Beams Department Engineer R. Veness present.

  12. The Application of Visual Illusion in the Visual Communication Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tao; You Ye, Han

    2018-03-01

    With the development of our national reform, opening up and modernization, the science and technology has also been well developed and it has been applied in every wall of life, the development of visual illusion industry is represented in the widespread use of advanced technology in it. Ultimately, the visual illusion is a phenomenon, it should be analyzed from the angles of physics and philosophy. The widespread application of visual illusion not only can improve the picture quality, but also could maximize peoples’ sense degree through the visual communication design works, expand people’s horizons and promote the diversity of visual communication design works.

  13. Understanding Visual Novel As Artwork of Visual Communication Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dendi Pratama

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Visual Novel is a kind of audiovisual game that offers visual strength through the narrative and visual characters. The developer community of Visual Novel (VN Project Indonesia indicated a limited local game developer that produces Visual Novel of Indonesia. In addition, Indonesian Visual Novel production was also more influenced by the style of anime or manga from Japan. Actually, Visual Novel is part of the potential of  creative industries products. The study is to formulate the problem, how to understand Visual Novel as artwork of visual communication design, especially among students? This research is a case study conducted on visual communication design student at the University Indraprasta PGRI Jakarta. The results showed low levels of knowledge, understanding, and experience of  the Visual Novel game, which is below 50%. Qualitative and quantitative methods combined with structural semiotic approach is used to describe the elements of the design and the signs structure at the Visual Novel. This research can be a scientific reference for further introduce and encourage an understanding of Visual Novel as artwork of Visual Communication Design. In addition, the results may add to the knowledge of  society, and encourage the development of Visual Novel artwork that  reflect the culture of Indonesia. Visual Novel adalah sejenis permainan audiovisual yang menawarkan kekuatan visual melalui narasi dan karakter visual. Data dari komunitas pengembang Visual Novel (VN Project Indonesia menunjukkan masih terbatasnya pengembang game lokal yang memproduksi Visual Novel Indonesia. Selain itu, produksi Visual Novel Indonesia juga lebih banyak dipengaruhi oleh gaya anime dan manga dari Jepang. Padahal Visual Novel adalah bagian dari produk industri kreatif yang potensial. Studi ini merumuskan masalah, bagaimana memahami Visual Novel sebagai karya seni desain komunikasi visual, khususnya di kalangan mahasiswa? Penelitian ini merupakan studi kasus

  14. Literacy Instruction Through Communicative and Visual Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hui

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the evidence suggesting the effectiveness of literacy instruction through communicative and visual arts, according to Flood, Heath, and Lapp (1997). Visual arts includes everything from dramatic performances to comic books to television viewing. The communicative arts, such as reading, writing, and…

  15. How scientists develop competence in visual communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergren, Marilyn

    Visuals (maps, charts, diagrams and illustrations) are an important tool for communication in most scientific disciplines, which means that scientists benefit from having strong visual communication skills. This dissertation examines the nature of competence in visual communication and the means by which scientists acquire this competence. This examination takes the form of an extensive multi-disciplinary integrative literature review and a series of interviews with graduate-level science students. The results are presented as a conceptual framework that lays out the components of competence in visual communication, including the communicative goals of science visuals, the characteristics of effective visuals, the skills and knowledge needed to create effective visuals and the learning experiences that promote the acquisition of these forms of skill and knowledge. This conceptual framework can be used to inform pedagogy and thus help graduate students achieve a higher level of competency in this area; it can also be used to identify aspects of acquiring competence in visual communication that need further study.

  16. Student Visual Communication of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Alandeom W.; Cook, Kristin

    2017-01-01

    Despite growing recognition of the importance of visual representations to science education, previous research has given attention mostly to verbal modalities of evolution instruction. Visual aspects of classroom learning of evolution are yet to be systematically examined by science educators. The present study attends to this issue by exploring…

  17. Climate Science Communications - Video Visualization Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, J. P.; Mann, M. E.

    2010-12-01

    Communicating Climate science is challenging due to it's complexity. But as they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. Visualization techniques can be merely graphical or combine multimedia so as to make graphs come alive in context with other visual and auditory cues. This can also make the information come alive in a way that better communicates what the science is all about. What types of graphics to use depends on your audience, some graphs are great for scientists but if you are trying to communicate to a less sophisticated audience, certain visuals translate information in a more easily perceptible manner. Hollywood techniques and style can be applied to these graphs to give them even more impact. Video is one of the most powerful communication tools in its ability to combine visual and audio through time. Adding music and visual cues such as pans and zooms can greatly enhance the ability to communicate your concepts. Video software ranges from relatively simple to very sophisticated. In reality, you don't need the best tools to get your point across. In fact, with relatively inexpensive software, you can put together powerful videos that more effectively convey the science you are working on with greater sophistication, and in an entertaining way. We will examine some basic techniques to increase the quality of video visualization to make it more effective in communicating complexity. If a picture is worth a thousand words, a decent video with music, and a bit of narration is priceless.

  18. Information, entropy and fidelity in visual communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; Fales, Carl L.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Rahman, Zia-Ur

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of visual communication that integrates the critical limiting factors of image gathering and display with the digital processing that is used to code and restore images. The approach focuses on two mathematical criteria, information and fidelity, and on their relationships to the entropy of the encoded data and to the visual quality of the restored image.

  19. Audio-Visual Communication Handbook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pett, Dennis W., Comp.

    Designed to assist Peace Corps volunteers to plan, produce, and use instructional materials in the classroom and in the community, this training manual focuses on materials that volunteers can produce or obtain locally at minimal expense. Included is a brief section about projected media, which are a useful means of communication in those…

  20. A framework for visual communication at Nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Kelly

    2016-04-25

    The scientific journal Nature, published weekly since 1869, serves as an excellent case study in visual communication. While journals are becoming increasingly specialist, Nature remains firmly multidisciplinary; and unlike many scientific journals, it contains original journalism, opinion pieces, and expert analysis in addition to peer-reviewed research papers. This variety of content types-covering an extensive range of scientific disciplines-translates into a wide and varied audience, and the need to employ an equally wide variety of communication styles.For example, a research paper may employ technical language to communicate to a highly specialized audience in that field, whereas a news story on the same subject will explain the science to an educated lay audience, often adding a wider context and stripping out acronyms. Each type of piece will use a communication approach tailored for its intended audience.This is true for visual content as well: the intended audience of a scientific figure, illustration or data visualization will determine the design approach to that visual. At Nature, given the high volume of content plus high quality standards, this process is applied in a fairly systematic way, using a framework to guide creative decision-making. That framework is described here, along with a discussion of best practices for the design of research figures and graphics by context. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Visual Communication Design as a Form of Public Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    This paper identifies visual communication design as a form of public pedagogy. Communication design practices aim to achieve the successful transmission of a message to a recipient in a visual mode. Understanding the theories and practices of visual communication design can assist in enhancing the reception of the communication, as these…

  2. Visual communication - Information and fidelity. [of images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Freidrich O.; Fales, Carl L.; Alter-Gartenberg, Rachel; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    This assessment of visual communication deals with image gathering, coding, and restoration as a whole rather than as separate and independent tasks. The approach focuses on two mathematical criteria, information and fidelity, and on their relationships to the entropy of the encoded data and to the visual quality of the restored image. Past applications of these criteria to the assessment of image coding and restoration have been limited to the link that connects the output of the image-gathering device to the input of the image-display device. By contrast, the approach presented in this paper explicitly includes the critical limiting factors that constrain image gathering and display. This extension leads to an end-to-end assessment theory of visual communication that combines optical design with digital processing.

  3. Jim Virdee, the new spokesperson of CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Jim Virdee and Michel Della Negra. On 21 June Tejinder 'Jim'Virdee was elected by the CMS collaboration as its new spokesperson, his 3-year term of office beginning in January 2007. He will take over from Michel Della Negra, who has been CMS spokesperson since its formalization in 1992. Three distinguished physicists stood as candidates for this election: Dan Green from Fermilab, programme manager of the US-CMS collaboration and coordinator of the CMS Hadron Calorimeter project; Jim Virdee from Imperial College London and CERN, deputy spokesperson of CMS since 1993; Gigi Rolandi from the University of Trieste and CERN, ex-Aleph spokesperson and currently involved in the preparations of the physics analyses to be done with CMS. On the early evening of 21 June, 141 of the 142 members of the CMS collaboration board, some represented by proxies, took part in a secret ballot. After two rounds of voting Jim Virdee was elected as spokesperson with a clear majority. Jim thanked the CMS collaboration 'for putting conf...

  4. Audio visual information materials for risk communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunji, Ikuko; Tabata, Rimiko; Ohuchi, Naomi

    2005-07-01

    Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC), Tokai Works set up the Risk Communication Study Team in January, 2001 to promote mutual understanding between the local residents and JNC. The Team has studied risk communication from various viewpoints and developed new methods of public relations which are useful for the local residents' risk perception toward nuclear issues. We aim to develop more effective risk communication which promotes a better mutual understanding of the local residents, by providing the risk information of the nuclear fuel facilities such a Reprocessing Plant and other research and development facilities. We explain the development process of audio visual information materials which describe our actual activities and devices for the risk management in nuclear fuel facilities, and our discussion through the effectiveness measurement. (author)

  5. Celebrity endorsements versus created spokespersons in advertising: a survey among students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delarey Van der Waldt

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study the use of endorsements in advertising was investigated.  Endorsements can either be in the form of a celebrity acting as a spokesperson for an organisation or the organisation can create a spokesperson to act as an endorser.  The problem that faces marketers is that little scientific proof exists if students perceive celebrity endorsements and creative spokespersons differently with regard to their expertise and trustworthiness.  The aim of this study was to determine the attitudes of respondents with regard to expertise, trustworthiness and attractiveness of created spokesperson and celebrity endorsements in advertisements. This knowledge will provide marketing professionals with the strategic advantage of how and when to make use of an endorser. Ohanian’s (1990 measurement scale of perceived expertise, trustworthiness and attractiveness was adopted in a self-administrative questionnaire for this article.  Respondents (n=185 were exposed to six visual images of endorsers namely:  three celebrities and three created spokespersons.  It was found that attractiveness should not be used as a factor when comparing created endorsers with celebrity endorsers.  The respondents perceived both endorsement applications as highly credible and professionals need to consider each application’s advantages and disadvantages when deciding which application will be more effective for their advertising strategy.  In the long term the organisation might find it more cost effective to create its own spokesperson due to the risk of possible characteristics changes or negative associations of celebrity endorsers.  Revoking advertisements after celebrity endorsers have received negative publicity or changed character can lead to great financial losses.  Created endorsers, on the other hand, provide the organisation with greater control and the ability to change to adapt to the organisations market and advertising needs.

  6. Guido Tonelli elected next CMS spokesperson

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Guido Tonelli has been elected as the next CMS spokesperson. He will take over from Jim Virdee on January 1, 2010, and will head the collaboration through the first crucial year of data-taking. Guido Tonelli, CMS spokesperson-elect, into the CMS cavern. "It will be very tough and there will be enormous pressure," explains Guido Tonelli, CMS spokesperson-elect. "It will be the first time that CMS will run for a whole year so it is important to go through the checklist to be able to take good quality data." Tonelli, who is currently CMS Deputy spokesperson, will take over from Jim Virdee on January 1, 2010 – only a few months into CMS’s first full year of data-taking. "The collisions will probably be different to our expectations. So it’s going to take the effort of the entire collaboration worldwide to be ready for this new phase." Born in Italy, Tonelli originally studied at the University of Pisa, where he is now a Professo...

  7. Cultural preferences for visual and verbal communication styles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Culture is a key issue in the development of marketing communications in international markets as cultures develop distinctive preferences for visual and verbal communications. The individualistic nature of American culture lends itself to a preference for simple, direct visual communication and low-context verbal ...

  8. The CMS Collaboration Board (CB) chairperson, deputy and secretary, with the CMS Spokesperson and deputies

    CERN Multimedia

    Lapka, M

    2012-01-01

    From left to right: Jorgen D'Hondt (CB Secretary), Claudia Wulz (CB Deputy Chair), Tiziano Camporesi (Deputy Spokesperson), Ian Shipsey (new CB Chair 2013-2014), Joe Incandela (CMS Spokesperson), Joao Varela (Deputy Spokesperson)

  9. Guidelines for Teaching Non-Verbal Communications Through Visual Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Mahima Ranjan

    1976-01-01

    There is a natural unique relationship between non-verbal communication and visual media such as television and film. Visual media will have to be used extensively--almost exclusively--in teaching non-verbal communications, as well as other methods requiring special teaching skills. (Author/ER)

  10. Flood risk communication : Visualization tools and evaluations of effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charriere, M.K.M.; Junier, S.J.; Mostert, E.; Bogaard, T.A.

    2012-01-01

    Visual risk communication can be used to reduce damages due to floods. The first objective of this study is to review the current state of the field by inventorying examples of visual communication in terms of purpose, content, audience, phases of risk management and means. As maps appear to be

  11. The Role of Visual Communication in the Process of Institutionalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Renate; Jancsary, Dennis; Boxenbaum, Eva

    How does visual communication contribute to the emergence and consolidation of new institutions? Previous research on institutionalization has primarily focused on verbal text and neglected its interaction with visual forms of communication. We propose that a more thorough and systematic engagement...... with the ways in which the visual interacts with the verbal may help address existing ‘fault lines’ and ‘blind spots’ in our knowledge about processes of institutionalization. In order to theorize such contribution of a visual perspective, we utilize insights from social semiotics and flesh out a number...... communication and how it may extend, speed up, or strengthen the effect of verbal communication. Essentially, we argue that visual communication plays a crucial role in shaping the trajectory of institutionalization....

  12. How Chinese Semantics Capability Improves Interpretation in Visual Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chu-Yu; Ou, Yang-Kun; Kin, Ching-Lung

    2017-01-01

    A visual representation involves delivering messages through visually communicated images. The study assumed that semantic recognition can affect visual interpretation ability, and the result showed that students graduating from a general high school achieve satisfactory results in semantic recognition and image interpretation tasks than students…

  13. Using Visual Script Interventions to Address Communication Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Jennifer B.

    2007-01-01

    Visual scripts and related educational strategies such as video modeling and social script narratives provide visual or auditory cues to promote communication and social skills in children with disabilities. Visual scripts are particularly useful for teachers who work with children with learning disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, and…

  14. Visual Communication in Web Design - Analyzing Visual Communication in Web Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    Web sites are rapidly becoming the preferred media choice for information search, company presentation, shopping, entertainment, education, and social contacts. And along with the various forms of communication that the Web offers the aesthetic aspects have begun to play an increasingly important role. However, studies in the design and the relevance of focusing on the aesthetic aspects in planning and using Web sites have only to a smaller degree been subject of theoretical reflection. For example, Miller (2000), Thorlacius (2001, 2002, 2005), Engholm (2002, 2003), and Beaird (2007) have been contributing to set a beginning agenda that address the aesthetic aspects. On the other hand, there is a considerable amount of literature addressing the theoretical and methodological aspects focusing on the technical and functional aspects. In this context it is the aim of this article to introduce a model for analysis of visual communication on websites.

  15. SHORT COMMUNICATION Rapid Visual Assessment of Fish ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surveys, underwater visual census, coral reefs. Abstract— Rapid visual censuses were conducted of fish on eight ... RAPID VISUAL ASSESSMENT OF FISH COMMUNITIES ON SELECTED BAZARUTO. REEFS. 117 a fundamental baseline in this ...... provided logistical support in the field. Anonymous referees are gratefully.

  16. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm related to visual symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung Hyun; Park, Sang Keun; Kim, Tae Hong; Shin, Jun Jae; Shin, Hyung Shik; Hwang, Yong Soon

    2009-09-01

    Intracranial aneurysms are sometimes presented with visual symptoms by their rupture or direct compression of the optic nerve. It is because their prevalent sites are anatomically located close to the optic pathway. Anterior communicating artery is especially located in close proximity to optic nerve. Aneurysm arising in this area can produce visual symptoms according to their direction while the size is small. Clinical importance of visual symptoms presented by aneurysmal optic nerve compression is stressed in this study. Retrospective analysis of ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms compressing optic apparatus were carried out. Total 33 cases were enrolled in this study. Optic nerve compression of the aneurysms was confirmed by the surgical fields. In 33 cases among 351 cases of ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysms treated surgically, from 1991 to 2000, the dome of aneurysm was compressed in optic pathway. In some cases, aneurysm impacted into the optic nerve that deep hollowness was found when the aneurysm sac was removed during operation. Among 33 cases, 10 cases presented with preoperative visual symptoms, such as visual dimness (5), unilateral visual field defect (2) or unilateral visual loss (3), 20 cases had no visual symptoms. Visual symptoms could not be checked in 3 cases due to the poor mental state. In 6 cases among 20 cases having no visual symptoms, optic nerve was deeply compressed by the dome of aneurysm which was seen in the surgical field. Of 10 patients who had visual symptoms, 8 showed improvement in visual symptoms within 6 months after clipping of aneurysms. In 2 cases, the visual symptoms did not recover. Anterior communicating artery aneurysm can cause visual symptoms by compressing the optic nerve or direct rupture to the optic nerve with focal hematoma formation. We emphasize that cerebral vascular study is highly recommended to detect intracranial aneurysm before its rupture in the case of normal CT findings with

  17. Visual Communication as an Information Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoît, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Visual literacy discussions and guidelines in LIS practice tend to be principle-driven concepts but are limited to an LIS discourse. In a casual tone, this paper reviews other expressions of what it means to be "informed" through visual means by using examples from literature, philosophy, and how end-users may think about visual…

  18. I Draw Therefore I Am: Drawing as Visual (Communication Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muliyadi Mahamood

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper sets view to consider the significance of drawings as part of visual communication design. Drawing gives a chance to observe, to muse, to select and develop continuous thinking techniques. It is to present that drawing is not just a cursory to generate ideas, but it has its own energy and philosophy which deserve studying as a domain of art. In recent years, drawing has received attention; there is on the one hand a group of drawing practitioners, and on the other hand a group of drawing researchers. Drawing in design is a medium of visual and spatial thinking. Digging into research actually is a necessity for visual communication studies. It is suggested here three kinds of research approaches: research into art/design; research through art/design; and research for art/design. Indeed, it leads to four axis topics (topoi for design studies: design practice, design product, design discourse, and design meta-discourse. A field of study called ‘visual culture’ which, departed from the study of critical theory and cultural studies which have set out relatively new field of study called ‘visual studies’. Based upon to this perspective, visual (communication studies should be more self-reflexive. The production of visual communication contributes to construct the visual culture in society.

  19. Visual Communication for Medicines: Malignant Assumptions and Benign Design?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Waarde, Karel

    2010-01-01

    An area of visual communication that might be classified as a "design failure" is the visual presentation of information about "prescription-only medicines" for patients. This information is provided on packaging, leaflets, brochures, labels and websites. The practical issue is that there are problems in convincing patients to…

  20. On the assessment of visual communication by information theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; Fales, Carl L.

    1993-01-01

    This assessment of visual communication integrates the optical design of the image-gathering device with the digital processing for image coding and restoration. Results show that informationally optimized image gathering ordinarily can be relied upon to maximize the information efficiency of decorrelated data and the visual quality of optimally restored images.

  1. The Potentials of Visual Rhetoric in Communication | Rishante ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Six fundamental goals of the visual rhetorician which include attention gaining, sustenance of interest, recognition, effective storage, recall and persuasion and their potential application in communication are considered. The ways in which visual rhetoric can be expressed within the framework of the universal laws of ...

  2. The Visual Image in Managerial Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor Ioan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasing proliferation and diversification of artificial languages have become a prerequisite for an efficient managerial discourse. The inclusion of language in a philosophy of management is justified by at least three reasons: language becomes the condition, the model and the object of scientific management. Implementing one�s management plan is consistent with the ability to send easily decipherable messages. It is a fact that one of the most important qualities of a leader is his or her ability to communicate. Career success is conditioned by facilitating the ease of communication between employees and superiors. Communication skills can lauch or ruin a career. Advances in messaging technology have a profound impact on our psychology. Communication through image, especially nowadays, is of particular importance. Included among the expressive behaviors, nonverbal communication is characterized by several aspects.

  3. Showing/Sharing: Analysing Visual Communication from a Praxeological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Schreiber

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution proposes a methodological framework for empirical research into visual practices on social media. The framework identifies practices, pictures and platforms as relevant dimensions of analysis. It is mainly developed within, and is compatible with qualitative, interpretive approaches which focus on visual communication as part of everyday personal communicative practices. Two screenshots from Instagram and Facebook are introduced as empirical examples to investigate collaborative practices of meaning-making relating to pictures on social media. While social media seems to augment reflexive, processual practices of negotiating identities, visual media, in particular, amps up aesthetic, ambivalent and embodied dimensions within these practices.

  4. Reinforcing Visual Grouping Cues to Communicate Complex Informational Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Juhee; Watson, Benjamin

    2014-12-01

    In his book Multimedia Learning [7], Richard Mayer asserts that viewers learn best from imagery that provides them with cues to help them organize new information into the correct knowledge structures. Designers have long been exploiting the Gestalt laws of visual grouping to deliver viewers those cues using visual hierarchy, often communicating structures much more complex than the simple organizations studied in psychological research. Unfortunately, designers are largely practical in their work, and have not paused to build a complex theory of structural communication. If we are to build a tool to help novices create effective and well structured visuals, we need a better understanding of how to create them. Our work takes a first step toward addressing this lack, studying how five of the many grouping cues (proximity, color similarity, common region, connectivity, and alignment) can be effectively combined to communicate structured text and imagery from real world examples. To measure the effectiveness of this structural communication, we applied a digital version of card sorting, a method widely used in anthropology and cognitive science to extract cognitive structures. We then used tree edit distance to measure the difference between perceived and communicated structures. Our most significant findings are: 1) with careful design, complex structure can be communicated clearly; 2) communicating complex structure is best done with multiple reinforcing grouping cues; 3) common region (use of containers such as boxes) is particularly effective at communicating structure; and 4) alignment is a weak structural communicator.

  5. Visual literacy and visual communication for global education : innovations in teaching e-learning in art, design and communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velders, Teun; de Vries, Sjoerd A.; Vaicaityte, Loreta

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the (student) proceedings of a successful inter-university co-operation between a research university and a university of applied sciences, in the field of Visual Literacy and Visual Communication. The origin lays in the international symposium “Digital Communities for Global

  6. Visual communication stimulates reproduction in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, A L S; Gonçalves-de-Freitas, E; Volpato, G L; Oliveira, C

    2009-04-01

    Reproductive fish behavior is affected by male-female interactions that stimulate physiological responses such as hormonal release and gonad development. During male-female interactions, visual and chemical communication can modulate fish reproduction. The aim of the present study was to test the effect of visual and chemical male-female interaction on the gonad development and reproductive behavior of the cichlid fish Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus (L.). Fifty-six pairs were studied after being maintained for 5 days under one of the four conditions (N = 14 for each condition): 1) visual contact (V); 2) chemical contact (Ch); 3) chemical and visual contact (Ch+V); 4) no sensory contact (Iso) - males and females isolated. We compared the reproductive behavior (nesting, courtship and spawning) and gonadosomatic index (GSI) of pairs of fish under all four conditions. Visual communication enhanced the frequency of courtship in males (mean +/- SEM; V: 24.79 +/- 3.30, Ch+V: 20.74 +/- 3.09, Ch: 0.1 +/- 0.07, Iso: 4.68 +/- 1.26 events/30 min; P communication did not affect the reproductive behavior of pairs nor did it enhance the effects of visual contact. Therefore, male-female visual communication is an effective cue, which stimulates reproduction among pairs of Nile tilapia.

  7. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of the blind.” News & Events Events Calendar NEI Press Releases News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios ... Frequently asked questions Clinical Studies Publications Catalog ...

  8. Developing visual images for communicating information about ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low literacy skills disempower patients in interactions with healthcare providers and preclude the use of existing written patient information materials, which are generally written at a high reading level. Visual images or pictograms used as a counselling tool or included in patient information leaflets have been shown to ...

  9. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media Relations ...

  10. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media ...

  11. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media ...

  12. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  13. The semiotics of landscape design communication: towards a critical visual research approach in landscape architecture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaphorst, K.M.C.; Duchhart, I.; Knaap, van der W.G.M.; Roeleveld, Gerda; Brink, van den A.

    2017-01-01

    In landscape architecture, visual representations are the primary means of communication between stakeholders in design processes. Despite the reliance on visual representations, little critical research has been undertaken by landscape architects on how visual communication forms work or their

  14. Conservation implications of anthropogenic impacts on visual communication and camouflage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhey, Kaspar; Peters, Anne

    2017-02-01

    Anthropogenic environmental impacts can disrupt the sensory environment of animals and affect important processes from mate choice to predator avoidance. Currently, these effects are best understood for auditory and chemosensory modalities, and recent reviews highlight their importance for conservation. We examined how anthropogenic changes to the visual environment (ambient light, transmission, and backgrounds) affect visual communication and camouflage and considered the implications of these effects for conservation. Human changes to the visual environment can increase predation risk by affecting camouflage effectiveness, lead to maladaptive patterns of mate choice, and disrupt mutualistic interactions between pollinators and plants. Implications for conservation are particularly evident for disrupted camouflage due to its tight links with survival. The conservation importance of impaired visual communication is less documented. The effects of anthropogenic changes on visual communication and camouflage may be severe when they affect critical processes such as pollination or species recognition. However, when impaired mate choice does not lead to hybridization, the conservation consequences are less clear. We suggest that the demographic effects of human impacts on visual communication and camouflage will be particularly strong when human-induced modifications to the visual environment are evolutionarily novel (i.e., very different from natural variation); affected species and populations have low levels of intraspecific (genotypic and phenotypic) variation and behavioral, sensory, or physiological plasticity; and the processes affected are directly related to survival (camouflage), species recognition, or number of offspring produced, rather than offspring quality or attractiveness. Our findings suggest that anthropogenic effects on the visual environment may be of similar importance relative to conservation as anthropogenic effects on other sensory modalities

  15. A model of visual, aesthetic communication focusing on web sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2002-01-01

    design. With a point of departure in Roman Jakobson's linguistic communication model, the reader is introduced to a model which covers the communication aspects, the visual aspects, the aesthetic aspects and the net specific aspects of the analysis of media products. The aesthetic aspects rank low......Theory books and method books within the field of web design mainly focus on the technical and functional aspects of the construction of web design. There is a lack of a model which weighs the analysis of the visual and aesthetic aspects against the the functional and technical aspects of web...

  16. Visual cues for person-centered communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kristine; Harris, Brynn; Lueger, Amy; Ward, Kathleen; Wassmer, Rebecca; Weber, Amy

    2011-11-01

    Nursing home communication is frequently limited and task-focused and fails to affirm resident personhood. We tested the feasibility and effects of automated digital displays of resident photographs to remind staff (N = 11) of resident (n = 6) personhood. Historical photographs were displayed in digital photo frames mounted in each resident's room. To evaluate the intervention's effects, staff-resident conversations were audio-recorded prior to displaying the frames and repeated 2 weeks and 3 months later. Conversations were transcribed and statements were topic coded (task-focused vs. interpersonal). Staff person-centered talk increased from 11% to 32% (z = 2.37, p = .02) after the intervention and task-talk decreased from 64% to 40%. Resident interpersonal topics increased from 20% to 37%. Staff statements increased from 29 at baseline, to 37 postintervention, and 41 at 3-month follow-up and resident engagement and reminiscence also increased. Effects were reduced after 3 months. Automated photo displays are an easily implemented, low-cost intervention to promote person-centered communication.

  17. Visual and acoustic communication in non-human animals: a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Auditory system; non-human animals; sensory modalities; visual communication. J. Biosci. | vol. 25 | No. ... munication in these two sensory modalities can serve analogous functions and evolve in response to similar selection forces, the two .... the receptor organ which transduces acoustic energy is tonotopic (Fay and ...

  18. Relevance Theory as model for analysing visual and multimodal communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Forceville, C.; Machin, D.

    2014-01-01

    Elaborating on my earlier work (Forceville 1996: chapter 5, 2005, 2009; see also Yus 2008), I will here sketch how discussions of visual and multimodal discourse can be embedded in a more general theory of communication and cognition: Sperber and Wilson’s Relevance Theory/RT (Sperber and Wilson

  19. New spokesperson for the LHCb collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Pierluigi Campana begins his 3-year tenure as LHCb spokesperson this June. As the new voice for the collaboration, Campana will lead the experiment through what should prove to be a very exciting phase.   Pierluigi Campana, from the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare in Frascati, has been with the collaboration since 2000 and was heavily involved in the construction of the muon chamber of the LHCb detector. He replaces Andrei Golutvin, from Imperial College London and Russia’s Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics. “Leading such a large collaboration is not an easy task,” says Campana. While he will rely heavily upon the work of his predecessor, he plans on leaving his own mark on the position: “One of the main goals of my job will be to enhance the spirit of collaboration between the different institutes within our experiment.” LHCb plays a key role in the search for new physics. The experiment is conducting a very precise search...

  20. Roles of Illustrators in Visual Communication of Scientific Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Okawa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific knowledge is the knowledge accumulated by systematic studies and organized by general principles. Visual, verbal, numeric, and other types of representation are used to communicate scientific knowledge. Scientific illustration is the visual representation of objects and concepts in order to record and to convey scientific knowledge(Ford, 1993. There are some discussions on scientific illustrations in history, philosophy and the sociology of science(Burri & Dumit, 2008, but little has been done on the creation of scientific illustrations by illustrators. This study focuses on the creation of scientific illustrations by illustrators. The purpose is to show how illustrators create the visual messages in communications of scientific knowledge. Through analysis of semi-structured interviews with 6 professional illustrators, creators and art directors, it is showed that illustrators select and edit scientific information, add non-scientific information, and organize information into one visual representation of scientific knowledge. The implication of this research will provide a new perspective to multisensory communication of scientific knowledge.

  1. Data Visualization and Infographics In Visual Communication Design Education at The Age of Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Inanc Uyan Dur

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and technologic developments in the last century facilitate people’s lives while also causing them to face more information. Information design has become much more important as a result of the chaos created by the unprocessed heap of data and information traffic. Therefore, people need designed information like infographics and data visualisation today. Design of information, which is among the most significant requirements of our age, has become a subject which needs to be dealt with more systematically in the education of visual communication design. Visual design of information and data is important not only for increasing perceptibility but also revealing the patterns within complex information, and being educative, persuasive and guiding depending on the content and objective. In this sense, incorporating data visualization and infographics works into the education of visual communication design would have significant contributions to train designers with sufficient qualification to meet the requirements of today’s world. This study examines the current/potential expansion of data visualization and infographics in the education of visual communication design  at the age of information. With respect to students, it deals with its effects to the design method, process and perception and its contributions to the multidisciplinary design approach.

  2. A model of visual, aesthetic communication focusing on web sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2002-01-01

    in the eyes of the media producers even though the most outstanding media products often obtained their success due to aesthetic phenomena. The formal aesthetic function and the inexpressible aesthetic function have therefore been prioritised in the model in regard to the construction and analysis of media......Theory books and method books within the field of web design mainly focus on the technical and functional aspects of the construction of web design. There is a lack of a model which weighs the analysis of the visual and aesthetic aspects against the the functional and technical aspects of web...... design. With a point of departure in Roman Jakobson's linguistic communication model, the reader is introduced to a model which covers the communication aspects, the visual aspects, the aesthetic aspects and the net specific aspects of the analysis of media products. The aesthetic aspects rank low...

  3. Information Visualization Techniques for Effective Cross-Discipline Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Ward

    2013-04-01

    Collaboration between research groups in different fields is a common occurrence, but it can often be frustrating due to the absence of a common vocabulary. This lack of a shared context can make expressing important concepts and discussing results difficult. This problem may be further exacerbated when communicating to an audience of laypeople. Without a clear frame of reference, simple concepts are often rendered difficult-to-understand at best, and unintelligible at worst. An easy way to alleviate this confusion is with the use of clear, well-designed visualizations to illustrate an idea, process or conclusion. There exist a number of well-described machine-learning and statistical techniques which can be used to illuminate the information present within complex high-dimensional datasets. Once the information has been separated from the data, clear communication becomes a matter of selecting an appropriate visualization. Ideally, the visualization is information-rich but data-scarce. Anything from a simple bar chart, to a line chart with confidence intervals, to an animated set of 3D point-clouds can be used to render a complex idea as an easily understood image. Several case studies will be presented in this work. In the first study, we will examine how a complex statistical analysis was applied to a high-dimensional dataset, and how the results were succinctly communicated to an audience of microbiologists and chemical engineers. Next, we will examine a technique used to illustrate the concept of the singular value decomposition, as used in the field of computer vision, to a lay audience of undergraduate students from mixed majors. We will then examine a case where a simple animated line plot was used to communicate an approach to signal decomposition, and will finish with a discussion of the tools available to create these visualizations.

  4. Visual-spatial cognition in children using aided communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadskleiv, Kristine; Batorowicz, Beata; Massaro, Munique; van Balkom, Hans; von Tetzchner, Stephen

    2018-03-01

    Children with severe motor impairments are restricted in their manipulation and exploration of objects, but little is known about how such limitations influence cognitive development. This study investigated visual-constructional abilities in 75 children and adolescents, aged 5;0-15;11 (years;months), with severe speech impairments and no intellectual disabilities (aided group) and in 56 children and adolescents with typical development (reference group). Verbal comprehension, non-verbal reasoning, and visual-spatial perception were assessed with standardized tests. The task of the participants was to verbally instruct communication partners to make physical constructions identical to models that the partner could not see. In the aided group, 55.7% of the constructions were identical to the models participants described, compared to 91.3% in the reference group. In the aided group, test results explained 51.4% of the variance in construction errors. The results indicate that the participants' language skills were decisive for construction success. Visual-perceptual challenges were common among the aided communicators, and their instructions included little information about size and spatial relations. This may reflect less experience with object manipulation and construction than children with typical development, and using aided communication to instruct others to make three-dimensional constructions. The results imply a need for interventions that compensate for the lack of relevant experience.

  5. 14 CFR 1221.108 - Establishment of the NASA Unified Visual Communications System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Communications System. 1221.108 Section 1221.108 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE... Communications System § 1221.108 Establishment of the NASA Unified Visual Communications System. (a) The NASA Administrator directed the establishment of a NASA Unified Visual Communications System. The system was...

  6. Muriel is approached to run as new ATLAS spokesperson

    CERN Multimedia

    Muriel

    Dear Muriel, There will be elections in 2008 for a new Spokesperson. Peter Jenni will be a hard person to follow: we need someone who will be highly visible and tough. Having watched your exploits through the ATLAS eNews, it is clear that you are the most visible person in ATLAS and it seems to me that you are just the kind of person we need to be out next Spokesperson (Spokesanimal?). Have you given this possibility any thought? Yours, Animal Lover. Muriel's reply: Dear Animal Lover, thank you very much for your support. I thought it was about time someone asked!I am certainly interested in the position. Will I get a CD plate for my car? Muriel decided to check out the scene before accepting to run for the ATLAS spokesperson position and gave it a try in the spokesperson's office. Muriel also decided to have add a productive chat with Fabiola Gianotti while raising support for her candidature.

  7. Mapping as a visual health communication tool: promises and dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Roxanne; Hopfer, Suellen; Ghetian, Christie; Lengerich, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    In the era of evidence-based public health promotion and planning, the use of maps as a form of evidence to communicate about the multiple determinants of cancer is on the rise. Geographic information systems and mapping technologies make future proliferation of this strategy likely. Yet disease maps as a communication form remain largely unexamined. This content analysis considers the presence of multivariate information, credibility cues, and the communication function of publicly accessible maps for cancer control activities. Thirty-six state comprehensive cancer control plans were publicly available in July 2005 and were reviewed for the presence of maps. Fourteen of the 36 state cancer plans (39%) contained map images (N = 59 static maps). A continuum of map inter activity was observed, with 10 states having interactive mapping tools available to query and map cancer information. Four states had both cancer plans with map images and interactive mapping tools available to the public on their Web sites. Of the 14 state cancer plans that depicted map images, two displayed multivariate data in a single map. Nine of the 10 states with interactive mapping capability offered the option to display multivariate health risk messages. The most frequent content category mapped was cancer incidence and mortality, with stage at diagnosis infrequently available. The most frequent communication function served by the maps reviewed was redundancy, as maps repeated information contained in textual forms. The social and ethical implications for communicating about cancer through the use of visual geographic representations are discussed.

  8. Electro-Optical Design for Efficient Visual Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Friedrich O.; Fales, Carl L.; Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-Ur

    1995-01-01

    Visual communication, in the form of telephotography and television, for example, can be regarded as efficient only if the amount of information that it conveys about the scene to the observer approaches the maximum possible and the associated cost approaches the minimum possible. Elsewhere we have addressed the problem of assessing the end to end performance of visual communication systems in terms of their efficiency in this sense by integrating the critical limiting factors that constrain image gathering into classical communications theory. We use this approach to assess the electro-optical design of image gathering devices as a function of the f number and apodization of the objective lens and the aperture size and sampling geometry of the phot-detection mechanism. Results show that an image gathering device that is designed to optimize information capacity performs similarly to the human eye. For both, the performance approaches the maximum possible, in terms of the efficiency with which the acquired information can be transmitted as decorrelated data, and the fidelity, sharpness, and clearity with which fine detail can be restored.

  9. Narrative Exemplars and the Celebrity Spokesperson in Lebanese Anti-Domestic Violence Public Service Announcements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khoury, Jessica R; Shafer, Autumn

    2016-08-01

    Domestic violence is a worldwide epidemic. This study examines the effects of narrative exemplars and a celebrity spokesperson in anti-domestic violence ads on Lebanese college students' attitudes and beliefs towards domestic violence and whether these effects are impacted by personal experience. The practical significance is derived from the high prevalence of domestic violence internationally, making it important to find ways to effectively use media to address this health-related issue that has huge consequences for the individual and society. This study adds to the theoretical understanding of narrative persuasion and media effects. Results indicated that narrative exemplars in anti-domestic violence ads promoting bystander awareness and intervention were more beneficial for people without relevant experience compared to people who know someone affected by domestic violence. Anti-domestic violence ads without narrative exemplars, but that also featured an emotional self-efficacy appeal targeting bystanders, were more effective for participants who know someone who had experienced domestic violence compared to participants without relevant experience. The presence of a celebrity spokesperson elicited more positive attitudes about the ad than a noncelebrity, but failed to directly affect relevant anti-domestic violence attitudes or beliefs. These results highlight the significance of formative audience research in health communication message design.

  10. Scientific visualization for enhanced interpretation and communication of geoscientific information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorauer, A. [Ontario Power Generation, Nuclear Waste Management Div., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: andre.vorauer@opg.com; Cotesta, L. [Laurentian Univ., MIRARCO Mining Innovation, Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: lcotesta@nickel.laurentian.ca

    2006-07-01

    Ontario Power Generation's Deep Geologic Repository Technology Program has undertaken applied research into the application of scientific visualization technologies to: i) improve the interpretation and synthesis of complex geoscientific field data; ii) facilitate the development of defensible conceptual site descriptive models; and iii) enhance communication between multi-disciplinary site investigation teams and other stakeholders. Two scientific visualization projects are summarized that benefited from the use of the Gocad earth modelling software and were supported by an immersive virtual reality laboratory: i) the Moderately Fractured Rock experiment at the 125,000 m{sup 3} block scale; and ii) the Sub-regional Flow System Modelling Project at the 100 km{sup 2} scale. (author)

  11. Does Visual Communication Get through to its Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tore; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    Visual communication is often directed towards an assumed homogenous target group, a marketor segment. However, this study shows that such constructs as typical, average consumer, modal or blue or red segment can be misleading. Individuals and markets represent distinct levels of analysis. The logo...... is desired because it means a thorough deep understanding, but between people variation means that the reception resembles a Babylonian confusion. We find that various visual elements are able to explain how these variations occur. When the market does not work well as a mass market, it should be addressed...... is a prime each individual to receive the next message in a positive mood. In this paper, a distinction is made between how the message is received by the single individual and how the message is received by the market that is how it is received by the “average respondent”. The distinction is made between...

  12. Visual Communication and Cognition in Everyday Decision-Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenichen, Claudine

    2017-01-01

    Understanding cognition and the context of decision-making should be prioritized in the design process in order to accurately anticipate the outcome for intended audiences. A thorough understanding of cognition has been excluded from being a part of foundational design principals in visual communication. By defining leisure, direct, urgent, and emergency scenarios and providing examples of work that deeply considers the viewer's relationship to the design solution in context of these scenarios allows us to affirm the relevancy of cognition as a design variable and the importance of projects that advocate public utility.

  13. Infants' visual and auditory communication when a partner is or is not visually attending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszkowski, Ulf; Albrecht, Konstanze; Carpenter, Malinda; Tomasello, Michael

    2008-04-01

    In the current study we investigated infants' communication in the visual and auditory modalities as a function of the recipient's visual attention. We elicited pointing at interesting events from thirty-two 12-month olds and thirty-two 18-month olds in two conditions: when the recipient either was or was not visually attending to them before and during the point. The main result was that infants initiated more pointing when the recipient's visual attention was on them than when it was not. In addition, when the recipient did not respond by sharing interest in the designated event, infants initiated more repairs (repeated pointing) than when she did, again, especially when the recipient was visually attending to them. Interestingly, accompanying vocalizations were used intentionally and increased in both experimental conditions when the recipient did not share attention and interest. However, there was little evidence that infants used their vocalizations to direct attention to their gestures when the recipient was not attending to them.

  14. Research for the design of visual fatigue based on the computer visual communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hu-Bin; Ding, Bao-min

    2013-03-01

    With the era of rapid development of computer networks. The role of network communication in the social, economic, political, become more and more important and suggested their special role. The computer network communicat ion through the modern media and byway of the visual communication effect the public of the emotional, spiritual, career and other aspects of the life. While its rapid growth also brought some problems, It is that their message across to the public, its design did not pass a relat ively perfect manifestation to express the informat ion. So this not only leads to convey the error message, but also to cause the physical and psychological fatigue for the audiences. It is said that the visual fatigue. In order to reduce the fatigue when people obtain the useful information in using computer. Let the audience in a short time to obtain the most useful informat ion, this article gave a detailed account of its causes, and propose effective solutions and, through the specific examples to explain it, also in the future computer design visual communicat ion applications development prospect.

  15. Fabiola Gianotti, the newly elected Spokesperson of ATLAS

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On 11 July Fabiola Gianotti was elected by the ATLAS Collaboration as its future Spokesperson. Her term of office will start on 1 March 2009 and will last for two years. She will take over from Peter Jenni who has been ATLAS Spokesperson since its formalization in 1992. Three distinguished physicists stood as candidates for this election: Fabiola Gianotti (CERN), Marzio Nessi (CERN), and Leonardo Rossi (INFN Genova, Italy). The nomination process started on 30 October 2007, with a general email sent to the ATLAS collaboration calling for nominations, and closed on 25 January 2008. Any ATLAS physicist could nominate a candidate, and 24 nominees were proposed before the ATLAS search committee narrowed them to the final three. After the voting process, which concluded the ATLAS general meeting in Bern, the Collaboration Board greeted the result with warm applause.

  16. Spokespersons in media campaigns of non-profit organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović Dragana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this research is how spokespersons can be used in campaigns of non-profit organizations, with a goal to increase their visibility and gain public support. Namely, many companies employ celebrities for their media campaigns as protagonists and promoters of brand values. With their appearance and engagement, celebrities transfer part of their image and credibility to the brand, which widens and enriches the field of associations which brands trigger in consumers' conscience. Non-profit organizations could get similar benefits out of these campaigns. In a society where there is a certain level of fascination with celebrities, i.e. celebrity culture, their influence can be used not only to attract attention to the goods, but also to ideas. The goal of the paper is to show how spokespersons can influence behavior and attitudes of the public by participating in media campaigns, and also the important aspects of choosing a spokesperson. The paper is supposed to be a starting point for practitioners,so they can design creative ideas based on this technique on the non-profit organizations market, especially in Serbia.

  17. Does Visual Communication Get through to its Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tore; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2014-01-01

    Visual communication is often directed towards an assumed homogenous target group, a marketor segment. However, this study shows that such constructs as typical, average consumer, modal or blue or red segment can be misleading. Individuals and markets represent distinct levels of analysis. The logo...... is a prime each individual to receive the next message in a positive mood. In this paper, a distinction is made between how the message is received by the single individual and how the message is received by the market that is how it is received by the “average respondent”. The distinction is made between...... individual vs. market variation. A variation seen by the individual means that the message is received with its complexity and meaningfulness, while a big market variation means people understand different things and a Babylonian confusion is the outcome. Also differences between cultures are investigated...

  18. Does Visual Communication Get Through to Its Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tore; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    Visual communication is often directed towards an assumed homogenous target group, a market- or segment. However, this study shows that such constructs as typical, average consumer, modal or blue or red segment can be misleading. Individuals and markets represent distinct levels of analysis....... The logo is a prime each individual to receive the next message in a positive mood. In this paper, a distinction is made between how the message is received by the single individual and how the message is received by the market that is how it is received by the "average respondent". The distinction is made...... between individual vs. market variation. A variation seen by the individual means that the message is received with its complexity and meaningfulness, while a big market variation means people understand different things and a Babylonian confusion is the outcome. Also differences between cultures...

  19. 27 May 2010 - UCLA Chancellor G. Block signing the guest book with Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre at building 354 with Collaboration Former Deputy Spokesperson B. Cousins and Deputy Spokesperson J. Incandela.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    27 May 2010 - UCLA Chancellor G. Block signing the guest book with Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre at building 354 with Collaboration Former Deputy Spokesperson B. Cousins and Deputy Spokesperson J. Incandela.

  20. Using Modality Replacement to Facilitate Communication between Visually and Hearing-Impaired People

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moustakas, K.; Tzovaras, D.; Dybkjaer, L.

    2011-01-01

    Using sign language, speech, and haptics as communication modalities, a virtual treasure-hunting game serves as an entertainment and educational tool for visually-and hearing-impaired users.......Using sign language, speech, and haptics as communication modalities, a virtual treasure-hunting game serves as an entertainment and educational tool for visually-and hearing-impaired users....

  1. Improving Empathy and Communication Skills of Visually Impaired Early Adolescents through a Psycho-Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Mehmet Ali; Duy, Baki

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of an interpersonal communication skills psycho-education program to improve empathy and communication skills of visually impaired adolescents. Participants of the study were sixteen early adolescents schooling in an elementary school for visually impaired youth in Diyarbakir. The…

  2. The Effect of Physical Attractiveness and Spokesperson Sex on Perceived Source and Organization Credibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Donna L.; And Others

    To explore the dimensions of credibility and physical attractiveness in a public relations setting, the impact of public relations (PR) spokesperson physical attractiveness--as operationalized as photographs of the spokesperson attached to a press release--on perceptions of both the writer's and the organization's credibility was examined.…

  3. Effects of apologies and crisis responsibility on corporate and spokesperson reputation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, Joost W.M.; van Hoof, Joris Jasper; ter Keurs, Han; van Vuuren, Hubrecht A.

    2012-01-01

    This study is aimed at the effects of making apologies in a crisis situation and attributed crisis responsibility on corporate- and spokesperson reputation. In a 2 × 2 scenario experiment (spokesperson making apologies versus no apologies; and accidental versus preventable crisis), 84 respondents

  4. [Change settings for visual analyzer of child users of mobile communication: longitudinal study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorseva, N I; Grigor'ev, Iu G; Gorbunova, N V

    2014-01-01

    The paper represents theresults of longitudinal monitoring of the changes in the parameters of simple visual-motor reaction, the visual acuity and the rate of the visual discrimination in the child users of mobile communication, which indicate the multivariability of the possible effects of radiation from mobile phones on the auditory system of children.

  5. Dog Breed Differences in Visual Communication with Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Akitsugu; Romero, Teresa; Inoue-Murayama, Miho; Saito, Atsuko; Hasegawa, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Domestic dogs (Canis familiaris) have developed a close relationship with humans through the process of domestication. In human-dog interactions, eye contact is a key element of relationship initiation and maintenance. Previous studies have suggested that canine ability to produce human-directed communicative signals is influenced by domestication history, from wolves to dogs, as well as by recent breed selection for particular working purposes. To test the genetic basis for such abilities in purebred dogs, we examined gazing behavior towards humans using two types of behavioral experiments: the 'visual contact task' and the 'unsolvable task'. A total of 125 dogs participated in the study. Based on the genetic relatedness among breeds subjects were classified into five breed groups: Ancient, Herding, Hunting, Retriever-Mastiff and Working). We found that it took longer time for Ancient breeds to make an eye-contact with humans, and that they gazed at humans for shorter periods of time than any other breed group in the unsolvable situation. Our findings suggest that spontaneous gaze behavior towards humans is associated with genetic similarity to wolves rather than with recent selective pressure to create particular working breeds.

  6. The Perception of Cooperativeness Without Any Visual or Auditory Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dong-Seon; Burger, Franziska; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; de la Rosa, Stephan

    2015-12-01

    Perceiving social information such as the cooperativeness of another person is an important part of human interaction. But can people perceive the cooperativeness of others even without any visual or auditory information? In a novel experimental setup, we connected two people with a rope and made them accomplish a point-collecting task together while they could not see or hear each other. We observed a consistently emerging turn-taking behavior in the interactions and installed a confederate in a subsequent experiment who either minimized or maximized this behavior. Participants experienced this only through the haptic force-feedback of the rope and made evaluations about the confederate after each interaction. We found that perception of cooperativeness was significantly affected only by the manipulation of this turn-taking behavior. Gender- and size-related judgments also significantly differed. Our results suggest that people can perceive social information such as the cooperativeness of other people even in situations where possibilities for communication are minimal.

  7. Visual Communications for Heterogeneous Networks/Visually Optimized Scalable Image Compression. Final Report for September 1, 1995 - February 28, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemami, S. S.

    2003-06-03

    The authors developed image and video compression algorithms that provide scalability, reconstructibility, and network adaptivity, and developed compression and quantization strategies that are visually optimal at all bit rates. The goal of this research is to enable reliable ''universal access'' to visual communications over the National Information Infrastructure (NII). All users, regardless of their individual network connection bandwidths, qualities-of-service, or terminal capabilities, should have the ability to access still images, video clips, and multimedia information services, and to use interactive visual communications services. To do so requires special capabilities for image and video compression algorithms: scalability, reconstructibility, and network adaptivity. Scalability allows an information service to provide visual information at many rates, without requiring additional compression or storage after the stream has been compressed the first time. Reconstructibility allows reliable visual communications over an imperfect network. Network adaptivity permits real-time modification of compression parameters to adjust to changing network conditions. Furthermore, to optimize the efficiency of the compression algorithms, they should be visually optimal, where each bit expended reduces the visual distortion. Visual optimality is achieved through first extensive experimentation to quantify human sensitivity to supra-threshold compression artifacts and then incorporation of these experimental results into quantization strategies and compression algorithms.

  8. Visualizing risks in cancer communication: A systematic review of computer-supported visual aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stellamanns, Jan; Ruetters, Dana; Dahal, Keshav; Schillmoeller, Zita; Huebner, Jutta

    2017-08-01

    Health websites are becoming important sources for cancer information. Lay users, patients and carers seek support for critical decisions, but they are prone to common biases when quantitative information is presented. Graphical representations of risk data can facilitate comprehension, and interactive visualizations are popular. This review summarizes the evidence on computer-supported graphs that present risk data and their effects on various measures. The systematic literature search was conducted in several databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL. Only studies with a controlled design were included. Relevant publications were carefully selected and critically appraised by two reviewers. Thirteen studies were included. Ten studies evaluated static graphs and three dynamic formats. Most decision scenarios were hypothetical. Static graphs could improve accuracy, comprehension, and behavioural intention. But the results were heterogeneous and inconsistent among the studies. Dynamic formats were not superior or even impaired performance compared to static formats. Static graphs show promising but inconsistent results, while research on dynamic visualizations is scarce and must be interpreted cautiously due to methodical limitations. Well-designed and context-specific static graphs can support web-based cancer risk communication in particular populations. The application of dynamic formats cannot be recommended and needs further research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. 8 June 2010 - South Dakota Governor M. Rounds signing the guest book with External Relations Office Adviser R. Voss, visiting the LHC superconducting Magnet test hall with Technology Department L. Bottura, in the CERN Control Centre with Beams Department Head P. Collier, ATLAS visitor Centre with Deputy Collaboration Spokesperson A. Lankford and visiting CMS Control Centre with Deputy Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela. LHC Communications and FNAL member K. Yurkewicz accompanies throughout (see complete delegation list below).

    CERN Multimedia

    Teams (M. Brice/J.C. Gadmer)

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1006100 24: from left to right: Permanent Mission Representative A. Shybut; External Relations Office Adviser R. Voss; LHC Communications and FNAL K. Yurkewicz, Washington CSG Director for internationl programmes S. Sutcliffe-Stephenson; Technology Department Representative L. Bottura; South Dakota State Patrol D. Svendsen; CSG Executive Director and Former State Senator from Kansas D. Atkins;Office of the First Lady L. Svendsen; Office of the Governor K. Mueller; First Lady J. Rounds; South Dakota Governor M. Rounds; Washington State Senator T. Eide;Judge M. Eide; Assemblyman J. Oceguera and G. Oceguera (with son Jackson Oceguera, 5 months).

  10. Using a Teaching Intervention and Calibrated Peer Review™ Diagnostics to Improve Visual Communication Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saterbak, Ann; Moturu, Anoosha; Volz, Tracy

    2018-03-01

    Rice University's bioengineering department incorporates written, oral, and visual communication instruction into its undergraduate curriculum to aid student learning and to prepare students to communicate their knowledge and discoveries precisely and persuasively. In a tissue culture lab course, we used a self- and peer-review tool called Calibrated Peer Review™ (CPR) to diagnose student learning gaps in visual communication skills on a poster assignment. We then designed an active learning intervention that required students to practice the visual communication skills that needed improvement and used CPR to measure the changes. After the intervention, we observed that students performed significantly better in their ability to develop high quality graphs and tables that represent experimental data. Based on these outcomes, we conclude that guided task practice, collaborative learning, and calibrated peer review can be used to improve engineering students' visual communication skills.

  11. Beyond Words: An Enquiry into Children's Home Visual Communication Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada-Rice, Dylan

    2010-01-01

    This research focuses on young children's experiences of the visual mode embedded in new multimodal literacy practices. An enquiry was undertaken into the role of visual and digital images in a group of 11 four-year-olds' out-of-school lives. The children photographed their use of a range of primarily visual-based media at home, to produce a book…

  12. Federico Antinori elected as the new ALICE Spokesperson

    CERN Document Server

    Iva Raynova

    2016-01-01

    On 8 April 2016 the ALICE Collaboration Board elected Federico Antinori from INFN Padova (Italy) as the new ALICE Spokesperson.   During his three-year mandate, starting in January 2017, he will lead a collaboration of more than 1500 people from 154 physics institutes across the globe. Antinori has been a member of the collaboration ever since it was created and he has already held many senior leadership positions. Currently he is the experiment’s Physics Coordinator and as such he has the responsibility to overview the whole sector of physics analysis. During his mandate ALICE has produced many of its most prominent results. Before that he was the Coordinator of the Heavy Ion First Physics Task Force, charged with the analysis of the first Pb-Pb data samples. In 2007 and 2008 Federico served as ALICE Deputy Spokesperson. He was also the first ALICE Trigger Coordinator, having a central role in defining the experiment’s trigger menus from the first run in 2009 until the end of...

  13. Visualization and Interaction in Research, Teaching, and Scientific Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Modern computing provides many tools for exploring observations, numerical calculations, and theoretical relationships. The number of options is, in fact, almost overwhelming. But the choices provide those with modest programming skills opportunities to create unique views of scientific information and to develop deeper insights into their data, their computations, and the underlying theoretical data-model relationships. I present simple examples of using animation and human-computer interaction to explore scientific data and scientific-analysis approaches. I illustrate how valuable a little programming ability can free scientists from the constraints of existing tools and can facilitate the development of deeper appreciation data and models. I present examples from a suite of programming languages ranging from C to JavaScript including the Wolfram Language. JavaScript is valuable for sharing tools and insight (hopefully) with others because it is integrated into one of the most powerful communication tools in human history, the web browser. Although too much of that power is often spent on distracting advertisements, the underlying computation and graphics engines are efficient, flexible, and almost universally available in desktop and mobile computing platforms. Many are working to fulfill the browser's potential to become the most effective tool for interactive study. Open-source frameworks for visualizing everything from algorithms to data are available, but advance rapidly. One strategy for dealing with swiftly changing tools is to adopt common, open data formats that are easily adapted (often by framework or tool developers). I illustrate the use of animation and interaction in research and teaching with examples from earthquake seismology.

  14. 75 FR 49527 - Caps Visual Communications, LLC; Black Dot Group; Formerly Known as Caps Group Acquisition, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-13

    ... Employment and Training Administration Caps Visual Communications, LLC; Black Dot Group; Formerly Known as... Adjustment Assistance on June 24, 2010, applicable to workers of Caps Visual Communications, LLC, Black Dot..., Caps Visual Communications, LLC, Black Dot Group, formerly known as Caps Group Acquisition, LLC...

  15. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Search the NEI Website search NEI on Social Media | Search A-Z | en español | Text size S M ... Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin. ...

  16. Implications of a Gestalt Approach to Research in Visual Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Ann

    Gestalt theory deals with the act of thinking and the construction of concepts in a situated manner, and, therefore, could be used to study how meaning is extracted from a visual display. Using the Gestalt framework of form cues and their usage patterns in the perception of, and learning from, visual media, researchers could study frame, line…

  17. Social preconditions of forming visuality as a key element of communication in information society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Schuster

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to social transformations of the second half of 20-th century, which have led to increasing significance of the visual channel of communication for the culture of the information society. We analyze the transition to the era of visual self-presentation, where the demonstration of the social status of the individual becomes the main goal of communication, instead of disclosing of the contents.

  18. Frequency spectrum might act as communication code between retina and visual cortex I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xu; Gong, Bo; Lu, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    To explore changes and possible communication relationship of local potential signals recorded simultaneously from retina and visual cortex I (V1). Fourteen C57BL/6J mice were measured with pattern electroretinogram (PERG) and pattern visually evoked potential (PVEP) and fast Fourier transform has been used to analyze the frequency components of those signals. The amplitude of PERG and PVEP was measured at about 36.7 µV and 112.5 µV respectively and the dominant frequency of PERG and PVEP, however, stay unchanged and both signals do not have second, or otherwise, harmonic generation. The results suggested that retina encodes visual information in the way of frequency spectrum and then transfers it to primary visual cortex. The primary visual cortex accepts and deciphers the input visual information coded from retina. Frequency spectrum may act as communication code between retina and V1.

  19. Genesis, visual attributes and contemporary communication features of the alphabet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Cvitić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Throughout 5,000 years of human literacy, the alphabet system has developed from pictograms and ideograms to the contemporary system of Latin letters. The simplification of primary pictograms and their transformation to ideograms followed the major goal of written communication – to transmit thoughts and ideas. Besides, written communication has enabled preservation of knowledge, and that has generated the expansion of information and its availability today. The high speed of gathering written information, as well as its superabundance, calls for rethinking of semiotic features of Latin letters as the basic units of written communication in the Western world, especially in terms of marketing communication and its effectiveness. The written expression is the major tool of branding and getting closer to target market segments. Social development influences the development of communication, which is visible through numerous brands and signs, i.e. symbols that make products and companies recognizable in the market. The distinct sign forms of the alphabet are used to suggest the story of a brand, product or service. A constituent element of its comprehension is conscious or unconscious knowledge drawn from different sources in the environment. The history of human literacy, the development of each particular letter, the communication rules of the contemporary marketplace, the impact of brands and information superabundance make up the basis for further research into communication features of the alphabet, semantics of written forms and their redefinition in the context of effective marketing communication.

  20. Visual Working Memory in Deaf Children with Diverse Communication Modes: Improvement by Differential Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Crespo, Ginesa; Daza, Maria Teresa; Mendez-Lopez, Magdalena

    2012-01-01

    Although visual functions have been proposed to be enhanced in deaf individuals, empirical studies have not yet established clear evidence on this issue. The present study aimed to determine whether deaf children with diverse communication modes had superior visual memory and whether their performance was improved by the use of differential…

  1. Biometric Research in Perception and Neurology Related to the Study of Visual Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallinos, Nikos

    Contemporary research findings in the fields of perceptual psychology and neurology of the human brain that are directly related to the study of visual communication are reviewed and briefly discussed in this paper. Specifically, the paper identifies those major research findings in visual perception that are relevant to the study of visual…

  2. Knowledge Communication Through Visualizations in Project Management Documents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampf, Constance

    in Internet based communication.  To examine online trust from a knowledge communication perspective, this paper looks at the I35W bridge reconstruction project in Minneapolis through web-based communication by the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT) about the project. The MnDOT bridge...... reconstruction website will be examined using a combination of 1). Nonaka et al's notion of knowledge assets, 2). Weick's notion of sensemaking, and 3). Kress and Van Leeuwan's notions of multimodal discourse.  These concepts are combined to examine the project website as a site for knowledge communication...... between MnDOT and the Twin Cities community about the bridge reconstruction project.  Results lead to an understanding of the knowledge communication processes operationg via the project website as a form of share experience....

  3. Disaster Managers’ Perception of Effective Visual Risk Communication for General Public

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Charriere, M.K.M.; Bogaard, T.A.; Mostert, E.

    2012-01-01

    Risk communication is one of the measures that should be implemented to increase the awareness and preparedness of the general public in order to attain disaster risk reduction. Among the various forms that can be used in communication campaigns, visualizations are appropriate to disseminate

  4. Are Language and Social Communication Intact in Children with Congenital Visual Impairment at School Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadic, Valerie; Pring, Linda; Dale, Naomi

    2010-01-01

    Background: Development of children with congenital visual impairment (VI) has been associated with vulnerable socio-communicative outcomes often bearing striking similarities to those of sighted children with autism. To date, very little is known about language and social communication in children with VI of normal intelligence. Methods: We…

  5. Image-Enabled Discourse: Investigating the Creation of Visual Information as Communicative Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    Anyone who has clarified a thought or prompted a response during a conversation by drawing a picture has exploited the potential of image making as an interactive tool for conveying information. Images are increasingly ubiquitous in daily communication, in large part due to advances in visually enabled information and communication technologies…

  6. Color-Space-Based Visual-MIMO for V2X Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jai-Eun; Kim, Ji-Won; Park, Youngil; Kim, Ki-Doo

    2016-04-23

    In this paper, we analyze the applicability of color-space-based, color-independent visual-MIMO for V2X. We aim to achieve a visual-MIMO scheme that can maintain the original color and brightness while performing seamless communication. We consider two scenarios of GCM based visual-MIMO for V2X. One is a multipath transmission using visual-MIMO networking and the other is multi-node V2X communication. In the scenario of multipath transmission, we analyze the channel capacity numerically and we illustrate the significance of networking information such as distance, reference color (symbol), and multiplexing-diversity mode transitions. In addition, in the V2X scenario of multiple access, we may achieve the simultaneous multiple access communication without node interferences by dividing the communication area using image processing. Finally, through numerical simulation, we show the superior SER performance of the visual-MIMO scheme compared with LED-PD communication and show the numerical result of the GCM based visual-MIMO channel capacity versus distance.

  7. Gallbladder visualization with technetium-99m glucoheptonate: concise communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyler, J.L.; Powers, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    Marked gallbladder concentration of glucoheptonate during renal function studies in dogs prompted a prospective study in order to assess the frequency of similar findings in human subjects. Of a total of 62 patients studied, the gallbladder was visualized clearly in 17 of the 18 patients (94%) who had documented normal hepatobiliary and renal function, and who were examined in a fasted state. In 38 nonfasting patients, only eight (22%) had gallbladder visualization. These findings may prove important in the interpretation of glucoheptonate renal studies in order to avoid confusion caused by a glucoheptonate-filled gallbladder lying close to the right kidney

  8. Developing a Schedule to Identify Social Communication Difficulties and Autism Spectrum Disorder in Young Children with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Absoud, Michael; Parr, Jeremy R.; Salt, Alison; Dale, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    Available observational tools used in the identification of social communication difficulties and diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) rely partly on visual behaviours and therefore may not be valid in children with visual impairment. A pilot observational instrument, the Visual Impairment and Social Communication Schedule (VISS), was…

  9. Visual Presentation and Communication of Croatian Academic Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selthofer, Josipa

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of the research is to analyse and compare visual identity elements of Croatian academic Websites with ones of European countries using Hofstede's model of cultural dimensions. The purpose of the research is to point to the influence a culture has on the design of Websites. Method: Graphical elements of university home pages…

  10. Visual Communication in PowerPoint Presentations in Applied Linguistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmalvand, Ayad

    2014-01-01

    PowerPoint knowledge presentation as a digital genre has established itself as the main software by which the findings of theses are disseminated in the academic settings. Although the importance of PowerPoint presentations is typically realized in academic settings like lectures, conferences, and seminars, the study of the visual features of…

  11. Visual-spatial cognition in children using aided communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stadskleiv, K.; Batorowicz, B.; Massaro, M.; Balkom, L.J.M. van; Tetzchner, S. von

    2018-01-01

    Children with severe motor impairments are restricted in their manipulation and exploration of objects, but little is known about how such limitations influence cognitive development. This study investigated visual-constructional abilities in 75 children and adolescents, aged 5;0-15;11

  12. Non-Verbal Communication in Children with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallineni, Sharmila; Nutheti, Rishita; Thangadurai, Shanimole; Thangadurai, Puspha

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine: (a) whether children with visual and additional impairments show any non-verbal behaviors, and if so what were the common behaviors; (b) whether two rehabilitation professionals interpreted the non-verbal behaviors similarly; and (c) whether a speech pathologist and a rehabilitation professional interpreted…

  13. Methods & Strategies: Unlocking the Power of Visual Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Julianne; McTigue, Erin

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the usage of Interactive read-alouds to help students decode science diagrams and other visual information. Three short vignettes are featured from a second-grade teacher, illustrating the research-based recommendations for introducing students to the graphics of science within an authentic classroom activity--the…

  14. Hidden Stories: Uncovering the Visual Metaphor for Education and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hube, Amy M.; Tremblay, Kenneth R., Jr.; Leigh, Katharine E.

    2015-01-01

    Design solutions have become increasingly complex and based on a rapidly growing body of knowledge. In order to articulate a design solution to a client, the graphic use of the design narrative can effectively communicate complex ideas. Two case study interventions were conducted in an interior design program in which students were introduced to…

  15. Smoke management photographic guide: a visual aid for communicating impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshua C. Hyde; Jarod Blades; Troy Hall; Roger D. Ottmar; Alistair. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Communicating emissions impacts to the public can sometimes be difficult because quantitatively conveying smoke concentrations is complicated. Regulators and land managers often refer to particulate-matter concentrations in micrograms per cubic meter, but this may not be intuitive or meaningful to everyone. The primary purpose of this guide is to serve as a tool for...

  16. Communicating Climate Change through ICT-Based Visualization: Towards an Analytical Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn-Ola Linnér

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The difficulties in communicating climate change science to the general public are often highlighted as one of the hurdles for support of enhanced climate action. The advances of interactive visualization using information and communication technology (ICT are claimed to be a game-changer in our ability to communicate complex issues. However, new analytical frameworks are warranted to analyse the role of such technologies. This paper develops a novel framework for analyzing the content, form, context and relevance of ICT-based visualization of climate change, based on insights from literature on climate change communication. Thereafter, we exemplify the analytical framework by applying it to a pilot case of ICT-based climate visualization in a GeoDome. Possibilities to use affordable advanced ICT-based visualization devices in science and policy communication are rapidly expanding. We thus see wider implications and applications of the analytical framework not only for other ICT environments but also other issue areas in sustainability communication.

  17. Tailoring the visual communication of climate projections for local adaptation practitioners in Germany and the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Susanne; Dessai, Suraje; Forster, Piers M; Paavola, Jouni

    2015-11-28

    Visualizations are widely used in the communication of climate projections. However, their effectiveness has rarely been assessed among their target audience. Given recent calls to increase the usability of climate information through the tailoring of climate projections, it is imperative to assess the effectiveness of different visualizations. This paper explores the complexities of tailoring through an online survey conducted with 162 local adaptation practitioners in Germany and the UK. The survey examined respondents' assessed and perceived comprehension (PC) of visual representations of climate projections as well as preferences for using different visualizations in communicating and planning for a changing climate. Comprehension and use are tested using four different graph formats, which are split into two pairs. Within each pair the information content is the same but is visualized differently. We show that even within a fairly homogeneous user group, such as local adaptation practitioners, there are clear differences in respondents' comprehension of and preference for visualizations. We do not find a consistent association between assessed comprehension and PC or use within the two pairs of visualizations that we analysed. There is, however, a clear link between PC and use of graph format. This suggests that respondents use what they think they understand the best, rather than what they actually understand the best. These findings highlight that audience-specific targeted communication may be more complex and challenging than previously recognized. © 2015 The Authors.

  18. Digital visual communications using a Perceptual Components Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Andrew B.

    1991-01-01

    The next era of space exploration will generate extraordinary volumes of image data, and management of this image data is beyond current technical capabilities. We propose a strategy for coding visual information that exploits the known properties of early human vision. This Perceptual Components Architecture codes images and image sequences in terms of discrete samples from limited bands of color, spatial frequency, orientation, and temporal frequency. This spatiotemporal pyramid offers efficiency (low bit rate), variable resolution, device independence, error-tolerance, and extensibility.

  19. Visual communication interface for severe physically disabled patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savino, M J; Fernandez, E A

    2007-01-01

    During the last years several interfaces have been developed to allow communication to those patients suffering serious physical disabilities. In this work, a computer based communication interface is presented. It was designed to allow communication to those patients that cannot use neither their hands nor their voice but they can do it through their eyes. The system monitors the eyes movements by means of a webcam. Then, by means of an Artificial Neural Network, the system allows the identification of specified position on the screen through the identification of the eyes positions. This way the user can control a virtual keyboard on a screen that allows him to write and browse the system and enables him to send e-mails, SMS, activate video/music programs and control environmental devices. A patient was simulated to evaluate the versatility of the system. Its operation was satisfactory and it allowed the evaluation of the system potential. The development of this system requires low cost elements that are easily found in the market

  20. Qualitative Research Methods in Visual Communication. Case Study: Visual Networks in the Promotional Videos of the European Year of Volunteering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Cmeciu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available European Years are a means of promoting European issues at a macro and micro-level. The objective of this paper is to provide the visual differences in the framing of the issue of volunteering at a European and national level. The approach focuses on a blending of two qualitative research methods in visual communication: ATLAS.ti (computer assisted/ aided qualitative data analysis software and social semiotics. The results of our analysis highlight two network views on volunteering promoted through videos, a salience of transactional processes in the implementation of volunteering at a European and national level, and a classification of various types of social practices specific to Romania. This study provides an insight into the way in which two different qualitative methods may be combined in order to provide a visual representation and interpretation to a European issue.

  1. Photophobia as the visual manifestation of chiasmal compression by unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagihara, Naoshi; Abe, Toshi; Yoshioka, Fumitaka; Watanabe, Mitsuo; Tabuchi, Kazuo

    2009-04-01

    A 37-year-old woman presented with photophobia without visual loss associated with chiasmal compression by an unruptured anterior communicating artery (AcomA) aneurysm. She had suffered progressive photophobia for one year. Neuroimaging indicated an AcomA aneurysm attached to the chiasm. Photophobia was resolved following clipping of the aneurysm. AcomA aneurysm should be considered in patients who experience photophobia without visual loss.

  2. An interactive wireless communication system for visually impaired people using city bus transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsiao-Lan; Chen, Ya-Ping; Rau, Chi-Lun; Yu, Chung-Huang

    2014-04-25

    Visually impaired people have difficulty accessing information about public transportation systems. Several systems have been developed for assisting visually impaired and blind people to use the city bus. Most systems provide only one-way communication and require high-cost and complex equipment. The purpose of this study is to reduce the difficulties faced by visually impaired people when taking city buses, using an interactive wireless communication system. The system comprised a user module and a bus module to establish a direct one-to-one connection. When the user inputs 4-digit numbers, the user module immediately sends out the information. If the bus module receives the matched bus number, it buzzes and the warning LED flashes to notify the bus driver that someone is waiting to board on the bus. User tests were conducted by two visually impaired people in a simulated vehicle and a city bus. The success rate of interactive wireless communication, recognizing the arrival of the bus and boarding the correct bus reached 100% in all of the tests. The interactive wireless communication aid system is a valid and low-cost device for assisting visually impaired people to use city buses.

  3. A guide to the visual analysis and communication of biomolecular structural data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Graham T; Hertig, Samuel

    2014-10-01

    Biologists regularly face an increasingly difficult task - to effectively communicate bigger and more complex structural data using an ever-expanding suite of visualization tools. Whether presenting results to peers or educating an outreach audience, a scientist can achieve maximal impact with minimal production time by systematically identifying an audience's needs, planning solutions from a variety of visual communication techniques and then applying the most appropriate software tools. A guide to available resources that range from software tools to professional illustrators can help researchers to generate better figures and presentations tailored to any audience's needs, and enable artistically inclined scientists to create captivating outreach imagery.

  4. Using Visual Metaphors in Health Messages: A Strategy to Increase Effectiveness for Mental Illness Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazard, Allison J; Bamgbade, Benita A; Sontag, Jennah M; Brown, Carolyn

    2016-12-01

    Depression is highly prevalent among college students. Although treatment is often available on university campuses, many stigma-based barriers prevent students from seeking help. Communication strategies, such as the use of metaphors, are needed to reduce barriers. Specially, the use of visual metaphors, as a strategic message design tactic, may be an effective communication strategy to increase message appeal and engagement. Using a 2-phase approach, this study first identified common metaphors students use to conceptualize mental illness. Messages incorporating conceptual and visual metaphors were then designed and tested to determine their potential in reducing stigma. Participants (n = 256) were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 conditions in a between-subjects experiment: messages with visual and textual metaphors, messages with straightforward visuals and textual metaphors, text-based metaphor messages, or a control group. Overall, metaphorical messages are appealing, the use of visual metaphors leads to greater message engagement, and messages based on conceptual metaphors have the potential to reduce stigma. The use of conceptual and visual metaphors in campaign design is an effective strategy to communicate about a complex health topic, such as mental illness, and should be considered for use in campaigns to reduce barriers for help-seeking behavior.

  5. Joint evaluation of communication quality and user experience in an audio-visual virtual reality meeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders Kalsgaard; Hoffmann, Pablo F.; Carrozzino, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    The state-of-the-art speech intelligibility tests are created with the purpose of evaluating acoustic communication devices and not for evaluating audio-visual virtual reality systems. This paper present a novel method to evaluate a communication situation based on both the speech intelligibility...... and the indexical characteristics of the speaker. The results will be available in the final paper. Index Terms: speech intelligibility , virtual reality, body language, telecommunication....

  6. Religion, Belief and Medial Layering of Communication. Perspectives from Studies in Visual Culture and Artistic Productions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Schade

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the relationship between religious practices, belief and the media based on the medial layering of communication. The arguments are situated within the fields of studies in visual culture and cultural studies, reflecting on the role of art as a specific medium in the Western religious tradition. Vera Frenkel’s video This Is Your Messiah Speaking (1990 is reviewed as a critical inquiry into religious practices and the media structures of communication.

  7. CPP-TRS(C): On using visual cognitive symbols to enhance communication effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonfoni, Graziella

    1994-01-01

    Communicative Positioning Program/Text Representation Systems (CPP-TRS) is a visual language based on a system of 12 canvasses, 10 signals and 14 symbols. CPP-TRS is based on the fact that every communication action is the result of a set of cognitive processes and the whole system is based on the concept that you can enhance communication by visually perceiving text. With a simple syntax, CPP-TRS is capable of representing meaning and intention as well as communication functions visually. Those are precisely invisible aspects of natural language that are most relevant to getting the global meaning of a text. CPP-TRS reinforces natural language in human machine interaction systems. It complements natural language by adding certain important elements that are not represented by natural language by itself. These include communication intention and function of the text expressed by the sender, as well as the role the reader is supposed to play. The communication intention and function of a text and the reader's role are invisible in natural language because neither specific words nor punctuation conveys them sufficiently and unambiguously; they are therefore non-transparent.

  8. Pilot-based parametric channel estimation algorithm for DCO-OFDM-based visual light communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Xuewen; Deng, Honggui; He, Hailang

    2017-10-01

    Due to wide modulation bandwidth in optical communication, multipath channels may be non-sparse and deteriorate communication performance heavily. Traditional compressive sensing-based channel estimation algorithm cannot be employed in this kind of situation. In this paper, we propose a practical parametric channel estimation algorithm for orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM)-based visual light communication (VLC) systems based on modified zero correlation code (ZCC) pair that has the impulse-like correlation property. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm achieves better performances than existing least squares (LS)-based algorithm in both bit error ratio (BER) and frequency response estimation.

  9. Applying technology to visually support language and communication in individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Howard C; Laubscher, Emily H; Schlosser, Ralf W; Flynn, Suzanne; Sorce, James F; Abramson, Jennifer

    2012-06-01

    The burgeoning role of technology in society has provided opportunities for the development of new means of communication for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). This paper offers an organizational framework for describing traditional and emerging augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technology, and highlights how tools within this framework can support a visual approach to everyday communication and improve language instruction. The growing adoption of handheld media devices along with applications acquired via a consumer-oriented delivery model suggests a potential paradigm shift in AAC for people with ASD.

  10. Visual Data Comm: A Tool for Visualizing Data Communication in the Multi Sector Planner Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwasoo Eric

    2010-01-01

    Data comm is a new technology proposed in future air transport system as a potential tool to provide comprehensive data connectivity. It is a key enabler to manage 4D trajectory digitally, potentially resulting in improved flight times and increased throughput. Future concepts with data comm integration have been tested in a number of human-in-the-loop studies but analyzing the results has proven to be particularly challenging because future traffic environment in which data comm is fully enabled has assumed high traffic density, resulting in data set with large amount of information. This paper describes the motivation, design, current and potential future application of Visual Data Comm (VDC), a tool for visualizing data developed in Java using Processing library which is a tool package designed for interactive visualization programming. This paper includes an example of an application of VDC on data pertaining to the most recent Multi Sector Planner study, conducted at NASA s Airspace Operations Laboratory in 2009, in which VDC was used to visualize and interpret data comm activities

  11. Visualizing Safeguards: Software for Conceptualizing and Communicating Safeguards Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallucci, N. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-07-12

    The nuclear programs of states are complex and varied, comprising a wide range of fuel cycles and facilities. Also varied are the types and terms of states’ safeguards agreements with the IAEA, each placing different limits on the inspectorate’s access to these facilities. Such nuances make it difficult to draw policy significance from the ground-level nuclear activities of states, or to attribute ground-level outcomes to the implementation of specific policies or initiatives. While acquiring a firm understanding of these relationships is critical to evaluating and formulating effective policy, doing so requires collecting and synthesizing large bodies of information. Maintaining a comprehensive working knowledge of the facilities comprising even a single state’s nuclear program poses a challenge, yet marrying this information with relevant safeguards and verification information is more challenging still. To facilitate this task, Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a means of capturing the development, operation, and safeguards history of all the facilities comprising a state’s nuclear program in a single graphic. The resulting visualization offers a useful reference tool to policymakers and analysts alike, providing a chronology of states’ nuclear development and an easily digestible history of verification activities across their fuel cycles.

  12. Using the Picture Exchange Communication System with Students with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivy, Sarah E.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Hooper, Jonathan D.

    2014-01-01

    Students with visual impairment (VI) were taught to request using the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) and tangible symbols. Participants were four males with additional disabilities, 5 to 11 years old, who had little to no functional vision. A functional relation between PECS Phase 1 and requesting was established using a multiple…

  13. Introduction to Visual Communication in the Age of Social Media: Conceptual, Theoretical and Methodological Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uta Russmann

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This thematic issue of Media and Communication focuses attention on the shift towards visual images on social media as well as the transformation of visual communication which has occurred within the online ecology of social media platforms. The sharing of images is becoming an integral part of the social media experience today, and given that social media platforms are the prime locus for sociability—at least among young people in the West—this shift towards visuals arguably transforms how we relate to each other and the world around us, as well as how we perceive and construct our sense of self. For researchers, this raises conceptual, theoretical and methodological challenges. This thematic issue presents six articles as well as a book review on visual communication in social media focusing on developing a conceptual apparatus and precise definitions of objects and practices of study as well as contributions that address and discuss the methodological challenges as well as their potential solutions. The idea was to synergize research from a wide variety of communication-related disciplines on this rather new topic.

  14. Approaches to Visual Communication Media Criticism and Their Application to Television Genres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metallinos, Nikos

    Several schools of thought regarding media criticism, derived from diverse disciplines and literary sources, have emerged during the last decade. To examine their application to the visual communication media arts such as film and television, this paper: (1) reviews the literature of media criticism; (2) discusses various approaches to visual…

  15. Enhancing Willingness to Communicate: Relative Effects of Visualization and Goal Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munezane, Yoko

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the relative effects of two treatments--goal setting and visualization--on enhancing Willingness to Communicate (WTC) among a group of 373 Japanese university EFL learners. Although longitudinal studies in both EFL and ESL settings have been conducted to examine the developmental aspect of WTC, no solid results of enhancing…

  16. Blended Learning in the Visual Communications Classroom: Student Reflections on a Multimedia Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    George-Palilonis, Jennifer; Filak, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Advances in digital technology and a rapidly evolving media landscape continue to dramatically change teaching and learning. Among these changes is the emergence of multimedia teaching and learning tools, online degree programs, and hybrid classes that blend traditional and digital content delivery. At the same time, visual communication programs…

  17. Resisting the Lure of Technology-Driven Design: Pedagogical Approaches to Visual Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcut, Kathryn M.; Brumberger, Eva R.

    2010-01-01

    Technical communicators are expected to work extensively with visual texts in workplaces. Fortunately, most academic curricula include courses in which the skills necessary for such tasks are introduced and sometimes developed in depth. We identify a tension between a focus on technological skill vs. a focus on principles and theory, arguing that…

  18. Making the Familiar Strange: Thinking Visually in a Study Abroad Course in Professional Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Deborah C.

    2016-01-01

    Business and professional communicators increasingly rely on visual thinking and design strategies to create effective messages. The workplace need for such thinking, however, is not readily accommodated in current pedagogy. A long-running study abroad short course for American students taught in London provides a model for meeting this need.…

  19. A Multimedia Data Visualization Based on Ad Hoc Communication Networks and Its Application to Disaster Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youhei Kawamura

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available After massive earthquakes and other large-scale disasters, existing communication infrastructure may become unavailable and, therefore, it can be quite difficult for relief organizations to fully grasp the impact of the disaster on the affected region. Consequently, this will be the cause of delays to offer the strategic assistance, and to provide water and food, etc. In order to solve the problem of re-establishing communication infrastructure to allow for information gathering, we developed an ad hoc mobile communications network for disaster-struck areas using ZigBee. As the communication speed of ZigBee is low, we propose a problem-specific image compression method for the multimedia data visualization. By using the proposed method combined with GPS information, it is possible to quickly grasp the damage situation in the region. Through our communication experiments in Tsukuba City, Japan we confirm the effectiveness of our system as a disaster information gathering and management system.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF A GEOGRAPHIC VISUALIZATION AND COMMUNICATIONS SYSTEMS (GVCS) FOR MONITORING REMOTE VEHICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    COLEMAN, P.; DUNCAN, M.; DURFEE, R.C.; GOELTZ, R; HARRISON, G.; HODGSON, M.E.; KOOK, M.; MCCLAIN, S.

    1998-03-30

    The purpose of this project is to integrate a variety of geographic information systems capabilities and telecommunication technologies for potential use in geographic network and visualization applications. The specific technical goals of the project were to design, develop, and simulate the components of an audio/visual geographic communications system to aid future real-time monitoring, mapping and managing of transport vehicles. The system components of this feasibility study are collectively referred to as a Geographic Visualization and Communications System (GVCS). State-of-the-art techniques will be used and developed to allow both the vehicle operator and network manager to monitor the location and surrounding environment of a transport vehicle during shipment.

  1. Real-time feedback on nonverbal clinical communication. Theoretical framework and clinician acceptance of ambient visual design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, A L; Patel, R A; Czerwinski, M; Pratt, W; Roseway, A; Chandrasekaran, N; Back, A

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of the focus theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Pervasive Intelligent Technologies for Health". Effective nonverbal communication between patients and clinicians fosters both the delivery of empathic patient-centered care and positive patient outcomes. Although nonverbal skill training is a recognized need, few efforts to enhance patient-clinician communication provide visual feedback on nonverbal aspects of the clinical encounter. We describe a novel approach that uses social signal processing technology (SSP) to capture nonverbal cues in real time and to display ambient visual feedback on control and affiliation--two primary, yet distinct dimensions of interpersonal nonverbal communication. To examine the design and clinician acceptance of ambient visual feedback on nonverbal communication, we 1) formulated a model of relational communication to ground SSP and 2) conducted a formative user study using mixed methods to explore the design of visual feedback. Based on a model of relational communication, we reviewed interpersonal communication research to map nonverbal cues to signals of affiliation and control evidenced in patient-clinician interaction. Corresponding with our formulation of this theoretical framework, we designed ambient real-time visualizations that reflect variations of affiliation and control. To explore clinicians' acceptance of this visual feedback, we conducted a lab study using the Wizard-of-Oz technique to simulate system use with 16 healthcare professionals. We followed up with seven of those participants through interviews to iterate on the design with a revised visualization that addressed emergent design considerations. Ambient visual feedback on non- verbal communication provides a theoretically grounded and acceptable way to provide clinicians with awareness of their nonverbal communication style. We provide implications for the design of such visual feedback that encourages empathic patient

  2. Issues in the use of visual supports to promote communication in individuals with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur-Kelly, Michael; Sigafoos, Jeff; Green, Vanessa; Mathisen, Bernice; Arthur-Kelly, Racheal

    2009-01-01

    Visual supports are widely used and generally regarded as an effective resource for intervention with individuals who function on the autism spectrum. More cross-contextual research into their efficacy is required. In this article, we selectively review the research literature around visual supports based on an original conceptual model that highlights their contribution in the interpersonal social and communicative milieu of classrooms, homes and other daily living contexts. Attention is drawn to a range of practical and research issues and challenges in the use of visual supports as well as evidence of their effectiveness in enhancing participation, learning and social membership in this population. Areas for further research relating to the introduction and use of visual supports with the autism spectrum disorder population are identified.

  3. TargetVue: Visual Analysis of Anomalous User Behaviors in Online Communication Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Nan; Shi, Conglei; Lin, Sabrina; Lu, Jie; Lin, Yu-Ru; Lin, Ching-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Users with anomalous behaviors in online communication systems (e.g. email and social medial platforms) are potential threats to society. Automated anomaly detection based on advanced machine learning techniques has been developed to combat this issue; challenges remain, though, due to the difficulty of obtaining proper ground truth for model training and evaluation. Therefore, substantial human judgment on the automated analysis results is often required to better adjust the performance of anomaly detection. Unfortunately, techniques that allow users to understand the analysis results more efficiently, to make a confident judgment about anomalies, and to explore data in their context, are still lacking. In this paper, we propose a novel visual analysis system, TargetVue, which detects anomalous users via an unsupervised learning model and visualizes the behaviors of suspicious users in behavior-rich context through novel visualization designs and multiple coordinated contextual views. Particularly, TargetVue incorporates three new ego-centric glyphs to visually summarize a user's behaviors which effectively present the user's communication activities, features, and social interactions. An efficient layout method is proposed to place these glyphs on a triangle grid, which captures similarities among users and facilitates comparisons of behaviors of different users. We demonstrate the power of TargetVue through its application in a social bot detection challenge using Twitter data, a case study based on email records, and an interview with expert users. Our evaluation shows that TargetVue is beneficial to the detection of users with anomalous communication behaviors.

  4. Visual Metaphors in Communication: Intertextual Semiosis and Déjà Vu in Print Advertising

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evripides Zantides

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metaphor, as a concept in which a signified is applied to a signifier that is not literally applicable, does not only refer to speech or verbal language, but also to a wide use of practical applications in visual communication, particularly in advertising design and communication. The metaphorical rhetoric in advertisements is a common practice often used to attract the viewers’ attention, as well as enhance the persuasiveness of messages. From a cognitive perspective, semiosis in the process of visual metaphors in communication, is a complex subject with often a variety of subjective interpretations on behalf of the viewers. Intertextuality, as another form of metaphoric communication that depends on pre-existing texts (verbal or non-verbal, produces meanings that often deal with parody, sarcasm or irony. Additionally, they are also frequently characterised as anarchistic and provocative, because of the anti-advertising or anti-consumerism/social statements they make. The current study aims to present a literature review on how visual metaphors are defined in printa dvertising, and build on this to examine the notion of intertextuality as a form of déjà vu-metaphor that is popular in advertising and graphic communication. Semiotic analysis as a methodology is used on a purposive sample of print advertisements—including examples of logotypes as well—in order to categorize thematically the major typological references, in respect of intertextual advertising, as well as extract ideological conclusions. The results show that intertextuality in advertising draws its sources of meaning mainly from the Film industry, Art, Monuments and places, Literary texts and Graphic and Advertising itself, whilst, as far as logos is concerned, the source of meaning is purely linguistic. The study also shows that Intertextual visual metaphor semiosis has a variety of popular verbal or non-verbal references and depends on the socio-political context of the

  5. Visual elements in direct-to-consumer advertising: Messages communicated to patients with arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Erin

    2017-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) advertising saturates popular health magazines, communicating persuasive messages to readers that may influence attitudes and behaviors. This research used a two-prong approach to investigate the visual elements used in DTC advertising and their influence on consumers' understanding of a disease and its treatment options. An analysis was conducted of DTC advertisements (N = 62) from a population sample of Arthritis Today magazine, 2000-2010. Three panels of people with arthritis were used to validate the findings and discuss implications for health literacy. Pharmaceutical companies have an opportunity to communicate tailored messages to readers of niche publications and improve disease management.

  6. Language and communication development in preschool children with visual impairment: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Renata; Kritzinger, Alta; van der Linde, Jeannie

    2015-01-01

    Language and communication difficulties of young children with visual impairment (VI) are ascribed to intellectual disability, multiple disabilities and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) rather than their sensory impairment. Consequently, the communication difficulties of children with VI may have been underestimated and undertreated. This report aims to critically appraise recent peer reviewed literature relating to communication and language development in children with VI. A systematic search of the literature (2003–2013) was completed using the PRISMA guidelines, and primary and secondary search phrases. Nine publications were reviewed in terms of the strength of recent evidence. Thematic analysis was used to describe the early language and communication characteristics of children with VI. All the selected articles (n = 9) were from developed countries and participants from seven of the studies had congenital VI. Five of the studies received an evidence level rating of III while four articles were rated as IIb. Two main themes emerged from the studies: early intervention, and multiple disabilities and ASD. Language and communication development is affected by VI, especially in the early stages of development. Speech-language therapists should therefore be included in early intervention for children with VI. Recent evidence on the early language and communication difficulties of children with VI exists, but children in developing countries with acquired VI appear to not be investigated. The identified language and communication developmental characteristics may assist speech-language therapists to build a knowledge base for participation in early intervention for young children with VI and their families.

  7. Language and communication development in preschool children with visual impairment: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosca, Renata; Kritzinger, Alta; Van der Linde, Jeannie

    2015-10-16

    Language and communication difficulties of young children with visual impairment (VI) are ascribed to intellectual disability, multiple disabilities and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) rather than their sensory impairment. Consequently, the communication difficulties of children with VI may have been underestimated and undertreated. This report aims to critically appraise recent peer reviewed literature relating to communication and language development in children with VI. A systematic search of the literature (2003-2013) was completed using the PRISMA guidelines, and primary and secondary search phrases. Nine publications were reviewed in terms of the strength of recent evidence. Thematic analysis was used to describe the early language and communication characteristics of children with VI. All the selected articles (n = 9) were from developed countries and participants from seven of the studies had congenital VI. Five of the studies received an evidence level rating of III while four articles were rated as IIb. Two main themes emerged from the studies: early intervention, and multiple disabilities and ASD. Language and communication development is affected by VI, especially in the early stages of development. Speech-language therapists should therefore be included in early intervention for children with VI. Recent evidence on the early language and communication difficulties of children with VI exists, but children in developing countries with acquired VI appear to not be investigated. The identified language and communication developmental characteristics may assist speech-language therapists to build a knowledge base for participation in early intervention for young children with VI and their families.

  8. Youth Gambling Prevention: Can Public Service Announcements Featuring Celebrity Spokespersons Be Effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shead, N. Will; Walsh, Kelly; Taylor, Amy; Derevensky, Jeffrey L.; Gupta, Rina

    2011-01-01

    Children and adolescents are at increased risk of developing gambling problems compared to adults. A review of successful prevention campaigns targeting drinking and driving, smoking, unprotected sex, and drug use suggests that public service announcements (PSAs) featuring celebrity spokespersons have strong potential for raising awareness of the…

  9. Research on the Collinear Equation Model of Visual Positioning Based on Visible Light Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yuqi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A positioning method based on visible light communication is proposed, which receiving visible light information by low-resolution photodiode array and receiving visual information by the front camera of mobile phone. The terminal position is determined by matching spot information provided by photodiode array with visual information and position information provided by visible light communication. A collinear equation model is derived which based on mobile phone front camera. A hardware-in-loop simulation has been conducted to verify the collinear equation. The three-dimensional positioning error is on the level of decimeter. Moreover, the main factors which affect the positioning accuracy are analyzed in order to further improve the positioning accuracy.

  10. Motor-auditory-visual integration: The role of the human mirror neuron system in communication and communication disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bel, Ronald M; Pineda, Jaime A; Sharma, Anu

    2009-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) is a trimodal system composed of neuronal populations that respond to motor, visual, and auditory stimulation, such as when an action is performed, observed, heard or read about. In humans, the MNS has been identified using neuroimaging techniques (such as fMRI and mu suppression in the EEG). It reflects an integration of motor-auditory-visual information processing related to aspects of language learning including action understanding and recognition. Such integration may also form the basis for language-related constructs such as theory of mind. In this article, we review the MNS system as it relates to the cognitive development of language in typically developing children and in children at-risk for communication disorders, such as children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or hearing impairment. Studying MNS development in these children may help illuminate an important role of the MNS in children with communication disorders. Studies with deaf children are especially important because they offer potential insights into how the MNS is reorganized when one modality, such as audition, is deprived during early cognitive development, and this may have long-term consequences on language maturation and theory of mind abilities. Readers will be able to (1) understand the concept of mirror neurons, (2) identify cortical areas associated with the MNS in animal and human studies, (3) discuss the use of mu suppression in the EEG for measuring the MNS in humans, and (4) discuss MNS dysfunction in children with (ASD).

  11. Teaching Undergraduate Students to Visualize and Communicate Public Health Data with Infographics

    OpenAIRE

    Shanks, Justin D.; Izumi, Betty; Sun, Christina; Martin, Allea; Byker Shanks, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which an infographic assignment facilitated student learning around health science issues, as well as the ways in which the assignment was an effective teaching tool. The objectives of the assignment were to (1) understand the purposes of and potential uses for infographics, (2) cultivate creative visual communication skills, and (3) disseminate a complex health topic to diverse audiences. The infographic assignment was developed at Monta...

  12. The Bauhaus movement and its influence in graphic design, visual communication and architecture in Greece

    OpenAIRE

    Kyriakopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    This paper attempts to present the elements defining the philosophical approach, the characteristics and the style of the Bauhaus movement. More specific it presents the social background of the period during which this school was established and the vision of its main representatives. It analyzes the way it influenced graphic design, visual communication and architecture in Greece. A comparison has been made between typical Bauhaus works and works of contemporary graphics aiming to find how ...

  13. The Bauhaus movement and its influence in graphic design, visual communication and architecture in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kyriakopoulos

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to present the elements defining the philosophical approach, the characteristics and the style of the Bauhaus movement. More specific it presents the social background of the period during which this school was established and the vision of its main representatives. It analyzes the way it influenced graphic design, visual communication and architecture in Greece. A comparison has been made between typical Bauhaus works and works of contemporary graphics aiming to find how they were influenced by the Bauhaus movement. Especially, it presents the projects (posters and buildings and the artists who worked according to the Bauhaus rules. This is a small research of how the Bauhaus school influenced modern graphic art and visual communication design in Greece until today. The conclusion of this research is that the Bauhaus movement which was the first to combine art with technology to obtain clarity and functionality rather than aesthetics, still has a crucial affect on modern design, graphic arts and visual communication in Greece

  14. The Bauhaus movement and its influence in graphic design, visual communication and architecture in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Kyriakopoulos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to present the elements defining the philosophical approach, the characteristics and the style of the Bauhaus movement. More specific it presents the social background of the period during which this school was established and the vision of its main representatives. It analyzes the way it influenced graphic design, visual communication and architecture in Greece. A comparison has been made between typical Bauhaus works and works of contemporary graphics aiming to find how they were influenced by the Bauhaus movement. Especially, it presents the projects (posters and buildings and the artists who worked according to the Bauhaus rules. This is a small research of how the Bauhaus school influenced modern graphic art and visual communication design in Greece until today. The conclusion of this research is that the Bauhaus movement which was the first to combine art with technology to obtain clarity and functionality rather than aesthetics, still has a crucial affect on modern design, graphic arts and visual communication in Greece.

  15. Flash signal evolution in Photinus fireflies: character displacement and signal exploitation in a visual communication system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanger-Hall, Kathrin F; Lloyd, James E

    2015-03-01

    Animal communication is an intriguing topic in evolutionary biology. In this comprehensive study of visual signal evolution, we used a phylogenetic approach to study the evolution of the flash communication system of North American fireflies. The North American firefly genus Photinus contains 35 described species with simple ON-OFF visual signals, and information on habitat types, sympatric congeners, and predators. This makes them an ideal study system to test hypotheses on the evolution of male and female visual signal traits. Our analysis of 34 Photinus species suggests two temporal pattern generators: one for flash duration and one for flash intervals. Reproductive character displacement was a main factor for signal divergence in male flash duration among sympatric Photinus species. Male flash pattern intervals (i.e., the duration of the dark periods between signals) were positively correlated with the number of sympatric Photuris fireflies, which include predators of Photinus. Females of different Photinus species differ in their response preferences to male traits. As in other communication systems, firefly male sexual signals seem to be a compromise between optimizing mating success (sexual selection) and minimizing predation risk (natural selection). An integrative model for Photinus signal evolution is proposed. © 2015 The Author(s).

  16. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (81st, Baltimore, Maryland, August 5-8, 1998). Visual Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Visual Communication section of the Proceedings contains the following 12 papers: "The Limits of Copyright Protection for the Use of Visual Works in Motion Pictures, Print Media, and Pop Art in the 1990s" (Andy Bechtel and Arati Korwar); "Afterthoughts on the Representational Strategies of the FSA Documentary" (Edgar…

  17. SPEECH VISUALIZATION SISTEM AS A BASIS FOR SPEECH TRAINING AND COMMUNICATION AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliana KRSTEVA

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available One receives much more information through a visual sense than through a tactile one. However, most visual aids for hearing-impaired persons are not wearable because it is difficult to make them compact and it is not a best way to mask always their vision.Generally it is difficult to get the integrated patterns by a single mathematical transform of signals, such as a Foruier transform. In order to obtain the integrated pattern speech parameters should be carefully extracted by an analysis according as each parameter, and a visual pattern, which can intuitively be understood by anyone, must be synthesized from them. Successful integration of speech parameters will never disturb understanding of individual features, so that the system can be used for speech training and communication.

  18. Three dimensional visualization breakthrough in analysis and communication of technical information for nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, D.H.; Cerny, B.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (USA); Hill, E.R.; Krupka, K.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Washington, DC (USA); Smoot, J.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA); Smith, D.R.; Waldo, K. [Dynamic Graphics, Inc., Bethesda, MD (USA)

    1990-11-01

    Computer graphics systems that provide interactive display and manipulation of three-dimensional data are powerful tools for the analysis and communication of technical information required for characterization and design of a geologic repository for nuclear waste. Greater understanding of site performance and repository design information is possible when performance-assessment modeling results can be visually analyzed in relation to site geologic and hydrologic information and engineering data for surface and subsurface facilities. In turn, this enhanced visualization capability provides better communication between technical staff and program management with respect to analysis of available information and prioritization of program planning. A commercially-available computer system was used to demonstrate some of the current technology for three-dimensional visualization within the architecture of systems for nuclear waste management. This computer system was used to interactively visualize and analyze the information for two examples: (1) site-characterization and engineering data for a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; and (2) three-dimensional simulations of a hypothetical release and transport of contaminants from a source of radionuclides to the vadose zone. Users may assess the three-dimensional distribution of data and modeling results by interactive zooming, rotating, slicing, and peeling operations. For those parts of the database where information is sparse or not available, the software incorporates models for the interpolation and extrapolation of data over the three-dimensional space of interest. 12 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Three dimensional visualization breakthrough in analysis and communication of technical information for nuclear waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, D.H.; Cerny, B.A.; Hill, E.R.; Krupka, K.M.; Smoot, J.L.; Smith, D.R.; Waldo, K.

    1990-11-01

    Computer graphics systems that provide interactive display and manipulation of three-dimensional data are powerful tools for the analysis and communication of technical information required for characterization and design of a geologic repository for nuclear waste. Greater understanding of site performance and repository design information is possible when performance-assessment modeling results can be visually analyzed in relation to site geologic and hydrologic information and engineering data for surface and subsurface facilities. In turn, this enhanced visualization capability provides better communication between technical staff and program management with respect to analysis of available information and prioritization of program planning. A commercially-available computer system was used to demonstrate some of the current technology for three-dimensional visualization within the architecture of systems for nuclear waste management. This computer system was used to interactively visualize and analyze the information for two examples: (1) site-characterization and engineering data for a potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; and (2) three-dimensional simulations of a hypothetical release and transport of contaminants from a source of radionuclides to the vadose zone. Users may assess the three-dimensional distribution of data and modeling results by interactive zooming, rotating, slicing, and peeling operations. For those parts of the database where information is sparse or not available, the software incorporates models for the interpolation and extrapolation of data over the three-dimensional space of interest. 12 refs., 4 figs

  20. Are language and social communication intact in children with congenital visual impairment at school age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadić, Valerie; Pring, Linda; Dale, Naomi

    2010-06-01

    Development of children with congenital visual impairment (VI) has been associated with vulnerable socio-communicative outcomes often bearing striking similarities to those of sighted children with autism.(1) To date, very little is known about language and social communication in children with VI of normal intelligence. We examined the presentation of language and social communication of 15 children with VI and normal-range verbal intelligence, age 6-12 years, using a standardised language assessment and parental reports of everyday social and communicative behaviours. Their profiles were compared to those of typically developing sighted children of similar age and verbal ability. Compared to their sighted peers, and relative to their own good and potentially superior structural language skills, children with VI showed significantly poorer use of language for social purposes. Pragmatic language weaknesses were a part of a broader socio-communicative profile of difficulties, present in a substantial proportion of these children and consistent with the pattern found in sighted children with autism. There are ongoing socio-communicative and pragmatic language difficulties in children with congenital VI at school age, despite their good intellectual abilities and advanced linguistic skills. Further research is required to unpack the underlying causes and factors maintaining this vulnerability in such children.

  1. Visual Culture Versus Counterculture: The Sixties Redux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, John Adkins

    2004-01-01

    This author contends that it is sometimes difficult to construe exactly what the visual culture movement really involves. To use the kind of lingo that its spokespersons favor, we are seeing a conflict between transfigured factions surviving from the 1960s. During that fevered era, it appeared to academic liberals that America was becoming…

  2. Masked Visual Analysis: Minimizing Type I Error in Visually Guided Single-Case Design for Communication Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Tara McAllister; Hitchcock, Elaine R; Ferron, John

    2017-06-10

    Single-case experimental designs are widely used to study interventions for communication disorders. Traditionally, single-case experiments follow a response-guided approach, where design decisions during the study are based on participants' observed patterns of behavior. However, this approach has been criticized for its high rate of Type I error. In masked visual analysis (MVA), response-guided decisions are made by a researcher who is blinded to participants' identities and treatment assignments. MVA also makes it possible to conduct a hypothesis test assessing the significance of treatment effects. This tutorial describes the principles of MVA, including both how experiments can be set up and how results can be used for hypothesis testing. We then report a case study showing how MVA was deployed in a multiple-baseline across-subjects study investigating treatment for residual errors affecting rhotics. Strengths and weaknesses of MVA are discussed. Given their important role in the evidence base that informs clinical decision making, it is critical for single-case experimental studies to be conducted in a way that allows researchers to draw valid inferences. As a method that can increase the rigor of single-case studies while preserving the benefits of a response-guided approach, MVA warrants expanded attention from researchers in communication disorders.

  3. Auditory and visual interhemispheric communication in musicians and non-musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woelfle, Rebecca; Grahn, Jessica A

    2013-01-01

    The corpus callosum (CC) is a brain structure composed of axon fibres linking the right and left hemispheres. Musical training is associated with larger midsagittal cross-sectional area of the CC, suggesting that interhemispheric communication may be faster in musicians. Here we compared interhemispheric transmission times (ITTs) for musicians and non-musicians. ITT was measured by comparing simple reaction times to stimuli presented to the same hemisphere that controlled a button-press response (uncrossed reaction time), or to the contralateral hemisphere (crossed reaction time). Both visual and auditory stimuli were tested. We predicted that the crossed-uncrossed difference (CUD) for musicians would be smaller than for non-musicians as a result of faster interhemispheric transfer times. We did not expect a difference in CUDs between the visual and auditory modalities for either musicians or non-musicians, as previous work indicates that interhemispheric transfer may happen through the genu of the CC, which contains motor fibres rather than sensory fibres. There were no significant differences in CUDs between musicians and non-musicians. However, auditory CUDs were significantly smaller than visual CUDs. Although this auditory-visual difference was larger in musicians than non-musicians, the interaction between modality and musical training was not significant. Therefore, although musical training does not significantly affect ITT, the crossing of auditory information between hemispheres appears to be faster than visual information, perhaps because subcortical pathways play a greater role for auditory interhemispheric transfer.

  4. Auditory and visual interhemispheric communication in musicians and non-musicians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Woelfle

    Full Text Available The corpus callosum (CC is a brain structure composed of axon fibres linking the right and left hemispheres. Musical training is associated with larger midsagittal cross-sectional area of the CC, suggesting that interhemispheric communication may be faster in musicians. Here we compared interhemispheric transmission times (ITTs for musicians and non-musicians. ITT was measured by comparing simple reaction times to stimuli presented to the same hemisphere that controlled a button-press response (uncrossed reaction time, or to the contralateral hemisphere (crossed reaction time. Both visual and auditory stimuli were tested. We predicted that the crossed-uncrossed difference (CUD for musicians would be smaller than for non-musicians as a result of faster interhemispheric transfer times. We did not expect a difference in CUDs between the visual and auditory modalities for either musicians or non-musicians, as previous work indicates that interhemispheric transfer may happen through the genu of the CC, which contains motor fibres rather than sensory fibres. There were no significant differences in CUDs between musicians and non-musicians. However, auditory CUDs were significantly smaller than visual CUDs. Although this auditory-visual difference was larger in musicians than non-musicians, the interaction between modality and musical training was not significant. Therefore, although musical training does not significantly affect ITT, the crossing of auditory information between hemispheres appears to be faster than visual information, perhaps because subcortical pathways play a greater role for auditory interhemispheric transfer.

  5. Effects of Visual Communication Tool and Separable Status Display on Team Performance and Subjective Workload in Air Battle Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schwartz, Daniel; Knott, Benjamin A; Galster, Scott M

    2008-01-01

    ... ambient cabin noise while performing several visual and manual tasks. The purpose of this study is to compare team performance and subjective workload on a simulated AWACS scenario, for two conditions of communication...

  6. Colour and inclusivity: a visual communication design project with older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Fernando Moreira

    2012-01-01

    In an ideal world, inclusive products and services would be the standard and not the exception. This paper presents a systematic approach to an overlap between Visual Communication Design, Printed Colour and Inclusive Design, for older people, with the aim to develop of a set of research-based ageing and ergonomics-centred communication design guidelines and recommendations for printed material (analogical displays). The approach included an initial extensive literature review in the area of colour, older people and ergonomics issues and vision common diseases, communication design. The second phase was the implementation of an experiment to measure the different colour experiences of the participants in two sample groups (one in UK and another one in Portugal), using printed material, to find out the colours one should use in analogical communication material, being aware of the colour contrast importance (foreground versus background) and the difficulties experienced by older people to read and understand lettering, signs. As main contribution of this research project, we developed a set of guidelines and recommendations based on the reviewed literature and the sample groups' findings, trying to demonstrate the importance of these guidelines when conceiving a new communicational design project in a way this project will achieve vision comfort and understandability, especially for older people, in an inclusive design perspective.

  7. Living in the dark does not mean a blind life: bird and mammal visual communication in dim light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penteriani, Vincenzo; Delgado, María Del Mar

    2017-04-05

    For many years, it was believed that bird and mammal communication 'in the dark of the night' relied exclusively on vocal and chemical signalling. However, in recent decades, several case studies have conveyed the idea that the nocturnal world is rich in visual information. Clearly, a visual signal needs a source of light to work, but diurnal light (twilight included, i.e. any light directly dependent on the sun) is not the only source of luminosity on this planet. Actually, moonlight represents a powerful source of illumination that cannot be neglected from the perspective of visual communication. White patches of feathers and fur on a dark background have the potential to be used to communicate with conspecifics and heterospecifics in dim light across different contexts and for a variety of reasons. Here: (i) we review current knowledge on visual signalling in crepuscular and nocturnal birds and mammals; and (ii) we also present some possible cases of birds and mammals that, due to the characteristics of their feather and fur coloration pattern, might use visual signals in dim light. Visual signalling in nocturnal animals is still an emerging field and, to date, it has received less attention than many other means of communication, including visual communication under daylight. For this reason, many questions remain unanswered and, sometimes, even unasked.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in dim light'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  8. Public Communication of Technical Issues in Today's Changing Visual Language - 12436

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, Laura [Potomac Communications Group (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Communication regarding the management of radioactive materials is a well-established challenge. Residents and consumers have suspected for years that companies and governments place short-term economic concerns ahead of health and safety. This skepticism is compounded with increased attention to safety issues at nuclear power plants everywhere after Fukushima. Nonetheless, today's environment presents unexpected opportunities to transform public fear into teachable moments that bring knowledge and facts to discussions on nuclear energy. In the weeks following Japan's crisis, the lack of reliable information on radiation levels saw citizens taking to the streets with dosimeters and Geiger counters in crowd-sourced radiation monitoring efforts. Efforts, based mainly online, represent a growing set of examples of how internet and cell-phone technology are being put to use in emergency situations. The maps, graphs and tables created to meet public interest also exemplify some of the psychological priorities of audiences and present learning tools that can improve future education efforts in non-emergency situations. Industry outreach efforts often consist of technical details and quantitative data that are difficult for lay audiences to interpret. The intense attention to nuclear energy issues since last March has produced a wide array of visual samples. Citizen monitors, news organizations, government agencies and others have displayed quantitative information in innovative ways. Their efforts offer new perspective on what charts, maps and info graphics do - or need to do - to illustrate requirements, record assessments and promote understanding of nuclear-waste issues. Surveying the best examples, nuclear communicators can improve their offerings of easy-to-use, evidence-based visuals to inform stakeholders. Familiar to most communications professionals in the nuclear industry, risk communication is a science-based approach with over three decades of

  9. 3D Visualization of Theater-Level Radio Communications Using a Networked Virtual Environment (CD-ROM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DJS-Java- VRML simulation and modeling toolkit, visualizations of radio-frequency energy and radio path- profiling data can be quickly generated as 3D...with communications staff planners in distant locations using such virtual environments. DIS-Java- VRML visualization tools can provide a clear picture

  10. Testing the impact on natural risks' awareness of visual communication through an exhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrière, Marie; Bogaard, Thom; Junier, Sandra; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Mostert, Erik

    2014-05-01

    The need to communicate about natural disasters in order to improve the awareness of communities at risk is not a matter for debate anymore. However, communication can be implemented using different media and tools, and their effectiveness may be difficult to grasp. Current research on the topic is usually focused on assessing whether communication practices meet users' needs, whereas impact assessment is mostly left out. It can be explained by difficulties arising from (1) the definition of the impact to measure, i.e. awareness, and the appropriate indicators to measure it and its variations, and (2) the implementation of a research design that allows assessing these impacts without bias. This research aims at both developing a methodology to measure risk awareness and to use it for testing the effectiveness of visual communication. The testing was conducted in the Ubaye Valley in France, an alpine area affected by multiple hazards, from December 2013 to mid-February 2014. The setting consisted of an exhibition in the public library of the main town, Barcelonnette. The main natural hazards of the study case (i.e. landslides, avalanches, flooding, debris flows and earthquakes), as well as structural and non-structural measures were presented to the general public using local examples of hazards events and mitigation. Various visualization tools were used: videos, Google earth map, interactive timeline, objects, mock-ups, technical devices as well as posters with pictures, drawings and graphs. In order to assess the effects of the exhibition on risk awareness, several groups of children and adults were submitted to a research design, consisting of 1) a pre-test, 2) the visit of the exhibition and 3) a post-test similar to the pre-test. Close-ended questions addressed the awareness indicators according to the literature, i.e. worry level, previous experiences with natural hazards events, exposure to awareness raising, ability to mitigate/respond/prepare, attitude to

  11. New Perspective on Visual Communication Design Education: An Empirical Study of Applying Narrative Theory to Graphic Design Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Ming; Hsu, Tzu-Fan

    2017-01-01

    Visual communication design (VCD) is a form of nonverbal communication. The application of relevant linguistic or semiotic theories to VCD education renders graphic design an innovative and scientific discipline. In this study, actual teaching activities were examined to verify the feasibility of applying narrative theory to graphic design…

  12. Knowledge and Perceptions of Visual Communications Curriculum in Arkansas Secondary Agricultural Classrooms: A Closer Look at Experiential Learning Integrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, Kristin; Calico, Carley; Edgar, Leslie D.; Edgar, Don W.; Johnson, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    The University of Arkansas developed and integrated visual communications curriculum related to agricultural communications into secondary agricultural programs throughout the state. The curriculum was developed, pilot tested, revised, and implemented by selected secondary agriculture teachers. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate…

  13. Microscope and spectacle: on the complexities of using new visual technologies to communicate about wildlife conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Audrey; van der Wal, René; Fischer, Anke

    2015-11-01

    Wildlife conservation-related organisations increasingly employ new visual technologies in their science communication and public engagement efforts. Here, we examine the use of such technologies for wildlife conservation campaigns. We obtained empirical data from four UK-based organisations through semi-structured interviews and participant observation. Visual technologies were used to provide the knowledge and generate the emotional responses perceived by organisations as being necessary for motivating a sense of caring about wildlife. We term these two aspects 'microscope' and 'spectacle', metaphorical concepts denoting the duality through which these technologies speak to both the cognitive and the emotional. As conservation relies on public support, organisations have to be seen to deliver information that is not only sufficiently detailed and scientifically credible but also spectacular enough to capture public interest. Our investigation showed that balancing science and entertainment is a difficult undertaking for wildlife-related organisations as there are perceived risks of contriving experiences of nature and obscuring conservation aims.

  14. The image in the visual arts. New ways of communications at school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flor Ángela Gutiérrez Castro

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This is a reflexive article which explains other possibilities and acknowledgements to the use of the visual image in the new ways of communication used at school, through the development of some strategies of action related to the contemplation and the image production: first, negotiate the tendency to the images transmission as a transparent reflecting suggested reality; secondly, to go beyond the interpretation of the images in terms of the negative or positive; and finally, to consider the importance of visual arts in school in the construction of the individual. Based on this reflection some essential concepts are developed about the image as a component of subjectivity since distinctive features that reveal more about its content rather than its definition. The article concludes by outlining the need to build new pedagogical practices, in which beyond promoting the compliance of established academic programs other conditions are built to understand the image as a comprehensible occurrence through the cultural visual-visual arts relationship.

  15. 27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  16. Improving Communication During Cardiac ICU Multidisciplinary Rounds Through Visual Display of Patient Daily Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Lindsey B; Cooper, David S; Henderson, Carla; Brown, James; Simon, Katherine; Clark, Lindsey; Fleckenstein, Elizabeth; Benscoter, Alexis; Nelson, David P

    2016-07-01

    To improve communication during daily cardiac ICU multidisciplinary rounds. Quality improvement methodology. Twenty-five-bed cardiac ICUs in an academic free-standing pediatric hospital. All patients admitted to the cardiac ICU. Implementation of visual display of patient daily goals through a write-down and read-back process. The Rounds Effectiveness Assessment and Communication Tool was developed based on the previously validated Patient Knowledge Assessment Tool to evaluate comprehension of patient daily goals. Rounds were assessed for each patient by the bedside nurse, nurse practitioner or fellow, and attending physician, and answers were compared to determine percent agreement per day. At baseline, percent agreement for patient goals was only 62%. After initial implementation of the daily goal write-down/read-back process, which was written on paper by the bedside nurse, the Rounds Effectiveness Assessment and Communication Tool survey revealed no improvement. With adaptation of the intervention so goals were written on whiteboards for visual display during rounds, the percent agreement improved to 85%. Families were also asked to complete a survey (1-6 Likert scale) of their satisfaction with rounds and understanding of daily goals before and after the intervention. Family survey results improved from a mean of 4.6-5.7. Parent selection of the best possible score for each question was 19% at baseline and 75% after the intervention. Visual display of patient daily goals via a write-down/read-back process improves comprehension of goals by all team members and improves parent satisfaction. The daily goal whiteboard facilitates consistent development of a comprehensive plan of care for each patient, fosters goal-directed care, and provides a checklist for providers and parents to review throughout the day.

  17. How to Visualize and Communicate Challenges in Climate and Environmental Sciences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, R.; Schertzer, D. J. M.; Deutsch, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    The challenges of climate and environmental sciences need a renewed dialogue with a large spectrum of stakeholders, ranging from the general publics to specialists. This requires a better use of sophisticated visualization techniques to both forward the information and to follow the corresponding flow of information. A particular case of interest is the question of resilience to extreme weather events that also relies on increasing awareness of urban communities. This research looks at the development of exploration techniques of unstructured Big Data. Indeed access to information on environmental and climate sciences has hugely increased in terms of variety and quantity, as a consequence of different factors, among others the development of public relations by research institutes and the pervasive role of digital media (Bucchi 2013; Trench 2008). We are left with unthinkable amounts of information from blogs, social networks postings, public speeches, press releases, articles, etc. It is possible now to explore and visualize patterns followed by digital information with the support of automated analysis tools. On the other hand these techniques can provide important insights on how different techniques of visual communication can impact on urban resilience to extreme weather. The selected case studies correspond to several research projects under the umbrella of the Chair "Hydrology for resilient cities" aimed to develop and test new solutions in urban hydrology that will contribute to the resilience of our cities to extreme weather. These research projects - ranging from regional projects (e.g. RadX@IdF), European projects (e.g. Blue Green Dream and RainGain), to worldwide collaborations (e.g. TOMACS) - include awareness raising and capacity building activities aimed to foster cooperation between scientists, professionals, and beneficiaries. This presentation will explore how visualization techniques can be used in the above mentioned projects in order to support

  18. How scary! An analysis of visual communication concerning genetically modified organisms in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Vera; Frisio, Dario G; Ferrazzi, Giovanni; Siletti, Elena

    2017-07-01

    Several studies provide evidence of the role of written communication in influencing public perception towards genetically modified organisms, whereas visual communication has been sparsely investigated. This article aims to evaluate the exposure of the Italian population to scary genetically modified organism-related images. A set of 517 images collected through Google are classified considering fearful attributes, and an index that accounts for the scary impact of these images is built. Then, through an ordinary least-squares regression, we estimate the relationship between the Scary Impact Index and a set of variables that describes the context in which the images appear. The results reveal that the first (and most viewed) Google result images contain the most frightful contents. In addition, the agri-food sector in Italy is strongly oriented towards offering a negative representation of genetically modified organisms. Exposure to scary images could be a factor that affects the negative perception of genetically modified organisms in Italy.

  19. Visualizing an Iterative, Dynamic Model for Improving Leadership-Employee Communication in the Organizational Change process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broillet, Alexandra; Barchilon, Marian; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    of visualizations to demonstrate the shift from the current Change Management Paradigm to a new paradigm that integrates enterprise and individual logics of change. The use of user-centered design principles offers Change Management the opportunity to broaden the basis for advising organizations going through......Change Management Literature addresses successful and unsuccessful change factors, but there is a conceptual gap that overlooks ways in which Leadership-Employee Communication can be operationalized. To deal with this concern, we address themes emerging from interviews focused on employees...

  20. Leaders as Corporate Responsibility Spokesperson: How Leaders Explain Liabilites Via Corporate Web Sites?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Öksüz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to reveal the corporate social responsibility (CSR understandings of corporations from the leaders’ perspective and discuss how leaders define and explain CSR practices their organizations executed as spokesperson via social media channels of their organizations.  In this context, a content analysis aiming to display the ideas of Turkey’s top 250 corporations’ leaders (CEO, chairman of the board, general manager designated by Istanbul Chamber of Industry in 2013. The leader messages about different dimensions of CSR and CSR practices that are partaking in corporate web sites were examined. According to the results of the analysis, it is found that the leaders act as responsible leaders, and also the spokesperson of their corporations. In addition it is found out that responsible leaders included multiplexed information on different dimensions and various practices of CSR in their social media messages.

  1. Effect of mobile technology featuring visual scene displays and just-in-time programming on communication turns by preadolescent and adolescent beginning communicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyfield, Christine; Caron, Jessica Gosnell; Drager, Kathryn; Light, Janice

    2018-03-05

    Visual scene displays (VSDs) and just-in-time programming supports are augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technology features with theoretical benefits for beginning communicators of all ages. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the effects of a communication application (app) on mobile technology that supported the just-in-time programming of VSDs on the communication of preadolescents and adolescents who were beginning communicators. A single-subject multiple-baseline across participant design was employed to evaluate the effect of the AAC app with VSDs programmed just-in-time by the researcher on the communication turns expressed by five preadolescents and adolescents (9-18 years old) who were beginning communicators. All five participants demonstrated marked increases in the frequency of their communication turns after the onset intervention. Just-in-time programming support and VSDs are two features that may positively impact communication for beginning communicators in preadolescence and adolescence. Apps with these features allow partners to quickly and easily capture photos of meaningful and motivating events and provide them immediately as VSDs with relevant vocabulary to support communication in response to beginning communicators' interests.

  2. Language, literacy, and communication regarding medication in an anticoagulation clinic: a comparison of verbal vs. visual assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillinger, Dean; Machtinger, Edward L; Wang, Frances; Palacios, Jorge; Rodriguez, Maytrella; Bindman, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Despite the importance of clinician-patient communication, little is known about rates and predictors of medication miscommunication. Measuring rates of miscommunication, as well as differences between verbal and visual modes of assessment, can inform efforts to more effectively communicate about medications. We studied 220 diverse patients in an anticoagulation clinic to assess concordance between patient and clinician reports of warfarin regimens. Bilingual research assistants asked patients to (1) verbalize their prescribed weekly warfarin regimen and (2) identify this regimen from a digitized color menu of warfarin pills. We obtained clinician reports of patient regimens from chart review. Patients were categorized as having regimen concordance if there were no patient-clinician discrepancies in total weekly dosage. We then examined whether verbal and visual concordance rates varied with patient's language and health literacy. Fifty percent of patients achieved verbal concordance and 66% achieved visual concordance with clinicians regarding the weekly warfarin regimen (P visual discordance. Shifting from verbal to visual modes was associated with greater patient-provider concordance across all patient subgroups, but especially for those with communication barriers.Clinician-patient discordance regarding patients' warfarin regimen was common but occurred less frequently when patients used a visual aid. Visual aids may improve the accuracy of medication assessment, especially for patients with communication barriers.

  3. 3D visualization as a communicative aid in pharmaceutical advice-giving over distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostlund, Martin; Dahlbäck, Nils; Petersson, Göran Ingemar

    2011-07-18

    Medication misuse results in considerable problems for both patient and society. It is a complex problem with many contributing factors, including timely access to product information. To investigate the value of 3-dimensional (3D) visualization paired with video conferencing as a tool for pharmaceutical advice over distance in terms of accessibility and ease of use for the advice seeker. We created a Web-based communication service called AssistancePlus that allows an advisor to demonstrate the physical handling of a complex pharmaceutical product to an advice seeker with the aid of 3D visualization and audio/video conferencing. AssistancePlus was tested in 2 separate user studies performed in a usability lab, under realistic settings and emulating a real usage situation. In the first study, 10 pharmacy students were assisted by 2 advisors from the Swedish National Co-operation of Pharmacies' call centre on the use of an asthma inhaler. The student-advisor interview sessions were filmed on video to qualitatively explore their experience of giving and receiving advice with the aid of 3D visualization. In the second study, 3 advisors from the same call centre instructed 23 participants recruited from the general public on the use of 2 products: (1) an insulin injection pen, and (2) a growth hormone injection syringe. First, participants received advice on one product in an audio-recorded telephone call and for the other product in a video-recorded AssistancePlus session (product order balanced). In conjunction with the AssistancePlus session, participants answered a questionnaire regarding accessibility, perceived expressiveness, and general usefulness of 3D visualization for advice-giving over distance compared with the telephone and were given a short interview focusing on their experience of the 3D features. In both studies, participants found the AssistancePlus service helpful in providing clear and exact instructions. In the second study, directly comparing

  4. Communicative interactions between visually impaired mothers and their sighted children: analysis of gaze, facial expressions, voice and physical contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, S; Galati, D; Schmidt, S

    2015-11-01

    Social and emotional development of infants and young children is largely based on the communicative interaction with their mother, or principal caretaker (Trevarthen ). The main modalities implied in this early communication are voice, facial expressions and gaze (Stern ). This study aims at analysing early mother-child interactions in the case of visually impaired mothers who do not have access to their children's gaze and facial expressions. Spontaneous play interactions between seven visually impaired mothers and their sighted children aged between 6 months and 3 years were filmed. These dyads were compared with a control group of sighted mothers and children analysing four modalities of communication and interaction regulation: gaze, physical contacts, verbal productions and facial expressions. The visually impaired mothers' facial expressions differed from the ones of sighted mothers mainly with respect to forehead movements, leading to an impoverishment of conveyed meaning. Regarding the other communicative modalities, results suggest that visually impaired mothers and their children use compensatory strategies to guaranty harmonic interaction despite the mother's impairment: whereas gaze results the main factor of interaction regulation in sighted dyads, physical contacts and verbal productions assume a prevalent role in dyads with visually impaired mothers. Moreover, visually impaired mother's children seem to be able to differentiate between their mother and sighted interaction partners, adapting differential modes of communication. The results of this study show that, in spite of the obvious differences in the modes of communication, visual impairment does not prevent a harmonious interaction with the child. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Acceptance and practicability of a visual communication tool in smoking cessation counselling: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuner-Jehle, Stefan; Knecht, Marianne I; Stey-Steurer, Claudia; Senn, Oliver

    2013-12-01

    Smoking cessation advice is important for reducing the worldwide burden of disease resulting from tobacco smoking. Appropriate risk communication formats improve the success of counselling interventions in primary care. To test the feasibility and acceptance of a smoking cessation counselling tool with different cardiovascular risk communication formats including graphs, in comparison with the International Primary Care Respiratory Group (IPCRG) 'quit smoking assistance' tool. GPs were randomised into an intervention group (using our communication tool in addition to the IPCRG sheet) and a control group (using the IPCRG sheet only). We asked participants for socioeconomic data, smoking patterns, understanding of information, motivation, acceptance and feasibility, and measured the duration and frequency of counselling sessions. Twenty-five GPs performed 2.8 counselling sessions per month in the intervention group and 1.7 in the control group (p=0.3) with 114 patients. The median duration of a session was 10 mins (control group 11 mins, p=0.09 for difference). Median patients' motivation for smoking cessation was 7 on a 10-point visual analogue scale with no significant difference before and after the intervention (p=0.2) or between groups (p=0.73 before and p=0.15 after the intervention). Median patients' ratings of motivation, selfconfidence, understanding of information, and satisfaction with the counselling were 3-5 on a 5-point Likert scale, similar to GPs' ratings of acceptance and feasibility, with no significant difference between groups. Among Swiss GPs and patients, both our innovative communication tool and the IPCRG tool were well accepted and both merit further dissemination and application in research.

  6. Collaboration between student art teachers and communication and digital media students promoting subject specific didactics in digital visual learning design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Kirsten; Buhl, Mie

    Collaboration between student art teachers and communication and digital media students promoting subject specific didactics in digital visual learning design This paper presents research perspective on how the collaboration between communication designers and teacher trainers in visual arts...... in how to use digital media for doing artwork that goes beyond the well-known re-mediations (image processing or editing programs) of traditional media like painting, drawing or video. Thus, the project suggested the development of a visual learning design for achieving augmented reality (AR) experiences...... involving the domain of communication and digital media for developing learning resources. However, it must be concluded that more iterations of the empirical design must be conducted in order to test its usability. References Amiel, T., & Reeves, T. C. (2008). Design Based Research and Educational...

  7. Collaboration Between Art Teacher Students and Communication and Digital Media Students Promoting Subject Specific Didactics in Digital Visual Learning Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Skov, Kirsten

    . Student art teachers and teacher trainers took part in the design process performed by communication students. The project took its point of the departure in the act of Danish teacher education where student teachers must be educated in the practical use of digital visual media for art practices aiming......, drawing or video. Thus, the project suggested the development of a visual learning design for achieving augmented reality (AR) experiences in urban environments and sharing them on social media. The purpose was to explore adequate approaches to work with digital media in visual arts education based...... and their lecturers. Finally, the designs indicate that a collaborative approach may promote new aspects to subject didactics, where visual art didactics gain new opportunities from involving the domain of communication and digital media for developing learning resources. However, it must be concluded that more...

  8. User evaluations of design complexity: the impact of visual perceptions for effective online health communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazard, Allison; Mackert, Michael

    2014-10-01

    This paper highlights the influential role of design complexity for users' first impressions of health websites. An experimental design was utilized to investigate whether a website's level of design complexity impacts user evaluations. An online questionnaire measured the hypothesized impact of design complexity on predictors of message effectiveness. Findings reveal that increased design complexity was positively associated with higher levels of perceived design esthetics, attitude toward the website, perceived message comprehensibility, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, perceived message quality, perceived informativeness, and perceived visual informativeness. This research gives further evidence that design complexity should be considered an influential variable for health communicators to effectively reach their audiences, as it embodies the critical first step for message evaluation via electronic platforms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Tridimensional visualization reveals direct communication between the embryo and glands critical for implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jia; Deng, Wenbo; Cha, Jeeyeon; Sun, Xiaofei; Borg, Jean-Paul; Dey, Sudhansu K

    2018-02-09

    Embryo implantation is central to pregnancy success. Our previous understanding is limited by studying this phenomenon primarily in two dimensions. Here we employ 3D visualization, revealing that epithelial evaginations that form implantation chambers (crypts) consistently arise with preexisting glands, suggesting direct access of glands to embryos within the chamber. While the lobular domains of the glands become more developed, the ductal regions continue to elongate and progressively stretch following implantation. Using diapausing mice and mice with deletion of the planar cell polarity gene Vangl2 in uterine epithelial cells, we show that dynamic changes in gland topography depend on implantation-competent blastocysts and planar cell polarity. By transferring blastocyst-size beads preloaded with HB-EGF in pseudopregnant mice, we found that HB-EGF is a trigger for the communication between embryos and glands. Glands directly connecting the crypt encasing the embryo during implantation are therefore fundamental to pregnancy success.

  10. The influence of visual representations of “the Other” in the system of modern sociocultural communications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolodii Nataliya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the way and the form of modern humanitaristics understanding of the problem of visual representation of “the Other”. The authors’ tasks were to comprehend the nature and dynamics of visualization, to give a distinct working definition of visual competence. Besides, the purpose of the paper was to state the components of visual competence, its criteria, estimation methods and in this context to interpret the image of “the Other” decoded in scientific philosophic and cultural literature and in daily cultural practices. And the final task was to reduce the visual message to the verbal one. The doctrine that the image may be read is the common prejudice, which prevents the formation of a new approach to visuality. The first step towards the solution of problem is to describe the techniques, which help in potential understanding of the visual structure. Understanding the image diversity and its possible text analogues should help in establishing the specific requirements, which can be and must be applicable to visual representation of “the Other”. Representations in the visual culture (photography, cinematography, media, painting, advertisement influence the social image, affects the daily social practices and communications. Visual representations are of interest for social theorists as well as cultural texts, as they give an idea on the context of cultural production, social interaction and individual experience.

  11. Color inference in visual communication: the meaning of colors in recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Karen B; Lessard, Laurent; Walmsley, Charlotte S; Foley, Kathleen

    2018-01-01

    People interpret abstract meanings from colors, which makes color a useful perceptual feature for visual communication. This process is complicated, however, because there is seldom a one-to-one correspondence between colors and meanings. One color can be associated with many different concepts (one-to-many mapping) and many colors can be associated with the same concept (many-to-one mapping). We propose that to interpret color-coding systems, people perform assignment inference to determine how colors map onto concepts. We studied assignment inference in the domain of recycling. Participants saw images of colored but unlabeled bins and were asked to indicate which bins they would use to discard different kinds of recyclables and trash. In Experiment 1, we tested two hypotheses for how people perform assignment inference. The local assignment hypothesis predicts that people simply match objects with their most strongly associated color. The global assignment hypothesis predicts that people also account for the association strengths between all other objects and colors within the scope of the color-coding system. Participants discarded objects in bins that optimized the color-object associations of the entire set, which is consistent with the global assignment hypothesis. This sometimes resulted in discarding objects in bins whose colors were weakly associated with the object, even when there was a stronger associated option available. In Experiment 2, we tested different methods for encoding color-coding systems and found that people were better at assignment inference when color sets simultaneously maximized the association strength between assigned color-object parings while minimizing associations between unassigned pairings. Our study provides an approach for designing intuitive color-coding systems that facilitate communication through visual media such as graphs, maps, signs, and artifacts.

  12. Visual word recognition in deaf readers: lexicality is modulated by communication mode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Barca

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that adequate phonological abilities are necessary to develop proficient reading skills and that later in life phonology also has a role in the covert visual word recognition of expert readers. Impairments of acoustic perception, such as deafness, can lead to atypical phonological representations of written words and letters, which in turn can affect reading proficiency. Here, we report an experiment in which young adults with different levels of acoustic perception (i.e., hearing and deaf individuals and different modes of communication (i.e., hearing individuals using spoken language, deaf individuals with a preference for sign language, and deaf individuals using the oral modality with less or no competence in sign language performed a visual lexical decision task, which consisted of categorizing real words and consonant strings. The lexicality effect was restricted to deaf signers who responded faster to real words than consonant strings, showing over-reliance on whole word lexical processing of stimuli. No effect of stimulus type was found in deaf individuals using the oral modality or in hearing individuals. Thus, mode of communication modulates the lexicality effect. This suggests that learning a sign language during development shapes visuo-motor representations of words, which are tuned to the actions used to express them (phono-articulatory movements vs. hand movements and to associated perceptions. As these visuo-motor representations are elicited during on-line linguistic processing and can overlap with the perceptual-motor processes required to execute the task, they can potentially produce interference or facilitation effects.

  13. Visual Word Recognition in Deaf Readers: Lexicality Is Modulated by Communication Mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Laura; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Castrataro, Marianna; Rinaldi, Pasquale; Caselli, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that adequate phonological abilities are necessary to develop proficient reading skills and that later in life phonology also has a role in the covert visual word recognition of expert readers. Impairments of acoustic perception, such as deafness, can lead to atypical phonological representations of written words and letters, which in turn can affect reading proficiency. Here, we report an experiment in which young adults with different levels of acoustic perception (i.e., hearing and deaf individuals) and different modes of communication (i.e., hearing individuals using spoken language, deaf individuals with a preference for sign language, and deaf individuals using the oral modality with less or no competence in sign language) performed a visual lexical decision task, which consisted of categorizing real words and consonant strings. The lexicality effect was restricted to deaf signers who responded faster to real words than consonant strings, showing over-reliance on whole word lexical processing of stimuli. No effect of stimulus type was found in deaf individuals using the oral modality or in hearing individuals. Thus, mode of communication modulates the lexicality effect. This suggests that learning a sign language during development shapes visuo-motor representations of words, which are tuned to the actions used to express them (phono-articulatory movements vs. hand movements) and to associated perceptions. As these visuo-motor representations are elicited during on-line linguistic processing and can overlap with the perceptual-motor processes required to execute the task, they can potentially produce interference or facilitation effects. PMID:23554976

  14. Visual word recognition in deaf readers: lexicality is modulated by communication mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barca, Laura; Pezzulo, Giovanni; Castrataro, Marianna; Rinaldi, Pasquale; Caselli, Maria Cristina

    2013-01-01

    Evidence indicates that adequate phonological abilities are necessary to develop proficient reading skills and that later in life phonology also has a role in the covert visual word recognition of expert readers. Impairments of acoustic perception, such as deafness, can lead to atypical phonological representations of written words and letters, which in turn can affect reading proficiency. Here, we report an experiment in which young adults with different levels of acoustic perception (i.e., hearing and deaf individuals) and different modes of communication (i.e., hearing individuals using spoken language, deaf individuals with a preference for sign language, and deaf individuals using the oral modality with less or no competence in sign language) performed a visual lexical decision task, which consisted of categorizing real words and consonant strings. The lexicality effect was restricted to deaf signers who responded faster to real words than consonant strings, showing over-reliance on whole word lexical processing of stimuli. No effect of stimulus type was found in deaf individuals using the oral modality or in hearing individuals. Thus, mode of communication modulates the lexicality effect. This suggests that learning a sign language during development shapes visuo-motor representations of words, which are tuned to the actions used to express them (phono-articulatory movements vs. hand movements) and to associated perceptions. As these visuo-motor representations are elicited during on-line linguistic processing and can overlap with the perceptual-motor processes required to execute the task, they can potentially produce interference or facilitation effects.

  15. Dynamic Network Communication in the Human Functional Connectome Predicts Perceptual Variability in Visual Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiwei; Zeljic, Kristina; Jiang, Qinying; Gu, Yong; Wang, Wei; Wang, Zheng

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitous variability between individuals in visual perception is difficult to standardize and has thus essentially been ignored. Here we construct a quantitative psychophysical measure of illusory rotary motion based on the Pinna-Brelstaff figure (PBF) in 73 healthy volunteers and investigate the neural circuit mechanisms underlying perceptual variation using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We acquired fMRI data from a subset of 42 subjects during spontaneous and 3 stimulus conditions: expanding PBF, expanding modified-PBF (illusion-free) and expanding modified-PBF with physical rotation. Brain-wide graph analysis of stimulus-evoked functional connectivity patterns yielded a functionally segregated architecture containing 3 discrete hierarchical networks, commonly shared between rest and stimulation conditions. Strikingly, communication efficiency and strength between 2 networks predominantly located in visual areas robustly predicted individual perceptual differences solely in the illusory stimulus condition. These unprecedented findings demonstrate that stimulus-dependent, not spontaneous, dynamic functional integration between distributed brain networks contributes to perceptual variability in humans. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Communicating textual health information to the mobile phones of visually-impaired users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kummervold, Per Egil; Holthe, Halgeir

    2008-01-01

    We investigated how short messages communicating health information would best be distributed to people with vision difficulties using mobile phones. Twelve visually-impaired persons who were unable to read short message service (SMS) messages directly compared three methods of presenting text messages as speech: (1) ordinary SMS messages were sent to the users and converted into speech by the mobile phone; (2) multimedia messages were sent to the users with prerecorded speech-synthesized information; and (3) mobile phone calls were placed to the users and prerecorded speech-synthesized messages were streamed to them. The latter two approaches used server-generated sound files. Over a three-month trial period, we sent a total of 88 SMS messages to the subjects, 111 multimedia messaging service (MMS) messages and 104 telephone calls. All of the SMS messages, 88% of the MMS messages and 69% of the telephone calls were received. In subsequent interviews, we asked the users which presentation method they preferred. SMS scored significantly better than both MMS (P = 0.033) and telephones (P = 0.006). All three methods had serious drawbacks. However, the study suggests that it might be possible to develop suitable technology for communicating with people with vision difficulties by mobile phone.

  17. Teaching Undergraduate Students to Visualize and Communicate Public Health Data with Infographics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, Justin D; Izumi, Betty; Sun, Christina; Martin, Allea; Byker Shanks, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which an infographic assignment facilitated student learning around health science issues, as well as the ways in which the assignment was an effective teaching tool. The objectives of the assignment were to (1) understand the purposes of and potential uses for infographics, (2) cultivate creative visual communication skills, and (3) disseminate a complex health topic to diverse audiences. The infographic assignment was developed at Montana State University and piloted at Portland State University. Students were assigned to small groups of three or four to create an infographic focused on a health science issue. The assignment was divided into four steps: brainstorming, developing, designing, and finalizing. Focus groups were conducted to assess how learning occurred throughout the assignment and identify any opportunities for modification of the assignment. This study was conducted with freshman students enrolled at Portland State University, a public university located in downtown Portland, OR, USA. Thirty four students completed the assignment and 31 students participated in one of three focus groups. Four themes emerged from focus groups: (1) Communicating Science-Related Topics to Non-experts, (2) Developing Professional Skills, (3) Understanding Health Issues, and (4) Overall Experience. This article outlines the assignment, discusses focus group results, and presents assignment modifications. It is clear that the infographic assignment facilitated learning about accessing and translating data. This assignment is ideally suited for use with diverse college-age audiences in health education and health promotion fields.

  18. Teaching Undergraduate Students to Visualize and Communicate Public Health Data with Infographics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin D. Shanks

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which an infographic assignment facilitated student learning around health science issues, as well as the ways in which the assignment was an effective teaching tool. The objectives of the assignment were to (1 understand the purposes of and potential uses for infographics, (2 cultivate creative visual communication skills, and (3 disseminate a complex health topic to diverse audiences. The infographic assignment was developed at Montana State University and piloted at Portland State University. Students were assigned to small groups of three or four to create an infographic focused on a health science issue. The assignment was divided into four steps: brainstorming, developing, designing, and finalizing. Focus groups were conducted to assess how learning occurred throughout the assignment and identify any opportunities for modification of the assignment. This study was conducted with freshman students enrolled at Portland State University, a public university located in downtown Portland, OR, USA. Thirty four students completed the assignment and 31 students participated in one of three focus groups. Four themes emerged from focus groups: (1 Communicating Science-Related Topics to Non-experts, (2 Developing Professional Skills, (3 Understanding Health Issues, and (4 Overall Experience. This article outlines the assignment, discusses focus group results, and presents assignment modifications. It is clear that the infographic assignment facilitated learning about accessing and translating data. This assignment is ideally suited for use with diverse college-age audiences in health education and health promotion fields.

  19. Relative Effects of Visualized and Verbal Presentation Methods in Communicating Environmental Information among Stakeholders: Okavango Delta, Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakadu, Olekae T.; Irani, Tracy; Telg, Ricky

    2011-01-01

    The present study examined the relative effectiveness of 2 public instructional communication methods in improving selected predictors of knowledge-sharing behaviors among communities in the Okavango Delta, Botswana. A total of 120 subjects took part in a quasiexperimental study, with 2 experimental treatments: (a) visualized PowerPoint…

  20. The Impact of Social Scripts and Visual Cues on Verbal Communication in Three Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Jennifer B.; Kaylor, Maria; Bourgeois, Bethany; Hadden, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    Social script and visual cue use with students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were examined. A multiple baseline design across activities with embedded withdrawal was used to measure student acquisition of verbal communication skills. Three children with ASD, two boys and one girl, were taught a series of scripts and were shown a "quiet"…

  1. Communicating forest management science and practices through visualized and animated media approaches to community presentations: An exploration and assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donald E. Zimmerman; Carol Akerelrea; Jane Kapler Smith; Garrett J. O' Keefe

    2006-01-01

    Natural-resource managers have used a variety of computer-mediated presentation methods to communicate management practices to diverse publics. We explored the effects of visualizing and animating predictions from mathematical models in computerized presentations explaining forest succession (forest growth and change through time), fire behavior, and management options...

  2. Visualization of N-acylhomoserine lactone-mediated cell-cell communication between bacteria colonizing the tomato rhizosphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steidle, A.; Sigl, K.; Schuhegger, R.

    2001-01-01

    -negative derivatives of Pseudomonas putida IsoF and Serratia liquefaciens MG1, two strains that are capable of colonizing tomato roots. These AHL monitor strains were used to visualize communication between defined bacterial populations in the rhizosphere of axenically grown tomato plants. Furthermore, we integrated...

  3. Developmental memory capacity resources of typical children retrieving picture communication symbols using direct selection and visual linear scanning with fixed communication displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Barry T; Jackson, Heather M

    2006-02-01

    This study examined the cognitive demands of 2 selection techniques in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC), direct selection, and visual linear scanning, by determining the memory retrieval abilities of typically developing children when presented with fixed communication displays. One hundred twenty typical children from kindergarten, 1st, and 3rd grades were randomly assigned to either a direct selection or visual linear scanning group. Memory retrieval was assessed through word span using Picture Communication Symbols (PCSs). Participants were presented various numbers and arrays of PCSs and asked to retrieve them by placing identical graphic symbols on fixed communication displays with grid layouts. The results revealed that participants were able to retrieve more PCSs during direct selection than scanning. Additionally, 3rd-grade children retrieved more PCSs than kindergarten and 1st-grade children. An analysis on the type of errors during retrieval indicated that children were more successful at retrieving the correct PCSs than the designated location of those symbols on fixed communication displays. AAC practitioners should consider using direct selection over scanning whenever possible and account for anticipatory monitoring and pulses when scanning is used in the service delivery of children with little or no functional speech. Also, researchers should continue to investigate AAC selection techniques in relationship to working memory resources.

  4. Comparison of the development of the communicative competence of the blind and visually impaired in institutions and including schooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Forte

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article is a research, belonging to the domain of practical/usable linguistics. The basis of the presented content is the communicative competence and the issue of its development by blind and visually impaired children. The methodology, used in the research, consists of primary and secondary materials. The secondary ones are theoretical, from: linguistics, psychology, medicine, pedagogies and special pedagogies. The primary materials can be divided in two sections. The first one is a comparison of two educational models for blind and visually impaired children, one from mainstream schools and the other from specialized institutions. The second part consists of four structured interviews, the analysis of which gives us the answer about the difference in the development of the communicative competence of the blind and the visually impaired in consideration of the chosen model of schooling.

  5. Direct or Directed: Orchestrating a More Harmonious Approach to Teaching Technology within an Art & Design Higher Education Curriculum with Special Reference to Visual Communications Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Lindsey; Meachem, Lester

    2007-01-01

    In this scoping study we have investigated the integration of subject-specific software into the structure of visual communications courses. There is a view that the response within visual communications courses to the rapid developments in technology has been linked to necessity rather than by design. Through perceptions of staff with day-to-day…

  6. On the questions that we can ask visual archives: for public history, communication and teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Bruce Silva

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Experiências anteriores com arquivos e coleções fotográficas datadas de meados do século XX, me levaram a pensar nas imagens que os sujeitos, as instituições e as épocas compartilham em suas falas cotidianas. Elas podem ser acessadas não somente em acervos, também na internet, em exposições, no cinema, na sala de aula e em outros espaços de convivência, vistos de uma plataforma como a História pública. Através das perguntas que lhes fazemos é possível distinguir como elas ficam presentes em nosso cotidiano. É possível reconstituir percursos e perscrutar, no presente, ecos daqueles valores que aparecem visualmente. Com isso, o objetivo deste ensaio é expor fragmentos que fazem parte da cultura visual no Recife. Como plataforma reflexiva, os argumentos identificam e relatam alguns desses fragmentos.   PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Arquivos e coleções fotográficas, História pública, comunicação, ensino.   ABSTRACT Previous experiences with photographic archives and collections dating from the mid-twentieth century have led me to think about the images that the subjects, the institutions and the epochs shared in their day-to-day discourse. They can be accessed not only in collections, but also on the internet, in exhibitions, in the cinema, in the classroom and in other spaces of coexistence, seen from a platform such as public History. Through the questions that we ask them, it is possible to distinguish how they become present in our daily lives. It is possible to reconstitute paths and examine, in the present, echoes of those values that appear visually. configure the visibility presented. On thinking about images, we carry out montages. The aim of this essay is therefore to expose fragments that are part of the visual culture in Recife. As a reflective platform, the arguments identify and relate some of these fragments.   KEYWORDS: Photographic archives and collections, public History, communication, teaching.     RESUMEN

  7. Assessing the Effectiveness of the Cone of Probability as a Visual Means of Communicating Scientific Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlove, B. S.; Broad, K.; Meyer, R.

    2010-12-01

    We review the evolution, communication, and differing interpretations of the National Hurricane Center (NHC)'s "cone of uncertainty" hurricane forecast graphic, drawing on several related disciplines—cognitive psychology, visual anthropology, and risk communication theory. We examine the 2004 hurricane season, two specific hurricanes (Katrina 2005 and Ike 2008) and the 2010 hurricane season, still in progress. During the 2004 hurricane season, five named storms struck Florida. Our analysis of that season draws upon interviews with key government officials and media figures, archival research of Florida newspapers, analysis of public comments on the NHC cone of uncertainty graphic and a multiagency study of 2004 hurricane behavior. At that time, the hurricane forecast graphic was subject to misinterpretation by many members of the public. We identify several characteristics of this graphic that contributed to public misinterpretation. Residents overemphasized the specific track of the eye, failed to grasp the width of hurricanes, and generally did not recognize the timing of the passage of the hurricane. Little training was provided to emergency response managers in the interpretation of forecasts. In the following year, Katrina became a national scandal, further demonstrating the limitations of the cone as a means of leading to appropriate responses to forecasts. In the second half of the first decade of the 21st century, three major changes occurred in hurricane forecast communication: the forecasts themselves improved in terms of accuracy and lead time, the NHC made minor changes in the graphics and expanded the explanatory material that accompanies the graphics, and some efforts were made to reach out to emergency response planners and municipal officials to enhance their understanding of the forecasts and graphics. There were some improvements in the responses to Ike, though a number of deaths were due to inadequate evacuations, and property damage probably

  8. Motor-auditory-visual integration: The role of the human mirror neuron system in communication and communication disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Le Bel, Ronald M.; Pineda, Jaime A.; Sharma, Anu

    2009-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) is a trimodal system composed of neuronal populations that respond to motor, visual, and auditory stimulation, such as when an action is performed, observed, heard or read about. In humans, the MNS has been identified using neuro-imaging techniques (such as fMRI and mu suppression in the EEG). It reflects an integration of motor-auditory-visual information processing related to aspects of language learning including action understanding and recognition. Such int...

  9. What to Do before the Violence Happens: Designing the Crisis Communication Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armistead, Lew

    1996-01-01

    When a crisis arrives, two elements can help save your school's reputation: the principal's precrisis credibility with the public and the press and a crisis communication plan. Crisis plans should designate a school spokesperson and procedures for gathering, communicating, and disseminating information. Key audiences include staff, students, and…

  10. Visual Communication in Transition: Designing for New Media Literacies and Visual Culture Art Education across Activities and Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuiker, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    As an example of design-based research, this case study describes and analyses the enactment of a collaborative drawing and animation studio in a Singapore secondary school art classroom. The design embodies principles of visual culture art education and new media literacies in order to organize transitions in the settings of participation and…

  11. Effects of Tactile, Visual, and Auditory Cues About Threat Location on Target Acquisition and Attention to Visual and Auditory Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    When Haas, Pillalamarri, Stachowiak , and Lattin (2005) presented target location information in plus and minus degrees (e.g., “Target minus 15 degrees...Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 2005. Haas, E. C.; Pillalamarri, R. S.; Stachowiak , C. C.; Lattin, M. A. Audio Cues to Assist Visual Search in

  12. National Science Foundation Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences Tony Chan (USA) visiting CMS experiment on 23rd May 2007 with Spokesperson T. Virdee, Deputy Spokesperson R. Cousins, Advisor to CERN Director-General J. Ellis, US CMS Research Program Deputy Manager D. Marlow and FNAL D. Green

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    National Science Foundation Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences Tony Chan (USA) visiting CMS experiment on 23rd May 2007 with Spokesperson T. Virdee, Deputy Spokesperson R. Cousins, Advisor to CERN Director-General J. Ellis, US CMS Research Program Deputy Manager D. Marlow and FNAL D. Green

  13. Senior Senator from Florida and Chairman, Senate Committee on Space, Aeronautics and Related Sciences W. Nelson, visiting the ATLAS cavern and LHC tunnel with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and AMS Collaboration Spokesperson S.C.C.Ting, 16 March 2008.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Senior Senator from Florida and Chairman, Senate Committee on Space, Aeronautics and Related Sciences W. Nelson, visiting the ATLAS cavern and LHC tunnel with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and AMS Collaboration Spokesperson S.C.C.Ting, 16 March 2008.

  14. 17th April 2008 - W. W. Tichenor, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the ATLAS cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and AMS Collaboration Spokesperson S.C.C.Ting.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    17th April 2008 - W. W. Tichenor, Ambassador, Permanent Representative of the United States of America to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the ATLAS cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and AMS Collaboration Spokesperson S.C.C.Ting.

  15. 17 September 2013 - Estonian Minister of Education and Research J. Aaviksoo signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R- Heuer; visiting the TOTEM facility with TOTEM Collaboration Spokesperson S. Giani; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka and visiting the CMS cavern with CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela. International Relations Adviser R. Voss present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    17 September 2013 - Estonian Minister of Education and Research J. Aaviksoo signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R- Heuer; visiting the TOTEM facility with TOTEM Collaboration Spokesperson S. Giani; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka and visiting the CMS cavern with CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela. International Relations Adviser R. Voss present.

  16. 21 June 2010 - TUBITAK Vice President A. Adli signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer, visiting the ATLAS control room at Point 1 with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and CMS Control Centre, building 354, with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli. Throughout accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    21 June 2010 - TUBITAK Vice President A. Adli signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer, visiting the ATLAS control room at Point 1 with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and CMS Control Centre, building 354, with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli. Throughout accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis.

  17. Masked Visual Analysis: Minimizing Type I Error in Visually Guided Single-Case Design for Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Tara McAllister; Hitchcock, Elaine R.; Ferron, John

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Single-case experimental designs are widely used to study interventions for communication disorders. Traditionally, single-case experiments follow a response-guided approach, where design decisions during the study are based on participants' observed patterns of behavior. However, this approach has been criticized for its high rate of…

  18. The PolarSEEDS project: communicating Greenland melting through visualization and sonification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedesco, M.; Perl, J.; Saltz, I.; Ham, E.

    2013-12-01

    During fall of 2011 a group of faculty at the City College of New York from the Science and Art Divisions drafted a concept for a project about communicating results from his research concerning the melting of the Greenland ice sheet through 'unconventional' venues, such as Visual Arts and Music. The opportunity to build a team and perform a project came to reality when the City College of New York (CCNY) called for the City SEED call proposal (therefore the name POLARSEEDS). The call was looking to fund innovative interdisciplinary work that could create connections among different disciplines within CCNY. The faculty members of the project were affiliated with the Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences (Tedesco), the Music Dept. and the Sonic Arts Center (Perl) and Art Dept. (Saltz and Ham). The PolarSEEDS project involved also six students at graduate and master level from the three departments. The project culminated in an exhibition at CCNY in which soundscapes obtained from sounds recorded during fieldwork in Greenland were combined with sonifications of the outputs of a climate model used to study melting in Greenland to generate ambient sounds. At the exhibit, many sonifications of the model outputs were available at computer stations together with the explanation of the different approaches undertaken to generate them. Large aerial photos of supraglacial streams and lakes over Greenland were exhibited together with infographics addressing some of the causes and implications of melting. Videos showing either footage of melting features or the impact of albedo on melting (through ad hoc experiments carried out in laboratory and filmed for the exhibit) were also exhibited. Lastly, the visitors had the opportunity to play an interactive web game developed for the project in which they had to balance the amount of clouds, solar radiation, rain and snow to keep the Greenland ice sheet from melting completely and flood New York City. In my presentation, I will

  19. Collaboration between student art teachers and communication and digital media students promoting subject specific didactics in digital visual learning design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Kirsten; Buhl, Mie

    =pdf Dunleavy, M. & Dede, C. (2014). Augmented reality teaching and learning. in. J.M. Spector, M.D. Merrill, J. Elen & M.J. Bishop (eds), The handbook og research for educational communications and technology New York: Springer http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/docs/icb.topic1116077.files...... facilitates the development of new forms of digital visual learning. Our discussion is based on an empirical project of developing a digital visual learning design. Student art teachers and teacher trainers took part in the design process performed by communication students. The project took its point...... Technology: Rethinking Technology and the Research Agenda. Educational Technology & Society, 11 (4), 2008, pp. 29–40 Beetham, H. (2007): An approach to learning activity design. In: Beetham, H. & Sharpe, R. (eds.) Rethinking pedagogy for a digital age. Designing and delivering e-learning. Abingdon: Routledge...

  20. Communicating landslide risk by combining hazard and open infrastructure data in interactive visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tost, Jordi; Olen, Stephanie M.; Bookhagen, Bodo; Heidmann, Frank

    2017-04-01

    The DIGENTI project ("DIGitaler ENtscheiderTIsch für das Naturgefahrenmanagement auf Basis von Satellitendaten und Volunteered Geographic Information") has the goal of quantifying and communicating the threat of natural hazards in the Cesar and La Guajira departments of northeast Colombia. The end-goal of the project is to provide an interactive guide for policy and decision makers, and for disaster relief coordination. Over the last years, abundant research has been done in order to analyze risk and to provide relevant information that improves effectiveness in disaster management. The communication of natural hazards risk has traditionally been built upon the estimation of hazard maps. In the context of landslides, hazard maps are used to depict potential danger from landslides and visualize the possibility of future landsliding throughout a given area. Such hazard maps provide a static snapshot of the local estimated threat in a region. However, in mountainous regions, a sufficiently large landslide in remote mountainous areas may represent a potential threat to settlements located downstream of a landslide event. The research presented here proposes an approach to visualize and interactively explore landslide risk by combining static hazard maps, hydrologic networks, and OpenStreetMap data. We estimated the potential for hillslope instabilities scenarios in the region of interest by using the TanDEM-X World DEM to calculate a suite Factor of Safety (FOS) maps. The FOS estimates the ratio of total resisting and driving forces to hillslope mass movements. By combining the World DEM with other environmental data (e.g., the Harmonized World Soil Database), we were able to create a suite of high-resolution landslide potential maps for the region of interest. The suite of FOS maps are calculated based on user-selectable parameters (e.g, total mass sliding thickness) that are not well constrained by field observations. We additionally use the TanDEM-X World DEM to

  1. Motor-Auditory-Visual Integration: The Role of the Human Mirror Neuron System in Communication and Communication Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bel, Ronald M.; Pineda, Jaime A.; Sharma, Anu

    2009-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) is a trimodal system composed of neuronal populations that respond to motor, visual, and auditory stimulation, such as when an action is performed, observed, heard or read about. In humans, the MNS has been identified using neuroimaging techniques (such as fMRI and mu suppression in the EEG). It reflects an…

  2. [A Case of Ruptured Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm with Visual Field Defects and Deteriorating to Severe Vision Loss].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakakura, Kazuki; Ikeda, Go; Nakai, Yasunobu; Watanabe, Noriyuki; Shiigai, Masanari; Uemura, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira

    2017-10-01

    Although Terson's syndrome is a well-known cause of vision loss due to intracerebral aneurysm rupture, optic nerve neuropathy can also occur because of other causes. Here, we report such a case, i.e., a ruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm accompanied by vision loss and visual field disturbances due to a cause other than Terson's syndrome. A 47-year-old man presented with right superior altitudinal hemianopia. Computed tomography (CT) showed subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and three-dimensional CT angiography revealed an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. Coil embolization was performed. Right visual acuity degenerated to blindness in the acute stage. MRI performed on day 7 post-admission revealed that the aneurysm had swollen and made contact with the right optic disk. On the basis of the patient's clinical course, we believe that the deterioration in his visual acuity could have been due to ischemic optic neuropathy (ION) resulting from SAH, and the subsequent edema and poor blood perfusion may be attributed to spasm. In cases of visual disturbance associated with SAH, as in our case, it is important to perform MRI to evaluate the damage or risk to the optic nerve as soon as possible. (Received December 26, 2016; Accepted June 9, 2017; Published October 1, 2017).

  3. Authenticity in Obesity Public Service Announcements: Influence of Spokesperson Type, Viewer Weight, and Source Credibility on Diet, Exercise, Information Seeking, and Electronic Word-of-Mouth Intentions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phua, Joe; Tinkham, Spencer

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the joint influence of spokesperson type in obesity public service announcements (PSAs) and viewer weight on diet intention, exercise intention, information seeking, and electronic word-of-mouth (eWoM) intention. Results of a 2 (spokesperson type: real person vs. actor) × 2 (viewer weight: overweight vs. non-overweight) between-subjects experiment indicated that overweight viewers who saw the PSA featuring the real person had the highest diet intention, exercise intention, information seeking, and eWoM intention. Parasocial interaction was also found to mediate the relationships between spokesperson type/viewer weight and two of the dependent variables: diet intention and exercise intention. In addition, viewers who saw the PSA featuring the real person rated the spokesperson as significantly higher on source credibility (trustworthiness, competence, and goodwill) than those who saw the PSA featuring the actor.

  4. 8 July 2011 - Kingdom of Lesotho Minister of Education and Training M. Khaketla in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    The delegation included Motsoakapa Makara, principal secretary for the ministry of education and training, Mefane Lintle, Lesotho delegate, and Moshe Anthony Maruping, Lesotho ambassador, visited the ATLAS visitor centre with Peter Jenni, former ATLAS spokesperson.

  5. 29 January 2009 - Italian Minister for Foreign Affairs F. Frattini, visiting the ATLAS experimental area with Director-General R. Heuer and Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    Present during the ATLAS undegrround visit: Dr Fabiola Gianotti,ATLAS CollaborationDeputy Spokesperson and Spokesperson Designate; Dr Monica Pepe-Altarelli, LHCb Collaboration CERN Team Leader; Prof. Guido Tonelli,CMS Collaboration, Deputy Spokesperson; Prof. Roberto Petronzio, INFN President. CERN participants present in the audience during the presentations by the Director-General R. Heuer and by Prof. Antonino Zichichi, ALICE Collaboration, University of Bologna: Prof. Sergio Bertolucci,Director for Research and Scientific Computing; Prof. Felicitas Pauss, Coordinator for External Relations Coordinator; Prof. Carlo Rubbia, CERN Former Director-General, Nobel Prize in Physics 1984; Dr Jurgen Schukraft, ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson. Members of the delegation in the audience: Ambassador to the UN, H. Exc. Mr Caracciolo di Vetri; Ambassador Alain G.M. Economides,Capo di Gabinetto; Prof. Antonio Bettanini\tCons. dell’On. Ministro per le Relazioni istituzionali; On. Mario Pescante and Min. Plen Maurizio Mas...

  6. The use of visual and verbal means of communication across psychological distance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amit, Elinor; Wakslak, Cheryl; Trope, Yaacov

    2013-01-01

    The current study investigated the effect of distance on medium preferences in interpersonal communication. Five experiments showed that people's preference for using pictures (vs. words) is increasingly higher when communicating with temporally, socially, or geographically proximal (vs. distal) others. In contrast, preference for words is increasingly higher when communicating with those who were distal. A sixth experiment showed that communication's medium influences distance preferences, such that people's preference for communicating a message to a distant (vs. proximal) target is greater for verbal compared with pictorial communications. A seventh experiment showed that recipients are more likely to heed a sender's suggestions when the medium and distance are congruent. These findings reflect the suitability of pictures for communication with proximal others and words with distal others. Implications of these findings for construal-level theory, perspective taking, embodied cognition, the development of language, and social skills with children are discussed.

  7. Art in the making. The evolutionary origins of visual art as a communication signal

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Straffon, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    The corpus of art from the Pleistocene has grown substantially in recent decades, and with it, the earliest evidence of visual art has become much older than previously anticipated, going back over 100,000 years. This new information has rendered some traditional ideas about the recent origins of visual art obsolete. Existing archaeological and evolutionary models that aim to explain the emergence of visual art should now be reassessed in light of current data. That is the aim of this book. F...

  8. Testing a key assumption in animal communication: between-individual variation in female visual systems alters perception of male signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald, Kelly L; Ensminger, Amanda L; Shawkey, Matthew D; Lucas, Jeffrey R; Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

    2017-12-15

    Variation in male signal production has been extensively studied because of its relevance to animal communication and sexual selection. Although we now know much about the mechanisms that can lead to variation between males in the properties of their signals, there is still a general assumption that there is little variation in terms of how females process these male signals. Variation between females in signal processing may lead to variation between females in how they rank individual males, meaning that one single signal may not be universally attractive to all females. We tested this assumption in a group of female wild-caught brown-headed cowbirds ( Molothrus ater ), a species that uses a male visual signal (e.g. a wingspread display) to make its mate-choice decisions. We found that females varied in two key parameters of their visual sensory systems related to chromatic and achromatic vision: cone densities (both total and proportions) and cone oil droplet absorbance. Using visual chromatic and achromatic contrast modeling, we then found that this between-individual variation in visual physiology leads to significant between-individual differences in how females perceive chromatic and achromatic male signals. These differences may lead to variation in female preferences for male visual signals, which would provide a potential mechanism for explaining individual differences in mate-choice behavior. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. Creating opportunities in astronomy: Communication for people who are blind or visually impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grice, N.

    2008-06-01

    Astronomy is such a visually rich field that you may wonder if access is possible for a person who is blind or visually impaired. The good news is that with creative strategies and available resources, students who are blind need not be excluded. Braille text, tactile illustrations, handson models, and descriptive narration can remove many barriers.

  10. Emotionalization in Science Communication: The Impact of Narratives and Visual Representations on Knowledge Gain and Risk Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Flemming

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The communication of scientific information plays an increasingly important role for scientists and scientific institutions. This is especially true of institutions in the field of biodiversity and conservation research, since the transfer of research results to the public is a prerequisite for decision-making, and the success of conservation measures often depends on public acceptance or active contribution. To have the desired impact, science communication in the context of human–wildlife interactions must enable recipients to (1 gain valid knowledge, (2 form an attitude toward the subject matter, and (3 develop an adequate understanding of the risks and dangers associated with human–wildlife interactions, which are usually overestimated by the general public. Using the topic of foxes in urban habitats, we investigated the role of emotionalization in science communication. In a laboratory experiment with 127 university students (91 females, we manipulated textual and visual features in an information brochure about foxes and examined their impact on people’s knowledge gain, attitude development, and modified risk perception. In particular, we compared a narrative presentation to a non-narrative list of facts and examined the use of photographs of young foxes. We found a positive development in all of the outcome variables from the pre- to the posttest (more knowledge, more positive attitude, lower risk perception. We also found an interaction effect of text type and visualization on knowledge gain that highlighted the importance of the fit between text type and visualization. In contrast to our expectations, we did not find any differential effects of specific treatments on attitude development. Finally, we found a main effect of text type on modified risk perception, indicating less reduction of risk perception with a narrative article than with a fact list. We discuss our findings with respect to the role of emotionalization in science

  11. Social media and its dual use in biopreparedness: communication and visualization tools in an animal bioterrorism incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Elisabeth; Barker, Gary C; Landgren, Jonas; Griberg, Isaac; Skiby, Jeffrey E; Tubbin, Anna; von Stapelmohr, Anne; Härenstam, Malin; Jansson, Mikael; Knutsson, Rickard

    2013-09-01

    This article focuses on social media and interactive challenges for emergency organizations during a bioterrorism or agroterrorism incident, and it outlines the dual-use dilemma of social media. Attackers or terrorists can use social media as their modus operandi, and defenders, including emergency organizations in law enforcement and public and animal health, can use it for peaceful purposes. To get a better understanding of the uses of social media in these situations, a workshop was arranged in Stockholm, Sweden, to raise awareness about social media and animal bioterrorism threats. Fifty-six experts and crisis communicators from international and national organizations participated. As a result of the workshop, it was concluded that emergency organizations can collect valuable information and monitor social media before, during, and after an outbreak. In order to make use of interactive communication to obtain collective intelligence from the public, emergency organizations must adapt to social networking technologies, requiring multidisciplinary knowledge in the fields of information, communication, IT, and biopreparedness. Social network messaging during a disease outbreak can be visualized in stream graphs and networks showing clusters of Twitter and Facebook users. The visualization of social media can be an important preparedness tool in the response to bioterrorism and agroterrorism.

  12. Corporate Communication Strategies in Restaurant Franchises. Chromatic Analysis of Visual Corporate Identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Juan M. Monserrat Gauchi, Juan.Monserrat@ua.es

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this piece of research is to determine the interrelationships between the corporate image used by the main restaurant franchises operating in Spain and the colours used by them. Following Colour Theory and the studies on colour psychology that will be dealt with during the course of this paper, we have started with the principal hypothesis that red will be the predominant colour, together with yellow, due to the fact that these colours, because of their inherent connotations, are those best able to convey the activity and philosophy of fast food companies.The field of Visual Corporate Identity is an extremely wide one in which various elements are at work, such as brand, logo, symbol, typography, colour, different compositions or versions of the brand and the application of the brand to different support media. This means that when it comes to the comparative analysis, this piece of research will focus on the chromatic aspect of each sample analysed as it operates in the fast food sector and the Spanish market, based on the assumption that the way in which elements such as colour are used is not arbitrary.The methodology used in this research meant selecting a sector of activity from within the commercial system of fast food franchises and determining the samples to be analysed based on the following criteria: highest volume of invoicing and greatest number of franchises operating in Spain. To accomplish this, the authors have based their research upon qualitative methods and secondary sources. In conclusion, we have been able to demonstrate how the use of corporate identity and, more specifically, colour, is deliberate and undoubtedly forms part of, and is subordinated to, the corporate communication strategies defined by the company.La presente investigación trata de determinar las interrelaciones que se dan entre la imagen corporativa utilizada por las principales cadenas de franquicia de restauración operativas en España y los

  13. Applying Technology to Visually Support Language and Communication in Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shane, Howard C.; Laubscher, Emily H.; Schlosser, Ralf W.; Flynn, Suzanne; Sorce, James F.; Abramson, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    The burgeoning role of technology in society has provided opportunities for the development of new means of communication for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). This paper offers an organizational framework for describing traditional and emerging augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technology, and highlights how tools…

  14. The Effectiveness of Combining Tangible Symbols with the Picture Exchange Communication System to Teach Requesting Skills to Children with Multiple Disabilities Including Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Emad

    2009-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an augmentative and alternative communication program (Frost & Bondy, 2002). Although PECS has been effectively used to teach functional requesting skills for children with autism, mental retardation, visual impairment, and physical disabilities (e.g., Anderson, Moore, & Bourne, 2007; Chambers &…

  15. Usability and Visual Communication for Southern California Tsunami Evacuation Information: The importance of information design in disaster risk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenichen, C.; Schandler, S.; Wells, M.; Danielsen, T.

    2015-12-01

    Evacuation behavior, including participation and response, is rarely an individual and isolated process and the outcomes are usually systemic. Ineffective evacuation information can easily attribute to delayed evacuation response. Delays increase demands on already extended emergency personal, increase the likelihood of traffic congestion, and can cause harm to self and property. From an information design perspective, addressing issues in cognitive recall and emergency psychology, this case study examines evacuation messaging including written, audio, and visual presentation of information, and describes the application of design principles and role of visual communication for Southern California tsunami evacuation outreach. The niche of this project is the inclusion of cognitive processing as the driving influence when making formal design decisions and measurable data from a 4-year cognitive recall study to support the solution. Image included shows a tsunami evacaution map before and after the redesign.

  16. Cultivating an entrepreneurial mindset at universities of social studies and visual communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpe Pérez, Inmaculada Concepción; Louro, Carla

    2016-01-01

    , suggesting that blending practice with visuals (games) is worth trying. In this paper we want to present the very positive experience of teaching and integrating entrepreneurial skills within social and visual education (filmmaking, animation and social work) and the creation of entrepreneurial minds......Entrepreneurship is often defined as a creation of start-up companies, but since the last decade this concept has been changing, therefor started the entrepreneurial teaching in schools. Approximately 65% of the population is visual, meaning it’s easier learning by images/animation or games...... with the use of pedagogics, to improve creative learning at the same time social emotional environments emerge. We present two study cases where students are simulating entrepreneurial experiences within universities. Considering that the learning process grows faster through experience, this method seems...

  17. A Simple, Visually Oriented Communication System to Improve Postoperative Care Following Microvascular Free Tissue Transfer: Development, Results, and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Peter W; Landford, Wilmina; Gardenier, Jason; Otterburn, David M; Rohde, Christine H; Spector, Jason A

    2016-07-01

    Background Communication, particularly transmission of information between the surgical and nursing teams, has been identified as one of the most crucial determinants of patient outcomes. Nonetheless, transfer of information among and between the physician and nursing teams in the immediate postoperative period is often informal, verbal, and inconsistent. Methods An iterative process of multidisciplinary information gathering was undertaken to create a novel postoperative communication system (the "Pop-form"). Once developed, nurses were surveyed on multiple measures regarding the perceived likelihood that it would improve their ability to provide directed patient care. Data were quantified using a Likert scale (0-10), and statistically analyzed. Results The Pop-form records and transfers operative details, specific anatomic monitoring parameters, and senior physician contact information. Sixty-eight nurses completed surveys. The perceived usefulness of different components of the Pop-form system was as follows: 8.9 for the description of the procedure; 9.3 for the operative diagram; 9.4 for the monitoring details and parameters; and 9.4 for the direct contact information for the appropriate surgical team member. All respondents were in favor of widespread adoption of the Pop-form. Conclusion This uniform, visual communication system requires less than 1 minute to compose, yet formalizes and standardizes inter-team communication, and therefore shows promise for improving outcomes following microvascular free tissue transfer. We believe that this simple, innovative communication tool has the potential to be more broadly applied to many other health care settings. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  18. A framework for communication between visually impaired, hearing impaired and speech impaired using arduino

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sujatha, R.; Khandelwa, Prakhar; Gupta, Anusha; Anand, Nayan

    2017-11-01

    A long time ago our society accepted the notion of treating people with disabilities not as unviable and disabled but as differently-abled, recognizing their skills beyond their disabilities. The next step has to be taken by our scientific community, that is, to normalize lives of the people with disabilities and make it so as if they are no different to us. The primary step in this direction would be to normalize communication between people. People with an impaired speech or impaired vision or impaired hearing face difficulties while having a casual conversation with others. Any form of communication feels so strenuous that the impaired end up communicating just the important information and avoid a casual conversation. To normalize conversation between the impaired we need a simple and compact device which facilitates the conversation by providing the information in the desired form.

  19. Evaluation methodology for comparing memory and communication of analytic processes in visual analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragan, Eric D [ORNL; Goodall, John R [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Provenance tools can help capture and represent the history of analytic processes. In addition to supporting analytic performance, provenance tools can be used to support memory of the process and communication of the steps to others. Objective evaluation methods are needed to evaluate how well provenance tools support analyst s memory and communication of analytic processes. In this paper, we present several methods for the evaluation of process memory, and we discuss the advantages and limitations of each. We discuss methods for determining a baseline process for comparison, and we describe various methods that can be used to elicit process recall, step ordering, and time estimations. Additionally, we discuss methods for conducting quantitative and qualitative analyses of process memory. By organizing possible memory evaluation methods and providing a meta-analysis of the potential benefits and drawbacks of different approaches, this paper can inform study design and encourage objective evaluation of process memory and communication.

  20. Art in the making. The evolutionary origins of visual art as a communication signal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mendoza Straffon, Larissa

    2014-01-01

    The corpus of art from the Pleistocene has grown substantially in recent decades, and with it, the earliest evidence of visual art has become much older than previously anticipated, going back over 100,000 years. This new information has rendered some traditional ideas about the recent origins of

  1. The impact of visual communication on the intersubjective development of early parent-child interaction with 18- to 24-month-old deaf toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loots, Gerrit; Devisé, Isabel; Jacquet, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    This article presents a study that examined the impact of visual communication on the quality of the early interaction between deaf and hearing mothers and fathers and their deaf children aged between 18 and 24 months. Three communication mode groups of parent-deaf child dyads that differed by the use of signing and visual-tactile communication strategies were involved: (a) hearing parents communicating with their deaf child in an auditory/oral way, (b) hearing parents using total communication, and (c) deaf parents using sign language. Based on Loots and colleagues' intersubjective developmental theory, parent-deaf child interaction was analyzed according to the occurrence of intersubjectivity during free play with a standard set of toys. The data analyses indicated that the use of sign language in a sequential visual way of communication enabled the deaf parents to involve their 18- to 24-month-old deaf infants in symbolic intersubjectivity, whereas hearing parents who hold on to oral-only communication were excluded from involvement in symbolic intersubjectivity with their deaf infants. Hearing parents using total communication were more similar to deaf parents, but they still differed from deaf parents in exchanging and sharing symbolic and linguistic meaning with their deaf child.

  2. The visual communication in the optonometric scales La comunicación visual en las escalas optométricas A comunicação visual nas escalas optométricas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Arruda Dantas

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication through vision involves visual apprenticeship that demands ocular integrity, which results in the importance of the evaluation of visual acuity. The scale of images, formed by optotypes, is a method for the verification of visual acuity in kindergarten children. To identify the optotype the child needs to know the image in analysis. Given the importance of visual communication during the process of construction of the scale of images, one presents a bibliographic, analytical study aiming at thinking about the principles for the construction of those tables. One considers the draw inserted as an optotype as a non-verbal symbolic expression of the body and/or of the environment constructed based on the caption of experiences by the individual. One contests the indiscriminate use of images, for one understands that there must be previous knowledge. Despite the subjectivity of the optotypes, the scales continue valid if one adapts images to those of the universe of the children to be examined.La comunicación que ocurre a través de la visión abarca el aprendizaje visual que depende de la integridad ocular, por eso es relevante la evaluación de su acuidad. La escala de figuras, formada por optotipos, es un método usado para verificar la acuidad visual en preescolares. Para identificar el opto-tipo, el niño necesita conocer la figura en análisis. Debido a la importancia de la comunicación visual durante el proceso de construcción de las escalas de figuras, se presenta un estudio bibliográfico analítico, cuyo objetivo es el de reflexionar sobre los principios de construcción de estas tablas. El dibujo inserido como opto-tipo se considera una expresión no verbal del cuerpo y/o del ambiente, construido mediante captación de experiencias por el individuo. Se cuestiona el uso indiscriminado de las figuras, pues conforme se entiende debe existir un conocimiento previo de las mismas. A pesar de la subjetividad de los optotipos, las

  3. Visual communication, reproductive behavior, and home range of Hylodes dactylocinus (Anura, Leptodactylidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Narvaes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We studied the signaling, reproductive and courtship behaviors of the diurnal stream-dwelling frog Hylodes dactylocinus. The repertoire of visual signals of H. dactylocinus includes foot-flagging, leg-stretching, body movements, and toe-wiggling. The visual signals are performed only by males and are used to defend territories against intruders and to attract females. Home rangesize varied from 0.12 to 13.12 m2 for males (N = 44, and from 0.45 to 7.98 m2 for females (N = 24; residency time varied from one to 12 months for males, and from two to 10 months for females. During the courtship of H. dactylocinus the male gives an encounter call towards an approaching female, touches her snout, and guides her to a previously dug nest. After oviposition, the female leaves the nest and returns to her own home range; the male remains calling after concealing the nest entrance.

  4. THE VISUAL COMMUNICATION FOR ORIENTATION IN THE INFORMAL ORIGIN ÁREAS OF THE CITY

    OpenAIRE

    LUIS OTÁVIO NOGUEIRA PESSÔA

    2007-01-01

    Esta pesquisa analisa a comunicação visual para orientação no espaço urbano da Cidade do Rio de Janeiro, seus emissores, veículos e receptores, com o propósito de avaliar a sua abrangência discursiva e especular sobre seu provável potencial de aproximação entre as áreas informais, ou de origem informal, e o conjunto da cidade, contribuindo para a declarada intenção da prefeitura de integrar todo o ambiente urbano. Retratando a realidade social e morfológica de c...

  5. Visual Communication and Design’s Role Drives Branding Innovation and Social Responsibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen T.F. Poon

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the aim of research is to analyse the theoretical principles of traditional and newer forms of branding design, and to review the visual communicator’s roles as constructed through traditional, social and postmodernist perspectives. Where designers traditionally direct their course in the branding process to solving clients’ problems through the production of symbolic icons and images, this study will place their responsibility towards understanding society’s attitudinal and behavioural change at the forefront. This paper uses case study and qualitative inquiry methods to challenge the design fraternity to see beyond the bread-and-butter work behind conceptual design development, and to find a stronger relational understanding between their life experiences, changing consumer perceptions of the world, and businesses’ ultimate goals of profit. Research shows that as the dynamics of ethical business and social purpose continue to affect the production and consumption of goods, the visual communicator’s role is to both define and empower cultural consumption as the core brand purpose of today’s organisations - five decades since Ken Garland’s manifesto; “First Things First” was proclaimed. Lastly, it shall be argued for every designer to evaluate their social responsibility in the branding execution of marketed consumer brands beyond symbolic meaning construction.  Keywords: design; postmodern branding; social innovation; social purpose.

  6. Creation and validation of a visual macroscopic hematuria scale for optimal communication and an objective hematuria index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Lih-Ming; Chum, Jia-Min; Maddy, Peter; Chan, Steven T F; Travis, Douglas; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2010-07-01

    Macroscopic hematuria is a common symptom and sign that is challenging to quantify and describe. The degree of hematuria communicated is variable due to health worker experience combined with lack of a reliable grading tool. We produced a reliable, standardized visual scale to describe hematuria severity. Our secondary aim was to validate a new laboratory test to quantify hemoglobin in hematuria specimens. Nurses were surveyed to ascertain current hematuria descriptions. Blood and urine were titrated at varying concentrations and digitally photographed in catheter bag tubing. Photos were processed and printed on transparency paper to create a prototype swatch or card showing light, medium, heavy and old hematuria. Using the swatch 60 samples were rated by nurses and laymen. Interobserver variability was reported using the generalized kappa coefficient of agreement. Specimens were analyzed for hemolysis by measuring optical density at oxyhemoglobin absorption peaks. Interobserver agreement between nurses and laymen was good (kappa = 0.51, p <0.001). Subgroup analysis showed substantial agreement for light hematuria (kappa = 0.71). Overall agreement improved when the moderate (kappa = 0.28) and heavy (kappa = 0.53) hematuria categories were combined (kappa = 0.70). Compared to known blood concentrations the assay of optical density at oxyhemoglobin absorption peaks showed a linear trend. A simple visual scale to grade and communicate hematuria with adequate interobserver agreement is feasible. The test for optical density at oxyhemoglobin absorption peaks is a new method, validated in our study, to quantify hemoglobin in a hematuria specimen. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Visual Culture and Visual Literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Onursoy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently visual literacy gains importance in the context of understanding the rising visual culture products, thinking about them and producing these products. The purpose of this article examines the concept of visual literacy that is the relationship with visual culture depending on the literature. Visual literacy is one of the multiple literatures that emerge from the development of information and information dissemination forms. Visual literacy is an interdisciplinary concept and associated with some areas, such as graphic design, visual arts, architectural engineering, industrial product design, visual communication and media literacy. Visual culture covers every human product, so visual products that we face in everyday life and visual realities with abundant alternatives constitute our daily life itself. Sometimes, this confusing visual understanding creates a gap between contemporary cultural richness and what can be observed.

  8. The Local Genius Typography as a Source of Idea for Latin-based Typeface Design in Visual Communication Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Haswanto

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During its long history, slowly but sure, Indonesia had accepted the influence of the written language from various nation and civilization. Approximately in the 15th century AD, European brought their language system, Latin, to Indonesia, which had been developed until present time. The usage of Latin alphabet for daily communication in Indonesia has created a disadvantage for the local/ethnic language, especially since the Latin provided an easier writing and speaking system. Latin uses alphabet system in which one sound represents one letter: A, B, C, etc. In contrast, the ethnic language uses syllable system in which one sound could consist of more than one letter (a, ba, ta, ka, nga, kha, etc. The growing of the nation of Indonesia with its various ethnic groups created the need for unification language, a language with a universal system. Furthermore, the alphabet system is easier to be used for various written and spoken language in the world. The richness of ethnic alphabet from Indonesia could become infinite ideas in developing computer typefaces. A typographer could design Latin alphabet with the characteristic of ethnic alphabets by capturing the traditional elements from the letters. These findings could enrich the field of visual communication nowadays. 

  9. Evaluation of Mixed-Mode Data-Link Communications for NextGen 4DT and Equivalent Visual Surface Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Jones, Denise R.; Allamandola, Angela S.; Arthur, Jarvis, J., III; Bailey, Randall E.

    2010-01-01

    By 2025, U.S. air traffic is predicted to increase 3-fold and may strain the current air traffic management system, which may not be able to accommodate this growth. In response to this challenge, a revolutionary new concept has been proposed for U.S. aviation operations, termed the Next Generation Air Transportation System or NextGen. Many key capabilities are being identified to enable NextGen, including the use of data-link communications. Because NextGen represents a radically different approach to air traffic management and requires a dramatic shift in the tasks, roles, and responsibilities for the flight deck, there are numerous research issues and challenges that must be overcome to ensure a safe, sustainable air transportation system. Flight deck display and crew-vehicle interaction concepts are being developed that proactively investigate and overcome potential technology and safety barriers that might otherwise constrain the full realization of NextGen. The paper describes simulation research examining data-link communications during 4DT and equivalent visual surface operations.

  10. Communications

    OpenAIRE

    anonymous

    1982-01-01

    Communications are read for interest in issues that have importance for all who practice and use management science. They are not refereed for technical correctness, as are articles and Notes that appear in Management Science. The reader is therefore cautioned that the publication of any Communication implies neither scientific standing nor acceptance per se on the part of either Management Science or TIMS. Centers Within Universities: Management and Evaluation by James G. Taaffe, On a Common...

  11. Image Quality Assessment for Different Wavelet Compression Techniques in a Visual Communication Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuha A. S. Alwan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Images with subband coding and threshold wavelet compression are transmitted over a Rayleigh communication channel with additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN, after quantization and 16-QAM modulation. A comparison is made between these two types of compression using both mean square error (MSE and structural similarity (SSIM image quality assessment (IQA criteria applied to the reconstructed image at the receiver. The two methods yielded comparable SSIM but different MSE measures. In this work, we justify our results which support previous findings in the literature that the MSE between two images is not indicative of structural similarity or the visibility of errors. It is found that it is difficult to reduce the pointwise errors in subband-compressed images (higher MSE. However, the compressed images provide comparable SSIM or perceived quality for both types of compression provided that the retained energy after compression is the same.

  12. Situational analysis of communication of HIV and AIDS information to persons with visual impairment: a case of Kang'onga Production Centre in Ndola, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintende, Grace Nsangwe; Sitali, Doreen; Michelo, Charles; Mweemba, Oliver

    2017-04-04

    Despite the increases in health promotion and educational programs on HIV and AIDS, lack of information and communication on HIV and AIDS for the visually impaired persons continues. The underlying factors that create the information and communication gaps have not been fully explored in Zambia. It is therefore important that, this situational analysis on HIV and AIDS information dissemination to persons with visual impairments at Kang'onga Production Centre in Ndola was conducted. The study commenced in December 2014 to May 2015. A qualitative case study design was employed. The study used two focus group discussions with males and females. Each group comprised twelve participants. Eight in-depth interviews involving the visually impaired persons and five key informants working with visually impaired persons were conducted. Data was analysed thematically using NVIVO 8 software. Ethical clearance was sought from Excellency in Research Ethics and Science. Reference Number 2014-May-030. It was established that most visually impaired people lacked knowledge on the cause, transmission and treatment of HIV and AIDS resulting in misconceptions. It was revealed that health promoters and people working with the visually impaired did not have specific HIV and AIDS information programs in Zambia. Further, it was discovered that the media, information education communication and health education were channels through which the visually impaired accessed HIV and AIDS information. Discrimination, stigma, lack of employment opportunities, funding and poverty were among the many challenges identified which the visually impaired persons faced in accessing HIV and AIDS information. Integration of the visually impaired in HIV and AIDS programs would increase funding for economic empowerment and health promotions in order to improve communication on HIV and AIDS information. The study showed that, the visually impaired persons in Zambia are not catered for in the dissemination of HIV

  13. Using Visual Scene Displays as Communication Support Options for People with Chronic, Severe Aphasia: A Summary of AAC Research and Future Research Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beukelman, David R; Hux, Karen; Dietz, Aimee; McKelvey, Miechelle; Weissling, Kristy

    2015-01-01

    Research about the effectiveness of communicative supports and advances in photographic technology has prompted changes in the way speech-language pathologists design and implement interventions for people with aphasia. The purpose of this paper is to describe the use of photographic images as a basis for developing communication supports for people with chronic aphasia secondary to sudden-onset events due to cerebrovascular accidents (strokes). Topics include the evolution of AAC-based supports as they relate to people with aphasia, the development and key features of visual scene displays (VSDs), and future directions concerning the incorporation of photographs into communication supports for people with chronic and severe aphasia.

  14. New CMS spokesperson: “An honour to be chosen to lead a spectacular collection of people”

    CERN Multimedia

    Achintya Rao

    2016-01-01

    Fermilab’s Joel Butler will take the reins of the CMS collaboration in September, after having been elected as its new spokesperson during the last CMS Week.   Joel Butler, new CMS spokesperson. (Image: Reidar Hahn/Fermilab) On 10 February, members of the CMS Collaboration Board, the “parliament” of the collaboration, held a ballot to appoint their next leader. The Board chose Joel Butler, who brings a wealth of experience – more than thirty years at Fermilab and more than ten of those with CMS – to this important management role, leading a collaboration of 3000 people from across the globe. High on Joel’s priority list is making sure that all collaborators are able to participate in the collaboration’s research easily and to the best of their abilities: “We need everybody to be involved in CMS, whether they’re big or small institutions,” he says in his office in CERN’s Building ...

  15. Using Visual Aids to Improve Communication of Risks about Health: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Garcia-Retamero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that patients frequently experience difficulties understanding health-relevant numerical concepts. A prominent example is denominator neglect, or the tendency to pay too much attention to numerators in ratios (e.g., number of treated patients who died with insufficient attention to denominators (e.g., overall number of treated patients. Denominator neglect can lead to inaccurate assessments of treatment risk reduction and thus can have important consequences for decisions about health. Here, we reviewed a series of studies investigating (1 different factors that can influence patients’ susceptibility to denominator neglect in medical decision making—including numerical or language-related abilities; (2 the extent to which denominator neglect can be attenuated by using visual aids; and (3 a factor that moderates the effectiveness of such aids (i.e., graph literacy. The review spans probabilistic national U.S. and German samples, as well as immigrant (i.e., Polish people living in the United Kingdom and undergraduate samples in Spain. Theoretical and prescriptive implications are discussed.

  16. Using visual aids to improve communication of risks about health: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Retamero, Rocio; Okan, Yasmina; Cokely, Edward T

    2012-01-01

    Recent research has shown that patients frequently experience difficulties understanding health-relevant numerical concepts. A prominent example is denominator neglect, or the tendency to pay too much attention to numerators in ratios (e.g., number of treated patients who died) with insufficient attention to denominators (e.g., overall number of treated patients). Denominator neglect can lead to inaccurate assessments of treatment risk reduction and thus can have important consequences for decisions about health. Here, we reviewed a series of studies investigating (1) different factors that can influence patients' susceptibility to denominator neglect in medical decision making--including numerical or language-related abilities; (2) the extent to which denominator neglect can be attenuated by using visual aids; and (3) a factor that moderates the effectiveness of such aids (i.e., graph literacy). The review spans probabilistic national U.S. and German samples, as well as immigrant (i.e., Polish people living in the United Kingdom) and undergraduate samples in Spain. Theoretical and prescriptive implications are discussed.

  17. Evidence-Based Communication Practices for Children with Visual Impairments and Additional Disabilities: An Examination of Single-Subject Design Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Amy T.; Grimmett, Eric S.; Summers, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    This review examines practices for building effective communication strategies for children with visual impairments, including those with additional disabilities, that have been tested by single-subject design methodology. The authors found 30 studies that met the search criteria and grouped intervention strategies to align any evidence of the…

  18. Using Photos and Visual-Processing Assistive Technologies to Develop Self-Expression and Interpersonal Communication of Adolescents with Asperger Syndrome (AS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrieber, Betty; Cohen, Yael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the use of photographs and assistive technologies for visual information processing as motivating tools for interpersonal communication of adolescents with Asperger Syndrome (AS), aged 16 to 18 years, attending special education school. Students with AS find it very difficult to create social and…

  19. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (82nd, New Orleans, Louisiana, August 3-8, 1999). Magazine and Visual Communication Divisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication.

    The Magazine and Visual Communication Divisions section of the Proceedings contains the following 8 papers: "Beefcake, Breadwinner, or Babysitter: A Content Analysis of Male Images in Female-Targeted Magazine Advertising, 1978-1998" (Mikalee Dahle and Jennifer Greer); "The Impact of Larry Flynt: An Overview of One Publisher's Legal…

  20. How a central bank perceives the (visual) communication of security features on its banknotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornare, Roland

    1998-04-01

    The banknotes of earlier generations were protected by two or three security features with which the general public was familiar: watermark, security thread, intaglio printing. The remaining features pleased primarily printers and central banks, with little thought being given to public perception. The philosophy adopted two decades ago was based on a certain measure of discretion. It required patience and perseverance to discover the built-in security features of the banknotes. When colour photocopiers appeared on the scene in the mid- eighties we were compelled to take precautionary measures to protect our banknotes. One such measure consisted of an information campaign to prepare ourselves for this new potential threat. At this point, we actually became fully aware of the complex design of our banknotes and how difficult it is to communicate clearly the difference between a genuine and a counterfeit banknote. This difficult experience has nevertheless been a great benefit. It badgered us continually during the initial phase of designing the banknotes and preparing the information campaign.

  1. A lack of vision: evidence for poor communication of visual problems and support needs in education statements/plans for children with SEN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, J-A; Saunders, K J

    2015-02-01

    Visual dysfunction is more common in children with neurological impairments and previous studies have recommended such children receive visual and refractive assessment. In the UK, children with neurological impairment often have educational statementing for Special Educational Needs (SEN) and the statement should detail all health care and support needs to ensure the child's needs are met during school life. This study examined the representation of visual information in statements of SEN and compared this to orthoptic visual information from school visual assessments for children in a special school in Northern Ireland, UK. The parents of 115 school children in a special school were informed about the study via written information. Participation involved parents permitting the researchers to access their child's SEN educational statement and orthoptic clinical records. Statement information was accessed for 28 participants aged between four and 19 years; 25 contained visual information. Two participants were identified in their statements as having a certification of visual impairment. An additional 10 children had visual acuity ≥ 0.3 logMAR. This visual deficit was not reported in statements in eight out of these 12 cases (67%). 11 participants had significant refractive error and wore spectacles, but only five (45%) had this requirement recorded in their statement. Overall, 10 participants (55%) had either reduced visual acuity or significant refractive error which was not recorded in their statement. Despite additional visual needs being common, and described in clinical records, the majority of those with reduced vision and/or spectacle requirements did not have this information included in their statement. If visual limitations are not recognized by educational services, the child's needs may not be met during school life. More comprehensive eye care services, embedded with stakeholder communication and links to education are necessary to improve

  2. 22 March 2012 - Canada Foundation for Innovation Senior Programs Officer H.-C. Bandulet with spouse in the ATLAS visitor centre guided by Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    CERN-HI-1203073 16: Senior Canadian Scientist, ATLAS Collaboration, University of Toronto/IPP R. Teuscher; L. Andrzejewski(Spouse); H.-C. Bandulet; R.Voss (behind);ATLAS Collaboration, University of Toronto N.Ilic; ;ATLAS Collaboration, University of Toronto, R. Rezvani; ATLAS Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  3. 31st January 2011 - OECD Secretary-General A. Gurría visiting the ATLAS underground experimental area with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    CERN-HI-1101036 21. Former ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, Counsellor for Scientific Affairs S. Michalowski, Secretary General Chief of Staff G. Ramos, OECD Secretary-General A. Gurría, Relations with International Organisations M. Bona, Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Director M. Oborne, in the ATLAS cavern.

  4. COMMUNICATIONS GROUP

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor

    2012-01-01

      Outreach and Education We are fortunate that our research has captured the public imagination, even though this inevitably puts us under the global media spotlight, as we saw with the Higgs seminar at CERN in December, which had 110,000 distinct webcast viewers. The media interest was huge with 71 media organisations registering to come to CERN to cover the Higgs seminar, which was followed by a press briefing with the DG and Spokespersons. This event resulted in about 2,000 generally positive stories in the global media. For this seminar, the CMS Communications Group prepared up-to-date news and public material, including links to the CMS results, animations and event displays [http://cern.ch/go/Ch8thttp://cern.ch/go/Ch8t]. There were 44,000 page-views on the CMS public website, with the Higgs news article being by far the most popular item. CMS event displays from iSpy are fast becoming the iconic media images, featuring on numerous major news outlets (BBC, CNN, MSN...) as well as in the sci...

  5. Communication between cochlear perilymph and cerebrospinal fluid through the cochlear modiolus visualized after intratympanic administration of Gd-DTPA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganawa, Shinji; Satake, Hiroko; Iwano, Shingo; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2008-01-01

    Intratympanic injection of gadolinium diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (Gd-DTPA) has been reported as a procedure to visualize endolymphatic hydrops of Meniere's disease. We frequently noted that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the internal auditory canal (IAC) was also enhanced after this procedure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate how frequently this occurs and to investigate the specific features of patients who lack this communication. A total of 25 patients with clinically suspected endolymphatic hydrops underwent the procedure. After 24 h, three-dimensional fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (3D-FLAIR) and 3D constructive interference in steady state (3D-CISS) were performed. The presence of contrast enhancement in the CSF space of the fundus of the IAC was evaluated. The contrast ratio between CSF of the IAC fundus and cerebellar white matter on the injected side was 1.49±0.65, and that of the noninjected side was 0.32±0.16 (P<0.01). Enhancement of the CSF space in the IAC fundus was seen in all but two subjects: one had enlarged endolymphatic duct and sac syndrome (EEDS), and the other had cochlear nerve agenesis. In these two patients, the cochlear modiolus seemed to be normal. Intratympanic Gd-DTPA administration can reveal permeability of the modiolus and might facilitate evaluation of functional abnormalities of the modiolus not detected by conventional imaging tests. (author)

  6. The visual divide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Alfons

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is a playground for visualization. Yet research and technological innovations in visual communication and data visualization do not account for a substantial part of the world's population: vulnerable audiences with low levels of literacy.

  7. COMMUNICATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Taylor and D. Barney

    2010-01-01

    CMS Centres, Outreach and the 7 TeV Media Event The new CMS Communications group is now established and is addressing three areas that are critical to CMS as it enters the physics operations phase: - Communications Infrastructure, including almost 50 CMS Centres Worldwide, videoconferencing systems, and CERN meeting rooms - Information systems, including the internal and external Web sites as well as the document preparation and management systems - Outreach and Education activities, including working with print, radio and TV media, visits to CMS, and exhibitions. The group has been active in many areas, with the highest priority being accorded to needs of CMS operations and preparations for the major media event planned for 7 TeV collisions. Unfortunately the CMS Centre@CERN suffered a major setback when, on 21st December, a cooling water pipe froze and burst on the floor above the CMS Centre main room. Water poured through the ceiling, flooding the floor and soaking some of the consoles, before e...

  8. COMMUNICATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Petrilli

    2013-01-01

    The organisation of the Open Days at the end of September was the single biggest effort of the CMS Communications Group this year. We would like to thank all volunteers for their hard work to show our Point 5 facilities and explain science and technology to the general public. During two days more than 5,000 people visited the CMS detector underground and profited from the surface activities, which included an exhibition on CMS, a workshop on superconductivity, and an activity for our younger visitors involving wooden Kapla blocks. The Communications Group took advantage of the preparations to produce new CMS posters that can be reused at other venues. Event display images have been produced not just for this occasion but also for other exhibits, education purposes, publications etc. During the Open Days, Gilles Jobin, 2012 winner of CERN Collide@CERN prize, performed his Quantum show in Point 5, with the light installation of German artist Julius von Bismarck. Image 3: CERN Open Days at CMS wel...

  9. National Science Foundation Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences Tony Chan (USA) visiting LHCb experiment on 23rd May 2007 with Spokesperson T. Nakada, Advisor to CERN Director-General J. Ellis and I. Belyaev of Syracuse

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    National Science Foundation Assistant Director for Mathematics and Physical Sciences Tony Chan (USA) visiting LHCb experiment on 23rd May 2007 with Spokesperson T. Nakada, Advisor to CERN Director-General J. Ellis and I. Belyaev of Syracuse

  10. 15th March 2011 - Singapore National Research Foundation Permanent Secretary(National Research and Development)T. M. Kian signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    15th March 2011 - Singapore National Research Foundation Permanent Secretary(National Research and Development)T. M. Kian signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

  11. 12 April 2013 - The British Royal Academy of Engineering visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    12 April 2013 - The British Royal Academy of Engineering visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton.

  12. 12th September 2011 - Undersecretary for Foreign Affairs F. Schmidt Ariztía in the ATLAS visitor centre with ATLAS Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni, Adviser for Chile J. Salicio Diez and Senior Physicist J. Mikenberg.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    12th September 2011 - Undersecretary for Foreign Affairs F. Schmidt Ariztía in the ATLAS visitor centre with ATLAS Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni, Adviser for Chile J. Salicio Diez and Senior Physicist J. Mikenberg.

  13. 11 March 2010 - Ambassador of Canada to Switzerland and to Liechtenstein R. Santi in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    11 March 2010 - Ambassador of Canada to Switzerland and to Liechtenstein R. Santi in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  14. 7 April 2010 - Rector, Ghent University, P. Van Cauwenberge with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Coordinator for external relations F. Pauss, visiting CMS control room at Point 5 with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    7 April 2010 - Rector, Ghent University, P. Van Cauwenberge with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Coordinator for external relations F. Pauss, visiting CMS control room at Point 5 with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck.

  15. 19 September 2012 - Indonesian Members of Parliament visiting the CMS control room and experimental cavern at Point 5 with Former Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck and International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    19 September 2012 - Indonesian Members of Parliament visiting the CMS control room and experimental cavern at Point 5 with Former Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck and International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

  16. Ambassadors of the Latin American and Carribean Countries accredited in Bern at ALICE experiment with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Schukraft and Non Member States Relations J. Ellis and J. Salicio Diez on 10 October 2006.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Ambassadors of the Latin American and Carribean Countries accredited in Bern at ALICE experiment with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Schukraft and Non Member States Relations J. Ellis and J. Salicio Diez on 10 October 2006.

  17. Dr Mauro Dell’Ambrogio, State Secretary for Education and Research of the Swiss Confederation visit the ATLAS Cavern and the LHC Machine with with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Technical Coordinator M. Nessi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Dr Mauro Dell’Ambrogio, State Secretary for Education and Research of the Swiss Confederation visit the ATLAS Cavern and the LHC Machine with with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Technical Coordinator M. Nessi.

  18. 28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

  19. 27 September 2013 -Lithuanian Minister of Culture Š. Birutis in the LHC tunnel with International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka and visiting CMS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi. Also present: V. Rapsevicius, CMS Collaboration.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli

    2013-01-01

    27 September 2013 -Lithuanian Minister of Culture Š. Birutis in the LHC tunnel with International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka and visiting CMS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi. Also present: V. Rapsevicius, CMS Collaboration.

  20. 4 July 2013- European Commission DG CONNECT Director-General R. Madelin, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting CMS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson J. Varela.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    4 July 2013- European Commission DG CONNECT Director-General R. Madelin, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting CMS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson J. Varela.

  1. 18th May 2011 - Chinese State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs (SAFEA) Deputy Director-General M. LU (State Council of China) in the ATLAS visitors centre with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford and Collaboration member Z. Ren.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    18th May 2011 - Chinese State Administration of Foreign Experts Affairs (SAFEA) Deputy Director-General M. LU (State Council of China) in the ATLAS visitors centre with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford and Collaboration member Z. Ren.

  2. 11th October 2011 - Chinese University of Science and Technology President J. Hou signing the guest book with Adviser R. Voss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Members of the ATLAS Chinese Collaboration.

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    11th October 2011 - Chinese University of Science and Technology President J. Hou signing the guest book with Adviser R. Voss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Members of the ATLAS Chinese Collaboration.

  3. 25th May 2011 - Egyptian Minister for Scientific Research, Science and Technology A. Ezzat Salama signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    He visited the CMS control room on the Meyrin site with, from left, CMS spokesperson, Guido Tonelli, Alaa Awad, Fayum University, Hisham Badr, ambassador at the UN Geneva, and Maged Elsherbiny, president of the Scientific Research Academy.

  4. 18 MArch 2008 - Director, Basic and Generic Research Division, Research Promotion Bureau, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Prof.Ohtake visiting ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    18 MArch 2008 - Director, Basic and Generic Research Division, Research Promotion Bureau, Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology Prof.Ohtake visiting ATLAS cavern with Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  5. Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) representative H. Ikukawa visiting ATLAS experiment with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, KEK representative T. Kondo and Advisor to CERN DG J. Ellis on 15 May 2007.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) representative H. Ikukawa visiting ATLAS experiment with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, KEK representative T. Kondo and Advisor to CERN DG J. Ellis on 15 May 2007.

  6. 9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  7. 29 January 2013 - Japanese Toshiba Corporation Executive Officer and Corporate Senior Vice President O. Maekawa in the ATLAS visitor centre with representatives of the CERN-Japanese community led by Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    29 January 2013 - Japanese Toshiba Corporation Executive Officer and Corporate Senior Vice President O. Maekawa in the ATLAS visitor centre with representatives of the CERN-Japanese community led by Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  8. 7 February 2012 - Signature of the Memorandum of Understanding between Suranaree University of Technology represented by Rector P. Suebka and the ALICE Collaboration represented by Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino; Adviser E. Tsesmelis is present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    7 February 2012 - Signature of the Memorandum of Understanding between Suranaree University of Technology represented by Rector P. Suebka and the ALICE Collaboration represented by Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino; Adviser E. Tsesmelis is present.

  9. 17th May 2011 - Minister of Natural Resources of the Kingdom of Lesotho M. Moleleki signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and in the ATLAS visitor centre with Deputy Collaboration Spokesperson A. Lankford.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    17th May 2011 - Minister of Natural Resources of the Kingdom of Lesotho M. Moleleki signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and in the ATLAS visitor centre with Deputy Collaboration Spokesperson A. Lankford.

  10. Data visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Azzam, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Do you communicate data and information to stakeholders? In Part 1, we introduce recent developments in the quantitative and qualitative data visualization field and provide a historical perspective on data visualization, its potential role in evaluation practice, and future directions. Part 2 delivers concrete suggestions for optimally using data visualization in evaluation, as well as suggestions for best practices in data visualization design. It focuses on specific quantitative and qualitative data visualization approaches that include data dashboards, graphic recording, and geographic information systems (GIS). Readers will get a step-by-step process for designing an effective data dashboard system for programs and organizations, and various suggestions to improve their utility.

  11. Event-related potential response to auditory social stimuli, parent-reported social communicative deficits and autism risk in school-aged children with congenital visual impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Bathelt, J.; Dale, N.; de Haan, M.

    2017-01-01

    Communication with visual signals, like facial expression, is important in early social development, but the question if these signals are necessary for typical social development remains to be addressed. The potential impact on social development of being born with no or very low levels of vision is therefore of high theoretical and clinical interest. The current study investigated event-related potential responses to basic social stimuli in a rare group of school-aged children with congenit...

  12. 18 December 2012 -Portuguese President of FCT M. Seabra visiting the Computing Centre with IT Department Head F. Hemmer, ATLAS experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and A. Henriques Correia, in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and CMS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson J. Varela, signing an administrative agreement with Director-General R. Heuer; LIP President J. M. Gago and Delegate to CERN Council G. Barreia present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2012-01-01

    18 December 2012 -Portuguese President of FCT M. Seabra visiting the Computing Centre with IT Department Head F. Hemmer, ATLAS experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and A. Henriques Correia, in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and CMS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson J. Varela, signing an administrative agreement with Director-General R. Heuer; LIP President J. M. Gago and Delegate to CERN Council G. Barreia present.

  13. Effects of Multimodal Displays About Threat Location on Target Acquisition and Attention to Visual and Auditory Communications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glumm, Monica M; Kehring, Kathy L; White, Timothy L

    2007-01-01

    This laboratory experiment examined the effects of paired sensory cues that indicate the location of targets on target acquisition performance, the recall of information presented in concurrent visual...

  14. Communicating CCS. Effects of text-only and text-and-visual depictions of CO2 storage on risk perceptions and attitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunsting, S.; De Best-Waldhober, M.; Brouwer, A.S. [ECN Policy Studies, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Riesch, H.; Reiner, D. [Cambridge University, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2013-05-01

    ' estimate of depth, and the more precise indication of depth in the visual the worse respondents' estimate of depth. No relation was found between respondents' depth estimate of CO2 injection and their attitude towards CCS and risk perceptions of CCS. However, a more positive attitude towards CCS was related to lower perceived risk. Explanations and implications for communication are discussed in the paper.

  15. Radio Transmitters and Tower Locations, Layer includes all towers identified visually and include cellular and other communication towers., Published in 2008, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Noble County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Radio Transmitters and Tower Locations dataset current as of 2008. Layer includes all towers identified visually and include cellular and other communication towers..

  16. On the Relationship between Iranian EFL Learner’s Musical and Visual Intelligences and their Use of Speaking Strategies in Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elham Sadripour

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of the past literature on the characteristics of successful language learners indicates that more successful learners are those who apply more strategies. Although a sizeable number of studies were conducted on language learning strategies, there is a limited amount of research with focus on speaking strategies. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between Iranian EFL learners’ musical and visual intelligences and their use of speaking strategies in communication. Gender differences regarding the use of speaking strategies were also examined in this research. Participants in this study were three hundred and sixty undergraduate EFL learners from several universities in Iran who were presented with a questionnaire including McKenzie’s Multiple Intelligences Inventory and Oral Communication Strategy Inventory (OCSI. Results of data analysis revealed that there is a significant relationship between EFL learners’ musical and visual intelligences and their use of speaking strategies. Results of more analysis indicated significant relationship between musical intelligence and accuracy-oriented and fluency-oriented strategies, and visual intelligence and social affective and negotiation for meaning strategies. Findings also revealed that females were superior in using some strategy types including message reduction and nonverbal strategies.

  17. Typical Toddlers' Participation in “Just-in-Time” Programming of Vocabulary for Visual Scene Display Augmentative and Alternative Communication Apps on Mobile Technology: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drager, Kathryn; Light, Janice; Caron, Jessica Gosnell

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) promotes communicative participation and language development for young children with complex communication needs. However, the motor, linguistic, and cognitive demands of many AAC technologies restrict young children's operational use of and influence over these technologies. The purpose of the current study is to better understand young children's participation in programming vocabulary “just in time” on an AAC application with minimized demands. Method A descriptive study was implemented to highlight the participation of 10 typically developing toddlers (M age: 16 months, range: 10–22 months) in just-in-time vocabulary programming in an AAC app with visual scene displays. Results All 10 toddlers participated in some capacity in adding new visual scene displays and vocabulary to the app just in time. Differences in participation across steps were observed, suggesting variation in the developmental demands of controls involved in vocabulary programming. Conclusions Results from the current study provide clinical insights toward involving young children in AAC programming just in time and steps that may allow for more independent participation or require more scaffolding. Technology designed to minimize motor, cognitive, and linguistic demands may allow children to participate in programming devices at a younger age. PMID:28586825

  18. Typical Toddlers' Participation in "Just-in-Time" Programming of Vocabulary for Visual Scene Display Augmentative and Alternative Communication Apps on Mobile Technology: A Descriptive Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holyfield, Christine; Drager, Kathryn; Light, Janice; Caron, Jessica Gosnell

    2017-08-15

    Augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) promotes communicative participation and language development for young children with complex communication needs. However, the motor, linguistic, and cognitive demands of many AAC technologies restrict young children's operational use of and influence over these technologies. The purpose of the current study is to better understand young children's participation in programming vocabulary "just in time" on an AAC application with minimized demands. A descriptive study was implemented to highlight the participation of 10 typically developing toddlers (M age: 16 months, range: 10-22 months) in just-in-time vocabulary programming in an AAC app with visual scene displays. All 10 toddlers participated in some capacity in adding new visual scene displays and vocabulary to the app just in time. Differences in participation across steps were observed, suggesting variation in the developmental demands of controls involved in vocabulary programming. Results from the current study provide clinical insights toward involving young children in AAC programming just in time and steps that may allow for more independent participation or require more scaffolding. Technology designed to minimize motor, cognitive, and linguistic demands may allow children to participate in programming devices at a younger age.

  19. Soldier-Robot Team Communication: An Investigation of Exogenous Orienting Visual Display Cues and Robot Reporting Preferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-12

    MMC is sending and/or receiving information through multiple sensory systems (e.g., seeing text information that is also presented auditorily). In...have shown that the decay of information in visual working memory can be gradual. Further, the capacity for storing visual images is larger compared...to auditory working memory . Therefore, the larger working memory storage, in addition to the chunking of information, might explain the Soldiers

  20. Promoting English oral communication and higher-order thinking in Taiwanese ESL students through the use of knowledge visualization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya-Huei; Liao, Hung-Chang

    2014-06-01

    The study examined whether the students using concept mapping in a Freshman English course would improve English oral communication proficiency, higher-order thinking, and perception of abilities. A quasi-experimental design, lasting for 12 weeks, was administered to an experimental group (21 students) and a control group (20 students). The experimental group had significantly better performance on all measures. Concept mapping was effective in improving college students' English oral communication, higher-order thinking, and perception of abilities development.

  1. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News from NEI Grantees Spokesperson bios Statistics and Data Resources for the media Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - ... MSC 9300 Bethesda, MD 20892-9300 (Courier services use: Rockville, MD 20852) 301-451-2020 Research at ...

  2. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media Relations ...

  3. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health problems and requirements of ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Anna Harper - Media Relations ...

  4. Fast 3D seismic wave simulations of 24 August 2016 Mw 6.0 central Italy earthquake for visual communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emanuele Casarotti

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available We present here the first application of the fast reacting framework for 3D simulations of seismic wave propagation generated by earthquakes in the Italian region with magnitude Mw 5. The driven motivation is to offer a visualization of the natural phenomenon to the general public but also to provide preliminary modeling to expert and civil protection operators. We report here a description of this framework during the emergency of 24 August 2016 Mw 6.0 central Italy Earthquake, a discussion on the accuracy of the simulation for this seismic event and a preliminary critical analysis of the visualization structure and of the reaction of the public.

  5. Effects of Multimodal Displays About Threat Location on Target Acquisition and Attention to Visual and Auditory Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    Pillalamarri, Stachowiak , and Lattin (2005) presented target location information in plus and minus degrees (e.g., “Target -- minus 15 degrees”) no...Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD, 2006. 30 Haas, E. C.; Pillalamarri, R. S.; Stachowiak , C. C.; Lattin, M. A. Audio Cues to Assist Visual Search in

  6. Event-related potential response to auditory social stimuli, parent-reported social communicative deficits and autism risk in school-aged children with congenital visual impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Bathelt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Communication with visual signals, like facial expression, is important in early social development, but the question if these signals are necessary for typical social development remains to be addressed. The potential impact on social development of being born with no or very low levels of vision is therefore of high theoretical and clinical interest. The current study investigated event-related potential responses to basic social stimuli in a rare group of school-aged children with congenital visual disorders of the anterior visual system (globe of the eye, retina, anterior optic nerve. Early-latency event-related potential responses showed no difference between the VI and control group, suggesting similar initial auditory processing. However, the mean amplitude over central and right frontal channels between 280 and 320 ms was reduced in response to own-name stimuli, but not control stimuli, in children with VI suggesting differences in social processing. Children with VI also showed an increased rate of autistic-related behaviours, pragmatic language deficits, as well as peer relationship and emotional problems on standard parent questionnaires. These findings suggest that vision may be necessary for the typical development of social processing across modalities.

  7. Event-related potential response to auditory social stimuli, parent-reported social communicative deficits and autism risk in school-aged children with congenital visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathelt, Joe; Dale, Naomi; de Haan, Michelle

    2017-10-01

    Communication with visual signals, like facial expression, is important in early social development, but the question if these signals are necessary for typical social development remains to be addressed. The potential impact on social development of being born with no or very low levels of vision is therefore of high theoretical and clinical interest. The current study investigated event-related potential responses to basic social stimuli in a rare group of school-aged children with congenital visual disorders of the anterior visual system (globe of the eye, retina, anterior optic nerve). Early-latency event-related potential responses showed no difference between the VI and control group, suggesting similar initial auditory processing. However, the mean amplitude over central and right frontal channels between 280 and 320ms was reduced in response to own-name stimuli, but not control stimuli, in children with VI suggesting differences in social processing. Children with VI also showed an increased rate of autistic-related behaviours, pragmatic language deficits, as well as peer relationship and emotional problems on standard parent questionnaires. These findings suggest that vision may be necessary for the typical development of social processing across modalities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Formation of Communication Skills in Preschool Children with Visual Impairments as an Important Factor of Their Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalova, Lera A.; Vasilyeva, Nadezda N.

    2016-01-01

    The urgency of the problem under investigation due to the provisions of the new federal state educational standards of preschool education in the Russian Federation, according to which at the present stage of priority education is to implement a high level of social and communicative potential of the child's personality as a prerequisite for its…

  9. 6 June 2008 - Chancellor F. Tomàs Vert, University of Valencia, visiting ATLAS control room and experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    6 June 2008 - Chancellor F. Tomàs Vert, University of Valencia, visiting ATLAS control room and experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni. Other participants: Prof. Francisco José Botella, Director, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, University of València and CSIC Prof. José Peñarrocha, Dean, Faculty of Physics Prof. Antonio Ferrer, Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, University of València and CSIC Prof. Antonio Pich, University of València, Member of IFIC (CSIC - Univ. València), Coordinator of CPAN, Spanish National Centre for Particle, Astroparticle and Nuclear Physics.

  10. Microsurgical Clipping of an Anterior Communicating Artery Aneurysm Using a Novel Robotic Visualization Tool in Lieu of the Binocular Operating Microscope: Operative Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinger, Daniel R; Reinard, Kevin A; Ajayi, Olaide O; Delashaw, Johnny B

    2018-01-01

    The binocular operating microscope has been the visualization instrument of choice for microsurgical clipping of intracranial aneurysms for many decades. To discuss recent technological advances that have provided novel visualization tools, which may prove to be superior to the binocular operating microscope in many regards. We present an operative video and our operative experience with the BrightMatterTM Servo System (Synaptive Medical, Toronto, Ontario, Canada) during the microsurgical clipping of an anterior communicating artery aneurysm. To the best of our knowledge, the use of this device for the microsurgical clipping of an intracranial aneurysm has never been described in the literature. The BrightMatterTM Servo System (Synaptive Medical) is a surgical exoscope which avoids many of the ergonomic constraints of the binocular operating microscope, but is associated with a steep learning curve. The BrightMatterTM Servo System (Synaptive Medical) is a maneuverable surgical exoscope that is positioned with a directional aiming device and a surgeon-controlled foot pedal. While utilizing this device comes with a steep learning curve typical of any new technology, the BrightMatterTM Servo System (Synaptive Medical) has several advantages over the conventional surgical microscope, which include a relatively unobstructed surgical field, provision of high-definition images, and visualization of difficult angles/trajectories. This device can easily be utilized as a visualization tool for a variety of cranial and spinal procedures in lieu of the binocular operating microscope. We anticipate that this technology will soon become an integral part of the neurosurgeon's armamentarium. Copyright © 2017 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  11. 26th February 2009 - US Google Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist V. Cerf signing the guest book with Director for research and Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting ATLAS control room and experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    HI-0902038 05: IT Department Head, F. Hemmer; US Google Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist V. Cerf; Computing Security Officer and Colloquium Convenor D. R. Myers; Member of the Internet Society Advisory Council F. Flückiger; Director for Research and Scientific Computing, S. Bertolucci ; Honorary Staff Member, B. Segal. HI-0902038 16: Computing Security Officer and Colloquium Convenor D. R. Myers; UC Irvine, ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson elect A. J. Lankford; US Google Vice President and Chief Internet Evangelist V. Cerf; ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni; IT Department Head, F. Hemmer.

  12. Humans-with-media and the reorganization of mathematical thinking information and communication technologies, modeling, visualization and experimentation

    CERN Document Server

    Borba, Marcelo C; Villarreal, Monica E

    2005-01-01

    This book offers a new conceptual framework for reflecting on the role of information and communication technology in mathematics education. Discussion focuses on how computers, writing and oral discourse transform education at an epistemological as well as a political level. Building on examples, research and theory, the authors propose that knowledge is not constructed solely by humans, but by collectives of humans and technologies of intelligence.

  13. A randomized control trial comparing the visual and verbal communication methods for reducing fear and anxiety during tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazal, Giath; Tola, Ahmed W; Fareed, Wamiq M; Alnazzawi, Ahmad A; Zafar, Muhammad S

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the value of using the visual information for reducing the level of dental fear and anxiety in patients undergoing teeth extraction under LA. A total of 64 patients were indiscriminately allotted to solitary of the study groups following reading the information sheet and signing the formal consent. If patient was in the control group, only verbal information and routine warnings were provided. If patient was in the study group, tooth extraction video was showed. The level of dental fear and anxiety was detailed by the patients on customary 100 mm visual analog scales (VAS), with "no dental fear and anxiety" (0 mm) and "severe dental distress and unease" (100 mm). Evaluation of dental apprehension and fretfulness was made pre-operatively, following visual/verbal information and post-extraction. There was a substantial variance among the mean dental fear and anxiety scores for both groups post-extraction (p-value < 0.05). Patients in tooth extraction video group were more comfortable after dental extraction than verbal information and routine warning group. For tooth extraction video group there were major decreases in dental distress and anxiety scores between the pre-operative and either post video information scores or postoperative scores (p-values < 0.05). Younger patients recorded higher dental fear and anxiety scores than older ones (P < 0.05). Dental fear and anxiety associated with dental extractions under local anesthesia can be reduced by showing a tooth extraction video to the patients preoperatively.

  14. Ptosis as partial oculomotor nerve palsy due to compression by infundibular dilatation of posterior communicating artery, visualized with three-dimensional computer graphics: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Yuta; Imai, Hideaki; Yoshino, Masanori; Kin, Taichi; Takasago, Megumi; Saito, Kuniaki; Nakatomi, Hirofumi; Saito, Nobuhito

    2014-01-01

    Oculomotor nerve palsy (ONP) due to internal carotid-posterior communicating artery (PcomA) aneurysm generally manifests as partial nerve palsy including pupillary dysfunction. In contrast, infundibular dilatation (ID) of the PcomA has no pathogenic significance, and mechanical compression of the cranial nerve is extremely rare. We describe a 60-year-old woman who presented with progressive ptosis due to mechanical compression of the oculomotor nerve by an ID of the PcomA. Three-dimensional computer graphics (3DCG) accurately visualized the mechanical compression by the ID, and her ptosis was improved after clipping of the ID. ID of the PcomA may cause ONP by mechanical compression and is treatable surgically. 3DCG are effective for the diagnosis and preoperative simulation.

  15. Rotational Scanning Electron Micrographs (rSEM: A novel and accessible tool to visualize and communicate complex morphology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Koon-Bong Cheung

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An accessible workflow is presented to create interactive, rotational scanning electron micrographs (rSEM. These information-rich animations facilitate the study and communication of complex morphological structures exemplified here by male arthropod genitalia. Methods are outlined for the publication of rSEMs on the web or in journal articles as SWF files. Image components of rSEMs were archived in MorphBank to ensure future data access. rSEM represents a promising new addition to the toolkit of a new generation of digital taxonomy.

  16. The use of information technologies and communication assistive technology as applied in the construction of knowledge of students with visual disabilities who attend rooms multifunction resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Rosan Christino Gitahy

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to investigate the contribution brought by the use of information and communication technologies applied to assistive technology in the construction of knowledge of students with visual impairment who attended the multifunction capabilities room. Research subjects were two students with visual impairment in different school years attending the multifunctional room features two educational institutions. In addition to students, the research subjects were also the teachers of the respective multi-functional resources they attend and the teachers who attended the in mainstream education. To achieve the goal, initially, the theoretical framework and was later carried out the field study procedure through the interview collection was consulted. The results found that two educational institutions surveyed are still building their pedagogical regarding the use and appropriation of ICT when used in multifunctional resource room as assistive technology. It is of fundamental importance to teacher training for the appropriation of ICT especially in relation to work with assistive technology in educational environments. Therefore, that it develops skills and abilities that allow building pedagogical practices in congruence with these technologies.

  17. How information visualization novices construct visualizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Lars; Tory, Melanie; Storey, Margaret-Anne

    2010-01-01

    It remains challenging for information visualization novices to rapidly construct visualizations during exploratory data analysis. We conducted an exploratory laboratory study in which information visualization novices explored fictitious sales data by communicating visualization specifications to a human mediator, who rapidly constructed the visualizations using commercial visualization software. We found that three activities were central to the iterative visualization construction process: data attribute selection, visual template selection, and visual mapping specification. The major barriers faced by the participants were translating questions into data attributes, designing visual mappings, and interpreting the visualizations. Partial specification was common, and the participants used simple heuristics and preferred visualizations they were already familiar with, such as bar, line and pie charts. We derived abstract models from our observations that describe barriers in the data exploration process and uncovered how information visualization novices think about visualization specifications. Our findings support the need for tools that suggest potential visualizations and support iterative refinement, that provide explanations and help with learning, and that are tightly integrated into tool support for the overall visual analytics process.

  18. Social Media and Its Dual Use in Biopreparedness: Communication and Visualization Tools in an Animal Bioterrorism Incident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöberg, Elisabeth; Barker, Gary C.; Landgren, Jonas

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on social media and interactive challenges for emergency organizations during a bioterrorism or agroterrorism incident, and it outlines the dual-use dilemma of social media. Attackers or terrorists can use social media as their modus of operandi, and defenders, including emer...... in stream graphs and networks showing clusters of Twitter and Facebook users. The visualization of social media can be an important preparedness tool in the response to bioterrorism and agroterrorism.......This article focuses on social media and interactive challenges for emergency organizations during a bioterrorism or agroterrorism incident, and it outlines the dual-use dilemma of social media. Attackers or terrorists can use social media as their modus of operandi, and defenders, including...... emergency organizations in law enforcement and public and animal health, can use it for peaceful purposes. To get a better understanding of the uses of social media in these situations, a workshop was arranged in Stockholm, Sweden, to raise awareness about social media and animal bioterrorism threats. Fifty...

  19. Visualization rhetoric: framing effects in narrative visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullman, Jessica; Diakopoulos, Nicholas

    2011-12-01

    Narrative visualizations combine conventions of communicative and exploratory information visualization to convey an intended story. We demonstrate visualization rhetoric as an analytical framework for understanding how design techniques that prioritize particular interpretations in visualizations that "tell a story" can significantly affect end-user interpretation. We draw a parallel between narrative visualization interpretation and evidence from framing studies in political messaging, decision-making, and literary studies. Devices for understanding the rhetorical nature of narrative information visualizations are presented, informed by the rigorous application of concepts from critical theory, semiotics, journalism, and political theory. We draw attention to how design tactics represent additions or omissions of information at various levels-the data, visual representation, textual annotations, and interactivity-and how visualizations denote and connote phenomena with reference to unstated viewing conventions and codes. Classes of rhetorical techniques identified via a systematic analysis of recent narrative visualizations are presented, and characterized according to their rhetorical contribution to the visualization. We describe how designers and researchers can benefit from the potentially positive aspects of visualization rhetoric in designing engaging, layered narrative visualizations and how our framework can shed light on how a visualization design prioritizes specific interpretations. We identify areas where future inquiry into visualization rhetoric can improve understanding of visualization interpretation. © 2011 IEEE

  20. The impact of a visual arts program on quality of life, communication, and well-being of people living with dementia: a mixed-methods longitudinal investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windle, Gill; Joling, Karlijn J; Howson-Griffiths, Teri; Woods, Bob; Jones, Catrin Hedd; van de Ven, Peter M; Newman, Andrew; Parkinson, Clive

    2018-03-01

    ABSTRACTBackground:Research reviews highlight methodological limitations and gaps in the evidence base for the arts in dementia care. In response, we developed a 12-week visual art program and evaluated the impact on people living with dementia through a mixed-methods longitudinal investigation. One hundred and twenty-five people living with mild to severe dementia were recruited across three research settings in England and Wales (residential care homes, a county hospital, and community venues). Quantitative and qualitative data on quality of life (QoL), communication and perceptions of the program were obtained through interviews and self-reports with participants and their carers. Eight domains of well-being were measured using a standardized observation tool, and data compared to an alternative activity with no art. Across all sites, scores for the well-being domains of interest, attention, pleasure, self-esteem, negative affect, and sadness were significantly better in the art program than the alternative condition. Proxy-reported QoL significantly improved between baseline and 3-month follow-up, but no improvements in QoL were reported by the participants with dementia. This was contrasted by their qualitative accounts, which described a stimulating experience important for social connectedness, well-being, and inner-strength. Communication deteriorated between baseline and follow-up in the hospital setting, but improved in the residential care setting. The findings highlight the potential for creative aging within dementia care, the benefits of art activities and the influence of the environment. We encourage dementia care providers and arts and cultural services to work toward embedding art activities within routine care provision.

  1. Visual languages and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Kang

    2010-01-01

    Visual languages have long been a pursuit of effective communication between human and machine. With rapid advances of the Internet and Web technology, human-human communication through the Web or electronic mobile devices is becoming more and more prevalent. Visual Languages and Applications is a comprehensive introduction to diagrammatical visual languages. This book discusses what visual programming languages are, and how such languages and their underlying foundations can be usefully applied to other fields in computer science. It also covers a broad range of contents from the underlying t

  2. Reconfigurable Auditory-Visual Display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begault, Durand R. (Inventor); Anderson, Mark R. (Inventor); McClain, Bryan (Inventor); Miller, Joel D. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    System and method for visual and audible communication between a central operator and N mobile communicators (N greater than or equal to 2), including an operator transceiver and interface, configured to receive and display, for the operator, visually perceptible and audibly perceptible signals from each of the mobile communicators. The interface (1) presents an audible signal from each communicator as if the audible signal is received from a different location relative to the operator and (2) allows the operator to select, to assign priority to, and to display, the visual signals and the audible signals received from a specified communicator. Each communicator has an associated signal transmitter that is configured to transmit at least one of the visual signals and the audio signal associated with the communicator, where at least one of the signal transmitters includes at least one sensor that senses and transmits a sensor value representing a selected environmental or physiological parameter associated with the communicator.

  3. Information and communication on risks related to medications and proper use of medications for healthcare professionals and the general public: precautionary principle, risk management, communication during and in the absence of crisis situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molimard, Mathieu; Bernaud, Corine; Lechat, Philippe; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Benattia, Cherif; Benkritly, Amel; Braunstein, David; Cabut, Sandrine; David, Nadine; Fourrier-Réglat, Annie; Gallet, Benoit; Gersberg, Marta; Goni, Sylvia; Jolliet, Pascale; Lamarque-Garnier, Véronique; Le Jeunne, Claire; Leurs, Irina; Liard, François; Malbezin, Muriel; Micallef, Joelle; Nguon, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Recent drug crises have highlighted the complexity, benefits and risks of medication communication. The difficulty of this communication is due to the diversity of the sources of information and the target audience, the credibility of spokespersons, the difficulty to communicate on scientific uncertainties and the precautionary principle, which is influenced by variable perceptions and tolerances of the risk. Globally, there is a lack of training in risk management with a tendency of modern society to refuse even the slightest risk. Communication on medications is subject to regulatory or legal requirements, often uses tools and messages that are not adapted to the target audience and is often based on a poor knowledge of communication techniques. In order to improve this situation, the available information must be coordinated by reinforcing the unique medication information website and by coordinating communication between authorities by means of a single spokesperson. A particular effort must be made in the field of training in the proper use and risk of medications for both the general population and patients but also for healthcare professionals, by setting up a unified academic on-line teaching platform for continuing medical education on medications and their proper use. © 2014 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  4. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Visual System Ever wonder how your eyes work? Watch this video to learn how you’re ... maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about this website ...

  5. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Video Series Glossary The Visual System Your Eyes’ Natural Defenses Eye Health and Safety First Aid Tips ... website is maintained by the NEI Office of Science Communications, Public Liaison, and Education. Technical questions about ...

  6. Canine communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, B S

    1997-05-01

    Communication occurs when one individual, the sender, produces a signal that alters the behavior of another individual, the receiver. The signal can provide broadcast information about species and individual identity or transmitted information, in which the sender effects a change in the receiver's behavior. To reduce ambiguity, signals have evolved to be conspicuous, redundant, and stereotypic. These features allow communication signals to be produced by senders and perceived and acted upon appropriately by receivers, both conspecific and heterospecific. The modality of the communication signal can be visual, olfactory, or acoustic. Visual signals can be adjusted rapidly for response during interactions between individuals at close or medium range. Examples include displays of relative dominance or submission. Olfactory signals can be used for individual, sex, or group identity at close range during greetings and assessments of individuals. Excretory products can be used for olfactory communication over long distances and for long periods of time. Acoustic signals can be adjusted rapidly for close- and far-range communication. They do not persist in the environment. For dogs, communication is fundamental to maintaining affiliations, reducing competition, and identifying individuals. These factors are critical to the highly developed social behavior of dogs. In an ultimate sense, dogs have been selectively bred for positive interactions with humans; in a proximate sense, many dogs spend their lives in close social association with humans. For these reasons, many of the signals used by dogs in dog-dog communication are also used in dog-human communication. Veterinarians act as receivers for communication signals when greeting dogs as patients. The information obtained is used to assess the state of arousal and probability of future behavior of the dog so that handling of the animal can be facilitated. The goals are to minimize stress and injury, to successfully

  7. CUERPOS Y TONOS DISCURSIVOS: UN PORTAVOZ DE HISPANOAMERICANISMO DEL SIGLO XIX (BERNARDO MONTEAGUDO DISCOURSE BODIES AND TONES: A SPOKESPERSON OF XIX CENTURY HISPANIC-AMERICANISM (BERNARDO MONTEAGUDO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciana Vázquez Villanueva

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo presentamos, a partir de los escritos publicados en la Gaceta de Buenos Aires por Bernardo Monteagudo entre 1811-1812, la conformación de una zona de la tradición discursiva del discurso revolucionario hispanoamericanista del siglo xix, centrado en la construcción de un determinado sujeto político -el portavoz/militante-. Para indagar las matrices que diseñan la emergencia de esa tradición discursiva, nuestro análisis se focaliza en el relevamiento de tres estrategias: el portavoz, el ethos discursivo y la comunidad discursiva. El portavoz, concebido como una forma particular de conducta política, permite esbozar la emergencia de la modernidad política a partir de sujetos imbricados en un complejo haz de preconstruidos culturales insertos en la filiación ilustrada y romántica. La delimitación del ethos conlleva a considerar la imagen del sujeto a partir del tono, del cuerpo y del carácter discursivo, encastrados en diversas huellas del lenguaje. Finalmente, la instauración de una comunidad discursiva, definida como la cara social de toda formación discursiva, posibilita aunar el vínculo entre la constitución de un modo de decir -de un lenguaje, de un sistema de representaciones- y de un orden político. A partir de estas estrategias se traza uno de los modelos discursivos del hispanoamericanismo, que será retomado y reformulado en posteriores procesos históricos, para expandir una memoria discursiva latinoamericana posicionada en la necesidad de implementar la integración regional.Starting from the papers published in Gaceta de Buenos Aires by Bernardo Monteagudo between 1811 and 1812, in this work we present the shaping of a discourse tradition zone of the Hispanic-Americanism revolution discourse in the nineteenth century. Such discourse focuses on the construction of a particular political subject: the militant spokesperson. To go deeper into the roots of the emergence of such a discourse tradition, our

  8. The Visual System

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... programs with respect to blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual function, preservation of sight, and the special health ... Pressroom Contacts Dustin Hays - Chief, Science Communication dustin.hays@nih.gov Kathryn DeMott, Media Relations ...

  9. Initial crisis risk communications: A success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, S.B.; Traverso, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    Federal regulations require nuclear facilities to be prepared for the risk communication aspects of a catastrophic emergency. Thus, all nuclear plants have provisions for a Joint Public Information Center (JPIC). The JPICs are designed to handle more than 300 media for 24 hours a day; to coordinate information among utility, federal, state, and local agencies; to provide spokespersons; etc. For a large-scale emergency, JPICs can work very well. However, some utilities - indeed, most companies - appear to have only two modes of emergency communication response: normal staff and JPIC. Experience has shown that normal staffing is inadequate to handle the risk communication response for media-intensive low-level emergencies and for the initial stages of an escalating emergency. It is clear that initial response will determine how well a company fares in its overall emergency response and in its long-term relations with the media and public. A solution to this risk communication challenge was developed by Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company's Perry Nuclear Plant - the Public Information Response Team. Using existing facilities and staff - only one of whom works regularly with the media - the Perry plant proactively manages its initial risk communication response

  10. Communication Challenges and Strategies of U.S. Health Professionals Caring for Seriously Ill South Asian Patients and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Nidhi; Washington, Karla T; Shaunfield, Sara; Aslakson, Rebecca

    2017-06-01

    While effective communication is important in the care of seriously ill patients, little is known about communication challenges faced by healthcare providers serving U.S. patients of South Asian origin, one of the fastest growing demographic groups in the United States. Researchers sought to examine communication challenges faced by healthcare providers serving seriously ill South Asian patients and their families and present strategies recommended by providers for effective communication. Researchers conducted a thematic analysis of qualitative data obtained through focus groups and individual interviews with 57 healthcare providers, including physicians, social workers, nurses, chaplains, and others drawn from different healthcare settings in one Midwestern city. While acknowledging the considerable diversity within the U.S. South Asian community, participants discussed three types of communication challenges they often encounter when serving this population: ensuring effective interpretation, identifying a spokesperson, and challenges posed by different cultural norms. Participants shared strategies to address these challenges such as proactively inquiring about patients' and families' preferences and encouraging early appointment of a spokesperson. While providers should avoid stereotyping patients, an awareness of common challenges and adoption of recommended strategies to address these challenges may enhance the provision of culturally responsive person-centered services for seriously ill South Asian patients and their families receiving care in the United States.

  11. Communicating CCS : Effects of text-only and text-and-visual depictions of CO2 storage on risk perceptions and attitudes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brunsting, S.; de Best-Waldhober, M.; Brouwer, A. S.; Riesch, H.; Reiner, D.

    2013-01-01

    This experiment aims to increase understanding of the conditions under which combining textual and visual information on CO, storage fosters comprehension of the technology. Specifically, it is investigated if and how precision in indicating the depth of CO2 injection in either text, visual, or

  12. TIPOGRAFI DALAM DESAIN KOMUNIKASI VISUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscilia Yunita Wijaya

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Visual Communication Design is needed especially in today s information era. Just as its sound%2C the function and goal of visual communication design is to communicate to its mass audience with the right perception. One of its elements that determine the effectiveness of a design is typography. This paper is going to talk about the role of typography and how it effects a design in visual communication design. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Di dalam era informasi saat ini kehadiran desain komunikasi visual sangatlah dibutuhkan. Sesuai dengan namanya%2C desain komunikasi visual mempunyai tujuan untuk mengkomunikasikan pesan yang dapat ditangkap oleh massa dengan benar. Salah satu elemen desain yang sangat penting dalam menunjang keberhasilan suatu desain dalam berkomunikasi dengan masyarakatnya adalah tipografi. Tulisan ini membahas bagaimana dan apa peran tipografi tersebut dalam desain komunikasi visual.

  13. Effectiveness of Combining Tangible Symbols with the Picture Exchange Communication System to Teach Requesting Skills to Children with Multiple Disabilities Including Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Emad; MacFarland, Stephanie Z.; Umbreit, John

    2011-01-01

    The Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) is an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) program used to teach functional requesting and commenting skills to people with disabilities (Bondy & Frost, 1993; Frost & Bondy, 2002). In this study, tangible symbols were added to PECS in teaching requesting to four students (ages 7-14) with…

  14. Effective Visual Design and Communication Practices for Research Posters: Exemplars Based on the Theory and Practice of Multimedia Learning and Rhetoric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedwell, Rhianna K.; Hardy, James A.; Rowland, Susan L.

    2017-01-01

    Evidence shows that science graduates often do not have the communication skills they need to meet workplace standards and expectations. One common mode of science communication is the poster. In a review of the literature we show that poster design is historically problematic, and that the guidance provided to students as they create posters for…

  15. Marketing engagement through visual content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius MANIC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Engaging visual is a must in the modern marketing world. Wide access to mass communication devices, with extended visuals enhancements, made visual content an important point of interest for any publisher, on all media channels. The decreasing costs and huge variety of types are premises for an easy and effective marketing investment, with strong benefits for any company and its brands. Loyal customers are achieved and kept through visual content; the lack of it in the general marketing

  16. Visual field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam. This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider ...

  17. Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Visual Impairment KidsHealth / For Teens / Visual Impairment What's in ... with the brain, making vision impossible. What Is Visual Impairment? Many people have some type of visual ...

  18. 29 March 2011 - Ninth President of Israel S.Peres welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer who introduces Council President M. Spiro, Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers, Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Physics Department Head P. Bloch, Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Human Resources Department Head A.-S. Catherin, Beams Department Head P. Collier, Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer, Adviser for Israel J. Ellis, Legal Counsel E. Gröniger-Voss, ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, Former ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni, Weizmann Institute G. Mikenberg, CERN VIP and Protocol Officer W. Korda.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    During his visit he toured the ATLAS underground experimental area with Giora Mikenberg of the ATLAS collaboration, Weizmann Institute of Sciences and Israeli industrial liaison office, Rolf Heuer, CERN’s director-general, and Fabiola Gianotti, ATLAS spokesperson. The president also visited the CERN computing centre and met Israeli scientists working at CERN.

  19. 8 February 2010: University College London President & Provost M. Grant signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R.Heuer and Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss; visiting the ATLAS control room with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Adviser for Non-Member States J. Ellis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    Caption for photograph 1002015 01: 8 February 2010: University College London President & Provost M. Grant (6th from left) visiting ATLAS control room with, from left to right, ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson and University of Birmingham D. Charlton; UCL Head of the HEP group M. Lancaster; UCL Vice Provost for research D. Price; ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti; UCL Department of Physics and Astronomy N. Konstantinidis; UCL Head of Physics Department J. Tennyson; Head of the UCL-ATLAS group and Vice-Dean for Research in the faculty of Mathematical and Physical Sciences J. Butterworth, visiting the ATLAS control room.

  20. Visualization of Personalization Information

    OpenAIRE

    Almerfors, Mattias

    2005-01-01

    There has been an increasing use of Internet as an information source and also as a new channel for business-to-business and business-to-consumer communication. This has lead to an increasing need for understanding web traffic and especially a growing need for analyzing this traffic, which demands new analysis tools. The objective for this study was to create an application framework for visualizing XML-formatted data representing web traffic reports. Visualization in two dimensions is create...

  1. Hacer televisión desde la comunicación, propuesta de rediseño de la identidad visual corporativa de Telecubanacán To make television from the communication, proposal of I redraw of the corporate visual identity of Telecubanacán

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk Díaz-Guzmán Corrales

    2011-06-01

    methodology and the method investigation-action. It was carried out from April 2009 to May 2010.The research techniques used were: analysis of bibliography, participant´s observation, semi-structured interviews, groupal sessions and operative briefing. The leading staff, founders, recent promotions of the Central University "Marta Abreu" de Las Villas in the channel and experts were the analysis units.Points of view about the corporative visual identity and their integration to the communication actions were exposed as a true added value, distinguishing basic elements of the design for the specific case of television.At first, the visual identity of Telecubanacán was characterized. For the design proposal the necessary elements of visual identity were determined, starting from the desired image of being a TV channel close to the community practices to elevate its status and indicators of prestige, recognizing it as a professional staff.The application of the new visual identity was proposed in the different broadcasting spaces and the disposition of its applications in the architecture of the organization was also proposed. The new visual identity became in integrative element that makes the channel singular, common, and coherent for the sake of an integrated broadcast of communication.

  2. Communication and presentation skills

    OpenAIRE

    Lorencová, Ivana

    2014-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with individual factors of communication and basic presentations skills. The theoretical part specifies the basic elements of verbal and non-verbal communication and basic factors connected with preparation and realisation of a presentation. The practical part of the thesis comprises an analysis of impacts of speaker's visual and other communication influences over an audience. The results are applied to a Multimedia Display exhibition taking place during the bachel...

  3. VRML metabolic network visualizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojdestvenski, Igor

    2003-03-01

    A successful date collection visualization should satisfy a set of many requirements: unification of diverse data formats, support for serendipity research, support of hierarchical structures, algorithmizability, vast information density, Internet-readiness, and other. Recently, virtual reality has made significant progress in engineering, architectural design, entertainment and communication. We experiment with the possibility of using the immersive abstract three-dimensional visualizations of the metabolic networks. We present the trial Metabolic Network Visualizer software, which produces graphical representation of a metabolic network as a VRML world from a formal description written in a simple SGML-type scripting language.

  4. Visualization and mathematics III

    CERN Document Server

    Polthier, Konrad

    2003-01-01

    This research book on Mathematical Visualization contains state of the art presentations on visualization problems in mathematics, on fundamental mathematical research in computer graphics, and on software frameworks for the application of visualization to real-world problems. All contributions were written by leading experts in the field and peer-refereed by an international editorial team. The book grew out of the third international workshop "Visualization and Mathematics", which was held from May 22-25, 2002 in Berlin. The themes of the book cover important recent developments on - Geometry and Combinatorics of Meshes - Discrete Vector Fields and Topology - Geometric Modelling - Image Based Visualization - Software Environments and Applications - Education and Communication The variety of topics makes the book a suitable resource for researchers, lecturers, and practitioners; http://www-sfb288.math.tu-berlin.de/vismath/

  5. 16 March 2009 - HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn, Kingdom of Thailand, visiting CMS experimental area and LHC tunnel with Coordinator for external relations F. Pauss and Collaboration Spokesperson T. Virdee.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    Photo 1: Relations with Non-Member State E. Tsesmelis, CMS Collaboration Spokesperson T. Virdee, HRH Princess Maha Chakri Sirindhorn and Coordinator for External relations F. Pauss, in CMS experimental area. Photo 2-12: Arrival of HRH at building 160: Posy presented to HRH by E. and F. Breedon; Welcome line: Director-General R. Heuer who introduces S. Bertolucci, F. Pauss, E. Tsesmelis, A. de Roeck, R. Breedon and Protocol Officer W. Korda. Photo 13-26:Presentation by Director-General R. Heuer and Head of Education R. Landua. Photo 27-30: Welcome at CMS by Spokesperson T. Virdee Photo 31-43: LHC tunnel visit Photo 44 - 60: CMS underground area visit Photo 61-63: HRH signs the guest book in the SCX5 conference room Photo 64-69: Signature of an expression of interest between SLRI and CMS Photo 75-88: Final discussion with Coordinator for External relation F. Pauss and Director-General R. Heuer.

  6. Effective visual design and communication practices for research posters: Exemplars based on the theory and practice of multimedia learning and rhetoric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedwell, Rhianna K; Hardy, James A; Rowland, Susan L

    2017-05-01

    Evidence shows that science graduates often do not have the communication skills they need to meet workplace standards and expectations. One common mode of science communication is the poster. In a review of the literature we show that poster design is historically problematic, and that the guidance provided to students as they create posters for assessment is frequently inconsistent. To address this inconsistency we provide some guiding design principles for posters that are grounded in communication theory and the fundamentals of rhetoric. We also present three nondiscipline-specific example posters with accompanying notes that explain why the posters are examples of poor, average, and excellent poster design. The subject matter for the posters is a fabricated set of experiments on a topic that could not actually be the subject of research. Instructors may use these resources with their students, secure in the knowledge that they do not and will never represent an answer set to an extant assessment item. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(3):249-261, 2017. © 2016 The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  7. Data visualization a guide to visual storytelling for libraries

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Data Visualization: A Guide to Visual Storytelling for Libraries is a practical guide to the skills and tools needed to create beautiful and meaningful visual stories through data visualization. Learn how to sift through complex datasets to better understand a variety of metrics, such as trends in user behavior and electronic resource usage, return on investment (ROI) and impact metrics, and learning and reference analytics. Sections include: .Identifying and interpreting datasets for visualization .Tools and technologies for creating meaningful visualizations .Case studies in data visualization and dashboards Understanding and communicating trends from your organization s data is essential. Whether you are looking to make more informed decisions by visualizing organizational data, or to tell the story of your library s impact on your community, this book will give you the tools to make it happen."

  8. Visual thinking in action: visualizations as used on whiteboards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walny, Jagoda; Carpendale, Sheelagh; Riche, Nathalie Henry; Venolia, Gina; Fawcett, Philip

    2011-12-01

    While it is still most common for information visualization researchers to develop new visualizations from a data- or taskdriven perspective, there is growing interest in understanding the types of visualizations people create by themselves for personal use. As part of this recent direction, we have studied a large collection of whiteboards in a research institution, where people make active use of combinations of words, diagrams and various types of visuals to help them further their thought processes. Our goal is to arrive at a better understanding of the nature of visuals that are created spontaneously during brainstorming, thinking, communicating, and general problem solving on whiteboards. We use the qualitative approaches of open coding, interviewing, and affinity diagramming to explore the use of recognizable and novel visuals, and the interplay between visualization and diagrammatic elements with words, numbers and labels. We discuss the potential implications of our findings on information visualization design. © 2011 IEEE

  9. Strengthening the Visual Element in Visual Media Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, R. Dwight

    1996-01-01

    Describes how to more effectively communicate the visual element in video and audiovisual materials. Discusses identifying a central topic, developing the visual content without words, preparing a storyboard, testing its effectiveness on people who are unacquainted with the production, and writing the script with as few words as possible. (AEF)

  10. Staging Visual Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flensborg, Ingelise

    2009-01-01

    A visual methodological approach of exploring postures and movemenets in young childrens communication with art. How do we translate bodily postures and movements into methodological categories to access data of the interactive processes? These issues will be discussed through video matrials...

  11. NCI Visuals Online

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI Visuals Online contains images from the collections of the National Cancer Institute's Office of Communications and Public Liaison, including general biomedical and science-related images, cancer-specific scientific and patient care-related images, and portraits of directors and staff of the National Cancer Institute.

  12. 23rd June 2010 - University of Bristol Head of the Aerospace Engineering Department and Professor of Aerospace Dynamics N. Lieven visiting CERN control centre with Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and CMS User J. Goldstein.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    23rd June 2010 - University of Bristol Head of the Aerospace Engineering Department and Professor of Aerospace Dynamics N. Lieven visiting CERN control centre with Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and CMS User J. Goldstein.

  13. 23 July - Italian Director-General for Prevention G. Ruocco and Director-General for European and International Relations Ministry of Health D. Roderigo visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson B. Heinemann. Life Sciences Section M. Cirilli and Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

    CERN Document Server

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    23 July - Italian Director-General for Prevention G. Ruocco and Director-General for European and International Relations Ministry of Health D. Roderigo visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson B. Heinemann. Life Sciences Section M. Cirilli and Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

  14. 24 February 2012 - Polish Vice-Rectors AGH University of Science and Technology Cracow visiting the ATLAS underground experimental area with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni; Vice Rector J. Lis signs a collaboration agreement with A. Unnervik; Adviser T. Kurtyka and A. Siemko accompany the delegation throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    24 February 2012 - Polish Vice-Rectors AGH University of Science and Technology Cracow visiting the ATLAS underground experimental area with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni; Vice Rector J. Lis signs a collaboration agreement with A. Unnervik; Adviser T. Kurtyka and A. Siemko accompany the delegation throughout.

  15. 31 Jannuary 2012 - Pakistan COMSATS Executive Director I. E. Qureshi visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and International Relations Adviser R. Voss; Exchange of gifts and signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    31 Jannuary 2012 - Pakistan COMSATS Executive Director I. E. Qureshi visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and International Relations Adviser R. Voss; Exchange of gifts and signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  16. 27 February 2012 - Director of the Health Directorate at the Research DG European Commission R. Draghia-Akli in the ATLAS visitor centre with ATLAS Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Head of CERN EU Projects Office S. Stavrev; in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with E. Todesco; and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Michel Blanc

    2012-01-01

    27 February 2012 - Director of the Health Directorate at the Research DG European Commission R. Draghia-Akli in the ATLAS visitor centre with ATLAS Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Head of CERN EU Projects Office S. Stavrev; in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with E. Todesco; and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  17. 13 February 2012 - World Economic Forum Founder and Executive Chairman K. Schwab and Chairperson and Co-Founder Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship H. Schwab (Mrs)in the ATLAS experimental area at LHC Point 1 with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    13 February 2012 - World Economic Forum Founder and Executive Chairman K. Schwab and Chairperson and Co-Founder Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship H. Schwab (Mrs)in the ATLAS experimental area at LHC Point 1 with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  18. 18 January 2011 - Ing. Vittorio Malacalza, ASG Superconductors S.p.A, Italy in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Deputy Department Head L. Rossi, in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental area with Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    18 January 2011 - Ing. Vittorio Malacalza, ASG Superconductors S.p.A, Italy in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Deputy Department Head L. Rossi, in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental area with Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

  19. 17 October 2013 - C. Ashton High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Vice-President of the European Commission visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    17 October 2013 - C. Ashton High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, Vice-President of the European Commission visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  20. 27 June 2012 - Ambassador K. Pierce, Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Department Head P. Collier and CMS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson J. Virdee.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    27 June 2012 - Ambassador K. Pierce, Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Department Head P. Collier and CMS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson J. Virdee.

  1. 7th April 2011 - Romanian President of the National Authority for Scientific Research State Secretary Ministry for Education, Research, Youth and Sport D. M. Ciuparu signing the guest book with Director for Research S. Bertolucci and ALICE surface building with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    7th April 2011 - Romanian President of the National Authority for Scientific Research State Secretary Ministry for Education, Research, Youth and Sport D. M. Ciuparu signing the guest book with Director for Research S. Bertolucci and ALICE surface building with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino.

  2. 25 June 2010 - Founder Chairman of the Japanese Science and Technology in Society Forum K. Omi signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Adviser J. Ellis and Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    25 June 2010 - Founder Chairman of the Japanese Science and Technology in Society Forum K. Omi signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Adviser J. Ellis and Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  3. 19 September 2011 - Japan Science and Technology Agency President K. Kitazawa visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with engineer M. Bajko; the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni and Senior Scientist T. Kondo; signing the guest book with Adviser R.Voss and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    19 September 2011 - Japan Science and Technology Agency President K. Kitazawa visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with engineer M. Bajko; the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni and Senior Scientist T. Kondo; signing the guest book with Adviser R.Voss and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  4. 31st August 2011 - Government of Japan R. Chubachi, Executive Member of the Council for Science and Technology Policy, Cabinet Office, Vice Chairman, Representative Corporate Executive Officer and Member of the Board, Sony Corporation, visiting the ATLAS experimental area with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Senior physicist T. Kondo.

    CERN Multimedia

    Raphaël Piguet

    2011-01-01

    31st August 2011 - Government of Japan R. Chubachi, Executive Member of the Council for Science and Technology Policy, Cabinet Office, Vice Chairman, Representative Corporate Executive Officer and Member of the Board, Sony Corporation, visiting the ATLAS experimental area with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Senior physicist T. Kondo.

  5. 25 January 2012 - Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador R. Jansons, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Latvia to the United Nations Office at Geneva, signing the guest book with CERN Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi.

    CERN Document Server

    Estelle Spirig

    2012-01-01

    25 January 2012 - Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador R. Jansons, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Latvia to the United Nations Office at Geneva, signing the guest book with CERN Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi.

  6. 25 April 2012 - Latvia Riga Technical University Rector L. Ribickis signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi and Adviser for the Republic of Latvia T. Kurtyka.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    25 April 2012 - Latvia Riga Technical University Rector L. Ribickis signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi and Adviser for the Republic of Latvia T. Kurtyka.

  7. 11 August 2008 - Member of the House of Councillors M. Naito (The National Diet of Japan, The Democratic Party of Japan) visiting the ATLAS experiment control room with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and ATLAS Muon Project Leader G. Mikenberg. Family photograph with CERN Japanese scientists in front of the ATLAS surface building.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    11 August 2008 - Member of the House of Councillors M. Naito (The National Diet of Japan, The Democratic Party of Japan) visiting the ATLAS experiment control room with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and ATLAS Muon Project Leader G. Mikenberg. Family photograph with CERN Japanese scientists in front of the ATLAS surface building.

  8. 23rd June 2011 . US NASA Administrator General C. Bolden visiting the AMS control room with Collaboration Spokesperson S. Ting and CERN Director-General R. Heuer; Tree planting ceremony in front of building 946, Prevessin site, hosting the AMS control room (CERN-HI-1106159 01 -87)

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    88-115: visiting CMS control centre in Meyrin with Collaboration Spokesperson-elect J. Incandela and on-shift scientists accompanied by Head of International Relations F. Pauss; 116-119: signature of photographs at the main building steps 120-136: with First Swiss Astronaut C. Nicollier at the main building steps.

  9. 12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

  10. 3 February 2011 - British Members of the Science and Technology Committee (Commons)led by A. Miller MP signing the guest book with CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; in the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1 with Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Deputy D. Charlton.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    3 February 2011 - British Members of the Science and Technology Committee (Commons)led by A. Miller MP signing the guest book with CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers; in the ATLAS experimental cavern at LHC Point 1 with Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Deputy D. Charlton.

  11. 6 November 2013 - Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations Office and Other international organizations in Geneva Ambassador J. Balmaceda Serigos signing the guest book with Adviser for Latin America J. Salicio Diez; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton (Spouse, Son and First Secretary present).

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    6 November 2013 - Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations Office and Other international organizations in Geneva Ambassador J. Balmaceda Serigos signing the guest book with Adviser for Latin America J. Salicio Diez; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton (Spouse, Son and First Secretary present).

  12. 28 March 2014 - Italian Minister of Education, University and Research S. Giannini welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci in the ATLAS experimental cavern with Former Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti. Signature of the guest book with Belgian State Secretary for the Scientific Policy P. Courard.

    CERN Multimedia

    Gadmer, Jean-Claude

    2014-01-01

    28 March 2014 - Italian Minister of Education, University and Research S. Giannini welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci in the ATLAS experimental cavern with Former Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti. Signature of the guest book with Belgian State Secretary for the Scientific Policy P. Courard.

  13. 22nd September 2010 - Korean Minister of Education, Science and Technology J.-H. Lee signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting ALICE exhibition with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Schukraft; accompanied throughout by Adviser R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Teams : M. Brice ; JC Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    22nd September 2010 - Korean Minister of Education, Science and Technology J.-H. Lee signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting ALICE exhibition with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Schukraft; accompanied throughout by Adviser R. Voss.

  14. 11 July 2011 - Carleton University Ottawa, Canada Vice President (Research and International) K. Matheson in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis and signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    11 July 2011 - Carleton University Ottawa, Canada Vice President (Research and International) K. Matheson in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis and signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  15. 23 April 2010 - Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, S. Gillett CMG CVO, accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the ATLAS control room with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, University of Birmingham, D. Charlton and signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    23 April 2010 - Her Majesty’s Ambassador to Switzerland and Liechtenstein, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, S. Gillett CMG CVO, accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier, visiting the ATLAS control room with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, University of Birmingham, D. Charlton and signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  16. 18 May 2010 - Costa Rica Minister of Science and Technology C. Fonseca discussing with Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss and Adviser for Latin America J. Salicio Diez and visiting the ATLAS visitor centre at LHC Point 1 with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1005079 16: from left to right: UNOSAT Member O. Van Damme, Deputy Permanent Representative C. Guillermet, Ambassador and Permenant Representative of Costa Rica to the UN M. B. Dengo, Minister of Science and Technology C. Fonseca, Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss, ATLAS Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Adviser for Latin America J. Salicio Diez.

  17. 18 June 2012 - DST Global Founder Y. Milner signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the AD facility in building 193 with AEGIS Collaboration Spokesperson M. Doser and Adviser for the Russian Federation T. Kurtyka. Managing Director I. Osborne also present with Mrs J. Milner and DST Global A. Lebedkina.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    18 June 2012 - DST Global Founder Y. Milner signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the AD facility in building 193 with AEGIS Collaboration Spokesperson M. Doser and Adviser for the Russian Federation T. Kurtyka. Managing Director I. Osborne also present with Mrs J. Milner and DST Global A. Lebedkina.

  18. H.E. Dr Danilo Türk President of the Republic of Slovenia (second from right) visiting the ATLAS detector with, from left to right, Ambassador A. Logar, Spokesperson F. Gianotti, Director-General R. Heuer, First Lady B. Miklič Türk and ATLAS Slovenian national contactperson M. Mikuz.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    H.E. Dr Danilo Türk President of the Republic of Slovenia (second from right) visiting the ATLAS detector with, from left to right, Ambassador A. Logar, Spokesperson F. Gianotti, Director-General R. Heuer, First Lady B. Miklič Türk and ATLAS Slovenian national contactperson M. Mikuz.

  19. 28 June 2012 - Ambassador I. Piperkov, Permanent Representative of Bulgaria to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva and Spouse visiting CMS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi and CERN Control Centre with M. Benedikt.Senior physicist L. Litov accompanies the delegation throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    28 June 2012 - Ambassador I. Piperkov, Permanent Representative of Bulgaria to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva and Spouse visiting CMS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi and CERN Control Centre with M. Benedikt.Senior physicist L. Litov accompanies the delegation throughout.

  20. Chairman of the DELL Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and in front of the ATLAS detector (centre) with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford (left) and Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer on 26th January 2010.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    Chairman of the DELL Board of Directors and Chief Executive Officer Michael S. Dell with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and in front of the ATLAS detector (centre) with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford (left) and Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer on 26th January 2010.

  1. 23rd June 2010 - Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization Chief Executive Officer A. Paterson signing a Joint Statement of Intent and the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre and control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    23rd June 2010 - Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization Chief Executive Officer A. Paterson signing a Joint Statement of Intent and the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre and control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  2. 8 May 2013 - Swedish European Spallation Source Chief Executive Officer J. H. Yeck in the ATLAS visitor centre and experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton (also present M. Nessi, R. Garoby and E. Tsesmelis); signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    8 May 2013 - Swedish European Spallation Source Chief Executive Officer J. H. Yeck in the ATLAS visitor centre and experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton (also present M. Nessi, R. Garoby and E. Tsesmelis); signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

  3. 15 January 2010 - Vice-Chancellor & Chief Executive C. Snowden, University of Surrey, United Kingdom and Mrs Snowden visiting ALICE exhibition and experimental undeground area with Collabortion Spokesperson J. Schukraft and Beams Department Head P. Collier; Signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    15 January 2010 - Vice-Chancellor & Chief Executive C. Snowden, University of Surrey, United Kingdom and Mrs Snowden visiting ALICE exhibition and experimental undeground area with Collabortion Spokesperson J. Schukraft and Beams Department Head P. Collier; Signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  4. 9th January 2012 - Indonesian Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador Triansyah Djani to to the United Nations, WTO and other International Organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser E. Tsesmelis, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

    CERN Document Server

    Estelle Spirig

    2012-01-01

    9th January 2012 - Indonesian Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador Triansyah Djani to to the United Nations, WTO and other International Organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser E. Tsesmelis, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

  5. 16 December 2013 - Hooke Professor of Experimental Physics and Pro Vice Chancellor University of Oxford Prof. I. Walmsley visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, Physics Department, ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells and Chair, CMS Collaboration Board, Oxford University and Purdue University I. Shipsey

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    16 December 2013 - Hooke Professor of Experimental Physics and Pro Vice Chancellor University of Oxford Prof. I. Walmsley visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, Physics Department, ATLAS Collaboration P. Wells and Chair, CMS Collaboration Board, Oxford University and Purdue University I. Shipsey

  6. The Honourable Lawrence Gonzi Prime Minister of Malta visiting CMS experiment on 10 January 2008, from left to right Ministry of Finance Permanent Secretary A. Camilleri, Ambassador V. Camilleri, Maltese Representative at CERN N. Sammut, Prime Minister L. Gonzi, CMS Collaboration Spokesperson T. Virdee, CERN Director-General R. Aymar, University of Malta Rector J. Camilleri, Adviser to Director-General E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    The Honourable Lawrence Gonzi Prime Minister of Malta visiting CMS experiment on 10 January 2008, from left to right Ministry of Finance Permanent Secretary A. Camilleri, Ambassador V. Camilleri, Maltese Representative at CERN N. Sammut, Prime Minister L. Gonzi, CMS Collaboration Spokesperson T. Virdee, CERN Director-General R. Aymar, University of Malta Rector J. Camilleri, Adviser to Director-General E. Tsesmelis.

  7. 19 July 2013 - Chairman of the Policy Committee, European Cancer Organisation, President, European Association for Cancer Research E. Celis visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, B. Heinemann and signing the Guest Book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers. Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    19 July 2013 - Chairman of the Policy Committee, European Cancer Organisation, President, European Association for Cancer Research E. Celis visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, B. Heinemann and signing the Guest Book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers. Life Sciences Adviser M. Dosanjh present.

  8. 22. August 2013 - Permanent Representative of the Republic of Korea to the United Nations Office and other international organizations in Geneva, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary S. Choi signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the LHC tunnel with P. Fessia and the CMS experimental cavern with Former Collaboration Spokesperson J. Virdee.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    22. August 2013 - Permanent Representative of the Republic of Korea to the United Nations Office and other international organizations in Geneva, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary S. Choi signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the LHC tunnel with P. Fessia and the CMS experimental cavern with Former Collaboration Spokesperson J. Virdee.

  9. 8 April 2011 - Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology A. Mercadante Oliva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with J.M. Jimenez.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    8 April 2011 - Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology A. Mercadante Oliva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with J.M. Jimenez.

  10. 28 September 2011 - Ambassador of the Republic of the Philippines to Switzerland and Liechtenstein L J. Baja visiting CMS control centre in Meyrin with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck and signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    28 September 2011 - Ambassador of the Republic of the Philippines to Switzerland and Liechtenstein L J. Baja visiting CMS control centre in Meyrin with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck and signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  11. 26 Feburary 2013 - Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs J. A. Meade Kuribreña welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer at LHC Point 2, signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci, visiting the ALICE experiment and LHC tunnel with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli; Alice

    2013-01-01

    26 Feburary 2013 - Mexican Secretary of Foreign Affairs J. A. Meade Kuribreña welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Heuer at LHC Point 2, signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci, visiting the ALICE experiment and LHC tunnel with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

  12. 30 January 2012 - Ecuadorian Ambassador Gallegos Chiriboga, Permanent Representative to the United Nations Office and other International Organisations at Geneva and San Francisco de Quito University Vice Chancellor C. Montùfar visiting CMS surface facilities and underground experimental area with CMS Collaboration L. Sulak and Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi, throughout accompanied by Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Michael Hoch

    2012-01-01

    30 January 2012 - Ecuadorian Ambassador Gallegos Chiriboga, Permanent Representative to the United Nations Office and other International Organisations at Geneva and San Francisco de Quito University Vice Chancellor C. Montùfar visiting CMS surface facilities and underground experimental area with CMS Collaboration L. Sulak and Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Camporesi, throughout accompanied by Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  13. 18 January 2011 - The British Royal Academy of Engineering in the LHC tunnel with CMS Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and Beams Department Head P. Collier; in the CERN Control Centre with P. Collier and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    18 January 2011 - The British Royal Academy of Engineering in the LHC tunnel with CMS Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and Beams Department Head P. Collier; in the CERN Control Centre with P. Collier and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry.

  14. 14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    14 November 2013 - Director of Indian Institute of Technology Indore P. Mathur with members of the Indian community working at CERN; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2, the ALICE experimental area and SM18 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson, Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare P. Giubellino and Technology Department, Accelerator Beam Transfer Group Leader V. Mertens

  15. 21 January 2008 - Vice-President of the Human Rights Commission Z. Muhsin Al Hussein, Ambassador to United Nations A. Attar and their delegation from Saudi Arabia, visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Technical Coordinator M. Nessi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2008-01-01

    21 January 2008 - Vice-President of the Human Rights Commission Z. Muhsin Al Hussein, Ambassador to United Nations A. Attar and their delegation from Saudi Arabia, visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Technical Coordinator M. Nessi.

  16. 24 January 2012 - British Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge Sir Leszek Borysiewicz signing the guest book with CERN Director-General, visiting ATLAS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton and Sm18 with engineer R. Veness.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    24 January 2012 - British Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge Sir Leszek Borysiewicz signing the guest book with CERN Director-General, visiting ATLAS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson D. Charlton and Sm18 with engineer R. Veness.

  17. 10 January 2011 - Former Minister of Science and Technology Honorary Member of the National Academy of Engineering of Korea J.-U.SEO in the CMS underground experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson J. Incandela, Former Adviser D. Blechschmidt and Adviser R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien brice

    2011-01-01

    10 January 2011 - Former Minister of Science and Technology Honorary Member of the National Academy of Engineering of Korea J.-U.SEO in the CMS underground experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson J. Incandela, Former Adviser D. Blechschmidt and Adviser R. Voss.

  18. 20th May 2010 - Malaysian Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation H. F: B. H. Yusof signing the guest book with Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss and CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by CERN Advisers J. Ellis and E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien brice

    2010-01-01

    20th May 2010 - Malaysian Minister for Science, Technology and Innovation H. F: B. H. Yusof signing the guest book with Coordinator for External Relations F. Pauss and CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by CERN Advisers J. Ellis and E. Tsesmelis.

  19. Mr Lars Leijonborg, Minister for Higher Education and Research of Sweden visiting the cavern ATLAS, the control room of ATLAS and the machine LHC at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Dr. Jos Engelen, Chief Scientific Officer of CERN.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2008-01-01

    Mr Lars Leijonborg, Minister for Higher Education and Research of Sweden visiting the cavern ATLAS, the control room of ATLAS and the machine LHC at Point 1 with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Dr. Jos Engelen, Chief Scientific Officer of CERN.

  20. 29 November 2013 - U. Humphrey Orjiako Nigerian Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Mission to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations R. Voss, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and the ALICE cavern with ALICE Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

    CERN Multimedia

    Noemi Caraban

    2013-01-01

    29 November 2013 - U. Humphrey Orjiako Nigerian Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Mission to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations R. Voss, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and the ALICE cavern with ALICE Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

  1. 5 June 2013 - European Union Ambassador to Switzerland and the Principality of Liechtenstein R. Jones in the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Head of the EU Projects Office S. Stavrev present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    5 June 2013 - European Union Ambassador to Switzerland and the Principality of Liechtenstein R. Jones in the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler, in the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Head of the EU Projects Office S. Stavrev present.

  2. 27 August 2013 - Signature of an Agreement between KTO Karatay University in Turkey represented by the Dean of Engineering Professor Ali Okatan, CERN represented by Director for Research and Computing Dr Sergio Bertolucci and ALICE Collaboration represented by ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson Dr Paolo Giubellino.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    27 August 2013 - Signature of an Agreement between KTO Karatay University in Turkey represented by the Dean of Engineering Professor Ali Okatan, CERN represented by Director for Research and Computing Dr Sergio Bertolucci and ALICE Collaboration represented by ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson Dr Paolo Giubellino.

  3. 16 December 2013 - P. Lavie President of the Technion Institute of Technology in Israel visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. G. Mikenberg, E. Rabinovici, Y. Rozen and S. Tarem present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    16 December 2013 - P. Lavie President of the Technion Institute of Technology in Israel visiting the ATLAS cavern with ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson T. Wengler; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. G. Mikenberg, E. Rabinovici, Y. Rozen and S. Tarem present throughout.

  4. 13 September 2013 - Chairman of the Board of Directors of the von Karman Institute Kingdom of Belgium J.-P. Contzen visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department N. Delruelle and signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli (visit)

    2013-01-01

    13 September 2013 - Chairman of the Board of Directors of the von Karman Institute Kingdom of Belgium J.-P. Contzen visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department N. Delruelle and signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka present.

  5. 14th March 2011 - Australian Senator the Hon. K. Carr Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research in the ATLAS Visitor Centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti,visiting the SM18 area with G. De Rijk,the Computing centre with Department Head F. Hemmer, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer with Head of International relations F. Pauss

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    14th March 2011 - Australian Senator the Hon. K. Carr Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research in the ATLAS Visitor Centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti,visiting the SM18 area with G. De Rijk,the Computing centre with Department Head F. Hemmer, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer with Head of International relations F. Pauss

  6. 28th February 2011 - Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs A. Davutoğlu signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; meeting the CERN Turkish Community at Point 1; visiting the ATLAS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    28th February 2011 - Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs A. Davutoğlu signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; meeting the CERN Turkish Community at Point 1; visiting the ATLAS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  7. 4th February 2011 - Austrian Academy of Sciences President H. Denk visiting CMS underground area with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli, Austrian Academy of Sciences Secretary General A. Suppan, CERN Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Director, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Austrian Academy of Sciences C Fabjan.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    4th February 2011 - Austrian Academy of Sciences President H. Denk visiting CMS underground area with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli, Austrian Academy of Sciences Secretary General A. Suppan, CERN Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Director, High Energy Physics Laboratory, Austrian Academy of Sciences C Fabjan.

  8. 30 August 2011 - Médecins sans frontières International President U. K Karunakara signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser for Life Sciences M. Dosanjh; visiting CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    30 August 2011 - Médecins sans frontières International President U. K Karunakara signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser for Life Sciences M. Dosanjh; visiting CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

  9. Tuesday 28 January 2014 - K. E. Huthmacher Ministerialdirektor Provision for the Future - Basic and Sustainability Research Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) visiting the stands with R. Heuer CERN Director-General on the occasion of the Inauguration of the Industrial Exhibition Germany@CERN and visiting the ATLAS Cavern with D. Charlton ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson and R. Voss Head of International Relations.

    CERN Multimedia

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Tuesday 28 January - K. E. Huthmacher Ministerialdirektor Provision for the Future - Basic and Sustainability Research Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) visiting the stands with R. Heuer CERN Director-General on the occasion of the Inauguration of the Industrial Exhibition Germany@CERN and visiting the ATLAS Cavern with D. Charlton ATLAS Collaboration Spokesperson and R. Voss Head of International Relations.

  10. 10 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Republic of India to the Conference on Disarmament, United Nations Office at Geneva Ambassador Mehta signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser R. Voss;in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and ALICE underground experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    10 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Republic of India to the Conference on Disarmament, United Nations Office at Geneva Ambassador Mehta signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser R. Voss;in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and ALICE underground experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

  11. 24 May 2013 - Rector of the Polish Stanislaw Staszic AGH University of Science and Technology T. Slomka in the LHC tunnel at Point 8 with Senior Polish Staff Member A. Siemko, in LHCb experimental cavern with LHCb Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Adviser for Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    24 May 2013 - Rector of the Polish Stanislaw Staszic AGH University of Science and Technology T. Slomka in the LHC tunnel at Point 8 with Senior Polish Staff Member A. Siemko, in LHCb experimental cavern with LHCb Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer. Adviser for Eastern Europe T. Kurtyka present.

  12. 30 August 2013 - Senior Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs in Japan M. Matsuyama signing the guest book with CERN Director-General; visit the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with former ATLAS Japan national contact physicist T. Kondo. R. Voss and K. Yoshida present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    30 August 2013 - Senior Vice Minister for Foreign Affairs in Japan M. Matsuyama signing the guest book with CERN Director-General; visit the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Spokesperson D. Charlton and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with former ATLAS Japan national contact physicist T. Kondo. R. Voss and K. Yoshida present throughout.

  13. 8 April 2013 - Indian Hon'ble Minister for Ministry of Science & Technology and Ministry of Earth Sciences Shri Sudini Jaipal Reddy in the LHC tunnel with K. Foraz, visiting the CMS cavern with Technical Coordinator A. Ball and Former Spokesperson T. Virdee, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2013-01-01

    8 April 2013 - Indian Hon'ble Minister for Ministry of Science & Technology and Ministry of Earth Sciences Shri Sudini Jaipal Reddy in the LHC tunnel with K. Foraz, visiting the CMS cavern with Technical Coordinator A. Ball and Former Spokesperson T. Virdee, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer.

  14. 27 February 2012- Thai Minister of Science and Technology P. Suraswadi with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis and CMS Collaboration Former Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck signing the guest book in the 6th floor conference room, building 60 and visiting CMS underground experimental area at LHC Point 5.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    27 February 2012- Thai Minister of Science and Technology P. Suraswadi with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis and CMS Collaboration Former Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck signing the guest book in the 6th floor conference room, building 60 and visiting CMS underground experimental area at LHC Point 5.

  15. Visualizing multi-channel networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antemijczuk, Paweł; Magiera, Marta; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a visualization to illustrate social interactions, built from multiple distinct channels of communication. The visualization displays a summary of dense personal information in a compact graphical notation. The starting point is an abstract drawing of a spider’s web. Below...

  16. ICT, Education, and Visual Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Graeme

    2001-01-01

    Reviews developments in the use of information and communications technology (ICT) in the education of children with visual impairments. Highlights include the population of children with visual impairments in the United Kingdom; and World Health Organization classification of disability as a criteria by which the relevance of ICT can be measured.…

  17. Visual Literacy and Message Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettersson, Rune

    2009-01-01

    Many researchers from different disciplines have explained their views and interpretations and written about visual literacy from their various perspectives. Visual literacy may be applied in almost all areas such as advertising, anatomy, art, biology, business presentations, communication, education, engineering, etc. (Pettersson, 2002a). Despite…

  18. Transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography for visualization of signal Intensity distribution pattern within an unruptured cerebral aneurysm: preliminarily assessment with anterior communicating artery aneurysms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, T.; Ekino, C.; Ohsako, C.

    2004-01-01

    The natural history of unruptured cerebral aneurysm is not known; also unknown is the potential growth and rupture in any individual aneurysm. The authors have developed transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) obtained by a time-of-flight sequence to investigate the interaction between the intra-aneurysmal signal intensity distribution patterns and configuration of unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Transluminal color-coded images were reconstructed from volume data of source magnetic resonance angiography by using a parallel volume-rendering algorithm with transluminal imaging technique. By selecting a numerical threshold range from a signal intensity opacity chart of the three-dimensional volume-rendering dataset several areas of signal intensity were depicted, assigned different colors, and visualized transparently through the walls of parent arteries and an aneurysm. Patterns of signal intensity distribution were analyzed with three operated cases of an unruptured anterior communicating artery aneurysm and compared with the actual configurations observed at microneurosurgery. A little difference in marginal features of an aneurysm was observed; however, transluminal color-coded images visualized the complex signal intensity distribution within an aneurysm in conjunction with aneurysmal geometry. Transluminal color-coded three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography can thus provide numerical analysis of the interaction between spatial signal intensity distribution patterns and aneurysmal configurations and may offer an alternative and practical method to investigate the patient-specific natural history of individual unruptured cerebral aneurysms. (orig.)

  19. Visual art and visual perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenderink, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Visual art and visual perception ‘Visual art’ has become a minor cul-de-sac orthogonal to THE ART of the museum directors and billionaire collectors. THE ART is conceptual, instead of visual. Among its cherished items are the tins of artist’s shit (Piero Manzoni, 1961, Merda d’Artista) “worth their

  20. A word from the Spokesperson

    CERN Multimedia

    Jenni, P

    Dear Colleagues, It is a great pleasure to open the first ATLAS eNews. Many exciting things happen across the detector construction sites all over the ATLAS world and at CERN, as well as for the preparation of the computing and the physics analysis. With the ATLAS eNews we hope that progress, highlights, special events, and challenges can be shared informally and quickly within the full Collaboration. The ATLAS eNews are a challenge in itself. Of course we have no time to write articles, fighting with construction schedules and daily technical problems! But here we are... with a great idea for the benefit of all of us in ATLAS. Let's make it a success! Pippa Wells will be the chief editor of the ATLAS eNews, and I thank her warmly for setting up an attractive frame to make it easy to contribute news. As we have seen at the last Overview Week in sunny BNL, there is no doubt that more and more our common dreams of a very powerful LHC detector are becoming a reality, even though there are still plenty of hur...

  1. The LandCarbon Web Application: Advanced Geospatial Data Delivery and Visualization Tools for Communication about Ecosystem Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, N.; Galey, B.; Zhu, Z.; Sleeter, B. M.; Lehmer, E.

    2015-12-01

    The LandCarbon web application (http://landcarbon.org) is a collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey and U.C. Berkeley's Geospatial Innovation Facility (GIF). The LandCarbon project is a national assessment focused on improved understanding of carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas fluxes in and out of ecosystems related to land use, using scientific capabilities from USGS and other organizations. The national assessment is conducted at a regional scale, covers all 50 states, and incorporates data from remote sensing, land change studies, aquatic and wetland data, hydrological and biogeochemical modeling, and wildfire mapping to estimate baseline and future potential carbon storage and greenhouse gas fluxes. The LandCarbon web application is a geospatial portal that allows for a sophisticated data delivery system as well as a suite of engaging tools that showcase the LandCarbon data using interactive web based maps and charts. The web application was designed to be flexible and accessible to meet the needs of a variety of users. Casual users can explore the input data and results of the assessment for a particular area of interest in an intuitive and interactive map, without the need for specialized software. Users can view and interact with maps, charts, and statistics that summarize the baseline and future potential carbon storage and fluxes for U.S. Level 2 Ecoregions for 3 IPCC emissions scenarios. The application allows users to access the primary data sources and assessment results for viewing and download, and also to learn more about the assessment's objectives, methods, and uncertainties through published reports and documentation. The LandCarbon web application is built on free and open source libraries including Django and D3. The GIF has developed the Django-Spillway package, which facilitates interactive visualization and serialization of complex geospatial raster data. The underlying LandCarbon data is available through an open application

  2. To be seen or to hide: visual characteristics of body patterns for camouflage and communication in the Australian giant cuttlefish Sepia apama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zylinski, S; How, M J; Osorio, D; Hanlon, R T; Marshall, N J

    2011-05-01

    It might seem obvious that a camouflaged animal must generally match its background whereas to be conspicuous an organism must differ from the background. However, the image parameters (or statistics) that evaluate the conspicuousness of patterns and textures are seldom well defined, and animal coloration patterns are rarely compared quantitatively with their respective backgrounds. Here we examine this issue in the Australian giant cuttlefish Sepia apama. We confine our analysis to the best-known and simplest image statistic, the correlation in intensity between neighboring pixels. Sepia apama can rapidly change their body patterns from assumed conspicuous signaling to assumed camouflage, thus providing an excellent and unique opportunity to investigate how such patterns differ in a single visual habitat. We describe the intensity variance and spatial frequency power spectra of these differing body patterns and compare these patterns with the backgrounds against which they are viewed. The measured image statistics of camouflaged animals closely resemble their backgrounds, while signaling animals differ significantly from their backgrounds. Our findings may provide the basis for a set of general rules for crypsis and signals. Furthermore, our methods may be widely applicable to the quantitative study of animal coloration.

  3. Sharpened cortical tuning and enhanced cortico-cortical communication contribute to the long-term neural mechanisms of visual motion perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nihong; Bi, Taiyong; Zhou, Tiangang; Li, Sheng; Liu, Zili; Fang, Fang

    2015-07-15

    Much has been debated about whether the neural plasticity mediating perceptual learning takes place at the sensory or decision-making stage in the brain. To investigate this, we trained human subjects in a visual motion direction discrimination task. Behavioral performance and BOLD signals were measured before, immediately after, and two weeks after training. Parallel to subjects' long-lasting behavioral improvement, the neural selectivity in V3A and the effective connectivity from V3A to IPS (intraparietal sulcus, a motion decision-making area) exhibited a persistent increase for the trained direction. Moreover, the improvement was well explained by a linear combination of the selectivity and connectivity increases. These findings suggest that the long-term neural mechanisms of motion perceptual learning are implemented by sharpening cortical tuning to trained stimuli at the sensory processing stage, as well as by optimizing the connections between sensory and decision-making areas in the brain. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.W. Markman

    2001-01-01

    The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M andO 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M andO 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree

  5. Flow visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Merzkirch, Wolfgang

    1974-01-01

    Flow Visualization describes the most widely used methods for visualizing flows. Flow visualization evaluates certain properties of a flow field directly accessible to visual perception. Organized into five chapters, this book first presents the methods that create a visible flow pattern that could be investigated by visual inspection, such as simple dye and density-sensitive visualization methods. It then deals with the application of electron beams and streaming birefringence. Optical methods for compressible flows, hydraulic analogy, and high-speed photography are discussed in other cha

  6. Creating visual guidelines for a Finnish fashion brand

    OpenAIRE

    Morozova, Elizaveta

    2017-01-01

    Visual communication is an essential part of branding. Visual elements like logo, brand colours, and typography create associations with a brand and make it distinctive. Graphic design is a tool for visual communication that allows creating aesthetic and functional visual elements that convey some messages. The client of this thesis is a Finnish fashion company that does not have clear and consistent visual image, and the goal is to create it based on company’s values and desired image...

  7. Visual Representations of the Water Cycle in Science Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinisha, K.; Ramadas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Visual representations, including photographs, sketches and schematic diagrams, are a valuable yet often neglected aspect of textbooks. Visual means of communication are particularly helpful in introducing abstract concepts in science. For effective communication, visuals and text need to be appropriately integrated within the textbook. This study…

  8. Garis dan Titik Berdasarkan Riset Visual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Kurniawati Homan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A design may not be created instantly, without going through a process of creation. At the beginning it all starts from nothing, blank. It requires a visual research to make a visual communication. Without a visual research, the design will not have a strong meaning to be communicated. When an idea is created, the next step is to generate the idea to become a design. The first thing a designer to do is drawing a line. Line is one of the design basic elements. In the journey to make a good design, a designer requires a visual record to assist her/him in remembering what is important. A visual record contains not only visual things seen by eyes, but also the perceived things. What is felt at the moment is important because it is easier to forget than visual memory. Sense is an important element in design. A good work will easily be communicated not only by visuals but also from senses. The study was conducted as an insight into the process of making a visual record of nirmana using visual recording method in the exploration of dots and dashes. This method was used to sharpen the sensitivity of students to dots and lines. Initially, the students visited a traditional market to do the visual research. After that, they created a visual record in the form of the composition of dots and lines in nirmana to remember the taste, smell, and visual experiences. 

  9. Visual Literacy in Bloom: Using Bloom's Taxonomy to Support Visual Learning Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneson, Jessie B.; Offerdahl, Erika G.

    2018-01-01

    "Vision and Change" identifies science communication as one of the core competencies in undergraduate biology. Visual representations are an integral part of science communication, allowing ideas to be shared among and between scientists and the public. As such, development of scientific visual literacy should be a desired outcome of…

  10. Lessons Learned about Best Practices for Communicating Earthquake Forecasting and Early Warning to Non-Scientific Publics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellnow, D. D.; Sellnow, T. L.

    2017-12-01

    Earthquake scientists are without doubt experts in understanding earthquake probabilities, magnitudes, and intensities, as well as the potential consequences of them to community infrastructures and inhabitants. One critical challenge these scientific experts face, however, rests with communicating what they know to the people they want to help. Helping scientists translate scientific information to non-scientists is something Drs. Tim and Deanna Sellnow have been committed to for decades. As such, they have compiled a host of data-driven best practices for communicating effectively to non-scientific publics about earthquake forecasting, probabilities, and warnings. In this session, they will summarize what they have learned as it may help earthquake scientists, emergency managers, and other key spokespersons share these important messages to disparate publics in ways that result in positive outcomes, the most important of which is saving lives.

  11. Qt Quality Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Sippola, Juha

    2013-01-01

    The idea for this Bachelor’s thesis came from Digia, which develops Qt, a cross-platform application and UI framework for software developers, together with the Qt Project, a meritocratic consensus-based open source developer community. The main objective of this thesis was to improve the visualization and communication of the Qt quality by creating a web portal to collect and display metrics on required Qt process areas, focusing on continuous integration. Raw results are available from many...

  12. Institutionalizing New Ideas Through Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Renate; Jancsary, Dennis; Höllerer, Markus A.

    How do visualization and visual forms of communication influence the process of transforming a novel idea into established organizational practice? In this paper, we build theory with regard to the role of visuals in manifesting and giving form to an innovative idea as it proceeds through various...... stages of institutionalization. Ideas become institutionalized not merely through widespread diffusion in a cognitive-discursive form but eventually through their translation into concrete activities and transformation into specific patterns of organizational practice. We argue that visualization plays...... a pivotal and unique role in this process. Visualization bridges the ideational with the practical realm by providing representations of ideas, connecting them to existing knowledge, and illustrating the specific actions that instantiate them. Similar to verbal discourse, and often in tandem, visual...

  13. Is There Anybody Out There? For a Better Communication Between Romanian Public Administrators and Their Constituencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tudor VLAD

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern public administration education has been established in Romania and in other former communist countries in the early 1990s. As a result, many senior managers in central and local governments have not had the opportunity to attend these academic programs, and the number of in-house training programs has been limited. This study focuses on a set of communication skills – including the use of new technologies and social media – that top local administrators should acquire in order to develop a better relationship with their constituencies. The study is based on assessments of eight workshops conducted in Romania and the Republic of Moldova with government spokespersons and top public administration managers, and on the most recent data on Internet use and Internet penetration in Romania provided by Internet World Stats (2012 and by Intellinews (2013.

  14. Visuel Communication in Web Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorlacius, Lisbeth

    2010-01-01

    in terms of the pictorial and graphical aspects of Web design by drawing on insights from semiotics, art history, communication theory, and graphic design. The practical use of the model will be demonstrated on two Web sites: Jakob Nielsen and Donald A. Norman's Web site www.nngroup.com and Walter Van......Web sites are rapidly becoming the preferred media choice for information search, company presentation, shopping, entertainment, education, and social contacts. And along with the various forms of communication that the Web offers the aesthetic aspects have begun to play an increasing important...... to introduce a model for analysis of the visual communication in Web design figure 2. This new model is based on Roman Jakobson's communication model, which focuses on the linguistic aspects of the communication. Jakobson’s model has been expanded and adapted so that it is applicable to visual communication...

  15. Audio-visual integration through the parallel visual pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaposvári, Péter; Csete, Gergő; Bognár, Anna; Csibri, Péter; Tóth, Eszter; Szabó, Nikoletta; Vécsei, László; Sáry, Gyula; Tamás Kincses, Zsigmond

    2015-10-22

    Audio-visual integration has been shown to be present in a wide range of different conditions, some of which are processed through the dorsal, and others through the ventral visual pathway. Whereas neuroimaging studies have revealed integration-related activity in the brain, there has been no imaging study of the possible role of segregated visual streams in audio-visual integration. We set out to determine how the different visual pathways participate in this communication. We investigated how audio-visual integration can be supported through the dorsal and ventral visual pathways during the double flash illusion. Low-contrast and chromatic isoluminant stimuli were used to drive preferably the dorsal and ventral pathways, respectively. In order to identify the anatomical substrates of the audio-visual interaction in the two conditions, the psychophysical results were correlated with the white matter integrity as measured by diffusion tensor imaging.The psychophysiological data revealed a robust double flash illusion in both conditions. A correlation between the psychophysical results and local fractional anisotropy was found in the occipito-parietal white matter in the low-contrast condition, while a similar correlation was found in the infero-temporal white matter in the chromatic isoluminant condition. Our results indicate that both of the parallel visual pathways may play a role in the audio-visual interaction. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Traffic Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picozzi, Matteo; Verdezoto, Nervo; Pouke, Matti

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a space-time visualization to provide city's decision-makers the ability to analyse and uncover important "city events" in an understandable manner for city planning activities. An interactive Web mashup visualization is presented that integrates several visualization...... techniques to give a rapid overview of traffic data. We illustrate our approach as a case study for traffic visualization systems, using datasets from the city of Oulu that can be extended to other city planning activities. We also report the feedback of real users (traffic management employees, traffic police...... officers, city planners) to support our arguments....

  17. Distributed Visualization

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Distributed Visualization allows anyone, anywhere, to see any simulation, at any time. Development focuses on algorithms, software, data formats, data systems and...

  18. Visualization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Evaluates and improves the operational effectiveness of existing and emerging electronic warfare systems. By analyzing and visualizing simulation results...

  19. 15 June 2009 - President of the Republic of Mozambique A. Guebuza visiting CMS experimental area with Non Member-State Relations Adviser J. Ellis, Collaboration Spokesperson T. Virdee and Ambassador to Switzerland and Permenant Representative of the Republic of Mozambique to the United Nations Office and the World Trade Organization in Geneva F. V. Vehlo Rodrigues.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    Tirage 1-3:H.E. A. Guebuza with Adviser for Non-Member States, J. Ellis and CMS Spokesperson, T. Virdee in CMS experimental area Tirage 4:H.E. A. Guebuza with CERN Director-General, R. Heuer Tirage 5-8: Presentation of CERN's activities by R. Heuer Tirage 9-12:H.E. A. Guebuza with Coordinator for External Relations,F. Pauss and R. Heuer Tirage 13-30:visiting CMS underground experimental area

  20. 15th December 2010 - World Intellectual Property Organization Director-General F. Gurry signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting CMS control room, experimental cavern and LHC tunnel with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson J. Incandela, accompanied by M. Bona.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1012325 36, from left to right: WIPO Arbitration and Mediation Center, Global Issues Sector Director E. Wilbers; CERN Adviser, Relations with International Organisations, M. Bona; CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson, University of California Santa Barbara J. Incandela; WIPO Deputy Director General, Global Issues Sector J. C. Wichard; WIPO Director-General F. Gurry; WIPO Executive Director and Chief of Staff, Office of the Director General N. Prasad.

  1. 30th August 2010 - Permanent Representative of the People's Republic of China to the United Nations Office at Geneva, Ambassador Y. He visiting the CMS underground experimental area and LHC tunnel with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1008197 01: in the LHC tunnel at Point 5: CMS Collaboaration Spokesperson G. Tonelli, Mrs L. Jianping (Ambassador's spouse), Mrs B. Heuer, Permanent Representative of the People's Republic of China to the United Nations Office at Geneva, Ambassador Y. He, CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Adviser R. Voss; CERN-HI-1008197 57: in front of the CMS experiment at LHC point 5: CMS technical Coordinator A. Ball, Mrs L. Jianping (Ambassador's spouse), Permanent Representative of the People's Republic of China to the United Nations Office at Geneva, Ambassador Y. He; Mrs B. Heuer, CERN Director-General R. Heuer, CMS Collaboaration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and Adviser R. Voss. CERN-HI-1008197 02 - 14: Welcome in front of building 3562 at CMS. Head of International relations F: Pauss gives the introduction talk to the delegation. CERN-HI-1008197 15 - 25: visiting CMS control room at Point 5 with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli; CERN-HI-1008197 26 - 29: visiting the service cavern in the CMS underground ar...

  2. Visual art and visual perception

    OpenAIRE

    Koenderink, Jan J.

    2015-01-01

    Visual art and visual perception ‘Visual art’ has become a minor cul-de-sac orthogonal to THE ART of the museum directors and billionaire collectors. THE ART is conceptual, instead of visual. Among its cherished items are the tins of artist’s shit (Piero Manzoni, 1961, Merda d’Artista) “worth their weight in gold”. I perceive a metabletic (van den Berg, 1956) parallel to philosophy transforming itself into speculative logic games, and psychology going cognitive by freeing itself from phenomen...

  3. Visual Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie; Flensborg, Ingelise

    2010-01-01

    The intrinsic breadth of various types of images creates new possibilities and challenges for visual education. The digital media have moved the boundaries between images and other kinds of modalities (e.g. writing, speech and sound) and have augmented the possibilities for integrating the functi......The intrinsic breadth of various types of images creates new possibilities and challenges for visual education. The digital media have moved the boundaries between images and other kinds of modalities (e.g. writing, speech and sound) and have augmented the possibilities for integrating...... to emerge in the interlocutory space of a global visual repertoire and diverse local interpretations. The two perspectives represent challenges for future visual education which require visual competences, not only within the arts but also within the subjects of natural sciences, social sciences, languages...

  4. Meaning and Identities: A Visual Performative Pedagogy for Socio-Cultural Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushka, Kathryn

    2009-01-01

    In this article I present personalised socio-cultural inquiry in visual art education as a critical and expressive material praxis. The model of "Visual Performative Pedagogy and Communicative Proficiency for the Visual Art Classroom" is presented as a legitimate means of manipulating visual codes, communicating meaning and mediating…

  5. Risk communication at a major university : an anthrax case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, C.E. [New Jersey Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry, New Brunswick, NJ (United States). School of Public Health; Chess, C. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States). Dept. of Human Ecology

    2005-07-01

    This paper discussed risk communication strategies used by Rutgers University to communicate with faculty, students, staff and community about issues concerning anthrax and mail safety. Several issues were considered in this paper, including: incident specific communication and participant responses to false alarms; general communication issues; and any recommendations that may be applicable to other institutions. A literature review guided the development of an interview protocol. Two groups of individuals were interviewed for approximately 30 minutes about their experiences with, and views on risk communication at Rutgers. Groups included information providers such as members of departments that develop and disseminate health and safety information, and information recipients, such as faculty, staff and students. Two sets of questions were developed for both general and incident-specific communications. Either one or both sets of interview questions were used. Data was analyzed using codes based on the selected risk communication concepts. Data related to specific incidents was also coded to explore the sequence of events and perceptions of those involved. Findings included information on incident specific communications; perceptions of information providers; perceptions of information recipients; and communication with the larger university community. Various recommendations were made as well as a summary of findings. Incident-specific communication recommendations included using an on-scene spokesperson to provide updated information as often as possible; determining and addressing key concerns and questions of participants; providing access to rest room facilities as well as food and water; explaining the limitations in providing information to a variety of audiences at the same time; and allowing individuals access to personal items that may be quarantined during an emergency. General communications findings were also presented, with reference to the fact

  6. The imperative of humor in the portfolio of communication strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, R. B.; White, J. W. C.

    2017-12-01

    Communicating geophysics often challenges scientists because the results often challenge the users of the information. We can bring good news, but far more often we are warning about impending disaster from hurricane or earthquake, landslide or sea-level rise. Much of our work is publicly funded, and thus carries the obligation to make the results useful, not just available. Our leading responsibility is to get the research right, because everything else rests on that foundation. But, beyond that, scholarship shows clearly that we must adopt multiple communication paths, with a wide range of spokespersons and techniques. Humor can ease a challenging situation, capture the attention of the unengaged, and make things easier for all involved, including the occasionally stressed scientists. The juxtaposition of a light touch with heavy science is often worthwhile for those willing to try it. Bungy jumping for science, or warning about tsunamis with Johnny Cash songs, may not be for everyone, but many geophysicists can come up with better, humorous ways to really connect, helping fulfill their obligation to the public.

  7. Análise da comunicação verbal e não-verbal de crianças com deficiencia visual durante interação com a mãe Analysis of the verbal and non-verbal communication of children with visual impairment during interaction with their mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jáima Pinheiro de Oliveira

    2005-12-01

    blind children, with low vision capacity and children with normal vision and, therefore, to analyze the particularities of the maternal communication during the interaction within free and planned contexts. Six children participated in the study: two blind; two with low vision capacity and; two with normal vision, who were selected from specific criteria. Two recordings of each were carried out in the familiar environment: free and planned situations. The analysis was performed by means of functional characterization of the verbal and non-verbal communication of the children with their mothers. The data showed that the verbal communicative resources were predominant in both free and planned situations. Overall, the results of this study indicate that although there were particularities during its use, the language of the visual impairment children does not present deficit in relation to the one of those with normal vision. Moreover, the mothers of the blind children and with low vision capacity used strategies such as descriptions of the environment, indications and localization of objects during their interactions that favored their performance.

  8. Publisher and Senior Research Communications Advisor | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Conceives and develops communication training tools (publishing guidelines, visual identity policies, etc.) to assist Centre program staff and IDRC-supported researchers in their efforts to effectively communicate with their target audiences. Strengthens IDRC staff and grantee capacity to synthesize and communicate ...

  9. A Critical Examination of Communication Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasono, Lisa K.

    2018-01-01

    Courses: This single-class teaching activity was designed for courses on critical communication pedagogy (CCP), gender and race, communication education, research methods, and visual communication. Objectives: By completing this activity, students should be able to (1) describe the principles of CCP, (2) examine critically how race and gender are…

  10. Visual cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Patrick

    2011-07-01

    Visual cognition, high-level vision, mid-level vision and top-down processing all refer to decision-based scene analyses that combine prior knowledge with retinal input to generate representations. The label "visual cognition" is little used at present, but research and experiments on mid- and high-level, inference-based vision have flourished, becoming in the 21st century a significant, if often understated part, of current vision research. How does visual cognition work? What are its moving parts? This paper reviews the origins and architecture of visual cognition and briefly describes some work in the areas of routines, attention, surfaces, objects, and events (motion, causality, and agency). Most vision scientists avoid being too explicit when presenting concepts about visual cognition, having learned that explicit models invite easy criticism. What we see in the literature is ample evidence for visual cognition, but few or only cautious attempts to detail how it might work. This is the great unfinished business of vision research: at some point we will be done with characterizing how the visual system measures the world and we will have to return to the question of how vision constructs models of objects, surfaces, scenes, and events. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tactile Communications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Communication with the crew is vital and must be maintained regardless of environmental conditions and crew activity. Current spacecraft communication systems depend...

  12. Communications article

    KAUST Repository

    Fariborzi, Hossein

    2017-07-20

    Seamless, covert communications using a communications system integrated or incorporated within an article of clothing is described. In one embodiment, the communications system is integrated or incorporated into a shoe insole and includes a haptic feedback mechanism, a communications module, a flexible pressure sensor, and a battery. The communications module includes a wireless communications module for wireless communications, a wired interface for wired communications, a microcontroller, and a battery charge controller. The flexible pressure sensor can be actuated by an individual\\'s toe, for example, and communication between two communications nodes can be achieved using coded signals sent by individuals using a combination of long and short presses on the pressure sensor. In response to the presses, wireless communications modules can transmit and receive coded signals based on the presses.

  13. How do family physicians communicate about cardiovascular risk? Frequencies and determinants of different communication formats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemann Thomas

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients understand information about risk better if it is communicated in numerical or visual formats (e.g. graphs compared to verbal qualifiers only. How frequently different communication formats are used in clinical primary care settings is unknown. Methods We collected socioeconomic and patient understanding data using questionnaires and audio-recorded consultations about cardiovascular disease risk. The frequencies of the communication formats were calculated and multivariate regression analysis of associations between communication formats, patient and general practitioner characteristics, and patient subjective understanding was performed. Results In 73% of 70 consultations, verbal qualifiers were used exclusively to communicate cardiovascular risk, compared to numerical (11% and visual (16% formats. Female GPs and female patient's gender were significantly associated with a higher use of verbal formats compared to visual formats (p = 0.001 and p = 0.039, respectively. Patient subjective understanding was significantly higher in visual counseling compared to verbal counseling (p = 0.001. Conclusions Verbal qualifiers are the most often used communication format, though recommendations favor numerical and visual formats, with visual formats resulting in better understanding than others. Also, gender is associated with the choice of communication format. Barriers against numerical and visual communication formats among GPs and patients should be studied, including gender aspects. Adequate risk communication should be integrated into physicians' education.

  14. Organ visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The advantages of selenium-75-labelled cholesterol derivatives for the visualization of the adren in nuclear medicine are outlined. Selenium-75 is a sole gamma emitter; its chemical preparation is described

  15. Enhancing learning and comprehension through strengthening visual literacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Roux, Cheryl

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Living in an image-rich world, as we currently do, does not mean that individuals naturally possess visual literacy skills. This article explores the concept of ‘visual literacy’, and the skills needed to develop visual literacy and visual intelligence. Developing visual literacy in educational environments is important because it can contribute to individual empowerment, and it is therefore necessary to take pedagogical advantage of visual literacy’s place across the disciplines. Doing this means tapping into experiences, expertise and interest in visual communication and building a new paradigm that takes visual education seriously.

  16. Desarrollo de la competencia comunicativa y la educación visual. Una metodología centrada en el proceso / Communicative awarness and visual culture. Proceedings. Compétence communicative et éducation culturelle. La recherche en classe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begoña Souviron López

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: En este trabajo presento algunas reflexiones sobre mi intervención docente y la productividad de los alumnos en el proceso de enseñanza-aprendizaje así como la evaluación del desarrollo de la competencia comunicativa y de la competencia de aprender a aprender junto a la adquisición de competencia social, cultural y artística. Mi objetivo es definir una metodología basada en la adquisición de competencias dentro de la modalidad de investigación en el aula en una clase de ESO y en la asignatura de Didáctica de la Lengua y la Literatura española en Educación Primaria. Abstract: In this paper I present the reflections on my teaching practice and the students’ productivity together with the assessment of the development of their communicative competence and their learning to learn competence; in so doing, I pretend to define a methodology based on the acquisition of competences within the paradigm of classroom research in a group of 3rd. Year (Educación Secundaria Obligatoria / Compulsory Secondary Education and also at the University in the area of Language and Spanish Literature Teaching

  17. Designing Data Visualizations Representing Informational Relationships

    CERN Document Server

    Steele, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Data visualization is an efficient and effective medium for communicating large amounts of information, but the design process can often seem like an unexplainable creative endeavor. This concise book aims to demystify the design process by showing you how to use a linear decision-making process to encode your information visually. Delve into different kinds of visualization, including infographics and visual art, and explore the influences at work in each one. Then learn how to apply these concepts to your design process. Learn data visualization classifications, including explanatory, expl

  18. Visual cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of essays covering issues in visual cognition presenting experimental techniques from cognitive psychology, methods of modeling cognitive processes on computers from artificial intelligence, and methods of studying brain organization from neuropsychology. Topics considered include: parts of recognition; visual routines; upward direction; mental rotation, and discrimination of left and right turns in maps; individual differences in mental imagery, computational analysis and the neurological basis of mental imagery: componental analysis.

  19. APLIKASI PRINSIP GESTALT PADA MEDIA DESAIN KOMUNIKASI VISUAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Bedjo Tanudjaja

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gestalt principle introduced around 1920 by Max Wertheimer is a general description for a concept which unifies different possibilities in design. Knowledge of Gestalt principle and visual perception helps as vital visual method in the development of visual strategy in graphic design and visual communication design today. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Prinsip Gestalt yang diperkenalkan pada sekitar tahun 1920 oleh Max Wertheimer merupakan deskripsi secara umum untuk konsep yang membuat kesatuan dan berbagai kemungkinan dalam desain. Prinsip Gestalt dan Persepsi visual merupakan pengertian yang sangat membantu sebagai metode visual utama dari perkembangan strategi visual desain grafis serta desain komunikasi visual saat ini. Gestalt principle%2C visual method%2C visual communication design.

  20. Participatory Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    This user guide on participatory communication aims to answer the following questions: What do we mean when we say participatory communication? What are the practical implications of working with participatory communication strategies in development and social change processes? What practical...... experiences document that participatory communication adds value to a development project or program? Many communication practitioners and development workers face obstacles and challenges in their practical work. A participatory communication strategy offers a very specific perspective on how to articulate......, tools, and experiences on how to implement participatory communications strategies. It is targeted toward government officials, World Bank staff, develompent workers in the field, and civil society....

  1. Visual Arts as a Tool for Phenomenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna S. CohenMiller

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article I explain the process and benefits of using visual arts as a tool within a transcendental phenomenological study. I present and discuss drawings created and described by four participants over the course of twelve interviews. Findings suggest the utility of visual arts methods within the phenomenological toolset to encourage participant voice through easing communication and facilitating understanding.

  2. Interfaces Visualize Data for Airline Safety, Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    As the A-Train Constellation orbits Earth to gather data, NASA scientists and partners visualize, analyze, and communicate the information. To this end, Langley Research Center awarded SBIR funding to Fairfax, Virginia-based WxAnalyst Ltd. to refine the company's existing user interface for Google Earth to visualize data. Hawaiian Airlines is now using the technology to help manage its flights.

  3. Event visualization in ATLAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, R. M.; Boudreau, J.; Konstantinidis, N.; Martyniuk, A. C.; Moyse, E.; Thomas, J.; Waugh, B. M.; Yallup, D. P.; ATLAS Collaboration

    2017-10-01

    At the beginning, HEP experiments made use of photographical images both to record and store experimental data and to illustrate their findings. Then the experiments evolved and needed to find ways to visualize their data. With the availability of computer graphics, software packages to display event data and the detector geometry started to be developed. Here, an overview of the usage of event display tools in HEP is presented. Then the case of the ATLAS experiment is considered in more detail and two widely used event display packages are presented, Atlantis and VP1, focusing on the software technologies they employ, as well as their strengths, differences and their usage in the experiment: from physics analysis to detector development, and from online monitoring to outreach and communication. Towards the end, the other ATLAS visualization tools will be briefly presented as well. Future development plans and improvements in the ATLAS event display packages will also be discussed.

  4. Event visualization in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00211497; The ATLAS collaboration; Boudreau, Joseph; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Martyniuk, Alex; Moyse, Edward; Thomas, Juergen; Waugh, Ben; Yallup, David

    2017-01-01

    At the beginning, HEP experiments made use of photographical images both to record and store experimental data and to illustrate their findings. Then the experiments evolved and needed to find ways to visualize their data. With the availability of computer graphics, software packages to display event data and the detector geometry started to be developed. Here, an overview of the usage of event display tools in HEP is presented. Then the case of the ATLAS experiment is considered in more detail and two widely used event display packages are presented, Atlantis and VP1, focusing on the software technologies they employ, as well as their strengths, differences and their usage in the experiment: from physics analysis to detector development, and from online monitoring to outreach and communication. Towards the end, the other ATLAS visualization tools will be briefly presented as well. Future development plans and improvements in the ATLAS event display packages will also be discussed.

  5. Revealing Visualization Insights from Quantified-Selfers' Personal Data Presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Eun Kyoung; Lee, Bongshin; Schraefel, M C

    2015-05-13

    Data visualization and analytics research has great potential to empower people to improve their lives by leveraging their own personal data. However, most Quantified-Selfers are neither visualization experts nor data scientists. Consequently, their visualizations of their data are often not ideal for conveying their insights. Aiming to design a visualization system to help non-experts explore and present their personal data, we conducted a pre-design empirical study. Through the lens of Quantified-Selfers, we examined what insights people gain specifically from their personal data and how they use visualizations to communicate their insights. Based on our analysis of 30 Quantified Self presentations, we characterized eight insight types (detail, self-reflection, trend, comparison, correlation, data summary, distribution, outlier) and mapped the visual annotations used to communicate them. We further discussed four areas for the design of personal visualization systems, including support for encouraging self-reflection, gaining valid insight, communicating insight, and using visual annotations.

  6. Visualizing water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baart, F.; van Gils, A.; Hagenaars, G.; Donchyts, G.; Eisemann, E.; van Velzen, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    A compelling visualization is captivating, beautiful and narrative. Here we show how melding the skills of computer graphics, art, statistics, and environmental modeling can be used to generate innovative, attractive and very informative visualizations. We focus on the topic of visualizing forecasts and measurements of water (water level, waves, currents, density, and salinity). For the field of computer graphics and arts, water is an important topic because it occurs in many natural scenes. For environmental modeling and statistics, water is an important topic because the water is essential for transport, a healthy environment, fruitful agriculture, and a safe environment.The different disciplines take different approaches to visualizing water. In computer graphics, one focusses on creating water as realistic looking as possible. The focus on realistic perception (versus the focus on the physical balance pursued by environmental scientists) resulted in fascinating renderings, as seen in recent games and movies. Visualization techniques for statistical results have benefited from the advancement in design and journalism, resulting in enthralling infographics. The field of environmental modeling has absorbed advances in contemporary cartography as seen in the latest interactive data-driven maps. We systematically review the design emerging types of water visualizations. The examples that we analyze range from dynamically animated forecasts, interactive paintings, infographics, modern cartography to web-based photorealistic rendering. By characterizing the intended audience, the design choices, the scales (e.g. time, space), and the explorability we provide a set of guidelines and genres. The unique contributions of the different fields show how the innovations in the current state of the art of water visualization have benefited from inter-disciplinary collaborations.

  7. Audio Cartography: Visual Encoding of Acoustic Parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Kornfeld, A.; Schiewe, J.; Dykes, J.

    2011-01-01

    Our sonic environment is the matter of subject in multiple domains which developed individual means of its description. As a result, it lacks an established visual language through which knowledge can be connected and insights shared. We provide a visual communication framework for the systematic and coherent documentation of sound in large-scale environments. This consists of visual encodings and mappings of acoustic parameters into distinct graphic variables that present plausible solutions...

  8. Methods of visualizing graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pak C.; Mackey, Patrick S.; Perrine, Kenneth A.; Foote, Harlan P.; Thomas, James J.

    2008-12-23

    Methods for visualizing a graph by automatically drawing elements of the graph as labels are disclosed. In one embodiment, the method comprises receiving node information and edge information from an input device and/or communication interface, constructing a graph layout based at least in part on that information, wherein the edges are automatically drawn as labels, and displaying the graph on a display device according to the graph layout. In some embodiments, the nodes are automatically drawn as labels instead of, or in addition to, the label-edges.

  9. Visual comparison for information visualization

    KAUST Repository

    Gleicher, M.

    2011-09-07

    Data analysis often involves the comparison of complex objects. With the ever increasing amounts and complexity of data, the demand for systems to help with these comparisons is also growing. Increasingly, information visualization tools support such comparisons explicitly, beyond simply allowing a viewer to examine each object individually. In this paper, we argue that the design of information visualizations of complex objects can, and should, be studied in general, that is independently of what those objects are. As a first step in developing this general understanding of comparison, we propose a general taxonomy of visual designs for comparison that groups designs into three basic categories, which can be combined. To clarify the taxonomy and validate its completeness, we provide a survey of work in information visualization related to comparison. Although we find a great diversity of systems and approaches, we see that all designs are assembled from the building blocks of juxtaposition, superposition and explicit encodings. This initial exploration shows the power of our model, and suggests future challenges in developing a general understanding of comparative visualization and facilitating the development of more comparative visualization tools. © The Author(s) 2011.

  10. Visual cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This collection of research papers on visual cognition first appeared as a special issue of Cognition: International Journal of Cognitive Science. The study of visual cognition has seen enormous progress in the past decade, bringing important advances in our understanding of shape perception, visual imagery, and mental maps. Many of these discoveries are the result of converging investigations in different areas, such as cognitive and perceptual psychology, artificial intelligence, and neuropsychology. This volume is intended to highlight a sample of work at the cutting edge of this research area for the benefit of students and researchers in a variety of disciplines. The tutorial introduction that begins the volume is designed to help the nonspecialist reader bridge the gap between the contemporary research reported here and earlier textbook introductions or literature reviews.

  11. Developing Visual Creative Literacies through Integrating Art-Based Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smilan, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    Visual literacy and the ability to think creatively are critical skills requisite to full participation and communication in the twenty-first century. Learning experiences that integrate studio-based inquiry and other academic concepts can develop discipline skills as well as communication skills of deciphering visual cues and de/re-constructing…

  12. Information Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz Baños, Carlos José; Andreasson, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Reasoning graphs are one of many ways to visualize information. It is very hard to understand certain type of information when it is presented in text or in tables with a huge amount of numbers. It is easier to present it graphically. People can have a general idea of the information and if it is necessary to see the details, it is possible to have a way to add more information to the graphical display. A graphical visualization is able to compress the information, which represented in text c...

  13. Visualizing Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Transformation, defined as the step of extracting, arranging and simplifying data into visual form (M. Neurath, 1974), was developed in connection with ISOTYPE (International System Of TYpographic Picture Education) and might well be the most important legacy of Isotype to the field of graphic...... design. Recently transformation has attracted renewed interest because of the book The Transformer written by Robin Kinross and Marie Neurath. My on-going research project, summarized in this paper, identifies and depicts the essential principles of data visualization underlying the process...

  14. Scientific communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Kobylarek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the problem of models of communication in science. The formal division of communication processes into oral and written does not resolve the problem of attitude. The author defines successful communication as a win-win game, based on the respect and equality of the partners, regardless of their position in the world of science. The core characteristics of the process of scientific communication are indicated , such as openness, fairness, support, and creation. The task of creating the right atmosphere for science communication belongs to moderators, who should not allow privilege and differentiation of position to affect scientific communication processes.

  15. Linear Narratives, Arbitrary Relationships: Arbitrary Relationships: Mimesis and Direct Communication for Effectively Representing Engineering Realities Multimodally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyaraj, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Engineers communicate multimodally using written and visual communication, but there is not much theorizing on why they do so and how. This essay, therefore, examines why engineers communicate multimodally, what, in the context of representing engineering realities, are the strengths and weaknesses of written and visual communication, and how,…

  16. Visualizing Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Hasan

    2008-01-01

    The importance of visualisation and multiple representations in mathematics has been stressed, especially in a context of problem solving. Hanna and Sidoli comment that "Diagrams and other visual representations have long been welcomed as heuristic accompaniments to proof, where they not only facilitate the understanding of theorems and their…

  17. Visual sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huron, Samuel; Vuillemot, Romain; Fekete, Jean-Daniel

    2013-12-01

    We introduce Visual Sedimentation, a novel design metaphor for visualizing data streams directly inspired by the physical process of sedimentation. Visualizing data streams (e. g., Tweets, RSS, Emails) is challenging as incoming data arrive at unpredictable rates and have to remain readable. For data streams, clearly expressing chronological order while avoiding clutter, and keeping aging data visible, are important. The metaphor is drawn from the real-world sedimentation processes: objects fall due to gravity, and aggregate into strata over time. Inspired by this metaphor, data is visually depicted as falling objects using a force model to land on a surface, aggregating into strata over time. In this paper, we discuss how this metaphor addresses the specific challenge of smoothing the transition between incoming and aging data. We describe the metaphor's design space, a toolkit developed to facilitate its implementation, and example applications to a range of case studies. We then explore the generative capabilities of the design space through our toolkit. We finally illustrate creative extensions of the metaphor when applied to real streams of data.

  18. Strategizing Communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulbrandsen, Ib Tunby; Just, Sine Nørholm

    and less on the plan to communicate. Against the backdrop of the comprehensive changes to communication in and about organizations brought about by the rise of digital communication technologies and related contextual developments, Strategizing Communication provides better and more up to date tools......Strategizing Communication offers a unique perspective on the theory and practice of strategic communication. Written for students and practitioners interested in learning about and acquiring tools for dealing with the technological, environmental and managerial challenges, which organizations face...... when communicating in today’s mediascape, this book presents an array of theories, concepts and models through which we can understand and practice communication strategically. The core of the argument is in the title: strategizing – meaning the act of making something strategic. This entails looking...

  19. CSR communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golob, Ursa; Podnar, Klement; Elving, Wim

    2013-01-01

    communications. The most important outlets for CSR communication-related topics are Journal of Business Ethics and Corporate Communications: An International Journal. Originality/value – This paper represents the first attempt to perform a systematic and comprehensive overview of CSR communication papers......Purpose – This paper aims to introduce the special issue on CSR communication attached to the First International CSR Communication Conference held in Amsterdam in October 2011. The aim of the introduction is also to review CSR communication papers published in scholarly journals in order to make...... in scholarly journals. Its value is in making this rather vast and heterogeneous literature more visible and accessible to all CSR communication scholars....

  20. Data communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preckshot, G.G.

    1993-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to recommend regulatory guidance for reviewers examining computer communication systems used in nuclear power plants. The recommendations cover three areas important to these communications systems: system design, communication protocols, and communication media. The first area, system design, considers three aspects of system design--questions about architecture, specific risky design elements or omissions to look for in designs being reviewed, and recommendations for multiplexed data communication systems used in safety systems. The second area reviews pertinent aspects of communication protocol design and makes recommendations for newly designed protocols or the selection of existing protocols for safety system, information display, and non-safety control system use. The third area covers communication media selection, which differs significantly from traditional wire and cable. The recommendations for communication media extend or enhance the concerns of published IEEE standards about three subjects: data rate, imported hazards and maintainability

  1. Chemosignals communicate human emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Jasper H B; Smeets, Monique A M; Kaldewaij, Annemarie; Duijndam, Maarten J A; Semin, Gün R

    2012-01-01

    Can humans communicate emotional states via chemical signals? In the experiment reported here, we addressed this question by examining the function of chemosignals in a framework furnished by embodied social communication theory. Following this theory, we hypothesized that the processes a sender experiences during distinctive emotional states are transmitted to receivers by means of the chemicals that the sender produces, thus establishing a multilevel correspondence between sender and receiver. In a double-blind experiment, we examined facial reactions, sensory-regulation processes, and visual search in response to chemosignals. We demonstrated that fear chemosignals generated a fearful facial expression and sensory acquisition (increased sniff magnitude and eye scanning); in contrast, disgust chemosignals evoked a disgusted facial expression and sensory rejection (decreased sniff magnitude, target-detection sensitivity, and eye scanning). These findings underline the neglected social relevance of chemosignals in regulating communicative correspondence outside of conscious access.

  2. Communication, Communication, Communication! Growth through Laboratory Instructing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jamie J.; DeAngelo, Samantha; Mack, Nancy; Thompson, Claudia; Cooper, Jennifer; Sesma, Arturo, Jr.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined gains undergraduate students made in their communication and collaboration skills when they served as peer teachers, i.e., laboratory instructors (LIs), for a General Psychology laboratory. Self-ratings of communication and collaboration skills were completed before and after teaching the laboratory. When compared to before the…

  3. Communication (action with communicative content).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, M T

    2010-01-01

    The term Communication generally designate the transmission of a message of concepts, feelings or needs from a speaker to a receiver by means of verbal or no verbal language. The pragmatic approach to human communication has put in evidence a further implication of this concept: every behaviour therefore has a value even when it is not intentional. Recently, a more dynamic concept of communication has been elaborated where communication means communicative action. This interpretation is the starting point for the theory of the "communicative acting" and subsequently of the so called discourse ethic elaborated by J. Habermas.

  4. Empirical Studies in Information Visualization: Seven Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Heidi; Bertini, Enrico; Isenberg, Petra; Plaisant, Catherine; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2012-09-01

    We take a new, scenario-based look at evaluation in information visualization. Our seven scenarios, evaluating visual data analysis and reasoning, evaluating user performance, evaluating user experience, evaluating environments and work practices, evaluating communication through visualization, evaluating visualization algorithms, and evaluating collaborative data analysis were derived through an extensive literature review of over 800 visualization publications. These scenarios distinguish different study goals and types of research questions and are illustrated through example studies. Through this broad survey and the distillation of these scenarios, we make two contributions. One, we encapsulate the current practices in the information visualization research community and, two, we provide a different approach to reaching decisions about what might be the most effective evaluation of a given information visualization. Scenarios can be used to choose appropriate research questions and goals and the provided examples can be consulted for guidance on how to design one's own study.

  5. Cultural Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armas, Jose

    It is too often taken for granted that the communication process with culturally different children takes place as readily as it might with children from Anglo cultures. Most teachers receive training in verbal and formal communication skills; children come to school with nonverbal and informal communication skills. This initially can create…

  6. Internal Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Rathouský, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    The diploma thesis focuses on characteristics of internal communication, its implementation in various forms in different companies and analysis of the internal communication in one selected company. After the analysis of its current state in the multinational company, the thesis will recommend improvements to the areas of internal communication and human resources, with the main focus of global implementation of these recommendations.

  7. Numbers, Pictures, and Politics: Teaching Research Methods through Data Visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Mark Carl

    2015-01-01

    Data visualization is the term used to describe the methods and technologies used to allow the exploration and communication of quantitative information graphically. Data visualization is a rapidly growing and evolving discipline, and visualizations are widely used to cover politics. Yet, while popular and scholarly publications widely use…

  8. A Content-Driven Approach to Visual Literacy: Gestalt Rediscovered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schamber, Linda

    The goal of an introductory graphics course is fundamental visual literacy, which includes learning to appreciate the power of visuals in communication and to express ideas visually. Traditional principles of design--the focus of the course--are based on more fundamental gestalt theory, which relates to human pattern-seeking behavior, particularly…

  9. Peranan Komunikasi Visual bagi Identitas Perusahaan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Christina Luzar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the current era of globalization, along with expanding the market, many companies are competing to attract the attention of consumers to buy their products. One way to compete and survive in this growing market is by creating an image and visual identity. Strong characters could position the image of a company, visual identity is so necessary in showing the image which wants to be introduced to the public. The vigorous competition between firms creates visual identity, become a prominent feature of each companies. Therefore, it is needed a visual communication designer who can create and develop the concept of corporate identity systems. Visual communication designer also have responsibility to create identity into a system that does not sell directly, but provides identity, information, persuasive and ultimately serves as an effective marketing media. 

  10. DESAIN KOMUNIKASI VISUAL DAN PANGGILAN KRISTIANI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herlianto

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual Communication Design is one of the arts movements. Being one aspect of the culture%2C it shows a holistic development and develops a great influence on human life including the way of thinking and attitude. To the Christian point of view%2C there are some visual media presentations that need special and precautious treatment. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Disain Komunikasi Visual merupakan perkembangan yang makin maju dari seni sebagai aspek kebudayaan yang berkembang makin holistik dan punya daya pengaruh empat dimensional terhadap kehidupan manusia%2C yaitu pandangan dan pola perilaku dan kehidupan seseorang. Ditinjau dari Iman Kristiani%2C setidaknya ada berbagai bentuk pengaruh penyajian media visual yang perlu dihadapi dengan kewaspadaan. Visual Communication Design%2C Christian values.

  11. “The problem often is that we do not have a family spokesperson but a spokesgroup”: Family Member Informal Roles in End-of-Life Decision-Making in Adult ICUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jill R.; Schmitt, Madeline; Baggs, Judith Gedney; Norton, Sally A.; Dombeck, Mary T.; Sellers, Craig R.

    2013-01-01

    Background To support the process of effective family decision-making, it is important to recognize and understand informal roles various family members may play in the end-of-life decision-making process. Objective The purpose of this study was to describe some informal roles consistently enacted by family members involved in the process of end-of-life decision-making in intensive care units (ICUs). Methods Ethnographic study. Data were collected via participant observation with field notes and semi-structured interviews on four ICUs in an academic health center in the mid-Atlantic United States from 2001 to 2004. The units studied were a medical ICU, a surgical ICU, a burn and trauma ICU, and a cardiovascular ICU. Participants Participants included health care clinicians, patients, and family members. Results Informal roles for family members consistently observed were:, Primary Caregiver, Primary Decision Maker, Family Spokesperson, Out-of-Towner, Patient Wishes Expert, Protector, Vulnerable Member, and Health Care Expert. The identified informal roles were part of family decision making processes, and each role was part of a potentially complicated family dynamic for end-of-life decision-making within the family system, and between the family and health care domains. Conclusions These informal roles reflect the diverse responses to demands for family decision making in what is usually a novel and stressful situation. Identification and description of these family member informal roles can assist clinicians to recognize and understand the functions of these roles in family decision making at the end-of-life, and guide development of strategies to support and facilitate increased effectiveness of family discussions and decision-making processes. PMID:22210699

  12. Visual rehabilitation of children with visual impairment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vervloed, M.P.J.; Janssen, N.M.; Knoors, H.E.T.

    2006-01-01

    Visual rehabilitation, consisting of visual stimulation and visual training, is a common practice in the education of children with visual impairments. Ferrell and Muir have stated that scientific research into the effects of visual stimulation and training is ambiguous and that therefore

  13. Communication Acoustics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blauert, Jens

    Communication Acoustics deals with the fundamentals of those areas of acoustics which are related to modern communication technologies. Due to the advent of digital signal processing and recording in acoustics, these areas have enjoyed an enormous upswing during the last 4 decades. The book...... the book a source of valuable information for those who want to improve or refresh their knowledge in the field of communication acoustics - and to work their way deeper into it. Due to its interdisciplinary character Communication Acoustics is bound to attract readers from many different areas, such as......: acoustics, cognitive science, speech science, and communication technology....

  14. Cloud-based Networked Visual Servo Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Haiyan; Lu, Lei; Chen, Chih-Chung

    2013-01-01

    The performance of vision-based control systems, in particular of highly dynamic vision-based motion control systems, is often limited by the low sampling rate of the visual feedback caused by the long image processing time. In order to overcome this problem, the networked visual servo control...... feedback, ii) a stabilizing control law for the networked visual servo control system with time-varying feedback time delay, and iii) a sending rate scheduling strategy aiming at reducing the communication network load. The performance of the networked visual servo control system with sending rate...

  15. Students and Teachers as Developers of Visual Learning Designs with Augmented Reality for Visual Arts Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This paper reports on a project in which communication and digital media students collaborated with visual arts teacher students and their teacher trainer to develop visual digital designs for learning that involved Augmented Reality (AR) technology. The project exemplified a design...

  16. Students with Low Vision Describe Their Visual Impairments and Visual Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerette, Amy R.; Lewis, Sandra; Mattingly, Cameron

    2011-01-01

    In the study reported here, the responses to a survey that was designed to determine the knowledge of their visual impairment of 51 students with low vision were analyzed. Although the students described their visual weaknesses and strengths, they had limited knowledge of, and difficulty communicating about, the medical aspects of their…

  17. Data communications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ann, Byeong Ho; Baek, Jeong Hun

    1998-01-01

    The contents of this book are notion of data communications : summary on data communication, data transmission, data communications system, data transmission technology, data conversion, data link control and control over error of data transmission and exchange of data communications network in the first part, computer communications network architecture : data communications architecture, OSI model, lower layer of OSI model, upper layer of OSI model and distributed surroundings in the second part, data information networking : LAN, FDDI, 100 Base T, DQDB and Frame Relay in the third part, Public Network : PSDN, N-ISDN, B-ISDN in the fourth part, internet and PC communication : emulator program, Binary file, BBS, E-mail service and user on-line service in the last part.

  18. Visualizing Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Reality Capture Technologies, Inc. is a spinoff company from Ames Research Center. Offering e-business solutions for optimizing management, design and production processes, RCT uses visual collaboration environments (VCEs) such as those used to prepare the Mars Pathfinder mission.The product, 4-D Reality Framework, allows multiple users from different locations to manage and share data. The insurance industry is one targeted commercial application for this technology.

  19. The Visual Uncertainty Paradigm for Controlling Screen-Space Information in Visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Aritra

    2012-01-01

    The information visualization pipeline serves as a lossy communication channel for presentation of data on a screen-space of limited resolution. The lossy communication is not just a machine-only phenomenon due to information loss caused by translation of data, but also a reflection of the degree to which the human user can comprehend visual…

  20. Visual research in clinical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezemer, Jeff

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to explore what might be gained from collecting and analysing visual data, such as photographs, scans, drawings, video and screen recordings, in clinical educational research. Its focus is on visual research that looks at teaching and learning 'as it naturally occurs' in the work place, in simulation centres and other sites, and also involves the collection and analysis of visual learning materials circulating in these sites. With the ubiquity of digital recording devices, video data and visual learning materials are now relatively cheap to collect. Compared to other domains of education research visual materials are not widely used in clinical education research. The paper sets out to identify and reflect on the possibilities for visual research using examples from an ethnographic study on surgical and inter-professional learning in the operating theatres of a London hospital. The paper shows how visual research enables recognition, analysis and critical evaluation of (1) the hidden curriculum, such as the meanings implied by embodied, visible actions of clinicians; (2) the ways in which clinical teachers design multimodal learning environments using a range of modes of communication available to them, combining, for instance, gesture and speech; (3) the informal assessment of clinical skills, and the intricate relation between trainee performance and supervisor feedback; (4) the potentialities and limitations of different visual learning materials, such as textbooks and videos, for representing medical knowledge. The paper concludes with theoretical and methodological reflections on what can be made visible, and therefore available for analysis, explanation and evaluation if visual materials are used for clinical education research, and what remains unaccounted for if written language remains the dominant mode in the research cycle. Opportunities for quantitative analysis and ethical implications are also discussed. © 2016 John Wiley