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Sample records for split-luciferase complementation assay

  1. Split Beta-Lactamase Complementation Assay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Concept of split beta. -lactamase protein fragment complementation assay. (A) and (B) are vector systems involved in the assay. As an example, a vector system for bacterial host is described here. (C) Co-transformation of complementation vectors in appropriate bacterial host. (D) and (E) are types of inter- actions expected ...

  2. Combined image guided monitoring the pharmacokinetics of rapamycin loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles with a split luciferase reporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fu; Yang, Kai; Wang, Zhe; Ma, Ying; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Hida, Naoki; Niu, Gang; Tian, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery carriers upon administration in the blood circulation, which complicates the interpretation of image findings. Herein we applied a genetically encoded luciferase reporter in conjunction with near infrared (NIR) fluorophores to investigate the respective PK profiles of a drug and its carrier in a biodegradable drug delivery system. In this system, a prototype hydrophobic agent, rapamycin (Rapa), was encapsulated into human serum albumin (HSA) to form HSA Rapa nanoparticles, which were then labeled with Cy5 fluorophore to facilitate the fluorescence imaging of HSA carrier. Meanwhile, we employed transgenetic HN12 cells that were modified with a split luciferase reporter, whose bioluminescence function is regulated by Rapa, to reflect the PK profile of the encapsulated agent. It was interesting to discover that there existed an obvious inconsistency of PK behaviors between HSA carrier and rapamycin in vitro and in vivo through near infrared fluorescence imaging (NIFRI) and bioluminescence imaging (BLI) after treatment with Cy5 labeled HSA Rapa. Nevertheless, HSA Rapa nanoparticles manifested favorable in vivo PK and tumor suppression efficacy in a follow-up therapeutic study. The developed strategy of combining a molecular reporter and a fluorophore in this study could be extended to other drug delivery systems to provide profound insights for non-invasive real-time evaluation of PK profiles of drug-loaded nanoparticles in pre-clinical studies.Imaging guided techniques have been increasingly employed to investigate the pharmacokinetics (PK) and biodistribution of nanoparticle based drug delivery systems. In most cases, however, the PK profiles of drugs could vary significantly from those of drug delivery

  3. Functional assay of the alternative complement pathway of rat serum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coonrod, J.D.; Jenkins, S.D.

    1979-01-01

    Two functional assays of the alternative pathway of complement activation in rat serum were developed. In the first assay, conditions were established for titration of alternative pathway activity by use of the 50% hemolytic end-point of rabbit red blood cells (RaRBC) in serum treated with ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N, N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). The second assay of alternative pathway activity was based on the opsonization of heat-killed radiolabeled pneumococci of serotype 25 (Pn25). Opsonization of Pn25 was shown to proceed entirely via the alternative pathway in rat serum. There was excellent correlation between the results obtained with the RaRBC lysis test and those obtained with the opsonization test. Because of its technical simplicity, the RaRBC lysis test appeared to be the single most useful test of alternative pathway activity in rat serum. (Auth.)

  4. Mapping the BH3 Binding Interface of Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and Mcl-1 Using Split-Luciferase Reassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Sean T; Carlson, Kevin J; Buchholz, Carl J; Helmers, Mark R; Ghosh, Indraneel

    2015-04-28

    The recognition of helical BH3 domains by Bcl-2 homology (BH) receptors plays a central role in apoptosis. The residues that determine specificity or promiscuity in this interactome are difficult to predict from structural and computational data. Using a cell free split-luciferase system, we have generated a 276 pairwise interaction map for 12 alanine mutations at the binding interface for three receptors, Bcl-xL, Bcl-2, and Mcl-1, and interrogated them against BH3 helices derived from Bad, Bak, Bid, Bik, Bim, Bmf, Hrk, and Puma. This panel, in conjunction with previous structural and functional studies, starts to provide a more comprehensive portrait of this interactome, explains promiscuity, and uncovers surprising details; for example, the Bcl-xL R139A mutation disrupts binding to all helices but the Bad-BH3 peptide, and Mcl-1 binding is particularly perturbed by only four mutations of the 12 tested (V220A, N260A, R263A, and F319A), while Bcl-xL and Bcl-2 have a more diverse set of important residues depending on the bound helix.

  5. Complementing in vitro screening assays with in silico ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput in vitro assays offer a rapid, cost-efficient means to screen thousands of chemicals across hundreds of pathway-based toxicity endpoints. However, one main concern involved with the use of in vitro assays is the erroneous omission of chemicals that are inactive under assay conditions but that can generate active metabolites under in vivo conditions. To address this potential issue, a case study will be presented to demonstrate the use of in silico tools to identify inactive parents with the ability to generate active metabolites. This case study used the results from an orthogonal assay designed to improve confidence in the identification of active chemicals tested across eighteen estrogen receptor (ER)-related in vitro assays by accounting for technological limitations inherent within each individual assay. From the 1,812 chemicals tested within the orthogonal assay, 1,398 were considered inactive. These inactive chemicals were analyzed using Chemaxon Metabolizer software to predict the first and second generation metabolites. From the nearly 1,400 inactive chemicals, over 2,200 first-generation (i.e., primary) metabolites and over 5,500 second-generation (i.e., secondary) metabolites were predicted. Nearly 70% of primary metabolites were immediately detoxified or converted to other metabolites, while over 70% of secondary metabolites remained stable. Among these predicted metabolites, those that are most likely to be produced and remain

  6. The complement system of the goat: Haemolytic assays and isolation of major proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno-Indias Isabel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to develop a haemolytic assay for the study of the complement system in dairy goats (Capra aegagrus hircus and to characterize the major goat complement system proteins. Results The commonly used sheep erythrocyte sensitized with rabbit antibodies were not sensitive to lysis by goat serum, but the combination of human red blood cells (RBC plus rabbit antibodies was the best option found for goat complement assay. A buffer based on HEPES instead of the classical veronal (barbitone was developed. Three proteins were isolated: factor H, C1q and C3 and these were compared with the corresponding human proteins. A novel affinity chromatography technique was developed for isolation of factor H. Conclusions Human RBC plus rabbit antibodies were a suitable option for haemolytic assays. The isolated proteins are similar to the human counterparts.

  7. Study of the optimal reaction conditions for assay of the mouse alternative complement pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, H. van; Rademaker, P.M.; Klerx, J.P.A.M.; Willers, J.M.M.

    1985-01-01

    The optimal reaction conditions for hemolytic assay of alternative complement pathway activity in mouse serum were investigated. A microtiter system was used, in which a number of 7.5×106 rabbit erythrocytes per test well appeared to be optimal. Rabbit erythrocytes were superior as target cells over

  8. An assay for the mannan-binding lectin pathway of complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steen Vang; Thiel, S; Jensen, L

    2001-01-01

    the C1 complex, whereas the carbohydrate-binding activity of MBL and the integrity of the MBL complex is maintained under hypertonic conditions. In the assay described here, the specific C4b-depositing capacity of the MBL pathway was determined by incubating serum diluted in buffer containing 1 M NaCl...... deposited on the mannan-coated surface. However, we also found a threefold variation in C4b-depositing capacity between individuals with similar MBL concentrations. The assay permits for the determination of MBL complex activity in serum and plasma samples and may thus be used to evaluate the clinical......The mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation has been established as the third pathway of complement activation. MBL is a carbohydrate-binding serum protein, which circulates in complex with serine proteases known as mannan-binding lectin associated serine proteases (MASPs...

  9. Discriminating the hemolytic risk of blood type A plasmas using the complement hemolysis using human erythrocytes (CHUHE) assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunnion, Kenji M; Hair, Pamela S; Krishna, Neel K; Sass, Megan A; Enos, Clinton W; Whitley, Pamela H; Maes, Lanne Y; Goldberg, Corinne L

    2017-03-01

    The agglutination-based cross-matching method is sensitive for antibody binding to red blood cells but is only partially predictive of complement-mediated hemolysis, which is important in many acute hemolytic transfusion reactions. Here, we describe complement hemolysis using human erythrocytes (CHUHE) assays that directly evaluate complement-mediated hemolysis between individual serum-plasma and red blood cell combinations. The CHUHE assay is used to evaluate correlations between agglutination titers and complement-mediated hemolysis as well as the hemolytic potential of plasma from type A blood donors. Plasma or serum from each type A blood donor was incubated with AB or B red blood cells in the CHUHE assay and measured for free hemoglobin release. CHUHE assays for serum or plasma demonstrate a wide, dynamic range and high sensitivity for complement-mediated hemolysis for individual serum/plasma and red blood cell combinations. CHUHE results suggest that agglutination assays alone are only moderately predictive of complement-mediated hemolysis. CHUHE results also suggest that plasma from particular type A blood donors produce minimal complement-mediated hemolysis, whereas plasma from other type A blood donors produce moderate to high-level complement-mediated hemolysis, depending on the red blood cell donor. The current results indicate that the CHUHE assay can be used to assess complement-mediated hemolysis for plasma or serum from a type A blood donor, providing additional risk discrimination over agglutination titers alone. © 2016 AABB.

  10. Electroluminescent TCC, C3dg and fB/Bb epitope assays for profiling complement cascade activation in vitro using an activated complement serum calibration standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vuuren, B Jansen; Bergseth, G; Mollnes, T E; Shaw, A M

    2014-01-15

    Electroluminescent assays for epitopes on the complement components C3dg, terminal complement complex (TCC) and factor B/Bb (fB/Bb) have been developed with capture and detection antibodies to produce detection limits C3dg=91±9ng/mL, TCC=3±0.1ng/mL and fB=55.7±0.1ng/mL. The assay performance was assessed against a series of zymosan and heat aggregated IgG (HAIgG) in vitro activations of complement using a calibrated activated complement serum (ACS) as calibration standard. The ACS standard was stable within 20% accuracy over a 6-month period with freeze-thaw cycles as required. Differential activation of the complement cascade was observed for TCC showing a pseudo-first order formation half-life of 3.5h after activation with zymosan. The C3dg activation fragment indicates a 10% total activation for both activation agents. The kinetic-epitope analysis for fB indicates that the capture epitope is on the fB/Bb protein fragment which can then become covered by the formation of C3bBb or C3bBbP complexes during the time course of the cascade. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Hemolytic plate assay for quantification of active human complement component C3 using methylamine-treated plasma as complement source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, M; Jessen, T E; Welinder, K. G.

    1985-01-01

    erythrocytes. Plasma treated with methylamine supplies the essential complement components other than C3. The lytic reaction is complete in 5 h at 37 degrees C and is unchanged by incubation overnight. The dose-response curve, i.e., lysis diameter versus logarithm of C3 concentration, is linear within 0...

  12. Rapid alternative to the clonogenic assay for measuring antibody and complement-mediated killing of tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, A.P.; Rolfe, A.E.; Worthington-White, D.; Graham-Pole, J.; Boyle, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the methods used to quantitate killing of tumor cells by antibody and complement has highlighted a number of problems. Using leukemia as a model, the authors have found that the release of 51 Cr from labeled tumor cells treated with antibody and complement can be an equivocal measure of cell viability. Combined with its restricted sensitivity (less than a 2 log range of cell killing) this makes this widely used assay of questionable value for detecting small numbers of viable cells, or for identifying subpopulations of complement-resistant cells. As an alternative a [ 125 I]iododeoxyuridine uptake assay has been developed, that combines the simplicity and rapidity of the 51 Cr release technique with the sensitivity of a clonogenic assay. This method eliminates the problem of spontaneous isotope release, inherent in prelabeling assays, and variability from experiment to experiment can be avoided by including a viable cell standard curve within each assay. The sensitivity of the 125 IUdR uptake method, which can be completed within a day, is similar to that of a 10 day methylcellulose cloning assay and was capable of detecting the presence of a minor subpopulation of complement-resistant tumor cells

  13. Specific, sensitive, precise, and rapid functional chromogenic assay of activated first complement component (C1) in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkvad, S; Jespersen, J; Sidelmann, Johannes Jakobsen

    1990-01-01

    We present a new functional assay for the first complement component (C1) in plasma, based on its activation by inhibition of the C1-esterase inhibitor (C1-inh) when monospecific antiserum to C1-inh is added to the plasma. After maximal activation, we can determine the concentration of activated ...

  14. Prediction of Protein-Protein Interactions by NanoLuc-Based Protein-Fragment Complementation Assay | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The CTD2 Center at Emory has developed a new NanoLuc®-based protein-fragment complementation assay (NanoPCA) which allows the detection of novel protein-protein interactions (PPI). NanoPCA allows the study of PPI dynamics with reversible interactions.  Read the abstract. Experimental Approaches Read the detailed Experimetnal Approaches. 

  15. Quantitative assessment of cellular uptake and cytosolic access of antibody in living cells by an enhanced split GFP complementation assay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji-sun; Choi, Dong-Ki; Park, Seong-wook; Shin, Seung-Min; Bae, Jeomil [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong-Myung [Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Tae Hyeon [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong-Sung, E-mail: kimys@ajou.ac.kr [Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon 443-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-27

    Considering the number of cytosolic proteins associated with many diseases, development of cytosol-penetrating molecules from outside of living cells is highly in demand. To gain access to the cytosol after cellular uptake, cell-penetrating molecules should be released from intermediate endosomes prior to the lysosomal degradation. However, it is very challenging to distinguish the pool of cytosolic-released molecules from those trapped in the endocytic vesicles. Here we describe a method to directly demonstrate the cytosolic localization and quantification of cytosolic amount of a cytosol-penetrating IgG antibody, TMab4, based on enhanced split GFP complementation system. We generated TMab4 genetically fused with one GFP fragment and separately established HeLa cells expressing the other GFP fragment in the cytosol such that the complemented GFP fluorescence is observed only when extracellular-treated TMab4 reaches the cytosol after cellular internalization. The high affinity interactions between streptavidin-binding peptide 2 and streptavidin was employed as respective fusion partners of GFP fragments to enhance the sensitivity of GFP complementation. With this method, cytosolic concentration of TMab4 was estimated to be about 170 nM after extracellular treatment of HeLa cells with 1 μM TMab4 for 6 h. We also found that after cellular internalization into living cells, nearly 1.3–4.3% of the internalized TMab4 molecules escaped into the cytosol from the endocytic vesicles. Our enhanced split GFP complementation assay provides a useful tool to directly quantify cytosolic amount of cytosol-penetrating agents and allows cell-based high-throughput screening for cytosol-penetrating agents with increased endosomal-escaping activity.

  16. Novel PCR Assays Complement Laser Biosensor-Based Method and Facilitate Listeria Species Detection from Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Pyo; Singh, Atul K; Bai, Xingjian; Leprun, Lena; Bhunia, Arun K

    2015-09-08

    The goal of this study was to develop the Listeria species-specific PCR assays based on a house-keeping gene (lmo1634) encoding alcohol acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Aad), previously designated as Listeria adhesion protein (LAP), and compare results with a label-free light scattering sensor, BARDOT (bacterial rapid detection using optical scattering technology). PCR primer sets targeting the lap genes from the species of Listeria sensu stricto were designed and tested with 47 Listeria and 8 non-Listeria strains. The resulting PCR primer sets detected either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or individual L. innocua, L. ivanovii and L. seeligeri, L. welshimeri, and L. marthii without producing any amplified products from other bacteria tested. The PCR assays with Listeria sensu stricto-specific primers also successfully detected all species of Listeria sensu stricto and/or Listeria innocua from mixed culture-inoculated food samples, and each bacterium in food was verified by using the light scattering sensor that generated unique scatter signature for each species of Listeria tested. The PCR assays based on the house-keeping gene aad (lap) can be used for detection of either all species of Listeria sensu stricto or certain individual Listeria species in a mixture from food with a detection limit of about 10⁴ CFU/mL.

  17. Adaptation of Tri-molecular fluorescence complementation allows assaying of regulatory Csr RNA-protein interactions in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelderman, Grant; Sivakumar, Anusha; Lipp, Sarah; Contreras, Lydia

    2015-02-01

    sRNAs play a significant role in controlling and regulating cellular metabolism. One of the more interesting aspects of certain sRNAs is their ability to make global changes in the cell by interacting with regulatory proteins. In this work, we demonstrate the use of an in vivo Tri-molecular Fluorescence Complementation assay to detect and visualize the central regulatory sRNA-protein interaction of the Carbon Storage Regulatory system in E. coli. The Carbon Storage Regulator consists primarily of an RNA binding protein, CsrA, that alters the activity of mRNA targets and of an sRNA, CsrB, that modulates the activity of CsrA. We describe the construction of a fluorescence complementation system that detects the interactions between CsrB and CsrA. Additionally, we demonstrate that the intensity of the fluorescence of this system is able to detect changes in the affinity of the CsrB-CsrA interaction, as caused by mutations in the protein sequence of CsrA. While previous methods have adopted this technique to study mRNA or RNA localization, this is the first attempt to use this technique to study the sRNA-protein interaction directly in bacteria. This method presents a potentially powerful tool to study complex bacterial RNA protein interactions in vivo. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. In-frame cDNA library combined with protein complementation assay identifies ARL11-binding partners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangkyou Lee

    Full Text Available The cDNA expression libraries that produce correct proteins are essential in facilitating the identification of protein-protein interactions. The 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs that are present in the majority of mammalian and non-mammalian genes are predicted to alter the expression of correct proteins from cDNA libraries. We developed a novel cDNA expression library from which 5'-UTRs were removed using a mixture of polymerase chain reaction primers that complement the Kozak sequences we refer to as an "in-frame cDNA library." We used this library with the protein complementation assay to identify two novel binding partners for ras-related ADP-ribosylation factor-like 11 (ARL11, cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2, and phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1. Thus, the in-frame cDNA library without 5'-UTRs we describe here increases the chance of correctly identifying protein interactions and will have wide applications in both mammalian and non-mammalian detection systems.

  19. Development and Use of a Serum Bactericidal Assay Using Pooled Human Complement To Assess Responses to a Meningococcal Group A Conjugate Vaccine in African Toddlers

    OpenAIRE

    Bash, Margaret C.; Lynn, Freyja; Mocca, Brian; Borrow, Ray; Findlow, Helen; Hassan-King, Musa; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Idoko, Olubukola; Sow, Samba; Kulkarni, Prasad; LaForce, F. Marc

    2014-01-01

    A meningococcal group A polysaccharide (PS) conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) has been developed for African countries affected by epidemic meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis. Complement-mediated serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assays are used to assess protective immune responses to meningococcal vaccination. Human complement (hC′) was used in early studies demonstrating antibody-mediated protection against disease, but it is difficult to obtain and standardize. We developed and evaluate...

  20. Development and use of a serum bactericidal assay using pooled human complement to assess responses to a meningococcal group A conjugate vaccine in African toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bash, Margaret C; Lynn, Freyja; Mocca, Brian; Borrow, Ray; Findlow, Helen; Hassan-King, Musa; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Idoko, Olubukola; Sow, Samba; Kulkarni, Prasad; Laforce, F Marc

    2014-05-01

    A meningococcal group A polysaccharide (PS) conjugate vaccine (PsA-TT) has been developed for African countries affected by epidemic meningitis caused by Neisseria meningitidis. Complement-mediated serum bactericidal antibody (SBA) assays are used to assess protective immune responses to meningococcal vaccination. Human complement (hC') was used in early studies demonstrating antibody-mediated protection against disease, but it is difficult to obtain and standardize. We developed and evaluated a method for sourcing hC' and then used the SBA assay with hC' (hSBA) to measure bactericidal responses to PsA-TT vaccination in 12- to 23-month-old African children. Sera with active complement from 100 unvaccinated blood donors were tested for intrinsic bactericidal activity, SBA titer using rabbit complement (rSBA), and anti-group A PS antibody concentration. Performance criteria and pooling strategies were examined and then verified by comparisons of three independently prepared hC' lots in two laboratories. hSBA titers of clinical trial sera were then determined using this complement sourcing method. Two different functional antibody tests were necessary for screening hC'. hSBA titers determined using three independent lots of pooled hC' were within expected assay variation among lots and between laboratories. In African toddlers, PsA-TT elicited higher hSBA titers than meningococcal polysaccharide or Hib vaccines. PsA-TT immunization or PS challenge of PsA-TT-primed subjects resulted in vigorous hSBA memory responses, and titers persisted in boosted groups for over a year. Quantifying SBA using pooled hC' is feasible and showed that PsA-TT was highly immunogenic in African toddlers.

  1. AKT1, LKB1, and YAP1 revealed as MYC interactors with NanoLuc-based protein-fragment complementation assay. | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    The c-Myc (MYC) transcription factor is a major cancer driver and a well-validated therapeutic target. However, directly targeting MYC has been challenging. Thus, identifying proteins that interact with and regulate MYC may provide alternative strategies to inhibit its oncogenic activity. Here we report the development of a NanoLuc®-based protein-fragment complementation assay (NanoPCA) and mapping of the MYC protein interaction hub in live mammalian cells.

  2. Ontwikkeling van een alternatief voor de Radio Immuno Assay kit ter bepaling van humaan complement factor C3A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orzechowski TJH; Bisschop A

    1989-01-01

    Due to the present developments in the field of biocompatibility of medical devices, the need for the availability of sensitive test methods with a high predictive value becomes more and more urgent. Commercial available RIA-testkits for measurement of complement activation are very expensive

  3. Complementing in vitro screening assays with in silico molecular chemistry tools to examine potential in vivo metabolite-mediated effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput in vitro assays offer a rapid, cost-efficient means to screen thousands of chemicals across hundreds of pathway-based toxicity endpoints. However, one main concern involved with the use of in vitro assays is the erroneous omission of chemicals that are inactive un...

  4. Comparison of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunoassay, complement fixation, anticomplement immunofluorescence and passive haemaglutination techniques for detecting cytomegalovirus IgG antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, J.C.; Hannington, G.; Bakir, T.M.F.; Stern, H.; Kangro, H.; Griffiths, P.D.; Heath, R.B.

    1982-01-01

    The radioimmunoassay (RIA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) techniques were found to be comparable in sensitivity and specificity for detecting cytomegalovirus IgG antibody, and 10 to 100 times more sensitive than complement-fixation (CF), anticomplement immunofluorescence (ACIF) and passive haemagglutination (PHA). In screening tests for antibody, the frequency of false-positive and -negative results was 0.6% for RIA and ELISA, 1.5% for CF, 1.6% for ACIF and 3.6% for PHA. PHA was the least satisfactory test, largely because of technical problems. (author)

  5. Determination of the loss of function complement C4 exon 29 CT insertion using a novel paralog-specific assay in healthy UK and Spanish populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boteva, Lora; Wu, Yee Ling; Cortes-Hernández, Josefina; Martin, Javier; Vyse, Timothy J; Fernando, Michelle M A

    2011-01-01

    Genetic variants resulting in non-expression of complement C4A and C4B genes are common in healthy European populations and have shown association with a number of diseases, most notably the autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus. The most frequent cause of a C4 "null" allele, following that of C4 gene copy number variation (CNV), is a non-sense mutation arising from a 2 bp CT insertion into codon 1232 of exon 29. Previous attempts to accurately genotype this polymorphism have not been amenable to high-throughput typing, and have been confounded by failure to account for CNV at this locus, as well as by inability to distinguish between paralogs. We have developed a novel, high-throughput, paralog-specific assay to detect the presence and copy number of this polymorphism. We have genotyped healthy cohorts from the United Kingdom (UK) and Spain. Overall, 30/719 (4.17%) individuals from the UK cohort and 8/449 (1.78%) individuals from the Spanish cohort harboured the CT insertion in a C4A gene. A single Spanish individual possessed a C4B CT insertion. There is weak correlation between the C4 CT insertion and flanking MHC polymorphism. Therefore it is important to note that, as with C4 gene CNV, disease-association due to this variant will be missed by current SNP-based genome-wide association strategies.

  6. Lanthanide chelate complementation and hydrolysis enhanced luminescent chelate in real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays for KLK3 transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alinezhad, Saeid; Väänänen, Riina-Minna; Lehmusvuori, Ari; Karhunen, Ulla; Soukka, Tero; Kähkönen, Esa; Taimen, Pekka; Alanen, Kalle; Pettersson, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The requirement for high-performance reporter probes in real-time detection of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has led to the use of time-resolved fluorometry of lanthanide chelates. The aim of this study was to investigate the applicability of the principle of lanthanide chelate complementation (LCC) in comparison with a method based on hydrolysis enhancement and quenching of intact probes. A real-time reverse transcription (RT) PCR assay for kallikrein-related peptidase 3 (KLK3, model analyte) was developed by using the LCC detection method. Both detection methods were tested with a standard series of purified PCR products, 20 prostatic tissues, 20 healthy and prostate cancer patient blood samples, and female blood samples spiked with LNCaP cells. The same limit of detection was obtained with both methods, and two cycles earlier detection with the LCC method was observed. KLK3 messenger RNA (mRNA) was detected in all tissue samples and in 1 of 20 blood samples identically with both methods. The background was 30 times lower, and the signal-to-background (S/B) ratio was 3 times higher, when compared with the reference method. Use of the new reporter method provided similar sensitivity and specificity as the reference method. The lower background, the improved S/B ratio, and the possibility of melting curve analysis and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection could be advantages for this new reporter probe. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Complementizer Agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Koppen, J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Complementizers agree in phi-features with the embedded subject in dialects of German and Dutch, in Tense with the embedded clause in Irish and in phi-features with the matrix subject in certain African languages. These complementizer agreement phenomena will be the main empirical focus of this

  8. Real-time polymerase chain reaction detection of cauliflower mosaic virus to complement the 35S screening assay for genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cankar, Katarina; Ravnikar, Maja; Zel, Jana; Gruden, Kristina; Toplak, Natasa

    2005-01-01

    Labeling of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) is now in place in many countries, including the European Union, in order to guarantee the consumer's choice between GM and non-GM products. Screening of samples is performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of regulatory sequences frequently introduced into genetically modified plants. Primers for the 35S promoter from Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) are those most frequently used. In virus-infected plants or in samples contaminated with plant material carrying the virus, false-positive results can consequently occur. A system for real-time PCR using a TaqMan minor groove binder probe was designed that allows recognition of virus coat protein in the sample, thus allowing differentiation between transgenic and virus-infected samples. We measured the efficiency of PCR amplification, limits of detection and quantification, range of linearity, and repeatability of the assay in order to assess the applicability of the assay for routine analysis. The specificity of the detection system was tested on various virus isolates and plant species. All 8 CaMV isolates were successfully amplified using the designed system. No cross-reactivity was detected with DNA from 3 isolates of the closely related Carnation etched ring virus. Primers do not amplify plant DNA from available genetically modified maize and soybean lines or from different species of Brassicaceae or Solanaceae that are natural hosts for CaMV. We evaluated the assay for different food matrixes by spiking CaMV DNA into DNA from food samples and have successfully amplified CaMV from all samples. The assay was tested on rapeseed samples from routine GMO testing that were positive in the 35S screening assay, and the presence of the virus was confirmed.

  9. Split Beta-Lactamase Complementation Assay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    prediction and determination of protein structures to ascribe them potential functions, characterization of proteins also needs to address how and when the proteins interact with other counter- part proteins to bring about the much-desired orchestration in the cellular physiology. Simultaneously, the lack of knowledge of a.

  10. Complement and Viral Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoermer, Kristina A.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The complement system functions as an immune surveillance system that rapidly responds to infection. Activation of the complement system by specific recognition pathways triggers a protease cascade, generating cleavage products that function to eliminate pathogens, regulate inflammatory responses, and shape adaptive immune responses. However, when dysregulated, these powerful functions can become destructive and the complement system has been implicated as a pathogenic effector in numerous diseases, including infectious diseases. This review highlights recent discoveries that have identified critical roles for the complement system in the pathogenesis of viral infection. PMID:21292294

  11. Complement activation in chromosome 13 dementias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostagno, A.; Revesz, T.; Lashley, T.

    2002-01-01

    experiments and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays specific for the activation products iC3b, C4d, Bb, and C5b-9 indicated that ABri and ADan are able to fully activate the complement cascade at levels comparable to those generated by Aβ1–42. ABri and ADan specifically bound C1q with high affinity and formed...

  12. Complement component 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These people are prone to certain infections or autoimmune disorders. There are nine major complement proteins. They are ... may be used to monitor people with an autoimmune disorder . For example, people with active systemic lupus erythematosus ...

  13. CSF coccidioides complement fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip navigation U.S. National Library of Medicine The navigation menu has been collapsed. ... of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003526.htm CSF coccidioides complement fixation test To use the sharing features ...

  14. Histoplasma complement fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip navigation U.S. National Library of Medicine The navigation menu has been collapsed. ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003527.htm Histoplasma complement fixation To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  15. Relative antibacterial functions of complement and NETs: NETs trap and complement effectively kills bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzouz, Louiza; Cherry, Ahmed; Riedl, Magdalena; Khan, Meraj; Pluthero, Fred G; Kahr, Walter H A; Palaniyar, Nades; Licht, Christoph

    2018-03-20

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are web-like DNA structures released by activated neutrophils. These structures are decorated with antimicrobial proteins, and considered to trap and kill bacteria extracellularly. However, the exact functions of NETs remain elusive, and contradictory observations have been made with NETs functioning as an antimicrobial or a pathogentrapping mechanism. There is a disconnect in the interpretation of the involvement of other major immune mechanisms, such as the complement system, as effectors of the function of NETs. We have recently shown that NETs activate complement. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the relative antimicrobial roles of NETs in the absence and presence of complement. Using primary human neutrophils, human serum (normal, heat inactivated, and C5-depleted), P. aeruginosa (at multiplicity of infection, MOI, of 1 or 10), S. aureus (MOI of 1), colony-counting assays and confocal microscopy, we demonstrate that most bacteria trapped by NETs remain viable, indicating that NETs have limited bactericidal properties. By contrast, complement effectively killed bacteria, but NETs decreased the bactericidal ability of complement and degrading NETs by DNases restored complement-mediated killing. Experiments with conditions allowing for specific pathway activation showed that the complement classical and lectin, but not the alternative, pathway lead to bacterial killing. NETs under static conditions showed limited killing of bacteria while NETs under dynamic conditions showed enhanced bacteria trapping and reduced killing. Furthermore, NETs incubated with normal human serum depleted complement and reduced the hemolytic capacity of the serum. This report, for the first time, clarifies the relative bactericidal contributions of NETs and complement. We propose that - while NETs can ensnare bacteria such as P. aeruginosa - complement is necessary for efficient bacterial killing. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  16. Material properties in complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, S. Moein; Andersen, Alina Joukainen; Ahmadvand, Davoud

    2011-01-01

    activation differently and through different sensing molecules and initiation pathways. The importance of material properties in triggering complement is considered and mechanistic aspects discussed. Mechanistic understanding of complement events could provide rational approaches for improved material design...

  17. Guinea pig complement potently measures vibriocidal activity of human antibodies in response to cholera vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Whun; Jeong, Soyoung; Ahn, Ki Bum; Yang, Jae Seung; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Han, Seung Hyun

    2017-12-01

    The vibriocidal assay using guinea pig complement is widely used for the evaluation of immune responses to cholera vaccines in human clinical trials. However, it is unclear why guinea pig complement has been used over human complement in the measurement of vibriocidal activity of human sera and there have not been comparison studies for the use of guinea pig complement over those from other species. Therefore, we comparatively investigated the effects of complements derived from human, guinea pig, rabbit, and sheep on vibriocidal activity. Complements from guinea pig, rabbit, and human showed concentration-dependent vibriocidal activity in the presence of quality control serum antibodies. Of these complements, guinea pig complement was the most sensitive and effective over a wide concentration range. When the vibriocidal activity of complements was measured in the absence of serum antibodies, human, sheep, and guinea pig complements showed vibriocidal activity up to 40-fold, 20-fold, and 1-fold dilution, respectively. For human pre- and post-vaccination sera, the most potent vibriocidal activity was observed when guinea pig complement was used. In addition, the highest fold-increases between pre- and post- vaccinated sera were obtained with guinea pig complement. Furthermore, human complement contained a higher amount of V. cholerae- and its lipopolysaccharide-specific antibodies than guinea pig complement. Collectively, these results suggest that guinea pig complements are suitable for vibriocidal assays due to their high sensitivity and effectiveness to human sera.

  18. C1Q Assay Results in Complement-Dependent Cytotoxicity Crossmatch Negative Renal Transplant Candidates with Donor-Specific Antibodies: High Specificity but Low Sensitivity When Predicting Flow Crossmatch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Arreola-Guerra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to describe the association of positive flow cross match (FXM and C1q-SAB. Methods. In this observational, cross-sectional, and comparative study, patients included had negative AHG-CDC-XM and donor specific antibodies (DSA and were tested with FXM. All pretransplant sera were tested with C1q-SAB assay. Results. A total of 50 donor/recipient evaluations were conducted; half of them had at least one C1q+ Ab (n=26, 52%. Ten patients (20.0% had DSA C1q+ Ab. Twenty-five (50% FXMs were positive. Factors associated with a positive FXM were the presence of C1q+ Ab (DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 27, 2.80–259.56, P=0.004, and no DSA C1q+ Ab: OR 5, 1.27–19.68, P=0.021 and the DSA LABScreen-SAB MFI (OR 1.26, 95% CI 1.06–1.49, P=0.007. The cutoff point of immunodominant LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI with the greatest sensitivity and specificity to predict FXM was 2,300 (sensitivity: 72% and specificity: 75%. For FXM prediction, DSA C1q+ Ab was the most specific (95.8%, 85–100 and the combination of DSA-MFI > 2,300 and C1q+ Ab was the most sensitive (92.0%, 79.3–100. Conclusions. C1q+ Ab and LABScreen SAB DSA-MFI were significantly associated with FXM. DSA C1q+ Ab was highly specific but with low sensitivity.

  19. Complementing Gender Analysis Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The existing gender analysis frameworks start with a premise that men and women are equal and should be treated equally. These frameworks give emphasis on equal distribution of resources between men and women and believe that this will bring equality which is not always true. Despite equal distribution of resources, women tend to suffer and experience discrimination in many areas of their lives such as the power to control resources within social relationships, and the need for emotional security and reproductive rights within interpersonal relationships. These frameworks believe that patriarchy as an institution plays an important role in women's oppression, exploitation, and it is a barrier in their empowerment and rights. Thus, some think that by ensuring equal distribution of resources and empowering women economically, institutions like patriarchy can be challenged. These frameworks are based on proposed equality principle which puts men and women in competing roles. Thus, the real equality will never be achieved. Contrary to the existing gender analysis frameworks, the Complementing Gender Analysis framework proposed by the author provides a new approach toward gender analysis which not only recognizes the role of economic empowerment and equal distribution of resources but suggests to incorporate the concept and role of social capital, equity, and doing gender in gender analysis which is based on perceived equity principle, putting men and women in complementing roles that may lead to equality. In this article the author reviews the mainstream gender theories in development from the viewpoint of the complementary roles of gender. This alternative view is argued based on existing literature and an anecdote of observations made by the author. While criticizing the equality theory, the author offers equity theory in resolving the gender conflict by using the concept of social and psychological capital.

  20. Identifying pathogenicity of human variants via paralog-based yeast complementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the health implications of personal genomes, we now face a largely unmet challenge to identify functional variants within disease-associated genes. Functional variants can be identified by trans-species complementation, e.g., by failure to rescue a yeast strain bearing a mutation in an orthologous human gene. Although orthologous complementation assays are powerful predictors of pathogenic variation, they are available for only a few percent of human disease genes. Here we systematically examine the question of whether complementation assays based on paralogy relationships can expand the number of human disease genes with functional variant detection assays. We tested over 1,000 paralogous human-yeast gene pairs for complementation, yielding 34 complementation relationships, of which 33 (97% were novel. We found that paralog-based assays identified disease variants with success on par with that of orthology-based assays. Combining all homology-based assay results, we found that complementation can often identify pathogenic variants outside the homologous sequence region, presumably because of global effects on protein folding or stability. Within our search space, paralogy-based complementation more than doubled the number of human disease genes with a yeast-based complementation assay for disease variation.

  1. Nanomedicine and the complement paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimi, S Moein; Farhangrazi, Z Shadi

    2013-05-01

    The role of complement in idiosyncratic reactions to nanopharmaceutical infusion is receiving increasing attention. We discuss this in relation to nanopharmaceutical development and the possible use of complement inhibitors to prevent related adverse reactions. We further call on initiation of genetic association studies to unravel the genetic basis of nanomedicine infusion-related adverse responses, since most of the polymorphic genes in the genome belong to the immune system. In this paper, idiosyncratic reactions based on complement activation are discussed in the context of newly available complement inhibitors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The renaissance of complement therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Reis, Edimara S; Lambris, John D

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of clinical conditions that involve a pathological contribution from the complement system - many of which affect the kidneys - has spurred a regained interest in therapeutic options to modulate this host defence pathway. Molecular insight, technological advances, and the first decade of clinical experience with the complement-specific drug eculizumab, have contributed to a growing confidence in therapeutic complement inhibition. More than 20 candidate drugs that target various stages of the complement cascade are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, and additional agents are in preclinical development. Such diversity is clearly needed in view of the complex and distinct involvement of complement in a wide range of clinical conditions, including rare kidney disorders, transplant rejection and haemodialysis-induced inflammation. The existing drugs cannot be applied to all complement-driven diseases, and each indication has to be assessed individually. Alongside considerations concerning optimal points of intervention and economic factors, patient stratification will become essential to identify the best complement-specific therapy for each individual patient. This Review provides an overview of the therapeutic concepts, targets and candidate drugs, summarizes insights from clinical trials, and reflects on existing challenges for the development of complement therapeutics for kidney diseases and beyond.

  3. The renaissance of complement therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Reis, Edimara S.; Lambris, John D.

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of clinical conditions that involve a pathological contribution from the complement system — many of which affect the kidneys — has spurred a regained interest in therapeutic options to modulate this host defence pathway. Molecular insight, technological advances, and the first decade of clinical experience with the complement-specific drug eculizumab, have contributed to a growing confidence in therapeutic complement inhibition. More than 20 candidate drugs that target various stages of the complement cascade are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, and additional agents are in preclinical development. Such diversity is clearly needed in view of the complex and distinct involvement of complement in a wide range of clinical conditions, including rare kidney disorders, transplant rejection and haemodialysis-induced inflammation. The existing drugs cannot be applied to all complement-driven diseases, and each indication has to be assessed individually. Alongside considerations concerning optimal points of intervention and economic factors, patient stratification will become essential to identify the best complement-specific therapy for each individual patient. This Review provides an overview of the therapeutic concepts, targets and candidate drugs, summarizes insights from clinical trials, and reflects on existing challenges for the development of complement therapeutics for kidney diseases and beyond. PMID:29199277

  4. Complement Evasion by Pathogenic Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Isaac, Lourdes; Barbosa, Angela Silva

    2016-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a neglected infectious disease caused by spirochetes from the genus Leptospira . Pathogenic microorganisms, notably those which reach the blood circulation such as Leptospira , have evolved multiple strategies to escape the host complement system, which is important for innate and acquired immunity. Leptospira avoid complement-mediated killing through: (i) recruitment of host complement regulators; (ii) acquisition of host proteases that cleave complement proteins on the bacterial surface; and, (iii) secretion of proteases that inactivate complement proteins in the Leptospira surroundings. The recruitment of host soluble complement regulatory proteins includes the acquisition of Factor H (FH) and FH-like-1 (alternative pathway), C4b-binding protein (C4BP) (classical and lectin pathways), and vitronectin (Vn) (terminal pathway). Once bound to the leptospiral surface, FH and C4BP retain cofactor activity of Factor I in the cleavage of C3b and C4b, respectively. Vn acquisition by leptospires may result in terminal pathway inhibition by blocking C9 polymerization. The second evasion mechanism lies in plasminogen (PLG) binding to the leptospiral surface. In the presence of host activators, PLG is converted to enzymatically active plasmin, which is able to degrade C3b, C4b, and C5 at the surface of the pathogen. A third strategy used by leptospires to escape from complement system is the active secretion of proteases. Pathogenic, but not saprophytic leptospires, are able to secrete metalloproteases that cleave C3 (central complement molecule), Factor B (alternative pathway), and C4 and C2 (classical and lectin pathways). The purpose of this review is to fully explore these complement evasion mechanisms, which act together to favor Leptospira survival and multiplication in the host.

  5. Complement's participation in acquired immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Claus Henrik; Leslie, Robert Graham Quinton

    2002-01-01

    in which antigen is seen, be it alone or in association with natural or induced antibodies and/or C3-complement fragments. The aim of this review is to describe the present status of our understanding of complement's participation in acquired immunity and the regulation of autoimmune responses........ It is now clear that complement serves as a regulator of several B cell functions, including specific antibody production, antigen uptake, processing and presentation, and shaping of the B cell repertoire. Of key importance, in this respect, is the role played by the B cell-signaling triad consisting...

  6. Functional analysis of Ficolin-3 mediated complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Honoré, Christian; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2010-01-01

    Ficolin-3 mediated complement activation that could be applicable for research and clinical use. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was acetylated (acBSA) and chosen as a solid phase ligand for Ficolins in microtiter wells. Binding of Ficolins on acBSA was evaluated, as was functional complement activation...... was applied to the samples that inhibited interference from the classical pathway due to the presence of anti-BSA antibodies in some sera. We describe a novel functional method for measuring complement activation mediated by Ficolin-3 in human serum up to the formation of TCC. The assay provides......The recognition molecules of the lectin complement pathway are mannose-binding lectin and Ficolin -1, -2 and -3. Recently deficiency of Ficolin-3 was found to be associated with life threatening infections. Thus, we aimed to develop a functional method based on the ELISA platform for evaluating...

  7. Complement component 3 (C3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... These people are prone to certain infections or autoimmune disorders. There are nine major complement proteins. They are ... may be used to monitor people with an autoimmune disorder . It is done to see if treatment for ...

  8. Binding of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endopeptidase O (PepO) to Complement Component C1q Modulates the Complement Attack and Promotes Host Cell Adherence*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Vaibhav; Sroka, Magdalena; Fulde, Marcus; Bergmann, Simone; Riesbeck, Kristian; Blom, Anna M.

    2014-01-01

    The Gram-positive species Streptococcus pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing severe local and life-threatening invasive diseases associated with high mortality rates and death. We demonstrated recently that pneumococcal endopeptidase O (PepO) is a ubiquitously expressed, multifunctional plasminogen and fibronectin-binding protein facilitating host cell invasion and evasion of innate immunity. In this study, we found that PepO interacts directly with the complement C1q protein, thereby attenuating the classical complement pathway and facilitating pneumococcal complement escape. PepO binds both free C1q and C1 complex in a dose-dependent manner based on ionic interactions. Our results indicate that recombinant PepO specifically inhibits the classical pathway of complement activation in both hemolytic and complement deposition assays. This inhibition is due to direct interaction of PepO with C1q, leading to a strong activation of the classical complement pathway, and results in consumption of complement components. In addition, PepO binds the classical complement pathway inhibitor C4BP, thereby regulating downstream complement activation. Importantly, pneumococcal surface-exposed PepO-C1q interaction mediates bacterial adherence to host epithelial cells. Taken together, PepO facilitates C1q-mediated bacterial adherence, whereas its localized release consumes complement as a result of its activation following binding of C1q, thus representing an additional mechanism of human complement escape by this versatile pathogen. PMID:24739385

  9. Complement fixation test to C burnetii

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complement fixation test; Coxiella burnetii - complement fixation test; C burnetii - complement fixation test ... a specific foreign substance ( antigen ), in this case, C burnetii . Antibodies defend the body against bacteria, viruses, ...

  10. Direct evidence of complement activation in HELLP syndrome: a link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Vaught, Arthur J.; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Hueppchen, Nancy; Blakemore, Karin; Yuan, Xuan; Seifert, Sara M.; York, Sarah; Brodsky, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) is a severe variant of preeclampsia whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Recent evidence and clinical similarities suggest a link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a disease of excessive activation of the alternative complement pathway effectively treated with a complement inhibitor, eculizumab. Therefore, we utilized a functional complement assay, the modified Ham test, to test sera of women with ...

  11. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1 Rapidly Inhibits Complement Activation after Intravascular Injection in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia A Sharp

    Full Text Available The complement system has been increasingly recognized to play a pivotal role in a variety of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. Consequently, therapeutic modulators of the classical, lectin and alternative pathways of the complement system are currently in pre-clinical and clinical development. Our laboratory has identified a peptide that specifically inhibits the classical and lectin pathways of complement and is referred to as Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1. In this study, we determined that the lead PIC1 variant demonstrates a salt-dependent binding to C1q, the initiator molecule of the classical pathway. Additionally, this peptide bound to the lectin pathway initiator molecule MBL as well as the ficolins H, M and L, suggesting a common mechanism of PIC1 inhibitory activity occurs via binding to the collagen-like tails of these collectin molecules. We further analyzed the effect of arginine and glutamic acid residue substitution on the complement inhibitory activity of our lead derivative in a hemolytic assay and found that the original sequence demonstrated superior inhibitory activity. To improve upon the solubility of the lead derivative, a pegylated, water soluble variant was developed, structurally characterized and demonstrated to inhibit complement activation in mouse plasma, as well as rat, non-human primate and human serum in vitro. After intravenous injection in rats, the pegylated derivative inhibited complement activation in the blood by 90% after 30 seconds, demonstrating extremely rapid function. Additionally, no adverse toxicological effects were observed in limited testing. Together these results show that PIC1 rapidly inhibits classical complement activation in vitro and in vivo and is functional for a variety of animal species, suggesting its utility in animal models of classical complement-mediated diseases.

  12. Exploitation of complement regulatory proteins by Borrelia and Francisella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madar, Marian; Bencurova, Elena; Mlynarcik, Patrik; Almeida, André M; Soares, Renata; Bhide, Katarina; Pulzova, Lucia; Kovac, Andrej; Coelho, Ana V; Bhide, Mangesh

    2015-06-01

    Pathogens have developed sophisticated mechanisms of complement evasion such as binding to the host complement regulatory proteins (CRPs) on their surface or expression of CRP mimicking molecules. The ability of pathogens to evade the complement system has been correlated with pathogenesis and host selectivity. Hitherto, little work has been undertaken to determine whether Borrelia and Francisella exploit various CRPs to block complement attack. Seventeen Borrelia (twelve species) and six Francisella (three subspecies) strains were used to assess their ability to bind human, sheep and cattle CRPs or mimic membrane associated complement regulators. A series of experiments including affinity ligand binding experiments, pull-down assays and mass spectrometry based protein identification, revealed an array of CRP binding proteins of Borrelia and Francisella. Unlike Francisella, Borrelia strains were able to bind multiple human CRPs. Three strains of Borrelia (SKT-4, SKT-2 and HO14) showed the presence of a human CD46-homologous motif, indicating their ability to possess putative human CD46 mimicking molecules. Similarly, five strains of Borrelia and two strains of Francisella may have surface proteins with human CD59-homologous motifs. Among ovine and bovine CRPs, the only CRP bound by Francisella (LVS, Tul4 strain) was vitronectin, while ovine C4BP, ovine factor H and bovine factor H were bound to Borrelia strains SKT-2, DN127 and Co53. This study presents an array of proteins of Borrelia and Francisella that bind CRPs or may mimic membrane-CRPs, thus enabling multiphasic complement evasion strategies of these pathogens.

  13. Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Woźny

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Force Dynamics of Verb Complementation The concepts of motion and force are both extensively discussed in cognitive linguistics literature. But they are discussed separately. The first usually in the context of ‘motion situations’ (Talmy, Slobin, Zlatev, the other as part of the Force Dynamics framework, which was developed by Talmy. The aim of this paper is twofold: first, to argue that the concepts of force and motion should not be isolated but considered as two inseparable parts of force-motion events. The second goal is to prove that the modified Force Dynamics (force-motion framework can be used for precise characterization of the verb complementation patterns. To this end, a random sample of 50 sentences containing the verb ‘went’ is analyzed, demonstrating the differences between the categories of intensive and intransitive complementation with respect to the linguistically coded parameters of force and motion.

  14. Functional analysis of Ficolin-3 mediated complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Honoré, Christian; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole

    2010-01-01

    assessed by C4, C3 and terminal complement complex (TCC) deposition. Serum Ficolin-3 bound to acBSA in a calcium dependent manner, while only minimal binding of Ficolin-2 and no binding of Ficolin-1 were observed. No binding to normal BSA was seen for any of the Ficolins. Serum C4, C3 and TCC deposition...... was applied to the samples that inhibited interference from the classical pathway due to the presence of anti-BSA antibodies in some sera. We describe a novel functional method for measuring complement activation mediated by Ficolin-3 in human serum up to the formation of TCC. The assay provides...

  15. A novel method for direct measurement of complement convertases activity in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, A M; Volokhina, E B; Fransson, V; Strömberg, P; Berghard, L; Viktorelius, M; Mollnes, T E; López-Trascasa, M; van den Heuvel, L P; Goodship, T H; Marchbank, K J; Okroj, M

    2014-10-01

    Complement convertases are enzymatic complexes that play a central role in sustaining and amplification of the complement cascade. Impairment of complement function leads directly or indirectly to pathological conditions, including higher infection rate, kidney diseases, autoimmune- or neurodegenerative diseases and ischaemia-reperfusion injury. An assay for direct measurement of activity of the convertases in patient sera is not available. Existing assays testing convertase function are based on purified complement components and, thus, convertase formation occurs under non-physiological conditions. We designed a new assay, in which C5 blocking compounds enabled separation of the complement cascade into two phases: the first ending at the stage of C5 convertases and the second ending with membrane attack complex formation. The use of rabbit erythrocytes or antibody-sensitized sheep erythrocytes as the platforms for convertase formation enabled easy readout based on measurement of haemolysis. Thus, properties of patient sera could be studied directly regarding convertase activity and membrane attack complex formation. Another advantage of this assay was the possibility to screen for host factors such as C3 nephritic factor and other anti-complement autoantibodies, or gain-of-function mutations, which prolong the half-life of complement convertases. Herein, we present proof of concept, detailed description and validation of this novel assay. © 2014 British Society for Immunology.

  16. Membrane complement regulatory protein reduces the damage of transplanting autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by suppressing the activation of complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kai; Fang, Zhenhua; Gao, Xinfeng; Zhao, Jingjing; Huang, Ruokun; Xie, Ming

    2017-10-01

    There are few studies on the interaction of transplanting autologous bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) and complement. In order to further explore the effect of complement on BMSCs, BMSCs were obtained from bone marrow of 20 cases clinical patients, and then experimented in vitro. The cytotoxicity of complement on the mesenchymal stem cells in autologous human serum (AHS) was measured by Europium cytotoxicity assay. The complement membrane attack complex (MAC) deposited on the membrane surface was detected by flow cytometry. Finally, the cytotoxicity on BMSCs was measured after mCRPs overexpression or knockdown. We found that more than 90% of cells derived from bone marrow were identified to be mesenchymal stem cells through detection of cell membrane surface markers by flow cytometry. BMSCs harvested from the 20 patients all had cytotoxicity after incubated with AHS, and the cytotoxicity was significant higher than that incubated with complement inactivated autologous human serum (iAHS). Complement attack complex (MAC) could be detected on the BMSCs incubated with AHS, which implied the complement activation. We also found that mCRPs CD55 and CD59 overexpressions can resist the cytotoxicity induced by complement activation, while mCRPs CD55 and CD59 knockdown can enhance the cytotoxicity. Thus, the results indicated that mCRPs could effectively protect BMSCs from attacking by complement by suppressing the activation of complement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Complement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through a vein. The procedure is called a venipuncture . How to Prepare for the Test There is ... Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of Medicine 8600 Rockville Pike, ...

  18. Sentential Complementation--An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuessel, Frank H., Jr.

    A review of traditional and transformational studies on the phenomenon of sentential complementation (noun clauses) reveals many areas of agreement. Although some adherents of generative grammar may have occasionally obscured this aspect because of the offensive nature of their criticism of other modes of analysis, it is seen that, in several…

  19. Complement: Alive and Kicking Nanomedicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Alina Joukainen; Hashemi, S.H.; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2009-01-01

    Administration of liposome- and polymer-based clinical nanomedicines, as well as many other proposed multifunctional nanoparticles, often triggers hypersensitivity reactions without the involvement of IgE. These anaphylactic reactions are believed to be secondary to activation of the complement s...

  20. Enzyme assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodelius, P E

    1991-02-01

    The past year or so has seen the development of new enzyme assays, as well as the improvement of existing ones. Assays are becoming more rapid and sensitive as a result of modifications such as amplification of the enzyme product(s). Recombinant DNA technology is now being recognized as a particularly useful tool in the search for improved assay systems.

  1. Serum complement changes during double-blind food challenges in children with a history of food sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, M E; Guthrie, L A; Bock, S A

    1984-04-01

    Serum levels of C3, C4, factor B, properdin, total hemolytic complement and alternative-pathway hemolytic activity were measured before and after double-blind food challenge in 23 children with impressive histories of adverse reactions to foods. The 23 subjects had 11 positive food challenges and 12 negative food challenges. Nine patients with reagin-mediated positive food challenges showed increases in all six complement assays after double-blind food challenge, while the group with negative food challenges showed decreases in five of the six assays. The difference between the two groups for complement changes after double-blind food challenge was significant only for the alternative-pathway assay. Individual subject analysis revealed markedly heterogeneous changes in direction and magnitude within both groups for all complement assays. Therefore, it is concluded that measurement of serum complement levels is not a useful test for the clinical evaluation of a patient with suspected food sensitivity.

  2. Complement in clinical medicine: Clinical trials, case reports and therapy monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2017-09-01

    Research during past decades made it evident that complement is involved in more tasks than fighting infections, but has important roles in other immune surveillance and housekeeping functions. If the balance between complement activation and regulation is out of tune, however, complement can quickly turn against the host and contribute to adverse processes that result in various clinical conditions. Whereas clinical awareness was initially focused on complement deficiencies, excessive activation and insufficient regulation are frequently the dominant factors in complement-related disorders. The individual complement profile of a patient often determines the course and severity of the disease, and the pathophysiological involvement of complement may be highly diverse. As a consequence, complement assays have evolved as essential tools not only in initial diagnosis but also for following disease progression and for monitoring complement-targeted therapies, which become increasingly available in routine clinical use. We herein review the current state of complement-directed drug candidates in clinical evaluation and provide an overview of extended indications considered for the FDA-approved inhibitor eculizumab. Furthermore we review the literature describing cases reports and case series where eculizumab has been used "off-label". Finally, we give a summary of the currently available tests to measure complement profiles and discuss their suitability in diagnostics and treatment monitoring. With complement finally entering the clinical arena, there are intriguing opportunities for treating complement-mediated diseases. However, this progress also requires a new awareness about complement pathophysiology, adequate diagnostic tools and suitable treatment options among clinicians treating patients with such disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, R; Skandarajah, A; Gerver, RE; Neira, HD; Fletcher, DA; Herr, AE

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 The Royal Society of Chemistry. Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a "lateral e-flow assay" and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to ...

  4. European Union funded project on the development of a whole complement deficiency screening ELISA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würzner, Reinhard; Tedesco, Francesco; Garred, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Eurodiagnostica, Malmö, entitled "Search for Applications for WIESLAB(®) Complement system Screen (SAW)" with the aim to look for further applications of this assay. During the latter project the group organized several scientific meetings aimed at evaluating the use of the assay as well as developing further...

  5. The Complement System and Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regal, Jean F.; Gilbert, Jeffrey S.; Burwick, Richard M.

    2015-01-01

    Adverse pregnancy outcomes significantly contribute to morbidity and mortality for mother and child, with lifelong health consequences for both. The innate and adaptive immune system must be regulated to insure survival of the feta allograft, and the complement system is no exception. An intact complement system optimizes placental development and function and is essential to maintain host defense and fetal survival. Complement regulation is apparent at the placental interface from early pregnancy with some degree of complement activation occurring normally throughout gestation. However, a number of pregnancy complications including early pregnancy loss, fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and preterm birth are associated with excessive or misdirected complement activation, and are more frequent in women with inherited or acquired complement system disorders or complement gene mutations. Clinical studies employing complement biomarkers in plasma and urine implicate dysregulated complement activation in components of each of the adverse pregnancy outcomes. In addition, mechanistic studies in rat and mouse models of adverse pregnancy outcomes address the complement pathways or activation products of importance and allow critical analysis of the pathophysiology. Targeted complement therapeutics are already in use to control adverse pregnancy outcomes in select situations. A clearer understanding of the role of the complement system in both normal pregnancy and complicated or failed pregnancy will allow a rational approach to future therapeutic strategies for manipulating complement with the goal of mitigating adverse pregnancy outcomes, preserving host defense, and improving long term outcomes for both mother and child. PMID:25802092

  6. Complement activation in experimental human malaria infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roestenberg, M.; McCall, M.B.B.; Mollnes, T.E.; Deuren, M. van; Sprong, T.; Klasen, I.S.; Hermsen, C.C.; Sauerwein, R.W.; Ven, A.J.A.M. van der

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate complement activation in uncomplicated, early phases of human malaria. Fifteen healthy volunteers were experimentally infected with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Parasitemia and complement activation products were assessed. During blood stage

  7. Subversion of complement by hematophagous parasites

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Hélène; Skelly, Patrick; Zipfel, Peter F.; Losson, Bertrand; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The complement system is a crucial part of innate and adaptive immunity which exerts a significant evolutionary pressure on pathogens. It has selected for those pathogens, mainly micro-organisms but also parasites, that have evolved countermeasures. The characterization of how pathogens evade complement attack is a rapidly developing field of current research. In recent years, multiple complement evasion strategies have been characterized. In this review, we focus on complement escape mechani...

  8. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    OpenAIRE

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors...

  9. conformational complexity of complement component C3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, B.J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of the immune system and critical for the elimination of pathogens. In mammals the complement system consists of an intricate set of about 35 soluble and cell-surface plasma proteins. Central to complement is component C3, a large protein of 1,641 residues.

  10. Complement defects in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Lange, Bibi; Kjeldsen, Anette D

    2012-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of our immune system, and complement defects lead generally to increased susceptibility to infections and autoimmune diseases. We have studied the role of complement activity in relation with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), and more specifically studied wh...

  11. HIV Coinfection Enhances Complement Activation During Sepsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huson, Michaëla A. M.; Wouters, Diana; van Mierlo, Gerard; Grobusch, Martin P.; Zeerleder, Sacha S.; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-induced complement activation may play a role in chronic immune activation in patients with HIV infection and influence the complement system during acute illness. We determined the impact of HIV infection on the complement system in patients with asymptomatic HIV

  12. Pseudomonas aeruginosa alkaline protease blocks complement activation via the classical and lectin pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laarman, Alexander J; Bardoel, Bart W; Ruyken, Maartje; Fernie, Job; Milder, Fin J; van Strijp, Jos A G; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2012-01-01

    The complement system rapidly detects and kills Gram-negative bacteria and supports bacterial killing by phagocytes. However, bacterial pathogens exploit several strategies to evade detection by the complement system. The alkaline protease (AprA) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been associated with bacterial virulence and is known to interfere with complement-mediated lysis of erythrocytes, but its exact role in bacterial complement escape is unknown. In this study, we analyzed how AprA interferes with complement activation and whether it could block complement-dependent neutrophil functions. We found that AprA potently blocked phagocytosis and killing of Pseudomonas by human neutrophils. Furthermore, AprA inhibited opsonization of bacteria with C3b and the formation of the chemotactic agent C5a. AprA specifically blocked C3b deposition via the classical and lectin pathways, whereas the alternative pathway was not affected. Serum degradation assays revealed that AprA degrades both human C1s and C2. However, repletion assays demonstrated that the mechanism of action for complement inhibition is cleavage of C2. In summary, we showed that P. aeruginosa AprA interferes with classical and lectin pathway-mediated complement activation via cleavage of C2.

  13. The Lectin Pathway of Complement and Biocompatibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Estrid; Garred, Peter

    2015-01-01

    activation, the coagulation system and the complement system. The complement system is an important part of the initial immune response and consists of fluid phase molecules in the blood stream. Three different activation pathways can initiate the complement system, the lectin, the classical...... and the alternative pathway, all converging in an amplification loop of the cascade system and downstream reactions. Thus, when exposed to foreign substances complement components will be activated and lead to a powerful inflammatory response. Biosurface induced complement activation is a recognised issue that has...

  14. The lectin pathway of complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballegaard, Vibe Cecilie Diederich; Haugaard, Anna Karen; Garred, P

    2014-01-01

    The pattern recognition molecules of the lectin complement pathway are important components of the innate immune system with known functions in host-virus interactions. This paper summarizes current knowledge of how these intriguing molecules, including mannose-binding lectin (MBL), Ficolin-1, -2......-1, -2 and -3 and CL-11 could have similar functions in HIV infection as the ficolins have been shown to play a role in other viral infections, and CL-11 resembles MBL and the ficolins in structure and binding capacity....... and -3, and collectin-11 (CL-11) may influence HIV-pathogenesis. It has been demonstrated that MBL is capable of binding and neutralizing HIV and may affect host susceptibility to HIV infection and disease progression. In addition, MBL may cause variations in the host immune response against HIV. Ficolin...

  15. Targeting the Human Complement Membrane Attack Complex to Selectively Kill Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    reproductive tract of the fe- male. In this regard, seminal plasma is devoid of complement ac- tivity and actually has a strong anti-complement activity (8...article: EA, Ab-sensitized sheep erythrocyte; ES, sheep erythrocyte; PSA, prostate-specific Ag; PVDF, polyvinylidene difluoride. Copyright 2013 by The...addition of sample loading buffer. Proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to PVDF membrane as described above. C3b/iC3b deposition assay Sheep

  16. Complement Activation and Inhibition in Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazander, Gwendolyn; Jukema, Gerrolt N.; Nibbering, Peter H.

    2012-01-01

    Complement activation is needed to restore tissue injury; however, inappropriate activation of complement, as seen in chronic wounds can cause cell death and enhance inflammation, thus contributing to further injury and impaired wound healing. Therefore, attenuation of complement activation by specific inhibitors is considered as an innovative wound care strategy. Currently, the effects of several complement inhibitors, for example, the C3 inhibitor compstatin and several C1 and C5 inhibitors, are under investigation in patients with complement-mediated diseases. Although (pre)clinical research into the effects of these complement inhibitors on wound healing is limited, available data indicate that reduction of complement activation can improve wound healing. Moreover, medicine may take advantage of safe and effective agents that are produced by various microorganisms, symbionts, for example, medicinal maggots, and plants to attenuate complement activation. To conclude, for the development of new wound care strategies, (pre)clinical studies into the roles of complement and the effects of application of complement inhibitors in wound healing are required. PMID:23346185

  17. The Role of Complement in Tumor Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, Ruben; Corrales, Leticia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Complement is a central part of the immune system that has developed as a first defense against non-self cells. Neoplastic transformation is accompanied by an increased capacity of the malignant cells to activate complement. In fact, clinical data demonstrate complement activation in cancer patients. On the basis of the use of protective mechanisms by malignant cells, complement activation has traditionally been considered part of the body's immunosurveillance against cancer. Inhibitory mechanisms of complement activation allow cancer cells to escape from complement-mediated elimination and hamper the clinical efficacy of monoclonal antibody–based cancer immunotherapies. To overcome this limitation, many strategies have been developed with the goal of improving complement-mediated effector mechanisms. However, significant work in recent years has identified new and surprising roles for complement activation within the tumor microenvironment. Recent reports suggest that complement elements can promote tumor growth in the context of chronic inflammation. This chapter reviews the data describing the role of complement activation in cancer immunity, which offers insights that may aid the development of more effective therapeutic approaches to control cancer. PMID:24272362

  18. Complement Evasion Strategies of Viruses: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palak Agrawal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Being a major first line of immune defense, the complement system keeps a constant vigil against viruses. Its ability to recognize large panoply of viruses and virus-infected cells, and trigger the effector pathways, results in neutralization of viruses and killing of the infected cells. This selection pressure exerted by complement on viruses has made them evolve a multitude of countermeasures. These include targeting the recognition molecules for the avoidance of detection, targeting key enzymes and complexes of the complement pathways like C3 convertases and C5b-9 formation – either by encoding complement regulators or by recruiting membrane-bound and soluble host complement regulators, cleaving complement proteins by encoding protease, and inhibiting the synthesis of complement proteins. Additionally, viruses also exploit the complement system for their own benefit. For example, they use complement receptors as well as membrane regulators for cellular entry as well as their spread. Here, we provide an overview on the complement subversion mechanisms adopted by the members of various viral families including Poxviridae, Herpesviridae, Adenoviridae, Flaviviridae, Retroviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Togaviridae, Orthomyxoviridae and Paramyxoviridae.

  19. Complement Evasion Strategies of Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Palak; Nawadkar, Renuka; Ojha, Hina; Kumar, Jitendra; Sahu, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    Being a major first line of immune defense, the complement system keeps a constant vigil against viruses. Its ability to recognize large panoply of viruses and virus-infected cells, and trigger the effector pathways, results in neutralization of viruses and killing of the infected cells. This selection pressure exerted by complement on viruses has made them evolve a multitude of countermeasures. These include targeting the recognition molecules for the avoidance of detection, targeting key enzymes and complexes of the complement pathways like C3 convertases and C5b-9 formation - either by encoding complement regulators or by recruiting membrane-bound and soluble host complement regulators, cleaving complement proteins by encoding protease, and inhibiting the synthesis of complement proteins. Additionally, viruses also exploit the complement system for their own benefit. For example, they use complement receptors as well as membrane regulators for cellular entry as well as their spread. Here, we provide an overview on the complement subversion mechanisms adopted by the members of various viral families including Poxviridae, Herpesviridae, Adenoviridae, Flaviviridae, Retroviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Togaviridae, Orthomyxoviridae and Paramyxoviridae .

  20. Monotest in the complement fixation test: the Chorus system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Meli

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The complement fixation test (CFT is a method used for the detection of antibodies against pathogens of infectious diseases, it has been proved to be a useful diagnostic method in the detection of acute disease in many medical laboratories.The test performed manually is time consuming and needs very skilled personnel.This study evaluates the automated Chorus CFT system with 87 serum samples in comparison with manual method using Virion-Serion reagents, against a panel of antigens, such as Adenovirus, Influenza A and B virus, Respiratory Syncythial Virus, Parainfluenza Mix, Mycoplasma Pneumoniae, and Echinococcus. The Chorus system includes standardized reagents and a monotest device to perform the single assay. In comparison to the manual CFT method, the correlation is 91.6% (7/83.The results obtained show that the automated Chorus system can be applied for detecting complement fixation antibodies against different infectious disease agents.

  1. The Stability of Complement-Mediated Bactericidal Activity in Human Serum against Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Cunningham, Adam F.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2012-01-01

    The complement cascade includes heat-labile proteins and care is required when handling serum in order to preserve its functional integrity. We have previously used a whole human serum bactericidal assay to show that antibody and an intact complement system are required in blood for killing of invasive isolates of Salmonella. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the conditions under which human serum can be stored and manipulated while maintaining complement integrity. Serum bactericidal activity against Salmonella was maintained for a minimum of 35 days when stored at 4°C, eight days at 22°C and 54 hours at 37°C. Up to three freeze-thaw cycles had no effect on the persistence of bactericidal activity and hemolytic complement assays confirmed no effect on complement function. Delay in the separation of serum for up to four days from clotted blood stored at 22°C did not affect bactericidal activity. Dilution of serum resulted in an increased rate of loss of bactericidal activity and so serum should be stored undiluted. These findings indicate that the current guidelines concerning manipulation and storage of human serum to preserve complement integrity and function leave a large margin for safety with regards to bactericidal activity against Salmonella. The study provides a scheme for determining the requirements for serum handling in relation to functional activity of complement in other systems. PMID:23145102

  2. Direct evidence of complement activation in HELLP syndrome: A link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaught, Arthur J; Gavriilaki, Eleni; Hueppchen, Nancy; Blakemore, Karin; Yuan, Xuan; Seifert, Sara M; York, Sarah; Brodsky, Robert A

    2016-05-01

    HELLP syndrome (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) is a severe variant of pre-eclampsia whose pathogenesis remains unclear. Recent evidence and clinical similarities suggest a link to atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome, a disease of excessive activation of the alternative complement pathway effectively treated with a complement inhibitor, eculizumab. Therefore, we used a functional complement assay, the modified Ham test, to analyze sera of women with classic or atypical HELLP syndrome, pre-eclampsia with severe features, normal pregnancies, and healthy nonpregnant women. Sera were also evaluated using levels of the terminal product of complement activation (C5b-9). We tested the in vitro ability of eculizumab to inhibit complement activation in HELLP serum. Increased complement activation was observed in participants with classic or atypical HELLP compared with those with normal pregnancies and nonpregnant controls. Mixing HELLP serum with eculizumab-containing serum resulted in a significant decrease in cell killing compared with HELLP serum alone. We found that HELLP syndrome is associated with increased complement activation as assessed with the modified Ham test. This assay may aid in the diagnosis of HELLP syndrome and could confirm that its pathophysiology is related to that of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Copyright © 2016 ISEH - International Society for Experimental Hematology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae assay system to investigate ligand/AdipoR1 interactions that lead to cellular signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha Aouida

    Full Text Available Adiponectin is a mammalian hormone that exerts anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and cardioprotective effects through interaction with its major ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane localized receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Here, we report a Saccharomyces cerevisiae based method for investigating agonist-AdipoR interactions that is amenable for high-throughput scale-up and can be used to study both AdipoRs separately. Agonist-AdipoR1 interactions are detected using a split firefly luciferase assay based on reconstitution of firefly luciferase (Luc activity due to juxtaposition of its N- and C-terminal fragments, NLuc and CLuc, by ligand induced interaction of the chimeric proteins CLuc-AdipoR1 and APPL1-NLuc (adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif 1-NLuc in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking the yeast homolog of AdipoRs (Izh2p. The assay monitors the earliest known step in the adiponectin-AdipoR anti-diabetic signaling cascade. We demonstrate that reconstituted Luc activity can be detected in colonies or cells using a CCD camera and quantified in cell suspensions using a microplate reader. AdipoR1-APPL1 interaction occurs in absence of ligand but can be stimulated specifically by agonists such as adiponectin and the tobacco protein osmotin that was shown to have AdipoR-dependent adiponectin-like biological activity in mammalian cells. To further validate this assay, we have modeled the three dimensional structures of receptor-ligand complexes of membrane-embedded AdipoR1 with cyclic peptides derived from osmotin or osmotin-like plant proteins. We demonstrate that the calculated AdipoR1-peptide binding energies correlate with the peptides' ability to behave as AdipoR1 agonists in the split luciferase assay. Further, we demonstrate agonist-AdipoR dependent activation of protein kinase A (PKA signaling and AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae, which are

  4. A Saccharomyces cerevisiae Assay System to Investigate Ligand/AdipoR1 Interactions That Lead to Cellular Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Aouida, Mustapha

    2013-06-07

    Adiponectin is a mammalian hormone that exerts anti-diabetic, anti-cancer and cardioprotective effects through interaction with its major ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane localized receptors, AdipoR1 and AdipoR2. Here, we report a Saccharomyces cerevisiae based method for investigating agonist-AdipoR interactions that is amenable for high-throughput scale-up and can be used to study both AdipoRs separately. Agonist-AdipoR1 interactions are detected using a split firefly luciferase assay based on reconstitution of firefly luciferase (Luc) activity due to juxtaposition of its N- and C-terminal fragments, NLuc and CLuc, by ligand induced interaction of the chimeric proteins CLuc-AdipoR1 and APPL1-NLuc (adaptor protein containing pleckstrin homology domain, phosphotyrosine binding domain and leucine zipper motif 1-NLuc) in a S. cerevisiae strain lacking the yeast homolog of AdipoRs (Izh2p). The assay monitors the earliest known step in the adiponectin-AdipoR anti-diabetic signaling cascade. We demonstrate that reconstituted Luc activity can be detected in colonies or cells using a CCD camera and quantified in cell suspensions using a microplate reader. AdipoR1-APPL1 interaction occurs in absence of ligand but can be stimulated specifically by agonists such as adiponectin and the tobacco protein osmotin that was shown to have AdipoR-dependent adiponectin-like biological activity in mammalian cells. To further validate this assay, we have modeled the three dimensional structures of receptor-ligand complexes of membrane-embedded AdipoR1 with cyclic peptides derived from osmotin or osmotin-like plant proteins. We demonstrate that the calculated AdipoR1-peptide binding energies correlate with the peptides\\' ability to behave as AdipoR1 agonists in the split luciferase assay. Further, we demonstrate agonist-AdipoR dependent activation of protein kinase A (PKA) signaling and AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in S. cerevisiae, which are homologous to

  5. Subversion of complement by hematophagous parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Hélène; Skelly, Patrick J; Zipfel, Peter F; Losson, Bertrand; Vanderplasschen, Alain

    2009-01-01

    The complement system is a crucial part of innate and adaptive immunity which exerts a significant evolutionary pressure on pathogens. It has selected for those pathogens, mainly microorganisms but also parasites, that have evolved countermeasures. The characterization of how pathogens evade complement attack is a rapidly developing field of current research. In recent years, multiple complement evasion strategies have been characterized. In this review, we focus on complement escape mechanisms expressed by hematophagous parasites, a heterogeneous group of metazoan parasites that share the property of ingesting the whole blood of their host. Complement inhibition is crucial for parasite survival within the host tissue or to facilitate blood feeding. Finally, complement inhibition by hematophagous parasites may also contribute to their success as pathogen vectors.

  6. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed. PMID:26696798

  7. Complement pathways and meningococcal disease : diagnostic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöholm, A G; Truedsson, L; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2001-01-01

    Complement is an immunological effector system that bridges innate and acquired immunity in several ways. There is a striking association between susceptibility to meningococcal disease and various forms of complement deficiency (1,2). In defense against bacterial infection, the most important...... activation on the bacterial surface (6,7). The newly discovered mannan-binding lectin (MBL) pathway of complement activation appears to be protective against many types of infection (8) and adds previously unsuspected aspects of innate immunity to complement-mediated defense. Interestingly, immune responses...... function of complement is probably to serve as a mediator of antibody-dependent immunity. Specific antibodies can trigger activation of the classical and the alternative pathways of complement activation (3-5). It is well known that antibody-independent mechanisms interfere with alternative pathway...

  8. NEPHROPATHIES ASSOCIATED WITH COMPLEMENT SYSTEM PATHOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Dlin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Summarized research material for nephropathy associated with the pathology of the complement system in children and adults. Presents clinical, immunological and morphological differences of the nephropathy associated with the pathology of the complement system with other renal diseases, especially glomerulonephritis, including membranoproliferative variants and nephrotic syndrome associated with disorders of complement. The pathogenesis of the development of nephropathy associated with the pathology of the complement system, where highlighted as forms, associated with genetic mutations or variants, due to the formation of autoantibodies to components of the complement. Shown the options and effectiveness of treatment immunosuppressive drugs and by eculizumab depending on pathogenetic and clinical features of nephropathy associated with the pathology of the complement system.

  9. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn

    2015-09-01

    The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorders. In cold agglutinin disease, efficient therapies have been developed in order to target the pathogenic B-cell clone, but complement modulation remains promising in some clinical situations. No established therapy exists for secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria, and the possibility of therapeutic complement inhibition is interesting. Currently, complement modulation is not clinically documented in any autoimmune hemolytic anemia. The most relevant candidate drugs and possible target levels of action are discussed.

  10. Hormone assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eisentraut, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    An improved radioimmunoassay is described for measuring total triiodothyronine or total thyroxine levels in a sample of serum containing free endogenous thyroid hormone and endogenous thyroid hormone bound to thyroid hormone binding protein. The thyroid hormone is released from the protein by adding hydrochloric acid to the serum. The pH of the separated thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone binding protein is raised in the absence of a blocking agent without interference from the endogenous protein. 125 I-labelled thyroid hormone and thyroid hormone antibodies are added to the mixture, allowing the labelled and unlabelled thyroid hormone and the thyroid hormone antibody to bind competitively. This results in free thyroid hormone being separated from antibody bound thyroid hormone and thus the unknown quantity of thyroid hormone may be determined. A thyroid hormone test assay kit is described for this radioimmunoassay. It provides a 'single tube' assay which does not require blocking agents for endogenous protein interference nor an external solid phase sorption step for the separation of bound and free hormone after the competitive binding step; it also requires a minimum number of manipulative steps. Examples of the assay are given to illustrate the reproducibility, linearity and specificity of the assay. (UK)

  11. Role of Complement in Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia

    OpenAIRE

    Berentsen, Sigbj?rn

    2015-01-01

    Summary The classification of autoimmune hemolytic anemias and the complement system are reviewed. In autoimmune hemolytic anemia of the warm antibody type, complement-mediated cell lysis is clinically relevant in a proportion of the patients but is hardly essential for hemolysis in most patients. Cold antibody-mediated autoimmune hemolytic anemias (primary cold agglutinin disease, secondary cold agglutinin syndrome and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria) are entirely complement-mediated disorder...

  12. Complement activation and inhibition: a delicate balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjöberg, A P; Trouw, L A; Blom, A M

    2009-01-01

    activation. Disturbances to the complement regulation on endogenous ligands can lead to diseases such as age-related macular degeneration, neurological and rheumatic disorders. A thorough understanding of these processes might be crucial to developing new therapeutic strategies....... proteins, pentraxins, amyloid deposits, prions and DNA, all bind the complement activator C1q, but also interact with complement inhibitors C4b-binding protein and factor H. This contrasts to the interaction between C1q and immune complexes, in which case no inhibitors bind, resulting in full complement...

  13. Hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibits complement activation by cleaving complement component 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiichi Mawatari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It has been hypothesized that persistent hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is mediated in part by viral proteins that abrogate the host immune response, including the complement system, but the precise mechanisms are not well understood. We investigated whether HCV proteins are involved in the fragmentation of complement component 4 (C4, composed of subunits C4α, C4β, and C4γ, and the role of HCV proteins in complement activation. METHODS: Human C4 was incubated with HCV nonstructural (NS 3/4A protease, core, or NS5. Samples were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then subjected to peptide sequencing. The activity of the classical complement pathway was examined using an erythrocyte hemolysis assay. The cleavage pattern of C4 in NS3/4A-expressing and HCV-infected cells, respectively, was also examined. RESULTS: HCV NS3/4A protease cleaved C4γ in a concentration-dependent manner, but viral core and NS5 did not. A specific inhibitor of NS3/4A protease reduced C4γ cleavage. NS3/4A protease-mediated cleavage of C4 inhibited classical pathway activation, which was abrogated by a NS3/4A protease inhibitor. In addition, co-transfection of cells with C4 and wild-type NS3/4A, but not a catalytic-site mutant of NS3/4A, produced cleaved C4γ fragments. Such C4 processing, with a concomitant reduction in levels of full-length C4γ, was also observed in HCV-infected cells expressing C4. CONCLUSIONS: C4 is a novel cellular substrate of the HCV NS3/4A protease. Understanding disturbances in the complement system mediated by NS3/4A protease may provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying persistent HCV infection.

  14. Sex chromosome complement influences functional callosal myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, S; Patel, R; Hannsun, G; Yang, J; Tiwari-Woodruff, S K

    2013-08-15

    In addition to androgen differences between males and females, there are genetic differences that are caused by unequal dosage of sex chromosome genes. Using the cuprizone-induced demyelination model, we recently showed that surgical gonadectomy of adult mice resulted in decreased normal myelination and remyelination compared to gonadally intact animals, suggesting a supporting role for sex hormones in the maintenance of myelination. However, inherent sex differences in normal myelination and remyelination persisted even after gonadectomy, with males consistently remyelinating to a lesser extent relative to normal myelination as assayed by axon conduction and immunohistochemistry. This suggests a potential role for the sex chromosome complement in mediating the differential rates of remyelination observed in males and females. The present study focuses on the impact that sex chromosomes might have on these myelination differences. Making use of the four core-genotype mice and cuprizone-diet induced demyelination/remyelination paradigm, our results demonstrate sex chromosome-mediated asymmetry between XX and XY mice. The rate of functional remyelination following cuprizone diet-induced callosal demyelination in four core-genotype mice is attenuated in XY compared to XX animals of both gonadal sexes. Importantly, this difference arises only in the absence of circulating sex hormones following gonadectomy and confirms the role of sex hormones in the remyelination process reported earlier by our group. Because a genotype-mediated difference only arises following gonadectomy, the chromosomal contribution to myelination and remyelination is subtle yet significant. To explain this difference, we propose a possible asymmetry in the expression of myelination-related genes in XX vs. XY mice that needs to be investigated in future studies. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Complement component 3: characterization and association with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Complement component C3 plays a major role as a central molecule of the complement cascade involving in killing ofmicroorganisms, either directly or in cooperation with phagocytic cells. C3 cDNA were isolated, from Egyptian buffalo and cattle, sequenced and characterized. The C3 cDNA sequences of buffalo and cattle ...

  16. Complement elevation in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebhun, J; Botvin, J

    1980-05-01

    Laboratory studies revealed an elevated complement in 66% of patients with spinal cord injury. It is postulated that the activated complement may be a component of self-feeding immunological mechanism responsible for the failure of regeneration of a mature mammalian spinal cord. There was no evidence that such an injury had any effect on pre-existing atopy.

  17. Viral mimicry of the complement system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    et al 2002), hepatitis C virus (Ishii et al 2001) and HIV. (Ezekowitz et al 1989; Saifuddin et al 2000). Activation of the complement system in the absence of proper regulation can lead to virus neutralization. The various mechanisms which are known to inactivate viruses are: (i) neutralization by complement dependant ...

  18. Viral mimicry of the complement system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The complement system is a potent innate immune mechanism consisting of cascades of proteins which are designed to fight against and annul intrusion of all the foreign pathogens. Although viruses are smaller in size and have relatively simple structure, they are not immune to complement attack. Thus, activation of the ...

  19. Protection of host cells by complement regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christoph Q.; Lambris, John D.; Ricklin, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Summary The complement cascade is an ancient immune-surveillance system that not only provides protection from pathogen invasion but has also evolved to participate in physiological processes to maintain tissue homeostasis. The alternative pathway (AP) of complement activation is the evolutionarily oldest part of this innate immune cascade. It is unique in that it is continuously activated at a low level and arbitrarily probes foreign, modified-self, and also unaltered self-structures. This indiscriminate activation necessitates the presence of preformed regulators on autologous surfaces to spare self-cells from the undirected nature of AP activation. Although the other two canonical complement activation routes, the classical and lectin pathways, initiate the cascade more specifically through pattern recognition, their activity still needs to be tightly controlled to avoid excessive reactivity. It is the perpetual duty of complement regulators to protect the self from damage inflicted by inadequate complement activation. Here, we review the role of complement regulators as preformed mediators of defense, explain their common and specialized functions, and discuss selected cases in which alterations in complement regulators lead to disease. Finally, rational engineering approaches using natural complement inhibitors as potential therapeutics are highlighted. PMID:27782321

  20. Complementing the patient: a complement component deficiency in a patient with recurrent infections and glomerulonephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, David; Wilde, Graeme; Bex, Samantha; Peters, Sheila

    2005-01-01

    We present a case showing the investigation of a 7-year-old girl with empyema and glomerulonephritis whose "immunological" defect was a single complement component (C2) deficiency which prevented her from activating her classical complement pathway. A defect in complement function should be suspected in any patient with severe or recurring pyogenic infections. Investigations of "? immune deficiency" should always include tests to assess the patency of the patient's complement system.

  1. Radioreceptor assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapka, R.

    1985-01-01

    Radioreceptor assay (RRA) is an analytical method using the specific interaction of some pharmaceuticals and endogenic substances (ligands) with specific receptors present in certin tissues of living organisms. RRA uses the principle of isotope dilution. The method is described in detail of the preparation of receptors, samples and radioligands, conditions of incubation, the separation of free and bound radioligand, and the mathematical evaluation of RRA. The sensitivity of RRA is measured in units to tens of pg. The specificity of RRA relates to a group of substances with similar pharmacological effect. RRA may be used for identifying neuroleptics, antidepressants, anxiolytics, ergot alkaloids, beta blockers, anticholinergic drugs, certain hormones and neuropeptides. (M.D.)

  2. The relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi resists complement-mediated killing by human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teegler, Axel; Herzberger, Pia; Margos, Gabriele; Fingerle, Volker; Kraiczy, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Borrelia miyamotoi, a relapsing fever spirochete transmitted by ixodid ticks, is able to cause infections associated with systemic complaints, including malaise and fever, as well as meningoencephalitis in immunocompromised patients. In order to elucidate immune evasion of previously difficult to cultivate B. miyamotoi, we have examined the ability of this newly emerging human pathogen to escape the complement system. Growth inhibition assays revealed that B. miyamotoi is strongly resistant to complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Investigating complement activation, we found that B. miyamotoi showed reduced deposition of components C3, C5, C7, C8, C9 as well as the membrane attack complex (MAC) on the borrelial surface. In addition, no aberrations in cell morphology were observed after incubation of B. miyamotoi in active human serum, confirming the findings of the growth inhibition assay. The data presented here provide strong evidence that B. miyamotoi overcome human complement by affecting the central complement component C3, thereby inhibiting formation of the C3 convertase and downstream activation of the complement cascade. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. GLUCOCORTICOSTEROIDS' EFFECT UPON THE COMPLEMENT LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voja Pavlovic

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of high doses of cortisol upon the level of the overall complements'hemolytic activity and particular complements' components is studies. The experimentsinvolved guinea pigs of male sex of the body mass from 300 to 400 g, namelythose that have not been treated by anything so far. The doses of hydrocortisone(Hemofarm DD were also used for the experiment. The overall complements'activity was determined by testing the capabilities of a series of various solutions ofthe guinea pigs' serum to separate sheep erythrocytes that were made sensitive byrabbit anti-erythrocyte antibodies. The determination of the C1, C2, C3 and C4complements' components was done by the method of the quantitative diffusion ofthe radial type by using the Partigen blocks Behringwerke AG. The series comprised25 guinea pigs of male sex. The low cortisol level rapidly increase the overallhemolytic activity of the complements of the C1 est erase concentration. Along withthe cortisol dose increase the overall hemolytic complements' activity is dropping aswell as that of the C1, C2, C3 and C4 complements' components.

  4. Pathogens' toolbox to manipulate human complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Francisco J; Gómez, Sara; Vega, M Cristina

    2017-12-14

    The surveillance and pathogen fighting functions of the complement system have evolved to protect mammals from life-threatening infections. In turn, pathogens have developed complex molecular mechanisms to subvert, divert and evade the effector functions of the complement. The study of complement immunoevasion by pathogens sheds light on their infection drivers, knowledge that is essential to implement therapies. At the same time, complement evasion also acts as a discovery ground that reveals important aspects of how complement works under physiological conditions. In recent years, complex interrelationships between infection insults and the onset of autoimmune and complement dysregulation diseases have led to propose that encounters with pathogens can act as triggering factors for disease. The correct management of these diseases involves the recognition of their triggering factors and the development and administration of complement-associated molecular therapies. Even more recently, unsuspected proteins from pathogens have been shown to possess moonlighting functions as virulence factors, raising the possibility that behind the first line of virulence factors there be many more pathogen proteins playing secondary, helping and supporting roles for the pathogen to successfully establish infections. In an era where antibiotics have a progressively reduced effect on the management and control of infectious diseases worldwide, knowledge on the mechanisms of pathogenic invasion and evasion look more necessary and pressing than ever. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard-Verger, A.; Descloux, E.; Ponard, D.; Deroux, A.; Fantin, B.; Fieschi, C.; John, M.; Bouldouyre, A.; Karkowsi, L.; Moulis, G.; Auvinet, H.; Valla, F.; Lechiche, C.; Davido, B.; Martinot, M.; Biron, C.; Lucht, F.; Asseray, N.; Froissart, A.; Buzelé, R.; Perlat, A.; Boutboul, D.; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V.; Isnard, S.; Bienvenu, B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies. A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis. Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15–67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1–10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35

  6. Activation capacity of the alternative and classic complement pathways in patients operated on for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann-Nielsen, Erik; Iversen, Lene H; Svehag, Sven-Erik

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tumor cells may suppress activation of the host's complement system, and the functional state of the complement system may be a prognostic marker of outcome in patients with malignancies. Serial plasma samples from patients undergoing intended curative surgery for colorectal cancer were...... analyzed for complement factor C3 activation capacity. METHODS: Samples were collected from 91 patients with colorectal cancer and 13 with benign colorectal diseases before surgery and 1, 2, and 7 days after surgery, between 8 and 13 days after surgery, and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months after...... surgery. The samples were analyzed with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that measured C3 activation capacity by the alternative and classic complement pathways. Cancer patients were compared according to Dukes stage, type of surgery performed, transfusion of blood, development of infection, venous...

  7. Streptococcus pyogenes Endopeptidase O Contributes to Evasion from Complement-mediated Bacteriolysis via Binding to Human Complement Factor C1q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Mori, Yasushi; Hamd, Dalia Talat; Ogawa, Taiji; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Nakata, Masanobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2017-03-10

    Streptococcus pyogenes secretes various virulence factors for evasion from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. However, full understanding of the molecules possessed by this organism that interact with complement C1q, an initiator of the classical complement pathway, remains elusive. In this study, we identified an endopeptidase of S. pyogenes , PepO, as an interacting molecule, and investigated its effects on complement immunity and pathogenesis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance analysis findings revealed that S. pyogenes recombinant PepO bound to human C1q in a concentration-dependent manner under physiological conditions. Sites of inflammation are known to have decreased pH levels, thus the effects of PepO on bacterial evasion from complement immunity was analyzed in a low pH condition. Notably, under low pH conditions, PepO exhibited a higher affinity for C1q as compared with IgG, and PepO inhibited the binding of IgG to C1q. In addition, pepO deletion rendered S. pyogenes more susceptible to the bacteriocidal activity of human serum. Also, observations of the morphological features of the pepO mutant strain (Δ pepO ) showed damaged irregular surfaces as compared with the wild-type strain (WT). WT-infected tissues exhibited greater severity and lower complement activity as compared with those infected by Δ pepO in a mouse skin infection model. Furthermore, WT infection resulted in a larger accumulation of C1q than that with Δ pepO. Our results suggest that interaction of S. pyogenes PepO with C1q interferes with the complement pathway, which enables S. pyogenes to evade complement-mediated bacteriolysis under acidic conditions, such as seen in inflammatory sites. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Streptococcus pyogenes Endopeptidase O Contributes to Evasion from Complement-mediated Bacteriolysis via Binding to Human Complement Factor C1q*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda-Ogawa, Mariko; Sumitomo, Tomoko; Mori, Yasushi; Hamd, Dalia Talat; Ogawa, Taiji; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Nakata, Masanobu; Kawabata, Shigetada

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes secretes various virulence factors for evasion from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. However, full understanding of the molecules possessed by this organism that interact with complement C1q, an initiator of the classical complement pathway, remains elusive. In this study, we identified an endopeptidase of S. pyogenes, PepO, as an interacting molecule, and investigated its effects on complement immunity and pathogenesis. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance analysis findings revealed that S. pyogenes recombinant PepO bound to human C1q in a concentration-dependent manner under physiological conditions. Sites of inflammation are known to have decreased pH levels, thus the effects of PepO on bacterial evasion from complement immunity was analyzed in a low pH condition. Notably, under low pH conditions, PepO exhibited a higher affinity for C1q as compared with IgG, and PepO inhibited the binding of IgG to C1q. In addition, pepO deletion rendered S. pyogenes more susceptible to the bacteriocidal activity of human serum. Also, observations of the morphological features of the pepO mutant strain (ΔpepO) showed damaged irregular surfaces as compared with the wild-type strain (WT). WT-infected tissues exhibited greater severity and lower complement activity as compared with those infected by ΔpepO in a mouse skin infection model. Furthermore, WT infection resulted in a larger accumulation of C1q than that with ΔpepO. Our results suggest that interaction of S. pyogenes PepO with C1q interferes with the complement pathway, which enables S. pyogenes to evade complement-mediated bacteriolysis under acidic conditions, such as seen in inflammatory sites. PMID:28154192

  9. Autocrine Effects of Tumor-Derived Complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Soon Cho

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a role for the complement system in enhancing cancer growth. Cancer cells secrete complement proteins that stimulate tumor growth upon activation. Complement promotes tumor growth via a direct autocrine effect that is partially independent of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T cells. Activated C5aR and C3aR signal through the PI3K/AKT pathway in cancer cells, and silencing the PI3K or AKT gene in cancer cells eliminates the progrowth effects of C5aR and C3aR stimulation. In patients with ovarian or lung cancer, higher tumoral C3 or C5aR mRNA levels were associated with decreased overall survival. These data identify a role for tumor-derived complement proteins in promoting tumor growth, and they therefore have substantial clinical and therapeutic implications.

  10. Transnationalism and integration : complements or Substitutes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, B.; Siegel, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between transnational practices and integration by testing whether they are substitutes or complements. For this purpose, we use a multidimensional transnationalism index. The index includes three dimensions of transnational practices, including migrants'

  11. Genetics Home Reference: complement component 2 deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic: Immune System and Disorders Health Topic: Lupus Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) Complement component 2 deficiency Additional NIH Resources (1 link) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases Educational Resources (6 ...

  12. Complement and thrombosis in the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oku, Kenji; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Kono, Michihiro; Ohmura, Kazumasa; Kato, Masaru; Bohgaki, Toshiyuki; Horita, Tetsuya; Yasuda, Shinsuke; Amengual, Olga; Atsumi, Tatsuya

    2016-10-01

    The involvement of complement activation in the pathophysiology of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) was first reported in murine models of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-related pregnancy morbidities. We previously reported that complement activation is prevalent and may function as a source of procoagulant cell activation in the sera of APS patients. Recently, autoantibodies against C1q, a component of complement 1, were reported to be correlated with complement activation in systemic lupus erythematosus. These antibodies target neoepitopes of deformed C1q bound to various molecules (i.e., anionic phospholipids) and induce accelerated complement activation. We found that anti-C1q antibodies are more frequently detected in primary APS patients than in control patients and in refractory APS patients with repeated thrombotic events. The titer of anti-C1q antibodies was significantly higher in refractory APS patients than in APS patients without flare. The binding of C1q to anionic phospholipids may be associated with the surge in complement activation in patients with anti-C1q antibodies when triggered by 'second-hit' biological stressors such as infection. Such stressors will induce overexpression of anionic phospholipids, with subsequent increases in deformed C1q that is targeted by anti-C1q antibodies. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. The ancestral complement system in sea urchins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L C; Clow, L A; Terwilliger, D P

    2001-04-01

    The origin of adaptive immunity in the vertebrates can be traced to the appearance of the ancestral RAG genes in the ancestral jawed vertebrate; however, the innate immune system is more ancient. A central subsystem within innate immunity is the complement system, which has been identified throughout and seems to be restricted to the deuterostomes. The evolutionary history of complement can be traced from the sea urchins (members of the echinoderm phylum), which have a simplified system homologous to the alternative pathway, through the agnathans (hagfish and lamprey) and the elasmobranchs (sharks and rays) to the teleosts (bony fish) and tetrapods, with increases in the numbers of complement components and duplications in complement pathways. Increasing complexity in the complement system parallels increasing complexity in the deuterostome animals. This review focuses on the simplest of the complement systems that is present in the sea urchin. Two components have been identified that show significant homology to vertebrate C3 and factor B (Bf), called SpC3 and SpBf, respectively. Sequence analysis from both molecules reveals their ancestral characteristics. Immune challenge of sea urchins indicates that SpC3 is inducible and is present in coelomic fluid (the body fluids) in relatively high concentrations, while SpBf expression is constitutive and is present in much lower concentrations. Opsonization of foreign cells and particles followed by augmented uptake by phagocytic coelomocytes appears to be a central function for this simpler complement system and important for host defense in the sea urchin. These activities are similar to some of the functions of the homologous proteins in the vertebrate complement system. The selective advantage for the ancestral deuterostome may have been the amplification feedback loop that is still of central importance in the alternative pathway of complement in higher vertebrates. Feedback loop functions would quickly coat

  14. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Is a Regulator of Epidermal Complement Component Expression and Complement Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abu-Humaidan, Anas H A; Ananthoju, Nageshwar; Mohanty, Tirthankar

    2014-01-01

    The complement system is activated in response to tissue injury. During wound healing, complement activation seems beneficial in acute wounds but may be detrimental in chronic wounds. We found that the epidermal expression of many complement components was only increased to a minor extent in skin...... wounds in vivo and in cultured keratinocytes after exposure to supernatant from stimulated mononuclear cells. In contrast, the epidermal expression of complement components was downregulated in ex vivo injured skin lacking the stimulation from infiltrating inflammatory cells but with intact injury......-induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated growth factor response. In cultured primary keratinocytes, stimulation with the potent EGFR ligand, TGF-α, yielded a significant downregulation of complement component expression. Indeed, EGFR inhibition significantly enhanced the induction of complement...

  15. Antibody complement-mediated hemolytic studies with kodecytes reveal that human complement utilized in the classical pathway is more stable than generally accepted.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Holly; Bovin, Nicolai; Henry, Stephen

    2016-10-01

    Complement has significant status in the field of transfusion medicine. The accepted stability profile of complement is based on historical studies of diluted human serum hemolyzing rabbit heterophile antibody-sensitized sheep red blood cells (RBCs). Contemporary tools are available to reevaluate these historical observations using human heterophile antibodies, undiluted serum, and antigen-modified human RBCs. Human RBCs were made into "animal-like" kodecytes with heterophile Galα3Galβ4GlcNAcβ function-spacer-lipid constructs. These α-Gal-kodecytes were prepared with an antigen dilution capable of consistently producing 50% antibody-mediated hemolysis against human α1-3galactose heterophile antibodies and undiluted standardized serum. Standardized human serum aliquots from a two-donor pool stored at -85, -20, 4, 22, and 37°C for durations of up to 150 days were evaluated for loss of hemolytic activity. Where practical methodologic procedures were aligned with historical studies. Comparison of the historical assay with the α-Gal-kodecyte assay against complement activity standards showed concordance. However, in most scenarios complement was found to be more than twice as stable as generally accepted. At least 60% of complement hemolytic activity was observed in serum stored at 22°C for 1 week or 2 months at 4°C. No loss of hemolytic activity was observed after 5 months' storage at temperatures below -20°C. An alternative method using undiluted serum and modified human RBCs observed that classical-pathway complement hemolytic activity in stored human serum is at least twice as stable as previously accepted. © 2016 AABB.

  16. Kallikrein Cleaves C3 and Activates Complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmscher, Sarah; Döring, Nadia; Halder, Luke D; Jo, Emeraldo A H; Kopka, Isabell; Dunker, Christine; Jacobsen, Ilse D; Luo, Shanshan; Slevogt, Hortense; Lorkowski, Stefan; Beyersdorf, Niklas; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine

    2017-12-14

    The human plasma contact system is an immune surveillance system activated by the negatively charged surfaces of bacteria and fungi and includes the kallikrein-kinin, the coagulation, and the fibrinolytic systems. Previous work shows that the contact system also activates complement, and that plasma enzymes like kallikrein, plasmin, thrombin, and FXII are involved in the activation process. Here, we show for the first time that kallikrein cleaves the central complement component C3 directly to yield active components C3b and C3a. The cleavage site within C3 is identical to that recognized by the C3 convertase. Also, kallikrein-generated C3b forms C3 convertases, which trigger the C3 amplification loop. Since kallikrein also cleaves factor B to yield Bb and Ba, kallikrein alone can trigger complement activation. Kallikrein-generated C3 convertases are inhibited by factor H; thus, the kallikrein activation pathway merges with the amplification loop of the alternative pathway. Taken together, these data suggest that activation of the contact system locally enhances complement activation on cell surfaces. The human pathogenic microbe Candida albicans activates the contact system in normal human serum. However, C. albicans immediately recruits factor H to the surface, thereby evading the alternative and likely kallikrein-mediated complement pathways. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Microinjection of Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease restores UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis in cells of 9 xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.R. de Jonge; W. Vermeulen (Wim); W. Keijzer; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractThe UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in cultured cells of excision-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) complementation groups A through I was assayed after injection of Micrococcus luteus UV-endonuclease using glass microneedles. In all complementation groups a restoration of

  18. Complement Inhibitors from Scabies Mites Promote Streptococcal Growth – A Novel Mechanism in Infected Epidermis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Angela; Reynolds, Simone L.; Pickering, Darren; McMillan, David; Sriprakash, Kadaba S.; Kemp, David J.; Fischer, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Background Scabies is highly prevalent in socially disadvantaged communities such as indigenous populations and in developing countries. Generalized itching causes discomfort to the patient; however, serious complications can occur as a result of secondary bacterial pyoderma, commonly caused by Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS) or Staphylococcus aureus. In the tropics, skin damage due to scabies mite infestations has been postulated to be an important link in the pathogenesis of disease associated with acute rheumatic fever and heart disease, poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis and systemic sepsis. Treatment of scabies decreases the prevalence of infections by bacteria. This study aims to identify the molecular mechanisms underlying the link between scabies and GAS infections. Methodology/Principal Findings GAS bacteria were pre-incubated with blood containing active complement, phagocytes and antibodies against the bacteria, and subsequently tested for viability by plate counts. Initial experiments were done with serum from an individual previously exposed to GAS with naturally acquired anti-GAS antibodies. The protocol was optimized for large-scale testing of low-opsonic whole blood from non-exposed human donors by supplementing with a standard dose of heat inactivated human sera previously exposed to GAS. This allowed an extension of the dataset to two additional donors and four proteins tested at a range of concentrations. Shown first is the effect of scabies mite complement inhibitors on human complement using ELISA-based complement activation assays. Six purified recombinant mite proteins tested at a concentration of 50 µg/ml blocked all three complement activation pathways. Further we demonstrate in human whole blood assays that each of four scabies mite complement inhibitors tested increased GAS survival rates by 2–15 fold. Conclusions/Significance We propose that local complement inhibition plays an important role in the development of pyoderma in scabies

  19. Applying Complement Therapeutics to Rare Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Edimara S.; Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Yancopoulou, Despina; Risitano, Antonio M.; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Around 350 million people worldwide suffer from rare diseases. These may have a genetic, infectious, or autoimmune basis, and several include an inflammatory component. Launching of effective treatments can be very challenging when there is a low disease prevalence and limited scientific insights into the disease mechanisms. As a key trigger of inflammatory processes, complement has been associated with a variety of diseases and has become an attractive therapeutic target for conditions involving inflammation. In view of the clinical experience acquired with drugs licensed for the treatment of rare diseases such as hereditary angioedema and paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, growing evidence supports the safety and efficacy of complement therapeutics in restoring immune balance and preventing aggravation of clinical outcomes. This review provides an overview of the candidates currently in the pharmaceutical pipeline with potential to treat orphan diseases and discusses the molecular mechanisms triggered by complement involved with the disease pathogenesis. PMID:26341313

  20. Local inflammation induces complement crosstalk which amplifies the antimicrobial response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available By eliciting inflammatory responses, the human immunosurveillance system notably combats invading pathogens, during which acute phase proteins (CRP and cytokines are elevated markedly. However, the Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a persistent opportunistic pathogen prevalent at the site of local inflammation, and its acquisition of multiple antibiotic-resistance factors poses grave challenges to patient healthcare management. Using blood samples from infected patients, we demonstrate that P. aeruginosa is effectively killed in the plasma under defined local infection-inflammation condition, where slight acidosis and reduced calcium levels (pH 6.5, 2 mM calcium typically prevail. We showed that this powerful antimicrobial activity is provoked by crosstalk between two plasma proteins; CRPratioL-ficolin interaction led to communication between the complement classical and lectin pathways from which two amplification events emerged. Assays for C4 deposition, phagocytosis, and protein competition consistently proved the functional significance of the amplification pathways in boosting complement-mediated antimicrobial activity. The infection-inflammation condition induced a 100-fold increase in CRPratioL-ficolin interaction in a pH- and calcium-sensitive manner. We conclude that the infection-induced local inflammatory conditions trigger a strong interaction between CRPratioL-ficolin, eliciting complement-amplification pathways which are autonomous and which co-exist with and reinforce the classical and lectin pathways. Our findings provide new insights into the host immune response to P. aeruginosa infection under pathological conditions and the potential development of new therapeutic strategies against bacterial infection.

  1. Complement propriety and conspiracy in nanomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, Seyed Moein

    2016-01-01

    The complement system is the first line of body's defense against intruders and it acts as a functional bridge between innate and adaptive arms of the immune system. This commentary examines the key roles of complement activation in response to nanomedicine administration, including nucleic acid...... complexes. These comprise beneficial (eg, adjuvanticity) as well as adverse effects (eg, infusion-related reactions). Pigs (and sheep) are often used as predictive models of nanomedicine-mediated infusion-related reactions in humans. The validity of these models in relation to human responses is questioned...

  2. Therapeutic complement inhibition in complement-mediated hemolytic anemias: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risitano, Antonio M; Marotta, Serena

    2016-06-01

    The introduction in the clinic of anti-complement agents represented a major achievement which gave to physicians a novel etiologic treatment for different human diseases. Indeed, the first anti-complement agent eculizumab has changed the treatment paradigm of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), dramatically impacting its severe clinical course. In addition, eculizumab is the first agent approved for atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome (aHUS), a life-threatening inherited thrombotic microangiopathy. Nevertheless, such remarkable milestone in medicine has brought to the fore additional challenges for the scientific community. Indeed, the list of complement-mediated anemias is not limited to PNH and aHUS, and other human diseases can be considered for anti-complement treatment. They include other thrombotic microangiopathies, as well as some antibody-mediated hemolytic anemias. Furthermore, more than ten years of experience with eculizumab led to a better understanding of the individual steps of the complement cascade involved in the pathophysiology of different human diseases. Based on this, new unmet clinical needs are emerging; a number of different strategies are currently under development to improve current anti-complement treatment, trying to address these specific clinical needs. They include: (i) alternative anti-C5 agents, which may improve the heaviness of eculizumab treatment; (ii) broad-spectrum anti-C3 agents, which may improve the efficacy of anti-C5 treatment by intercepting the complement cascade upstream (i.e., preventing C3-mediated extravascular hemolysis in PNH); (iii) targeted inhibitors of selective complement activating pathways, which may prevent early pathogenic events of specific human diseases (e.g., anti-classical pathway for antibody-mediated anemias, or anti-alternative pathway for PNH and aHUS). Here we briefly summarize the status of art of current and future complement inhibition for different complement-mediated anemias

  3. Complement C3 is a novel modulator of the anti-factor VIII immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayes, Julie; Ing, Mathieu; Delignat, Sandrine; Peyron, Ivan; Gilardin, Laurent; Vogel, Carl-Wilhelm; Fritzinger, David C; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Roumenina, Lubka T; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2018-02-01

    Development of neutralizing antibodies against therapeutic Factor VIII (FVIII) is the most serious complication of the treatment of hemophilia A. There is growing evidence to show the multifactorial origin of the anti-FVIII immune response, combining both genetic and environmental factors. While a role for the complement system on innate as well as adaptive immunity has been documented, the implication of complement activation on the onset of the anti-FVIII immune response is unknown. Here, using in vitro assays for FVIII endocytosis by human monocyte-derived dendritic cells and presentation to T cells, as well as in vivo complement depletion in FVIII-deficient mice, we show a novel role for complement C3 in enhancing the immune response against therapeutic FVIII. In vitro , complement C3 and its cleavage product C3b enhanced FVIII endocytosis by dendritic cells and presentation to a FVIII-specific CD4 + T-cell hybridoma. The C1 domain of FVIII had previously been shown to play an important role in FVIII endocytosis, and alanine substitutions of the K2092, F2093 and R2090 C1 residues drastically reduce FVIII uptake in vitro Interestingly, complement activation rescued the endocytosis of the FVIII C1 domain triple mutant. In a mouse model of severe hemophilia A, transient complement C3 depletion by humanized cobra venom factor, which does not generate anaphylatoxin C5a, significantly reduced the primary anti-FVIII immune response, but did not affect anti-FVIII recall immune responses. Taken together, our results suggest an important adjuvant role for the complement cascade in the initiation of the immune response to therapeutic FVIII. Copyright© 2018 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  4. Anopheles midgut epithelium evades human complement activity by capturing factor H from the blood meal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattab, Ayman; Barroso, Marta; Miettinen, Tiera; Meri, Seppo

    2015-02-01

    Hematophagous vectors strictly require ingesting blood from their hosts to complete their life cycles. Exposure of the alimentary canal of these vectors to the host immune effectors necessitates efficient counteractive measures by hematophagous vectors. The Anopheles mosquito transmitting the malaria parasite is an example of hematophagous vectors that within seconds can ingest human blood double its weight. The innate immune defense mechanisms, like the complement system, in the human blood should thereby immediately react against foreign cells in the mosquito midgut. A prerequisite for complement activation is that the target cells lack complement regulators on their surfaces. In this work, we analyzed whether human complement is active in the mosquito midgut, and how the mosquito midgut cells protect themselves against complement attack. We found that complement remained active for a considerable time and was able to kill microbes within the mosquito midgut. However, the Anopheles mosquito midgut cells were not injured. These cells were found to protect themselves by capturing factor H, the main soluble inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Factor H inhibited complement on the midgut cells by promoting inactivation of C3b to iC3b and preventing the activity of the alternative pathway amplification C3 convertase enzyme. An interference of the FH regulatory activity by monoclonal antibodies, carried to the midgut via blood, resulted in increased mosquito mortality and reduced fecundity. By using a ligand blotting assay, a putative mosquito midgut FH receptor could be detected. Thereby, we have identified a novel mechanism whereby mosquitoes can tolerate human blood.

  5. Anopheles midgut epithelium evades human complement activity by capturing factor H from the blood meal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman Khattab

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Hematophagous vectors strictly require ingesting blood from their hosts to complete their life cycles. Exposure of the alimentary canal of these vectors to the host immune effectors necessitates efficient counteractive measures by hematophagous vectors. The Anopheles mosquito transmitting the malaria parasite is an example of hematophagous vectors that within seconds can ingest human blood double its weight. The innate immune defense mechanisms, like the complement system, in the human blood should thereby immediately react against foreign cells in the mosquito midgut. A prerequisite for complement activation is that the target cells lack complement regulators on their surfaces. In this work, we analyzed whether human complement is active in the mosquito midgut, and how the mosquito midgut cells protect themselves against complement attack. We found that complement remained active for a considerable time and was able to kill microbes within the mosquito midgut. However, the Anopheles mosquito midgut cells were not injured. These cells were found to protect themselves by capturing factor H, the main soluble inhibitor of the alternative complement pathway. Factor H inhibited complement on the midgut cells by promoting inactivation of C3b to iC3b and preventing the activity of the alternative pathway amplification C3 convertase enzyme. An interference of the FH regulatory activity by monoclonal antibodies, carried to the midgut via blood, resulted in increased mosquito mortality and reduced fecundity. By using a ligand blotting assay, a putative mosquito midgut FH receptor could be detected. Thereby, we have identified a novel mechanism whereby mosquitoes can tolerate human blood.

  6. Murine complement deficiency ameliorates acute cigarette smoke-induced nasal damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Kara S; Casey, Sarah E; Mulligan, Jennifer K; Mulligan, Ryan M; Schlosser, Rodney J; Atkinson, Carl

    2010-07-01

    Exposure to cigarette smoke is a risk factor for chronic rhinosinusitis. Current literature confirms complement fragments are activated in human nasal mucosa. The mechanism(s) responsible for this activation is unclear. We investigated the effects of cigarette smoke on nasal mucosa in vitro and via a model of cigarette smoke exposure by using animals deficient in complement components. Prospective, controlled animal and in vitro human cell line study. University laboratory. Human respiratory epithelial cells were exposed to five, 10, and 20 percent cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in vitro in the presence or absence of human serum. Complement activation was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescent techniques. Complement-deficient (C3(-/-), n = 6; factor B(-/-), n = 50) and sufficient mice (wild type, n = 10) were exposed to the smoke of four cigarettes per exposure for two exposures per day for three days. Mice were sacrificed 12 hours after the last exposure, and the nasal cavity was surgically removed. Histological characteristics were analyzed by the use of a subjective scale and quantitative image analysis scoring systems. In vitro analysis of respiratory cell cultures demonstrated that exposure of serum to CSE resulted in complement activation. Furthermore, immunofluorescent staining for C3d could only be demonstrated in CSE-exposed cultures. In vivo analysis demonstrated that complement deficiency, either C3 or factor B deficiency, resulted in a significant reduction in histological evidence of damage as compared with wild-type control mice (wild type vs C3(-/-), P = 0.02; wild type vs factor B(-/-), P = 0.07; no significant difference between C3(-/-) vs factor B(-/-)). These data demonstrate that cigarette smoke activates the complement system. Furthermore, complement deficiency protected against smoke-induced mucosal damage in this small series. 2010 American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation. Published by

  7. Viral mimicry of the complement system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The complement system is a potent innate immune mechanism consisting of cascades of proteins which are designed to fight against and annul intrusion of all the ... of cell-free viruses, phagocytosis of C3b-coated viral particles, lysis of virus-infected cells, and generation of inflammatory and specific immune responses.

  8. Complement Activation by Ceramide Transporter Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bode, G.H.; Losen, M.; Buurman, W.A.; Veerhuis, R.; Molenaar, P.C.; Steinbusch, H.W.M.; De Baets, M.H.; Daha, MR; Martinez-Martinez, P.

    2014-01-01

    C1q is the initiator of the classical complement pathway and, as such, is essential for efficient opsonization and clearance of pathogens, altered self-structures, and apoptotic cells. The ceramide transporter protein (CERT) and its longer splicing isoform CERTL are known to interact with

  9. Lectin Complement Pathway Proteins in Healthy Individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troldborg, Anne; Hansen, Annette; Hansen, Søren W K

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the lectin pathway of complement activation, numerous clinical cohorts have been examined for one or more of the proteins, with the intention of uncovering the functions of the proteins or with the aim of discovering new biomarkers or diagnostic tools. To unveil the abnormal...

  10. Non-specific adsorption of complement proteins affects complement activation pathways of gold nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, Quang Huy; Kah, James Chen Yong

    2017-04-01

    The complement system is a key humoral component of innate immunity, serving as the first line of defense against intruders, including foreign synthetic nanomaterials. Although gold nanomaterials (AuNMs) are widely used in nanomedicine, their immunological response is not well understood. Using AuNMs of three shapes commonly used in biomedical applications: spherical gold nanoparticles, gold nanostars and gold nanorods, we demonstrated that AuNMs activated whole complement system, leading to the formation of SC5b-9 complex. All three complement pathways were simultaneously activated by all the AuNMs. Recognition molecules of the complement system interacted with all AuNMs in vitro, except for l-ficolin, but the correlation between these interactions and corresponding complement pathway activation was only observed in the classical and alternative pathways. We also observed the mediating role of complement activation in cellular uptake of all AuNMs by human U937 promonocytic cells, which expresses complement receptors. Taken together, our results highlighted the potential immunological challenges for clinical applications of AuNMs that were often overlooked.

  11. [Correlation of occupational stress with serum levels of immunoglobulins and complement in police].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Jiang, K Y; Zhou, W H; Gu, G Z; Wu, Y Y; Yu, S F

    2016-02-20

    To investigate the correlation of occupational stress with the serum levels of immunoglobulins(IgG, IgM, and IgA) and complement(C3 and C4). In May 2011, convenience sampling and cluster sampling were used to select 225 policemen from a local police station as study subjects. A questionnaire was used to investigate demographic features and occupational stress, and the immunoturbidimetric assay was applied to measure the serum levels of IgG, IgM, IgA, and complement C3 and C4. Positive affectivity was positively correlated with the concentration of IgG(r=0.084, Pstress is correlated with the serum levels of immunoglobulins and complement.

  12. Complement activation by the amyloid proteins A beta peptide and beta 2-microglobulin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Nielsen, E H; Svehag, S E

    1999-01-01

    Complement activation (CA) has been reported to play a role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To investigate whether CA may contribute to amyloidogenesis in general, the CA potential of different amyloid fibril proteins was tested. CA induced by A beta preparations containing soluble...... protein, protofilaments and some fibrils or only fibrils in a solid phase system (ELISA) was modest with a slow kinetics compared to the positive delta IgG control. Soluble A beta induced no detectable CA in a liquid phase system (complement consumption assay) while fibrillar A beta caused CA at 200 mg....../ml and higher concentrations. Soluble beta 2-microglobulin (beta 2M) purified from peritoneal dialysates was found to be as potent a complement activator as A beta in both solid and liquid phase systems while beta 2M purified from urine exhibited lower activity, a difference which may be explained...

  13. A lateral electrophoretic flow diagnostic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Robert; Skandarajah, Arunan; Gerver, Rachel E; Neira, Hector D; Fletcher, Daniel A; Herr, Amy E

    2015-03-21

    Immunochromatographic assays are a cornerstone tool in disease screening. To complement existing lateral flow assays (based on wicking flow) we introduce a lateral flow format that employs directed electrophoretic transport. The format is termed a "lateral e-flow assay" and is designed to support multiplexed detection using immobilized reaction volumes of capture antigen. To fabricate the lateral e-flow device, we employ mask-based UV photopatterning to selectively immobilize unmodified capture antigen along the microchannel in a barcode-like pattern. The channel-filling polyacrylamide hydrogel incorporates a photoactive moiety (benzophenone) to immobilize capture antigen to the hydrogel without a priori antigen modification. We report a heterogeneous sandwich assay using low-power electrophoresis to drive biospecimen through the capture antigen barcode. Fluorescence barcode readout is collected via a low-resource appropriate imaging system (CellScope). We characterize lateral e-flow assay performance and demonstrate a serum assay for antibodies to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). In a pilot study, the lateral e-flow assay positively identifies HCV+ human sera in 60 min. The lateral e-flow assay provides a flexible format for conducting multiplexed immunoassays relevant to confirmatory diagnosis in near-patient settings.

  14. complement C3, Complement C4 and C-reactive protein

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-19

    reactive protein, body mass index, complement. INTRODUCTION. Tobacco was first cultivated in North America. The word. 'nicotine' is derived from French language after French. Ambassador to Portugal Jean Nicot. Nicotine ...

  15. Peptide redesign for inhibition of the complement system: Targeting age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Rohith R.; Cabrera, Andrea P.; Harrison, Reed E. S.; Gorham, Ronald D.; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Ghosh, Kaustabh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To redesign a complement-inhibiting peptide with the potential to become a therapeutic for dry and wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Methods We present a new potent peptide (Peptide 2) of the compstatin family. The peptide is developed by rational design, based on a mechanistic binding hypothesis, and structural and physicochemical properties derived from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. The inhibitory activity, efficacy, and solubility of Peptide 2 are evaluated using a hemolytic assay, a human RPE cell–based assay, and ultraviolet (UV) absorption properties, respectively, and compared to the respective properties of its parent peptide (Peptide 1). Results The sequence of Peptide 2 contains an arginine-serine N-terminal extension (a characteristic of parent Peptide 1) and a novel 8-polyethylene glycol (PEG) block C-terminal extension. Peptide 2 has significantly improved aqueous solubility compared to Peptide 1 and comparable complement inhibitory activity. In addition, Peptide 2 is more efficacious in inhibiting complement activation in a cell-based model that mimics the pathobiology of dry AMD. Conclusions We have designed a new peptide analog of compstatin that combines N-terminal polar amino acid extensions and C-terminal PEGylation extensions. This peptide demonstrates significantly improved aqueous solubility and complement inhibitory efficacy, compared to the parent peptide. The new peptide overcomes the aggregation limitation for clinical translation of previous compstatin analogs and is a candidate to become a therapeutic for the treatment of AMD. PMID:27829783

  16. Complement activation by ceramide transporter proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Gerard H; Losen, Mario; Buurman, Wim A; Veerhuis, Robert; Molenaar, Peter C; Steinbusch, Harry W M; De Baets, Marc H; Daha, Mohamed R; Martinez-Martinez, Pilar

    2014-02-01

    C1q is the initiator of the classical complement pathway and, as such, is essential for efficient opsonization and clearance of pathogens, altered self-structures, and apoptotic cells. The ceramide transporter protein (CERT) and its longer splicing isoform CERTL are known to interact with extracellular matrix components, such as type IV collagen, and with the innate immune protein serum amyloid P. In this article, we report a novel function of CERT in the innate immune response. Both CERT isoforms, when immobilized, were found to bind the globular head region of C1q and to initiate the classical complement pathway, leading to activation of C4 and C3, as well as generation of the membrane attack complex C5b-9. In addition, C1q was shown to bind to endogenous CERTL on the surface of apoptotic cells. These results demonstrate the role of CERTs in innate immunity, especially in the clearance of apoptotic cells.

  17. Complementing the sugar code: role of GAGs and sialic acid in complement regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex eLangford-Smith

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sugar molecules play a vital role on both microbial and mammalian cells, where they are involved in cellular communication, govern microbial virulence and modulate host immunity and inflammatory responses. The complement cascade, as part of a host’s innate immune system, is a potent weapon against invading bacteria but has to be tightly regulated to prevent inappropriate attack and damage to host tissues. A number of complement regulators, such as factor H and properdin, interact with sugar molecules, such as glycosaminoglycans and sialic acid, on host and pathogen membranes and direct the appropriate complement response by either promoting the binding of complement activators or inhibitors. The binding of these complement regulators to sugar molecules can vary from location to location, due to their different specificities and because distinct structural and functional subpopulations of sugars are found in different human organs, such as the brain, kidney and eye. This review will cover recent studies that have provided important new insights into the role of glycosaminoglycans and sialic acid in complement regulation and how sugar recognition may be compromised in disease

  18. Using an in vitro xenoantibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity model to evaluate the complement inhibitory activity of the peptidic C3 inhibitor Cp40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junxiang; Wang, Lu; Xiang, Ying; Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D; Chen, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Simple and reliable methods for evaluating the inhibitory effects of drug candidates on complement activation are essential for preclinical development. Here, using an immortalized porcine aortic endothelial cell line (iPEC) as target, we evaluated the feasibility and effectiveness of an in vitro xenoantibody-mediated complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) model for evaluating the complement inhibitory activity of Cp40, a potent analog of the peptidic C3 inhibitor compstatin. The binding of human xenoantibodies to iPECs led to serum dilution-dependent cell death. Pretreatment of the human serum with Cp40 almost completely inhibited the deposition of C3 fragments and C5b-9 on the cells, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition of CDC against the iPECs. Using the same method to compare the effects of Cp40 on complement activation in humans, rhesus and cynomolgus monkeys, we found that the inhibitory patterns were similar overall. Thus, the in vitro xenoantibody-mediated CDC assay may have considerable potential for future clinical use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Environmental agreements : strategic complements and transnational cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Kähler, Leonhard

    2017-01-01

    Mitigation of greenhouse gasses will have to increase strongly in order to avoid disastrous consequences. This work uses game theory to explore promising negotiation structures. Adaptation can be a chance for negotiations on emissions. Adaptation-driven strategic complements can induce countries to act quasi-cooperatively if they have a Stackelberg follower position. They take such a follower position if the sequence of play is endogenised. Cooperation can and should go beyond traditional str...

  20. COMPLEMENT REGULATION IN RENAL DISEASE MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Abhijit; Sharma, Shweta; Quigg, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Activation of the complement system is tightly regulated by plasma and cell-associated complement regulatory proteins (CRPs), such as factor H (fH), decay-accelerating factor (DAF), and membrane cofactor protein (MCP). Animal models of disease have provided considerable insights into the important roles for CRPs in the kidney. Mice deficient in fH have excessive fluid phase C3 activation and inactivation leading to deposition of iC3b in glomerular capillary walls (GCW), comparable to dense deposit disease. In contrast, when fH lacks C-terminal surface targeting regions, local activation on the GCW leads to a disease reminiscent of thrombotic microangiopathy. The uniquely rodent protein, CR1-related y (Crry), has features analogous to human MCP. Defective Crry leads to unrestricted alternative pathway activation in the tubulointerstitium (TI) resulting in pathological features ranging from TMA, acute kidney injury and TI nephritis. In the presence of initiators of the classical or lectin pathways, commonly in the form of immune complexes in human glomerular diseases, complement regulation on self is stressed, with the potential for recruitment of the spontaneously active alternative pathway. The threshold for this activation is set by CRPs; pathology is more likely when complement regulation is defective. Within the endocapillary region of the GCW, fH is key, while DAF and Crry are protective on mesangial cells and podocytes. Arguably, acquired alterations in these CRPs is a more common event, extending from pathological states of cellular injury or production of inhibitory antibodies, to physiological fine tuning of the adaptive immune response. PMID:24161042

  1. Susceptibility of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria spp. to complement-mediated lysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteman, L Y; Marciano-Cabral, F

    1987-01-01

    The susceptibility of four species of Naegleria amoebae to complement-mediated lysis was determined. The amoebicidal activity of normal human serum (NHS) and normal guinea pig serum (NGPS) for Naegleria amoebae was measured by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Release of radioactivity from amoebae labeled with [3H]uridine and visual observation with a compound microscope were used as indices of lysis. Highly pathogenic mouse-passaged N. fowleri was less susceptible to the lytic effects of NHS a...

  2. Complement Fixing Polysaccharides from Terminalia macroptera Root Bark, Stem Bark and Leaves

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan-Feng Zou; Bing-Zhao Zhang; Hilde Barsett; Kari Tvete Inngjerdingen; Drissa Diallo; Terje Einar Michaelsen; Berit Smestad Paulsen

    2014-01-01

    The root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera were sequentially extracted with ethanol, 50% ethanol-water, and 50 °C and 100 °C water using an accelerated solvent extractor. Ten bioactive purified polysaccharide fractions were obtained from those crude extracts after anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The polysaccharides and their native extracts were characterized with respect to molecular weight, chemical compositions and effects in the complement assay. The ch...

  3. Complement research in the 18th-21st centuries: Progress comes with new technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, R B; Schwaeble, W; Fujita, T

    2016-10-01

    The complement system has been studied for about 120 years. Progress in defining this large and complex system has been dependent on the research technologies available, but since the introduction of protein chromatography, electrophoresis, and antibody-based assay methods in the 1950s and 60s, and sequencing of proteins and DNA in the 70s and 80s, there has been very rapid accumulation of data. With more recent improvements in 3D structure determination (nmr and X-ray crystallography), the structures of most of the complement proteins have now been solved. Complement research since 1990 has been greatly stimulated by the discoveries of the multiple proteins in the lectin pathway, the strong association of Factor H, C3, Factor B allelic variants with adult macular degeneration and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, and the introduction of the anti-C5 monoclonal antibody as a therapy for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. Potential new roles for complement in tissue development and the search for novel therapeutics suggest a very active future for complement research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Activation of the lectin pathway of complement in experimental human keratitis with Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osthoff, Michael; Brown, Karl D; Kong, David C M; Daniell, Mark; Eisen, Damon P

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) microbial keratitis (MK) is a sight-threatening disease. Previous animal studies have identified an important contribution of the complement system to the clearance of P. aeruginosa infection of the cornea. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition receptor of the lectin pathway of complement, has been implicated in the host defense against P. aeruginosa. However, studies addressing the role of the lectin pathway in P. aeruginosa MK are lacking. Hence, we sought to determine the activity of the lectin pathway in human MK caused by P. aeruginosa. Primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs) from cadaveric donors were exposed to two different P. aeruginosa strains. Gene expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, MBL, and other complement proteins was determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and MBL synthesis by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and intracellular flow cytometry. MBL gene expression was not detected in unchallenged HCECs. Exposure of HCECs to P. aeruginosa resulted in rapid induction of the transcriptional expression of MBL, IL-6, and IL-8. In addition, expression of several complement proteins of the classical and lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, were upregulated after 5 h of challenge, including MBL-associated serine protease 1. However, MBL protein secretion was not detectable 18 h after challenge with P. aeruginosa. MK due to P. aeruginosa triggers activation of MBL and the lectin pathway of complement. However, the physiologic relevance of this finding is unclear, as corresponding MBL oligomer production was not observed.

  5. A new treatment for neurogenic inflammation caused by EV71 with CR2-targeted complement inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu Shaofu

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterovirus 71 (EV71, one of the most important neurotropic EVs, has caused death and long-term neurological sequelae in hundreds of thousands of young children in the Asia-Pacific region in the past decade. The neurological diseases are attributed to infection by EV71 inducing an extensive peripheral and central nervous system (CNS inflammatory response with abnormal cytokine production and lymphocyte depletion induced by EV71 infection. In the absence of specific antiviral agents or vaccines, an effective immunosuppressive strategy would be valuable to alleviate the severity of the local inflammation induced by EV71 infection. Presentation of the hypothesis The complement system plays a pivotal role in the inflammatory response. Inappropriate or excessive activation of the complement system results in a severe inflammatory reaction or numerous pathological injuries. Previous studies have revealed that EV71 infection can induce complement activation and an inflammatory response of the CNS. CR2-targeted complement inhibition has been proved to be a potential therapeutic strategy for many diseases, such as influenza virus-induced lung tissue injury, postischemic cerebral injury and spinal cord injury. In this paper, a mouse model is proposed to test whether a recombinant fusion protein consisting of CR2 and a region of Crry (CR2-Crry is able to specifically inhibit the local complement activation induced by EV71 infection, and to observe whether this treatment strategy can alleviate or even cure the neurogenic inflammation. Testing the hypothesis CR2-Crry is expressed in CHO cells, and its biological activity is determined by complement inhibition assays. 7-day-old ICR mice are inoculated intracranially with EV71 to duplicate the neurological symptoms. The mice are then divided into two groups, in one of which the mice are treated with CR2-Crry targeted complement inhibitor, and in the other with phosphate-buffered saline. A

  6. A hemolysis-hemagglutination assay for characterizing constitutive innate humoral immunity in wild and domestic birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matson, K.D.; Ricklefs, R.E.; Klasing, K.C.

    2005-01-01

    Methods to assess immunocompetence requiring only a single sample are useful in comparative studies where practical considerations prevent holding or recapturing individuals. The assay for natural antibody-mediated complement activation and red blood cell agglutination described here, requiring ~100

  7. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoa, D V A; Wimmers, K

    2015-09-01

    The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative) leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS), Duroc (DU), Berlin miniature pig (BMP), German Landrace (LR), Pietrain (PIE), and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig). Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP) that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE) show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK). Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9) as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future.

  8. Genetic Association of the Porcine C9 Complement Component with Hemolytic Complement Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. A. Khoa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is a part of the natural immune regulation mechanism against invading pathogens. Complement activation from three different pathways (classical, lectin, and alternative leads to the formation of C5-convertase, an enzyme for cleavage of C5 into C5a and C5b, followed by C6, C7, C8, and C9 in membrane attack complex. The C9 is the last complement component of the terminal lytic pathway, which plays an important role in lysis of the target cells depending on its self-polymerization to form transmembrane channels. To address the association of C9 with traits related to disease resistance, the complete porcine C9 cDNA was comparatively sequenced to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in pigs of the breeds Hampshire (HS, Duroc (DU, Berlin miniature pig (BMP, German Landrace (LR, Pietrain (PIE, and Muong Khuong (Vietnamese potbelly pig. Genotyping was performed in 417 F2 animals of a resource population (DUMI: DU×BMP that were vaccinated with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Aujeszky diseases virus and porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus at 6, 14 and 16 weeks of age, respectively. Two SNPs were detected within the third exon. One of them has an amino acid substitution. The European porcine breeds (LR and PIE show higher allele frequency of these SNPs than Vietnamese porcine breed (MK. Association of the substitution SNP with hemolytic complement activity indicated statistically significant differences between genotypes in the classical pathway but not in the alternative pathway. The interactions between eight time points of measurement of complement activity before and after vaccinations and genotypes were significantly different. The difference in hemolytic complement activity in the both pathways depends on genotype, kind of vaccine, age and the interaction to the other complement components. These results promote the porcine C9 (pC9 as a candidate gene to improve general animal health in the future.

  9. Recombinant human complement component C2 produced in a human cell line restores the classical complement pathway activity in-vitro: an alternative treatment for C2 deficiency diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martini Paolo GV

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complement C2 deficiency is the most common genetically determined complete complement deficiency and is associated with a number of diseases. Most prominent are the associations with recurrent serious infections in young children and the development of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in adults. The links with these diseases reflect the important role complement C2 plays in both innate immunity and immune tolerance. Infusions with normal fresh frozen plasma for the treatment of associated disease have demonstrated therapeutic effects but so far protein replacement therapy has not been evaluated. Results Human complement C2 was cloned and expressed in a mammalian cell line. The purity of recombinant human C2 (rhC2 was greater than 95% and it was characterized for stability and activity. It was sensitive to C1s cleavage and restored classical complement pathway activity in C2-deficient serum both in a complement activation ELISA and a hemolytic assay. Furthermore, rhC2 could increase C3 fragment deposition on the human pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae in C2-deficient serum to levels equal to those with normal serum. Conclusions Taken together these data suggest that recombinant human C2 can restore classical complement pathway activity and may serve as a potential therapeutic for recurring bacterial infections or SLE in C2-deficient patients.

  10. Determination of the complement components C1q, C4 and C3 in serum and cerebrospinal fluid by radioimmunoassay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dujardin, B.C.G.; Roijers, A.F.M.; Driedijk, P.C.; Out, T.A.

    1985-06-25

    Non-competitive 2-site radioimmunoassays (RIA) for the determination of the complement proteins C1q, C4 and C3 in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are described. The quantitative results of the RIAs were the same as those obtained by other assay methods: radial immunodiffusion and turbidimetry and, in the case of C4, the haemolytic assay. The ratios (concentration in CSF)/(concentration in serum) of the complement proteins correlated poorly with that of albumin. In contrast, the ratio of IgG was significantly correlated with that of albumin. The ratios of the complement proteins were higher than might be expected on the basis of their molecular masses. This suggests that these proteins may be synthesized within the normal central nervous system. (Auth.). 20 refs.; 3 figs.; 3 tabs.

  11. Inflammatory markers in Huntington's disease plasma—A robust nanoLC–MRM-MS assay development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melinda Rezeli

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The development of an MRM assay for the measurements of six inflammatory markers is presented. We report a robust and sensitive quantitative assay with a relative standard deviation of <15% that accounts for the entire sample processing. The assay has a dynamic range with 4 orders of magnitude and the LOQs are in the attomolar range. We used plasma from Huntington's disease gene carriers and healthy controls to compare our MRM method with antibody based methods. Importantly, we found a good agreement between assays for the measurement of C-reactive protein, in contrast to complement component 3 and complement factor H.

  12. Genetic Deficiency of Complement Component 3 Does Not Alter Disease Progression in a Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Paul B.; Muchowski, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Several genes and proteins of the complement cascade are present at elevated levels in brains of patients with Huntington's disease (HD). The complement cascade is well characterized as an effector arm of the immune system, and in the brain it is important for developmental synapse elimination. We hypothesized that increased levels of complement in HD brains contributes to disease progression, perhaps by contributing to synapse elimination or inflammatory signaling. We tested this hypothesis in the R6/2 mouse model of HD by crossing mice deficient in complement component 3 (C3), a crucial complement protein found at increased levels in HD brains, to R6/2 mice and monitoring behavioral and neuropathological disease progression. We found no alterations in multiple behavioral assays, weight or survival in R6/2 mice lacking C3. We also quantified the expression of several complement cascade genes in R6/2 brains and found that the large scale upregulation of complement genes observed in HD brains is not mirrored in R6/2 brains. These data show that C3 deficiency does not alter disease progression in the R6/2 mouse model of HD. PMID:23097680

  13. Genetic, molecular and functional analyses of complement factor I deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, S.C.; Trouw, L.A.; Renault, N.

    2009-01-01

    Complete deficiency of complement inhibitor factor I (FI) results in secondary complement deficiency due to uncontrolled spontaneous alternative pathway activation leading to susceptibility to infections. Current genetic examination of two patients with near complete FI deficiency and three patie...

  14. Complement in immune and inflammatory disorders: pathophysiological mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2013-01-01

    While acute or chronic inflammation is a common component of many clinical disorders, the underlying processes can be highly distinct. In recent years, the complement system has been associated with a growing number of immunological and inflammatory conditions that include degenerative diseases, cancer and transplant rejection. It becomes evident that excessive activation or insufficient control of complement activation on host cells can cause an immune imbalance that may fuel a vicious cycle between complement, inflammatory cells and tissue damage that exacerbates clinical complications. Although the exact involvement of complement needs to be carefully investigated for each disease, therapeutic modulation of complement activity emerges as attractive target for upstream inhibition of inflammatory processes. This review provides an update about the functional and collaborative capabilities of complement, highlights major disease areas with known complement contribution, and indicates the potential for complement as focal point in immunomodulatory strategies for treating inflammatory diseases. PMID:23564577

  15. Role of complement in graft rejection after organ transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, Ineke G. A.; ten Berge, Ineke J. M.; Hack, C. Erik

    2002-01-01

    Activation of the complement system may significantly contribute to the inflammatory reaction after solid organ transplantation. In allotransplantation, the complement system may be activated by ischemia/reperfusion and, possibly, by antibodies directed against the graft. In xenotransplantation from

  16. Complement and Immunoregulation in Tissue Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    that detects complement precursor C3 and fragments of C3 including c3a, c3b and c3c. Intestinal tissue sections from sham-operated mice displayed...C3a we considered that C3 is activated intracellularly by proteases. We searched for cathepsin expression in Caco2 cells by qPCR and found that...homeostasis. Annu Rev Immunol 28: 623-667. 27. Kulik, L., S. D. Fleming, et al. (2009). Pathogenic natural antibodies recognizing annexin IV are

  17. Endogenous Natural Complement Inhibitor Regulates Cardiac Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Simon A; Skov, Louise L; Kjaer-Sorensen, Kasper

    2017-01-01

    mechanisms during fetal development and adult homeostasis. In this article, we describe the function of an endogenous complement inhibitor, mannan-binding lectin (MBL)-associated protein (MAp)44, in regulating the composition of a serine protease-pattern recognition receptor complex, MBL-associated serine...... of MAp44 caused impaired cardiogenesis, lowered heart rate, and decreased cardiac output. These defects were associated with aberrant neural crest cell behavior. We found that MAp44 competed with MASP-3 for pattern recognition molecule interaction, and knockdown of endogenous MAp44 expression could...

  18. Inhibition of the classical pathway of the complement system by saliva of Amblyomma cajennense (Acari: Ixodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Paula F; Silva, Naylene C S; Fazito do Vale, Vladimir; Abreu, Jéssica F; Santos, Vânia C; Gontijo, Nelder F; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Pereira, Marcos H; Sant'Anna, Mauricio R V; Gomes, Alessandra P S; Araujo, Ricardo N

    2016-05-01

    Inhibition of the complement system during and after haematophagy is of utmost importance for tick success in feeding and tick development. The role of such inhibition is to minimise damage to the intestinal epithelium as well as avoiding inflammation and opsonisation of salivary molecules at the bite site. Despite its importance, the salivary anti-complement activity has been characterised only in species belonging to the Ixodes ricinus complex which saliva is able to inhibit the alternative and lectin pathways. Little is known about this activity in other species of the Ixodidae family. Thus, the aim of this study was to describe the inhibition of the classical pathway of the complement system by the saliva of Amblyomma cajennense at different stages of the haematophagy. The A. cajennense saliva and salivary gland extract (SGE) were able to inhibit the complement classical pathway through haemolytic assays with higher activity observed when saliva was used. The anti-complement activity is present in the salivary glands of starving females and also in females throughout the whole feeding process, with significant higher activity soon after tick detachment. The SGE activity from both females fed on mice or horses had no significant correlation (p > 0.05) with tick body weight. The pH found in the intestinal lumen of A. cajennense was 8.04 ± 0.08 and haemolytic assays performed at pH 8.0 showed activation of the classical pathway similarly to what occurs at pH 7.4. Consequently, inhibition could be necessary to protect the tick enterocytes. Indeed, the inhibition observed by SGE was higher in pH 8.0 in comparison to pH 7.4 reinforcing the role of saliva in protecting the intestinal cells. Further studies should be carried out in order to identify the inhibitor molecule and characterise its inhibition mechanism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Does Host Complement Kill Borrelia burgdorferi within Ticks?

    OpenAIRE

    Rathinavelu, Sivaprakash; Broadwater, Anne; de Silva, Aravinda M.

    2003-01-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, inhabits the gut lumen of the tick vector. At this location the spirochete is exposed to host blood when a tick feeds. We report here on studies that were done with normal and complement-deficient (C3-knockout) mice to determine if the host complement system killed spirochetes within the vector. We found that spirochete numbers within feeding nymphs were not influenced by complement, most likely because host complement was inactivated within ...

  20. The Complement System in Dialysis : A Forgotten Story?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poppelaars, Felix; Faria, Bernardo; da Costa, Mariana Gaya; Franssen, Casper F. M.; van Son, Willem J.; Berger, Stefan P.; Daha, Mohamed R.; Seelen, Marc A.

    2018-01-01

    Significant advances have lead to a greater understanding of the role of the complement system within nephrology. The success of the first clinically approved complement inhibitor has created renewed appreciation of complement-targeting therapeutics. Several clinical trials are currently underway to

  1. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes. Solubilization inhibition and complement factor levels in SLE patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, Gunnar; Petersen, Ivan; Kappelgaard, E

    1984-01-01

    Thirty-two of 36 serum samples from 19 SLE patients showed reduced capacity to mediate complement-dependent solubilization of immune complexes (IC). SLE patients with nephritis exerted the lowest complement-mediated solubilization capacity (CMSC) whereas sera from patients with inactive disease...... no medical treatment and the lowest inhibition by sera from patients with inactive disease. There was a significant negative correlation between CMSC and CMSC inhibition (r = -0.67, P less than 0.001). Sera with low concentrations of C1q, C3, factor B or high C3d levels showed markedly reduced CMSC values...

  2. Complement lysis activity in autologous plasma is associated with lower viral loads during the acute phase of HIV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Huber

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To explore the possibility that antibody-mediated complement lysis contributes to viremia control in HIV-1 infection, we measured the activity of patient plasma in mediating complement lysis of autologous primary virus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Sera from two groups of patients-25 with acute HIV-1 infection and 31 with chronic infection-were used in this study. We developed a novel real-time PCR-based assay strategy that allows reliable and sensitive quantification of virus lysis by complement. Plasma derived at the time of virus isolation induced complement lysis of the autologous virus isolate in the majority of patients. Overall lysis activity against the autologous virus and the heterologous primary virus strain JR-FL was higher at chronic disease stages than during the acute phase. Most strikingly, we found that plasma virus load levels during the acute but not the chronic infection phase correlated inversely with the autologous complement lysis activity. Antibody reactivity to the envelope (Env proteins gp120 and gp41 were positively correlated with the lysis activity against JR-FL, indicating that anti-Env responses mediated complement lysis. Neutralization and complement lysis activity against autologous viruses were not associated, suggesting that complement lysis is predominantly caused by non-neutralizing antibodies. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively our data provide evidence that antibody-mediated complement virion lysis develops rapidly and is effective early in the course of infection; thus it should be considered a parameter that, in concert with other immune functions, steers viremia control in vivo.

  3. Increased activity of the complement system in cerebrospinal fluid of the patients with Non-HIV Cryptococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lei; Zheng, Jianming; Wang, Yan; Zhu, Mengqi; Zhu, Haoxiang; Cheng, Qi; Li, Qian

    2017-01-04

    Cryptococcal meningitis (CM) has been known to lead to significant morbidity and mortality. The relative contribution of the complement system in protection and pathogenesis during CM remains largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the baseline complement component profiles in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from non-HIV patients with CM, and therefore to provide insights of possible roles of the complement system in CM. CSF and blood samples from forty two CM patients not infected with HIV and thirteen non-CM control patients (Ctrl) were retrospectively selected and evaluated from the patients admitted to the hospital with a suspected diagnosis of CM. CSF and blood samples were collected at the admission. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for complement components, cytokine IL-12 and western blot for C3 activation were performed on CSF and plasma samples. The levels of complement C1q, factor B (FB), mannose binding lectin (MBL), C2, C3, C4, C5, C4 binding protein (C4BP), Factor I (FI), Factor H (FH), sC5b-9 in CSF and plasma samples were compared. Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated on variables between complement components and the levels of total protein in the CSF samples. Our data demonstrated that the CSF levels of complement components of C1q, FB, MBL as well as complement pathway factors sC5b-9 and complement regulator FH were all elevated in patients with CM as compared to the controls, CSF C3 breakdown products iC3b were found in both CSF and plasma samples of the CM patients. A positive correlation was found between the levels of CSF protein and MBL, C1q or FB. The activity of the complement system in CSF was increased in non-HIV patients with CM. C1q, MBL and FB are the important participants in the complement activation in CM. The relative contribution of each of the specific complement pathways and complement cascades in protection and inflammation resolution against CM warrant further investigation.

  4. A scabies mite serpin interferes with complement-mediated neutrophil functions and promotes staphylococcal growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl M Swe

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scabies is a contagious skin disease caused by the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei. The disease is highly prevalent worldwide and known to predispose to secondary bacterial infections, in particular by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Reports of scabies patients co-infected with methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA pose a major concern for serious down-stream complications. We previously reported that a range of complement inhibitors secreted by the mites promoted the growth of S. pyogenes. Here, we show that a recently characterized mite serine protease inhibitor (SMSB4 inhibits the complement-mediated blood killing of S. aureus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Blood killing of S. aureus was measured in whole blood bactericidal assays, counting viable bacteria recovered after treatment in fresh blood containing active complement and phagocytes, treated with recombinant SMSB4. SMSB4 inhibited the blood killing of various strains of S. aureus including methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive isolates. Staphylococcal growth was promoted in a dose-dependent manner. We investigated the effect of SMSB4 on the complement-mediated neutrophil functions, namely phagocytosis, opsonization and anaphylatoxin release, by flow cytometry and in enzyme linked immuno sorbent assays (ELISA. SMSB4 reduced phagocytosis of S. aureus by neutrophils. It inhibited the deposition of C3b, C4b and properdin on the bacteria surface, but did not affect the depositions of C1q and MBL. SMSB4 also inhibited C5 cleavage as indicated by a reduced C5b-9 deposition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We postulate that SMSB4 interferes with the activation of all three complement pathways by reducing the amount of C3 convertase formed. We conclude that SMSB4 interferes with the complement-dependent killing function of neutrophils, thereby reducing opsonization, phagocytosis and further recruitment of neutrophils to the site of infection. As a

  5. A scabies mite serpin interferes with complement-mediated neutrophil functions and promotes staphylococcal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swe, Pearl M; Fischer, Katja

    2014-06-01

    Scabies is a contagious skin disease caused by the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei. The disease is highly prevalent worldwide and known to predispose to secondary bacterial infections, in particular by Streptococcus pyogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. Reports of scabies patients co-infected with methicillin resistant S. aureus (MRSA) pose a major concern for serious down-stream complications. We previously reported that a range of complement inhibitors secreted by the mites promoted the growth of S. pyogenes. Here, we show that a recently characterized mite serine protease inhibitor (SMSB4) inhibits the complement-mediated blood killing of S. aureus. Blood killing of S. aureus was measured in whole blood bactericidal assays, counting viable bacteria recovered after treatment in fresh blood containing active complement and phagocytes, treated with recombinant SMSB4. SMSB4 inhibited the blood killing of various strains of S. aureus including methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive isolates. Staphylococcal growth was promoted in a dose-dependent manner. We investigated the effect of SMSB4 on the complement-mediated neutrophil functions, namely phagocytosis, opsonization and anaphylatoxin release, by flow cytometry and in enzyme linked immuno sorbent assays (ELISA). SMSB4 reduced phagocytosis of S. aureus by neutrophils. It inhibited the deposition of C3b, C4b and properdin on the bacteria surface, but did not affect the depositions of C1q and MBL. SMSB4 also inhibited C5 cleavage as indicated by a reduced C5b-9 deposition. We postulate that SMSB4 interferes with the activation of all three complement pathways by reducing the amount of C3 convertase formed. We conclude that SMSB4 interferes with the complement-dependent killing function of neutrophils, thereby reducing opsonization, phagocytosis and further recruitment of neutrophils to the site of infection. As a consequence secreted scabies mites complement inhibitors, such as SMSB4, provide favorable

  6. Hijacking Complement Regulatory Proteins for Bacterial Immune Evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovingh, Elise S; van den Broek, Bryan; Jongerius, Ilse

    2016-01-01

    The human complement system plays an important role in the defense against invading pathogens, inflammation and homeostasis. Invading microbes, such as bacteria, directly activate the complement system resulting in the formation of chemoattractants and in effective labeling of the bacteria for phagocytosis. In addition, formation of the membrane attack complex is responsible for direct killing of Gram-negative bacteria. In turn, bacteria have evolved several ways to evade complement activation on their surface in order to be able to colonize and invade the human host. One important mechanism of bacterial escape is attraction of complement regulatory proteins to the microbial surface. These molecules are present in the human body for tight regulation of the complement system to prevent damage to host self-surfaces. Therefore, recruitment of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface results in decreased complement activation on the microbial surface which favors bacterial survival. This review will discuss recent advances in understanding the binding of complement regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface at the molecular level. This includes, new insights that have become available concerning specific conserved motives on complement regulatory proteins that are favorable for microbial binding. Finally, complement evasion molecules are of high importance for vaccine development due to their dominant role in bacterial survival, high immunogenicity and homology as well as their presence on the bacterial surface. Here, the use of complement evasion molecules for vaccine development will be discussed.

  7. [In vitro effects of antiallergic eyedrops on complement activation induced by particulate matter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondin, C; Cholley, B; Haeffner-Cavaillon, N; Goldschmidt, P

    2003-04-01

    Recent decades have been marked by an increasing number of patients suffering from ocular allergic-like symptoms without being associated with an increase in IgE levels. These symptoms include heaviness of the lid, foreign body sensation, burning, stinging and photophobia. Both epidemiological studies and controlled human exposure clinical studies have shown cause-effect relationships between allergic-like symptoms and environmental factors such as outdoor air pollutants or poor indoor air quality. An ocular surface subclinical inflammation is thought to be responsible for pseudoallergic, pollution-related conjunctivitis. The complement system is considered as one of the major effector mechanisms involved in initiation of the subclinical inflammation that leads to IgE-independent eye irritation. To study the capability of nine antiallergic eyedrops commonly used in the treatment of allergic conjunctivitis to inhibit complement activation induced in vitro by pollutants. Normal human serum obtained from healthy individuals was used as a source of complement. Activation of complement was assessed using the complement hemolytic 50% (CH50) assay, in the absence or the presence of antiallergic eyedrops and in the absence or the presence of various stimuli, including sand, common house dust, eye mascara, and Dactylis glomerata pollen extract. Zymosan was used as a standardized complement activator. The following eyedrops were studied: Naabak (4.9% N-acetyl aspartic acid-glutamic acid, NAAGA, sodium salt), Almide (lodoxamide 0.1%), Levophta (0.05% levocabastine), Emadine (0.05% emedastine), Tilavist (2% nedocromil), Allergodil (0.05% azelastine), Patanol (olopatadine), and Zaditen (0.025% ketotifen). Effects of preservative-free lodoxamide and ketotifen were also assessed and compared to those of the preserved formulations. A solution of 0.01% benzalkonium chloride (BAC), the most widely used preservative in topical eyedrops, was also tested. Zymosan-induced activation of

  8. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potempa, Michal; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz; Nguyen, Ky-Anh; Wawrzonek, Katarzyna; Manandhar, Surya P; Popadiak, Katarzyna; Riesbeck, Kristian; Eick, Sigrun; Blom, Anna M

    2009-02-01

    Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A) resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  9. Interpain A, a cysteine proteinase from Prevotella intermedia, inhibits complement by degrading complement factor C3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Potempa

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease of the supporting structures of the teeth caused by, among other pathogens, Prevotella intermedia. Many strains of P. intermedia are resistant to killing by the human complement system, which is present at up to 70% of serum concentration in gingival crevicular fluid. Incubation of human serum with recombinant cysteine protease of P. intermedia (interpain A resulted in a drastic decrease in bactericidal activity of the serum. Furthermore, a clinical strain 59 expressing interpain A was more serum-resistant than another clinical strain 57, which did not express interpain A, as determined by Western blotting. Moreover, in the presence of the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, the killing of strain 59 by human serum was enhanced. Importantly, we found that the majority of P. intermedia strains isolated from chronic and aggressive periodontitis carry and express the interpain A gene. The protective effect of interpain A against serum bactericidal activity was found to be attributable to its ability to inhibit all three complement pathways through the efficient degradation of the alpha-chain of C3 -- the major complement factor common to all three pathways. P. intermedia has been known to co-aggregate with P. gingivalis, which produce gingipains to efficiently degrade complement factors. Here, interpain A was found to have a synergistic effect with gingipains on complement degradation. In addition, interpain A was able to activate the C1 complex in serum, causing deposition of C1q on inert and bacterial surfaces, which may be important at initial stages of infection when local inflammatory reaction may be beneficial for a pathogen. Taken together, the newly characterized interpain A proteinase appears to be an important virulence factor of P. intermedia.

  10. Bothrops asper snake venom and its metalloproteinase BaP-1 activate the complement system. Role in leucocyte recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsky, S H; Gonçalves, L R; Gutiérrez, J M; Correa, A P; Rucavado, A; Gasque, P; Tambourgi, D V

    2000-01-01

    The venom of the snake Bothrops asper, the most important poisonous snake in Central America, evokes an inflammatory response, the mechanisms of which are not well characterized. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether B. asper venom and its purified toxins--phospholipases and metalloproteinase--activate the complement system and the contribution of the effect on leucocyte recruitment. In vitro chemotaxis assays were performed using Boyden's chamber model to investigate the ability of serum incubated with venom and its purified toxins to induce neutrophil migration. The complement consumption by the venom was evaluated using an in vitro haemolytic assay. The importance of complement activation by the venom on neutrophil migration was investigated in vivo by injecting the venom into the peritoneal cavity of C5-deficient mice. Data obtained demonstrated that serum incubated with crude venom and its purified metalloproteinase BaP-1 are able to induce rat neutrophil chemotaxis, probably mediated by agent(s) derived from the complement system. This hypothesis was corroborated by the capacity of the venom to activate this system in vitro. The involvement of C5a in neutrophil chemotaxis induced by venom-activated serum was demonstrated by abolishing migration when neutrophils were pre-incubated with antirat C5a receptor antibody. The relevance of the complement system in in vivo leucocyte mobilization was further demonstrated by the drastic decrease of this response in C5-deficient mice. Pre-incubation of serum with the soluble human recombinant complement receptor type 1 (sCR 1) did not prevent the response induced by the venom, but abolished the migration evoked by metalloproteinase-activated serum. These data show the role of the complement system in bothropic envenomation and the participation of metalloproteinase in the effect. Also, they suggest that the venom may contain other component(s) which can cause direct activation of C5a. PMID:11200361

  11. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus clinical isolates, their comparison with strain GG and their recognition by complement system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eija Nissilä

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains are ubiquitous in fermented foods, and in the human body where they are commensals naturally present in the normal microbiota composition of gut, vagina and skin. However, in some cases, Lactobacillus spp. have been implicated in bacteremia. The aim of the study was to examine the genomic and immunological properties of 16 clinical blood isolates of L. rhamnosus and to compare them to the well-studied L. rhamnosus probiotic strain GG. Blood cultures from bacteremic patients were collected at the Helsinki University Hospital laboratory in 2005-2011 and L. rhamnosus strains were isolated and characterized by genomic sequencing. The capacity of the L. rhamnosus strains to activate serum complement was studied using immunological assays for complement factor C3a and the terminal pathway complement complex (TCC. Binding of complement regulators factor H and C4bp was also determined using radioligand assays. Furthermore, the isolated strains were evaluated for their ability to aggregate platelets and to form biofilms in vitro. Genomic comparison between the clinical L. rhamnosus strains showed them to be clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG and to cluster in two distinct lineages. All L. rhamnosus strains activated complement in serum and none of them bound complement regulators. Four out of 16 clinical blood isolates induced platelet aggregation and/or formed more biofilms than L. rhamnosus GG, which did not display platelet aggregation activity nor showed strong biofilm formation. These findings suggest that clinical L. rhamnosus isolates show considerable heterogeneity but are clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG at the genomic level. All L. rhamnosus strains are still normally recognized by the human complement system.

  12. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus clinical isolates, their comparison with strain GG and their recognition by complement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douillard, François P.; Ritari, Jarmo; Paulin, Lars; Järvinen, Hanna M.; Rasinkangas, Pia; Haapasalo, Karita; Meri, Seppo; Jarva, Hanna; de Vos, Willem M.

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains are ubiquitous in fermented foods, and in the human body where they are commensals naturally present in the normal microbiota composition of gut, vagina and skin. However, in some cases, Lactobacillus spp. have been implicated in bacteremia. The aim of the study was to examine the genomic and immunological properties of 16 clinical blood isolates of L. rhamnosus and to compare them to the well-studied L. rhamnosus probiotic strain GG. Blood cultures from bacteremic patients were collected at the Helsinki University Hospital laboratory in 2005–2011 and L. rhamnosus strains were isolated and characterized by genomic sequencing. The capacity of the L. rhamnosus strains to activate serum complement was studied using immunological assays for complement factor C3a and the terminal pathway complement complex (TCC). Binding of complement regulators factor H and C4bp was also determined using radioligand assays. Furthermore, the isolated strains were evaluated for their ability to aggregate platelets and to form biofilms in vitro. Genomic comparison between the clinical L. rhamnosus strains showed them to be clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG and to cluster in two distinct lineages. All L. rhamnosus strains activated complement in serum and none of them bound complement regulators. Four out of 16 clinical blood isolates induced platelet aggregation and/or formed more biofilms than L. rhamnosus GG, which did not display platelet aggregation activity nor showed strong biofilm formation. These findings suggest that clinical L. rhamnosus isolates show considerable heterogeneity but are clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG at the genomic level. All L. rhamnosus strains are still normally recognized by the human complement system. PMID:28493885

  13. Genotypic and phenotypic diversity of Lactobacillus rhamnosus clinical isolates, their comparison with strain GG and their recognition by complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissilä, Eija; Douillard, François P; Ritari, Jarmo; Paulin, Lars; Järvinen, Hanna M; Rasinkangas, Pia; Haapasalo, Karita; Meri, Seppo; Jarva, Hanna; de Vos, Willem M

    2017-01-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus strains are ubiquitous in fermented foods, and in the human body where they are commensals naturally present in the normal microbiota composition of gut, vagina and skin. However, in some cases, Lactobacillus spp. have been implicated in bacteremia. The aim of the study was to examine the genomic and immunological properties of 16 clinical blood isolates of L. rhamnosus and to compare them to the well-studied L. rhamnosus probiotic strain GG. Blood cultures from bacteremic patients were collected at the Helsinki University Hospital laboratory in 2005-2011 and L. rhamnosus strains were isolated and characterized by genomic sequencing. The capacity of the L. rhamnosus strains to activate serum complement was studied using immunological assays for complement factor C3a and the terminal pathway complement complex (TCC). Binding of complement regulators factor H and C4bp was also determined using radioligand assays. Furthermore, the isolated strains were evaluated for their ability to aggregate platelets and to form biofilms in vitro. Genomic comparison between the clinical L. rhamnosus strains showed them to be clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG and to cluster in two distinct lineages. All L. rhamnosus strains activated complement in serum and none of them bound complement regulators. Four out of 16 clinical blood isolates induced platelet aggregation and/or formed more biofilms than L. rhamnosus GG, which did not display platelet aggregation activity nor showed strong biofilm formation. These findings suggest that clinical L. rhamnosus isolates show considerable heterogeneity but are clearly different from L. rhamnosus GG at the genomic level. All L. rhamnosus strains are still normally recognized by the human complement system.

  14. Bothrops asper snake venom and its metalloproteinase BaP–1 activate the complement system. Role in leucocyte recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra H. P. Farsky

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The venom of the snake Bothrops asper, the most important poisonous snake in Central America, evokes an inflammatory response, the mechanisms of which are not well characterized. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether B. asper venom and its purified toxins – phospholipases and metalloproteinase – activate the complement system and the contribution of the effect on leucocyte recruitment. In vitro chemotaxis assays were performed using Boyden's chamber model to investigate the ability of serum incubated with venom and its purified toxins to induce neutrophil migration. The complement consumption by the venom was evaluated using an in vitro haemolytic assay. The importance of complement activation by the venom on neutrophil migration was investigated in vivo by injecting the venom into the peritoneal cavity of C5-deficient mice. Data obtained demonstrated that serum incubated with crude venom and its purified metalloproteinase BaP–1 are able to induce rat neutrophil chemotaxis, probably mediated by agent(s derived from the complement system. This hypothesis was corroborated by the capacity of the venom to activate this system in vitro. The involvement of C5a in neutrophil chemotaxis induced by venom-activated serum was demonstrated by abolishing migration when neutrophils were pre-incubated with antirat C5a receptor antibody. The relevance of the complement system in in vivo leucocyte mobilization was further demonstrated by the drastic decrease of this response in C5-deficient mice. Pre-incubation of serum with the soluble human recombinant complement receptor type 1 (sCR 1 did not prevent the response induced by the venom, but abolished the migration evoked by metalloproteinase-activated serum. These data show the role of the complement system in bothropic envenomation and the participation of metalloproteinase in the effect. Also, they suggest that the venom may contain other component(s which can cause direct activation

  15. Novel Scabies Mite Serpins Inhibit the Three Pathways of the Human Complement System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Angela; Reynolds, Simone L.; Mohlin, Frida C.; Willis, Charlene; Swe, Pearl M.; Pickering, Darren A.; Halilovic, Vanja; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Pike, Robert N.; Blom, Anna M.; Kemp, David J.; Fischer, Katja

    2012-01-01

    Scabies is a parasitic infestation of the skin by the mite Sarcoptes scabiei that causes significant morbidity worldwide, in particular within socially disadvantaged populations. In order to identify mechanisms that enable the scabies mite to evade human immune defenses, we have studied molecules associated with proteolytic systems in the mite, including two novel scabies mite serine protease inhibitors (SMSs) of the serpin superfamily. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that within mite-infected human skin SMSB4 (54 kDa) and SMSB3 (47 kDa) were both localized in the mite gut and feces. Recombinant purified SMSB3 and SMSB4 did not inhibit mite serine and cysteine proteases, but did inhibit mammalian serine proteases, such as chymotrypsin, albeit inefficiently. Detailed functional analysis revealed that both serpins interfered with all three pathways of the human complement system at different stages of their activation. SMSB4 inhibited mostly the initial and progressing steps of the cascades, while SMSB3 showed the strongest effects at the C9 level in the terminal pathway. Additive effects of both serpins were shown at the C9 level in the lectin pathway. Both SMSs were able to interfere with complement factors without protease function. A range of binding assays showed direct binding between SMSB4 and seven complement proteins (C1, properdin, MBL, C4, C3, C6 and C8), while significant binding of SMSB3 occurred exclusively to complement factors without protease function (C4, C3, C8). Direct binding was observed between SMSB4 and the complement proteases C1s and C1r. However no complex formation was observed between either mite serpin and the complement serine proteases C1r, C1s, MASP-1, MASP-2 and MASP-3. No catalytic inhibition by either serpin was observed for any of these enzymes. In summary, the SMSs were acting at several levels mediating overall inhibition of the complement system and thus we propose that they may protect scabies mites from complement

  16. Activation of complement by plicatic acid, the chemical compound responsible for asthma due to western red cedar (Thuja plicata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan-Yeung, M; Giclas, P C; Henson, P M

    1980-05-01

    Plicatic acid, a low-molecular-weight compound responsible for western red cedar (Thuja plicata) asthma was tested for its ability to activate complement and to generate chemotactic activity from pooled normal human serum (NHS). Dose-dependent complement consumption was found as determined by hemolytic assay (CH50). Activation of complement by plicatic acid was also confirmed by the demonstration of conversion of C3 to C3b on immunoelectrophoresis. This activation was completely prevented by pretreating the serum with either edetate (EDTA) or ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA), suggesting that complement was activated via the classical pathway. No conversion of factor B was seen in any of the samples. Leukocyte chemotactic activity was also generated when serum was incubated with plicatic acid. The consumption of C3 and CH50 was unimpaired in two samples of serum from patients with severe, untreated hypogammaglobulinemia and thus appears to be immunoglobulin independent. These observations suggest that plicatic acid could activate complement in vivo, thereby inducing an inflammatory response in the airways and contributing to the higher prevalence of industrial chronic bronchitis in exposed subjects. The pathogenetic role of complement activation in red cedar asthma has yet to elucidated.

  17. Complement inhibition: a promising concept for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pio, Ruben; Ajona, Daniel; Lambris, John D.

    2013-01-01

    For decades, complement has been recognized as an effector arm of the immune system that contributes to the destruction of tumor cells. In fact, many therapeutic strategies have been proposed that are based on the intensification of complement-mediated responses against tumors. However, recent studies have challenged this paradigm by demonstrating a tumor-promoting role for complement. Cancer cells seem to be able to establish a convenient balance between complement activation and inhibition, taking advantage of complement initiation without suffering its deleterious effects. Complement activation may support chronic inflammation, promote an immunosuppressive microenvironment, induce angiogenesis, and activate cancer-related signaling pathways. In this context, inhibition of complement activation would be a therapeutic option for treating cancer. This concept is relatively novel and deserves closer attention. In this paper, we will summarize the mechanisms of complement activation on cancer cells, the cancer-promoting effect of complement initiation, and the rationale behind the use of complement inhibition as a therapeutic strategy against cancer. PMID:23706991

  18. Increased activity of the mannan-binding lectin complement activation pathway in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ytting, H; Jensenius, Jens Christian; Christensen, I J

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postoperative bacterial infectious complications are frequent in patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), with subsequent increased recurrence rates and poor prognosis. Deficiency of the mannan-binding lectin (MBL) complement activation pathway may cause increased risk of infection......: Serum MBL concentrations and MBL/MASP activity were determined using immunofluorometric assays. The levels are presented as the median, inter-quartile range and range. RESULTS: Serum MBL levels were significantly (P cancer (1384 (400-2188) ng/mL) (median...... in the colon or rectum, and disease stages according to Dukes' classification. No statistical difference (P=0.20) in frequency of MBL deficiency was found between the patients (20%) and the donors (27%). CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the MBL complement activation pathway is significantly increased in patients...

  19. Optimization of Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays of gene expression in lettuce, tomato and Arabidopsis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wroblewski, T.; Finkers-Tomczak, A.M.; Michelmore, R.

    2005-01-01

    Agrobacterium-mediated transient assays for gene function are increasingly being used as alternatives to genetic complementation and stable transformation. However, such assays are variable and not equally successful in different plant species. We analysed a range of genetic and physiological

  20. European Union funded project on the development of a whole complement deficiency screening ELISA-A story of success and an exceptional manager: Mohamed R. Daha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würzner, Reinhard; Tedesco, Francesco; Garred, Peter; Mollnes, Tom Eirik; Truedsson, Lennart; Turner, Malcolm W; Sommarin, Yngve; Wieslander, Jörgen; Sim, Robert B

    2015-11-01

    A whole complement ELISA-based assay kit, primarily designed to screen for deficiencies in components of the complement system was developed during a European Union grant involving more than a dozen European scientists and a small-medium enterprise company (Wieslab, which later merged into Eurodiagnostica). The consortium was led by Prof. Mohamed R. Daha who had already guided a preceding European grant which prepared the ground for this endeavor to create a novel and sophisticated complement measurement tool. The final result of the grant was a scientific publication (Seelen et al., 2005, J. Immunol. Methods 296, 187-198) and a commercially available complement deficiency screening kit, WIESLAB(®) Complement system Screen. Thereafter, the group decided to carry on with a grant, located at Innsbruck Medical University, and supported by royalties and unrestricted educational grants from Eurodiagnostica, Malmö, entitled "Search for Applications for WIESLAB(®) Complement system Screen (SAW)" with the aim to look for further applications of this assay. During the latter project the group organized several scientific meetings aimed at evaluating the use of the assay as well as developing further branches of its platform. A look back over almost two decades reveals a great story of excellent research which was also commercially successful, fulfilling the aims of European Union grants. It is also a story of ageless friendship, only possible due to the vision and guidance of an exceptional manager: Moh Daha. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes and their interaction with complement C3 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Ivan; Baatrup, Gunnar; Jepsen, H H

    1985-01-01

    Some of the molecular events in the complement (C)-mediated solubilization of immune complexes (IC) have been clarified in recent years. The solubilization is primarily mediated by alternative C pathway proteins whereas factors in the classical pathway accelerate the process. Components of the me......Some of the molecular events in the complement (C)-mediated solubilization of immune complexes (IC) have been clarified in recent years. The solubilization is primarily mediated by alternative C pathway proteins whereas factors in the classical pathway accelerate the process. Components...... of the cellular localization, expression and structure of the C3 receptors, especially the C3b (CR1) receptor, has been considerably extended in the last few years, whereas our understanding of the physiological role of these receptors is still fragmentary. However, it is becoming increasingly evident...

  2. Polysaccharides from Arnebia euchroma Ameliorated Endotoxic Fever and Acute Lung Injury in Rats Through Inhibiting Complement System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Ying-Ye; Jiang, Yun; Li, Hong; Zhang, Yun-Yi; Lu, Yan; Chen, Dao-Feng

    2017-02-01

    Arnebiaeuchroma (Royle) Johnst (Ruanzicao) is a traditional Chinese herbal medicine (TCM). It is extensively used in China and other countries for treatment of inflammatory diseases. It is known that hyper-activated complement system involves in the fever and acute lung injury (ALI) in rats. In our preliminary studies, anti-complementary activity of crude Arnebiaeuchroma polysaccharides (CAEP) had been demonstrated in vitro. This study aimed to investigate the role and mechanism of crude Arnebiaeuchroma polysaccharides (CAEP) using two animal models, which relate with inappropriate activation of complement system. In lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced fever model, the body temperature and leukocytes of peripheral blood in rats were significantly increased, while the complement levels of serum were remarkably decreased. CAEP administration alleviated the LPS-induced fever, reduced the number of leukocytes, and improved the levels of complement. Histological assay showed that there were severe damages and complement depositions in lung of the ALI rats. Further detection displayed that the oxidant stress was enhanced, and total hemolytic activity and C3/C4 levels in serum were decreased significantly in the ALI model group. Remarkably, CAEP not only attenuated the morphological injury, edema, and permeability in the lung but also significantly weakened the oxidant stress in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the ALI rats. The levels of complement and complement depositions were improved by the CAEP treatment. In conclusion, the CAEP treatment ameliorated febrile response induced by LPS and acute lung injury induced by LPS plus ischemia-reperfusion. CAEP exerted beneficial effects on inflammatory disease potentially via inhibiting the inappropriate activation of complement system.

  3. Microbead agglutination based assays

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2013-01-21

    We report a simple and rapid room temperature assay for point-of-care (POC) testing that is based on specific agglutination. Agglutination tests are based on aggregation of microbeads in the presence of a specific analyte thus enabling the macroscopic observation. Such tests are most often used to explore antibody-antigen reactions. Agglutination has been used for protein assays using a biotin/streptavidin system as well as a hybridization based assay. The agglutination systems are prone to selftermination of the linking analyte, prone to active site saturation and loss of agglomeration at high analyte concentrations. We investigated the molecular target/ligand interaction, explaining the common agglutination problems related to analyte self-termination, linkage of the analyte to the same bead instead of different microbeads. We classified the agglutination process into three kinds of assays: a two- component assay, a three-component assay and a stepped three- component assay. Although we compared these three kinds of assays for recognizing DNA and protein molecules, the assay can be used for virtually any molecule, including ions and metabolites. In total, the optimized assay permits detecting analytes with high sensitivity in a short time, 5 min, at room temperature. Such a system is appropriate for POC testing.

  4. Obesity-induced metabolic disturbance drives oxidative stress and complement activation in the retinal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natoli, Riccardo; Fernando, Nilisha; Dahlenburg, Tess; Jiao, Haihan; Aggio-Bruce, Riemke; Barnett, Nigel L; Chao de la Barca, Juan Manuel; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Reynier, Pascal; Fang, Johnny; Chu-Tan, Joshua A; Valter, Krisztina; Provis, Jan; Rutar, Matt

    2018-01-01

    Systemic increases in reactive oxygen species, and their association with inflammation, have been proposed as an underlying mechanism linking obesity and age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Studies have found increased levels of oxidative stress biomarkers and inflammatory cytokines in obese individuals; however, the correlation between obesity and retinal inflammation has yet to be assessed. We used the leptin-deficient (ob/ob) mouse to further our understanding of the contribution of obesity to retinal oxidative stress and inflammation. Retinas from ob/ob mice were compared to age-matched wild-type controls for retinal function (electroretinography) and gene expression analysis of retinal stress ( Gfap ), oxidative stress ( Gpx3 and Hmox1 ), and complement activation ( C3 , C2 , Cfb , and Cfh ). Oxidative stress was further quantified using a reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) assay. Retinal microglia and macrophage migration to the outer retina and complement activation were determined using immunohistochemistry for IBA1 and C3, respectively. Retinas and sera were used for metabolomic analysis using QTRAP mass spectrometry. Retinal function was reduced in ob/ob mice, which correlated to changes in markers of retinal stress, oxidative stress, and inflammation. An increase in C3-expressing microglia and macrophages was detected in the outer retinas of the ob/ob mice, while gene expression studies showed increases in the complement activators ( C2 and Cfb ) and a decrease in a complement regulator ( Cfh ). The expression of several metabolites were altered in the ob/ob mice compared to the controls, with changes in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) detected. The results of this study indicate that oxidative stress, inflammation, complement activation, and lipid metabolites in the retinal environment are linked with obesity in ob/ob animals. Understanding the interplay between these

  5. Initiation and Regulation of Complement during Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowell, Sean R.; Winkler, Anne M.; Maier, Cheryl L.; Arthur, C. Maridith; Smith, Nicole H.; Girard-Pierce, Kathryn R.; Cummings, Richard D.; Zimring, James C.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.

    2012-01-01

    Hemolytic transfusion reactions represent one of the most common causes of transfusion-related mortality. Although many factors influence hemolytic transfusion reactions, complement activation represents one of the most common features associated with fatality. In this paper we will focus on the role of complement in initiating and regulating hemolytic transfusion reactions and will discuss potential strategies aimed at mitigating or favorably modulating complement during incompatible red blood cell transfusions. PMID:23118779

  6. Mobile MSN Messenger: Still a Complement?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Nyberg

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to understand how mobile instant messaging services can fit into the users’ current communication behavior, Ericsson Research performed a qualitative user study in Sweden in May 2007. The results showed that the respondents were positive towards (free of charge mobile MSN Messenger and perceived it as an ex¬tension of the computer-based version that could be used anywhere. However, although MSN Messenger on the com¬puter definitely was considered as a ‘must-have’ application, the mobile version was only perceived as a ‘nice-to-have’ application and a complement to text mes¬saging (SMS. Almost one year later, in April 2008, Ericsson Research performed a short qualita¬tive follow-up study with the same set of respondents to un¬derstand if and how the mobile MSN Messenger usage had changed. The results actually revealed that none of the re¬spondents used mobile MSN Messenger anymore as the application no longer was free of charge. On a general level, the study highlights important considera¬tions when intro¬ducing computer-based concepts and Internet services in a mo¬bile environment.

  7. Radioreceptor opioid assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.J.; Chang, K.-J.

    1981-01-01

    A radioreceptor assay is described for assaying opioid drugs in biological fluids. The method enables the assay of total opioid activity, being specific for opioids as a class but lacking specificity within the class. A radio-iodinated opioid and the liquid test sample are incubated with an opiate receptor material. The percentage inhibition of the binding of the radio-iodinated compound to the opiate receptor is calculated and the opioid activity of the test liquid determined from a standard curve. Examples of preparing radio-iodinated opioids and assaying opioid activity are given. A test kit for the assay is described. Compared to other methods, this assay is cheap, easy and rapid. (U.K.)

  8. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2010-07-13

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  9. Absolute nuclear material assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Manoj K [Pleasanton, CA; Snyderman, Neal J [Berkeley, CA; Rowland, Mark S [Alamo, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  10. Tricyclic antidepressant radioreceptor assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Innis, R.B.; Tune, L.; Rock, R.; Depaulo, R.; U'Prichard, D.C.; Snyder, S.M.

    1979-01-01

    A receptor assay for tricyclic antidepressants described here is based on the ability of these drugs to compete with [ 3 H]-3-guinuclidnyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB) for binding to muscarinic cholinergic receptors in rat brain membranes. The assay is sensitive, in that it can detect, for example, 2ng/ml nortriptyline in plasma. Seven plasma samples from depressed patients treated with nortriptyline were assayed with the radioreceptor and gas liquid chromatographic methods, and the results from these two methods were almost identical. This assay should be used cautiously, if at all, in patients treated with other drugs that have potent anticholinergic effects. (Auth.)

  11. Comparison of complement fixation and ELISA for diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, P.H.; Gonzalez, S.; Orue, P.M.; Vergara, N.N.

    1998-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus is characterised by its rapid transmission and its great antigenic variability which require a requires a rapid and accurate diagnosis in the laboratory, in order to initiate an immediate response for control. From these studies it is clear that Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has the advantage over the Complement fixation test (CFT) of being a test of high sensitivity and specificity. Therefore, this technique is now used in our laboratory for diagnosis to detect FMD virus (O-A-C) in epithelia from animals affected by the disease. (author)

  12. The role of complement inhibitors beyond controlling inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, A M

    2017-08-01

    The complement system is an arm of innate immunity that aids in the removal of pathogens and dying cells. Due to its harmful, pro-inflammatory potential, complement is controlled by several soluble and membrane-bound inhibitors. This family of complement regulators has been recently extended by the discovery of several new members, and it is becoming apparent that these proteins harbour additional functions. In this review, the current state of knowledge of the physiological functions of four complement regulators will be described: cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), CUB and sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1), sushi domain-containing protein 4 (SUSD4) and CD59. Complement activation is involved in both the development of and defence against cancer. COMP expression is pro-oncogenic, whereas CSMD1 and SUSD4 act as tumour suppressors. These effects may be related in part to the complex influence of complement on cancer but also depend on unrelated functions such as the protection of cells from endoplasmic reticulum stress conveyed by intracellular COMP. CD59 is the main inhibitor of the membrane attack complex, and its deficiency leads to complement attack on erythrocytes and severe haemolytic anaemia, which is now amenable to treatment with an inhibitor of C5 cleavage. Unexpectedly, the intracellular pool of CD59 is crucial for insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells. This finding is one of several relating to the intracellular functions of complement proteins, which until recently were only considered to be present in the extracellular space. Understanding the alternative functions of complement inhibitors may unravel unexpected links between complement and other physiological systems, but is also important for better design of therapeutic complement inhibition. © 2017 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  13. Von Neumann algebras as complemented subspaces of B(H)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Erik; Wang, Liguang

    2014-01-01

    Let M be a von Neumann algebra of type II1 which is also a complemented subspace of B( H). We establish an algebraic criterion, which ensures that M is an injective von Neumann algebra. As a corollary we show that if M is a complemented factor of type II1 on a Hilbert space H, then M is injective...

  14. Complement Attack against Aspergillus and Corresponding Evasion Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Speth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Invasive aspergillosis shows a high mortality rate particularly in immunocompromised patients. Perpetually increasing numbers of affected patients highlight the importance of a clearer understanding of interactions between innate immunity and fungi. Innate immunity is considered to be the most significant host defence against invasive fungal infections. Complement represents a crucial part of this first line defence and comprises direct effects against invading pathogens as well as bridging functions to other parts of the immune network. However, despite the potency of complement to attack foreign pathogens, the prevalence of invasive fungal infections is increasing. Two possible reasons may explain that phenomenon: First, complement activation might be insufficient for an effective antifungal defence in risk patients (due to, e.g., low complement levels, poor recognition of fungal surface, or missing interplay with other immune elements in immunocompromised patients. On the other hand, fungi may have developed evasion strategies to avoid recognition and/or eradication by complement. In this review, we summarize the most important interactions between Aspergillus and the complement system. We describe the various ways of complement activation by Aspergillus and the antifungal effects of the system, and also show proven and probable mechanisms of Aspergillus for complement evasion.

  15. Vaccinia virus Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Mysteries of the smallpox vaccine. 141. Viral mimicry. Viral mimicry of the complement system. 249. Viral molecules. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional pro- tein and a potential wonder drug. 265. Viral pneumonia. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS): an old virus jumping into a new host or a new ...

  16. Schur complements of matrices with acyclic bipartite graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Thomas Johann; Olesky, D.D.; van den Driessche, P.

    2005-01-01

    Bipartite graphs are used to describe the generalized Schur complements of real matrices having nos quare submatrix with two or more nonzero diagonals. For any matrix A with this property, including any nearly reducible matrix, the sign pattern of each generalized Schur complement is shown to be ...

  17. Demand Heterogeneity and the Adoption of Platform Complements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J. Rietveld (Joost); J.P. Eggers

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis paper offers a demand-based theory of how platform maturity affects the adoption of platform complements. We argue that differences between early and late adopters of the platform include willingness to pay for the platform-and-complement bundle, risk preferences, preference for

  18. Comparison of serum C3 complement levels between young women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maimun Syukri

    2014-05-29

    May 29, 2014 ... Abstract Background: C3 complement plays a pivotal role in the complement cascade, subserves several critical functions in human immune response and enhancing bacterial killing and its levels correlate with infectious diseases. However, the association of C3 with recurrent urinary tract infec- tion (UTI) ...

  19. Complement evasion by Bordetella pertussis: implications for improving current vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongerius, Ilse; Schuijt, Tim J; Mooi, Frits R; Pinelli, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Bordetella pertussis causes whooping cough or pertussis, a highly contagious disease of the respiratory tract. Despite high vaccination coverage, reported cases of pertussis are rising worldwide and it has become clear that the current vaccines must be improved. In addition to the well-known protective role of antibodies and T cells during B. pertussis infection, innate immune responses such as the complement system play an essential role in B. pertussis killing. In order to evade this complement activation and colonize the human host, B. pertussis expresses several molecules that inhibit complement activation. Interestingly, one of the known complement evasion proteins, autotransporter Vag8, is highly expressed in the recently emerged B. pertussis isolates. Here, we describe the current knowledge on how B. pertussis evades complement-mediated killing. In addition, we compare this to complement evasion strategies used by other bacterial species. Finally, we discuss the consequences of complement evasion by B. pertussis on adaptive immunity and how identification of the bacterial molecules and the mechanisms involved in complement evasion might help improve pertussis vaccines.

  20. Schur complements of matrices with acyclic bipartite graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Britz, Thomas Johann; Olesky, D.D.; van den Driessche, P.

    2005-01-01

    Bipartite graphs are used to describe the generalized Schur complements of real matrices having nos quare submatrix with two or more nonzero diagonals. For any matrix A with this property, including any nearly reducible matrix, the sign pattern of each generalized Schur complement is shown...

  1. Staphylococcal Proteases Aid in Evasion of the Human Complement System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jusko, Monika; Potempa, Jan; Kantyka, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    lines of defense against bacterial pathogens, and S. aureus expresses several specific complement inhibitors. The effect of extracellular proteases from this bacterium on complement, however, has been the subject of limited investigation, except for a recent report regarding cleavage of the C3 component...

  2. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have an exaggerated immune response, endothelial damage/dysfunction, and increased risk of diabetes mellitus (DM). The inter-relationship(s) between indices of complement activation (soluble membrane attack complex, sMAC), inflammation (hs......, IR was an independent predictor of sMAC in the CHF group beta = 0.37 (p complement system and thus...

  3. Complement receptor mediates enhanced flavivirus replication in macrophages

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    Evidence is presented that M phi complement receptors (CR3) mediate IgM- dependent enhancement of flavivirus replication in the presence of complement. Enhancement is blocked by pretreatment of macrophages with monoclonal antibody Ml/70, which inhibits CR3 binding, but not by pretreatment with monoclonal antibody 2.4G2, which inhibits FcR binding.

  4. Complement evasion by Borrelia burgdorferi: it takes three to tango

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Taeye, Steven W.; Kreuk, Lieselotte; van Dam, Alje P.; Hovius, Joppe W.; Schuijt, Tim J.

    2013-01-01

    The complement system is one of the major innate defense mechanisms Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato has to overcome to establish an infection of mammalian hosts and to cause Lyme borreliosis in humans. Borrelia prevents complement-mediated killing during host colonization through (i) recruitment of

  5. Complement in renal transplantation : The road to translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, Neeltina M; Poppelaars, Felix; Daha, Mohamed R; Seelen, Marc A

    Renal transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal disease. The vital role of the complement system in renal transplantation is widely recognized. This review discusses the role of complement in the different phases of renal transplantation: in the donor, during

  6. Comparison of serum C3 complement levels between young women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: C3 complement plays a pivotal role in the complement cascade, subserves several critical functions in human immune response and enhancing bacterial killing and its levels correlate with infectious diseases. However, the association of C3 with recurrent urinary tract infection (UTI) is still debatable. Aim: The ...

  7. Targeting the Complement Cascade: Novel Treatments Coming down the Pike

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Joshua M.; Le Quintrec, Moglie

    2016-01-01

    The complement cascade is a vital component of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. Complement activation also contributes to the pathogenesis of many diseases, however, and the kidney is particularly susceptible to complement-mediated injury. Drugs that block complement activation can rapidly reduce tissue inflammation and also attenuate the adaptive immune response to foreign and tissue antigens. Eculizumab is a monoclonal antibody that prevents the cleavage of C5. It has been approved for the treatment of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), and it has been used in selected patients with other kidney diseases. Many additional drugs are also in development for blocking the complement cascade, including new monoclonal antibodies, recombinant proteins, small molecules, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) agents. Validation of these new drugs as effective treatments for kidney diseases faces several challenges. Many complement-mediated kidney diseases are rare, so it is not feasible to test all of the new drugs in numerous different rare diseases. The onset and course of the diseases are heterogeneous and many of these diseases also carry a life-long risk of recurrence, and it is not clear how long complement inhibition must be maintained. In spite of these challenges, new therapeutic options for targeting the complement system will likely become available in the near future and may prove useful for treating patients with kidney disease. PMID:27325183

  8. The role of complement activation in thrombosis and hemolytic anemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, John; Terry, Hunter S; Kleinert, Dorothy; Laurence, Jeffrey

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to describe complement activation in hemostatic and pathologic states of coagulation and in the acquired and congenital hemolytic anemias. We review published and emerging data on the involvement of the classic, alternative and lectin-based complement pathways in coagulation and the hemolytic anemias. The alternative pathway in particular is always "on," at low levels, and is particularly sensitive to hyper-activation in a variety of physiologic and pathologic states including infection, autoimmune disorders, thrombosis and pregnancy, requiring tight control predicated on a variety of soluble and membrane bound regulatory proteins. In acquired hemolytic anemias such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) and cold agglutinin disease (CAD), the complement system directly induces red blood cell injury, resulting in intravascular and extravascular hemolysis. In congenital hemolytic anemias such as sickle cell disease and β-thalassemia, the complement system may also contribute to thrombosis and vascular disease. Complement activation may also lead to a storage lesion in red blood cells prior to transfusion. Complement pathways are activated in hemolytic anemias and are closely linked with thrombosis. In acquired disorders such as PNH and possibly CAD, inhibition of the alternative complement pathway improves clinical outcomes and reduces thrombosis risk. Whether complement inhibition has a similar role in congenital hemolytic anemias apart from the atypical hemolytic-uremic (aHUS)-type thrombotic microangiopathies remains to be determined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A vital role for complement in heart disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut T; Garred, Peter; Jonasson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    fibrillation often share risk factors both with coronary heart disease and heart failure, and there is some evidence implicating complement activation in atrial fibrillation. Moreover, Chagas heart disease, a protozoal infection, is an important cause of heart failure in Latin America, and the complement...

  10. Molecular mechanisms of complement activation, regulation and evasion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, J.

    2012-01-01

    The complement system of our immune defense can rapidly recognize and eliminate pathogens in blood. Activation of complement depends on enzymatic complexes, known as C3 convertases, which are short lived and dissociate irreversibly. Staphylococcus aureus secretes a small protein (named SCIN) that

  11. Complementation of diverse HIV-1 Env defects through cooperative subunit interactions: a general property of the functional trimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salzwedel Karl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV-1 Env glycoprotein mediates virus entry by catalyzing direct fusion between the virion membrane and the target cell plasma membrane. Env is composed of two subunits: gp120, which binds to CD4 and the coreceptor, and gp41, which is triggered upon coreceptor binding to promote the membrane fusion reaction. Env on the surface of infected cells is a trimer consisting of three gp120/gp41 homo-dimeric protomers. An emerging question concerns cooperative interactions between the protomers in the trimer, and possible implications for Env function. Results We extended studies on cooperative subunit interactions within the HIV-1 Env trimer, using analysis of functional complementation between coexpressed inactive variants harboring different functional deficiencies. In assays of Env-mediated cell fusion, complementation was observed between variants with a wide range of defects in both the gp120 and gp41 subunits. The former included gp120 subunits mutated in the CD4 binding site or incapable of coreceptor interaction due either to mismatched specificity or V3 loop mutation. Defective gp41 variants included point mutations at different residues within the fusion peptide or heptad repeat regions, as well as constructs with modifications or deletions of the membrane proximal tryptophan-rich region or the transmembrane domain. Complementation required the defective variants to be coexpressed in the same cell. The observed complementation activities were highly dependent on the assay system. The most robust activities were obtained with a vaccinia virus-based expression and reporter gene activation assay for cell fusion. In an alternative system involving Env expression from integrated provirus, complementation was detected in cell fusion assays, but not in virus particle entry assays. Conclusion Our results indicate that Env function does not require every subunit in the trimer to be competent for all essential activities. Through

  12. Endogenous Locus Reporter Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaping; Hermes, Jeffrey; Li, Jing; Tudor, Matthew

    2018-01-01

    Reporter gene assays are widely used in high-throughput screening (HTS) to identify compounds that modulate gene expression. Traditionally a reporter gene assay is built by cloning an endogenous promoter sequence or synthetic response elements in the regulatory region of a reporter gene to monitor transcriptional activity of a specific biological process (exogenous reporter assay). In contrast, an endogenous locus reporter has a reporter gene inserted in the endogenous gene locus that allows the reporter gene to be expressed under the control of the same regulatory elements as the endogenous gene, thus more accurately reflecting the changes seen in the regulation of the actual gene. In this chapter, we introduce some of the considerations behind building a reporter gene assay for high-throughput compound screening and describe the methods we have utilized to establish 1536-well format endogenous locus reporter and exogenous reporter assays for the screening of compounds that modulate Myc pathway activity.

  13. A typology of subjunctive complements in Balkan languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Hill

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a comparative approach to the subjunctive complements to verbs and nouns in two language groups: Romance Balkan (i.e. Standard Romanian, Aromanian, Megleno-Romanian and Slavic Balkan (mostly Serbian, Croatian, and Macedonian. There are many analyses of V-subjunctive complement selection in these languages but, to our knowledge, none that zooms in on the group differences in the composition of the left periphery of subjunctive clauses. In these configurations, our analysis finds a micro-variation that has implications for the understanding of other cross-linguistic variations among these languages, in particular, in the subjunctive complementation to nouns. In other words, we argue that the typology of verb complementation is the key to the understanding of the typology of noun complementation in these languages.

  14. Novel Evasion Mechanisms of the Classical Complement Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Brandon L; Zwarthoff, Seline A; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M; Geisbrecht, Brian V

    2016-09-15

    Complement is a network of soluble and cell surface-associated proteins that gives rise to a self-amplifying, yet tightly regulated system with fundamental roles in immune surveillance and clearance. Complement becomes activated on the surface of nonself cells by one of three initiating mechanisms known as the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. Evasion of complement function is a hallmark of invasive pathogens and hematophagous organisms. Although many complement-inhibition strategies hinge on hijacking activities of endogenous complement regulatory proteins, an increasing number of uniquely evolved evasion molecules have been discovered over the past decade. In this review, we focus on several recent investigations that revealed mechanistically distinct inhibitors of the classical pathway. Because the classical pathway is an important and specific mediator of various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders, in-depth knowledge of novel evasion mechanisms could direct future development of therapeutic anti-inflammatory molecules. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  15. Complement C3 and High Risk of Venous Thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Ina; Nielsen, Sune Fallgaard; Nordestgaard, Børge Grønne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complement activation may contribute to venous thromboembolism, including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. We tested the hypothesis that high complement C3 concentrations are associated with high risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population. METHODS: We...... included 80 517 individuals without venous thromboembolism from the Copenhagen General Population Study recruited in 2003-2012. Plasma complement C3 concentrations were measured at baseline, and venous thromboembolism (n = 1176) was ascertained through April 2013 in nationwide registries. No individuals...... were lost to follow-up. RESULTS: Complement C3 concentrations were approximately normally distributed, with a mean value of 1.13 g/L (interquartile range 0.98-1.26; SD 0.21). The cumulative incidence of venous thromboembolism was higher with progressively higher tertiles of complement C3 (log...

  16. Complement regulators in human disease: lessons from modern genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszewski, M K; Atkinson, J P

    2015-03-01

    First identified in human serum in the late 19th century as a 'complement' to antibodies in mediating bacterial lysis, the complement system emerged more than a billion years ago probably as the first humoral immune system. The contemporary complement system consists of nearly 60 proteins in three activation pathways (classical, alternative and lectin) and a terminal cytolytic pathway common to all. Modern molecular biology and genetics have not only led to further elucidation of the structure of complement system components, but have also revealed function-altering rare variants and common polymorphisms, particularly in regulators of the alternative pathway, that predispose to human disease by creating 'hyperinflammatory complement phenotypes'. To treat these 'complementopathies', a monoclonal antibody against the initiator of the membrane attack complex, C5, has received approval for use. Additional therapeutic reagents are on the horizon. © 2014 The Association for the Publication of the Journal of Internal Medicine.

  17. Susceptibility of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria spp. to complement-mediated lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteman, L Y; Marciano-Cabral, F

    1987-10-01

    The susceptibility of four species of Naegleria amoebae to complement-mediated lysis was determined. The amoebicidal activity of normal human serum (NHS) and normal guinea pig serum (NGPS) for Naegleria amoebae was measured by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Release of radioactivity from amoebae labeled with [3H]uridine and visual observation with a compound microscope were used as indices of lysis. Highly pathogenic mouse-passaged N. fowleri was less susceptible to the lytic effects of NHS and NGPS than the weakly pathogenic, axenically grown N. fowleri or N. australiensis and the nonpathogenic amoebae N. gruberi and N. lovaniensis. However, both pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria spp. depleted complement as assessed by total hemolytic activity. Treatment of serum with EDTA, heat (56 degrees C, 30 min), cobra venom factor, or antibody to C3 or C9 complement components decreased the amoebicidal activity of NHS. The presence of specific agglutinating antibody to N. fowleri enhanced the amoebicidal activity of NGPS for N. fowleri.

  18. Complement fixing polysaccharides from Terminalia macroptera root bark, stem bark and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan-Feng; Zhang, Bing-Zhao; Barsett, Hilde; Inngjerdingen, Kari Tvete; Diallo, Drissa; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2014-06-06

    The root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera were sequentially extracted with ethanol, 50% ethanol-water, and 50 °C and 100 °C water using an accelerated solvent extractor. Ten bioactive purified polysaccharide fractions were obtained from those crude extracts after anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The polysaccharides and their native extracts were characterized with respect to molecular weight, chemical compositions and effects in the complement assay. The chemical compositions showed that the polysaccharides are of pectic nature. The results indicated that there was no great difference of the complement fixation activities in the crude extracts from the different plant parts when extracting with the accelerated solvent extraction system. The purified polysaccharide fractions 100WTSBH-I-I and 100WTRBH-I-I isolated from the 100 °C water extracts of stem and root bark respectively, showed the highest complement fixation activities. These two fractions have rhamnogalacturonan type I backbone, but only 100WTSBH-I-I contains side chains of both arabinogalactan type I and II. Based on the yield and activities of the fractions studied those from the root bark gave highest results, followed by those from leaves and stem bark. But in total, all plant materials are good sources for fractions containing bioactive polysaccharides.

  19. Complement Fixing Polysaccharides from Terminalia macroptera Root Bark, Stem Bark and Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Feng Zou

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera were sequentially extracted with ethanol, 50% ethanol-water, and 50 °C and 100 °C water using an accelerated solvent extractor. Ten bioactive purified polysaccharide fractions were obtained from those crude extracts after anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The polysaccharides and their native extracts were characterized with respect to molecular weight, chemical compositions and effects in the complement assay. The chemical compositions showed that the polysaccharides are of pectic nature. The results indicated that there was no great difference of the complement fixation activities in the crude extracts from the different plant parts when extracting with the accelerated solvent extraction system. The purified polysaccharide fractions 100WTSBH-I-I and 100WTRBH-I-I isolated from the 100 °C water extracts of stem and root bark respectively, showed the highest complement fixation activities. These two fractions have rhamnogalacturonan type I backbone, but only 100WTSBH-I-I contains side chains of both arabinogalactan type I and II. Based on the yield and activities of the fractions studied those from the root bark gave highest results, followed by those from leaves and stem bark. But in total, all plant materials are good sources for fractions containing bioactive polysaccharides.

  20. Different host complement systems and their interactions with saliva from Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera, Psychodidae and Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

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    Antonio Ferreira Mendes-Sousa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lutzomyia longipalpis is the vector of Leishmania infantum in the New World, and its saliva inhibits classical and alternative human complement system pathways. This inhibition is important in protecting the insect´s midgut from damage by the complement. L. longipalpis is a promiscuous blood feeder and must be protected against its host's complement. The objective of this study was to investigate the action of salivary complement inhibitors on the sera of different host species, such as dogs, guinea pigs, rats and chickens, at a pH of 7.4 (normal blood pH and 8.15 (the midgut pH immediately after a blood meal. We also investigated the role of the chicken complement system in Leishmania clearance in the presence and absence of vector saliva. RESULTS: The saliva was capable of inhibiting classical pathways in dogs, guinea pigs and rats at both pHs. The alternative pathway was not inhibited except in dogs at a pH of 8.15. The chicken classical pathway was inhibited only by high concentrations of saliva and it was better inhibited by the midgut contents of sand flies. Neither the saliva nor the midgut contents had any effect on the avian alternative pathway. Fowl sera killed L. infantum promastigotes, even at a low concentration (2%, and the addition of L. longipalpis saliva did not protect the parasites. The high body temperature of chickens (40°C had no effect on Leishmania viability during our assays. CONCLUSION: Salivary inhibitors act in a species-specific manner. It is important to determine their effects in the natural hosts of Leishmania infantum because they act on canid and rodent complements but not on chickens (which do not harbour the parasite. Moreover, we concluded that the avian complement system is the probable mechanism through which chickens eliminate Leishmania and that their high body temperature does not influence this parasite.

  1. Different host complement systems and their interactions with saliva from Lutzomyia longipalpis (Diptera, Psychodidae) and Leishmania infantum promastigotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes-Sousa, Antonio Ferreira; Nascimento, Alexandre Alves Sousa; Queiroz, Daniel Costa; Vale, Vladimir Fazito; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio; Araújo, Ricardo Nascimento; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Gontijo, Nelder Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    Lutzomyia longipalpis is the vector of Leishmania infantum in the New World, and its saliva inhibits classical and alternative human complement system pathways. This inhibition is important in protecting the insect´s midgut from damage by the complement. L. longipalpis is a promiscuous blood feeder and must be protected against its host's complement. The objective of this study was to investigate the action of salivary complement inhibitors on the sera of different host species, such as dogs, guinea pigs, rats and chickens, at a pH of 7.4 (normal blood pH) and 8.15 (the midgut pH immediately after a blood meal). We also investigated the role of the chicken complement system in Leishmania clearance in the presence and absence of vector saliva. The saliva was capable of inhibiting classical pathways in dogs, guinea pigs and rats at both pHs. The alternative pathway was not inhibited except in dogs at a pH of 8.15. The chicken classical pathway was inhibited only by high concentrations of saliva and it was better inhibited by the midgut contents of sand flies. Neither the saliva nor the midgut contents had any effect on the avian alternative pathway. Fowl sera killed L. infantum promastigotes, even at a low concentration (2%), and the addition of L. longipalpis saliva did not protect the parasites. The high body temperature of chickens (40°C) had no effect on Leishmania viability during our assays. Salivary inhibitors act in a species-specific manner. It is important to determine their effects in the natural hosts of Leishmania infantum because they act on canid and rodent complements but not on chickens (which do not harbour the parasite). Moreover, we concluded that the avian complement system is the probable mechanism through which chickens eliminate Leishmania and that their high body temperature does not influence this parasite.

  2. The lectin complement pathway serine proteases (MASPs) represent a possible crossroad between the coagulation and complement systems in thromboinflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kozarcanin, H; Lood, C; Fog, Lea Munthe

    2016-01-01

    both in vitro and in vivo. These findings may represent a crossroad between the complement and the coagulation systems. SUMMARY: BACKGROUND: The activated forms of the complement lectin pathway (LP) proteases MASP-1 and MASP-2 are able to cleave the coagulation factors prothrombin, fibrinogen, factor...

  3. Solid phase assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reese, M.G.; Johnson, L.R.; Ransom, D.K.

    1980-01-01

    In a solid phase assay for quantitative determination of biological and other analytes, a sample such as serum is contacted with a receptor for the analyte being assayed, the receptor being supported on a solid support. No tracer for the analyte is added to the sample before contacting with the receptor; instead the tracer is contacted with the receptor after unbound analyte has been removed from the receptor. The assay can be otherwise performed in a conventional manner but can give greater sensitivity. (author)

  4. Alternative complement pathway and factor B activities in rats with altered blood levels of thyroid hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitencourt, C.S.; Duarte, C.G.; Azzolini, A.E.C.S.; Assis-Pandochi, A.I.

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating the activity of the complement system under conditions of altered thyroid hormone levels might help elucidate the role of complement in triggering autoimmune processes. Here, we investigated alternative pathway (AP) activity in male Wistar rats (180 ± 10 g) after altering their thyroid hormone levels by treatment with triiodothyronine (T3), propylthiouracil (PTU) or thyroidectomy. T3 and thyroxine (T4) levels were determined by chemiluminescence assays. Hemolytic assays were performed to evaluate the lytic activity of the AP. Factor B activity was evaluated using factor B-deficient serum. An anti-human factor B antibody was used to measure factor B levels in serum by radial immunodiffusion. T3 measurements in thyroidectomized animals or animals treated with PTU demonstrated a significant reduction in hormone levels compared to control. The results showed a reduction in AP lytic activity in rats treated with increasing amounts of T3 (1, 10, or 50 µg). Factor B activity was also decreased in the sera of hyperthyroid rats treated with 1 to 50 µg T3. Additionally, treating rats with 25 µg T3 significantly increased factor B levels in their sera (P < 0.01). In contrast, increased factor B concentration and activity (32%) were observed in hypothyroid rats. We conclude that alterations in thyroid hormone levels affect the activity of the AP and factor B, which may in turn affect the roles of AP and factor B in antibody production

  5. More than just immune evasion: Hijacking complement by Plasmodium falciparum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Christoph Q; Kennedy, Alexander T; Tham, Wai-Hong

    2015-09-01

    Malaria remains one of the world's deadliest diseases. Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for the most severe and lethal form of human malaria. P. falciparum's life cycle involves two obligate hosts: human and mosquito. From initial entry into these hosts, malaria parasites face the onslaught of the first line of host defence, the complement system. In this review, we discuss the complex interaction between complement and malaria infection in terms of hosts immune responses, parasite survival and pathogenesis of severe forms of malaria. We will focus on the role of complement receptor 1 and its associated polymorphisms in malaria immune complex clearance, as a mediator of parasite rosetting and as an entry receptor for P. falciparum invasion. Complement evasion strategies of P. falciparum parasites will also be highlighted. The sexual forms of the malaria parasites recruit the soluble human complement regulator Factor H to evade complement-mediated killing within the mosquito host. A novel evasion strategy is the deployment of parasite organelles to divert complement attack from infective blood stage parasites. Finally we outline the future challenge to understand the implications of these exploitation mechanisms in the interplay between successful infection of the host and pathogenesis observed in severe malaria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Classical complement pathway activation in the nasal tissue of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roey, Griet A; Vanison, Christopher C; Wu, Jeffanie; Huang, Julia H; Suh, Lydia A; Carter, Roderick G; Norton, James E; Shintani-Smith, Stephanie; Conley, David B; Welch, Kevin C; Peters, Anju T; Grammer, Leslie C; Harris, Kathleen E; Hulse, Kathryn E; Kato, Atsushi; Stevens, Whitney W; Kern, Robert C; Schleimer, Robert P; Tan, Bruce K

    2017-07-01

    Complement plays a major role in inflammatory diseases, but its involvement and mechanisms of activation in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) are not known. After earlier studies discovering autoantibodies in patients with CRS, we sought to investigate the nature, extent, and location of complement activation in nasal tissue of patients with CRS. Specifically, we were interested in whether antibody-mediated activation through the classical pathway was a major mechanism for complement activation in patients with CRS. Nasal tissue was obtained from patients with CRS and control subjects. Tissue homogenates were analyzed for complement activation products (ELISA-C5b-9, C4d, activated C1, and C5a) and major complement-fixing antibodies (Luminex). Tissue sections were stained for C5b-9, C4d, and laminin. Antibodies were purified with protein A/G columns from nasal polyps (NP), matching patient serum, and control serum and assayed for basement membrane binding by means of ELISA. C5b-9 levels were significantly increased in NP tissue compared with uncinate tissue (UT) of patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) and those with chronic rhinosinusitis without nasal polyps (CRSsNP; P < .01). Similarly, C4d levels were increased in NPs compared with UT of patients with CRSwNP, patients with CRSsNP, and control subjects (P < .05). Activated C1 levels were also increased in NP tissue compared with UT of patients with CRSsNP and control subjects (P < .05) and correlated with levels of C5a (P < .01), local immunoglobulins (especially IgM, P < .0001), and anti-double-stranded DNA IgG (P < .05). Immunofluorescence showed that C5b-9 and C4d deposition occurred linearly along the epithelial basement membrane. NP tissue extracts had significantly more anti-basement membrane antibodies than sera from patients with CRSwNP and control subjects (P < .0001). Levels of C5b-9, C4d, and activated C1 were significantly increased locally in NP tissue

  7. Molluskan Hemocyanins Activate the Classical Pathway of the Human Complement System through Natural Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro-Bauerle, Javier; Maldonado, Ismael; Sosoniuk-Roche, Eduardo; Vallejos, Gerardo; López, Mercedes N; Salazar-Onfray, Flavio; Aguilar-Guzmán, Lorena; Valck, Carolina; Ferreira, Arturo; Becker, María Inés

    2017-01-01

    Molluskan hemocyanins are enormous oxygen-carrier glycoproteins that show remarkable immunostimulatory properties when inoculated in mammals, such as the generation of high levels of antibodies, a strong cellular reaction, and generation of non-specific antitumor immune responses in some types of cancer, particularly for superficial bladder cancer. These proteins have the ability to bias the immune response toward a T h 1 phenotype. However, despite all their current uses with beneficial clinical outcomes, a clear mechanism explaining these properties is not available. Taking into account reports of natural antibodies against the hemocyanin of the gastropod Megathura crenulata [keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)] in humans as well as other vertebrate species, we report here for the first time, the presence, in sera from unimmunized healthy donors, of antibodies recognizing, in addition to KLH, two other hemocyanins from gastropods with documented immunomodulatory capacities: Fisurella latimarginata hemocyanin (FLH) and Concholepas concholepas hemocyanin (CCH). Through an ELISA screening, we found IgM and IgG antibodies reactive with these hemocyanins. When the capacity of these antibodies to bind deglycosylated hemocyanins was studied, no decreased interaction was detected. Moreover, in the case of FLH, deglycosylation increased antibody binding. We evaluated through an in vitro complement deposition assay whether these antibodies activated the classical pathway of the human complement system. The results showed that all three hemocyanins and their deglycosylated counterparts elicited this activation, mediated by C1 binding to immunoglobulins. Thus, this work contributes to the understanding on how the complement system could participate in the immunostimulatory properties of hemocyanins, through natural, complement-activating antibodies reacting with these proteins. Although a role for carbohydrates cannot be completely ruled out, in our experimental setting

  8. Lateral flow assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M; Gallotta, Andrea

    2016-06-30

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  9. Lateral flow assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczula, Katarzyna M.

    2016-01-01

    Lateral flow assays (LFAs) are the technology behind low-cost, simple, rapid and portable detection devices popular in biomedicine, agriculture, food and environmental sciences. This review presents an overview of the principle of the method and the critical components of the assay, focusing on lateral flow immunoassays. This type of assay has recently attracted considerable interest because of its potential to provide instantaneous diagnosis directly to patients. The range and interpretation of results and parameters used for evaluation of the assay will also be discussed. The main advantages and disadvantages of LFAs will be summarized and relevant future improvements to testing devices and strategies will be proposed. Finally, the major recent advances and future diagnostic applications in the LFA field will be explored. PMID:27365041

  10. Defining the complement biomarker profile of C3 glomerulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yuzhou; Nester, Carla M; Martin, Bertha

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: C3 glomerulopathy (C3G) applies to a group of renal diseases defined by a specific renal biopsy finding: a dominant pattern of C3 fragment deposition on immunofluorescence. The primary pathogenic mechanism involves abnormal control of the alternative complement pathway......, although a full description of the disease spectrum remains to be determined. This study sought to validate and define the association of complement dysregulation with C3G and to determine whether specific complement pathway abnormalities could inform disease definition. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS...

  11. Temporal specification and subject reference in Romanian subjunctive complements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aurelia Cotfas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper looks at the dependency of Romanian subjunctive complements on the semantic class of the matrix verb. It shows that different types of temporal dependency trigger different identity relations between the null embedded subject and the (subject antecedent in the main clause (cf. Farkas 1984. Volitional verbs are also looked at in terms of the restrictions they impose on the subjunctive complements they subcategorize for. Finally, following Landau’s (1999 classification of infinitive complements in English, Romanian subjunctives are argued to fall into two distinct classses exhibiting different properties in terms of subject reference and temporal dependency.

  12. Adhesion of platelets to microcapsules and the role of complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, N; Kondo, T

    1984-07-11

    Rabbit platelets rapidly adhered to carboxylated polyamide microcapsules through the adsorbed layer of plasma components. These components were found to be heat-labile proteins, which exist in fresh serum, and to demand calcium ions to function. These findings ascribed the components to the complement system. In fact, a good correlation was obtained between platelet adhesion to, and complement fixation by, the microcapsules. Moreover, the activation of the complement system by the microcapsules was assumed to proceed via the classical pathway. It was concluded that adhesion of platelets to the microcapsules is brought about by immune adherence.

  13. The role of the complement system in diabetic nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flyvbjerg, Allan

    2017-01-01

    -threatening disease. An increasing body of evidence points toward a role of the complement system in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. For example, circulating levels of mannose-binding lectin (MBL), a pattern recognition molecule of the innate immune system, have emerged as a robust biomarker...... for the development and progression of this disease, and evidence suggests that MBL, H-ficolin, complement component C3 and the membrane attack complex might contribute to renal injury in the hyperglycaemic mileu. New approaches to modulate the complement system might lead to the development of new agents to prevent...

  14. Inhibition of the Membrane Attack Complex by Dengue Virus NS1 through Interaction with Vitronectin and Terminal Complement Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, Jonas Nascimento; da Silva, Emiliana Mandarano; Allonso, Diego; Coelho, Diego Rodrigues; Andrade, Iamara da Silva; de Medeiros, Luciano Neves; Menezes, Joice Lima; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo

    2016-11-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) infects millions of people worldwide and is a major public health problem. DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a conserved glycoprotein that associates with membranes and is also secreted into the plasma in DENV-infected patients. The present study describes a novel mechanism by which NS1 inhibits the terminal complement pathway. We first identified the terminal complement regulator vitronectin (VN) as a novel DENV2 NS1 binding partner by using a yeast two-hybrid system. This interaction was further assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) assay. The NS1-VN complex was also detected in plasmas from DENV-infected patients, suggesting that this interaction occurs during DENV infection. We also demonstrated that the DENV2 NS1 protein, either by itself or by interacting with VN, hinders the formation of the membrane attack complex (MAC) and C9 polymerization. Finally, we showed that DENV2, West Nile virus (WNV), and Zika virus (ZIKV) NS1 proteins produced in mammalian cells inhibited C9 polymerization. Taken together, our results points to a role for NS1 as a terminal pathway inhibitor of the complement system. Dengue is the most important arthropod-borne viral disease nowadays and is caused by dengue virus (DENV). The flavivirus NS1 glycoprotein has been characterized functionally as a complement evasion protein that can attenuate the activation of the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. The present study describes a novel mechanism by which DENV NS1 inhibits the terminal complement pathway. We identified the terminal complement regulator vitronectin (VN) as a novel DENV NS1 binding partner, and the NS1-VN complex was detected in plasmas from DENV-infected patients, suggesting that this interaction occurs during DENV infection. We also demonstrated that the NS1-VN complex inhibited membrane attack complex (MAC) formation, thus interfering with the complement terminal pathway. Interestingly

  15. A novel behavioral assay for measuring cold sensation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel S Brenner

    Full Text Available Behavioral models of cold responses are important tools for exploring the molecular mechanisms of cold sensation. To complement the currently cold behavioral assays and allow further studies of these mechanisms, we have developed a new technique to measure the cold response threshold, the cold plantar assay. In this assay, animals are acclimated on a glass plate and a cold stimulus is applied to the hindpaw through the glass using a pellet of compressed dry ice. The latency to withdrawal from the cooled glass is used as a measure of the cold response threshold of the rodents, and the dry ice pellet provides a ramping cold stimulus on the glass that allows the correlation of withdrawal latency values to rough estimates of the cold response threshold temperature. The assay is highly sensitive to manipulations including morphine-induced analgesia, Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced inflammatory allodynia, and Spinal Nerve Ligation-induced neuropathic allodynia.

  16. A novel behavioral assay for measuring cold sensation in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Daniel S; Golden, Judith P; Gereau, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    Behavioral models of cold responses are important tools for exploring the molecular mechanisms of cold sensation. To complement the currently cold behavioral assays and allow further studies of these mechanisms, we have developed a new technique to measure the cold response threshold, the cold plantar assay. In this assay, animals are acclimated on a glass plate and a cold stimulus is applied to the hindpaw through the glass using a pellet of compressed dry ice. The latency to withdrawal from the cooled glass is used as a measure of the cold response threshold of the rodents, and the dry ice pellet provides a ramping cold stimulus on the glass that allows the correlation of withdrawal latency values to rough estimates of the cold response threshold temperature. The assay is highly sensitive to manipulations including morphine-induced analgesia, Complete Freund's Adjuvant-induced inflammatory allodynia, and Spinal Nerve Ligation-induced neuropathic allodynia.

  17. Emerging Technologies and Generic Assays for the Detection of Anti-Drug Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Partridge

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti-drug antibodies induced by biologic therapeutics often impact drug pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics response, clinical efficacy, and patient safety. It is critical to assess the immunogenicity risk of potential biotherapeutics in producing neutralizing and nonneutralizing anti-drug antibodies, especially in clinical phases of drug development. Different assay methodologies have been used to detect all anti-drug antibodies, including ELISA, radioimmunoassay, surface plasmon resonance, and electrochemiluminescence-based technologies. The most commonly used method is a bridging assay, performed in an ELISA or on the Meso Scale Discovery platform. In this report, we aim to review the emerging new assay technologies that can complement or address challenges associated with the bridging assay format in screening and confirmation of ADAs. We also summarize generic anti-drug antibody assays that do not require drug-specific reagents for nonclinical studies. These generic assays significantly reduce assay development efforts and, therefore, shorten the assay readiness timeline.

  18. Complement involvement in periodontitis: molecular mechanisms and rational therapeutic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Maekawa, Tomoki; Abe, Toshiharu; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a network of interacting fluid-phase and cell surface-associated molecules that trigger, amplify, and regulate immune and inflammatory signaling pathways. Dysregulation of this finely balanced network can destabilize host-microbe homeostasis and cause inflammatory tissue damage. Evidence from clinical and animal model-based studies suggests that complement is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, a polymicrobial community-induced chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. This review discusses molecular mechanisms of complement involvement in the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal microbiome and the resulting destructive inflammation, culminating in loss of periodontal bone support. These mechanistic studies have additionally identified potential therapeutic targets. In this regard, interventional studies in preclinical models have provided proof-of-concept for using complement inhibitors for the treatment of human periodontitis. PMID:26306443

  19. Complement: a key system for immune surveillance and homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Hajishengallis, George; Yang, Kun; Lambris, John D

    2010-09-01

    Nearly a century after the significance of the human complement system was recognized, we have come to realize that its functions extend far beyond the elimination of microbes. Complement acts as a rapid and efficient immune surveillance system that has distinct effects on healthy and altered host cells and foreign intruders. By eliminating cellular debris and infectious microbes, orchestrating immune responses and sending 'danger' signals, complement contributes substantially to homeostasis, but it can also take action against healthy cells if not properly controlled. This review describes our updated view of the function, structure and dynamics of the complement network, highlights its interconnection with immunity at large and with other endogenous pathways, and illustrates its multiple roles in homeostasis and disease.

  20. Complement inhibitors to treat IgM-mediated autoimmune hemolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Diana; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2015-01-01

    Complement activation in autoimmune hemolytic anemia may exacerbate extravascular hemolysis and may occasionally result in intravascular hemolysis. IgM autoantibodies as characteristically found in cold autoantibody autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in cold agglutinin disease but also in a considerable

  1. The role of complement in the acquired immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Fischer, E M; Leslie, R G

    2000-01-01

    Studies over the past three decades have clearly established a central role for complement in the promotion of a humoral immune response. The primary function of complement, in this regard, is to opsonize antigen or immune complexes for uptake by complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) expressed...... on B cells, follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and some T cells. A variety of mechanisms appear to be involved in complement-mediated promotion of the humoral response. These include: enhancement of antigen (Ag) uptake and processing by both Ag-specific and non-specific B cells for presentation...... to specific T cells; the activation of a CD21/CD19 complex-mediated signalling pathway in B cells, which provides a stimulus synergistic to that induced by antigen interaction with the B-cell receptor (BCR); and promotion of the interaction between B cells and FDC, where C3d-bearing immune complexes...

  2. Complement C4 phenotypes in dementia of the Alzheimer type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eikelenboom, P.; Goetz, J.; Pronk, J. C.; Hauptmann, G.

    1988-01-01

    Complement C4 phenotype distribution was studied in 64 patients with dementia of the Alzheimer type. In contrast to reported findings we failed to find a significant association between C4B2 gene frequency and Alzheimer's dementia

  3. The role of complement in the acquired immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Fischer, E M; Leslie, R G

    2000-01-01

    on B cells, follicular dendritic cells (FDC) and some T cells. A variety of mechanisms appear to be involved in complement-mediated promotion of the humoral response. These include: enhancement of antigen (Ag) uptake and processing by both Ag-specific and non-specific B cells for presentation...... to specific T cells; the activation of a CD21/CD19 complex-mediated signalling pathway in B cells, which provides a stimulus synergistic to that induced by antigen interaction with the B-cell receptor (BCR); and promotion of the interaction between B cells and FDC, where C3d-bearing immune complexes......Studies over the past three decades have clearly established a central role for complement in the promotion of a humoral immune response. The primary function of complement, in this regard, is to opsonize antigen or immune complexes for uptake by complement receptor type 2 (CR2, CD21) expressed...

  4. Effects of radiographic contrast media on the serum complement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tirone, P.; Boldrini, E.

    1983-01-01

    The authors explored the activation of the complement system produced by a nonionic organic iodine compound, namely iopamidol, which is proposed as a contrast medium for radiographic examination by intravenous and intra-arterial injection. The study was conducted in vitro versus established ionic contrasts (diatrizoate, iothalamate, acetrizoate) and a nonionic compound (metrizamide). The adopted experimental model was the immunohemolytic detector system, in which the immune complex consisted of goat erythrocytes sensitized with the corresponding antibody (hemolysin), and complement (C') was supplied by guinea pig serum. All the products caused complement activation. The results show that nonionic contrast media produce less activation of the complement system than the traditional ionic contrast. Thus the use of nonionic contrast for radiological procedures necessitating the introduction of contrast material into the blood compartment would imply a reduced risk of anaphylactoid reactions. (orig.)

  5. Polysomnographic correlates of inflammatory complement components in young healthy males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M Ejaz; Golam Sarwar, Abu Hasnath M; Alam, Mohd Shoeb; Noohu, Majumi M; Zannat, Wassilatul; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Bahammam, Ahmed S; Manzar, Md Dilshad

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence has delineated the predominant role of humoral mediators of inflammation in linking sleep with immunity. Nonetheless, characterization of the relationship between complement components with inflammatory functions and objective sleep measures has not been performed. In this study we investigated the relationships between objective measures of sleep and complement components with inflammatory functions. Thirty-six healthy male university students (age, 23.94±4.23 years; BMI, 23.44±2.67 kg/m(2)) completed the study. An RMS Quest 32 polysomnograph (PSG) was used for sleep recording. Non-fasting blood was collected before subjects went to bed on the second night in the sleep laboratory to estimate complement component 3 (C-3), complement component 4 (C-4), complement factor-H (Factor-H), C1-inhibitor (C1INH), complement factor I (CFI) and other inflammatory mediators, such as IL-6 and sICAM-1. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the association between PSG sleep measures and inflammatory mediators. Higher values of C-3 and lower values of sICAM-1, C1INH, and CFI (adjusted model, R2=0.211, p<0.041) predicted longer sleep duration. Lower C-3 (adjusted model, R2=0.078, p<0.055) predicted higher N1 (%). Higher levels of C1INH and CFI and lower values of C-4 (model adjusted R2=0.269, p<0.008) predicted higher N3 (%). Higher C-3, higher C-4, lower IL-6, lower C1INH and lower CFI (model adjusted R2=0.296, p<0.007) predicted higher REM (%). Poor sleep measures were associated with increased levels of pro-inflammatory complement components and decreased anti-inflammatory complement components.

  6. Depletion of complement system immunity in patients with myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenwen; Che, Lin; Jiang, Jinfa; Yang, Fan; Duan, Qianglin; Song, Haoming; Liu, Xiaohong; Shen, Yuqin; Wang, Lemin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate differences in the expression of complement system genes, and serum levels of CH50, C3 and C4 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with myocardial infarction (AMI), stable angina pectoris (SA) and controls. A total of 100 patients with AMI, 100 with SA and 100 clinical controls were recruited in the present study. In each group, 20 randomly selected individuals were examined using whole human genome microarray analysis to detect the expression of genes of the complement system. The serum levels of CH50, C3 and C4 were measured in all 300 subjects. In the patients with AMI, the expression levels of genes encoding C1qα, C1qβ, C1qγ, C1r, Factor P, C5a (complement component), CR1, integrin αM, integrin αX, integrin β2, C5aR, CRIg (complement receptors) and CD46, CD55 and CD59 (complement regulators) were significantly higher, compared with the respective genes in the SA patients and controls (Pcomplement components or regulators between the SA and control groups. The serum levels of CH50, C3 and C4 were significantly increased in the AMI and SA groups, compared with the controls. In the AMI and SA groups, the complement system was activated. However, the differential mRNA expression of complement components, receptors and regulators in the AMI group suggested the dysfunction of the C5b-9 complex. The depression of complement system immunity in the patients with AMI may be associated with the pathogenesis of AMI.

  7. Does host complement kill Borrelia burgdorferi within ticks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathinavelu, Sivaprakash; Broadwater, Anne; de Silva, Aravinda M

    2003-02-01

    The Lyme disease spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, inhabits the gut lumen of the tick vector. At this location the spirochete is exposed to host blood when a tick feeds. We report here on studies that were done with normal and complement-deficient (C3-knockout) mice to determine if the host complement system killed spirochetes within the vector. We found that spirochete numbers within feeding nymphs were not influenced by complement, most likely because host complement was inactivated within the vector. The Lyme disease outer surface protein A (OspA) vaccine is a transmission-blocking vaccine that targets spirochetes in the vector. In experiments with mice hyperimmunized with OspA, complement was not required to kill spirochetes within nymphs and to block transmission from nymphs to the vaccinated host. However, host complement did enhance the ability of OspA antibody to block larvae from acquiring spirochetes. Thus, the effects of OspA antibody on nymphal transmission and larval acquisition appear to be based on different mechanisms.

  8. The versatile functions of complement C3-derived ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Anna; Sándor, Noémi; Mácsik-Valent, Bernadett; Lukácsi, Szilvia; Kremlitzka, Mariann; Bajtay, Zsuzsa

    2016-11-01

    The complement system is a major component of immune defense. Activation of the complement cascade by foreign substances and altered self-structures may lead to the elimination of the activating agent, and during the enzymatic cascade, several biologically active fragments are generated. Most immune regulatory effects of complement are mediated by the activation products of C3, the central component. The indispensable role of C3 in opsonic phagocytosis as well as in the regulation of humoral immune response is known for long, while the involvement of complement in T-cell biology have been revealed in the past few years. In this review, we discuss the immune modulatory functions of C3-derived fragments focusing on their role in processes which have not been summarized so far. The importance of locally synthesized complement will receive special emphasis, as several immunological processes take place in tissues, where hepatocyte-derived complement components might not be available at high concentrations. We also aim to call the attention to important differences between human and mouse systems regarding C3-mediated processes. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The Role of Complement System in Septic Shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Charchaflieh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Septic shock is a critical clinical condition with a high mortality rate. A better understanding of the underlying mechanisms is important to develop effective therapies. Basic and clinical studies suggest that activation of complements in the common cascade, for example, complement component 3 (C3 and C5, is involved in the development of septic shock. The involvement of three upstream complement pathways in septic shock is more complicated. Both the classical and alternative pathways appear to be activated in septic shock, but the alternative pathway may be activated earlier than the classical pathway. Activation of these two pathways is essential to clear endotoxin. Recent investigations have shed light on the role of lectin complement pathway in septic shock. Published reports suggest a protective role of mannose-binding lectin (MBL against sepsis. Our preliminary study of MBL-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2 in septic shock patients indicated that acute decrease of MASP-2 in the early phase of septic shock might correlate with in-hospital mortality. It is unknown whether excessive activation of these three upstream complement pathways may contribute to the detrimental effects in septic shock. This paper also discusses additional complement-related pathogenic mechanisms and intervention strategies for septic shock.

  10. On the Status of the Complementizer WAA6 in Cantonese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ka-Wai Yeung

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Complementizers are generally known as function words that introduce a clausal complement, like that in English, for instance (Radford 1997. In many languages, complementizers are re-analyzed from verba dicendi, or verbs of ‘saying’ (Lord 1976; Frajzyngier 1991; Hopper and Traugott 1993; Lord 1993. This paper argues for the existence of a complementizer re-analyzed from a verb of ‘saying’ in Cantonese by providing a synchronic analysis for waa6. Waa6 has often been assumed to be a lexical verb in serial verb construction because of its following a ‘saying’ predicate or a cognitive predicate. However, this paper argues that waa6 is not always a verb, postulating that waa6 may have different meanings and subcategorizations in different situations, including waa61 meaning ‘say’ [__ (PP CP] or {__PP NP}, the transitive verb waa62 meaning ‘blame/condemn’ [__NP CP], and the complementizer waa63 selecting a clause [__ IP]. This proposal is supported by different tests, such as aspect marking and argument selection, confirming that the complementizer waa63 formally exhibits different properties from that of the verbs waa61 and waa62.

  11. Functional recruitment of human complement inhibitor C4B-binding protein to outer membrane protein Rck of Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek K Ho

    Full Text Available Resistance to complement mediated killing, or serum resistance, is a common trait of pathogenic bacteria. Rck is a 17 kDa outer membrane protein encoded on the virulence plasmid of Salmonella enterica serovars Typhimurium and Enteritidis. When expressed in either E. coli or S. enterica Typhimurium, Rck confers LPS-independent serum resistance as well as the ability to bind to and invade mammalian cells. Having recently shown that Rck binds the inhibitor of the alternative pathway of complement, factor H (fH, we hypothesized that Rck can also bind the inhibitor of the classical and lectin pathways, C4b-binding protein (C4BP. Using flow cytometry and direct binding assays, we demonstrate that E. coli expressing Rck binds C4BP from heat-inactivated serum and by using the purified protein. No binding was detected in the absence of Rck expression. C4BP bound to Rck is functional, as we observed factor I-mediated cleavage of C4b in cofactor assays. In competition assays, binding of radiolabeled C4BP to Rck was reduced by increasing concentrations of unlabeled protein. No effect was observed by increasing heparin or salt concentrations, suggesting mainly non-ionic interactions. Reduced binding of C4BP mutants lacking complement control protein domains (CCPs 7 or 8 was observed compared to wt C4BP, suggesting that these CCPs are involved in Rck binding. While these findings are restricted to Rck expression in E. coli, these data suggest that C4BP binding may be an additional mechanism of Rck-mediated complement resistance.

  12. Assay method and compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Methods are described for measuring catecholamine levels in human and animal body fluids and tissues using the catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) radioassay. The assay involves incubating the biological sample with COMT and the tritiated methyl donor, S-adenosyl-L-methionine( 3 H)-methyl. The O-methylated ( 3 H) epinephrine and/or norepinephrine are extracted and oxidised to vanillin- 3 H which in turn is extracted and its radioactivity counted. When analysing dopamine levels the assay is extended by vanillin- 3 H and raising the pH of the aqueous periodate phase from which O-methylated ( 3 H) dopamine is extracted and counted. The assay may be modified depending on whether measurements of undifferentiated total endogenous catecholamine levels or differential analyses of the catecholamine levels are being performed. The sensitivity of the assay can be as low as 5 picograms for norepinephrine and epinephrine and 12 picograms for dopamine. The assemblance of the essential components of the assay into a kit for use in laboratories is also described. (U.K.)

  13. Structural Basis for the Function of Complement Component C4 within the Classical and Lectin Pathways of Complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Sofia; Kidmose, Rune Thomas; Petersen, Steen Vang

    2015-01-01

    Complement component C4 is a central protein in the classical and lectin pathways within the complement system. During activation of complement, its major fragment C4b becomes covalently attached to the surface of pathogens and altered self-tissue, where it acts as an opsonin marking the surface...... for removal. Moreover, C4b provides a platform for assembly of the proteolytically active convertases that mediate downstream complement activation by cleavage of C3 and C5. In this article, we present the crystal and solution structures of the 195-kDa C4b. Our results provide the molecular details...... of the rearrangement accompanying C4 cleavage and suggest intramolecular flexibility of C4b. The conformations of C4b and its paralogue C3b are shown to be remarkably conserved, suggesting that the convertases from the classical and alternative pathways are likely to share their overall architecture and mode...

  14. Complement receptor expression and activation of the complement cascade on B lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquart, H V; Svendsen, A; Rasmussen, J M

    1995-01-01

    It has previously been reported that the expression of the complement receptors, CR1 on erythrocytes and blood leucocytes and CR2 on B cells, is reduced in patients with SLE, and that the reduced expression of CR1 on erythrocytes is related to disease activity. We have earlier demonstrated...... that normal B cells are capable of activating the alternative pathway (AP) of complement in a CR2-dependent fashion. In this study we have investigated whether disturbances in this activity may be related to the altered phenotype of SLE B cells. Flow cytometry was used to measure expression of complement...... activation by B cells in homologous serum. Finally, we demonstrated an inverse relationship between SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) and the expression of complement receptor 2 (CR2) on SLE B cells. Thus, determination of CR2 on B cells may emerge as an additional laboratory tool in the assessment of SLE...

  15. Radioreceptor assay for insulin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kazuo

    1975-01-01

    Radioreceptor assay of insulin was discussed from the aspects of the measuring method, its merits and problems to be solved, and its clinical application. Rat liver 10 x g pellet was used as receptor site, and enzymatic degradation of insulin by the system contained in this fraction was inhibited by adding 1 mM p-CMB. 125 I-labelled porcine insulin was made by lactoperoxidase method under overnight incubation at 4 0 C and later purification by Sephadex G-25 column and Whatman CF-11 cellulose powder. Dog pancreatic vein serum insulin during and after the glucose load was determined by radioreceptor assay and radioimmunoassay resulting that both measurements accorded considerably. Radioreceptor assay would clarify the pathology of disorders of glucose metabolism including diabetes. (Tsukamoto, Y.)

  16. Rover waste assay system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akers, D.W.; Stoots, C.M.; Kraft, N.C.; Marts, D.J.

    1997-01-01

    The Rover Waste Assay System (RWAS) is a nondestructive assay system designed for the rapid assay of highly-enriched 235 U contaminated piping, tank sections, and debris from the Rover nuclear rocket fuel processing facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant. A scanning system translates a NaI(Tl) detector/collimator system over the structural components where both relative and calibrated measurements for 137 Cs are made. Uranium-235 concentrations are in operation and is sufficiently automated that most functions are performed by the computer system. These functions include system calibration, problem identification, collimator control, data analysis, and reporting. Calibration of the system was done through a combination of measurements on calibration standards and benchmarked modeling. A description of the system is presented along with the methods and uncertainties associated with the calibration and analysis of the system for components from the Rover facility. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  17. Cigarette smoke can activate the alternative pathway of complement in vitro by modifying the third component of complement.

    OpenAIRE

    Kew, R R; Ghebrehiwet, B; Janoff, A

    1985-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is associated with significant increases in the number of pulmonary mononuclear phagocytes and neutrophils. A potent chemoattractant for these cells is C5a, a peptide generated during complement (C) activation. We, therefore, investigated the possibility that cigarette smoke could activate the complement system in vitro. Our results show that factor(s) (mol wt less than 1,000) present in an aqueous solution of whole, unfiltered cigarette smoke can deplete the hemolytic capac...

  18. Radioreceptor assay for GH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsushima, Toshio; Matsuzaki, Fukashi

    1975-01-01

    Radioreceptor assay (RRA) of growth hormone (GH) was studied using the protein which specifically bound to GH presenting in the liver of rabbits. 100,000g pellet of the liver homogenate was used as receptor source. The factors which affected the results of RRA such as salt, temperature and incubation time, were discussed. As same as in other RRA methods, serum protein inhibited non-specifically 125 I-GH binding in this method. In this assay, serum GH less than 5ng/ml could not be detected. The difference between the value obtained by RRA and that by radioimmunoassay was compared with reference to the patients with acromegalia. (Tsukamoto, Y.)

  19. Lateral flow strip assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robin R [Danville, CA; Benett, William J [Livermore, CA; Coleman, Matthew A [Oakland, CA; Pearson, Francesca S [Livermore, CA; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L [Livermore, CA

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  20. Complement factor H-related proteins CFHR2 and CFHR5 represent novel ligands for the infection-associated CRASP proteins of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinna Siegel

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available One virulence property of Borrelia burgdorferi is its resistance to innate immunity, in particular to complement-mediated killing. Serum-resistant B. burgdorferi express up to five distinct complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASP which interact with complement regulator factor H (CFH and factor H-like protein 1 (FHL1 or factor H-related protein 1 (CFHR1. In the present study we elucidate the role of the infection-associated CRASP-3 and CRASP-5 protein to serve as ligands for additional complement regulatory proteins as well as for complement resistance of B. burgdorferi.To elucidate whether CRASP-5 and CRASP-3 interact with various human proteins, both borrelial proteins were immobilized on magnetic beads. Following incubation with human serum, bound proteins were eluted and separated by Glycine-SDS-PAGE. In addition to CFH and CFHR1, complement regulators CFHR2 and CFHR5 were identified as novel ligands for both borrelial proteins by employing MALDI-TOF. To further assess the contributions of CRASP-3 and CRASP-5 to complement resistance, a serum-sensitive B. garinii strain G1 which lacks all CFH-binding proteins was used as a valuable model for functional analyses. Both CRASPs expressed on the B. garinii outer surface bound CFH as well as CFHR1 and CFHR2 in ELISA. In contrast, live B. garinii bound CFHR1, CFHR2, and CFHR5 and only miniscute amounts of CFH as demonstrated by serum adsorption assays and FACS analyses. Further functional analysis revealed that upon NHS incubation, CRASP-3 or CRASP-5 expressing borreliae were killed by complement.In the absence of CFH and the presence of CFHR1, CFHR2 and CFHR5, assembly and integration of the membrane attack complex was not efficiently inhibited indicating that CFH in co-operation with CFHR1, CFHR2 and CFHR5 supports complement evasion of B. burgdorferi.

  1. Plasmin cleaves fibrinogen and the human complement proteins C3b and C5 in the presence of Leptospira interrogans proteins: A new role of LigA and LigB in invasion and complement immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; Fraga, Tatiana Rodrigues; Pagotto, Ana Helena; Serrano, Solange Maria de Toledo; Abreu, Patricia Antonia Estima; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Isaac, Lourdes

    2016-05-01

    Plasminogen is a single-chain glycoprotein found in human plasma as the inactive precursor of plasmin. When converted to proteolytically active plasmin, plasmin(ogen) regulates both complement and coagulation cascades, thus representing an important target for pathogenic microorganisms. Leptospira interrogans binds plasminogen, which is converted to active plasmin. Leptospiral immunoglobulin-like (Lig) proteins are surface exposed molecules that interact with extracellular matrix components and complement regulators, including proteins of the FH family and C4BP. In this work, we demonstrate that these multifunctional molecules also bind plasminogen through both N- and C-terminal domains. These interactions are dependent on lysine residues and are affected by ionic strength. Competition assays suggest that plasminogen does not share binding sites with C4BP or FH on Lig proteins at physiological molar ratios. Plasminogen bound to Lig proteins is converted to proteolytic active plasmin in the presence of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA). Lig-bound plasmin is able to cleave the physiological substrates fibrinogen and the complement proteins C3b and C5. Taken together, our data point to a new role of LigA and LigB in leptospiral invasion and complement immune evasion. Plasmin(ogen) acquisition by these versatile proteins may contribute to Leptospira infection, favoring bacterial survival and dissemination inside the host. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. A specific assay for quantification of human C4c by use of an anti-C4c monoclonal antibody

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilely, Katrine; Skjoedt, Mikkel-Ole; Nielsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The increasing evidence of the implication of the complement system in the pathogenesis of several diseases has emphasized the need for the development of specific and valid assays, optimized for quantitative detection of complement activation in vivo. In the present study, we have developed a mo...

  3. Complement activation and interleukin response in major abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvarnström, A L; Sarbinowski, R T; Bengtson, J-P; Jacobsson, L M; Bengtsson, A L

    2012-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether major abdominal surgery leads to complement activation and interleukin response and whether the kind of anaesthesia influence complement activation and the release of inflammatory interleukins. The study design was prospective and randomised. Fifty patients undergoing open major colorectal surgery due to cancer disease or inflammatory bowel disease were studied. Twenty-five patients were given total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and remifentanil, and 25 patients were given inhalational anaesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl. To determine complement activation (C3a and SC5b-9) and the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory interleukins (tumour necrosis factor-a (TNF-a)), interleukin-1b (IL-1b), IL-6, IL-8, IL-4 and IL-10), blood samples were drawn preoperatively, 60 minutes after start of surgery, 30 minutes after end of surgery and 24 hours postoperatively. Complement was activated and pro-inflammatory interleukins (IL-6 and IL-8) and anti-inflammatory interleukins (IL-10) were released during major colorectal surgery. There was no significant difference between TIVA and inhalational anaesthesia regarding complement activation and cytokine release. Major colorectal surgery leads to activation of the complement cascade and the release of both pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. There are no significant differences between total intravenous anaesthesia (TIVA) with propofol and remifentanil and inhalational anaesthesia with sevoflurane and fentanyl regarding complement activation and the release of pro- and anti-inflammatory interleukins. © 2012 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd. Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  4. A novel method for direct measurement of complement convertases activity in human serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom, A.M.; Volokhina, E.B.; Fransson, V.; Stromberg, P.; Berghard, L.; Viktorelius, M.; Mollnes, T.E.; Lopez-Trascasa, M.; Heuvel, B. van den; Goodship, T.H.; Marchbank, K.J.; Okroj, M.

    2014-01-01

    Complement convertases are enzymatic complexes that play a central role in sustaining and amplification of the complement cascade. Impairment of complement function leads directly or indirectly to pathological conditions, including higher infection rate, kidney diseases, autoimmune- or

  5. ELISA for evaluating the incorporation of plasma derived complement split-products C3b/iC3b into solid-phase immune complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann-Nielsen, E; Svehag, S E; Thorlacius-Ussing, O

    2001-01-01

    An ELISA that measures plasma derived complement (C) split-products C3b/iC3b deposited on solid-phase immune complexes during C activation is described. Plates are coated with BSA, anti-BSA and plasma is added. Deposited C3b/iC3b is then detected by biotinylated anti-C3c-antibodies, avidin......) or classical pathway (CP) with regard to age or gender was demonstrated. The total coefficient of variation was ELISA procedure was compared to a standard hemolytic complement CH(50) assay using plasma from 23 out-patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). There was a weak correlation between...... the two assays for both C pathways, but neither the ELISA nor the CH(50) assay showed any correlation with the diagnostic ACR-criteria for SLE. However, the capacity of the CP was significantly reduced in SLE out-patients compared to healthy blood donors (P

  6. Analysis of Complement C3 Gene Reveals Susceptibility to Severe Preeclampsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Inkeri Lokki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Preeclampsia (PE is a common vascular disease of pregnancy with genetic predisposition. Dysregulation of the complement system has been implicated, but molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. In this study, we determined the potential linkage of severe PE to the most central complement gene, C3. Three cohorts of Finnish patients and controls were recruited for a genetic case-control study. Participants were genotyped using Sequenom genotyping and Sanger sequencing. Initially, we studied 259 Finnish patients with severe PE and 426 controls from the Southern Finland PE and the Finnish population-based PE cohorts. We used a custom-made single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP genotyping assay consisting of 98 SNPs in 18 genes that encode components of the complement system. Following the primary screening, C3 was selected as the candidate gene and consequently Sanger sequenced. Fourteen SNPs from C3 were also genotyped by a Sequenom panel in 960 patients with severe PE and 705 controls, including already sequenced individuals. Three of the 43 SNPs observed within C3 were associated with severe PE: rs2287845 (p = 0.038, OR = 1.158, rs366510 (p = 0.039, OR = 1.158, and rs2287848 (p = 0.041, OR = 1.155. We also discovered 16 SNP haplotypes with extreme linkage disequilibrium in the middle of the gene with a protective (p = 0.044, OR = 0.628 or a predisposing (p = 0.011, OR = 2.110 effect to severe PE depending on the allele combination. Genetic variants associated with PE are located in key domains of C3 and could thereby influence the function of C3. This is, as far as we are aware, the first candidate gene in the complement system with an association to a clinically relevant PE subphenotype, severe PE. The result highlights a potential role for the complement system in the pathogenesis of PE and may help in defining prognostic and therapeutic subgroups of preeclamptic women.

  7. Hyaluronic Acid Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Itenov, Theis Skovsgaard; Kirkby, Nikolai S; Bestle, Morten H

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUD: Hyaluronic acid (HA) is proposed as a marker of functional liver capacity. The aim of the present study was to compare a new turbidimetric assay for measuring HA with the current standard method. METHODS: HA was measured by a particle-enhanced turbidimetric immunoassay (PETIA) and enzyme...

  8. Lateral flow assays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Posthuma-Trumpie, G.A.; Amerongen, van A.

    2012-01-01

    A simple version of immunochemical-based methods is the Lateral Flow Assay (LFA). It is a dry chemistry technique (reagents are included); the fluid from the sample runs through a porous membrane (often nitrocellulose) by capillary force. Typically the membrane is cut as a strip of 0.5*5 cm. In most

  9. FLUIDICS DEVICE FOR ASSAY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device for use in performing assays on standard laboratory solid supports whereon chemical entities are attached. The invention furthermore relates to the use of such a device and a kit comprising such a device. The device according to the present invention is a...

  10. Mutations participating in interallelic complementation in propionic acidemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gravel, R.A.; Akerman, B.R.; Lamhonwah, A.M.; Loyer, M.; Leon-del-Rio, A.; Italiano, I. (McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada))

    1994-07-01

    Deficiency of propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC; [alpha][sub 4][beta][sub 4]) results in the rare, autosomal recessive disease propionic acidemia. Cell fusion experiments have revealed two complementation groups, pccA and pccB, corresponding to defects of the PCCA ([alpha]-subunit) and PCCB ([beta]-subunit) genes, respectively. The pccBCC group includes subgroups, pccB and pccC, which are thought to reflect interallelic complementation between certain mutations of the PCCB gene. In this study, the authors have identified the mutations in two pccB, one pccC, and two pccBC cell lines and have deduced those alleles participating in interallelic complementation. One pccB line was a compound hetrozygote of Pro228Leu and Asn536Asp. The latter mutation was also detected in a noncomplementing pccBC line. This leaves Pro228Leu responsible for complementation in the pccB cells. The second pccB line contained an insertional duplication, dupKICK140-143, and a splice mutation IVS+1 G[yields]T, located after Lys466. The authors suggest that the dupKICK mutation is the complementing allele, since the second allele is incompatible with normal splicing. The pccC line studied was homozygous for Arg410Trp, which is necessarily the complementing allele in that line. For a second pccC line, they previously had proposed that [Delta]Ile408 was the complementing allele. They now show that its second allele, [open quotes]Ins[center dot]Del[close quotes], a 14-bp deletion replaced by a 12-bp insertion beginning at codon 407, fails to complement in homozygous form. The authors conclude that the interallelic complementation results from mutations in domains that can interact between [beta]-subunits in the PCC heteromer to restore enzymatic function. On the basis of sequence homology with the Propionibacterium shermanii transcarboxylase 12S subunit, they suggest that the pccC domain, defined by Ile408 and Arg410, may involve the propionyl-CoA binding site. 37 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Complement factor H in host defense and immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente, Raffaella; Clark, Simon J; Inforzato, Antonio; Day, Anthony J

    2017-05-01

    Complement is the major humoral component of the innate immune system. It recognizes pathogen- and damage-associated molecular patterns, and initiates the immune response in coordination with innate and adaptive immunity. When activated, the complement system unleashes powerful cytotoxic and inflammatory mechanisms, and thus its tight control is crucial to prevent damage to host tissues and allow restoration of immune homeostasis. Factor H is the major soluble inhibitor of complement, where its binding to self markers (i.e., particular glycan structures) prevents complement activation and amplification on host surfaces. Not surprisingly, mutations and polymorphisms that affect recognition of self by factor H are associated with diseases of complement dysregulation, such as age-related macular degeneration and atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome. In addition, pathogens (i.e., non-self) and cancer cells (i.e., altered-self) can hijack factor H to evade the immune response. Here we review recent (and not so recent) literature on the structure and function of factor H, including the emerging roles of this protein in the pathophysiology of infectious diseases and cancer.

  12. The Case-agreement System in Subjunctive Complements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feras Saeed

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Unlike matrix verbs, the verb in subjunctive complements in Standard Arabic lacks tense; nonetheless, it inflects for agreement and mood. The subject of subjunctive verbs is Case-marked accusative if it surfaces in a preverbal position; and nominative if it appears in a postverbal position. In addition, the subjunctive verb shows agreement asymmetry with its subject, depending on the position of the subject. Subjunctive complements appear in tenseless contexts in this language, i.e. control structures, ECM-like structures, and obviative structures. In this paper, I provide a new analysis for subject-verb agreement asymmetry in these complements and account for the different Case markers that appear on their subject. In particular, I argue that feature-specification on the inflectional head T triggers the verbal agreement asymmetry in subjunctive complements. I also argue that formal features and nominative Case in these complements can be valued by a defective probe. Crucially, I argue that the defective probe can establish agreement and assign nominative Case in-situ, without resorting to A-movement, and the subsequent movement of the embedded subject to a preverbal position is triggered by the EPP feature on the Φ-complete T. The corollary of this investigation lends support to the assumption that the Case-agreement system in this language is not contingent on tense.

  13. Coagulation and complement system in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helling, H; Stephan, B; Pindur, G

    2015-01-01

    Activation of coagulation and inflammatory response including the complement system play a major role in the pathogenesis of critical illness. However, only limited data are available addressing the relationship of both pathways and its assessment of a predictive value for the clinical outcome in intense care medicine. Therefore, parameters of the coagulation and complement system were studied in patients with septicaemia and multiple trauma regarded as being exemplary for critical illness. 34 patients (mean age: 51.38 years (±16.57), 15 females, 19 males) were investigated at day 1 of admittance to the intensive care unit (ICU). Leukocytes, complement factors C3a and C5a were significantly (p complement system as part of the inflammatory response is a significant mechanism in septicaemia, whereas loss and consumption of blood components including parts of the coagulation and complement system is more characteristic for multiple trauma. Protein C in case of severe reduction might be of special concern for surviving in sepsis. Activation of haemostasis was occurring in both diseases, however, overt DIC was not confirmed in this study to be a leading mechanism in critically ill patients. MOF score, lactate, C1-inhibitor and prothrombin time have been the only statistically significant predictors for lethal outcome suggesting that organ function, microcirculation, haemostasis and inflammatory response are essential elements of the pathomechanism and clinical course of diseases among critically ill patients.

  14. Micrurus snake venoms activate human complement system and generate anaphylatoxins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanaka Gabriela D

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Micrurus, coral snakes (Serpentes, Elapidae, comprises more than 120 species and subspecies distributed from the south United States to the south of South America. Micrurus snake bites can cause death by muscle paralysis and further respiratory arrest within a few hours after envenomation. Clinical observations show mainly neurotoxic symptoms, although other biological activities have also been experimentally observed, including cardiotoxicity, hemolysis, edema and myotoxicity. Results In the present study we have investigated the action of venoms from seven species of snakes from the genus Micrurus on the complement system in in vitro studies. Several of the Micrurus species could consume the classical and/or the lectin pathways, but not the alternative pathway, and C3a, C4a and C5a were generated in sera treated with the venoms as result of this complement activation. Micrurus venoms were also able to directly cleave the α chain of the component C3, but not of the C4, which was inhibited by 1,10 Phenanthroline, suggesting the presence of a C3α chain specific metalloprotease in Micrurus spp venoms. Furthermore, complement activation was in part associated with the cleavage of C1-Inhibitor by protease(s present in the venoms, which disrupts complement activation control. Conclusion Micrurus venoms can activate the complement system, generating a significant amount of anaphylatoxins, which may assist due to their vasodilatory effects, to enhance the spreading of other venom components during the envenomation process.

  15. Complement monitoring of Pluronic 127 gel and micelles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamad, Islam; Hunter, A Christy; Moghimi, Seyed Moien

    2013-01-01

    Poloxamer 407 is a non-ionic polyethylene oxide (PEO)/polypropylene oxide (PPO) block copolymer, which exhibits reversible thermogelation properties. Poloxamer gel has attracted many applications for controlled release of therapeutic agents as well as in surgical interventions such as controlled......, which may have been responsible for triggering complement. Since poloxamer 407 administration has been reported to cause significant changes in plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels we further examined the role of lipoproteins in poloxamer-mediated complement activation. Our results show...... above its cmc) with human LDL, which could have played a significant role in regulating complement activation. These observations are in line with the suggested modulatory role of lipoproteins in host defence and inflammatory processes. A better understanding of block copolymer interaction...

  16. Progress in Parallel Schur Complement Preconditioning for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Timothy J.; Chan, Tony F.; Tang, Wei-Pai; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We consider preconditioning methods for nonself-adjoint advective-diffusive systems based on a non-overlapping Schur complement procedure for arbitrary triangulated domains. The ultimate goal of this research is to develop scalable preconditioning algorithms for fluid flow discretizations on parallel computing architectures. In our implementation of the Schur complement preconditioning technique, the triangulation is first partitioned into a number of subdomains using the METIS multi-level k-way partitioning code. This partitioning induces a natural 2X2 partitioning of the p.d.e. discretization matrix. By considering various inverse approximations of the 2X2 system, we have developed a family of robust preconditioning techniques. A computer code based on these ideas has been developed and tested on the IBM SP2 and the SGI Power Challenge array using MPI message passing protocol. A number of example CFD calculations will be presented to illustrate and assess various Schur complement approximations.

  17. How regional non-proliferation arrangements complement international verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, J.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation focuses on international verification in the form of IAEA Safeguards, and discusses the relationship between IAEA safeguards and the relevant regional arrangements, both the existing and the future. For most States the political commitment against acquisition of nuclear weapons has been carefully reached and strongly held. Their observance of treaty commitments does not depend on the deterrent effect of verification activities. Safeguards serve to assist States who recognise it is in their own interest to demonstrate their compliance to others. Thus safeguards are a vital confidence building measure in their own right, as well as being a major complement to the broader range of international confidence building measures. Safeguards can both complement other confidence building measures and in turn be complemented by them. Within consideration of how it could work it is useful to consider briefly current developments of IAEA safeguards, i.e. existing regional arrangements and nuclear weapon free zones

  18. Complement activity of polysaccharides from three different plant parts of Terminalia macroptera extracted as healers do.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan-Feng; Zhang, Bing-Zhao; Inngjerdingen, Kari Tvete; Barsett, Hilde; Diallo, Drissa; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2014-08-08

    Water decoctions of the root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera are used by traditional healers in Mali to cure a wide range of illnesses, such as wounds, hepatitis, malaria, fever, cough and diarrhea as well as tuberculosis. Plant polysaccharides isolated from crude water extracts have previously shown effects related to the immune system. The aims of this study are comparing the properties of the polysaccharides among different plant parts, as well as relationship between chemical characteristics and complement fixation activities when the plant material has been extracted as the traditional healers do, with boiling water directly. Root bark, stem bark and leaves of Terminalia macroptera were extracted by boiling water, and five purified polysaccharide fractions were obtained by anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Chemical compositions were determined by GC of the TMS derivatives of the methyl-glycosides and the linkage determined after permethylation and GC-MS of the derived partly methylated alditol acetates. The bioactivity was determined by the complement fixation assay of the crude extracts and purified fractions. The acidic fraction TRBD-I-I isolated from the root bark was the most active of the fractions isolated. Structural studies showed that all purified fractions are of pectic nature, containing rhamnogalacturonan type I backbone. Arabinogalactan type II side chains were present in all fractions except TRBD-I-II. The observed differences in complement fixation activities among the five purified polysaccharide fractions are probably due to differences in monosaccharide compositions, linkage types and molecular sizes. The crude extracts from root bark and stem bark have similar total activities, both higher than those from leaves. The root bark, leaves and stem bark are all good sources for fractions containing bioactive polysaccharides. But due to sustainability, it is prefer to use leaves rather than the other two plant

  19. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Geoffrey S [Santa Fe, NM; Cabantous, Stephanie [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  20. Transformation of serum-susceptible Escherichia coli O111 with p16Slux plasmid to allow for real-time monitoring of complement-based inactivation of bacterial growth in bovine milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maye, S; Stanton, C; Fitzgerald, G F; Kelly, P M

    2016-01-01

    Complement activity has only recently been characterized in raw bovine milk. However, the activity of this component of the innate immune system was found to diminish as milk was subjected to heat or partitioning during cream separation. Detection of complement in milk relies on a bactericidal assay. This assay exploits the specific growth susceptibility of Escherichia coli O111 to the presence of complement. Practical application of the assay was demonstrated when a reduction in complement activity was recorded in the case of pasteurized and reduced-fat milks. This presented an opportunity to improve the functionality of the bactericidal assay by incorporating bioluminescence capability into the target organism. Following some adaptation, the strain was transformed by correctly integrating the p16Slux plasmid. Growth properties of the transformed strain of E. coli O111 were unaffected by the modification. The efficacy of the strain adaptation was correlated using the LINEST function analysis [r=0.966; standard error of prediction (SEy)=0.957] bioluminescence with that of bactericidal assay total plate counts within the range of 7.5 to 9.2 log cfu/mL using a combination of raw and processed milk samples. Importantly, the transformed E. coli O111 p16Slux strain could be identified in milk and broth samples using bioluminescence measurement, thus enabling the bactericidal assay-viability test to be monitored in real time throughout incubation. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. More than complementing Tolls: complement-Toll-like receptor synergy and crosstalk in innate immunity and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Lambris, John D

    2016-11-01

    Complement and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play key roles in the host immune response and are swiftly activated by infection or other types of immunological stress. This review focuses on the capacity of complement and TLRs to engage in signaling crosstalk, ostensibly to coordinate immune and inflammatory responses through synergistic or antagonistic (regulatory) interactions. However, overactivation or dysregulation of either system may lead-often synergistically-to exaggerated inflammation and host tissue injury. Intriguingly, moreover, certain pathogens can manipulate complement-TLR crosstalk pathways in ways that undermine host immunity and favor their persistence. In the setting of polymicrobial inflammatory disease, subversion of complement-TLR crosstalk by keystone pathogens can promote dysbiosis. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying complement-TLR crosstalk pathways can, therefore, be used productively for tailored therapeutic approaches, such as, to enhance host immunity, mitigate destructive inflammation, or counteract microbial subversion of the host response. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Dual isotope assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, G.F.W.; Stevens, R.A.J.; Jacoby, B.

    1980-01-01

    Dual isotope assays for thyroid function are performed by carrying out a radio-immunoassay for two of thyroxine (T4), tri-iodothyronine (T3), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), and thyroxine binding globulin (TBG), by a method wherein a version of one of the thyroid components, preferably T4 or T3 is labelled with Selenium-75 and the version of the other thyroid component is labelled with a different radionuclide, preferably Iodine-125. (author)

  3. Cytotoxicity assay automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinthal, E. C.; Payne, R. O.

    1971-01-01

    The design and construction of a system to automatically test HLP antigens are described. Major efforts were made to test and evaluate the performance of such a system, and compare its performance with nonautomatic tissue typing techniques. The system is based on the fluorochromatic cytotoxicity assay. Results show the system will work but is subject to malfunctions after a few samplings, and poses problems in showing correctly the necessary readings.

  4. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidani, Kárita C. F.; Bavia, Lorena; Ambrosio, Altair R.; de Messias-Reason, Iara J.

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD), a neglected sickness that affects around 6–8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP), lectin (LP), and alternative (AP). The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion of plasma

  5. The Complement System: A Prey of Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kárita C. F. Lidani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD, a neglected sickness that affects around 6–8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP, lectin (LP, and alternative (AP. The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs, respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion

  6. The Complement System: A Prey ofTrypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidani, Kárita C F; Bavia, Lorena; Ambrosio, Altair R; de Messias-Reason, Iara J

    2017-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi is a protozoan parasite known to cause Chagas disease (CD), a neglected sickness that affects around 6-8 million people worldwide. Originally, CD was mainly found in Latin America but more recently, it has been spread to countries in North America, Asia, and Europe due the international migration from endemic areas. Thus, at present CD represents an important concern of global public health. Most of individuals that are infected by T. cruzi may remain in asymptomatic form all lifelong, but up to 40% of them will develop cardiomyopathy, digestive mega syndromes, or both. The interaction between the T. cruzi infective forms and host-related immune factors represents a key point for a better understanding of the physiopathology of CD. In this context, the complement, as one of the first line of host defense against infection was shown to play an important role in recognizing T. cruzi metacyclic trypomastigotes and in controlling parasite invasion. The complement consists of at least 35 or more plasma proteins and cell surface receptors/regulators, which can be activated by three pathways: classical (CP), lectin (LP), and alternative (AP). The CP and LP are mainly initiated by immune complexes or pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), respectively, whereas AP is spontaneously activated by hydrolysis of C3. Once activated, several relevant complement functions are generated which include opsonization and phagocytosis of particles or microorganisms and cell lysis. An important step during T. cruzi infection is when intracellular trypomastigotes are release to bloodstream where they may be target by complement. Nevertheless, the parasite uses a sequence of events in order to escape from complement-mediated lysis. In fact, several T. cruzi molecules are known to interfere in the initiation of all three pathways and in the assembly of C3 convertase, a key step in the activation of complement. Moreover, T. cruzi promotes secretion of plasma

  7. Microvascular alterations and the role of complement in dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahoria, Rajat; Selcen, Duygu; Engel, Andrew G

    2016-07-01

    Different mechanisms have been proposed to explain the pathological basis of perifascicular muscle fibre atrophy in dermatomyositis. These include ischaemia due to immune-mediated microvascular injury, enhanced expression of type 1 interferon-induced gene transcripts in perifascicular capillaries and muscle fibres, and occlusion of larger perimysial blood vessels. Microvascular complement deposition is a feature of dermatomyositis pathology but the trigger for complement activation, the predominant complement pathway involved, or its role in the pathogenesis of the disease, has not been clearly defined. In the first step of this study we examined the density of capillaries and transverse vessels and searched for occlusion or depletion of larger perimysial blood vessels in 10 patients with dermatomyositis. This revealed an invariable association of perifascicular atrophy with capillary and transverse vessel depletion. The capillary and transverse vessel densities in non-atrophic fibre regions were not significantly different from those in muscle specimens of 10 age-matched controls. Next, in the same 10, as well as in 40 additional dermatomyositis patients, we searched for vascular deposits of IgG, IgM, and the C5b-9 complement membrane attack complex. Thirty-one of 50 dermatomyositis specimens contained C5b-9 reactive endomysial microvessels but none of these or other vessels reacted for IgG. Ten of 50 specimens harboured IgM-positive capillaries but only a few of these reacted for C5b-9. Finally, we analysed and compared different pathways of complement activation in dermatomyositis, lupus nephritis, and necrotic muscle fibres in Duchenne dystrophy. In lupus nephritis, C5-b9 deposits co-localized with IgG, IgM, C1q, and C4d, consistent with immune complex dependent activation of the classical complement pathway. In both dermatomyositis and Duchenne dystrophy, C5-b9 deposits co-localized with C1q and C4d and rarely with IgM indicating activation of the classical

  8. Reincarnation of ancient links between coagulation and complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, E M

    2015-06-01

    Throughout evolution, organisms have developed means to contain wounds by simultaneously limiting bleeding and eliminating pathogens and damaged host cells via the recruitment of innate defense mechanisms. Disease emerges when there is unchecked activation of innate immune and/or coagulation responses. A key component of innate immunity is the complement system. Concurrent excess activation of coagulation and complement - two major blood-borne proteolytic pathways - is evident in numerous diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, venous thromboembolic disease, thrombotic microangiopathies, arthritis, cancer, and infectious diseases. Delineating the cross-talk between these two cascades will uncover novel therapeutic insights. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  9. Therapeutic complement inhibition – from experimental to clinical medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappegård, Knut Tore; Bjerre, Anna; Tjønnfjord, Geir Erland; Mollnes, Tom Eirik

    2015-10-20

    Internationally, the use of the C5-inhibiting monoclonal antibody eculizumab has in the course of just a few years become the first choice of treatment of atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome and the most severe phenotypes of paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria. At present eculizumab is the only complement inhibitor in ordinary clinical use. This despite the fact that there only exists one randomised, placebo-controlled trial of eculizumab for paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria and none for atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and that the therapy is very costly. There is reason to believe that complement inhibition as therapy will increase in the future, and that other drugs will also prove to be effective.

  10. Human neutrophil peptides and complement factor Bb in pathogenesis of acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Wenjing; Pham, Huy P; Williams, Lance A; McDaniel, Jenny; Siniard, Rance C; Lorenz, Robin G; Marques, Marisa B; Zheng, X Long

    2016-11-01

    Acquired thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura is primarily caused by the deficiency of plasma ADAMTS13 activity resulting from autoantibodies against ADAMTS13. However, ADAMTS13 deficiency alone is often not sufficient to cause acute thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Infections or systemic inflammation may precede acute bursts of the disease, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Herein, 52 patients with acquired autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura and 30 blood donor controls were recruited for the study. The plasma levels of human neutrophil peptides 1-3 and complement activation fragments (i.e. Bb, iC3b, C4d, and sC5b-9) were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Univariate analyses were performed to determine the correlation between each biomarker and clinical outcomes. We found that the plasma levels of human neutrophil peptides 1-3 and Bb in patients with acute thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura were significantly higher than those in the control (Ppurpura patients and the control. We conclude that innate immunity, i.e. neutrophil and complement activation via the alternative pathway, may play a role in the pathogenesis of acute autoimmune thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, and a therapy targeted at these pathways may be considered in a subset of these patients. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  11. Edwardsiella tarda Tunes Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle to Evade Complement-Mediated Killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-xue Cheng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Evasion of complement-mediated killing is a common phenotype for many different types of pathogens, but the mechanism is still poorly understood. Most of the clinic isolates of Edwardsiella tarda, an important pathogen infecting both of human and fish, are commonly found serum-resistant. To explore the potential mechanisms, we applied gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS-based metabolomics approaches to profile the metabolomes of E. tarda EIB202 in the presence or absence of serum stress. We found that tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle was greatly enhanced in the presence of serum. The quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR and enzyme activity assays validated this result. Furthermore, exogenous succinate that promotes the TCA cycle increased serum resistance, while TCA cycle inhibitors (bromopyruvate and propanedioic acid that inhibit TCA cycle, attenuated serum resistance. Moreover, the enhanced TCA cycle increased membrane potential, thus decreased the formation of membrane attack complex at cell surface, resulting serum resistance. These evidences suggested a previously unknown membrane potential-dependent mechanism of serum resistance. Therefore, our findings reveal that pathogen mounts a metabolic trick to cope with the serum complement-mediated killing.

  12. Serum and plasma fibronectin binds to complement reacted immune complexes primarily via Clq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, G; Svehag, S E

    1986-01-01

    The binding of fibronectin to human Clq, C3b, and complement-reacted immune complexes (IC) was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Microplates were coated with BSA followed by incubation with rabbit-anti-BSA IgG or F(ab')2 fragments of rabbit anti-BSA. Incubation of the solid phase...... with serum at 37 degrees C caused attachment of Clq and C3b. Addition of EDTA to the serum inhibited the binding of C3b, but not Clq, whereas substitution of the anti-BSA IgG on the solid phase with the F(ab')2 fragments abrogated the Clq, but not the C3b binding. Fibronectin binding was observed after...

  13. Contribution of the complement Membrane Attack Complex to the bactericidal activity of human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berends, Evelien T M; Mohan, Sarbani; Miellet, Willem R; Ruyken, Maartje; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2015-06-01

    Direct killing of Gram-negative bacteria by serum is usually attributed to the Membrane Attack Complex (MAC) that is assembled upon activation of the complement system. In serum bactericidal assays, the activity of the MAC is usually blocked by a relatively unspecific method in which certain heat-labile complement components are inactivated at 56°C. The goal of this study was to re-evaluate MAC-driven lysis towards various Gram-negative bacteria. Instead of using heat-treatment, we included the highly specific C5 cleavage inhibitor OmCI to specifically block the formation of the MAC. Using a C5 conversion analysis tool, we monitored the efficacy of the inhibitor during the incubations. Our findings indicate that 'serum-sensitive' bacteria are not necessarily killed by the MAC. Other heat-labile serum factors can contribute to serum bactericidal activity. These unidentified factors are most potent at serum concentrations of 10% and higher. Furthermore, we also find that some bacteria can be killed by the MAC at a slower rate. Our data demonstrate the requirement for the use of specific inhibitors in serum bactericidal assays and revealed that the classification of serum-sensitive and resistant strains needs re-evaluation. Moreover, it is important to determine bacterial viability at multiple time intervals to differentiate serum susceptibility between bacterial species. In conclusion, these data provide new insights into bacterial killing by the humoral immune system and may guide future vaccine development studies for the treatment of pathogenic serum-resistant bacteria. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The Use of Competitive Enzyme Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 500 lung tissues and sera samples of cattle from CBPP endemic areas was used in this study to determine the effectiveness of combining abattoir survey with competitive Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (cELISA) as an alternative to Complement Fixation Test (CFT) in providing a better and more reliable ...

  15. Functional Characterization of the Disease-Associated N-Terminal Complement Factor H Mutation W198R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcell Cserhalmi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dysregulation of the complement alternative pathway is involved in the pathogenesis of several diseases, including the kidney diseases atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS and C3 glomerulopathy (C3G. In a patient, initially diagnosed with chronic glomerulonephritis, possibly C3G, and who 6 years later had an episode of aHUS, a heterozygous missense mutation leading to a tryptophan to arginine exchange (W198R in the factor H (FH complement control protein (CCP 3 domain has previously been identified. The aim of this study was to clarify the functional relevance of this mutation. To this end, wild-type (FH1–4WT and mutant (FH1–4W198R CCPs 1–4 of FH were expressed as recombinant proteins. The FH1–4W198R mutant showed decreased C3b binding compared with FH1–4WT. FH1–4W198R had reduced cofactor and decay accelerating activity compared with the wild-type protein. Hemolysis assays demonstrated impaired capacity of FH1–4W198R to protect rabbit erythrocytes from human complement-mediated lysis, and also to prevent lysis of sheep erythrocytes in human serum induced by a monoclonal antibody binding in FH CCP5 domain, compared with that of FH1–4WT. Thus, the FH W198R exchange results in impaired complement alternative pathway regulation. The heterozygous nature of this mutation in the index patient may explain the manifestation of two diseases, likely due to different triggers leading to complement dysregulation in plasma or on cell surfaces.

  16. Functional recruitment of the human complement inhibitor C4BP to Yersinia pseudotuberculosis outer membrane protein Ail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Derek K; Riva, Rauna; Kirjavainen, Vesa; Jarva, Hanna; Ginström, Erica; Blom, Anna M; Skurnik, Mikael; Meri, Seppo

    2012-05-01

    Ail is a 17-kDa chromosomally encoded outer membrane protein that mediates serum resistance (complement resistance) in the pathogenic Yersiniae (Yersinia pestis, Y. enterocolitica, and Y. pseudotuberculosis). In this article, we demonstrate that Y. pseudotuberculosis Ail from strains PB1, 2812/79, and YPIII/pIB1 (serotypes O:1a, O:1b, and O:3, respectively) can bind the inhibitor of the classical and lectin pathways of complement, C4b-binding protein (C4BP). Binding was observed irrespective of serotype tested and independently of YadA, which is the primary C4BP receptor of Y. enterocolitica. Disruption of the ail gene in Y. pseudotuberculosis resulted in loss of C4BP binding. Cofactor assays revealed that bound C4BP is functional, because bound C4BP in the presence of factor I cleaved C4b. In the absence of YadA, Ail conferred serum resistance to strains PB1 and YPIII, whereas serum resistance was observed in strain 2812/79 in the absence of both YadA and Ail, suggesting additional serum resistance factors. Ail from strain YPIII/pIB1 alone can mediate serum resistance and C4BP binding, because its expression in a serum-sensitive laboratory strain of Escherichia coli conferred both of these phenotypes. Using a panel of C4BP mutants, each deficient in a single complement control protein domain, we observed that complement control protein domains 6-8 are important for binding to Ail. Binding of C4BP was unaffected by increasing heparin or salt concentrations, suggesting primarily nonionic interactions. These results indicate that Y. pseudotuberculosis Ail recruits C4BP in a functional manner, facilitating resistance to attack from complement.

  17. Construction of a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Protein–protein interactions are essential for signal transduction in cells. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) is a novel technology that utilises green fluorescent proteins to visualize protein–protein interactions and subcellular protein localisation. BiFC based on pSATN vectors are a good system for ...

  18. Non-kinetic capabilities: complementing the kinetic prevalence to targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ducheine, P.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting is used in military doctrine to describe a military operational way, using (military) means to influence a target (or addressee) in order to achieve designated political and/or military goals. The four factors italicized are used to analyse non-kinetic targeting, complementing our

  19. Non-kinetic capabilities: complementing the kinetic prevalence to targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ducheine, P.A.L.; Ducheine, P.A.L.; Schmitt, M.N.; Osinga, F.P.B.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting is used in military doctrine to describe a military operational way, using (military) means to influence a target (or addressee) in order to achieve designated political and/or military goals. The four factors italicized are used to analyse non-kinetic targeting, thereby complementing our

  20. Intrusion detection systems: complement to firewall security system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intrusion detection systems: complement to firewall security system. ... Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management. Journal Home ... If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs.

  1. Structural and functional characterization of human complement factor P

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dennis

    The complement system is of great importance for the innate immune response, which can lead to opsonization and removal of invading pathogens, as well as immune complexes and damaged self-cells. Factor P (FP), also known as properdin, acts as a positive regulator of the alternative pathway...

  2. X-linked inheritance of Fanconi anemia complementation group B.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meetei, AR; Levitus, M.; Xue, Y; Medhurst, A.L. dr.; Zwaan, M.; Ling, C; Rooimans, M.A.; Bier, P; Hoatlin, M.; Pals, G.; Winter, de J.P.; Joenje, H.

    2004-01-01

    Fanconi anemia is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by diverse clinical symptoms, hypersensitivity to DNA crosslinking agents, chromosomal instability and susceptibility to cancer. Fanconi anemia has at least 11 complementation groups (A, B, C, D1, D2, E, F, G, I, J, L); the genes

  3. Pleurotus sajor-caju HSP100 complements a thermotolerance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To examine its function, PsHsp100 was transformed into a temperature-sensitive hsp104 deletion mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain to test the hypothesis that PsHSP100 is an protein that functions in thermotolerance. Overexpression of PsHSP100 complemented the thermotolerance defect of the hsp104 mutant ...

  4. Complement factor d in age-related macular degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stanton, C.M.; Yates, J.R.W.; Hollander, A.I. den; Seddon, J.M.; Swaroop, A.; Stambolian, D.; Fauser, S.; Hoyng, C.B.; Yu, Y.; Atsuhiro, K.; Branham, K.; Othman, M.; Chen, W.; Kortvely, E.; Chalmers, K.; Hayward, C.; Moore, A.T.; Dhillon, B.; Ueffing, M.; Wright, A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the role of complement factor D (CFD) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) by analysis of genetic association, copy number variation, and plasma CFD concentrations. Methods. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the CFD gene were genotyped and the results analyzed by

  5. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    molecule and potential drug. [Jha P and Kotwal G J 2003 Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a potential wonder drug; J. Biosci. 28 265–271]. 1. Introduction. The pathogen-host interaction is a dynamic phenomenon which involves generation of defense mechanism by host and its evasion by ...

  6. Antibody and complement levels in patients with Burkitt's lymphoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentration of immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, and IgM) and complement (C3 and C4) were measured in fifty-seven (57) Nigerian children with Burkitt's lymphoma (BL), and in twenty-eight (28) apparently healthy control subjects, using the single radial immunodiffusion (SRID) technique. The sera analyzed were obtained ...

  7. Complement-dependent transport of antigen into B cell follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Santiago F.; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Kuligowski, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    Since the original proposal by Fearon and Locksley (Fearon and Locksley. 1996. Science 272: 50-53) that the complement system linked innate and adaptive immunity, there has been a rapid expansion of studies on this topic. With the advance of intravital imaging, a number of recent papers revealed ...

  8. The complemental role of dryland cultivated pastures in market ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complemental role of dryland cultivated pastures in market-related beef production from semi-arid rangeland. ... Abstract. Rangeland condition is a decisive factor in determining the income/cost ratio of production hence in the profitability of any beef production enterprise. Cultivated pastures can play an important role in ...

  9. Terminal complement inhibitor eculizumab in atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legendre, C.M.; Licht, C.; Muus, P.; Greenbaum, L.A.; Babu, S.; Bedrosian, C.; Bingham, C.; Cohen, D.J.; Delmas, Y.; Douglas, K.; Eitner, F.; Feldkamp, T.; Fouque, D.; Furman, R.R.; Gaber, O.; Herthelius, M.; Hourmant, M.; Karpman, D.; Lebranchu, Y.; Mariat, C.; Menne, J.; Moulin, B.; Nurnberger, J.; Ogawa, M.; Remuzzi, G.; Richard, T.; Sberro-Soussan, R.; Severino, B.; Sheerin, N.S.; Trivelli, A.; Zimmerhackl, L.B.; Goodship, T.; Loirat, C.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome is a genetic, life-threatening, chronic disease of complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy. Plasma exchange or infusion may transiently maintain normal levels of hematologic measures but does not treat the underlying systemic disease. METHODS: We

  10. Complement Levels in Normal Anaesthetised South Mrican Pigs

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-09-11

    Sep 11, 1974 ... zero haemolysis) the serum dilution was replaced by 2,7 ml diluent and ... deviation, coefficient of variation, 95% confidence limits and t values ... the degree of lysis. The constant k is the 50% unit of complement. The exponent Iln, which determines the shape of the sigmoid curve, depends on experimental.

  11. Echinoderm immunity and the evolution of the complement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, P S; Al-Sharif, W Z; Clow, L A; Smith, L C

    1999-01-01

    Our understanding of inflammatory responses in humans has its roots in the comparative approach to immunology. In the late 1900s, research on echinoderms provided the initial evidence for the importance of phagocytic cells in reactions to foreign material. Studies of allograft rejection kinetics have shown that echinoderms have a non-adaptive, activation type of immune response. Coelomocytes mediate the cellular responses to immune challenges through phagocytosis, encapsulation, cytotoxicity, and the production of antimicrobial agents. In addition, a variety of humoral factors found in the coelomic fluid, including lectins, agglutinins, and lysins, are important in host defense against pathogens and other foreign substances. Recently, a simple complement system has been identified in the purple sea urchin that is homologous to the alternative pathway in vertebrates. The sea urchin [corrected] homologue of C3, is inducible by challenge with lipopolysaccharide, which is known to activate coelomocytes. Complement components have been identified in all vertebrate classes, and now have been characterized in protochordates and echinoderms indicating the primordial nature of the complement system. Because it is thought that the complement system evolved from a few primordial genes by gene duplication and divergence, the origin of this system appears to have occurred within the common ancestor of the deuterostomes.

  12. Vaccinia complement control protein: Multi-functional protein and a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In addition to binding complement, VCP also binds to heparin. These two binding abilities can take place simultaneously and contribute to its many function and to its potential use in several inflammatory diseases, e.g. Alzheimer's disease (AD), CNS injury, xenotransplantation, etc. making it a truly fascinating molecule and ...

  13. Dynamics of human complement-mediated killing of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nypaver, Christina M; Thornton, Margaret M; Yin, Suellen M; Bracho, David O; Nelson, Patrick W; Jones, Alan E; Bortz, David M; Younger, John G

    2010-11-01

    With an in vitro system that used a luminescent strain of Klebsiella pneumoniae to assess bacterial metabolic activity in near-real-time, we investigated the dynamics of complement-mediated attack in healthy individuals and in patients presenting to the emergency department with community-acquired severe sepsis. A novel mathematical/statistical model was developed to simplify light output trajectories over time into two fitted parameters, the rate of complement activation and the delay from activation to the onset of killing. Using Factor B-depleted serum, the alternative pathway was found to be the primary bactericidal effector: In the absence of B, C3 opsonization as measured by flow cytometry did not progress and bacteria proliferated near exponentially. Defects in bacterial killing were easily demonstrable in patients with severe sepsis compared with healthy volunteers. In most patients with sepsis, the rate of activation was higher than in normal subjects but was associated with a prolonged delay between activation and bacterial killing (P < 0.05 for both). Theoretical modeling suggested that this combination of accentuated but delayed function should allow successful bacterial killing but with significantly greater complement activation. The use of luminescent bacteria allowed for the development of a novel and powerful tool for assessing complement immunology for the purposes of mechanistic study and patient evaluation.

  14. Proposing the LEGS framework to complement the WHO building ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This includes the health sector. The framework is based on the four pillars of leadership, ethics, governance and systems, hence called LEGS framework. It can complement the six World Health Organization building blocks that guide inputs to help a health system achieve the intended goals. Despite all the strengths of the ...

  15. Complement Levels and Haemate-Biochemical Parameters as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complement levels and haemato-biochemical parameters in West African Dwarf (WAD) and Borno White (BW) goats experimentally infected with Trypanosoma congolense were investigated. Parasitaemia was established in both breeds of goats by day 7 post-infection. Peak parasitaemia of 7.5 x 103/µL for WAD goats was ...

  16. Multiple complementizers in Modern Danish and Middle English

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvad, Anne Mette

    2016-01-01

    This paper expands the empirical coverage of the cP/CP-distinction proposed by Nyvad, Christensen & Vikner (2015) by applying it to a range of embedded clause types involving multiple complementizers in Middle English and Modern Danish, and offering a uniform analysis. Due to the fact that a number...

  17. Electroencephalography Is a Good Complement to Currently Established Dementia Biomarkers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Daniel; Jelic, Vesna; Cavallin, Lena

    2016-01-01

    EEG to the diagnostic workup substantially increases the detection of AD pathology even in pre-dementia stages and improves differential diagnosis. EEG could serve as a good complement to currently established dementia biomarkers since it is cheap, noninvasive, and extensively applied outside academic centers....

  18. Yin and Yang: complement activation and regulation in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yong; Meri, Seppo

    2003-08-01

    The spectrum of inflammatory diseases is nowadays considered to include diverse diseases of the central nervous system (CNS). Current evidence suggests that syndromes such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) have important inflammatory and immune components and may be amenable to treatment by anti-inflammatory and immunotherapeutic approaches. Compelling evidence has been reported that complement activation occurs in the brain with Alzheimer's disease, and that this contributes to the development of a local inflammatory state that is correlated with cognitive dysfunction. The complement system is a critical element of the innate immune system recognizing and killing, or targeting for destruction, otherwise pathogenic organisms. In addition to triggering the generation of a membranolytic complex, complement proteins interact with cell surface receptors to promote a local inflammatory response that contributes to the protection and healing of the host. Complement activation causes inflammation and cell damage, yet it is an essential component in trying to eliminate cell debris and potentially toxic protein aggregates. It is the balance of these seemingly competing events--the "Yin" and the "Yang"--that influences the ultimate state of neuronal function. Knowledge of the unique molecular interactions that occur in the development of Alzheimer's disease, the functional consequences of those interactions, and the proportional contribution of each element to this disorder, should facilitate the design of effective therapeutic strategies for this disease.

  19. Cell phenotypes, immunoglobulins and complement in lesions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... stained positive for CD68. Type III reaction consisted of a discrete epithelioid granuloma without wellformed grains. IgG, IgM and C3 were found on the surface of the grain and the hyphae . Keywords: Madurella mycetomatis lesion, cell phenotypes, immunoglobulins, complement. Sudanese Journal of Dermatology Vol.

  20. Complement and renal transplantation : From donor to recipient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Jeffrey; Schuurs, Theo A.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Seelen, Marc A.

    2008-01-01

    Long-term kidney graft survival is affected by different variables including donor condition, ischemia-reperfusion injury, and graft rejection during the transplantation process. The complement system is an important mediator of renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and in rejecting allografts. However,

  1. The role of complement in autoimmune renal disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seelen, M. A.; Daha, M. R.

    The predominance of renal involvement in autoimmune diseases can most likely be assigned to the specialised function of the kidneys filtrating over 120 ml plasma per minute. Complement activation by autoantibodies directed against planted antigens or antigens already present in renal tissue in the

  2. The complement system in the peripheral nerve: Friend or foe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaglia, V.; Daha, M. R.; Baas, F.

    2008-01-01

    The complement (C) system plays a central role in innate immunity and bridges innate and adaptive immune responses. A fine balance of C activation and regulation mediates the elimination of invading pathogens and the protection of the host from excessive C deposition on healthy tissues. If this

  3. The Importance of Being a Complement: CED Effects Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurka, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation revisits subject island effects (Ross 1967, Chomsky 1973) cross-linguistically. Controlled acceptability judgment studies in German, English, Japanese and Serbian show that extraction out of specifiers is consistently degraded compared to extraction out of complements, indicating that the Condition on Extraction domains (CED,…

  4. A Graphical Teaching Tool for Understanding Two's Complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Carlos L.

    As part of the Electrical Engineering program at the Univesity of Southern Maine, students are typically introduced to Two's Complement algebra and representation, a method to include negative numbers in the binary representation of integers that is widely used in microprocessors and related digital systems. The traditional, procedural method to…

  5. High protein complementation with high fiber substrates for oyster ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Agricultural residues have been world widely accepted for oyster mushroom culture. In this study, we used wheat straw, barley straw, maize stem residue, and lawn residue as substrates coupled with wheat bran, rice bran and soybean powder as complements for the growth of Pleurotus florida and Pleurotus ostreatus as ...

  6. Activation of the lectin complement pathway on human renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study aimed to investigate the roles of high glucose and mannose-binding lectin (MBL) on the activation of the lectin complement pathway (LCP) on human renal glomerular endothelial cells (HRGECs) in vitro. Flow cytometry analysis, immunofluorescence staining and Western blot were used to detect the cell surface ...

  7. Complement factor H deficiency results in decreased neuroretinal expression of Cd59a in aged mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Carsten; Williams, Jennifer; Juel, Helene Bæk

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The complement system is closely linked to the pathogenesis of AMD. Several complement genes are expressed in RPE, and complement proteins accumulate in drusen. Further, a common variant of complement factor H (CFH) confers increased risk of developing AMD. Because the mechanisms by which...

  8. Soluble complement receptor 1 protects the peripheral nerve from early axon loss after injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaglia, Valeria; Wolterman, Ruud; de Kok, Maryla; Vigar, Miriam Ann; Wagenaar-Bos, Ineke; King, Rosalind Helen Mary; Morgan, Brian Paul; Baas, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Complement activation is a crucial early event in Wallerian degeneration. In this study we show that treatment of rats with soluble complement receptor 1 (sCR1), an inhibitor of all complement pathways, blocked both systemic and local complement activation after crush injury of the sciatic nerve.

  9. Radon assay for SNO+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rumleskie, Janet [Laurentian University, Greater Sudbury, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-12-31

    The SNO+ experiment will study neutrinos while located 6,800 feet below the surface of the earth at SNOLAB. Though shielded from surface backgrounds, emanation of radon radioisotopes from the surrounding rock leads to back-grounds. The characteristic decay of radon and its daughters allows for an alpha detection technique to count the amount of Rn-222 atoms collected. Traps can collect Rn-222 from various positions and materials, including an assay skid that will collect Rn-222 from the organic liquid scintillator used to detect interactions within SNO+.

  10. Radiorespirometic assay device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, G.V.; Straat, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    A radiorespirometic assay device is described in which the presence of microorganisms in a sample is determined by placing the sample in contact with a metabolisable radioactive labelled substrate, collecting any gas evolved, exposing a photosensitive material to the gas and determining if a spot is produced on the material. A spot indicates the presence of radioactivity showing that the substrate has been metabolized by a microorganism. Bacteria may be detected in body fluids, hospital operating rooms, water, food, cosmetics and drugs. (U.K.)

  11. Alternative complement pathway deregulation is correlated with dengue severity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo J M Nascimento

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The complement system, a key component that links the innate and adaptive immune responses, has three pathways: the classical, lectin, and alternative pathways. In the present study, we have analyzed the levels of various complement components in blood samples from dengue fever (DF and dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF patients and found that the level of complement activation is associated with disease severity. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with DHF had lower levels of complement factor 3 (C3; p = 0.002 and increased levels of C3a, C4a and C5a (p<0.0001 when compared to those with the less severe form, DF. There were no significant differences between DF and DHF patients in the levels of C1q, immunocomplexes (CIC-CIq and CRP. However, small but statistically significant differences were detected in the levels of MBL. In contrast, the levels of two regulatory proteins of the alternative pathway varied widely between DF and DHF patients: DHF patients had higher levels of factor D (p = 0.01, which cleaves factor B to yield the active (C3bBb C3 convertase, and lower levels of factor H (p = 0.03, which inactivates the (C3bBb C3 convertase, than did DF patients. When we considered the levels of factors D and H together as an indicator of (C3bBb C3 convertase regulation, we found that the plasma levels of these regulatory proteins in DHF patients favored the formation of the (C3bBb C3 convertase, whereas its formation was inhibited in DF patients (p<0.0001. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that an imbalance in the levels of regulatory factors D and H is associated with an abnormal regulation of complement activity in DHF patients.

  12. Comparative evaluation of genetic toxicity patterns of carcinogens and noncarcinogens: strategies for predictive use of short-term assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennant, R.W.; Spalding, J.W.; Stasiewicz, S.; Caspary, W.D.; Mason, J.M.; Resnick, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The results of a recent comprehensive evaluation of the relationship between four measures of in vitro genetic toxicity and the capacity of the chemicals to induce neoplasia in rodents carry some important implications. The results showed that while the Salmonella mutagenesis assay detected only about half of the carcinogenes as mutagens, the other three in vitro assays (mutagenesis in MOLY cells or induction of aberrations or SCEs in CHO cells) did not complement Salmonella since they failed to effectively discriminate between the carcinogens and noncarcinogens found negative in the Salmonella assay. The specificity of the Salmonella assay for this group of 73 chemicals was relatively high (only 4 of 29 noncarcinogens were positive). Therefore, the authors have begun to evaluate in vivo genetic toxicity assays for their ability to complement Salmonella in the identification of carcinogens

  13. Conglutinin exhibits a complement-dependent enhancement of the respiratory burst of phagocytes stimulated by E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, P; Svehag, S E; Andersen, Ove

    1991-01-01

    . Conglutinin enhances, in a dose-dependent manner, the respiratory burst of spleen cells stimulated with serum-opsonized Escherichia coli. The enhancement was only demonstrable in the presence of a functional complement system. The conglutinin-mediated enhancement of the respiratory burst was inhibited......Conglutinin is a mammalian C-type lectin which shows anti-bacterial activity when tested in vivo and in vitro. This study concerns the effect of conglutinin on the respiratory burst of murine spleen cells, using a chemiluminescence assay for measurement of generated reactive oxygen metabolites...

  14. Borrelia burgdorferi complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 2 does not contribute to complement resistance or host infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam S Coleman

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi, the pathogen of Lyme disease, cycles in nature through Ixodes ticks and mammalian hosts. At least five Complement Regulator-Acquiring Surface Proteins (BbCRASPs are produced by B. burgdorferi, which are thought to assist spirochetes in host immune evasion. Recent studies established that BbCRASP-2 is preferentially expressed in mammals, and elicits robust antibody response in infected hosts, including humans. We show that BbCRASP-2 is ubiquitously expressed in diverse murine tissues, but not in ticks, reinforcing a role of BbCRASP-2 in conferring B. burgdorferi defense against persistent host immune threats, such as complement. BbCRASP-2 immunization, however, fails to protect mice from B. burgdorferi infection and does not modify disease, as reflected by the development of arthritis. An infectious BbCRASP-2 mutant was generated, therefore, to examine the precise role of the gene product in spirochete infectivity. Similar to wild type B. burgdorferi, BbCRASP-2 mutants remain insensitive to complement-mediated killing in vitro, retain full murine infectivity and induce arthritis. Quantitative RT-PCR assessment indicates that survivability of BbCRASP-2-deficient B. burgdorferi is not due to altered expression of other BbCRASPs. Together, these results suggest that the function of a selectively expressed B. burgdorferi gene, BbCRASP-2, is not essential for complement resistance or infectivity in the murine host.

  15. A potent complement factor C3 specific nanobody inhibiting multiple functions in the alternative pathway of human and murine complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Rasmus K; Pihl, Rasmus; Gadeberg, Trine A F; Jensen, Jan K; Andersen, Kasper R; Thiel, Steffen; Laursen, Nick S; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2018-03-01

    The complement system is a complex, carefully regulated proteolytic cascade for which suppression of aberrant activation is of increasing clinical relevance and inhibition of the complement alternative pathway is a subject of intense research. Here, we describe the nanobody hC3Nb1 that binds to multiple functional states of C3 with sub-nanomolar affinity. The nanobody causes a complete shutdown of alternative pathway activity in human and murine serum when present in concentrations comparable to C3, and hC3Nb1 is shown to prevent both proconvertase assembly as well as binding of the C3 substrate to C3 convertases. Our crystal structure of the C3b-hC3Nb1 complex and functional experiments demonstrate that proconvertase formation is blocked by steric hindrance between the nanobody and an Asn-linked glycan on complement factor B. In addition, hC3Nb1 is shown to prevent factor H binding to C3b rationalizing its inhibition of factor I activity. Our results identify hC3Nb1 as a versatile, inexpensive, and powerful inhibitor of the alternative pathway in both human and murine in vitro model systems of complement activation. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Large-scale protein-protein interaction analysis in Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplasts by split firefly luciferase complementation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Feng Li

    Full Text Available Protein-protein interactions (PPIs constitute the regulatory network that coordinates diverse cellular functions. There are growing needs in plant research for creating protein interaction maps behind complex cellular processes and at a systems biology level. However, only a few approaches have been successfully used for large-scale surveys of PPIs in plants, each having advantages and disadvantages. Here we present split firefly luciferase complementation (SFLC as a highly sensitive and noninvasive technique for in planta PPI investigation. In this assay, the separate halves of a firefly luciferase can come into close proximity and transiently restore its catalytic activity only when their fusion partners, namely the two proteins of interest, interact with each other. This assay was conferred with quantitativeness and high throughput potential when the Arabidopsis mesophyll protoplast system and a microplate luminometer were employed for protein expression and luciferase measurement, respectively. Using the SFLC assay, we could monitor the dynamics of rapamycin-induced and ascomycin-disrupted interaction between Arabidopsis FRB and human FKBP proteins in a near real-time manner. As a proof of concept for large-scale PPI survey, we further applied the SFLC assay to testing 132 binary PPIs among 8 auxin response factors (ARFs and 12 Aux/IAA proteins from Arabidopsis. Our results demonstrated that the SFLC assay is ideal for in vivo quantitative PPI analysis in plant cells and is particularly powerful for large-scale binary PPI screens.

  17. The relapsing fever spirochete Borrelia miyamotoi is cultivable in a modified Kelly-Pettenkofer medium, and is resistant to human complement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemakers, Alex; Oei, Anneke; Fikrig, Michelle M; Miellet, Willem R; Hovius, Joppe W

    2014-09-04

    Borrelia miyamotoi is a relapsing fever spirochete found in Ixodes ticks in North America, Europe, and Asia, and has recently been found to be invasive in humans. Cultivation of this spirochete has not yet been described, but is important for patient diagnostics and scientific purposes. Host specificity of Borrelia species is dependent on resistance to host complement (serum resistance), and since B. miyamotoi has been identified as a human pathogen we were interested whether B. miyamotoi is resistant to human complement. We inoculated B. miyamotoi strains LB-2001 and HT31 in modified-Kelly-Pettenkofer medium with 10% fetal calf serum (MKP-F), and used standard non-laborious Borrelia culture methods to culture the spirochetes. Next, we assessed serum sensitivity by a direct killing assay and a growth inhibition assay. We were able to passage B. miyamotoi over 10 times using a standard culture method in MKP-F medium, and found B. miyamotoi to be resistant to human complement. In contrast to B. miyamotoi, Borrelia anserina--a relapsing fever spirochete unrelated to human infection--was serum sensitive. Using a variation on MKP medium we were able to culture B. miyamotoi, opening the door to in vitro research into this spirochete. In addition, we describe that B. miyamotoi is resistant to human complement, which might play an important role in pathogenesis. We have also found B. anserina to be sensitive to human complement, which might explain why it is not related to human infection. Summarizing, we describe a novel culture method for B. miyamotoi and show it is resistant to human complement.

  18. Disagreement between Human Papillomavirus Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2014-01-01

    -65 years (n = 2,881), 23% tested positive on at least one assay, and 42 to 58% of these showed positive agreement on any compared pair of the assays. While 4% of primary screening samples showed abnormal cytology, 6 to 10% were discordant on any pair of assays. A literature review corroborated our findings...

  19. Combination of neurofilament heavy chain and complement c3 as CSF biomarkers for ALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesalingam, Jeban; An, Jiyan; Shaw, Christopher E; Shaw, Gerry; Lacomis, David; Bowser, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a rapidly progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disease with an average survival of 3 years from symptom onset. Rapid and conclusive early diagnosis is essential if interventions with disease-modifying therapies are to be successful. Cytoskeletal modification and inflammation are known to occur during the pathogenesis of ALS. We measured levels of cytoskeletal proteins and inflammatory markers in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of ALS, disease controls and healthy subjects. We determined threshold values for each protein that provided the optimal sensitivity and specificity for ALS within a training set, as determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Interestingly, the optimal assay was a ratio of the levels for phosphorylated neurofilament heavy chain and complement C3 (pNFH/C3). We next applied this assay to a separate test set of CSF samples to verify our results. Overall, the predictive pNFH/C3 ratio identified ALS with 87.3% sensitivity and 94.6% specificity in a total of 71 ALS subjects, 52 disease control subjects and 40 healthy subjects. In addition, the level of CSF pNFH correlated with survival of ALS patients. We also detected increased pNFH in the plasma of ALS patients and observed a correlation between CSF and plasma pNFH levels within the same subjects. These findings support large-scale prospective biomarker studies to determine the clinical utility of diagnostic and prognostic signatures in ALS. PMID:21418221

  20. Interactions among the early Escherichia coli divisome proteins revealed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Manuel; Natale, Paolo; Margolin, William; Vicente, Miguel

    2013-12-01

    We used bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays to detect protein-protein interactions of all possible pairs of the essential Escherichia coli proto-ring components, FtsZ, FtsA and ZipA, as well as the non-essential FtsZ-associated proteins ZapA and ZapB. We found an unexpected interaction between ZipA and ZapB at potential cell division sites, and when co-overproduced, they induced long narrow constrictions at division sites that were dependent on FtsZ. These assays also uncovered an interaction between ZipA and ZapA that was mediated by FtsZ. BiFC with ZapA and ZapB showed that in addition to their expected interaction at midcell, they also interact at the cell poles. BiFC detected interaction between FtsZ and ZapB at midcell and close to the poles. Results from the remaining pairwise combinations confirmed known interactions between FtsZ and ZipA, and ZapB with itself. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. An acoustic prion assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Hayward

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An acoustic prion assay has been demonstrated for sheep brain samples. Only five false positives and no false negatives were observed in a test of 45 positive and 45 negative samples. The acoustic prion sensor was constructed using a thickness shear mode quartz resonator coated with a covalently bound recombinant prion protein. The characteristic indicator of a scrapie infected sheep brain sample was an observed shoulder in the frequency decrease in response to a sample.The response of the sensor aligns with a conformational shift in the surface protein and with the propagation mechanism of the disease. This alignment is evident in the response timing and shape, dependence on concentration, cross species behaviour and impact of blood plasma. This alignment is far from sufficient to prove the mechanism of the sensor but it does offer the possibility of a rapid and inexpensive additional tool to explore prion disease. Keywords: Prions, Thickness shear mode quartz sensor

  2. Assay of oestrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    A particular problem with the direct radioimmunoassay of unconjugated oestriol in pregnancy is caused by the increased amount of steroid-binding proteins present in pregnancy serum and plasma. The steroid-binding proteins react with oestriol and 125 I-labelled oestriol during the assay procedure and the steroid-protein bound 125 I-labelled oestriol is precipitated along with the antibody-bound 125 I-labelled oestriol by the ammonium sulphate solution separation system. A novel method is described whereby progesterone (1-20 μg/ml) is used to block the action of steroid-binding proteins in pregnancy serum and plasma samples, thus minimizing interference in a direct radioimmunoassay for unconjugated oestriol using a specific anti-oestriol serum. (U.K.)

  3. Complements and the Wound Healing Cascade: An Updated Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani Sinno

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wound healing is a complex pathway of regulated reactions and cellular infiltrates. The mechanisms at play have been thoroughly studied but there is much still to learn. The health care system in the USA alone spends on average 9 billion dollars annually on treating of wounds. To help reduce patient morbidity and mortality related to abnormal or prolonged skin healing, an updated review and understanding of wound healing is essential. Recent works have helped shape the multistep process in wound healing and introduced various growth factors that can augment this process. The complement cascade has been shown to have a role in inflammation and has only recently been shown to augment wound healing. In this review, we have outlined the biology of wound healing and discussed the use of growth factors and the role of complements in this intricate pathway.

  4. Regulation of mast cell activation by complement-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdei, Anna; Andrásfalvy, Márton; Péterfy, Hajna; Tóth, Gábor; Pecht, Israel

    2004-03-29

    It is known for more than 25 years that the complement-derived anaphylatoxic peptides, C3a, C4a and C5a are potent activators of basophils and certain types of mast cells. Although tissue distribution of receptors for C3a and C5a well exceeds myeloid cells, apparently they are not expressed on mucosal type mast cells, consequently these cells are not activated by C3a and C5a. Our results do however demonstrate that C3a and peptides related to this complement activation product are able to inhibit FcRI-clustering induced activation of mucosal type mast cells-such as RBL-2H3 cells and bone-marrow derived mast cells. Based on the current results we propose the presence of separate "activator" and "inhibitor" sequence motifs in C3a which are in balance under physiologic conditions.

  5. Complement activation in Ghanaian children with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helegbe, Gideon K; Goka, Bamenla Q; Kurtzhals, Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe anaemia (SA), intravascular haemolysis (IVH) and respiratory distress (RD) are severe forms of Plasmodium falciparum malaria, with RD reported to be of prognostic importance in African children with malarial anaemia. Complement factors have been implicated in the mechanism......55)] in children with discrete clinical forms of P. falciparum malaria. The relationship between the findings and clinical parameters including coma, haemoglobin (Hb) levels and RD were investigated. RESULTS: Of the 484 samples tested, 131(27%) were positive in DCT, out of which 115/131 (87.8%) were...... malaria, possibly through induction of erythrophagocytosis and haemolysis. In contrast to other studies, this study did not find association between levels of the complement...

  6. Coagulation assays and anticoagulant monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Dorothy M Adcock

    2012-01-01

    Anticoagulant therapy, including conventional agents and a variety of new oral, fast-acting drugs, is prescribed for millions of patients annually. Each anticoagulant varies in its effect on routine and specialty coagulation assays and each drug may require distinct laboratory assay(s) to measure drug concentration or activity. This review provides an overview of the assorted assays that can measure anticoagulant drug concentration or activity and includes key assay interferences. The effect of these conventional and new anticoagulant agents on specialty coagulation assays used to evaluate for bleeding or clotting disorders, and whether this impact is physiological or factitious, is included. Also provided is a short review of superwarfarin poisoning and features distinguishing this from warfarin overdose. Knowledge of clinically significant pearls and pitfalls pertinent to coagulation assays in relation to anticoagulant therapy are important to optimize patient care.

  7. Complement-dependent transport of antigen into B cell follicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Santiago F.; Lukacs-Kornek, Veronika; Kuligowski, Michael P.

    2010-01-01

    an additional novel pathway in which complement C3 and its receptors enhance humoral immunity through delivery of Ag to the B cell compartment. In this review, we discuss this pathway and highlight several novel exceptions recently found with a model influenza vaccine, such as mannose-binding lectin...... opsonization of influenza and uptake by macrophages, and the capture of virus by dendritic cells residing in the medullary compartment of peripheral lymph nodes....

  8. Non-kinetic capabilities: complementing the kinetic prevalence to targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Ducheine, P.

    2014-01-01

    Targeting is used in military doctrine to describe a military operational way, using (military) means to influence a target (or addressee) in order to achieve designated political and/or military goals. The four factors italicized are used to analyse non-kinetic targeting, complementing our knowledge and understanding of the kinetic prevalence. Paradoxically, non-kinetic targeting is not recognized as a separate concept: kinetic and non-kinetic are intertwined facets of targeting. Kinetic tar...

  9. Almost disjoint families of countable sets and separable complementation properties

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ferrer, J.; Koszmider, P.; Kubiś, Wieslaw

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 401, č. 2 (2013), s. 939-949 ISSN 0022-247X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP201/12/0290 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : almost disjoint family * separable complementation property Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.119, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0022247X13000139

  10. Evaluation of complement proteins as screening markers for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Line; Christensen, Ib J; Jensenius, Jens C

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Lack of symptoms results in late detection and increased mortality. Inflammation, including complement activation, plays an important role in tumorigenesis. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: The concentrations of nine proteins o......, M-ficolin and MAp44 in combination discriminate between CRC and patients without cancer. The markers did not have sufficient discriminatory value for CRC detection, but may prove useful for screening when combined with other markers....

  11. Complement pathway biomarkers and age-related macular degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemenetzi, M; Lotery, A J

    2016-01-01

    In the age-related macular degeneration (AMD) ‘inflammation model', local inflammation plus complement activation contributes to the pathogenesis and progression of the disease. Multiple genetic associations have now been established correlating the risk of development or progression of AMD. Stratifying patients by their AMD genetic profile may facilitate future AMD therapeutic trials resulting in meaningful clinical trial end points with smaller sample sizes and study duration. PMID:26493033

  12. Tobacco and alcohol: complements or substitutes? ; a structural model approach

    OpenAIRE

    Tauchmann, Harald; Göhlmann, Silja; Requate, Till; Schmidt, Christoph M.

    2008-01-01

    The question of whether two drugs – namely alcohol and tobacco – are used as complements or substitutes is of crucial interest if side-effects of anti-smoking policies are considered. Numerous papers have empirically addressed this issue by estimating demand systems for alcohol and tobacco and subsequently calculating cross-price effects. However, this traditional approach often is seriously hampered by insufficient price-variation observed in survey data. We therefore suggest an alternative ...

  13. Enhanced CDC of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells mediated by rituximab combined with a novel anti-complement factor H antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark T Winkler

    Full Text Available Rituximab therapy for B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL has met with mixed success. Among several factors to which resistance can be attributed is failure to activate complement dependent cytotoxicity (CDC due to protective complement regulatory proteins, including the soluble regulator complement factor H (CFH. We hypothesized that rituximab killing of non-responsive B-CLL cells could be augmented by a novel human monoclonal antibody against CFH. The B cells from 11 patients with B-CLL were tested ex vivo in CDC assays with combinations of CFH monoclonal antibody, rituximab, and a negative control antibody. CDC of rituximab non-responsive malignant B cells from CLL patients could in some cases be augmented by the CFH monoclonal antibody. Antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of cells was dependent upon functional complement. In one case where B-CLL cells were refractory to CDC by the combination of rituximab plus CFH monoclonal antibody, additionally neutralizing the membrane complement regulatory protein CD59 allowed CDC to occur. Inhibiting CDC regulatory proteins such as CFH holds promise for overcoming resistance to rituximab therapy in B-CLL.

  14. Early Intra-Articular Complement Activation in Ankle Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Schmal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokine regulation possibly influences long term outcome following ankle fractures, but little is known about synovial fracture biochemistry. Eight patients with an ankle dislocation fracture were included in a prospective case series and matched with patients suffering from grade 2 osteochondritis dissecans (OCD of the ankle. All fractures needed external fixation during which joint effusions were collected. Fluid analysis was done by ELISA measuring aggrecan, bFGF, IL-1β, IGF-1, and the complement components C3a, C5a, and C5b-9. The time periods between occurrence of fracture and collection of effusion were only significantly associated with synovial aggrecan and C5b-9 levels (P<0.001. Furthermore, synovial expressions of both proteins correlated with each other (P<0.001. Although IL-1β expression was relatively low, intra-articular levels correlated with C5a (P<0.01 and serological C-reactive protein concentrations 2 days after surgery (P<0.05. Joint effusions were initially dominated by neutrophils, but the portion of monocytes constantly increased reaching 50% at day 6 after fracture (P<0.02. Whereas aggrecan and IL-1β concentrations were not different in fracture and OCD patients, bFGF, IGF-1, and all complement components were significantly higher concentrated in ankle joints with fractures (P<0.01. Complement activation and inflammatory cell infiltration characterize the joint biology following acute ankle fractures.

  15. Complement-triggered pathways orchestrate regenerative responses throughout phylogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; DeAngelis, Robert A.; Lambris, John D.

    2014-01-01

    Adult tissue plasticity, cell reprogramming, and organ regeneration are major challenges in the field of modern regenerative medicine. Devising strategies to increase the regenerative capacity of tissues holds great promise for dealing with donor organ shortages and low transplantation outcomes and also provides essential impetus to tissue bioengineering approaches for organ repair and replacement. The inherent ability of cells to reprogram their fate by switching into an embryonic-like, pluripotent progenitor state is an evolutionary vestige that in mammals has been retained mostly in fetal tissues and persists only in a few organs of the adult body. Tissue regeneration reflects the capacity of terminally differentiated cells to re-enter the cell cycle and proliferate in response to acute injury or environmental stress signals. In lower vertebrates, this regenerative capacity extends to several organs and remarkably culminates in precise tissue patterning, through cellular transdifferentiation and complex morphogenetic processes that can faithfully reconstruct entire body parts. Many lessons have been learned from robust regeneration models in amphibians such as the newt and axolotl. However, the dynamic interactions between the regenerating tissue, the surrounding stroma, and the host immune response, as it adapts to the actively proliferating tissue, remain ill-defined. The regenerating zone, through a sequence of distinct molecular events, adopts phenotypic plasticity and undergoes rigorous tissue remodeling that, in turn, evokes a significant inflammatory response. Complement is a primordial sentinel of the innate immune response that engages in multiple inflammatory cascades as it becomes activated during tissue injury and remodeling. In this respect, complement proteins have been implicated in tissue and organ regeneration in both urodeles and mammals. Distinct complement-triggered pathways have been shown to modulate critical responses that promote tissue

  16. Complement inhibitory proteins expression in placentas of thrombophilic women Complement inhibitory proteins expression in placentas of thrombophilic women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Krzysztof Wirstlein

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Factors controlling complement activation appear to exert a protective effect on pregnancy. This is
    particularly important in women with thrombophilia. The aim of this study was to determine the transcript and
    protein levels of complement decay-accelerating factor (DAF and membrane cofactor protein (MCP in the
    placentas of women with acquired and inherited thrombophilia. Also, we assessed immunohistochemistry staining
    of inhibitors of the complement cascade, DAF and MCP proteins, in the placentas of thrombophilic women.
    Placentas were collected from eight women with inherited thrombophilia and ten with acquired thrombophilia.
    The levels of DAF and MCP transcripts were evaluated by qPCR, the protein level was evaluated by Western
    blot. We observed a higher transcript (p < 0.05 and protein (p < 0.001 levels of DAF and MCP in the placentas
    of thrombophilic women than in the control group. DAF and MCP were localized on villous syncytiotrophoblast
    membranes, but the assessment of staining in all groups did not differ. The observed higher expression level of
    proteins that control activation of complement control proteins is only seemingly contradictory to the changes
    observed for example in the antiphospholipid syndrome. However, given the hitherto known biochemical changes
    associated with thrombophilia, a mechanism in which increased expression of DAF and MCP in the placentas is
    an effect of proinflammatory cytokines, which accompanies thrombophilia, is probable.Factors controlling complement activation appear to exert a protective effect on pregnancy. This is
    particularly important in women with thrombophilia. The aim of this study was to determine the transcript and
    protein levels of complement decay-accelerating factor (DAF and membrane cofactor protein (MCP in the
    placentas of women with acquired and inherited thrombophilia. Also, we assessed immunohistochemistry

  17. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) demonstrates antioxidant activity via single electron transport (SET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory Rivera, Magdielis; Hair, Pamela S; Cunnion, Kenji M; Krishna, Neel K

    2018-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are natural byproducts of oxidative respiration that are toxic to organs and tissues. To mitigate ROS damage, organisms have evolved a variety of antioxidant systems to counteract these harmful molecules, however in certain pathological conditions these protective mechanisms can be overwhelmed. We have recently demonstrated that Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1) mitigates peroxidase activity of the heme bearing proteins myeloperoxidase, hemoglobin, and myoglobin through a reversible process. To determine if this property of PIC1 was antioxidant in nature, we tested PIC1 in a number of well-established antioxidant assays. PIC1 showed dose-dependent antioxidant activity in a total antioxidant (TAC) assay, hydroxyl radical antioxidant capacity (HORAC) assay, oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC) assay as well as the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) assay to screen for PIC1 antioxidant activity in human plasma. The antioxidant activity of PIC1 in the TAC assay, as well as the HORAC/ORAC assay demonstrated that this peptide acts via the single electron transport (SET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms, respectively. Consistent with this mechanism of action, PIC1 did not show activity in a metal chelating activity (MCA) assay. PIC1 contains two vicinal cysteine residues and displayed similar antioxidant activity to the well characterized cysteine-containing tripeptide antioxidant molecule glutathione (GSH). Consistent with the role of the cysteine residues in the antioxidant activity of PIC1, oxidation of these residues significantly abrogated antioxidant activity. These results demonstrate that in addition to its described complement inhibiting activity, PIC1 displays in vitro antioxidant activity.

  18. A potent complement factor C3 specific nanobody inhibiting multiple functions in the alternative pathway of human and murine complement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus K; Pihl, Rasmus; Gadeberg, Trine A F

    2018-01-01

    The complement system is a complex, carefully regulated proteolytic cascade for which suppression of aberrant activation is of increasing clinical relevance and inhibition of the complement alternative pathway is a subject of intense research. Here, we describe the nanobody hC3Nb1 that binds...... to multiple functional states of C3 with sub-nanomolar affinity. The nanobody causes a complete shutdown of alternative pathway activity in human and murine serum when present in concentrations comparable to C3, and hC3Nb1 is shown to prevent both proconvertase assembly as well as binding of the C3 substrate...... to C3 convertases. Our crystal structure of the C3b-hC3Nb1 complex and functional experiments demonstrate that proconvertase formation is blocked by steric hindrance between the nanobody and an Asn-linked glycan on complement factor B. In addition, hC3Nb1 is shown to prevent factor H binding to C3b...

  19. PathogenicLeptospiraSecreted Proteases Target the Membrane Attack Complex: A Potential Role for Thermolysin in Complement Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amamura, Thais A; Fraga, Tatiana R; Vasconcellos, Sílvio A; Barbosa, Angela S; Isaac, Lourdes

    2017-01-01

    effect on these molecules by direct interactions. Finally, a functional assay demonstrated that thermolysin was able to inhibit MAC-dependent erythrocytes lysis. We conclude that proteases secreted exclusively by pathogenic Leptospira strains are capable of degrading several Complement effector molecules, representing potential targets for the development of new therapies and prophylactic approaches in leptospirosis.

  20. Pathogenic Leptospira Secreted Proteases Target the Membrane Attack Complex: A Potential Role for Thermolysin in Complement Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais A. Amamura

    2017-05-01

    additional inhibitory effect on these molecules by direct interactions. Finally, a functional assay demonstrated that thermolysin was able to inhibit MAC-dependent erythrocytes lysis. We conclude that proteases secreted exclusively by pathogenic Leptospira strains are capable of degrading several Complement effector molecules, representing potential targets for the development of new therapies and prophylactic approaches in leptospirosis.

  1. Pathogenic Leptospira Secreted Proteases Target the Membrane Attack Complex: A Potential Role for Thermolysin in Complement Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amamura, Thais A.; Fraga, Tatiana R.; Vasconcellos, Sílvio A.; Barbosa, Angela S.; Isaac, Lourdes

    2017-01-01

    effect on these molecules by direct interactions. Finally, a functional assay demonstrated that thermolysin was able to inhibit MAC-dependent erythrocytes lysis. We conclude that proteases secreted exclusively by pathogenic Leptospira strains are capable of degrading several Complement effector molecules, representing potential targets for the development of new therapies and prophylactic approaches in leptospirosis. PMID:28611756

  2. Effects of two serine proteases from Bothrops pirajai snake venom on the complement system and the inflammatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menaldo, Danilo L; Bernardes, Carolina P; Pereira, Juliana C; Silveira, Denise S C; Mamede, Carla C N; Stanziola, Leonilda; Oliveira, Fábio de; Pereira-Crott, Luciana S; Faccioli, Lúcia H; Sampaio, Suely V

    2013-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of two serine proteases from Bothrops pirajai snake venom, named BpirSP27 and BpirSP41, on the complement system and the inflammatory response. The effects of these enzymes on the human complement system were assessed by kinetic hemolytic assays, evaluating the hemolysis promoted by the classical/lectin (CP/LP) and alternative (AP) pathways after incubation of normal human serum with the serine proteases. The results suggested that these enzymes were able to induce modulation of CP/LP and AP at different levels: BpirSP41 showed higher inhibitory effects on the hemolytic activity of CP/LP than BpirSP27, with inhibition values close to 40% and 20%, respectively, for the highest concentration assayed. Regarding AP, both enzymes showed percentages of inhibition of the hemolytic activity around 20% for the highest concentrations tested, indicating similar effects on this complement pathway. The proinflammatory effects of B. pirajai serine proteases were evaluated regarding their ability to induce paw edema, variations in the pain threshold and leukocyte recruitment at the site of injection. Both showed mild effects on these inflammatory processes, leading to low levels of increase of paw volumes and decrease in pain thresholds in rats up to 6 h after injection, and inducing neutrophil recruitment without significant increases in the total number of leukocytes in the inflammatory exudates after 6 and 24 h of administration into mice peritoneal cavity. These results suggest that serine proteases must present a minor role in the inflammation caused by B. pirajai snake venom. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. PEX12, the pathogenic gene of group III Zellweger syndrome: cDNA cloning by functional complementation on a CHO cell mutant, patient analysis, and characterization of PEX12p

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okumoto, K.; Shimozawa, N.; Kawai, A.; Tamura, S.; Tsukamoto, T.; Osumi, T.; Moser, H.; Wanders, R. J.; Suzuki, Y.; Kondo, N.; Fujiki, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Rat PEX12 cDNA was isolated by functional complementation of peroxisome deficiency of a mutant CHO cell line, ZP109 (K. Okumoto, A. Bogaki, K. Tateishi, T. Tsukamoto, T. Osumi, N. Shimozawa, Y. Suzuki, T. Orii, and Y. Fujiki, Exp. Cell Res. 233:11-20, 1997), using a transient transfection assay and

  4. Microinjection of Escherichia coli UvrA, B, C and D proteins into fibroblasts of xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups A and C does not result in restoration of UV-induced DNA synthesis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Zwetsloot; A.P. Barbeiro; W. Vermeulen (Wim); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) in cultured human fibroblasts of repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum complementation groups A and C was assayed after injection of identical activities of either Uvr excinuclease (UvrA, B, C and D) from Escherichia coli or endonuclease V

  5. Role of complement in in vitro and in vivo lung inflammatory reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B; Bless, N M

    1998-01-01

    Complement is one of the integral buttresses of the inflammatory response. In addition to host defense activities, proinflammatory properties of several complement components are described. This overview elucidates the role of complement in inflammatory reactions in vitro and in vivo, focusing...... on the complement activation products, C5a, and the membrane attack complex, C5b-9. Using several approaches, the impact of these complement components in mechanisms relevant to neutrophil recruitment is emphasized. In addition, the participation of complement in endothelial superoxide generation and its essential...... requirement for full expression of lung injury is demonstrated, as are the involved intracellular signal transduction pathways. Understanding the mechanisms of complement-induced proinflammatory effects may provide a basis for future therapeutic blockade of complement and/or its activation products....

  6. Approximate Schur complement preconditioning of the lowest order nodal discretizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulton, J.D.; Ascher, U.M. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Morel, J.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Particular classes of nodal methods and mixed hybrid finite element methods lead to equivalent, robust and accurate discretizations of 2nd order elliptic PDEs. However, widespread popularity of these discretizations has been hindered by the awkward linear systems which result. The present work exploits this awkwardness, which provides a natural partitioning of the linear system, by defining two optimal preconditioners based on approximate Schur complements. Central to the optimal performance of these preconditioners is their sparsity structure which is compatible with Dendy`s black box multigrid code.

  7. Complement activation by cholesterol crystals triggers a subsequent cytokine response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niyonzima, Nathalie; Halvorsen, Bente; Sporsheim, Bjørnar

    2017-01-01

    may under certain circumstances drive processes leading to adverse inflammation. One example is cholesterol crystals (CC) that accumulate in the vessel wall during early phases of atherogenesis and represent an important endogenous danger signal promoting inflammation. CC is recognized by the lectin...... of inflammation processes before downstream release of cytokines including IL-1β. Another therapeutic candidate can be broad-acting 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin, a compound that targets several mechanisms such as cholesterol efflux, complement gene expression, and the NLRP3 pathway. In summary, emerging...

  8. Word order variation and foregrounding of complement clauses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tanya Karoli; Jensen, Torben Juel

    2015-01-01

    Through mixed models analyses of complement clauses in a corpus of spoken Danish we examine the role of sentence adverbials in relation to a word order distinction in Scandinavian signalled by the relative position of sentence adverbials and finite verb (V>Adv vs. Adv>V). The type of sentence...... adverbial was the third-most important factor in explaining the word order variation: Sentence adverbials categorized as ‘dialogic’ are significantly associated with V>Adv word order. We argue that the results are readily interpretable in the light of the semantico-pragmatic hypothesis that V>Adv signals...

  9. Recent Progress in Parallel Schur Complement Preconditioning for Computational Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Tim; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We consider preconditioning methods for nonself-adjoint advective-diffusive systems based on a nonoverlapping Schur complement procedure for arbitrary triangulated domains. The triangulation is first partitioned using the METIS multi-level $k$-way partitioning code. This partitioning of the triangulation induces a natural 2x2 partitioning of the demoralization matrix. By considering various inverse approximations of the 2x2 system we have developed a family of robust preconditioning techniques. The performance of these approximations will be discussed and numerous examples shown to illustrate the efficiency of the technique.

  10. Lessons learned from mice deficient in lectin complement pathway molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genster, Ninette; Takahashi, Minoru; Sekine, Hideharu

    2014-01-01

    The lectin pathway of the complement system is initiated when the pattern-recognition molecules, mannose-binding lectin (MBL), ficolins or collectin-11, bind to invading pathogens or damaged host cells. This leads to activation of MBL/ficolin/collectin-11 associated serine proteases (MASPs), which...... differences in the genetic arrangements of murine and human orthologues of lectin pathway molecules, the knockout mice have proven to be valuable models to explore the effect of deficiency states in humans. In addition, new insight and unexpected findings on the diverse roles of lectin pathway molecules...

  11. The Emerging Role of Complement Lectin Pathway in Trypanosomatids: Molecular Bases in Activation, Genetic Deficiencies, Susceptibility to Infection, and Complement System-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Evans-Osses

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is evolutionary and ancient and is the pivotal line of the host defense system to protect against invading pathogens and abnormal self-derived components. Cellular and molecular components are involved in recognition and effector mechanisms for a successful innate immune response. The complement lectin pathway (CLP was discovered in 1990. These new components at the complement world are very efficient. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL and ficolin not only recognize many molecular patterns of pathogens rapidly to activate complement but also display several strategies to evade innate immunity. Many studies have shown a relation between the deficit of complement factors and susceptibility to infection. The recently discovered CLP was shown to be important in host defense against protozoan microbes. Although the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by MBL and Ficolins reveal efficient complement activations, an increase in deficiency of complement factors and diversity of parasite strategies of immune evasion demonstrate the unsuccessful effort to control the infection. In the present paper, we will discuss basic aspects of complement activation, the structure of the lectin pathway components, genetic deficiency of complement factors, and new therapeutic opportunities to target the complement system to control infection.

  12. Role of complement in in vitro and in vivo lung inflammatory reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czermak, B J; Lentsch, A B; Bless, N M

    1998-01-01

    Complement is one of the integral buttresses of the inflammatory response. In addition to host defense activities, proinflammatory properties of several complement components are described. This overview elucidates the role of complement in inflammatory reactions in vitro and in vivo, focusing on...

  13. DMPD: Complement-mediated phagocytosis--the role of Syk. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16754322 Complement-mediated phagocytosis--the role of Syk. Tohyama Y, Yamamura H. ...IUBMB Life. 2006 May-Jun;58(5-6):304-8. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Complement-mediated phagocytosis-...-the role of Syk. PubmedID 16754322 Title Complement-mediated phagocytosis--the role of Syk. Authors Tohyama

  14. Viral-derived complement inhibitors: current status and potential role in immunomodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-El-Hassan, Hadi; Zaraket, Hassan

    2017-02-01

    The complement system is one of the body's major innate immune defense mechanisms in vertebrates. Its function is to detect foreign bodies and promote their elimination through opsonisation or lysis. Complement proteins play an important role in the immunopathogenesis of several disorders. However, excessive complement activation does not confer more protection but instead leads to several autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. With inappropriate activation of the complement system, activated complement proteins and glycoproteins may damage both healthy and diseased tissues. Development of complement inhibitors represents an effective approach in controlling dysregulated complement activity and reducing disease severity, yet few studies have investigated the nature and role of novel complement inhibitory proteins of viral origin. Viral complement inhibitors have important implications in understanding the importance of complement inhibition and their role as a promising novel therapeutic approach in diseases caused by dysregulated complement function. In this review, we discuss the role and importance of complement inhibitors derived from several viruses in the scope of human inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  15. Mutations in Complement Factor H Impair Alternative Pathway Regulation on Mouse Glomerular Endothelial Cells in Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loeven, M.A.; Rops, A.; Lehtinen, M.J.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Daha, M.R.; Smith, R.J.; Bakker, M.A.H.; Berden, J.H.; Rabelink, T.J.; Jokiranta, T.S.; Vlag, J. van der

    2016-01-01

    Complement factor H (FH) inhibits complement activation and interacts with glomerular endothelium via its complement control protein domains 19 and 20, which also recognize heparan sulfate (HS). Abnormalities in FH are associated with the renal diseases atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome and dense

  16. Marketplace Clinics Complementing Diabetes Care for Urban Residing American Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rick, Robert; Hoye, Robert E; Thron, Raymond W; Kumar, Vibha

    2017-10-01

    For several decades, the Minneapolis American Indian population has experienced limited health care access and threefold diabetes health disparity. As part of an urban health initiative, the marketplace clinics located in nearby CVS, Target, and Supervalu stores committed financial support, providers, certified educators, and pharmacy staff for a community-based diabetes support group. To measure the extent to which collaborating marketplace clinics and the community-based support group expanded diabetes care and provided self-management education for this largely urban Indian neighborhood. A controlled quasi-experimental study and 3-years retrospective analysis of secondary data were used to test whether the Minneapolis marketplace clinics and the community diabetes support group participants (n = 48) had improved diabetes health outcomes relative to the comparison group (n = 87). The marketplace complemented intervention group employed motivational interviewing and the patient activation measure (PAM®) in coaching diabetes self-care and behavioral modification. The federally funded comparison group received only basic self-management education. T tests and effect sizes were used to quantify the difference between the study intervention and comparison groups. Statistical significance was determined for the following outcome variables: A1C ( P health complementation were found with regard to improved blood glucose control, weight loss, and healthful lifestyle adaptation. Primary care and community health improvements could be realized by incorporating patient activation with diabetes prevention programs for the urban Indian two-thirds majority of the United States 5 million American Indian population.

  17. Identification of the Fanconi Anemia Complementation Group I Gene, FANCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine C. Dorsman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To identify the gene underlying Fanconi anemia (FA complementation group I we studied informative FA-I families by a genome-wide linkage analysis, which resulted in 4 candidate regions together encompassing 351 genes. Candidates were selected via bioinformatics and data mining on the basis of their resemblance to other FA genes/proteins acting in the FA pathway, such as: degree of evolutionary conservation, presence of nuclear localization signals and pattern of tissue-dependent expression. We found a candidate, KIAA1794 on chromosome 15q25-26, to be mutated in 8 affected individuals previously assigned to complementation group I. Western blots of endogenous FANCI indicated that functionally active KIAA1794 protein is lacking in FA-I individuals. Knock-down of KIAA1794 expression by siRNA in HeLa cells caused excessive chromosomal breakage induced by mitomycin C, a hallmark of FA cells. Furthermore, phenotypic reversion of a patient-derived cell line was associated with a secondary genetic alteration at the KIAA1794 locus. These data add up to two conclusions. First, KIAA1794 is a FA gene. Second, this gene is identical to FANCI, since the patient cell lines found mutated in this study included the reference cell line for group I, EUFA592.

  18. Circulating AIM Prevents Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Complement Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natsumi Maehara

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a widespread fatal disease and the third most common cause of cancer deaths. Here, we show the potent anti-HCC effect of the circulating protein AIM. As in adipocytes, AIM is incorporated into normal hepatocytes, where it interferes with lipid storage. In contrast, AIM accumulates on the HCC cell surface and activates the complement cascade via inactivating multiple regulators of complement activation. This response provokes necrotic cell death specifically in AIM-bound HCC cells. Accordingly, AIM−/− mice were highly susceptible to steatosis-associated HCC development, whereas no AIM+/+ mouse developed the disease despite comparable liver inflammation and fibrosis in response to a long-term high-fat diet. Administration of AIM prevented tumor development in AIM−/− mice, and HCC induction by diethylnitrosamine was more prominent in AIM−/− than wild-type mice. These findings could be the basis for novel AIM-based therapeutic strategies for HCC.

  19. Entailments, pragmatic assertion and mood in Spanish complements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Errapel Mejías-Bikandi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a frequently overlooked class of expressions in Spanish that license the subjunctive mood in a complement clause. This class contains expressions such as poco/a/s “few”, menos de “less than” and solo “only”. The goal of the paper is to offer an account of the use of mood with these expressions that incorporates the data under discussion into previous pragmatic accounts of mood based on notions of assertion and informative value. The paper first offers a semantic characterization of this class of expressions that is based on their monotonic properties (Ladusaw 1980, Ladusaw 1983. Next, it explores the pragmatic effects of their semantic properties. Following Stalnaker (1978, I assume that the effect of a pragmatic assertion is to reduce the set of possible worlds that represents the presuppositions held by a speaker and their audience (referred to as the context set. It is argued that propositions under the scope of an upward entailing expression are more informative, and they are thus more relevant and higher in a scale of assertability (Lunn 1989, in that they allow for inferences that further reduce the context set. Propositions under the scope of expressions that are not upward entailing lose some of their informative value, and thus they are lower in the scale of assertability, which correlates with the possibility of using subjunctive mood in a complement under their scope.

  20. Complement activation in emergency department patients with severe sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, John G; Bracho, David O; Chung-Esaki, Hangyul M; Lee, Moonseok; Rana, Gurpreet K; Sen, Ananda; Jones, Alan E

    2010-04-01

    This study assessed the extent and mechanism of complement activation in community-acquired sepsis at presentation to the emergency department (ED) and following 24 hours of quantitative resuscitation. A prospective pilot study of patients with severe sepsis and healthy controls was conducted among individuals presenting to a tertiary care ED. Resuscitation, including antibiotics and therapies to normalize central venous and mean arterial pressure (MAP) and central venous oxygenation, was performed on all patients. Serum levels of Factor Bb (alternative pathway), C4d (classical and mannose-binding lectin [MBL] pathway), C3, C3a, and C5a were determined at presentation and 24 hours later among patients. Twenty patients and 10 healthy volunteer controls were enrolled. Compared to volunteers, all proteins measured were abnormally higher among septic patients (C4d 3.5-fold; Factor Bb 6.1-fold; C3 0.8-fold; C3a 11.6-fold; C5a 1.8-fold). Elevations in C5a were most strongly correlated with alternative pathway activation. Surprisingly, a slight but significant inverse relationship between illness severity (by sequential organ failure assessment [SOFA] score) and C5a levels at presentation was noted. Twenty-four hours of structured resuscitation did not, on average, affect any of the mediators studied. Patients with community-acquired sepsis have extensive complement activation, particularly of the alternative pathway, at the time of presentation that was not significantly reversed by 24 hours of aggressive resuscitation.

  1. Non-linear dynamics of the complement system activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korotaevskiy, Andrey A; Hanin, Leonid G; Khanin, Mikhail A

    2009-12-01

    The complement system (CS) plays a prominent role in the immune defense. The goal of this work is to study the dynamics of activation of the classic and alternative CS pathways based on the method of mathematical modeling. The principal difficulty that hinders modeling effort is the absence of the measured values of kinetic constants of many biochemical reactions forming the CS. To surmount this difficulty, an optimization procedure consisting of constrained minimization of the total protein consumption by the CS was designed. The constraints made use of published data on the in vitro kinetics of elimination of the Borrelia burgdorferi bacteria by the CS. Special features of the problem at hand called for a significant modification of the general constrained optimization procedure to include a mathematical model of the bactericidal effect of the CS in the iterative setting. Determination of the unknown kinetic constants of biochemical reactions forming the CS led to a fully specified mathematical model of the dynamics of cell killing induced by the CS. On the basis of the model, effects of the initial concentrations of complements and their inhibitors on the bactericidal action of the CS were studied. Proteins playing a critical role in the regulation of the bactericidal action of the CS were identified. Results obtained in this work serve as an important stepping stone for the study of functioning of the CS as a whole as well as for developing methods for control of pathogenic processes.

  2. Complement-Opsonized HIV-1 Overcomes Restriction in Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Posch

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available DCs express intrinsic cellular defense mechanisms to specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Thus, DCs are productively infected only at very low levels with HIV-1, and this non-permissiveness of DCs is suggested to go along with viral evasion. We now illustrate that complement-opsonized HIV-1 (HIV-C efficiently bypasses SAMHD1 restriction and productively infects DCs including BDCA-1 DCs. Efficient DC infection by HIV-C was also observed using single-cycle HIV-C, and correlated with a remarkable elevated SAMHD1 T592 phosphorylation but not SAMHD1 degradation. If SAMHD1 phosphorylation was blocked using a CDK2-inhibitor HIV-C-induced DC infection was also significantly abrogated. Additionally, we found a higher maturation and co-stimulatory potential, aberrant type I interferon expression and signaling as well as a stronger induction of cellular immune responses in HIV-C-treated DCs. Collectively, our data highlight a novel protective mechanism mediated by complement opsonization of HIV to effectively promote DC immune functions, which might be in the future exploited to tackle HIV infection.

  3. Localized irradiations, evaluation through 'Comet Assay'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Giorgio, Marina; Taja, Maria R.; Nasazzi, Nora B.; Bustos, N.; Cavalieri, H.; Bolgiani, A.

    2000-01-01

    During the last 50 years various radiation accidents involving localized irradiations occurred, resulting mainly from improper handling of sealed sources of Cobalt 60, Cesium 137 or Iridium 192 at work placed for industrial gammagraphy and other radiation sources. Severe skin reaction may developed at the contact sites. Such inhomogeneous irradiations lead to a differential exposure of lymphocytes in lymphatic tissues or other organs that may recirculate into the peripheral blood producing a mixed irradiated and unirradiated population of lymphocytes. Applying the mathematical models 'Contaminated Poisson' of Dolphin and Qdr method of Sasaki, a mean dose in the irradiated body area and its size can be estimated from unstable chromosome aberration scoring. There are also different biophysical techniques that can give response in localized irradiations. Biological dosimetry is a necessary complement to physical and clinical dosimetries. Thus, there is increasing interest in the assessment of biological markers that permit the detection of radiation induced damage in the localized irradiations. The 'Comet Assay' (single cell gel electrophoresis) is a sensitive, rapid and relatively inexpensive method for measuring DNA damage in individual cells. Single cells are embedded in agarose on microscope slides, lysed to remove the majority of the proteins, electrophoresed, then stained with ethidium bromide in order to visualize the DNA. When visualized using a fluorescent microscope, DNA of undamaged cells appears as a spherical mass occupying the cavity formed by the lysed cell. Following radiation damage, the smaller the fragment size and the grater the number of fragments of DNA, the grater the percentage of DNA that it is able to migrate in an electric field, forming a comet image. The assay can be performed under alkaline conditions to examine DNA single strand breaks (SSBs), or in non denaturing (neutral) conditions to measure double strand breaks (DSBs) in individual

  4. Complement receptor expression and activation of the complement cascade on B lymphocytes from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquart, H V; Svendsen, A; Rasmussen, J M

    1995-01-01

    receptors and regulatory proteins on B cells from SLE patients, as well as the deposition of C3 fragments occurring in vivo or after in vitro AP activation. We have confirmed, for a proportion of the patients studied, reduced expression of CR1 and CR2 on B cells, and shown a consistency between low CR2...... activation by B cells in homologous serum. Finally, we demonstrated an inverse relationship between SLE disease activity index (SLEDAI) and the expression of complement receptor 2 (CR2) on SLE B cells. Thus, determination of CR2 on B cells may emerge as an additional laboratory tool in the assessment of SLE...

  5. Solution Structures of Complement C2 and its C4 Complexes Propose Pathway Specific Mechanisms for Control and Activation of the Complement Proconvertases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Sofia; Jensen, Jan Kristian; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    2016-01-01

    The lectin (LP) and classical (CP) pathways are two of the three main activation cascades of the complement system. These pathways start with recognition of different pathogen- or danger-associated molecular patterns and include identical steps of proteolytic activation of complement component C4...

  6. Expanding the repertoire of Modified Vaccinia Ankara-based vaccine vectors via genetic complementation strategies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Garber

    immunizations as compared to the udg(+ control virus MVA-gag, as determined by intracellular cytokine assay. In contrast, levels of HIV Gag-specific antibodies were elicited similarly in macaques following immunization with MVADeltaudg-gag and MVA-gag. Furthermore, both udg(- and udg(+ MVA vectors induced comparatively similar titers of MVA-specific neutralizing antibody responses following immunization of mice (over a 4-log range: 10(4-10(8 PFU and rhesus macaques. These results suggest that the generation of MVA-specific neutralizing antibody responses are largely driven by input MVA antigens, rather than those that are synthesized de novo during infection, and that the processes governing the generation of antiviral antibody responses are more readily saturated by viral antigen than are those that elicit CD8+ T cell responses.Our identification of a spontaneously-immortalized (but not transformed chicken embryo fibroblast cell line (DF-1 that is fully permissive for MVA growth and that can be engineered to stably express MVA genes provides the basis for a genetic system for MVA. DF-1 cells (and derivatives thereof constitute viable alternatives, for the manufacture of MVA-based vaccines, to primary CEFs -- the conventional cell substrate for MVA vaccines that is not amenable to genetic complementation strategies due to these cells' finite lifespan in culture. The establishment of a genetic system for MVA, as illustrated here to allow udg deletion, enables the generation of novel replication-defective MVA mutants and expands the repertoire of genetic viral variants that can now be explored as improved vaccine vectors.

  7. A method for functional trans-complementation of intracellular Francisella tularensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaun Steele

    Full Text Available Francisella tularensis is a highly infectious bacterial pathogen that invades and replicates within numerous host cell types. After uptake, F. tularensis bacteria escape the phagosome, replicate within the cytosol, and suppress cytokine responses. However, the mechanisms employed by F. tularensis to thrive within host cells are mostly unknown. Potential F. tularensis mutants involved in host-pathogen interactions are typically discovered by negative selection screens for intracellular replication or virulence. Mutants that fulfill these criteria fall into two categories: mutants with intrinsic intracellular growth defects and mutants that fail to modify detrimental host cell processes. It is often difficult and time consuming to discriminate between these two possibilities. We devised a method to functionally trans-complement and thus identify mutants that fail to modify the host response. In this assay, host cells are consistently and reproducibly infected with two different F. tularensis strains by physically tethering the bacteria to antibody-coated beads. To examine the efficacy of this protocol, we tested phagosomal escape, cytokine suppression, and intracellular replication for F. tularensis ΔripA and ΔpdpC. ΔripA has an intracellular growth defect that is likely due to an intrinsic defect and fails to suppress IL-1β secretion. In the co-infection model, ΔripA was unable to replicate in the host cell when wild-type bacteria infected the same cell, but cytokine suppression was rescued. Therefore, ΔripA intracellular growth is due to an intrinsic bacterial defect while cytokine secretion results from a failed host-pathogen interaction. Likewise, ΔpdpC is deficient for phagosomal escape, intracellular survival and suppression of IL-1β secretion. Wild-type bacteria that entered through the same phagosome as ΔpdpC rescued all of these phenotypes, indicating that ΔpdpC failed to properly manipulate the host. In summary, functional

  8. CYP4F18-Deficient Neutrophils Exhibit Increased Chemotaxis to Complement Component C5a

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Vaivoda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CYP4Fs were first identified as enzymes that catalyze hydroxylation of leukotriene B4 (LTB4. CYP4F18 has an unusual expression in neutrophils and was predicted to play a role in regulating LTB4-dependent inflammation. We compared chemotaxis of wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout neutrophils using an in vitro assay. There was no significant difference in the chemotactic response to LTB4, but the response to complement component C5a increased 1.9–2.25-fold in knockout cells compared to wild-type (P < 0.01. This increase was still observed when neutrophils were treated with inhibitors of eicosanoid synthesis. There were no changes in expression of other CYP4 enzymes in knockout neutrophils that might compensate for loss of CYP4F18 or lead to differences in activity. A mouse model of dextran sodium sulfate colitis was used to investigate the consequences of increased C5a-dependent chemotaxis in vivo, but there was no significant difference in weight loss, disease activity, or colonic tissue myeloperoxidase between wild-type and Cyp4f18 knockout mice. This study demonstrates the limitations of inferring CYP4F function based on an ability to use LTB4 as a substrate, points to expanding roles for CYP4F enzymes in immune regulation, and underscores the in vivo challenges of CYP knockout studies.

  9. Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 Inhibits the Peroxidase Activity of Hemoglobin and Myoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela S. Hair

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hemoglobin is the natural carrier of oxygen in red blood cells (RBCs. While intracellular hemoglobin provides life-sustaining oxygen transport, extracellular free hemoglobin displays toxicity due to inherent peroxidase activity generating reactive oxygen species that subsequently react with the hemoglobin molecule to produce toxic heme degradation products resulting in free radicals, oxidative stress damage, and lipid peroxidation. We have recently demonstrated that Peptide Inhibitor of Complement C1 (PIC1 inhibits peroxidase activity of the heme-based enzyme myeloperoxidase. To elucidate whether PIC1 could inhibit peroxidase activity of hemoglobin, we evaluated the consequence of PIC1 on RBC lysates, methemoglobin, and myoglobin using tetramethylbenzidine (TMB as an oxidation target. PIC1 reversibly and dose-dependently prevented TMB oxidation to tetramethylbenzidine diimine by RBC lysates, methemoglobin, and myoglobin, having comparable activity to the inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. PIC1 inhibited TMB oxidation of RBC lysates similar to L-cysteine suggesting that the two cysteine residues contained in PIC1 may mediate peroxidase activity. PIC1 also inhibited heme destruction by NaOCl for RBC lysates, hemoglobin, and myoglobin as assayed by preservation of the Soret absorbance peak in the presence of NaOCl and reduction in free iron release. In conclusion, PIC1 inhibits peroxidase activity of hemoglobin and myoglobin likely via an antioxidant mechanism.

  10. Real time imaging of mRNA expression dynamics in live cells using protein complementation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meller, Amit

    2009-03-01

    Traditional methods for mRNA quantification in cells, such as northern blots, quantitative PCR or microarrays assays, require cell lysis and therefore do not preserve its dynamics. These methods cannot be used to probe the spatio-temporal localization of mRNA in cells, which provide useful information for a wide range biomolecular process, including RNA metabolizim, expression kinetics and RNA interference. To probe mRNA dynamics in live prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, we develop a method, which exploit the strong affinity of the eukaryotic initiation factor 4A (eIF4A) to specific RNA aptamers. Two parts of the eIF4A are fused to a split Green Fluorescence Protein (GFP), and are expressed in the cells at high abundance. However, only when the RNA apatmer is also present, the two protein parts complement and become fluorescent. Thus, the fluorescent background remains low, allowing us to directly image the expression of mRNA molecules in live e-coli cells from its early onset, over hours. We find that the expression kinetics can be classified in one out of at least three forms, which also display distinct spatial distributions. I will discuss the possible biological origin for these distributions and their time evolution.

  11. Complement activation, endothelial dysfunction, insulin resistance and chronic heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, M.; Kistorp, C.; Hansen, T.K.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) have an exaggerated immune response, endothelial damage/dysfunction, and increased risk of diabetes mellitus (DM). The inter-relationship(s) between indices of complement activation (soluble membrane attack complex, sMAC), inflammation (hs......CRP), endothelial activation (soluble E-selectin, sEsel)), endothelial damage/dysfunction (von Willebrand factor, vWf) and insulin resistance (IR) and prognosis in CHF remains unknown. Design. We investigated the association(s) between plasma sMAC, hsCRP, sEsel, vWf and IR (assessed by homeostatic model assessment......, HOMA) in a prospective study including a total of 193 patients with CHF, and assessed whether high levels of these biomarkers had a prognostic impact. Biomarker levels in CHF patients were compared to 100 age-matched controls. Results. Plasma sMAC levels were elevated in patients with CHF due...

  12. Complementing ultrafast shape recognition with an optical isomerism descriptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ting; Lafleur, Karine; Caflisch, Amedeo

    2010-11-01

    We introduce the mixed product of three vectors spanning four molecular locations as a descriptor of optical isomerism. This descriptor is very efficient as it does not require molecular superposition, and is very robust in discriminating between a given isomer and its mirror image. In particular, conformational isomers that are mirror images of each other, as well as optical isomers have opposite sign of the descriptor value. For efficient database searches, the optical isomerism descriptor can be used to complement an available ultrafast shape recognition (USR) method based solely on distances, which is not able to distinguish enantiomers. By an extensive comparison of the USR-based similarity score with an approach based on Gaussian molecular volume overlap, the accuracy and completeness of the former are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Graphs cospectral with a friendship graph or its complement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Abdollahi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Let $n$ be any positive integer and let $F_n$ be the friendship (or Dutch windmill graph with $2n+1$ vertices and $3n$ edges. Here we study graphs with the same adjacency spectrum as the $F_n$. Two graphs are called cospectral if the eigenvalues multiset of their adjacency matrices are the same. Let $G$ be a graph cospectral with $F_n$. Here we prove that if $G$ has no cycle of length $4$ or $5$, then $Gcong F_n$. Moreover if $G$ is connected and planar then $Gcong F_n$.All but one of connected components of $G$ are isomorphic to $K_2$.The complement $overline{F_n}$ of the friendship graph is determined by its adjacency eigenvalues, that is, if $overline{F_n}$ is cospectral with a graph $H$, then $Hcong overline{F_n}$.

  14. Manipulation of the Complement System for Benefit in Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A. Ward

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence in sepsis, both in rodents and in humans, that activation of the complement system results in excessive production of C5a, which triggers a series of events leading to septic shock, multiorgan failure, and lethality. In rodents following cecal ligation and puncture (CLP, which induces polymicrobial sepsis, in vivo blockade of C5a using neutralizing antibodies dramatically improved survival, reduced apoptosis of lymphoid cells, and attenuated the ensuing coagulopathy. Based on these data, it seems reasonable to consider therapeutic blockade of C5a in humans entering into sepsis and septic shock. Strategies for the development of such an antibody for use in humans are presented.

  15. Terminal complement inhibitor eculizumab in atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legendre, C M; Licht, C; Muus, P; Greenbaum, L A; Babu, S; Bedrosian, C; Bingham, C; Cohen, D J; Delmas, Y; Douglas, K; Eitner, F; Feldkamp, T; Fouque, D; Furman, R R; Gaber, O; Herthelius, M; Hourmant, M; Karpman, D; Lebranchu, Y; Mariat, C; Menne, J; Moulin, B; Nürnberger, J; Ogawa, M; Remuzzi, G; Richard, T; Sberro-Soussan, R; Severino, B; Sheerin, N S; Trivelli, A; Zimmerhackl, L B; Goodship, T; Loirat, C

    2013-06-06

    Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome is a genetic, life-threatening, chronic disease of complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy. Plasma exchange or infusion may transiently maintain normal levels of hematologic measures but does not treat the underlying systemic disease. We conducted two prospective phase 2 trials in which patients with atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome who were 12 years of age or older received eculizumab for 26 weeks and during long-term extension phases. Patients with low platelet counts and renal damage (in trial 1) and those with renal damage but no decrease in the platelet count of more than 25% for at least 8 weeks during plasma exchange or infusion (in trial 2) were recruited. The primary end points included a change in the platelet count (in trial 1) and thrombotic microangiopathy event-free status (no decrease in the platelet count of >25%, no plasma exchange or infusion, and no initiation of dialysis) (in trial 2). A total of 37 patients (17 in trial 1 and 20 in trial 2) received eculizumab for a median of 64 and 62 weeks, respectively. Eculizumab resulted in increases in the platelet count; in trial 1, the mean increase in the count from baseline to week 26 was 73×10(9) per liter (Pdialysis was discontinued in 4 of 5 patients. Earlier intervention with eculizumab was associated with significantly greater improvement in the estimated GFR. Eculizumab was also associated with improvement in health-related quality of life. No cumulative toxicity of therapy or serious infection-related adverse events, including meningococcal infections, were observed through the extension period. Eculizumab inhibited complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy and was associated with significant time-dependent improvement in renal function in patients with atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome. (Funded by Alexion Pharmaceuticals; C08-002 ClinicalTrials.gov numbers, NCT00844545 [adults] and NCT00844844 [adolescents]; C08-003 ClinicalTrials.gov numbers

  16. HOX gene complement and expression in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko W. Currie

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freshwater planarians are well known for their regenerative abilities. Less well known is how planarians maintain spatial patterning in long-lived adult animals or how they re-pattern tissues during regeneration. HOX genes are good candidates to regulate planarian spatial patterning, yet the full complement or genomic clustering of planarian HOX genes has not yet been described, primarily because only a few have been detectable by in situ hybridization, and none have given morphological phenotypes when knocked down by RNAi. Results Because the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea (S. mediterranea is unsegmented, appendage less, and morphologically simple, it has been proposed that it may have a simplified HOX gene complement. Here, we argue against this hypothesis and show that S. mediterranea has a total of 13 HOX genes, which represent homologs to all major axial categories, and can be detected by whole-mount in situ hybridization using a highly sensitive method. In addition, we show that planarian HOX genes do not cluster in the genome, yet 5/13 have retained aspects of axially restricted expression. Finally, we confirm HOX gene axial expression by RNA deep-sequencing 6 anterior–posterior “zones” of the animal, which we provide as a dataset to the community to discover other axially restricted transcripts. Conclusions Freshwater planarians have an unappreciated HOX gene complexity, with all major axial categories represented. However, we conclude based on adult expression patterns that planarians have a derived body plan and their asexual lifestyle may have allowed for large changes in HOX expression from the last common ancestor between arthropods, flatworms, and vertebrates. Using our in situ method and axial zone RNAseq data, it should be possible to further understand the pathways that pattern the anterior–posterior axis of adult planarians.

  17. The fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindhagen, Elin; Nygren, Peter; Larsson, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    The fluorometric microculture cytotoxicity assay (FMCA) is a nonclonogenic microplate-based cell viability assay used for measurement of the cytotoxic and/or cytostatic effect of different compounds in vitro. The assay is based on hydrolysis of the probe, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) by esterases in cells with intact plasma membranes. The assay is available as both a semiautomated 96-well plate setup and a 384-well plate version fully adaptable to robotics. Experimental plates are prepared with a small amount of drug solution and can be stored frozen. Cells are seeded on the plates and cell viability is evaluated after 72 h. The protocol described here is applicable both for cell lines and freshly prepared tumor cells from patients and is suitable both for screening in drug development and as a basis for a predictive test for individualization of anticancer drug therapy.

  18. A fluorimetric assay for cortisol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Daniel; Schmid, Rolf D; Dragan, Calin-Aurel; Bureik, Matthias; Urlacher, Vlada B

    2005-09-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive fluorimetric assay for the quantitative determination of cortisol is reported. The assay is based on the formation of a fluorescent dye when cortisol is incubated with a mixture of sulfuric acid and acetic acid. The fluorescence spectrum recorded for the resulting dye shows a maximum extinction at 475 nm and a maximum emission at 525 nm. The solvent 2-methyl-4-pentanone was used for extraction and was found to act as a fluorescence amplifier. A limit of detection of 2.7 muM was achieved, making it possible to forego solvent evaporation. The assay suffers minor interference from 11-deoxycortisol which exhibits low fluorescence at lambda (ex): 460 nm; lambda (em): 505 nm. Typical standard deviations were below 4%. We validated the assay using a biotransformation with recombinant Schizosaccharomyces pombe which regioselectively hydroxylates 11-deoxycortisol to cortisol. The method described herein is suitable for preliminary screening of microorganisms capable of steroid hydroxylation.

  19. Commercial Laboratory Testing of Excision Repair Cross-Complementation Group 1 Expression in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadfar, Nosha; Sivapiragasam, Abirami; Geller, Matthew; Islam, Shahidul; Selbs, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) expression by non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has been reported to predict resistance to platinum-based therapies. On this basis, several commercial laboratories have offered ERCC1 testing to facilitate clinical decision making, but the reliability of such assays has recently been called into question. Methods. First, three large commercial laboratories were queried for their cumulative ERCC1 test results in NSCLC patients to compare their independent rates of ERCC1 expression. Second, identical tumor blocks from individual NSCLC patients underwent round-robin analysis to evaluate interlaboratory concordance for ERCC1 expression. Third, a retrospective review of medical records from NSCLC patients identified those who were both highly responsive and resistant to platinum-based chemotherapies. Tumor blocks from these patients were then used in a gold standard analysis to determine individual laboratory sensitivity and specificity for ERCC1 results. Results. Significant differences were observed in independent laboratory ERRC1 expression rates (Clarient 70% vs. Genzyme 60% vs. Third Laboratory 44%, p marketed laboratory assays achieved a specificity of greater than 50%. Conclusion. The results of commercial laboratory testing for ERCC1 are inconsistent and unreliable. Better validation and postmarketing surveillance should be mandated before tumor biomarker assays are allowed to enter the clinical arena. PMID:24705979

  20. Radioligand assay in reproductive biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenman, S.G.; Sherman, B.M.

    1975-01-01

    Radioligand assays have been developed for the principal reproductive steroids and peptide hormones. Specific binding reagents have included antibodies, plasma binders, and intracellular receptors. In each assay, problems of specificity, sensitivity, and nonspecific inhibitors were encountered. Many features of the endocrine physiology in childhood, during puberty, and in adulthood have been characterized. Hormonal evaluations of endocrine disorders of reproduction are characterized on the basis of their characteristic pathophysiologic alterations. (U.S.)

  1. ICE1 of Pyrus ussuriensis functions in cold tolerance by enhancing PuDREBa transcriptional levels through interacting with PuHHP1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaosan; Li, Kongqing; Jin, Cong; Zhang, Shaoling

    2015-12-01

    ICE1 transcription factor plays an important role in plant cold stress via regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. In this study, a PuICE1 gene isolated from Pyrus ussuriensis was characterized for its function in cold tolerance. The expression levels of the PuICE1 were induced by cold, dehydration and salt, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PuICE1 was localized in the nucleus and could bind specifically to the MYC element in the PuDREBa promoter. The PuICE1 fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain to have transcriptional activation activity. Ectopic expression of the PuICE1 in tomato conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stress at cold temperatures, less electrolyte leakage, less MDA content, higher chlorophyll content, higher survival rate, higher proline content, higher activities of enzymes. In additon, steady-state mRNA levels of six stress-responsive genes coding for either functional or regulatory genes were induced to higher levels in the transgenic lines by cold stress. Yeast two-hybrid, transient assay, split luciferase complementation and BiFC assays all revealed that PuHHP1 protein can physically interact with PuICE1. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PuICE1 plays a positive role in cold tolerance, which may be due to enhancement of PuDREBa transcriptional levels through interacting with the PuHHP1.

  2. On the Functional Overlap between Complement and Anti-Microbial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Jana; Hobkirk, James; Mohamed, Fatima; Browning, Michael J; Stover, Cordula M

    2014-01-01

    Intriguingly, activated complement and anti-microbial peptides share certain functionalities; lytic, phagocytic, and chemo-attractant activities and each may, in addition, exert cell instructive roles. Each has been shown to have distinct LPS detoxifying activity and may play a role in the development of endotoxin tolerance. In search of the origin of complement, a functional homolog of complement C3 involved in opsonization has been identified in horseshoe crabs. Horseshoe crabs possess anti-microbial peptides able to bind to acyl chains or phosphate groups/saccharides of endotoxin, LPS. Complement activity as a whole is detectable in marine invertebrates. These are also a source of anti-microbial peptides with potential pharmaceutical applicability. Investigating the locality for the production of complement pathway proteins and their role in modulating cellular immune responses are emerging fields. The significance of local synthesis of complement components is becoming clearer from in vivo studies of parenchymatous disease involving specifically generated, complement-deficient mouse lines. Complement C3 is a central component of complement activation. Its provision by cells of the myeloid lineage varies. Their effector functions in turn are increased in the presence of anti-microbial peptides. This may point to a potentiating range of activities, which should serve the maintenance of health but may also cause disease. Because of the therapeutic implications, this review will consider closely studies dealing with complement activation and anti-microbial peptide activity in acute inflammation (e.g., dialysis-related peritonitis, appendicitis, and ischemia).

  3. The role of complement in CD4⁺ T cell homeostasis and effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolev, Martin; Le Friec, Gaëlle; Kemper, Claudia

    2013-02-01

    The complement system is among the evolutionary oldest 'players' of the immune system. It was discovered in 1896 by Jules Bordet as a heat-labile fraction of the serum responsible for the opsonisation and subsequent killing of bacteria. The decades between the 1920s and 1990s then marked the discovery and biochemical characterization of the proteins comprising the complement system. Today, complement is defined as a complex system consisting of more than 30 membrane-bound and soluble plasma proteins, which are activated in a cascade-like manner, very similarly to the caspase proteases and blood coagulation systems. Complement is engrained in the immunologist's mind as a serum-effective, quintessential part of innate immunity, vitally required for the detection and removal of pathogens or other dangerous entities. Three decades ago, this rather confined definition was challenged and then refined when it was shown that complement participates vitally in the induction and regulation of B cell responses, thus adaptive immunity. Similarly, research work published in more recent years supports an equally important role for the complement system in shaping T cell responses. Today, we are again facing paradigm shifts in the field: complement is actively involved in the negative control of T cell effector immune responses, and thus, by definition in immune homeostasis. Further, while serum complement activity is without doubt fundamental in the defence against invading pathogens, local immune cell-derived production of complement emerges as key mediator of complement's impact on adaptive immune responses. And finally, the impact of complement on metabolic pathways and the crosstalk between complement and other immune effector systems is likely more extensive than previously anticipated and is fertile ground for future discoveries. In this review, we will discuss these emerging new roles of complement, with a focus on Th1 cell biology. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. Complement in patients receiving maintenance hemodialysis: functional screening and quantitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horikoshi Satoshi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The complement system is vital for innate immunity and is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases and the mechanism of host defense. Complement deficiencies occasionally cause life-threatening diseases. In hemodialysis (HD patients, profiles on complement functional activity and deficiency are still obscure. The objectives of the present study were to measure the functional complement activities of the classical pathway (CP, lectin pathway (LP and alternative pathway (AP using a novel method and consequently to elucidate the rates of deficiencies among HD patients. Methods In the present study, 244 HD patients at one dialysis center and 204 healthy controls were enrolled. Functional complement activities were measured simultaneously using the Wielisa®-kit. The combination of the results of these three pathway activities allows us to speculate which candidate complement is deficient; subsequently, the deficient complement was determined. Results All three functional complement activities were significantly higher in the HD patients than in the control group (P ®-kit, 16 sera (8.8% with mannose-binding lectin (MBL deficiency, 1 serum (0.4% with C4 deficiency, 1 serum (0.4% with C9 deficiency, and 1 serum (0.4% with B deficiency were observed in the HD group, and 18 sera (8.8% with MBL deficiency and 1 serum (0.5% with B deficiency were observed in the control group. There were no significant differences in the 5-year mortality rate between each complement-deficient group and the complement-sufficient group among the HD patients. Conclusion This is the first report that profiles complement deficiencies by simultaneous measurement of functional activities of the three complement pathways in HD patients. Hemodialysis patients frequently suffer from infections or malignancies, but functional complement deficiencies do not confer additional risk of mortality.

  5. Correlation between the genotoxicity endpoints measured by two different genotoxicity assays: comet assay and CBMN assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Ladeira

    2015-06-01

    The results concerning of positive findings by micronuclei and non significant ones by comet assay, are corroborated by Deng et al. (2005 study performed in workers occupationally exposed to methotrexate, also a cytostatic drug. According to Cavallo et al. (2009, the comet assay seems to be more suitable for the prompt evaluation of the genotoxic effects, for instance, of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons mixtures containing volatile substances, whereas the micronucleus test seems more appropriate to evaluate the effects of exposure to antineoplastic agents. However, there are studies that observed an increase in both the comet assay and the micronucleus test in nurses handling antineoplastic drugs, although statistical significance was only seen in the comet assay, quite the opposite of our results (Maluf & Erdtmann, 2000; Laffon et al. 2005.

  6. Plasmodium falciparum CENH3 is able to functionally complement Cse4p and its, C-terminus is essential for centromere function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Garima; Surolia, Namita

    2013-01-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum centromeric histone variant PfCENH3 has been shown to occupy a 4-4.5 kb region on each chromosome, but the experimental demonstration of its structure-function relationship remains unexplored. By functional complementation assays, we report that the C-terminus, specifically the CATD region within the HFD of PfCENH3 is essential in centromere function. Our studies also indicate that the PfCENH3 specific LLAL residues of the CATD region are required for centromere targeting and chromosome segregation. Histone H3 of P. falciparum is not found to complement Cse4p (the yeast homologue of CENH3). We also report the identification of PfCENP-C, another component of the inner kinetochore protein complex and its association with PfCENH3. These studies thus delineate the structural determinants of PfCENH3. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Contribution of the Infection-Associated Complement Regulator-Acquiring Surface Protein 4 (ErpC to Complement Resistance of Borrelia burgdorferi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Hammerschmidt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Borrelia burgdorferi evades complement-mediated killing by interacting with complement regulators through distinct complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs. Here, we extend our analyses to the contribution of CRASP-4 in mediating complement resistance of B. burgdorferi and its interaction with human complement regulators. CRASP-4 (also known as ErpC was immobilized onto magnetic beads and used to capture proteins from human serum. Following Western blotting, factor H (CFH, CFH-related protein 1 (CFHR1, CFHR2, and CFHR5 were identified as ligands of CRASP-4. To analyze the impact of native CRASP-4 on mediating survival of serum-sensitive cells in human serum, a B. garinii strain was generated that ectopically expresses CRASP-4. CRASP-4-producing bacteria bound CFHR1, CFHR2, and CFHR5 but not CFH. In addition, transformed spirochetes deposited significant amounts of lethal complement components on their surface and were susceptible to human serum, thus indicating that CRASP-4 plays a subordinate role in complement resistance of B. burgdorferi.

  8. Complement protective epitopes and CD55-microtubule complexes facilitate the invasion and intracellular persistence of uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Tanu; Hasan, Rafia J; Nowicki, Stella; Venkatarajan, Mathura S; Singh, Rajbir; Urvil, Petri T; Popov, Vsevolod; Braun, Werner A; Popik, Waldemar; Goodwin, J Shawn; Nowicki, Bogdan J

    2014-04-01

     Escherichia coli-bearing Dr-adhesins (Dr+ E. coli) cause chronic pyelonephritis in pregnant women and animal models. This chronic renal infection correlates with the capacity of bacteria to invade epithelial cells expressing CD55. The mechanism of infection remains unknown.  CD55 amino acids in the vicinity of binding pocket-Ser155 for Dr-adhesin were mutated to alanine and subjected to temporal gentamicin-invasion/gentamicin-survival assay in Chinese hamster ovary cells. CD55/microtubule (MT) responses were studied using confocal/electron microscopy, and 3-dimensional structure analysis.  Mutant analysis revealed that complement-protective CD55-Ser165 and CD55-Phe154 epitopes control E. coli invasion by coregulating CD55-MT complex expression. Single-point CD55 mutations changed E. coli to either a minimally invasive (Ser165Ala) or a hypervirulent pathogen (Phe154Ala). Thus, single amino acid modifications with no impact on CD55 structure and bacterial attachment can have a profound impact on E. coli virulence. While CD55-Ser165Ala decreased E. coli invasion and led to dormant intracellular persistence, intracellular E. coli in CD55-Phe154Ala developed elongated forms (multiplying within vacuoles), upregulated CD55-MT complexes, acquired CD55 coat, and escaped phagolysosomal fusion.  E. coli target complement-protective CD55 epitopes for invasion and exploit CD55-MT complexes to escape phagolysosomal fusion, leading to a nondestructive parasitism that allows bacteria to persist intracellularly.

  9. Complementation analysis of mutants of 1-aminocyclopropane- 1-carboxylate synthase reveals the enzyme is a dimer with shared active sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarun, A S; Theologis, A

    1998-05-15

    The pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS, EC 4.4.1.14) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the ethylene biosynthetic pathway. ACS shares the conservation of 11 invariant residues with a family of aminotransferases that includes aspartate aminotransferase. Site-directed mutagenesis on two of these residues, Tyr-92 and Lys-278, in the tomato isoenzyme Le-ACS2 greatly reduces enzymatic activity, indicating their importance in catalysis. These mutants have been used in complementation experiments either in vivo in Escherichia coli or in an in vitro transcription/translation assay to study whether the enzyme functions as a dimer. When the Y92L mutant is coexpressed with the K278A mutant protein, there is partial restoration of enzyme activity, suggesting that the mutant proteins can dimerize and form active heterodimers. Coexpressing a double mutant with the wild-type protein reduces wild-type activity, indicating that inactive heterodimers are formed between the wild-type and the double mutant protein subunits. Furthermore, hybrid complementation shows that another tomato isoenzyme, Le-ACS4, can dimerize and that Le-ACS2 and Le-ACS4 have limited capacity for heterodimerization. The data suggest that ACS functions as a dimer with shared active sites.

  10. Complement activation as a bioequivalence issue relevant to the development of generic liposomes and other nanoparticulate drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szebeni, Janos, E-mail: jszebeni2@gmail.com [Nanomedicine Research and Education Center, Semmelweis University, Budapest & SeroScience Ltd, Budapest (Hungary); Storm, Gert [Department of Pharmaceutics, Utrecht Institute for Pharmaceutical Sciences (UIPS), Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-12-18

    Liposomes are known to activate the complement (C) system, which can lead in vivo to a hypersensitivity syndrome called C activation-related pseudoallergy (CARPA). CARPA has been getting increasing attention as a safety risk of i.v. therapy with liposomes, whose testing is now recommended in bioequivalence evaluations of generic liposomal drug candidates. This review highlights the adverse consequences of C activation, the unique symptoms of CARPA triggered by essentially all i.v. administered liposomal drugs, and the various features of vesicles influencing this adverse immune effect. For the case of Doxil, we also address the mechanism of C activation and the opsonization vs. long circulation (stealth) paradox. In reviewing the methods of assessing C activation and CARPA, we delineate the most sensitive porcine model and an algorithm for stepwise evaluation of the CARPA risk of i.v. liposomes, which are proposed for standardization for preclinical toxicology evaluation of liposomal and other nanoparticulate drug candidates. - Highlights: • Outlining of difficulties in generic development of liposomal drugs. • New regulatory requirements to evaluate CARPA in preclinical studies. • Review of complement activation by liposomes and its adverse consequences (CARPA). • Assays of C activation in vitro and CARPA in vivo, with the porcine test in focus. • Decision tree how to handle the risk of CARPA assessed by a battery of tests.

  11. Complement component C5a Promotes Expression of IL-22 and IL-17 from Human T cells and its Implication in Age-related Macular Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klein Michael L

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age related macular degeneration (AMD is the leading cause of irreversible blindness in elderly populations worldwide. Inflammation, among many factors, has been suggested to play an important role in AMD pathogenesis. Recent studies have demonstrated a strong genetic association between AMD and complement factor H (CFH, the down-regulatory factor of complement activation. Elevated levels of complement activating molecules including complement component 5a (C5a have been found in the serum of AMD patients. Our aim is to study whether C5a can impact human T cells and its implication in AMD. Methods Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were isolated from the blood of exudative form of AMD patients using a Ficoll gradient centrifugation protocol. Intracellular staining and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays were used to measure protein expression. Apoptotic cells were detected by staining of cells with the annexin-V and TUNEL technology and analyzed by a FACS Caliber flow cytometer. SNP genotyping was analyzed by TaqMan genotyping assay using the Real-time PCR system 7500. Results We show that C5a promotes interleukin (IL-22 and IL-17 expression by human CD4+ T cells. This effect is dependent on B7, IL-1β and IL-6 expression from monocytes. We have also found that C5a could protect human CD4+ cells from undergoing apoptosis. Importantly, consistent with a role of C5a in promoting IL-22 and IL-17 expression, significant elevation in IL-22 and IL-17 levels was found in AMD patients as compared to non-AMD controls. Conclusions Our results support the notion that C5a may be one of the factors contributing to the elevated serum IL-22 and IL-17 levels in AMD patients. The possible involvement of IL-22 and IL-17 in the inflammation that contributes to AMD may herald a new approach to treat AMD.

  12. Complementing theoretical biochemistry with the uso of computer aids (Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Herrera

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Teaching  biochemistry  in  the  current  state  of  science  and  society  requires  a  special motivation for learning, especially for students where Biochemistry is one of the courses on  their  careers.  The  traditional  way  of  teaching,  based  on  the  teacher-student relationship,  mostly  unidirectional,  does  not  fulfil  the  needs  imposed  in  this  era. Considering  the  current  situation,  University  students  require  new  abilities  in  their training  and  the  use  of  computers  can  be  a  facility  for  discovering  and  research, enabling the experience of new and  diverse situations. The design of teaching material for undergraduate students who take biochemistry as complementary course should be seen  as  an  opportunity  to  complement  theoretical  aspect  on  the  current  courses.  We have used three different approaches: (I Modelling proteins indicating key motifs at the three-dimensional structure and residues where inhibitors can be attach. (II Generation of  activities  by  the  use  of  sensors.  And  (III  elaborating  active  quizzes  where  students can  be  drive  on  their  learning.  Building  knowledge  based  on  practical  experience  can improve  student’s  competence  on  basic  science  and  the  learning  process  can  be complemented in the use of dynamics models.

  13. Antibodies Against Complement Components: Relevance for the Antiphospholipid Syndrome-Biomarkers of the Disease and Biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bećarević, Mirjana

    2017-07-01

    Laboratory criterion for the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL Abs). Complement system has a role in mediating aPL Abs-induced thrombosis in animal models. The importance of antibodies against complement components (potential biomarkers of APS) and the importance of antibodies with beneficial anti-complement effects in APS (as biopharmaceuticals) are reviewed. Antibodies against complement components described in APS patients, so far, are anti-C1q and anti-factor H Abs, although anti-factor B Abs and anti-C5a Abs were described in animal models of APS. Clinical studies in APS patients are limited to a small number of case reports. Studies that would confirm potential role of Abs against complement components (as potential biomarkers of APS) are lacking. Lack of randomized clinical trials (that would provide complete data for confirmation of beneficial effects of biopharmaceuticals in complement inhibition) in APS is alarming.

  14. The Role of Properdin in Zymosan- and Escherichia coli-Induced Complement Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Morten; Garred, Peter; Lindstad, Julie K

    2012-01-01

    Properdin is well known as an enhancer of the alternative complement amplification loop when C3 is activated, whereas its role as a recognition molecule of exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns and initiator of complement activation is less understood. We therefore studied the role...... of properdin in activation of complement in normal human serum by zymosan and various Escherichia coli strains. In ELISA, microtiter plates coated with zymosan induced efficient complement activation with deposition of C4b and terminal complement complex on the solid phase. Virtually no deposition of C4b...... or terminal complement complex was observed with mannose-binding lectin (MBL)-deficient serum. Reconstitution with purified MBL showed distinct activation in both readouts. In ELISA, normal human serum-induced deposition of properdin by zymosan was abolished by the C3-inhibiting peptide compstatin. Flow...

  15. Human pathogenic Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. resists complement-mediated killing by direct binding of immune regulators factor H and factor H-like protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberger, Pia; Siegel, Corinna; Skerka, Christine; Fingerle, Volker; Schulte-Spechtel, Ulrike; van Dam, Alje; Wilske, Bettina; Brade, Volker; Zipfel, Peter F; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter

    2007-10-01

    Borrelia spielmanii sp. nov. has recently been shown to be a novel human pathogenic genospecies that causes Lyme disease in Europe. In order to elucidate the immune evasion mechanisms of B. spielmanii, we compared the abilities of isolates obtained from Lyme disease patients and tick isolate PC-Eq17 to escape from complement-mediated bacteriolysis. Using a growth inhibition assay, we show that four B. spielmanii isolates, including PC-Eq17, are serum resistant, whereas a single isolate, PMew, was more sensitive to complement-mediated lysis. All isolates activated complement in vitro, as demonstrated by covalent attachment of C3 fragments; however, deposition of the later activation products C6 and C5b-9 was restricted to the moderately serum-resistant isolate PMew and the serum-sensitive B. garinii isolate G1. Furthermore, serum adsorption experiments revealed that all B. spielmanii isolates acquired the host alternative pathway regulators factor H and factor H-like protein (FHL-1) from human serum. Both complement regulators retained their factor I-mediated C3b inactivation activities when bound to spirochetes. In addition, two distinct factor H and FHL-1 binding proteins, BsCRASP-1 and BsCRASP-2, were identified, which we estimated to be approximately 23 to 25 kDa in mass. A further factor H binding protein, BsCRASP-3, was found exclusively in the tick isolate, PC-Eq17. This is the first report describing an immune evasion mechanism utilized by B. spielmanii sp. nov., and it demonstrates the capture of human immune regulators to resist complement-mediated killing.

  16. Comprehensive and comparative transcription analyses of the complement pathway in rainbow trout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köbis, Judith M; Rebl, Alexander; Kühn, Carsten; Korytář, Tomáš; Köllner, Bernd; Goldammer, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is one of the most ancient and most essential innate immune cascades throughout the animal kingdom. Survival of aquatic animals, such as rainbow trout, depends on this early inducible, efficient immune cascade. Despite increasing research on genes coding for complement components in bony fish, some complement-related genes are still unknown in salmonid fish. In the present study, we characterize the genes encoding complement factor D (CFD), CD93 molecule (CD93), and C-type lectin domain family 4, member M (CLEC4M) from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Subsequently, we performed comprehensive and comparative expression analyses of 36 complement genes including CFD, CD93, and CLEC4M and further putative complement-associated genes to obtain general information about the functional gene interaction within the complement pathway in fish. These quantification analyses were conducted in liver, spleen and gills of healthy fish of two rainbow trout strains, selected for survival (strain BORN) and growth (Import strain), respectively. The present expression study clearly confirms for rainbow trout that liver represents the primary site of complement expression. Spleen and gills also express most complement genes, although the mean transcript levels were generally lower than in liver. The transcription data suggest a contribution of spleen and gills to complement activity. The comparison of the two rainbow trout strains revealed a generally similar complement gene expression. However, a significantly lower expression of numerous genes especially in spleen seems characteristic for the BORN strain. This suggests a strain-specific complement pathway regulation under the selected rearing conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. New perspectives on mannan-binding lectin-mediated complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn, Søren Egedal; Thiel, Steffen; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune system, mediating several major effector functions and modulating adaptive immune responses. Three complement activation pathways exist: the classical pathway (CP), the alternative pathway (AP), and the lectin pathway (LP). The LP...... picture of the complement system is more that of a small "scale-free" network where C3 acts as the main hub, than that of three linear pathways converging in a common terminal pathway....

  18. Complement and HIV-I infection/ HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fengming; Dai, Shen; Gordon, Jennifer; Qin, Xuebin

    2014-01-01

    The various neurological complications associated with HIV-1 infection, specifically HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) persist as a major public health burden worldwide. Despite the widespread use of anti-retroviral therapy, the prevalence of HAND is significantly high. HAND results from the direct effects of an HIV-1 infection as well as secondary effects of HIV-1-induced immune reaction and inflammatory response. Complement, a critical mediator of innate and acquired immunity, plays important roles in defeating many viral infections by the formation of a lytic pore or indirectly by opsonization and recruitment of phagocytes. While the role of complement in the pathogenesis of HIV-1 infection and HAND has been previously recognized for over fifteen years, it has been largely underestimated thus far. Complement can be activated through HIV-1 envelope proteins, mannose binding lectins (MBL) and anti-HIV-1 antibodies. Complement not only fights against HIV-1 infection but also enhances HIV-1 infection. Also, HIV-1 can hijack complement regulators such as CD59 and CD55 and can utilize these regulators and factor H to escape from complement attack. Normally, complement levels in brain are much lower than plasma levels and there is no or little complement deposition in brain cells. Interestingly, local production and deposition of complement are dramatically increased in HIV-1-infected brain, indicating that complement may contribute to the pathogenesis of HAND. Here, we review the current understanding of the role of complement in HIV-1 infection and HAND as well as potential therapeutic approaches targeting to the complement system for the treatment and eradications of HIV-1 infection. PMID:24639397

  19. Large Covariance Estimation by Thresholding Principal Orthogonal Complements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of a high-dimensional covariance with a conditional sparsity structure and fast-diverging eigenvalues. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix in an approximate factor model, we allow for the presence of some cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common but unobservable factors. We introduce the Principal Orthogonal complEment Thresholding (POET) method to explore such an approximate factor structure with sparsity. The POET estimator includes the sample covariance matrix, the factor-based covariance matrix (Fan, Fan, and Lv, 2008), the thresholding estimator (Bickel and Levina, 2008) and the adaptive thresholding estimator (Cai and Liu, 2011) as specific examples. We provide mathematical insights when the factor analysis is approximately the same as the principal component analysis for high-dimensional data. The rates of convergence of the sparse residual covariance matrix and the conditional sparse covariance matrix are studied under various norms. It is shown that the impact of estimating the unknown factors vanishes as the dimensionality increases. The uniform rates of convergence for the unobserved factors and their factor loadings are derived. The asymptotic results are also verified by extensive simulation studies. Finally, a real data application on portfolio allocation is presented. PMID:24348088

  20. Yersinia pestis targets neutrophils via complement receptor 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Peter M.; Nero, Thomas; Bohman, Lesley; Felek, Suleyman; Krukonis, Eric S.; Marketon, Melanie M.

    2015-01-01

    Yersinia species display a tropism for lymphoid tissues during infection, and the bacteria select innate immune cells for delivery of cytotoxic effectors by the type III secretion system. Yet the mechanism for target cell selection remains a mystery. Here we investigate the interaction of Yersinia pestis with murine splenocytes to identify factors that participate in the targeting process. We find that interactions with primary immune cells rely on multiple factors. First, the bacterial adhesin Ail is required for efficient targeting of neutrophils in vivo. However, Ail does not appear to directly mediate binding to a specific cell type. Instead, we find that host serum factors direct Y. pestis to specific innate immune cells, particularly neutrophils. Importantly, specificity towards neutrophils was increased in the absence of bacterial adhesins due to reduced targeting of other cell types, but this phenotype was only visible in the presence of mouse serum. Addition of antibodies against complement receptor 3 and CD14 blocked target cell selection, suggesting that a combination of host factors participate in steering bacteria toward neutrophils during plague infection. PMID:25359083

  1. Form and function: Optional complementizers reduce causal inferences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Rohde

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Many factors are known to influence the inference of the discourse coherence relationship between two sentences. Here, we examine the relationship between two conjoined embedded clauses in sentences like 'The professor noted that the student teacher did not look confident and (that the students were poorly behaved'. In two studies, we find that the presence of 'that 'before the second embedded clause in such sentences reduces the possibility of a forward causal relationship between the clauses, i.e., the inference that the student teacher’s confidence was what affected student behavior. Three further studies tested the possibility of a backward causal relationship between clauses in the same structure, and found that the complementizer’s presence aids that relationship, especially in a forced-choice paradigm. The empirical finding that a complementizer, a linguistic element associated primarily with structure rather than event-level semantics, can affect discourse coherence is novel and illustrates an interdependence between syntactic parsing and discourse parsing.

  2. Complement inhibition in biomaterial- and biosurface-induced thromboinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdahl, Kristina N; Huang, Shan; Nilsson, Bo; Teramura, Yuji

    2016-06-01

    Therapeutic medicine today includes a vast number of procedures involving the use of biomaterials, transplantation of therapeutic cells or cell clusters, as well as of solid organs. These treatment modalities are obviously of great benefit to the patient, but also present a great challenge to the innate immune system, since they involve direct exposure of non-biological materials, cells of non-hematological origin as well as endothelial cells, damaged by ischemia-perfusion in solid organs to proteins and cells in the blood. The result of such an exposure may be an inappropriate activation of the complement and contact/kallikrein systems, which produce mediators capable of triggering the platelets and PMNs and monocytes, which can ultimately result in thrombotic and inflammatory (i.e., a thrombo-inflammatory) response to the treatment modality. In this concept review, we give an overview of the mechanisms of recognition within the innate immunity system, with the aim to identify suitable points for intervention. Finally, we discuss emerging and promising techniques for surface modification of biomaterials and cells with specific inhibitors in order to diminish thromboinflammation and improve clinical outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Large Covariance Estimation by Thresholding Principal Orthogonal Complements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2013-09-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of a high-dimensional covariance with a conditional sparsity structure and fast-diverging eigenvalues. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix in an approximate factor model, we allow for the presence of some cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common but unobservable factors. We introduce the Principal Orthogonal complEment Thresholding (POET) method to explore such an approximate factor structure with sparsity. The POET estimator includes the sample covariance matrix, the factor-based covariance matrix (Fan, Fan, and Lv, 2008), the thresholding estimator (Bickel and Levina, 2008) and the adaptive thresholding estimator (Cai and Liu, 2011) as specific examples. We provide mathematical insights when the factor analysis is approximately the same as the principal component analysis for high-dimensional data. The rates of convergence of the sparse residual covariance matrix and the conditional sparse covariance matrix are studied under various norms. It is shown that the impact of estimating the unknown factors vanishes as the dimensionality increases. The uniform rates of convergence for the unobserved factors and their factor loadings are derived. The asymptotic results are also verified by extensive simulation studies. Finally, a real data application on portfolio allocation is presented.

  4. Complement factor C4 activation in patients with hereditary angioedema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åbom, Anne; Bygum, Anette; Koch, Claus

    2017-01-01

    , that C1-INH-HAE may potentially be overlooked, if screening is performed only by measurement of C4. It has been suggested that measurement of C4 activation products is better suited to avoid false negative results. Our aim was to investigate whether total antigenic C4 or non-functional C4c is a better......Objectives: Low complement factor C4 is usually considered a valuable screening tool for patients with the potentially life-threatening hereditary angioedema with C1-inhibitor (C1-INH) deficiency (C1-INH-HAE). However, there are patients with C1-INH-HAE presenting with normal C4 levels. This means...... measure of the increased C4 activation in C1-INH-HAE patients. Design and methods: Two different monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to human C4 were produced: one had specificity for the β-chain of C4 and would thus react with both functional and non-functional C4, and the other was developed against the factor...

  5. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis

    OpenAIRE

    Viviana P. Ferreira; Vladimir Fazito Vale; Michael K. Pangburn; Maha Abdeladhim; Antonio Ferreira Mendes-Sousa; Iliano V. Coutinho-Abreu; Manoochehr Rasouli; Elizabeth A. Brandt; Claudio Meneses; Kolyvan Ferreira Lima; Ricardo Nascimento Araújo; Marcos Horácio Pereira; Michalis Kotsyfakis; Fabiano Oliveira; Shaden Kamhawi

    2016-01-01

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host's skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the sa...

  6. A radioreceptor assay for benzodiazepines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, P.; Husson, J.-M.; Raynaud, J.-P.

    1979-01-01

    A simple, rapid and sensitive radioreceptor assay for determining benzodiazepines in serum is based on the displacement by the drug specific [ 3 H] diazepam binding to a membrane fraction from rat brain. The limit of detection of the more active benzodiazepines is about 0.5 ng. Diazepam, nitrazepam, clobazam and HR 458 have been assayed in human serum after a single oral clinical dose. The results can be used for determining pharmacokinetic parameters. The technique measures not only the parent benzodiazepine but also clinically active metabolites. (author)

  7. Optimization of cytotoxicity assay by real-time, impedance-based cell analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramis, G; Martínez-Alarcón, L; Quereda, J J; Mendonça, L; Majado, M J; Gomez-Coelho, K; Mrowiec, A; Herrero-Medrano, J M; Abellaneda, J M; Pallares, F J; Ríos, A; Ramírez, P; Muñoz, A

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents an optimized procedure for assessing an immune-mediated cytotoxicity, produced after the addition of human and baboon serum to transgenic porcine fibroblasts. This procedure is performed with the xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analyzer (RTCA). The xCELLigence system measures the impedance variations in the culture media of a 96-well microelectronic plate, and shows the changes in cell number and morphology in a real-time plot. However, different factors need to be optimized before developing an RTCA assay. Thus, we studied the influence of several variables, such as the number of cells seeded, the time the cells were allowed to grow before the tests, the serum concentration and the addition of rabbit complement. The findings were confirmed by the WST-1 classical cytotoxicity test. The results showed that 7.5 × 10(3) cells seeded per well produced the adequate CI in 10 h. The area under the curve and the CImin versus concentration values showed a very high correlation index (r(2) = 0.966 and r(2) = 0.92 for the first 50 h after challenge, respectively), proving that CI variations are directly proportional to the quantity of serum added. The addition of complement resulted in lower CImin values. Therefore, both the cytolysis level with and without exogenous complement addition had to be assessed. There was a high correlation between the relative cytotoxicity assessed by WST-1 and the CI obtained by RTCA when exogenous complement was not added (r(2) = 0.827; p < 0.001). The correlation was average when rabbit complement was added (r(2) = 0.523; p = 0.046). In conclusion, culture conditions have an important influence on RTCA cytotoxicity assays.

  8. Assembly and activation of alternative complement components on endothelial cell-anchored ultra-large von Willebrand factor links complement and hemostasis-thrombosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy A Turner

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial cells (ECs express and release protein components of the complement pathways, as well as secreting and anchoring ultra-large von Willebrand factor (ULVWF multimers in long string-like structures that initiate platelet adhesion during hemostasis and thrombosis. The alternative complement pathway (AP is an important non-antibody-requiring host defense system. Thrombotic microangiopathies can be associated with defective regulation of the AP (atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome or with inadequate cleavage by ADAMTS-13 of ULVWF multimeric strings secreted by/anchored to ECs (thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura. Our goal was to determine if EC-anchored ULVWF strings caused the assembly and activation of AP components, thereby linking two essential defense mechanisms.We quantified gene expression of these complement components in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs by real-time PCR: C3 and C5; complement factor (CF B, CFD, CFP, CFH and CFI of the AP; and C4 of the classical and lectin (but not alternative complement pathways. We used fluorescent microscopy, monospecific antibodies against complement components, fluorescent secondary antibodies, and the analysis of >150 images to quantify the attachment of HUVEC-released complement proteins to ULVWF strings secreted by, and anchored to, the HUVECs (under conditions of ADAMTS-13 inhibition. We found that HUVEC-released C4 did not attach to ULVWF strings, ruling out activation of the classical and lectin pathways by the strings. In contrast, C3, FB, FD, FP and C5, FH and FI attached to ULVWF strings in quantitative patterns consistent with assembly of the AP components into active complexes. This was verified when non-functional FB blocked the formation of AP C3 convertase complexes (C3bBb on ULVWF strings.AP components are assembled and activated on EC-secreted/anchored ULVWF multimeric strings. Our findings provide one possible molecular mechanism for clinical

  9. Complement factor H protects mice from ischemic acute kidney injury but is not critical for controlling complement activation by glomerular IgM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Lindsey; Laskowski, Jennifer; Renner, Brandon; Pickering, Matthew C; Kulik, Liudmila; Klawitter, Jelena; Stites, Erik; Christians, Uwe; van der Vlag, Johan; Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Holers, V Michael; Thurman, Joshua M

    2018-02-01

    Natural IgM binds to glomerular epitopes in several progressive kidney diseases. Previous work has shown that IgM also binds within the glomerulus after ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) but does not fully activate the complement system. Factor H is a circulating complement regulatory protein, and congenital or acquired deficiency of factor H is a strong risk factor for several types of kidney disease. We hypothesized that factor H controls complement activation by IgM in the kidney after I/R, and that heterozygous factor H deficiency would permit IgM-mediated complement activation and injury at this location. We found that mice with targeted heterozygous deletion of the gene for factor H developed more severe kidney injury after I/R than wild-type controls, as expected, but that complement activation within the glomeruli remained well controlled. Furthermore, mice that are unable to generate soluble IgM were not protected from renal I/R, even in the setting of heterozygous factor H deficiency. These results demonstrate that factor H is important for limiting injury in the kidney after I/R, but it is not critical for controlling complement activation by immunoglobulin within the glomerulus in this setting. IgM binds to glomerular epitopes after I/R, but it is not a significant source of injury. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Problems with the PTH assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalier, Etienne; Delanaye, Pierre; Nyssen, Laurent; Souberbielle, Jean-Claude

    2015-05-01

    Even if the first assay for parathyroid hormone (PTH) was published in the early 1960s, its determination remains a challenge even today. Indeed, in the circulation, PTH is present in its active form (PTH 1-84), but many PTH fragments can also be present. These fragments accumulate when renal function declines and are recognized, at different extents, by the 2nd generation ("intact") PTH assays that are widely used in the clinical laboratories. Some assays, called "3rd generation PTH" do not recognize these fragments, but are not available everywhere. Hence, different problems are also linked with PTH determination. Among them, one can cite the lack of a reference method, the lack of standardization of the assays and, sometimes, the lack of consistent reference range. We can also point out stability problems and a large intra-individual variation. A workgroup is working on these problems under the auspices of the IFCC and we hope that some of these problems will be resolved in the next years. In this article, we will discuss all the possible issues of PTH determination. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. semen by MTT reduction assay

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    the concentration of sperm in each semen sample, sperm motility, plasma integrity of sperm in terms of hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) test, live and dead ratio of sperm and MTT reduction assay of each ejaculate were determined. Plasma membrane integrity of fresh sperm was assessed using a hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) ...

  12. Alcohol and cannabis use among college students: Substitutes or complements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Ross E; Armeli, Stephen; Tennen, Howard

    2016-07-01

    Economists debate whether changes in availability of alcohol or cannabis are positively or negatively related to changes in use of the other substance. Implicit in these arguments are two competing, individual-level hypotheses-that people use alcohol and cannabis either as complements or substitutes for one another. This is the first study to test these hypotheses using micro-longitudinal data on individuals' alcohol and cannabis use on a given evening. United States college students who use alcohol and cannabis (n=876) were selected from a larger sample who participated in a 30-day online daily diary study. At baseline, students reported their proclivity to use alcohol/drugs to cope with stress. Each day students reported their level of alcohol use from the prior evening as well as whether they had used cannabis. Evening levels of alcohol use and mean levels of alcohol use positively predicted the likelihood of evening cannabis use, results indicative of complementary use. This relation, however, was moderated by coping style, such that students who were more likely to use alcohol/drugs to cope were less likely to use cannabis as their evening or mean alcohol use levels increased, results indicative of substitution. Substance-using college students showed evidence for complementary alcohol and cannabis use at both the within- and between-person levels. Students with a proclivity toward using alcohol/drugs to cope, however, showed evidence of substitution. These findings suggest that studies based on economic theories of substance use should take into account individual differences in substance use motives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome associated with a hybrid complement gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian P Venables

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sequence analysis of the regulators of complement activation (RCA cluster of genes at chromosome position 1q32 shows evidence of several large genomic duplications. These duplications have resulted in a high degree of sequence identity between the gene for factor H (CFH and the genes for the five factor H-related proteins (CFHL1-5; aliases CFHR1-5. CFH mutations have been described in association with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS. The majority of the mutations are missense changes that cluster in the C-terminal region and impair the ability of factor H to regulate surface-bound C3b. Some have arisen as a result of gene conversion between CFH and CFHL1. In this study we tested the hypothesis that nonallelic homologous recombination between low-copy repeats in the RCA cluster could result in the formation of a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene that predisposes to the development of aHUS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a family with many cases of aHUS that segregate with the RCA cluster we used cDNA analysis, gene sequencing, and Southern blotting to show that affected individuals carry a heterozygous CFH/CFHL1 hybrid gene in which exons 1-21 are derived from CFH and exons 22/23 from CFHL1. This hybrid encodes a protein product identical to a functionally significant CFH mutant (c.3572C>T, S1191L and c.3590T>C, V1197A that has been previously described in association with aHUS. CONCLUSIONS: CFH mutation screening is recommended in all aHUS patients prior to renal transplantation because of the high risk of disease recurrence post-transplant in those known to have a CFH mutation. Because of our finding it will be necessary to implement additional screening strategies that will detect a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene.

  14. SOLARNET: a high resolution mission to complement the ILWS programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dame, L.; Clade, S.; Malherbe, J. M.

    SOLARNET is a medium size high resolution solar physics mission proposed to CNES for a new start in 2006 and a possible launch in 2010. Partnerships with Germany, Belgium, China and India are under discussion. At the center of the SOLARNET mission is a 3-telescopes interferometer of 1 meter baseline capable to provide 50 times the best ever spatial resolution achieved in Space with previous, current or even planned solar missions: 20 mas - 20 km on the Sun in the FUV. The interferometer is associated to an on-axis subtractive double monochromator (imaging spectrograph) capable of high spectral (0.01 nm) and high temporal resolutions (50 ms) on a field of view of 40 arcsec and over the FUV and UV spectral domains (from 117.5 to 400 nm). This will allow to access process scales of magnetic reconnection, dissipation, emerging flux and much more, from the high chromosphere to the low corona with emphasis on the transition zone where the magnetic confinement is expected to be maximum. A whole new chapter of the physics of solar magnetic field structuring and evolution will be opened. The interferometer is complemented by several other instruments providing larger field of view and higher temperature (EUV-XUV coronal imaging) to define the context and extension of the solar phenomena. Helioseismology, a strong asset of SOHO, is also intended with both velocity and diameter measures, allowed by a non-eclipsing Sun synchronous orbit. The SOLARNET interferometer design results of an extensive laboratory demonstration program of interferometric imaging of extended objects. It started 10 years ago and culminates this year with the first interferometric observations (images) of the Sun at Meudon Observatory at the "Grand Siderostat de Foucault" with a complete 3 telescopes cophased interferometer representative of SOLARNET. We will review the scientific program of SOLARNET, describe the interferometer concept and design, present the first solar imaging results of the

  15. Reciprocal complementation of the tumoricidal effects of radiation and natural killer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Lin Yang

    Full Text Available The tumor microenvironment is a key determinant for radio-responsiveness. Immune cells play an important role in shaping tumor microenvironments; however, there is limited understanding of how natural killer (NK cells can enhance radiation effects. This study aimed to assess the mechanism of reciprocal complementation of radiation and NK cells on tumor killing. Various tumor cell lines were co-cultured with human primary NK cells or NK cell line (NK-92 for short periods and then exposed to irradiation. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and transwell assays were performed to assess apoptotic efficacy and cell viability. Western blot analysis and immunoprecipitation methods were used to determine XIAP (X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein and Smac (second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase expression and interaction in tumor cells. Co-culture did not induce apoptosis in tumor cells, but a time- and dose-dependent enhancing effect was found when co-cultured cells were irradiated. A key role for caspase activation via perforin/granzyme B (Grz B after cell-cell contact was determined, as the primary radiation enhancing effect. The efficacy of NK cell killing was attenuated by upregulation of XIAP to bind caspase-3 in tumor cells to escape apoptosis. Knockdown of XIAP effectively potentiated NK cell-mediated apoptosis. Radiation induced Smac released from mitochondria and neutralized XIAP and therefore increased the NK killing. Our findings suggest NK cells in tumor microenvironment have direct radiosensitization effect through Grz B injection while radiation enhances NK cytotoxicity through triggering Smac release.

  16. Interaction of complement factor h and fibulin3 in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Keith Wyatt

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is a major cause of vision loss. It is associated with development of characteristic plaque-like deposits (soft drusen in Bruch's membrane basal to the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE. A sequence variant (Y402H in short consensus repeat domain 7 (SCR7 of complement factor H (CFH is associated with risk for "dry" AMD. We asked whether the eye-targeting of this disease might be related to specific interactions of CFH SCR7 with proteins expressed in the aging human RPE/choroid that could contribute to protein deposition in drusen. Yeast 2-hybrid (Y2H screens of a retinal pigment epithelium/choroid library derived from aged donors using CFH SCR7 baits detected an interaction with EFEMP1/Fibulin 3 (Fib3, which is the locus for an inherited macular degeneration and also accumulates basal to macular RPE in AMD. The CFH/Fib3 interaction was validated by co-immunoprecipitation of native proteins. Quantitative Y2H and ELISA assays with different recombinant protein constructs both demonstrated higher affinity for Fib3 for the disease-related CFH 402H variant. Immuno-labeling revealed colocalization of CFH and Fib3 in globular deposits within cholesterol-rich domains in soft drusen in two AMD donors homozygous for CFH 402H (H/H. This pattern of labeling was quite distinct from those seen in examples of eyes with Y/Y and H/Y genotypes. The CFH 402H/Fib3 interaction could contribute to the development of pathological aggregates in soft drusen in some patients and as such might provide a target for therapeutic intervention in some forms of AMD.

  17. Automation of the dicentric chromosome assay and related assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balajee, Adayabalam S.; Dainiak, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Dicentric Chromosome Assay (DCA) is considered to be the 'gold standard' for personalized dose assessment in humans after accidental or incidental radiation exposure. Although this technique is superior to other cytogenetic assays in terms of specificity and sensitivity, its potential application to radiation mass casualty scenarios is highly restricted because DCA is time consuming and labor intensive when performed manually. Therefore, it is imperative to develop high throughput automation techniques to make DCA suitable for radiological triage scenarios. At the Cytogenetic Biodosimetry Laboratory in Oak Ridge, efforts are underway to develop high throughput automation of DCA. Current status on development of various automated cytogenetic techniques in meeting the biodosimetry needs of radiological/nuclear incident(s) will be discussed

  18. Assay strategies and methods for phospholipases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, L.J.; Washburn, W.N.; Deems, R.A.; Dennis, E.A.

    1991-01-01

    Of the general considerations discussed, the two issues which are most important in choosing an assay are (1) what sensitivity is required to assay a particular enzyme and (2) whether the assay must be continuous. One can narrow the options further by considering substrate availability, enzyme specificity, assay convenience, or the presence of incompatible side reactions. In addition, the specific preference of a particular phospholipase for polar head group, micellar versus vesicular substrates, and anionic versus nonionic detergents may further restrict the options. Of the many assays described in this chapter, several have limited applicability or serious drawbacks and are not commonly employed. The most commonly used phospholipase assays are the radioactive TLC assay and the pH-stat assay. The TLC assay is probably the most accurate, sensitive assay available. These aspects often outweigh the disadvantages of being discontinuous, tedious, and expensive. The radioactive E. coli assay has become popular recently as an alternative to the TLC assay for the purification of the mammalian nonpancreatic phospholipases. The assay is less time consuming and less expensive than the TLC assay, but it is not appropriate when careful kinetics are required. Where less sensitivity is needed, or when a continuous assay is necessary, the pH-stat assay is often employed. With purified enzymes, when free thiol groups are not present, a spectrophotometric thiol assay can be used. This assay is ∼ as sensitive as the pH-stat assay but is more convenient and more reproducible, although the substrate is not available commercially. Despite the many assay choices available, the search continues for a convenient, generally applicable assay that is both sensitive and continuous

  19. 21 CFR 225.158 - Laboratory assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Laboratory assays. 225.158 Section 225.158 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS... Laboratory assays. Where the results of laboratory assays of drug components, including assays by State feed...

  20. Complement is activated by IgG hexamers assembled at the cell surface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diebolder, Christoph A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325786771; Beurskens, Frank J.; De Jong, Rob N.; Koning, Roman I.; Strumane, Kristin; Lindorfer, Margaret A.; Voorhorst, Marleen; Ugurlar, Deniz; Rosati, Sara; Heck, Albert J. R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/105189332; Van De Winkel, Jan G. J.; Wilson, Ian A.; Koster, Abraham J.; Taylor, Ronald P.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Burton, Dennis R.; Schuurman, Janine; Gros, Piet|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/075243016; Parren, Paul W. H. I.

    2014-01-01

    Complement activation by antibodies bound to pathogens, tumors, and self antigens is a critical feature of natural immune defense, a number of disease processes, and immunotherapies. How antibodies activate the complement cascade, however, is poorly understood. We found that specific noncovalent

  1. VEGF regulates local inhibitory complement proteins in the eye and kidney

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keir, Lindsay S.; Firth, Rachel; Aponik, Lyndsey; Sakimoto, Susumu; Aguilar, Edith; Welsh, Gavin I.; Richards, Anna; Usui, Yoshihiko; Satchell, Simon C.; Kuzmuk, Valeryia; Coward, Richard J.; Goult, Jonathan; Bull, Katherine R.; Bharti, Kapil; Westenskow, Peter D.; Michael, Iacovos P.; Saleem, Moin A.

    2016-01-01

    Outer retinal and renal glomerular functions rely on specialized vasculature maintained by VEGF that is produced by neighboring epithelial cells, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and podocytes, respectively. Dysregulation of RPE- and podocyte-derived VEGF is associated with neovascularization in wet age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), choriocapillaris degeneration, and glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Since complement activation and genetic variants in inhibitory complement factor H (CFH) are also features of both ARMD and TMA, we hypothesized that VEGF and CFH interact. Here, we demonstrated that VEGF inhibition decreases local CFH and other complement regulators in the eye and kidney through reduced VEGFR2/PKC-α/CREB signaling. Patient podocytes and RPE cells carrying disease-associated CFH genetic variants had more alternative complement pathway deposits than controls. These deposits were increased by VEGF antagonism, a common wet ARMD treatment, suggesting that VEGF inhibition could reduce cellular complement regulatory capacity. VEGF antagonism also increased markers of endothelial cell activation, which was partially reduced by genetic complement inhibition. Together, these results suggest that VEGF protects the retinal and glomerular microvasculature, not only through VEGFR2-mediated vasculotrophism, but also through modulation of local complement proteins that could protect against complement-mediated damage. Though further study is warranted, these findings could be relevant for patients receiving VEGF antagonists. PMID:27918307

  2. VEGF regulates local inhibitory complement proteins in the eye and kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keir, Lindsay S; Firth, Rachel; Aponik, Lyndsey; Feitelberg, Daniel; Sakimoto, Susumu; Aguilar, Edith; Welsh, Gavin I; Richards, Anna; Usui, Yoshihiko; Satchell, Simon C; Kuzmuk, Valeryia; Coward, Richard J; Goult, Jonathan; Bull, Katherine R; Sharma, Ruchi; Bharti, Kapil; Westenskow, Peter D; Michael, Iacovos P; Saleem, Moin A; Friedlander, Martin

    2017-01-03

    Outer retinal and renal glomerular functions rely on specialized vasculature maintained by VEGF that is produced by neighboring epithelial cells, the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and podocytes, respectively. Dysregulation of RPE- and podocyte-derived VEGF is associated with neovascularization in wet age-related macular degeneration (ARMD), choriocapillaris degeneration, and glomerular thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Since complement activation and genetic variants in inhibitory complement factor H (CFH) are also features of both ARMD and TMA, we hypothesized that VEGF and CFH interact. Here, we demonstrated that VEGF inhibition decreases local CFH and other complement regulators in the eye and kidney through reduced VEGFR2/PKC-α/CREB signaling. Patient podocytes and RPE cells carrying disease-associated CFH genetic variants had more alternative complement pathway deposits than controls. These deposits were increased by VEGF antagonism, a common wet ARMD treatment, suggesting that VEGF inhibition could reduce cellular complement regulatory capacity. VEGF antagonism also increased markers of endothelial cell activation, which was partially reduced by genetic complement inhibition. Together, these results suggest that VEGF protects the retinal and glomerular microvasculature, not only through VEGFR2-mediated vasculotrophism, but also through modulation of local complement proteins that could protect against complement-mediated damage. Though further study is warranted, these findings could be relevant for patients receiving VEGF antagonists.

  3. Complement fixation by solid phase immune complexes. Reduced capacity in SLE sera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, G; Jonsson, H; Sjöholm, A

    1988-01-01

    We describe an ELISA for assessment of complement function based on the capacity of serum to support fixation of complement components to solid phase immune complexes (IC). Microplates were coated with aggregated bovine serum albumin (BSA) followed by rabbit anti-BSA IgG. The solid phase IC were...

  4. Cristina et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2014) 11(4):48 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cadewumi

    Cristina et al., Afr J Tradit Complement Altern Med. (2014) .... New data about the multiple therapeutic valences of this plant will complement the gathered knowledge about the ..... days, on sheep initially treated with 10, 5 and 2%, respectively tincture concentrations, no fed ticks were found, demonstrating the repellent.

  5. SALO, a novel classical pathway complement inhibitor from saliva of the sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Viviana P; Fazito Vale, Vladimir; Pangburn, Michael K; Abdeladhim, Maha; Mendes-Sousa, Antonio Ferreira; Coutinho-Abreu, Iliano V; Rasouli, Manoochehr; Brandt, Elizabeth A; Meneses, Claudio; Lima, Kolyvan Ferreira; Nascimento Araújo, Ricardo; Pereira, Marcos Horácio; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Oliveira, Fabiano; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ribeiro, Jose M C; Gontijo, Nelder F; Collin, Nicolas; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2016-01-13

    Blood-feeding insects inject potent salivary components including complement inhibitors into their host's skin to acquire a blood meal. Sand fly saliva was shown to inhibit the classical pathway of complement; however, the molecular identity of the inhibitor remains unknown. Here, we identified SALO as the classical pathway complement inhibitor. SALO, an 11 kDa protein, has no homology to proteins of any other organism apart from New World sand flies. rSALO anti-complement activity has the same chromatographic properties as the Lu. longipalpis salivary gland homogenate (SGH)counterparts and anti-rSALO antibodies blocked the classical pathway complement activity of rSALO and SGH. Both rSALO and SGH inhibited C4b deposition and cleavage of C4. rSALO, however, did not inhibit the protease activity of C1s nor the enzymatic activity of factor Xa, uPA, thrombin, kallikrein, trypsin and plasmin. Importantly, rSALO did not inhibit the alternative or the lectin pathway of complement. In conclusion our data shows that SALO is a specific classical pathway complement inhibitor present in the saliva of Lu. longipalpis. Importantly, due to its small size and specificity, SALO may offer a therapeutic alternative for complement classical pathway-mediated pathogenic effects in human diseases.

  6. Complement-mediated tumour growth: implications for cancer nanotechnology and nanomedicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, S. M.; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2009-01-01

    The recent unexpected observation that complement activation helps turnout growth and progression has an important bearing on the future development of cancer nanomedicines for site-specific tumour targeting as these entities are capable of triggering complement. These issues are discussed and su...

  7. Deficiency of the complement regulator CD59a exacerbates Wallerian degeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaglia, Valeria; King, Rosalind Helen Mary; Morgan, Bryan Paul; Baas, Frank

    2009-01-01

    The complement system is implicated in Wallerian degeneration (WD). We have previously shown that the membrane attack complex (MAC) the terminal activation product of the complement cascade, mediates rapid axonal degradation and myelin clearance during WD after peripheral nerve injury. In this study

  8. Complement modulation of T cell immune responses during homeostasis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Elizabeth V; Tenner, Andrea J

    2014-11-01

    The complement system is an ancient and critical effector mechanism of the innate immune system as it senses, kills, and clears infectious and/or dangerous particles and alerts the immune system to the presence of the infection and/or danger. Interestingly, an increasing number of reports have demonstrated a clear role for complement in the adaptive immune system as well. Of note, a number of recent studies have identified previously unknown roles for complement proteins, receptors, and regulators in T cell function. Here, we will review recent data demonstrating the influence of complement proteins C1q, C3b/iC3b, C3a (and C3aR), and C5a (and C5aR) and complement regulators DAF (CD55) and CD46 (MCP) on T cell function during homeostasis and disease. Although new concepts are beginning to emerge in the field of complement regulation of T cell function, future experiments should focus on whether complement is interacting directly with the T cell or is having an indirect effect on T cell function via APCs, the cytokine milieu, or downstream complement activation products. Importantly, the identification of the pivotal molecular pathways in the human systems will be beneficial in the translation of concepts derived from model systems to therapeutic targeting for treatment of human disorders. © 2014 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  9. Complement Set Reference after Implicitly Small Quantities: An Event-Related Potentials Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Joanne; Ferguson, Heather J.

    2018-01-01

    An anaphoric reference to the complement-set is a reference to the set that does not fulfil the predicate of the preceding sentence. Preferred reference to the complement-set has been found in eye movements when a character's implicit desire for a high amount has been denied using a negative emotion. We recorded event-related potentials to examine…

  10. The Manuscript That We Finished: Structural Separation Reduces the Cost of Complement Coercion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowder, Matthew W.; Gordon, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Two eye-tracking experiments examined the effects of sentence structure on the processing of complement coercion, in which an event-selecting verb combines with a complement that represents an entity (e.g., "began the memo"). Previous work has demonstrated that these expressions impose a processing cost, which has been attributed to the…

  11. [Reaction of the complement system in response to the nootropil correction of hypoxic state].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsova, L N

    2008-12-01

    The functional activity of the complement system was studied in vivo when altitude hypoxia (8 km) was stimulated both with and without the use of nootropil. The impact of hypoxia and the efficiency of its pharmacological correction may be estimated, by analyzing the time course of changes in complement components.

  12. Targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors improves renal function after transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damman, Jeffrey; Hoeger, Simone; Boneschansker, Leo; Theruvath, Ashok; Waldherr, Ruediger; Leuvenink, Henri G.; Ploeg, Rutger J.; Yard, Benito A.; Seelen, Marc A.

    Kidneys recovered from brain-dead donors have inferior outcomes after transplantation compared to kidneys from living donors. Since complement activation plays an important role in renal transplant related injury, targeting complement activation in brain-dead donors might improve renal function

  13. Classical complement pathway activation in the kidneys of women with preeclampsia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, Marlies; Chua, Jamie S.; Van Kooten, Cees; Zandbergen, Malu; Buurma, Aletta; Schutte, Joke; Bruijn, Jan Anthonie; Khankin, Eliyahu V.; Bloemenkamp, Kitty; Karumanchi, S. Ananth; Baelde, Hans

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that complement dysregulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. The kidney is one of the major organs affected in preeclampsia. Because the kidney is highly susceptible to complement activation, we hypothesized that preeclampsia is associated with

  14. Complement activation by carbon nanotubes and its influence on the phagocytosis and cytokine response macrophages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pondman, K.M.; Sobik, M.T.; Nayak, A.; Tsolaki, A.G.; Jäkel, A.; Flahaut, E.; Hampel, S.; ten Haken, Bernard; Sim, R.B.; Kishore, U.D.

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have promised a range of applications in biomedicine. Although influenced by the dispersants used, CNTs are recognized by the innate immune system, predominantly by the classical pathway of the complement system. Here, we confirm that complement activation by the CNT used

  15. Increased complement C4d deposition at the maternal-fetal interface in unexplained recurrent miscarriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuleman, Tess; Cohen, Danielle; Swings, Godelieve M J S; Veraar, Kimberly; Claas, Frans H J; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W M

    2015-01-01

    C4d is a footprint of antibody-mediated classical complement activation, and has evolved as a useful diagnostic marker of antibody-mediated rejection. It is unknown if complement activation, as reflected by C4d deposition plays a role in unexplained recurrent miscarriage. In a case-control study

  16. Complement C3-Targeted Therapy: Replacing Long-Held Assertions with Evidence-Based Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Reis, Edimara S; Ricklin, Daniel; Smith, Richard J; Lambris, John D

    2017-06-01

    Complement dysregulation underlies several inflammatory disorders, and terminal complement inhibition has thus far afforded significant clinical gains. Nonetheless, emerging pathologies, fueled by complement imbalance and therapy-skewing genetic variance, underscore the need for more comprehensive, disease-tailored interventions. Modulation at the level of C3, a multifaceted orchestrator of the complement cascade, opens up prospects for broader therapeutic efficacy by targeting multiple pathogenic pathways modulated by C3-triggered proinflammatory crosstalk. Notably, C3 intervention is emerging as a viable therapeutic strategy for renal disorders with predominantly complement-driven etiology, such as C3 glomerulopathy (C3G). Using C3G as a paradigm, we argue that concerns about the feasibility of long-term C3 intervention need to be placed into perspective and weighed against actual therapeutic outcomes in prospective clinical trials. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. Structural insight into the recognition of complement C3 activation products by integrin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is the major effector of innate immunity. It is the body’s first defense against pathogens recognizing and tagging them for subsequent elimination. Complement is a germline-encoded system of more than 50 circulating and membrane-bound proteins that recognize molecular patterns...... associated with microbes and apoptotic or necrotic cells. Complement not only protects against pathogens but also maintains body homeostasis. Activation of complement leads to cleavage of the complement proteins C4, C3 and C5, and their fragments have effector functions through binding to pathogen surfaces...... on one side and to host cell receptors on the other. This elicits inflammatory responses directing immune cells to the place of infection, tagging of pathogens for phagocytosis, their subsequent lysis and stimulation of adaptive immunity. The C3 molecule is cleaved into a large fragment C3b and a small...

  18. Evasion Mechanisms Used by Pathogens to Escape the Lectin Complement Pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosbjerg, Anne; Genster, Ninette; Pilely, Katrine

    2017-01-01

    The complement system is a crucial defensive network that protects the host against invading pathogens. It is part of the innate immune system and can be initiated via three pathways: the lectin, classical and alternative activation pathway. Overall the network compiles a group of recognition...... the level of activity. The result is a pro-inflammatory response meant to combat foreign microbes. Microbial elimination is, however, not a straight forward procedure; pathogens have adapted to their environment by evolving a collection of evasion mechanisms that circumvent the human complement system....... Complement evasion strategies features different ways of exploiting human complement proteins and moreover features different pathogen-derived proteins that interfere with the normal processes. Accumulated, these mechanisms target all three complement activation pathways as well as the final common part...

  19. Human genetic deficiencies reveal the roles of complement in the inflammatory network: lessons from nature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lappegård, Knut Tore; Christiansen, Dorte; Pharo, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Complement component C5 is crucial for experimental animal inflammatory tissue damage; however, its involvement in human inflammation is incompletely understood. The responses to gram-negative bacteria were here studied taking advantage of human genetic complement-deficiencies--nature's own...... does not interfere with the complement system. Expression of tissue factor, cell adhesion molecules, and oxidative burst depended highly on C5, mediated through the activation product C5a, whereas granulocyte enzyme release relied mainly on C3 and was C5a-independent. Release of cytokines...... and chemokines was mediated to varying degrees by complement and CD14; for example, interleukin (IL)-1beta and IL-8 were more dependent on complement than IFN-gamma and IL-6, which were highly dependent on CD14. IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) and IFN-gamma inducible protein 10 (IP-10) were fully dependent...

  20. Structural insight into the recognition of complement C3 activation products by integrin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bajic, Goran

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is the major effector of innate immunity. It is the body’s first defense against pathogens recognizing and tagging them for subsequent elimination. Complement is a germline-encoded system of more than 50 circulating and membrane-bound proteins that recognize molecular patterns...... on one side and to host cell receptors on the other. This elicits inflammatory responses directing immune cells to the place of infection, tagging of pathogens for phagocytosis, their subsequent lysis and stimulation of adaptive immunity. The C3 molecule is cleaved into a large fragment C3b and a small...... fragment C3a called anaphylatoxin. Complement leads to opsonization as the proteolytic fragment C3b becomes covalently linked to the activator surface through a reactive thioester. Self-surfaces are protected by complement regulators, whereas complement activation vividly amplifies on pathogens...

  1. The complement system and its role in the pathogenesis of periodontitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian; Holmstrup, Palle; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Periodontitis is a highly prevalent inflammatory disease in tooth supporting tissues, induced by bacteria growing in a biofilm on tooth surfaces. Components of the complement system are present in the periodontal tissue and the system is activated in periodontitis. Continuous complement activation...... and modulation by bacteria within the biofilm in periodontal pockets, however, may enhance local tissue destruction, providing the biofilm with both essential nutrients and space to grow. A more profound understanding of the mechanisms involved in complement-derived tissue degradation may facilitate...... the development of new treatment concepts for periodontitis. Further studies on the role of complement in periodontitis pathogenesis may also contribute to the understanding of why some individuals fail to resolve periodontitis. Here, we review evidence that links complement to the pathogenesis of periodontitis...

  2. Evidence that the Yeast Desaturase Ole1p Exists as a Dimer In Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lou, Y.; Shanklin, J.

    2010-06-18

    Desaturase enzymes are composed of two classes, the structurally well characterized soluble class found predominantly in the plastids of higher plants and the more widely distributed but poorly structurally defined integral membrane class. Despite their distinct evolutionary origins, the two classes both require an iron cofactor and molecular oxygen for activity and are inhibited by azide and cyanide, suggesting strong mechanistic similarities. The fact that the soluble desaturase is active as a homodimer prompted us test the hypothesis that an archetypal integral membrane desaturase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the {Delta}{sup o}-acyl-Co-A desaturase Ole1p, also exhibits a dimeric organization. Ole1p was chosen because it is one of the best characterized integral membrane desaturase and because it retains activity when fused with epitope tags. FLAG-Ole1p was detected by Western blotting of immunoprecipitates in which anti-Myc antibodies were used for capture from yeast extracts co-expressing Ole1p-Myc and Ole1p-FLAG. Interaction was confirmed by two independent bimolecular complementation assays (i.e. the split ubiquitin system and the split luciferase system). Co-expression of active and inactive Ole1p subunits resulted in an {approx}75% suppression of the accumulation of palmitoleic acid, demonstrating that the physiologically active form of Ole1p in vivo is the dimer in which both protomers must be functional.

  3. Immune complement activation is attenuated by surface nanotopography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elwing H

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mats Hulander1, Anders Lundgren1, Mattias Berglin1, Mattias Ohrlander2, Jukka Lausmaa3,4, Hans Elwing1 1Department of Cell and Molecular Biology/Interface Biophysics, University of Gothenburg, Medicinaregatan 9E, Gothenburg, 2Bactiguard AB, Stockholm, 3SP Technical Research Institute, Boras, 4Biomatcell, The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Abstract: The immune complement (IC is a cell-free protein cascade system, and the first part of the innate immune system to recognize foreign objects that enter the body. Elevated activation of the system from, for example, biomaterials or medical devices can result in both local and systemic adverse effects and eventually loss of function or rejection of the biomaterial. Here, the researchers have studied the effect of surface nanotopography on the activation of the IC system. By a simple nonlithographic process, gold nanoparticles with an average size of 58 nm were immobilized on a smooth gold substrate, creating surfaces where a nanostructure is introduced without changing the surface chemistry. The activation of the IC on smooth and nanostructured surfaces was viewed with fluorescence microscopy and quantified with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring in human serum. Additionally, the ability of pre-adsorbed human immunoglobulin G (IgG (a potent activator of the IC to activate the IC after a change in surface hydrophobicity was studied. It was found that the activation of the IC was significantly attenuated on nanostructured surfaces with nearly a 50% reduction, even after pre-adsorption with IgG. An increase in surface hydrophobicity blunted this effect. The possible role of the curvature of the nanoparticles for the orientation of adsorbed IgG molecules, and how this can affect the subsequent activation of the IC, are discussed. The present findings are important for further understanding of how surface nanotopography affects complex protein

  4. Assay of vitamin B12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tovey, K.C.; Carrick, D.T.

    1982-01-01

    A radioassay is described for vitamin B12 which involves denaturing serum protein binding proteins with alkali. In the denaturation step a dithiopolyol and cyanide are used and in the intrinsic factor assay step a vitamin B12 analogue such as cobinamide is used to bind with any remaining serum proteins. The invention also includes a kit in which the dithiopolyol is provided in admixture with the alkali. The dithiopolyol may be dithiothreitol or dithioerythritol. (author)

  5. Complement-mediated virus infectivity neutralisation by HLA antibodies is associated with sterilising immunity to SIV challenge in the macaque model for HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Mark; Quartey-Papafio, Ruby; Robinson, Mark; Hassall, Mark; Cranage, Martin; Stott, James; Almond, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Sterilising immunity is a desired outcome for vaccination against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and has been observed in the macaque model using inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). This protection was attributed to antibodies specific for cell proteins including human leucocyte antigens (HLA) class I and II incorporated into virions during vaccine and challenge virus preparation. We show here, using HLA bead arrays, that vaccinated macaques protected from virus challenge had higher serum antibody reactivity compared with non-protected animals. Moreover, reactivity was shown to be directed against HLA framework determinants. Previous studies failed to correlate serum antibody mediated virus neutralisation with protection and were confounded by cytotoxic effects. Using a virus entry assay based on TZM-bl cells we now report that, in the presence of complement, serum antibody titres that neutralise virus infectivity were higher in protected animals. We propose that complement-augmented virus neutralisation is a key factor in inducing sterilising immunity and may be difficult to achieve with HIV/SIV Env-based vaccines. Understanding how to overcome the apparent block of inactivated SIV vaccines to elicit anti-envelope protein antibodies that effectively engage the complement system could enable novel anti-HIV antibody vaccines that induce potent, virolytic serological response to be developed.

  6. Assay of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pike, C.; Berry, J.

    1987-01-01

    Assays of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase (rubisco) can be used to illustrate many properties of photosynthetic systems. Many different leaves have been assayed with this standard procedure. The tissue is ground with a mortar and pestle in extraction buffer. The supernatant after centrifugation is used as the source of enzyme. Buffer, RuBP, [ 14 C]-NaHCO 3 , and enzyme are combined in a scintillation vial; the reaction is run for 1 min at 30 0 . The acid-stable products are counted. Reproducibility in student experiments has been excellent. The assay data can be combined with analyses of leaf properties such as fresh and dry weight, chlorophyll and protein content, etc. Students have done projects such as the response of enzyme to temperature and to various inhibitors. They also report on the use of a transition state analog, carboxyarabinitol bisphosphate, to titrate the molar concentration of rubisco molecules (active sites) in an enzyme sample. Thus, using crude extracts the catalytic activity of a sample can be compared to the absolute quantity of enzyme or to the turnover number

  7. Further structural insights into the binding of complement factor H by complement regulator-acquiring surface protein 1 (CspA) of Borrelia burgdorferi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caesar, Joseph J. E.; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter; Zipfel, Peter F.; Lea, Susan M.

    2013-01-01

    B. burgdorferi binds complement factor H using a dimeric surface protein, CspA (BbCRASP-1). Presented here is a new structure of CspA that suggests that there is a degree of flexibility between subunits which may have implications for complement regulator binding. Borrelia burgdorferi has evolved many mechanisms of evading the different immune systems across its range of reservoir hosts, including the capture and presentation of host complement regulators factor H and factor H-like protein-1 (FHL-1). Acquisition is mediated by a family of complement regulator-acquiring surface proteins (CRASPs), of which the atomic structure of CspA (BbCRASP-1) is known and shows the formation of a homodimeric species which is required for binding. Mutagenesis studies have mapped a putative factor H binding site to a cleft between the two subunits. Presented here is a new atomic structure of CspA which shows a degree of flexibility between the subunits which may be critical for factor H scavenging by increasing access to the binding interface and allows the possibility that the assembly can clamp around the bound complement regulators

  8. Rivaroxaban limits complement activation compared with warfarin in antiphospholipid syndrome patients with venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arachchillage, D R J; Mackie, I J; Efthymiou, M; Chitolie, A; Hunt, B J; Isenberg, D A; Khamashta, M; Machin, S J; Cohen, H

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Complement activation has a pathogenic role in thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Coagulation proteases such as factor Xa can activate complement proteins. Complement activation markers were elevated in anticoagulated thrombotic APS patients. Complement activation decreased in APS patients switching from warfarin to rivaroxaban. Background Complement activation may play a major role in the pathogenesis of thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Coagulation proteases such as factor Xa can activate complement proteins. Aims To establish whether rivaroxaban, a direct factor Xa inhibitor, limits complement activation compared with warfarin in APS patients with previous venous thromboembolism (VTE). Methods A total of 111 APS patients with previous VTE, on warfarin target INR 2.5, had blood samples taken at baseline and at day 42 after randomization in the RAPS (Rivaroxaban in Antiphospholipid Syndrome) trial. Fifty-six patients remained on warfarin and 55 switched to rivaroxaban. Fifty-five normal controls (NC) were also studied. Markers of complement activation (C3a, C5a, terminal complement complex [SC5b-9] and Bb fragment) were assessed. Results APS patients had significantly higher complement activation markers compared with NC at both time-points irrespective of the anticoagulant. There were no differences between the two patient groups at baseline, or patients remaining on warfarin at day 42. In 55 patients randomized to rivaroxaban, C3a, C5a and SC5b-9 were lower at day 42 (median (ng mL -1 ) [confidence interval] 64 [29-125] vs. 83 [35-147], 9 [2-15] vs. 12 [4-18] and 171 [56-245] vs. 201 [66-350], respectively) but levels of Bb fragment were unchanged. There were no correlations between rivaroxaban levels and complement activation markers. Conclusions APS patients with previous VTE on warfarin exhibit increased complement activation, which is likely to occur via the classical pathway and is decreased by rivaroxaban administration

  9. N-Terminal Prodomain of Pfs230 Synthesized Using a Cell-Free System Is Sufficient To Induce Complement-Dependent Malaria Transmission-Blocking Activity▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Mayumi; Wu, Yimin; Iriko, Hideyuki; Muratova, Olga; MacDonald, Nicholas J.; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Takeo, Satoru; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2011-01-01

    The aim of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine is to block the development of malaria parasites in the mosquito and thus prevent subsequent infection of the human host. Previous studies have demonstrated that the gametocyte/gamete surface protein Pfs230 can induce transmission-blocking immunity and have evaluated Escherichia coli-produced Pfs230 as a transmission-blocking vaccine candidate. In this study, we used the wheat germ cell-free expression system to produce N-terminal fragments of Pfs230 and evaluated the transmission-blocking activity of antisera raised against the recombinant Pfs230 protein. The rabbit antisera reacted to the surface of cultured gametocytes and gametes of the Plasmodium falciparum NF54 line, recognized the 360-kDa form of parasite-produced Pfs230 by Western blot assay, and reduced the infectivity of NF54 parasites to Anopheles stefensi mosquitoes in the presence of complement in a standard membrane feeding assay. Thus, our data demonstrate that the N-terminal pro domain of Pfs230 is sufficient to induce complement-dependent transmission-blocking activity against P. falciparum. PMID:21715579

  10. N-terminal prodomain of Pfs230 synthesized using a cell-free system is sufficient to induce complement-dependent malaria transmission-blocking activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Mayumi; Wu, Yimin; Iriko, Hideyuki; Muratova, Olga; MacDonald, Nicholas J; Sattabongkot, Jetsumon; Takeo, Satoru; Otsuki, Hitoshi; Torii, Motomi; Tsuboi, Takafumi

    2011-08-01

    The aim of a malaria transmission-blocking vaccine is to block the development of malaria parasites in the mosquito and thus prevent subsequent infection of the human host. Previous studies have demonstrated that the gametocyte/gamete surface protein Pfs230 can induce transmission-blocking immunity and have evaluated Escherichia coli-produced Pfs230 as a transmission-blocking vaccine candidate. In this study, we used the wheat germ cell-free expression system to produce N-terminal fragments of Pfs230 and evaluated the transmission-blocking activity of antisera raised against the recombinant Pfs230 protein. The rabbit antisera reacted to the surface of cultured gametocytes and gametes of the Plasmodium falciparum NF54 line, recognized the 360-kDa form of parasite-produced Pfs230 by Western blot assay, and reduced the infectivity of NF54 parasites to Anopheles stefensi mosquitoes in the presence of complement in a standard membrane feeding assay. Thus, our data demonstrate that the N-terminal pro domain of Pfs230 is sufficient to induce complement-dependent transmission-blocking activity against P. falciparum.

  11. Activation of the classical pathway of complement by tobacco glycoprotein (TGP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koethe, S M; Nelson, K E; Becker, C G

    1995-07-15

    Tobacco glycoprotein (TGP), a polyphenol-rich glycoprotein isolated from tobacco leaves, activates the classical complement pathway through a mechanism that appears to involve direct interaction with C1q. A binding site on C1q for TGP can be localized by competitive inhibition with DNA to a region located in the junction between the collagen-like and globular regions of the molecule. A protein with activity similar to TGP has also been isolated from cigarette smoke condensate (TGP-S); it shares a binding site on C1q with TGP and has similar functional activity, with the exception that complement activation does not proceed to formation of a C3 cleaving enzyme. The ability of TGP and TGP-S to activate complement can be partially duplicated using polyphenols associated with tobacco leaf and smoke, i.e., chlorogenic acid and rutin. These polyphenols also compete with TGP for a binding site on immobilized C1q, suggesting that the polyphenol portion of TGP is critical for activation of complement. These results provide an additional mechanism for complement activation by cigarette products that, in vivo, could result in a localized complement depletion, generation of biologically active complement cleavage products, and initiation of an inflammatory response.

  12. Protective function of complement against alcohol-induced rat liver damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bykov, Igor L; Väkevä, Antti; Järveläinen, Harri A; Meri, Seppo; Lindros, Kai O

    2004-11-01

    The complement system can promote tissue damage or play a homeostatic role in the clearance and disposal of damaged tissue. We assessed the role of the terminal complement pathway in alcohol-induced liver damage in complement C6 (C6-/-) genetically deficient rats. C6-/- and corresponding C6+/+ rats were continuously exposed to ethanol by feeding ethanol-supplemented liquid diet for six weeks. Liver samples were analyzed for histopathology and complement component deposition by immunofluorescence microscopy. Prostaglandin E receptors and cytokine mRNA levels were analyzed by RT-PCR and plasma cytokines by ELISA. Deposition of complement components C1, C3, C8 and C9 was observed in C6+/+ rats, but not in C6-/- animals. The histopathological changes, the liver weight increase and the elevation of the plasma pro-/anti-inflammatory TNF-alpha/IL-10 ratio were, on the other hand, more marked in C6-/- rats. Furthermore, ethanol enhanced the hepatic mRNA expression of the prostaglandin E receptors EP2R and EP4R exclusively in the C6-/- rats. Our results indicate that a deficient terminal complement pathway predisposes to tissue injury and promotes a pro-inflammatory cytokine response. This suggests that an intact complement system has a protective function in the development of alcoholic liver damage.

  13. Complement emerges as a masterful regulator of CNS homeostasis, neural synaptic plasticity and cognitive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastellos, Dimitrios C

    2014-11-01

    Growing evidence points to a previously elusive role of complement-modulated pathways in CNS development, neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Distinct complement effectors appear to play a multifaceted role in brain homeostasis by regulating synaptic pruning in the retinogeniculate system and sculpting functional neural circuits both in the developing and adult mammalian brain. A recent study by Perez-Alcazar et al. (2014) provides novel insights into this intricate interplay between complement and the dynamically regulated brain synaptic circuitry, by reporting that mice deficient in C3 exhibit enhanced hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and cognitive performance. This behavioral pattern is associated with an impact of C3 on the functional capacity of glutamatergic synapses, supporting a crucial role for complement in excitatory synapse elimination in the hippocampus. These findings add a fresh twist to this rapidly evolving research field, suggesting that discrete complement components may differentially modulate synaptic connectivity by wiring up with diverse neural effectors in different regions of the brain. The emerging role of complement in synaptogenesis and neural network plasticity opens new conceptual avenues for considering complement interception as a potential therapeutic modality for ameliorating progressive cognitive impairment in age-related, debilitating brain diseases with a prominent inflammatory signature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Complement-mediated inflammation and injury in brain dead organ donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppelaars, Felix; Seelen, Marc A

    2017-04-01

    The importance of the complement system in renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and acute rejection is widely recognized, however its contribution to the pathogenesis of tissue damage in the donor remains underexposed. Brain-dead (BD) organ donors are still the primary source of organs for transplantation. Brain death is characterized by hemodynamic changes, hormonal dysregulation, and immunological activation. Recently, the complement system has been shown to be involved. In BD organ donors, complement is activated systemically and locally and is an important mediator of inflammation and graft injury. Furthermore, complement activation can be used as a clinical marker for the prediction of graft function after transplantation. Experimental models of BD have shown that inhibition of the complement cascade is a successful method to reduce inflammation and injury of donor grafts, thereby improving graft function and survival after transplantation. Consequently, complement-targeted therapeutics in BD organ donors form a new opportunity to improve organ quality for transplantation. Future studies should further elucidate the mechanism responsible for complement activation in BD organ donors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modulation of anxiety behavior by intranasally administered vaccinia virus complement control protein and curcumin in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, A P; Govender, D A; Kotwal, G J; Kellaway, L A

    2011-02-01

    Widespread neuroinflammation in the central nervous system (CNS) of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, involving pro-inflammatory mediators such as complement components, might be responsible for AD associated behavioral symptoms such as anxiety. Vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP) and curcumin (Cur) are the bioactive compounds of natural origin shown to inhibit the in-vitro complement activation. In order to develop complement regulatory compounds which could be delivered to the CNS by a non-invasive route, VCP, its truncated version (tVCP), and Cur were administered to Wistar rats intranasally. The distribution of these compounds in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was studied using an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using VCP and tVCP as antigens and a modified fluorimetric method (Cur). VCP and tVCP were also detected in the olfactory lobes of the rat brain using immunohistochemical analysis. These compounds were then compared for their ability to attenuate the anxiety levels in APPswePS1δE9 mice using an elevated plus maze (EPM) apparatus. VCP treatment significantly improved the exploratory behavior and reduced the anxiety behavior in APPswePS1δE9 mice. tVCP however showed an opposite effect to VCP, whereas Cur showed no effect on the anxiety behavior of these mice. When these mice were subsequently tested for their cognitive performance in the Morris water maze (MWM), they showed tendencies to collide with the periphery of the walls of MWM. This unusual activity was termed "kissperi" behavior. This newly defined index of anxiety was comparable to the anxiety profile of the VCP and tVCP treated groups on EPM. VCP can thus be delivered to the CNS effectively via intranasal route of administration to attenuate anxiety associated with AD.

  16. Brown Recluse spider bite mediated hemolysis: clinical features, a possible role for complement inhibitor therapy, and reduced RBC surface glycophorin A as a potential biomarker of venom exposure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Gehrie

    Full Text Available The venom of Loxosceles reclusa (Brown Recluse spider can cause a severe, life-threatening hemolysis in humans for which no therapy is currently available in the USA beyond supportive measures. Because this hemolysis is uncommon, relatively little is known about its clinical manifestation, diagnosis, or management. Here, we aimed to clarify the clinical details of envenomation, to determine the efficacy of the complement inhibitor eculizumab to prevent the hemolysis in vitro, and to investigate markers of exposure to Brown Recluse venom.We performed a 10-year chart review of cases of Brown Recluse spider bite-mediated hemolysis at our institution. We also designed an in vitro assay to test the efficacy of eculizumab to inhibit hemolysis of venom exposed red blood cells. Finally, we compared levels of CD55, CD59 and glycophorin A on venom exposed versus venom-naïve cells.Most victims of severe Brown Recluse spider mediated hemolysis at our institution are children and follow an unpredictable clinical course. Brown Recluse spider bite mediated hemolysis is reduced by 79.2% (SD=18.8% by eculizumab in vitro. Erythrocyte glycophorin A, but not CD55 or CD59, is reduced after red blood cells are incubated with venom in vitro.Taken together, our laboratory data and clinical observations indicate that L. reclusa venom exposure results in non-specific antibody and complement fixation on red blood cells, resulting in complement mediated hemolysis that is curtailed by the complement inhibitor eculizumab in vitro. Glycophorin A measurement by flow cytometry may help to identify victims of L. reclusa envenomation.

  17. Cell-bound complement activation products in systemic lupus erythematosus: comparison with anti-double-stranded DNA and standard complement measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Putterman, Chaim; Furie, Richard; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Askanase, Anca; Buyon, Jill; Kalunian, Kenneth; Chatham, W Winn; Massarotti, Elena; Kirou, Kyriakos; Jordan, Nicole; Blanco, Irene; Weinstein, Arthur; Chitkara, Puja; Manzi, Susan; Ahearn, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Objective To compare the performance characteristics of cell-bound complement (C4d) activation products (CBCAPS) on erythrocyte (EC4d) and B cells (BC4d) with antibodies to double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA) and complement C3 and C4 in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods The study enrolled 794 subjects consisting of 304 SLE and a control group consisting of 285 patients with other rheumatic diseases and 205 normal individuals. Anti-dsDNA and other autoantibodies were measured using soli...

  18. Inducibility of nuclear Rad51 foci after DNA damage distinguishes all Fanconi anemia complementation groups from D1/BRCA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godthelp, Barbara C. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Wassenaarseweg 72, NL-2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands); Wiegant, Wouter W. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Wassenaarseweg 72, NL-2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands); Waisfisz, Quinten [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Medhurst, Annette L. [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Arwert, Fre [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Joenje, Hans [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, Free University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z. [Department of Toxicogenetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Wassenaarseweg 72, NL-2333 AL Leiden (Netherlands) and Department of Molecular Cell Genetics, Collegium Medicum, N. Copernicus University, Bydgoszcz (Poland)]. E-mail: m.z.zdzienicka@lumc.nl

    2006-02-22

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is a cancer susceptibility disorder characterized by chromosomal instability and hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linking agents. So far 11 complementation groups have been identified, from which only FA-D1/BRCA2 and FA-J are defective downstream of the central FANCD2 protein as cells from these groups are capable of monoubiquitinating FANCD2. In this study we show that cells derived from patients from the new complementation groups, FA-I, FA-J and FA-L are all proficient in DNA damage induced Rad51 foci formation, making the cells from FA-D1/BRCA2 patients that are defective in this process the sole exception. Although FA-B patient HSC230 was previously reported to also have biallelic BRCA2 mutations, we found normal Rad51 foci formation in cells from this patient, consistent with the recent identification of an X-linked gene being mutated in four unrelated FA-B patients. Thus, our data show that none of the FA proteins, except BRCA2, are required to sequester Rad51 into nuclear foci. Since cells from the FA-D1 and FA-J patient groups are both able to monoubiquitinate FANCD2, the 'Rad51 foci phenotype' provides a convenient assay to distinguish between these two groups. Our results suggest that FANCJ and FANCD1/BRCA2 are part of the integrated FANC/BRCA DNA damage response pathway or, alternatively, that they represent sub-pathways in which only FANCD1/BRCA2 is directly connected to the process of homologous recombination.

  19. Evidence of complement genes in the sea-star Asterias rubens. Comparisons with the sea urchin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Michel; Kresdorn, Nicolas; Rotter, Björn

    2013-03-01

    The axial organ of the sea star Asterias rubens is a primitive immune organ. The B-like cells, when stimulated by various antigens, produce antibody substances correlating with Ig kappa genes, .On the other hand,component complement genes were found. For each component, one or several contigs were analyzed. It is said that Asterias forbesi, another sea-star, in earlier results, showed complement-like activity. A brief comparison with the complement system in sea urchin was performed, especially about the C3 component. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Perioperative functional activity of the alternative pathway of complement in patients with colonic cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, G; Zimmermann-Nielsen, E; Qvist, N

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the functional capacity of the alternative pathway of complement in patients with cancer of the colon before, during, and after operation. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: One university and two district hospitals, Denmark. SUBJECTS: 28 patients having elective...... or emergency operations for colonic cancer. INTERVENTIONS: Measurements of C3b fixing capacity of the alternative complement pathway in serum before, during, and after operation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS: The functional capacity of the alternative pathway of complement, and changes during operation. RESULTS......: The functional capacity of the alternative pathway in patients with cancer of the colon was above normal (p

  1. Intragenic complementation by the nifJ-coded protein of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    OpenAIRE

    Stacey, G; Zhu, J; Shah, V K; Shen, S C; Brill, W J

    1982-01-01

    A single mutation, nifC1005 (Jin et al. Sci. Sin. 23:108-118, 1980), located between nifH and nifJ in the nif cluster of Klebsiella pneumoniae, genetically complemented mutations in each of the 17 known nif genes. This suggested that the mutation is located in a new nif gene. We showed by complementation analyses that only 3 of 12 nifJ mutations tested were complemented by nifC1005. Nitrogenase activity in cell extracts of the mutant with nifC1005 as well as NifJ- mutants was stimulated by th...

  2. Protective role of complement C3 against cytokine-mediated beta cell apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dos Santos, R. S.; Marroqui, L.; Grieco, F. A.

    2017-01-01

    Background and aims: Type 1 diabetes is a chronic autoimmune disease characterized by pancreatic islet inflammation and β-cell destruction by pro-inflammatory cytokines and other mediators. The complement system, a major component of the immune system, has been recently shown to also act...... in metabolic organs, such as liver, adipose tissue, and pancreas. In the present study we identified complement C3 as an important hub of a cytokine-modified complement network in human islets and characterized the role of C3 in β-cell survival....

  3. Infections Revealing Complement Deficiency in Adults: A French Nationwide Study Enrolling 41 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audemard-Verger, A; Descloux, E; Ponard, D; Deroux, A; Fantin, B; Fieschi, C; John, M; Bouldouyre, A; Karkowsi, L; Moulis, G; Auvinet, H; Valla, F; Lechiche, C; Davido, B; Martinot, M; Biron, C; Lucht, F; Asseray, N; Froissart, A; Buzelé, R; Perlat, A; Boutboul, D; Fremeaux-Bacchi, V; Isnard, S; Bienvenu, B

    2016-05-01

    Complement system is a part of innate immunity, its main function is to protect human from bacterial infection. As genetic disorders, complement deficiencies are often diagnosed in pediatric population. However, complement deficiencies can also be revealed in adults but have been poorly investigated. Herein, we describe a case series of infections revealing complement deficiency in adults to study clinical spectrum and management of complement deficiencies.A nationwide retrospective study was conducted in French university and general hospitals in departments of internal medicine, infectious diseases enrolling patients older than 15 years old who had presented at least one infection leading to a complement deficiency diagnosis.Forty-one patients included between 2002 and 2015 in 19 different departments were enrolled in this study. The male-to-female ratio was 1.3 and the mean age at diagnosis was 28 ± 14 (15-67) years. The main clinical feature was Neisseria meningitidis meningitis 75% (n = 31/41) often involving rare serotype: Y (n = 9) and W 135 (n = 7). The main complement deficiency observed was the common final pathway deficiency 83% (n = 34/41). Half of the cohort displayed severe sepsis or septic shock at diagnosis (n = 22/41) but no patient died. No patient had family history of complement deficiency. The mean follow-up was 1.15 ± 1.95 (0.1-10) years. Half of the patients had already suffered from at least one infection before diagnosis of complement deficiency: meningitis (n = 13), pneumonia (n = 4), fulminans purpura (n = 1), or recurrent otitis (n = 1). Near one-third (n = 10/39) had received prophylactic antibiotics (cotrimoxazole or penicillin) after diagnosis of complement deficiency. The vaccination coverage rate, at the end of the follow-up, for N meningitidis, Streptococcus pneumonia, and Haemophilius influenzae were, respectively, 90% (n = 33/37), 47% (n = 17/36), and 35% (n = 14

  4. Complement activation cascade triggered by PEG-PL engineered nanomedicines and carbon nanotubes: The challenges ahead

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moghimi, S.M.; Andersen, Alina Joukainen; Hashemi, S.H.

    2010-01-01

    reactions to certain PEG-PL engineered nanomedicines in both experimental animals and man. These reactions are classified as pseudoallergy and may be associated with cardiopulmonary disturbance and other related symptoms of anaphylaxis. Recent studies suggest that complement activation may be a contributing......, but not a rate limiting factor, in eliciting hypersensitivity reactions to such nanomedicines in sensitive individuals. This is rather surprising since PEGylated structures are generally assumed to suppress protein adsorption and blood opsonization events including complement. Here, we examine the molecular...... basis of complement activation by PEG-PL engineered nanomedicines and carbon nanotubes and discuss the challenges ahead....

  5. Structure, functions, and evolution of the third complement component and viral molecular mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, A; Sunyer, J O; Moore, W T; Sarrias, M R; Soulika, A M; Lambris, J D

    1998-01-01

    The third component of the complement system, C3, is a common denominator in the activation of the classical, alternative, and lectin pathways. The ability of C3 molecule to interact with at least 20 different proteins makes it the most versatile component of this system. Since these interactions are important for phagocytic, immunoregulatory, and immune evasion mechanisms, the analysis of its structure and functions has been a subject of intense research. Here we review our current work on the C3-ligand interactions, C3-related viral molecular mimicry, evolution of the complement system, and identification of C3-based complement inhibitors.

  6. Radiosotopic assay and binder therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caston, J.D.; Kamen, B.A.

    1976-01-01

    A rapid and less costly radioisotopic assay for measuring the concentration of folate in blood serum is described. This procedure utilizes 3 H-pteroylmonoglutamate, unlabeled 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid, and a partially purified folate binder, such as for example a folate binder extracted from hog kidney. The procedure involves radioisotopically relating the bound amounts of a labeled folate and a known folate at various concentrations of the known folate in a system containing a predetermined amount of the labeled folate, a predetermined amount of the binder factor for the folates, and a predetermined amount of defolated test serum. 16 claims, 8 drawing figures

  7. The interaction between circulating complement proteins and cutaneous microvascular endothelial cells in the development of childhood Henoch-Schonlein Purpura.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Hsu Yang

    Full Text Available In addition to IgA, the deposition of complement (C3 in dermal vessels is commonly found in Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of circulating complement proteins in the pathogenesis of childhood HSP.Plasma levels of C3a, C4a, C5a, and Bb in 30 HSP patients and 30 healthy controls were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. The expression of C3a receptor (C3aR, C5a receptor (CD88, E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1, C3, C5, interleukin (IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP-1, and RANTES by human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-d was evaluated either by flow cytometry or by ELISA.At the acute stage, HSP patients had higher plasma levels of C3a (359.5 ± 115.3 vs. 183.3 ± 94.1 ng/ml, p < 0.0001, C5a (181.4 ± 86.1 vs. 33.7 ± 26.3 ng/ml, p < 0.0001, and Bb (3.7 ± 2.6 vs. 1.0 ± 0.6 μg/ml, p < 0.0001, but not C4a than healthy controls. Although HSP patient-derived acute phase plasma did not alter the presentation of C3aR and CD88 on HMVEC-d, it enhanced the production of endothelial C3 and C5. Moreover, C5a was shown in vitro to up-regulate the expression of IL-8, MCP-1, E-selectin, and ICAM-1 by HMVEC-d with a dose-dependent manner.In HSP, the activation of the complement system in part through the alternative pathway may have resulted in increased plasma levels of C3a and C5a, which, especially C5a, may play a role in the disease pathogenesis by activating endothelium of cutaneous small vessels.

  8. Functional variant in complement C3 gene promoter and genetic susceptibility to temporal lobe epilepsy and febrile seizures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Jamali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human mesial temporal lobe epilepsies (MTLE represent the most frequent form of partial epilepsies and are frequently preceded by febrile seizures (FS in infancy and early childhood. Genetic associations of several complement genes including its central component C3 with disorders of the central nervous system, and the existence of C3 dysregulation in the epilepsies and in the MTLE particularly, make it the C3 gene a good candidate for human MTLE. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A case-control association study of the C3 gene was performed in a first series of 122 patients with MTLE and 196 controls. Four haplotypes (HAP1 to 4 comprising GF100472, a newly discovered dinucleotide repeat polymorphism [(CA8 to (CA15] in the C3 promoter region showed significant association after Bonferroni correction, in the subgroup of MTLE patients having a personal history of FS (MTLE-FS+. Replication analysis in independent patients and controls confirmed that the rare HAP4 haplotype comprising the minimal length allele of GF100472 [(CA8], protected against MTLE-FS+. A fifth haplotype (HAP5 with medium-size (CA11 allele of GF100472 displayed four times higher frequency in controls than in the first cohort of MTLE-FS+ and showed a protective effect against FS through a high statistical significance in an independent population of 97 pure FS. Consistently, (CA11 allele by its own protected against pure FS in a second group of 148 FS patients. Reporter gene assays showed that GF100472 significantly influenced C3 promoter activity (the higher the number of repeats, the lower the transcriptional activity. Taken together, the consistent genetic data and the functional analysis presented here indicate that a newly-identified and functional polymorphism in the promoter of the complement C3 gene might participate in the genetic susceptibility to human MTLE with a history of FS, and to pure FS. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study provides important

  9. Reporter Gene Assays in Ecotoxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Tal; Belkin, Shimshon

    The need for simple and rapid means for evaluating the potential toxic effects of environmental samples has prompted the development of reporter gene assays, based on tester cells (bioreporters) genetically engineered to report on sample toxicity by producing a readily quantifiable signal. Bacteria are especially suitable to serve as bioreporters owing to their fast responses, low cost, convenient preservation, ease of handling, and amenability to genetic manipulations. Various bacterial bioreporters have been introduced for general toxicity and genotoxicity assessment, and the monitoring of endocrine disrupting and dioxin-like compounds has been mostly covered by similarly engineered eukaryotic cells. Some reporter gene assays have been validated, standardized, and accredited, and many others are under constant development. Efforts are aimed at broadening detection spectra, lowering detection thresholds, and combining toxicity identification capabilities with characterization of the toxic effects. Taking advantage of bacterial robustness, attempts are also being made to incorporate bacterial bioreporters into field instrumentation for online continuous monitoring or on-site spot checks. However, key hurdles concerning test validation, cell preservation, and regulatory issues related to the use of genetically modified organisms still remain to be overcome.

  10. Immune evasion of Borrelia miyamotoi: CbiA, a novel outer surface protein exhibiting complement binding and inactivating properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röttgerding, Florian; Wagemakers, Alex; Koetsveld, Joris; Fingerle, Volker; Kirschfink, Michael; Hovius, Joppe W.; Zipfel, Peter F.; Wallich, Reinhard; Kraiczy, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Borrelia (B.) miyamotoi, an emerging tick-borne relapsing fever spirochete, resists complement-mediated killing. To decipher the molecular principles of immune evasion, we sought to identify determinants contributing to complement resistance. Employing bioinformatics, we identified a gene encoding

  11. Deposition of C3, the terminal complement complex and vitronectin in primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garred, P; Lyon, H; Christoffersen, P

    1993-01-01

    Characteristics of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are bile duct destruction and portal inflammation. Increased levels of circulating complement activation products are also present. This raises the possibility of involvement of complement...

  12. Change of immunoglobulins and complement factors in patients with self-injurious behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, T J; Mykletun, A; Matre, R; Skovlund, E; Bassøe, C-F; Dahl, A A

    2003-02-01

    As stress activates the inflammatory response system, and attempted suicide is connected with severe stress, we hypothesized that patients hospitalized for self-injurious behaviour have changed immunocompetence. The concentration of immunoglobulins IgG, IgA, IgM, and the complement components C3 and C4 in 73 patients hospitalized for self-injurious behaviour was compared with those of 122 healthy controls. The immunoglobulins and complement were quantified by nephelometric technique. The levels of IgG and IgM were significantly lower, and the complement C3 and C4 were significantly higher in self-injurious patients compared with controls. This was valid in both genders and the effects did not interact with gender. This controlled study showed that the concentrations of immunoglobulins were reduced and complement components were increased in patients who are admitted to hospital for self-injurious behaviour.

  13. Parasitic scabies mites and associated bacteria joining forces against host complement defence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swe, P M; Reynolds, S L; Fischer, K

    2014-11-01

    Scabies is a ubiquitous and contagious skin disease caused by the parasitic mite Sarcoptes scabiei Epidemiological studies have identified scabies as a causative agent for secondary skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes. This is an important notion, as such bacterial infections can lead to serious downstream life-threatening complications. As the complement system is the first line of host defence that confronts invading pathogens, both the mite and bacteria produce a large array of molecules that inhibit the complement cascades. It is hypothesised that scabies mite complement inhibitors may play an important role in providing a favourable micro-environment for the establishment of secondary bacterial infections. This review aims to bring together the current literature on complement inhibition by scabies mites and bacteria associated with scabies and to discuss the proposed molecular link between scabies and bacterial co-infections. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Complement factor H family proteins in their non-canonical role as modulators of cellular functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Józsi, Mihály; Schneider, Andrea E; Kárpáti, Éva; Sándor, Noémi

    2018-01-04

    Complement factor H is a major regulator of the alternative pathway of the complement system. The factor H-related proteins are less characterized, but recent data indicate that they rather promote complement activation. These proteins have some common ligands with factor H and have both overlapping and distinct functions depending on domain composition and the degree of conservation of amino acid sequence. Factor H and some of the factor H-related proteins also appear in a non-canonical function that is beyond their role in the modulation of complement activation. This review covers our current understanding on this emerging role of factor H family proteins in modulating the activation and function of various cells by binding to receptors or receptor ligands. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Cyclodextrin Reduces Cholesterol Crystal-Induced Inflammation by Modulating Complement Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakke, Siril S; Aune, Marie H; Niyonzima, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    Cholesterol crystals (CC) are abundant in atherosclerotic plaques and promote inflammatory responses via the complement system and inflammasome activation. Cyclic oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (BCD) is a compound that solubilizes lipophilic substances. Recently we have shown...

  16. Complementation of the beige mutation in cultured cells by episomally replicating murine yeast artificial chromosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perou, C.M.; Pryor, R.J.; Kaplan, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Justice, M.J. [Oak Ridge National Labortory, TN (United States)

    1996-06-11

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome in man and the beige mutation of mice are phenotypically similar disorders that have profound effects upon lysosome and melansosome morphology and function. We isolated two murine yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) that, when introduced into beige mouse fibroblasts, complement the beige mutation. The complementing YACs exist as extrachromosomal elements that are amplified in high concentrations of G418. When YAC-complemented beige cells were fused to human Chediak-Higashi syndrome or Aleutian mink fibroblasts, complementation of the mutant phenotype also occurred. These results localize the beige gene to a 500-kb interval and demonstrate that the same or homologous genes are defective in mice, minks, and humans. 16 refs., 5 figs.

  17. Acute antibody-mediated rejection of skin grafts without involvement of granulocytes or complement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogman, M.J.; Cornelissen, I.M.; Koene, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    In immunosuppressed mice that carry rat skin xeno-grafts, acute antibody-mediated graft rejection (AAR) can be induced by intravenous administration of mouse anti-rat globulin. Dependent on the amount of antibody injected and on the complement status of the recipient, an Arthus-like or a Shwartzman-like pattern of vasculitis occurs. The role of polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs) in either type of vasculitis was tested by inducing AAR in recipients depleted of PMNs by total body irradiation. Despite the absence of PMNs in the graft vessels, AAR occurred both in the Arthus-like and in the Shwartzman-like type. Moreover, AAR could be elicited in PMN-depleted recipients that were complement-depleted by cobra venom factor treatment or were congenitally C5-deficient. We conclude that neither the PMN nor complement is an essential mediator the PMN nor complement is an essential mediator in this form of antibody-mediated vasculitis

  18. Complement components of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid influence the microenvironment of nerve regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-shuai Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nerve regeneration conditioned fluid is secreted by nerve stumps inside a nerve regeneration chamber. A better understanding of the proteinogram of nerve regeneration conditioned fluid can provide evidence for studying the role of the microenvironment in peripheral nerve regeneration. In this study, we used cylindrical silicone tubes as the nerve regeneration chamber model for the repair of injured rat sciatic nerve. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation proteomics technology and western blot analysis confirmed that there were more than 10 complement components (complement factor I, C1q-A, C1q-B, C2, C3, C4, C5, C7, C8ß and complement factor D in the nerve regeneration conditioned fluid and each varied at different time points. These findings suggest that all these complement components have a functional role in nerve regeneration.

  19. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Screening Complements Conventional Biophysical Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Xinsheng; Langkilde, Annette Eva; Thorolfsson, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    introduce small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to characterize antibody solution behavior, which strongly complements conventional biophysical analysis. First, we apply a variety of conventional biophysical techniques for the evaluation of structural, conformational, and colloidal stability and report...

  20. Virulence of Group A Streptococci Is Enhanced by Human Complement Inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ermert, David; Shaughnessy, Jutamas; Joeris, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an important human bacterial pathogen that can cause invasive infections. Once it colonizes its exclusively human host, GAS needs to surmount numerous innate immune defense mechanisms, including opsonization by complement...