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Sample records for spliced forms termed

  1. Novel female-specific trans-spliced and alternative splice forms of dsx in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jianping; Xu, Hanfu; Wang, Feng; Ma, Sanyuan; Zha, Xingfu; Guo, Huizhen; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2013-02-15

    The Bombyx mori doublesex gene (Bmdsx) plays an important role in somatic sexual development. Its pre-mRNA splices in a sex-specific manner to generate two female-specific and one male-specific splice forms. The present study investigated six novel dsx variants generated by trans-splicing between female dsx transcripts and two additional novel genes, dsr1 and dsr2. Expression analysis indicated that Bmdsx-dsr1 represented splicing noise, whereas dsr2, which trans-spliced with dsx to generate five variants, regulated the expression of the female-specific B. mori dsx transcript Bmdsx(F)s. We unexpectedly found a novel exon 2n insertion during Bmdsx transcription, which did not influence the validity of the novel protein, BmDSX(F3). Ectopic expression of BmDSX(F3) repressed the pheromone-binding protein gene and the testis-specific gene A2 in males, and activated of the storage protein 1 gene. Our findings suggest that trans-splicing is a novel regulatory function of Bmdsx, which participates in female sexual development by regulating the expression of three BmDSX(F) proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Malignant Tregs express low molecular splice forms of FOXP3 in Sézary syndrome

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    Krejsgaard, T; Gjerdrum, L M; Ralfkiaer, E

    2008-01-01

    Sézary syndrome (SS) is an aggressive variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. During disease progression, immunodeficiency develops; however, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we study the regulatory T cell (Treg) function and the expression of FOXP3...... in SS. We demonstrate that malignant T cells in 8 of 15 patients stain positive with an anti-FOXP3 antibody. Western blotting analysis shows expression of two low molecular splice forms of FOXP3, but not of wild-type (wt) FOXP3. The malignant T cells produce interleukin-10 and TGF-beta and suppress...... the growth of non-malignant T cells. The Treg phenotype and the production of suppressive cytokines are driven by aberrant activation of Jak3 independent of the FOXP3 splice forms. In contrast to wt FOXP3, the low molecular splice forms of FOXP3 have no inhibitory effect on nuclear factor-kappaB (NF...

  3. Identification of a novel splicing form of amelogenin gene in a reptile, Ctenosaura similis.

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    Xinping Wang

    Full Text Available Amelogenin, the major enamel matrix protein in tooth development, has been demonstrated to play a significant role in tooth enamel formation. Previous studies have identified the alternative splicing of amelogenin in many mammalian vertebrates as one mechanism for amelogenin heterogeneous expression in teeth. While amelogenin and its splicing forms in mammalian vertebrates have been cloned and sequenced, the amelogenin gene, especially its splicing forms in non-mammalian species, remains largely unknown. To better understand the mechanism underlying amelogenin evolution, we previously cloned and characterized an amelogenin gene sequence from a squamate, the green iguana. In this study, we employed RT-PCR to amplify the amelogenin gene from the black spiny-tailed iguana Ctenosaura similis teeth, and discovered a novel splicing form of the amelogenin gene. The transcript of the newly identified iguana amelogenin gene (named C. Similis-T2L is 873 nucleotides long encoding an expected polypeptide of 206 amino acids. The C. Similis-T2L contains a unique exon denominated exon X, which is located between exon 5 and exon 6. The C. Similis-T2L contains 7 exons including exon 1, 2, 3, 5, X, 6, and 7. Analysis of the secondary and tertiary structures of T2L amelogenin protein demonstrated that exon X has a dramatic effect on the amelogenin structures. This is the first report to provide definitive evidence for the amelogenin alternative splicing in non-mammalian vertebrates, revealing a unique exon X and the splicing form of the amelogenin gene transcript in Ctenosaura similis.

  4. Expression of full-length and splice forms of FoxP3 in rheumatoid arthritis

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    Ryder, L R; Woetmann, A; Madsen, H O

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of our study was to compare the presence of full-length and alternative splice forms of FoxP3 mRNA in CD4 cells from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and healthy controls. METHODS: A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (QRT-PCR) method was used to measure the amo...

  5. Alternatively spliced short and long isoforms of adaptor protein intersectin 1 form complexes in mammalian cells

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    Rynditch A. V.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Intersectin 1 (ITSN1 is an adaptor protein involved in membrane trafficking and cell signaling. Long and short isoforms of ITSN1 (ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S are produced by alternative splicing. The aim of our study was to investigate whether ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S could interact in mammalian cells. Methods. During this study we employed immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. Results. We have shown that endogenous ITSN1-S co-precipitates with overexpressed ITSN1-L in PC12, 293 and 293T cells. Long and short isoforms of ITSN1 also co-localize in 293T cells. Conclusions. ITSN1-L and ITSN1-S form complexes in mammalian cells.

  6. The Epithelial Sodium Channel α subunit (α ENaC alternatively spliced form "b" in Dahl rats: What's next?

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    Shehata Marlene F

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The amiloride-sensitive Epithelial Sodium Channel (ENaC is critical in maintaining Na+ balance, extracellular fluid volume and long term blood pressure control. ENaC is composed of three main subunits α, β, & γ. While α ENaC is critical for channel functionality, β & γ ENaC maximize channel function. To date, there are four alternatively spliced forms of the α subunit of ENaC (α ENaC-a, -b, -c, & -d that have been published in rats, in addition to the major α ENaC transcript. While α ENaC-a, -c & -d transcripts are low abundance transcripts compared to full-length α ENaC, α ENaC-b is a higher abundance and salt-sensitive transcript compared to full-length α ENaC. Presentation of the hypothesis α ENaC-b protein, which is preferentially produced in Dahl R rats, to a greater extent on high salt diet, exerts a dominant negative effect on full-length α ENaC subunit by physically binding to and trapping full-length α ENaC subunit in the endoplasmic reticulum, and finally accelerating full-length α ENaC proteolytic degradation in a dose-dependent manner. Testing the hypothesis 1 To examine the mRNA and protein abundance of α ENaC-b relative to α ENaC full-length in kidney, lung, and taste tissues of Dahl rats. 2 To compare the expression (mRNA and protein of α ENaC-b in kidneys of Dahl S and R rats on regular and high salt diet. 3 To examine the putative binding of α ENaC-b proteins to full-length α ENaC in vitro and to determine the impact of such binding on full-length α ENaC expression in vitro. Implications of the hypothesis Our studies will be the first to demonstrate the over-expression of salt-sensitive α ENaC-b spliced form in kidney tissues of Dahl R rats at the expense of full-length α ENaC. The current proposal will provide highly novel insights into the putative mechanisms leading to ENaC hypoactivity in high-salt-fed Dahl R rats. Finally, findings from the present proposal will uncover a new

  7. Adipocyte spliced form of X-box-binding protein 1 promotes adiponectin multimerization and systemic glucose homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sha, H.; Yang, L.; Liu, M.; Xia, S.; Liu, Y.; Liu, F.; Kersten, A.H.; Qi, L.

    2014-01-01

    The physiological role of the spliced form of X-box–binding protein 1 (XBP1s), a key transcription factor of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, in adipose tissue remains largely unknown. In this study, we show that overexpression of XBP1s promotes adiponectin multimerization in

  8. Differential splicing in mouse thymus generates two forms of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase.

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    Doyen, N; d'Andon, M F; Bentolila, L A; Nguyen, Q T; Rougeon, F

    1993-01-01

    A new form of TdT mRNA has been identified by screening a mouse thymus cDNA library. It contains an open reading frame of 1527 base pairs corresponding to a protein containing 509 aminoacids, whereas the previously identified mouse TdT mRNA is composed of 1587 base pairs and encodes a protein of 529 aminoacids. Analysis of a mouse genomic clone containing the 3' portion of the TdT gene shows that these twenty additional aminoacids are encoded by an additional exon located between exons X and XI. Both forms of TdT mRNA are present in the thymus and could be generated by alternative splicing. The cDNA reported here corresponds to the major form of TdT mRNA in Balb/c mice and closely resembles human and bovine TdT cDNA. Expression of this cDNA in mammalian cells shows that it encodes a functional protein capable of catalysing N region insertions at the recombination junction of an episomic recombination substrate. Images PMID:8464703

  9. Abiotic Stresses Cause Differential Regulation of Alternative Splice Forms of GATA Transcription Factor in Rice

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    Priyanka Gupta

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The GATA gene family is one of the most conserved families of transcription factors, playing a significant role in different aspects of cellular processes, in organisms ranging from fungi to angiosperms. GATA transcription factors are DNA-binding proteins, having a class IV zinc-finger motif CX2CX17−20CX2C followed by a highly basic region and are known to bind a consensus sequence WGATAR. In plants, GATAs are known to be involved in light-dependent gene regulation and nitrate assimilation. However, a comprehensive analysis of these GATA gene members has not yet been highlighted in rice when subjected to environmental stresses. In this study, we present an overview of the GATA gene family in rice (OsGATA in terms of, their chromosomal distribution, domain architecture, and phylogeny. Our study has revealed the presence of 28 genes, encoding 35 putative GATA transcription factors belonging to seven subfamilies in the rice genome. Transcript abundance analysis in contrasting genotypes of rice—IR64 (salt sensitive and Pokkali (salt tolerant, for individual GATA members indicated their differential expression in response to various abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, and exogenous ABA. One of the members of subfamily VII—OsGATA23a, emerged as a multi-stress responsive transcription factor giving elevated expression levels in response to salinity and drought. ABA also induces expression of OsGATA23a by 35 and 55-folds in IR64 and Pokkali respectively. However, OsGATA23b, an alternative splice variant of OsGATA23 did not respond to above-mentioned stresses. Developmental regulation of the OsGATA genes based on a publicly available microarray database showed distinct expression patterns for most of the GATA members throughout different stages of rice development. Altogether, our results suggest inherent roles of diverse OsGATA factors in abiotic stress signaling and also throw some light on the tight regulation of the spliced variants of

  10. Species-Specific Expression of Full-Length and Alternatively Spliced Variant Forms of CDK5RAP2.

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    John S Y Park

    Full Text Available CDK5RAP2 is one of the primary microcephaly genes that are associated with reduced brain size and mental retardation. We have previously shown that human CDK5RAP2 exists as a full-length form (hCDK5RAP2 or an alternatively spliced variant form (hCDK5RAP2-V1 that is lacking exon 32. The equivalent of hCDK5RAP2-V1 has been reported in rat and mouse but the presence of full-length equivalent hCDK5RAP2 in rat and mouse has not been examined. Here, we demonstrate that rat expresses both a full length and an alternatively spliced variant form of CDK5RAP2 that are equivalent to our previously reported hCDK5RAP2 and hCDK5RAP2-V1, repectively. However, mouse expresses only one form of CDK5RAP2 that is equivalent to the human and rat alternatively spliced variant forms. Knowledge of this expression of different forms of CDK5RAP2 in human, rat and mouse is essential in selecting the appropriate model for studies of CDK5RAP2 and primary microcephaly but our findings further indicate the evolutionary divergence of mouse from the human and rat species.

  11. Alarin but not its alternative-splicing form, GALP (Galanin-like peptide) has antimicrobial activity

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    Wada, Akihiro, E-mail: a-wada@nagasaki-u.ac.jp [Department of Bacteriology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Wong, Pooi-Fong [Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Hojo, Hironobu [Department of Applied Biochemistry, Institute of Glycoscience, Tokai University, Kanagawa 2591292 (Japan); Hasegawa, Makoto [Department of Bioscience, Faculty of Bioscience, Nagahama Institute of Bio-Science and Technology, Shiga 5260829 (Japan); Ichinose, Akitoyo [Electron Microscopy Shop Central Laboratory, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Llanes, Rafael [Institute Pedro Kouri, Havana (Cuba); Kubo, Yoshinao [Division of Cytokine Signaling, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Senba, Masachika [Department of Pathology, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan); Ichinose, Yoshio [Kenya Research Station, Institute of Tropical Medicine, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 8528523 (Japan)

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: • Alarin inhibits the growth of E. coli but not S. aureus. • Alarin’s potency is comparable to LL-37 in inhibiting the growth of E. coli. • Alarin can cause bacterial membrane blebbing. • Alalin does not induce hemolysis on erythrocytes. -- Abstract: Alarin is an alternative-splicing form of GALP (galanin-like peptide). It shares only 5 conserved amino acids at the N-terminal region with GALP which is involved in a diverse range of normal brain functions. This study seeks to investigate whether alarin has additional functions due to its differences from GALP. Here, we have shown using a radial diffusion assay that alarin but not GALP inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli (strain ML-35). The conserved N-terminal region, however, remained essential for the antimicrobial activity of alarin as truncated peptides showed reduced killing effect. Moreover, alarin inhibited the growth of E. coli in a similar potency as human cathelicidin LL-37, a well-studied antimicrobial peptide. Electron microscopy further showed that alarin induced bacterial membrane blebbing but unlike LL-37, it did not cause hemolysis of erythrocytes. In addition, alarin is only active against the gram-negative bacteria, E. coli but not the gram-positive bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus. Thus, these data suggest that alarin has potentials as an antimicrobial and should be considered for the development in human therapeutics.

  12. Stress-induced alternative splice forms of MDM2 and MDMX modulate the p53-pathway in distinct ways.

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    Aishwarya G Jacob

    Full Text Available MDM2 and MDMX are the chief negative regulators of the tumor-suppressor protein p53 and are essential for maintaining homeostasis within the cell. In response to genotoxic stress and also in several cancer types, MDM2 and MDMX are alternatively spliced. The splice variants MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 lack the p53-binding domain and are incapable of negatively regulating p53. However, they retain the RING domain that facilitates dimerization of the full-length MDM proteins. Concordantly, MDM2-ALT1 has been shown to lead to the stabilization of p53 through its interaction with and inactivation of full-length MDM2. The impact of MDM2-ALT1 expression on the p53 pathway and the nature of its interaction with MDMX remain unclear. Also, the role of the architecturally similar MDMX-ALT2 and its influence of the MDM2-MDMX-p53 axis are yet to be elucidated. We show here that MDM2-ALT1 is capable of binding full-length MDMX as well as full-length MDM2. Additionally, we demonstrate that MDMX-ALT2 is able to dimerize with both full-length MDMX and MDM2 and that the expression of MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 leads to the upregulation of p53 protein, and also of its downstream target p21. Moreover, MDM2-ALT1 expression causes cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase in a p53 and p21 dependent manner, which is consistent with the increased levels of p21. Finally we present evidence that MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 expression can activate subtly distinct subsets of p53-transcriptional targets implying that these splice variants can modulate the p53 tumor suppressor pathway in unique ways. In summary, our study shows that the stress-inducible alternative splice forms MDM2-ALT1 and MDMX-ALT2 are important modifiers of the p53 pathway and present a potential mechanism to tailor the p53-mediated cellular stress response.

  13. The soluble form of the EIAV receptor encoded by an alternative splicing variant inhibits EIAV infection of target cells.

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    Lin, Yue-Zhi; Yang, Fei; Zhang, Shu-Qin; Sun, Liu-Ke; Wang, Xue-Feng; Du, Cheng; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2013-01-01

    Equine lentivirus receptor 1 (ELR1) has been identified as the sole receptor for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) and is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily. In addition to the previously described membrane-associated form of ELR1, two other major alternative splicing variant mRNAs were identified in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs). One major spliced species (ELR1-IN) contained an insertion of 153 nt, which resulted in a premature stop codon situated 561 nt upstream of the predicted membrane spanning domain. The other major species (ELR1-DE) has a deletion of 109 nt that causes a shift of the open reading frame and generates a stop codon 312 nt downstream. Because ELR1-DE presumably encodes a peptide of a mere 23 residues, only ELR1-IN was further analyzed. The expression of a soluble form of ELR1 (sELR1) by ELR1-IN was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Similar to ELR1, the transcription level of ELR1-IN varied among individual horses and at different time points in the same individuals. The ratio of ELR1-IN mRNA species to ELR1 mRNA was approximately 1∶2.5. Pre-incubation of the recombinant sELR1 with EIAV significantly inhibited EIAV infection in equine macrophages, the primary in vivo target cell of the virus. Fetal equine dermal (FED) cells are susceptible to EIAV in vitro, and the replication of EIAV in FED cells transiently transfected with ELR1-IN was markedly reduced when compared with replication in cells transfected with the empty vector. Finally, the expression levels of both forms of the EIAV receptor were significantly regulated by infection with this virus. Taken together, our data indicate that sELR1 acts as a secreted cellular factor that inhibits EIAV infection in host cells.

  14. The soluble form of the EIAV receptor encoded by an alternative splicing variant inhibits EIAV infection of target cells.

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    Yue-Zhi Lin

    Full Text Available Equine lentivirus receptor 1 (ELR1 has been identified as the sole receptor for equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV and is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR superfamily. In addition to the previously described membrane-associated form of ELR1, two other major alternative splicing variant mRNAs were identified in equine monocyte-derived macrophages (eMDMs. One major spliced species (ELR1-IN contained an insertion of 153 nt, which resulted in a premature stop codon situated 561 nt upstream of the predicted membrane spanning domain. The other major species (ELR1-DE has a deletion of 109 nt that causes a shift of the open reading frame and generates a stop codon 312 nt downstream. Because ELR1-DE presumably encodes a peptide of a mere 23 residues, only ELR1-IN was further analyzed. The expression of a soluble form of ELR1 (sELR1 by ELR1-IN was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence analyses. Similar to ELR1, the transcription level of ELR1-IN varied among individual horses and at different time points in the same individuals. The ratio of ELR1-IN mRNA species to ELR1 mRNA was approximately 1∶2.5. Pre-incubation of the recombinant sELR1 with EIAV significantly inhibited EIAV infection in equine macrophages, the primary in vivo target cell of the virus. Fetal equine dermal (FED cells are susceptible to EIAV in vitro, and the replication of EIAV in FED cells transiently transfected with ELR1-IN was markedly reduced when compared with replication in cells transfected with the empty vector. Finally, the expression levels of both forms of the EIAV receptor were significantly regulated by infection with this virus. Taken together, our data indicate that sELR1 acts as a secreted cellular factor that inhibits EIAV infection in host cells.

  15. Genome-wide identification of alternative splice forms down-regulated by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay in Drosophila.

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    Kasper Daniel Hansen

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative mRNA splicing adds a layer of regulation to the expression of thousands of genes in Drosophila melanogaster. Not all alternative splicing results in functional protein; it can also yield mRNA isoforms with premature stop codons that are degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD pathway. This coupling of alternative splicing and NMD provides a mechanism for gene regulation that is highly conserved in mammals. NMD is also active in Drosophila, but its effect on the repertoire of alternative splice forms has been unknown, as has the mechanism by which it recognizes targets. Here, we have employed a custom splicing-sensitive microarray to globally measure the effect of alternative mRNA processing and NMD on Drosophila gene expression. We have developed a new algorithm to infer the expression change of each mRNA isoform of a gene based on the microarray measurements. This method is of general utility for interpreting splicing-sensitive microarrays and high-throughput sequence data. Using this approach, we have identified a high-confidence set of 45 genes where NMD has a differential effect on distinct alternative isoforms, including numerous RNA-binding and ribosomal proteins. Coupled alternative splicing and NMD decrease expression of these genes, which may in turn have a downstream effect on expression of other genes. The NMD-affected genes are enriched for roles in translation and mitosis, perhaps underlying the previously observed role of NMD factors in cell cycle progression. Our results have general implications for understanding the NMD mechanism in fly. Most notably, we found that the NMD-target mRNAs had significantly longer 3' untranslated regions (UTRs than the nontarget isoforms of the same genes, supporting a role for 3' UTR length in the recognition of NMD targets in fly.

  16. A new splice variant of the major subunit of human asialoglycoprotein receptor encodes a secreted form in hepatocytes.

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    Jia Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The human asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGPR is composed of two polypeptides, designated H1 and H2. While variants of H2 have been known for decades, the existence of H1 variants has never been reported. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified two splice variants of ASGPR H1 transcripts, designated H1a and H1b, in human liver tissues and hepatoma cells. Molecular cloning of ASGPR H1 variants revealed that they differ by a 117 nucleotide segment corresponding to exon 2 in the ASGPR genomic sequence. Thus, ASGPR variant H1b transcript encodes a protein lacking the transmembrane domain. Using an H1b-specific antibody, H1b protein and a functional soluble ASGPR (sASGPR composed of H1b and H2 in human sera and in hepatoma cell culture supernatant were identified. The expression of ASGPR H1a and H1b in Hela cells demonstrated the different cellular loctions of H1a and H1b proteins at cellular membranes and in intracellular compartments, respectively. In vitro binding assays using fluorescence-labeled sASGPR or the substract ASOR revealed that the presence of sASGPR reduced the binding of ASOR to cells. However, ASOR itself was able to enhance the binding of sASGPR to cells expressing membrane-bound ASGPR. Further, H1b expression is reduced in liver tissues from patients with viral hepatitis. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that two naturally occurring ASGPR H1 splice variants are produced in human hepatocytes. A hetero-oligomeric complex sASGPR consists of the secreted form of H1 and H2 and may bind to free substrates in circulation and carry them to liver tissue for uptake by ASGPR-expressing hepatocytes.

  17. MYC Regulates α6 Integrin Subunit Expression and Splicing Under Its Pro-Proliferative ITGA6A Form in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

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    Groulx, Jean-François; Boudjadi, Salah; Beaulieu, Jean-François

    2018-02-03

    The α6 integrin subunit ( ITGA6 ) pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing to form two splicing variants, named ITGA6A and ITGA6B. In primary human colorectal cancer cells, the levels of both ITGA6 and β4 integrin subunit (ITGB4) subunits of the α6β4 integrin are increased. We previously found that the upregulation of ITGA6 is a direct consequence of the increase of the pro-proliferative ITGA6A variant. However, the mechanisms that control ITGA6 expression and splicing into the ITGA6A variant over ITGA6B in colorectal cancer cells remain poorly understood. Here, we show that the promoter activity of the ITGA6 gene is regulated by MYC. Pharmacological inhibition of MYC activity with the MYC inhibitor (MYCi) 10058-F4 or knockdown of MYC expression by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) both lead to a decrease in ITGA6 and ITGA6A levels in colorectal cancer cells, while overexpression of MYC enhances ITGA6 promoter activity. We also found that MYC inhibition decreases the epithelial splicing regulatory protein 2 (ESRP2) splicing factor at both the mRNA and protein levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that the proximal promoter sequences of ITGA6 and ESRP2 were occupied by MYC and actively transcribed in colorectal cancer cells. Furthermore, expression studies in primary colorectal tumors and corresponding resection margins confirmed that the up-regulation of the ITGA6A subunit can be correlated with the increase in MYC and ESRP2 . Taken together, our results demonstrate that the proto-oncogene MYC can regulate the promoter activation and splicing of the ITGA6 integrin gene through ESRP2 to favor the production of the pro-proliferative ITGA6A variant in colorectal cancer cells.

  18. Correction of a splice-site mutation in the beta-globin gene stimulated by triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids

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    Chin, Joanna Y; Kuan, Jean Y; Lonkar, Pallavi S

    2008-01-01

    Splice-site mutations in the beta-globin gene can lead to aberrant transcripts and decreased functional beta-globin, causing beta-thalassemia. Triplex-forming DNA oligonucleotides (TFOs) and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been shown to stimulate recombination in reporter gene loci in mammalian...... DNA fragments, can promote single base-pair modification at the start of the second intron of the beta-globin gene, the site of a common thalassemia-associated mutation. This single base pair change was detected by the restoration of proper splicing of transcripts produced from a green fluorescent...... cells via site-specific binding and creation of altered helical structures that provoke DNA repair. We have designed a series of triplex-forming PNAs that can specifically bind to sequences in the human beta-globin gene. We demonstrate here that these PNAs, when cotransfected with recombinatory donor...

  19. FoxP3 mRNA splice forms in synovial CD4+ T cells in rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis

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    Ryder, L Rebekka; Bartels, Else Marie; Woetmann, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Our aim was to elucidate the relative amount of the different splice forms of FoxP3 mRNA in CD4+ T cells in peripheral blood (PB) compared to synovial fluid (SF) in RA and PsA patients. FoxP3 mRNA was measured using a quantitative real-time PCR method. CD4+ T cells were isolated from 17 paired sa...

  20. GC content around splice sites affects splicing through pre-mRNA secondary structures

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    Chen Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing increases protein diversity by generating multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene through different combinations of exons or through different selections of splice sites. It has been reported that RNA secondary structures are involved in alternative splicing. Here we perform a genomic study of RNA secondary structures around splice sites in humans (Homo sapiens, mice (Mus musculus, fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster, and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans to further investigate this phenomenon. Results We observe that GC content around splice sites is closely associated with the splice site usage in multiple species. RNA secondary structure is the possible explanation, because the structural stability difference among alternative splice sites, constitutive splice sites, and skipped splice sites can be explained by the GC content difference. Alternative splice sites tend to be GC-enriched and exhibit more stable RNA secondary structures in all of the considered species. In humans and mice, splice sites of first exons and long exons tend to be GC-enriched and hence form more stable structures, indicating the special role of RNA secondary structures in promoter proximal splicing events and the splicing of long exons. In addition, GC-enriched exon-intron junctions tend to be overrepresented in tissue-specific alternative splice sites, indicating the functional consequence of the GC effect. Compared with regions far from splice sites and decoy splice sites, real splice sites are GC-enriched. We also found that the GC-content effect is much stronger than the nucleotide-order effect to form stable secondary structures. Conclusion All of these results indicate that GC content is related to splice site usage and it may mediate the splicing process through RNA secondary structures.

  1. Regular languages, regular grammars and automata in splicing systems

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    Mohamad Jan, Nurhidaya; Fong, Wan Heng; Sarmin, Nor Haniza

    2013-04-01

    Splicing system is known as a mathematical model that initiates the connection between the study of DNA molecules and formal language theory. In splicing systems, languages called splicing languages refer to the set of double-stranded DNA molecules that may arise from an initial set of DNA molecules in the presence of restriction enzymes and ligase. In this paper, some splicing languages resulted from their respective splicing systems are shown. Since all splicing languages are regular, languages which result from the splicing systems can be further investigated using grammars and automata in the field of formal language theory. The splicing language can be written in the form of regular languages generated by grammar. Besides that, splicing systems can be accepted by automata. In this research, two restriction enzymes are used in splicing systems namely BfuCI and NcoI.

  2. A Novel Mechanism in Regulating the Alpha-Subunit of the Epithelial Sodium Channel (α ENaC by the Alternatively Spliced Form α ENaC-b

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    Marlene F. Shehata

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Dahl rats’ kidney cortex, the alternatively spliced form of the epithelial sodium channel α subunit (α ENaC-b is the most abundant mRNA transcript (32+/-3 fold α ENaC-wt as was investigated by quantitative RT-PCR analysis. α ENaC-b mRNA levels were significantly higher in Dahl R versus S rats, and were further augmented by high salt diet.Objectives: In the present study, we described the molecular cloning and searched for a possible role of α ENaC-b by testing its potential expression in COS7 cells as well as its impact on α ENaC-wt expression levels when co-expressed in COS7 cells in a dose-dependent manner.Methods: Using RT-PCR strategy, the full-length wildtype α ENaC transcript and the alternatively spliced form α ENaC-b were amplified, sequenced, cloned, subcloned into PCMV-sport6 expression vector, expressed and co-expressed into COS7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. A combination of denaturing and native western blotting techniques was employed to examine the expression of α ENaC-b in vitro, and to determine if an interaction between α ENaC-b and α ENaC-wt occurs in vitro, and finally to demonstrate if degradation of α ENaC-wt protein does occur.Results: α ENaC-b is translated in COS7 cells. Co-expression of α ENaC-b together with α ENaC-wt reduced α ENaC-wt levels in a dose-dependent manner. α ENaC-wt and α ENaC-b appear to form a complex that enhances the degradation of α ENaC-wt.Conclusions: Western blots suggest a novel mechanism in α ENaC regulation whereby α ENaC-b exerts a dominant negative effect on α ENaC-wt expression. This is potentially by sequestering α ENaC-wt, enhancing its proteolytic degradation, and possibly explaining the mechanism of salt-resistance in Dahl R rats.

  3. Co-dominant expression of the HLA-G gene and various forms of alternatively spliced HLA-G mRNA in human first trimester trophoblast

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    Hviid, T V; Møller, C; Sørensen, S

    1998-01-01

    Genes may be silenced at the transcriptional level by 'genomic imprinting' in such a way that only one of the parental alleles is expressed. Imprinting may be tissue-specific and in some cases it seems also to be time-dependent during development. The phenomenon has been studied in pre- and post-...... investigated the different alternatively spliced forms of HLA-G mRNA in first trimester trophoblast and found the full-length transcript to be the far most abundant....... Transcription (RT) Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) products of HLA-G mRNA to examine the expression of maternal and paternal alleles. Our results demonstrate that HLA-G is co-dominantly expressed in first trimester trophoblast cells. A "new" non-synonymous base substitution in exon 4 was detected. We also......Genes may be silenced at the transcriptional level by 'genomic imprinting' in such a way that only one of the parental alleles is expressed. Imprinting may be tissue-specific and in some cases it seems also to be time-dependent during development. The phenomenon has been studied in pre- and post...

  4. Alcoholism and Alternative Splicing of Candidate Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshikazu Sasabe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression studies have shown that expression patterns of several genes have changed during the development of alcoholism. Gene expression is regulated not only at the level of transcription but also through alternative splicing of pre-mRNA. In this review, we discuss some of the evidence suggesting that alternative splicing of candidate genes such as DRD2 (encoding dopamine D2 receptor may form the basis of the mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of alcoholism. These reports suggest that aberrant expression of splice variants affects alcohol sensitivities, and alcohol consumption also regulates alternative splicing. Thus, investigations of alternative splicing are essential for understanding the molecular events underlying the development of alcoholism.

  5. tRNA splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Abelson, John; Trotta, Christopher R.; Li, Hong

    1998-01-01

    Introns interrupt the continuity of many eukaryal genes, and therefore their removal by splicing is a crucial step in gene expression. Interestingly, even within Eukarya there are at least four splicing mechanisms. mRNA splicing in the nucleus takes place in two phosphotransfer reactions on a complex and dynamic machine, the spliceosome. This reaction is related in mechanism to the two self-splicing mechanisms for Group 1 and Group 2 introns. In fact the Group 2 introns are spliced by an iden...

  6. Material description of fluxes in terms of differential forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Salvatore; Grillo, Alfio; Segev, Reuven

    2016-03-01

    The flux of a certain extensive physical quantity across a surface is often represented by the integral over the surface of the component of a pseudo-vector normal to the surface. A pseudo-vector is in fact a possible representation of a second-order differential form, i.e. a skew-symmetric second-order covariant tensor, which follows the regular transformation laws of tensors. However, because of the skew-symmetry of differential forms, the associated pseudo-vector follows a transformation law that is different from that of proper vectors, and is named after the Italian mathematical physicist Gabrio Piola (1794-1850). In this work, we employ the methods of Differential Geometry and the representation in terms of differential forms to demonstrate how the flux of an extensive quantity transforms from the spatial to the material point of view. After an introduction to the theory of differential forms, their transformation laws, and their role in integration theory, we apply them to the case of first-order transport laws such as Darcy's law and Ohm's law.

  7. Novel forms of Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2: Generation by alternative translation initiation and mRNA splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Daniel J

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor (PITX gene family, particularly PITX1 and PITX2, play important roles in normal development and in differentiated cell functions. Three major isoforms of PITX2 were previously reported to be produced through both alternative mRNA splicing (PITX2A and PITX2B and alternative promoter usage (PITX2C. The proteins derived from these mRNAs contain identical homeodomain and carboxyl termini. Differences in the amino-termini of the proteins may confer functional differences in some contexts. Results Here, we report the identification of two novel PITX2 isoforms. First, we demonstrate that the Pitx2c mRNA generates two protein products, PITX2Cα and PITX2Cβ, via alternative translation initiation. Second, we identified a novel mRNA splice variant, Pitx2b2, which uses the same 5' splice donor in intron 2 as Pitx2b (hereafter referred to as Pitx2b1, but employs an alternative 3' splice acceptor, leading to an in-frame deletion of 39 base pairs relative to Pitx2b1. Pitx2b2 mRNA is expressed in both murine and human pituitary. The data show that in a murine gonadotrope cell line and adult murine pituitary what was previously thought to be PITX2B1 is actually PITX2Cβ, or perhaps PITX2B2. PITX2B1 is expressed at lower levels than previously thought. PITX2Cβ and PITX2B2 activate gonadotrope-specific gene promoter-reporters similarly to known PITX2 isoforms. Conclusion We have identified and characterized two novel isoforms of PITX2, generated by alternative translation initiation (PITX2Cβ and alternative mRNA splicing (PITX2B2. These proteins show similar DNA binding and trans-activation functions as other PITX2 isoforms in vitro, though their conservation across species suggests that they may play distinct, as yet unidentified, roles in vivo.

  8. Radionuclide Incorporation and Long Term Performance of Apatite Waste Forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jianwei [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States); Lian, Jie [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Gao, Fei [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2016-01-04

    This project aims to combines state-of-the-art experimental and characterization techniques with atomistic simulations based on density functional theory (DFT) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. With an initial focus on long-lived I-129 and other radionuclides such as Cs, Sr in apatite structure, specific research objectives include the atomic scale understanding of: (1) incorporation behavior of the radionuclides and their effects on the crystal chemistry and phase stability; (2) stability and microstructure evolution of designed waste forms under coupled temperature and radiation environments; (3) incorporation and migration energetics of radionuclides and release behaviors as probed by DFT and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations; and (4) chemical durability as measured in dissolution experiments for long term performance evaluation and model validation.

  9. Development of a novel splice array platform and its application in the identification of alternative splice variants in lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomez-Roman Javier

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays strategies, which allow for the characterization of thousands of alternative splice forms in a single test, can be applied to identify differential alternative splicing events. In this study, a novel splice array approach was developed, including the design of a high-density oligonucleotide array, a labeling procedure, and an algorithm to identify splice events. Results The array consisted of exon probes and thermodynamically balanced junction probes. Suboptimal probes were tagged and considered in the final analysis. An unbiased labeling protocol was developed using random primers. The algorithm used to distinguish changes in expression from changes in splicing was calibrated using internal non-spliced control sequences. The performance of this splice array was validated with artificial constructs for CDC6, VEGF, and PCBP4 isoforms. The platform was then applied to the analysis of differential splice forms in lung cancer samples compared to matched normal lung tissue. Overexpression of splice isoforms was identified for genes encoding CEACAM1, FHL-1, MLPH, and SUSD2. None of these splicing isoforms had been previously associated with lung cancer. Conclusions This methodology enables the detection of alternative splicing events in complex biological samples, providing a powerful tool to identify novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for cancer and other pathologies.

  10. Identification of a novel splice variant form of the influenza A virus M2 ion channel with an antigenically distinct ectodomain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen M Wise

    Full Text Available Segment 7 of influenza A virus produces up to four mRNAs. Unspliced transcripts encode M1, spliced mRNA2 encodes the M2 ion channel, while protein products from spliced mRNAs 3 and 4 have not previously been identified. The M2 protein plays important roles in virus entry and assembly, and is a target for antiviral drugs and vaccination. Surprisingly, M2 is not essential for virus replication in a laboratory setting, although its loss attenuates the virus. To better understand how IAV might replicate without M2, we studied the reversion mechanism of an M2-null virus. Serial passage of a virus lacking the mRNA2 splice donor site identified a single nucleotide pseudoreverting mutation, which restored growth in cell culture and virulence in mice by upregulating mRNA4 synthesis rather than by reinstating mRNA2 production. We show that mRNA4 encodes a novel M2-related protein (designated M42 with an antigenically distinct ectodomain that can functionally replace M2 despite showing clear differences in intracellular localisation, being largely retained in the Golgi compartment. We also show that the expression of two distinct ion channel proteins is not unique to laboratory-adapted viruses but, most notably, was also a feature of the 1983 North American outbreak of H5N2 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus. In identifying a 14th influenza A polypeptide, our data reinforce the unexpectedly high coding capacity of the viral genome and have implications for virus evolution, as well as for understanding the role of M2 in the virus life cycle.

  11. Novel forms of Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor 2 (PITX2): Generation by alternative translation initiation and mRNA splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard Daniel J; Hjalt Tord A; Lamba Pankaj

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Members of the Paired-like homeodomain transcription factor (PITX) gene family, particularly PITX1 and PITX2, play important roles in normal development and in differentiated cell functions. Three major isoforms of PITX2 were previously reported to be produced through both alternative mRNA splicing (PITX2A and PITX2B) and alternative promoter usage (PITX2C). The proteins derived from these mRNAs contain identical homeodomain and carboxyl termini. Differences in the amino-t...

  12. spliceR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitting-Seerup, Kristoffer; Porse, Bo Torben; Sandelin, Albin

    2014-01-01

    RNA-seq data is currently underutilized, in part because it is difficult to predict the functional impact of alternate transcription events. Recent software improvements in full-length transcript deconvolution prompted us to develop spliceR, an R package for classification of alternative splicing...

  13. RNA Splicing: Regulation and Dysregulation in the Heart

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoogenhof, Maarten M. G.; Pinto, Yigal M.; Creemers, Esther E.

    2016-01-01

    RNA splicing represents a post-transcriptional mechanism to generate multiple functional RNAs or proteins from a single transcript. The evolution of RNA splicing is a prime example of the Darwinian function follows form concept. A mutation that leads to a new mRNA (form) that encodes for a new

  14. A mild form of SLC29A3 disorder: a frameshift deletion leads to the paradoxical translation of an otherwise noncoding mRNA splice variant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bolze

    Full Text Available We investigated two siblings with granulomatous histiocytosis prominent in the nasal area, mimicking rhinoscleroma and Rosai-Dorfman syndrome. Genome-wide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous frameshift deletion in SLC29A3, which encodes human equilibrative nucleoside transporter-3 (hENT3. Germline mutations in SLC29A3 have been reported in rare patients with a wide range of overlapping clinical features and inherited disorders including H syndrome, pigmented hypertrichosis with insulin-dependent diabetes, and Faisalabad histiocytosis. With the exception of insulin-dependent diabetes and mild finger and toe contractures in one sibling, the two patients with nasal granulomatous histiocytosis studied here displayed none of the many SLC29A3-associated phenotypes. This mild clinical phenotype probably results from a remarkable genetic mechanism. The SLC29A3 frameshift deletion prevents the expression of the normally coding transcripts. It instead leads to the translation, expression, and function of an otherwise noncoding, out-of-frame mRNA splice variant lacking exon 3 that is eliminated by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD in healthy individuals. The mutated isoform differs from the wild-type hENT3 by the modification of 20 residues in exon 2 and the removal of another 28 amino acids in exon 3, which include the second transmembrane domain. As a result, this new isoform displays some functional activity. This mechanism probably accounts for the narrow and mild clinical phenotype of the patients. This study highlights the 'rescue' role played by a normally noncoding mRNA splice variant of SLC29A3, uncovering a new mechanism by which frameshift mutations can be hypomorphic.

  15. Detection and Quantization of the Expression of Two mu-Opioid Receptor Splice Variants mRNA (hMOR-1A and hMOR-1O in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes of Long-Term Abstinent Former Opioid Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Vousooghi, Pharm

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives

    The mu-Opioid receptor (MOR exerts a critical role on effects of opiodis. The objective of this study is to find a peripheral bio-marker in addiction studies through quantization of the expression of two MOR splice variants mRNA (hMOR-1A and hMOR-1O in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs of long-term abstinent former opioids addicts.

    Methods

    In this case-control study, case and control people were male and divided in two groups: people who gave up addiction to opioids (case and healthy individuals without history of addiction (control. The mRNA expression in PBLs of participants was detected and measured by real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR using SYBR Green Dye.

    Results

    The hMOR-1A mRNA expression in PBLs of abstinent group was significantly reduced and reached to 0.33 of the control group (p<0.001. Similar results were obtained for the other splice variant with the mRNA expression of hMOR-1O in PBLs of abstinent group reaching to 0.38 of that of the control group (p < 0.001.

    Conclusion

    mRNA expression deficiency of two mu-opioid receptor splice variants, hMOR-1A and nMOR-1O, seams to be a risk factor making individuals vulnerable to drug addiction. Based on this analysis measuring the amount of mRNA expression of these two splice variants in PBLs can serve as a peripheral bio-marker for detecting people at risk.

  16. Multiset splicing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassow, Jürgen; Vaszil, György

    2004-01-01

    We consider splicing systems reflecting two important aspects of the behaviour of DNA molecules in nature or in laboratory experiments which so far have not been studied in the literature. We examine the effect of splicing rules applied to finite multisets of words using sequential and different types of parallel derivation strategies and compare the sets of words or sets of multisets which can be obtained.

  17. Vitamin D and alternative splicing of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2015-04-01

    The active form of vitamin D (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D, 1,25(OH)2D) exerts its genomic effects via binding to a nuclear high-affinity vitamin D receptor (VDR). Recent deep sequencing analysis of VDR binding locations across the complete genome has significantly expanded our understanding of the actions of vitamin D and VDR on gene transcription. However, these studies have also promoted appreciation of the extra-transcriptional impact of vitamin D on gene expression. It is now clear that vitamin D interacts with the epigenome via effects on DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and microRNA generation to maintain normal biological functions. There is also increasing evidence that vitamin D can influence pre-mRNA constitutive splicing and alternative splicing, although the mechanism for this remains unclear. Pre-mRNA splicing has long been thought to be a post-transcription RNA processing event, but current data indicate that this occurs co-transcriptionally. Several steroid hormones have been recognized to coordinately control gene transcription and pre-mRNA splicing through the recruitment of nuclear receptor co-regulators that can both control gene transcription and splicing. The current review will discuss this concept with specific reference to vitamin D, and the potential role of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C (hnRNPC), a nuclear factor with an established function in RNA splicing. hnRNPC, has been shown to be involved in the VDR transcriptional complex as a vitamin D-response element-binding protein (VDRE-BP), and may act as a coupling factor linking VDR-directed gene transcription with RNA splicing. In this way hnRNPC may provide an additional mechanism for the fine-tuning of vitamin D-regulated target gene expression. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '17th Vitamin D Workshop'. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The neurogenetics of alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuong, Celine K; Black, Douglas L; Zheng, Sika

    2016-05-01

    Alternative precursor-mRNA splicing is a key mechanism for regulating gene expression in mammals and is controlled by specialized RNA-binding proteins. The misregulation of splicing is implicated in multiple neurological disorders. We describe recent mouse genetic studies of alternative splicing that reveal its critical role in both neuronal development and the function of mature neurons. We discuss the challenges in understanding the extensive genetic programmes controlled by proteins that regulate splicing, both during development and in the adult brain.

  19. Alternative Splicing in Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Pio, Ruben; Montuenga, Luis M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Alterations in alternative splicing affect essential biologic processes and are the basis for a number of pathologic conditions, including cancer. In this review we will summarize the evidence supporting the relevance of alternative splicing in lung cancer. An example that illustrates this relevance is the altered balance between Bcl-xL and Bcl-xS, two splice variants of the apoptosis regulator Bcl-x. Splice modifications in cancer-related genes can be associated ...

  20. Regulation of HIV-1 splicing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, N.

    2016-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) produces a single primary RNA transcript. The full-length transcript functions as RNA genome that is packaged into virions and as mRNA for translation of the Gag and Pol proteins. HIV-1 RNA contains several splice donor (5’splice site; 5’ss) and splice

  1. Splice Site Mutations in the ATP7A Gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjørringe, Tina; Tümer, Zeynep; Møller, Lisbeth Birk

    2011-01-01

    Menkes disease (MD) is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12...... mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation...... to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations...

  2. A study of alternative splicing in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Gilchrist, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Since at least half of the genes in mammalian genomes are subjected to alternative splicing, alternative pre-mRNA splicing plays an important contribution to the complexity of the mammalian proteome. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) provide evidence of a great number of possible...... alternative isoforms. With the EST resource for the domestic pig now containing more than one million porcine ESTs, it is possible to identify alternative splice forms of the individual transcripts in this species from the EST data with some confidence. RESULTS: The pig EST data generated by the Sino...... transcripts with expression patterns matching those of the EST data. The remaining four genes had tissue-restricted expression of alternative spliced transcripts. Five out of the 16 splice events that were experimentally verified were found to be putative pig specific. CONCLUSIONS: In accordance with human...

  3. Where splicing joins chromatin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hnilicová, Jarmila; Staněk, David

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2011), s. 182-188 ISSN 1949-1034 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP305/10/0424; GA AV ČR KAN200520801 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : chromatin * exon * alternative splicing * transcription * snRNP Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  4. Expressiveness of basic Splice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. van de Pol (Jaco)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe study a simple software architecture, in which application processes are coordinated by writing into and reading from a global set. This architecture underlies Splice, which is developed and used at the company Hollandse Signaalapparaten. Our approach is distinguished by viewing the

  5. The Role of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in the Expression and Splicing of Nitric Oxide Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharina, Iraida G; Martin, Emil

    2017-01-20

    Nitric oxide (NO)-dependent signaling is critical to many cellular functions and physiological processes. Soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) acts as an NO receptor and mediates the majority of NO functions. The signaling between NO and sGC is strongly altered by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Recent Advances: Besides NO scavenging, sGC is affected by oxidation/loss of sGC heme, oxidation, or nitrosation of cysteine residues and phosphorylation. Apo-sGC or sGC containing oxidized heme is targeted for degradation. sGC transcription and the stability of sGC mRNA are also affected by oxidative stress. Studies cited in this review suggest the existence of compensatory processes that adapt cellular processes to diminished sGC function under conditions of short-term or moderate oxidative stress. Alternative splicing of sGC transcripts is discussed as a mechanism with the potential to both enhance and reduce sGC function. The expression of α1 isoform B, a functional and stable splice variant of human α1 sGC subunit, is proposed as one of such compensatory mechanisms. The expression of dysfunctional splice isoforms is discussed as a contributor to decreased sGC function in vascular disease. Targeting the process of sGC splicing may be an important approach to maintain the composition of sGC transcripts that are expressed in healthy tissues under normal conditions. Emerging new strategies that allow for targeted manipulations of RNA splicing offer opportunities to use this approach as a preventive measure and to control the composition of sGC splice isoforms. Rational management of expressed sGC splice forms may be a valuable complementary treatment strategy for existing sGC-directed therapies. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 122-136.

  6. SpliceDetector: a software for detection of alternative splicing events in human and model organisms directly from transcript IDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baharlou Houreh, Mandana; Ghorbani Kalkhajeh, Payam; Niazi, Ali; Ebrahimi, Faezeh; Ebrahimie, Esmaeil

    2018-03-22

    In eukaryotes, different combinations of exons lead to multiple transcripts with various functions in protein level, in a process called alternative splicing (AS). Unfolding the complexity of functional genomics through genome-wide profiling of AS and determining the altered ultimate products provide new insights for better understanding of many biological processes, disease progress as well as drug development programs to target harmful splicing variants. The current available tools of alternative splicing work with raw data and include heavy computation. In particular, there is a shortcoming in tools to discover AS events directly from transcripts. Here, we developed a Windows-based user-friendly tool for identifying AS events from transcripts without the need to any advanced computer skill or database download. Meanwhile, due to online working mode, our application employs the updated SpliceGraphs without the need to any resource updating. First, SpliceGraph forms based on the frequency of active splice sites in pre-mRNA. Then, the presented approach compares query transcript exons to SpliceGraph exons. The tool provides the possibility of statistical analysis of AS events as well as AS visualization compared to SpliceGraph. The developed application works for transcript sets in human and model organisms.

  7. A novel 'splice site' HCN4 Gene mutation, c.1737+1 G>T, causes familial bradycardia, reduced heart rate response, impaired chronotropic competence and increased short-term heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hategan, Lidia; Csányi, Beáta; Ördög, Balázs; Kákonyi, Kornél; Tringer, Annamária; Kiss, Orsolya; Orosz, Andrea; Sághy, László; Nagy, István; Hegedűs, Zoltán; Rudas, László; Széll, Márta; Varró, András; Forster, Tamás; Sepp, Róbert

    2017-08-15

    The most important molecular determinant of heart rate regulation in sino-atrial pacemaker cells includes hyperpolarization-activated, cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channels, the major isoform of which is encoded by the HCN4 gene. Mutations affecting the HCN4 gene are associated primarily with sick sinus syndrome. A novel c.1737+1 G>T 'splice-site' HCN4 mutation was identified in a large family with familial bradycardia which co-segregated with the disease providing a two-point LOD score of 4.87. Twelve out of the 22 investigated family members [4 males, 8 females average age 36 (SD 6) years] were considered as clinically affected (heart rateheart rates [62 (SD 8) vs. 73 (SD 8) bpm, p=0.0168) were significantly lower in carriers on 24-hour Holter recordings. Under maximum exercise test carriers achieved significantly lower heart rates than non-carrier family members, and percent heart rate reserve and percent corrected heart rate reserve were significantly lower in carriers. Applying rigorous criteria for chronotropic incompetence a higher number of carriers exhibited chronotropic incompetence. Parameters, characterizing short-term variability of heart rate (i.e. rMSSD and pNN50%) were increased in carrier family members, even after normalization for heart rate, in the 24-hour ECG recordings with the same relative increase in 5-minute recordings. The identified novel 'splice site' HCN4 gene mutation, c.1737+1 G>T, causes familial bradycardia and leads to reduced heart rate response, impaired chronotropic competence and increased short-term heart rate variability in the mutation carriers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Identification and analysis of Eimeria nieschulzi gametocyte genes reveal splicing events of gam genes and conserved motifs in the wall-forming proteins within the genus Eimeria (Coccidia, Apicomplexa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiedmer Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The genus Eimeria (Apicomplexa, Coccidia provides a wide range of different species with different hosts to study common and variable features within the genus and its species. A common characteristic of all known Eimeria species is the oocyst, the infectious stage where its life cycle starts and ends. In our study, we utilized Eimeria nieschulzi as a model organism. This rat-specific parasite has complex oocyst morphology and can be transfected and even cultivated in vitro up to the oocyst stage. We wanted to elucidate how the known oocyst wall-forming proteins are preserved in this rodent Eimeria species compared to other Eimeria. In newly obtained genomics data, we were able to identify different gametocyte genes that are orthologous to already known gam genes involved in the oocyst wall formation of avian Eimeria species. These genes appeared putatively as single exon genes, but cDNA analysis showed alternative splicing events in the transcripts. The analysis of the translated sequence revealed different conserved motifs but also dissimilar regions in GAM proteins, as well as polymorphic regions. The occurrence of an underrepresented gam56 gene version suggests the existence of a second distinct E. nieschulzi genotype within the E. nieschulzi Landers isolate that we maintain.

  9. Alternative REST Splicing Underappreciated

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Guo-Lin; Miller, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    As a major orchestrator of the cellular epigenome, the repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor (REST) can either repress or activate thousands of genes depending on cellular context, suggesting a highly context-dependent REST function tuned by environmental cues. While REST shows cell-type non-selective active transcription, an N-terminal REST4 isoform caused by alternative splicing - inclusion of an extra exon (N3c) which introduces a pre-mature stop codon - has been implicated in...

  10. The neurogenetics of alternative splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Vuong, Celine K.; Black, Douglas L.; Zheng, Sika

    2016-01-01

    Alternative precursor-mRNA splicing is a key mechanism for regulating gene expression in mammals and is controlled by specialized RNA-binding proteins. The misregulation of splicing is implicated in multiple neurological disorders. We describe recent mouse genetic studies of alternative splicing that reveal its critical role in both neuronal development and the function of mature neurons. We discuss the challenges in understanding the extensive genetic programmes controlled by proteins that r...

  11. Work organization for splice consolidation

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F

    2011-01-01

    The Splices Task Force has worked in 2010 to prepare the necessary interventions for 7 TeV operation. The design solution for consolidating the main interconnection splices is well advanced. The required activities to implement it are described, highlighting working assumptions, missing resources and schedule considerations. Progress has also been made in assessing other splices, 6 kA praying hands and corrector circuits: results and ongoing work are presented, highlighting priorities for the remaining work.

  12. RAGE splicing variants in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterenczak, Katharina Anna; Nolte, Ingo; Murua Escobar, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) is a multiligand receptor of environmental stressors which plays key roles in pathophysiological processes, including immune/inflammatory disorders, Alzheimer's disease, diabetic arteriosclerosis, tumorigenesis, and metastasis. Besides the full-length RAGE protein in humans nearly 20 natural occurring RAGE splicing variants were described on mRNA and protein level. These naturally occurring isoforms are characterized by either N-terminally or C-terminally truncations and are discussed as possible regulators of the full-length RAGE receptor either by competitive ligand binding or by displacing the full-length protein in the membrane. Accordingly, expression deregulations of the naturally occurring isoforms were supposed to have significant effect on RAGE-mediated disorders. Thereby the soluble C-truncated RAGE isoforms present in plasma and tissues are the mostly focused isoforms in research and clinics. Deregulations of the circulating levels of soluble RAGE forms were reported in several RAGE-associated pathological disorders including for example atherosclerosis, diabetes, renal failure, Alzheimer's disease, and several cancer types. Regarding other mammalian species, the canine RAGE gene showed high similarities to the corresponding human structures indicating RAGE to be evolutionary highly conserved between both species. Similar to humans the canine RAGE showed a complex and extensive splicing activity leading to a manifold pattern of RAGE isoforms. Due to the similarities seen in several canine and human diseases-including cancer-comparative structural and functional analyses allow the development of RAGE and ligand-specific therapeutic approaches beneficial for human and veterinary medicine.

  13. Coding potential of the products of alternative splicing in human.

    KAUST Repository

    Leoni, Guido

    2011-01-20

    BACKGROUND: Analysis of the human genome has revealed that as much as an order of magnitude more of the genomic sequence is transcribed than accounted for by the predicted and characterized genes. A number of these transcripts are alternatively spliced forms of known protein coding genes; however, it is becoming clear that many of them do not necessarily correspond to a functional protein. RESULTS: In this study we analyze alternative splicing isoforms of human gene products that are unambiguously identified by mass spectrometry and compare their properties with those of isoforms of the same genes for which no peptide was found in publicly available mass spectrometry datasets. We analyze them in detail for the presence of uninterrupted functional domains, active sites as well as the plausibility of their predicted structure. We report how well each of these strategies and their combination can correctly identify translated isoforms and derive a lower limit for their specificity, that is, their ability to correctly identify non-translated products. CONCLUSIONS: The most effective strategy for correctly identifying translated products relies on the conservation of active sites, but it can only be applied to a small fraction of isoforms, while a reasonably high coverage, sensitivity and specificity can be achieved by analyzing the presence of non-truncated functional domains. Combining the latter with an assessment of the plausibility of the modeled structure of the isoform increases both coverage and specificity with a moderate cost in terms of sensitivity.

  14. Splicing variants of porcine synphilin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud Erik; Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Farajzadeh, Leila

    2015-01-01

    %) and to mouse (84%) synphilin-1. Three shorter transcript variants of the synphilin-1 gene were identified, all lacking one or more exons. SNCAIP transcripts were detected in most examined organs and tissues and the highest expression was found in brain tissues and lung. Conserved splicing variants and a novel...... splice form of synhilin-1 were found in this study. All synphilin-1 isoforms encoded by the identified transcript variants lack functional domains important for protein degradation....... with α-synuclein in LBs. The aim of this study was to isolate and characterize porcine synphilin-1 and isoforms hereof with the future perspective to use the pig as a model for Parkinson's disease. The porcine SNCAIP cDNA was cloned by reverse transcriptase PCR. The spatial expression of SNCAIP mRNA...

  15. Intronic Alus influence alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galit Lev-Maor

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Examination of the human transcriptome reveals higher levels of RNA editing than in any other organism tested to date. This is indicative of extensive double-stranded RNA (dsRNA formation within the human transcriptome. Most of the editing sites are located in the primate-specific retrotransposed element called Alu. A large fraction of Alus are found in intronic sequences, implying extensive Alu-Alu dsRNA formation in mRNA precursors. Yet, the effect of these intronic Alus on splicing of the flanking exons is largely unknown. Here, we show that more Alus flank alternatively spliced exons than constitutively spliced ones; this is especially notable for those exons that have changed their mode of splicing from constitutive to alternative during human evolution. This implies that Alu insertions may change the mode of splicing of the flanking exons. Indeed, we demonstrate experimentally that two Alu elements that were inserted into an intron in opposite orientation undergo base-pairing, as evident by RNA editing, and affect the splicing patterns of a downstream exon, shifting it from constitutive to alternative. Our results indicate the importance of intronic Alus in influencing the splicing of flanking exons, further emphasizing the role of Alus in shaping of the human transcriptome.

  16. Width of gene expression profile drives alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Wegmann

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates an enormous amount of functional and proteomic diversity in metazoan organisms. This process is probably central to the macromolecular and cellular complexity of higher eukaryotes. While most studies have focused on the molecular mechanism triggering and controlling alternative splicing, as well as on its incidence in different species, its maintenance and evolution within populations has been little investigated. Here, we propose to address these questions by comparing the structural characteristics as well as the functional and transcriptional profiles of genes with monomorphic or polymorphic splicing, referred to as MS and PS genes, respectively. We find that MS and PS genes differ particularly in the number of tissues and cell types where they are expressed.We find a striking deficit of PS genes on the sex chromosomes, particularly on the Y chromosome where it is shown not to be due to the observed lower breadth of expression of genes on that chromosome. The development of a simple model of evolution of cis-regulated alternative splicing leads to predictions in agreement with these observations. It further predicts the conditions for the emergence and the maintenance of cis-regulated alternative splicing, which are both favored by the tissue specific expression of splicing variants. We finally propose that the width of the gene expression profile is an essential factor for the acquisition of new transcript isoforms that could later be maintained by a new form of balancing selection.

  17. Splice site mutations in the ATP7A gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Skjørringe

    Full Text Available Menkes disease (MD is caused by mutations in the ATP7A gene. We describe 33 novel splice site mutations detected in patients with MD or the milder phenotypic form, Occipital Horn Syndrome. We review these 33 mutations together with 28 previously published splice site mutations. We investigate 12 mutations for their effect on the mRNA transcript in vivo. Transcriptional data from another 16 mutations were collected from the literature. The theoretical consequences of splice site mutations, predicted with the bioinformatics tool Human Splice Finder, were investigated and evaluated in relation to in vivo results. Ninety-six percent of the mutations identified in 45 patients with classical MD were predicted to have a significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the absence of any detectable wild-type transcript in all 19 patients investigated in vivo. Sixty-seven percent of the mutations identified in 12 patients with milder phenotypes were predicted to have no significant effect on splicing, which concurs with the presence of wild-type transcript in 7 out of 9 patients investigated in vivo. Both the in silico predictions and the in vivo results support the hypothesis previously suggested by us and others, that the presence of some wild-type transcript is correlated to a milder phenotype.

  18. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zodwa Dlamini

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets.

  19. Transgenic Mice Expressing an Inhibitory Truncated Form of p300 Exhibit Long-Term Memory Deficits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Wood, Marcelo A.; McDonough, Conor B.; Abel, Ted

    2007-01-01

    The formation of many forms of long-term memory requires several molecular mechanisms including regulation of gene expression. The mechanisms directing transcription require not only activation of individual transcription factors but also recruitment of transcriptional coactivators. CBP and p300 are transcriptional coactivators that interact with…

  20. Handbook of knotting and splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Hasluck, Paul N

    2005-01-01

    Clearly written and amply illustrated with 208 figures, this classic guide ranges from simple and useful knots to complex varieties. Additional topics include rope splicing, working cordage, hammock making, more.

  1. Effect of splice-site polymorphisms of the TMPRSS4, NPHP4 and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    structural changes in mRNA transcripts as a result of splice-site polymorphisms implies that they may be of biological significance in certain pathological conditions. ..... show the genomic structures of the normal (diagram “a”) and abnormal (diagram “b” and “c”) splicing forms. Inserted and deleted sequences are indicated ...

  2. An accessible four-dimensional treatment of Maxwell's equations in terms of differential forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sá, Lucas

    2017-03-01

    Maxwell’s equations are derived in terms of differential forms in the four-dimensional Minkowski representation, starting from the three-dimensional vector calculus differential version of these equations. Introducing all the mathematical and physical concepts needed (including the tool of differential forms), using only knowledge of elementary vector calculus and the local vector version of Maxwell’s equations, the equations are reduced to a simple and elegant set of two equations for a unified quantity, the electromagnetic field. The treatment should be accessible for students taking a first course on electromagnetism.

  3. Alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay of circadian clock genes under environmental stress conditions in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Young-Ju; Park, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Sang-Gyu; Baldwin, Ian T; Park, Chung-Mo

    2014-05-19

    The circadian clock enables living organisms to anticipate recurring daily and seasonal fluctuations in their growth habitats and synchronize their biology to the environmental cycle. The plant circadian clock consists of multiple transcription-translation feedback loops that are entrained by environmental signals, such as light and temperature. In recent years, alternative splicing emerges as an important molecular mechanism that modulates the clock function in plants. Several clock genes are known to undergo alternative splicing in response to changes in environmental conditions, suggesting that the clock function is intimately associated with environmental responses via the alternative splicing of the clock genes. However, the alternative splicing events of the clock genes have not been studied at the molecular level. We systematically examined whether major clock genes undergo alternative splicing under various environmental conditions in Arabidopsis. We also investigated the fates of the RNA splice variants of the clock genes. It was found that the clock genes, including EARLY FLOWERING 3 (ELF3) and ZEITLUPE (ZTL) that have not been studied in terms of alternative splicing, undergo extensive alternative splicing through diverse modes of splicing events, such as intron retention, exon skipping, and selection of alternative 5' splice site. Their alternative splicing patterns were differentially influenced by changes in photoperiod, temperature extremes, and salt stress. Notably, the RNA splice variants of TIMING OF CAB EXPRESSION 1 (TOC1) and ELF3 were degraded through the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway, whereas those of other clock genes were insensitive to NMD. Taken together, our observations demonstrate that the major clock genes examined undergo extensive alternative splicing under various environmental conditions, suggesting that alternative splicing is a molecular scheme that underlies the linkage between the clock and environmental stress

  4. Forms of Providing and Financing Long-Term Care in OECD Countries

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    Halásková Renáta

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Long-term care is being prioritised due to population ageing, and hand in hand with the development of professional provision of long-term care, public expendi-tures will be increasing. Mainly countries with a sharp increase in the number of people aged 80+ will have to address the sustainability of long-term care systems and the pro-curement of relevant services. This paper aims to evaluate the forms of provision and financing of long-term care in selected OECD countries. Provision and funding of long-term care in terms of a formal system are assessed based on selected criteria using analytical methods (principal component analysis and TwoStep cluster analysis. Results of the evaluation carried out in 2008 and 2013 by means of the selected indicators of long-term care, using TwoStep cluster analysis, confirmed both similar as well as different approaches to the provision and financing of long-term care in the analysed countries. The most marked differences in the provision of care based on indicators LTC recipients aged 65+ and LTC recipients in institutions as a percentage of total LTC recipients were found between the first cluster (Australia and Korea with the highest share of LTC recipients and the second cluster (Czech Republic, Estonia, with the lowest share of LTC recipients. In financing of long-term care (LTC expenditures on institutions as a percentage of total LTC expenditures, the most significant differences were observed between the first (Australia, Korea, with the largest share of LTC expenditures on institutions and third cluster (mainly Nordic countries, with the lowest share of LTC expenditures on institutions of total LTC expenditures.

  5. FINANCIAL-ECONOMICAL ENTERPRISE SECURITY STRATEGY FORMING IN THE TERMS OF UNCONFORMITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galyna Mykhayliv

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical points as for definition of “financial-economical security” have been researched and summing up. The present attitude were analyzed as for the financial-economical enterprise security forming in the terms of unconformity and system attitude necessity stipulated for strategy system management by a financial-economical enterprise security. Keywords: financial-economical enterprise security, strategy management, financial security, economical security, financial stability, economical security, external JEL: M 20

  6. FINANCIAL-ECONOMICAL ENTERPRISE SECURITY STRATEGY FORMING IN THE TERMS OF UNCONFORMITY

    OpenAIRE

    Galyna Mykhayliv

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical points as for definition of “financial-economical security” have been researched and summing up. The present attitude were analyzed as for the financial-economical enterprise security forming in the terms of unconformity and system attitude necessity stipulated for strategy system management by a financial-economical enterprise security. Keywords: financial-economical enterprise security, strategy management, financial security, economical security, financial stability, economical...

  7. ulfasQTL: an ultra-fast method of composite splicing QTL analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qian; Hu, Yue; Li, Jun; Zhang, Xuegong

    2017-01-25

    Alternative splicing plays important roles in many regulatory processes and diseases in human. Many genetic variants contribute to phenotypic differences in gene expression and splicing that determine variations in human traits. Detecting genetic variants that affect splicing phenotypes is essential for understanding the functional impact of genetic variations on alternative splicing. For many situations, the key phenotype is the relative splicing ratios of alternative isoforms rather than the expression values of individual isoforms. Splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTL) analysis methods have been proposed for detecting associations of genetic variants with the vectors of isoform splicing ratios of genes. We call this task as composite sQTL analysis. Existing methods are computationally intensive and cannot scale up for whole genome analysis. We developed an ultra-fast method named ulfasQTL for this task based on a previous method sQTLseekeR. It transforms tests of splicing ratios of multiple genes to a matrix form for efficient computation, and therefore can be applied for sQTL analysis at whole-genome scales at the speed thousands times faster than the existing method. We tested ulfasQTL on the data from the GEUVADIS project and compared it with an existing method. ulfasQTL is a very efficient tool for composite splicing QTL analysis and can be applied on whole-genome analysis with acceptable time.

  8. Long-term musical training may improve different forms of visual attention ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Ana Carolina; Loureiro, Maurício Alves; Caramelli, Paulo

    2013-08-01

    Many studies have suggested that structural and functional cerebral neuroplastic processes result from long-term musical training, which in turn may produce cognitive differences between musicians and non-musicians. We aimed to investigate whether intensive, long-term musical practice is associated with improvements in three different forms of visual attention ability: selective, divided and sustained attention. Musicians from symphony orchestras (n=38) and non-musicians (n=38), who were comparable in age, gender and education, were submitted to three neuropsychological tests, measuring reaction time and accuracy. Musicians showed better performance relative to non-musicians on four variables of the three visual attention tests, and such an advantage could not solely be explained by better sensorimotor integration. Moreover, in the group of musicians, significant correlations were observed between the age at the commencement of musical studies and reaction time in all visual attention tests. The results suggest that musicians present augmented ability in different forms of visual attention, thus illustrating the possible cognitive benefits of long-term musical training. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 0-6652 : spliced Texas girder bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Spliced girder technology continues to attract : attention due to its versatility over traditional : prestressed concrete highway bridge construction. : By joining multiple precast concrete girders using : post-tensioning, spliced girder technology :...

  10. Alternative splicing variations in mouse CAPS2: differential expression and functional properties of splicing variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furuichi Teiichi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ca2+-dependent activator protein 2 (CAPS2/CADPS2 is a secretory vesicle-associated protein involved in the release of neurotrophin. We recently reported that an aberrant, alternatively spliced CAPS2 mRNA that lacks exon 3 (CAPS2Δexon3 is detected in some patients with autism. Splicing variations in mouse CAPS2 and their expression and functions remain unclear. Results In this study, we defined 31 exons in the mouse CAPS2 gene and identified six alternative splicing variants, CAPS2a-f. CAPS2a is an isoform lacking exons 22 and 25, which encode part of the Munc13-1-homologous domain (MHD. CAPS2b lacks exon 25. CAPS2c lacks exons 11 and 22. CAPS2d, 2e, and 2f have C-terminal deletions from exon 14, exon 12, and exon 5, respectively. On the other hand, a mouse counterpart of CAPS2Δexon3 was not detected in the mouse tissues tested. CAPS2b was expressed exclusively in the brain, and the other isoforms were highly expressed in the brain, but also in some non-neural tissues. In the brain, all isoforms showed predominant expression patterns in the cerebellum. In the developing cerebellum, CAPS2b showed an up-regulated expression pattern, whereas the other isoforms exhibited transiently peaked expression patterns. CAPS2 proteins were mostly recovered in soluble fractions, but some were present in membrane fractions, except for CAPS2c and 2f, both of which lack the PH domain, suggesting that the PH domain is important for membrane association. In contrast to CAPS2a and 2b, CAPS2c showed slightly decreased BDNF-releasing activity, which is likely due to the C-terminal truncation of the PH domain in CAPS2c. Conclusion This study indicates that, in mouse, there are six splicing variants of CAPS2 (CAPS2a-f, and that these are subdivided into two groups: a long form containing the C-terminal MHD and a short form lacking the C-terminal MHD. These results demonstrate that the splicing variations correlate with their expression patterns and

  11. Proteomic analysis of Entamoeba histolytica in vivo assembled pre-mRNA splicing complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Jesús; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi; Sato, Emi; Chiba, Yoko; Nakada-Tsukui, Kumiko; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Winkler, Robert; Azuara-Liceaga, Elisa; Mendoza-Figueroa, María Saraí; Watanabe, Natsuki; Santos, Herbert J; Saito-Nakano, Yumiko; Galindo-Rosales, José Manuel

    2014-12-05

    The genome of the human intestinal parasite Entamoeba histolytica contains nearly 3000 introns and bioinformatic predictions indicate that major and minor spliceosomes occur in Entamoeba. However, except for the U2-, U4-, U5- and U6 snRNAs, no other splicing factor has been cloned and characterized. Here, we HA-tagged cloned the snRNP component U1A and assessed its expression and nuclear localization. Because the snRNP-free U1A form interacts with polyadenylate-binding protein, HA-U1A immunoprecipitates could identify early and late splicing complexes. Avoiding Entamoeba's endonucleases and ensuring the precipitation of RNA-binding proteins, parasite cultures were UV cross-linked prior to nuclear fraction immunoprecipitations with HA antibodies, and precipitates were subjected to tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) analyses. To discriminate their nuclear roles (chromatin-, co-transcriptional-, splicing-related), MS/MS analyses were carried out with proteins eluted with MS2-GST-sepharose from nuclear extracts of an MS2 aptamer-tagged Rabx13 intron amoeba transformant. Thus, we probed thirty-six Entamoeba proteins corresponding to 32 cognate splicing-specific factors, including 13 DExH/D helicases required for all stages of splicing, and 12 different splicing-related helicases were identified also. Furthermore 50 additional proteins, possibly involved in co-transcriptional processes were identified, revealing the complexity of co-transcriptional splicing in Entamoeba. Some of these later factors were not previously found in splicing complex analyses. Numerous facts about the splicing of the nearly 3000 introns of the Entamoeba genome have not been unraveled, particularly the splicing factors and their activities. Considering that many of such introns are located in metabolic genes, the knowledge of the splicing cues has the potential to be used to attack or control the parasite. We have found numerous new splicing-related factors which could have therapeutic benefit. We

  12. Genetic variations and alternative splicing. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eZaphiropoulos

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is a post-transcriptional regulatory process that is attaining stronger recognition as a modulator of gene expression. Alternative splicing occurs when the primary RNA transcript is differentially processed into more than one mature RNAs. This is the result of a variable definition/inclusion of the exons, the sequences that are excised from the primary RNA to form the mature RNAs. Consequently, RNA expression can generate a collection of differentially spliced RNAs, which may distinctly influence subsequent biological events, such as protein synthesis or other biomolecular interactions. Still the mechanisms that control exon definition and exon inclusion are not fully clarified. This mini-review highlights advances in this field as well as the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms in affecting splicing decisions. The Glioma associated oncogene 1, GLI1, is taken as an example in addressing the role of nucleotide substitutions for splicing regulation.

  13. Functional diversity of human protein kinase splice variants marks significant expansion of human kinome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Krishanpal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein kinases are involved in diverse spectrum of cellular processes. Availability of draft version of the human genomic data in the year 2001 enabled recognition of repertoire of protein kinases. However, over the years the human genomic data is being refined and the current release of human genomic data has helped us to recognize a larger repertoire of over 900 human protein kinases represented mainly by splice variants. Results Many of these identified protein kinases are alternatively spliced products. Interestingly, some of the human kinase splice variants appear to be significantly diverged in terms of their functional properties as represented by incorporation or absence of one or more domains. Many sets of protein kinase splice variants have substantially different domain organization and in a few sets of splice variants kinase domains belong to different subfamilies of kinases suggesting potential participation in different signal transduction pathways. Conclusions Addition or deletion of a domain between splice variants of multi-domain kinases appears to be a means of generating differences in the functional features of otherwise similar kinases. It is intriguing that marked sequence diversity within the catalytic regions of some of the splice variant kinases result in kinases belonging to different subfamilies. These human kinase splice variants with different functions might contribute to diversity of eukaryotic cellular signaling.

  14. Effect of tension lap splice on the behavior of high strength concrete (HSC beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed El-Azab

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, many research efforts have been carried out on the bond strength between normal strength concrete (NSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. Many codes gave a minimum splice length for tension and compression reinforcement as a factor of the bar diameter depending on many parameters such as concrete strength, steel yield stress, shape of bar end, shape of bar surface and also bar location. Also, codes gave another restriction about the percentage of total reinforcement to be spliced at the same time. Comparatively limited attention has been directed toward the bond between high strength concrete (HSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. HSC has high modulus of elasticity, high density and long-term durability. This research presents an experimental study on the bond between high strength concrete (HSC and reinforcing bars spliced in tension zones in beams. It reports the influence of several parameters on bond in splices. The parameters covered are casting position, splice length as a factor of bar diameter, bar diameter and reinforcement ratio. The research involved tests on sixteen simply-supported beams of 1800 mm span, 200 mm width and 400 mm thickness made of HSC. In each beam, the total tensile steel bars were spliced in the constant moment zone. Crack pattern, crack propagation, cracking load, failure load and mi span deflection were recorded and analyzed to study the mentioned parameters effect.

  15. Intrasplicing coordinates alternative first exons with alternative splicing in the protein 4.1R gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conboy, John G.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Tan, Jeff S.; Mohandas, Narla; Conboy, John G.

    2008-11-07

    In the protein 4.1R gene, alternative first exons splice differentially to alternative 3' splice sites far downstream in exon 2'/2 (E2'/2). We describe a novel intrasplicing mechanism by which exon 1A (E1A) splices exclusively to the distal E2'/2 acceptor via two nested splicing reactions regulated by novel properties of exon 1B (E1B). E1B behaves as an exon in the first step, using its consensus 5' donor to splice to the proximal E2'/2 acceptor. A long region of downstream intron is excised, juxtaposing E1B with E2'/2 to generate a new composite acceptor containing the E1B branchpoint/pyrimidine tract and E2 distal 3' AG-dinucleotide. Next, the upstream E1A splices over E1B to this distal acceptor, excising the remaining intron plus E1B and E2' to form mature E1A/E2 product. We mapped branch points for both intrasplicing reactions and demonstrated that mutation of the E1B 5' splice site or branchpoint abrogates intrasplicing. In the 4.1R gene, intrasplicing ultimately determines N-terminal protein structure and function. More generally, intrasplicing represents a new mechanism whereby alternative promoters can be coordinated with downstream alternative splicing.

  16. The structural bases of long-term anabiosis in non-spore-forming bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzina, Natalia E.; Mulyukin, Andrey L.; Dmitriev, Vladimir V.; Nikolaev, Yury A.; Shorokhova, Anna P.; Bobkova, Yulia S.; Barinova, Ekaterina S.; Plakunov, Vladimir K.; El-Registan, Galina I.; Duda, Vitalii I.

    2006-01-01

    Peculiarities of the structural organization in non-spore-forming bacteria associated with long-term anabiosis were revealed both in laboratory cultures and in natural populations isolated from 1 3-Myr-old Eastern Siberian permafrost and tundra soil. Different advanced methods were used, including (a) high-resolution electron microscopy; (b) simulation of in situ conditions in the laboratory by varying the composition of growth medium and cultivation conditions; (c) low-temperature fractionation to isolate and concentrate microbial cells from natural soils; (d) comparative morphological analysis of microbial cells in model cultures and natural soils (in situ). Under laboratory conditions, the intense formation of resting cells by representatives of various taxa of eubacteria and halophilic archaea occurred in 2 9-month-old cultures grown in carbon-, nitrogen-, or phosphorus-limited media, in starved cell suspensions in the presence of sodium silicate, or on soil agar. Among resting cells, we revealed cystlike forms having a complicated structure and common features. These included a thick capsule; a thickened and multiprofile cell wall; the presence of large intramembrane particles on PF- and EF-fracture surfaces; fine-grained or lumpy cytoplasm; and a condensed nucleoid. The general morphological properties, ultrastructural organization, physiological features of cystlike cells, and their ability to germinate under the appropriate conditions suggest the existence of constitutive dormancy in non-spore-forming bacteria. It was found that the majority of microorganisms in permafrost and tundra soil are cystlike cells, very similar to those in laboratory cultures. Anabiotic (resting) cystlike cells are responsible for the survival of non-spore-formers in extreme Earth habitats and may be regarded as possible analogs of extraterrestrial forms of microbial life.

  17. Two novel splicing mutations in the SLC45A2 gene cause Oculocutaneous Albinism Type IV by unmasking cryptic splice sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straniero, Letizia; Rimoldi, Valeria; Soldà, Giulia; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Andreucci, Elena; Bargiacchi, Sara; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Asselta, Rosanna; Primignani, Paola

    2015-09-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type IV (OCA4) is one of the four commonly recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the SLC45A2 gene. Here, we investigated the genetic basis of OCA4 in an Italian child. The mutational screening of the SLC45A2 gene identified two novel potentially pathogenic splicing mutations: a synonymous transition (c.888G>A) involving the last nucleotide of exon 3 and a single-nucleotide insertion (c.1156+2dupT) within the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of intron 5. As computer-assisted analysis for mutant splice-site prediction was not conclusive, we investigated the effects on pre-mRNA splicing of these two variants by using an in vitro minigene approach. Production of mutant transcripts in HeLa cells demonstrated that both mutations cause the almost complete abolishment of the physiologic donor splice site, with the concomitant unmasking of cryptic donor splice sites. To our knowledge, this work represents the first in-depth molecular characterization of splicing defects in a OCA4 patient.

  18. Titin Diversity—Alternative Splicing Gone Wild

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Guo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Titin is an extremely large protein found in highest concentrations in heart and skeletal muscle. The single mammalian gene is expressed in multiple isoforms as a result of alternative splicing. Although titin isoform expression is controlled developmentally and in a tissue specific manner, the vast number of potential splicing pathways far exceeds those described in any other alternatively spliced gene. Over 1 million human splice pathways for a single individual can be potentially derived from the PEVK region alone. A new splicing pattern for the human cardiac N2BA isoform type has been found in which the PEVK region includes only the N2B type exons. The alterations in splicing and titin isoform expression in human heart disease provide impetus for future detailed study of the splicing mechanisms for this giant protein.

  19. HIV-1 splicing at the major splice donor site is restricted by RNA structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nancy; van Bel, Nikki; Berkhout, Ben; Das, Atze T

    2014-11-01

    The 5' leader region of the HIV-1 RNA contains the major 5' splice site (ss) that is used in the production of all spliced viral RNAs. This splice-donor (SD) region can fold a stem-loop structure. We demonstrate that whereas stabilization of this SD hairpin reduces splicing efficiency, destabilization increases splicing. Both stabilization and destabilization reduce viral fitness. These results demonstrate that the stability of the SD hairpin can modulate the level of splicing, most likely by controlling the accessibility of the 5'ss for the splicing machinery. The natural stability of the SD hairpin restricts splicing and this stability seems to be fine-tuned to reach the optimal balance between unspliced and spliced RNAs for efficient virus replication. The 5'ss region of different HIV-1 isolates and the related SIVmac239 can fold a similar structure. This evolutionary conservation supports the importance of this structure in viral replication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Pedagogical terms of forming of healthy method of life of modern pupils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odarchenko V.I.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The questions of conditioning forming of healthy method of life of pupils of general educational educational establishments are probed. In an experiment 156 pupils took part in age from 6 to 17 years. It is set that the characteristic feature of bodily condition of health of pupils is a result of the protracted unfavorable influence of socio-economic, ecological and pedagogical factors. An idea speaks out, that search of the new going near organization of an educational educate process at school it is necessary to send educations to humanizing. It will provide creation of optimum terms for spiritual growth of personality, valuable realization of psychophysical possibilities, maintainance and strengthening of health. It is well-proven that realization of the personality oriented approach taking into account basic valeological principles positively influences on the process of education of responsible attitude toward an own health as to the greatest individual and public value.

  1. New insights into the genomic organization and splicing of the doublesex gene, a terminal regulator of sexual differentiation in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianping Duan

    Full Text Available Sex-determination mechanisms differ among organisms. The primary mechanism is diverse, whereas the terminal regulator is relatively-conserved. We analyzed the transcripts of the Bombyx mori doublesex gene (Bmdsx, and reported novel results concerning the genomic organization and expression of Bmdsx. Bmdsx consists of nine exons and eight introns, of which two exons are novel and have not been reported previously. Bmdsx transcripts are spliced to generate seventeen alternatively-spliced forms and eleven putative trans-spliced variants. Thirteen of the alternatively-spliced forms and five of the putative trans-spliced forms are reported here for the first time. Sequence analysis predicts that ten female-specific, six male-specific splice forms and one splice form found in males and females will result in four female-specific, two male-specific Dsx proteins and one Dsx protein common to males and females. The Dsx proteins are expected to be functional and regulate downstream target genes. Some of the predicted Dsx proteins are described here for the first time. Therefore the expression of the dsx gene in B. mori results in a variety of cis- and trans-spliced transcripts and multiple Dsx proteins. These findings show that in B. mori there is a complicated pattern of dsx splicing, and that the regulation of splicing and sex-specific functions of lepidopteran dsx have evolved complexity.

  2. Alternative Splicing in Plant Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengming Yang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS occurs widely in plants and can provide the main source of transcriptome and proteome diversity in an organism. AS functions in a range of physiological processes, including plant disease resistance, but its biological roles and functional mechanisms remain poorly understood. Many plant disease resistance (R genes undergo AS, and several R genes require alternatively spliced transcripts to produce R proteins that can specifically recognize pathogen invasion. In the finely-tuned process of R protein activation, the truncated isoforms generated by AS may participate in plant disease resistance either by suppressing the negative regulation of initiation of immunity, or by directly engaging in effector-triggered signaling. Although emerging research has shown the functional significance of AS in plant biotic stress responses, many aspects of this topic remain to be understood. Several interesting issues surrounding the AS of R genes, especially regarding its functional roles and regulation, will require innovative techniques and additional research to unravel.

  3. Alanine repeats influence protein localization in splicing speckles and paraspeckles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuo-Hsiu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Lu, Chia-Chen; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2014-12-16

    Mammalian splicing regulatory protein RNA-binding motif protein 4 (RBM4) has an alanine repeat-containing C-terminal domain (CAD) that confers both nuclear- and splicing speckle-targeting activities. Alanine-repeat expansion has pathological potential. Here we show that the alanine-repeat tracts influence the subnuclear targeting properties of the RBM4 CAD in cultured human cells. Notably, truncation of the alanine tracts redistributed a portion of RBM4 to paraspeckles. The alanine-deficient CAD was sufficient for paraspeckle targeting. On the other hand, alanine-repeat expansion reduced the mobility of RBM4 and impaired its splicing activity. We further took advantage of the putative coactivator activator (CoAA)-RBM4 conjoined splicing factor, CoAZ, to investigate the function of the CAD in subnuclear targeting. Transiently expressed CoAZ formed discrete nuclear foci that emerged and subsequently separated-fully or partially-from paraspeckles. Alanine-repeat expansion appeared to prevent CoAZ separation from paraspeckles, resulting in their complete colocalization. CoAZ foci were dynamic but, unlike paraspeckles, were resistant to RNase treatment. Our results indicate that the alanine-rich CAD, in conjunction with its conjoined RNA-binding domain(s), differentially influences the subnuclear localization and biogenesis of RBM4 and CoAZ. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Long-term differences in extinction risk among the seven forms of rarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnik, Paul G; Simpson, Carl; Payne, Jonathan L

    2012-12-22

    Rarity is widely used to predict the vulnerability of species to extinction. Species can be rare in markedly different ways, but the relative impacts of these different forms of rarity on extinction risk are poorly known and cannot be determined through observations of species that are not yet extinct. The fossil record provides a valuable archive with which we can directly determine which aspects of rarity lead to the greatest risk. Previous palaeontological analyses confirm that rarity is associated with extinction risk, but the relative contributions of different types of rarity to extinction risk remain unknown because their impacts have never been examined simultaneously. Here, we analyse a global database of fossil marine animals spanning the past 500 million years, examining differential extinction with respect to multiple rarity types within each geological stage. We observe systematic differences in extinction risk over time among marine genera classified according to their rarity. Geographic range played a primary role in determining extinction, and habitat breadth a secondary role, whereas local abundance had little effect. These results suggest that current reductions in geographic range size will lead to pronounced increases in long-term extinction risk even if local populations are relatively large at present.

  5. Expression of p89c-Mybex9b, an alternatively spliced form of c-Myb, is required for proliferation and survival of p210BCR/ABL-expressing cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzotti, G; Mariani, S A; Corradini, F; Bussolari, R; Cesi, V; Vergalli, J; Ferrari-Amorotti, G; Fragliasso, V; Soliera, A R; Cattelani, S; Raschellà, G; Holyoake, T L; Calabretta, B

    2012-01-01

    The c-Myb gene encodes the p75 c-Myb isoform and less-abundant proteins generated by alternatively spliced transcripts. Among these, the best known is p c-Mybex9b , which contains 121 additional amino acids between exon 9 and 10, in a domain involved in protein–protein interactions and negative regulation. In hematopoietic cells, expression of p c-Mybex9b accounts for 10–15% of total c-Myb; these levels may be biologically relevant because modest changes in c-Myb expression affects proliferation and survival of leukemic cells and lineage choice and frequency of normal hematopoietic progenitors. In this study, we assessed biochemical activities of p c-Mybex9b and the consequences of perturbing its expression in K562 and primary chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) progenitor cells. Compared with p75 c-Myb , p c-Mybex9b is more stable and more effective in transactivating Myb-regulated promoters. Ectopic expression of p c-Mybex9b enhanced proliferation and colony formation and reduced imatinib (IM) sensitivity of K562 cells; conversely, specific downregulation of p c-Mybex9b reduced proliferation and colony formation, enhanced IM sensitivity of K562 cells and markedly suppressed colony formation of CML CD34 + cells, without affecting the levels of p75 c-Myb . Together, these studies indicate that expression of the low-abundance p c-Mybex9b isoform has an important role for the overall biological effects of c-Myb in BCR/ABL-transformed cells

  6. Capacity of columns with splice imperfections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, E.P.; Stephen, R.M.

    1977-01-01

    To study the behavior of spliced columns subjected to tensile forces simulating situations which may develop in an earthquake, all of the spliced specimens were tested to failure in tension after first having been subjected to large compressive loads. The results of these tests indicate that the lack of perfect contact at compression splices of columns may not be important, provided that the gaps are shimmed and welding is used to maintain the sections in alignment

  7. The connection between splicing and cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrow, Anabella; Kornblihtt, Alberto Rodolfo

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a crucial mechanism for generating protein diversity. Different splice variants of a given protein can display different and even antagonistic biological functions. Therefore, appropriate control of their synthesis is required to assure the complex orchestration of cellular processes within multicellular organisms. Mutations in cisacting splicing elements or changes in the activity of regulatory proteins that compromise the accuracy of either constitutive or alternativ...

  8. Control of fibroblast fibronectin expression and alternative splicing via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, Eric S.; Sagana, Rommel L.; Booth, Adam J.; Yan, Mei; Cornett, Ashley M.; Bloomheart, Christopher A.; Tsui, Jessica L.; Wilke, Carol A.; Moore, Bethany B.; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse; Muro, Andres F.

    2010-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN), a ubiquitous glycoprotein that plays critical roles in physiologic and pathologic conditions, undergoes alternative splicing which distinguishes plasma FN (pFN) from cellular FN (cFN). Although both pFN and cFN can be incorporated into the extracellular matrix, a distinguishing feature of cFN is the inclusion of an alternatively spliced exon termed EDA (for extra type III domain A). The molecular steps involved in EDA splicing are well-characterized, but pathways influencing EDA splicing are less clear. We have previously found an obligate role for inhibition of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue on chromosome 10 (PTEN), the primary regulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway, in fibroblast activation. Here we show TGF-β, a potent inducer of both EDA splicing and fibroblast activation, inhibits PTEN expression and activity in mesenchymal cells, corresponding with enhanced PI3K/Akt signaling. In pten -/- fibroblasts, which resemble activated fibroblasts, inhibition of Akt attenuated FN production and decreased EDA alternative splicing. Moreover, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in pten -/- cells also blocked FN production and EDA splicing. This effect was due to inhibition of Akt-mediated phosphorylation of the primary EDA splicing regulatory protein SF2/ASF. Importantly, FN silencing in pten -/- cells resulted in attenuated proliferation and migration. Thus, our results demonstrate that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis is instrumental in FN transcription and alternative splicing, which regulates cell behavior.

  9. Alternative Splicing in Neurogenesis and Brain Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Hao Su

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of precursor mRNA is an important mechanism that increases transcriptomic and proteomic diversity and also post-transcriptionally regulates mRNA levels. Alternative splicing occurs at high frequency in brain tissues and contributes to every step of nervous system development, including cell-fate decisions, neuronal migration, axon guidance, and synaptogenesis. Genetic manipulation and RNA sequencing have provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of alternative splicing in stem cell self-renewal and neuronal fate specification. Timely expression and perhaps post-translational modification of neuron-specific splicing regulators play important roles in neuronal development. Alternative splicing of many key transcription regulators or epigenetic factors reprograms the transcriptome and hence contributes to stem cell fate determination. During neuronal differentiation, alternative splicing also modulates signaling activity, centriolar dynamics, and metabolic pathways. Moreover, alternative splicing impacts cortical lamination and neuronal development and function. In this review, we focus on recent progress toward understanding the contributions of alternative splicing to neurogenesis and brain development, which has shed light on how splicing defects may cause brain disorders and diseases.

  10. Benefits of CO2 laser heating for high reliability fiber splicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Douglas M.; Nasir, Usman; Saravanos, Elli

    2016-03-01

    The use of a CO2 laser as a heat source became commercially available for optical fiber splicing and component fabrication only in recent years. In addition to long-term trouble-free and low-maintenance heat source operation, laser fusion splicing offers unique benefits for fabricating high-power optical components, as well as for splice reliability. When used as the heating method for fiber splicing, the energy of the CO2 laser beam is efficiently absorbed by the outer layer of the glass, and is then conducted inwards. This heating method is well controlled, and results in a smooth and contamination-free glass surface. Other heating methods, such as arc fusion or resistive heating, may leave tungsten, graphite, or metal oxide deposits on the spliced fiber surface. By contrast, with CO2 laser splicing, the lack of surface irregularities and contamination enables remarkable spliced-fiber strength results, with some strength results nearly within the range of coated fiber breaking strength.

  11. Metaphorization as a Way of Forming Terms of Subject Area "Cosmetology"

    OpenAIRE

    Diana B. Temirova

    2017-01-01

    The article justifies the role of metaphorization as one of the most important sources of replenishment of scientific terminology with new terms. Metaphor is considered as a cognitive mechanism allowing to comprehend abstract concepts in more concrete terms. The purpose of the article is to describe the general patterns of the formation and functioning of metaphorical terms in the subject field of cosmetology. Practical material is cosmetic terms obtained by the method of continuous sampling ...

  12. The splicing fate of plant SPO11 genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorben eSprink

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Towards the global understanding of plant meiosis, it seems to be essential to decipher why all as yet sequenced plants need or at least encode for two different meiotic SPO11 genes. This is in contrast to mammals and fungi, where only one SPO11 is present. Both SPO11 in plants are essential for the initiation of double strand breaks (DSBs during the meiotic prophase. In nearly all eukaryotic organisms DSB induction by SPO11 leads to meiotic DSB repair, thereby ensuring the formation of a necessary number of crossovers (CO as physical connections between the allelic chromosomes. We aim to investigate the specific functions and evolution of both SPO11 genes in land plants. Therefore, we identified and cloned the respective orthologous genes from Brassica rapa, Carica papaya, Oryza sativa and Physcomitrella patens. In parallel we determined the full length cDNA sequences of SPO11-1 and -2 from all of these plants by RT-PCR. During these experiments we observed that the analyzed plants exhibit a pattern of aberrant splicing products of both SPO11 mRNAs. Such an aberrant splicing has previously been described for Arabidopsis and therefore seems to be conserved throughout evolution. Most of the splicing forms of SPO11-1 and -2 seem to be non functional as they either showed intron retention or shortened exons accompanied by a frameshift leading to premature termination codons (PTCs in most cases. Nevertheless, we could detect one putative functional alternatively spliced mRNA for SPO11-1 and -2 each, indicating that splicing of SPO11 does not depend only on the gene sequence but also on the plant species and that it might play a regulatory role.

  13. SplicingTypesAnno: annotating and quantifying alternative splicing events for RNA-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Zuo, Fenghua; Ru, Yuanbin; Guo, Jiqiang; Yan, Xiaoyan; Sablok, Gaurav

    2015-04-01

    Alternative splicing plays a key role in the regulation of the central dogma. Four major types of alternative splicing have been classified as intron retention, exon skipping, alternative 5 splice sites or alternative donor sites, and alternative 3 splice sites or alternative acceptor sites. A few algorithms have been developed to detect splice junctions from RNA-Seq reads. However, there are few tools targeting at the major alternative splicing types at the exon/intron level. This type of analysis may reveal subtle, yet important events of alternative splicing, and thus help gain deeper understanding of the mechanism of alternative splicing. This paper describes a user-friendly R package, extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. SplicingTypesAnno can: (1) provide annotation for major alternative splicing at exon/intron level. By comparing the annotation from GTF/GFF file, it identifies the novel alternative splicing sites; (2) offer a convenient two-level analysis: genome-scale annotation for users with high performance computing environment, and gene-scale annotation for users with personal computers; (3) generate a user-friendly web report and additional BED files for IGV visualization. SplicingTypesAnno is a user-friendly R package for extracting, annotating and analyzing alternative splicing types at exon/intron level for sequence alignment files from RNA-Seq. It is publically available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/splicingtypes/files/ or http://genome.sdau.edu.cn/research/software/SplicingTypesAnno.html. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Spliced

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addison, Courtney Page

    2017-01-01

    Human gene therapy (HGT) aims to cure disease by inserting or editing the DNA of patients with genetic conditions. Since foundational genetic techniques came into use in the 1970s, the field has developed to the point that now three therapies have market approval, and over 1800 clinical trials have...... been initiated. In this article I present a brief history of HGT, showing how the ethical and practical viability of the field was achieved by key scientific and regulatory actors. These parties carefully articulated gene therapy’s scope, limiting it to therapeutic interventions on somatic cells......, and cultivated alliances and divisions that bolstered the field’s legitimacy. At times these measures faltered, and then practitioners and sometimes patients would invoke an ethical imperative, posing gene therapy as the best solution to life and death problems. I suggest that we consider how boundary...

  15. Understanding of Technical Terms and Contents of Informed Consent Forms for Sedative Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihnsook Jeong, RN, PhD

    2013-03-01

    Conclusion: The understanding of the terms and knowledge about the procedures were disappointing. Therefore, sufficient explanations should be provided to the patients. While the informed consent was taken by doctors, the level of understanding should be monitored by nurses. In particular, subjects who did not have any previous experience with endoscopy procedures showed relatively lower level of understanding. We recommend that medical terms should be replaced with more common and nontechnical words in consent forms.

  16. Genetic deletion of melanin-concentrating hormone neurons impairs hippocampal short-term synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of short-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Barillier, Léa; Léger, Lucienne; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice; Malleret, Gaël; Salin, Paul-Antoine

    2015-11-01

    The cognitive role of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons, a neuronal population located in the mammalian postero-lateral hypothalamus sending projections to all cortical areas, remains poorly understood. Mainly activated during paradoxical sleep (PS), MCH neurons have been implicated in sleep regulation. The genetic deletion of the only known MCH receptor in rodent leads to an impairment of hippocampal dependent forms of memory and to an alteration of hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. By using MCH/ataxin3 mice, a genetic model characterized by a selective deletion of MCH neurons in the adult, we investigated the role of MCH neurons in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and hippocampal-dependent forms of memory. MCH/ataxin3 mice exhibited a deficit in the early part of both long-term potentiation and depression in the CA1 area of the hippocampus. Post-tetanic potentiation (PTP) was diminished while synaptic depression induced by repetitive stimulation was enhanced suggesting an alteration of pre-synaptic forms of short-term plasticity in these mice. Behaviorally, MCH/ataxin3 mice spent more time and showed a higher level of hesitation as compared to their controls in performing a short-term memory T-maze task, displayed retardation in acquiring a reference memory task in a Morris water maze, and showed a habituation deficit in an open field task. Deletion of MCH neurons could thus alter spatial short-term memory by impairing short-term plasticity in the hippocampus. Altogether, these findings could provide a cellular mechanism by which PS may facilitate memory encoding. Via MCH neuron activation, PS could prepare the day's learning by increasing and modulating short-term synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Global Gene Expression Profiling and Alternative Splicing Events during the Chondrogenic Differentiation of Human Cartilage Endplate-Derived Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Shang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain (LBP is a very prevalent disease and degenerative disc diseases (DDDs usually account for the LBP. However, the pathogenesis of DDDs is complicated and difficult to elucidate. Alternative splicing is a sophisticated regulatory process which greatly increases cellular complexity and phenotypic diversity of eukaryotic organisms. In addition, the cartilage endplate-derived stem cells have been discovered and identified by our research group. In this paper, we continue to investigate gene expression profiling and alternative splicing events during chondrogenic differentiation of cartilage endplate-derived stem cells. We adopted Affymetrix Human Transcriptome Array 2.0 (HTA 2.0 to compare the transcriptional and splicing changes between the control and differentiated samples. RT-PCR and quantitative PCR are used to validate the microarray results. The GO and KEGG pathway analysis was also performed. After bioinformatics analysis of the data, we detected 1953 differentially expressed genes. In terms of alternative splicing, the Splicing Index algorithm was used to select alternatively spliced genes. We detected 4411 alternatively spliced genes. GO and KEGG pathway analysis also revealed several functionally involved biological processes and signaling pathways. To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate the alternative splicing mechanisms in chondrogenic differentiation of stem cells on a genome-wide scale.

  18. Heat-shrinkable splicing materials for Class 1E wire and cable systems in nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Katsue; Maruyama, Masahiro; Kanno, Mikio; Ohya, Shingo; Nagakawa, Seiji; Sugimori, Mikihiro

    1987-01-01

    This report describes the shapes of heat-shrinkable splicing materials (cable sleeve and breakout, and round end cap) made of polyolefine resin, their application to cable splicing, and the properties of the materials as well as of the splice using them. Particularly, the report features introduction of their properties as determined by tests under the same conditions as used in Japan in qualifying tests on wires and cables for nuclear power generating stations. The heat-shrinkable splicing materials proved to be equal in properties to flame-retardant cables for nuclear power plants when tested for oxygen index and subjected to a vertical flame test on ''insulated wire'' and a vertical tray flame test on the cable splice. It was also confirmed that Class 1E cable using these splicing materials could stand the most rigorous environmental test in Japan. Therefore they can be used for splicing Class 1E wires and cables and the splice formed with them can be regarded as Class 1E specified in IEEE Std. 383. (author)

  19. Depolarization-mediated regulation of alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alok eSharma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing in eukaryotes plays an important role in regulating gene expression by selectively including alternative exons. A wealth of information has been accumulated that explains how alternative exons are selected in a developmental stage- or tissue-specific fashion. However, our knowledge of how cells respond to environmental changes to alter alternative splicing is very limited. For example, although a number of alternative exons have been shown to be regulated by calcium level alterations, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. As calcium signaling in neurons plays a crucial role in essential neuronal functions such as learning and memory formation, it is important to understand how this process is regulated at every level in gene expression. The significance of the dynamic control of alternative splicing in response to changes of calcium levels has been largely unappreciated. In this communication, we will summarize the recent advances in calcium signaling-mediated alternative splicing that have provided some insights into the important regulatory mechanisms. In addition to describing the cis-acting RNA elements on the pre-mRNA molecules that respond to changes of intracellular calcium levels, we will summarize how splicing regulators change and affect alternative splicing in this process. We will also discuss a novel mode of calcium-mediated splicing regulation at the level of chromatin structure and transcription.

  20. Estimation of Ship Long-term Wave-induced Bending Moment using Closed-Form Expressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Juncher; Mansour, A. E.

    2002-01-01

    A semi-analytical approach is used to derive frequency response functions and standard deviations for the wave-induced bending moment amidships for mono-hull ships. The results are given as closed-form expressions and the required input information for the procedure is restricted to the main......-empirical closed-form expression for the skewness. The effect of whipping is included by assuming that whipping and wave-induced responses are conditionally independent given Hs. The procedure is simple and can be used to make quick estimates of the design wave bending moment at the conceptual design phase...

  1. Microstructural investigation of the oxide formed on TP 347H FG during long-term steam oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Anette Nørgaard; Danielsen, Hilmar Kjartansson; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2010-01-01

    The long-term oxidation behaviour of TP347H FG in ultra supercritical steam conditions was assessed by exposing the steel in test superheater loops in a Danish coal-fired power plant and characterising the oxide layer with reflective light and electron microscopy. Double layered oxide scales formed...

  2. A Splice Variant of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome 5 (BBS5 Protein that Is Selectively Expressed in Retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan N Bolch

    Full Text Available Bardet-Biedl syndrome is a complex ciliopathy that usually manifests with some form of retinal degeneration, amongst other ciliary-related deficiencies. One of the genetic causes of this syndrome results from a defect in Bardet-Biedl Syndrome 5 (BBS5 protein. BBS5 is one component of the BBSome, a complex of proteins that regulates the protein composition in cilia. In this study, we identify a smaller molecular mass form of BBS5 as a variant formed by alternative splicing and show that expression of this splice variant is restricted to the retina.Reverse transcription PCR from RNA was used to isolate and identify potential alternative transcripts of Bbs5. A peptide unique to the C-terminus of the BBS5 splice variant was synthesized and used to prepare antibodies that selectively recognized the BBS5 splice variant. These antibodies were used on immunoblots of tissue extracts to determine the extent of expression of the alternative transcript and on tissue slices to determine the localization of expressed protein. Pull-down of fluorescently labeled arrestin1 by immunoprecipitation of the BBS5 splice variant was performed to assess functional interaction between the two proteins.PCR from mouse retinal cDNA using Bbs5-specific primers amplified a unique cDNA that was shown to be a splice variant of BBS5 resulting from the use of cryptic splicing sites in Intron 7. The resulting transcript codes for a truncated form of the BBS5 protein with a unique 24 amino acid C-terminus, and predicted 26.5 kD molecular mass. PCR screening of RNA isolated from various ciliated tissues and immunoblots of protein extracts from these same tissues showed that this splice variant was expressed in retina, but not brain, heart, kidney, or testes. Quantitative PCR showed that the splice variant transcript is 8.9-fold (+/- 1.1-fold less abundant than the full-length transcript. In the retina, the splice variant of BBS5 appears to be most abundant in the connecting cilium

  3. 26 CFR 1.6052-1 - Information returns regarding payment of wages in the form of group-term life insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... in the form of group-term life insurance. 1.6052-1 Section 1.6052-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... § 1.6052-1 Information returns regarding payment of wages in the form of group-term life insurance. (a... employees remuneration for services in the form of group-term life insurance on the life of such employee...

  4. Cell-Specific PKM Isoforms Contribute to the Maintenance of Different Forms of Persistent Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jiangyuan; Adler, Kerry; Farah, Carole Abi; Hastings, Margaret H; Sossin, Wayne S; Schacher, Samuel

    2017-03-08

    Multiple kinase activations contribute to long-term synaptic plasticity, a cellular mechanism mediating long-term memory. The sensorimotor synapse of Aplysia expresses different forms of long-term facilitation (LTF)-nonassociative and associative LTF-that require the timely activation of kinases, including protein kinase C (PKC). It is not known which PKC isoforms in the sensory neuron or motor neuron L7 are required to sustain each form of LTF. We show that different PKMs, the constitutively active isoforms of PKCs generated by calpain cleavage, in the sensory neuron and L7 are required to maintain each form of LTF. Different PKMs or calpain isoforms were blocked by overexpressing specific dominant-negative constructs in either presynaptic or postsynaptic neurons. Blocking either PKM Apl I in L7, or PKM Apl II or PKM Apl III in the sensory neuron 2 d after 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) treatment reversed persistent nonassociative LTF. In contrast, blocking either PKM Apl II or PKM Apl III in L7, or PKM Apl II in the sensory neuron 2 d after paired stimuli reversed persistent associative LTF. Blocking either classical calpain or atypical small optic lobe (SOL) calpain 2 d after 5-HT treatment or paired stimuli did not disrupt the maintenance of persistent LTF. Soon after 5-HT treatment or paired stimuli, however, blocking classical calpain inhibited the expression of persistent associative LTF, while blocking SOL calpain inhibited the expression of persistent nonassociative LTF. Our data suggest that different stimuli activate different calpains that generate specific sets of PKMs in each neuron whose constitutive activities sustain long-term synaptic plasticity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Persistent synaptic plasticity contributes to the maintenance of long-term memory. Although various kinases such as protein kinase C (PKC) contribute to the expression of long-term plasticity, little is known about how constitutive activation of specific kinase isoforms sustains long-term

  5. Learning of spiking networks with different forms of long-term synaptic plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, D.S.; Sboev, A.G.; Serenko, A.V.; Rybka, R.B.; Moloshnikov, I.A.

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of modeling the learning process based on different forms of spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) has been studied. It has been shown that the learnability depends on the choice of the spike pairing scheme in the STDP rule and the type of the input signal used during learning [ru

  6. Characterization of TTN Novex Splicing Variants across Species and the Role of RBM20 in Novex-Specific Exon Splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhilong Chen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Titin (TTN is a major disease-causing gene in cardiac muscle. Titin (TTN contains 363 exons in human encoding various sizes of TTN protein due to alternative splicing regulated mainly by RNA binding motif 20 (RBM20. Three isoforms of TTN protein are produced by mutually exclusive exons 45 (Novex 1, 46 (Novex 2, and 48 (Novex 3. Alternatively splicing in Novex isoforms across species and whether Novex isoforms are associated with heart disease remains completely unknown. Cross-species exon comparison with the mVISTA online tool revealed that exon 45 is more highly conserved across all species than exons 46 and 48. Importantly, a conserved region between exons 47 and 48 across species was revealed for the first time. Reverse transcript polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and DNA sequencing confirmed a new exon named as 48′ in Novex 3. In addition, with primer pairs for Novex 1, a new truncated form preserving introns 44 and 45 was discovered. We discovered that Novex 2 is not expressed in the pig, mouse, and rat with Novex 2 primer pairs. Unexpectedly, three truncated forms were identified. One TTN variant with intron 46 retention is mainly expressed in the human and frog heart, another variant with co-expression of exons 45 and 46 exists predominantly in chicken and frog heart, and a third with retention of introns 45 and 46 is mainly expressed in pig, mouse, rat, and chicken. Using Rbm20 knockout rat heart, we revealed that RBM20 is not a splicing regulator of Novex variants. Furthermore, the expression levels of Novex variants in human hearts with cardiomyopathies suggested that Novexes 2 and 3 could be associated with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM and/or arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC. Taken together, our study reveals that splicing diversity of Novex exons across species and Novex variants might play a role in cardiomyopathy.

  7. Splicing pattern - ASTRA | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us ASTRA Splicing pattern Data detail Data name Splicing pattern DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc00371-0...04 Description of data contents The patterns of alternative splicing/transcriptional initiation Data file Fi...le name: astra_splicing_pattern.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/astra/LATEST/astra_splicing_patte...ogodb/view/astra_splicing_pattern#en Data acquisition method For the five organisms (H. sapiens, M. musculus...apping data into bit arrays, detection of splicing patterns and distribution to t

  8. Kinetin improves IKBKAP mRNA splicing in patients with familial dysautonomia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Felicia B.; Liebes, Leonard; Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle; Mendoza, Sandra; Mull, James; Leyne, Maire; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Kaufmann, Horacio; Slaugenhaupt, Susan A.

    2011-01-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is caused by an intronic splice mutation in the IKBKAP gene that leads to partial skipping of exon 20 and tissue-specific reduction in I-κ-B kinase complex associated protein/ elongation protein 1 (IKAP/ELP-1) expression. Kinetin (6-furfurylaminopurine) has been shown to improve splicing and increase wild-type IKBKAP mRNA and IKAP protein expression in FD cell lines and carriers. To determine if oral kinetin treatment could alter mRNA splicing in FD subjects and was tolerable, we administered kinetin to eight FD individuals homozygous for the splice mutation. Subjects received 23.5 mg/Kg/day for 28 days. An increase in wild-type IKBKAP mRNA expression in leukocytes was noted after eight days in six of eight individuals; after 28 days the mean increase as compared to baseline was significant (p=0.002). We have demonstrated that kinetin is tolerable in this medically fragile population. Not only did kinetin produce the desired effect on splicing in FD patients, but also that effect appears to improve with time despite lack of dose change. This is the first report of a drug that produces in vivo mRNA splicing changes in individuals with FD and supports future long-term trials to determine if kinetin will prove therapeutic in FD patients. PMID:21775922

  9. Semi-supervised Learning Predicts Approximately One Third of the Alternative Splicing Isoforms as Functional Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqi Hao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing acts on transcripts from almost all human multi-exon genes. Notwithstanding its ubiquity, fundamental ramifications of splicing on protein expression remain unresolved. The number and identity of spliced transcripts that form stably folded proteins remain the sources of considerable debate, due largely to low coverage of experimental methods and the resulting absence of negative data. We circumvent this issue by developing a semi-supervised learning algorithm, positive unlabeled learning for splicing elucidation (PULSE; http://www.kimlab.org/software/pulse, which uses 48 features spanning various categories. We validated its accuracy on sets of bona fide protein isoforms and directly on mass spectrometry (MS spectra for an overall AU-ROC of 0.85. We predict that around 32% of “exon skipping” alternative splicing events produce stable proteins, suggesting that the process engenders a significant number of previously uncharacterized proteins. We also provide insights into the distribution of positive isoforms in various functional classes and into the structural effects of alternative splicing.

  10. Long-term performance of aged waste forms treated by stabilization/solidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antemir, Aurora; Hills, Colin D.; Carey, Paula J.; Gardner, Kevin H.; Bates, Edward R.; Crumbie, Alison K.

    2010-01-01

    Current regulatory testing of stabilized/solidified (S/S) soils is based on short-term performance tests and is insufficient to determine their long-term stability or expected service life. In view of this, and the significant lack of data on long-term field performance in the literature, S/S material has been extracted from full-scale remedial operations and examined using a variety of analytical techniques to evaluate field performance. The results, including those from X-ray analytical techniques, optical and electron microscopy and leaching tests are presented and discussed. The microstructure of retrieved samples was found to be analogous to other cement-based materials, but varied according to the soil type, the contaminants present, the treatment applied and the field exposure conditions. Summary of the key microstructural features in the USA and UK is presented in this work. The work has shown that during 16 years of service the S/S wastes investigated performed satisfactorily.

  11. Diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Lin

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Exonization of Alu elements is a major mechanism for birth of new exons in primate genomes. Prior analyses of expressed sequence tags show that almost all Alu-derived exons are alternatively spliced, and the vast majority of these exons have low transcript inclusion levels. In this work, we provide genomic and experimental evidence for diverse splicing patterns of exonized Alu elements in human tissues. Using Exon array data of 330 Alu-derived exons in 11 human tissues and detailed RT-PCR analyses of 38 exons, we show that some Alu-derived exons are constitutively spliced in a broad range of human tissues, and some display strong tissue-specific switch in their transcript inclusion levels. Most of such exons are derived from ancient Alu elements in the genome. In SEPN1, mutations of which are linked to a form of congenital muscular dystrophy, the muscle-specific inclusion of an Alu-derived exon may be important for regulating SEPN1 activity in muscle. Realtime qPCR analysis of this SEPN1 exon in macaque and chimpanzee tissues indicates human-specific increase in its transcript inclusion level and muscle specificity after the divergence of humans and chimpanzees. Our results imply that some Alu exonization events may have acquired adaptive benefits during the evolution of primate transcriptomes.

  12. Protein splicing and its evolution in eukaryotes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starokadomskyy P. L.

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Inteins, or protein introns, are parts of protein sequences that are post-translationally excised, their flanking regions (exteins being spliced together. This process was called protein splicing. Originally inteins were found in prokaryotic or unicellular eukaryotic organisms. But the general principles of post-translation protein rearrangement are evolving yielding different post-translation modification of proteins in multicellular organisms. For clarity, these non-intein mediated events call either protein rearrangements or protein editing. The most intriguing example of protein editing is proteasome-mediated splicing of antigens in vertebrates that may play important role in antigen presentation. Other examples of protein rearrangements are maturation of Hg-proteins (critical receptors in embryogenesis as well as maturation of several metabolic enzymes. Despite a lack of experimental data we try to analyze some intriguing examples of protein splicing evolution.

  13. HOLLYWOOD: a comparative relational database of alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holste, Dirk; Huo, George; Tung, Vivian; Burge, Christopher B

    2006-01-01

    RNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression, and is often variable, giving rise to multiple alternatively spliced mRNA and protein isoforms from a single gene locus. The design of effective databases to support experimental and computational investigations of alternative splicing (AS) is a significant challenge. In an effort to integrate accurate exon and splice site annotation with current knowledge about splicing regulatory elements and predicted AS events, and to link information about the splicing of orthologous genes in different species, we have developed the Hollywood system. This database was built upon genomic annotation of splicing patterns of known genes derived from spliced alignment of complementary DNAs (cDNAs) and expressed sequence tags, and links features such as splice site sequence and strength, exonic splicing enhancers and silencers, conserved and non-conserved patterns of splicing, and cDNA library information for inferred alternative exons. Hollywood was implemented as a relational database and currently contains comprehensive information for human and mouse. It is accompanied by a web query tool that allows searches for sets of exons with specific splicing characteristics or splicing regulatory element composition, or gives a graphical or sequence-level summary of splicing patterns for a specific gene. A streamlined graphical representation of gene splicing patterns is provided, and these patterns can alternatively be layered onto existing information in the UCSC Genome Browser. The database is accessible at http://hollywood.mit.edu.

  14. Clay Nanoparticles Elicit Long-Term Immune Responses by Forming Biodegradable Depots for Sustained Antigen Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Weiyu; Zuo, Huali; Li, Bei; Duan, Chengcheng; Rolfe, Barbara; Zhang, Bing; Mahony, Timothy J; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2018-04-14

    Nanomaterials have been widely tested as new generation vaccine adjuvants, but few evoke efficient immunoreactions. Clay nanoparticles, for example, layered double hydroxide (LDH) and hectorite (HEC) nanoparticles, have shown their potent adjuvanticity in generating effective and durable immune responses. However, the mechanism by which clay nanoadjuvants stimulate the immune system is not well understood. Here, it is demonstrated that LDH and HEC-antigen complexes form loose agglomerates in culture medium/serum. They also form nodules with loose structures in tissue after subcutaneous injection, where they act as a depot for up to 35 d. More importantly, clay nanoparticles actively and continuously recruit immune cells into the depot for up to one month, and stimulate stronger immune responses than FDA-approved adjuvants, Alum and QuilA. Sustained antigen release is also observed in clay nanoparticle depots, with 50-60% antigen released after 35 d. In contrast, Alum-antigen complexes show minimal antigen release from the depot. Importantly, LDH and HEC are more effective than QuilA and Alum in promoting memory T-cell proliferation. These findings suggest that both clay nanoadjuvants can serve as active vaccine platforms for sustained and potent immune responses. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Long-term leach testing of solidified radioactive waste forms (International Standard Publication ISO 6961:1982)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanik, J.

    2001-01-01

    Processes are developed for the immobilization of radionuclides by solidification of radioactive wastes. The resulting solidification products are characterized by strong resistance to leaching aimed at low release rates of the radionuclides to the environment. To measure this resistance to leaching of the solidified materials: glass, glass-ceramics, bitumen, cement, concrete, plastics, a long-term leach test is presented. The long-term leach test is aimed at: a) the comparison of different kinds or compositions of solidified waste forms; b) the intercomparison between leach test results from different laboratories on one product; c) the intercomparison between leach test results on products from different processes

  16. Identifying alternative hyper-splicing signatures in MG-thymoma by exon arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilach Soreq

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The vast majority of human genes (>70% are alternatively spliced. Although alternative pre-mRNA processing is modified in multiple tumors, alternative hyper-splicing signatures specific to particular tumor types are still lacking. Here, we report the use of Affymetrix Human Exon Arrays to spot hyper-splicing events characteristic of myasthenia gravis (MG-thymoma, thymic tumors which develop in patients with MG and discriminate them from colon cancer changes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We combined GO term to parent threshold-based and threshold-independent ad-hoc functional statistics with in-depth analysis of key modified transcripts to highlight various exon-specific changes. These denote alternative splicing in MG-thymoma tumors compared to healthy human thymus and to in-house and Affymetrix datasets from colon cancer and healthy tissues. By using both global and specific, term-to-parent Gene Ontology (GO statistical comparisons, our functional integrative ad-hoc method allowed the detection of disease-relevant splicing events. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Hyper-spliced transcripts spanned several categories, including the tumorogenic ERBB4 tyrosine kinase receptor and the connective tissue growth factor CTGF, as well as the immune function-related histocompatibility gene HLA-DRB1 and interleukin (IL19, two muscle-specific collagens and one myosin heavy chain gene; intriguingly, a putative new exon was discovered in the MG-involved acetylcholinesterase ACHE gene. Corresponding changes in spliceosome composition were indicated by co-decreases in the splicing factors ASF/SF(2 and SC35. Parallel tumor-associated changes occurred in colon cancer as well, but the majority of the apparent hyper-splicing events were particular to MG-thymoma and could be validated by Fluorescent In-Situ Hybridization (FISH, Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR and mass spectrometry (MS followed by peptide sequencing. Our findings

  17. Loss of nuclear TDP-43 in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) causes altered expression of splicing machinery and widespread dysregulation of RNA splicing in motor neurones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Highley, J. Robin; Kirby, Janine; Jansweijer, Joeri A.; Webb, Philip S.; Hewamadduma, Channa A.; Heath, Paul R.; Higginbottom, Adrian; Raman, Rohini; Ferraiuolo, Laura; Cooper-Knock, Johnathan; McDermott, Christopher J.; Wharton, Stephen B.; Shaw, Pamela J.; Ince, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    Loss of nuclear TDP-43 characterizes sporadic and most familial forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). TDP-43 (encoded by TARDBP) has multiple roles in RNA processing. We aimed to determine whether (1) RNA splicing dysregulation is present in lower motor neurones in ALS and in a motor

  18. Mechanism of alternative splicing and its regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Liu, Jing; Huang, B O; Xu, Yan-Mei; Li, Jing; Huang, Lin-Feng; Lin, Jin; Zhang, Jing; Min, Qing-Hua; Yang, Wei-Ming; Wang, Xiao-Zhong

    2015-03-01

    Alternative splicing of precursor mRNA is an essential mechanism to increase the complexity of gene expression, and it plays an important role in cellular differentiation and organism development. Regulation of alternative splicing is a complicated process in which numerous interacting components are at work, including cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors, and is further guided by the functional coupling between transcription and splicing. Additional molecular features, such as chromatin structure, RNA structure and alternative transcription initiation or alternative transcription termination, collaborate with these basic components to generate the protein diversity due to alternative splicing. All these factors contributing to this one fundamental biological process add up to a mechanism that is critical to the proper functioning of cells. Any corruption of the process may lead to disruption of normal cellular function and the eventuality of disease. Cancer is one of those diseases, where alternative splicing may be the basis for the identification of novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, as well as new strategies for therapy. Thus, an in-depth understanding of alternative splicing regulation has the potential not only to elucidate fundamental biological principles, but to provide solutions for various diseases.

  19. Thermopriming Triggers Splicing Memory in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Yu

    2018-02-20

    Abiotic and biotic stresses limit crop productivity. Exposure to a non-lethal stress, referred to as priming, can allow plants to survive subsequent and otherwise lethal conditions; the priming effect persists even after a prolonged stress-free period. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying priming are not fully understood. Here, we investigated the molecular basis of heat shock memory and the role of priming in Arabidopsisthaliana. Comprehensive analysis of transcriptome-wide changes in gene expression and alternative splicing in primed and non-primed plants revealed that alternative splicing functions as a novel component of heat shock memory. We show that priming of plants with a non-lethal heat stress results in de-repression of splicing after a second exposure to heat stress. By contrast, non-primed plants showed significant repression of splicing. These observations link ‘splicing memory’ to the ability of plants to survive subsequent and otherwise lethal heat stress. This newly discovered priming-induced splicing memory may represent a general feature of heat stress responses in plants and other organisms as many of the key components of heat shock responses are conserved among eukaryotes. Furthermore, this finding could facilitate the development of novel approaches to improve plant survival under extreme heat stress.

  20. Evaluating long-term performance of in situ vitrified waste forms: Methodology and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrail, B.P.; Olson, K.M.

    1992-11-01

    In situ vitrification (ISV) is an emerging technology for the remediation of hazardous and radioactive waste sites. The concept relies on the principle of Joule heating to raise the temperature of a soil between an array of electrodes above the melting temperature. After cooling, the melt solidifies into a massive glass and crystalline block similar to naturally occurring obsidian. Determining the long-term performance of ISV products in a changing regulatory environment requires a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms controlling the dissolution behavior of the material. A series of experiments was performed to determine the dissolution behavior of samples produced from the ISV processing of typical soils from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory subsurface disposal area. Dissolution rate constant measurements were completed at 90 degrees C over the pH range 2 to 11 for one sample obtained from a field test of the ISV process

  1. Constitutive homo- and hetero-oligomerization of TbetaRII-B, an alternatively spliced variant of the mouse TGF-beta type II receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishnaveni, Manda S; Hansen, Jakob Lerche; Seeger, Werner

    2006-01-01

    , but the oligomerization pattern and dynamics of TbetaRII splice variants in live cells has not been demonstrated thus far. Using co-immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET), we demonstrate that the mouse TbetaRII receptor splice variant TbetaRII-B is capable of forming ligand...

  2. Chimpanzees form long-term memories for food locations after limited exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Natacha; Call, Josep

    2014-05-01

    Remembering the location of fruiting trees for extended periods of time has been hypothesized to play a major role in the evolution of primate cognition. Such ability would be especially useful when paired with a fast learning mechanism capable of consolidating long-term memory after minimal exposure. We investigated whether chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) can remember different food locations after minimal exposure (i.e., 1-2 trials) both after 24 hr and after 3-month. We released pairs of chimpanzees in their indoor enclosure (the enclosure of group A measured 430 m(2) and group B's measured 175 m(2) ) and tested them for four consecutive days (Baseline, Test, Retest, and Post-test). During the Test and Retest food was hidden in the same location whereas no food was hidden during the Baseline and Post-test days (control trials). Subjects were tested with four different locations and assessed for their retention after 24 hr and 3-month since the initial food discovery. Results revealed that chimpanzees accurately remembered the locations in which they found the food after one or two exposures to them, and both after 24 hr and a 3-month retention interval. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Self-guided Change: The most common form of long-term, maintained health behavior change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, F Michler

    2018-01-01

    Millions of people change risky, health-related behaviors and maintain those changes. However, they often take years to change, and their unhealthy behaviors may harm themselves and others and constitute a significant cost to society. A review—similar in nature to a scoping review—was done of the literature related to long-term health behavior change in six areas: alcohol, cocaine and heroin misuse, gambling, smoking, and overeating. Based on the limited research available, reasons for change and strategies for changing and for maintaining change were also reviewed. Fifty years of research clearly indicate that as people age, in the case of alcohol, heroin and cocaine misuse, smoking, and gambling, 80–90 percent moderate or stop their unhealthy behaviors. The one exception is overeating; only 20 percent maintain their weight loss. Most of these changes, when they occur, appear to be the result of self-guided change. More ways to accelerate self-guided, health-related behavior change need to be developed and disseminated. PMID:29375888

  4. Analysis of Short-Term Steel Corrosion Products Formed in Tropical Marine Environments of Panama

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Jaén

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A low-carbon steel A-36 and two conventional weathering steels A-588 and COR-420 exposed at four atmospheric test stations located in (i Tocumen, an urban site near the Pacific Ocean, (ii Sherman-Open, (iii Sherman-Coastal, and (iv Sherman-Breakwater on the Caribbean coast of Panama. Kinetics of the short-term atmospheric corrosion process and the relationship with exposure time and environmental characteristics of each site were investigated. The atmospheric exposure conditions, particularly the time of wetness, deposition of chloride, and the washing effect of contaminants on the metal surface by rain are of upmost importance in determining the corrosion behaviour and composition of rust. The corrosion products were mainly identified using room temperature and low temperature (80 K Mössbauer spectroscopy, FTIR, and X-ray powder diffraction. In all samples, γ-FeOOH and α-FeOOH were the main constituents. Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3, magnetite (Fe3O4, and Akaganeite (β-FeOOH were also identified.

  5. Self-guided Change: The most common form of long-term, maintained health behavior change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, F Michler

    2018-01-01

    Millions of people change risky, health-related behaviors and maintain those changes. However, they often take years to change, and their unhealthy behaviors may harm themselves and others and constitute a significant cost to society. A review-similar in nature to a scoping review-was done of the literature related to long-term health behavior change in six areas: alcohol, cocaine and heroin misuse, gambling, smoking, and overeating. Based on the limited research available, reasons for change and strategies for changing and for maintaining change were also reviewed. Fifty years of research clearly indicate that as people age, in the case of alcohol, heroin and cocaine misuse, smoking, and gambling, 80-90 percent moderate or stop their unhealthy behaviors. The one exception is overeating; only 20 percent maintain their weight loss. Most of these changes, when they occur, appear to be the result of self-guided change. More ways to accelerate self-guided, health-related behavior change need to be developed and disseminated.

  6. Short- and long-term memories formed upon backward conditioning in honeybees (Apis mellifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felsenberg, Johannes; Plath, Jenny Aino; Lorang, Steven; Morgenstern, Laura; Eisenhardt, Dorothea

    2014-01-01

    In classical conditioning, the temporal sequence of stimulus presentations is critical for the association between the conditioned stimulus (CS) and the unconditioned stimulus (US). In forward conditioning, the CS precedes the US and is learned as a predictor for the US. Thus it acquires properties to elicit a behavioral response, defined as excitatory properties. In backward conditioning, the US precedes the CS. The CS might be learned as a predictor for the cessation of the US acquiring inhibitory properties that inhibit a behavioral response. Interestingly, behavior after backward conditioning is controlled by both excitatory and inhibitory properties of the CS, but the underlying mechanisms determining which of these opposing properties control behavior upon retrieval is poorly understood. We performed conditioning experiments in the honeybee (Apis mellifera) to investigate the CS properties that control behavior at different time points after backward conditioning. The CS properties, as characterized by the retardation or enhancement of subsequent acquisition, were examined 30 min and 24 h after backward conditioning. We found that 30 min after backward conditioning, the CS acquired an inhibitory property during backward conditioning depending on the intertrial interval, the number of trials, and the odor used as the CS. One day after backward conditioning, we observed significant retardation of acquisition. In addition, we demonstrated an enhanced, generalized odor response in the backward conditioned group compared to untreated animals. These results indicate that two long-lasting opposing memories have been formed in parallel: one about the excitatory properties of the CS and one about the inhibitory properties of the CS. PMID:24353291

  7. BRCA1 Exon 11, a CERES (Composite Regulatory Element of Splicing Element Involved in Splice Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Tammaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Unclassified variants (UV of BRCA1 can affect normal pre-mRNA splicing. Here, we investigate the UV c.693G>A, a “silent” change in BRCA1 exon 11, which we have found induces aberrant splicing in patient carriers and in vitro. Using a minigene assay, we show that the UV c.693G>A has a strong effect on the splicing isoform ratio of BRCA1. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the area surrounding the nucleotide position c.693G>A induced variable changes in the level of exon 11 inclusion/exclusion in the mRNA, pointing to the presence of a complex regulatory element with overlapping enhancer and silencer functions. Accordingly, protein binding analysis in the region detected several splicing regulatory factors involved, including SRSF1, SRSF6 and SRSF9, suggesting that this sequence represents a composite regulatory element of splicing (CERES.

  8. Characterization of a splicing mutation in group A xeroderma pigmentosum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satokata, Ichiro; Tanaka, Kiyoji; Miura, Naoyuki; Miyamoto, Iwai; Okada, Yoshio; Satoh, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Seiji

    1990-01-01

    The molecular basis of group A xeroderma pigmentosum (WP) was investigated by comparison of the nucleotide sequences of multiple clones of the XP group A complementing gene (XPAC) from a patient with group A XP with that of a normal gene. The clones showed a G → C substitution at the 3' splice acceptor site of intron 3, which altered the obligatory AG acceptor dinucleotide to AC. Nucleotide sequencing of cDNAs amplified by the polymerase chain reaction revealed that this single base substitution abolishes the canonical 3' splice site, thus creating two abnormally spliced mRNA forms. The larger form is identical with normal mRNA except for a dinucleotide deletion at the 5' end of exon 4. This deletion results in a frameshift with premature translation termination in exon 4. The smaller form has a deletion of the entire exon 3 and the dinucleotide at the 5' end of exon 4. The result of a transfection study provided additional evidence that this single base substitution is the disease-causing mutation. This single base substitution creates a new cleavage site for the restriction nuclease AlwNI. Analysis of AlwNI restriction fragment length polymorphism showed a high frequency of this mutation in Japanese patients with group A XP: 16 of 21 unrelated Japanese patients were homozygous and 4 were heterozygous for this mutation. However, 11 Caucasians and 2 Blacks with group A XP did not have this mutant allele. The polymorphic AlwNI restriction fragments are concluded to be useful for diagnosis of group A XP in Japanese subjects, including prenatal cases and carriers

  9. Dynamic regulation of genome-wide pre-mRNA splicing and stress tolerance by the Sm-like protein LSm5 in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Cui, Peng

    2014-01-07

    Background: Sm-like proteins are highly conserved proteins that form the core of the U6 ribonucleoprotein and function in several mRNA metabolism processes, including pre-mRNA splicing. Despite their wide occurrence in all eukaryotes, little is known about the roles of Sm-like proteins in the regulation of splicing.Results: Here, through comprehensive transcriptome analyses, we demonstrate that depletion of the Arabidopsis supersensitive to abscisic acid and drought 1 gene (SAD1), which encodes Sm-like protein 5 (LSm5), promotes an inaccurate selection of splice sites that leads to a genome-wide increase in alternative splicing. In contrast, overexpression of SAD1 strengthens the precision of splice-site recognition and globally inhibits alternative splicing. Further, SAD1 modulates the splicing of stress-responsive genes, particularly under salt-stress conditions. Finally, we find that overexpression of SAD1 in Arabidopsis improves salt tolerance in transgenic plants, which correlates with an increase in splicing accuracy and efficiency for stress-responsive genes.Conclusions: We conclude that SAD1 dynamically controls splicing efficiency and splice-site recognition in Arabidopsis, and propose that this may contribute to SAD1-mediated stress tolerance through the metabolism of transcripts expressed from stress-responsive genes. Our study not only provides novel insights into the function of Sm-like proteins in splicing, but also uncovers new means to improve splicing efficiency and to enhance stress tolerance in a higher eukaryote. 2014 Cui et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  10. Optimization of Peptide Nucleic Acid Antisense Oligonucleotides for Local and Systemic Dystrophin Splice Correction in the mdx Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, HaiFang; Betts, Corinne; Saleh, Amer F; Ivanova, Gabriela D; Lee, Hyunil; Seow, Yiqi; Kim, Dalsoo; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew JA

    2010-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides (AOs) have the capacity to alter the processing of pre-mRNA transcripts in order to correct the function of aberrant disease-related genes. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal X-linked muscle degenerative disease that arises from mutations in the DMD gene leading to an absence of dystrophin protein. AOs have been shown to restore the expression of functional dystrophin via splice correction by intramuscular and systemic delivery in animal models of DMD and in DMD patients via intramuscular administration. Major challenges in developing this splice correction therapy are to optimize AO chemistry and to develop more effective systemic AO delivery. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) AOs are an alternative AO chemistry with favorable in vivo biochemical properties and splice correcting abilities. Here, we show long-term splice correction of the DMD gene in mdx mice following intramuscular PNA delivery and effective splice correction in aged mdx mice. Further, we report detailed optimization of systemic PNA delivery dose regimens and PNA AO lengths to yield splice correction, with 25-mer PNA AOs providing the greatest splice correcting efficacy, restoring dystrophin protein in multiple peripheral muscle groups. PNA AOs therefore provide an attractive candidate AO chemistry for DMD exon skipping therapy. PMID:20068555

  11. Modulation of 5' splice site selection using tailed oligonucleotides carrying splicing signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elela Sherif

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously described the use of tailed oligonucleotides as a means of reprogramming alternative pre-mRNA splicing in vitro and in vivo. The tailed oligonucleotides that were used interfere with splicing because they contain a portion complementary to sequences immediately upstream of the target 5' splice site combined with a non-hybridizing 5' tail carrying binding sites for the hnRNP A1/A2 proteins. In the present study, we have tested the inhibitory activity of RNA oligonucleotides carrying different tail structures. Results We show that an oligonucleotide with a 5' tail containing the human β-globin branch site sequence inhibits the use of the 5' splice site of Bcl-xL, albeit less efficiently than a tail containing binding sites for the hnRNP A1/A2 proteins. A branch site-containing tail positioned at the 3' end of the oligonucleotide also elicited splicing inhibition but not as efficiently as a 5' tail. The interfering activity of a 3' tail was improved by adding a 5' splice site sequence next to the branch site sequence. A 3' tail carrying a Y-shaped branch structure promoted similar splicing interference. The inclusion of branch site or 5' splice site sequences in the Y-shaped 3' tail further improved splicing inhibition. Conclusion Our in vitro results indicate that a variety of tail architectures can be used to elicit splicing interference at low nanomolar concentrations, thereby broadening the scope and the potential impact of this antisense technology.

  12. The Long-Term Study of Some mechanical and Chemical Properties of Polymer Modified Cement Waste Forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shatta, H.A.; Eskander, S.B.

    2002-01-01

    The present work is a new experimental trend to study the long-term durability of polymer/cement/borate waste forms in storage and disposal sites during the long period of time. The data obtained indicate that all the samples of polymer modified cement waste forms immersed in both distilled and ground water (for more than 2700 days) show a slight increase in the compressive strength values. The chemical stability of the immobilized borate waste forms in distilled and ground water was studied. The cumulative leach fraction in percentage, of Cs-137 isotope from the final solidified waste forms in case of using ground water was lower than that in distilled water for all samples used and the presence of polymer lowered the percent release of radioactive Cs-137 isotope in all samples studied . The leach coefficients (Lc) and the leach indices (Li) of radioactive cesium-137 isotope for cement borate and polymer modified cement waste forms were also calculated. It was found that the leach indices values greater than 6

  13. Homologous SV40 RNA trans-splicing: Special case or prime example of viral RNA trans-splicing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Poddar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available To date the Simian Virus 40 (SV40 is the only proven example of a virus that recruits the mechanism of RNA trans-splicing to diversify its sequences and gene products. Thereby, two identical viral transcripts are efficiently joined by homologous trans-splicing triggering the formation of a highly transforming 100 kDa super T antigen. Sequences of other viruses including HIV-1 and the human adenovirus type 5 were reported to be involved in heterologous trans-splicing towards cellular or viral sequences but the meaning of these events remains unclear. We computationally and experimentally investigated molecular features associated with viral RNA trans-splicing and identified a common pattern: Viral RNA trans-splicing occurs between strong cryptic or regular viral splice sites and strong regular or cryptic splice sites of the trans-splice partner sequences. The majority of these splice sites are supported by exonic splice enhancers. Splice sites that could compete with the trans-splicing sites for cis-splice reactions are weaker or inexistent. Finally, all but one of the trans-splice reactions seem to be facilitated by one or more complementary binding domains of 11 to 16 nucleotides in length which, however occur with a statistical probability close to one for the given length of the involved sequences. The chimeric RNAs generated via heterologous viral RNA trans-splicing either did not lead to fusion proteins or led to proteins of unknown function. Our data suggest that distinct viral RNAs are highly susceptible to trans-splicing and that heterologous viral trans-splicing, unlike homologous SV40 trans-splicing, represents a chance event.

  14. Multivariate Analysis and Visualization of Splicing Correlations in Single-Gene Transcriptomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnew William S

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA metabolism, through 'combinatorial splicing', can generate enormous structural diversity in the proteome. Alternative domains may interact, however, with unpredictable phenotypic consequences, necessitating integrated RNA-level regulation of molecular composition. Splicing correlations within transcripts of single genes provide valuable clues to functional relationships among molecular domains as well as genomic targets for higher-order splicing regulation. Results We present tools to visualize complex splicing patterns in full-length cDNA libraries. Developmental changes in pair-wise correlations are presented vectorially in 'clock plots' and linkage grids. Higher-order correlations are assessed statistically through Monte Carlo analysis of a log-linear model with an empirical-Bayes estimate of the true probabilities of observed and unobserved splice forms. Log-linear coefficients are visualized in a 'spliceprint,' a signature of splice correlations in the transcriptome. We present two novel metrics: the linkage change index, which measures the directional change in pair-wise correlation with tissue differentiation, and the accuracy index, a very simple goodness-of-fit metric that is more sensitive than the integrated squared error when applied to sparsely populated tables, and unlike chi-square, does not diverge at low variance. Considerable attention is given to sparse contingency tables, which are inherent to single-gene libraries. Conclusion Patterns of splicing correlations are revealed, which span a broad range of interaction order and change in development. The methods have a broad scope of applicability, beyond the single gene – including, for example, multiple gene interactions in the complete transcriptome.

  15. Control of fibroblast fibronectin expression and alternative splicing via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Eric S., E-mail: docew@umich.edu [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Sagana, Rommel L.; Booth, Adam J.; Yan, Mei; Cornett, Ashley M.; Bloomheart, Christopher A.; Tsui, Jessica L.; Wilke, Carol A.; Moore, Bethany B. [Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse [Department of Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Louisville, KY (United States); Muro, Andres F. [International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Trieste (Italy)

    2010-10-01

    Fibronectin (FN), a ubiquitous glycoprotein that plays critical roles in physiologic and pathologic conditions, undergoes alternative splicing which distinguishes plasma FN (pFN) from cellular FN (cFN). Although both pFN and cFN can be incorporated into the extracellular matrix, a distinguishing feature of cFN is the inclusion of an alternatively spliced exon termed EDA (for extra type III domain A). The molecular steps involved in EDA splicing are well-characterized, but pathways influencing EDA splicing are less clear. We have previously found an obligate role for inhibition of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue on chromosome 10 (PTEN), the primary regulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway, in fibroblast activation. Here we show TGF-{beta}, a potent inducer of both EDA splicing and fibroblast activation, inhibits PTEN expression and activity in mesenchymal cells, corresponding with enhanced PI3K/Akt signaling. In pten{sup -/-} fibroblasts, which resemble activated fibroblasts, inhibition of Akt attenuated FN production and decreased EDA alternative splicing. Moreover, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in pten{sup -/-} cells also blocked FN production and EDA splicing. This effect was due to inhibition of Akt-mediated phosphorylation of the primary EDA splicing regulatory protein SF2/ASF. Importantly, FN silencing in pten{sup -/-} cells resulted in attenuated proliferation and migration. Thus, our results demonstrate that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis is instrumental in FN transcription and alternative splicing, which regulates cell behavior.

  16. Results of studies on long-term exposition of dormant forms of various organisms in outer space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikova, Nataliya; Gusev, Oleg; Sugimoto, Manabu; Deshevaya, Elena; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Okuda, Takashi; Orlov, Oleg; Alekseev, Victor; Poddubko, Svetlana; Polikarpov, Nikolay

    The planetary quarantine is one of the key problems of deep space exploration. Risks of the possible transfer of biological objects across interplanetary space should be necessarily assessed during space exploration. The risks associated with a possible transfer of biological objects and primarily microorganisms in interplanetary space is a priority for space studies We can assume, that on the exterior side of both unmanned and manned space stations there can be millions of microbial cells, many of which are in spore forms, the stability of which towards the unfavorable factors is extremely high. However, direct evidence to support this assumption, obtained only in recent years. “Biorisk” is an apparatus designed for conduction of space experiments focused on long-term exposition of latent stages of different forms of organism on the outer side of Russian Segment of International Space Station was developed and used in SSC RF - Institute for Biomedical Problems RAS. The purpose of this experiment is to determine the principle capability of preservation of life capacity in test-cultures of microorganisms during long-term exposure (comparable with the term of interplanetary flight) in space. The first experiment was performed using spores of bacteria (Bacillus) and fungi (Penicillium, Aspergillus and Cladosporium) housed in 3 boxes that were exposed to outer space for 7, 12 or 18 months. It was for the first time demonstrated that bacterial and fungal spores could survive an exposure to outer space during the time period comparable with the duration of a return mission to Mars. Moreover, the microbial strains proved viable and highly active. The second experiment was expanded by flying, in addition to the above spores, dormant forms of higher plants, insects, lower crustaceans and vertebrates. The 31-month experiment showed that, in spite of harsher than in the first study temperatures, some specimens remained viable and capable of further multiplication. In

  17. Consolidation of the 13 kA Splices in the Electrical Feedboxes of the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, A; Duarte Ramos, D; Pirotte, O; Principe, R; Savary, F; Scheuerlein, C; Tock, J Ph; Verweij, A

    2012-01-01

    In 2008 a defective connection in one of the 13 kA dipole circuits of the LHC caused an electric breakdown that resulted in extensive damage in a sector of the accelerator. The investigation performed after the accident showed the necessity to consolidate the electrical splices of the 13 kA dipole and quadrupole circuits in order to operate the LHC at its nominal energy of 7 TeV. These circuits are powered through electrical feedboxes located at each end of the 8 sectors of the LHC. In the feedboxes the current is routed from room temperature to the superconducting magnets busbars along current leads and superconducting busbars and flows through at least two internal splices. These splices are based on the same technology as the magnet-to-magnet ones but they are significantly different in terms of environment and configuration. As for the magnet to magnet splices, a consolidation will be necessary to operate them at nominal current. This paper presents an analysis of the properties of these splices and the t...

  18. Splice-correction strategies for treatment of X-linked agammaglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestas, Burcu; Turunen, Janne J; Blomberg, K Emelie M; Wang, Qing; Månsson, Robert; El Andaloussi, Samir; Berglöf, Anna; Smith, C I Edvard

    2015-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the gene coding for Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK). Deficiency of BTK leads to a developmental block in B cell differentiation; hence, the patients essentially lack antibody-producing plasma cells and are susceptible to various infections. A substantial portion of the mutations in BTK results in splicing defects, consequently preventing the formation of protein-coding mRNA. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are therapeutic compounds that have the ability to modulate pre-mRNA splicing and alter gene expression. The potential of ASOs has been exploited for a few severe diseases, both in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Recently, advances have also been made in using ASOs as a personalized therapy for XLA. Splice-correction of BTK has been shown to be feasible for different mutations in vitro, and a recent proof-of-concept study demonstrated the feasibility of correcting splicing and restoring BTK both ex vivo and in vivo in a humanized bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC)-transgenic mouse model. This review summarizes the advances in splice correction, as a personalized medicine for XLA, and outlines the promises and challenges of using this technology as a curative long-term treatment option.

  19. How to find the real one (at the level of pre-mRNA splicing).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch, T; Kiss, Ibolya

    2003-01-01

    The mature mRNA always carries nucleotide sequences that faithfully mirror the protein product according to the niles of the genetic code. However, in the chromosome, the nucleotide sequence that represents a certain protein is interrupted by additional sequences. Therefore, most eukaryotic genes are longer than their final mRNA products. The human genome project revealed that only a tiny portion of sequences serves as protein-coding region and almost one quarter of the genome is occupied by non-coding intervening sequences. The elimination of these non-coding regions from the precursor RNA in a process termed splicing must be extremely precise, because even a single nucleotide mistake may cause a fatal error. At present, two types of intervening sequences have been identified in protein-coding genes. One of them, the U2-dependent or major-class is prevalent and represents 99% of known sequences. The other one, the so-called U12-dependent or minor-class of introns, occurs in much lesser amounts in the genome. The basic problem of nuclear splicing concerns i/ the molecular mechanisms, which ensure that the coding regions are correctly recognized and spliced together: ii/ the principles and mechanisms that guarantee the high fidelity of the splicing system; iii/ the differences in the excision mechanisms of the two classes of introns. We are going to present models explaining how intervening sequences are accurately removed and the coding regions correctly juxtaposed. The two splicing mechanisms will also be compared.

  20. Widespread evolutionary conservation of alternatively spliced exons in caenorhabditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob L; Penny, David

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) contributes to increased transcriptome and proteome diversity in various eukaryotic lineages. Previous studies showed low levels of conservation of alternatively spliced (cassette) exons within mammals and within dipterans. We report a strikingly different pattern in Cae...

  1. A View of Pre-mRNA Splicing from RNase R Resistant RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Suzuki

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available During pre-mRNA splicing, exons in the primary transcript are precisely connected to generate an mRNA. Intron lariat RNAs are formed as by-products of this process. In addition, some exonic circular RNAs (circRNAs may also result from exon skipping as by-products. Lariat RNAs and circRNAs are both RNase R resistant RNAs. RNase R is a strong 3' to 5' exoribonuclease, which efficiently degrades linear RNAs, such as mRNAs and rRNAs; therefore, the circular parts of lariat RNAs and the circRNAs can be segregated from eukaryotic total RNAs by their RNase R resistance. Thus, RNase R resistant RNAs could provide unexplored splicing information not available from mRNAs. Analyses of these RNAs identified repeating splicing phenomena, such as re-splicing of mature mRNAs and nested splicing. Moreover, circRNA might function as microRNA sponges. There is an enormous variety of endogenous circRNAs, which are generally synthesized in cells and tissues.

  2. Eukaryotic TPP riboswitch regulation of alternative splicing involving long-distance base pairing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sanshu; Breaker, Ronald R

    2013-03-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) riboswitches are found in organisms from all three domains of life. Examples in bacteria commonly repress gene expression by terminating transcription or by blocking ribosome binding, whereas most eukaryotic TPP riboswitches are predicted to regulate gene expression by modulating RNA splicing. Given the widespread distribution of eukaryotic TPP riboswitches and the diversity of their locations in precursor messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs), we sought to examine the mechanism of alternative splicing regulation by a fungal TPP riboswitch from Neurospora crassa, which is mostly located in a large intron separating protein-coding exons. Our data reveal that this riboswitch uses a long-distance (∼530-nt separation) base-pairing interaction to regulate alternative splicing. Specifically, a portion of the TPP-binding aptamer can form a base-paired structure with a conserved sequence element (α) located near a 5' splice site, which greatly increases use of this 5' splice site and promotes gene expression. Comparative sequence analyses indicate that many fungal species carry a TPP riboswitch with similar intron architecture, and therefore the homologous genes in these fungi are likely to use the same mechanism. Our findings expand the scope of genetic control mechanisms relying on long-range RNA interactions to include riboswitches.

  3. Design and Experimental Evolution of trans-Splicing Group I Intron Ribozymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich F. Müller

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Group I intron ribozymes occur naturally as cis-splicing ribozymes, in the form of introns that do not require the spliceosome for their removal. Instead, they catalyze two consecutive trans-phosphorylation reactions to remove themselves from a primary transcript, and join the two flanking exons. Designed, trans-splicing variants of these ribozymes replace the 3′-portion of a substrate with the ribozyme’s 3′-exon, replace the 5′-portion with the ribozyme’s 5′-exon, or insert/remove an internal sequence of the substrate. Two of these designs have been evolved experimentally in cells, leading to variants of group I intron ribozymes that splice more efficiently, recruit a cellular protein to modify the substrate’s gene expression, or elucidate evolutionary pathways of ribozymes in cells. Some of the artificial, trans-splicing ribozymes are promising as tools in therapy, and as model systems for RNA evolution in cells. This review provides an overview of the different types of trans-splicing group I intron ribozymes that have been generated, and the experimental evolution systems that have been used to improve them.

  4. Production of the 2400 kb Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene transcript; transcription time and cotranscriptional splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tennyson, C.N.; Worton, R.G. [Univ. of Toronto and the Hospital for Sick Children, Ontario (Canada)

    1994-09-01

    The largest known gene in any organism is the human DMD gene which has 79 exons that span 2400 kb. The extreme nature of the DMD gene raises questions concerning the time required for transcription and whether splicing begins before transcription is complete. DMD gene transcription is induced as cultured human myoblasts differentiate to form multinucleated myotubes, providing a system for studying the kinetics of transcription and splicing. Using quantitative RT-PCR, transcript accumulation was monitored from four different regions within the gene following induction of expression. By comparing the accumulation of transcripts from the 5{prime} and 3{prime} ends of the gene we have shown that approximately 12 hours are required to transcribe 1770 kb of the gene, extrapolating to a time of 16 hours for the transcription unit expressed in muscle. Comparison of accumulation profiles for spliced and total transcript demonstrated that transcripts are spliced at the 5{prime} end before transcription is complete, providing strong evidence for cotranscriptional splicing of DMD gene transcripts. Finally, the rate of transcript accumulation was reduced at the 3{prime} end of the gene relative to the 5{prime} end, perhaps due to premature termination of transcription complexes as they traverse this enormous transcription unit. The lag between transcription initiation and the appearance of complete transcripts could be important in limiting transcript production in dividing cells and to the timing of mRNA appearance in differentiating muscle.

  5. Differential dynamics of splicing factor SC35 during the cell cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srinivas

    Pre-mRNA splicing factors are enriched in nuclear domains termed interchromatin granule clusters or nuclear speckles. During mitosis, nuclear ... and mitotic cells. In HeLa cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-SC35, this was localized in speckles during ... mitotic cells was determined with respect to markers for.

  6. Identification of Common Genetic Variation That Modulates Alternative Splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, Jeremy; Campino, Susana; Rowlands, Kate; Chan, Man-Suen; Copley, Richard R; Taylor, Martin S; Rockett, Kirk; Elvidge, Gareth; Keating, Brendan; Knight, Julian; Kwiatkowski, Dominic

    2007-01-01

    Alternative splicing of genes is an efficient means of generating variation in protein function. Several disease states have been associated with rare genetic variants that affect splicing patterns. Conversely, splicing efficiency of some genes is known to vary between individuals without apparent ill effects. What is not clear is whether commonly observed phenotypic variation in splicing patterns, and hence potential variation in protein function, is to a significant extent determined by nat...

  7. High qualitative and quantitative conservation of alternative splicing in Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Irimia, Manuel; Mørk, Søren

    2007-01-01

    the qualitative and quantitative expression of 21 orthologous alternative splice events through the development of 2 nematode species separated by 85-110 Myr of evolutionary time. We demonstrate that most of these alternative splice events present in Caenorhabditis elegans are conserved in Caenorhabditis briggsae...... mechanisms controlling AS are to a large extent conserved during the evolution of Caenorhabditis. This strong conservation indicates that both major and minor splice forms have important functional roles and that the relative quantities in which they are expressed are crucial. Our results therefore suggest...... that the quantitative regulation of isoform expression levels is an intrinsic part of most AS events. Moreover, our results indicate that AS contributes little to transcript variation in Caenorhabditis genes and that gene duplication may be the major evolutionary mechanism for the origin of novel transcripts in these 2...

  8. Universal Alternative Splicing of Noncoding Exons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deveson, Ira W; Brunck, Marion E; Blackburn, James

    2018-01-01

    The human transcriptome is so large, diverse, and dynamic that, even after a decade of investigation by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we have yet to resolve its true dimensions. RNA-seq suffers from an expression-dependent bias that impedes characterization of low-abundance transcripts. We performed......, indicative of regulation by a deeply conserved splicing code. We propose that noncoding exons are functionally modular, with alternative splicing generating an enormous repertoire of potential regulatory RNAs and a rich transcriptional reservoir for gene evolution....

  9. SPA: a probabilistic algorithm for spliced alignment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Recent large-scale cDNA sequencing efforts show that elaborate patterns of splice variation are responsible for much of the proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes. To obtain an accurate account of the repertoire of splice variants, and to gain insight into the mechanisms of alternative splicing, it is essential that cDNAs are very accurately mapped to their respective genomes. Currently available algorithms for cDNA-to-genome alignment do not reach the necessary level of accuracy because they use ad hoc scoring models that cannot correctly trade off the likelihoods of various sequencing errors against the probabilities of different gene structures. Here we develop a Bayesian probabilistic approach to cDNA-to-genome alignment. Gene structures are assigned prior probabilities based on the lengths of their introns and exons, and based on the sequences at their splice boundaries. A likelihood model for sequencing errors takes into account the rates at which misincorporation, as well as insertions and deletions of different lengths, occurs during sequencing. The parameters of both the prior and likelihood model can be automatically estimated from a set of cDNAs, thus enabling our method to adapt itself to different organisms and experimental procedures. We implemented our method in a fast cDNA-to-genome alignment program, SPA, and applied it to the FANTOM3 dataset of over 100,000 full-length mouse cDNAs and a dataset of over 20,000 full-length human cDNAs. Comparison with the results of four other mapping programs shows that SPA produces alignments of significantly higher quality. In particular, the quality of the SPA alignments near splice boundaries and SPA's mapping of the 5' and 3' ends of the cDNAs are highly improved, allowing for more accurate identification of transcript starts and ends, and accurate identification of subtle splice variations. Finally, our splice boundary analysis on the human dataset suggests the existence of a novel non

  10. Targeting GH-1 splicing as a novel pharmacological strategy for growth hormone deficiency type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miletta, Maria Consolata; Flück, Christa E; Mullis, Primus-E

    2017-01-15

    Isolated growth hormone deficiency type II (IGHD II) is a rare genetic splicing disorder characterized by reduced growth hormone (GH) secretion and short stature. It is mainly caused by autosomal dominant-negative mutations within the growth hormone gene (GH-1) which results in missplicing at the mRNA level and the subsequent loss of exon 3, producing the 17.5-kDa GH isoform: a mutant and inactive GH protein that reduces the stability and the secretion of the 22-kDa GH isoform, the main biologically active GH form. At present, patients suffering from IGHD II are treated with daily injections of recombinant human GH (rhGH) in order to reach normal height. However, this type of replacement therapy, although effective in terms of growth, does not prevent the toxic effects of the 17.5-kDa mutant on the pituitary gland, which may eventually lead to other hormonal deficiencies. As the severity of the disease inversely correlates with the 17.5-kDa/22-kDa ratio, increasing the inclusion of exon 3 is expected to ameliorate disease symptoms. This review focuses on the recent advances in experimental and therapeutic strategies applicable to treat IGHD II in clinical and preclinical contexts. Several avenues for alternative IGHD II therapy will be discussed including the use of small interfering RNA (siRNA) and short hairpin RNA (shRNA) constructs that specifically target the exon 3-deleted transcripts as well as the application of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and antisense oligonucleotides (AONs) to enhance full-length GH-1 transcription, correct GH-1 exon 3 splicing and manipulate GH pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Intercoder Reliability of Mapping Between Pharmaceutical Dose Forms in the German Medication Plan and EDQM Standard Terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, Julian; Becker, Kim; Ludmann, Dominik; Pantazoglou, Elisabeth; Dewenter, Heike; Thun, Sylvia

    2018-01-01

    A nationally uniform medication plan has recently been part of German legislation. The specification for the German medication plan was developed in cooperation between various stakeholders of the healthcare system. Its' goal is to enhance usability and interoperability while also providing patients and physicians with the necessary information they require for a safe and high-quality therapy. Within the research and development project named Medication Plan PLUS, the specification of the medication plan was tested and reviewed for semantic interoperability in particular. In this study, the list of pharmaceutical dose forms provided in the specification was mapped to the standard terms of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare by different coders. The level of agreement between coders was calculated using Cohen's Kappa (κ). Results show that less than half of the dose forms could be coded with EDQM standard terms. In addition to that Kappa was found to be moderate, which means rather unconvincing agreement among coders. In conclusion, there is still vast room for improvement in utilization of standardized international vocabulary and unused potential considering cross-border eHealth implementations in the future.

  12. The Cancer Exome Generated by Alternative mRNA Splicing Dilutes Predicted HLA Class I Epitope Density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stranzl, Thomas; Larsen, Mette Voldby; Lund, Ole

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes...... is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the cell surface. Here, we use a peptidome wide analysis of predicted alternative splice forms, based...... on a publicly available database, to show that peptides over-represented in cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes compared to peptides from normal transcripts. Peptides over-represented in cancer transcripts are in the case of the three most common HLA class I...

  13. Alternative splicing originates different domain structure organization of Lutzomyia longipalpis chitinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortigão-Farias, João Ramalho; Di-Blasi, Tatiana; Telleria, Erich Loza; Andorinho, Ana Carolina; Lemos-Silva, Thais; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo; Tempone, Antônio Jorge; Traub-Csekö, Yara Maria

    2018-02-01

    BACKGROUND The insect chitinase gene family is composed by more than 10 paralogs, which can codify proteins with different domain structures. In Lutzomyia longipalpis, the main vector of visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil, a chitinase cDNA from adult female insects was previously characterized. The predicted protein contains one catalytic domain and one chitin-binding domain (CBD). The expression of this gene coincided with the end of blood digestion indicating a putative role in peritrophic matrix degradation. OBJECTIVES To determine the occurrence of alternative splicing in chitinases of L. longipalpis. METHODS We sequenced the LlChit1 gene from a genomic clone and the three spliced forms obtained by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using larvae cDNA. FINDINGS We showed that LlChit1 from L. longipalpis immature forms undergoes alternative splicing. The spliced form corresponding to the adult cDNA was named LlChit1A and the two larvae specific transcripts were named LlChit1B and LlChit1C. The B and C forms possess stop codons interrupting the translation of the CBD. The A form is present in adult females post blood meal, L4 larvae and pre-pupae, while the other two forms are present only in L4 larvae and disappear just before pupation. Two bands of the expected size were identified by Western blot only in L4 larvae. MAIN CONCLUSIONS We show for the first time alternative splicing generating chitinases with different domain structures increasing our understanding on the finely regulated digestion physiology and shedding light on a potential target for controlling L. longipalpis larval development.

  14. Alternative splicing and differential gene expression in colon cancer detected by a whole genome exon array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugnet Charles

    2006-12-01

    predictions of alternative splicing in cancer. Conclusion Differential expression of high confidence transcripts correlated extremely well with known cancer genes and pathways, suggesting that the more speculative transcripts, largely based solely on computational prediction and mostly with no previous annotation, might be novel targets in colon cancer. Five of the identified splicing events affect mediators of cytoskeletal organization (ACTN1, VCL, CALD1, CTTN, TPM1, two affect extracellular matrix proteins (FN1, COL6A3 and another participates in integrin signaling (SLC3A2. Altogether they form a pattern of colon-cancer specific alterations that may particularly impact cell motility.

  15. An in vivo genetic screen for genes involved in spliced leader trans-splicing indicates a crucial role for continuous de novo spliced leader RNP assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Lucas; Pandarakalam, George C; Fasimoye, Rotimi; Harrison, Neale; Connolly, Bernadette; Pettitt, Jonathan; Müller, Berndt

    2017-08-21

    Spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing is a critical element of gene expression in a number of eukaryotic groups. This process is arguably best understood in nematodes, where biochemical and molecular studies in Caenorhabditis elegans and Ascaris suum have identified key steps and factors involved. Despite this, the precise details of SL trans-splicing have yet to be elucidated. In part, this is because the systematic identification of the molecules involved has not previously been possible due to the lack of a specific phenotype associated with defects in this process. We present here a novel GFP-based reporter assay that can monitor SL1 trans-splicing in living C. elegans. Using this assay, we have identified mutants in sna-1 that are defective in SL trans-splicing, and demonstrate that reducing function of SNA-1, SNA-2 and SUT-1, proteins that associate with SL1 RNA and related SmY RNAs, impairs SL trans-splicing. We further demonstrate that the Sm proteins and pICln, SMN and Gemin5, which are involved in small nuclear ribonucleoprotein assembly, have an important role in SL trans-splicing. Taken together these results provide the first in vivo evidence for proteins involved in SL trans-splicing, and indicate that continuous replacement of SL ribonucleoproteins consumed during trans-splicing reactions is essential for effective trans-splicing. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Periostin shows increased evolutionary plasticity in its alternatively spliced region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoersch Sebastian

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Periostin (POSTN is a secreted extracellular matrix protein of poorly defined function that has been related to bone and heart development as well as to cancer. In human and mouse, it is known to undergo alternative splicing in its C-terminal region, which is devoid of known protein domains. Differential expression of periostin, sometimes of specific splicing isoforms, is observed in a broad range of human cancers, including breast, pancreatic, and colon cancer. Here, we combine genomic and transcriptomic sequence data from vertebrate organisms to study the evolution of periostin and particularly of its C-terminal region. Results We found that the C-terminal part of periostin is markedly more variable among vertebrates than the rest of periostin in terms of exon count, length, and splicing pattern, which we interpret as a consequence of neofunctionalization after the split between periostin and its paralog transforming growth factor, beta-induced (TGFBI. We also defined periostin's sequential 13-amino acid repeat units - well conserved in teleost fish, but more obscure in higher vertebrates - whose secondary structure is predicted to be consecutive beta strands. We suggest that these beta strands may mediate binding interactions with other proteins through an extended beta-zipper in a manner similar to the way repeat units in bacterial cell wall proteins have been reported to bind human fibronectin. Conclusions Our results, obtained with the help of the increasingly large collection of complete vertebrate genomes, document the evolutionary plasticity of periostin's C-terminal region, and for the first time suggest a basis for its functional role.

  17. The hnRNP 2H9 gene, which is involved in the splicing reaction, is a multiply spliced gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    2000-01-01

    The hnRNP 2H9 gene products are involved in the splicing process and participate in early heat shock-induced splicing arrest. By combining low/high stringency hybridisation, database search, Northern and Western blotting it is shown that the gene is alternatively spliced into at least six transcr...

  18. Auxiliary splice factor U2AF26 and transcription factor Gfi1 cooperate directly in regulating CD45 alternative splicing.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heyd, F.; Dam, G.B. ten; Moroy, T.

    2006-01-01

    By alternative splicing, different isoforms of the transmembrane tyrosine phosphatase CD45 are generated that either enhance or limit T cell receptor signaling. We report here that CD45 alternative splicing is regulated by cooperative action of the splice factor U2AF26 and the transcription factor

  19. Insertion of a T next to the donor splice site of intron 1 causes aberrantly spliced mRNA in a case of infantile GM1-gangliosidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrone, A; Morreau, H; Zhou, X Y; Zammarchi, E; Kleijer, W J; Galjaard, H; d'Azzo, A

    1994-01-01

    The lysosomal storage disorders GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio B syndrome are caused by a complete or partial deficiency of acid beta-galactosidase. Here, we have characterized the mutation segregating in a family with two siblings affected by the severe infantile form of GM1-gangliosidosis. In total mRNA preparations derived from the patients' fibroblasts at least two aberrantly spliced beta-galactosidase transcripts (1 and 2) have been identified. Both transcripts contain a 20 nucleotide (nt) insertion derived from the 5' end of intron 1 of the beta-galactosidase gene. Furthermore, in transcript 2 sequences encoded by exon II are deleted during the splicing process. Comparison of the 20-nt insertion with wild-type intronic sequences indicated that in the genomic DNA of the patients an extra T nucleotide is present immediately downstream of the conserved GT splice donor dinucleotide of intron 1. Both patients are homozygous for the T nucleotide insertion. We propose that this single base insertion is the mutation responsible for aberrant splicing of beta-galactosidase pre-mRNA, giving rise to transcripts that cannot encode a normal protein.

  20. The Alternative Splicing Regulator Tra2b Is Required for Somitogenesis and Regulates Splicing of an Inhibitory Wnt11b Isoform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darwin S. Dichmann

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is pervasive in vertebrates, yet little is known about most isoforms or their regulation. transformer-2b (tra2b encodes a splicing regulator whose endogenous function is poorly understood. Tra2b knockdown in Xenopus results in embryos with multiple defects, including defective somitogenesis. Using RNA sequencing, we identify 142 splice changes (mostly intron retention and exon skipping, 89% of which are not in current annotations. A previously undescribed isoform of wnt11b retains the last intron, resulting in a truncated ligand (Wnt11b-short. We show that this isoform acts as a dominant-negative ligand in cardiac gene induction and pronephric tubule formation. To determine the contribution of Wnt11b-short to the tra2b phenotype, we induce retention of intron 4 in wnt11b, which recapitulates the failure to form somites but not other tra2b morphant defects. This alternative splicing of a Wnt ligand adds intricacy to a complex signaling pathway and highlights intron retention as a regulatory mechanism.

  1. Use of a Fluorescent Aptamer RNA as an Exonic Sequence to Analyze Self-Splicing Ability of a Group I Intron from Structured RNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Airi Furukawa

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Group I self-splicing intron constitutes an important class of functional RNA molecules that can promote chemical transformation. Although the fundamental mechanism of the auto-excision from its precursor RNA has been established, convenient assay systems for its splicing activity are still useful for a further understanding of its detailed mechanism and of its application. Because some host RNA sequences, to which group I introns inserted form stable three-dimensional (3D structures, the effects of the 3D structures of exonic elements on the splicing efficiency of group I introns are important but not a fully investigated issue. We developed an assay system for group I intron self-splicing by employing a fluorescent aptamer RNA (spinach RNA as a model exonic sequence inserted by the Tetrahymena group I intron. We investigated self-splicing of the intron from spinach RNA, serving as a model exonic sequence with a 3D structure.

  2. Capillary Electrophoresis Analysis of Conventional Splicing Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Garibay, Gorka Ruiz; Acedo, Alberto; García-Casado, Zaida

    2014-01-01

    of these assays is often challenging. Here, we explore this issue by conducting splicing assays in 31 BRCA2 genetic variants. All variants were assessed by RT-PCR followed by capillary electrophoresis and direct sequencing. If assays did not produce clear-cut outputs (Class-2 or Class-5 according to analytical...

  3. Survey of gene splicing algorithms based on reads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Xiuhua; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Lei; Wu, Ruo; Ma, Jiquan

    2017-11-02

    Gene splicing is the process of assembling a large number of unordered short sequence fragments to the original genome sequence as accurately as possible. Several popular splicing algorithms based on reads are reviewed in this article, including reference genome algorithms and de novo splicing algorithms (Greedy-extension, Overlap-Layout-Consensus graph, De Bruijn graph). We also discuss a new splicing method based on the MapReduce strategy and Hadoop. By comparing these algorithms, some conclusions are drawn and some suggestions on gene splicing research are made.

  4. Approaches to link RNA secondary structures with splicing regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plass, Mireya; Eyras, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    by facilitating or hindering the interaction with factors and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that regulate splicing. Moreover, the secondary structure could play a fundamental role in the splicing of yeast species, which lack many of the regulatory splicing factors present in metazoans. This chapter......In higher eukaryotes, alternative splicing is usually regulated by protein factors, which bind to the pre-mRNA and affect the recognition of splicing signals. There is recent evidence that the secondary structure of the pre-mRNA may also play an important role in this process, either...

  5. Long-term succession of structure and diversity of a biofilm formed in a model drinking water distribution system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, A.C.; Jørgensen, T.M.; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we examined the long-term development of the overall structural morphology and community composition of a biofilm formed in a model drinking water distribution system with biofilms from 1 day to 3 years old. Visualization and subsequent quantification showed how the biofilm developed...... techniques illustrated the successional formation of a biofilm during a 3-year period in this model drinking water distribution system....... of 16S rRNA fragments illustrated how a wide variety of cells recruited from the bulk water initially attached and resulted in a species richness comparable to that in the water phase. This step was followed by the growth of a bacterium which was related to Nitrospira, which constituted 78...

  6. A medium-term coalition-forming model of heterogeneous DERs for a commercial virtual power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabanzadeh, Morteza; Sheikh-El-Eslami, Mohammad-Kazem; Haghifam, Mahmoud-Reza

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A medium-term coalition-forming scheme is proposed for commercial VPPs. • Decision making on the optimal selection of VPP coalition members, bilateral and forward contracting, and pool involvement. • VPP acts as an arbitrageur by exercising arbitrage between diverse energy trading floors. • Stochastic programming approach applied to characterize the uncertainty and to derive informed decisions. - Abstract: Within a medium-term market horizon, this research work provides a methodology that allows a commercial virtual power plant (CVPP) to form an optimal coalition of heterogeneous distributed energy resources (DERs) based on weekly bilateral contracting, futures-market involvement, and pool participation. The established model aims at composing an optimal portfolio of available DERs and jointly takes into account the risk associated with the energy trading strategy of the CVPP. Perceiving the fact that pool prices have highly uncertain nature, a framework based on stochastic programming approach is utilized to model this decision-making problem. The proposed framework consists of two stages. The first stage deals with decisions regarding DERs optimal selection for the VPP coalition, the amount of agreed quantity in the bilateral negotiation, and the type and quantity selection of futures-market contracts as well. In the second stage, decisions are made based on the most plausible realizations of the stochastic prices in the day-ahead market. For a given pre-specified risk level on profit volatility, the main objective is to maximize the expected profit for the VPP manager over the planning horizon. The efficiency and applicability of the developed model is illustrated and analyzed by its implementation in a system with few heterogeneous DERs and through different scenarios, and finally thereby meaningful conclusions are duly drawn.

  7. Protein trans-splicing of multiple atypical split inteins engineered from natural inteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Lin

    Full Text Available Protein trans-splicing by split inteins has many uses in protein production and research. Splicing proteins with synthetic peptides, which employs atypical split inteins, is particularly useful for site-specific protein modifications and labeling, because the synthetic peptide can be made to contain a variety of unnatural amino acids and chemical modifications. For this purpose, atypical split inteins need to be engineered to have a small N-intein or C-intein fragment that can be more easily included in a synthetic peptide that also contains a small extein to be trans-spliced onto target proteins. Here we have successfully engineered multiple atypical split inteins capable of protein trans-splicing, by modifying and testing more than a dozen natural inteins. These included both S1 split inteins having a very small (11-12 aa N-intein fragment and S11 split inteins having a very small (6 aa C-intein fragment. Four of the new S1 and S11 split inteins showed high efficiencies (85-100% of protein trans-splicing both in E. coli cells and in vitro. Under in vitro conditions, they exhibited reaction rate constants ranging from ~1.7 × 10(-4 s(-1 to ~3.8 × 10(-4 s(-1, which are comparable to or higher than those of previously reported atypical split inteins. These findings should facilitate a more general use of trans-splicing between proteins and synthetic peptides, by expanding the availability of different atypical split inteins. They also have implications on understanding the structure-function relationship of atypical split inteins, particularly in terms of intein fragment complementation.

  8. Modulation of KCNQ1 alternative splicing regulates cardiac IKs and action potential repolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hsiang-Chun; Rudy, Yoram; Po-Yuan, Phd; Sheu, Sheng-Hsiung; Chang, Jan-Gowth; Cui, Jianmin

    2013-08-01

    Slow delayed-rectifier potassium current (IKs) channels, made of the pore-forming KCNQ1 and auxiliary KCNE1 subunits, play a key role in determining action potential duration (APD) in cardiac myocytes. The consequences of drug-induced KCNQ1 splice alteration remain unknown. To study the modulation of KCNQ1 alternative splicing by amiloride and the consequent changes in IKs and action potentials (APs) in ventricular myocytes. Canine endocardial, midmyocardial, and epicardial ventricular myocytes were isolated. Levels of KCNQ1a and KCNQ1b as well as a series of splicing factors were quantified by using the reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. The effect of amiloride-induced changes in the KCNQ1b/total KCNQ1 ratio on AP was measured by using whole-cell patch clamp with and without isoproterenol. With 50 μmol/L of amiloride for 6 hours, KCNQ1a at transcriptional and translational levels increased in midmyocardial myocytes but decreased in endo- and epicardial myocytes. Likewise, changes in splicing factors in midmyocardial were opposite to that in endo- and epicardial myocytes. In midmyocardial myocytes amiloride shortened APD and decreased isoproterenol-induced early afterdepolarizations significantly. The same amiloride-induced effects were demonstrated by using human ventricular myocyte model for AP simulations under beta-adrenergic stimulation. Moreover, amiloride reduced the transmural dispersion of repolarization in pseudo-electrocardiogram. Amiloride regulates IKs and APs with transmural differences and reduces arrhythmogenicity through the modulation of KCNQ1 splicing. We suggested that the modulation of KCNQ1 splicing may help prevent arrhythmia. Copyright © 2013 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Early diagnostic value of survivin and its alternative splice variants in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Salma; Bennit, Heather Ferguson; Turay, David; Perez, Mia; Mirshahidi, Saied; Yuan, Yuan; Wall, Nathan R

    2014-01-01

    The inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) protein Survivin and its splice variants are differentially expressed in breast cancer tissues. Our previous work showed Survivin is released from tumor cells via small membrane-bound vesicles called exosomes. We, therefore, hypothesize that analysis of serum exosomal Survivin and its splice variants may provide a novel biomarker for early diagnosis of breast cancer. We collected sera from forty breast cancer patients and ten control patients who were disease free for 5 years after treatment. In addition, twenty-three paired breast cancer tumor tissues from those same 40 patients were analyzed for splice variants. Serum levels of Survivin were analyzed using ELISA and exosomes were isolated from this serum using the commercially available ExoQuick kit, with subsequent Western blots and immunohistochemistry performed. Survivin levels were significantly higher in all the breast cancer samples compared to controls (p < 0.05) with exosome amounts significantly higher in cancer patient sera compared to controls (p < 0.01). While Survivin and Survivin-∆Ex3 splice variant expression and localization was identical in serum exosomes, differential expression of Survivin-2B protein existed in the exosomes. Similarly, Survivin and Survivin-∆Ex3 proteins were the predominant forms detected in all of the breast cancer tissues evaluated in this study, whereas a more variable expression of Survivin-2B level was found at different cancer stages. In this study we show for the first time that like Survivin, the Survivin splice variants are also exosomally packaged in the breast cancer patients’ sera, mimicking the survivin splice variant pattern that we also report in breast cancer tissues. Differential expression of exosomal-Survivin, particularly Survivin-2B, may serve as a diagnostic and/or prognostic marker, a “liquid biopsy” if you will, in early breast cancer patients. Furthermore, a more thorough understanding of the role of this

  10. Novel pre-mRNA splicing of intronically integrated HBV generates oncogenic chimera in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Wong, John K L; Choi, Shing-Wan; Sze, Karen M F; Ho, Daniel W H; Chan, Lo-Kong; Lee, Joyce M F; Man, Kwan; Cherny, Stacey; Yang, Wan-Ling; Wong, Chun-Ming; Sham, Pak-Chung; Ng, Irene O L

    2016-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) integration is common in HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and may play an important pathogenic role through the production of chimeric HBV-human transcripts. We aimed to screen the transcriptome for HBV integrations in HCCs. Transcriptome sequencing was performed on paired HBV-associated HCCs and corresponding non-tumorous liver tissues to identify viral-human chimeric sites. Validation was further performed in an expanded cohort of human HCCs. Here we report the discovery of a novel pre-mRNA splicing mechanism in generating HBV-human chimeric protein. This mechanism was exemplified by the formation of a recurrent HBV-cyclin A2 (CCNA2) chimeric transcript (A2S), as detected in 12.5% (6 of 48) of HCC patients, but in none of the 22 non-HCC HBV-associated cirrhotic liver samples examined. Upon the integration of HBV into the intron of the CCNA2 gene, the mammalian splicing machinery utilized the foreign splice sites at 282nt. and 458nt. of the HBV genome to generate a pseudo-exon, forming an in-frame chimeric fusion with CCNA2. The A2S chimeric protein gained a non-degradable property and promoted cell cycle progression, demonstrating its potential oncogenic functions. A pre-mRNA splicing mechanism is involved in the formation of HBV-human chimeric proteins. This represents a novel and possibly common mechanism underlying the formation of HBV-human chimeric transcripts from intronically integrated HBV genome with functional impact. HBV is involved in the mammalian pre-mRNA splicing machinery in the generation of potential tumorigenic HBV-human chimeras. This study also provided insight on the impact of intronic HBV integration with the gain of splice sites in the development of HBV-associated HCC. Copyright © 2016 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-term preservation of early formed mantle heterogeneity by mobile lid convection: Importance of grainsize evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Bradford J.; Rizo, Hanika

    2017-10-01

    The style of tectonics on the Hadean and Archean Earth, particularly whether plate tectonics was in operation or not, is debated. One important, albeit indirect, constraint on early Earth tectonics comes from observations of early-formed geochemical heterogeneities: 142Nd and 182W anomalies recorded in Hadean to Phanerozoic rocks from different localities indicate that chemically heterogeneous reservoirs, formed during the first ∼500 Myrs of Earth's history, survived their remixing into the mantle for over 1 Gyrs. Such a long mixing time is difficult to explain because hotter mantle temperatures, expected for the early Earth, act to lower mantle viscosity and increase convective vigor. Previous studies found that mobile lid convection typically erases heterogeneity within ∼100 Myrs under such conditions, leading to the hypothesis that stagnant lid convection on the early Earth was responsible for the observed long mixing times. However, using two-dimensional Cartesian convection models that include grainsize evolution, we find that mobile lid convection can preserve heterogeneity at high mantle temperature conditions for much longer than previously thought, because higher mantle temperatures lead to larger grainsizes in the lithosphere. These larger grainsizes result in stronger plate boundaries that act to slow down surface and interior convective motions, in competition with the direct effect temperature has on mantle viscosity. Our models indicate that mobile lid convection can preserve heterogeneity for ≈0.4-1 Gyrs at early Earth mantle temperatures when the initial heterogeneity has the same viscosity as the background mantle, and ≈1-4 Gyrs when the heterogeneity is ten times more viscous than the background mantle. Thus, stagnant lid convection is not required to explain long-term survival of early formed geochemical heterogeneities, though these heterogeneities having an elevated viscosity compared to the surrounding mantle may be essential for their

  12. Functional and evolutionary analysis of alternatively spliced genes is consistent with an early eukaryotic origin of alternative splicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Penny, David

    2007-01-01

    , and may therefore predate multicellularity, is still unknown. To better understand the origin and evolution of alternative splicing and its usage in diverse organisms, we studied alternative splicing in 12 eukaryotic species, comparing rates of alternative splicing across genes of different functional...... classes, cellular locations, intron/exon structures and evolutionary origins. RESULTS: For each species, we find that genes from most functional categories are alternatively spliced. Ancient genes (shared between animals, fungi and plants) show high levels of alternative splicing. Genes with products...

  13. Alternative RNA Splicing in the Pathogenesis of Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas J. G. Webster

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is becoming increasingly prevalent due to the worldwide obesity epidemic and currently affects one-third of adults or about one billion people worldwide. NAFLD is predicted to affect over 50% of the world’s population by the end of the next decade. It is the most common form of liver disease and is associated with increased risk for progression to a more severe form non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, as well as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, cirrhosis, and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma. This review article will focus on the role of alternative splicing in normal liver physiology and dysregulation in liver disease.

  14. Genomic HEXploring allows landscaping of novel potential splicing regulatory elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkelenz, Steffen; Theiss, Stephan; Otte, Marianne; Widera, Marek; Peter, Jan Otto; Schaal, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    Effective splice site selection is critically controlled by flanking splicing regulatory elements (SREs) that can enhance or repress splice site use. Although several computational algorithms currently identify a multitude of potential SRE motifs, their predictive power with respect to mutation effects is limited. Following a RESCUE-type approach, we defined a hexamer-based 'HEXplorer score' as average Z-score of all six hexamers overlapping with a given nucleotide in an arbitrary genomic sequence. Plotted along genomic regions, HEXplorer score profiles varied slowly in the vicinity of splice sites. They reflected the respective splice enhancing and silencing properties of splice site neighborhoods beyond the identification of single dedicated SRE motifs. In particular, HEXplorer score differences between mutant and reference sequences faithfully represented exonic mutation effects on splice site usage. Using the HIV-1 pre-mRNA as a model system highly dependent on SREs, we found an excellent correlation in 29 mutations between splicing activity and HEXplorer score. We successfully predicted and confirmed five novel SREs and optimized mutations inactivating a known silencer. The HEXplorer score allowed landscaping of splicing regulatory regions, provided a quantitative measure of mutation effects on splice enhancing and silencing properties and permitted calculation of the mutationally most effective nucleotide. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  15. Evolution of Nova-dependent splicing regulation in the brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejc Jelen

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A large number of alternative exons are spliced with tissue-specific patterns, but little is known about how such patterns have evolved. Here, we study the conservation of the neuron-specific splicing factors Nova1 and Nova2 and of the alternatively spliced exons they regulate in mouse brain. Whereas Nova RNA binding domains are 94% identical across vertebrate species, Nova-dependent splicing silencer and enhancer elements (YCAY clusters show much greater divergence, as less than 50% of mouse YCAY clusters are conserved at orthologous positions in the zebrafish genome. To study the relation between the evolution of tissue-specific splicing and YCAY clusters, we compared the brain-specific splicing of Nova-regulated exons in zebrafish, chicken, and mouse. The presence of YCAY clusters in lower vertebrates invariably predicted conservation of brain-specific splicing across species, whereas their absence in lower vertebrates correlated with a loss of alternative splicing. We hypothesize that evolution of Nova-regulated splicing in higher vertebrates proceeds mainly through changes in cis-acting elements, that tissue-specific splicing might in some cases evolve in a single step corresponding to evolution of a YCAY cluster, and that the conservation level of YCAY clusters relates to the functions encoded by the regulated RNAs.

  16. Alternative mRNA Splicing in the Pathogenesis of Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ming Wong

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alternative mRNA splicing is an important mechanism in expansion of proteome diversity by production of multiple protein isoforms. However, emerging evidence indicates that only a limited number of annotated protein isoforms by alternative splicing are detected, and the coding sequence of alternative splice variants usually is only slightly different from that of the canonical sequence. Nevertheless, mis-splicing is associated with a large array of human diseases. Previous reviews mainly focused on hereditary and somatic mutations in cis-acting RNA sequence elements and trans-acting splicing factors. The importance of environmental perturbations contributed to mis-splicing is not assessed. As significant changes in exon skipping and splicing factors expression levels are observed with diet-induced obesity, this review focuses on several well-known alternatively spliced metabolic factors and discusses recent advances in the regulation of the expressions of splice variants under the pathophysiological conditions of obesity. The potential of targeting the alternative mRNA mis-splicing for obesity-associated diseases therapies will also be discussed.

  17. Intronic alternative splicing regulators identified by comparative genomics in nematodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Kabat

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Many alternative splicing events are regulated by pentameric and hexameric intronic sequences that serve as binding sites for splicing regulatory factors. We hypothesized that intronic elements that regulate alternative splicing are under selective pressure for evolutionary conservation. Using a Wobble Aware Bulk Aligner genomic alignment of Caenorhabditis elegans and Caenorhabditis briggsae, we identified 147 alternatively spliced cassette exons that exhibit short regions of high nucleotide conservation in the introns flanking the alternative exon. In vivo experiments on the alternatively spliced let-2 gene confirm that these conserved regions can be important for alternative splicing regulation. Conserved intronic element sequences were collected into a dataset and the occurrence of each pentamer and hexamer motif was counted. We compared the frequency of pentamers and hexamers in the conserved intronic elements to a dataset of all C. elegans intron sequences in order to identify short intronic motifs that are more likely to be associated with alternative splicing. High-scoring motifs were examined for upstream or downstream preferences in introns surrounding alternative exons. Many of the high-scoring nematode pentamer and hexamer motifs correspond to known mammalian splicing regulatory sequences, such as (TGCATG, indicating that the mechanism of alternative splicing regulation is well conserved in metazoans. A comparison of the analysis of the conserved intronic elements, and analysis of the entire introns flanking these same exons, reveals that focusing on intronic conservation can increase the sensitivity of detecting putative splicing regulatory motifs. This approach also identified novel sequences whose role in splicing is under investigation and has allowed us to take a step forward in defining a catalog of splicing regulatory elements for an organism. In vivo experiments confirm that one novel high-scoring sequence from our analysis

  18. Resolving deconvolution ambiguity in gene alternative splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubbell Earl

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For many gene structures it is impossible to resolve intensity data uniquely to establish abundances of splice variants. This was empirically noted by Wang et al. in which it was called a "degeneracy problem". The ambiguity results from an ill-posed problem where additional information is needed in order to obtain an unique answer in splice variant deconvolution. Results In this paper, we analyze the situations under which the problem occurs and perform a rigorous mathematical study which gives necessary and sufficient conditions on how many and what type of constraints are needed to resolve all ambiguity. This analysis is generally applicable to matrix models of splice variants. We explore the proposal that probe sequence information may provide sufficient additional constraints to resolve real-world instances. However, probe behavior cannot be predicted with sufficient accuracy by any existing probe sequence model, and so we present a Bayesian framework for estimating variant abundances by incorporating the prediction uncertainty from the micro-model of probe responsiveness into the macro-model of probe intensities. Conclusion The matrix analysis of constraints provides a tool for detecting real-world instances in which additional constraints may be necessary to resolve splice variants. While purely mathematical constraints can be stated without error, real-world constraints may themselves be poorly resolved. Our Bayesian framework provides a generic solution to the problem of uniquely estimating transcript abundances given additional constraints that themselves may be uncertain, such as regression fit to probe sequence models. We demonstrate the efficacy of it by extensive simulations as well as various biological data.

  19. DNA computing based on splicing: universality results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csuhaj-Varjú, E; Freund, R; Kari, L; Păun, G

    1996-01-01

    The paper extends some of the most recently obtained results on the computational universality of specific variants of H systems (e.g. with regular sets of rules) and proves that we can construct universal computers based on various types of H systems with a finite set of splicing rules as well as a finite set of axioms, i.e. we show the theoretical possibility to design programmable universal DNA computers based on the splicing operation. For H systems working in the multiset style (where the numbers of copies of all available strings are counted) we elaborate how a Turing machine computing a partial recursive function can be simulated by an equivalent H system computing the same function; in that way, from a universal Turning machine we obtain a universal H system. Considering H systems as language generating devices we have to add various simple control mechanisms (checking the presence/absence of certain symbols in the spliced strings) to systems with a finite set of splicing rules as well as with a finite set of axioms in order to obtain the full computational power, i.e. to get a characterization of the family of recursively enumerable languages. We also introduce test tube systems, where several H systems work in parallel in their tubes and from time to time the contents of each tube are redistributed to all tubes according to certain separation conditions. By the construction of universal test tube systems we show that also such systems could serve as the theoretical basis for the development of biological (DNA) computers.

  20. Stochastic principles governing alternative splicing of RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Jianfei Hu; Eli Boritz; William Wylie; Daniel C Douek

    2017-01-01

    Author summary Alternative RNA splicing within eukaryotic cells enables each gene to generate multiple different mature transcripts which further encode proteins with distinct or even opposing functions. The relative frequencies of the transcript isoforms generated by a particular gene are essential to the maintenance of normal cellular physiology; however, the underlying mechanisms and principles that govern these frequencies are unknown. We analyzed the frequency distribution of all transcr...

  1. The Analytical Repository Source-Term (AREST) model: Analysis of spent fuel as a nuclear waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apted, M.J.; Liebetrau, A.M.; Engel, D.W.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the performance of spent fuel as a final waste form. The release of radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel has been simulated for the three repository sites that were nominated for site characterization in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The simulation is based on waste package designs that were presented in the environmental assessments prepared for each site. Five distinct distributions for containment failure have been considered, and the release for nuclides from the UO 2 matrix, gap (including grain boundary), crud/surface layer, and cladding has been calculated with the Analytic Repository Source-Term (AREST) code. Separate scenarios involving incongruent and congruent release from the UO 2 matrix have also been examined using the AREST code. Congruent release is defined here as the condition in which the relative mass release rates of a given nuclide and uranium from the UO 2 matrix are equal to their mass ratios in the matrix. Incongruent release refers to release of a given nuclide from the UO 2 matrix controlled by its own solubility-limiting solid phase. Release of nuclides from other sources within the spent fuel (e.g., cladding, fuel/cladding gap) is evaluated separately from either incongruent or congruent matrix release. 51 refs., 200 figs., 9 tabs

  2. Genome and transcriptome sequencing of lung cancers reveal diverse mutational and splicing events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Lee, William; Jiang, Zhaoshi; Chen, Zhongqiang; Jhunjhunwala, Suchit; Haverty, Peter M; Gnad, Florian; Guan, Yinghui; Gilbert, Houston N; Stinson, Jeremy; Klijn, Christiaan; Guillory, Joseph; Bhatt, Deepali; Vartanian, Steffan; Walter, Kimberly; Chan, Jocelyn; Holcomb, Thomas; Dijkgraaf, Peter; Johnson, Stephanie; Koeman, Julie; Minna, John D; Gazdar, Adi F; Stern, Howard M; Hoeflich, Klaus P; Wu, Thomas D; Settleman, Jeff; de Sauvage, Frederic J; Gentleman, Robert C; Neve, Richard M; Stokoe, David; Modrusan, Zora; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Shames, David S; Zhang, Zemin

    2012-12-01

    Lung cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease in terms of both underlying genetic lesions and response to therapeutic treatments. We performed deep whole-genome sequencing and transcriptome sequencing on 19 lung cancer cell lines and three lung tumor/normal pairs. Overall, our data show that cell line models exhibit similar mutation spectra to human tumor samples. Smoker and never-smoker cancer samples exhibit distinguishable patterns of mutations. A number of epigenetic regulators, including KDM6A, ASH1L, SMARCA4, and ATAD2, are frequently altered by mutations or copy number changes. A systematic survey of splice-site mutations identified 106 splice site mutations associated with cancer specific aberrant splicing, including mutations in several known cancer-related genes. RAC1b, an isoform of the RAC1 GTPase that includes one additional exon, was found to be preferentially up-regulated in lung cancer. We further show that its expression is significantly associated with sensitivity to a MAP2K (MEK) inhibitor PD-0325901. Taken together, these data present a comprehensive genomic landscape of a large number of lung cancer samples and further demonstrate that cancer-specific alternative splicing is a widespread phenomenon that has potential utility as therapeutic biomarkers. The detailed characterizations of the lung cancer cell lines also provide genomic context to the vast amount of experimental data gathered for these lines over the decades, and represent highly valuable resources for cancer biology.

  3. Splicing modulation therapy in the treatment of genetic diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arechavala-Gomeza V

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Virginia Arechavala-Gomeza,1 Bernard Khoo,2 Annemieke Aartsma-Rus3 1Neuromuscular Disorders Group, BioCruces Health Research Institute, Barakaldo, Bizkaia, Spain; 2Endocrinology, Division of Medicine, University College London, London, UK; 3Department of Human Genetics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, the Netherlands All authors contributed equally to this manuscript Abstract: Antisense-mediated splicing modulation is a tool that can be exploited in several ways to provide a potential therapy for rare genetic diseases. This approach is currently being tested in clinical trials for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinal muscular atrophy. The present review outlines the versatility of the approach to correct cryptic splicing, modulate alternative splicing, restore the open reading frame, and induce protein knockdown, providing examples of each. Finally, we outline a possible path forward toward the clinical application of this approach for a wide variety of inherited rare diseases. Keywords: splicing, therapy, antisense oligonucleotides, cryptic splicing, alternative splicing

  4. The emerging role of alternative splicing in senescence and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deschênes, Mathieu; Chabot, Benoit

    2017-10-01

    Deregulation of precursor mRNA splicing is associated with many illnesses and has been linked to age-related chronic diseases. Here we review recent progress documenting how defects in the machinery that performs intron removal and controls splice site selection contribute to cellular senescence and organismal aging. We discuss the functional association linking p53, IGF-1, SIRT1, and ING-1 splice variants with senescence and aging, and review a selection of splicing defects occurring in accelerated aging (progeria), vascular aging, and Alzheimer's disease. Overall, it is becoming increasingly clear that changes in the activity of splicing factors and in the production of key splice variants can impact cellular senescence and the aging phenotype. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Accumulation of GC donor splice signals in mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koonin Eugene V

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The GT dinucleotide in the first two intron positions is the most conserved element of the U2 donor splice signals. However, in a small fraction of donor sites, GT is replaced by GC. A substantial enrichment of GC in donor sites of alternatively spliced genes has been observed previously in human, nematode and Arabidopsis, suggesting that GC signals are important for regulation of alternative splicing. We used parsimony analysis to reconstruct evolution of donor splice sites and inferred 298 GT > GC conversion events compared to 40 GC > GT conversion events in primate and rodent genomes. Thus, there was substantive accumulation of GC donor splice sites during the evolution of mammals. Accumulation of GC sites might have been driven by selection for alternative splicing. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Jerzy Jurka and Anton Nekrutenko. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' Reports section.

  6. Castration resistance in human prostate cancer is conferred by a frequently occurring androgen receptor splice variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shihua; Sprenger, Cynthia C.T.; Vessella, Robert L.; Haugk, Kathleen; Soriano, Kathryn; Mostaghel, Elahe A.; Page, Stephanie T.; Coleman, Ilsa M.; Nguyen, Holly M.; Sun, Huiying; Nelson, Peter S.; Plymate, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    Progression of prostate cancer following castration is associated with increased androgen receptor (AR) expression and signaling despite AR blockade. Recent studies suggest that these activities are due to the generation of constitutively active AR splice variants, but the mechanisms by which these splice variants could mediate such effects are not fully understood. Here we have identified what we believe to be a novel human AR splice variant in which exons 5, 6, and 7 are deleted (ARv567es) and demonstrated that this variant can contribute to cancer progression in human prostate cancer xenograft models in mice following castration. We determined that, in human prostate cancer cell lines, ARv567es functioned as a constitutively active receptor, increased expression of full-length AR (ARfl), and enhanced the transcriptional activity of AR. In human xenografts, human prostate cancer cells transfected with ARv567es cDNA formed tumors that were resistant to castration. Furthermore, the ratio of ARv567es to ARfl expression within the xenografts positively correlated with resistance to castration. Importantly, we also detected ARv567es frequently in human prostate cancer metastases. In summary, these data indicate that constitutively active AR splice variants can contribute to the development of castration-resistant prostate cancers and may serve as biomarkers for patients who are likely to suffer from early recurrence and are candidates for therapies directly targeting the AR rather than ligand. PMID:20644256

  7. High-throughput proteomics detection of novel splice isoforms in human platelets.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Power, Karen A

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is an intrinsic regulatory mechanism of all metazoans. Recent findings suggest that 100% of multiexonic human genes give rise to splice isoforms. AS can be specific to tissue type, environment or developmentally regulated. Splice variants have also been implicated in various diseases including cancer. Detection of these variants will enhance our understanding of the complexity of the human genome and provide disease-specific and prognostic biomarkers. We adopted a proteomics approach to identify exon skip events - the most common form of AS. We constructed a database harboring the peptide sequences derived from all hypothetical exon skip junctions in the human genome. Searching tandem mass spectrometry (MS\\/MS) data against the database allows the detection of exon skip events, directly at the protein level. Here we describe the application of this approach to human platelets, including the mRNA-based verification of novel splice isoforms of ITGA2, NPEPPS and FH. This methodology is applicable to all new or existing MS\\/MS datasets.

  8. Splicing Express: a software suite for alternative splicing analysis using next-generation sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose E. Kroll

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Motivation. Alternative splicing events (ASEs are prevalent in the transcriptome of eukaryotic species and are known to influence many biological phenomena. The identification and quantification of these events are crucial for a better understanding of biological processes. Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have allowed deep characterization of transcriptomes and made it possible to address these issues. ASEs analysis, however, represents a challenging task especially when many different samples need to be compared. Some popular tools for the analysis of ASEs are known to report thousands of events without annotations and/or graphical representations. A new tool for the identification and visualization of ASEs is here described, which can be used by biologists without a solid bioinformatics background.Results. A software suite named Splicing Express was created to perform ASEs analysis from transcriptome sequencing data derived from next-generation DNA sequencing platforms. Its major goal is to serve the needs of biomedical researchers who do not have bioinformatics skills. Splicing Express performs automatic annotation of transcriptome data (GTF files using gene coordinates available from the UCSC genome browser and allows the analysis of data from all available species. The identification of ASEs is done by a known algorithm previously implemented in another tool named Splooce. As a final result, Splicing Express creates a set of HTML files composed of graphics and tables designed to describe the expression profile of ASEs among all analyzed samples. By using RNA-Seq data from the Illumina Human Body Map and the Rat Body Map, we show that Splicing Express is able to perform all tasks in a straightforward way, identifying well-known specific events.Availability and Implementation.Splicing Express is written in Perl and is suitable to run only in UNIX-like systems. More details can be found at: http://www.bioinformatics-brazil.org/splicingexpress.

  9. Splice-Switching Therapy for Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharina E. Meijboom

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA is a genetic disorder with severity ranging from premature death in infants to restricted motor function in adult life. Despite the genetic cause of this disease being known for over twenty years, only recently has a therapy been approved to treat the most severe form of this disease. Here we discuss the genetic basis of SMA and the subsequent studies that led to the utilization of splice switching oligonucleotides to enhance production of SMN protein, which is absent in patients, through a mechanism of exon inclusion into the mature mRNA. Whilst approval of oligonucleotide-based therapies for SMA should be celebrated, we also discuss some of the limitations of this approach and alternate genetic strategies that are currently underway in clinical trials.

  10. IMAGE SPLICING DETECTION BASED ON DEMOSAICKING AND WAVELET TRANSFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endina Putri Purwandari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Image splicing is a form of digital image manipulation by combining two or more image into a new image. The application was developed through a passive approach using demosaicking and wavelet transformation method. This research purposed a method to implement the demosaicking and wavelet transform for digital image forgery detection with a passive approach. This research shows that (1 demosaicking can be used as a comparison image in forgery detection; (2 the application of demosaicking and wavelet transformation can improve the quality of the input image (3 demosaicking and wavelet algorithm are able to estimate whether the input image is real or fake image with a passive approach and estimate the manipulation area from the input image.

  11. An Exemplar-Familiarity Model Predicts Short-Term and Long-Term Probe Recognition across Diverse Forms of Memory Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosofsky, Robert M.; Cox, Gregory E.; Cao, Rui; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to test a modern exemplar-familiarity model on its ability to account for both short-term and long-term probe recognition within the same memory-search paradigm. Also, making connections to the literature on attention and visual search, the model was used to interpret differences in probe-recognition performance across…

  12. The Am-tra2 gene is an essential regulator of female splice regulation at two levels of the sex determination hierarchy of the honeybee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Inga; Müller, Miriam; Beye, Martin

    2012-11-01

    Heteroallelic and homo- or hemiallelic Complementary sex determiner (Csd) proteins determine sexual fate in the honeybee (Apis mellifera) by controlling the alternative splicing of the downstream gene fem (feminizer). Thus far, we have little understanding of how heteroallelic Csd proteins mediate the splicing of female fem messenger RNAs (mRNAs) or how Fem proteins direct the splicing of honeybee dsx (Am-dsx) pre-mRNAs. Here, we report that Am-tra2, which is an ortholog of Drosophila melanogaster tra2, is an essential component of female splicing of the fem and Am-dsx transcripts in the honeybee. The Am-tra2 transcripts are alternatively (but non-sex-specifically) spliced, and they are translated into six protein isoforms that all share the basic RNA-binding domain/RS (arginine/serine) domain structure. Knockdown studies showed that the Am-tra2 gene is required to splice fem mRNAs into the productive female and nonproductive male forms. We suggest that the Am-Tra2 proteins are essential regulators of fem pre-mRNA splicing that, together with heteroallelic Csd proteins and/or Fem proteins, implement the female pathway. In males, the Am-Tra2 proteins may enhance the switch of fem transcripts into the nonproductive male form when heteroallelic Csd proteins are absent. This dual function of Am-Tra2 proteins possibly enhances and stabilizes the binary decision process of male/female splicing. Our knockdown studies also imply that the Am-Tra2 protein is an essential regulator for Am-dsx female splice regulation, suggesting an ancestral role in holometabolous insects. We also provide evidence that the Am-tra2 gene has an essential function in honeybee embryogenesis that is unrelated to sex determination.

  13. Identification of common genetic variation that modulates alternative splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Hull

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing of genes is an efficient means of generating variation in protein function. Several disease states have been associated with rare genetic variants that affect splicing patterns. Conversely, splicing efficiency of some genes is known to vary between individuals without apparent ill effects. What is not clear is whether commonly observed phenotypic variation in splicing patterns, and hence potential variation in protein function, is to a significant extent determined by naturally occurring DNA sequence variation and in particular by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs. In this study, we surveyed the splicing patterns of 250 exons in 22 individuals who had been previously genotyped by the International HapMap Project. We identified 70 simple cassette exon alternative splicing events in our experimental system; for six of these, we detected consistent differences in splicing pattern between individuals, with a highly significant association between splice phenotype and neighbouring SNPs. Remarkably, for five out of six of these events, the strongest correlation was found with the SNP closest to the intron-exon boundary, although the distance between these SNPs and the intron-exon boundary ranged from 2 bp to greater than 1,000 bp. Two of these SNPs were further investigated using a minigene splicing system, and in each case the SNPs were found to exert cis-acting effects on exon splicing efficiency in vitro. The functional consequences of these SNPs could not be predicted using bioinformatic algorithms. Our findings suggest that phenotypic variation in splicing patterns is determined by the presence of SNPs within flanking introns or exons. Effects on splicing may represent an important mechanism by which SNPs influence gene function.

  14. Alternative Splicing of FOXP3-Virtue and Vice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailer, Reiner K W

    2018-01-01

    FOXP3 is the lineage-defining transcription factor of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells. While many aspects of its regulation, interaction, and function are conserved among species, alternatively spliced FOXP3 isoforms are expressed only in human cells. This review summarizes current knowledge about alternative splicing of FOXP3 and the specific functions of FOXP3 isoforms in health and disease. Future perspectives in research and the therapeutic potential of manipulating alternative splicing of FOXP3 are discussed.

  15. RNA G-quadruplex secondary structure promotes alternative splicing via the RNA-binding protein hnRNPF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huilin; Zhang, Jing; Harvey, Samuel E; Hu, Xiaohui; Cheng, Chonghui

    2017-11-15

    It is generally thought that splicing factors regulate alternative splicing through binding to RNA consensus sequences. In addition to these linear motifs, RNA secondary structure is emerging as an important layer in splicing regulation. Here we demonstrate that RNA elements with G-quadruplex-forming capacity promote exon inclusion. Destroying G-quadruplex-forming capacity while keeping G tracts intact abrogates exon inclusion. Analysis of RNA-binding protein footprints revealed that G quadruplexes are enriched in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein F (hnRNPF)-binding sites and near hnRNPF-regulated alternatively spliced exons in the human transcriptome. Moreover, hnRNPF regulates an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated CD44 isoform switch in a G-quadruplex-dependent manner, which results in inhibition of EMT. Mining breast cancer TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) data sets, we demonstrate that hnRNPF negatively correlates with an EMT gene signature and positively correlates with patient survival. These data suggest a critical role for RNA G quadruplexes in regulating alternative splicing. Modulation of G-quadruplex structural integrity may control cellular processes important for tumor progression. © 2017 Huang et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  16. Effect of long-term irrigation patterns on phosphorus forms and distribution in the brown soil zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang; Dang, Xiuli; Mayes, Melanie A; Chen, Leilei; Zhang, Yulong

    2017-01-01

    Continuous application of P fertilizers under different irrigation patterns can change soil phosphorus (P) chemical behavior and increase soil P levels that are of environmental concern. To assess the effect of long-term different irrigation patterns on soil P fractions and availability, this study examined sequential changes in soil organic P and inorganic P from furrow irrigation (FI), surface drip irrigation (SUR), and subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) in the brown soil zone (0-60 cm) during 1998 to 2011. Analyses of soil P behavior showed that the levels of total P are frequently high on top soil layers. The total P (TP) contents of the entire soil profiles under three irrigation treatments were 830.2-3180.1 mg/kg. The contents of available P (AP) were 72.6-319.3 mg P/kg soil through soil profiles. The greatest TP and AP contents were obtained within the upper soil layers in FI. Results of Hedley's P fractionation indicate that HCl-P is a dominant form and the proportion to TP ranges from 29% to 43% in all three methods. The contents of various fractions of P were positively correlated with the levels of total carbon (TC), total inorganic carbon (TIC), and calcium (Ca), whereas the P fractions had negative correlation with pH in all soil samples. Regression models proved that NaHCO3-Po was an important factor in determining the amount of AP in FI. H2O-Po, NaHCO3-Po, and NaOH-Pi were related to available P values in SUR. NaHCO3-Po and NaOH-Po played important roles in SDI. The tomato yield under SUR was higher than SDI and FI. The difference of P availability was also controlled by the physicochemical soil properties under different irrigation schedule. SUR was a reasonable irrigation pattern to improve the utilization efficiency of water and fertilizer.

  17. Does general movements quality in term infants predict cerebral palsy and milder forms of limited mobility at 6 years?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Iersel, Patricia A. M.; Bakker, Saskia C. M.; Jonker, Arnold J. H.; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate in term infants associations between quality of general movements and developmental outcome in term infants at 6 years with either cerebral palsy (CP) or limited mobility without CP. METHOD: Participants of this prospective study were 145 term infants (86 male, 59 female). Their

  18. Systematic Analysis of Splice-Site-Creating Mutations in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyka G. Jayasinghe

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: For the past decade, cancer genomic studies have focused on mutations leading to splice-site disruption, overlooking those having splice-creating potential. Here, we applied a bioinformatic tool, MiSplice, for the large-scale discovery of splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs across 8,656 TCGA tumors. We report 1,964 originally mis-annotated mutations having clear evidence of creating alternative splice junctions. TP53 and GATA3 have 26 and 18 SCMs, respectively, and ATRX has 5 from lower-grade gliomas. Mutations in 11 genes, including PARP1, BRCA1, and BAP1, were experimentally validated for splice-site-creating function. Notably, we found that neoantigens induced by SCMs are likely several folds more immunogenic compared to missense mutations, exemplified by the recurrent GATA3 SCM. Further, high expression of PD-1 and PD-L1 was observed in tumors with SCMs, suggesting candidates for immune blockade therapy. Our work highlights the importance of integrating DNA and RNA data for understanding the functional and the clinical implications of mutations in human diseases. : Jayasinghe et al. identify nearly 2,000 splice-site-creating mutations (SCMs from over 8,000 tumor samples across 33 cancer types. They provide a more accurate interpretation of previously mis-annotated mutations, highlighting the importance of integrating data types to understand the functional and the clinical implications of splicing mutations in human disease. Keywords: splicing, RNA, mutations of clinical relevance

  19. Suppression of HPV-16 late L1 5′-splice site SD3632 by binding of hnRNP D proteins and hnRNP A2/B1 to upstream AUAGUA RNA motifs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoze; Johansson, Cecilia; Glahder, Jacob; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Schwartz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) 5′-splice site SD3632 is used exclusively to produce late L1 mRNAs. We identified a 34-nt splicing inhibitory element located immediately upstream of HPV-16 late 5′-splice site SD3632. Two AUAGUA motifs located in these 34 nt inhibited SD3632. Two nucleotide substitutions in each of the HPV-16 specific AUAGUA motifs alleviated splicing inhibition and induced late L1 mRNA production from episomal forms of the HPV-16 genome in primary human keratinocytes. The AUAGUA motifs bind specifically not only to the heterogeneous nuclear RNP (hnRNP) D family of RNA-binding proteins including hnRNP D/AUF, hnRNP DL and hnRNP AB but also to hnRNP A2/B1. Knock-down of these proteins induced HPV-16 late L1 mRNA expression, and overexpression of hnRNP A2/B1, hnRNP AB, hnRNP DL and the two hnRNP D isoforms hnRNP D37 and hnRNP D40 further suppressed L1 mRNA expression. This inhibition may allow HPV-16 to hide from the immune system and establish long-term persistent infections with enhanced risk at progressing to cancer. There is an inverse correlation between expression of hnRNP D proteins and hnRNP A2/B1 and HPV-16 L1 production in the cervical epithelium, as well as in cervical cancer, supporting the conclusion that hnRNP D proteins and A2/B1 inhibit HPV-16 L1 mRNA production. PMID:24013563

  20. Functional characterization of two novel splicing mutations in the OCA2 gene associated with oculocutaneous albinism type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimoldi, Valeria; Straniero, Letizia; Asselta, Rosanna; Mauri, Lucia; Manfredini, Emanuela; Penco, Silvana; Gesu, Giovanni P; Del Longo, Alessandra; Piozzi, Elena; Soldà, Giulia; Primignani, Paola

    2014-03-01

    Oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) is characterized by hypopigmentation of the skin, hair and eye, and by ophthalmologic abnormalities caused by a deficiency in melanin biosynthesis. OCA type II (OCA2) is one of the four commonly-recognized forms of albinism, and is determined by mutation in the OCA2 gene. In the present study, we investigated the molecular basis of OCA2 in two siblings and one unrelated patient. The mutational screening of the OCA2 gene identified two hitherto-unknown putative splicing mutations. The first one (c.1503+5G>A), identified in an Italian proband and her affected sibling, lies in the consensus sequence of the donor splice site of OCA2 intron 14 (IVS14+5G>A), in compound heterozygosity with a frameshift mutation, c.1450_1451insCTGCCCTGACA, which is predicted to determine the premature termination of the polypeptide chain (p.I484Tfs*19). In-silico prediction of the effect of the IVS14+5G>A mutation on splicing showed a score reduction for the mutant splice site and indicated the possible activation of a newly-created deep-intronic acceptor splice site. The second mutation is a synonymous transition (c.2139G>A, p.K713K) involving the last nucleotide of exon 20. This mutation was found in a young African albino patient in compound heterozygosity with a previously-reported OCA2 missense mutation (p.T404M). In-silico analysis predicted that the mutant c.2139G>A allele would result in the abolition of the splice donor site. The effects on splicing of these two novel mutations were investigated using an in-vitro hybrid-minigene approach that led to the demonstration of the causal role of the two mutations and to the identification of aberrant transcript variants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plants: In Vivo Functions of RNA-Binding Proteins Implicated in the Splicing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Meyer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Alternative pre-messenger RNA splicing in higher plants emerges as an important layer of regulation upon exposure to exogenous and endogenous cues. Accordingly, mutants defective in RNA-binding proteins predicted to function in the splicing process show severe phenotypic alterations. Among those are developmental defects, impaired responses to pathogen threat or abiotic stress factors, and misregulation of the circadian timing system. A suite of splicing factors has been identified in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we summarize recent insights on how defects in these splicing factors impair plant performance.

  2. Identification of cis-acting elements and splicing factors involved in the regulation of BIM Pre-mRNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, Wen Chun; Roca, Xavier; Ong, S Tiong

    2014-01-01

    Aberrant changes in the expression of the pro-apoptotic protein, BCL-2-like 11 (BIM), can result in either impaired or excessive apoptosis, which can contribute to tumorigenesis and degenerative disorders, respectively. Altering BIM pre-mRNA splicing is an attractive approach to modulate apoptosis because BIM activity is partly determined by the alternative splicing of exons 3 or 4, whereby exon 3-containing transcripts are not apoptotic. Here we identified several cis-acting elements and splicing factors involved in BIM alternative splicing, as a step to better understand the regulation of BIM expression. We analyzed a recently discovered 2,903-bp deletion polymorphism within BIM intron 2 that biased splicing towards exon 3, and which also impaired BIM-dependent apoptosis. We found that this region harbors multiple redundant cis-acting elements that repress exon 3 inclusion. Furthermore, we have isolated a 23-nt intronic splicing silencer at the 3' end of the deletion that is important for excluding exon 3. We also show that PTBP1 and hnRNP C repress exon 3 inclusion, and that downregulation of PTBP1 inhibited BIM-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, these findings start building our understanding of the cis-acting elements and splicing factors that regulate BIM alternative splicing, and also suggest potential approaches to alter BIM splicing for therapeutic purposes.

  3. Unexpected role of the steroid-deficiency protein ecdysoneless in pre-mRNA splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Katrin Claudius

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The steroid hormone ecdysone coordinates insect growth and development, directing the major postembryonic transition of forms, metamorphosis. The steroid-deficient ecdysoneless1 (ecd1 strain of Drosophila melanogaster has long served to assess the impact of ecdysone on gene regulation, morphogenesis, or reproduction. However, ecd also exerts cell-autonomous effects independently of the hormone, and mammalian Ecd homologs have been implicated in cell cycle regulation and cancer. Why the Drosophila ecd1 mutants lack ecdysone has not been resolved. Here, we show that in Drosophila cells, Ecd directly interacts with core components of the U5 snRNP spliceosomal complex, including the conserved Prp8 protein. In accord with a function in pre-mRNA splicing, Ecd and Prp8 are cell-autonomously required for survival of proliferating cells within the larval imaginal discs. In the steroidogenic prothoracic gland, loss of Ecd or Prp8 prevents splicing of a large intron from CYP307A2/spookier (spok pre-mRNA, thus eliminating this essential ecdysone-biosynthetic enzyme and blocking the entry to metamorphosis. Human Ecd (hEcd can substitute for its missing fly ortholog. When expressed in the Ecd-deficient prothoracic gland, hEcd re-establishes spok pre-mRNA splicing and protein expression, restoring ecdysone synthesis and normal development. Our work identifies Ecd as a novel pre-mRNA splicing factor whose function has been conserved in its human counterpart. Whether the role of mammalian Ecd in cancer involves pre-mRNA splicing remains to be discovered.

  4. Transcription rate strongly affects splicing fidelity and cotranscriptionality in budding yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Aslanzadeh, Vahid; Huang, Yuanhua; Sanguinetti, Guido; Beggs, Jean D.

    2018-01-01

    The functional consequences of alternative splicing on altering the transcription rate have been the subject of intensive study in mammalian cells but less is known about effects of splicing on changing the transcription rate in yeast. We present several lines of evidence showing that slow RNA polymerase II elongation increases both cotranscriptional splicing and splicing efficiency and that faster elongation reduces cotranscriptional splicing and splicing efficiency in budding yeast, suggest...

  5. A Path Following Algorithm for Sparse Pseudo-Likelihood Inverse Covariance Estimation (SPLICE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-24

    due to the `1 penalty, and we term this method SPLICE. Its regularization path can be computed via an algorithm based on the homotopy /LARS-Lasso... method is very computationally tractable (an algorithm based on the homotopy algorithm for linear regressions is detailed below in Appendix B.1), it...variants. Journal of Multivariate Analysis 98, 227–255. Hocking, R. R. 1996. Methods and Applications of Linear Models: Regression and the Analysis of

  6. Long-term behaviour of waste-forms in the near-field environment of a deep underground storage site, overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toulhoat, P.; Lassabatere, Th.; Galle, Ch.; Cranga, M.; Trotignon, L.; Maillard, S.; Iracane, D.

    1997-01-01

    CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission) is responsible for the achievement of high activity and/or long life waste conditioning processes. Various waste-forms are used (glass, bitumen, etc...). ANDRA (French National Agency for Nuclear Waste Management) has to integrate the long-term durability of such waste-forms in the conception of a deep disposal and the assessment of its long-term confinement performances. The influence of near-field and of the boundary conditions imposed by the far-field on the long-term evolution is being more and more documented. Transport properties and reactivity of silica in the near field is one of the best examples of such effects. A coherent framework with relevant successive events (site re-saturation, chemical evolution of the engineered barrier, overpack corrosion) and a thorough analysis of hierarchized couplings are necessary to evaluate the long term durability of waste-form, and finally, to deliver a near-field-integrated source-term of radionuclides versus lime. We present hereafter some preliminary results obtained in the framework of the CEA 'C3P' project - long-term behaviour of waste-forms in their near-field environment. (authors)

  7. On the Durability of Nuclear Waste Forms from the Perspective of Long-Term Geologic Repository Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifeng Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available High solid/water ratios and slow water percolation cause the water in a repository to quickly (on a repository time scale reach radionuclide solubility controlled by the equilibrium with alteration products; the total release of radionuclides then becomes insensitive to the dissolution rates of primary waste forms. It is therefore suggested that future waste form development be focused on conditioning waste forms or repository environments to minimize radionuclide solubility, rather than on marginally improving the durability of primary waste forms.

  8. Evolution of alternative splicing regulation: changes in predicted exonic splicing regulators are not associated with changes in alternative splicing levels in primates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob Lewin; Roy, Scott William

    2009-01-01

    of interspecific differences in these elements on the evolution of alternative splicing levels has not yet been investigated at genomic level. Here we study the effect of interspecific differences in predicted exonic splicing regulators (ESRs) on exon inclusion levels in human and chimpanzee. For this purpose, we...... compiled and studied comprehensive datasets of predicted ESRs, identified by several computational and experimental approaches, as well as microarray data for changes in alternative splicing levels between human and chimpanzee. Surprisingly, we found no association between changes in predicted ESRs...

  9. A Phylogenetic Survey on the Structure of the HIV-1 Leader RNA Domain That Encodes the Splice Donor Signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nancy; Das, Atze T; Berkhout, Ben

    2016-07-21

    RNA splicing is a critical step in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication cycle because it controls the expression of the complex viral proteome. The major 5' splice site (5'ss) that is positioned in the untranslated leader of the HIV-1 RNA transcript is of particular interest because it is used for the production of the more than 40 differentially spliced subgenomic mRNAs. HIV-1 splicing needs to be balanced tightly to ensure the proper levels of all viral proteins, including the Gag-Pol proteins that are translated from the unspliced RNA. We previously presented evidence that the major 5'ss is regulated by a repressive local RNA structure, the splice donor (SD) hairpin, that masks the 11 nucleotides (nts) of the 5'ss signal for recognition by U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) of the spliceosome machinery. A strikingly different multiple-hairpin RNA conformation was recently proposed for this part of the HIV-1 leader RNA. We therefore inspected the sequence of natural HIV-1 isolates in search for support, in the form of base pair (bp) co-variations, for the different RNA conformations.

  10. Revealing the Determinants of Widespread Alternative Splicing Perturbation in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available It is increasingly appreciated that alternative splicing plays a key role in generating functional specificity and diversity in cancer. However, the mechanisms by which cancer mutations perturb splicing remain unknown. Here, we developed a network-based strategy, DrAS-Net, to investigate more than 2.5 million variants across cancer types and link somatic mutations with cancer-specific splicing events. We identified more than 40,000 driver variant candidates and their 80,000 putative splicing targets deregulated in 33 cancer types and inferred their functional impact. Strikingly, tumors with splicing perturbations show reduced expression of immune system-related genes and increased expression of cell proliferation markers. Tumors harboring different mutations in the same gene often exhibit distinct splicing perturbations. Further stratification of 10,000 patients based on their mutation-splicing relationships identifies subtypes with distinct clinical features, including survival rates. Our work reveals how single-nucleotide changes can alter the repertoires of splicing isoforms, providing insights into oncogenic mechanisms for precision medicine.

  11. ASpedia: a comprehensive encyclopedia of human alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyung, Daejin; Kim, Jihyun; Cho, Soo Young; Park, Charny

    2018-01-04

    Alternative splicing confers the human genome complexity by increasing the diversity of expressed mRNAs. Hundreds or thousands of splicing regions have been identified through differential alternative splicing analysis of high-throughput datasets. However, it is hard to explain the functional impact of each splicing event. Protein domain formation and nonsense-mediated decay are considered the main functional features of splicing. However, other functional features such as miRNA target sites, phosphorylation sites and single-nucleotide variations are directly affected by alternative splicing and affect downstream function. Hence, we established ASpedia: a comprehensive database for human alternative splicing annotation, which encompasses a range of functions, from genomic annotation to isoform-specific function (ASpedia, http://combio.snu.ac.kr/aspedia). The database provides three features: (i) genomic annotation extracted from DNA, RNA and proteins; (ii) transcription and regulation elements analyzed from next-generation sequencing datasets; and (iii) isoform-specific functions collected from known and published datasets. The ASpedia web application includes three components: an annotation database, a retrieval system and a browser specialized in the identification of human alternative splicing events. The retrieval system supports multiple AS event searches resulting from high-throughput analysis and the AS browser comprises genome tracks. Thus, ASpedia facilitates the systemic annotation of the functional impacts of multiple AS events. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Quantitative regulation of alternative splicing in evolution and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irimia, Manuel; Rukov, Jakob L; Roy, Scott W

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) is a widespread mechanism with an important role in increasing transcriptome and proteome diversity by generating multiple different products from the same gene. Evolutionary studies of AS have focused primarily on the conservation of alternatively spliced sequences or o...

  13. A novel splicing mutation in COL1A1 gene caused type I osteogenesis imperfecta in a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao; Zhang, Yuhui; Long, Zhigao; Zhao, Ding; Guo, Zhenxin; Xue, Jinjie; Xie, Zhiguo; Xiong, Zhimin; Xu, Xiaojuan; Su, Wei; Wang, Bing; Xia, Kun; Hu, Zhengmao

    2012-07-10

    Osteogenesis imperfect (OI) is a heritable connective tissue disorder with bone fragility as a cardinal manifestation, accompanied by short stature, dentinogenesis imperfecta, hyperlaxity of ligaments and skin, blue sclerae and hearing loss. Dominant form of OI is caused by mutations in the type I procollagen genes, COL1A1/A2. Here we identified a novel splicing mutation c.3207+1G>A (GenBank ID: JQ236861) in the COL1A1 gene that caused type I OI in a Chinese family. RNA splicing analysis proved that this mutation created a new splicing site at c.3200, and then led to frameshift. This result further enriched the mutation spectrum of type I procollagen genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Detecting Image Splicing Using Merged Features in Chroma Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Image splicing is an image editing method to copy a part of an image and paste it onto another image, and it is commonly followed by postprocessing such as local/global blurring, compression, and resizing. To detect this kind of forgery, the image rich models, a feature set successfully used in the steganalysis is evaluated on the splicing image dataset at first, and the dominant submodel is selected as the first kind of feature. The selected feature and the DCT Markov features are used together to detect splicing forgery in the chroma channel, which is convinced effective in splicing detection. The experimental results indicate that the proposed method can detect splicing forgeries with lower error rate compared to the previous literature.

  15. Some relations between two stages DNA splicing languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudaber, Mohammad Hassan; Yusof, Yuhani; Mohamad, Mohd Sham

    2014-06-01

    A new symbolization of Yusof-Goode (Y-G) rule, which is associated with Y-G splicing system, was introduced by Yusof in 2012 under the framework of formal language theory. The purpose of this investigation is to present the biological process of DNA splicing in a translucent way. In this study, two stages splicing languages are introduced based on Y-G approach and some relations between stage one and stage two splicing languages are presented, given as theorems. Additionally, the existing relations between two stages splicing languages based on crossings and contexts of restriction enzymes factors with respect to two initial strings (having two cutting sites) and two rules are presented as subset.

  16. Does general movements quality in term infants predict cerebral palsy and milder forms of limited mobility at 6 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Iersel, Patricia A M; Bakker, Saskia C M; Jonker, Arnold J H; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate in term infants associations between quality of general movements and developmental outcome in term infants at 6 years with either cerebral palsy (CP) or limited mobility without CP. Participants of this prospective study were 145 term infants (86 male, 59 female). Their general movements quality was assessed at 'writhing' and 'fidgety' general movements age (3wks and 13wks post term). The assessment at 6 years consisted of a neurological examination, including assessment of minor neurological dysfunction (MND), evaluation of mobility with the Movement Assessment Battery for Children, and of behaviour and learning problems with questionnaires. Definitely abnormal general movements at writhing age were not associated with CP, whereas definitely abnormal general movements at fidgety age were (sensitivity 60%; specificity 91%; positive predictive value 19%, negative predictive value 98%). In children without CP, general movements quality was not associated with limited mobility, but it was associated to a minor extent with MND. In term infants, definitely abnormal general movements at fidgety age do predict CP, but with lower accuracy than in preterm infants. General movements quality does not predict limited mobility in children without CP. The study supports suggestions that predictive value of general movements assessment in term infants is lower than that in preterm infants. © 2016 Mac Keith Press.

  17. Characterization of an insect heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channel with unique alternative splicing mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xuan-Zhao; Pei, Yu-Xia; Lei, Wei; Wang, Ke-Yi; Shang, Feng; Jiang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2017-01-01

    Recent discovery of the heterodimeric voltage-gated sodium channels (Na v ) in two aphid species, Acyrthosiphon pisum and Myzus persicae, aroused interest in exploring whether this kind of channel is conserved for aphids. Herewith, we aim to provide evidence for the conservation of heterodimeric Na v s in aphids and investigate whether they have unique splicing patterns. We found that the only identifiable Na v from Toxoptera citricida consisted of two subunits, forming a heterodimeric Na v , which carried an atypical "DENS" ion selectivity filter and a conventional "MFM" inactivation gate, confirming the heterodimeric Na v s' conservation within aphids. These unique heterodimeric channels may form a new Na v subfamily, specific to aphids. A more ancient member of four-domain Na v homolog was well preserved in T. citricida, carrying a typical "DEEA" and "MFL" motif. The presence of "DENS" in mammalian Na x s and "DEKT" in a fungus Na v suggested that the heterodimeric Na v s may still preserve Na + permeability. Sequencing 46 clones from nymphs and adults exposed unique splicing patterns for this heterodimeric Na v from T. citricida, revealing 7 alternatively spliced exons, evidencing that exon 5 was no longer unique to Bombyx mori, and exon k/l was semi-mutually exclusive. Two previously undescribed optional exons and a SNP site seemingly unique to aphids were identified. In conclusion, the dimeric Na v s might form a new aphids-specific heterodimeric N a v subfamily. This dimeric Na v from T. citricida was characterized with distinguishable alternative splicing modes, exemplified by the discovery of two novel alternative exons and unique usage patterns of alternative exons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Evolutionarily conserved exon definition interactions with U11 snRNP mediate alternative splicing regulation on U11-48K and U11/U12-65K genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemelä, Elina H; Verbeeren, Jens; Singha, Prosanta; Nurmi, Visa; Frilander, Mikko J

    2015-01-01

    Many splicing regulators bind to their own pre-mRNAs to induce alternative splicing that leads to formation of unstable mRNA isoforms. This provides an autoregulatory feedback mechanism that regulates the cellular homeostasis of these factors. We have described such an autoregulatory mechanism for two core protein components, U11-48K and U11/U12-65K, of the U12-dependent spliceosome. This regulatory system uses an atypical splicing enhancer element termed USSE (U11 snRNP-binding splicing enhancer), which contains two U12-type consensus 5' splice sites (5'ss). Evolutionary analysis of the USSE element from a large number of animal and plant species indicate that USSE sequence must be located 25-50 nt downstream from the target 3' splice site (3'ss). Together with functional evidence showing a loss of USSE activity when this distance is reduced and a requirement for RS-domain of U11-35K protein for 3'ss activation, our data suggests that U11 snRNP bound to USSE uses exon definition interactions for regulating alternative splicing. However, unlike standard exon definition where the 5'ss bound by U1 or U11 will be subsequently activated for splicing, the USSE element functions similarly as an exonic splicing enhancer and is involved only in upstream splice site activation but does not function as a splicing donor. Additionally, our evolutionary and functional data suggests that the function of the 5'ss duplication within the USSE elements is to allow binding of two U11/U12 di-snRNPs that stabilize each others' binding through putative mutual interactions.

  19. A juvenile form of postsynaptic hippocampal long-term potentiation in mice deficient for the AMPA receptor subunit GluR-A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, V.; Kaiser, K.M.M.; Borchardt, T.; Adelmann, G.; Rozov, A.; Burnashev, N.; Brix, C.; Frotscher, M.; Anderson, P.; Hvalby, O.; Sakmann, B.; Seeburg, P.H.; Sprengel, R.

    2003-01-01

    In adult mice, long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission at CA3-to-CA1 synapses induced by tetanic stimulation requires L-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors containing GluR-A subunits. Here, we report a GluR-A-independent form of LTP, which is comparable in

  20. The GABA[subscript A] Receptor Agonist Muscimol Induces an Age- and Region-Dependent Form of Long-Term Depression in the Mouse Striatum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqun; Yao, Ning; Chergui, Karima

    2016-01-01

    Several forms of long-term depression (LTD) of glutamatergic synaptic transmission have been identified in the dorsal striatum and in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Such experience-dependent synaptic plasticity might play important roles in reward-related learning. The GABA[subscript A] receptor agonist muscimol was recently found to trigger a…

  1. Short Term International Study for Teachers as a Form of Experiential Learning: A Case Study of American Educators in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Zulfikar

    2017-01-01

    This dissertation is a case study of the experiences and perspectives of nine US teachers who participated in a short-term international study tour to Turkey, from the theoretical perspectives of global education and experiential learning. It examines how that experience shaped the teachers' understandings of global dynamics, cultural differences…

  2. 76 FR 37403 - Treasury International Capital Form SLT: Report of Aggregate Holdings of Long-Term Securities by...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Treasury International Capital Form SLT: Report of Aggregate Holdings... is informing the public that it is conducting a mandatory monthly collection of information on cross....- resident end-investor. Securities held as part of a direct investment relationship should not be reported...

  3. RADIATION SAFETY JUSTIFICATION FOR THE LONG-TERM STORAGE OF GAS CONDENSATE IN THE UNDERGROUND RESERVOURS FORMED BY THE NUCLEAR EXPLOSION TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Romanovich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents approaches to the safety justification of the gas condensate and brine long-term storage in the underground reservoirs formed by the nuclear explosion technology. Gas condensate and brine are the intermediate level liquid radioactive waste containing isotopes: 3Н, 137Cs and 90Sr, in traces - 239Pu, 235U, 241Am.Safety of the gas condensate and brine long-term storage in the underground reservoirs is assessed on the base of the multi-barrier principle implementation, used during radioactive waste disposal. It is shown that the gas condensate and brine long-term storage in the sealed underground reservoirs formed by nuclear explosion technologies in salt domes does not lead to the surface radioactive contamination and population exposure.

  4. Splicing Express: a software suite for alternative splicing analysis using next-generation sequencing data

    OpenAIRE

    Kroll, Jose E.; Kim, Jihoon; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; de Souza, Sandro J.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation. Alternative splicing events (ASEs) are prevalent in the transcriptome of eukaryotic species and are known to influence many biological phenomena. The identification and quantification of these events are crucial for a better understanding of biological processes. Next-generation DNA sequencing technologies have allowed deep characterization of transcriptomes and made it possible to address these issues. ASEs analysis, however, represents a challenging task especially when many dif...

  5. Eight nucleotide substitutions inhibit splicing to HPV-16 3'-splice site SA3358 and reduce the efficiency by which HPV-16 increases the life span of primary human keratinocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoze Li

    Full Text Available The most commonly used 3'-splice site on the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16 genome named SA3358 is used to produce HPV-16 early mRNAs encoding E4, E5, E6 and E7, and late mRNAs encoding L1 and L2. We have previously shown that SA3358 is suboptimal and is totally dependent on a downstream splicing enhancer containingmultiple potential ASF/SF2 binding sites. Here weshow that only one of the predicted ASF/SF2 sites accounts for the majority of the enhancer activity. We demonstrate that single nucleotide substitutions in this predicted ASF/SF2 site impair enhancer function and that this correlates with less efficient binding to ASF/SF2 in vitro. We provide evidence that HPV-16 mRNAs that arespliced to SA3358 interact with ASF/SF2 in living cells. In addition,mutational inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site weakened the enhancer at SA3358 in episomal forms of the HPV-16 genome, indicating that the enhancer is active in the context of the full HPV-16 genome.This resulted in induction of HPV-16 late gene expression as a result of competition from late splice site SA5639. Furthermore, inactivation of the ASF/SF2 site of the SA3358 splicing enhancer reduced the ability of E6- and E7-encoding HPV-16 plasmids to increase the life span of primary keratinocytes in vitro, demonstrating arequirement for an intact splicing enhancer of SA3358 forefficient production of the E6 and E7 mRNAs. These results link the strength of the HPV-16 SA3358 splicing enhancer to expression of E6 and E7 and to the pathogenic properties of HPV-16.

  6. Global Splicing Pattern Reversion during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Ohta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing generates multiple transcripts from a single gene, and cell-type-specific splicing profiles are important for the properties and functions of the cells. Recently, somatic cells have been shown to undergo dedifferentiation after the forced expression of transcription factors. However, it remains unclear whether somatic cell splicing is reorganized during reprogramming. Here, by combining deep sequencing with high-throughput absolute qRT-PCR, we show that somatic splicing profiles revert to pluripotent ones during reprogramming. Remarkably, the splicing pattern in pluripotent stem cells resembles that in testes, and the regulatory regions have specific characteristics in length and sequence. Furthermore, our siRNA screen has identified RNA-binding proteins that regulate splicing events in iPSCs. We have then demonstrated that two of the RNA-binding proteins, U2af1 and Srsf3, play a role in somatic cell reprogramming. Our results indicate that the drastic alteration in splicing represents part of the molecular network involved in the reprogramming process.

  7. Herboxidiene triggers splicing repression and abiotic stress responses in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Alshareef, Sahar

    2017-03-27

    Background Constitutive and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs from multiexonic genes controls the diversity of the proteome; these precisely regulated processes also fine-tune responses to cues related to growth, development, and stresses. Small-molecule inhibitors that perturb splicing provide invaluable tools for use as chemical probes to uncover the molecular underpinnings of splicing regulation and as potential anticancer compounds. Results Here, we show that herboxidiene (GEX1A) inhibits both constitutive and alternative splicing. Moreover, GEX1A activates genome-wide transcriptional patterns involved in abiotic stress responses in plants. GEX1A treatment -activated ABA-inducible promoters, and led to stomatal closure. Interestingly, GEX1A and pladienolide B (PB) elicited similar cellular changes, including alterations in the patterns of transcription and splicing, suggesting that these compounds might target the same spliceosome complex in plant cells. Conclusions Our study establishes GEX1A as a potent splicing inhibitor in plants that can be used to probe the assembly, dynamics, and molecular functions of the spliceosome and to study the interplay between splicing stress and abiotic stresses, as well as having potential biotechnological applications.

  8. Aberrant and alternative splicing in skeletal system disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xin; Tang, Liling

    2013-10-01

    The main function of skeletal system is to support the body and help movement. A variety of factors can lead to skeletal system disease, including age, exercise, and of course genetic makeup and expression. Pre-mRNA splicing plays a crucial role in gene expression, by creating multiple protein variants with different biological functions. The recent studies show that several skeletal system diseases are related to pre-mRNA splicing. This review focuses on the relationship between pre-mRNA splicing and skeletal system disease. On the one hand, splice site mutation that leads to aberrant splicing often causes genetic skeletal system disease, like COL1A1, SEDL and LRP5. On the other hand, alternative splicing without genomic mutation may generate some marker protein isoforms, for example, FN, VEGF and CD44. Therefore, understanding the relationship between pre-mRNA splicing and skeletal system disease will aid in uncovering the mechanism of disease and contribute to the future development of gene therapy. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Osseointegration of Plateau Root Form Implants: Unique Healing Pathway Leading to Haversian-Like Long-Term Morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Paulo G; Suzuki, Marcelo; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Gil, Luis F; Tovar, Nick; Jimbo, Ryo; Neiva, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A

    2015-01-01

    Endosteal dental implants have been utilized as anchors for dental and orthopedic rehabilitations for decades with one of the highest treatment success rates in medicine. Such success is due to the phenomenon of osseointegration where after the implant surgical placement, bone healing results into an intimate contact between bone and implant surface. While osseointegration is an established phenomenon, the route which osseointegration occurs around endosteal implants is related to various implant design factors including surgical instrumentation and implant macro, micro, and nanometer scale geometry. In an implant system where void spaces (healing chambers) are present between the implant and bone immediately after placement, its inherent bone healing pathway results in unique opportunities to accelerate the osseointegration phenomenon at the short-term and its maintenance on the long-term through a haversian-like bone morphology and mechanical properties.

  10. “I Agree”: The Effects of Embedding Terms of Service Key Points in Online User Registration Form

    OpenAIRE

    Kljun, Matjaž; Vičič, Jernej; Pucihar, Klen,; Kavšek, Branko

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Terms of service (ToS) are becoming an ubiquitous part of online account creation. There is a general understanding that users rarely read them and do not particularly care about binding themselves into legally enforceable contracts with online service providers. Some services are trying to change this trend with presenting ToS section as key points on a ToS dedicated page. However, little is known how would such presentation of key points affect the continuation of us...

  11. Oriented scanning is the leading mechanism underlying 5' splice site selection in mammals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borensztajn, Keren; Sobrier, Marie-Laure; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Fischer, Anne-Marie; Tapon-Bretaudière, Jacqueline; Amselem, Serge

    2006-01-01

    Splice site selection is a key element of pre-mRNA splicing. Although it is known to involve specific recognition of short consensus sequences by the splicing machinery, the mechanisms by which 5' splice sites are accurately identified remain controversial and incompletely resolved. The human F7

  12. Splicing landscape of the eight collaborative cross founder strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Christina L; Wilmot, Beth; Walter, Nicole Ar; Oberbeck, Denesa; Kawane, Sunita; Searles, Robert P; McWeeney, Shannon K; Hitzemann, Robert

    2015-02-05

    The Collaborative Cross (CC) is a large panel of genetically diverse recombinant inbred mouse strains specifically designed to provide a systems genetics resource for the study of complex traits. In part, the utility of the CC stems from the extensive genome-wide annotations of founder strain sequence and structural variation. Still missing, however, are transcriptome-specific annotations of the CC founder strains that could further enhance the utility of this resource. We provide a comprehensive survey of the splicing landscape of the 8 CC founder strains by leveraging the high level of alternative splicing within the brain. Using deep transcriptome sequencing, we found that a majority of the splicing landscape is conserved among the 8 strains, with ~65% of junctions being shared by at least 2 strains. We, however, found a large number of potential strain-specific splicing events as well, with an average of ~3000 and ~500 with ≥3 and ≥10 sequence read coverage, respectively, within each strain. To better understand strain-specific splicing within the CC founder strains, we defined criteria for and identified high-confidence strain-specific splicing events. These splicing events were defined as exon-exon junctions 1) found within only one strain, 2) with a read coverage ≥10, and 3) defined by a canonical splice site. With these criteria, a total of 1509 high-confidence strain-specific splicing events were identified, with the majority found within two of the wild-derived strains, CAST and PWK. Strikingly, the overwhelming majority, 94%, of these strain-specific splicing events are not yet annotated. Strain-specific splicing was also located within genomic regions recently reported to be over- and under-represented within CC populations. Phenotypic characterization of CC populations is increasing; thus these results will not only aid in further elucidating the transcriptomic architecture of the individual CC founder strains, but they will also help in guiding

  13. Categorization of 77 dystrophin exons into 5 groups by a decision tree using indexes of splicing regulatory factors as decision markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malueka, Rusdy Ghazali; Takaoka, Yutaka; Yagi, Mariko; Awano, Hiroyuki; Lee, Tomoko; Dwianingsih, Ery Kus; Nishida, Atsushi; Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Matsuo, Masafumi

    2012-03-31

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, a fatal muscle-wasting disease, is characterized by dystrophin deficiency caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Skipping of a target dystrophin exon during splicing with antisense oligonucleotides is attracting much attention as the most plausible way to express dystrophin in DMD. Antisense oligonucleotides have been designed against splicing regulatory sequences such as splicing enhancer sequences of target exons. Recently, we reported that a chemical kinase inhibitor specifically enhances the skipping of mutated dystrophin exon 31, indicating the existence of exon-specific splicing regulatory systems. However, the basis for such individual regulatory systems is largely unknown. Here, we categorized the dystrophin exons in terms of their splicing regulatory factors. Using a computer-based machine learning system, we first constructed a decision tree separating 77 authentic from 14 known cryptic exons using 25 indexes of splicing regulatory factors as decision markers. We evaluated the classification accuracy of a novel cryptic exon (exon 11a) identified in this study. However, the tree mislabeled exon 11a as a true exon. Therefore, we re-constructed the decision tree to separate all 15 cryptic exons. The revised decision tree categorized the 77 authentic exons into five groups. Furthermore, all nine disease-associated novel exons were successfully categorized as exons, validating the decision tree. One group, consisting of 30 exons, was characterized by a high density of exonic splicing enhancer sequences. This suggests that AOs targeting splicing enhancer sequences would efficiently induce skipping of exons belonging to this group. The decision tree categorized the 77 authentic exons into five groups. Our classification may help to establish the strategy for exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  14. [Quality of life of patients at late terms after surgical treatment of complicated forms of diabetic foot syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, T V; Levchik, E Iu

    2010-01-01

    Quality of life were explored in an open prospective controlled study in 116 patients with complicated diabetic foot syndrome (experimental group) and 30 diabetics without this syndrome (control group) by questioning of quality of life (questionnaires SF-36, Functional Scale of Lower Extremity) in long terms (6-18 months) after surgical treatment. Advantages of foot "saving" resections in surgical treatment of complicated diabetic boot syndrome were detected: patients without amputations had the physical wellbeing score and the Functional Scale of Lower Extremity number, comparable with the group of diabetics without diabetic foot syndrome. The integral mental wellbeing scores were low in all observed groups of patients.

  15. Distinct target cell-dependent forms of short-term plasticity of the central visceral afferent synapses of the rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watabe Ayako M

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The visceral afferents from various cervico-abdominal sensory receptors project to the dorsal vagal complex (DVC, which is composed of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS, the area postrema and the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DMX, via the vagus and glossopharyngeal nerves and then the solitary tract (TS in the brainstem. While the excitatory transmission at the TS-NTS synapses shows strong frequency-dependent suppression in response to repeated stimulation of the afferents, the frequency dependence and short-term plasticity at the TS-DMX synapses, which also transmit monosynaptic information from the visceral afferents to the DVC neurons, remain largely unknown. Results Recording of the EPSCs activated by paired or repeated TS stimulation in the brainstem slices of rats revealed that, unlike NTS neurons whose paired-pulse ratio (PPR is consistently below 0.6, the distribution of the PPR of DMX neurons shows bimodal peaks that are composed of type I (PPR, 0.6-1.5; 53% of 120 neurons recorded and type II (PPR, Conclusions These two general types of short-term plasticity might contribute to the differential activation of distinct vago-vagal reflex circuits, depending on the firing frequency and type of visceral afferents.

  16. Changes in Alternative Splicing in Apis Mellifera Bees Fed Apis Cerana Royal Jelly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Yuan Yuan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Western honey bee (Apis mellifera is a social insect characterized by caste differentiation in which the queen bee and worker bees display marked differences in morphology, behavior, reproduction, and longevity despite their identical genomes. The main causative factor in caste differentiation is the food fed to queen larvae, termed royal jelly (RJ. Alternative splicing (AS is an important RNA-mediated post-transcriptional process in eukaryotes. Here we report AS changes in A. mellifera after being fed either A. mellifera RJ or A. cerana RJ. The results demonstrated that the RJ type affected 4 types of AS in adult A. mellifera: exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5’ splice sites, and alternative 3’splice sites. After feeding with A. cerana RJ, AS occurred in many genes in adult A. mellifera that encode proteins involved in development, growth, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and substance metabolism. This study provides the first evidence that heterospecific RJ can influence the AS of many genes related to honey bee development and growth.

  17. Generation of Chimeric RNAs by cis-splicing of adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) in mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Jian-Shu; Jing, Xiao-Yan; Du, Xin; Yang, Xiu-Qin

    2018-02-20

    Chimeric RNA molecules, possessing exons from two or more independent genes, are traditionally believed to be produced by chromosome rearrangement. However, recent studies revealed that cis-splicing of adjacent genes (cis- SAGe) is one of the major mechanisms underlying the formation of chimeric RNAs. cis-SAGe refers to intergenic splicing of directly adjacent genes with the same transcriptional orientation, resulting in read-through transcripts, termed chimeric RNAs, which contain sequences from two or more parental genes. cis-SAGe was first identified in tumor cells, since then its potential in carcinogenesis has attracted extensive attention. More and more scientists are focusing on it. With the development of research, cis-SAGe was found to be ubiquitous in various normal tissues, and might make a crucial contribution to the formation of novel genes in the evolution of genomes. In this review, we summarize the splicing pattern, expression characteristics, possible mechanisms, and significance of cis-SAGe in mammals. This review will be helpful for general understanding of the current status and development tendency of cis-SAGe.

  18. Splice variation in the cytoplasmic domains of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein affects its cellular localisation and transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Louise H; Traherne, James A; Plotnek, Gemma; Ward, Rosemary; Trowsdale, John

    2007-09-01

    Although myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein is a candidate autoantigen in multiple sclerosis, its function remains unknown. In humans, mRNA expressed by the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein gene is alternatively spliced resulting in at least nine unique protein isoforms. In this study, we investigated the sub-cellular localisation and membrane trafficking of six isoforms by cloning them into mammalian expression vectors. Confocal microscopy revealed that these protein products are expressed in different cellular compartments. While two full-length isoforms (25.6 and 25.1) are expressed at the cell surface, three alternatively spliced forms (22.7, 21.0 and 20.5) have a more intracellular distribution, localising to the endoplasmic reticulum and/or endosomes. Isoform 16.3, which lacks a transmembrane domain, is secreted. A switch in the sub-cellular localisation of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein may have profound effects on receptor:ligand interactions and consequently the function of the protein. The structural features of the alternative isoforms and their differential, sub-cellular expression patterns could dictate the exposure of major immunogenic determinants within the central nervous system. Our findings highlight myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein splicing as a factor that could be critical to the phenotypic expression of multiple sclerosis.

  19. Cancer-associated splicing variant of tumor suppressor AIMP2/p38: pathological implication in tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Woo Choi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Although ARS-interacting multifunctional protein 2 (AIMP2, also named as MSC p38 was first found as a component for a macromolecular tRNA synthetase complex, it was recently discovered to dissociate from the complex and work as a potent tumor suppressor. Upon DNA damage, AIMP2 promotes apoptosis through the protective interaction with p53. However, it was not demonstrated whether AIMP2 was indeed pathologically linked to human cancer. In this work, we found that a splicing variant of AIMP2 lacking exon 2 (AIMP2-DX2 is highly expressed by alternative splicing in human lung cancer cells and patient's tissues. AIMP2-DX2 compromised pro-apoptotic activity of normal AIMP2 through the competitive binding to p53. The cells with higher level of AIMP2-DX2 showed higher propensity to form anchorage-independent colonies and increased resistance to cell death. Mice constitutively expressing this variant showed increased susceptibility to carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. The expression ratio of AIMP2-DX2 to normal AIMP2 was increased according to lung cancer stage and showed a positive correlation with the survival of patients. Thus, this work identified an oncogenic splicing variant of a tumor suppressor, AIMP2/p38, and suggests its potential for anti-cancer target.

  20. Spent fuel as a waste form: Data needs to allow long term performance assessment under repository disposal conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oversby, V.M.

    1986-12-01

    Performance assessment calculations are required for high level waste repositories for a period of 10,000 years. The Siting Guidelines require a comparison of sites following site characterization and prior to final site selection to be made over a 100,000 year period. To perform the required calculations, a detailed knowledge of the physical and chemical processes that affect waste form performance will be needed for each site. This paper will review the factors that affect the release of radionuclides from spent fuel under repository conditions, summarize our present state of knowledge, and suggest areas where more work is needed to support the performance assessment calculations. 17 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Cross-species EST alignments reveal novel and conserved alternative splicing events in legumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendel Volker

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although originally thought to be less frequent in plants than in animals, alternative splicing (AS is now known to be widespread in plants. Here we report the characteristics of AS in legumes, one of the largest and most important plant families, based on EST alignments to the genome sequences of Medicago truncatula (Mt and Lotus japonicus (Lj. Results Based on cognate EST alignments alone, the observed frequency of alternatively spliced genes is lower in Mt (~10%, 1,107 genes and Lj (~3%, 92 genes than in Arabidopsis and rice (both around 20%. However, AS frequencies are comparable in all four species if EST levels are normalized. Intron retention is the most common form of AS in all four plant species (~50%, with slightly lower frequency in legumes compared to Arabidopsis and rice. This differs notably from vertebrates, where exon skipping is most common. To uncover additional AS events, we aligned ESTs from other legume species against the Mt genome sequence. In this way, 248 additional Mt genes were predicted to be alternatively spliced. We also identified 22 AS events completely conserved in two or more plant species. Conclusion This study extends the range of plant taxa shown to have high levels of AS, confirms the importance of intron retention in plants, and demonstrates the utility of using ESTs from related species in order to identify novel and conserved AS events. The results also indicate that the frequency of AS in plants is comparable to that observed in mammals. Finally, our results highlight the importance of normalizing EST levels when estimating the frequency of alternative splicing.

  2. Splice variants of enigma homolog, differentially expressed during heart development, promote or prevent hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tomoko; Wälchli, Sébastien; Fujita, Toshitsugu; Ryser, Stephan; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Schlegel, Werner; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Maturana, Andrés D

    2010-06-01

    Proteins with a PDZ (for PSD-95, DLG, ZO-1) and one to three LIM (for Lin11, Isl-1, Mec-3) domains are scaffolding sarcomeric and cytoskeletal elements that form structured muscle fibres and provide for the link to intracellular signalling by selectively associating protein kinases, ion channels, and transcription factors with the mechanical stress-strain sensors. Enigma homolog (ENH) is a PDZ-LIM protein with four splice variants: ENH1 with an N-terminal PDZ domain and three C-terminal LIM domains and ENH2, ENH3, and ENH4 without LIM domains. We addressed the functional role of ENH alternative splicing. We studied the expression of the four ENH isoforms in the heart during development and in a mouse model of heart hypertrophy. All four isoforms are expressed in the heart but the pattern of expression is clearly different between embryonic, neonatal, and adult stages. ENH1 appears as the embryonic isoform, whereas ENH2, ENH3, and ENH4 are predominant in adult heart. Moreover, alternative splicing of ENH was changed following induction of heart hypertrophy, producing an ENH isoform pattern similar to that of neonatal heart. Next, we tested a possible causal role of ENH1 and ENH4 in the development of cardiac hypertrophy. When overexpressed in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, ENH1 promoted the expression of hypertrophy markers and increased cell volume, whereas, on the contrary, ENH4 overexpression prevented these changes. Antagonistic splice variants of ENH may play a central role in the adaptive changes of the link between mechanical stress-sensing and signalling occurring during embryonic development and/or heart hypertrophy.

  3. PPS, a large multidomain protein, functions with sex-lethal to regulate alternative splicing in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew L; Nagengast, Alexis A; Salz, Helen K

    2010-03-05

    Alternative splicing controls the expression of many genes, including the Drosophila sex determination gene Sex-lethal (Sxl). Sxl expression is controlled via a negative regulatory mechanism where inclusion of the translation-terminating male exon is blocked in females. Previous studies have shown that the mechanism leading to exon skipping is autoregulatory and requires the SXL protein to antagonize exon inclusion by interacting with core spliceosomal proteins, including the U1 snRNP protein Sans-fille (SNF). In studies begun by screening for proteins that interact with SNF, we identified PPS, a previously uncharacterized protein, as a novel component of the machinery required for Sxl male exon skipping. PPS encodes a large protein with four signature motifs, PHD, BRK, TFS2M, and SPOC, typically found in proteins involved in transcription. We demonstrate that PPS has a direct role in Sxl male exon skipping by showing first that loss of function mutations have phenotypes indicative of Sxl misregulation and second that the PPS protein forms a complex with SXL and the unspliced Sxl RNA. In addition, we mapped the recruitment of PPS, SXL, and SNF along the Sxl gene using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), which revealed that, like many other splicing factors, these proteins bind their RNA targets while in close proximity to the DNA. Interestingly, while SNF and SXL are specifically recruited to their predicted binding sites, PPS has a distinct pattern of accumulation along the Sxl gene, associating with a region that includes, but is not limited to, the SxlPm promoter. Together, these data indicate that PPS is different from other splicing factors involved in male-exon skipping and suggest, for the first time, a functional link between transcription and SXL-mediated alternative splicing. Loss of zygotic PPS function, however, is lethal to both sexes, indicating that its role may be of broad significance.

  4. SnoI, a novel alternatively spliced isoform of the ski protooncogene homolog, sno.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson-White, S

    1993-09-25

    We have cloned and sequenced a novel human isoform of sno, snoI for insertion. SnoI contains 1330 nucleotides inserted in place of 7 nucleotides of the snoN mRNA. Sno is a member of the ski protooncogene family, which has been implicated in muscle development. The two previously known sno alternatively spliced isoforms are snoN (684 amino acids), and snoA (415 amino acids); snoI encodes a truncated isoform of 399 amino acids (44,298 MW). Southern blot experiments show that snoI contains a third alternative exon from the sno gene; a single sno gene can express all three isoforms of sno by alternative splicing. All three isoforms contain the region that is most similar to the ski proto-oncogene. The relationship between snoI and snoN is analogous to that between delta fosB and fosB, where a truncated form of the fosB transcription factor is produced by alternative splicing. We find conservation of human snoI-specific sequences in several mammalian species, in monkey, dog, cow, rabbit and pig, but not in rodents, whereas the common portion of the sno gene is conserved in all vertebrate species tested. SnoN, snoA, and ski mRNAs accumulate in many human tissues including skeletal muscle; the snoI alternative mRNA accumulates more specifically in skeletal muscle. SnoI is also expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma tumor, a tumor that contains differentiated skeletal muscle. The tissue-specific alternative splicing of human snoI, an mRNA in the ski/sno gene family, and the presence of sno mRNAs in muscle are consistent with a proposed role for the sno oncogene in muscle gene regulation.

  5. Androgen Receptor Splice Variants and Resistance to Taxane Chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    report. Inventions, patent applications, and/or licenses Nothing to report. Others Nothing to report. 7. Participants & Other... Brand LJ et al: Androgen receptor splice variants mediate enzalutamide resistance in castration-resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Cancer Res

  6. Minor class splicing shapes the zebrafish transcriptome during development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markmiller, Sebastian; Cloonan, Nicole; Lardelli, Rea M

    2014-01-01

    Minor class or U12-type splicing is a highly conserved process required to remove a minute fraction of introns from human pre-mRNAs. Defects in this splicing pathway have recently been linked to human disease, including a severe developmental disorder encompassing brain and skeletal abnormalities...... known as Taybi-Linder syndrome or microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism 1, and a hereditary intestinal polyposis condition, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Although a key mechanism for regulating gene expression, the impact of impaired U12-type splicing on the transcriptome is unknown. Here, we...... as the U11/U12 di-snRNP 65-kDa protein, a unique component of the U12-type spliceosome. The biochemical impact of the mutation in clbn is the formation of aberrant U11- and U12-containing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins that impair the efficiency of U12-type splicing. Using RNA sequencing and microarrays...

  7. Radiosensitivity of kidney colony-forming cells: a short-term assay in situ in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewen, C.; Hendry, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    A short-term colony assay for renal tubule epithelium has been developed. Uranyl nitrate (UN) is a heavy metal nephrotoxin that induces acute tubule necrosis followed by a large compensatory increase in the rate of cell proliferation in the nephron. UN was used to precipitate latent damage following renal irradiation. Using a subcapsular colony count at 14 days after unilateral irradiation, a single-dose cell survival curve was obtained with a D0 of 4.2 +/- 0.3 Gy. High-dose irradiation of an exteriorized kidney resulted in a survival curve which was biphasic, with a plateau in survival between 18 and 40 Gy. Subtraction of this plateau level from all the survival data gave D0 values of 2.5 +/- 0.2 Gy (data analyzed between 7.5 and 16 Gy) or 2.0 +/- 0.2 Gy (over range 12-16 Gy). The D0 value obtained at 20 months after bilateral (or unilateral) kidney irradiation, without the use of UN, was 2.9 +/- 1.1 Gy (over range 10-14 Gy)

  8. In situ testing of waste forms and container materials: Contribution to the identification of their long term behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iseghem, P. Van; Kursten, B.; Valcke, E.; Serra, H.; Fays, J.; Sneyers, A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews in situ projects that have been carried out in the underground laboratory in Boom Clay in Mol in Belgium. The projects involved in situ interaction between candidate container materials, nuclear waste glasses or cements and the Boom Clay. The in situ tests on container materials showed a strong corrosion of C-steel, so that a new container (overpack) material is being considered actually in Belgium, namely stainless steel. The interaction between waste glass or cements and Boom Clay results in reaction layers of a few hundred μm thickness. These layers were successfully characterised in detail, and the reaction processes based on these analyses interpreted. The outputs of the in situ tests on the different materials are compared, and possible interferences discussed. The added value of these in situ tests as part of the global objective of evaluating the long term behaviour of the materials in a disposal rock, in conjunction with laboratory tests and modelling is discussed. (authors)

  9. Stress enhances fear by forming new synapses with greater capacity for long-term potentiation in the amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suvrathan, Aparna; Bennur, Sharath; Ghosh, Supriya; Tomar, Anupratap; Anilkumar, Shobha; Chattarji, Sumantra

    2014-01-05

    Prolonged and severe stress leads to cognitive deficits, but facilitates emotional behaviour. Little is known about the synaptic basis for this contrast. Here, we report that in rats subjected to chronic immobilization stress, long-term potentiation (LTP) and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated synaptic responses are enhanced in principal neurons of the lateral amygdala, a brain area involved in fear memory formation. This is accompanied by electrophysiological and morphological changes consistent with the formation of 'silent synapses', containing only NMDARs. In parallel, chronic stress also reduces synaptic inhibition. Together, these synaptic changes would enable amygdalar neurons to undergo further experience-dependent modifications, leading to stronger fear memories. Consistent with this prediction, stressed animals exhibit enhanced conditioned fear. Hence, stress may leave its mark in the amygdala by generating new synapses with greater capacity for plasticity, thereby creating an ideal neuronal substrate for affective disorders. These findings also highlight the unique features of stress-induced plasticity in the amygdala that are strikingly different from the stress-induced impairment of structure and function in the hippocampus.

  10. Field investigation finding of long term effects in Alberta livestock exposed to acid forming emissions: Survey following the Lodgepole blowout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, B.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of the Amoco Dome Brazeau River (Lodgepole) sour gas well blowout of October 1982 on livestock are reviewed. For 26 days the well was not on fire, with condensate falling on the area immediately surrounding the well site, while during the 41 days the well was burning, sour gas and condensate underwent combustion in the intense fire. Many local residents noted problems with their farm animals during the blowout period. A study was undertaken to evaluate opinions and attitudes of livestock producers about the long-term effects of the Lodgepole blowout. Contact was made with producers in the area of concern, and a worksheet was developed to aid in the collection of data. Information gathered was based on producer records, auction sale tickets, sales receipts and memory. Twenty livestock producers were interviewed, representing 1,700 head of beef cows, 40 dairy cows and 21 sows. Concerns expressed by producers included birth weight, birth defects or stillbirth, scours and problem calves, poor growth, open or dry cows, abortions, late calves, poor growth in replacement heifers, abnormal hair, and abnormal breeding. 1 tab

  11. Cell-Type-Specific Splicing of Piezo2 Regulates Mechanotransduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Szczot

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Piezo2 is a mechanically activated ion channel required for touch discrimination, vibration detection, and proprioception. Here, we discovered that Piezo2 is extensively spliced, producing different Piezo2 isoforms with distinct properties. Sensory neurons from both mice and humans express a large repertoire of Piezo2 variants, whereas non-neuronal tissues express predominantly a single isoform. Notably, even within sensory ganglia, we demonstrate the splicing of Piezo2 to be cell type specific. Biophysical characterization revealed substantial differences in ion permeability, sensitivity to calcium modulation, and inactivation kinetics among Piezo2 splice variants. Together, our results describe, at the molecular level, a potential mechanism by which transduction is tuned, permitting the detection of a variety of mechanosensory stimuli. : Szczot et al. find that the mechanoreceptor Piezo2 is extensively alternatively spliced, generating multiple distinct isoforms. Their findings indicate that these splice products have specific tissue and cell type expression patterns and exhibit differences in receptor properties. Keywords: Piezo, touch, sensation, ion-channel, splicing

  12. GOASVM: a subcellular location predictor by incorporating term-frequency gene ontology into the general form of Chou's pseudo-amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Shibiao; Mak, Man-Wai; Kung, Sun-Yuan

    2013-04-21

    Prediction of protein subcellular localization is an important yet challenging problem. Recently, several computational methods based on Gene Ontology (GO) have been proposed to tackle this problem and have demonstrated superiority over methods based on other features. Existing GO-based methods, however, do not fully use the GO information. This paper proposes an efficient GO method called GOASVM that exploits the information from the GO term frequencies and distant homologs to represent a protein in the general form of Chou's pseudo-amino acid composition. The method first selects a subset of relevant GO terms to form a GO vector space. Then for each protein, the method uses the accession number (AC) of the protein or the ACs of its homologs to find the number of occurrences of the selected GO terms in the Gene Ontology annotation (GOA) database as a means to construct GO vectors for support vector machines (SVMs) classification. With the advantages of GO term frequencies and a new strategy to incorporate useful homologous information, GOASVM can achieve a prediction accuracy of 72.2% on a new independent test set comprising novel proteins that were added to Swiss-Prot six years later than the creation date of the training set. GOASVM and Supplementary materials are available online at http://bioinfo.eie.polyu.edu.hk/mGoaSvmServer/GOASVM.html. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of NR1 splicing on NR1/NR3B-type excitatory glycine receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orth Angela

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs are the most complex of ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs. Subunits of this subfamily assemble into heteromers, which – depending on the subunit combination – may display very different pharmacological and electrophysiological properties. The least studied members of the NMDAR family, the NR3 subunits, have been reported to assemble with NR1 to form excitatory glycine receptors in heterologous expression systems. The heterogeneity of NMDARs in vivo is in part conferred to the receptors by splicing of the NR1 subunit, especially with regard to proton sensitivity. Results Here, we have investigated whether the NR3B subunit is capable of assembly with each of the eight functional NR1 splice variants, and whether the resulting receptors share the unique functional properties described for NR1-1a/NR3. We provide evidence that functional excitatory glycine receptors formed regardless of the NR1 isoform, and their pharmacological profile matched the one reported for NR1-1a/NR3: glycine alone fully activated the receptors, which were insensitive to glutamate and block by Mg2+. Surprisingly, amplitudes of agonist-induced currents showed little dependency on the C-terminally spliced NR1 variants in NR1/NR3B diheteromers. Even more strikingly, NR3B conferred proton sensitivity also to receptors containing NR1b variants – possibly via disturbing the "proton shield" of NR1b splice variants. Conclusion While functional assembly could be demonstrated for all combinations, not all of the specific interactions seen for NR1 isoforms with coexpressed NR2 subunits could be corroborated for NR1 assembly with NR3. Rather, NR3 abates trafficking effects mediated by the NR1 C terminus as well as the N-terminally mediated proton insensitivity. Thus, this study establishes that NR3B overrides important NR1 splice variant-specific receptor properties in NR1/NR3B excitatory glycine receptors.

  14. Spliced leader RNA silencing (SLS - a programmed cell death pathway in Trypanosoma brucei that is induced upon ER stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaeli Shulamit

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Trypanosoma brucei is the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. The parasite cycles between its insect (procyclic form and mammalian hosts (bloodstream form. Trypanosomes lack conventional transcription regulation, and their genes are transcribed in polycistronic units that are processed by trans-splicing and polyadenylation. In trans-splicing, which is essential for processing of each mRNA, an exon, the spliced leader (SL is added to all mRNAs from a small RNA, the SL RNA. Trypanosomes lack the machinery for the unfolded protein response (UPR, which in other eukaryotes is induced under endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress. Trypanosomes respond to such stress by changing the stability of mRNAs, which are essential for coping with the stress. However, under severe ER stress that is induced by blocking translocation of proteins to the ER, treatment of cells with chemicals that induce misfolding in the ER, or extreme pH, trypanosomes elicit the spliced leader silencing (SLS pathway. In SLS, the transcription of the SL RNA gene is extinguished, and tSNAP42, a specific SL RNA transcription factor, fails to bind to its cognate promoter. SLS leads to complete shut-off of trans-splicing. In this review, I discuss the UPR in mammals and compare it to the ER stress response in T. brucei leading to SLS. I summarize the evidence supporting the notion that SLS is a programmed cell death (PCD pathway that is utilized by the parasites to substitute for the apoptosis observed in higher eukaryotes under prolonged ER stress. I present the hypothesis that SLS evolved to expedite the death process, and rapidly remove from the population unfit parasites that, by elimination via SLS, cause minimal damage to the parasite population.

  15. A novel, secreted form of human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha) provokes myogenesis in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilpin, B J; Loechel, F; Mattei, M G

    1998-01-01

    , the cysteine-rich domain, and the unique 34 amino acid carboxyl terminus. Nude mouse tumors derived from these transfected cells contained ectopic muscle cells of apparent mouse origin as shown by species-specific markers. These results may have potential applications in the development of muscle-directed gene......The ADAM (A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease) family of cell-surface proteins may have an important role in cellular interactions and in modulating cellular responses. In this report we describe a novel, secreted form of human ADAM 12 (meltrin alpha), designated ADAM 12-S (S for short), and a larger......, membrane-bound form designated ADAM 12-L (L for long form). These two forms arise by alternative splicing of a single gene located on chromosome 10q26. Northern blotting demonstrated that mRNAs of both forms are abundant in human term placenta and are also present in some tumor cell lines. The ADAM 12-L...

  16. LSM Proteins Provide Accurate Splicing and Decay of Selected Transcripts to Ensure Normal Arabidopsis Development[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perea-Resa, Carlos; Hernández-Verdeja, Tamara; López-Cobollo, Rosa; Castellano, María del Mar; Salinas, Julio

    2012-01-01

    In yeast and animals, SM-like (LSM) proteins typically exist as heptameric complexes and are involved in different aspects of RNA metabolism. Eight LSM proteins, LSM1 to 8, are highly conserved and form two distinct heteroheptameric complexes, LSM1-7 and LSM2-8,that function in mRNA decay and splicing, respectively. A search of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome identifies 11 genes encoding proteins related to the eight conserved LSMs, the genes encoding the putative LSM1, LSM3, and LSM6 proteins being duplicated. Here, we report the molecular and functional characterization of the Arabidopsis LSM gene family. Our results show that the 11 LSM genes are active and encode proteins that are also organized in two different heptameric complexes. The LSM1-7 complex is cytoplasmic and is involved in P-body formation and mRNA decay by promoting decapping. The LSM2-8 complex is nuclear and is required for precursor mRNA splicing through U6 small nuclear RNA stabilization. More importantly, our results also reveal that these complexes are essential for the correct turnover and splicing of selected development-related mRNAs and for the normal development of Arabidopsis. We propose that LSMs play a critical role in Arabidopsis development by ensuring the appropriate development-related gene expression through the regulation of mRNA splicing and decay. PMID:23221597

  17. A splice site mutation in laminin-α2 results in a severe muscular dystrophy and growth abnormalities in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vandana A Gupta

    Full Text Available Congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of inherited muscle disorders. In patients, muscle weakness is usually present at or shortly after birth and is progressive in nature. Merosin deficient congenital muscular dystrophy (MDC1A is a form of CMD caused by a defect in the laminin-α2 gene (LAMA2. Laminin-α2 is an extracellular matrix protein that interacts with the dystrophin-dystroglycan (DGC complex in membranes providing stability to muscle fibers. In an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screen to develop zebrafish models of neuromuscular diseases, we identified a mutant fish that exhibits severe muscular dystrophy early in development. Genetic mapping identified a splice site mutation in the lama2 gene. This splice site is highly conserved in humans and this mutation results in mis-splicing of RNA and a loss of protein function. Homozygous lama2 mutant zebrafish, designated lama2(cl501/cl501, exhibited reduced motor function and progressive degeneration of skeletal muscles and died at 8-15 days post fertilization. The skeletal muscles exhibited damaged myosepta and detachment of myofibers in the affected fish. Laminin-α2 deficiency also resulted in growth defects in the brain and eye of the mutant fish. This laminin-α2 deficient mutant fish represents a novel disease model to develop therapies for modulating splicing defects in congenital muscular dystrophies and to restore the muscle function in human patients with CMD.

  18. The cancer exome generated by alternative mRNA splicing dilutes predicted HLA class I epitope density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stranzl, Thomas; Larsen, Mette V; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Brunak, Søren

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the cell surface. Here, we use a peptidome wide analysis of predicted alternative splice forms, based on a publicly available database, to show that peptides over-represented in cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes compared to peptides from normal transcripts. Peptides over-represented in cancer transcripts are in the case of the three most common HLA class I supertype representatives consistently found to contain fewer predicted epitopes compared to normal tissue. We observed a significant difference in amino acid composition between protein sequences associated with normal versus cancer tissue, as transcripts found in cancer are enriched with hydrophilic amino acids. This variation contributes to the observed significant lower likelihood of cancer-specific peptides to be predicted epitopes compared to peptides found in normal tissue.

  19. The cancer exome generated by alternative mRNA splicing dilutes predicted HLA class I epitope density.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Stranzl

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that cancers actively regulate alternative splicing. Altered splicing mechanisms in cancer lead to cancer-specific transcripts different from the pool of transcripts occurring only in healthy tissue. At the same time, altered presentation of HLA class I epitopes is frequently observed in various types of cancer. Down-regulation of genes related to HLA class I antigen processing has been observed in several cancer types, leading to fewer HLA class I antigens on the cell surface. Here, we use a peptidome wide analysis of predicted alternative splice forms, based on a publicly available database, to show that peptides over-represented in cancer splice variants comprise significantly fewer predicted HLA class I epitopes compared to peptides from normal transcripts. Peptides over-represented in cancer transcripts are in the case of the three most common HLA class I supertype representatives consistently found to contain fewer predicted epitopes compared to normal tissue. We observed a significant difference in amino acid composition between protein sequences associated with normal versus cancer tissue, as transcripts found in cancer are enriched with hydrophilic amino acids. This variation contributes to the observed significant lower likelihood of cancer-specific peptides to be predicted epitopes compared to peptides found in normal tissue.

  20. Training Lymnaea in the presence of a predator scent results in a long-lasting ability to form enhanced long-term memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest, Jeremy; Sunada, Hiroshi; Dodd, Shawn; Lukowiak, Ken

    2016-06-01

    Lymnaea exposed to crayfish effluent (CE) gain an enhanced ability to form long-term memory (LTM). We test the hypothesis that a single CE exposure and operant conditioning training leads to long lasting changes in the capability of snails to form LTM when tested in pond water four weeks later. We trained both juvenile and adult snails with a single 0.5 h training session in CE and show that LTM was present 24 h later. Snails trained in a similar manner in just pond water show no LTM. We then asked if such training in CE conferred enhanced memory forming capabilities on these snails four weeks later. That is, would LTM be formed in these snails four weeks later following a single 0.5 h training session in pond water? We found that both adult and juvenile snails previously trained in CE one month previously had enhanced LTM formation abilities. The injection of a DNA methylation blocker, 5-AZA, prior to training in adult snails blocked enhanced LTM formation four weeks later. Finally, this enhanced LTM forming ability was not passed on to the next generation of snails.

  1. Method of predicting Splice Sites based on signal interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deogun Jitender S

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predicting and proper ranking of canonical splice sites (SSs is a challenging problem in bioinformatics and machine learning communities. Any progress in SSs recognition will lead to better understanding of splicing mechanism. We introduce several new approaches of combining a priori knowledge for improved SS detection. First, we design our new Bayesian SS sensor based on oligonucleotide counting. To further enhance prediction quality, we applied our new de novo motif detection tool MHMMotif to intronic ends and exons. We combine elements found with sensor information using Naive Bayesian Network, as implemented in our new tool SpliceScan. Results According to our tests, the Bayesian sensor outperforms the contemporary Maximum Entropy sensor for 5' SS detection. We report a number of putative Exonic (ESE and Intronic (ISE Splicing Enhancers found by MHMMotif tool. T-test statistics on mouse/rat intronic alignments indicates, that detected elements are on average more conserved as compared to other oligos, which supports our assumption of their functional importance. The tool has been shown to outperform the SpliceView, GeneSplicer, NNSplice, Genio and NetUTR tools for the test set of human genes. SpliceScan outperforms all contemporary ab initio gene structural prediction tools on the set of 5' UTR gene fragments. Conclusion Designed methods have many attractive properties, compared to existing approaches. Bayesian sensor, MHMMotif program and SpliceScan tools are freely available on our web site. Reviewers This article was reviewed by Manyuan Long, Arcady Mushegian and Mikhail Gelfand.

  2. HIV-1 infection induces changes in expression of cellular splicing factors that regulate alternative viral splicing and virus production in macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purcell Damian FJ

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Macrophages are important targets and long-lived reservoirs of HIV-1, which are not cleared of infection by currently available treatments. In the primary monocyte-derived macrophage model of infection, replication is initially productive followed by a decline in virion output over ensuing weeks, coincident with a decrease in the levels of the essential viral transactivator protein Tat. We investigated two possible mechanisms in macrophages for regulation of viral replication, which appears to be primarily regulated at the level of tat mRNA: 1 differential mRNA stability, used by cells and some viruses for the rapid regulation of gene expression and 2 control of HIV-1 alternative splicing, which is essential for optimal viral replication. Results Following termination of transcription at increasing times after infection in macrophages, we found that tat mRNA did indeed decay more rapidly than rev or nef mRNA, but with similar kinetics throughout infection. In addition, tat mRNA decayed at least as rapidly in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Expression of cellular splicing factors in uninfected and infected macrophage cultures from the same donor showed an inverse pattern over time between enhancing factors (members of the SR family of RNA binding proteins and inhibitory factors (members of the hnRNP family. While levels of the SR protein SC35 were greatly up-regulated in the first week or two after infection, hnRNPs of the A/B and H groups were down-regulated. Around the peak of virus production in each culture, SC35 expression declined to levels in uninfected cells or lower, while the hnRNPs increased to control levels or above. We also found evidence for increased cytoplasmic expression of SC35 following long-term infection. Conclusion While no evidence of differential regulation of tat mRNA decay was found in macrophages following HIV-1 infection, changes in the balance of cellular splicing factors which regulate alternative

  3. Forms and accumulation of copper and zinc in a sandy typic hapludalf soil after long-term application of pig slurry and deep litter

    OpenAIRE

    Tadeu Luis Tiecher; Carlos Alberto Ceretta; Jucinei José Comin; Eduardo Girotto; Alcione Miotto; Marcel Pires de Moraes; Lucas Benedet; Paulo Ademar Avelar Ferreira; Cledimar Rogério Lorenzi; Rafael da Rosa Couto; Gustavo Brunetto

    2013-01-01

    Successive applications of pig slurry and pig deep litter may lead to an accumulation of copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) fractions in the soil profile. The objective of this study was to evaluate the Cu and Zn forms and accumulation in a Sandy Typic Hapludalf soil after long-term application of pig slurry and deep litter. In March 2010, eight years after initiating an experiment in Braço do Norte, Santa Catarina (SC), Brazil, on a Sandy Typic Hapludalf soil, soil samples were collected from the 0-2...

  4. Stress-Induced Isoforms of MDM2 and MDM4 Correlate with High-Grade Disease and an Altered Splicing Network in Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishwarya G. Jacob

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS is a morphologically and genetically heterogeneous malignancy commonly classified into three histologic subtypes, namely, alveolar, embryonal, and anaplastic. An issue that continues to challenge effective RMS patient prognosis is the dearth of molecular markers predictive of disease stage irrespective of tumor subtype. Our study involving a panel of 70 RMS tumors has identified specific alternative splice variants of the oncogenes Murine Double Minute 2 (MDM2 and MDM4 as potential biomarkers for RMS. Our results have demonstrated the strong association of genotoxic-stress inducible splice forms MDM2-ALT1 (91.6% Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group stage 4 tumors and MDM4-ALT2 (90.9% MDM4-ALT2-positive T2 stage tumors with high-risk metastatic RMS. Moreover, MDM2-ALT1-positive metastatic tumors belonged to both the alveolar (50% and embryonal (41.6% subtypes, making this the first known molecular marker for high-grade metastatic disease across the most common RMS subtypes. Furthermore, our results show that MDM2-ALT1 expression can function by directly contribute to metastatic behavior and promote the invasion of RMS cells through a matrigel-coated membrane. Additionally, expression of both MDM2-ALT1 and MDM4-ALT2 increased anchorage-independent cell-growth in soft agar assays. Intriguingly, we observed a unique coordination in the splicing of MDM2-ALT1 and MDM4-ALT2 in approximately 24% of tumor samples in a manner similar to genotoxic stress response in cell lines. To further explore splicing network alterations with possible relevance to RMS disease, we used an exon microarray approach to examine stress-inducible splicing in an RMS cell line (Rh30 and observed striking parallels between stress-responsive alternative splicing and constitutive splicing in RMS tumors.

  5. Differentiating the persistency and permanency of some two stages DNA splicing language via Yusof-Goode (Y-G) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudaber, M. H.; Yusof, Y.; Mohamad, M. S.

    2017-09-01

    Predicting the existence of restriction enzymes sequences on the recombinant DNA fragments, after accomplishing the manipulating reaction, via mathematical approach is considered as a convenient way in terms of DNA recombination. In terms of mathematics, for this characteristic of the recombinant DNA strands, which involve the recognition sites of restriction enzymes, is called persistent and permanent. Normally differentiating the persistency and permanency of two stages recombinant DNA strands using wet-lab experiment is expensive and time-consuming due to running the experiment at two stages as well as adding more restriction enzymes on the reaction. Therefore, in this research, by using Yusof-Goode (Y-G) model the difference between persistent and permanent splicing language of some two stages is investigated. Two theorems were provided, which show the persistency and non-permanency of two stages DNA splicing language.

  6. Convergent origins and rapid evolution of spliced leader trans-splicing in metazoa: insights from the ctenophora and hydrozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derelle, Romain; Momose, Tsuyoshi; Manuel, Michael; Da Silva, Corinne; Wincker, Patrick; Houliston, Evelyn

    2010-04-01

    Replacement of mRNA 5' UTR sequences by short sequences trans-spliced from specialized, noncoding, spliced leader (SL) RNAs is an enigmatic phenomenon, occurring in a set of distantly related animal groups including urochordates, nematodes, flatworms, and hydra, as well as in Euglenozoa and dinoflagellates. Whether SL trans-splicing has a common evolutionary origin and biological function among different organisms remains unclear. We have undertaken a systematic identification of SL exons in cDNA sequence data sets from non-bilaterian metazoan species and their closest unicellular relatives. SL exons were identified in ctenophores and in hydrozoan cnidarians, but not in other cnidarians, placozoans, or sponges, or in animal unicellular relatives. Mapping of SL absence/presence obtained from this and previous studies onto current phylogenetic trees favors an evolutionary scenario involving multiple origins for SLs during eumetazoan evolution rather than loss from a common ancestor. In both ctenophore and hydrozoan species, multiple SL sequences were identified, showing high sequence diversity. Detailed analysis of a large data set generated for the hydrozoan Clytia hemisphaerica revealed trans-splicing of given mRNAs by multiple alternative SLs. No evidence was found for a common identity of trans-spliced mRNAs between different hydrozoans. One feature found specifically to characterize SL-spliced mRNAs in hydrozoans, however, was a marked adenosine enrichment immediately 3' of the SL acceptor splice site. Our findings of high sequence divergence and apparently indiscriminate use of SLs in hydrozoans, along with recent findings in other taxa, indicate that SL genes have evolved rapidly in parallel in diverse animal groups, with constraint on SL exon sequence evolution being apparently rare.

  7. Analysis of a splice array experiment elucidates roles of chromatin elongation factor Spt4-5 in splicing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Xiao

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Splicing is an important process for regulation of gene expression in eukaryotes, and it has important functional links to other steps of gene expression. Two examples of these linkages include Ceg1, a component of the mRNA capping enzyme, and the chromatin elongation factors Spt4-5, both of which have recently been shown to play a role in the normal splicing of several genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using a genomic approach to characterize the roles of Spt4-5 in splicing, we used splicing-sensitive DNA microarrays to identify specific sets of genes that are mis-spliced in ceg1, spt4, and spt5 mutants. In the context of a complex, nested, experimental design featuring 22 dye-swap array hybridizations, comprising both biological and technical replicates, we applied five appropriate statistical models for assessing differential expression between wild-type and the mutants. To refine selection of differential expression genes, we then used a robust model-synthesizing approach, Differential Expression via Distance Synthesis, to integrate all five models. The resultant list of differentially expressed genes was then further analyzed with regard to select attributes: we found that highly transcribed genes with long introns were most sensitive to spt mutations. QPCR confirmation of differential expression was established for the limited number of genes evaluated. In this paper, we showcase splicing array technology, as well as powerful, yet general, statistical methodology for assessing differential expression, in the context of a real, complex experimental design. Our results suggest that the Spt4-Spt5 complex may help coordinate splicing with transcription under conditions that present kinetic challenges to spliceosome assembly or function.

  8. Deciphering Transcriptome and Complex Alternative Splicing Transcripts in Mammary Gland Tissues from Cows Naturally Infected with Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Ge Wang

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS contributes to the complexity of the mammalian proteome and plays an important role in diseases, including infectious diseases. The differential AS patterns of these transcript sequences between the healthy (HS3A and mastitic (HS8A cows naturally infected by Staphylococcus aureus were compared to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying mastitis resistance and susceptibility. In this study, using the Illumina paired-end RNA sequencing method, 1352 differentially expressed genes (DEGs with higher than twofold changes were found in the HS3A and HS8A mammary gland tissues. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses revealed that the cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction pathway is the most significantly enriched pathway. Approximately 16k annotated unigenes were respectively identified in two libraries, based on the bovine Bos taurus UMD3.1 sequence assembly and search. A total of 52.62% and 51.24% annotated unigenes were alternatively spliced in term of exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5' splicing and alternative 3' splicing. Additionally, 1,317 AS unigenes were HS3A-specific, whereas 1,093 AS unigenes were HS8A-specific. Some immune-related genes, such as ITGB6, MYD88, ADA, ACKR1, and TNFRSF1B, and their potential relationships with mastitis were highlighted. From Chromosome 2, 4, 6, 7, 10, 13, 14, 17, and 20, 3.66% (HS3A and 5.4% (HS8A novel transcripts, which harbor known quantitative trait locus associated with clinical mastitis, were identified. Many DEGs in the healthy and mastitic mammary glands are involved in immune, defense, and inflammation responses. These DEGs, which exhibit diverse and specific splicing patterns and events, can endow dairy cattle with the potential complex genetic resistance against mastitis.

  9. Deciphering Transcriptome and Complex Alternative Splicing Transcripts in Mammary Gland Tissues from Cows Naturally Infected with Staphylococcus aureus Mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qiang; Yang, Chun Hong; Zhang, Yan; Sun, Yan; Li, Rong Ling; Wang, Chang Fa; Zhong, Ji Feng; Huang, Jin Ming

    2016-01-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) contributes to the complexity of the mammalian proteome and plays an important role in diseases, including infectious diseases. The differential AS patterns of these transcript sequences between the healthy (HS3A) and mastitic (HS8A) cows naturally infected by Staphylococcus aureus were compared to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying mastitis resistance and susceptibility. In this study, using the Illumina paired-end RNA sequencing method, 1352 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) with higher than twofold changes were found in the HS3A and HS8A mammary gland tissues. Gene ontology and KEGG pathway analyses revealed that the cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction pathway is the most significantly enriched pathway. Approximately 16k annotated unigenes were respectively identified in two libraries, based on the bovine Bos taurus UMD3.1 sequence assembly and search. A total of 52.62% and 51.24% annotated unigenes were alternatively spliced in term of exon skipping, intron retention, alternative 5′ splicing and alternative 3ʹ splicing. Additionally, 1,317 AS unigenes were HS3A-specific, whereas 1,093 AS unigenes were HS8A-specific. Some immune-related genes, such as ITGB6, MYD88, ADA, ACKR1, and TNFRSF1B, and their potential relationships with mastitis were highlighted. From Chromosome 2, 4, 6, 7, 10, 13, 14, 17, and 20, 3.66% (HS3A) and 5.4% (HS8A) novel transcripts, which harbor known quantitative trait locus associated with clinical mastitis, were identified. Many DEGs in the healthy and mastitic mammary glands are involved in immune, defense, and inflammation responses. These DEGs, which exhibit diverse and specific splicing patterns and events, can endow dairy cattle with the potential complex genetic resistance against mastitis. PMID:27459697

  10. An engineered U1 small nuclear RNA rescues splicing-defective coagulation F7 gene expression in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, D; Faella, A; Margaritis, P; Cavallari, N; Pagani, F; Bernardi, F; Arruda, V R; Pinotti, M

    2014-01-01

    Background The ability of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNA U1 (U1snRNA) to rescue pre-mRNA splicing impaired by mutations makes it an attractive therapeutic molecule. Coagulation factor deficiencies due to splicing mutations are relatively frequent and could therefore benefit from this strategy. However, the effects of U1snRNAs in vivo remain unknown. Objectives To assess the rescue of the F7 c.859+5G>A splicing mutation (FVII+5A), causing severe human factor VII (hFVII) deficiency, by the modified U1snRNA+5a (U1+5a) in a murine model. Methods Mice expressing the human F7 c.859+5G>A mutant were generated following liver-directed expression by plasmid or recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector administration. The rescue of the splice-site defective pre-mRNA by U1+5a was monitored in liver and plasma through hFVII-specific assays. Results Injection of plasmids encoding the U1+5a rescued plasma hFVII levels, which increased from undetectable to ∼8.5% of those obtained with the wild-type hFVII plasmid control. To assess long-term effects, mice were injected with low and high doses of two AAV vectors encoding the FVII+5A splice site mutant as template to be corrected by U1+5a. This strategy resulted in hFVII plasma levels of 3.9 ± 0.8 or 23.3 ± 5.1 ng mL−1 in a dose-dependent manner, corresponding in patients to circulating FVII levels of ∼1–4.5% of normal. Moreover, in both experimental models, we also detected correctly spliced hFVII transcripts and hFVII-positive cells in liver cells. Conclusions Here we provide the first in vivo proof-of-principle of the rescue of the expression of a splicing-defective F7 mutant by U1snRNAs, thus highlighting their therapeutic potential in coagulation disorders. PMID:24738135

  11. An engineered U1 small nuclear RNA rescues splicing defective coagulation F7 gene expression in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, D; Faella, A; Margaritis, P; Cavallari, N; Pagani, F; Bernardi, F; Arruda, V R; Pinotti, M

    2014-02-01

    The ability of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNA U1 (U1snRNA) to rescue pre-mRNA splicing impaired by mutations makes it an attractive therapeutic molecule. Coagulation factor deficiencies due to splicing mutations are relatively frequent and could therefore benefit from this strategy. However, the effects of U1snRNAs in vivo remain unknown. To assess the rescue of the F7 c.859+5G>A splicing mutation (FVII+5A), causing severe human factor VII (hFVII) deficiency, by the modified U1snRNA+5a (U1+5a) in a murine model. Mice expressing the human F7 c.859+5G>A mutant were generated following liver-directed expression by plasmid or recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector administration. The rescue of the splice-site defective pre-mRNA by U1+5a was monitored in liver and plasma through hFVII-specific assays. Injection of plasmids encoding the U1+5a rescued plasma hFVII levels, which increased from undetectable to ~8.5% of those obtained with the wild-type hFVII plasmid control. To assess long-term effects, mice were injected with low and high doses of two AAV vectors encoding the FVII+5A splice site mutant as template to be corrected by U1+5a. This strategy resulted in hFVII plasma levels of 3.9 ± 0.8 or 23.3 ± 5.1 ng mL⁻¹ in a dose-dependent manner, corresponding in patients to circulating FVII levels of ~1-4.5% of normal. Moreover, in both experimental models, we also detected correctly spliced hFVII transcripts and hFVII-positive cells in liver cells. Here we provide the first in vivo proof of-principle of the rescue of the expression of a splicing-defective F7 mutant by U1snRNAs, thus highlighting their therapeutic potential in coagulation disorders.

  12. Two new splice variants in porcine PPARGC1A

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    Peelman Luc J

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PPARGC1A is a coactivator with a vital and central role in fat and energy metabolism. It is considered to be a candidate gene for meat quality in pigs and is involved in the development of obesity and diabetes in humans. How its many functions are regulated, is however still largely unclear. Therefore a transcription profile of PPARGC1A in 32 tissues and 4 embryonic developmental stages in the pig was constructed by screening its cDNA for possible splice variants with exon-spanning primers. Findings This led to the discovery of 2 new splice variants in the pig, which were subsequently also detected in human tissues. In these variants, exon 8 was either completely or partly (the last 66 bp were conserved spliced out, potentially coding for a much shorter protein of respectively 337 and 359 amino acids (aa, of which the first 291 aa would be the same compared to the complete protein (796 aa. Conclusion Considering the functional domains of the PPARGC1A protein, it is very likely these splice variants considerably affect the function of the protein and alternative splicing could be one of the mechanisms by which the diverse functions of PPARGC1A are regulated.

  13. TUMOR-SPECIFIC EXPRESSION AND ALTERNATIVE SPLICING OF THE COL6A3 GENE IN PANCREATIC CANCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat, Hwyda; Lazar, Melissa; Salem, Khalifa; Chipitsyna, Galina; Gong, Qiaoke; Pan, Te-Cheng; Zhang, Rui-Zhu; Yeo, Charles J.; Chu, Mon-Li

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is a highly lethal disease in which a prominent desmoplastic reaction is a defining characteristic. Fibrillar collagens, such as collagen I and to a lesser extent, collagen III and V comprise the majority of this stromal fibrosis. Type VI collagen (COL6) forms a microfibrillar network associated with type I collagen fibrils. The expression of COL6 has been linked to inflammation and survival. Importantly, tumor-specific alternative splicing in COL6A3 has been identified in several cancers by genome exon arrays. We evaluated the expression and localization of COL6A3 in PDA and premalignant lesions and explored the presence of alternative splicing events. Methods We analyzed paired PDA-normal (n=18), IPMN (n=5), pancreatic cystadenoma (n=5), and eight PDA cell lines with RT-PCR, using unique primers that identify total COL6A3 gene and alternative splicing sites in several of its exons. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze the expression levels and localization of COL6A3 protein in the different lesions, and in two animal models of PDA. Results COL6A3 protein levels were significantly upregulated in 77% of the paired PDA-adjacent tissue examined. COL6A3 was mainly present in the desmoplastic stroma of PDA, with high deposition around the malignant ducts and in between the sites of stromal fatty infiltration. Analysis of the COL6A3 splice variants showed tumor-specific consistent inclusion of exons 3 and 6 in 17 of the 18 (94%) paired PDA-adjacent tissues. Inclusion of exon 4 was exclusively tumor-specific, with barely detectable expression in the adjacent tissues. IPMN and pancreatic cystadenomas showed no expression of any of the examined exons. Total COL6A3 mRNA and exon 6 were identified in six PDA cell lines, but only two cell lines (MIA PACA-2 and ASPC-1) expressed exons 3 and 4. In both the xenograft and transgenic models of PDA, COL6A3 immunoreactivity was present in the stroma

  14. Interactions of SR45, an SR-like protein, with spliceosomal proteins and an intronic sequence: insights into regulated splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Irene S; Golovkin, Maxim; Palusa, Saiprasad G; Link, Alicia; Ali, Gul S; Thomas, Julie; Richardson, Dale N; Reddy, Anireddy S N

    2012-09-01

    SR45 is a serine/arginine-rich (SR)-like protein with two arginine/serine-rich (RS) domains. We have previously shown that SR45 regulates alternative splicing (AS) by differential selection of 5' and 3' splice sites. However, it is unknown how SR45 regulates AS. To gain mechanistic insights into the roles of SR45 in splicing, we screened a yeast two-hybrid library with SR45. This screening resulted in the isolation of two spliceosomal proteins, U1-70K and U2AF(35) b that are known to function in 5' and 3' splice site selection, respectively. This screen not only confirmed our prior observation that U1-70K and SR45 interact, but also helped to identify an additional interacting partner (U2AF(35) ). In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed an interaction of SR45 with both paralogs of U2AF(35) . Furthermore, we show that the RS1 and RS2 domains of SR45, and not the RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain, associate independently with both U2AF(35) proteins. Interaction studies among U2AF(35) paralogs and between U2AF(35) and U1-70K revealed that U2AF(35) can form homo- or heterodimers and that U2AF(35) proteins can associate with U1-70K. Using RNA probes from SR30 intron 10, whose splicing is altered in the sr45 mutant, we show that SR45 and U2AF(35) b bind to different parts of the intron, with a binding site for SR45 in the 5' region and two binding regions, each ending with a known 3' splice site, for U2AF(35) b. These results suggest that SR45 recruits U1snRNP and U2AF to 5' and 3' splice sites, respectively, by interacting with pre-mRNA, U1-70K and U2AF(35) and modulates AS. © 2012 The Authors. The Plant Journal © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Repair of Mybpc3 mRNA by 5′-trans-splicing in a Mouse Model of Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

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    Giulia Mearini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA trans-splicing has been explored as a therapeutic option for a variety of genetic diseases, but not for cardiac genetic disease. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is an autosomal-dominant disease, characterized by left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH and diastolic dysfunction. MYBPC3, encoding cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C is frequently mutated. We evaluated the 5′-trans-splicing strategy in a mouse model of HCM carrying a Mybpc3 mutation. 5′-trans-splicing was induced between two independently transcribed molecules, the mutant endogenous Mypbc3 pre-mRNA and an engineered pre-trans-splicing molecule (PTM carrying a FLAG-tagged wild-type (WT Mybpc3 cDNA sequence. PTMs were packaged into adeno-associated virus (AAV for transduction of cultured cardiac myocytes and the heart in vivo. Full-length repaired Mybpc3 mRNA represented up to 66% of total Mybpc3 transcripts in cardiac myocytes and 0.14% in the heart. Repaired cMyBP-C protein was detected by immunoprecipitation in cells and in vivo and exhibited correct incorporation into the sarcomere in cardiac myocytes. This study provides (i the first evidence of successful 5′-trans-splicing in vivo and (ii proof-of-concept of mRNA repair in the most prevalent cardiac genetic disease. Since current therapeutic options for HCM only alleviate symptoms, these findings open new horizons for causal therapy of the severe forms of the disease.

  16. Conservation and Sex-Specific Splicing of the transformer Gene in the Calliphorids Cochliomyia hominivorax, Cochliomyia macellaria and Lucilia sericata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Vensko, Steven P.; Belikoff, Esther J.; Scott, Maxwell J.

    2013-01-01

    Transformer (TRA) promotes female development in several dipteran species including the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina, the Mediterranean fruit fly, housefly and Drosophila melanogaster. tra transcripts are sex-specifically spliced such that only the female form encodes full length functional protein. The presence of six predicted TRA/TRA2 binding sites in the sex-specific female intron of the L. cuprina gene suggested that tra splicing is auto-regulated as in medfly and housefly. With the aim of identifying conserved motifs that may play a role in tra sex-specific splicing, here we have isolated and characterized the tra gene from three additional blowfly species, L. sericata, Cochliomyia hominivorax and C. macellaria. The blowfly adult male and female transcripts differ in the choice of splice donor site in the first intron, with males using a site downstream of the site used in females. The tra genes all contain a single TRA/TRA2 site in the male exon and a cluster of four to five sites in the male intron. However, overall the sex-specific intron sequences are poorly conserved in closely related blowflies. The most conserved regions are around the exon/intron junctions, the 3′ end of the intron and near the cluster of TRA/TRA2 sites. We propose a model for sex specific regulation of tra splicing that incorporates the conserved features identified in this study. In L. sericata embryos, the male tra transcript was first detected at around the time of cellular blastoderm formation. RNAi experiments showed that tra is required for female development in L. sericata and C. macellaria. The isolation of the tra gene from the New World screwworm fly C. hominivorax, a major livestock pest, will facilitate the development of a “male-only” strain for genetic control programs. PMID:23409170

  17. Evaluation of MYBPC3 trans-Splicing and Gene Replacement as Therapeutic Options in Human iPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes

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    Maksymilian Prondzynski

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is a promising option for severe forms of genetic diseases. We previously provided evidence for the feasibility of trans-splicing, exon skipping, and gene replacement in a mouse model of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM carrying a mutation in MYBPC3, encoding cardiac myosin-binding protein C (cMyBP-C. Here we used human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs from an HCM patient carrying a heterozygous c.1358-1359insC MYBPC3 mutation and from a healthy donor. HCM hiPSC-CMs exhibited ∼50% lower MYBPC3 mRNA and cMyBP-C protein levels than control, no truncated cMyBP-C, larger cell size, and altered gene expression, thus reproducing human HCM features. We evaluated RNA trans-splicing and gene replacement after transducing hiPSC-CMs with adeno-associated virus. trans-splicing with 5′ or 3′ pre-trans-splicing molecules represented ∼1% of total MYBPC3 transcripts in healthy hiPSC-CMs. In contrast, gene replacement with the full-length MYBPC3 cDNA resulted in ∼2.5-fold higher MYBPC3 mRNA levels in HCM and control hiPSC-CMs. This restored the cMyBP-C level to 81% of the control level, suppressed hypertrophy, and partially restored gene expression to control level in HCM cells. This study provides evidence for (1 the feasibility of trans-splicing, although with low efficiency, and (2 efficient gene replacement in hiPSC-CMs with a MYBPC3 mutation.

  18. Conservation and sex-specific splicing of the transformer gene in the calliphorids Cochliomyia hominivorax, Cochliomyia macellaria and Lucilia sericata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Li

    Full Text Available Transformer (TRA promotes female development in several dipteran species including the Australian sheep blowfly Lucilia cuprina, the Mediterranean fruit fly, housefly and Drosophila melanogaster. tra transcripts are sex-specifically spliced such that only the female form encodes full length functional protein. The presence of six predicted TRA/TRA2 binding sites in the sex-specific female intron of the L. cuprina gene suggested that tra splicing is auto-regulated as in medfly and housefly. With the aim of identifying conserved motifs that may play a role in tra sex-specific splicing, here we have isolated and characterized the tra gene from three additional blowfly species, L. sericata, Cochliomyia hominivorax and C. macellaria. The blowfly adult male and female transcripts differ in the choice of splice donor site in the first intron, with males using a site downstream of the site used in females. The tra genes all contain a single TRA/TRA2 site in the male exon and a cluster of four to five sites in the male intron. However, overall the sex-specific intron sequences are poorly conserved in closely related blowflies. The most conserved regions are around the exon/intron junctions, the 3' end of the intron and near the cluster of TRA/TRA2 sites. We propose a model for sex specific regulation of tra splicing that incorporates the conserved features identified in this study. In L. sericata embryos, the male tra transcript was first detected at around the time of cellular blastoderm formation. RNAi experiments showed that tra is required for female development in L. sericata and C. macellaria. The isolation of the tra gene from the New World screwworm fly C. hominivorax, a major livestock pest, will facilitate the development of a "male-only" strain for genetic control programs.

  19. Read-Split-Run: an improved bioinformatics pipeline for identification of genome-wide non-canonical spliced regions using RNA-Seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yongsheng; Kinne, Jeff; Donham, Brandon; Jiang, Feng; Ding, Lizhong; Hassler, Justin R; Kaufman, Randal J

    2016-08-22

    Most existing tools for detecting next-generation sequencing-based splicing events focus on generic splicing events. Consequently, special types of non-canonical splicing events of short mRNA regions (IRE1α targeted) have not yet been thoroughly addressed at a genome-wide level using bioinformatics approaches in conjunction with next-generation technologies. During endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, the gene encoding the RNase Ire1α is known to splice out a short 26 nt region from the mRNA of the transcription factor Xbp1 non-canonically within the cytosol. This causes an open reading frame-shift that induces expression of many downstream genes in reaction to ER stress as part of the unfolded protein response (UPR). We previously published an algorithm termed "Read-Split-Walk" (RSW) to identify non-canonical splicing regions using RNA-Seq data and applied it to ER stress-induced Ire1α heterozygote and knockout mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines. In this study, we have developed an improved algorithm "Read-Split-Run" (RSR) for detecting genome-wide Ire1α-targeted genes with non-canonical spliced regions at a faster speed. We applied the RSR algorithm using different combinations of several parameters to the previously RSW tested mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEF) and the human Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) RNA-Seq data. We also compared the performance of RSR with two other alternative splicing events identification tools (TopHat (Trapnell et al., Bioinformatics 25:1105-1111, 2009) and Alt Event Finder (Zhou et al., BMC Genomics 13:S10, 2012)) utilizing the context of the spliced Xbp1 mRNA as a positive control in the data sets we identified it to be the top cleavage target present in Ire1α (+/-) but absent in Ire1α (-/-) MEF samples and this comparison was also extended to human ENCODE RNA-Seq data. Proof of principle came in our results by the fact that the 26 nt non-conventional splice site in Xbp1 was detected as the top hit by our new RSR

  20. Functional Characterization of NIPBL Physiological Splice Variants and Eight Splicing Mutations in Patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

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    María E. Teresa-Rodrigo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS is a congenital developmental disorder characterized by distinctive craniofacial features, growth retardation, cognitive impairment, limb defects, hirsutism, and multisystem involvement. Mutations in five genes encoding structural components (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21 or functionally associated factors (NIPBL, HDAC8 of the cohesin complex have been found in patients with CdLS. In about 60% of the patients, mutations in NIPBL could be identified. Interestingly, 17% of them are predicted to change normal splicing, however, detailed molecular investigations are often missing. Here, we report the first systematic study of the physiological splicing of the NIPBL gene, that would reveal the identification of four new splicing isoforms ΔE10, ΔE12, ΔE33,34, and B’. Furthermore, we have investigated nine mutations affecting splice-sites in the NIPBL gene identified in twelve CdLS patients. All mutations have been examined on the DNA and RNA level, as well as by in silico analyses. Although patients with mutations affecting NIPBL splicing show a broad clinical variability, the more severe phenotypes seem to be associated with aberrant transcripts resulting in a shift of the reading frame.

  1. Understanding pre-mRNA splicing through crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Sara; Zhang, Lingdi; Li, Xueni; Zhao, Rui

    2017-08-01

    Crystallography is a powerful tool to determine the atomic structures of proteins and RNAs. X-ray crystallography has been used to determine the structure of many splicing related proteins and RNAs, making major contributions to our understanding of the molecular mechanism and regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. Compared to other structural methods, crystallography has its own advantage in the high-resolution structural information it can provide and the unique biological questions it can answer. In addition, two new crystallographic methods - the serial femtosecond crystallography and 3D electron crystallography - were developed to overcome some of the limitations of traditional X-ray crystallography and broaden the range of biological problems that crystallography can solve. This review discusses the theoretical basis, instrument requirements, troubleshooting, and exciting potential of these crystallographic methods to further our understanding of pre-mRNA splicing, a critical event in gene expression of all eukaryotes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Stabilized cyclopropane analogs of the splicing inhibitor FD-895.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Reymundo; Kashyap, Manoj Kumar; Kumar, Deepak; Kipps, Thomas J; Castro, Januario E; La Clair, James J; Burkart, Michael D

    2013-09-12

    Targeting the spliceosome with small molecule inhibitors provides a new avenue to target cancer by intercepting alternate splicing pathways. Although our understanding of alternate mRNA splicing remains poorly understood, it provides an escape pathway for many cancers resistant to current therapeutics. These findings have encouraged recent academic and industrial efforts to develop natural product spliceosome inhibitors, including FD-895 (1a), pladienolide B (1b), and pladienolide D (1c), into next-generation anticancer drugs. The present study describes the application of semisynthesis and total synthesis to reveal key structure-activity relationships for the spliceosome inhibition by 1a. This information is applied to deliver new analogs with improved stability and potent activity at inhibiting splicing in patient derived cell lines.

  3. Body Temperature Cycles Control Rhythmic Alternative Splicing in Mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preußner, Marco; Goldammer, Gesine; Neumann, Alexander; Haltenhof, Tom; Rautenstrauch, Pia; Müller-McNicoll, Michaela; Heyd, Florian

    2017-08-03

    The core body temperature of all mammals oscillates with the time of the day. However, direct molecular consequences of small, physiological changes in body temperature remain largely elusive. Here we show that body temperature cycles drive rhythmic SR protein phosphorylation to control an alternative splicing (AS) program. A temperature change of 1°C is sufficient to induce a concerted splicing switch in a large group of functionally related genes, rendering this splicing-based thermometer much more sensitive than previously described temperature-sensing mechanisms. AS of two exons in the 5' UTR of the TATA-box binding protein (Tbp) highlights the general impact of this mechanism, as it results in rhythmic TBP protein levels with implications for global gene expression in vivo. Together our data establish body temperature-driven AS as a core clock-independent oscillator in mammalian peripheral clocks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Alternative splicing: an important mechanism for myometrial gene regulation that can be manipulated to target specific genes associated with preterm labour

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    Tyson-Capper Alison

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Considerable effort has been expended in attempting to distinguish genes that contribute to initiating the onset of term and preterm labour (PTL from those that change in expression as a consequence of the progression of labour. The ability to define more clearly the genes involved in triggering labour contractions should lead to the development of new effective and safer strategies to prevent preterm birth. There is ample evidence to suggest that specific genes are co-ordinately regulated within the upper and lower regions of the myometrium prior to and during parturition and many of these genes are regulated by alternative pre-mRNA splicing. This mini-review highlights that expression of a range of different splicing factors, with defined roles in pre-mRNA splicing, is both temporally and spatially regulated within the uterine smooth muscle during pregnancy and labour. Moreover, several of these splicing factors play key roles in controlling the differential expression of specific regulatory proteins involved in uterine signalling and uterine quiescence. In addition, antisense morpholino oligonucleotide manipulation of pre-mRNA splicing may have potential in defining and targeting uterine pro-labour genes and thus contribute to the development of new therapeutic approaches to prevent PTL.

  5. Cloning, expression and alternative splicing of the novel isoform of hTCP11 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Yong-xin; Zhang, Si-zhong; Wu, Qia-qing

    2003-01-01

    To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing.......To identify a novel isoform of hTCP11 gene and investigate its expression and alternative splicing....

  6. Minor class splicing shapes the zebrafish transcriptome during development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markmiller, Sebastian; Cloonan, Nicole; Lardelli, Rea M; Doggett, Karen; Keightley, Maria-Cristina; Boglev, Yeliz; Trotter, Andrew J; Ng, Annie Y; Wilkins, Simon J; Verkade, Heather; Ober, Elke A; Field, Holly A; Grimmond, Sean M; Lieschke, Graham J; Stainier, Didier Y R; Heath, Joan K

    2014-02-25

    Minor class or U12-type splicing is a highly conserved process required to remove a minute fraction of introns from human pre-mRNAs. Defects in this splicing pathway have recently been linked to human disease, including a severe developmental disorder encompassing brain and skeletal abnormalities known as Taybi-Linder syndrome or microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism 1, and a hereditary intestinal polyposis condition, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. Although a key mechanism for regulating gene expression, the impact of impaired U12-type splicing on the transcriptome is unknown. Here, we describe a unique zebrafish mutant, caliban (clbn), with arrested development of the digestive organs caused by an ethylnitrosourea-induced recessive lethal point mutation in the rnpc3 [RNA-binding region (RNP1, RRM) containing 3] gene. rnpc3 encodes the zebrafish ortholog of human RNPC3, also known as the U11/U12 di-snRNP 65-kDa protein, a unique component of the U12-type spliceosome. The biochemical impact of the mutation in clbn is the formation of aberrant U11- and U12-containing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins that impair the efficiency of U12-type splicing. Using RNA sequencing and microarrays, we show that multiple genes involved in various steps of mRNA processing, including transcription, splicing, and nuclear export are disrupted in clbn, either through intron retention or differential gene expression. Thus, clbn provides a useful and specific model of aberrant U12-type splicing in vivo. Analysis of its transcriptome reveals efficient mRNA processing as a critical process for the growth and proliferation of cells during vertebrate development.

  7. Analysis for Behavior of Reinforcement Lap Splices in Deep Beams

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    Ammar Yaser Ali

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study includes an experimental and theoretical investigation of reinforced concrete deep beams containing tensile reinforcement lap splices at constant moment zone under static load. The study included two stages: in the first one, an experimental work included testing of eight simply supported RC deep beams having a total length (L = 2000 mm, overall depth (h= 600 mm and width (b = 150 mm. The tested specimens were divided into three groups to study the effect of main variables: lap length, location of splice, internal confinement (stirrups and external confinement (strengthening by CFRP laminates. The experimental results showed that the use of CFRP as external strengthening in deep beam with lap spliced gives best behavior such as increase in stiffness, decrease in deflection, delaying the cracks appearance and reducing the crack width. The reduction in deflection about (14-21 % than the unstrengthened beam and about (5-14 % than the beam with continuous bars near ultimate load. Also, it was observed that the beams with unstrengthened tensile reinforcement lap splices had three types of cracks: flexural, flexural-shear and splitting cracks while the beams with strengthened tensile reinforcement lap splices or continuous bars don’t observe splitting cracks. In the second stage, a numerical analysis of three dimensional finite element analysis was utilized to explore the behavior of the RC deep beams with tensile reinforcement lap splices, in addition to parametric study of many variables. The comparison between the experimental and theoretical results showed reasonable agreement. The average difference of the deflection at service load was less than 5%.

  8. Oncogenic Alternative Splicing Switches: Role in Cancer Progression and Prospects for Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bonomi, Serena; Gallo, Stefania; Catillo, Morena; Pignataro, Daniela; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Ghigna, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in the abundance or activities of alternative splicing regulators generate alternatively spliced variants that contribute to multiple aspects of tumor establishment, progression and resistance to therapeutic treatments. Notably, many cancer-associated genes are regulated through alternative splicing suggesting a significant role of this post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism in the production of oncogenes and tumor suppressors. Thus, the study of alternative splicing in cancer ...

  9. A novel splicing mutation in the V2 vasopressin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamperis, Konstantinos; Siggaard, C; Herlin, Troels

    2000-01-01

    as clinical investigations comprising a fluid deprivation test and a 1-deamino-8-D-arginine-vasopressin (dDAVP) infusion test in the study subject and his mother. We found a highly unusual, novel, de novo 1447A-->C point mutation (gDNA), involving the invariable splice acceptor of the second intron...... of the gene in both the affected male (hemizygous) and his mother (heterozygous). This mutation is likely to cause aberrant splicing of the terminal intron of the gene, leading to a non-functional AVP receptor. The clinical studies were consistent with such a hypothesis, as the affected subject had a severe...

  10. ISVASE: identification of sequence variant associated with splicing event using RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljohi, Hasan Awad; Liu, Wanfei; Lin, Qiang; Yu, Jun; Hu, Songnian

    2017-06-28

    Exon recognition and splicing precisely and efficiently by spliceosome is the key to generate mature mRNAs. About one third or a half of disease-related mutations affect RNA splicing. Software PVAAS has been developed to identify variants associated with aberrant splicing by directly using RNA-seq data. However, it bases on the assumption that annotated splicing site is normal splicing, which is not true in fact. We develop the ISVASE, a tool for specifically identifying sequence variants associated with splicing events (SVASE) by using RNA-seq data. Comparing with PVAAS, our tool has several advantages, such as multi-pass stringent rule-dependent filters and statistical filters, only using split-reads, independent sequence variant identification in each part of splicing (junction), sequence variant detection for both of known and novel splicing event, additional exon-exon junction shift event detection if known splicing events provided, splicing signal evaluation, known DNA mutation and/or RNA editing data supported, higher precision and consistency, and short running time. Using a realistic RNA-seq dataset, we performed a case study to illustrate the functionality and effectiveness of our method. Moreover, the output of SVASEs can be used for downstream analysis such as splicing regulatory element study and sequence variant functional analysis. ISVASE is useful for researchers interested in sequence variants (DNA mutation and/or RNA editing) associated with splicing events. The package is freely available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/isvase/ .

  11. Interplay between DMD Point Mutations and Splicing Signals in Dystrophinopathy Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan-Mateu, Jonàs; González-Quereda, Lidia; Rodríguez, Maria José; Verdura, Edgard; Lázaro, Kira; Jou, Cristina; Nascimento, Andrés; Jiménez-Mallebrera, Cecilia; Colomer, Jaume; Monges, Soledad; Lubieniecki, Fabiana; Foncuberta, Maria Eugenia; Pascual-Pascual, Samuel Ignacio; Molano, Jesús; Baiget, Montserrat; Gallano, Pia

    2013-01-01

    DMD nonsense and frameshift mutations lead to severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy while in-frame mutations lead to milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Exceptions are found in 10% of cases and the production of alternatively spliced transcripts is considered a key modifier of disease severity. Several exonic mutations have been shown to induce exon-skipping, while splice site mutations result in exon-skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites. However, factors determining the splicing pathway are still unclear. Point mutations provide valuable information regarding the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and elements defining exon identity in the DMD gene. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of 98 point mutations related to clinical phenotype and their effect on muscle mRNA and dystrophin expression. Aberrant splicing was found in 27 mutations due to alteration of splice sites or splicing regulatory elements. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to test the ability of the available algorithms to predict consequences on mRNA and to investigate the major factors that determine the splicing pathway in mutations affecting splicing signals. Our findings suggest that the splicing pathway is highly dependent on the interplay between splice site strength and density of regulatory elements. PMID:23536893

  12. Interplay between DMD point mutations and splicing signals in Dystrophinopathy phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonàs Juan-Mateu

    Full Text Available DMD nonsense and frameshift mutations lead to severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy while in-frame mutations lead to milder Becker muscular dystrophy. Exceptions are found in 10% of cases and the production of alternatively spliced transcripts is considered a key modifier of disease severity. Several exonic mutations have been shown to induce exon-skipping, while splice site mutations result in exon-skipping or activation of cryptic splice sites. However, factors determining the splicing pathway are still unclear. Point mutations provide valuable information regarding the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing and elements defining exon identity in the DMD gene. Here we provide a comprehensive analysis of 98 point mutations related to clinical phenotype and their effect on muscle mRNA and dystrophin expression. Aberrant splicing was found in 27 mutations due to alteration of splice sites or splicing regulatory elements. Bioinformatics analysis was performed to test the ability of the available algorithms to predict consequences on mRNA and to investigate the major factors that determine the splicing pathway in mutations affecting splicing signals. Our findings suggest that the splicing pathway is highly dependent on the interplay between splice site strength and density of regulatory elements.

  13. EXAMINATION OF ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS OF THE ATRIUMS IN PATIENTS WITH LONG-TERM PERSISTENT FORM OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION AND VALVULAR HEART DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Kulikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study objective is to examine electrophysiological parameters of atrial myocardium, characteristics of atrioventricular conduction, and potential factors affecting recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF in patients with persistent and long-term persistent forms of AF prior to the Labirynth IIIB surgery with single-step correction of valvular heart disease.Materials and methods. The study included 100 adults (48 men, 52 women with persistent and long-term persistent forms of AF and different valvular heart diseases. Mean patient age was 59 years. Mean AF duration was 4 years. All patients were prescribed antiarrhythmic therapy but it proved ineffective. In 15 % of patients, restoration of the sinus rhythm was attempted through electrical cardioversion but long-term control of the sinus rhythm wasn’t achieved. All patients were diagnosed with organic pathology of the mitral valve. Also, in 80 % of patients, relative insufficiency of the tricuspid valve was detected. Chronic heart failure functional class per NYHA was III. Size of the left atrium was 5 cm, mean left ventricular ejection fraction was 61 %. All patients underwent electrical cardioversion. After successful restoration of the sinus rhythm, endocardial electrophysiology study (EES of the heart was performed. Then, correction of valvular pathologies and the Labyrinth IIIB surgery were performed. Results. Examination of refractoriness of different parts of the atriums has shown that effective refractory period (ERP of the atrioventricular node was minimal compared to other parts of the atriums. Maximal ERP duration was observed in the upper part of the right atrium. Therefore, in patients with long history of AF, heterogeneity of atrial myocardium ERP duration is observed. In 17 % of patients, atrial vulnerability was detected. The area of atrial vulnerability was always associated with ERP. Its duration in patients with atrial vulnerability was significantly higher.Conclusion. Long-term

  14. A selective splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA in hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toki, Yasumichi [Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Sasaki, Katsunori, E-mail: k-sasaki@asahikawa-med.ac.jp [Department of Gastrointestinal Immunology and Regenerative Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Tanaka, Hiroki [Department of Legal Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masayo; Hatayama, Mayumi; Ito, Satoshi; Ikuta, Katsuya; Shindo, Motohiro; Hasebe, Takumu; Nakajima, Shunsuke; Sawada, Koji; Fujiya, Mikihiro [Division of Gastroenterology and Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Asahikawa Medical University, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Torimoto, Yoshihiro [Oncology Center, Asahikawa Medical University Hospital, Hokkaido 078-8510 (Japan); Ohtake, Takaaki; Kohgo, Yutaka [Department of Gastroenterology, International University of Health and Welfare Hospital, Tochigi 329-2763 (Japan)

    2016-08-05

    Hepcidin is a main regulator of iron metabolism, of which abnormal expression affects intestinal absorption and reticuloendothelial sequestration of iron by interacting with ferroportin. It is also noted that abnormal iron accumulation is one of the key factors to facilitate promotion and progression of cancer including hepatoma. By RT-PCR/agarose gel electrophoresis of hepcidin mRNA in a hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HLF, a smaller mRNA band was shown in addition to the wild-type hepcidin mRNA. From sequencing analysis, this additional band was a selective splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA lacking exon 2 of HAMP gene, producing the transcript that encodes truncated peptide lacking 20 amino acids at the middle of preprohepcidin. In the present study, we used the digital PCR, because such a small amount of variant mRNA was difficult to quantitate by the conventional RT-PCR amplification. Among seven hepatoma-derived cell lines, six cell lines have significant copy numbers of this variant mRNA, but not in one cell line. In the transient transfection analysis of variant-type hepcidin cDNA, truncated preprohepcidin has a different character comparing with native preprohepcidin: its product is insensitive to digestion, and secreted into the medium as a whole preprohepcidin form without maturation. Loss or reduction of function of HAMP gene by aberrantly splicing may be a suitable phenomenon to obtain the proliferating advantage of hepatoma cells. - Highlights: • An aberrant splicing variant of hepcidin mRNA lacking exon 2 of HAMP gene. • Absolute quantification of hepcidin mRNA by digital PCR amplification. • Hepatoma-derived cell lines have significant copies of variant-type hepcidin mRNA. • Truncated preprohepcidin is secreted from cells without posttranslational cleavage.

  15. The Status analysis of ASFA, UNESCO and thesaurus of Sociology in terms of semantic relation, form construction, displaying controlled vocabularies and management systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Kazerani

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to shed light on the status of Persian thesauri of Humanities and to evaluate them in terms of four dimensions of form construction, semantic relationships, displaying controlled vocabularies, and management systems, based on the latest version of the ANSI/NISO z39.19 2005 standard. The research method utilized in this study is the analytical survey method. Systematic sampling method was used to select samples of the terms contained in the latest edition of every thesaurus in the field of Humanities except Islamic sciences thesauri. So the number of thesauri in this study was 3, and they were ASFA, UNESCO and thesaurus of Sociology. The research instrument used in this study was a check list defined in Microsoft Excel. The samples for the four dimensions were entered in the checklist and were evaluated on the basis of the relevant standards. The results of the study shows that the level of observance of semantic relations standards in ASFA, UNESCO and thesaurus of Sociology were respectively 93%,99% and 99%.The level of observance of form construction standards in ASFA, UNESCO and thesaurus of Sociology were respectively 99%, 99.5% and 96%. The level of observance of the standards in ASFA, UNESCO and thesaurus of Sociology was respectively With regard to displaying controlled vocabularies dimension were respectively 84%, 43% and 54.5% and the level of observance of management system standards in ASFA was 82% while the rate of this dimension in the remaining two thesauri was 14%. Finally, it is concluded that possessing the required expertise, familiarity with the standards of thesauri construction, utilizing appropriate models, taking the needs of the end users into consideration, reviewing and revising information storage and retrieval policies, and activation of the indexing and the reference sections of the libraries for registering the users' documents are among the major factors that if observed can lead to the construction

  16. Teaching Form as Form

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2012-01-01

    understanding of form per se, or, to use an expression from this text, of form as form. This challenge can be reduced to one question: how can design teaching support students in achieving not only the ability to recognize and describe different form-related concepts in existing design (i.e. analytical...... and concepts from real designs by studying form in abstract contexts. The challenge for the first approach is how to support students in decoupling form from the work as a whole. The challenge for the second approach is how to translate general form into real design. Hence, choosing between the two approaches...

  17. Short-term glucocorticoid administration in patients with protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Part 2 — comparison of different medication forms efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A A Fedorova

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare efficacy of different glucocorticoid (GC medication forms in protracted and chronic gout arthritis. Material and methods. 59 pts with tophaceous gout (crystal-verified diagnosis and arthritis of three and more joints lasting more than a months in spite of treatment with sufficient doses of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were included. Median age of pts was 56 [48;63], median disease duration — 15,2 years [7,4;20], median swollen joint count at the examination — 8 [5; 11]. The patients were randomized into 2 groups. Methylprednisolone (MP 500 mg/day iv during 2 days and placebo im once was administered in one of them, betamethasone (BM 7 mg im once and placebo iv twice — in the other. Results. Number of pts with full resolution of arthritis, recurrent exacerbation, insufficient arthritis resolution or clinically insignificant response was comparable in both groups. More rapid decrease of pain at moving was achieved during the first 2-3 days after GC administration in pts with full resolution of arthritis (p=0,03 in group receiving MP in comparison with BM. At day 14 joint damage measures did not differ between groups. Conclusion. Efficacy of short-term glucocorticoid administration does not depend on mode of administration and GC medication form (methylprednisolone 500 mg/day iv during 2 days or betamethasone 7 mg im once.

  18. fruitless alternative splicing and sex behaviour in insects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Drosophila melanogaster, male courtship requires proteins encoded by the fruitless (fru) gene that are produced in different sex-specific isoforms via alternative splicing. Drosophila mutant flies with loss-of-function alleles of the fru gene exhibit blocked male courtship behaviour. However, various individual steps in the ...

  19. fruitless alternative splicing and sex behaviour in insects: an ancient ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In Drosophila melanogaster, male courtship requires proteins encoded by the fruitless (fru) gene that are produced in different sex-specific isoforms via alternative splicing. Drosophila mutant flies with loss-of-function alleles of the fru gene exhibit blocked male courtship behaviour. However, various individual steps in the ...

  20. Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of RB1 mRNA from blood leukocytes of patients with retinoblastoma identified the effects of mutations involving consensus splice site, exonic substitution and whole-exon deletions identified in genomic DNA of these patients. In addition, this study identified mutations in cases in which no mutations were detectable ...

  1. Multishot diffusion-weighted SPLICE PROPELLER MRI of the abdomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jie; Omary, Reed A; Larson, Andrew C

    2008-05-01

    Multishot FSE (fast spin echo)-based diffusion-weighted (DW)-PROPELLER (periodically rotated overlapping parallel lines with enhanced reconstruction) MRI offers the potential to reduce susceptibility artifacts associated with single-shot DW-EPI (echo-planar imaging) approaches. However, DW-PROPELLER in the abdomen is challenging due to the large field-of-view and respiratory motion during DW preparation. Incoherent signal phase due to motion will violate the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) conditions, leading to destructive interference between spin echo and stimulated echo signals and consequent signal cancellation. The SPLICE (split-echo acquisition of FSE signals) technique can mitigate non-CPMG artifacts in FSE-based sequences. For SPLICE, spin echo and stimulated echo are separated by using imbalanced readout gradients and extended acquisition window. Two signal families each with coherent phase properties are acquired at different intervals within the readout window. Separate reconstruction of these two signal families can avoid destructive phase interference. Phantom studies were performed to validate signal phase properties with different initial magnetization phases. This study evaluated the feasibility of combining SPLICE and PROPELLER for DW imaging of the abdomen. It is demonstrated that DW-SPLICE-PROPELLER can effectively mitigate non-CPMG artifacts and improve DW image quality and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map homogeneity. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Long-range RNA pairings contribute to mutually exclusive splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Yuan; Yang, Yun; Dai, Lanzhi; Cao, Guozheng; Chen, Ran; Hong, Weiling; Liu, Baoping; Shi, Yang; Meng, Yijun; Shi, Feng; Xiao, Mu; Jin, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Mutually exclusive splicing is an important means of increasing the protein repertoire, by which the Down's syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) gene potentially generates 38,016 different isoforms in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the regulatory mechanisms remain obscure due to the complexity of the Dscam exon cluster. Here, we reveal a molecular model for the regulation of the mutually exclusive splicing of the serpent pre-mRNA based on competition between upstream and downstream RNA pairings. Such dual RNA pairings confer fine tuning of the inclusion of alternative exons. Moreover, we demonstrate that the splicing outcome of alternative exons is mediated in relative pairing strength-correlated mode. Combined comparative genomics analysis and experimental evidence revealed similar bidirectional structural architectures in exon clusters 4 and 9 of the Dscam gene. Our findings provide a novel mechanistic framework for the regulation of mutually exclusive splicing and may offer potentially applicable insights into long-range RNA-RNA interactions in gene regulatory networks. © 2015 Yue et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. CD44 splice variants as prognostic markers in colorectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wielenga, V. J.; van der Voort, R.; Mulder, J. W.; Kruyt, P. M.; Weidema, W. F.; Oosting, J.; Seldenrijk, C. A.; van Krimpen, C.; Offerhaus, G. J.; Pals, S. T.

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Splice variants of CD44 play a causal role in the metastatic spread of pancreatic carcinoma in the rat. In previous studies we have shown that homologues of these CD44 isoforms (CD44v6) are overexpressed during colorectal tumorigenesis in man and that CD44v6 overexpression is associated

  4. Unusual structure and splicing pattern of the vertebrate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ROSA CALVELLO

    2018-03-08

    Mar 8, 2018 ... coding section of SLC25A3 which occurred in fish and is conserved in amphibia, birds and mammals. Further, we discuss the way the splicing mechanism compensates. Rosa Calvello and Antonia Cianciulli contributed equally to this work. for the potentially harmful consequences of this 'genomic glitch'.

  5. Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    . [Parsam VL, Ali MJ, Honavar SG, Vemuganti GK and Kannabiran C 2011 Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in retinoblastoma. J. Biosci. 36 281–287] DOI 10.1007/s12038-011-9062-9. 1. Introduction.

  6. Splicing aberrations caused by constitutional RB1 gene mutations in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Analysis of RB1 mRNA from blood leukocytes of patients with retinoblastoma identified the effects of mutations involving consensus splice site, .... bilateral Rb. Genomic DNA analysis from peripheral blood was as described by Parsam .... the patterns are not always the same in different studies (Klutz et al. 2002; Taylor et al.

  7. Higher-order Zeeman and spin terms in the electron paramagnetic resonance spin Hamiltonian; their description in irreducible form using Cartesian, tesseral spherical tensor and Stevens' operator expressions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGavin, Dennis G; Tennant, W Craighead

    2009-01-01

    In setting up a spin Hamiltonian (SH) to study high-spin Zeeman and high-spin nuclear and/or electronic interactions in electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) experiments, it is argued that a maximally reduced SH (MRSH) framed in tesseral combinations of spherical tensor operators is necessary. Then, the SH contains only those terms that are necessary and sufficient to describe the particular spin system. The paper proceeds then to obtain interrelationships between the parameters of the MRSH and those of alternative SHs expressed in Cartesian tensor and Stevens operator-equivalent forms. The examples taken, initially, are those of Cartesian and Stevens' expressions for high-spin Zeeman terms of dimension BS 3 and BS 5 . Starting from the well-known decomposition of the general Cartesian tensor of second rank to three irreducible tensors of ranks 0, 1 and 2, the decomposition of Cartesian tensors of ranks 4 and 6 are treated similarly. Next, following a generalization of the tesseral spherical tensor equations, the interrelationships amongst the parameters of the three kinds of expressions, as derived from equivalent SHs, are determined and detailed tables, including all redundancy equations, set out. In each of these cases the lowest symmetry, 1-bar Laue class, is assumed and then examples of relationships for specific higher symmetries derived therefrom. The validity of a spin Hamiltonian containing mixtures of terms from the three expressions is considered in some detail for several specific symmetries, including again the lowest symmetry. Finally, we address the application of some of the relationships derived here to seldom-observed low-symmetry effects in EPR spectra, when high-spin electronic and nuclear interactions are present.

  8. Alternative Splicing of NOX4 in the Failing Human Heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltán V. Varga

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased oxidative stress is a major contributor to the development and progression of heart failure, however, our knowledge on the role of the distinct NADPH oxidase (NOX isoenzymes, especially on NOX4 is controversial. Therefore, we aimed to characterize NOX4 expression in human samples from healthy and failing hearts. Explanted human heart samples (left and right ventricular, and septal regions were obtained from patients suffering from heart failure of ischemic or dilated origin. Control samples were obtained from donor hearts that were not used for transplantation. Deep RNA sequencing of the cardiac transcriptome indicated extensive alternative splicing of the NOX4 gene in heart failure as compared to samples from healthy donor hearts. Long distance PCR analysis with a universal 5′-3′ end primer pair, allowing amplification of different splice variants, confirmed the presence of the splice variants. To assess translation of the alternatively spliced transcripts we determined protein expression of NOX4 by using a specific antibody recognizing a conserved region in all variants. Western blot analysis showed up-regulation of the full-length NOX4 in ischemic cardiomyopathy samples and confirmed presence of shorter isoforms both in control and failing samples with disease-associated expression pattern. We describe here for the first time that NOX4 undergoes extensive alternative splicing in human hearts which gives rise to the expression of different enzyme isoforms. The full length NOX4 is significantly upregulated in ischemic cardiomyopathy suggesting a role for NOX4 in ROS production during heart failure.

  9. A Comprehensive Analysis of Alternative Splicing in Paleopolyploid Maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Mei

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Identifying and characterizing alternative splicing (AS enables our understanding of the biological role of transcript isoform diversity. This study describes the use of publicly available RNA-Seq data to identify and characterize the global diversity of AS isoforms in maize using the inbred lines B73 and Mo17, and a related species, sorghum. Identification and characterization of AS within maize tissues revealed that genes expressed in seed exhibit the largest differential AS relative to other tissues examined. Additionally, differences in AS between the two genotypes B73 and Mo17 are greatest within genes expressed in seed. We demonstrate that changes in the level of alternatively spliced transcripts (intron retention and exon skipping do not solely reflect differences in total transcript abundance, and we present evidence that intron retention may act to fine-tune gene expression across seed development stages. Furthermore, we have identified temperature sensitive AS in maize and demonstrate that drought-induced changes in AS involve distinct sets of genes in reproductive and vegetative tissues. Examining our identified AS isoforms within B73 × Mo17 recombinant inbred lines (RILs identified splicing QTL (sQTL. The 43.3% of cis-sQTL regulated junctions are actually identified as alternatively spliced junctions in our analysis, while 10 Mb windows on each side of 48.2% of trans-sQTLs overlap with splicing related genes. Using sorghum as an out-group enabled direct examination of loss or conservation of AS between homeologous genes representing the two subgenomes of maize. We identify several instances where AS isoforms that are conserved between one maize homeolog and its sorghum ortholog are absent from the second maize homeolog, suggesting that these AS isoforms may have been lost after the maize whole genome duplication event. This comprehensive analysis provides new insights into the complexity of AS in maize.

  10. Diversification of the Histone Acetyltransferase GCN5 through Alternative Splicing in Brachypodium distachyon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Martel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The epigenetic modulatory SAGA complex is involved in various developmental and stress responsive pathways in plants. Alternative transcripts of the SAGA complex's enzymatic subunit GCN5 have been identified in Brachypodium distachyon. These splice variants differ based on the presence and integrity of their conserved domain sequences: the histone acetyltransferase domain, responsible for catalytic activity, and the bromodomain, involved in acetyl-lysine binding and genomic loci targeting. GCN5 is the wild-type transcript, while alternative splice sites result in the following transcriptional variants: L-GCN5, which is missing the bromodomain and S-GCN5, which lacks the bromodomain as well as certain motifs of the histone acetyltransferase domain. Absolute mRNA quantification revealed that, across eight B. distachyon accessions, GCN5 was the dominant transcript isoform, accounting for up to 90% of the entire transcript pool, followed by L-GCN5 and S-GCN5. A cycloheximide treatment further revealed that the S-GCN5 splice variant was degraded through the nonsense-mediated decay pathway. All alternative BdGCN5 transcripts displayed similar transcript profiles, being induced during early exposure to heat and displaying higher levels of accumulation in the crown, compared to aerial tissues. All predicted protein isoforms localize to the nucleus, which lends weight to their purported epigenetic functions. S-GCN5 was incapable of forming an in vivo protein interaction with ADA2, the transcriptional adaptor that links the histone acetyltransferase subunit to the SAGA complex, while both GCN5 and L-GCN5 interacted with ADA2, which suggests that a complete histone acetyltransferase domain is required for BdGCN5-BdADA2 interaction in vivo. Thus, there has been a diversification in BdGCN5 through alternative splicing that has resulted in differences in conserved domain composition, transcript fate and in vivo protein interaction partners. Furthermore, our

  11. Development of Neuroendocrine Prostate Cancers by the Ser/Arg Repetitive Matrix 4-Mediated RNA Splicing Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahn R. Lee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available While the use of next-generation androgen receptor pathway inhibition (ARPI therapy has significantly increased the survival of patients with metastatic prostate adenocarcinoma (AdPC, several groups have reported a treatment-resistant mechanism, whereby cancer cells can become androgen receptor (AR indifferent and gain a neuroendocrine (NE-like phenotype. This subtype of castration-resistant prostate cancer has been termed “treatment-induced castration-resistant neuroendocrine prostate cancer” (CRPC-NE. Recent reports indicate that the overall genomic landscapes of castration-resistant tumors with AdPC phenotypes and CRPC-NE are not significantly altered. However, CRPC-NE tumors have been found to contain a NE-specific pattern throughout their epigenome and splicing transcriptome, which are significantly modified. The molecular mechanisms by which CRPC-NE develops remain unclear, but several factors have been implicated in the progression of the disease. Recently, Ser/Arg repetitive matrix 4 (SRRM4, a neuronal-specific RNA splicing factor that is upregulated in CRPC-NE tumors, has been shown to establish a CRPC-NE-unique splicing transcriptome, to induce a NE-like morphology in AdPC cells, and, most importantly, to transform AdPC cells into CRPC-NE xenografts under ARPI. Moreover, the SRRM4-targeted splicing genes are highly enriched in various neuronal processes, suggesting their roles in facilitating a CRPC-NE program. This article will address the importance of SRRM4-mediated alternative RNA splicing in reprogramming translated proteins to facilitate NE differentiation, survival, and proliferation of cells to establish CRPC-NE tumors. In addition, we will discuss the potential roles of SRRM4 in conjunction with other known pathways and factors important for CRPC-NE development, such as the AR pathway, TP53 and RB1 genes, the FOXA family of proteins, and environmental factors. This study aims to explore the multifaceted functions of SRRM4

  12. Rapid screening of yeast mutants with reporters identifies new splicing phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreumont, Natacha; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2013-06-01

    Nuclear precursor mRNA splicing requires the stepwise assembly of a large complex, the spliceosome. Recent large-scale analyses, including purification of splicing complexes, high-throughput genetic screens and interactomic studies, have linked numerous factors to this dynamic process, including a well-defined core conserved from yeast to human. Intriguingly, despite extensive studies, no splicing defects were reported for some of the corresponding yeast mutants. To resolve this paradox, we screened a collection of viable yeast strains carrying mutations in splicing-related factors with a set of reporters including artificial constructs carrying competing splice sites. Previous analyses have indeed demonstrated that this strategy identifies yeast factors able to regulate alternative splicing and whose properties are conserved in human cells. The method, sensitive to subtle defects, revealed new splicing phenotypes for most analyzed factors such as the Urn1 protein. Interestingly, a mutant of PRP8 specifically lacking an N-terminal proline-rich region stimulated the splicing of a reporter containing competing branchpoint/3' splice site regions. Thus, using appropriate reporters, yeast can be used to quickly delineate the effect of various factors on splicing and identify those with the propensity to regulate alternative splicing events. © 2013 FEBS.

  13. Transcription rate strongly affects splicing fidelity and cotranscriptionality in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, Vahid; Huang, Yuanhua; Sanguinetti, Guido; Beggs, Jean D

    2018-02-01

    The functional consequences of alternative splicing on altering the transcription rate have been the subject of intensive study in mammalian cells but less is known about effects of splicing on changing the transcription rate in yeast. We present several lines of evidence showing that slow RNA polymerase II elongation increases both cotranscriptional splicing and splicing efficiency and that faster elongation reduces cotranscriptional splicing and splicing efficiency in budding yeast, suggesting that splicing is more efficient when cotranscriptional. Moreover, we demonstrate that altering the RNA polymerase II elongation rate in either direction compromises splicing fidelity, and we reveal that splicing fidelity depends largely on intron length together with secondary structure and splice site score. These effects are notably stronger for the highly expressed ribosomal protein coding transcripts. We propose that transcription by RNA polymerase II is tuned to optimize the efficiency and accuracy of ribosomal protein gene expression, while allowing flexibility in splice site choice with the nonribosomal protein transcripts. © 2018 Aslanzadeh et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  14. A 5' splice site enhances the recruitment of basal transcription initiation factors in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Kahns, Søren; Lykke-Andersen, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Transcription and pre-mRNA splicing are interdependent events. Although mechanisms governing the effects of transcription on splicing are becoming increasingly clear, the means by which splicing affects transcription remain elusive. Using cell lines stably expressing HIV-1 or β-globin mRNAs, harb...... a promoter-proximal 5′ splice site via its U1 snRNA interaction can feed back to stimulate transcription initiation by enhancing preinitiation complex assembly.......Transcription and pre-mRNA splicing are interdependent events. Although mechanisms governing the effects of transcription on splicing are becoming increasingly clear, the means by which splicing affects transcription remain elusive. Using cell lines stably expressing HIV-1 or β-globin mRNAs......, harboring wild-type or various 5′ splice site mutations, we demonstrate a strong positive correlation between splicing efficiency and transcription activity. Interestingly, a 5′ splice site can stimulate transcription even in the absence of splicing. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show enhanced...

  15. Timber joints under long-term loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldborg, T.; Johansen, M.

    This report describes tests and results from stiffness and strength testing of splice joints under long-term loading. During two years of loading the spicimens were exposed to cyclically changing relative humidity. After the loading period the specimens were short-term tested. The connectors were...

  16. Effect of Chord Splice Joints on Force Distribution and Deformations in Trusses with Punched Metal Plate Fasteners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Peter

    2007-01-01

    - their real behaviour is semi-rigid. The influence of splice joints on the distribution of member forces and rotations in the splice joints is investigated in this paper. A finite element program, TrussLab, where the splice joints are given semi-rigid properties is used to analyse the effect of splice joints...

  17. Mammalian tissues defective in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay display highly aberrant splicing patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weischenfeldt, Joachim Lütken; Waage, Johannes Eichler; Tian, Geng

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) affects the outcome of alternative splicing by degrading mRNA isoforms with premature termination codons. Splicing regulators constitute important NMD targets; however, the extent to which loss of NMD causes extensive deregulation...... of alternative splicing has not previously been assayed in a global, unbiased manner. Here, we combine mouse genetics and RNA-seq to provide the first in vivo analysis of the global impact of NMD on splicing patterns in two primary mouse tissues ablated for the NMD factor UPF2. RESULTS: We developed...... importance, the latter events are associated with high intronic conservation. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that NMD regulates alternative splicing outcomes through an intricate web of splicing regulators and that its loss leads to the deregulation of a panoply of splicing events, providing novel...

  18. Effect of fiber blending ratios of cotton/polyester yarns on retained splice diameter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, H. İ.; Kaynak, H. K.

    2017-10-01

    The most important performance parameters of splicing are obtaining adequate strength and appearance at the splice point for all processing requirements. The diameter of spliced portion effects not only appearance of the splice joints but also physical characteristics such as packing density, strength, specific volume of the yarn. In this study, the effect of cotton/polyester fiber blend ratios on spliced portion diameter at different slicing air pressures was investigated. For this aim, three yarn samples 100% cotton, 80-20% CO-PES and 50- 50% CO-PES were produced with 40/1 Ne. Each yarn samples was spliced at three different pressures; 4 bar, 5 bar and 6 bar. The diameters of spliced portion and retained yarns were measured by using ImageJ program and the results were analyzed statistically.

  19. Concerted effects of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 to control vitamin D-directed gene transcription and RNA splicing in human bone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rui; Park, Juw Won; Chun, Rene F; Lisse, Thomas S; Garcia, Alejandro J; Zavala, Kathryn; Sea, Jessica L; Lu, Zhi-Xiang; Xu, Jianzhong; Adams, John S; Xing, Yi; Hewison, Martin

    2017-01-25

    Traditionally recognized as an RNA splicing regulator, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein C1/C2 (hnRNPC1/C2) can also bind to double-stranded DNA and function in trans as a vitamin D response element (VDRE)-binding protein. As such, hnRNPC1/C2 may couple transcription induced by the active form of vitamin D, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25(OH) 2 D) with subsequent RNA splicing. In MG63 osteoblastic cells, increased expression of the 1,25(OH) 2 D target gene CYP24A1 involved immunoprecipitation of hnRNPC1/C2 with CYP24A1 chromatin and RNA. Knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 suppressed expression of CYP24A1, but also increased expression of an exon 10-skipped CYP24A1 splice variant; in a minigene model the latter was attenuated by a functional VDRE in the CYP24A1 promoter. In genome-wide analyses, knockdown of hnRNPC1/C2 resulted in 3500 differentially expressed genes and 2232 differentially spliced genes, with significant commonality between groups. 1,25(OH) 2 D induced 324 differentially expressed genes, with 187 also observed following hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown, and a further 168 unique to hnRNPC1/C2 knockdown. However, 1,25(OH) 2 D induced only 10 differentially spliced genes, with no overlap with differentially expressed genes. These data indicate that hnRNPC1/C2 binds to both DNA and RNA and influences both gene expression and RNA splicing, but these actions do not appear to be linked through 1,25(OH) 2 D-mediated induction of transcription. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  20. Oriented scanning is the leading mechanism underlying 5' splice site selection in mammals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keren Borensztajn

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Splice site selection is a key element of pre-mRNA splicing. Although it is known to involve specific recognition of short consensus sequences by the splicing machinery, the mechanisms by which 5' splice sites are accurately identified remain controversial and incompletely resolved. The human F7 gene contains in its seventh intron (IVS7 a 37-bp VNTR minisatellite whose first element spans the exon7-IVS7 boundary. As a consequence, the IVS7 authentic donor splice site is followed by several cryptic splice sites identical in sequence, referred to as 5' pseudo-sites, which normally remain silent. This region, therefore, provides a remarkable model to decipher the mechanism underlying 5' splice site selection in mammals. We previously suggested a model for splice site selection that, in the presence of consecutive splice consensus sequences, would stimulate exclusively the selection of the most upstream 5' splice site, rather than repressing the 3' following pseudo-sites. In the present study, we provide experimental support to this hypothesis by using a mutational approach involving a panel of 50 mutant and wild-type F7 constructs expressed in various cell types. We demonstrate that the F7 IVS7 5' pseudo-sites are functional, but do not compete with the authentic donor splice site. Moreover, we show that the selection of the 5' splice site follows a scanning-type mechanism, precluding competition with other functional 5' pseudo-sites available on immediate sequence context downstream of the activated one. In addition, 5' pseudo-sites with an increased complementarity to U1snRNA up to 91% do not compete with the identified scanning mechanism. Altogether, these findings, which unveil a cell type-independent 5'-3'-oriented scanning process for accurate recognition of the authentic 5' splice site, reconciliate apparently contradictory observations by establishing a hierarchy of competitiveness among the determinants involved in 5' splice site selection.

  1. Structural Basis for Regulation of GPR56/ADGRG1 by Its Alternatively Spliced Extracellular Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, Gabriel S; Ackerman, Sarah D; Ding, Chen; Koide, Akiko; Leon, Katherine; Luo, Rong; Stoveken, Hannah M; Fernandez, Celia G; Tall, Gregory G; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R; Koide, Shohei; Araç, Demet

    2016-09-21

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) play critical roles in diverse neurobiological processes including brain development, synaptogenesis, and myelination. aGPCRs have large alternatively spliced extracellular regions (ECRs) that likely mediate intercellular signaling; however, the precise roles of ECRs remain unclear. The aGPCR GPR56/ADGRG1 regulates both oligodendrocyte and cortical development. Accordingly, human GPR56 mutations cause myelination defects and brain malformations. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the GPR56 ECR, the first structure of any complete aGPCR ECR, in complex with an inverse-agonist monobody, revealing a GPCR-Autoproteolysis-Inducing domain and a previously unidentified domain that we term Pentraxin/Laminin/neurexin/sex-hormone-binding-globulin-Like (PLL). Strikingly, PLL domain deletion caused increased signaling and characterizes a GPR56 splice variant. Finally, we show that an evolutionarily conserved residue in the PLL domain is critical for oligodendrocyte development in vivo. Thus, our results suggest that the GPR56 ECR has unique and multifaceted regulatory functions, providing novel insights into aGPCR roles in neurobiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ire1 Has Distinct Catalytic Mechanisms for XBP1/HAC1 Splicing and RIDD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvin B. Tam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available An evolutionarily conserved unfolded protein response (UPR component, IRE1, cleaves XBP1/HAC1 introns in order to generate spliced mRNAs that are translated into potent transcription factors. IRE1 also cleaves endoplasmic-reticulum-associated RNAs leading to their decay, an activity termed regulated IRE1-dependent decay (RIDD; however, the mechanism by which IRE1 differentiates intron cleavage from RIDD is not well understood. Using in vitro experiments, we found that IRE1 has two different modes of action: XBP1/HAC1 is cleaved by IRE1 subunits acting cooperatively within IRE1 oligomers, whereas a single subunit of IRE1 performs RIDD without cooperativity. Furthermore, these distinct activities can be separated by complementation of catalytically inactive IRE1 RNase and mutations at oligomerization interfaces. Using an IRE1 RNase inhibitor, STF-083010, selective inhibition of XBP1 splicing indicates that XBP1 promotes cell survival, whereas RIDD leads to cell death, revealing modulation of IRE1 activities as a drug-development strategy.

  3. pPKCδ activates SC35 splicing factor during H9c2 myoblastic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zara, Susi; Falconi, Mirella; Rapino, Monica; Zago, Michela; Orsini, Giovanna; Mazzotti, Giovanni; Cataldi, Amelia; Teti, Gabriella

    2011-01-01

    Although Protein Kinase C (PKC) isoforms' role in the neonatal and adult cardiac tissue development and ageing has been widely described "in vivo", the interaction of such enzymes with specific nuclear substrates needs to be investigated. The aim of our research has been the study of the expression, localization and interaction with the splicing factor SC35 of PKC isoforms (α, δ, ε, ζ) and their potential role in modulating the transcription machinery. H9c2 cells induced to myoblast differentiation in the presence of 1% Horse Serum (HS) have represented our experimental model. The expression of PKC isoforms, their distribution and interaction with SC35 have been evaluated by western blotting, co-immunoprecipitation and double gold immunolabeling for transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Our results show PKCδ as the most expressed isoform in differentiated cells. Surprisingly, the distribution of PKCδ and SC35 does not show any significant modification between 10%FBS and 1%HS treated samples and no co-localization is observed. Moreover the interaction between the phosphorylated form of PKCδ (pPKCδ) and SC35 increases, is distributed and co-localizes within the nucleus of differentiated H9c2. These data represent reasonable evidence of pPKCδ mediated SC35 splicing factor activation, suggesting its direct effect on transcription via interaction with the transcription machinery. Furthermore, this co-localization represents a crucial event resulting in downstream changes in transcription of components which determine the morphological modifications related to cardiomyoblast differentiated phenotype.

  4. Cytoplasmic tethering of a RING protein RBCK1 by its splice variant lacking the RING domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Tatematsu, Kenji; Koyanagi, Tomoyoshi; Okajima, Toshihide; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2005-01-01

    RBCC protein interacting with PKC 1 (RBCK1) is a transcription factor belonging to the RING-IBR protein family and has been shown to shuttle between the nucleus and cytoplasm, possessing both the nuclear export and localization signals within its amino acid sequence. RBCK2, lacking the C-terminal half of RBCK1 including the RING-IBR domain, has also been identified as an alternative splice variant of RBCK1. RBCK2 shows no transcriptional activity and instead it represses the transcriptional activity of RBCK1. Here, we show that RBCK2 is present usually in the cytoplasm containing two Leu-rich regions that presumably serve as a nuclear export signal (NES). Moreover, an NES-disrupted RBCK1 that is mostly localized within the nucleus is translocated to the cytoplasm when coexpressed with RBCK2, suggesting that RBCK2 serves as a cytoplasmic tethering protein for RBCK1. We propose a novel and general function of RING-lacking splice variants of RING proteins to control the intracellular localization and functions of the parental RING proteins by forming a hetero-oligomeric complex

  5. Survivin 2α: a novel Survivin splice variant expressed in human malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honsey Laura E

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Survivin and its alternative splice forms are involved in critical cellular processes, including cell division and programmed cell death. Survivin is expressed in the majority of human cancers, but minimally in differentiated normal tissues. Expression levels correlate with tumor aggressiveness and resistance to therapy. Results In the present study, we identify and characterize a novel survivin isoform that we designate survivin 2α. Structurally, the transcript consists of 2 exons: exon 1 and exon 2, as well as a 3' 197 bp region of intron 2. Acquisition of a new in-frame stop codon within intron 2 results in an open reading frame of 225 nucleotides, predicting a truncated 74 amino acid protein. Survivin 2α is expressed at high levels in several malignant cell lines and primary tumors. Functional assays show that survivin 2α attenuates the anti-apoptotic activity of survivin. Subcellular localization and immunoprecipitation of survivin 2α suggests a physical interaction with survivin. Conclusion We characterized a novel survivin splice variant that we designated survivin 2α. We hypothesize that survivin 2α can alter the anti-apoptotic functions of survivin in malignant cells. Thus survivin 2α may be useful as a therapeutic tool in sensitizing chemoresistant tumor cells to chemotherapy.

  6. Implementation of CsLIS/NES in linalool biosynthesis involves transcript splicing regulation in Camellia sinensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo-Feng; Liu, Jing-Jing; He, Zhi-Rong; Wang, Fu-Min; Yang, Hua; Yan, Yi-Feng; Gao, Ming-Jun; Gruber, Margaret Y; Wan, Xiao-Chun; Wei, Shu

    2018-01-01

    Volatile terpenoids produced in tea plants (Camellia sinensis) are airborne signals interacting against other ecosystem members, but also pleasant odorants of tea products. Transcription regulation (including transcript processing) is pivotal for plant volatile terpenoid production. In this study, a terpene synthase gene CsLIS/NES was recovered from tea plants (C. sinensis cv. "Long-Men Xiang"). CsLIS/NES transcription regulation resulted in 2 splicing forms: CsLIS/NES-1 and CsLIS/NES-2 lacking a 305 bp-fragment at N-terminus, both producing (E)-nerolidol and linalool in vitro. Transgenic tobacco studies and a gene-specific antisense oligo-deoxynucleotide suppression applied in tea leaves indicated that CsLIS/NES-1, localized in chloroplasts, acted as linalool synthase, whereas CsLIS/NES-2 localized in cytosol, functioned as a potential nerolidol synthase, but not linalool synthase. Expression patterns of the 2 transcript isoforms in tea were distinctly different and responded differentially to the application of stress signal molecule methyl jasmonate. Leaf expression of CsLIS/NES-1, but not CsLIS/NES-2, was significantly induced by methyl jasmonate. Our data indicated that distinct transcript splicing regulation patterns, together with subcellular compartmentation of CsLIS/NE-1 and CsLIS/NE-2 implemented the linalool biosynthesis regulation in tea plants in responding to endogenous and exogenous regulatory factors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. MAISTAS: a tool for automatic structural evaluation of alternative splicing products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floris, Matteo; Raimondo, Domenico; Leoni, Guido; Orsini, Massimiliano; Marcatili, Paolo; Tramontano, Anna

    2011-06-15

    Analysis of the human genome revealed that the amount of transcribed sequence is an order of magnitude greater than the number of predicted and well-characterized genes. A sizeable fraction of these transcripts is related to alternatively spliced forms of known protein coding genes. Inspection of the alternatively spliced transcripts identified in the pilot phase of the ENCODE project has clearly shown that often their structure might substantially differ from that of other isoforms of the same gene, and therefore that they might perform unrelated functions, or that they might even not correspond to a functional protein. Identifying these cases is obviously relevant for the functional assignment of gene products and for the interpretation of the effect of variations in the corresponding proteins. Here we describe a publicly available tool that, given a gene or a protein, retrieves and analyses all its annotated isoforms, provides users with three-dimensional models of the isoform(s) of his/her interest whenever possible and automatically assesses whether homology derived structural models correspond to plausible structures. This information is clearly relevant. When the homology model of some isoforms of a gene does not seem structurally plausible, the implications are that either they assume a structure unrelated to that of the other isoforms of the same gene with presumably significant functional differences, or do not correspond to functional products. We provide indications that the second hypothesis is likely to be true for a substantial fraction of the cases. http://maistas.bioinformatica.crs4.it/.

  8. Functional diversification of sea urchin ABCC1 (MRP1) by alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gökirmak, Tufan; Campanale, Joseph P; Reitzel, Adam M; Shipp, Lauren E; Moy, Gary W; Hamdoun, Amro

    2016-06-01

    The multidrug resistance protein (MRP) family encodes a diverse repertoire of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters with multiple roles in development, disease, and homeostasis. Understanding MRP evolution is central to unraveling their roles in these diverse processes. Sea urchins occupy an important phylogenetic position for understanding the evolution of vertebrate proteins and have been an important invertebrate model system for study of ABC transporters. We used phylogenetic analyses to examine the evolution of MRP transporters and functional approaches to identify functional forms of sea urchin MRP1 (also known as SpABCC1). SpABCC1, the only MRP homolog in sea urchins, is co-orthologous to human MRP1, MRP3, and MRP6 (ABCC1, ABCC3, and ABCC6) transporters. However, efflux assays revealed that alternative splicing of exon 22, a region critical for substrate interactions, could diversify functions of sea urchin MRP1. Phylogenetic comparisons also indicate that while MRP1, MRP3, and MRP6 transporters potentially arose from a single transporter in basal deuterostomes, alternative splicing appears to have been the major mode of functional diversification in invertebrates, while duplication may have served a more important role in vertebrates. These results provide a deeper understanding of the evolutionary origins of MRP transporters and the potential mechanisms used to diversify their functions in different groups of animals. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Becker muscular dystrophy due to an intronic splicing mutation inducing a dual dystrophin transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todeschini, Alice; Gualandi, Francesca; Trabanelli, Cecilia; Armaroli, Annarita; Ravani, Anna; Fanin, Marina; Rota, Silvia; Bello, Luca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Pegoraro, Elena; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano

    2016-10-01

    We describe a 29-year-old patient who complained of left thigh muscle weakness since he was 23 and of moderate proximal weakness of both lower limbs with difficulty in climbing stairs and running since he was 27. Mild weakness of iliopsoas and quadriceps muscles and muscle atrophy of both the distal forearm and thigh were observed upon clinical examination. He harboured a novel c.1150-3C>G substitution in the DMD gene, affecting the intron 10 acceptor splice site and causing exon 11 skipping and an out-of-frame transcript. However, protein of normal molecular weight but in reduced amounts was observed on Western Blot analysis. Reverse transcription analysis on muscle RNA showed production, via alternative splicing, of a transcript missing exon 11 as well as a low abundant full-length transcript which is enough to avoid the severe Duchenne phenotype. Our study showed that a reduced amount of full length dystrophin leads to a mild form of Becker muscular dystrophy. These results confirm earlier findings that low amounts of dystrophin can be associated with a milder phenotype, which is promising for therapies aiming at dystrophin restoration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Parametrizations of three-body hadronic B - and D -decay amplitudes in terms of analytic and unitary meson-meson form factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boito, D.; Dedonder, J.-P.; El-Bennich, B.; Escribano, R.; Kamiński, R.; Leśniak, L.; Loiseau, B.

    2017-12-01

    We introduce parametrizations of hadronic three-body B and D weak decay amplitudes that can be readily implemented in experimental analyses and are a sound alternative to the simplistic and widely used sum of Breit-Wigner type amplitudes, also known as the isobar model. These parametrizations can be particularly useful in the interpretation of C P asymmetries in the Dalitz plots. They are derived from previous calculations based on a quasi-two-body factorization approach in which two-body hadronic final-state interactions are fully taken into account in terms of unitary S - and P -wave π π , π K , and K K ¯ form factors. These form factors can be determined rigorously, fulfilling fundamental properties of quantum field-theory amplitudes such as analyticity and unitarity, and are in agreement with the low-energy behavior predicted by effective theories of QCD. They are derived from sets of coupled-channel equations using T -matrix elements constrained by experimental meson-meson phase shifts and inelasticities, chiral symmetry, and asymptotic QCD. We provide explicit amplitude expressions for the decays B±→π+π-π±, B →K π+π-, B±→K+K-K±, D+→π-π+π+, D+→K-π+π+, and D0→KS0π+π-, for which we have shown in previous studies that this approach is phenomenologically successful; in addition, we provide expressions for the D0→KS0K+K- decay. Other three-body hadronic channels can be parametrized likewise.

  11. Phosphorus forms and chemistry in the soil profile under long-term conservation tillage: a phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade-Menun, Barbara J; Carter, Martin R; James, Dean C; Liu, Corey W

    2010-01-01

    In many regions, conservation tillage has replaced conventional tilling practices to reduce soil erosion, improve water conservation, and increase soil organic matter. However, tillage can have marked effects on soil properties, specifically nutrient redistribution or stratification in the soil profile. The objective of this research was to examine soil phosphorus (P) forms and concentrations in a long-term study comparing conservation tillage (direct drilling, "No Till") and conventional tillage (moldboard plowing to 20 cm depth, "Till") established on a fine sandy loam (Orthic Humo-Ferric Podzol) in Prince Edward Island, Canada. No significant differences in total carbon (C), total nitrogen (N), total P, or total organic P concentrations were detected between the tillage systems at any depth in the 0- to 60-cm depth range analyzed. However, analysis with phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy showed differences in P forms in the plow layer. In particular, the concentration of orthophosphate was significantly higher under No Till than Till at 5 to 10 cm, but the reverse was true at 10 to 20 cm. Mehlich 3-extractable P was also significantly higher in No Till at 5 to 10 cm and significantly higher in Till at 20 to 30 cm. This P stratification appears to be caused by a lack of mixing of applied fertilizer in No Till because the same trends were observed for pH and Mehlich 3-extractable Ca (significantly higher in the Till treatment at 20 to 30 cm), reflecting mixing of applied lime. The P saturation ratio was significantly higher under No Till at 0 to 5 cm and exceeded the recommended limits, suggesting that P stratification under No Till had increased the potential for P loss in runoff from these sites.

  12. The β2-microglobulin-free heterodimerization of rhesus monkey MHC class I A with its normally spliced variant reduces the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of MHC class I A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zhang, Gao-Hong; Zhang, Xi-He; Xia, Hou-Jun; Li, Shao-You; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2012-03-01

    The MHC class I (MHC I) molecules play a pivotal role in the regulation of immune responses by presenting antigenic peptides to CTLs and by regulating cytolytic activities of NK cells. In this article, we show that MHC I A in rhesus macaques can be alternatively spliced, generating a novel MHC I A isoform (termed "MHC I A-sv1") devoid of α(3) domain. Despite the absence of β2-microglobulin (β2m), the MHC I A-sv1 proteins reached the cell surface of K562-transfected cells as endoglycosidase H-sensitive glycoproteins that could form disulfide-bonded homodimers. Cycloheximide-based protein chase experiments showed that the MHC I A-sv1 proteins were more stable than the full-length MHC I A in transiently or stably transfected cell lines. Of particular interest, our studies demonstrated that MHC I A-sv1 could form β2m-free heterodimers with its full-length protein in mammalian cells. The formation of heterodimers was accompanied by a reduction in full-length MHC I A ubiquitination and consequent stabilization of the protein. Taken together, these results demonstrated that MHC I A-sv1 and MHC I A can form a novel heterodimeric complex as a result of the displacement of β2m and illustrated the relevance of regulated MHC I A protein degradation in the β2m-free heterodimerization-dependent control, which may have some implications for the MHC I A splice variant in the fine tuning of classical MHC I A/TCR and MHC I A/killer cell Ig-like receptor interactions.

  13. Molecular characterization of a CpTRIM35-like protein and its splice variants from whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Xinshang; Zhao, Heng; Chen, Yeyu; Luo, Huiying; Yao, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A TRIM gene and three splice variants were firstly cloned from elasmobranch fish. • The genes were constitutively expressed with high levels in spleen and kidney. • The gene products were distributed in cytoplasm alone or cytoplasm and nucleus. • As E3 ubiquitin ligases, the proteins differed in immune responses to challenges. - Abstract: The tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins play important roles in a broad range of biological processes, including apoptosis, cell proliferation and innate immunity response. In this study, a TRIM gene and its three splice variants were cloned from an elasmobranch fish—whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum Bennett). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the gene was closely related to TRIM35 homologs, thus termed CpTRIM35-like. Deduced CpTRIM35 has a RBCC-PRY/SPRY structure typical of TRIM proteins, and its splice variants (CpTRIM35-1–3) have different truncations at the C-terminus. The gene products were constitutively expressed in adult sharks with the highest levels in spleen and kidney. The different subcellular locations, upregulation upon LPS and poly I:C stimulation, and significant E3 ubiquitin ligase activities suggested their different roles in immune responses as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. This is the first TRIM protein ever characterized in elasmobranch fish

  14. Molecular characterization of a CpTRIM35-like protein and its splice variants from whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xinshang, E-mail: sanmaosound@163.com; Zhao, Heng, E-mail: hengzhao2000@gmail.com; Chen, Yeyu, E-mail: cyyleaf@126.com; Luo, Huiying, E-mail: luohuiying@caas.cn; Yao, Bin, E-mail: binyao@caas.cn

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • A TRIM gene and three splice variants were firstly cloned from elasmobranch fish. • The genes were constitutively expressed with high levels in spleen and kidney. • The gene products were distributed in cytoplasm alone or cytoplasm and nucleus. • As E3 ubiquitin ligases, the proteins differed in immune responses to challenges. - Abstract: The tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins play important roles in a broad range of biological processes, including apoptosis, cell proliferation and innate immunity response. In this study, a TRIM gene and its three splice variants were cloned from an elasmobranch fish—whitespotted bamboo shark (Chiloscyllium plagiosum Bennett). Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the gene was closely related to TRIM35 homologs, thus termed CpTRIM35-like. Deduced CpTRIM35 has a RBCC-PRY/SPRY structure typical of TRIM proteins, and its splice variants (CpTRIM35-1–3) have different truncations at the C-terminus. The gene products were constitutively expressed in adult sharks with the highest levels in spleen and kidney. The different subcellular locations, upregulation upon LPS and poly I:C stimulation, and significant E3 ubiquitin ligase activities suggested their different roles in immune responses as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. This is the first TRIM protein ever characterized in elasmobranch fish.

  15. In situ observation of modulated light emission of fiber fuse synchronized with void train over hetero-core splice point.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichi Todoroki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Fiber fuse is a process of optical fiber destruction under the action of laser radiation, found 20 years ago. Once initiated, opical discharge runs along the fiber core region to the light source and leaves periodic voids whose shape looks like a bullet pointing the direction of laser beam. The relation between damage pattern and propagation mode of optical discharge is still unclear even after the first in situ observation three years ago. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fiber fuse propagation over hetero-core splice point (Corning SMF-28e and HI 1060 was observed in situ. Sequential photographs obtained at intervals of 2.78 micros recorded a periodic emission at the tail of an optical discharge pumped by 1070 nm and 9 W light. The signal stopped when the discharge ran over the splice point. The corresponding damage pattern left in the fiber core region included a segment free of periodicity. CONCLUSIONS: The spatial modulation pattern of the light emission agreed with the void train formed over the hetero-core splice point. Some segments included a bullet-shaped void pointing in the opposite direction to the laser beam propagation although the sequential photographs did not reveal any directional change in the optical discharge propagation.

  16. Splice variation in the cytoplasmic domains of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein affects its cellular localisation and transport1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Louise H; Traherne, James A; Plotnek, Gemma; Ward, Rosemary; Trowsdale, John

    2007-01-01

    Although myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein is a candidate autoantigen in multiple sclerosis, its function remains unknown. In humans, mRNA expressed by the myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein gene is alternatively spliced resulting in at least nine unique protein isoforms. In this study, we investigated the sub-cellular localisation and membrane trafficking of six isoforms by cloning them into mammalian expression vectors. Confocal microscopy revealed that these protein products are expressed in different cellular compartments. While two full-length isoforms (25.6 and 25.1) are expressed at the cell surface, three alternatively spliced forms (22.7, 21.0 and 20.5) have a more intracellular distribution, localising to the endoplasmic reticulum and/or endosomes. Isoform 16.3, which lacks a transmembrane domain, is secreted. A switch in the sub-cellular localisation of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein may have profound effects on receptor:ligand interactions and consequently the function of the protein. The structural features of the alternative isoforms and their differential, sub-cellular expression patterns could dictate the exposure of major immunogenic determinants within the central nervous system. Our findings highlight myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein splicing as a factor that could be critical to the phenotypic expression of multiple sclerosis. PMID:17573820

  17. Arabidopsis IRE1 catalyses unconventional splicing of bZIP60 mRNA to produce the active transcription factor

    KAUST Repository

    Nagashima, Yukihiro

    2011-07-01

    IRE1 plays an essential role in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response in yeast and mammals. We found that a double mutant of Arabidopsis IRE1A and IRE1B (ire1a/ire1b) is more sensitive to the ER stress inducer tunicamycin than the wild-type. Transcriptome analysis revealed that genes whose induction was reduced in ire1a/ire1b largely overlapped those in the bzip60 mutant. We observed that the active form of bZIP60 protein detected in the wild-type was missing in ire1a/ire1b. We further demonstrated that bZIP60 mRNA is spliced by ER stress, removing 23 ribonucleotides and therefore causing a frameshift that replaces the C-terminal region of bZIP60 including the transmembrane domain (TMD) with a shorter region without a TMD. This splicing was detected in ire1a and ire1b single mutants, but not in the ire1a/ire1b double mutant. We conclude that IRE1A and IRE1B catalyse unconventional splicing of bZIP60 mRNA to produce the active transcription factor.

  18. Biodesign of a renal-protective peptide based on alternative splicing of B-type natriuretic peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shuchong; Chen, Horng H; Dickey, Deborah M; Boerrigter, Guido; Lee, Candace; Kleppe, Laurel S; Hall, Jennifer L; Lerman, Amir; Redfield, Margaret M; Potter, Lincoln R; Burnett, John C; Simari, Robert D

    2009-07-07

    Alternative RNA splicing may provide unique opportunities to identify drug targets and therapeutics. We identified an alternative spliced transcript for B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) resulting from intronic retention. This transcript is present in failing human hearts and is reduced following mechanical unloading. The intron-retained transcript would generate a unique 34 amino acid (aa) carboxyl terminus while maintaining the remaining structure of native BNP. We generated antisera to this carboxyl terminus and identified immunoreactivity in failing human heart tissue. The alternatively spliced peptide (ASBNP) was synthesized and unlike BNP, failed to stimulate cGMP in vascular cells or vasorelax preconstricted arterial rings. This suggests that ASBNP may lack the dose-limiting effects of recombinant BNP. Given structural considerations, a carboxyl-terminal truncated form of ASBNP was generated (ASBNP.1) and was determined to retain the ability of BNP to stimulate cGMP in canine glomerular isolates and cultured human mesangial cells but lacked similar effects in vascular cells. In a canine-pacing model of heart failure, systemic infusion of ASBNP.1 did not alter mean arterial pressure but increased the glomerular filtration rate (GFR), suppressed plasma renin and angiotensin, while inducing natriuresis and diuresis. Consistent with its distinct in vivo effects, the activity of ASBNP.1 may not be explained through binding and activation of NPR-A or NPR-B. Thus, the biodesigner peptide ASBNP.1 enhances GFR associated with heart failure while lacking the vasoactive properties of BNP. These findings demonstrate that peptides with unique properties may be designed based on products of alternatively splicing.

  19. Expression analysis of an evolutionarily conserved alternative splicing factor, Sfrs10, in age-related macular degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devi Krishna Priya Karunakaran

    Full Text Available Age-related macular degeneration (AMD is the most common cause of blindness in the elderly population. Hypoxic stress created in the micro-environment of the photoreceptors is thought to be the underlying cause that results in the pathophysiology of AMD. However, association of AMD with alternative splicing mediated gene regulation is not well explored. Alternative Splicing is one of the primary mechanisms in humans by which fewer protein coding genes are able to generate a vast proteome. Here, we investigated the expression of a known stress response gene and an alternative splicing factor called Serine-Arginine rich splicing factor 10 (Sfrs10. Sfrs10 is a member of the serine-arginine (SR rich protein family and is 100% identical at the amino acid level in most mammals. Immunoblot analysis on retinal extracts from mouse, rat, and chicken showed a single immunoreactive band. Further, immunohistochemistry on adult mouse, rat and chicken retinae showed pan-retinal expression. However, SFRS10 was not detected in normal human retina but was observed as distinct nuclear speckles in AMD retinae. This is in agreement with previous reports that show Sfrs10 to be a stress response gene, which is upregulated under hypoxia. The difference in the expression of Sfrs10 between humans and lower mammals and the upregulation of SFRS10 in AMD is further reflected in the divergence of the promoter sequence between these species. Finally, SFRS10+ speckles were independent of the SC35+ SR protein speckles or the HSF1+ stress granules. In all, our data suggests that SFRS10 is upregulated and forms distinct stress-induced speckles and might be involved in AS of stress response genes in AMD.

  20. Branched intermediate formation is the slowest step in the protein splicing reaction of the Ala1 KlbA intein from Methanococcus jannaschii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Lana; Southworth, Maurice W; Considine, Nancy; O'Neill, Colleen; Benner, Jack; Bollinger, J Martin; Perler, Francine B

    2011-12-13

    We report the first detailed investigation of the kinetics of protein splicing by the Methanococcus jannaschii KlbA (Mja KlbA) intein. This intein has an N-terminal Ala in place of the nucleophilic Cys or Ser residue that normally initiates splicing but nevertheless splices efficiently in vivo [Southworth, M. W., Benner, J., and Perler, F. B. (2000) EMBO J.19, 5019-5026]. To date, the spontaneous nature of the cis splicing reaction has hindered its examination in vitro. For this reason, we constructed an Mja KlbA intein-mini-extein precursor using intein-mediated protein ligation and engineered a disulfide redox switch that permits initiation of the splicing reaction by the addition of a reducing agent such as dithiothreitol (DTT). A fluorescent tag at the C-terminus of the C-extein permits monitoring of the progress of the reaction. Kinetic analysis of the splicing reaction of the wild-type precursor (with no substitutions in known nucleophiles or assisting groups) at various DTT concentrations shows that formation of the branched intermediate from the precursor is reversible (forward rate constant of 1.5 × 10(-3) s(-1) and reverse rate constant of 1.7 × 10(-5) s(-1) at 42 °C), whereas the productive decay of this intermediate to form the ligated exteins is faster and occurs with a rate constant of 2.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). This finding conflicts with reports about standard inteins, for which Asn cyclization has been assigned as the rate-determining step of the splicing reaction. Despite being the slowest step of the reaction, branched intermediate formation in the Mja KlbA intein is efficient in comparison with those of other intein systems. Interestingly, it also appears that this intermediate is protected against thiolysis by DTT, in contrast to other inteins. Evidence is presented in support of a tight coupling between the N-terminal and C-terminal cleavage steps, despite the fact that the C-terminal single-cleavage reaction occurs in variant Mja KlbA inteins in

  1. Interplay between estrogen receptor and AKT in estradiol-induced alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat-Nakshatri, Poornima; Song, Eun-Kyung; Collins, Nikail R; Uversky, Vladimir N; Dunker, A Keith; O'Malley, Bert W; Geistlinger, Tim R; Carroll, Jason S; Brown, Myles; Nakshatri, Harikrishna

    2013-06-11

    Alternative splicing is critical for generating complex proteomes in response to extracellular signals. Nuclear receptors including estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) and their ligands promote alternative splicing. The endogenous targets of ERα:estradiol (E2)-mediated alternative splicing and the influence of extracellular kinases that phosphorylate ERα on E2-induced splicing are unknown. MCF-7 and its anti-estrogen derivatives were used for the majority of the assays. CD44 mini gene was used to measure the effect of E2 and AKT on alternative splicing. ExonHit array analysis was performed to identify E2 and AKT-regulated endogenous alternatively spliced apoptosis-related genes. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to verify alternative splicing. ERα binding to alternatively spliced genes was verified by chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. Bromodeoxyuridine incorporation-ELISA and Annexin V labeling assays were done to measure cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. We identified the targets of E2-induced alternative splicing and deconstructed some of the mechanisms surrounding E2-induced splicing by combining splice array with ERα cistrome and gene expression array. E2-induced alternatively spliced genes fall into at least two subgroups: coupled to E2-regulated transcription and ERα binding to the gene without an effect on rate of transcription. Further, AKT, which phosphorylates both ERα and splicing factors, influenced ERα:E2 dependent splicing in a gene-specific manner. Genes that are alternatively spliced include FAS/CD95, FGFR2, and AXIN-1. E2 increased the expression of FGFR2 C1 isoform but reduced C3 isoform at mRNA level. E2-induced alternative splicing of FAS and FGFR2 in MCF-7 cells correlated with resistance to FAS activation-induced apoptosis and response to keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), respectively. Resistance of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to the anti-estrogen tamoxifen was associated with ER

  2. Footprints of a trypanosomatid RNA world: pre-small subunit rRNA processing by spliced leader addition trans-splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Gustavo Mayer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The addition of a capped mini-exon [spliced leader (SL] through trans-splicing is essential for the maturation of RNA polymerase (pol II-transcribed polycistronic pre-mRNAs in all members of the Trypanosomatidae family. This process is an inter-molecular splicing reaction that follows the same basic rules of cis-splicing reactions. In this study, we demonstrated that mini-exons were added to precursor ribosomal RNA (pre-rRNA are transcribed by RNA pol I, including the 5' external transcribed spacer (ETS region. Additionally, we detected the SL-5'ETS molecule using three distinct methods and located the acceptor site between two known 5'ETS rRNA processing sites (A' and A1 in four different trypanosomatids. Moreover, we detected a polyadenylated 5'ETS upstream of the trans-splicing acceptor site, which also occurs in pre-mRNA trans-splicing. After treatment with an indirect trans-splicing inhibitor (sinefungin, we observed SL-5'ETS decay. However, treatment with 5-fluorouracil (a precursor of RNA synthesis that inhibits the degradation of pre-rRNA led to the accumulation of SL-5'ETS, suggesting that the molecule may play a role in rRNA degradation. The detection of trans-splicing in these molecules may indicate broad RNA-joining properties, regardless of the polymerase used for transcription.

  3. RRM domain of Arabidopsis splicing factor SF1 is important for pre-mRNA splicing of a specific set of genes

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Keh Chien

    2017-04-11

    The RNA recognition motif of Arabidopsis splicing factor SF1 affects the alternative splicing of FLOWERING LOCUS M pre-mRNA and a heat shock transcription factor HsfA2 pre-mRNA. Splicing factor 1 (SF1) plays a crucial role in 3\\' splice site recognition by binding directly to the intron branch point. Although plant SF1 proteins possess an RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain that is absent in its fungal and metazoan counterparts, the role of the RRM domain in SF1 function has not been characterized. Here, we show that the RRM domain differentially affects the full function of the Arabidopsis thaliana AtSF1 protein under different experimental conditions. For example, the deletion of RRM domain influences AtSF1-mediated control of flowering time, but not the abscisic acid sensitivity response during seed germination. The alternative splicing of FLOWERING LOCUS M (FLM) pre-mRNA is involved in flowering time control. We found that the RRM domain of AtSF1 protein alters the production of alternatively spliced FLM-β transcripts. We also found that the RRM domain affects the alternative splicing of a heat shock transcription factor HsfA2 pre-mRNA, thereby mediating the heat stress response. Taken together, our results suggest the importance of RRM domain for AtSF1-mediated alternative splicing of a subset of genes involved in the regulation of flowering and adaptation to heat stress.

  4. Features generated for computational splice-site prediction correspond to functional elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilbur W John

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate selection of splice sites during the splicing of precursors to messenger RNA requires both relatively well-characterized signals at the splice sites and auxiliary signals in the adjacent exons and introns. We previously described a feature generation algorithm (FGA that is capable of achieving high classification accuracy on human 3' splice sites. In this paper, we extend the splice-site prediction to 5' splice sites and explore the generated features for biologically meaningful splicing signals. Results We present examples from the observed features that correspond to known signals, both core signals (including the branch site and pyrimidine tract and auxiliary signals (including GGG triplets and exon splicing enhancers. We present evidence that features identified by FGA include splicing signals not found by other methods. Conclusion Our generated features capture known biological signals in the expected sequence interval flanking splice sites. The method can be easily applied to other species and to similar classification problems, such as tissue-specific regulatory elements, polyadenylation sites, promoters, etc.

  5. The Role of Canonical and Noncanonical Pre-mRNA Splicing in Plant Stress Responses

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    A. S. Dubrovina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are sessile organisms capable of adapting to various environmental constraints, such as high or low temperatures, drought, soil salinity, or pathogen attack. To survive the unfavorable conditions, plants actively employ pre-mRNA splicing as a mechanism to regulate expression of stress-responsive genes and reprogram intracellular regulatory networks. There is a growing evidence that various stresses strongly affect the frequency and diversity of alternative splicing events in the stress-responsive genes and lead to an increased accumulation of mRNAs containing premature stop codons, which in turn have an impact on plant stress response. A number of studies revealed that some mRNAs involved in plant stress response are spliced counter to the traditional conception of alternative splicing. Such noncanonical mRNA splicing events include trans-splicing, intraexonic deletions, or variations affecting multiple exons and often require short direct repeats to occur. The noncanonical alternative splicing, along with common splicing events, targets the spliced transcripts to degradation through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay or leads to translation of truncated proteins. Investigation of the diversity, biological consequences, and mechanisms of the canonical and noncanonical alternative splicing events will help one to identify those transcripts which are promising for using in genetic engineering and selection of stress-tolerant plants.

  6. A Feature-Based Forensic Procedure for Splicing Forgeries Detection

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    Irene Amerini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, determining if an image appeared somewhere on the web or in a magazine or is authentic or not has become crucial. Image forensics methods based on features have demonstrated so far to be very effective in detecting forgeries in which a portion of an image is cloned somewhere else onto the same image. Anyway such techniques cannot be adopted to deal with splicing attack, that is, when the image portion comes from another picture that then, usually, is not available anymore for an operation of feature match. In this paper, a procedure in which these techniques could also be employed will be shown to get rid of splicing attack by resorting to the use of some repositories of images available on the Internet like Google Images or TinEye Reverse Image Search. Experimental results are presented on some real case images retrieved on the Internet to demonstrate the capacity of the proposed procedure.

  7. Alternative splice variants of the human PD-1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian; Ohm-Laursen, Line; Barington, Torben

    2005-01-01

    PD-1 is an immunoregulatory receptor expressed on the surface of activated T cells, B cells, and monocytes. We describe four alternatively spliced PD-1 mRNA transcripts (PD-1Deltaex2, PD-1Deltaex3, PD-1Deltaex2,3, and PD-1Deltaex2,3,4) in addition to the full length isoform. PD-1Deltaex2 and PD-1...

  8. Exon expression and alternatively spliced genes in Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yingfang; Liao, Isaac H; Zhan, Xinhua; Gunther, Joan R; Ander, Bradley P; Liu, Dazhi; Lit, Lisa; Jickling, Glen C; Corbett, Blythe A; Bos-Veneman, Netty G P; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Sharp, Frank R

    2011-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is diagnosed based upon clinical criteria including motor and vocal tics. We hypothesized that differences in exon expression and splicing might be useful for pathophysiology and diagnosis. To demonstrate exon expression and alternatively spliced gene differences in blood of individuals with TS compared to healthy controls (HC), RNA was isolated from the blood of 26 un-medicated TS subjects and 23 HC. Each sample was run on Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST (HuExon) arrays and on 3' biased U133 Plus 2.0 (HuU133) arrays. To investigate the differentially expressed exons and transcripts, analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were performed, controlling for age, gender, and batch. Differential alternative splicing patterns between TS and HC were identified using analyses of variance (ANOVA) models in Partek. Three hundred and seventy-six exon probe sets were differentially expressed between TS and HC (raw P |1.2|) that separated TS and HC subjects using hierarchical clustering and Principal Components Analysis. The probe sets predicted TS compared to HC with a >90% sensitivity and specificity using a 10-fold cross-validation. Ninety genes (transcripts) had differential expression of a single exon (raw P < 0.005) and were predicted to be alternatively spliced (raw P < 0.05) in TS compared to HC. These preliminary findings might provide insight into the pathophysiology of TS and potentially provide prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. However, the findings are tempered by the small sample size and multiple comparisons and require confirmation using PCR or deep RNA sequencing and a much larger patient population. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. The plethora of PMCA isoforms: Alternative splicing and differential expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    In this review the four different genes of the mammalian plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) and their spliced isoforms are discussed with respect to their tissue distribution, their differences during development and their importance for regulating Ca²⁺ homeostasis under different conditions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Long-term and Continius Horticatural Practices on Distribution of Potassium Forms and their Adsorption Properties in Urmia Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    zahra amirpour

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Multiple biological and physiological processes in the plant, including carbohydrates and proteins formation, activation of 50 enzymes for energy transmission as well as reducing water losses from leaf pores, are mostly affected by the presence of potassium in the plant. In order to test this hypothesis, five soil subgroups (TypicCalcixerepts, FluventicHaploxerepts, TypicEndoaquepts, TypicHalaquepts and VerticEndoaquepts belonging 15 series of gardened and adjoining virgin soils were described and sampled. The studied soils had been influenced under horticultural practices for over five decades. Materials and Methods: The soil samples were analyzed for different K forms, K adsorption and physico- chemical properties after air drying and grinding to pass through a 2 mm-sieve. The particle-size distribution was determined by the hydrometer method (Bouyoucos, 1962. The total carbonate in the soil expressed as the calcium carbonate equivalent (CCE was determined by a rapid titration method (Nelson, 1982. Organic matter (OM was measuredby the Walkley and Black (1934 dichromate oxidation method. The pH of the soil was analyzed in 2:1 CaCl2/soil suspension using glass electrode pH meter (Crockford and Norwell, 1956 and EC was detected in a saturated extract. The cation exchange capacity (CEC was measured using sodium acetate (1 M NaOAc at pH 8.2 (Chapman, 1965. Water soluble K was extracted with deionized water (1: 5 w/v after shaking for 30 minutes on a mechanical shaker and later contents were centrifuged to separate clear extract (Jackson 1973. Exchangeable K was determined by extracting the soil with neutral normal ammonium acetate, Non-exchangeable K was estimated as the difference between boiling 1N HNO3 –K and neutral normal ammonium acetate K (Thomas 1982. Results and Discussion: The result showed that for most of the studied soils, long-terms horticultural practices decreased the amount of different K forms as a result of

  11. Conserved and species-specific alternative splicing in mammalian genomes

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    Favorov Alexander V

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing has been shown to be one of the major evolutionary mechanisms for protein diversification and proteome expansion, since a considerable fraction of alternative splicing events appears to be species- or lineage-specific. However, most studies were restricted to the analysis of cassette exons in pairs of genomes and did not analyze functionality of the alternative variants. Results We analyzed conservation of human alternative splice sites and cassette exons in the mouse and dog genomes. Alternative exons, especially minor-isofom ones, were shown to be less conserved than constitutive exons. Frame-shifting alternatives in the protein-coding regions are less conserved than frame-preserving ones. Similarly, the conservation of alternative sites is highest for evenly used alternatives, and higher when the distance between the sites is divisible by three. The rate of alternative-exon and site loss in mouse is slightly higher than in dog, consistent with faster evolution of the former. The evolutionary dynamics of alternative sites was shown to be consistent with the model of random activation of cryptic sites. Conclusion Consistent with other studies, our results show that minor cassette exons are less conserved than major-alternative and constitutive exons. However, our study provides evidence that this is caused not only by exon birth, but also lineage-specific loss of alternative exons and sites, and it depends on exon functionality.

  12. Alternative Splicing of G9a Regulates Neuronal Differentiation

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    Ana Fiszbein

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin modifications are critical for the establishment and maintenance of differentiation programs. G9a, the enzyme responsible for histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation in mammalian euchromatin, exists as two isoforms with differential inclusion of exon 10 (E10 through alternative splicing. We find that the G9a methyltransferase is required for differentiation of the mouse neuronal cell line N2a and that E10 inclusion increases during neuronal differentiation of cultured cells, as well as in the developing mouse brain. Although E10 inclusion greatly stimulates overall H3K9me2 levels, it does not affect G9a catalytic activity. Instead, E10 increases G9a nuclear localization. We show that the G9a E10+ isoform is necessary for neuron differentiation and regulates the alternative splicing pattern of its own pre-mRNA, enhancing E10 inclusion. Overall, our findings indicate that by regulating its own alternative splicing, G9a promotes neuron differentiation and creates a positive feedback loop that reinforces cellular commitment to differentiation.

  13. VEGF Spliced Variants: Possible Role of Anti-Angiogenesis Therapy

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    Caroline Hilmi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis has been targeted in retinopathies, psoriasis, and a variety of cancers (colon, breast, lung, and kidney. Among these tumour types, clear cell renal cell carcinomas (RCCs are the most vascularized tumours due to mutations of the von Hippel Lindau gene resulting in HIF-1 alpha stabilisation and overexpression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF. Surgical nephrectomy remains the most efficient curative treatment for patients with noninvasive disease, while VEGF targeting has resulted in varying degrees of success for treating metastatic disease. VEGF pre-mRNA undergoes alternative splicing generating pro-angiogenic isoforms. However, the recent identification of novel splice variants of VEGF with anti-angiogenic properties has provided some insight for the lack of current treatment efficacy. Here we discuss an explanation for the relapse to anti-angiogenesis treatment as being due to either an initial or acquired resistance to the therapy. We also discuss targeting angiogenesis via SR (serine/arginine-rich proteins implicated in VEGF splicing.

  14. Changes in RNA Splicing in Developing Soybean (Glycine max Embryos

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    Delasa Aghamirzaie

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Developing soybean seeds accumulate oils, proteins, and carbohydrates that are used as oxidizable substrates providing metabolic precursors and energy during seed germination. The accumulation of these storage compounds in developing seeds is highly regulated at multiple levels, including at transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. RNA sequencing was used to provide comprehensive information about transcriptional and post-transcriptional events that take place in developing soybean embryos. Bioinformatics analyses lead to the identification of different classes of alternatively spliced isoforms and corresponding changes in their levels on a global scale during soybean embryo development. Alternative splicing was associated with transcripts involved in various metabolic and developmental processes, including central carbon and nitrogen metabolism, induction of maturation and dormancy, and splicing itself. Detailed examination of selected RNA isoforms revealed alterations in individual domains that could result in changes in subcellular localization of the resulting proteins, protein-protein and enzyme-substrate interactions, and regulation of protein activities. Different isoforms may play an important role in regulating developmental and metabolic processes occurring at different stages in developing oilseed embryos.

  15. Forms and accumulation of copper and zinc in a sandy typic hapludalf soil after long-term application of pig slurry and deep litter

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    Tadeu Luis Tiecher

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Successive applications of pig slurry and pig deep litter may lead to an accumulation of copper (Cu and zinc (Zn fractions in the soil profile. The objective of this study was to evaluate the Cu and Zn forms and accumulation in a Sandy Typic Hapludalf soil after long-term application of pig slurry and deep litter. In March 2010, eight years after initiating an experiment in Braço do Norte, Santa Catarina (SC, Brazil, on a Sandy Typic Hapludalf soil, soil samples were collected from the 0-2.5, 2.5-5.0, 5-10 and 10-15 cm layers in treatments consisting of no manure application (control and with applications of pig slurry and deep litter at two levels: the single and double rate of N requirement for maize and black oat succession. The soil was dried, ground in an agate mortar and analyzed for Cu and Zn contents by 0.01 mol L-1 EDTA and chemically fractionated to determine Cu and Zn. The applications of Pig deep litter and slurry at doses equivalent to 90 kg ha-1 N increased the contents of available Cu and Zn in the surface soil layer, if the double of this dose was applied in pig deep litter or double this dose in pig slurry, Cu and Zn migrated to a depth of 15 cm. Copper is accumulated mainly in the organic and residual fractions, and zinc preferentially in the fraction linked to clay minerals, especially in the surface soil layers.

  16. Transforming growth factor-β1 regulates fibronectin isoform expression and splicing factor SRp40 expression during ATDC5 chondrogenic maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Fei; Gilbert, James R.; Harrison, Gerald; Adams, Christopher S.; Freeman, Theresa; Tao Zhuliang; Zaka, Raihana; Liang Hongyan; Williams, Charlene; Tuan, Rocky S.; Norton, Pamela A.; Hickok, Noreen J.

    2007-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) isoform expression is altered during chondrocyte commitment and maturation, with cartilage favoring expression of FN isoforms that includes the type II repeat extra domain B (EDB) but excludes extra domain A (EDA). We and others have hypothesized that the regulated splicing of FN mRNAs is necessary for the progression of chondrogenesis. To test this, we treated the pre-chondrogenic cell line ATDC5 with transforming growth factor-β1, which has been shown to modulate expression of the EDA and EDB exons, as well as the late markers of chondrocyte maturation; it also slightly accelerates the early acquisition of a sulfated proteoglycan matrix without affecting cell proliferation. When chondrocytes are treated with TGF-β1, the EDA exon is preferentially excluded at all times whereas the EDB exon is relatively depleted at early times. This regulated alternative splicing of FN correlates with the regulation of alternative splicing of SRp40, a splicing factor facilitating inclusion of the EDA exon. To determine if overexpression of the SRp40 isoforms altered FN and FN EDA organization, cDNAs encoding these isoforms were overexpressed in ATDC5 cells. Overexpression of the long-form of SRp40 yielded an FN organization similar to TGF-β1 treatment; whereas overexpression of the short form of SRp40 (which facilitates EDA inclusion) increased formation of long-thick FN fibrils. Therefore, we conclude that the effects of TGF-β1 on FN splicing during chondrogenesis may be largely dependent on its effect on SRp40 isoform expression

  17. Analysis and recognition of 5 ' UTR intron splice sites in human pre-mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eden, E.; Brunak, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Prediction of splice sites in non-coding regions of genes is one of the most challenging aspects of gene structure recognition. We perform a rigorous analysis of such splice sites embedded in human 5' untranslated regions (UTRs), and investigate correlations between this class of splice sites...... and other features found in the adjacent exons and introns. By restricting the training of neural network algorithms to 'pure' UTRs (not extending partially into protein coding regions), we for the first time investigate the predictive power of the splicing signal proper, in contrast to conventional splice...... in the synaptic weights of the neural networks trained to identify UTR donor sites. Conventional splice site prediction methods perform poorly in UTRs because the reading frame pattern is absent. The NetUTR method presented here performs 2-.3-fold better compared with NetGene2 and GenScan in 5' UTRs. We also...

  18. The CEA/CD3-bispecific antibody MEDI-565 (MT111) binds a nonlinear epitope in the full-length but not a short splice variant of CEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li; Oberst, Michael D; Huang, Jiaqi; Brohawn, Philip; Morehouse, Chris; Lekstrom, Kristen; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Wu, Herren; Yao, Yihong; Coats, Steven R; Dall'Acqua, William; Damschroder, Melissa; Hammond, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    MEDI-565 (also known as MT111) is a bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE®) antibody in development for the treatment of patients with cancers expressing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). MEDI-565 binds CEA on cancer cells and CD3 on T cells to induce T-cell mediated killing of cancer cells. To understand the molecular basis of human CEA recognition by MEDI-565 and how polymorphisms and spliced forms of CEA may affect MEDI-565 activity, we mapped the epitope of MEDI-565 on CEA using mutagenesis and homology modeling approaches. We found that MEDI-565 recognized a conformational epitope in the A2 domain comprised of amino acids 326-349 and 388-410, with critical residues F(326), T(328), N(333), V(388), G(389), P(390), E(392), I(408), and N(410). Two non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (rs10407503, rs7249230) were identified in the epitope region, but they are found at low homozygosity rates. Searching the National Center for Biotechnology Information GenBank® database, we further identified a single, previously uncharacterized mRNA splice variant of CEA that lacks a portion of the N-terminal domain, the A1 and B1 domains, and a large portion of the A2 domain. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of multiple cancers showed widespread expression of full-length CEA in these tumors, with less frequent but concordant expression of the CEA splice variant. Because the epitope was largely absent from the CEA splice variant, MEDI-565 did not bind or mediate T-cell killing of cells solely expressing this form of CEA. In addition, the splice variant did not interfere with MEDI-565 binding or activity when co-expressed with full-length CEA. Thus MEDI-565 may broadly target CEA-positive tumors without regard for expression of the short splice variant of CEA. Together our data suggest that MEDI-565 activity will neither be impacted by SNPs nor by a splice variant of CEA.

  19. Identification of genome-wide non-canonical spliced regions and analysis of biological functions for spliced sequences using Read-Split-Fly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yongsheng; Kinne, Jeff; Ding, Lizhong; Rath, Ethan C; Cox, Aaron; Naidu, Siva Dharman

    2017-10-03

    It is generally thought that most canonical or non-canonical splicing events involving U2- and U12 spliceosomes occur within nuclear pre-mRNAs. However, the question of whether at least some U12-type splicing occurs in the cytoplasm is still unclear. In recent years next-generation sequencing technologies have revolutionized the field. The "Read-Split-Walk" (RSW) and "Read-Split-Run" (RSR) methods were developed to identify genome-wide non-canonical spliced regions including special events occurring in cytoplasm. As the significant amount of genome/transcriptome data such as, Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE) project, have been generated, we have advanced a newer more memory-efficient version of the algorithm, "Read-Split-Fly" (RSF), which can detect non-canonical spliced regions with higher sensitivity and improved speed. The RSF algorithm also outputs the spliced sequences for further downstream biological function analysis. We used open access ENCODE project RNA-Seq data to search spliced intron sequences against the U12-type spliced intron sequence database to examine whether some events could occur as potential signatures of U12-type splicing. The check was performed by searching spliced sequences against 5'ss and 3'ss sequences from the well-known orthologous U12-type spliceosomal intron database U12DB. Preliminary results of searching 70 ENCODE samples indicated that the presence of 5'ss with U12-type signature is more frequent than U2-type and prevalent in non-canonical junctions reported by RSF. The selected spliced sequences have also been further studied using miRBase to elucidate their functionality. Preliminary results from 70 samples of ENCODE datasets show that several miRNAs are prevalent in studied ENCODE samples. Two of these are associated with many diseases as suggested in the literature. Specifically, hsa-miR-1273 and hsa-miR-548 are associated with many diseases and cancers. Our RSF pipeline is able to detect many possible junctions

  20. Sequence Analysis of In Vivo-Expressed HIV-1 Spliced RNAs Reveals the Usage of New and Unusual Splice Sites by Viruses of Different Subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Yolanda; Delgado, Elena; de la Barrera, Jorge; Carrera, Cristina; Zaballos, Ángel; Cuesta, Isabel; Mariño, Ana; Ocampo, Antonio; Miralles, Celia; Pérez-Castro, Sonia; Álvarez, Hortensia; López-Miragaya, Isabel; García-Bodas, Elena; Díez-Fuertes, Francisco; Thomson, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 RNAs are generated through a complex splicing mechanism, resulting in a great diversity of transcripts, which are classified in three major categories: unspliced, singly spliced (SS), and doubly spliced (DS). Knowledge on HIV-1 RNA splicing in vivo and by non-subtype B viruses is scarce. Here we analyze HIV-1 RNA splice site usage in CD4+CD25+ lymphocytes from HIV-1-infected individuals through pyrosequencing. HIV-1 DS and SS RNAs were amplified by RT-PCR in 19 and 12 samples, respectively. 13,108 sequences from HIV-1 spliced RNAs, derived from viruses of five subtypes (A, B, C, F, G), were identified. In four samples, three of non-B subtypes, five 3' splice sites (3'ss) mapping to unreported positions in the HIV-1 genome were identified. Two, designated A4i and A4j, were used in 22% and 25% of rev RNAs in two viruses of subtypes B and A, respectively. Given their close proximity (one or two nucleotides) to A4c and A4d, respectively, they could be viewed as variants of these sites. Three 3'ss, designated A7g, A7h, and A7i, located 20, 32, and 18 nucleotides downstream of A7, respectively, were identified in a subtype C (A7g, A7h) and a subtype G (A7i) viruses, each in around 2% of nef RNAs. The new splice sites or variants of splice sites were associated with the usual sequence features of 3'ss. Usage of unusual 3'ss A4d, A4e, A5a, A7a, and A7b was also detected. A4f, previously identified in two subtype C viruses, was preferentially used by rev RNAs of a subtype C virus. These results highlight the great diversity of in vivo splice site usage by HIV-1 RNAs. The fact that four of five newly identified splice sites or variants of splice sites were detected in non-subtype B viruses allows anticipating an even greater diversity of HIV-1 splice site usage than currently known.

  1. Activation of Antitumorigenic Stat3beta in Breast Cancer by Splicing Redirection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    the dual role of these proteins can be exploited by splicing re-direction approaches to manipulate their expression, in order to simultaneously...55 Wang, Z. et al. (2012) Manipulation of PK-M mutually exclusive alternative splicing by antisense oligonucleotides. Open Biol 2 (10), 120133 56...an antisense-mediated shift of Bcl-x pre-mRNA splicing and antineoplastic agents. J Biol Chem 277 (51), 49374-49382 64 Bauman, J.A. et al. (2010

  2. Antagonistic factors control the unproductive splicing of SC35 terminal intron

    OpenAIRE

    Dreumont, Natacha; Hardy, Sara; Behm-Ansmant, Isabelle; Kister, Liliane; Branlant, Christiane; St?venin, James; Bourgeois, Cyril F.

    2009-01-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated in part by variations in the relative concentrations of a variety of factors, including serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins. The SR protein SC35 self-regulates its expression by stimulating unproductive splicing events in the 3? untranslated region of its own pre-mRNA. Using various minigene constructs containing the terminal retained intron and flanking exons, we identified in the highly conserved last exon a number of exonic splicing enhancer elements respon...

  3. Clinical significance of intronic variants in BRAF inhibitor resistant melanomas with altered BRAF transcript splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Pupo, Gulietta M.; Boyd, Suzanah C.; Fung, Carina; Carlino, Matteo S.; Menzies, Alexander M.; Pedersen, Bernadette; Johansson, Peter; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Kefford, Richard F.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Long, Georgina V.; Rizos, Helen

    2017-01-01

    Alternate BRAF splicing is the most common mechanism of acquired resistance to BRAF inhibitor treatment in melanoma. Recently, alternate BRAF exon 4?8 splicing was shown to involve an intronic mutation, located 51 nucleotides upstream of BRAF exon 9 within a predicted splicing branch point. This intronic mutation was identified in a single cell line but has not been examined in vivo. Herein we demonstrate that in three melanomas biopsied from patients with acquired resistance to BRAF inhibito...

  4. Investigation of tissue-specific human orthologous alternative splice events in pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher; Salicio, Susanna Cirera

    2010-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA can contribute to differences between tissues or cells either by regulating gene expression or creating proteins with various functions encoded by one gene. The number of investigated alternative splice events in pig has so far been limited. In this study we have ...... in preservation of open reading frame are indicative of a functional significance of the splice variants of the gene....

  5. Persistent ER stress induces the spliced leader RNA silencing pathway (SLS, leading to programmed cell death in Trypanosoma brucei.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanoch Goldshmidt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomes are parasites that cycle between the insect host (procyclic form and mammalian host (bloodstream form. These parasites lack conventional transcription regulation, including factors that induce the unfolded protein response (UPR. However, they possess a stress response mechanism, the spliced leader RNA silencing (SLS pathway. SLS elicits shut-off of spliced leader RNA (SL RNA transcription by perturbing the binding of the transcription factor tSNAP42 to its cognate promoter, thus eliminating trans-splicing of all mRNAs. Induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in procyclic trypanosomes elicits changes in the transcriptome similar to those induced by conventional UPR found in other eukaryotes. The mechanism of up-regulation under ER stress is dependent on differential stabilization of mRNAs. The transcriptome changes are accompanied by ER dilation and elevation in the ER chaperone, BiP. Prolonged ER stress induces SLS pathway. RNAi silencing of SEC63, a factor that participates in protein translocation across the ER membrane, or SEC61, the translocation channel, also induces SLS. Silencing of these genes or prolonged ER stress led to programmed cell death (PCD, evident by exposure of phosphatidyl serine, DNA laddering, increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS production, increase in cytoplasmic Ca(2+, and decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential, as well as typical morphological changes observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM. ER stress response is also induced in the bloodstream form and if the stress persists it leads to SLS. We propose that prolonged ER stress induces SLS, which serves as a unique death pathway, replacing the conventional caspase-mediated PCD observed in higher eukaryotes.

  6. Splice of photonic crystal fibres by use of double phase-conjugate mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Yusuke; Okamoto, Atsushi; Takayama, Yoshihisa; Hayano, Yutaka

    2007-05-01

    We present a novel splicing method for photonic crystal fibres (PCFs) with a double phase-conjugate mirror (DPCM). The DPCM is an optical device with photorefractive crystal (PRC) which generates phase-conjugate beams easily. In this report, we experimentally measure the splice losses of the DPCM for transverse PCF offset. We numerically estimate the splice losses in the case that butt coupled PCFs without DPCM. Comparing the experimental and numerical values of the splice loss of PCFs, we discuss the tolerance of the DPCM for the PCF displacement. Also, we discuss the causes of loss inside the DPCM module.

  7. Somatic Mutational Landscape of Splicing Factor Genes and Their Functional Consequences across 33 Cancer Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Seiler

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Hotspot mutations in splicing factor genes have been recently reported at high frequency in hematological malignancies, suggesting the importance of RNA splicing in cancer. We analyzed whole-exome sequencing data across 33 tumor types in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, and we identified 119 splicing factor genes with significant non-silent mutation patterns, including mutation over-representation, recurrent loss of function (tumor suppressor-like, or hotspot mutation profile (oncogene-like. Furthermore, RNA sequencing analysis revealed altered splicing events associated with selected splicing factor mutations. In addition, we were able to identify common gene pathway profiles associated with the presence of these mutations. Our analysis suggests that somatic alteration of genes involved in the RNA-splicing process is common in cancer and may represent an underappreciated hallmark of tumorigenesis. : Seiler et al. report that 119 splicing factor genes carry putative driver mutations over 33 tumor types in TCGA. The most common mutations appear to be mutually exclusive and are associated with lineage-independent altered splicing. Samples with these mutations show deregulation of cell-autonomous pathways and immune infiltration. Keywords: splicing, SF3B1, U2AF1, SRSF2, RBM10, FUBP1, cancer, mutation

  8. Quantification of pre-mRNA escape rate and synergy in splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Marie Mi; Voegeli, Sylvia; Baudrimont, Antoine; Séraphin, Bertrand; Becskei, Attila

    2014-11-10

    Splicing reactions generally combine high speed with accuracy. However, some of the pre-mRNAs escape the nucleus with a retained intron. Intron retention can control gene expression and increase proteome diversity. We calculated the escape rate for the yeast PTC7 intron and pre-mRNA. This prediction was facilitated by the observation that splicing is a linear process and by deriving simple algebraic expressions from a model of co- and post-transcriptional splicing and RNA surveillance that determines the rate of the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of the pre-mRNAs with the retained intron. The escape rate was consistent with the observed threshold of splicing rate below which the mature mRNA level declined. When an mRNA contains multiple introns, the outcome of splicing becomes more difficult to predict since not only the escape rate of the pre-mRNA has to be considered, but also the possibility that the splicing of each intron is influenced by the others. We showed that the two adjacent introns in the SUS1 mRNA are spliced cooperatively, but this does not counteract the escape of the partially spliced mRNA. These findings will help to infer promoter activity and to predict the behavior of and to control splicing regulatory networks. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  9. The proper splicing of RNAi factors is critical for pericentric heterochromatin assembly in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott P Kallgren

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin preferentially assembles at repetitive DNA elements, playing roles in transcriptional silencing, recombination suppression, and chromosome segregation. The RNAi machinery is required for heterochromatin assembly in a diverse range of organisms. In fission yeast, RNA splicing factors are also required for pericentric heterochromatin assembly, and a prevailing model is that splicing factors provide a platform for siRNA generation independently of their splicing activity. Here, by screening the fission yeast deletion library, we discovered four novel splicing factors that are required for pericentric heterochromatin assembly. Sequencing total cellular RNAs from the strongest of these mutants, cwf14Δ, showed intron retention in mRNAs of several RNAi factors. Moreover, introducing cDNA versions of RNAi factors significantly restored pericentric heterochromatin in splicing mutants. We also found that mutations of splicing factors resulted in defective telomeric heterochromatin assembly and mis-splicing the mRNA of shelterin component Tpz1, and that replacement of tpz1+ with its cDNA partially rescued heterochromatin defects at telomeres in splicing mutants. Thus, proper splicing of RNAi and shelterin factors contributes to heterochromatin assembly at pericentric regions and telomeres.

  10. Trans-Splicing Improvement by the Combined Application of Antisense Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Koller

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing has become an emergent tool for the repair of mutated pre-mRNAs in the treatment of genetic diseases. RNA trans-splicing molecules (RTMs are designed to induce a specific trans-splicing reaction via a binding domain for a respective target pre-mRNA region. A previously established reporter-based screening system allows us to analyze the impact of various factors on the RTM trans-splicing efficiency in vitro. Using this system, we are further able to investigate the potential of antisense RNAs (AS RNAs, presuming to improve the trans-splicing efficiency of a selected RTM, specific for intron 102 of COL7A1. Mutations in the COL7A1 gene underlie the dystrophic subtype of the skin blistering disease epidermolysis bullosa (DEB. We have shown that co-transfections of the RTM and a selected AS RNA, interfering with competitive splicing elements on a COL7A1-minigene (COL7A1-MG, lead to a significant increase of the RNA trans-splicing efficiency. Thereby, accurate trans-splicing between the RTM and the COL7A1-MG is represented by the restoration of full-length green fluorescent protein GFP on mRNA and protein level. This mechanism can be crucial for the improvement of an RTM-mediated correction, especially in cases where a high trans-splicing efficiency is required.

  11. Non-sequential and multi-step splicing of the dystrophin transcript.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzoli, Isabella; Pulyakhina, Irina; Verwey, Nisha E; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Laros, Jeroen F J; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke

    2016-01-01

    The dystrophin protein encoding DMD gene is the longest human gene. The 2.2 Mb long human dystrophin transcript takes 16 hours to be transcribed and is co-transcriptionally spliced. It contains long introns (24 over 10kb long, 5 over 100kb long) and the heterogeneity in intron size makes it an ideal transcript to study different aspects of the human splicing process. Splicing is a complex process and much is unknown regarding the splicing of long introns in human genes. Here, we used ultra-deep transcript sequencing to characterize splicing of the dystrophin transcripts in 3 different human skeletal muscle cell lines, and explored the order of intron removal and multi-step splicing. Coverage and read pair analyses showed that around 40% of the introns were not always removed sequentially. Additionally, for the first time, we report that non-consecutive intron removal resulted in 3 or more joined exons which are flanked by unspliced introns and we defined these joined exons as an exon block. Lastly, computational and experimental data revealed that, for the majority of dystrophin introns, multistep splicing events are used to splice out a single intron. Overall, our data show for the first time in a human transcript, that multi-step intron removal is a general feature of mRNA splicing.

  12. Targeted RNA-Seq profiling of splicing pattern in the DMD gene: exons are mostly constitutively spliced in human skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougé, Anne-Laure; Murauer, Eva; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Miro, Julie; Varilh, Jessica; Taulan, Magali; Koenig, Michel; Claustres, Mireille; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2017-01-03

    We have analysed the splicing pattern of the human Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) NB transcript in normal skeletal muscle. To achieve depth of coverage required for the analysis of this lowly expressed gene in muscle, we designed a targeted RNA-Seq procedure that combines amplification of the full-length 11.3 kb DMD cDNA sequence and 454 sequencing technology. A high and uniform coverage of the cDNA sequence was obtained that allowed to draw up a reliable inventory of the physiological alternative splicing events in the muscular DMD transcript. In contrast to previous assumptions, we evidenced that most of the 79 DMD exons are constitutively spliced in skeletal muscle. Only a limited number of 12 alternative splicing events were identified, all present at a very low level. These include previously known exon skipping events but also newly described pseudoexon inclusions and alternative 3' splice sites, of which one is the first functional NAGNAG splice site reported in the DMD gene. This study provides the first RNA-Seq-based reference of DMD splicing pattern in skeletal muscle and reports on an experimental procedure well suited to detect condition-specific differences in this low abundance transcript that may prove useful for diagnostic, research or RNA-based therapeutic applications.

  13. Rates and patterns in the evolution of snake-like body form in squamate reptiles: evidence for repeated re-evolution of lost digits and long-term persistence of intermediate body forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandley, Matthew C; Huelsenbeck, John P; Wiens, John J

    2008-08-01

    An important challenge in evolutionary biology is to understand how major changes in body form arise. The dramatic transition from a lizard-like to snake-like body form in squamate reptiles offers an exciting system for such research because this change is replicated dozens of times. Here, we use morphometric data for 258 species and a time-calibrated phylogeny to explore rates and patterns of body-form evolution across squamates. We also demonstrate how time-calibrated phylogenies may be used to make inferences about the time frame over which major morphological transitions occur. Using the morphometric data, we find that the transition from lizard-like to snake-like body form involves concerted evolution of limb reduction, digit loss, and body elongation. These correlations are similar across squamate clades, despite very different ecologies and >180 million years (My) of divergence. Using the time-calibrated phylogeny and ancestral reconstructions, we find that the dramatic transition between these body forms can occur in 20 My or less, but that seemingly intermediate morphologies can also persist for tens of millions of years. Finally, although loss of digits is common, we find statistically significant support for at least six examples of the re-evolution of lost digits in the forelimb and hind limb.

  14. Developmental regulation of tau splicing is disrupted in stem cell-derived neurons from frontotemporal dementia patients with the 10 + 16 splice-site mutation in MAPT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sposito, Teresa; Preza, Elisavet; Mahoney, Colin J; Setó-Salvia, Núria; Ryan, Natalie S; Morris, Huw R; Arber, Charles; Devine, Michael J; Houlden, Henry; Warner, Thomas T; Bushell, Trevor J; Zagnoni, Michele; Kunath, Tilo; Livesey, Frederick J; Fox, Nick C; Rossor, Martin N; Hardy, John; Wray, Selina

    2015-09-15

    The alternative splicing of the tau gene, MAPT, generates six protein isoforms in the adult human central nervous system (CNS). Tau splicing is developmentally regulated and dysregulated in disease. Mutations in MAPT that alter tau splicing cause frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with tau pathology, providing evidence for a causal link between altered tau splicing and disease. The use of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons has revolutionized the way we model neurological disease in vitro. However, as most tau mutations are located within or around the alternatively spliced exon 10, it is important that iPSC-neurons splice tau appropriately in order to be used as disease models. To address this issue, we analyzed the expression and splicing of tau in iPSC-derived cortical neurons from control patients and FTD patients with the 10 + 16 intronic mutation in MAPT. We show that control neurons only express the fetal tau isoform (0N3R), even at extended time points of 100 days in vitro. Neurons from FTD patients with the 10 + 16 mutation in MAPT express both 0N3R and 0N4R tau isoforms, demonstrating that this mutation overrides the developmental regulation of exon 10 inclusion in our in vitro model. Further, at extended time points of 365 days in vitro, we observe a switch in tau splicing to include six tau isoforms as seen in the adult human CNS. Our results demonstrate the importance of neuronal maturity for use in in vitro modeling and provide a system that will be important for understanding the functional consequences of altered tau splicing. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  15. Expression analysis of Lrrk1, Lrrk2 and Lrrk2 splice variants in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Giesert

    Full Text Available Missense mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2 are linked to autosomal dominant forms of Parkinson's disease (PD. In order to get insights into the physiological role of Lrrk2, we examined the distribution of Lrrk2 mRNA and different splice variants in the developing murine embryo and the adult brain of Mus musculus. To analyse if the Lrrk2-paralog, Lrrk1, may have redundant functions in PD-development, we also compared Lrrk1 and Lrrk2 expression in the same tissues. Using radioactive in situ hybridization, we found ubiquitous expression of both genes at low level from embryonic stage E9.5 onward, which progressively increased up until birth. The developing central nervous system (CNS displayed no prominent Lrrk2 mRNA signals at these time-points. However, in the entire postnatal brain Lrrk2 became detectable, showing strongest level in the striatum and the cortex of adult mice; Lrrk1 was only detectable in the mitral cell layer of the olfactory bulb. Thus, due to the non-overlapping expression patterns, a redundant function of Lrrk2 and Lrrk1 in the pathogenesis of PD seems to be unlikely. Quantification of Lrrk2 mRNA and protein level in several brain regions by real-time PCR and Western blot verified the striatum and cortex as hotspots of postnatal Lrrk2 expression. Strong expression of Lrrk2 is mainly found in neurons, specifically in the dopamine receptor 1 (DRD1a and 2 (DRD2-positive subpopulations of the striatal medium spiny neurons. Finally, we identified 2 new splice-variants of Lrrk2 in RNA-samples from various adult brain regions and organs: a variant with a skipped exon 5 and a truncated variant terminating in an alternative exon 42a. In order to identify the origin of these two splice variants, we also analysed primary neural cultures independently and found cell-specific expression patterns for these variants in microglia and astrocytes.

  16. Drosophila muscleblind is involved in troponin T alternative splicing and apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Vicente-Crespo

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Muscleblind-like proteins (MBNL have been involved in a developmental switch in the use of defined cassette exons. Such transition fails in the CTG repeat expansion disease myotonic dystrophy due, in part, to sequestration of MBNL proteins by CUG repeat RNA. Four protein isoforms (MblA-D are coded by the unique Drosophila muscleblind gene.We used evolutionary, genetic and cell culture approaches to study muscleblind (mbl function in flies. The evolutionary study showed that the MblC protein isoform was readily conserved from nematods to Drosophila, which suggests that it performs the most ancestral muscleblind functions. Overexpression of MblC in the fly eye precursors led to an externally rough eye morphology. This phenotype was used in a genetic screen to identify five dominant suppressors and 13 dominant enhancers including Drosophila CUG-BP1 homolog aret, exon junction complex components tsunagi and Aly, and pro-apoptotic genes Traf1 and reaper. We further investigated Muscleblind implication in apoptosis and splicing regulation. We found missplicing of troponin T in muscleblind mutant pupae and confirmed Muscleblind ability to regulate mouse fast skeletal muscle Troponin T (TnnT3 minigene splicing in human HEK cells. MblC overexpression in the wing imaginal disc activated apoptosis in a spatially restricted manner. Bioinformatics analysis identified a conserved FKRP motif, weakly resembling a sumoylation target site, in the MblC-specific sequence. Site-directed mutagenesis of the motif revealed no change in activity of mutant MblC on TnnT3 minigene splicing or aberrant binding to CUG repeat RNA, but altered the ability of the protein to form perinuclear aggregates and enhanced cell death-inducing activity of MblC overexpression.Taken together our genetic approach identify cellular processes influenced by Muscleblind function, whereas in vivo and cell culture experiments define Drosophila troponin T as a new Muscleblind target, reveal a

  17. Performance of Grouted Splice Sleeve Connector under Tensile Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Alias

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The grouted splice sleeve connector system takes advantage of the bond-slip resistance of the grout and the mechanical gripping of reinforcement bars to provide resistance to tensile force. In this system, grout acts as a load-transferring medium and bonding material between the bars and sleeve. This study adopted the end-to-end rebars connection method to investigate the effect of development length and sleeve diameter on the bonding performance of the sleeve connector. The end-to-end method refers to the condition where reinforcement bars are inserted into the sleeve from both ends and meet at the centre before grout is filled. Eight specimens of grouted splice sleeve connector were tested under tensile load to determine their performance. The sleeve connector was designed using 5 mm thick circular hollow section (CHS steel pipe and consisted of one external and two internal sleeves. The tensile test results show that connectors with a smaller external and internal sleeve diameter appear to provide better bonding performance. Three types of failure were observed in this research, which are bar fracture (outside the sleeve, bar pullout, and internal sleeve pullout. With reference to these failure types, the development length of 200 mm is the optimum value due to its bar fracture type, which indicates that the tensile capacity of the connector is higher than the reinforcement bar. It is found that the performance of the grouted splice sleeve connector is influenced by the development length of the reinforcement bar and the diameter of the sleeve.

  18. Recurrent Hyperparathyroidism Due to a Novel CDC73 Splice Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattangady, Namita Ganesh; Wilson, Tremika Le-Shan; Miller, Barbra Sue; Lerario, Antonio Marcondes; Giordano, Thomas James; Choksi, Palak; Else, Tobias

    2017-08-01

    The recognition of hereditary causes of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT) is important because clinical care and surveillance differ significantly between sporadic and hereditary pHPT. In addition, the increasing number of genetic tests poses a challenge to classify mutations as benign or pathogenic. Functional work-up of variants remains a mainstay to provide evidence for pathogenicity. We describe a 52-year-old male patient with recurrent pHPT since age 35 years. Despite several neck surgeries with complete parathyroidectomy, he experienced persistent pHPT, necessitating repeated surgery for a forearm autotransplant, which finally resulted in unmeasurable parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Genetic testing revealed a new CDC73 variant (c.238-8G>A [IVS2-8G>A]), initially classified as a variant of uncertain significance. Parathyroid tissue from the initial surgeries showed loss of heterozygosity. Using an RT-PCR approach, we show that the mutation leads to the use of a cryptic splice site in peripheral mononuclear cells. In addition, a minigene approach confirms the use of the cryptic splice site in a heterologous cell system. The novel c.238-8G>A CDC73 variant activates a cryptic splice site, and the functional data provided justify the classification as a likely pathogenic variant. Our results underscore the importance of functional work-up for variant classification in the absence of other available data, such as presence in disease-specific databases, other syndromic clinical findings, or family history. In addition, the presented case exemplifies the importance to consider a hereditary condition in young patients with pHPT, particularly those with multi-gland involvement. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  19. Splice isoforms of phosducin-like protein control the expression of heterotrimeric G proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xueli; Sinha, Satyabrata; Belcastro, Marycharmain; Woodard, Catherine; Ramamurthy, Visvanathan; Stoilov, Peter; Sokolov, Maxim

    2013-09-06

    Heterotrimeric G proteins play an essential role in cellular signaling; however, the mechanism regulating their synthesis and assembly remains poorly understood. A line of evidence indicates that the posttranslational processing of G protein β subunits begins inside the protein-folding chamber of the chaperonin containing t-complex protein 1. This process is facilitated by the ubiquitously expressed phosducin-like protein (PhLP), which is thought to act as a CCT co-factor. Here we demonstrate that alternative splicing of the PhLP gene gives rise to a transcript encoding a truncated, short protein (PhLPs) that is broadly expressed in human tissues but absent in mice. Seeking to elucidate the function of PhLPs, we expressed this protein in the rod photoreceptors of mice and found that this manipulation caused a dramatic translational and posttranslational suppression of rod heterotrimeric G proteins. The investigation of the underlying mechanism revealed that PhLPs disrupts the folding of Gβ and the assembly of Gβ and Gγ subunits, events normally assisted by PhLP, by forming a stable and apparently inactive tertiary complex with CCT preloaded with nascent Gβ. As a result, the cellular levels of Gβ and Gγ, which depends on Gβ for stability, decline. In addition, PhLPs evokes a profound and rather specific down-regulation of the Gα transcript, leading to a complete disappearance of the protein. This study provides the first evidence of a generic mechanism, whereby the splicing of the PhLP gene could potentially and efficiently regulate the cellular levels of heterotrimeric G proteins.

  20. MAISTAS: a tool for automatic structural evaluation of alternative splicing products.

    KAUST Repository

    Floris, Matteo

    2011-04-15

    MOTIVATION: Analysis of the human genome revealed that the amount of transcribed sequence is an order of magnitude greater than the number of predicted and well-characterized genes. A sizeable fraction of these transcripts is related to alternatively spliced forms of known protein coding genes. Inspection of the alternatively spliced transcripts identified in the pilot phase of the ENCODE project has clearly shown that often their structure might substantially differ from that of other isoforms of the same gene, and therefore that they might perform unrelated functions, or that they might even not correspond to a functional protein. Identifying these cases is obviously relevant for the functional assignment of gene products and for the interpretation of the effect of variations in the corresponding proteins. RESULTS: Here we describe a publicly available tool that, given a gene or a protein, retrieves and analyses all its annotated isoforms, provides users with three-dimensional models of the isoform(s) of his/her interest whenever possible and automatically assesses whether homology derived structural models correspond to plausible structures. This information is clearly relevant. When the homology model of some isoforms of a gene does not seem structurally plausible, the implications are that either they assume a structure unrelated to that of the other isoforms of the same gene with presumably significant functional differences, or do not correspond to functional products. We provide indications that the second hypothesis is likely to be true for a substantial fraction of the cases. AVAILABILITY: http://maistas.bioinformatica.crs4.it/.

  1. Intronic non-CG DNA hydroxymethylation and alternative mRNA splicing in honey bees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cingolani, Pablo; Cao, Xiaoyi; Khetani, Radhika S; Chen, Chieh-Chun; Coon, Melissa; Sammak, Alya'a; Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Land, Susan; Huang, Yun; Hudson, Matthew E; Garfinkel, Mark D; Zhong, Sheng; Robinson, Gene E; Ruden, Douglas M

    2013-09-30

    Previous whole-genome shotgun bisulfite sequencing experiments showed that DNA cytosine methylation in the honey bee (Apis mellifera) is almost exclusively at CG dinucleotides in exons. However, the most commonly used method, bisulfite sequencing, cannot distinguish 5-methylcytosine from 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, an oxidized form of 5-methylcytosine that is catalyzed by the TET family of dioxygenases. Furthermore, some analysis software programs under-represent non-CG DNA methylation and hydryoxymethylation for a variety of reasons. Therefore, we used an unbiased analysis of bisulfite sequencing data combined with molecular and bioinformatics approaches to distinguish 5-methylcytosine from 5-hydroxymethylcytosine. By doing this, we have performed the first whole genome analyses of DNA modifications at non-CG sites in honey bees and correlated the effects of these DNA modifications on gene expression and alternative mRNA splicing. We confirmed, using unbiased analyses of whole-genome shotgun bisulfite sequencing (BS-seq) data, with both new data and published data, the previous finding that CG DNA methylation is enriched in exons in honey bees. However, we also found evidence that cytosine methylation and hydroxymethylation at non-CG sites is enriched in introns. Using antibodies against 5-hydroxmethylcytosine, we confirmed that DNA hydroxymethylation at non-CG sites is enriched in introns. Additionally, using a new technique, Pvu-seq (which employs the enzyme PvuRts1l to digest DNA at 5-hydroxymethylcytosine sites followed by next-generation DNA sequencing), we further confirmed that hydroxymethylation is enriched in introns at non-CG sites. Cytosine hydroxymethylation at non-CG sites might have more functional significance than previously appreciated, and in honey bees these modifications might be related to the regulation of alternative mRNA splicing by defining the locations of the introns.

  2. Alternative Splice Forms Influence Functions of Whirlin in Mechanosensory Hair Cell Stereocilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seham Ebrahim

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available WHRN (DFNB31 mutations cause diverse hearing disorders: profound deafness (DFNB31 or variable hearing loss in Usher syndrome type II. The known role of WHRN in stereocilia elongation does not explain these different pathophysiologies. Using spontaneous and targeted Whrn mutants, we show that the major long (WHRN-L and short (WHRN-S isoforms of WHRN have distinct localizations within stereocilia and also across hair cell types. Lack of both isoforms causes abnormally short stereocilia and profound deafness and vestibular dysfunction. WHRN-S expression, however, is sufficient to maintain stereocilia bundle morphology and function in a subset of hair cells, resulting in some auditory response and no overt vestibular dysfunction. WHRN-S interacts with EPS8, and both are required at stereocilia tips for normal length regulation. WHRN-L localizes midway along the shorter stereocilia, at the level of inter-stereociliary links. We propose that differential isoform expression underlies the variable auditory and vestibular phenotypes associated with WHRN mutations.

  3. Unusual intron conservation near tissue-regulated exons found by splicing microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles W Sugnet

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing contributes to both gene regulation and protein diversity. To discover broad relationships between regulation of alternative splicing and sequence conservation, we applied a systems approach, using oligonucleotide microarrays designed to capture splicing information across the mouse genome. In a set of 22 adult tissues, we observe differential expression of RNA containing at least two alternative splice junctions for about 40% of the 6,216 alternative events we could detect. Statistical comparisons identify 171 cassette exons whose inclusion or skipping is different in brain relative to other tissues and another 28 exons whose splicing is different in muscle. A subset of these exons is associated with unusual blocks of intron sequence whose conservation in vertebrates rivals that of protein-coding exons. By focusing on sets of exons with similar regulatory patterns, we have identified new sequence motifs implicated in brain and muscle splicing regulation. Of note is a motif that is strikingly similar to the branchpoint consensus but is located downstream of the 5' splice site of exons included in muscle. Analysis of three paralogous membrane-associated guanylate kinase genes reveals that each contains a paralogous tissue-regulated exon with a similar tissue inclusion pattern. While the intron sequences flanking these exons remain highly conserved among mammalian orthologs, the paralogous flanking intron sequences have diverged considerably, suggesting unusually complex evolution of the regulation of alternative splicing in multigene families.

  4. Identification of a novel function of CX-4945 as a splicing regulator.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyeongki Kim

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing is a nearly ubiquitous versatile process that controls gene expression and creates numerous protein isoforms with different functions from a single gene. The significance of alternative splicing has been confirmed by the increasing number of human diseases that are caused by misregulation of splicing events. Very few compounds, however, have been reported to act as inhibitors of alternative splicing, and their potential clinical use needs to be evaluated. Here, we report that CX-4945, a previously well-characterized inhibitor of casein kinase 2 (CK2 and a molecule currently in clinical trials (Phase II for cancer treatment, regulates splicing in mammalian cells in a CK2-independent manner. Transcriptome-wide analysis using exon array also showed a widespread alteration in alternative splicing of numerous genes. We found that CX-4945 potently inhibits the Cdc2-like kinases (Clks in vitro and in turn, leads to suppression of the phosphorylation of serine/arginine-rich (SR proteins in mammalian cells. Surprisingly, the overall efficacy of CX-4945 on Clks (IC50 = 3-90 nM was stronger than that of TG-003, the strongest inhibitor reported to date. Of the Clks, Clk2 was most strongly inhibited by CX-4945 in an ATP-competitive manner. Our research revealed an unexpected activity of the drug candidate CX-4945 as a potent splicing modulator and also suggested a potential application for therapy of diseases caused by abnormal splicing.

  5. Alternative splicing, a new target to block cellular gene expression by poliovirus 2A protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Enrique, E-mail: ealvarez@cbm.uam.es [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Nicolas Cabrera, 1 Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Castello, Alfredo; Carrasco, Luis; Izquierdo, Jose M. [Centro de Biologia Molecular Severo Ochoa (CSIC-UAM), Nicolas Cabrera, 1 Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-14

    Highlights: {yields} Novel role for poliovirus 2A protease as splicing modulator. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease inhibits the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. {yields} Poliovirus 2A protease blocks the second catalytic step of splicing. -- Abstract: Viruses have developed multiple strategies to interfere with the gene expression of host cells at different stages to ensure their own survival. Here we report a new role for poliovirus 2A{sup pro} modulating the alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. Expression of 2A{sup pro} potently inhibits splicing of reporter genes in HeLa cells. Low amounts of 2A{sup pro} abrogate Fas exon 6 skipping, whereas higher levels of protease fully abolish Fas and FGFR2 splicing. In vitro splicing of MINX mRNA using nuclear extracts is also strongly inhibited by 2A{sup pro}, leading to accumulation of the first exon and the lariat product containing the unspliced second exon. These findings reveal that the mechanism of action of 2A{sup pro} on splicing is to selectively block the second catalytic step.

  6. Alternative splicing in colon, bladder, and prostate cancer identified by exon-array analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Kasper; Sørensen, Karina D.; Brems-Eskildsen, Anne Sofie

    2008-01-01

    , PIK4CB, TPM1, and VCL). The validated tumor-specific splicing alterations were highly consistent, enabling clear separation of normal and cancer samples and in some cases even of different tumor stages. A subset of the tumor-specific splicing alterations (ACTN1, CALD1, and VCL) was found in all three...

  7. Reprogramming the Dynamin 2 mRNA by Spliceosome-mediated RNA Trans-splicing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Trochet

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dynamin 2 (DNM2 is a large GTPase, ubiquitously expressed, involved in membrane trafficking and regulation of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. DNM2 mutations cause autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy which is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by skeletal muscle weakness and histopathological features including nuclear centralization in absence of regeneration. No curative treatment is currently available for the DNM2-related autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy. In order to develop therapeutic strategy, we evaluated here the potential of Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing technology to reprogram the Dnm2-mRNA in vitro and in vivo in mice. We show that classical 3′-trans-splicing strategy cannot be considered as accurate therapeutic strategy regarding toxicity of the pre-trans-splicing molecules leading to low rate of trans-splicing in vivo. Thus, we tested alternative strategies devoted to prevent this toxicity and enhance frequency of trans-splicing events. We succeeded to overcome the toxicity through a 5′-trans-splicing strategy which also allows detection of trans-splicing events at mRNA and protein levels in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing strategy may be used to reprogram mutated Dnm2-mRNA but highlight the potential toxicity linked to the molecular tools which have to be carefully investigated during preclinical development.

  8. Features of 5'-splice-site efficiency derived from disease-causing mutations and comparative genomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roca, Xavier; Olson, Andrew J; Rao, Atmakuri R

    2008-01-01

    Many human diseases, including Fanconi anemia, hemophilia B, neurofibromatosis, and phenylketonuria, can be caused by 5'-splice-site (5'ss) mutations that are not predicted to disrupt splicing, according to position weight matrices. By using comparative genomics, we identify pairwise dependencies...

  9. Conservation and sex-specific splicing of the doublesex gene in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genetic control of sex determination in insects has been best characterized in Drosophila melanogaster, where the master gene Sxl codes for RNA that is sex specifically spliced to produce a functional protein only in females. SXL regulates the sex-specific splicing of transformer (tra) RNA which, in turn, regulates the ...

  10. Differential dynamics of splicing factor SC35 during the cell cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srinivas

    We analysed the dynamics of the splicing factor SC35 in interphase and mitotic cells. In HeLa cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-SC35, this was localized ... Cell cycle dynamics; FRAP analysis; mitotic interchromatin granules; splicing factor SC35 .... for 1 h at room temperature for single labelling experiments.

  11. Splicing-Mediated Autoregulation Modulates Rpl22p Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Gabunilas

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, splicing is critical for expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs, which are among the most highly expressed genes and are tightly regulated according to growth and environmental conditions. However, knowledge of the precise mechanisms by which RPG pre-mRNA splicing is regulated on a gene-by-gene basis is lacking. Here we show that Rpl22p has an extraribosomal role in the inhibition of splicing of the RPL22B pre-mRNA transcript. A stem loop secondary structure within the intron is necessary for pre-mRNA binding by Rpl22p in vivo and splicing inhibition in vivo and in vitro and can rescue splicing inhibition in vitro when added in trans to splicing reactions. Splicing inhibition by Rpl22p may be partly attributed to the reduction of co-transcriptional U1 snRNP recruitment to the pre-mRNA at the RPL22B locus. We further demonstrate that the inhibition of RPL22B pre-mRNA splicing contributes to the down-regulation of mature transcript during specific stress conditions, and provide evidence hinting at a regulatory role for this mechanism in conditions of suppressed ribosome biogenesis. These results demonstrate an autoregulatory mechanism that fine-tunes the expression of the Rpl22 protein and by extension Rpl22p paralog composition according to the cellular demands for ribosome biogenesis.

  12. Splicing-Mediated Autoregulation Modulates Rpl22p Expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabunilas, Jason; Chanfreau, Guillaume

    2016-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, splicing is critical for expression of ribosomal protein genes (RPGs), which are among the most highly expressed genes and are tightly regulated according to growth and environmental conditions. However, knowledge of the precise mechanisms by which RPG pre-mRNA splicing is regulated on a gene-by-gene basis is lacking. Here we show that Rpl22p has an extraribosomal role in the inhibition of splicing of the RPL22B pre-mRNA transcript. A stem loop secondary structure within the intron is necessary for pre-mRNA binding by Rpl22p in vivo and splicing inhibition in vivo and in vitro and can rescue splicing inhibition in vitro when added in trans to splicing reactions. Splicing inhibition by Rpl22p may be partly attributed to the reduction of co-transcriptional U1 snRNP recruitment to the pre-mRNA at the RPL22B locus. We further demonstrate that the inhibition of RPL22B pre-mRNA splicing contributes to the down-regulation of mature transcript during specific stress conditions, and provide evidence hinting at a regulatory role for this mechanism in conditions of suppressed ribosome biogenesis. These results demonstrate an autoregulatory mechanism that fine-tunes the expression of the Rpl22 protein and by extension Rpl22p paralog composition according to the cellular demands for ribosome biogenesis.

  13. Measurement of Resistance and Strength of Conductor Splices in the MICE Coupling Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Feng Yu; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Lui, X. K.; Li, E.; Dietderich, Dan; Higley, Hugh; Tam, D. G.; Trillaud, Fredric; Wang, Li; Green, M.A.

    2009-08-19

    The superconducting magnets for the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment [1] (MICE) use a copper based Nb-Ti conductor with un-insulated dimensions of 0.95 by 1.60 mm. There may be as many as twelve splices in one MICE superconducting coupling coil. These splices are to be wound in the coil. The conductor splices produce Joule heating, which may cause the magnet to quench. A technique of making conductor splices was developed by ICST. Two types of 1-meter long of soldered lap-joints have been tested. Side-by-side splices and up-down one splices were studied theoretically and experimentally using two types of soft solder made of eutectic tin-lead solder and tin-silver solder. The resistances of the splices made by ICST were tested at LBNL at liquid helium temperatures over a range of magnetic fields up to 5 T. The breaking strength of 250 mm long splices was also measured at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature.

  14. Tissue-specific alternative splicing and expression of ATP1B2 gene

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user6

    2012-05-15

    May 15, 2012 ... provide some useful information for further studies into the function of the bovine ATP1B2 gene. Alternative splicing (AS) is recognized as the major contributor to protein diversity from limited gene pool. ATP1B2-AS2 was the splice of intron retention found from ATP1B2 in liver, kidney, muscle and.

  15. A directed approach for the identification of transcripts harbouring the spliced leader sequence and the effect of trans-splicing knockdown in Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourão, Marina de Moraes; Bitar, Mainá; Lobo, Francisco Pereira; Peconick, Ana Paula; Grynberg, Priscila; Prosdocimi, Francisco; Waisberg, Michael; Cerqueira, Gustavo Coutinho; Macedo, Andréa Mara; Machado, Carlos Renato; Yoshino, Timothy; Franco, Glória Regina

    2013-09-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major neglected tropical disease caused by trematodes from the genus Schistosoma. Because schistosomes exhibit a complex life cycle and numerous mechanisms for regulating gene expression, it is believed that spliced leader (SL) trans-splicing could play an important role in the biology of these parasites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the function of trans-splicing in Schistosoma mansoni through analysis of genes that may be regulated by this mechanism and via silencing SL-containing transcripts through RNA interference. Here, we report our analysis of SL transcript-enriched cDNA libraries from different S. mansoni life stages. Our results show that the trans-splicing mechanism is apparently not associated with specific genes, subcellular localisations or life stages. In cross-species comparisons, even though the sets of genes that are subject to SL trans-splicing regulation appear to differ between organisms, several commonly shared orthologues were observed. Knockdown of trans-spliced transcripts in sporocysts resulted in a systemic reduction of the expression levels of all tested trans-spliced transcripts; however, the only phenotypic effect observed was diminished larval size. Further studies involving the findings from this work will provide new insights into the role of trans-splicing in the biology of S. mansoni and other organisms. All Expressed Sequence Tags generated in this study were submitted to dbEST as five different libraries. The accessions for each library and for the individual sequences are as follows: (i) adult worms of mixed sexes (LIBEST_027999: JZ139310 - JZ139779), (ii) female adult worms (LIBEST_028000: JZ139780 - JZ140379), (iii) male adult worms (LIBEST_028001: JZ140380 - JZ141002), (iv) eggs (LIBEST_028002: JZ141003 - JZ141497) and (v) schistosomula (LIBEST_028003: JZ141498 - JZ141974).

  16. A directed approach for the identification of transcripts harbouring the spliced leader sequence and the effect of trans-splicing knockdown in Schistosoma mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina de Moraes Mourao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a major neglected tropical disease caused by trematodes from the genus Schistosoma. Because schistosomes exhibit a complex life cycle and numerous mechanisms for regulating gene expression, it is believed that spliced leader (SL trans-splicing could play an important role in the biology of these parasites. The purpose of this study was to investigate the function of trans-splicing in Schistosoma mansoni through analysis of genes that may be regulated by this mechanism and via silencing SL-containing transcripts through RNA interference. Here, we report our analysis of SL transcript-enriched cDNA libraries from different S. mansoni life stages. Our results show that the trans-splicing mechanism is apparently not associated with specific genes, subcellular localisations or life stages. In cross-species comparisons, even though the sets of genes that are subject to SL trans-splicing regulation appear to differ between organisms, several commonly shared orthologues were observed. Knockdown of trans-spliced transcripts in sporocysts resulted in a systemic reduction of the expression levels of all tested trans-spliced transcripts; however, the only phenotypic effect observed was diminished larval size. Further studies involving the findings from this work will provide new insights into the role of trans-splicing in the biology of S. mansoni and other organisms. All Expressed Sequence Tags generated in this study were submitted to dbEST as five different libraries. The accessions for each library and for the individual sequences are as follows: (i adult worms of mixed sexes (LIBEST_027999: JZ139310 - JZ139779, (ii female adult worms (LIBEST_028000: JZ139780 - JZ140379, (iii male adult worms (LIBEST_028001: JZ140380 - JZ141002, (iv eggs (LIBEST_028002: JZ141003 - JZ141497 and (v schistosomula (LIBEST_028003: JZ141498 - JZ141974.

  17. Self-splicing of a group IIC intron: 5? exon recognition and alternative 5? splicing events implicate the stem?loop motif of a transcriptional terminator

    OpenAIRE

    Toor, Navtej; Robart, Aaron R.; Christianson, Joshua; Zimmerly, Steven

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial IIC introns are a newly recognized subclass of group II introns whose ribozyme properties have not been characterized in detail. IIC introns are typically located downstream of transcriptional terminator motifs (inverted repeat followed by T's) or other inverted repeats in bacterial genomes. Here we have characterized the self-splicing activity of a IIC intron, B.h.I1, from Bacillus halodurans. B.h.I1 self-splices in vitro through hydrolysis to produce linear intron, but interesting...

  18. cis-Acting and trans-acting modulation of equine infectious anemia virus alternative RNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao, Huey-Jane; Baker, Carl C.; Princler, Gerald L.; Derse, David

    2004-01-01

    Equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV), a lentivirus distantly related to HIV-1, encodes regulatory proteins, EIAV Tat (ETat) and Rev (ERev), from a four-exon mRNA. Exon 3 of the tat/rev mRNA contains a 30-nucleotide purine-rich element (PRE) which binds both ERev and SF2/ASF, a member of the SR family of RNA splicing factors. To better understand the role of this element in the regulation of EIAV pre-mRNA splicing, we quantified the effects of mutation or deletion of the PRE on exon 3 splicing in vitro and on alternative splicing in vivo. We also determined the branch point elements upstream of exons 3 and 4. In vitro splicing of exon 3 to exon 4 was not affected by mutation of the PRE, and addition of purified SR proteins enhanced splicing independently of the PRE. In vitro splicing of exon 2 to exon 3 was dependent on the PRE; under conditions of excess SR proteins, either the PRE or the 5' splice site of exon 3 was sufficient to activate splicing. We applied isoform-specific primers in real-time RT-PCR reactions to quantitatively analyze alternative splicing in cells transfected with rev-minus EIAV provirus constructs. In the context of provirus with wild-type exon 3, greater than 80% of the viral mRNAs were multiply spliced, and of these, less than 1% excluded exon 3. Deletion of the PRE resulted in a decrease in the relative amount of multiply spliced mRNA to about 40% of the total and approximately 39% of the viral mRNA excluded exon 3. Ectopic expression of ERev caused a decrease in the relative amount of multiply spliced mRNA to approximately 50% of the total and increased mRNAs that excluded exon 3 to about 4%. Over-expression of SF2/ASF in cells transfected with wild-type provirus constructs inhibited splicing but did not significantly alter exon 3 skipping

  19. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2015-12-22

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system.

  20. Towards a Consolidation of LHC Superconducting Splices for 7 TeV Operation

    CERN Document Server

    Bertinelli, F; Fessia, P; Garion, C; Mathot, S; Perin, A; Scheuerlein, C; Sgobba, S; ten Kat, H; Tock, J P; Verweij, A; Willering, G

    2010-01-01

    Following the analysis of the September 2008 LHC incident, the assembly process and the quality assurance of the main 13 kA interconnection splices were improved, with new measurement and diagnostics methods introduced. During the 2008-2009 shutdown ~5% of these 10 000 splices were newly assembled with these improvements implemented, but essentially maintaining the original design. It is known today that a limiting factor towards 7 TeV operation is the normal conducting resistance of ~15% of the original main 13 kA interconnection splices, associated to the electrical continuity of the copper stabiliser. A “Splices Task Force” has been set up at CERN to evaluate the need for, develop and test design improvements and prepare the implementation of a consolidation campaign. Important issues of splice design, process choice, resources and time requirements are considered.

  1. An experimental investigation on contact compression lap splice in circular columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed S. Askar

    2016-08-01

    The objective of the present investigation is to study the influence of splice length, volume of transverse reinforcement and end bearing condition on the behavior of compression lap splice. The conducted investigation included experimental tests of nine circular columns under uniaxial compression loads. All spliced bars were in contact with each other and with constant concrete cover. Based on the experimental investigation and test results, concluding remarks have been drawn, based on which a design simplified equation for splice length in compression has been developed. A correlation between the experimental and calculated results of the author specimens and other results available in literature, showed a good agreement. Also, the formulas adapted by different codes for predicting the compression lap splice length have been checked with the proposed equation.

  2. Fractional Differential Texture Descriptors Based on the Machado Entropy for Image Splicing Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabha W. Ibrahim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Image splicing is a common operation in image forgery. Different techniques of image splicing detection have been utilized to regain people’s trust. This study introduces a texture enhancement technique involving the use of fractional differential masks based on the Machado entropy. The masks slide over the tampered image, and each pixel of the tampered image is convolved with the fractional mask weight window on eight directions. Consequently, the fractional differential texture descriptors are extracted using the gray-level co-occurrence matrix for image splicing detection. The support vector machine is used as a classifier that distinguishes between authentic and spliced images. Results prove that the achieved improvements of the proposed algorithm are compatible with other splicing detection methods.

  3. Controlled synthesis of target strings in a class of splicing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peter C Y

    2005-08-01

    This article presents an approach for synthesizing target strings in a class of computational models of DNA recombination. The computational models are formalized as splicing systems in the context of formal languages. Given a splicing system (of a restricted type) and a target string to be synthesized, we construct (i) a rule-embedded splicing automaton that recognizes languages containing strings embedded with symbols representing splicing rules, and (ii) an automaton that implicitly recognizes the target string. By manipulating these two automata, we extract all rule sequences that lead to the production of the target string (if that string belongs to the splicing language). An algorithm for synthesizing a certain type of target strings based on such rule sequences is presented.

  4. Comparative cross-species alternative splicing in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ner-Gaon, Hadas; Leviatan, Noam; Rubin, Eitan; Fluhr, Robert

    2007-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) can add significantly to genome complexity. Plants are thought to exhibit less AS than animals. An algorithm, based on expressed sequence tag (EST) pairs gapped alignment, was developed that takes advantage of the relatively small intron and exon size in plants and directly compares pairs of ESTs to search for AS. EST pairs gapped alignment was first evaluated in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), rice (Oryza sativa), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) for which annotated genome sequence is available and was shown to accurately predict splicing events. The method was then applied to 11 plant species that include 17 cultivars for which enough ESTs are available. The results show a large, 3.7-fold difference in AS rates between plant species with Arabidopsis and rice in the lower range and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) in the upper range. Hence, compared to higher animals, plants show a much greater degree of variety in their AS rates and in some plant species the rates of animal and plant AS are comparable although the distribution of AS types may differ. In eudicots but not monocots, a correlation between genome size and AS rates was detected, implying that in eudicots the mechanisms that lead to larger genomes are a driving force for the evolution of AS.

  5. Integrated analysis of differential expression and alternative splicing of non-small cell lung cancer based on RNA sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zulei; Zhao, Kai; Tian, Hui

    2017-08-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, with high morbidity and mortality rates. Numerous diagnosis and treatment methods have been proposed, and the prognosis of NSCLC has improved to a certain extent. However, the mechanisms of NSCLC remain largely unknown, and additional studies are required. In the present study, the RNA sequencing dataset of NSCLC was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/geo/). The clean reads obtained from the raw data were mapped to the University of California Santa Cruz human genome (hg19), based on TopHat, and were assembled into transcripts via Cufflink. The differential expression (DE) and differential alternative splicing (DAS) genes were screened out through Cuffdiff and rMATS, respectively. The significantly enriched gene ontology (GO) terms and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways were obtained through the Database of Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID). Different numbers of DE and DAS genes were identified in different types of NSCLC samples, but a number of common functions and pathways were obtained, including biological processes associated with abnormal immune and cell activity. GO terms and pathways associated with substance metabolism, including the insulin signaling pathway and oxidative phosphorylation, were enriched in DAS genes rather than DE genes. Integrated analysis of differential expression and alternative splicing may be helpful in understanding the mechanisms of NSCLC, in addition to its early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. The emergence of alternative 3' and 5' splice site exons from constitutive exons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Koren

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Alternative 3' and 5' splice site (ss events constitute a significant part of all alternative splicing events. These events were also found to be related to several aberrant splicing diseases. However, only few of the characteristics that distinguish these events from alternative cassette exons are known currently. In this study, we compared the characteristics of constitutive exons, alternative cassette exons, and alternative 3'ss and 5'ss exons. The results revealed that alternative 3'ss and 5'ss exons are an intermediate state between constitutive and alternative cassette exons, where the constitutive side resembles constitutive exons, and the alternative side resembles alternative cassette exons. The results also show that alternative 3'ss and 5'ss exons exhibit low levels of symmetry (frame-preserving, similar to constitutive exons, whereas the sequence between the two alternative splice sites shows high symmetry levels, similar to alternative cassette exons. In addition, flanking intronic conservation analysis revealed that exons whose alternative splice sites are at least nine nucleotides apart show a high conservation level, indicating intronic participation in the regulation of their splicing, whereas exons whose alternative splice sites are fewer than nine nucleotides apart show a low conservation level. Further examination of these exons, spanning seven vertebrate species, suggests an evolutionary model in which the alternative state is a derivative of an ancestral constitutive exon, where a mutation inside the exon or along the flanking intron resulted in the creation of a new splice site that competes with the original one, leading to alternative splice site selection. This model was validated experimentally on four exons, showing that they indeed originated from constitutive exons that acquired a new competing splice site during evolution.

  7. Novel mutations affecting LRP5 splicing in patients with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, C M; Chung, B D; Susic, M; Prescott, T; Semler, O; Fiskerstrand, T; D'Eufemia, P; Castori, M; Pekkinen, M; Sochett, E; Cole, W G; Netzer, C; Mäkitie, O

    2011-08-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma sydrome (OPPG) is an autosomal recessive disorder with early-onset severe osteoporosis and blindness, caused by biallelic loss-of-function mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) gene. Heterozygous carriers exhibit a milder bone phenotype. Only a few splice mutations in LRP5 have been published. We present clinical and genetic data for four patients with novel LRP5 mutations, three of which affect splicing. Patients were evaluated clinically and by radiography and bone densitometry. Genetic screening of LRP5 was performed on the basis of the clinical diagnosis of OPPG. Splice aberrances were confirmed by cDNA sequencing or exon trapping. The effect of one splice mutation on LRP5 protein function was studied. A novel splice-site mutation c.1584+4A>T abolished the donor splice site of exon 7 and activated a cryptic splice site, which led to an in-frame insertion of 21 amino acids (p.E528_V529ins21). Functional studies revealed severely impaired signal transduction presumably caused by defective intracellular transport of the mutated receptor. Exon trapping was used on two samples to confirm that splice-site mutations c.4112-2A>G and c.1015+1G>T caused splicing-out of exons 20 and 5, respectively. One patient carried a homozygous deletion of exon 4 causing the loss of exons 4 and 5, as demonstrated by cDNA analysis. Our results broaden the spectrum of mutations in LRP5 and provide the first functional data on splice aberrations.

  8. Splice Expression Variation Analysis (SEVA) for Inter-tumor Heterogeneity of Gene Isoform Usage in Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afsari, Bahman; Guo, Theresa; Considine, Michael; Florea, Liliana; Kagohara, Luciane T; Stein-O'Brien, Genevieve L; Kelley, Dylan; Flam, Emily; Zambo, Kristina D; Ha, Patrick K; Geman, Donald; Ochs, Michael F; Califano, Joseph A; Gaykalova, Daria A; Favorov, Alexander V; Fertig, Elana J

    2018-01-12

    Current bioinformatics methods to detect changes in gene isoform usage in distinct phenotypes compare the relative expected isoform usage in phenotypes. These statistics model differences in isoform usage in normal tissues, which have stable regulation of gene splicing. Pathological conditions, such as cancer, can have broken regulation of splicing that increases the heterogeneity of the expression of splice variants. Inferring events with such differential heterogeneity in gene isoform usage requires new statistical approaches. We introduce Splice Expression Variability Analysis (SEVA) to model increased heterogeneity of splice variant usage between conditions (e.g., tumor and normal samples). SEVA uses a rank-based multivariate statistic that compares the variability of junction expression profiles within one condition to the variability within another. Simulated data show that SEVA is unique in modeling heterogeneity of gene isoform usage, and benchmark SEVA's performance against EBSeq, DiffSplice, and rMATS that model differential isoform usage instead of heterogeneity. We confirm the accuracy of SEVA in identifying known splice variants in head and neck cancer and perform cross-study validation of novel splice variants. A novel comparison of splice variant heterogeneity between subtypes of head and neck cancer demonstrated unanticipated similarity between the heterogeneity of gene isoform usage in HPV-positive and HPV-negative subtypes and anticipated increased heterogeneity among HPV-negative samples with mutations in genes that regulate the splice variant machinery. These results show that SEVA accurately models differential heterogeneity of gene isoform usage from RNA-seq data. SEVA is implemented in the R/Bioconductor package GSReg. bahman@jhu.edu, ejfertig@jhmi.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2018). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. Differential expression and functional characterization of luteinizing hormone receptor splice variants in human luteal cells: implications for luteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, Rachel E; Stewart, Alan J; Myers, Michelle; Millar, Robert P; Duncan, W Colin

    2009-06-01

    The human LH receptor (LHR) plays a key role in luteal function and the establishment of pregnancy through its interaction with the gonadotropins LH and human chorionic gonadotropin. We previously identified four splice variants of the LHR in human luteinized granulosa cells (LGCs) and corpora lutea (CL). Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that expression of the full-length LHR (LHRa) and the most truncated form (LHRd) changed significantly in CL harvested at different stages of the ovarian cycle (P < 0.01, ANOVA). LHRa expression was reduced in the late luteal CL (P < 0.05). Conversely, an increase in LHRd expression was observed in the late luteal CL (P < 0.01). Chronic manipulation of human chorionic gonadotropin in LGC primary cultures supported the in vivo findings. LHRd encodes a protein lacking the transmembrane and carboxyl terminal domains. COS-7 cells expressing LHRd were unable to produce cAMP in response to LH stimulation. COS-7 cells coexpressing LHRd and LHRa also failed to generate cAMP in response to LH, suggesting that this truncated form has a negative effect on the signaling of LHRa. Immunofluorescence staining of LGC and COS-7 cells implied that there is a reduction in cell surface expression of LHRa when LHRd is present. Overall, these results imply expression of LHR splice variants is regulated in the human CL. Furthermore, during functional luteolysis a truncated variant could modulate the cell surface expression and activity of full-length LHR.

  10. Moessbauer spectroscopic study of rust formed on a weathering steel and a mild steel exposed for a long term in an industrial environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimura, Takayuki; Nasu, Saburo; Tazaki, Takashi; Kuzushita, Kaori; Morimoto, Shotaro

    2002-01-01

    The rusts formed on mild steel (15-year exposure) and weathering steel (32-year exposure) exposed to an industrial environment have been characterized by means of X-ray diffraction technique and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. By using an X-ray diffraction method, it is suggested that the rusts formed on both steels consist of the crystalline α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH and an X-ray amorphous phase, which gives no peak to X-ray diffraction pattern. The amount of the X-ray amorphous phase exceeds 50% of the total amount of the rust. The 57 Fe Moessbauer spectra observed at 10K indicate that the rust contains only α-FeOOH, γ-FeOOH and Fe 3-δ O 4 (γ-Fe 2 O 3 ) for mild steel, and only α-FeOOH and γ-FeOOH for weathering steel. The X-ray amorphous substance in the rust payer formed on mild steel possesses the structures of mainly α-FeOOH showing superparamagnetism owing to its small particle size, and Fe 3-δ O 4 (γ-Fe 2 O 3 ). They are contained both in the inner rust layer and in the outer rust layer. The X-ray amorphous phase in the rust layer formed on weathering steel is mainly α-FeOOH. (author)

  11. New Modularity of DAP-Kinases: Alternative Splicing of the DRP-1 Gene Produces a ZIPk-Like Isoform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoval, Yishay; Berissi, Hanna; Kimchi, Adi; Pietrokovski, Shmuel

    2011-01-01

    DRP-1 and ZIPk are two members of the Death Associated Protein Ser/Thr Kinase (DAP-kinase) family, which function in different settings of cell death including autophagy. DAP kinases are very similar in their catalytic domains but differ substantially in their extra-catalytic domains. This difference is crucial for the significantly different modes of regulation and function among DAP kinases. Here we report the identification of a novel alternatively spliced kinase isoform of the DRP-1 gene, termed DRP-1β. The alternative splicing event replaces the whole extra catalytic domain of DRP-1 with a single coding exon that is closely related to the sequence of the extra catalytic domain of ZIPk. As a consequence, DRP-1β lacks the calmodulin regulatory domain of DRP-1, and instead contains a leucine zipper-like motif similar to the protein binding region of ZIPk. Several functional assays proved that this new isoform retained the biochemical and cellular properties that are common to DRP-1 and ZIPk, including myosin light chain phosphorylation, and activation of membrane blebbing and autophagy. In addition, DRP-1β also acquired binding to the ATF4 transcription factor, a feature characteristic of ZIPk but not DRP-1. Thus, a splicing event of the DRP-1 produces a ZIPk like isoform. DRP-1β is highly conserved in evolution, present in all known vertebrate DRP-1 loci. We detected the corresponding mRNA and protein in embryonic mouse brains and in human embryonic stem cells thus confirming the in vivo utilization of this isoform. The discovery of module conservation within the DAPk family members illustrates a parsimonious way to increase the functional complexity within protein families. It also provides crucial data for modeling the expansion and evolution of DAP kinase proteins within vertebrates, suggesting that DRP-1 and ZIPk most likely evolved from their ancient ancestor gene DAPk by two gene duplication events that occurred close to the emergence of vertebrates

  12. New modularity of DAP-kinases: alternative splicing of the DRP-1 gene produces a ZIPk-like isoform.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yishay Shoval

    Full Text Available DRP-1 and ZIPk are two members of the Death Associated Protein Ser/Thr Kinase (DAP-kinase family, which function in different settings of cell death including autophagy. DAP kinases are very similar in their catalytic domains but differ substantially in their extra-catalytic domains. This difference is crucial for the significantly different modes of regulation and function among DAP kinases. Here we report the identification of a novel alternatively spliced kinase isoform of the DRP-1 gene, termed DRP-1β. The alternative splicing event replaces the whole extra catalytic domain of DRP-1 with a single coding exon that is closely related to the sequence of the extra catalytic domain of ZIPk. As a consequence, DRP-1β lacks the calmodulin regulatory domain of DRP-1, and instead contains a leucine zipper-like motif similar to the protein binding region of ZIPk. Several functional assays proved that this new isoform retained the biochemical and cellular properties that are common to DRP-1 and ZIPk, including myosin light chain phosphorylation, and activation of membrane blebbing and autophagy. In addition, DRP-1β also acquired binding to the ATF4 transcription factor, a feature characteristic of ZIPk but not DRP-1. Thus, a splicing event of the DRP-1 produces a ZIPk like isoform. DRP-1β is highly conserved in evolution, present in all known vertebrate DRP-1 loci. We detected the corresponding mRNA and protein in embryonic mouse brains and in human embryonic stem cells thus confirming the in vivo utilization of this isoform. The discovery of module conservation within the DAPk family members illustrates a parsimonious way to increase the functional complexity within protein families. It also provides crucial data for modeling the expansion and evolution of DAP kinase proteins within vertebrates, suggesting that DRP-1 and ZIPk most likely evolved from their ancient ancestor gene DAPk by two gene duplication events that occurred close to the

  13. Novel splice variant CAR 4/6 of the coxsackie adenovirus receptor is differentially expressed in cervical carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietel, Marit; Häfner, Norman; Jansen, Lars; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo B

    2011-06-01

    The coxsackie adenovirus receptor (CAR) is a component of the tight junction complex and involved in cell adhesion. Loss of CAR expression can affect cell adhesion which in the context of carcinogenesis may influence both invasion and metastatic spread. Functional inactivation of CAR may also result from the interaction with its soluble isoforms. To relate alterations of CAR expression to tumor progression, we aimed to establish a highly specific real-time PCR protocol for quantification of all splice variants. In the process of cloning, we identified a novel splice variant termed CAR4/6 that lacked exon 5 but retained exon 6 encoding the transmembrane domain. Localization of CAR4/6 in the cell membrane was confirmed by ectopic expression in HT1080 cells. Expression analyses using cDNA arrays revealed that most normal tissues, including those of the female genital tract, express full-length CAR (CAR6/7) but not CAR4/6. Differential expression of both CAR splice variants was validated in microdissected epithelia (n = 66) derived from normal cervical ectodermal tissue, high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3) and invasive squamous cervical carcinoma. CAR4/6 was not expressed in normal cervical tissue but in 42% of CIN2/3 and in most cervical carcinomas (p < 0.001). In contrast, CAR6/7 was detected in all of the microdissected samples. As for CAR4/6 expression levels of CAR6/7 were significantly lower in normal tissue as compared with CIN2/3 and cancer (p < 0.01). Ectopic expression of CAR4/6 in different cell lines enhanced the proliferative and invasive properties indicating a possible role in cancer progression.

  14. Relationships between salinity and short-term soil carbon accumulation rates form marsh types across a landscape in the Mississippi River Delta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baustian, Melissa M.; Stagg, Camille L.; Perry, Carey L.; Moss, Leland C; Carruthers, Tim J.B.; Allison, Mead

    2017-01-01

    Salinity alterations will likely change the plant and environmental characteristics in coastal marshes thereby influencing soil carbon accumulation rates. Coastal Louisiana marshes have been historically classified as fresh, intermediate, brackish, or saline based on resident plant community and position along a salinity gradient. Short-term total carbon accumulation rates were assessed by collecting 10-cm deep soil cores at 24 sites located in marshes spanning the salinity gradient. Bulk density, total carbon content, and the short-term accretion rates obtained with feldspar horizon markers were measured to determine total carbon accumulation rates. Despite some significant differences in soil properties among marsh types, the mean total carbon accumulation rates among marsh types were not significantly different (mean ± std. err. of 190 ± 27 g TC m−2 year−1). However, regression analysis indicated that mean annual surface salinity had a significant negative relationship with total carbon accumulation rates. Based on both analyses, the coastal Louisiana total marsh area (1,433,700 ha) accumulates about 2.7 to 3.3 Tg C year−1. Changing salinities due to increasing relative sea level or resulting from restoration activities may alter carbon accumulation rates in the short term and significantly influence the global carbon cycle.

  15. [Variants of changes in the psychopathological phenomenology of the long-term remission in stable patients with attack-like progressive form of schizophrenia: a longitudinal study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozova, M A; Burminskiy, D S; Rupchev, G E

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of literature data on schizophrenia shows the change of interest from acute psychosis to phenomenology of remission. The separate objects of research become the impact of symptoms, observed in remission, on everyday life of patients and factors, which influence rapidity and comprehension of reintegration of patients into society. Authors aimed to describe the changes in psychopathological phenomenology and personality functioning during long-term (no less than three years) remission in patients with schizophrenia treated with atypical antipsychotics. One hundred and thirty stable patients with schizophrenia underwent regular clinical examination during no less than three years. All patients were constantly medicated with atypical antipsychotics. Long-term observation of patients with the similar diagnosis and phase of disease, similar treatment and good treatment response (at least without psychotic exacerbation during the observation period) and tolerability revealed difference in changes of psychopathological phenomenology and personality functioning, which could be grouped into four distinct variants. The description of specificity of each variant is presented. A role of the initial level of personality functioning and its changes during observation period were analyzed. A new concept is introduced in order to name the ability of patients to use rationally recourses, delivered by treatment. The connection of this concept with the level of personality functioning was demonstrated. The hypothesis of mechanisms which underlie the four variants is offered. Long-term observation of the changes in the psychopathological phenomenology in the period of disease reveals the variants of the development of remission. The fluctuation of adaptive and regressive phases is registered. More objective factors, which impact on prognosis, are elucidated.

  16. Alternative splicing of the maize Ac transposase transcript in transgenic sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisson, Ralph; Hellert, Jan; Ringleb, Malte; Machens, Fabian; Kraus, Josef; Hehl, Reinhard

    2010-09-01

    The maize Activator/Dissociation (Ac/Ds) transposable element system was introduced into sugar beet. The autonomous Ac and non-autonomous Ds element excise from the T-DNA vector and integrate at novel positions in the sugar beet genome. Ac and Ds excisions generate footprints in the donor T-DNA that support the hairpin model for transposon excision. Two complete integration events into genomic sugar beet DNA were obtained by IPCR. Integration of Ac leads to an eight bp duplication, while integration of Ds in a homologue of a sugar beet flowering locus gene did not induce a duplication. The molecular structure of the target site indicates Ds integration into a double strand break. Analyses of transposase transcription using RT-PCR revealed low amounts of alternatively spliced mRNAs. The fourth intron of the transposase was found to be partially misspliced. Four different splice products were identified. In addition, the second and third exon were found to harbour two and three novel introns, respectively. These utilize each the same splice donor but several alternative splice acceptor sites. Using the SplicePredictor online tool, one of the two introns within exon two is predicted to be efficiently spliced in maize. Most interestingly, splicing of this intron together with the four major introns of Ac would generate a transposase that lacks the DNA binding domain and two of its three nuclear localization signals, but still harbours the dimerization domain.

  17. Misregulation of Alternative Splicing in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronghui Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the human MECP2 gene cause Rett syndrome (RTT, a severe neurodevelopmental disorder that predominantly affects girls. Despite decades of work, the molecular function of MeCP2 is not fully understood. Here we report a systematic identification of MeCP2-interacting proteins in the mouse brain. In addition to transcription regulators, we found that MeCP2 physically interacts with several modulators of RNA splicing, including LEDGF and DHX9. These interactions are disrupted by RTT causing mutations, suggesting that they may play a role in RTT pathogenesis. Consistent with the idea, deep RNA sequencing revealed misregulation of hundreds of splicing events in the cortex of Mecp2 knockout mice. To reveal the functional consequence of altered RNA splicing due to the loss of MeCP2, we focused on the regulation of the splicing of the flip/flop exon of Gria2 and other AMPAR genes. We found a significant splicing shift in the flip/flop exon toward the flop inclusion, leading to a faster decay in the AMPAR gated current and altered synaptic transmission. In summary, our study identified direct physical interaction between MeCP2 and splicing factors, a novel MeCP2 target gene, and established functional connection between a specific RNA splicing change and synaptic phenotypes in RTT mice. These results not only help our understanding of the molecular function of MeCP2, but also reveal potential drug targets for future therapies.

  18. TBX3 regulates splicing in vivo: a novel molecular mechanism for Ulnar-mammary syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Kumar P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available TBX3 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors with critical roles in development, oncogenesis, cell fate, and tissue homeostasis. TBX3 mutations in humans cause complex congenital malformations and Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Previous investigations into TBX3 function focused on its activity as a transcriptional repressor. We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify TBX3 interacting proteins in vivo and discovered that TBX3 interacts with multiple mRNA splicing factors and RNA metabolic proteins. We discovered that TBX3 regulates alternative splicing in vivo and can promote or inhibit splicing depending on context and transcript. TBX3 associates with alternatively spliced mRNAs and binds RNA directly. TBX3 binds RNAs containing TBX binding motifs, and these motifs are required for regulation of splicing. Our study reveals that TBX3 mutations seen in humans with UMS disrupt its splicing regulatory function. The pleiotropic effects of TBX3 mutations in humans and mice likely result from disrupting at least two molecular functions of this protein: transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing.

  19. TBX3 regulates splicing in vivo: a novel molecular mechanism for Ulnar-mammary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar P, Pavan; Franklin, Sarah; Emechebe, Uchenna; Hu, Hao; Moore, Barry; Lehman, Chris; Yandell, Mark; Moon, Anne M

    2014-03-01

    TBX3 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors with critical roles in development, oncogenesis, cell fate, and tissue homeostasis. TBX3 mutations in humans cause complex congenital malformations and Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Previous investigations into TBX3 function focused on its activity as a transcriptional repressor. We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify TBX3 interacting proteins in vivo and discovered that TBX3 interacts with multiple mRNA splicing factors and RNA metabolic proteins. We discovered that TBX3 regulates alternative splicing in vivo and can promote or inhibit splicing depending on context and transcript. TBX3 associates with alternatively spliced mRNAs and binds RNA directly. TBX3 binds RNAs containing TBX binding motifs, and these motifs are required for regulation of splicing. Our study reveals that TBX3 mutations seen in humans with UMS disrupt its splicing regulatory function. The pleiotropic effects of TBX3 mutations in humans and mice likely result from disrupting at least two molecular functions of this protein: transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing.

  20. The Musashi 1 Controls the Splicing of Photoreceptor-Specific Exons in the Vertebrate Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Daniel; Carstens, Russ

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing expands the coding capacity of eukaryotic genomes, potentially enabling a limited number of genes to govern the development of complex anatomical structures. Alternative splicing is particularly prevalent in the vertebrate nervous system, where it is required for neuronal development and function. Here, we show that photoreceptor cells, a type of sensory neuron, express a characteristic splicing program that affects a broad set of transcripts and is initiated prior to the development of the light sensing outer segments. Surprisingly, photoreceptors lack prototypical neuronal splicing factors and their splicing profile is driven to a significant degree by the Musashi 1 (MSI1) protein. A striking feature of the photoreceptor splicing program are exons that display a "switch-like" pattern of high inclusion levels in photoreceptors and near complete exclusion outside of the retina. Several ubiquitously expressed genes that are involved in the biogenesis and function of primary cilia produce highly photoreceptor specific isoforms through use of such “switch-like” exons. Our results suggest a potential role for alternative splicing in the development of photoreceptors and the conversion of their primary cilia to the light sensing outer segments. PMID:27541351

  1. Alternative splicing in the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells into cardiac precursors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Salomonis

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The role of alternative splicing in self-renewal, pluripotency and tissue lineage specification of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs is largely unknown. To better define these regulatory cues, we modified the H9 hESC line to allow selection of pluripotent hESCs by neomycin resistance and cardiac progenitors by puromycin resistance. Exon-level microarray expression data from undifferentiated hESCs and cardiac and neural precursors were used to identify splice isoforms with cardiac-restricted or common cardiac/neural differentiation expression patterns. Splice events for these groups corresponded to the pathways of cytoskeletal remodeling, RNA splicing, muscle specification, and cell cycle checkpoint control as well as genes with serine/threonine kinase and helicase activity. Using a new program named AltAnalyze (http://www.AltAnalyze.org, we identified novel changes in protein domain and microRNA binding site architecture that were predicted to affect protein function and expression. These included an enrichment of splice isoforms that oppose cell-cycle arrest in hESCs and that promote calcium signaling and cardiac development in cardiac precursors. By combining genome-wide predictions of alternative splicing with new functional annotations, our data suggest potential mechanisms that may influence lineage commitment and hESC maintenance at the level of specific splice isoforms and microRNA regulation.

  2. Supplementary Material for: Herboxidiene triggers splicing repression and abiotic stress responses in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Alshareef, Sahar

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Constitutive and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs from multiexonic genes controls the diversity of the proteome; these precisely regulated processes also fine-tune responses to cues related to growth, development, and stresses. Small-molecule inhibitors that perturb splicing provide invaluable tools for use as chemical probes to uncover the molecular underpinnings of splicing regulation and as potential anticancer compounds. Results Here, we show that herboxidiene (GEX1A) inhibits both constitutive and alternative splicing. Moreover, GEX1A activates genome-wide transcriptional patterns involved in abiotic stress responses in plants. GEX1A treatment -activated ABA-inducible promoters, and led to stomatal closure. Interestingly, GEX1A and pladienolide B (PB) elicited similar cellular changes, including alterations in the patterns of transcription and splicing, suggesting that these compounds might target the same spliceosome complex in plant cells. Conclusions Our study establishes GEX1A as a potent splicing inhibitor in plants that can be used to probe the assembly, dynamics, and molecular functions of the spliceosome and to study the interplay between splicing stress and abiotic stresses, as well as having potential biotechnological applications.

  3. Targeting of highly conserved Dengue virus sequences with anti-Dengue virus trans-splicing group I introns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Tresa S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue viruses (DENV are one of the most important viral diseases in the world with approximately 100 million infections and 200,000 deaths each year. The current lack of an approved tetravalent vaccine and ineffective insecticide control measures warrant a search for alternatives to effectively combat DENV. The trans-splicing variant of the Tetrahymena thermophila group I intron catalytic RNA, or ribozyme, is a powerful tool for post-transcriptional RNA modification. The nature of the ribozyme and the predictability with which it can be directed makes it a powerful tool for modifying RNA in nearly any cell type without the need for genome-altering gene therapy techniques or dependence on native cofactors. Results Several anti-DENV Group I trans-splicing introns (αDENV-GrpIs were designed and tested for their ability to target DENV-2 NGC genomes in situ. We have successfully targeted two different uracil bases on the positive sense genomic strand within the highly conserved 5'-3' cyclization sequence (CS region common to all serotypes of DENV with our αDENV-GrpIs. Our ribozymes have demonstrated ability to specifically trans-splice a new RNA sequence downstream of the targeted site in vitro and in transfected insect cells as analyzed by firefly luciferase and RT-PCR assays. The effectiveness of these αDENV-GrpIs to target infecting DENV genomes is also validated in transfected or transformed Aedes mosquito cell lines upon infection with unattenuated DENV-2 NGC. Conclusions Analysis shows that our αDENV-GrpIs have the ability to effectively trans-splice the DENV genome in situ. Notably, these results show that the αDENV-GrpI 9v1, designed to be active against all forms of Dengue virus, effectively targeted the DENV-2 NGC genome in a sequence specific manner. These novel αDENV-GrpI introns provide a striking alternative to other RNA based approaches for the transgenic suppression of DENV in transformed mosquito cells and

  4. Identification and characterization of evolutionarily conserved alternative splicing events in a mangrove genus Sonneratia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuchen; Guo, Wuxia; Shen, Xu; Li, Jianfang; Yang, Shuhuan; Chen, Sufang; He, Ziwen; Zhou, Renchao; Shi, Suhua

    2018-03-13

    Alternative splicing (AS), which produces multiple mRNA transcripts from a single gene, plays crucial roles in plant growth, development and environmental stress responses. Functional significances of conserved AS events among congeneric species have not been well characterized. In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing to characterize AS events in four common species of Sonneratia, a mangrove genus excellently adaptive to intertidal zones. 7,248 to 12,623 AS events were identified in approximately 25% to 35% expressed genes in the roots of the four species. The frequency of AS events in Sonneratia was associated with genomic features, including gene expression level and intron/exon number and length. Among the four species, 1,355 evolutionarily conserved AS (ECAS) events were identified from 1,170 genes. Compared with non-ECAS events, ECAS events are of shorter length and less possibility to introduce premature stop codons (PTCs) and frameshifts. Functional annotations of the genes containing ECAS events showed that four of the 26 enriched Gene Ontology (GO) terms are involved in proton transport, signal transduction and carbon metabolism, and 60 genes from another three GO terms are implicated in responses to osmotic, oxidative and heat stresses, which may contribute to the adaptation of Sonneratia species to harsh intertidal environments.

  5. Long-term flood controls on semi-arid river form: evidence from the Sabie and Olifants rivers, eastern South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Heritage

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rivers in the Kruger National Park, eastern South Africa, are characterised by bedrock-influenced "macrochannels" containing variable alluvial thicknesses and riparian vegetation assemblages. Evidence from the Sabie and Olifants rivers suggests that flows up to moderate floods (3 s−1 tend to result in net alluviation, with sediments gradually covering the underlying bedrock. More extreme floods strip alluvium and erode bedrock, effectively exerting the primary control over long-term river morphologic development. On the Olifants River, post-flood aerial LIDAR imagery reveals that the 2012 extreme flood (~14000 m3 s−1 resulted in extensive stripping of stored alluvial sediment, exposing and eroding the underlying weathered bedrock. On the Sabie River, preliminary optically stimulated luminescence ages for remnant alluvium are all less than 1000 years, highlighting typical timescales of sediment storage. Together, these results suggest that while periods of general alluviation occur on these systems, long-term river development results from extreme flood-generated bedrock erosion.

  6. A method of predicting changes in human gene splicing induced by genetic variants in context of cis-acting elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hicks Chindo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphic variants and mutations disrupting canonical splicing isoforms are among the leading causes of human hereditary disorders. While there is a substantial evidence of aberrant splicing causing Mendelian diseases, the implication of such events in multi-genic disorders is yet to be well understood. We have developed a new tool (SpliceScan II for predicting the effects of genetic variants on splicing and cis-regulatory elements. The novel Bayesian non-canonical 5'GC splice site (SS sensor used in our tool allows inference on non-canonical exons. Results Our tool performed favorably when compared with the existing methods in the context of genes linked to the Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD. SpliceScan II was able to predict more aberrant splicing isoforms triggered by the mutations, as documented in DBASS5 and DBASS3 aberrant splicing databases, than other existing methods. Detrimental effects behind some of the polymorphic variations previously associated with Alzheimer's and breast cancer could be explained by changes in predicted splicing patterns. Conclusions We have developed SpliceScan II, an effective and sensitive tool for predicting the detrimental effects of genomic variants on splicing leading to Mendelian and complex hereditary disorders. The method could potentially be used to screen resequenced patient DNA to identify de novo mutations and polymorphic variants that could contribute to a genetic disorder.

  7. Splice variants of porcine PPHLN1 encoding periphilin-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Knud Erik; Momeni, Jamal; Farajzadeh, Leila

    2017-01-01

    splice variants hereof. RT-PCR cloning using oligonucleotide primers derived from in silico sequences resulted in three PPHLN1 transcripts: a full-length mRNA and two transcript variant resulting in shorter proteins. The longest encoded periphilin-1, consisting of 373 amino acids, displays a high......The periphilin-1 protein is encoded by the PPHLN1 gene. Periphilin-1 is found in the cornified cell envelope during the terminal differentiation of keratinocyte at the outer layer of epidermis. In the current study we report on the cloning and characterization of the porcine PPHLN1 cDNA and two...... homology to the human periphilin-1 protein coded by the transcript variant 2 (91%). A shorter transcript variant (PPHLN1Sp1) contains a 1065-codon ORF, which is consistent with that of the authentic PPHLN1, but lacks a region of 57 bp spanning exon 7. Hence, the encoded polypeptide periphilin-1Sp1 consists...

  8. Novel Alternative Splice Variants of Mouse Cdk5rap2.

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    Nadine Kraemer

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by a pronounced reduction of brain volume and intellectual disability. A current model for the microcephaly phenotype invokes a stem cell proliferation and differentiation defect, which has moved the disease into the spotlight of stem cell biology and neurodevelopmental science. Homozygous mutations of the Cyclin-dependent kinase-5 regulatory subunit-associated protein 2 gene CDK5RAP2 are one genetic cause of MCPH. To further characterize the pathomechanism underlying MCPH, we generated a conditional Cdk5rap2 LoxP/hCMV Cre mutant mouse. Further analysis, initiated on account of a lack of a microcephaly phenotype in these mutant mice, revealed the presence of previously unknown splice variants of the Cdk5rap2 gene that are at least in part accountable for the lack of microcephaly in the mice.

  9. BBMap: A Fast, Accurate, Splice-Aware Aligner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushnell, Brian

    2014-03-17

    Alignment of reads is one of the primary computational tasks in bioinformatics. Of paramount importance to resequencing, alignment is also crucial to other areas - quality control, scaffolding, string-graph assembly, homology detection, assembly evaluation, error-correction, expression quantification, and even as a tool to evaluate other tools. An optimal aligner would greatly improve virtually any sequencing process, but optimal alignment is prohibitively expensive for gigabases of data. Here, we will present BBMap [1], a fast splice-aware aligner for short and long reads. We will demonstrate that BBMap has superior speed, sensitivity, and specificity to alternative high-throughput aligners bowtie2 [2], bwa [3], smalt, [4] GSNAP [5], and BLASR [6].

  10. Unmasking alternative splicing inside protein-coding exons defines exitrons and their role in proteome plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez, Yamile; Höpfler, Markus; Ayatollahi, Zahra; Barta, Andrea; Kalyna, Maria

    2015-07-01

    Alternative splicing (AS) diversifies transcriptomes and proteomes and is widely recognized as a key mechanism for regulating gene expression. Previously, in an analysis of intron retention events in Arabidopsis, we found unusual AS events inside annotated protein-coding exons. Here, we also identify such AS events in human and use these two sets to analyse their features, regulation, functional impact, and evolutionary origin. As these events involve introns with features of both introns and protein-coding exons, we name them exitrons (exonic introns). Though exitrons were detected as a subset of retained introns, they are clearly distinguishable, and their splicing results in transcripts with different fates. About half of the 1002 Arabidopsis and 923 human exitrons have sizes of multiples of 3 nucleotides (nt). Splicing of these exitrons results in internally deleted proteins and affects protein domains, disordered regions, and various post-translational modification sites, thus broadly impacting protein function. Exitron splicing is regulated across tissues, in response to stress and in carcinogenesis. Intriguingly, annotated intronless genes can be also alternatively spliced via exitron usage. We demonstrate that at least some exitrons originate from ancestral coding exons. Based on our findings, we propose a "splicing memory" hypothesis whereby upon intron loss imprints of former exon borders defined by vestigial splicing regulatory elements could drive the evolution of exitron splicing. Altogether, our studies show that exitron splicing is a conserved strategy for increasing proteome plasticity in plants and animals, complementing the repertoire of AS events. © 2015 Marquez et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  11. Fine-scale variation and genetic determinants of alternative splicing across individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin Coulombe-Huntington

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently, thanks to the increasing throughput of new technologies, we have begun to explore the full extent of alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS in the human transcriptome. This is unveiling a vast layer of complexity in isoform-level expression differences between individuals. We used previously published splicing sensitive microarray data from lymphoblastoid cell lines to conduct an in-depth analysis on splicing efficiency of known and predicted exons. By combining publicly available AS annotation with a novel algorithm designed to search for AS, we show that many real AS events can be detected within the usually unexploited, speculative majority of the array and at significance levels much below standard multiple-testing thresholds, demonstrating that the extent of cis-regulated differential splicing between individuals is potentially far greater than previously reported. Specifically, many genes show subtle but significant genetically controlled differences in splice-site usage. PCR validation shows that 42 out of 58 (72% candidate gene regions undergo detectable AS, amounting to the largest scale validation of isoform eQTLs to date. Targeted sequencing revealed a likely causative SNP in most validated cases. In all 17 incidences where a SNP affected a splice-site region, in silico splice-site strength modeling correctly predicted the direction of the micro-array and PCR results. In 13 other cases, we identified likely causative SNPs disrupting predicted splicing enhancers. Using Fst and REHH analysis, we uncovered significant evidence that 2 putative causative SNPs have undergone recent positive selection. We verified the effect of five SNPs using in vivo minigene assays. This study shows that splicing differences between individuals, including quantitative differences in isoform ratios, are frequent in human populations and that causative SNPs can be identified using in silico predictions. Several cases affected disease-relevant genes and

  12. Diffusion MR imaging with PSIF and SPLICE. Experiences in phantom studies and the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchikoshi, Masato; Ueda, Takashi; Kaji, Yasushi

    2001-01-01

    Studies have shown that diffusion MR imaging is a reliable method for the diagnosis of central nervous system diseases, especially acute cerebral infarction. Although echo planar imaging (EPI) is a promising tool for that purpose, it is vulnerable to susceptibility artifacts that are responsible for image distortion or signal loss. Our purpose in this study was to evaluate the usefulness of diffusion MR imaging with PSIF (reversed fast imaging SSFP) and split acquisition of fast-spin-echo signals for diffusion imaging (SPLICE) in the central nervous system (CNS). First, PSIF and SPLICE were applied to the phantoms. Each phantom, including acetone, acetic acid, and water, was analyzed for apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) based on SPLICE and for diffusion-related coefficient (DRC) based on PSIF. The ADCs based on SPLICE were 4.36±0.89 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec, 1.25±0.04 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec, and 2.35±0.04 x 10 -3 mm 2 /sec, and the DRCs based on PSIF were 0.353±0.25, 0.178±0.07, and 0.273±0.018 for acetone, acetic acid, and water, respectively. These calculated ADCs based on SPLICE were well correlated with known diffusion coefficients, showing a correlation coefficient of 0.995. Second, PSIF and SPLICE were applied to the CNS. The advantage of PSIF and SPLICE was that susceptibility artifacts were reduced in the images of spinal cord and brain stem. PSIF was especially useful for diffusion MR imaging in the spinal cord. The disadvantage of SPLICE was the decreased SN ratio. We conclude that PSIF or SPLICE may be helpful when EPI diffusion MR imaging is insufficient. (author)

  13. Alternative Splicing Regulated by Butyrate in Bovine Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sitao; Li, Congjun; Huang, Wen; Li, Weizhong; Li, Robert W.

    2012-01-01

    As a signaling molecule and an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs), butyrate exerts its impact on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. This study examined the effect of butyrate on alternative splicing in bovine epithelial cells using RNA-seq technology. Junction reads account for 11.28 and 12.32% of total mapped reads between the butyrate-treated (BT) and control (CT) groups. 201,326 potential splicing junctions detected were supported by ≥3 junction reads. Approximately 94% of these junctions conformed to the consensus sequence (GT/AG) while ∼3% were GC/AG junctions. No AT/AC junctions were observed. A total of 2,834 exon skipping events, supported by a minimum of 3 junction reads, were detected. At least 7 genes, their mRNA expression significantly affected by butyrate, also had exon skipping events differentially regulated by butyrate. Furthermore, COL5A3, which was induced 310-fold by butyrate (FDR butyrate were detected. For example, Isoform 1 of ORC1 was strongly repressed by butyrate while Isoform 2 remained unchanged. Butyrate physically binds to and inhibits all zinc-dependent HDACs except HDAC6 and HDAC10. Our results provided evidence that butyrate also regulated deacetylase activities of classical HDACs via its transcriptional control. Moreover, thirteen gene fusion events differentially affected by butyrate were identified. Our results provided a snapshot into complex transcriptome dynamics regulated by butyrate, which will facilitate our understanding of the biological effects of butyrate and other HDAC inhibitors. PMID:22720068

  14. Discovery of a Splicing Regulator Required for Cell Cycle Progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suvorova, Elena S.; Croken, Matthew; Kratzer, Stella; Ting, Li-Min; Conde de Felipe, Magnolia; Balu, Bharath; Markillie, Lye Meng; Weiss, Louis M.; Kim, Kami; White, Michael W.

    2013-02-01

    In the G1 phase of the cell division cycle, eukaryotic cells prepare many of the resources necessary for a new round of growth including renewal of the transcriptional and protein synthetic capacities and building the machinery for chromosome replication. The function of G1 has an early evolutionary origin and is preserved in single and multicellular organisms, although the regulatory mechanisms conducting G1 specific functions are only understood in a few model eukaryotes. Here we describe a new G1 mutant from an ancient family of apicomplexan protozoans. Toxoplasma gondii temperature-sensitive mutant 12-109C6 conditionally arrests in the G1 phase due to a single point mutation in a novel protein containing a single RNA-recognition-motif (TgRRM1). The resulting tyrosine to asparagine amino acid change in TgRRM1 causes severe temperature instability that generates an effective null phenotype for this protein when the mutant is shifted to the restrictive temperature. Orthologs of TgRRM1 are widely conserved in diverse eukaryote lineages, and the human counterpart (RBM42) can functionally replace the missing Toxoplasma factor. Transcriptome studies demonstrate that gene expression is downregulated in the mutant at the restrictive temperature due to a severe defect in splicing that affects both cell cycle and constitutively expressed mRNAs. The interaction of TgRRM1 with factors of the tri-SNP complex (U4/U6 & U5 snRNPs) indicate this factor may be required to assemble an active spliceosome. Thus, the TgRRM1 family of proteins is an unrecognized and evolutionarily conserved class of splicing regulators. This study demonstrates investigations into diverse unicellular eukaryotes, like the Apicomplexa, have the potential to yield new insights into important mechanisms conserved across modern eukaryotic kingdoms.

  15. Splicing factor 1 modulates dietary restriction and TORC1 pathway longevity in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heintz, Caroline; Doktor, Thomas K; Lanjuin, Anne

    2017-01-01

    via splicing factor 1 (SFA-1; the C. elegans homologue of SF1, also known as branchpoint binding protein, BBP). We show that SFA-1 is specifically required for lifespan extension by dietary restriction and by modulation of the TORC1 pathway components AMPK, RAGA-1 and RSKS-1/S6 kinase. We also...... homeostasis is a biomarker and predictor of life expectancy in Caenorhabditis elegans. Using transcriptomics and in-depth splicing analysis in young and old animals fed ad libitum or subjected to dietary restriction, we find defects in global pre-mRNA splicing with age that are reduced by dietary restriction...

  16. A maturase-encoding group IIA intron of yeast mitochondria self-splices in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Hebbar, S K; Belcher, S M; Perlman, P S

    1992-01-01

    Intron 1 of the coxI gene of yeast mitochondrial DNA (aI1) is a group IIA intron that encodes a maturase function required for its splicing in vivo. It is shown here to self-splice in vitro under some reaction conditions reported earlier to yield efficient self-splicing of group IIB introns of yeast mtDNA that do not encode maturase functions. Unlike the group IIB introns, aI1 is inactive in 10 mM Mg2+ (including spermidine) and requires much higher levels of Mg2+ and added salts (1M NH4Cl or...

  17. Splice variants of the forkhead box protein AFX exhibit dominant negative activity and inhibit AFXalpha-mediated tumor cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jig Lee

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function in the apoptosis-inducing genes is known to facilitate tumorigenesis. AFX (FOXO4, a member of forkhead transcription factors functions as a tumor suppressor and has 2 isoforms, AFXalpha (505 a.a. and AFXzeta (450 a.a.. In human cancer cells, we identified an N-terminally deleted form of AFXalpha (alpha198-505, translated from a downstream start and 2 short N-terminal AFX proteins (90, and 101 a.a. produced by aberrant splicing.We investigated the expression and role of these AFX variants. Cell transduction study revealed that short N-terminal AFX proteins were not stable. Though alpha(198-505 protein expression was detected in the cytoplasm and nucleus, alpha(198-505 expressing cells did not show a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling mediated by PI3 kinase signaling. Whereas, we observed this shuttling in cells expressing either AFXalpha or AFXzeta protein. AFXzeta and alpha(198-505 lost the ability to transactivate BCL6 or suppress cyclin D2 gene expression. These variants did not induce cancer cell death whereas AFXalpha resulted in apoptosis. We found that AFXzeta and alpha(198-505 suppress the AFXalpha stimulation of BCL6 promoter in a dose dependent manner, indicating dominant negative activity. These variants also inhibited AFXalpha induction of apoptosis.Loss of function by aberrant splicing and the dominant negative activity of AFX variants may provide a mechanism for enhanced survival of neoplastic cells.

  18. Photorefractive splicing device with double phase conjugate mirror using Sn2P2S6:Sb crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Yuta; Okamoto, Atsushi; Shimayabu, Kohei; Kojima, Yasunori; Grabar, Alexander A.

    2009-02-01

    We develop a splicing device for photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) based on a double phase conjugate mirror (DPCM) using a novel photorefractive (PR) Sn2P2S6:Sb 1.5% crystal. This PR splicer has many attractive characteristics including modal field compensation and the automatic reconfiguration of the optical path. Utilizing a DPCM as the splicer, our device can adapt to misalignments automatically since the incident beams continuously rewrite an index grating which formed in the crystal. By the implementation of the Sn2P2S6:Sb crystal, the response time for the characteristic of dynamic reconfiguration is improved several-hundred-fold compared with conventional materials, e.g. BaTiO3. We demonstrate that the high angular tolerance is provided using the DPCM with the Sn2P2S6:Sb crystal. When the misalignment of the incident angle is from -7° to 8°, the increment of coupling loss is less than 0.6dB. This is several-ten-fold compared with the fusion splicing. We reveal the dependence of the coupling loss on the position of the incident beams and also the dependence of the energy flow on the propagation distance for the first time with the two-dimensional finite-difference beampropagation method. Using our numerical simulation tool, we can visually investigate the beam propagation property considering the influence of the fanning effect in the Sn2P2S6 crystals.

  19. Novel aberrant splicings caused by a splice site mutation (IVS1a+5g>a) in F7 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qiulan; Wu, Wenman; Fu, Qihua; Wang, Xuefeng; Hu, Yiqun; Wang, Hongli; Wang, Zhenyi

    2005-06-01

    Low FVII coagulant activity (FVII:C 8.2%) and antigen level (FVII:Ag 34.1%) in a 46-year-old Chinese male led to a diagnosis of coagulation factor VII (FVII) deficiency. Compound heterozygous mutations were identified in his F 7 gene:a G to A transition in the 5' donor splice site of intron 1a (IVS1a+5g>a) and a T to G transition at the nucleotide position 10961 in exon 8, resulting in a His to Gln substitution at amino acid residue 348. An analysis of ectopic transcripts of F7 in the leukocytes of the patient reveals that the mutation (IVS1a+5g>a) is associated with two novel aberrant patterns of splicing. The predominant alternative transcript removes exon 2, but retains intron 3, which shifts the reading frame and predicts a premature translation termination at the nucleotide positions 2-4 in intron 3. The minor alternative transcript skips both exon 2 and exon 3 (FVII Delta 2, 3), leading to an in-frame deletion of the propeptide and gamma-carboxylated glutamic acid (Gla) domains of mature FVII protein. In vitro expression studies of the alternative transcript FVII Delta 2,3 by transient transfection of HEK 293 cells with PcDNA 3.1(-) expression vector showed that although the mutant protein could be secreted, no pro-coagulation activity was detected. The coexistence of the two abnormal transcripts and a heterozygous mutation His348Gln, explained the patient's phenotype.

  20. Reactivation of latently infected HIV-1 viral reservoirs and correction of aberrant alternative splicing in the LMNA gene via AMPK activation: Common mechanism of action linking HIV-1 latency and Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finley, Jahahreeh

    2015-09-01

    Although the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART) has proven highly effective in controlling and suppressing HIV-1 replication, the persistence of latent but replication-competent proviruses in a small subset of CD4(+) memory T cells presents significant challenges to viral eradication from infected individuals. Attempts to eliminate latent reservoirs are epitomized by the 'shock and kill' approach, a strategy involving the combinatorial usage of compounds that influence epigenetic modulation and initiation of proviral transcription. However, efficient regulation of viral pre-mRNA splicing through manipulation of host cell splicing machinery is also indispensible for HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, aberrant alternative splicing of the LMNA gene via the usage of a cryptic splice site has been shown to be the cause of most cases of Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS), a rare genetic condition characterized by an accelerated aging phenotype due to the accumulation of a truncated form of lamin A known as progerin. Recent evidence has shown that inhibition of the splicing factors ASF/SF2 (or SRSF1) and SRp55 (or SRSF6) leads to a reduction or an increase in progerin at both the mRNA and protein levels, respectively, thus altering the LMNA pre-mRNA splicing ratio. It is also well-established that during the latter stages of HIV-1 infection, an increase in the production and nuclear export of unspliced viral mRNA is indispensible for efficient HIV-1 replication and that the presence of ASF/SF2 leads to excessive viral pre-mRNA splicing and a reduction of unspliced mRNA, while the presence of SRp55 inhibits viral pre-mRNA splicing and aids in the generation and translation of unspliced HIV-1 mRNAs. The splicing-factor associated protein and putative mitochondrial chaperone p32 has also been shown to inhibit ASF/SF2, increase unspliced HIV-1 viral mRNA, and enhance mitochondrial DNA replication and oxidative phosphorylation. It is our hypothesis that activation of

  1. Alternatively Spliced Methionine Synthase in SH-SY5Y Neuroblastoma Cells: Cobalamin and GSH Dependence and Inhibitory Effects of Neurotoxic Metals and Thimerosal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Waly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The folate and cobalamin (Cbl- dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MS is highly sensitive to oxidation and its activity affects all methylation reactions. Recent studies have revealed alternative splicing of MS mRNA in human brain and patient-derived fibroblasts. Here we show that MS mRNA in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells is alternatively spliced, resulting in three primary protein species, thus providing a useful model to examine cofactor dependence of these variant enzymes. MS activity was dependent upon methylcobalamin (MeCbl or the combination of hydroxocobalamin (OHCbl and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM. OHCbl-based activity was eliminated by depletion of the antioxidant glutathione (GSH but could be rescued by provision of either glutathionylcobalamin (GSCbl or MeCbl. Pretreatment of cells with lead, arsenic, aluminum, mercury, or the ethylmercury-containing preservative thimerosal lowered GSH levels and inhibited MS activity in association with decreased uptake of cysteine, which is rate-limiting for GSH synthesis. Thimerosal treatment decreased cellular levels of GSCbl and MeCbl. These findings indicate that the alternatively spliced form of MS expressed in SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells is sensitive to inhibition by thimerosal and neurotoxic metals, and lower GSH levels contribute to their inhibitory action.

  2. G-quadruplex structure at intron 2 of TFE3 and its role in Xp11.2 translocation and splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Shiv Prakash; Das, Parimal

    2018-03-01

    Transcription Factor E3 (TFE3) translocation is found in a group of different type of cancers and most of the translocations are located in the 5' region of TFE3 which may be considered as Breakpoint Region (BR). In our In silico study by QGRS mapper and non BdB web servers we found a Potential G-quadruplex forming Sequence (PQS) in the intron 2 of TFE3 gene. In vitro G-quadruplex formation was shown by native PAGE in presence of Pyridostatin(PDS), which with inter molecular secondary structure caused reduced mobility to migrate slower. G-quadruplex formation was mapped at single base resolution by Sanger sequencing and Circular Dichroism showed the formation of parallel G-quadruplex. FRET analysis revealed increased and decreased formation of G-quadruplex in presence of PDS and antisense oligonucleotide respectively. PCR stop assay, transcriptional and translational inhibition by PQS showed stable G-quadruplex formation affecting the biological processes. TFE3 minigene splicing study showed the involvement of this G-quadruplex in TFE3 splicing too. Therefore, G-quadruplex is evident to be the reason behind TFE3 induced oncogenesis executed by translocation and also involved in the mRNA splicing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Cytoplasmic viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase disrupts the intracellular splicing machinery by entering the nucleus and interfering with Prp8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chin Liu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary role of cytoplasmic viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp is viral genome replication in the cellular cytoplasm. However, picornaviral RdRp denoted 3D polymerase (3D(pol also enters the host nucleus, where its function remains unclear. In this study, we describe a novel mechanism of viral attack in which 3D(pol enters the nucleus through the nuclear localization signal (NLS and targets the pre-mRNA processing factor 8 (Prp8 to block pre-mRNA splicing and mRNA synthesis. The fingers domain of 3D(pol associates with the C-terminal region of Prp8, which contains the Jab1/MPN domain, and interferes in the second catalytic step, resulting in the accumulation of the lariat form of the splicing intermediate. Endogenous pre-mRNAs trapped by the Prp8-3D(pol complex in enterovirus-infected cells were identified and classed into groups associated with cell growth, proliferation, and differentiation. Our results suggest that picornaviral RdRp disrupts pre-mRNA splicing processes, that differs from viral protease shutting off cellular transcription and translation which contributes to the pathogenesis of viral infection.

  4. Proof that dinoflagellate spliced leader (DinoSL) is a useful hook for fishing dinoflagellate transcripts from mixed microbial samples: Symbiodinium kawagutii as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huan; Zhuang, Yunyun; Gill, John; Lin, Senjie

    2013-07-01

    The ability to analyze dinoflagellate lineage-specific transcriptomes in the natural environment would be powerful for gaining understanding on how these organisms thrive in diverse environments and how they form harmful algal blooms and produce biotoxins. This can be made possible by lineage-specific mRNA markers such as the dinoflagellate-specific trans-spliced leader (DinoSL). By constructing and sequencing a 5'-cap selective full-length cDNA library for a monoculture of the coral reef endosymbiotic dinoflagellate Symbiodinium kawagutii and a DinoSL-based cDNA library for a mixture of S. kawagutii and other phytoplankton, we found DinoSL in essentially all full-length cDNAs in the 5'-cap selective library. We also discovered that the DinoSL-based library contained functionally diverse transcripts all belonging to dinoflagellates with no evidence of biases toward certain groups of functional genes. The results verified that DinoSL is specific to dinoflagellate mRNAs and is ubiquitous in the dinoflagellate transcriptomes. Annotation of the unigene dataset generated from the two libraries combined indicated high functional diversity of the transcriptome and revealed some biochemical pathways previously undocumented in Symbiodinium such as an mRNA splicing machinery potentially serving both cis- and trans-splicing. The protocol will be useful for transcriptomic studies of Symbiodinium in hospite and other dinoflagellates in natural environments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Sxl-Dependent, tra/tra2-Independent Alternative Splicing of the Drosophila melanogaster X-Linked Gene found in neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xia; Yang, Haiwang; Sturgill, David; Oliver, Brian; Rabinow, Leonard; Samson, Marie-Laure

    2015-01-01

    Somatic sexual determination and behavior in Drosophila melanogaster are under the control of a genetic cascade initiated by Sex lethal (Sxl). In the female soma, SXL RNA-binding protein regulates the splicing of transformer (tra) transcripts into a female-specific form. The RNA-binding protein TRA and its cofactor TRA2 function in concert in females, whereas SXL, TRA, and TRA2 are thought to not function in males. To better understand sex-specific regulation of gene expression, we analyzed male and female head transcriptome datasets for expression levels and splicing, quantifying sex-biased gene expression via RNA-Seq and qPCR. Our data uncouple the effects of Sxl and tra/tra2 in females in the-sex-biased alternative splicing of head transcripts from the X-linked locus found in neurons (fne), encoding a pan-neuronal RNA-binding protein of the ELAV family. We show that FNE protein levels are downregulated by Sxl in female heads, also independently of tra/tra2. We argue that this regulation may have important sexually dimorphic consequences for the regulation of nervous system development or function. PMID:26511498

  6. Over-expression of SR-cyclophilin, an interaction partner of nuclear pinin, releases SR family splicing factors from nuclear speckles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.-L.; Leu, Steve; Lu, M.-C.; Ouyang Pin

    2004-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing takes place within a dynamic ribonucleoprotein particle called the spliceosome and occurs in an ordered pathway. Although it is known that spliceosome consists of five small nuclear RNAs and at least 50 proteins, little is known about how the interaction among the proteins changes during splicing. Here we identify that SR-cyp, a Moca family of nuclear cyclophilin, interacts and colocalizes with nuclear pinin (pnn), a SR-related protein involving in pre-mRNA splicing. Nuclear pnn interacts with SR-cyp via its C-terminal RS domain. Upon SR-cyp over-expression, however, the subnuclear distribution of nuclear pnn is altered, resulting in its redistribution from nuclear speckles to a diffuse nucleoplasmic form. The diffuse subnuclear distribution of nuclear pnn is not due to epitope masking, accelerated protein turnover or post-translational modification. Furthermore, we find that SR-cyp regulates the subnuclear distribution of other SR family proteins, including SC35 and SRm300, in a similar manner as it does on nuclear pnn. This result is significant because it suggests that SR-cyp plays a general role in modulating the distribution pattern of SR-like and SR proteins, similar to that of Clk (cdc2-like kinase)/STY on SR family splicing factors. SR-cyp might direct its effect via either alteration of protein folding/conformation or of protein-protein interaction and thus may add another control level of regulation of SR family proteins and modification of their functions

  7. Influenza A Virus Utilizes Suboptimal Splicing to Coordinate the Timing of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Chua

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus is unique as an RNA virus in that it replicates in the nucleus and undergoes splicing. With only ten major proteins, the virus must gain nuclear access, replicate, assemble progeny virions in the cytoplasm, and then egress. In an effort to elucidate the coordination of these events, we manipulated the transcript levels from the bicistronic nonstructural segment that encodes the spliced virus product responsible for genomic nuclear export. We find that utilization of an erroneous splice site ensures the slow accumulation of the viral nuclear export protein (NEP while generating excessive levels of an antagonist that inhibits the cellular response to infection. Modulation of this simple transcriptional event results in improperly timed export and loss of virus infection. Together, these data demonstrate that coordination of the influenza A virus life cycle is set by a “molecular timer” that operates on the inefficient splicing of a virus transcript.

  8. RBM20 and RBM24 cooperatively promote the expression of short enh splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Jumpei; Iijima, Masumi; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Niimi, Tomoaki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi; Maturana, Andrés D

    2016-07-01

    PDZ-LIM protein ENH1 is a scaffold protein for protein kinases and transcriptional regulators. While ENH1 promotes the hypertrophic growth of cardiomyocytes, its short splice variant (ENH3) prevents the hypertrophic growth. The mechanism underlying the alternative splicing of enh mRNA between ENH short and long isoforms has remained unknown. Here, we found that two splicing factors, RNA-binding motif 20 (RBM20) and RNA-binding motif 24 (RBM24) together promoted the expression of short enh splice variants and bound the 5' intronic region of exon 11 containing an in-phase stop codon. In addition, expression of both RBMs is repressed by hypertrophic stimulations. Collectively, our results suggest that, in healthy conditions, RBM20 and RBM24 cooperate to promote the expression of short ENH isoforms. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. The Integrity of ACSR Full Tension Single-Stage Splice Connector at Higher Operation Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; King Jr, Thomas J [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    Due to increases in power demand and limited investment in new infrastructure, existing overhead power transmission lines often need to operate at temperatures higher than those used for the original design criteria. This has led to the accelerated aging and degradation of splice connectors. It is manifested by the formation of hot-spots that have been revealed by infrared imaging during inspection. The implications of connector aging is two-fold: (1) significant increases in resistivity of the splice connector (i.e., less efficient transmission of electricity) and (2) significant reductions in the connector clamping strength, which could ultimately result in separation of the power transmission line at the joint. Therefore, the splice connector appears to be the weakest link in electric power transmission lines. This report presents a protocol for integrating analytical and experimental approaches to evaluate the integrity of full tension single-stage splice connector assemblies and the associated effective lifetime at high operating temperature.

  10. Rbfox proteins regulate tissue-specific alternative splicing of Mef2D required for muscle differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runfola, Valeria; Sebastian, Soji; Dilworth, F Jeffrey; Gabellini, Davide

    2015-02-15

    Among the Mef2 family of transcription factors, Mef2D is unique in that it undergoes tissue-specific splicing to generate an isoform that is essential for muscle differentiation. However, the mechanisms mediating this muscle-specific processing of Mef2D remain unknown. Using bioinformatics, we identified Rbfox proteins as putative modulators of Mef2D muscle-specific splicing. Accordingly, we found direct and specific Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 binding to Mef2D pre-mRNA in vivo. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments demonstrated that Rbfox1 and Rbfox2 cooperate in promoting Mef2D splicing and subsequent myogenesis. Thus, our findings reveal a new role for Rbfox proteins in regulating myogenesis through activation of essential muscle-specific splicing events. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. The Role of the Polypyrimidine Tract Binding Protein on CD44 Alternative Splicing in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wagner, Eric

    2001-01-01

    ... of changes seen in breast cancer cells during tumor progression. Thus far, a strong connection between the splicing machinery and these subtle, yet significant, changes in gene expression has yet to be documented...

  12. Clinical Significance of HER-2 Splice Variants in Breast Cancer Progression and Drug Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Jackson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER-2 occurs in 20–30% of breast cancers and confers survival and proliferative advantages on the tumour cells making HER-2 an ideal therapeutic target for drugs like Herceptin. Continued delineation of tumour biology has identified splice variants of HER-2, with contrasting roles in tumour cell biology. For example, the splice variant 16HER-2 (results from exon 16 skipping increases transformation of cancer cells and is associated with treatment resistance; conversely, Herstatin (results from intron 8 retention and p100 (results from intron 15 retention inhibit tumour cell proliferation. This review focuses on the potential clinical implications of the expression and coexistence of HER-2 splice variants in cancer cells in relation to breast cancer progression and drug resistance. “Individualised” strategies currently guide breast cancer management; in accordance, HER-2 splice variants may prove valuable as future prognostic and predictive factors, as well as potential therapeutic targets.

  13. Splice performance evaluation of enamel-coated rebar for structural safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    This report summarizes the findings and results from an experimental study of vitreous enamel coating effects on the bond : strength between deformed rebar and normal strength concrete. A total of 24 beam splice specimens were tested under four-point...

  14. Roles of viral and cellular proteins in the expression of alternatively spliced HTLV-1 pX mRNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Princler, Gerald L.; Julias, John G.; Hughes, Stephen H.; Derse, David

    2003-01-01

    The human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) genome contains a cluster of at least five open reading frames (ORFs) near the 3' terminus within the pX region. The pX ORFs are encoded by mono- or bicistronic mRNAs that are generated by alternative splicing. The various pX mRNAs result from skipping of the internal exon (2-exon versus 3-exon isofoms) or from the utilization of alternative splice acceptor sites in the terminal exon. The Rex and Tax proteins, encoded by ORFs X-III and X-IV, have been studied intensively and are encoded by the most abundant of the alternative 3-exon mRNAs. The protein products of the other pX ORFs have not been detected in HTLV-1-infected cell lines and the levels of the corresponding mRNAs have not been accurately established. We have used real-time RT-PCR with splice-site specific primers to accurately measure the levels of individual pX mRNA species in chronically infected T cell lines. We have asked whether virus regulatory proteins or ectopic expression of cellular factors influence pX mRNA splicing in cells that were transfected with HTLV-1 provirus clones. In chronically infected cell lines, the pX-tax/rex mRNA was present at 500- to 2500-fold higher levels than the pX-tax-orfII mRNA and at approximately 1000-fold higher levels than pX-rex-orfI mRNA. Chronically infected cell lines that contain numerous defective proviruses expressed 2-exon forms of pX mRNAs at significantly higher levels compared to cell lines that contain a single full-length provirus. Cells transfected with provirus expression plasmids expressed similar relative amounts of 3-exon pX mRNAs but lower levels of 2-exon mRNA forms compared to cells containing a single, full-length provirus. The pX mRNA expression patterns were nearly identical in cells transfected with wild-type, Tax-minus, or Rex-minus proviruses. Cotransfection of cells with HTLV-1 provirus in combination with SF2/ASF expression plasmid resulted in a relative increase in pX-tax/rex m

  15. Roles of viral and cellular proteins in the expression of alternatively spliced HTLV-1 pX mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Princler, Gerald L; Julias, John G; Hughes, Stephen H; Derse, David

    2003-12-05

    The human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) genome contains a cluster of at least five open reading frames (ORFs) near the 3' terminus within the pX region. The pX ORFs are encoded by mono- or bicistronic mRNAs that are generated by alternative splicing. The various pX mRNAs result from skipping of the internal exon (2-exon versus 3-exon isofoms) or from the utilization of alternative splice acceptor sites in the terminal exon. The Rex and Tax proteins, encoded by ORFs X-III and X-IV, have been studied intensively and are encoded by the most abundant of the alternative 3-exon mRNAs. The protein products of the other pX ORFs have not been detected in HTLV-1-infected cell lines and the levels of the corresponding mRNAs have not been accurately established. We have used real-time RT-PCR with splice-site specific primers to accurately measure the levels of individual pX mRNA species in chronically infected T cell lines. We have asked whether virus regulatory proteins or ectopic expression of cellular factors influence pX mRNA splicing in cells that were transfected with HTLV-1 provirus clones. In chronically infected cell lines, the pX-tax/rex mRNA was present at 500- to 2500-fold higher levels than the pX-tax-orfII mRNA and at approximately 1000-fold higher levels than pX-rex-orfI mRNA. Chronically infected cell lines that contain numerous defective proviruses expressed 2-exon forms of pX mRNAs at significantly higher levels compared to cell lines that contain a single full-length provirus. Cells transfected with provirus expression plasmids expressed similar relative amounts of 3-exon pX mRNAs but lower levels of 2-exon mRNA forms compared to cells containing a single, full-length provirus. The pX mRNA expression patterns were nearly identical in cells transfected with wild-type, Tax-minus, or Rex-minus proviruses. Cotransfection of cells with HTLV-1 provirus in combination with SF2/ASF expression plasmid resulted in a relative increase in pX-tax/rex m

  16. Spliceman2: a computational web server that predicts defects in pre-mRNA splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygan, Kamil Jan; Sanford, Clayton Hendrick; Fairbrother, William Guy

    2017-09-15

    Most pre-mRNA transcripts in eukaryotic cells must undergo splicing to remove introns and join exons, and splicing elements present a large mutational target for disease-causing mutations. Splicing elements are strongly position dependent with respect to the transcript annotations. In 2012, we presented Spliceman, an online tool that used positional dependence to predict how likely distant mutations around annotated splice sites were to disrupt splicing. Here, we present an improved version of the previous tool that will be more useful for predicting the likelihood of splicing mutations. We have added industry-standard input options (i.e. Spliceman now accepts variant call format files), which allow much larger inputs than previously available. The tool also can visualize the locations-within exons and introns-of sequence variants to be analyzed and the predicted effects on splicing of the pre-mRNA transcript. In addition, Spliceman2 integrates with RNAcompete motif libraries to provide a prediction of which trans -acting factors binding sites are disrupted/created and links out to the UCSC genome browser. In summary, the new features in Spliceman2 will allow scientists and physicians to better understand the effects of single nucleotide variations on splicing. Freely available on the web at http://fairbrother.biomed.brown.edu/spliceman2 . Website implemented in PHP framework-Laravel 5, PostgreSQL, Apache, and Perl, with all major browsers supported. william_fairbrother@brown.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Automated Eukaryotic Gene Structure Annotation Using EVidenceModeler and the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, B J; Salzberg, S L; Zhu, W; Pertea, M; Allen, J E; Orvis, J; White, O; Buell, C R; Wortman, J R

    2007-12-10

    EVidenceModeler (EVM) is presented as an automated eukaryotic gene structure annotation tool that reports eukaryotic gene structures as a weighted consensus of all available evidence. EVM, when combined with the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA), yields a comprehensive, configurable annotation system that predicts protein-coding genes and alternatively spliced isoforms. Our experiments on both rice and human genome sequences demonstrate that EVM produces automated gene structure annotation approaching the quality of manual curation.

  18. Osteopontin splice variants are differential predictors of breast cancer treatment responses

    OpenAIRE

    Zduniak, Krzysztof; Agrawal, Anil; Agrawal, Siddarth; Hossain, Md Monir; Ziolkowski, Piotr; Weber, Georg F.

    2016-01-01

    Background Osteopontin is a marker for breast cancer progression, which in previous studies has also been associated with resistance to certain anti-cancer therapies. It is not known which splice variants may mediate treatment resistance. Methods Here we analyze the association of osteopontin variant expression before treatment, differentiated according to immunohistochemistry with antibodies to exon 4 and to the osteopontin-c splice junction respectively, with the ensuing therapy responses i...

  19. Temperature induced alternative splicing is affected in sdg8 and sdg26

    OpenAIRE

    Pajoro, A.; Severing, E.I.; Immink, G.H.

    2017-01-01

    Plants developed a plasticity to environmental conditions, such as temperature, that allows their adaptation. A change in ambient temperature leads to changes in the transcriptome in plants, such as the production of different splicing isoforms. Here we study temperature induced alternative splicing events in Arabidopsis thaliana wild-type and two epigenetic mutants, sdg8-2 and sdg26-1 using an RNA-seq approach.

  20. The influence of calcium signaling on the regulation of alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Joachim

    2009-06-01

    In this review the influence of calcium signaling on the regulation of alternative splicing is discussed with respect to its influence on cell- and developmental-specific expression of different isoforms of the plasma membrane calcium pump (PMCA). In a second part the possibility is discussed that due to the interaction of the calcium-binding protein ALG-2 with a spliceosomal regulator of alternative splicing, RBM22, Ca2+-signaling may thus influence its regulatory property.

  1. Genome-wide survey of cold stress regulated alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with tiling microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noam Leviatan

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression.

  2. Genome-wide survey of cold stress regulated alternative splicing in Arabidopsis thaliana with tiling microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leviatan, Noam; Alkan, Noam; Leshkowitz, Dena; Fluhr, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Alternative splicing plays a major role in expanding the potential informational content of eukaryotic genomes. It is an important post-transcriptional regulatory mechanism that can increase protein diversity and affect mRNA stability. Alternative splicing is often regulated in a tissue-specific and stress-responsive manner. Cold stress, which adversely affects plant growth and development, regulates the transcription and splicing of plant splicing factors. This can affect the pre-mRNA processing of many genes. To identify cold regulated alternative splicing we applied Affymetrix Arabidopsis tiling arrays to survey the transcriptome under cold treatment conditions. A novel algorithm was used for detection of statistically relevant changes in intron expression within a transcript between control and cold growth conditions. A reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of a number of randomly selected genes confirmed the changes in splicing patterns under cold stress predicted by tiling array. Our analysis revealed new types of cold responsive genes. While their expression level remains relatively unchanged under cold stress their splicing pattern shows detectable changes in the relative abundance of isoforms. The majority of cold regulated alternative splicing introduced a premature termination codon (PTC) into the transcripts creating potential targets for degradation by the nonsense mediated mRNA decay (NMD) process. A number of these genes were analyzed in NMD-defective mutants by RT-PCR and shown to evade NMD. This may result in new and truncated proteins with altered functions or dominant negative effects. The results indicate that cold affects both quantitative and qualitative aspects of gene expression.

  3. Group-II intron splicing factors in higher-plants mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory G. Brown

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Group-II introns are large catalytic RNAs (ribozymes which are found in bacteria and organellar genomes of several lower eukaryotes, but are particularly prevalent within the mitochondrial genomes (mtDNA in plants, where they reside in numerous critical genes. Their excision is therefore essential for mitochondria biogenesis and respiratory functions, and is facilitated in vivo by various protein cofactors. Typical group-II introns are classified as mobile genetic elements, consisting of the self-splicing ribozyme and its intron-encoded maturase protein. A hallmark of maturases is that they are intron specific, acting as cofactors which bind their own cognate containing pre-mRNAs to facilitate splicing. However, the plant organellar introns have diverged considerably from their bacterial ancestors, such as they lack many regions which are necessary for splicing and also lost their evolutionary related maturase ORFs. In fact, only a single maturase has retained in the mtDNA of angiosperms: matR encoded in the fourth intron of the NADH-dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1 intron 4. Their degeneracy and the absence of cognate ORFs suggest that the splicing of plant mitochondria introns is assisted by trans-acting cofactors. Interestingly, in addition to MatR, the nuclear genomes of angiosperms also harbor four genes (nMat 1-4, which are closely related to maturases and contain N-terminal mitochondrial localization signals. Recently, we established the roles of two of these paralogs in Arabidopsis, nMAT1 and nMAT2, in the splicing of mitochondrial introns. In addition to the nMATs, genetic screens led to the identification of other genes encoding various factors, which are required for the splicing and processing of mitochondrial introns in plants. In this review we will summarize recent data on the splicing and processing of mitochondrial introns and their implication in plant development and physiology, with a focus on maturases and their accessory

  4. Modulation of splicing of the preceding intron by antisense oligonucleotide complementary to intra-exon sequence deleted in dystrophin Kobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeshima, Y.; Matuso, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Nishio, H. [Kobe Univ. School of Medicine and Science (Japan)

    1994-09-01

    Molecular analysis of dystrophin Kobe showed that exon 19 of the dystrophin gene bearing a 52 bp deletion was skipped during splicing, although the known consensus sequences at the 5{prime} and 3{prime} splice site of exon 19 were maintained. These data suggest that the deleted sequence of exon 19 may function as a cis-acting factor for exact splicing for the upstream intron. To investigate this potential role, an in vitro splicing system using dystrophin precursors was established. A two-exon precursor containing exon 18, truncated intron 18, and exon 19 was accurately spliced. However, splicing of intron 18 was dramatically inhibited when wild exon 19 was replaced with mutated exon 19. Even though the length of exon 19 was restored to normal by replacing the deleted sequence with other sequence, splicing of intron 18 was not fully reactivated. Characteristically, splicing of intron 18 was inactivated more markedly when the replaced sequence contained less polypurine stretches. These data suggested that modification of the exon sequence would result in a splicing abnormality. Antisense 31 mer 2`-O-methyl ribonucleotide was targeted against 5{prime} end of deleted region of exon 19 to modulate splicing of the mRNA precursor. Splicing of intron 18 was inhibited in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This is the first in vitro evidence to show splicing of dystrophin pre-mRNA can be managed by antisense oligonucleotides. These experiments represent an approach in which antisense oligonucleotides are used to restore the function of a defective dystrophin gene in Duchenne muscular dystrophy by inducing skipping of certain exons during splicing.

  5. Manufacturing processes 4 forming

    CERN Document Server

    Klocke, Fritz

    2013-01-01

    This book provides essential information on metal forming, utilizing a practical distinction between bulk and sheet metal forming. In the field of bulk forming, it examines processes of cold, warm and hot bulk forming, as well as rolling and a new addition, the process of thixoforming. As for the field of sheet metal working, on the one hand it deals with sheet metal forming processes (deep drawing, flange forming, stretch drawing, metal spinning and bending). In terms of special processes, the chapters on internal high-pressure forming and high rate forming have been revised and refined. On the other, the book elucidates and presents the state of the art in sheet metal separation processes (shearing and fineblanking). Furthermore, joining by forming has been added to the new edition as a new chapter describing mechanical methods for joining sheet metals. The new chapter “Basic Principles” addresses both sheet metal and bulk forming, in addition to metal physics, plastomechanics and computational basics; ...

  6. Pre-mRNA splicing is a determinant of histone H3K36 methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Soojin; Kim, Hyunmin; Fong, Nova; Erickson, Benjamin; Bentley, David L

    2011-08-16

    A chromatin code appears to mark introns and exons with distinct patterns of nucleosome enrichment and histone methylation. We investigated whether a causal relationship exists between splicing and chromatin modification by asking whether splice-site mutations affect the methylation of histone H3K36. Deletions of the 3' splice site in intron 2 or in both introns 1 and 2 of an integrated β-globin reporter gene caused a shift in relative distribution of H3K36 trimethylation away from 5' ends and toward 3' ends. The effects of splice-site mutations correlated with enhanced retention of a U5 snRNP subunit on transcription complexes downstream of the gene. In contrast, a poly(A) site mutation did not affect H3K36 methylation. Similarly, global inhibition of splicing by spliceostatin A caused a rapid repositioning of H3K36me3 away from 5' ends in favor of 3' ends. These results suggest that the cotranscriptional splicing apparatus influences establishment of normal patterns of histone modification.

  7. SKIP is a component of the spliceosome linking alternative splicing and the circadian clock in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-08-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5' and 3' splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level.

  8. Histone H3 lysine 36 methylation affects temperature-induced alternative splicing and flowering in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajoro, A; Severing, E; Angenent, G C; Immink, R G H

    2017-06-01

    Global warming severely affects flowering time and reproductive success of plants. Alternative splicing of pre-messenger RNA (mRNA) is an important mechanism underlying ambient temperature-controlled responses in plants, yet its regulation is poorly understood. An increase in temperature promotes changes in plant morphology as well as the transition from the vegetative to the reproductive phase in Arabidopsis thaliana via changes in splicing of key regulatory genes. Here we investigate whether a particular histone modification affects ambient temperature-induced alternative splicing and flowering time. We use a genome-wide approach and perform RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) analyses and histone H3 lysine 36 tri-methylation (H3K36me3) chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) in plants exposed to different ambient temperatures. Analysis and comparison of these datasets reveal that temperature-induced differentially spliced genes are enriched in H3K36me3. Moreover, we find that reduction of H3K36me3 deposition causes alteration in temperature-induced alternative splicing. We also show that plants with mutations in H3K36me3 writers, eraser, or readers have altered high ambient temperature-induced flowering. Our results show a key role for the histone mark H3K36me3 in splicing regulation and plant plasticity to fluctuating ambient temperature. Our findings open new perspectives for the breeding of crops that can better cope with environmental changes due to climate change.

  9. Live-Cell Visualization of Pre-mRNA Splicing with Single-Molecule Sensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Martin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Removal of introns from pre-messenger RNAs (pre-mRNAs via splicing provides a versatile means of genetic regulation that is often disrupted in human diseases. To decipher how splicing occurs in real time, we directly examined with single-molecule sensitivity the kinetics of intron excision from pre-mRNA in the nucleus of living human cells. By using two different RNA labeling methods, MS2 and λN, we show that β-globin introns are transcribed and excised in 20–30 s. Furthermore, we show that replacing the weak polypyrimidine (Py tract in mouse immunoglobulin μ (IgM pre-mRNA by a U-rich Py decreases the intron lifetime, thus providing direct evidence that splice-site strength influences splicing kinetics. We also found that RNA polymerase II transcribes at elongation rates ranging between 3 and 6 kb min−1 and that transcription can be rate limiting for splicing. These results have important implications for a mechanistic understanding of cotranscriptional splicing regulation in the live-cell context.

  10. Antagonistic factors control the unproductive splicing of SC35 terminal intron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreumont, Natacha; Hardy, Sara; Behm-Ansmant, Isabelle; Kister, Liliane; Branlant, Christiane; Stévenin, James; Bourgeois, Cyril F

    2010-03-01

    Alternative splicing is regulated in part by variations in the relative concentrations of a variety of factors, including serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins. The SR protein SC35 self-regulates its expression by stimulating unproductive splicing events in the 3' untranslated region of its own pre-mRNA. Using various minigene constructs containing the terminal retained intron and flanking exons, we identified in the highly conserved last exon a number of exonic splicing enhancer elements responding specifically to SC35, and showed an inverse correlation between affinity of SC35 and enhancer strength. The enhancer region, which is included in a long stem loop, also contains repressor elements, and is recognized by other RNA-binding proteins, notably hnRNP H protein and TAR DNA binding protein (TDP-43). Finally, in vitro and in cellulo experiments indicated that hnRNP H and TDP-43 antagonize the binding of SC35 to the terminal exon and specifically repress the use of SC35 terminal 3' splice site. Our study provides new information about the molecular mechanisms of SC35-mediated splicing activation. It also highlights the existence of a complex network of self- and cross-regulatory mechanisms between splicing regulators, which controls their homeostasis and offers many ways of modulating their concentration in response to the cellular environment.

  11. Detained introns are a novel, widespread class of post-transcriptionally spliced introns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutz, Paul L; Bhutkar, Arjun; Sharp, Phillip A

    2015-01-01

    Deep sequencing of embryonic stem cell RNA revealed many specific internal introns that are significantly more abundant than the other introns within polyadenylated transcripts; we classified these as "detained" introns (DIs). We identified thousands of DIs, many of which are evolutionarily conserved, in human and mouse cell lines as well as the adult mouse liver. DIs can have half-lives of over an hour yet remain in the nucleus and are not subject to nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). Drug inhibition of Clk, a stress-responsive kinase, triggered rapid splicing changes for a specific subset of DIs; half showed increased splicing, and half showed increased intron detention, altering transcript pools of >300 genes. Srsf4, which undergoes a dramatic phosphorylation shift in response to Clk kinase inhibition, regulates the splicing of some DIs, particularly in genes encoding RNA processing and splicing factors. The splicing of some DIs-including those in Mdm4, a negative regulator of p53-was also altered following DNA damage. After 4 h of Clk inhibition, the expression of >400 genes changed significantly, and almost one-third of these are p53 transcriptional targets. These data suggest a widespread mechanism by which the rate of splicing of DIs contributes to the level of gene expression. © 2015 Boutz et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  12. Experimental Investigation for Behavior of Spliced Continuous RC Girders Strengthened with CFRP Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar Yasir Ali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the behavior of spliced continuous reinforced concrete girders was experimentally investigated. The main objective was to examine the contribution of the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP laminates in strengthening the spliced continuous reinforced concrete girders. Eight models of continuous reinforced concrete girder were constructed and tested. The test variables were strengthening the splice joints by different schemes of CFRP laminates, presence of horizontal stirrups through the interfaces of the joints and using binder material at the interfaces of the joints. The results showed that strengthening the continuous spliced girders with 45° inclined CFRP laminates led to an increase in the ultimate load in a range of (47 to 74%. Besides, strengthening the continuous spliced girder with horizontal CFRP laminates bonded at its lateral faces could increase the ultimate load by 70%. Additionally, the ultimate load of the continuous spliced girder was increased by (30% due to presence of the horizontal steel stirrups through the interfaces of the joints

  13. Gene Therapy via Trans-Splicing for LMNA-Related Congenital Muscular Dystrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feriel Azibani

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We assessed the potential of Lmna-mRNA repair by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a therapeutic approach for LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy. This gene therapy strategy leads to reduction of mutated transcript expression for the benefit of corresponding wild-type (WT transcripts. We developed 5′-RNA pre-trans-splicing molecules containing the first five exons of Lmna and targeting intron 5 of Lmna pre-mRNA. Among nine pre-trans-splicing molecules, differing in the targeted sequence in intron 5 and tested in C2C12 myoblasts, three induced trans-splicing events on endogenous Lmna mRNA and confirmed at protein level. Further analyses performed in primary myotubes derived from an LMNA-related congenital muscular dystrophy (L-CMD mouse model led to a partial rescue of the mutant phenotype. Finally, we tested this approach in vivo using adeno-associated virus (AAV delivery in newborn mice and showed that trans-splicing events occurred in WT mice 50 days after AAV delivery, although at a low rate. Altogether, while these results provide the first evidence for reprogramming LMNA mRNA in vitro, strategies to improve the rate of trans-splicing events still need to be developed for efficient application of this therapeutic approach in vivo.

  14. Electrical Resistance of the Solder Connections for the Consolidation of the LHC Main Interconnection Splices

    CERN Document Server

    Lutum, R; Scheuerlein, C

    2013-01-01

    For the consolidation of the LHC 13 kA main interconnection splices, shunts will be soldered onto each of the 10170 splices. The solder alloy selected for this purpose is Sn60Pb40. In this context the electrical resistance of shunt to busbar lap splices has been measured in the temperature range from RT to 20 K. A cryocooler set-up has been adapted such that a test current of 150 A could be injected for accurate resistance measurements in the low nΩ range. To study the influence of the solder bulk resistivity on the overall splice resistance, connections produced with Sn96Ag4 and Sn77.2In20Ag2.8 have been studied as well. The influence of the Sn60Pb40 solder resistance is negligible when measuring the splice resistance in a longitudinal configuration over a length of 6 cm. In a transverse measurement configuration the splice resistance is significantly influenced by the solder. The connections prepared with Sn77.2In20Ag2.8 show significantly higher resistance values, as expected from the relatively high sol...

  15. FUBP1: a new protagonist in splicing regulation of the DMD gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miro, Julie; Laaref, Abdelhamid Mahdi; Rofidal, Valérie; Lagrafeuille, Rosyne; Hem, Sonia; Thorel, Delphine; Méchin, Déborah; Mamchaoui, Kamel; Mouly, Vincent; Claustres, Mireille; Tuffery-Giraud, Sylvie

    2015-02-27

    We investigated the molecular mechanisms for in-frame skipping of DMD exon 39 caused by the nonsense c.5480T>A mutation in a patient with Becker muscular dystrophy. RNase-assisted pull down assay coupled with mass spectrometry revealed that the mutant RNA probe specifically recruits hnRNPA1, hnRNPA2/B1 and DAZAP1. Functional studies in a human myoblast cell line transfected with DMD minigenes confirmed the splicing inhibitory activity of hnRNPA1 and hnRNPA2/B1, and showed that DAZAP1, also known to activate splicing, acts negatively in the context of the mutated exon 39. Furthermore, we uncovered that recognition of endogenous DMD exon 39 in muscle cells is promoted by FUSE binding protein 1 (FUBP1), a multifunctional DNA- and RNA-binding protein whose role in splicing is largely unknown. By serial deletion and mutagenesis studies in minigenes, we delineated a functional intronic splicing enhancer (ISE) in intron 38. FUBP1 recruitment to the RNA sequence containing the ISE was established by RNA pull down and RNA EMSA, and further confirmed by RNA-ChIP on endogenous DMD pre-mRNA. This study provides new insights about the splicing regulation of DMD exon 39, highlighting the emerging role of FUBP1 in splicing and describing the first ISE for constitutive exon inclusion in the mature DMD transcript. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Endogenous Multiple Exon Skipping and Back-Splicing at the DMD Mutation Hotspot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Hitoshi; Aoki, Yoshitsugu; Kameyama, Toshiki; Saito, Takashi; Masuda, Satoru; Tanihata, Jun; Nagata, Tetsuya; Mayeda, Akila; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Tsukahara, Toshifumi

    2016-10-13

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe muscular disorder. It was reported that multiple exon skipping (MES), targeting exon 45-55 of the DMD gene, might improve patients' symptoms because patients who have a genomic deletion of all these exons showed very mild symptoms. Thus, exon 45-55 skipping treatments for DMD have been proposed as a potential clinical cure. Herein, we detected the expression of endogenous exons 44-56 connected mRNA transcript of the DMD using total RNAs derived from human normal skeletal muscle by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and identified a total of eight types of MES products around the hotspot. Surprisingly, the 5' splice sites of recently reported post-transcriptional introns (remaining introns after co-transcriptional splicing) act as splicing donor sites for MESs. We also tested exon combinations to generate DMD circular RNAs (circRNAs) and determined the preferential splice sites of back-splicing, which are involved not only in circRNA generation, but also in MESs. Our results fit the current circRNA-generation model, suggesting that upstream post-transcriptional introns trigger MES and generate circRNA because its existence is critical for the intra-intronic interaction or for extremely distal splicing.

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Modulation of Alternative Splicing by the Biguanide Metformin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Laustriat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Major physiological changes are governed by alternative splicing of RNA, and its misregulation may lead to specific diseases. With the use of a genome-wide approach, we show here that this splicing step can be modified by medication and demonstrate the effects of the biguanide metformin, on alternative splicing. The mechanism of action involves AMPK activation and downregulation of the RBM3 RNA-binding protein. The effects of metformin treatment were tested on myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1, a multisystemic disease considered to be a spliceopathy. We show that this drug promotes a corrective effect on several splicing defects associated with DM1 in derivatives of human embryonic stem cells carrying the causal mutation of DM1 as well as in primary myoblasts derived from patients. The biological effects of metformin were shown to be compatible with typical therapeutic dosages in a clinical investigation involving diabetic patients. The drug appears to act as a modifier of alternative splicing of a subset of genes and may therefore have novel therapeutic potential for many more diseases besides those directly linked to defective alternative splicing.

  18. Benzo[a]pyrene treatment leads to changes in nuclear protein expression and alternative splicing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan Chunlan; Wu Wei [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Li Haiyan [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Huzhou Maternity and Child Care Hospital, Huzhou, Zhejiang 313000 (China); Zhang Guanglin [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Duerksen-Hughes, Penelope J. [Department of Basic Sciences, Loma Linda University School of Medicine, Loma Linda, CA 92354 (United States); Zhu Xinqiang, E-mail: zhuxq@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Yang Jun, E-mail: gastate@zju.edu.cn [Department of Toxicology, Zhejiang University School of Public Health, 388 Yu-Hang-Tang Road, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310029 (China)

    2010-04-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) is a potent pro-carcinogen generated from the combustion of fossil fuel and cigarette smoke. Previously, using a proteomic approach, we have shown that BaP can induce changes in the expression of many cellular proteins, including transcription regulators. In the present study, using a similar approach, we examined the nuclear protein response to BaP in HeLa cells and found that BaP treatment caused expression changes in many nuclear proteins. Twenty-four of these proteins were successfully identified, several of which are involved in the alternative splicing of mRNA, DNA replication, recombination, and repair. The changed expression levels were further confirmed by immunoblot analysis using specific antibodies for two proteins, Lamin A and mitotic checkpoint protein Bub3. The nuclear localization of these two proteins was also confirmed by confocal microscopy. To determine whether alternative splicing was activated following BaP treatment, we examined Fas and CD44, two genes previously shown to be targets of alternative splicing in respond to DNA damage. While no significant activation of alternative splicing was observed for Fas, CD44 splicing variants were found after BaP treatment. Together, these data show that DNA damage induces dramatic changes in nuclear protein expression, and that alternative splicing might be involved in the cellular response to DNA damage.

  19. The evolutionary landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Yimeng; Zhou, Hongxia; Yu, Yao; Chen, Longxian; Hao, Pei; Li, Xuan

    2015-01-01

    To explore the landscape of intergenic trans-splicing events and characterize their functions and evolutionary dynamics, we conduct a mega-data study of a phylogeny containing eight species across five orders of class Insecta, a model system spanning 400 million years of evolution. A total of 1,627 trans-splicing events involving 2,199 genes are identified, accounting for 1.58% of the total genes. Homology analysis reveals that mod(mdg4)-like trans-splicing is the only conserved event that is consistently observed in multiple species across two orders, which represents a unique case of functional diversification involving trans-splicing. Thus, evolutionarily its potential for generating proteins with novel function is not broadly utilized by insects. Furthermore, 146 non-mod trans-spliced transcripts are found to resemble canonical genes from different species. Trans-splicing preserving the function of ‘breakup' genes may serve as a general mechanism for relaxing the constraints on gene structure, with profound implications for the evolution of genes and genomes. PMID:26521696

  20. Computational Analysis of an Evolutionarily Conserved VertebrateMuscle Alternative Splicing Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Debopriya; Clark, Tyson A.; Schweitzer, Anthony; Marr,Henry; Yamamoto, Miki L.; Parra, Marilyn K.; Arribere, Josh; Minovitsky,Simon; Dubchak, Inna; Blume, John E.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-06-15

    A novel exon microarray format that probes gene expression with single exon resolution was employed to elucidate critical features of a vertebrate muscle alternative splicing program. A dataset of 56 microarray-defined, muscle-enriched exons and their flanking introns were examined computationally in order to investigate coordination of the muscle splicing program. Candidate intron regulatory motifs were required to meet several stringent criteria: significant over-representation near muscle-enriched exons, correlation with muscle expression, and phylogenetic conservation among genomes of several vertebrate orders. Three classes of regulatory motifs were identified in the proximal downstream intron, within 200nt of the target exons: UGCAUG, a specific binding site for Fox-1 related splicing factors; ACUAAC, a novel branchpoint-like element; and UG-/UGC-rich elements characteristic of binding sites for CELF splicing factors. UGCAUG was remarkably enriched, being present in nearly one-half of all cases. These studies suggest that Fox and CELF splicing factors play a major role in enforcing the muscle-specific alternative splicing program, facilitating expression of a set of unique isoforms of cytoskeletal proteins that are critical to muscle cell differentiation. Supplementary materials: There are four supplementary tables and one supplementary figure. The tables provide additional detailed information concerning the muscle-enriched datasets, and about over-represented oligonucleotide sequences in the flanking introns. The supplementary figure shows RT-PCR data confirming the muscle-enriched expression of exons predicted from the microarray analysis.

  1. DBIRD complex integrates alternative mRNA splicing with RNA polymerase II transcript elongation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Close, Pierre; East, Philip; Dirac-Svejstrup, A Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Alternative messenger RNA splicing is the main reason that vast mammalian proteomic complexity can be achieved with a limited number of genes. Splicing is physically and functionally coupled to transcription, and is greatly affected by the rate of transcript elongation. As the nascent pre-mRNA em...... elongation, particularly across areas encompassing affected exons. Together, these data indicate that the DBIRD complex acts at the interface between mRNP particles and RNAPII, integrating transcript elongation with the regulation of alternative splicing.......Alternative messenger RNA splicing is the main reason that vast mammalian proteomic complexity can be achieved with a limited number of genes. Splicing is physically and functionally coupled to transcription, and is greatly affected by the rate of transcript elongation. As the nascent pre...... and help to integrate transcript elongation with mRNA splicing remain unclear. Here we characterize the human interactome of chromatin-associated mRNP particles. This led us to identify deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1) and ZNF326 (which we call ZNF-protein interacting with nuclear mRNPs and DBC1 (ZIRD...

  2. Rhythmic Behavior Is Controlled by the SRm160 Splicing Factor in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwith, Esteban J; Hernando, Carlos E; Polcowñuk, Sofía; Bertolin, Agustina P; Mancini, Estefania; Ceriani, M Fernanda; Yanovsky, Marcelo J

    2017-10-01

    Circadian clocks organize the metabolism, physiology, and behavior of organisms throughout the day-night cycle by controlling daily rhythms in gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. While many transcription factors underlying circadian oscillations are known, the splicing factors that modulate these rhythms remain largely unexplored. A genome-wide assessment of the alterations of gene expression in a null mutant of the alternative splicing regulator SR-related matrix protein of 160 kDa (SRm160) revealed the extent to which alternative splicing impacts on behavior-related genes. We show that SRm160 affects gene expression in pacemaker neurons of the Drosophila brain to ensure proper oscillations of the molecular clock. A reduced level of SRm160 in adult pacemaker neurons impairs circadian rhythms in locomotor behavior, and this phenotype is caused, at least in part, by a marked reduction in period ( per ) levels. Moreover, rhythmic accumulation of the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR in the dorsal projections of these neurons is abolished after SRm160 depletion. The lack of rhythmicity in SRm160-downregulated flies is reversed by a fully spliced per construct, but not by an extra copy of the endogenous locus, showing that SRm160 positively regulates per levels in a splicing-dependent manner. Our findings highlight the significant effect of alternative splicing on the nervous system and particularly on brain function in an in vivo model. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  3. Alternative pre-mRNA splicing switches modulate gene expression in late erythropoiesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Miki L.; Clark, Tyson A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Kang, Jeong-Ah; Schweitzer, Anthony C.; Wickrema, Amittha; Conboy, John G.

    2009-02-03

    Differentiating erythroid cells execute a unique gene expression program that insures synthesis of the appropriate proteome at each stage of maturation. Standard expression microarrays provide important insight into erythroid gene expression but cannot detect qualitative changes in transcript structure, mediated by RNA processing, that alter structure and function of encoded proteins. We analyzed stage-specific changes in the late erythroid transcriptome via use of high-resolution microarrays that detect altered expression of individual exons. Ten differentiation-associated changes in erythroblast splicing patterns were identified, including the previously known activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 splicing. Six new alternative splicing switches involving enhanced inclusion of internal cassette exons were discovered, as well as 3 changes in use of alternative first exons. All of these erythroid stage-specific splicing events represent activated inclusion of authentic annotated exons, suggesting they represent an active regulatory process rather than a general loss of splicing fidelity. The observation that 3 of the regulated transcripts encode RNA binding proteins (SNRP70, HNRPLL, MBNL2) may indicate significant changes in the RNA processing machinery of late erythroblasts. Together, these results support the existence of a regulated alternative pre-mRNA splicing program that is critical for late erythroid differentiation.

  4. RNA-binding protein RBM20 represses splicing to orchestrate cardiac pre-mRNA processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maatz, Henrike; Jens, Marvin; Liss, Martin; Schafer, Sebastian; Heinig, Matthias; Kirchner, Marieluise; Adami, Eleonora; Rintisch, Carola; Dauksaite, Vita; Radke, Michael H; Selbach, Matthias; Barton, Paul J R; Cook, Stuart A; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Gotthardt, Michael; Landthaler, Markus; Hubner, Norbert

    2014-08-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the RNA-binding protein RBM20 have been implicated in dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), a major cause of chronic heart failure, presumably through altering cardiac RNA splicing. Here, we combined transcriptome-wide crosslinking immunoprecipitation (CLIP-seq), RNA-seq, and quantitative proteomics in cell culture and rat and human hearts to examine how RBM20 regulates alternative splicing in the heart. Our analyses revealed the presence of a distinct RBM20 RNA-recognition element that is predominantly found within intronic binding sites and linked to repression of exon splicing with RBM20 binding near 3' and 5' splice sites. Proteomic analysis determined that RBM20 interacts with both U1 and U2 small nuclear ribonucleic particles (snRNPs) and suggested that RBM20-dependent splicing repression occurs through spliceosome stalling at complex A. Direct RBM20 targets included several genes previously shown to be involved in DCM as well as genes not typically associated with this disease. In failing human hearts, reduced expression of RBM20 affected alternative splicing of several direct targets, indicating that differences in RBM20 expression may affect cardiac function. Together, these findings identify RBM20-regulated targets and provide insight into the pathogenesis of human heart failure.

  5. An alternative splicing isoform of MITA antagonizes MITA-mediated induction of type I IFNs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Honghe; Pei, Rongjuan; Zhu, Wandi; Zeng, Rui; Wang, Yun; Wang, Yanyi; Lu, Mengji; Chen, Xinwen

    2014-02-01

    Mediator of IFN regulatory transcription factor 3 activation (MITA) is an important adaptor protein to mediate the induction of type I IFNs. In this study, we identified an alternatively spliced isoform of MITA lacking exon 7, termed MITA-related protein (MRP). MRP shares the N-terminal portion aa 1-253 with MITA but possesses a unique 30-aa sequence at the carboxyl terminal part, therefore lacking the conserved domains including TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1) and cyclic diguanylate binding domain. MRP is expressed in multiple tissues and distinct cell lines. Overexpression of MRP inhibited MITA-mediated activation of IFN-β promoter by sendai virus infection and cyclic diguanylate treatment but enhanced that in HSV-1 infection. Interestingly, MRP expression was reduced after Sendai virus infection but was upregulated after HSV-1 infection. Overexpression of MRP inhibited MITA-mediated induction of IFN-β via TBK1-IFN regulatory transcription factor 3 by disrupting the MITA-TBK1 interaction. However, NF-κB pathway was still activated by MRP, as MRP retained the ability to interact with inducible inhibitor of NF-κB (iκB) kinase. Thus, MRP acts as a dominant negative regulator of MITA-mediated induction of IFN production.

  6. Alternative splicing regulated by butyrate in bovine epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitao Wu

    Full Text Available As a signaling molecule and an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs, butyrate exerts its impact on a broad range of biological processes, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to its critical role in energy metabolism in ruminants. This study examined the effect of butyrate on alternative splicing in bovine epithelial cells using RNA-seq technology. Junction reads account for 11.28 and 12.32% of total mapped reads between the butyrate-treated (BT and control (CT groups. 201,326 potential splicing junctions detected were supported by ≥ 3 junction reads. Approximately 94% of these junctions conformed to the consensus sequence (GT/AG while ~3% were GC/AG junctions. No AT/AC junctions were observed. A total of 2,834 exon skipping events, supported by a minimum of 3 junction reads, were detected. At least 7 genes, their mRNA expression significantly affected by butyrate, also had exon skipping events differentially regulated by butyrate. Furthermore, COL5A3, which was induced 310-fold by butyrate (FDR <0.001 at the gene level, had a significantly higher number of junction reads mapped to Exon#8 (Donor and Exon#11 (Acceptor in BT. This event had the potential to result in the formation of a COL5A3 mRNA isoform with 2 of the 69 exons missing. In addition, 216 differentially expressed transcript isoforms regulated by butyrate were detected. For example, Isoform 1 of ORC1 was strongly repressed by butyrate while Isoform 2 remained unchanged. Butyrate physically binds to and inhibits all zinc-dependent HDACs except HDAC6 and HDAC10. Our results provided evidence that butyrate also regulated deacetylase activities of classical HDACs via its transcriptional control. Moreover, thirteen gene fusion events differentially affected by butyrate were identified. Our results provided a snapshot into complex transcriptome dynamics regulated by butyrate, which will facilitate our understanding of the biological effects of butyrate and other HDAC

  7. Ultraviolet B (UVB) induced DNA damage affects alternative splicing in skin cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, M.J.; Nieto Moreno, N.; Kornblihtt, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    The ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the Sun that reaches the Earth's surface is a combination of low (UVA, 320-400 nm) and high (UVB, 290-320 nm) energy light. UVB light causes two types of mutagenic DNA lesions: thymine dimers and (6-4) photo-products. UVB mutagenesis is a critical step in the generation of different forms of skin cancer, which develops almost exclusively in sun exposed areas. We have previously shown that RNA polymerase II (pol II) hyperphosphorylation induced by UVC (254 nm) irradiation of non-skin cells inhibits pol II elongation rates which in turn affects alternative splicing (AS) patterns, altering the synthesis of pro- and anti-apoptotic isoforms of key proteins like Bcl-x or Caspase 9 (C9). Since the UVC radiation is fully filtered by the ozone layer and AS regulation in skin pathologies has been poorly studied, we decided to extend our studies to human keratinocytes in culture treated with UVB (302 nm) light. We observed that pol II hyperphosphorylation is increased upon UVB irradiation, being this modification necessary for the observed change in AS of a model cassette exon. Moreover, UVB irradiation induces the proapoptotic mRNA isoforms of B