WorldWideScience

Sample records for spine reposition sense

  1. Relationship between position sense and reposition errors according to the degree of upper crossed syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Seo-Yeung; Hwangbo, Gak; Lee, Jeon-Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare reposition errors in subjects with upper crossed syndrome to examine the effects of upper crossed syndrome on position senses. [Subjects and Methods] A sample population of 60 subjects was randomly divided into three groups of 20: a normal group, a mild group, a moderate group. A cervical range of motion device was attached to the head of each subject using straps and the reposition errors of cervical flexion, extension, right lateral flexion...

  2. Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tierney, Kevin; Jensen, Rune Møller

    2011-01-01

    Liner shipping fleet repositioning consists of moving vessels between services in a liner ship- ping network in order to better orient the overall network to the world economy, and to ensure the proper maintenance of vessels. Thus, fleet repositioning involves sailing and loading activities subject......, can be accurately modeled. Numerous liner shipping fleet repositioning problems are solved each year by the world’s shipping firms without the assistance of any decision support, even though humans can require between two to three days to find a reasonable solution. Finding optimal repositionings...

  3. Nucleosome repositioning via loop formation

    CERN Document Server

    Kulic, M L

    2002-01-01

    Active (catalysed) and passive (intrinsic) nucleosome repositioning is known to be a crucial event during the transcriptional activation of certain eucaryotic genes. Here we consider theoretically the intrinsic mechanism and study in detail the energetics and dynamics of DNA-loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning, as previously proposed by Schiessel et al. (H. Schiessel, J. Widom, R. F. Bruinsma, and W. M. Gelbart. 2001. {\\it Phys. Rev. Lett.} 86:4414-4417). The surprising outcome of the present study is the inherent nonlocality of nucleosome motion within this model -- being a direct physical consequence of the loop mechanism. On long enough DNA templates the longer jumps dominate over the previously predicted local motion, a fact that contrasts simple diffusive mechanisms considered before. The possible experimental outcome resulting from the considered mechanism is predicted, discussed and compared to existing experimental findings.

  4. Repositioning of the Brand Frisco

    OpenAIRE

    Klimešová, Nikola

    2013-01-01

    The main goal of the master's thesis is to find reasons for and assess the results of recent repositioning of the brand Frisco conducted in 2013. In the theoretical part, main brand theories are analyzed together with a recent theory of so-called "Brand Archetypes". In the practical part, based on own consumer survey, market trends, brand history and company research, a brand SWOT analyses is conducted. As a result of this analysis, further recommendations for the brand heading are proposed.

  5. Drug repositioning for orphan diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardana, Divya; Zhu, Cheng; Zhang, Minlu; Gudivada, Ranga C; Yang, Lun; Jegga, Anil G

    2011-07-01

    The need and opportunity to discover therapeutics for rare or orphan diseases are enormous. Due to limited prevalence and/or commercial potential, of the approximately 6000 orphan diseases (defined by the FDA Orphan Drug Act as development is complicated, time-consuming and expensive with extremely low success rates only adds to the low rate of therapeutics available for orphan diseases. An alternative and efficient strategy to boost the discovery of orphan disease therapeutics is to find connections between an existing drug product and orphan disease. Drug Repositioning or Drug Repurposing--finding a new indication for a drug--is one way to maximize the potential of a drug. The advantages of this approach are manifold, but rational drug repositioning for orphan diseases is not trivial and poses several formidable challenges--pharmacologically and computationally. Most of the repositioned drugs currently in the market are the result of serendipity. One reason the connection between drug candidates and their potential new applications are not identified in an earlier or more systematic fashion is that the underlying mechanism 'connecting' them is either very intricate and unknown or indirect or dispersed and buried in an ever-increasing sea of information, much of which is emerging only recently and therefore is not well organized. In this study, we will review some of these issues and the current methodologies adopted or proposed to overcome them and translate chemical and biological discoveries into safe and effective orphan disease therapeutics.

  6. Automated Planning for Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tierney, Kevin; Jensen, Rune Møller; Kroer, Christian;

    2012-01-01

    The Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem (LSFRP) poses a large financial burden on liner shipping firms. During repositioning, vessels are moved between services in a liner shipping network. The LSFRP is characterized by chains of interacting activities, many of which have costs that are a ......The Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem (LSFRP) poses a large financial burden on liner shipping firms. During repositioning, vessels are moved between services in a liner shipping network. The LSFRP is characterized by chains of interacting activities, many of which have costs...

  7. Temporal Optimization Planning for Fleet Repositioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tierney, Kevin; Jensen, Rune Møller

    2011-01-01

    Fleet repositioning problems pose a high financial bur- den on shipping firms, but have received little attention in the literature, despite their high importance to the shipping industry. Fleet repositioning problems are characterized by chains of interacting activities, but state-of-the-art pla......Fleet repositioning problems pose a high financial bur- den on shipping firms, but have received little attention in the literature, despite their high importance to the shipping industry. Fleet repositioning problems are characterized by chains of interacting activities, but state......-of-the-art planning and scheduling techniques do not offer cost models that are rich enough to represent essential objectives of these problems. To this end, we introduce a novel framework called Temporal Optimization Planning (TOP). TOP uses partial order planning to build optimization models associated...... with the different possible activity scenarios and applies branch-and-bound with tight lower bounds to find optimal solutions efficiently. We show how key aspects of fleet repositioning can be modeled using TOP and demonstrate experimentally that our approach scales to the size of problems considered by our...

  8. Nucleosome repositioning underlies dynamic gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocetti, Nicolas; Whitehouse, Iestyn

    2016-03-15

    Nucleosome repositioning at gene promoters is a fundamental aspect of the regulation of gene expression. However, the extent to which nucleosome repositioning is used within eukaryotic genomes is poorly understood. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of nucleosome positions as budding yeast transit through an ultradian cycle in which expression of >50% of all genes is highly synchronized. We present evidence of extensive nucleosome repositioning at thousands of gene promoters as genes are activated and repressed. During activation, nucleosomes are relocated to allow sites of general transcription factor binding and transcription initiation to become accessible. The extent of nucleosome shifting is closely related to the dynamic range of gene transcription and generally related to DNA sequence properties and use of the coactivators TFIID or SAGA. However, dynamic gene expression is not limited to SAGA-regulated promoters and is an inherent feature of most genes. While nucleosome repositioning occurs pervasively, we found that a class of genes required for growth experience acute nucleosome shifting as cells enter the cell cycle. Significantly, our data identify that the ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling enzyme Snf2 plays a fundamental role in nucleosome repositioning and the expression of growth genes. We also reveal that nucleosome organization changes extensively in concert with phases of the cell cycle, with large, regularly spaced nucleosome arrays being established in mitosis. Collectively, our data and analysis provide a framework for understanding nucleosome dynamics in relation to fundamental DNA-dependent transactions.

  9. Repositioning chairs in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, Niels; Hansen, Søren; Møller, Martin Nue;

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to evaluate the clinical value of repositioning chairs in management of refractory benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) and to study how different BPPV subtypes respond to treatment. We performed a retrospective chart review of 150 consecutive cases with refractory vertigo...

  10. Drug repositioning summit: finding new routes to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campas, Clara

    2009-03-01

    The Third Annual Drug Repositioning Summit 2008 was held at the Hyatt Harborside Hotel in Boston, Massachusetts, October 6-7, and focused on new strategies for drug repositioning. The meeting, organized by The Cambridge Healthtech Institute, brought together a panel of speakers from the industry and the academia, who discussed and proposed new routes for success in drug repositioning based on their own experience in the field. This meeting report summarizes the most relevant presentations and issues discussed. PMID:19330171

  11. Flip-Floppers and Wafflers: Explanations and Repositioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robison, Joshua

    Repositioning by political elites plays a key role in a variety of political phenomena, including legislative policymaking, and campaigning. However, the likely electoral consequences from repositioning remain unclear due to conflicting results from the empirical literature. I contribute to this ......Repositioning by political elites plays a key role in a variety of political phenomena, including legislative policymaking, and campaigning. However, the likely electoral consequences from repositioning remain unclear due to conflicting results from the empirical literature. I contribute...... implications not just for this particular element of elite behavior, but also related questions concerning governmental accountability and representation....

  12. A PDDL Domain for the Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tierney, Kevin; Coles, Amanda; Coles, Andrew;

    The Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem (LSFRP) poses a large financial burden on liner shipping firms. During repositioning, vessels are moved between services in a liner shipping network. The LSFRP is characterized by chains of interacting activities, many of which have costs that are a ......The Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem (LSFRP) poses a large financial burden on liner shipping firms. During repositioning, vessels are moved between services in a liner shipping network. The LSFRP is characterized by chains of interacting activities, many of which have costs...

  13. Solving the Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem with Cargo Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tierney, Kevin; Askelsdottir, Björg; Jensen, Rune Møller;

    2015-01-01

    We solve a central problem in the liner shipping industry called the liner shipping fleet repositioning problem (LSFRP). The LSFRP poses a large financial burden on liner shipping firms. During repositioning, vessels are moved between routes in a liner shipping network. Liner carriers wish...

  14. The Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem with Cargo Flows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tierney, Kevin; Jensen, Rune Møller

    2012-01-01

    We solve an important problem for the liner shipping industry called the Liner Shipping Fleet Repositioning Problem (LSFRP). The LSFRP poses a large financial burden on liner shipping firms. During repositioning, vessels are moved between services in a liner shipping network. Shippers wish...

  15. Spine Injuries and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your backbone, or spine, is made up of 26 bone discs called vertebrae. The vertebrae protect your spinal cord and allow you to ... of problems can change the structure of the spine or damage the vertebrae and surrounding tissue. They ...

  16. Lumbar spine chordoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Hatem, M.B.Ch.B, MRes, LMCC

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma is a rare tumor arising from notochord remnants in the spine. It is slow-growing, which makes it difficult to diagnose and difficult to follow up after treatment. Typically, it occurs in the base of the skull and sacrococcygeal spine; it rarely occurs in other parts of the spine. CT-guided biopsy of a suspicious mass enabled diagnosis of lumbar spine chordoma.

  17. Lumbar spine chordoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatem, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare tumor arising from notochord remnants in the spine. It is slow-growing, which makes it difficult to diagnose and difficult to follow up after treatment. Typically, it occurs in the base of the skull and sacrococcygeal spine; it rarely occurs in other parts of the spine. CT-guided biopsy of a suspicious mass enabled diagnosis of lumbar spine chordoma. PMID:27186250

  18. Repositioning Strategy for Malaysian Companies Internationalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismi Rajiani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The rise of the emerging-market countries offers both developing and developed countries a unique opportunity to gain the benefits of a truly international economy. Consequently, it is imper- ative to advance our knowledge of emerging-market countries MNC emergence and competitive- ness including Malaysian firms on how will they position their products strategically. Based on the framework of Porter’s Generic Strategy, this paper is composed of price/ volume segments and im- pacts on product strategy theory. The aim is to identify crucial triggering cues and focus areas for Malaysian companies and measure what role these play in different segments. This study argues that some Malaysian companies will reposition themselves strategically when internationalizing and that they will focus on other factors or triggering cues when doing so not merely adapting the prevalent price leadership strategy.

  19. Repositioning a decentered intraocular lens with 4 haptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiewei; Liu, Wenjie; Jia, Yading; Al-Mohtaseb, Zaina N; Wang, Li

    2016-03-01

    We describe a technique to reposition a decentered 4-haptic intraocular lens (IOL). Using an ophthalmic viscosurgical device, the haptic with the worst distortion is dissected from the capsular bag and pulled outside the bag. The opposite haptic (180 degrees away) is also dissected and placed in front of the anterior capsule. The remaining 2 haptics are left in the capsular bag. With this repositioning, the 2 haptics in the bag limit the IOL movement, the 2 haptics outside the bag are no longer distorted, and the IOL is centered. We present 2 cases in which this technique was used to reposition decentered 4-haptic IOLs.

  20. Mechanical oscillopsia after lower eyelid blepharoplasty with fat repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thinda, Sumeer; Vaphiades, Michael S; Mawn, Louise A

    2013-03-01

    Blepharoplasty with fat repositioning is a technique used to fill the tear trough in the aging lower eyelid. We describe a patient who underwent transcutaneous lower eyelid blepharoplasty with fat repositioning who subsequently developed mechanical oscillopsia in the right eye exacerbated by facial movement. Surgical exploration revealed cicatrix between the inferior oblique muscle and the anterior superficial musculoaponeurotic system. Excision of the scar bands led to immediate amelioration of symptoms. When performing blepharoplasty with fat repositioning, it is essential to be aware of the anatomic location of the inferior oblique in the anterior inferomedial orbit to avoid incarceration of this muscle. PMID:23222371

  1. North American Spine Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... NASS Spine Research Endowment Fund Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation 2017 Research Funding Now Available ... and stimulation techniques. Didactics, hands-on training and discussions. Register Now A ...

  2. Case report: Non-operative repositioning and fixation of a fractured calcaneum in the operating theater; Fallstudie: Unblutige Reposition und Fixierung einer Fersenbeinfraktur im OP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeuser, H. [Zentralklinikum Augsburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Diagnostische Radiologie und Neuroradiologie

    2000-05-01

    Using the mobile CT system Tomoscan M for non-operational repositioning and fixation of a fractured calcineum reduces the risk of infection and achieves anatomically exact and correct repositioning. (orig./CB) [German] Der Einsatz eines mobilen CT-Systems Tomoscan M bei der unblutigen Reposition und Fixierung einer Fersenbeinfraktur senkt das Infektionsrisiko und sorgt fuer eine exakte anatomische Repositionierung. Eine Fallstudie. (orig.)

  3. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  4. Multiplanner spine computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H. K.; Jeon, H. J.; Hong, K. C.; Chung, K. B.; Suh, W. H. [Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1983-06-15

    The computed tomography is useful in evaluation of bony structures and adjacent soft tissues of the spine. Recently, the multiplanar spine CT scan is highly superior than usual axial scan, because of easily demonstrable longitudinal dimension, level of spine and spinal canal. We evaluated 62 cases of spine CT, whom complains of spinal symptoms, from July, 1982 to January, 1983. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 45 male and 17 female, ages were from 15 years to 76 years, and sites were 15 cervical spine, 7 thoracic spine, 42 lumbar spine and 21 sacral spine. 2. Sixty two cases of the CT diagnosis were reviewed and shows 19 cases of herniated intervertebral disc, 7 cases of spine fracture, 5 cases of degenerative disease, 4 cases of metastatic cancer, 2 cases of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, 1 case of cord injury and 24 cases of normal. 3. The CT findings of herniated intervertebral disc were protruding disc, obliteration of anterior epidural fat, with or without indentation of dural sac and calcification within posterior disc margin. In cases of trauma, the multiplanar spine CT scan detects more specific extension of the fracture sites, and it is able to demonstrate relationship between fracture fragment and spinal cord, therefore operability can be decided. In case of posterior longitudinal ligament ossification, it is easy to demonstrate linear high density along posterior margin of vertebral bodies on sagittal reconstruction scan. 4. The computed tomography is diagnostic in detection of spinal disease. However, multiplanar spine CT is more diagnostic than axial computed tomography such as detecting the longitudinal dimension and demonstration of spinal canal.

  5. Cervical Spine Axial Rotation Goniometer Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emin Ulaş Erdem

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the cervical spine rotation movement is quiet harder than other joints. Configuration and arrangement of current goniometers and devices is not always practic in clinics and some methods are quiet expensive. The cervical axial rotation goniometer designed by the authors is consists of five pieces (head apparatus, chair, goniometric platform, eye pads and camera. With this goniometer design a detailed evaluation of cervical spine range of motion can be obtained. Besides, measurement of "joint position sense" which is recently has rising interest in researches can be made practically with this goniometer.

  6. The ageing spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contain 15 selections. Some of the titles are: Effects of age on the appearance of magnetic resonance images of the spine; Potential for image analysis in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the aging spine; Potential of x-ray diffraction computed tomography for discriminating between normal and osteoporotic bone; and Spinal fusion in the elderly

  7. Anesthesia for Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. Aloka Samantaray

    2006-01-01

    Patient presenting for surgical procedures of the spine are a diverse population undergoing a wide variety of operative procedures and present diverse challenge to the anesthesiologists. The anesthetic management depends on the operative site; spine pathology; surgical approach and the anesthesiologists experience & expertise.

  8. Tuberculosis of spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Agrawal

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis of the spine is one of the most common spine pathology in India. Over last 4 decades a lot has changed in the diagnosis, medical treatment and surgical procedures to treat this disorder. Further developments in diagnosis using molecular genetic techniques, more effective antibiotics and more aggressive surgical protocols have become essential with emergence of multidrug resistant TB. Surgical procedures such as single stage anterior and posterior stabilization, extrapleral dorsal spine anterior stabilization and endoscopic thoracoscopic surgeries have reduced the mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedures. is rapidly progressing. It is a challenge to treat MDR-TB Spine with late onset paraplegia and progressive deformity. Physicians must treat tuberculosis of spine on the basis of Culture and sensitivity.

  9. Thoracic spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  10. Laryngeal dislocation after ventral fusion of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Krauel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 70-year-old patient who underwent ventral fusion of the cervical spine (C3/4 and C4/5 for spinal canal stenosis performed by the neurosurgery department. The patient suffered an exceedingly rare complication of the surgery - laryngeal dislocation. Had the deformed laryngeal structures been overlooked and the patient extubated as usual after surgery, reintubation would have been impossible due to the associated swelling, which might have had disastrous consequences. Leftward dislocation of the larynx became apparent post-operatively, but prior to extubation. Extubation was therefore postponed and a subsequent computed tomography (CT scan revealed entrapment of laryngeal structures within the osteosynthesis. A trial of repositioning using microlaryngoscopy performed by otolaryngology (ears, nose and throat specialists failed, making open surgical revision necessary. At surgery, the entrapped laryngeal tissue was successfully mobilised. Laryngeal oedema developed despite prompt repositioning; thus, necessitating tracheotomy and long-term ventilation. Laryngeal dislocation may be an unusual cause of post-operative neck swelling after anterior cervical spine surgery and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if surgical site haematoma and other causes have been ruled out. Imaging studies including CT of the neck may be needed before extubation to confirm the suspicion and should be promptly obtained to facilitate specific treatment.

  11. Differences in proprioceptive senses between children with diplegic and children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyo Jeong; Song, Gui-Bin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] In the present study, in order to examine the differences in proprioceptive senses between children with diplegic CP and children with hemiplegic CP, neck reposition errors were measured. [Subjects and Methods] Head reposition senses were measured after neck flexion, extension, and left-right rotation, using head repositioning accuracy tests. These tests were done with 12 children with diplegic CP and nine children with hemiplegic CP. [Results] The results indicated that children with diplegic CP had poorer head repositioning senses after movements in all directions compared to children with hemiplegic CP. [Conclusion] The results indicated that children with diplegic CP had poorer head repositioning senses after movements in all directions as compared to children with hemiplegic CP.

  12. Differences in proprioceptive senses between children with diplegic and children with hemiplegic cerebral palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Hyo Jeong; Song, Gui-bin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] In the present study, in order to examine the differences in proprioceptive senses between children with diplegic CP and children with hemiplegic CP, neck reposition errors were measured. [Subjects and Methods] Head reposition senses were measured after neck flexion, extension, and left-right rotation, using head repositioning accuracy tests. These tests were done with 12 children with diplegic CP and nine children with hemiplegic CP. [Results] The results indicated that children with diplegic CP had poorer head repositioning senses after movements in all directions compared to children with hemiplegic CP. [Conclusion] The results indicated that children with diplegic CP had poorer head repositioning senses after movements in all directions as compared to children with hemiplegic CP. PMID:27065559

  13. Management of intrusive luxation with immediate surgical repositioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazumdar Dibyendu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Intrusive luxation is one of the most severe forms of traumatic injuries in which the affected tooth is forced to displace deeper into the alveolus. As a consequence of this type of injury, maximum damage occurs to the pulp and all the supporting structures. This report presents a case of severe intrusive luxation of mature maxillary central and lateral incisor in a 40-year-old male. The intruded tooth was immediately repositioned (surgical extrusion and splinted within hours following injury. Antibiotic therapy was initiated at the time of repositioning and maintained for 5 days. Pulp removal and calcium hydroxide treatment of the root canal was carried out after repositioning. Splint was removed 2 months later. Definitive root canal treatment with Gutta percha was accomplished at a later appointment. Clinical and radiographic examination 6, 12 and 24 months after the surgical extrusion revealed satisfactory progressive apical and periodontal healing.

  14. Laser measurement and analysis of reposition error in polishing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weisen; Wang, Junhua; Xu, Min; He, Xiaoying

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, robotic reposition error measurement method based on laser interference remote positioning is presented, the geometric error is analyzed in the polishing system based on robot and the mathematical model of the tilt error is presented. Studies show that less than 1 mm error is mainly caused by the tilt error with small incident angle. Marking spot position with interference fringe enhances greatly the error measurement precision, the measurement precision of tilt error can reach 5 um. Measurement results show that reposition error of the polishing system is mainly from the tilt error caused by the motor A, repositioning precision is greatly increased after polishing system improvement. The measurement method has important applications in the actual error measurement with low cost, simple operation.

  15. The Role of Elite Accounts in Mitigating the Negative Effects of Repositioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Robison, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Repositioning by political elites plays a key role in a variety of political phenomena, including legislative policymaking and campaigning. While previous studies suggest that repositioning will lead to negative evaluations, these studies have not explored the role of elite communications...

  16. Spine surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vertebral interbody fusion - discharge; Posterior spinal fusion - discharge; Arthrodesis - discharge; Anterior spinal fusion - discharge; Spine surgery - spinal fusion - discharge Images Spinal surgery -- cervical - series References Agrawal BM, Zeidman SM, Rhines L, ...

  17. Laparoscopic lumbar spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    O’Dowd, J. K.

    2000-01-01

    The use of transperitoneal endoscopic approaches to the distal segments of the lumbar spine has recently been described. This has been the catalyst for the development of other minimally invasive anterior ¶approaches to the spine. This review looks at the published results so ¶far, and highlights the principles, techniques and complications. The limitations of laparoscopic approaches have meant that surgeons are moving on to endoscopic extraperitoneal and mini-open approaches, but important l...

  18. The "addicted" spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Saturnino; Mulas, Giovanna; Piras, Francesca; Diana, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Units of dendritic branches called dendritic spines represent more than simply decorative appendages of the neuron and actively participate in integrative functions of "spinous" nerve cells thereby contributing to the general phenomenon of synaptic plasticity. In animal models of drug addiction, spines are profoundly affected by treatments with drugs of abuse and represent important sub cellular markers which interfere deeply into the physiology of the neuron thereby providing an example of the burgeoning and rapidly increasing interest in "structural plasticity". Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs) of the Nucleus Accumbens (Nacc) show a reduced number of dendritic spines and a decrease in TH-positive terminals upon withdrawal from opiates, cannabinoids and alcohol. The reduction is localized "strictly" to second order dendritic branches where dopamine (DA)-containing terminals, impinging upon spines, make synaptic contacts. In addition, long-thin spines seems preferentially affected raising the possibility that cellular learning of these neurons may be selectively hampered. These findings suggest that dendritic spines are affected by drugs widely abused by humans and provide yet another example of drug-induced aberrant neural plasticity with marked reflections on the physiology of synapses, system structural organization, and neuronal circuitry remodeling. PMID:25324733

  19. Repositioning Ideology Critique in a Critical Theory of Adult Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brookfield, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Reexamines critical theory as a response to Marxism and repositions ideology critique as a crucial adult learning process. Argues that a critical theory of adult learning should focus on how adults learn to recognize and challenge ideological domination and manipulation. (Contains 31 references.) (SK)

  20. Repositioning for the Future: Franklin and Marshall College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Richard B.

    1992-01-01

    Franklin and Marshall College (Pennsylvania) has used institutional mission, strategic planning, lessons learned from previous experience, and sound general management principles to guide reallocation of resources during a period of financial constraint. The objective was repositioning, not retrenchment, and the resulting academic program is…

  1. The degenerative cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. PMID:26878769

  2. Cervical spine chordoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Díez-González L

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chordomas are neoplasms that arise from notochord embryonic remnants, been the sacrococcygeal spine the main site of involvement; the cervical spine site is uncommon and it account for less than 10% of chordomas. Because of their slow growth, the diagnosis is delayed until they reach a large size, despite which they are locally aggressive tumours due to their relation to critical neurovascular structures and present a high rate of local recurrence. Radical surgery is the elective treatment and proton radiotherapy is used when residual tumour tissue and recurrences.Because of the uncommonness of this pathology, we report a case of a patient with cervical chordoma.

  3. SpineData

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher;

    2015-01-01

    % with mid-back pain, and 15% with neck pain. Collectively, across the body regions and measurement time points, there are approximately 1,980 patient-related variables in the database across a broad range of biopsychosocial factors. To date, 36 research projects have used data from the SpineData registry......, including collaborations with researchers from Denmark, Australia, the United Kingdom, and Brazil. Conclusion: We described the aims, development, structure, and content of the SpineData registry, and what is known about any attrition bias and cluster effects in the data. For epidemiology research...

  4. The Degenerative Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarençon, Frédéric; Law-Ye, Bruno; Bienvenot, Peggy; Cormier, Évelyne; Chiras, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a leading cause of back pain and radiculopathy, and is a frequent indication for spine MR imaging. Disc degeneration, disc protrusion/herniation, discarhtrosis, spinal canal stenosis, and facet joint arthrosis, as well as interspinous processes arthrosis, may require an MR imaging workup. This review presents the MR imaging patterns of these diseases and describes the benefit of the MR imaging in these indications compared with the other imaging modalities like plain radiographs or computed tomography scan. PMID:27417397

  5. Repositórios institucionais como ferramentas de gestão do conhecimento científico no ambiente acadêmico

    OpenAIRE

    Leite, Fernando César Lima; Costa, Sely Maria de Souza

    2006-01-01

    Universities have, traditionally, been recognised as the loci of scientific knowledge production and transfer. Although it has been possible to find studies on knowledge management within the university context in the specialised literature, these studies usually deal with the scientific knowledge in the same perspective of the organisational knowledge. However, the scientific knowledge and the environment where it is created, shared and used are peculiar. In this sense, institutional reposit...

  6. Mining integrated semantic networks for drug repositioning opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Joseph; Cockell, Simon J; Tipney, Hannah; Woollard, Peter M; Wipat, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Current research and development approaches to drug discovery have become less fruitful and more costly. One alternative paradigm is that of drug repositioning. Many marketed examples of repositioned drugs have been identified through serendipitous or rational observations, highlighting the need for more systematic methodologies to tackle the problem. Systems level approaches have the potential to enable the development of novel methods to understand the action of therapeutic compounds, but requires an integrative approach to biological data. Integrated networks can facilitate systems level analyses by combining multiple sources of evidence to provide a rich description of drugs, their targets and their interactions. Classically, such networks can be mined manually where a skilled person is able to identify portions of the graph (semantic subgraphs) that are indicative of relationships between drugs and highlight possible repositioning opportunities. However, this approach is not scalable. Automated approaches are required to systematically mine integrated networks for these subgraphs and bring them to the attention of the user. We introduce a formal framework for the definition of integrated networks and their associated semantic subgraphs for drug interaction analysis and describe DReSMin, an algorithm for mining semantically-rich networks for occurrences of a given semantic subgraph. This algorithm allows instances of complex semantic subgraphs that contain data about putative drug repositioning opportunities to be identified in a computationally tractable fashion, scaling close to linearly with network data. We demonstrate the utility of our approach by mining an integrated drug interaction network built from 11 sources. This work identified and ranked 9,643,061 putative drug-target interactions, showing a strong correlation between highly scored associations and those supported by literature. We discuss the 20 top ranked associations in more detail, of which

  7. Repositioning job fair of career opportunities – Career DAYS

    OpenAIRE

    Vodák, Ondřej

    2015-01-01

    This bachelor's thesis maps the change of prestigious job fair Career DAYS into an informal festival. For the process of change it uses various analysis of the consumer's perceptions which are used as basics for the product differentiation and positioning strategy. Opinions about the subject were gathered from professionals such as Kotler and Trout. This work examines the process from segmentation to targeting and differentiation of marketing offer with the branding and repositioning. The goa...

  8. Lip repositioning: An alternative cosmetic treatment for gummy smile

    OpenAIRE

    Dayakar, Mudnoor Manjunath; Gupta, Sachin; Shivananda, Hiranya

    2014-01-01

    Excessive gingival display, commonly referred to as ‘gummy smile’ is a major hurdle in overall personality of an individual. Gummy smile, secondary to altered passive eruption and tooth mal-positioning, can be predictably treated with Surgery and orthodontic therapy. In patients with jaw deformities, orthognathic surgery can be performed. However, this requires hospitalization and entails significant discomfort. Lip repositioning is a simple surgical procedure to treat ‘gummy smile’. The proc...

  9. An Integrated Data Driven Approach to Drug Repositioning Using Gene-Disease Associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Joseph; Cockell, Simon J; Woollard, Peter; Wipat, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Drug development is both increasing in cost whilst decreasing in productivity. There is a general acceptance that the current paradigm of R&D needs to change. One alternative approach is drug repositioning. With target-based approaches utilised heavily in the field of drug discovery, it becomes increasingly necessary to have a systematic method to rank gene-disease associations. Although methods already exist to collect, integrate and score these associations, they are often not a reliable reflection of expert knowledge. Furthermore, the amount of data available in all areas covered by bioinformatics is increasing dramatically year on year. It thus makes sense to move away from more generalised hypothesis driven approaches to research to one that allows data to generate their own hypothesis. We introduce an integrated, data driven approach to drug repositioning. We first apply a Bayesian statistics approach to rank 309,885 gene-disease associations using existing knowledge. Ranked associations are then integrated with other biological data to produce a semantically-rich drug discovery network. Using this network, we show how our approach identifies diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) to be an area of interest. CNS disorders are identified due to the low numbers of such disorders that currently have marketed treatments, in comparison to other therapeutic areas. We then systematically mine our network for semantic subgraphs that allow us to infer drug-disease relations that are not captured in the network. We identify and rank 275,934 drug-disease has_indication associations after filtering those that are more likely to be side effects, whilst commenting on the top ranked associations in more detail. The dataset has been created in Neo4j and is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/ncl-intbio/genediseaserepositioning along with a Java implementation of the searching algorithm. PMID:27196054

  10. Chordoma Of Lumbar Spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmala M.J.*, H.A. Parshwanath and A.M.Patil

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Chordoma, lesion derived from the notochord, represents about 4% of the primary malignant bone tumours. Males are affected more commonly than females and it is very rare in children;the peak incidence is in the sixth decade of life.The sacrococcygeal region accounts for 50% of cases and the spheno-occipital region or the base of the skull for 37% of cases.The remainder of the cases reported occur in the descending order of frequency in the cervical,thoracic and the lumbar spine.It is found to be rarely involving the lumbar spine(about 2%.We present a case of chordoma involving L4 and L5 vertebral body and disc.The role of epithelial cell marker study has proved a well adjunct to the histopathological diagnosis of chordoma.

  11. Beyond the spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donovan, James; Cassidy, J David; Cancelliere, Carol;

    2015-01-01

    Over the past two decades, clinical research within the chiropractic profession has focused on the spine and spinal conditions, specifically neck and low back pain. However, there is now a small group of chiropractors with clinical research training that are shifting their focus away from...... traditional research pursuits towards new and innovative areas. Specifically, these researchers are now delving into areas such as brain injury, work disability prevention, undifferentiated chest pain, hip osteoarthritis, and prevention of pain in children and adolescents to name a few. In this paper, we...... highlight recent research in these new areas and discuss how clinical research efforts in musculoskeletal areas beyond the spine can benefit patient care and the future of the chiropractic profession....

  12. Treating the Aging Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choma, Theodore J; Rechtine, Glenn; McGuire, Robert A; Brodke, Darrel S

    2016-01-01

    Demographic trends make it incumbent on orthopaedic spine surgeons to recognize the special challenges involved in caring for older patients with spine pathology. Unique pathologies, such as osteoporosis and degenerative deformities, must be recognized and treated. Recent treatment options and recommendations for the medical optimization of bone health include vitamin D and calcium supplementation, diphosphonates, and teriparatide. Optimizing spinal fixation in elderly patients who have osteoporosis is critical; cement augmentation of pedicle screws is promising. In the management of geriatric odontoid fractures, nonsurgical support with a collar may be considered for low-demand patients, whereas surgical fixation is favored for high-demand patients. Management of degenerative deformity must address sagittal plane balance, which includes consideration of pelvic incidence. Various osteotomies may prove helpful in this setting. PMID:27049195

  13. Corporate Brand Repositioning with CSR as the Differentiating Factor: A Study on Consumer Perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Vilppo, Tiina; Lindberg-Repo, Kirsti

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – This research paper studies how the strategy of repositioning enables marketers to communicate CSR as their brand’s differentiating factor. It aims at understanding how consumer perceptions can be managed to generate brand value through corporate brand repositioning when CSR is the differentiating factor. The purpose of this paper is to answer the following research question: How can consumer perceptions be managed to generate brand value through corporate brand repositioning wh...

  14. Interventional spine procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelekis, A.D. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece)]. E-mail: akelekis@cc.uoa.gr; Somon, T. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Yilmaz, H. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Bize, P. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Brountzos, E.N. [Attikon University Hospital, 2nd Radiology Department, University of Athens, Rimini 1, 124 61 Athens (Greece); Lovblad, K. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Ruefenacht, D. [Geneva University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, 24, Rue Micheli-du-Crest, 1211 Geneva 14 (Switzerland); Martin, J.B. [Clinique Generale Beaulieu 12 chemin Beau Soleil 1206 Geneva (Switzerland)]. E-mail: jbmartin@beaulieu.ch

    2005-09-01

    Minimally invasive techniques for the treatment of some spinal diseases are percutaneous treatments, proposed before classic surgery. By using imaging guidance, one can significantly increase accuracy and decrease complication rates. This review report physiopathology and discusses indications, methods, complications and results of performing these techniques on the spine, including different level (cervical, thoracic, lumbar and sacroiliac) and different kind of treatments (nerve block, disc treatment and bone treatment). Finally the present article also reviews current literature on the controversial issues involved.

  15. Rendering the Topological Spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieves-Rivera, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-05

    Many tools to analyze and represent high dimensional data already exits yet most of them are not flexible, informative and intuitive enough to help the scientists make the corresponding analysis and predictions, understand the structure and complexity of scientific data, get a complete picture of it and explore a greater number of hypotheses. With this in mind, N-Dimensional Data Analysis and Visualization (ND²AV) is being developed to serve as an interactive visual analysis platform with the purpose of coupling together a number of these existing tools that range from statistics, machine learning, and data mining, with new techniques, in particular with new visualization approaches. My task is to create the rendering and implementation of a new concept called topological spines in order to extend ND²AV's scope. Other existing visualization tools create a representation preserving either the topological properties or the structural (geometric) ones because it is challenging to preserve them both simultaneously. Overcoming such challenge by creating a balance in between them, the topological spines are introduced as a new approach that aims to preserve them both. Its render using OpenGL and C++ and is currently being tested to further on be implemented on ND²AV. In this paper I will present what are the Topological Spines and how they are rendered.

  16. THORACIC SPINE FRACTURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴力扬

    2001-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the unique characteristics and treatment of thoracic spine fractures.Methods. Severty-seven patients with thoracic spine fractures were retrospectively reviewed. Of these, therewere 37 compressior fractures, 34 fracture-dislocations, 3 burst fractures and 3 burst-dislocations. Twenty-six pa-tients had a complete lesion of the spinal cord, 14 sustained a neurologically incomplete injury, and 37 wereneurologically intact. Fifty-three patients were treated nonoperatively and 24 treated operatively.Results. All patients were followed up for 2 ~ 15 years. None of the 26 patients with a complete lesion recov-ered any significant function. Of 37 neurologically intact patients, 13 had local pain although all of them re-mained normal function. Two of 14 patients with incomplete paraplegia returned to normal, 7 recovered some func-tion and 5 did not recovered.Conclusions. E ecause of the unique anatomy and biomechanics of the thoracic spine, the classification common-ly applied to thoracolumbar fractures is not suitable for thoracic fractures. Fusion and instrumentation are indicat-ed when the fractures are unstable, while patients with incomplete lesion of the spinal cord may be the candidatesfor supplemented decompression.

  17. An investigation of a video-based patient repositioning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We have investigated a video-based patient repositioning technique designed to use skin features for radiotherapy repositioning. We investigated the feasibility of the clinical application of this system by quantitative evaluation of performance characteristics of the methodology. Methods and Materials: Multiple regions of interest (ROI) were specified in the field of view of video cameras. We used a normalized correlation pattern-matching algorithm to compute the translations of each ROI pattern in a target image. These translations were compared against trial translations using a quadratic cost function for an optimization process in which the patient rotation and translational parameters were calculated. Results: A hierarchical search technique achieved high-speed (compute correlation for 128x128 ROI in 512x512 target image within 0.005 s) and subpixel spatial accuracy (as high as 0.2 pixel). By treating the observed translations as movements of points on the surfaces of a hypothetical cube, we were able to estimate accurately the actual translations and rotations of the test phantoms used in our experiments to less than 1 mm and 0.2 deg. with a standard deviation of 0.3 mm and 0.5 deg. respectively. For human volunteer cases, we estimated the translations and rotations to have an accuracy of 2 mm and 1.2 deg. Conclusion: A personal computer-based video system is suitable for routine patient setup of fractionated conformal radiotherapy. It is expected to achieve high-precision repositioning of the skin surface with high efficiency

  18. Repositioning of malpositioned or flipped central venous catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.; Balzer, J.; Vogl, T.J. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Central Radiology Clinic, J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2002-03-01

    Primary misplaced or secondary flipped implanted catheters are located mostly in the right jugular vein. We demonstrate an effective method to replace fix implanted catheters such as Ports, Grochomg or Hickman catheters. Using a femoral venous approach, replacement into the superior vena cava can easily be done with a Sidewinder 1 catheter which is hooked over the misplaced central venous approach. In all our patients the method was successful. The repositioning technique described is simple, fast and has low costs. We can keep sterile conditions and do not need to solve the catheters' fixation. (orig.)

  19. Preoperative erythropoietin in spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Colomina, Maria J.; Bagó, Juan; Pellisé, Ferran; Godet, Carmen; Villanueva, Carlos

    2004-01-01

    Spine surgery may be associated with profuse intraoperative bleeding that often requires blood transfusions. In recent years several techniques have been developed to avoid allogenic transfusions and their potential complications to surgical patients. In this study we review and analyse the role of preoperative recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) administration in spine surgery as a blood conservation strategy. Between 1998 and 2002, a total of 250 patients scheduled for spine surgery w...

  20. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make the bone stronger. Sometimes, patients may need surgery to secure the spine using a bone graft or an internal metal ... bone is safe. Patients with tumors on the spine may be at slightly higher risk of complications. You should always discuss the risks of any ...

  1. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  2. Lipid dynamics at dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotti, Carlos Gerardo; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Dynamic changes in the structure and composition of the membrane protrusions forming dendritic spines underlie memory and learning processes. In recent years a great effort has been made to characterize in detail the protein machinery that controls spine plasticity. However, we know much less about the involvement of lipids, despite being major membrane components and structure determinants. Moreover, protein complexes that regulate spine plasticity depend on specific interactions with membrane lipids for proper function and accurate intracellular signaling. In this review we gather information available on the lipid composition at dendritic spine membranes and on its dynamics. We pay particular attention to the influence that spine lipid dynamism has on glutamate receptors, which are key regulators of synaptic plasticity.

  3. Degenerative disease of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallucci, Massimo; Limbucci, Nicola; Paonessa, Amalia; Splendiani, Alessandra

    2007-02-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a definition that includes a wide spectrum of degenerative abnormalities. Degeneration involves bony structures and the intervertebral disk, although many aspects of spine degeneration are strictly linked because the main common pathogenic factor is identified in chronic overload. During life the spine undergoes continuous changes as a response to physiologic axial load. These age-related changes are similar to pathologic degenerative changes and are a common asymptomatic finding in adults and elderly persons. A mild degree of degenerative changes is paraphysiologic and should be considered pathologic only if abnormalities determine symptoms. Imaging allows complete evaluation of static and dynamic factors related to degenerative disease of the spine and is useful in diagnosing the different aspects of spine degeneration.

  4. Low back skin sensitivity has minimal impact on active lumbar spine proprioception and stability in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudette, Shawn M; Larson, Katelyn J; Larson, Dennis J; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the current work was to (1) determine whether low back cutaneous sensitivity could be reduced through the use of a topical lidocaine-prilocaine anesthetic (EMLA(®)) to mirror reductions reported in chronic lower back pain (CLBP) patients, as well as to (2) identify whether reductions in cutaneous sensitivity resulted in decreased lumbar spine proprioception, neuromuscular control and dynamic stability. Twenty-eight healthy participants were divided equally into matched EMLA and PLACEBO treatment groups. Groups completed cutaneous minimum monofilament and two-point discrimination (TPD) threshold tests, as well as tests of sagittal and axial lumbar spine active repositioning error, seated balance and repeated lifting dynamic stability. These tests were administered both before and after the application of an EMLA or PLACEBO treatment. Results show that low back minimum monofilament and TPD thresholds were significantly increased within the EMLA group. Skin sensitivity remained unchanged in the PLACEBO group. In the EMLA group, decreases in low back cutaneous sensitivity had minimal effect on low back proprioception (active sagittal and axial repositioning) and dynamic stability (seated balance and repeated lifting). These findings demonstrate that treating the skin of the low back with an EMLA anesthetic can effectively decrease the cutaneous sensitivity of low back region. Further, these decreases in peripheral cutaneous sensitivity are similar in magnitude to those reported in CLBP patients. Within this healthy population, decreased cutaneous sensitivity of the low back region has minimal influence on active lumbar spine proprioception, neuromuscular control and dynamic stability. PMID:27010722

  5. A Computational Drug Repositioning Approach for Targeting Oncogenic Transcription Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayvert, Kaitlyn M; Dardenne, Etienne; Cheung, Cynthia; Boland, Mary Regina; Lorberbaum, Tal; Wanjala, Jackline; Chen, Yu; Rubin, Mark A; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Rickman, David S; Elemento, Olivier

    2016-06-14

    Mutations in transcription factor (TF) genes are frequently observed in tumors, often leading to aberrant transcriptional activity. Unfortunately, TFs are often considered undruggable due to the absence of targetable enzymatic activity. To address this problem, we developed CRAFTT, a computational drug-repositioning approach for targeting TF activity. CRAFTT combines ChIP-seq with drug-induced expression profiling to identify small molecules that can specifically perturb TF activity. Application to ENCODE ChIP-seq datasets revealed known drug-TF interactions, and a global drug-protein network analysis supported these predictions. Application of CRAFTT to ERG, a pro-invasive, frequently overexpressed oncogenic TF, predicted that dexamethasone would inhibit ERG activity. Dexamethasone significantly decreased cell invasion and migration in an ERG-dependent manner. Furthermore, analysis of electronic medical record data indicates a protective role for dexamethasone against prostate cancer. Altogether, our method provides a broadly applicable strategy for identifying drugs that specifically modulate TF activity. PMID:27264179

  6. DNAdigest and Repositive: Connecting the World of Genomic Data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadezda V Kovalevskaya

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There is no unified place where genomics researchers can search through all available raw genomic data in a way similar to OMIM for genes or Uniprot for proteins. With the recent increase in the amount of genomic data that is being produced and the ever-growing promises of precision medicine, this is becoming more and more of a problem. DNAdigest is a charity working to promote efficient sharing of human genomic data to improve the outcome of genomic research and diagnostics for the benefit of patients. Repositive, a social enterprise spin-out of DNAdigest, is building an online platform that indexes genomic data stored in repositories and thus enables researchers to search for and access a range of human genomic data sources through a single, easy-to-use interface, free of charge.

  7. siRNA Genome Screening Approaches to Therapeutic Drug Repositioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph A. Tripp

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bridging high-throughput screening (HTS with RNA interference (RNAi has allowed for rapid discovery of the molecular basis of many diseases, and identification of potential pathways for developing safe and effective treatments. These features have identified new host gene targets for existing drugs paving the pathway for therapeutic drug repositioning. Using RNAi to discover and help validate new drug targets has also provided a means to filter and prioritize promising therapeutics. This review summarizes these approaches across a spectrum of methods and targets in the host response to pathogens. Particular attention is given to the utility of drug repurposing utilizing the promiscuous nature of some drugs that affect multiple molecules or pathways, and how these biological pathways can be targeted to regulate disease outcome.

  8. Trauma of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary reconstructive surgery is assuming increasing importance in the management of fractures of the spine. Analysis of the injury and thus surgical decision-making are greatly facilitated by the diagnostic power of CT and MRI. This volume provides a systemic introduction to the interpretation of CT and MRI images of injuries to the spinal column and the spinal cord, with special emphasis on the assessment or residual stability. Since survey X-rays remain the indispensable first step in radiodiagnosis, the typical appearances of spinal injuries on conventional films are also shown. This will help the reader interpret the CT and MRI images and also reflects the procedure in radiologic practice. The book's classification of spinal fractures, together with the attempt to conclude how the injury happened by analyzing the damage caused, paves the way for individually oriented therapy. (orig.) With 72 figs. in 132 separate illustrations

  9. Muscle Repositioning: a new verifiable approach to neuro-myofascial release?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolucci, Luiz Fernando

    2008-07-01

    The clinical observation of involuntary motor activity during application of a particular style of myofascial release (Muscle Repositioning-MR) has led to the hypothesis that this technique might evoke neurological reactions. Preliminary EMG recordings presented here show involuntary tonic cervical erector action during MR. Involuntary eye movements were also observed. This article presents these experimental data, along with clinical observations during the application of MR in the treatment of musculoskeletal conditions. The author hypothesizes that MR might constitute a novel manual technique: it produces unique palpatory sensations for the practitioner (e.g., a sense of firmness to the touch and the integration of bodily segments into a single block) that correspond to unique sensory experiences for the client. The article raises the possibility that MR's specific sensory input might activate the central nervous system, thus eliciting neural reactions. These reactions, in turn, might be related to the technique's efficacy. As the EMG objectively measures reactions contemporaneous with subjective palpatory phenomena, MR potentially brings the objective and subjective into congruence. EMG monitoring of touch could serve as an objective criterion in the development of treatment protocols, as well as a feedback tool for teaching. Greater objectivity, precision and reproducibility are all possible outcomes of such an approach. The author believes that MR can be used in various therapeutic settings--either as the principal approach, or as an adjunct to a variety of other approaches.

  10. [Pediatric orthopedic cervical spine problems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helenius, Ilkka

    2016-01-01

    Treatment-requiring diseases of the cervical spine in children are rare. The most common cases requiring medical assessment and treatment are acute torticollis and various accidents. A torticollis having lasted for more than a week should be recognized, because it can be treated by skull traction. Cervical spine fractures in children under school age are very rare, the most common being a fracture of the base of the dens of the second cervical vertebra. Cervical spine instability is almost always associated with an underlying disease. PMID:27400588

  11. De novo spine surgery as a predictor of additional spine surgery at the same or distant spine regions

    OpenAIRE

    Tolaymat, Abdullah; Abbara, Moataz; Robinson III, Joe Sam; Walid, M Sami; Robinson Jr, Joe Sam

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Degenerative spine disorders are steadily increasing parallel to the aging of the population with considerable impact on cost and productivity. In this paper we study the prevalence and risk factors for multiple spine surgery and its impact on cost. Methods: Data on 1,153 spine surgery inpatients operated between October 2005 and September 2008 (index spine surgery) in regard to the number of previous spine surgeries and location of surgeries (cervical or lumbar) were retrospect...

  12. Massive Pneumocephalus And Meiningitis Following Spine Instrumentation

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar S; Ravi Kumar P; Manasseh N.

    2005-01-01

    Pneumocephalus with meningitis usually occurs as a complication of head injury or surgery. It is uncommon after procedures or traumatic injuries to spine. We report an adolescent presenting with features of Pott′s spine who developed pneumocephalus and meningitis following spine instrumentation (stabilization of thoracic spine). Early recognition and prompt treatment with parenteral antibiotics resulted in a favorable outcome.

  13. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI): Lumbar Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... performed to assess the anatomy of the lumbar spine, to help plan surgery on the spine, or to monitor changes in the spine after ... For example, it can find areas of the spine where the spinal canal (which ... narrowed and might require surgery. It can assess the disks to see whether ...

  14. Typhoid spine - A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Salmonella typhi isolated from L4-L5 spine is reported here. The causative organism was not suspected preoperatively. The patient responded favourably to surgical drainage and appropriate antibiotic therapy.

  15. Pulmonary complications after spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Stundner, Ottokar; Taher, Fadi; Pawar, Abhijit; Memtsoudis, Stavros G.

    2012-01-01

    Spine surgery is one of the fastest growing branches of orthopedic surgery. Patients often present with a relatively high acuity and, depending on surgical approach, morbidity and mortality can be comparatively high. Among the most prevalent and most frequently fatality-bound perioperative complications are those affecting the pulmonary system; evidence of clinical or subclinical lung injury triggered by spine surgical procedures is emerging. Increasing burden of comorbidity among the patient...

  16. The “addicted” spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Saturnino; Mulas, Giovanna; Piras, Francesca; Diana, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Units of dendritic branches called dendritic spines represent more than simply decorative appendages of the neuron and actively participate in integrative functions of “spinous” nerve cells thereby contributing to the general phenomenon of synaptic plasticity. In animal models of drug addiction, spines are profoundly affected by treatments with drugs of abuse and represent important sub cellular markers which interfere deeply into the physiology of the neuron thereby providing an example of the burgeoning and rapidly increasing interest in “structural plasticity”. Medium Spiny Neurons (MSNs) of the Nucleus Accumbens (Nacc) show a reduced number of dendritic spines and a decrease in TH-positive terminals upon withdrawal from opiates, cannabinoids and alcohol. The reduction is localized “strictly” to second order dendritic branches where dopamine (DA)-containing terminals, impinging upon spines, make synaptic contacts. In addition, long-thin spines seems preferentially affected raising the possibility that cellular learning of these neurons may be selectively hampered. These findings suggest that dendritic spines are affected by drugs widely abused by humans and provide yet another example of drug-induced aberrant neural plasticity with marked reflections on the physiology of synapses, system structural organization, and neuronal circuitry remodeling. PMID:25324733

  17. Postoperative spine; Postoperative Wirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaeger, R. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Neurologische Klinik und Poliklinik, Basel (Switzerland); Lieb, J.M. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland); Shariat, K. [Neurochirurgie Koeln-Merheim, Koeln (Germany); Ahlhelm, F.J. [Kantonsspital Baden AG, Abteilung Neuroradiologie, Institut fuer Radiologie, Baden (Switzerland)

    2014-11-15

    Approximately 15-30 % of surgical procedures involving the lumbar spine are associated with complications that require further diagnostic work-up. The choice of imaging modality for postoperative complications depends on the extent, pattern and temporal evolution of the postoperative neurological signs and symptoms as well as on the preoperative clinical status, the surgical procedure itself and the underlying pathology. The interpretation of imaging findings, in particular the distinction between postoperative complications and normally expected nonspecific postoperative imaging alterations can be challenging and requires the integration of clinical neurological information and the results of laboratory tests. The combination of different imaging techniques might help in cases of equivocal imaging results. (orig.) [German] Etwa 15-30 % der operativen Eingriffe im Bereich der lumbalen Wirbelsaeule verlaufen nicht komplikationsfrei und erfordern weiterfuehrende Abklaerungen. Die Auswahl des bildgebenden Verfahrens im Rahmen postoperativer Komplikationen haengt dabei wesentlich von der zeitlichen Entwicklung, dem Ausmass und Verteilungsmuster der neuaufgetretenen klinisch-neurologischen bzw. orthopaedischen Symptome sowie von den Ausfaellen vor dem Eingriff, der zugrundeliegenden Pathologie und der Lokalisation und Art des Eingriffs ab. Die Interpretation der bildgebenden Befunde, insbesondere die Abgrenzung postoperativer Komplikationen von natuerlicherweise zu erwartenden postoperativen Veraenderungen kann dabei eine Herausforderung darstellen. Bei unklaren Befunden kann ergaenzend zur eingehend klinisch-neurologischen und laborchemischen Bestandsaufnahme auch der kombinierte Einsatz mehrerer bildgebender Modalitaeten diagnostisch weiterhelfen. (orig.)

  18. The postsurgical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos Armentia, E; Prada González, R; Silva Priegue, N

    2016-04-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome is the persistence or reappearance of pain after surgery on the spine. This term encompasses both mechanical and nonmechanical causes. Imaging techniques are essential in postoperative follow-up and in the evaluation of potential complications responsible for failed back surgery syndrome. This review aims to familiarize radiologists with normal postoperative changes and to help them identify the pathological imaging findings that reflect failed back surgery syndrome. To interpret the imaging findings, it is necessary to know the type of surgery performed in each case and the time elapsed since the intervention. In techniques used to fuse the vertebrae, it is essential to evaluate the degree of bone fusion, the material used (both its position and its integrity), the bone over which it lies, the interface between the implant and bone, and the vertebral segments that are adjacent to metal implants. In decompressive techniques it is important to know what changes can be expected after the intervention and to be able to distinguish them from peridural fibrosis and the recurrence of a hernia. It is also crucial to know the imaging findings for postoperative infections. Other complications are also reviewed, including arachnoiditis, postoperative fluid collections, and changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the surgical site.

  19. Radiology illustrated. Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Joon Woo [Seoul National Univ. Bundang Hospital, Seongnam, Kyonggi-do (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology; Kwon, Jong Won [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Radiology

    2014-04-01

    Offers a practical approach to image interpretation for spinal disorders. Includes numerous high-quality radiographic images and schematic illustrations. Will serve as a self-learning book covering daily routine cases from the basic to the advanced. Radiology Illustrated: Spine is an up-to-date, superbly illustrated reference in the style of a teaching file that has been designed specifically to be of value in clinical practice. Common, critical, and rare but distinctive spinal disorders are described succinctly with the aid of images highlighting important features and informative schematic illustrations. The first part of the book, on common spinal disorders, is for radiology residents and other clinicians who are embarking on the interpretation of spinal images. A range of key disorders are then presented, including infectious spondylitis, cervical trauma, spinal cord disorders, spinal tumors, congenital disorders, uncommon degenerative disorders, inflammatory arthritides, and vascular malformations. The third part is devoted to rare but clinically significant spinal disorders with characteristic imaging features, and the book closes by presenting practical tips that will assist in the interpretation of confusing cases.

  20. Transconjunctival subperiosteal fat reposition for tear trough deformity: pedicled fat redraping versus septal reset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Seungki; Shin, Jong In; Kim, Jeong Tae; Kim, Youn Hwan

    2014-11-01

    Fat-preserving lower blepharoplasty techniques are increasingly common, but to date there has been insufficient data comparing the results of fat repositioning and septal reset. The authors compared the aesthetic results of the 2 methods using statistical analysis. A total of 120 patients, who had undergone transconjunctival subperiosteal fat repositioning from February 2008 to April 2009, were included. Group 1 (71 patients) underwent fat reposition with pedicled infraorbital fat redraping. Group 2 (49 patients) underwent septal reset to reposition the underlying fat. Documentation of the results with grading (grade 0-III) by 2 surgeons was done, and the results were evaluated for clinical improvement.Septal reset showed statistical significance on grade improvement compared to direct fat manipulation methods in the patients with grade II and grade III deformities. Septal reset also showed a trend for a higher degree of improvement compared to the latter. There were no major postoperative complications. PMID:23722575

  1. Repositioning reference new methods and new services for a new age

    CERN Document Server

    Rozaklis, Lillian

    2014-01-01

    Repositioning Reference reimagines reference services in libraries and information organizations and the role of reference librarians, taking into account rapid developments in technology and information-specific services in non-library sectors.

  2. Elimination of a "Gummy Smile" With Crown Lengthening and Lip Repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahn, Douglas H

    2016-01-01

    Excessive gingival display is considered unattractive by many patients. A combination of surgical approaches may be required to correct this problem. Clinical crown lengthening involves recontouring crestal bone levels and moving the gingival margin in an apical direction. Lip repositioning reduces gingival display by limiting upper lip movement when smiling. This article describes a case in which a combination of clinical crown lengthening and lip repositioning was used to correct excessive gingival display when smiling.

  3. Patient repositioning and pressure ulcer risk—Monitoring interface pressures of at-risk patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Peterson, PhD

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Repositioning patients regularly to prevent pressure ulcers and reduce interface pressures is the standard of care, yet prior work has found that standard repositioning does not relieve all areas of at-risk tissue in nondisabled subjects. To determine whether this holds true for high-risk patients, we assessed the effectiveness of routine repositioning in relieving at-risk tissue of the perisacral area using interface pressure mapping. Bedridden patients at risk for pressure ulcer formation (n = 23, Braden score 95% of the observation period. Thirteen participants were observed in three distinct positions (supine, turned left, turned right, and all had specific skin areas (166 +/– 184 cm2 that exceeded pressure thresholds for >95% of the observation period. At-risk patients have skin areas that are likely always at risk throughout their hospital stay despite repositioning. Healthcare providers are unaware of the actual tissue-relieving effectiveness (or lack thereof of their repositioning interventions, which may partially explain why pressure ulcer mitigation strategies are not always successful. Relieving at-risk tissue is a necessary part of pressure ulcer prevention, but the repositioning practice itself needs improvement.

  4. Accuracy of positioning the cervical spine for radiation therapy and the relationship to GTV, CTV and PTV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippenes, Hege; Gavin, Patrick R; Sande, Ronald D; Rogers, Dennis; Sweet, Vaughn

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the accuracy and precision of a rigid positioning device for repositioning the cervical spine accurately and precisely during conformal radiation therapy of dogs. Fifteen purpose bred research dogs in a radiation therapy study were included. The dogs were positioned using a head holder and a deflatable pillow attached to the treatment table. Port films were reviewed retrospectively, and repositioning precision was recorded by measurements in three orthogonal planes of the head, 2nd cervical vertebra and 1st thoracic spinous process. Mean treatment position was compared to the planning position for a measurement of systematic set-up error. Mean interfraction position variation of the 2nd cervical vertebra was 0.2, 0.1 and 0.2 cm for the ventrodorsal, caudocranial and laterolateral directions respectively, and the average systematic set up error was 0.2, 0.1 and 0.2 cm for the ventrodorsal, caudocranial and laterolateral directions respectively. Knowledge of the magnitude of reposition errors should be included when determining the margins around the tumor. PMID:14703256

  5. Multiplanar CT of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, S.L.G.; Glenn, W.V. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This is an illustrated text on computed tomography (CT) of the lumbar spine with an emphasis on the role and value of multiplanar imaging for helping determine diagnoses. The book has adequate discussion of scanning techniques for the different regions, interpretations of various abnormalities, degenerative disk disease, and different diagnoses. There is a 50-page chapter on detailed sectional anatomy of the spine and useful chapters on the postoperative spine and the planning and performing of spinal surgery with CT multiplanar reconstruction. There are comprehensive chapters on spinal tumors and trauma. The final two chapters of the book are devoted to CT image processing using digital networks and CT applications of medical computer graphics.

  6. Cervical Spine Instrumentation in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedequist, Daniel J; Emans, John B

    2016-06-01

    Instrumentation of the cervical spine enhances stability and improves arthrodesis rates in children undergoing surgery for deformity or instability. Various morphologic and clinical studies have been conducted in children, confirming the feasibility of anterior or posterior instrumentation of the cervical spine with modern implants. Knowledge of the relevant spine anatomy and preoperative imaging studies can aid the clinician in understanding the pitfalls of instrumentation for each patient. Preoperative planning, intraoperative positioning, and adherence to strict surgical techniques are required given the small size of children. Instrumentation options include anterior plating, occipital plating, and a variety of posterior screw techniques. Complications related to screw malposition include injury to the vertebral artery, neurologic injury, and instrumentation failure. PMID:27097300

  7. Effect of short-term application of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk repositioning in healthy females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Sara A; Frost, Lydia R; Vallis, Lori Ann; Brown, Stephen H M

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the potential effects of kinesio tape on the flexion-relaxation phenomenon, trunk postural control and trunk position sense when applied for a short period (30 min) to the low back of healthy female participants. Twenty-four participants were assigned to one of two groups: kinesio tape applied in either the recommended stretched or non-stretched (control) manner over the low back. Tests were performed at three time points (pre-tape, with tape, post-tape) to assess low-back muscle flexion-relaxation, position sense during active trunk repositioning and trunk postural control during seated balance. Results demonstrated that wearing kinesio tape did not affect the angle at which the erector spinae muscles became silent during trunk flexion (flexion-relaxation). Trunk repositioning error increased when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and this increased error persisted after the tape was removed. Seated balance control improved when wearing kinesio tape in both the stretched and non-stretched manner, and these improvements persisted after the tape was removed. In conclusion, these findings do not support the general suggestions that short-term use of kinesio tape on the low-back region alter low-back muscle activation and enhance tasks related to proprioception, at least under these taping conditions in a group of healthy females.

  8. Degenerative disorders of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patients with back pain and degenerative disorders of the spine have a significant impact on health care costs. Some authors estimate that up to 80% of all adults experience back pain at some point in their lives. Disk herniation represents one of the most frequent causes. Nevertheless, other degenerative diseases have to be considered. In this paper, pathology and imaging of degenerative spine diseases will be discussed, starting from pathophysiology of normal age-related changes of the intervertebral disk and vertebral body. (orig.)

  9. Degenerative disorders of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallucci, Massimo; Puglielli, Edoardo; Splendiani, Alessandra [University of L' Aquila, Department of Radiology, L' Aquila (Italy); Pistoia, Francesca; Spacca, Giorgio [S. Salvatore Hospital, Department of Neuroscience, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2005-03-01

    Patients with back pain and degenerative disorders of the spine have a significant impact on health care costs. Some authors estimate that up to 80% of all adults experience back pain at some point in their lives. Disk herniation represents one of the most frequent causes. Nevertheless, other degenerative diseases have to be considered. In this paper, pathology and imaging of degenerative spine diseases will be discussed, starting from pathophysiology of normal age-related changes of the intervertebral disk and vertebral body. (orig.)

  10. CASTOR: Cathode/Anode Satellite Thruster for Orbital Repositioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mruphy, Gloria A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of CASTOR (Cathode/Anode Satellite Thruster for Orbital Repositioning) satellite is to demonstrate in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) a nanosatellite that uses a Divergent Cusped Field Thruster (DCFT) to perform orbital maneuvers representative of an orbital transfer vehicle. Powered by semi-deployable solar arrays generating 165W of power, CASTOR will achieve nearly 1 km/s of velocity increment over one year. As a technology demonstration mission, success of CASTOR in LEO will pave the way for a low cost, high delta-V orbital transfer capability for small military and civilian payloads in support of Air Force and NASA missions. The educational objective is to engage graduate and undergraduate students in critical roles in the design, development, test, carrier integration and on-orbit operations of CASTOR as a supplement to their curricular activities. This program is laying the foundation for a long-term satellite construction program at MIT. The satellite is being designed as a part of AFRL's University Nanosatellite Program, which provides the funding and a framework in which student satellite teams compete for a launch to orbit. To this end, the satellite must fit within an envelope of 50cmx50cmx60cm, have a mass of less than 50kg, and meet stringent structural and other requirements. In this framework, the CASTOR team successfully completed PDR in August 2009 and CDR in April 2010 and will compete at FCR (Flight Competition Review) in January 2011. The complexity of the project requires implementation of many systems engineering techniques which allow for development of CASTOR from conception through FCR and encompass the full design, fabrication, and testing process.

  11. Fractures of the Thoracic and Lumbar Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... evaluate the spinal fracture pattern and decide whether spine surgery is needed. A CT scan taken from the ... the fracture falls through the disks of the spine, surgery should be performed to stabilize the fracture. AAOS ...

  12. Automatic construction of patient-specific finite-element mesh of the spine from IVDs and vertebra segmentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M.; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2016-03-01

    Computational medicine aims at developing patient-specific models to help physicians in the diagnosis and treatment selection for patients. The spine, and other skeletal structures, is an articulated object, composed of rigid bones (vertebrae) and non-rigid parts (intervertebral discs (IVD), ligaments and muscles). These components are usually extracted from different image modalities, involving patient repositioning. In the case of the spine, these models require the segmentation of IVDs from MR and vertebrae from CT. In the literature, there exists a vast selection of segmentations methods, but there is a lack of approaches to align the vertebrae and IVDs. This paper presents a method to create patient-specific finite element meshes for biomechanical simulations, integrating rigid and non-rigid parts of articulated objects. First, the different parts are aligned in a complete surface model. Vertebrae extracted from CT are rigidly repositioned in between the IVDs, initially using the IVDs location and then refining the alignment using the MR image with a rigid active shape model algorithm. Finally, a mesh morphing algorithm, based on B-splines, is employed to map a template finite-element (volumetric) mesh to the patient-specific surface mesh. This morphing reduces possible misalignments and guarantees the convexity of the model elements. Results show that the accuracy of the method to align vertebrae into MR, together with IVDs, is similar to that of the human observers. Thus, this method is a step forward towards the automation of patient-specific finite element models for biomechanical simulations.

  13. Vertebral artery injuries in cervical spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, Gregory D.; Hsu, Wellington K.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Vertebral artery injuries during cervical spine surgery are rare, but potentially fatal. When performing cervical spine surgery, it is imperative that the surgeon has a systematic approach for avoiding, and if necessary, dealing with a vertebral artery injury. Methods: This is a review paper. Results: Upper posterior cervical spine surgeries put the vertebral artery at the highest risk, as opposed to anterior subaxial cervical spine procedures, which put the artery at the least ri...

  14. Magnetic resonance of the spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enzmann, D.R.; De La Paz, R.L.; Rubin, J.R.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Three chapters discuss principles of cerebrospinal fluid flow, spinal imaging techniques, and the physical basis and anatomic correlates of signal intensity in the spine. There are chapters on normal anatomy, congenital anomalies, trauma, tumors, infection, demyelinating disease, degenerative disease, vascular conditions, and syringomyelia.

  15. Kissing spines: fact or fancy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beks, J W

    1989-01-01

    In the Neurosurgical Clinic in Groningen 64 patients underwent surgery between 1975 and 1985 for a clinical and radiological syndrome described by Baastrup in 1933 and called in the Anglo-saxon literature: "kissing spines". Because the results of the surgical treatment were disappointing we submitted these results to further analysis. PMID:2589119

  16. Novel insight into drug repositioning: Methylthiouracil as a case in point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Moon-Chang; Jung, Byeongjin; Kang, Hyejin; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Bae, Jong-Sup

    2015-09-01

    Drug repositioning refers to the development of existing drugs for new indications. These drugs may have (I) failed to show efficacy in late stage clinical trials without safety issues; (II) stalled in the development for commercial reasons; (III) passed the point of patent expiry; or (IV) are being explored in new geographic markets. Over the past decade, pressure on the pharmaceutical industry caused by the 'innovation gap' owing to rising development costs and stagnant product output have become major reasons for the growing interest in drug repositioning. Companies that offer a variety of broad platforms for identifying new indications have emerged; some have been successful in building their own pipelines of candidates with reduced risks and timelines associated with further clinical development. The business models and platforms offered by these companies will be validated if they are able to generate positive proof-of-concept clinical data for their repositioned compounds. This review describes the strategy of biomarker-guided repositioning of chemotherapeutic drugs for inflammation therapy, considering the repositioning of methylthiouracil (MTU), an antithyroid drug, as a potential anti-inflammatory reagent. PMID:26117428

  17. The Oxygen Sensor PHD2 Controls Dendritic Spines and Synapses via Modification of Filamin A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Segura

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal function is highly sensitive to changes in oxygen levels, but how hypoxia affects dendritic spine formation and synaptogenesis is unknown. Here we report that hypoxia, chemical inhibition of the oxygen-sensing prolyl hydroxylase domain proteins (PHDs, and silencing of Phd2 induce immature filopodium-like dendritic protrusions, promote spine regression, reduce synaptic density, and decrease the frequency of spontaneous action potentials independently of HIF signaling. We identified the actin cross-linker filamin A (FLNA as a target of PHD2 mediating these effects. In normoxia, PHD2 hydroxylates the proline residues P2309 and P2316 in FLNA, leading to von Hippel-Lindau (VHL-mediated ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. In hypoxia, PHD2 inactivation rapidly upregulates FLNA protein levels because of blockage of its proteasomal degradation. FLNA upregulation induces more immature spines, whereas Flna silencing rescues the immature spine phenotype induced by PHD2 inhibition.

  18. Imaging of cervical spine injuries of childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khanna, Geetika; El-Khoury, Georges Y. [University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Department of Radiology, 3951 JPP, Iowa, IA (United States)

    2007-06-15

    Cervical spine injuries of children, though rare, have a high morbidity and mortality. The pediatric cervical spine is anatomically and biomechanically different from that of adults. Hence, the type, level and outcome of cervical spine injuries in children are different from those seen in adults. Normal developmental variants seen in children can make evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine challenging. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric cervical spine trauma, normal variants seen in children and specific injuries that are more common in the pediatric population. We also propose an evidence-based imaging protocol to avoid unnecessary imaging studies and minimize radiation exposure in children. (orig.)

  19. Cervical spine in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, Amy Hoi-Ying; Clark, Bruce Eric; David, David John; Anderson, Peter John

    2012-05-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a congenital syndrome with characteristic craniofacial malformations, which are well described in the literature. However, the presence of cervical spine dysmorphology in this syndrome has been minimally described. This study reviews cervical spine radiographs of 40 patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. In this sample, 7 of 40 patients displayed cervical spine anomalies, with 3 of these patients displaying multiple cervical spine anomalies. The patterns of spinal anomalies were variable, suggesting that the underlying genetic mutation has variable expressivity in cervical spine development as it does elsewhere in the craniofacial skeleton.

  20. Plasticity of dendritic spines: subcompartmentalization of signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgan, Lesley A; Yasuda, Ryohei

    2014-01-01

    The ability to induce and study neuronal plasticity in single dendritic spines has greatly advanced our understanding of the signaling mechanisms that mediate long-term potentiation. It is now clear that in addition to compartmentalization by the individual spine, subcompartmentalization of biochemical signals occurs at specialized microdomains within the spine. The spatiotemporal coordination of these complex cascades allows for the concomitant remodeling of the postsynaptic density and actin spinoskeleton and for the regulation of membrane traffic to express functional and structural plasticity. Here, we highlight recent findings in the signaling cascades at spine microdomains as well as the challenges and approaches to studying plasticity at the spine level. PMID:24215443

  1. Criação de um Repositório Digital Institucional

    OpenAIRE

    Marques, Sacramento

    2009-01-01

    Este trabalho tem como objectivo equacionar a necessidade da criação de um ou mais Repositórios Digitais no contexto actual da Força Aérea Portuguesa (FAP). São apontadas as diferentes áreas que potencialmente são candidatas à sua implementação, através da análise das suas características e especificidades. É ainda determinado o modelo de gestão dos eventuais repositórios a criar. Para atingir estes objectivos são em primeiro lugar definidos alguns conceitos essenciais como ...

  2. Reposition osteotomy for fracture neck of femur - A simplified technique of surgery and assessment of results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nath Rajendra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Delayed presentation of femoral neck fracture poses problem of management. Methods: Sixteen patients of fracture neck femur were treated with repositioning osteotomy and osteosynthesis with a 120 o double angle blade plate. Ten patients had Pauwel′s type II and 6 had type III fracture. Results : The average period for fracture healing was 14.87 weeks. No patient developed avascular necrosis. The average duration of follow up was 25 months. A new scoring system has been described. The results were excellent in four; good in nine; satisfactory in two and poor in one case. Conclusion : Reposition osteotomy provides stability and union in femoral neck fractures.

  3. Solving a static repositioning problem in bike-sharing systems using iterated tabu search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Sin C.; Szeto, W. Y.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we study the static bike repositioning problem where the problem consists of selecting a subset of stations to visit, sequencing them, and determining the pick-up/drop-off quantities (associated with each of the visited stations) under the various operational constraints. The objec......In this paper, we study the static bike repositioning problem where the problem consists of selecting a subset of stations to visit, sequencing them, and determining the pick-up/drop-off quantities (associated with each of the visited stations) under the various operational constraints...

  4. Fetal evaluation of spine dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulas, Dorothy [George Washington University Medical Center, Division of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiology, Children' s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-06-15

    Spinal dysraphism or neural tube defects (NTD) encompass a heterogeneous group of congenital spinal anomalies that result from the defective closure of the neural tube early in gestation with anomalous development of the caudal cell mass. Advances in ultrasound and MRI have dramatically improved the diagnosis and therapy of spinal dysraphism and caudal spinal anomalies both prenatally and postnatally. Advances in prenatal US including high frequency linear transducers and three dimensional imaging can provide detailed information concerning spinal anomalies. MR imaging is a complementary tool that can further elucidate spine abnormalities as well as associated central nervous system and non-CNS anomalies. Recent studies have suggested that 3-D CT can help further assess fetal spine anomalies in the third trimester. With the advent of fetal therapy including surgery, accurate prenatal diagnosis of open and closed spinal dysraphism becomes critical in appropriate counselling and perinatal management. (orig.)

  5. CLINICAL OBSERVATION ON THE THERAPEUTIC EFFECT OF ACUPUNCTURE PLUS MANUAL REPOSITION FOR TREATMENT OF ACUTE LUMBAR VERTEBRAL ARTICULAR DYSKINESIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    骆钧梵

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To observe the therapeutic effect of acupuncture plus manual reposition for treatment of acute lumbar vertebral articular dyskinesia for choosing a better remedy. Methods: 66 cases of acute lumbar vertebral articular dyskinesia were randomly divided into acupuncture plus manual reposition group (treatment group, n= 33) and routine manual reposition group (control group, n = 33). Yaotong-point was punctured, when, the patient was asked to move his or her waist simultaneously. Results: After one session of treatment, of the two 33 cases in treatment and control groups, 28 (84.85%) and20 (60.61%) were cured, 4 (12.12%) and 9 (27.27%) were improved, and 1 (3.03%) and 4 (12.12%) failed in the treatment. The therapeutic effect of treatment group was significantly superior to that of control group ( P< 0.05). Conclusion: Acupuncture combined with manual reposition is apparently superior to simple routine manual reposition in relieving acute lumbar vertebral articular dyskinesia.

  6. CT anatomy of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective CT scanning of the spine requires gantry opening greater than 50 cm, spatial resolution of less than 1 mm, contrast resolution of better than 0.5%, and a method for exact localization and selection of cut levels. With a suitable scanner, excellent images of the intervertebral disc, dural sac, spinal cord, facet joints, ligamentum flavum, and epidural veins can be obtained. The purpose of this report is to describe the normal CT appearance of the spinal soft tissues. (orig.)

  7. Understanding Competition in Spine Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Alok D; Schroeder, Gregory D; West, Michael E; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-04-01

    The changing landscape from volume to value represents a natural transformation in the health care industry. Increasingly provider groups are finding themselves responding to unfamiliar market forces. Whether explicit or implicit, competition is playing a larger role for the sustainability of providers. For spine care providers who are attempting to navigate the transition from volume to value, understanding the forces that shape competition in health care can help achieve success. PMID:26925860

  8. MRI of the fetal spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Erin M. [Departement of Radiology, Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2004-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the fetal spine is a vital complement to fetal sonographic examination. Assessing the wide spectrum of spinal dysraphism, as well as spinal neoplasia, allows for more correct prenatal diagnoses, patient care planning, and patient counselling. Proper appraisal of the value of experimental procedures, such as fetal myelomeningocoele repair, requires a high level of diagnostic accuracy for the selection and follow-up of appropriate candidates. (orig.)

  9. Quick repositioning maneuver for horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinrang Li; Pengfei Guo; Shiyu Tian; Keliang Li; Hao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the efficacy of quick repositioning maneuver for horizontal semicircular canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (H-BPPV). Methods:Clinical data of 67 patients with H-BPPV who underwent quick repositioning maneuver in our hospital from July 2009 to November 2014 were retrospectively analyzed. The maneuver involved rotating the patient in the axial plane for 180? from the involved side towards contralateral side as quickly as possible. Results:Complete symptom resolution was achieved in 61 patients (91.0%) at one week and in 64 patients (95.5%) at 3 months post-treatment. During the repositioning maneuver process, there were no obvious untoward responses except transient nausea with or without vomiting in a few patients. Conclusion:The results indicate that the quick repositioning maneuver is an easy and effective alternative treatment in the management of H-BPPV. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Production & hosting by Elsevier (Singapore) Pte Ltd On behalf of PLA General Hospital Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  10. Can stimulating massage improve joint repositioning error in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Hans; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else M;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of massage applied to the thigh muscles on joint repositioning error (JRE) in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA).We hypothesized that stimulating massage of the muscles around an osteoarthritic knee joint, could improve the...

  11. Program management for spring location and repositioning (SLAR) operations at Pickering NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1988 a major project was planned for Units 5 and 6 of Pickering NGS (Nuclear Generating Station). The project involved remotely locating and repositioning the four spacer (garter) springs separating each pressure tube from the surrounding calandria tube. This paper describes the requirements for SLAR, and the work being undertaken at Pickering NGS to implement the project

  12. Repositioning Your EMBA Program and Reinventing Your Brand: A Case Study Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Francis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to illustrate how Fordham University, the Jesuit University of New York, repositioned its Executive MBA Program and reinvented its brand, over a ten year period. More specifically, this research will analyze the current state of the Executive MBA market and will discuss the best practices and frameworks implemented…

  13. Repositioning Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) for Youths Employment and National Security in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunaya, T. C.; Udoudo, Ekereobong S.

    2015-01-01

    The paper focused on repositioning Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) for youth's employment and national security in Nigeria. It examined briefly the concepts of technical vocational education and training (TVET), youths, unemployment and national security as well as the effects of unemployment on national security in Nigeria.…

  14. Pre and post garter spring repositioning ultrasonic inspection of pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper present a description of the ultrasonic cracked hydride blister detections system used for pre and post inspection of pressure tubes during garter spring repositioning in CNE (Embalse Nuclear Power Station). Ultrasonic system setup configuration, transducers characteristics, blister detection head, calibration of parameters, operating procedure, records of ultrasonic inspections and evaluation. (author)

  15. Repositioning Guidance and Counselling and Curriculum Innovation in Higher Education in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onyilofor, Florence N. C.

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on repositioning guidance and counseling and curriculum innovation in higher education in Nigeria. Descriptive survey research design was employed in the study. The study covered four Federal universities in the South-West Geopolitical zone of Nigeria, namely University of Ibadan in Oyo State; Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife…

  16. Repositioning of an Intraventricular Dislocated Aortic Valve during Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Natour, Ehsan; Douglas, Yvonne L.; Jainandunsing, Jayant S.; Schurer, Remco A. J.; van der Werf, Hendrik W.; van den Heuvel, Ad F. M.

    2014-01-01

    The case is presented of a 75-year-old man referred for transcatheter aortic valve implantation. During the procedure the prosthetic aortic valve became dislocated into the left ventricle shortly after expansion. The subsequent steps taken to reposition the valve using only materials at hand are des

  17. Charcot Spine and Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Loriaut

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charcot spine is rare condition whose association with Parkinson’s disease (PD has not been reported yet. The authors reported the cases of two patients with PD who developed Charcot spine. Both patients presented with a history of back pain and bilateral radicular leg pain. They had complete clinical and radiological assessment. Lumbar spine was involved in both patients. Clinical features and response to treatment were described. In the first case, circumferential fusion and stabilization were performed on the dislocated vertebral levels. A solid and stable fusion of the spine was obtained with satisfactory clinical outcome. Surgical treatment has been recommended to the other patient. In both cases, no other neurological etiology was found to account for Charcot spine. In conclusion, Charcot spine is associated with several neurological affections but has not previously been reported in association with Parkinson’s disease.

  18. Thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for tuberculosis of cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjiv Huzurbazar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The primary objective was to report this rare case and discuss the probable mechanism of thyroid storm following anterior cervical spine surgery for Kochs cervical spine.

  19. Imaging membrane potential in dendritic spines

    OpenAIRE

    Nuriya, Mutsuo; Jiang, Jiang; Nemet, Boaz; Eisenthal, Kenneth B.; Yuste, Rafael

    2006-01-01

    Dendritic spines mediate most excitatory inputs in the brain. Although it is clear that spines compartmentalize calcium, it is still unknown what role, if any, they play in integrating synaptic inputs. To investigate the electrical function of spines directly, we used second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging of membrane potential in pyramidal neurons from hippocampal cultures and neocortical brain slices. With FM 4-64 as an intracellular SHG chromophore, we imaged membrane potential in the so...

  20. Adverse events in spine surgery in Sweden

    OpenAIRE

    Öhrn, Annica; Olai, Anders; Rutberg, Hans; Nilsen, Per; Tropp, Hans

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose Our knowledge of complications and adverse events in spinal surgery is limited, especially concerning incidence and consequences. We therefore investigated adverse events in spine surgery in Sweden by comparing patient claims data from the County Councils' Mutual Insurance Company register with data from the National Swedish Spine Register (Swespine). Methods We analyzed patient claims (n = 182) to the insurance company after spine surgery performed between 2003 and 200...

  1. Epithelioid hemangioma of the spine: Two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Bendan M. O'Shea, MD; Jinsuh Kim, MD

    2015-01-01

    We report two cases of epithelioid hemangioma (EH) manifested in the thoracic spine with associated clinical, radiographic, and pathological findings. Epithelioid hemangioma is a benign vascular tumor that can involve any bone (including the spine in a subset of patients). Although recognized as a benign tumor by the WHO, it can display locally aggressive features. Within the spine, these features may lead to pain, instability, and/or neurologic dysfunction. The radiographic appearance is mos...

  2. Diagnostic Approach to Pediatric Spine Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Martinetti, Carola; Morana, Giovanni; Severino, Mariasavina; Tortora, Domenico

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the developmental features of the pediatric spine and spinal cord, including embryologic steps and subsequent growth of the osteocartilaginous spine and contents is necessary for interpretation of the pathologic events that may affect the pediatric spine. MR imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnostic evaluation of patients suspected of harboring spinal abnormalities, whereas computed tomography and ultrasonography play a more limited, complementary role. This article discusses the embryologic and developmental anatomy features of the spine and spinal cord, together with some technical points and pitfalls, and the most common indications for pediatric spinal MR imaging.

  3. Chondrosarcoma of the Mobile Spine and Sacrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan M. Stuckey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Chondrosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor of bone. This family of tumors can be primary malignant tumors or a secondary malignant transformation of an underlying benign cartilage tumor. Pain is often the initial presenting complaint when chondrosarcoma involves the spine. In the mobile spine, chondrosarcoma commonly presents within the vertebral body and shows a predilection for the thoracic spine. Due to the resistance of chondrosarcoma to both radiation and chemotherapy, treatment is focused on surgery. With en bloc excision of chondrosarcoma of the mobile spine and sacrum patients can have local recurrence rates as low as 20%.

  4. THE EFFECT OF WEARING HEADSCARVES ON CERVICAL SPINE PROPRIOCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samiah F. Alqabbani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proprioception plays an important role in sensorimotor control of posture and movement. Impairments in cervical proprioception have been demonstrated in subjects with whiplash-associated disorder, patients with age-related degeneration, and patients with articular diseases or spondylosis. The joint position error test is widely used to measure head repositioning accuracy. Objective: The purpose of this pilot study was to compare cervical spine joint position error in females who routinely wear headscarves to females that do not wear headscarves. Methods: Twelve females with mean age 27.5±4.0 years were divided into two groups: females who routinely wear headscarves (n=6, and females who never wear headscarves (n=6. Joint position error was measured using a head-mounted laser while subjects were seated. The tasks involved relocating the head to neutral after flexion, extension, right rotation, and left rotation. A total of six trials were done for each direction. Results: The joint position error was higher in females wearing headscarves compared to females who do not wear them in the cumulative joint position error score (8.2±1.0 vs. 4.4±1.0, p=0.06 as well as during head rotation to the right (9.3±1.6 vs. 3.1±1.6, p=0.06. Conclusion: Wearing headscarves may increase the cervical joint position error and can negatively impact postural control. However, further studies are needed to confirm this finding.

  5. Targeting the new generation woman: voice-over as a tool in gender repositioning traditionally male dominant product

    OpenAIRE

    Staunton, Ciara

    1995-01-01

    This exploratory research study examines the power of the voice-over as a tool in gender re-positioning of a traditionally male dominant product and the response of the female market to such re-positioning. The increasing consumption by females of masculine products has led marketers to question how they can target such products at the female market, without losing the existing male customers. A potentially appropriate method of doing so is through subtle gender re-positioning by altering the...

  6. THE SPINE OF THE COSMIC WEB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A.; Platen, Erwin; van de Weygaert, Rien; Szalay, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    We present the SpineWeb framework for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its walls, filaments, and cluster nodes. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the SpineWeb method invokes the local adjacency properties of the boundaries between th

  7. Sport injuries of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article reports on injuries of the cervical spine occurring during sports activities. An attempt is made to reconstruct the movements which led to the cervical spine injuries in question. In two cases of accidents occuring during bathing, one football accident and a toboggan accident, the injuries concerned point to hyperextension of the cervical spine as cause of the injury. In another football accident and a riding accident, the changes observed allow us to conclude that the movement leading to the injury must have been a hyperflexion. One accident occurring while jumping on the trampolin resulted in an injury of the upper cervical spine pointing to the action of a compressive force on the cervical spine in addition to the force resulting in hyperflexion. (orig.)

  8. Automated fetal spine detection in ultrasound images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolay, Paresh; Vajinepalli, Pallavi; Bhattacharya, Puranjoy; Firtion, Celine; Sisodia, Rajendra Singh

    2009-02-01

    A novel method is proposed for the automatic detection of fetal spine in ultrasound images along with its orientation in this paper. This problem presents a variety of challenges, including robustness to speckle noise, variations in the visible shape of the spine due to orientation of the ultrasound probe with respect to the fetus and the lack of a proper edge enclosing the entire spine on account of its composition out of distinct vertebra. The proposed method improves robustness and accuracy by making use of two independent techniques to estimate the spine, and then detects the exact location using a cross-correlation approach. Experimental results show that the proposed method is promising for fetal spine detection.

  9. Antiprotozoal Activity Profiling of Approved Drugs: A Starting Point toward Drug Repositioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcel Kaiser

    Full Text Available Neglected tropical diseases cause significant morbidity and mortality and are a source of poverty in endemic countries. Only a few drugs are available to treat diseases such as leishmaniasis, Chagas' disease, human African trypanosomiasis and malaria. Since drug development is lengthy and expensive, a drug repurposing strategy offers an attractive fast-track approach to speed up the process. A set of 100 registered drugs with drug repositioning potential for neglected diseases was assembled and tested in vitro against four protozoan parasites associated with the aforementioned diseases. Several drugs and drug classes showed in vitro activity in those screening assays. The results are critically reviewed and discussed in the perspective of a follow-up drug repositioning strategy where R&D has to be addressed with limited resources.

  10. Repositioning of premaxilla in bilateral cleft lip and palate using a "J-hook headgear".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecik, Defne; Enacar, Ayhan

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this clinical approach is to present the successful treatment of the severely protruded and extruded premaxilla with high-pull J-hook headgear. Two patients with bilateral cleft lip and palate deformity and a protruding and extruding premaxilla causing a deep bite were treated with high-pull J-hook headgear and fixed orthodontic appliances. The lateral cephalometric measurements before and after orthodontic treatment were evaluated with Ricketts analysis. The premaxillae of the two patients were repositioned, correcting the deep overbite and overjet and a well-functioning occlusion was attained. The repositioning of an inferiorly positioned and protruded premaxilla with J-hook headgear is an alternative treatment approach compared to other treatment modalities.

  11. Helmet Versus Active Repositioning for Plagiocephaly: A Three-Dimensional Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lipira, A.B.; Gordon, S.; Darvann, Tron Andre;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Orthotic helmets and active repositioning are the most common treatments for deformational plagiocephaly (DP). Existing evidence is not sufficient to objectively inform decisions between these options. A three-dimensional (3D), whole-head asymmetry analysis was used...... for severity of initial deformity. Surfaces were spatially registered to a symmetric template, which was deformed to achieve detailed right-to-left point correspondence for every point on the head surface. A ratio-metric asymmetry value was calculated for each point relative to its contralateral counterpart....... Maximum and mean asymmetry values were determined. Change in mean and maximum asymmetry with treatment was the basis for group comparison. RESULTS: The helmeted group had a larger reduction than the repositioned group in both maximum (4.0% vs 2.5%; P = .02) and mean asymmetry (0.9% vs 0.5%; P = .02...

  12. Repositioning urban governments? Energy efficiency and Australia’s changing climate and energy governance regimes.

    OpenAIRE

    McGuirk, Pauline; Dowling, Robyn; Bulkeley, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Urban local governments are important players in climate governance, and their roles are evolving. This review traces the changing nexus of Australia’s climate policy, energy policy and energy efficiency imperatives and its repositioning of urban local governments. We characterise the ways urban local governments’ capacities and capabilities are being mobilised in light of a changing multi-level political opportunity structure around energy efficiency. The shifts we observe not only extend lo...

  13. A Subpathway-Based Method of Drug Reposition for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hai-Ying; Liu, Jian-Qiao; Mai, Zi-xin; Zeng, Yan-Ting

    2014-01-01

    The need for development of new therapeutic agents for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is urgent due to general lack of efficient and specialized drugs currently available. We aimed to explore the metabolic mechanism of PCOS and inferred drug reposition for PCOS by a subpathway-based method. Using the GSE34526 microarray data from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, we first identified the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between PCOS and normal samples. Then, we identified 13 signifi...

  14. Prediction of Drug-Target Interactions for Drug Repositioning Only Based on Genomic Expression Similarity

    OpenAIRE

    Kejian Wang; Jiazhi Sun; Shufeng Zhou; Chunling Wan; Shengying Qin; Can Li; Lin He; Lun Yang

    2013-01-01

    Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI). However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore develop...

  15. Short Term Outcome of Anterior Lamellar Reposition in Treating Trachomatous Trichiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Rania A. Ahmed; Abdelbaky, Sameh H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the outcome of anterior lamellar reposition (ALR) in treating trachomatous trichiasis. Methods. Patients with trachomatous trichiasis or entropion with short tarsus were treated by ALR between February 2009 and November 2013. This included splitting of the lid margin behind the aberrant lash line to separate the lid lamellae. The anterior lamella was recessed and fixated using 4/0 silk sutures. The extra lashes and their routes were excised. Sutures were removed by the 3r...

  16. DenguePredict: An Integrated Drug Repositioning Approach towards Drug Discovery for Dengue

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, QuanQiu; Xu, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Dengue is a viral disease of expanding global incidence without cures. Here we present a drug repositioning system (DenguePredict) leveraging upon a unique drug treatment database and vast amounts of disease- and drug-related data. We first constructed a large-scale genetic disease network with enriched dengue genetics data curated from biomedical literature. We applied a network-based ranking algorithm to find dengue-related diseases from the disease network. We then developed a novel algori...

  17. The Comparison of Cervical Repositioning Errors According to Smartphone Addiction Grades

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, JeonHyeong; Seo, KyoChul

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare cervical repositioning errors according to smartphone addiction grades of adults in their 20s. [Subjects and Methods] A survey of smartphone addiction was conducted of 200 adults. Based on the survey results, 30 subjects were chosen to participate in this study, and they were divided into three groups of 10; a Normal Group, a Moderate Addiction Group, and a Severe Addiction Group. After attaching a C-ROM, we measured the cervical repositionin...

  18. Dual beam encoded extended fractional Fourier transform security hologram with in-built repositioning

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Amit K Sharma; D P Chhachhia; D Mohan; A K Aggarwal

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple method for making dual beam encoded extended fractional Fourier transform (EFRT) security holograms. The hologram possesses different stages of encoding so that security features are concealed and remain invisible to the counterfeiter. These concealed and encoded anticounterfeit security features in the security hologram can only be read through a key hologram. Key hologram also facilitates in-built repositioning of security hologram. The method of fabrication, the principle of reconstruction and the experimental results are presented.

  19. The aging spine in sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borg-Stein, Joanne; Elson, Lauren; Brand, Erik

    2012-07-01

    1. Masters athletes may experience low back pain from multiple sources. Masters athletes with discogenic back pain should avoid or modify sports with combined rotational and compressive forces; individuals with facet-mediated pain should avoid or modify sports with excessive extension and rotation. 2. Optimization of flexibility, strength, endurance, and core control is critical. Sports specific training, realistic goal setting, and counseling are of maximal importance. 3. Overall, the health benefits of continued sports and athletic participation outweigh the potential risks of spinal degeneration in middle-aged athletes. There is little correlation between radiographic appearance of the spine and symptoms; therefore, symptoms should serve as the primary guide when determining activity modifications. Overall, masters athletes should be encouraged to remain active and fit to enhance their quality of life and reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease.

  20. Hemangiopericytoma of the cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghvendra V Ramdasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old male presented with neck pain and dysesthesias in the right upper limb. On examination, he had a firm, well-defined midline posterior cervical mass discernible on palpation at the mid-cervical level. He had no neurological deficit. Neuroradiology revealed a variegated enhancing cervical mass is arising from C3 lamina. The mass extended into the right extradural space eroding the C3 lamina and posteriorly into the intermuscular plane. The tumor was excised totally. Histopathology of the tumor showed features of hemangiopericytoma (HPC. The patient underwent postoperative radiotherapy. Primary osseous spinal HPC are rare malignant extra-axial tumors that tend to recur and metastasize. Only two cases of primary osseous HPC have been reported earlier to involve the cervical spine. The clinical presentation and management of the present case with a review of the literature is presented.

  1. [Discovering L-type calcium channels inhibitors of antihypertensive drugs based on drug repositioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying-xi; He, Yu-su; Jiang, Lu-di; Yue, Qiao-xin; Cui, Shuai; Bin, Li; Ye, Xiao-tong; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Zhang, Yang-ling

    2015-09-01

    This study was amid to construct the pharmacophore model of L-type calcium channel antagonist in the application of screening Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs resulting from virtual screening and discusses the relocation-based drug discovery methods, screening antihypertensive drugs with L-type calcium channel function from TCMD. Qualitative hypotheses wre generated by HipHop separately on the basis of 12 compounds with antagonistic action on L-type calcium channel expressed in rabbit cardiac muscle. Datebase searching method was used to evaluate the generated hypotheses. The optimum hypothesis was used to search Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs and evaluates the antihypertensive effect of the chemical constituent of traditional Chinese medicine resulting from virtual screening by the matching score and literature. The results showed that optimum qualitative hypothesis is with six features, which were two hydrogen-bond acceptors, four hydrophobic groups, and the CAI value of 2.78. Screening Drugbank achieves 93 approved drugs. Screening TCMD achieves 285 chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine. It was concluded that the hypothesis is reliable and can be used to screen datebase. The approved drugs resulting from virtual screening, such as pravastatin, are potentially L-type calcium channels inhibitors. The chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine, such as Arctigenin III and Arctigenin are potentially antihypertensive drugs. It indicates that Drug Repositioning based on hypothesis is possible. PMID:26983215

  2. [Discovering L-type calcium channels inhibitors of antihypertensive drugs based on drug repositioning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying-xi; He, Yu-su; Jiang, Lu-di; Yue, Qiao-xin; Cui, Shuai; Bin, Li; Ye, Xiao-tong; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Zhang, Yang-ling

    2015-09-01

    This study was amid to construct the pharmacophore model of L-type calcium channel antagonist in the application of screening Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs resulting from virtual screening and discusses the relocation-based drug discovery methods, screening antihypertensive drugs with L-type calcium channel function from TCMD. Qualitative hypotheses wre generated by HipHop separately on the basis of 12 compounds with antagonistic action on L-type calcium channel expressed in rabbit cardiac muscle. Datebase searching method was used to evaluate the generated hypotheses. The optimum hypothesis was used to search Drugbank and TCMD. This paper repositions the approved drugs and evaluates the antihypertensive effect of the chemical constituent of traditional Chinese medicine resulting from virtual screening by the matching score and literature. The results showed that optimum qualitative hypothesis is with six features, which were two hydrogen-bond acceptors, four hydrophobic groups, and the CAI value of 2.78. Screening Drugbank achieves 93 approved drugs. Screening TCMD achieves 285 chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine. It was concluded that the hypothesis is reliable and can be used to screen datebase. The approved drugs resulting from virtual screening, such as pravastatin, are potentially L-type calcium channels inhibitors. The chemical constituents of traditional Chinese medicine, such as Arctigenin III and Arctigenin are potentially antihypertensive drugs. It indicates that Drug Repositioning based on hypothesis is possible.

  3. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber N Brown

    Full Text Available Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse.

  4. The comparison of cervical repositioning errors according to smartphone addiction grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeonhyeong; Seo, Kyochul

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to compare cervical repositioning errors according to smartphone addiction grades of adults in their 20s. [Subjects and Methods] A survey of smartphone addiction was conducted of 200 adults. Based on the survey results, 30 subjects were chosen to participate in this study, and they were divided into three groups of 10; a Normal Group, a Moderate Addiction Group, and a Severe Addiction Group. After attaching a C-ROM, we measured the cervical repositioning errors of flexion, extension, right lateral flexion and left lateral flexion. [Results] Significant differences in the cervical repositioning errors of flexion, extension, and right and left lateral flexion were found among the Normal Group, Moderate Addiction Group, and Severe Addiction Group. In particular, the Severe Addiction Group showed the largest errors. [Conclusion] The result indicates that as smartphone addiction becomes more severe, a person is more likely to show impaired proprioception, as well as impaired ability to recognize the right posture. Thus, musculoskeletal problems due to smartphone addiction should be resolved through social cognition and intervention, and physical therapeutic education and intervention to educate people about correct postures. PMID:24764641

  5. Nucleosome Repositioning: A Novel Mechanism for Nicotine- and Cocaine-Induced Epigenetic Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Amber N; Vied, Cynthia; Dennis, Jonathan H; Bhide, Pradeep G

    2015-01-01

    Drugs of abuse modify behavior by altering gene expression in the brain. Gene expression can be regulated by changes in DNA methylation as well as by histone modifications, which alter chromatin structure, DNA compaction and DNA accessibility. In order to better understand the molecular mechanisms directing drug-induced changes in chromatin structure, we examined DNA-nucleosome interactions within promoter regions of 858 genes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y) exposed to nicotine or cocaine. Widespread, drug- and time-resolved repositioning of nucleosomes was identified at the transcription start site and promoter region of multiple genes. Nicotine and cocaine produced unique and shared changes in terms of the numbers and types of genes affected, as well as repositioning of nucleosomes at sites which could increase or decrease the probability of gene expression based on DNA accessibility. Half of the drug-induced nucleosome positions approximated a theoretical model of nucleosome occupancy based on physical and chemical characteristics of the DNA sequence, whereas the basal or drug naïve positions were generally DNA sequence independent. Thus we suggest that nucleosome repositioning represents an initial dynamic genome-wide alteration of the transcriptional landscape preceding more selective downstream transcriptional reprogramming, which ultimately characterizes the cell- and tissue-specific responses to drugs of abuse.

  6. Spatial and Working Memory Is Linked to Spine Density and Mushroom Spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rasha Refaat Mahmmoud

    Full Text Available Changes in synaptic structure and efficacy including dendritic spine number and morphology have been shown to underlie neuronal activity and size. Moreover, the shapes of individual dendritic spines were proposed to correlate with their capacity for structural change. Spine numbers and morphology were reported to parallel memory formation in the rat using a water maze but, so far, there is no information on spine counts or shape in the radial arm maze (RAM, a frequently used paradigm for the evaluation of complex memory formation in the rodent.24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups, 8 were trained, 8 remained untrained in the RAM and 8 rats served as cage controls. Dendritic spine numbers and individual spine forms were counted in CA1, CA3 areas and dentate gyrus of hippocampus using a DIL dye method with subsequent quantification by the Neuronstudio software and the image J program.Working memory errors (WME and latency in the RAM were decreased along the training period indicating that animals performed the task. Total spine density was significantly increased following training in the RAM as compared to untrained rats and cage controls. The number of mushroom spines was significantly increased in the trained as compared to untrained and cage controls. Negative significant correlations between spine density and WME were observed in CA1 basal dendrites and in CA3 apical and basal dendrites. In addition, there was a significant negative correlation between spine density and latency in CA3 basal dendrites.The study shows that spine numbers are significantly increased in the trained group, an observation that may suggest the use of this method representing a morphological parameter for memory formation studies in the RAM. Herein, correlations between WME and latency in the RAM and spine density revealed a link between spine numbers and performance in the RAM.

  7. Unusual cervical spine epidural abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Jr-Han; Su, Yu-Jang

    2015-10-01

    A 48-year-old man presented to the emergency department with complain of severe neck pain and anterior chest pain. Intermittent fever in the recent 2 days was also noted. There is a track maker over his left side of neck. The laboratory examination showed leukocytosis and high C-reactive protein level. Urine drug screen was positive for opiate. Empirical antibiotic administration was given. Blood culture grew gram-positive cocci in chain, and there was no vegetation found by heart echocardiogram. However, progressive weakness of four limbs was noted, and patient even cannot stand up and walk. The patient also complained of numbness sensation over bilateral hands and legs, and lower abdomen. Acute urine retention occurred. We arranged magnetic resonance imaging survey, which showed evidence of inflammatory process involving the retropharyngeal spaces and epidural spaces from the skull base to the bony level of T5. Epidural inflammatory process resulted in compression of the spinal cord and bilateral neural foramen narrowing. Neurosurgeon was consulted. Operation with laminectomy and posterior fusion with bone graft and internal fixation was done. Culture of epidural abscess and 2 sets of blood culture all yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. For epidural abscess, the most common involved spine is lumbar followed by thoracic and cervical spine. Diagnosis and treatment in the drug abusers are still challenging because they lack typical presentation, drug compliance, and adequate follow-up and because it is hard to stop drug abuser habit. Significant improvement of neurological deficit can be expected in most spinal abscess in drug abusers after treatment. PMID:26298050

  8. Dendritic spine detection using curvilinear structure detector and LDA classifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Xiaobo; Witt, Rochelle M; Sabatini, Bernardo L; Adjeroh, Donald; Wong, Stephen T C

    2007-06-01

    Dendritic spines are small, bulbous cellular compartments that carry synapses. Biologists have been studying the biochemical pathways by examining the morphological and statistical changes of the dendritic spines at the intracellular level. In this paper a novel approach is presented for automated detection of dendritic spines in neuron images. The dendritic spines are recognized as small objects of variable shape attached or detached to multiple dendritic backbones in the 2D projection of the image stack along the optical direction. We extend the curvilinear structure detector to extract the boundaries as well as the centerlines for the dendritic backbones and spines. We further build a classifier using Linear Discriminate Analysis (LDA) to classify the attached spines into valid and invalid types to improve the accuracy of the spine detection. We evaluate the proposed approach by comparing with the manual results in terms of backbone length, spine number, spine length, and spine density.

  9. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic Or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Nobuyuki; Abe, Junya; Satoh, Hidetoshi; Arima, Hironori; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-08-15

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  10. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHIMOKAWA, Nobuyuki; ABE, Junya; SATOH, Hidetoshi; ARIMA, Hironori; TAKAMI, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  11. Traumatic cervical spine fractures in the adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copley, Phillip; Tilliridou, Vicky; Jamjoom, Aimun

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews fractures of the cervical spine, highlighting the pertinent goals of initial management, the indications for different imaging modalities and the different fracture patterns. Basic principles of management of these different fracture patterns are outlined. PMID:27640656

  12. How to image patients with spine pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Imaging plays and important role for the evaluation of patients with spine pain. • MRI is the best method to evaluateintraspinal lesions, soft tissue and ligaments. • CT of the spine is useful to evaluate bony structures. - Abstract: Different radiological methods play an important role in the work-up of patients complaining of spine pain. Depending on the symptoms and the suspected underlying etiology different methods are selected. In the following presentation we briefly present the different radiological and magnetic resonance tomography methods that are at hand, give some guidance in which method to use, and present the typical imaging findings in some of the most common conditions that presents with spine pain

  13. Baastrup’s disease: The kissing spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Amit; Shankar, Vivek; Mittal, Samarth; Agarwal, Abhinav; Garg, Bhavuk

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old male presented with a gradually progressive low back pain of 2 years duration. The patient was leading a retired life and there was no history of chronic fever or significant trauma. There was no radiation of pain or any features suggestive of claudication. There was no history of any comorbidity. The pain was aggravated with extension of the spine and relieved with flexion. There was no swelling or neurological deficit, but muscle spasm was present. Radiographs of the spine revealed degenerative changes in the lumbosacral spine, along with articulation of spinous processes at in lumbar spine at all levels level suggestive of Baastrup’s disease, commonly known as “kissing spine”. Routine blood investigations were within normal limits. The patient was managed conservatively. He was given a week’s course of analgesics and muscle relaxants and then started on spinal flexion exercises, with significant improvement being noted at 6 months follow up. PMID:24579072

  14. The FAt Spondyloarthritis Spine Score (FASSS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne Juhl; Zhao, Zheng; Lambert, Robert Gw;

    2013-01-01

    Studies have shown that fat lesions follow resolution of inflammation in the spine of patients with axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). Fat lesions at vertebral corners have also been shown to predict development of new syndesmophytes. Therefore, scoring of fat lesions in the spine may constitute both...... an important measure of treatment efficacy as well as a surrogate marker for new bone formation. The aim of this study was to develop and validate a new scoring method for fat lesions in the spine, the Fat SpA Spine Score (FASSS), which in contrast to the existing scoring method addresses the localization...... and phenotypic diversity of fat lesions in patients with axial SpA....

  15. How to image patients with spine pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemund, R. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institution of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund Univeristy, Lund (Sweden); Thurnher, M. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institution of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund Univeristy, Lund (Sweden); Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-Guided Therapy, Medical University Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Sundgren, P.C., E-mail: Pia.sundgren@med.lu.se [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Institution of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund Univeristy, Lund (Sweden)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Imaging plays and important role for the evaluation of patients with spine pain. • MRI is the best method to evaluateintraspinal lesions, soft tissue and ligaments. • CT of the spine is useful to evaluate bony structures. - Abstract: Different radiological methods play an important role in the work-up of patients complaining of spine pain. Depending on the symptoms and the suspected underlying etiology different methods are selected. In the following presentation we briefly present the different radiological and magnetic resonance tomography methods that are at hand, give some guidance in which method to use, and present the typical imaging findings in some of the most common conditions that presents with spine pain.

  16. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back Purchase Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can ...

  17. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back Purchase Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can actually reduce back pain. Some exercises can ...

  18. Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment | View Video Back Purchase Video Struggling with Low Back Pain? Many people are surprised to learn that carefully selected exercise can ...

  19. Posteroanterior versus anteroposterior lumbar spine radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuno, M.M.; Shu, G.J. (Cleveland Chiropractic College, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The posteroanterior view of the lumbar spine has important features including radiation protection and image quality; these have been studied by various investigators. Investigators have shown that sensitive tissues receive less radiation dosage in the posteroanterior view of the spine for scoliosis screening and intracranial tomography without altering the image quality. This paper emphasizes the importance of the radiation safety aspect of the posteroanterior view and shows the improvement in shape distortion in the lumbar vertebrae.

  20. The Spine of the Cosmic Web

    CERN Document Server

    Aragon-Calvo, Miguel A; van de Weygaert, Rien; Szalay, Alexander S

    2008-01-01

    We present a new concept, the Spine of the Cosmic Web, for the topological analysis of the Cosmic Web and the identification of its filaments and walls. Based on the watershed segmentation of the cosmic density field, the method invokes the local properties of the regions adjacent to the critical points, which define its separatrices. Our method allows their classification into walls and the spine of filaments and clusters. Tests on a heuristic Voronoi model yielded outstanding results.

  1. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  2. Computed tomography of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until the advent of Computed Tomography (CT), axial studies of the spine were limited in the main to gross bony anatomy and to conventional transaxial tomography (TAT). Others studied the upper cervical cord in transverse section during gas myelography and encephalography. The potential role of CT in the evaluation of spinal anatomy and disease was recognized, however, at an early stage in the development of the general purpose CT scanner. CT is not organ specific and therefore provides a uniformly thin (1.5-13 mm) axial section displaying detailed spinal topographical anatomy against a background of paravertebral muscles, vascular structures and body cavity organs. The relationships of the apophyseal joints to the spinal canal and intervertebral foramina are particularly well displayed. The study of neural tissue and pathology within the spinal canal is facilitated by the use of a non-ionic water-soluble contrast medium (viz. metrizamide) in the subarachnoid spaces. The high sensitivity of CT to very small changes in X-ray attenuation permits studies to be continued over several hours. The digital derivation of the sequential CT transaxial sections enables not only interrogation of data and quantitative studies to be made but also makes possible computer-generated reconstructions in other planes

  3. Serviço Centralizado de Estatísticas de Utilização de Repositórios

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Hélder de Jesus Almeida da

    2011-01-01

    Dissertação de mestrado em Engenharia Informática Nos dias de hoje presenciamos a uma mudança de paradigma no que diz respeito aos repositórios institucionais. Passamos do repositório isolado no seu contexto institucional para os consórcios onde conjuntos de repositórios partilham ideias, políticas e tecnologias, contribuindo para o crescimento do conhecimento das comunidades em que estão inseridos. Podia falar-se da importância que os repositórios institucionais mantêm j...

  4. Differential spatial repositioning of activated genes in Biomphalaria glabrata snails infected with Schistosoma mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arican-Goktas, Halime D; Ittiprasert, Wannaporn; Bridger, Joanna M; Knight, Matty

    2014-09-01

    Schistosomiasis is an infectious disease infecting mammals as the definitive host and fresh water snails as the intermediate host. Understanding the molecular and biochemical relationship between the causative schistosome parasite and its hosts will be key to understanding and ultimately treating and/or eradicating the disease. There is increasing evidence that pathogens that have co-evolved with their hosts can manipulate their hosts' behaviour at various levels to augment an infection. Bacteria, for example, can induce beneficial chromatin remodelling of the host genome. We have previously shown in vitro that Biomphalaria glabrata embryonic cells co-cultured with schistosome miracidia display genes changing their nuclear location and becoming up-regulated. This also happens in vivo in live intact snails, where early exposure to miracidia also elicits non-random repositioning of genes. We reveal differences in the nuclear repositioning between the response of parasite susceptible snails as compared to resistant snails and with normal or live, attenuated parasites. Interestingly, the stress response gene heat shock protein (Hsp) 70 is only repositioned and then up-regulated in susceptible snails with the normal parasite. This movement and change in gene expression seems to be controlled by the parasite. Other differences in the behaviour of genes support the view that some genes are responding to tissue damage, for example the ferritin genes move and are up-regulated whether the snails are either susceptible or resistant and upon exposure to either normal or attenuated parasite. This is the first time host genome reorganisation has been seen in a parasitic host and only the second time for any pathogen. We believe that the parasite elicits a spatio-epigenetic reorganisation of the host genome to induce favourable gene expression for itself and this might represent a fundamental mechanism present in the human host infected with schistosome cercariae as well as in

  5. Drug repositioning in SLE: crowd-sourcing, literature-mining and Big Data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, A C; Ryals, M M; Heuer, S E; Robl, R D; Madamanchi, S; Davis, L S; Lauwerys, B; Catalina, M D; Lipsky, P E

    2016-09-01

    Lupus patients are in need of modern drugs to treat specific manifestations of their disease effectively and safely. In the past half century, only one new treatment has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In 2014-2015, the FDA approved 71 new drugs, only one of which targeted a rheumatic disease and none of which was approved for use in SLE. Repositioning/repurposing drugs approved for other diseases using multiple approaches is one possible means to find new treatment options for lupus patients. "Big Data" analysis approaches this challenge from an unbiased standpoint whereas literature mining and crowd sourcing for candidates assessed by the CoLTs (Combined Lupus Treatment Scoring) system provide a hypothesis-based approach to rank potential therapeutic candidates for possible clinical application. Both approaches mitigate risk since the candidates assessed have largely been extensively tested in clinical trials for other indications. The usefulness of a multi-pronged approach to drug repositioning in lupus is highlighted by orthogonal confirmation of hypothesis-based drug repositioning predictions by "Big Data" analysis of differentially expressed genes from lupus patient samples. The goal is to identify novel therapies that have the potential to affect disease processes specifically. Involvement of SLE patients and the scientists that study this disease in thinking about new drugs that may be effective in lupus though crowd-sourcing sites such as LRxL-STAT (www.linkedin.com/in/lrxlstat) is important in stimulating the momentum needed to test these novel drug targets for efficacy in lupus rapidly in small, proof-of-concept trials conducted by LuCIN, the Lupus Clinical Investigators Network (www.linkedin.com/in/lucinstat).

  6. Drug repositioning in SLE: crowd-sourcing, literature-mining and Big Data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammer, A C; Ryals, M M; Heuer, S E; Robl, R D; Madamanchi, S; Davis, L S; Lauwerys, B; Catalina, M D; Lipsky, P E

    2016-09-01

    Lupus patients are in need of modern drugs to treat specific manifestations of their disease effectively and safely. In the past half century, only one new treatment has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). In 2014-2015, the FDA approved 71 new drugs, only one of which targeted a rheumatic disease and none of which was approved for use in SLE. Repositioning/repurposing drugs approved for other diseases using multiple approaches is one possible means to find new treatment options for lupus patients. "Big Data" analysis approaches this challenge from an unbiased standpoint whereas literature mining and crowd sourcing for candidates assessed by the CoLTs (Combined Lupus Treatment Scoring) system provide a hypothesis-based approach to rank potential therapeutic candidates for possible clinical application. Both approaches mitigate risk since the candidates assessed have largely been extensively tested in clinical trials for other indications. The usefulness of a multi-pronged approach to drug repositioning in lupus is highlighted by orthogonal confirmation of hypothesis-based drug repositioning predictions by "Big Data" analysis of differentially expressed genes from lupus patient samples. The goal is to identify novel therapies that have the potential to affect disease processes specifically. Involvement of SLE patients and the scientists that study this disease in thinking about new drugs that may be effective in lupus though crowd-sourcing sites such as LRxL-STAT (www.linkedin.com/in/lrxlstat) is important in stimulating the momentum needed to test these novel drug targets for efficacy in lupus rapidly in small, proof-of-concept trials conducted by LuCIN, the Lupus Clinical Investigators Network (www.linkedin.com/in/lucinstat). PMID:27497259

  7. Physiotherapy of a displaced disc with reposition of a temporomandibular joint

    OpenAIRE

    BROŽKOVÁ, Aya

    2013-01-01

    The topic of my bachelor thesis is physiotherapy of a displaced disc with reposition of a temporomandibular joint. It is a functional disorder, when the mandible disc is not in a physiological position and creates an obstacle for a condyle movement. When mouth is fully opened the disc does not return to its original position. This moment is characteristic with a clicking sound. Another symptom is inclining of the chin to the disordered site when the mouth is being opened. Main cause of TMD is...

  8. Repositioning a marketingová komunikácia značky Fatra

    OpenAIRE

    Pribilová, Petronela

    2010-01-01

    The topic of the Bachelor's thesis is repositioning of the Slovak mineral water Fatra, which was inovated in terms of a strategy focused on a diametrically different target group in 2008. The document consists of two main parts, the theoretical one, which includes all the basic terms and their explanations, and then the practical one, which is a crux of the document. The thesis gradually analyze the "new" Fatra's marketing mix, where the main purpose is heading to a communication to a new cus...

  9. Right thoracic curvature in the normal spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Keigo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trunk asymmetry and vertebral rotation, at times observed in the normal spine, resemble the characteristics of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Right thoracic curvature has also been reported in the normal spine. If it is determined that the features of right thoracic side curvature in the normal spine are the same as those observed in AIS, these findings might provide a basis for elucidating the etiology of this condition. For this reason, we investigated right thoracic curvature in the normal spine. Methods For normal spinal measurements, 1,200 patients who underwent a posteroanterior chest radiographs were evaluated. These consisted of 400 children (ages 4-9, 400 adolescents (ages 10-19 and 400 adults (ages 20-29, with each group comprised of both genders. The exclusion criteria were obvious chest and spinal diseases. As side curvature is minimal in normal spines and the range at which curvature is measured is difficult to ascertain, first the typical curvature range in scoliosis patients was determined and then the Cobb angle in normal spines was measured using the same range as the scoliosis curve, from T5 to T12. Right thoracic curvature was given a positive value. The curve pattern was organized in each collective three groups: neutral (from -1 degree to 1 degree, right (> +1 degree, and left ( Results In child group, Cobb angle in left was 120, in neutral was 125 and in right was 155. In adolescent group, Cobb angle in left was 70, in neutral was 114 and in right was 216. In adult group, Cobb angle in left was 46, in neutral was 102 and in right was 252. The curvature pattern shifts to the right side in the adolescent group (p Conclusions Based on standing chest radiographic measurements, a right thoracic curvature was observed in normal spines after adolescence.

  10. Management of osteoporosis in spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Ronald A; Kang, Daniel Gene; Wagner, Scott Cameron

    2015-04-01

    Osteoporosis is a burgeoning clinical problem that is characterized by decreased bone strength and density. It predisposes patients to fragility fractures and debilitating spine deformities. Several complications are associated with spine surgery in patients with osteoporosis, and there is currently no treatment algorithm to guide the spine surgeon. A multidisciplinary approach to treatment of patients with osteoporosis and spine deformity or fracture is encouraged, and preoperative planning is crucial for successful surgical outcomes. Several surgical techniques have been developed to treat osteoporosis-related deformities, including posterior instrumentation with fusion. However, achieving fixation and fusion in these patients can be difficult secondary to poor bone stock. Augmentation methods to improve pedicle screw fixation have evolved, including instrumentation at multiple levels, bioactive cement augmentation, and fenestrated or expandable pedicle screws, but their impact on clinical outcomes remains unknown. Management of osteoporosis in patients undergoing spine surgery is challenging, but with appropriate patient selection, medical optimization, and surgical techniques, these patients can experience pain relief, deformity correction, and improved function. PMID:25808687

  11. Management of thoracolumbar spine trauma An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Rajasekaran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracolumbar spine fractures are common injuries that can result in significant disability, deformity and neurological deficit. Controversies exist regarding the appropriate radiological investigations, the indications for surgical management and the timing, approach and type of surgery. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, biomechanical principles, radiological and clinical evaluation, classification and management principles. Literature review of all relevant articles published in PubMed covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with or without neurologic deficit was performed. The search terms used were thoracolumbar, thoracic, lumbar, fracture, trauma and management. All relevant articles and abstracts covering thoracolumbar spine fractures with and without neurologic deficit were reviewed. Biomechanically the thoracolumbar spine is predisposed to a higher incidence of spinal injuries. Computed tomography provides adequate bony detail for assessing spinal stability while magnetic resonance imaging shows injuries to soft tissues (posterior ligamentous complex [PLC] and neurological structures. Different classification systems exist and the most recent is the AO spine knowledge forum classification of thoracolumbar trauma. Treatment includes both nonoperative and operative methods and selected based on the degree of bony injury, neurological involvement, presence of associated injuries and the integrity of the PLC. Significant advances in imaging have helped in the better understanding of thoracolumbar fractures, including information on canal morphology and injury to soft tissue structures. The ideal classification that is simple, comprehensive and guides management is still elusive. Involvement of three columns, progressive neurological deficit, significant kyphosis and canal compromise with neurological deficit are accepted indications for surgical stabilization through anterior, posterior or combined approaches.

  12. Repositioning "old" drugs for new causes: identifying new inhibitors of prostate cancer cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Esha T; Upadhyaya, Akanksha; Philp, Lisa K; Tang, Tiffany; Skalamera, Dubravka; Gunter, Jennifer; Nelson, Colleen C; Williams, Elizabeth D; Hollier, Brett G

    2016-04-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) deaths occur due to the metastatic spread of tumor cells to distant organs. Currently, there is a lack of effective therapies once tumor cells have spread outside the prostate. It is therefore imperative to rapidly develop therapeutics to inhibit the metastatic spread of tumor cells. Gain of cell motility and invasive properties is the first step of metastasis and by inhibiting motility one can potentially inhibit metastasis. Using the drug repositioning strategy, we developed a cell-based multi-parameter primary screening assay to identify drugs that inhibit the migratory and invasive properties of metastatic PC-3 PCa cells. Following the completion of the primary screening assay, 33 drugs were identified from an FDA approved drug library that either inhibited migration or were cytotoxic to the PC-3 cells. Based on the data obtained from the subsequent validation studies, mitoxantrone hydrochloride, simvastatin, fluvastatin and vandetanib were identified as strong candidates that can inhibit both the migration and invasion of PC-3 cells without significantly affecting cell viability. By employing the drug repositioning strategy instead of a de novo drug discovery and development strategy, the identified drug candidates have the potential to be rapidly translated into the clinic for the management of men with aggressive forms of PCa.

  13. Larval zebrafish model for FDA-approved drug repositioning for tobacco dependence treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margot A Cousin

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking remains the most preventable cause of death and excess health care costs in the United States, and is a leading cause of death among alcoholics. Long-term tobacco abstinence rates are low, and pharmacotherapeutic options are limited. Repositioning medications approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA may efficiently provide clinicians with new treatment options. We developed a drug-repositioning paradigm using larval zebrafish locomotion and established predictive clinical validity using FDA-approved smoking cessation therapeutics. We evaluated 39 physician-vetted medications for nicotine-induced locomotor activation blockade. We further evaluated candidate medications for altered ethanol response, as well as in combination with varenicline for nicotine-response attenuation. Six medications specifically inhibited the nicotine response. Among this set, apomorphine and topiramate blocked both nicotine and ethanol responses. Both positively interact with varenicline in the Bliss Independence test, indicating potential synergistic interactions suggesting these are candidates for translation into Phase II clinical trials for smoking cessation.

  14. Drug Repositioning Discovery for Early- and Late-Stage Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hung Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug repositioning is a popular approach in the pharmaceutical industry for identifying potential new uses for existing drugs and accelerating the development time. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. To reduce the biological heterogeneity effects among different individuals, both normal and cancer tissues were taken from the same patient, hence allowing pairwise testing. By comparing early- and late-stage cancer patients, we can identify stage-specific NSCLC genes. Differentially expressed genes are clustered separately to form up- and downregulated communities that are used as queries to perform enrichment analysis. The results suggest that pathways for early- and late-stage cancers are different. Sets of up- and downregulated genes were submitted to the cMap web resource to identify potential drugs. To achieve high confidence drug prediction, multiple microarray experimental results were merged by performing meta-analysis. The results of a few drug findings are supported by MTT assay or clonogenic assay data. In conclusion, we have been able to assess the potential existing drugs to identify novel anticancer drugs, which may be helpful in drug repositioning discovery for NSCLC.

  15. Prediction of drug-target interactions and drug repositioning via network-based inference.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feixiong Cheng

    Full Text Available Drug-target interaction (DTI is the basis of drug discovery and design. It is time consuming and costly to determine DTI experimentally. Hence, it is necessary to develop computational methods for the prediction of potential DTI. Based on complex network theory, three supervised inference methods were developed here to predict DTI and used for drug repositioning, namely drug-based similarity inference (DBSI, target-based similarity inference (TBSI and network-based inference (NBI. Among them, NBI performed best on four benchmark data sets. Then a drug-target network was created with NBI based on 12,483 FDA-approved and experimental drug-target binary links, and some new DTIs were further predicted. In vitro assays confirmed that five old drugs, namely montelukast, diclofenac, simvastatin, ketoconazole, and itraconazole, showed polypharmacological features on estrogen receptors or dipeptidyl peptidase-IV with half maximal inhibitory or effective concentration ranged from 0.2 to 10 µM. Moreover, simvastatin and ketoconazole showed potent antiproliferative activities on human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line in MTT assays. The results indicated that these methods could be powerful tools in prediction of DTIs and drug repositioning.

  16. Cervical spine injuries in rugby players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovio, O M; Van Peteghem, P K; Schweigel, J F

    1984-03-15

    Nine patients with serious cervical spine injuries that occurred while they were playing rugby were seen in a British Columbia acute spinal cord injury unit during the period 1975-82. All the injuries had occurred during the "scrum" or the "tackle". Two of the patients were rendered permanently quadriplegic, and one patient died. There is a need for a central registry that would record all cervical spine injuries in rugby players as well as for changes in the rules of the game. PMID:6697282

  17. Baastrup’s disease: The kissing spine

    OpenAIRE

    Singla, Amit; Shankar, Vivek; Mittal, Samarth; Agarwal, Abhinav; Garg, Bhavuk

    2014-01-01

    A 67-year-old male presented with a gradually progressive low back pain of 2 years duration. The patient was leading a retired life and there was no history of chronic fever or significant trauma. There was no radiation of pain or any features suggestive of claudication. There was no history of any comorbidity. The pain was aggravated with extension of the spine and relieved with flexion. There was no swelling or neurological deficit, but muscle spasm was present. Radiographs of the spine rev...

  18. Axial loaded MRI of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saifuddin, A. E-mail: asaifuddin@aol.com; Blease, S.; MacSweeney, E

    2003-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging is established as the technique of choice for assessment of degenerative disorders of the lumbar spine. However, it is routinely performed with the patient supine and the hips and knees flexed. The absence of axial loading and lumbar extension results in a maximization of spinal canal dimensions, which may in some cases, result in failure to demonstrate nerve root compression. Attempts have been made to image the lumbar spine in a more physiological state, either by imaging with flexion-extension, in the erect position or by using axial loading. This article reviews the literature relating to the above techniques.

  19. Actin Remodeling and Polymerization Forces Control Dendritic Spine Morphology

    CERN Document Server

    Miermans, Karsten; Storm, Cornelis; Hoogenraad, Casper

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines are small membranous structures that protrude from the neuronal dendrite. Each spine contains a synaptic contact site that may connect its parent dendrite to the axons of neighboring neurons. Dendritic spines are markedly distinct in shape and size, and certain types of stimulation prompt spines to evolve, in fairly predictable fashion, from thin nascent morphologies to the mushroom-like shapes associated with mature spines. This striking progression is coincident with the (re)configuration of the neuronal network during early development, learning and memory formation, and has been conjectured to be part of the machinery that encodes these processes at the scale of individual neuronal connections. It is well established that the structural plasticity of spines is strongly dependent upon the actin cytoskeleton inside the spine. A general framework that details the precise role of actin in directing the transitions between the various spine shapes is lacking. We address this issue, and present...

  20. Thromboembolic Complications Following Spine Surgery Assessed with Spiral CT Scans: DVT/PE Following Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Han Jo; Walcott-Sapp, Sarah; Adler, Ronald S.; Pavlov, Helene; Boachie-Adjei, Oheneba; Westrich, Geoffrey H.

    2010-01-01

    Spine surgery is associated with a significant risk of postoperative pulmonary embolism (PE) and/or deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The goal of this study was to determine which symptoms and risk factors were associated with spiral CT scans positive for PE and/or DVT in the postoperative spine surgery patient. We conducted a retrospective review of all spine patients who underwent a postoperative CT to rule out PE during the period of March 2004–February 2006. The type of surgical procedure, risk...

  1. Upper spine morphology in hypophosphatemic rickets and healthy controls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjørup, Hans; Sonnesen, Liselotte; Beck-Nielsen, Signe S;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe upper spine morphology in adult patients with hypophosphatemic rickets (HR) compared with controls to assess differences in spine morphology in terms of severity of skeletal impact and to study associations between spine morphology...

  2. Dynamic microtubules regulate dendritic spine morphology and synaptic plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Jaworski; L.C. Kapitein; S. Montenegro Gouveia; B.R. Dortland; P.S. Wulf; I. Grigoriev; P. Camera; S.A. Spangler; P. Di Stefano; J. Demmers; H. Krugers; P. Defilippi; A. Akhmanova; C.C. Hoogenraad

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the major sites of excitatory synaptic input, and their morphological changes have been linked to learning and memory processes. Here, we report that growing microtubule plus ends decorated by the microtubule tip-tracking protein EB3 enter spines and can modulate spine morpholog

  3. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Qiao; Ming-Xing Li; Chang Xu; Hui-Bin Chen; Shu-Cheng An; Xin-Ming Ma

    2016-01-01

    Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS), chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS), have ...

  4. Development and validation of a strategic repositioning model for defense and aerospace contractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bers, John A.

    Strategic repositioning refers to the organized efforts of defense contractors to "reposition" a technology that they have developed for a defense sector customer into a civilian or commercial market. The strategic repositioning model developed here is a structural model: it seeks to isolate the factors that influence choice of strategy, which in turn influences the organization's performance. The model draws from the prior experience of contractors (through interviews and surveys) and companies in other sectors (through a review of the relevant published research). (1) Over all, the model accounted for 55% of the variance in financial performance of the sample and 35% for the underlying population. (2) Key success factors include a rigorous planning process, a target market in the growth (vs. incubation) stage, a priority on market leadership as well as financial return, the ability to operate in an ambiguous business environment, and a relatively short time horizon but strong corporate support. (3) The greatest challenges that a contractor is likely to encounter are understanding his new customers' buying practices, strong competition, and adapting his technology to their needs and price expectations. (4) To address these issues contractors often involve partners in their entry strategy, but partnerships of equals tend to be more difficult to bring off than direct entry strategies. (5) The two major target market categories--government and commercial--present different challenges. Commercial customers are more likely to resist doing business with the contractor, while contractors entering government and other noncommercial markets are more likely to encounter price resistance, low technical sophistication among customers, and difficulties reaching their customer base. (6) Despite these differences across markets, performance is not influenced by the target market category, nor by the type of product or service or the contractor's functional orientation (marketing

  5. Development of the Korean Spine Database and Automatic Surface Mesh Intersection Algorithm for Constructing e-Spine Simulator

    OpenAIRE

    Dongmin Seo; Hanmin Jung; Won-Kyung Sung; Dukyun Nam

    2014-01-01

    By 2026, Korea is expected to surpass the UN’s definition of an aged society and reach the level of a superaged society. With an aging population come increased disorders involving the spine. To prevent unnecessary spinal surgery and support scientific diagnosis of spinal disease and systematic prediction of treatment outcomes, we have been developing e-Spine, which is a computer simulation model of the human spine. In this paper, we present the Korean spine database and automatic surface mes...

  6. On the controversies of spine surgery research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, W.C.H.

    1974-01-01

    This thesis is about effectiveness of surgical interventions in the spine and the value of different methodologies for providing a valid answer. In the first part five systematic reviews were performed. One reviewed cervical degenerative disc disease comparing the different anterior fusion techniqu

  7. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  8. Stretching the Spines of Gymnasts: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, William A; McNeal, Jeni R; Penitente, Gabriella; Murray, Steven Ross; Nassar, Lawrence; Jemni, Monèm; Mizuguchi, Satoshi; Stone, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Gymnastics is noted for involving highly specialized strength, power, agility and flexibility. Flexibility is perhaps the single greatest discriminator of gymnastics from other sports. The extreme ranges of motion achieved by gymnasts require long periods of training, often occupying more than a decade. Gymnasts also start training at an early age (particularly female gymnasts), and the effect of gymnastics training on these young athletes is poorly understood. One of the concerns of many gymnastics professionals is the training of the spine in hyperextension-the ubiquitous 'arch' seen in many gymnastics positions and movements. Training in spine hyperextension usually begins in early childhood through performance of a skill known as a back-bend. Does practising a back-bend and other hyperextension exercises harm young gymnasts? Current information on spine stretching among gymnasts indicates that, within reason, spine stretching does not appear to be an unusual threat to gymnasts' health. However, the paucity of information demands that further study be undertaken. PMID:26581832

  9. [The growing spine : Normal and abnormal development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stücker, R

    2016-06-01

    Growth of the pediatric spine occurs in phases. The first 5 years of life are characterized by rapid growth. The lower extremities and trunk contribute equally to the entire growth by 50 % each. In the following years, until the onset of puberty, a steady but reduced rate of growth is observed. During these years a T1-S1 growth of only 1 cm per year can be detected and the spine contributes only one third to the entire growth. Puberty consists of an acceleration phase lasting 2 years. In the first year of this phase the growth peak of the extremities and in the following year the growth peak of the spine can be noticed. The ensuing deceleration phase of puberty lasts for 3 years. During that period the development of the Risser sign, menarche, and fusion of the trochanter epiphysis are taking place. Clinical parameters such as sitting height, standing height, and arm span may be used to evaluate growth. Important radiological parameters include the Risser sign, the determination of skeletal age according to Greulich and Pyle, and the T1-T12 height. The use of the olecranon method during the ascending phase of puberty can be recommended. Problems of the developing spine may include malformations, developmental disruptions or deformations. According to their manifestations they have a different prognosis, which can be estimated by knowledge of residual growth and the typical course of spinal growth in childhood. PMID:27250620

  10. Adult idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an observational and treatment study using three case histories to describe common patterns of muscle and fascial asymmetry in adults with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) who have significant scoliotic curvatures that were not surgically corrected and who have chronic pain. Rather than being located in the paraspinal muscles, the myofascial trigger points (TrPs) apparently responsible for the pain were located at some distance from the spine, yet referred pain to locations throughout the thoracolumbar spine. Asymmetries in these muscles appear to tether the spine in such a way that they contribute to scoliotic curvatures. Evaluation also showed that each of these individuals had major ligamentous laxity and this may also have contributed to development of scoliotic curvatures. Treatment focused on release of TrPs found to refer pain into the spine, release of related fascia, and correction of related joint dysfunction. Treatment resulted in substantial relief of longstanding chronic pain. Treatment thus validated the diagnostic hypothesis that myofascial and fascial asymmetries were to some extent responsible for pain in adults with significant scoliotic curvatures. Treatment of these patterns of TrPs and muscle and fascial asymmetries and related joint dysfunction was also effective in relieving pain in each of these individuals after they were injured in auto accidents. Treatment of myofascial TrPs and asymmetrical fascial tension along with treatment of accompanying joint dysfunction is proposed as an effective approach to treating both chronic and acute pain in adults with scoliosis that has not been surgically corrected.

  11. A musculoskeletal model for the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christophy, Miguel; Faruk Senan, Nur Adila; Lotz, Jeffrey C; O'Reilly, Oliver M

    2012-01-01

    A new musculoskeletal model for the lumbar spine is described in this paper. This model features a rigid pelvis and sacrum, the five lumbar vertebrae, and a rigid torso consisting of a lumped thoracic spine and ribcage. The motion of the individual lumbar vertebrae was defined as a fraction of the net lumbar movement about the three rotational degrees of freedom: flexion-extension lateral bending, and axial rotation. Additionally, the eight main muscle groups of the lumbar spine were incorporated using 238 muscle fascicles with prescriptions for the parameters in the Hill-type muscle models obtained with the help of an extensive literature survey. The features of the model include the abilities to predict joint reactions, muscle forces, and muscle activation patterns. To illustrate the capabilities of the model and validate its physiological similarity, the model's predictions for the moment arms of the muscles are shown for a range of flexion-extension motions of the lower back. The model uses the OpenSim platform and is freely available on https://www.simtk.org/home/lumbarspine to other spinal researchers interested in analyzing the kinematics of the spine. The model can also be integrated with existing OpenSim models to build more comprehensive models of the human body. PMID:21318374

  12. X-Ray parameters of lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otabek Ablyazov

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of anatomic spinal structures, especially its relation-ship to the functions performed, is necessary to form a correct diagnosis. The anatomical structure of the vertebrae varies de-pending on the level of the spinal segment. Normal anatomical parameters, derived from bone structures of the spine, are roughly determined by X-ray method.This paper presents the results of the survey radiography of the lumbar spine in a straight line and lateral projections in 30 individ-uals without pathology spine, aged 21-60 years with frequently observed lumbar spinal stenosis stenosis. Applying X-ray method there were studied shape, height, and the contours of the vertebral bodies and intervertebral disc in the front (interpedicular and sagittal planes; there were measured dimensions of the lumbar canal and foramen holes in the same planes. Using X-ray method can fully identify the bone parameters of vertebral column. How-ever, the informativity of the method depends on knowledge of radiologist about topographic anatomical features of spine.

  13. Congenital spine anomalies: the closed spinal dysraphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, Erin Simon [University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Rossi, Andrea [G. Gaslini Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Genoa (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    The term congenital spinal anomalies encompasses a wide variety of dysmorphology that occurs during early development. Familiarity with current terminology and a practical, clinico-radiologic classification system allows the radiologist to have a more complete understanding of malformations of the spine and improves accuracy of diagnosis when these entities are encountered in practice. (orig.)

  14. On the Shoulders of Giants? Global Science, Resource Asymmetries, and Repositioning of Research Universities in China and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleksiyenko, Anatoly

    2014-01-01

    Chinese and Russian universities are increasingly drawn into center-periphery repositioning, as they compete for symbolic, financial, and intellectual resources locally and globally. However, their strategies on national and institutional linkages differ with regards to the individual scientist's powers in knowledge production. As global…

  15. A Novel Technique for Repositioning Lower Eyelid Fat via the Transoral Approach in Association with Midface Lift

    OpenAIRE

    Mofid, M. Mark

    2011-01-01

    Background Orbital fat repositioning in association with subperiosteal midface elevation has been variably described via both the transconjunctival and skin muscle flap approaches. Poor visualization, middle and posterior lamellar cicatricial fibrosis, technical difficulty, and incomplete release are disadvantages commonly ascribed to the transconjunctival approach. Lower eyelid malposition and retraction also are commonly seen in association with skin muscle flap approaches. A simple techniq...

  16. Learner Engagement under the "Regulatory Gaze": Possibilities for Re-Positioning Early Childhood Pre-Service Teachers as Autonomous Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovanovic, Jessie; Fane, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In a climate of increasing regulation within early childhood education and care services, and the greater re-positioning of professionals within public sectors, this article seeks to extend the literature surrounding risk and regulation in early childhood. In efforts to "push back" against the "regulatory gaze" in the early…

  17. Anatomy of large animal spines and its comparison to the human spine: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-zi; Zhu, Guo-Qing; Zhou, Yi-fei

    2009-01-01

    Animal models have been commonly used for in vivo and in vitro spinal research. However, the extent to which animal models resemble the human spine has not been well known. We conducted a systematic review to compare the morphometric features of vertebrae between human and animal species, so as to give some suggestions on how to choose an appropriate animal model in spine research. A literature search of all English language peer-reviewed publications was conducted using PubMed, OVID, Springe...

  18. Automatic Thresholding for Frame-Repositioning Using External Tracking in PET Brain Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Keller, Sune; Sibomana, Merence;

    2010-01-01

    Motion correction (MC) in positron emission tomography (PET) brain imaging become of higher importance with increasing scanner resolution. Several motion correction methods have been suggested and so far the Polaris Vicra tracking system has been the preferred one for motion registration. We...... present an automated algorithm for dividing PET acquisitions into subframes based on the registered head motion to correct for intra-frame motion with the frame repositioning MC method. The method is tested on real patient data (five 11C-SB studies and five 11C-PIB studies) and compared with an image...... based registration method (AIR). Quantitative evaluation was done using a correlation measure. The study shows that MC improves the correlation of the PET images and that AIR performed slightly better than the Polaris Vicra. We found significant intra-frame motion of 1-5 mm in 9 frames...

  19. Can stimulating massage improve joint repositioning error in patients with knee osteoarthritis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Hans; Henriksen, Marius; Bartels, Else M;

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of massage applied to the thigh muscles on joint repositioning error (JRE) in patients suffering from osteoarthritis (OA).We hypothesized that stimulating massage of the muscles around an osteoarthritic knee joint, could improve...... the neuromuscular function and thereby optimize the positive and minimize the negative performance factors in relation to an exercise program. METHODS: In a cross-over design, 19 patients with knee osteoarthritis, mean age of 73.1 years (SD: 9.4; range 56 to 88 years), recruited from the local department...... with knee osteoarthritis, ie, if an improved JRE is important for improving the performance factors when exercising, stimulating massage may not be recommendable to use....

  20. Prediction of drug-target interactions for drug repositioning only based on genomic expression similarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kejian Wang

    Full Text Available Small drug molecules usually bind to multiple protein targets or even unintended off-targets. Such drug promiscuity has often led to unwanted or unexplained drug reactions, resulting in side effects or drug repositioning opportunities. So it is always an important issue in pharmacology to identify potential drug-target interactions (DTI. However, DTI discovery by experiment remains a challenging task, due to high expense of time and resources. Many computational methods are therefore developed to predict DTI with high throughput biological and clinical data. Here, we initiatively demonstrate that the on-target and off-target effects could be characterized by drug-induced in vitro genomic expression changes, e.g. the data in Connectivity Map (CMap. Thus, unknown ligands of a certain target can be found from the compounds showing high gene-expression similarity to the known ligands. Then to clarify the detailed practice of CMap based DTI prediction, we objectively evaluate how well each target is characterized by CMap. The results suggest that (1 some targets are better characterized than others, so the prediction models specific to these well characterized targets would be more accurate and reliable; (2 in some cases, a family of ligands for the same target tend to interact with common off-targets, which may help increase the efficiency of DTI discovery and explain the mechanisms of complicated drug actions. In the present study, CMap expression similarity is proposed as a novel indicator of drug-target interactions. The detailed strategies of improving data quality by decreasing the batch effect and building prediction models are also effectively established. We believe the success in CMap can be further translated into other public and commercial data of genomic expression, thus increasing research productivity towards valid drug repositioning and minimal side effects.

  1. Cervical spine injury in child abuse: report of two cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pediatric cervical spine injuries have rarely been reported in the setting of child abuse. We report two cases of unsuspected lower cervical spine fracture-dislocation in twin infant girls who had no physical examination findings to suggest cervical spine injury. Classic radio-graphic findings of child abuse were noted at multiple other sites in the axial and appendicular skeleton. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging proved to be valuable in both the initial evaluation of the extent of cervical spine injury and in following postoperative changes. The unexpected yet devastating findings in these two cases further substantiate the importance of routine evaluation of the cervical spine in cases of suspected child abuse. (orig.)

  2. Super-Brownian motion: Lp-convergence of martingales through the pathwise spine decomposition

    CERN Document Server

    Murillo-Salas, A E Kyprianou A

    2011-01-01

    Evans (1992) described the semi-group of a superprocess with quadratic branching mechanism under a martingale change of measure in terms of the semi-group of an immortal particle and the semigroup of the superprocess prior to the change of measure. This result, commonly referred to as the spine decomposition, alludes to a pathwise decomposition in which independent copies of the original process `immigrate' along the path of the immortal particle. For branching particle diffusions the analogue of this decomposition has already been demonstrated in the pathwise sense, see for example Hardy and Harris (2009). The purpose of this short note is to exemplify a new {\\it pathwise} spine decomposition for supercritical super-Brownian motion with general branching mechanism (cf. Kyprianou et al. (2010)) by studying $L^p$ convergence of naturally underlying additive martingales in the spirit of analogous arguments for branching particle diffusions due to Hardys and Harris (2009). Amongst other ingredients, the Dynkin-K...

  3. Detailed sectional anatomy of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphologic studies on the human spine constitute a special challenge because of the spine's complex topographic anatomy and the intimate relationship between the supporting skeleton and the contiguous soft tissues (muscles, discs, joint capsules) as well as the neurovascular contents of the spinal canal and intervertebral foramina. The improving resolution and multiplanar image reformatting capabilities of modern CT scanners call for accurate anatomic reference material. Such anatomic images should be available without distortion, in natural colors, and in considerable detail. The images should present the anatomy in the correct axial, sagittal, and coronal planes and should also be sufficiently closely spaced so as to follow the thin cuts of modern CT scanners. This chapter details one of several recent attempts to correlate gross anatomy with the images depicted by high-resolution CT. The methods of specimen preparation, sectioning, and photographing have been documented elsewhere

  4. Development of the Young Spine Questionnaire

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik Hein; Hestbæk, Lise

    Title Development of the Young Spine Questionnaire Authors & Affiliations Henrik Hein Lauridsen1, Lise Hestbæk1,2 1. Research Unit for Clinical Biomechanics, Institute of Sports Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Clinical Locomotion Network, Campusvej 55, DK-5230...... and adolescents are absent. The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument for children aged 9-12 years which could fill this gap in the literature. Methods The Young Spine Questionnaire (YSQ) was developed in three phases – the conceptualisation, development and testing phase. We used the conceptual...... we used an iterative process to carefully rephrase existing items used in prior questionnaires such as the Standardised Nordic Questionnaire. To measure pain the “Revised Faces Pain Scale” (rFPS) was included. The testing phase consisted of an iterative method assessing respondent understanding...

  5. Upright positional MRI of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alyas, F.; Connell, D. [London Upright MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [London Upright MRI Centre, London (United Kingdom); Department of Radiology, Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)], E-mail: asif.saifuddin@rnoh.nhs.uk

    2008-09-15

    Supine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is routinely used in the assessment of low back pain and radiculopathy. However, imaging findings often correlate poorly with clinical findings. This is partly related to the positional dependence of spinal stenosis, which reflects dynamic changes in soft-tissue structures (ligaments, disc, dural sac, epidural fat, and nerve roots). Upright MRI in the flexed, extended, rotated, standing, and bending positions, allows patients to reproduce the positions that bring about their symptoms and may uncover MRI findings that were not visible with routine supine imaging. Assessment of the degree of spinal stability in the degenerate and postoperative lumbar spine is also possible. The aim of this review was to present the current literature concerning both the normal and symptomatic spine as imaged using upright MRI and to illustrate the above findings using clinical examples.

  6. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for solitary spine metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sun Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chun, Mison [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Mi Jo [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Eulji Universtiy School of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    A clear consensus has not been established regarding the best treatment for solitary bone metastasis. Here, we reviewed the medical records of patients with a controlled primary malignancy who had only solitary spine metastasis without metastasis to the extraspinal bone or viscera and underwent treatment between April 2007 and December 2012 with stereotactic body radiosurgery using CyberKnife, with a total dose of 24 Gy in three to four fractions. During that time, there were only four cases. This was effective in each case, and all the four patients had no local failure and remained alive at a median follow-up of 68 months (range, 64 to 80 months). Although our experience is limited, this study suggests that stereotactic body radiotherapy could be a feasible, safe, effective, and noninvasive alternative treatment for solitary spine metastasis in patients who are medically inoperable or unsuitable for surgery.

  7. Primary bone tumors of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañete, A Navas; Bloem, H L; Kroon, H M

    2016-04-01

    Primary bone tumors of the spine are less common than metastases or multiple myeloma. Based on the patient's age and the radiologic pattern and topography of the tumor, a very approximate differential diagnosis can be established for an osseous vertebral lesion. This article shows the radiologic manifestations of the principal primary bone tumors of the spine from a practical point of view, based on our personal experience and a review of the literature. If bone metastases, multiple myeloma, lymphomas, hemangiomas, and enostoses are excluded, only eight types of tumors account for 80% of all vertebral tumors. These are chordomas, osteoblastomas, chondrosarcomas, giant-cell tumors, osteoid osteomas, Ewing's sarcomas, osteosarcomas, and aneurysmal bone cysts.

  8. Optimal control of the spine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yunfei; Choi, Jongeun; Reeves, N Peter; Cholewicki, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    The goal of this work is to present methodology to first evaluate the performance of an in vivo spine system and then to synthesize optimal neuromuscular control for rehabilitation interventions. This is achieved (1) by determining control system parameters such as static feedback gains and delays from experimental data, (2) by synthesizing the optimal feedback gains to attenuate the effect of disturbances to the system using modern control theory, and (3) by evaluating the robustness of the optimized closed-loop system. We also apply these methods to a postural control task, with two different control strategies, and evaluate the robustness of the spine system with respect to longer latencies found in the low back pain population. This framework could be used for rehabilitation design. To this end, we discuss several future research needs necessary to implement our framework in practice. PMID:20459205

  9. [Modeling the spine and spinal cord].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubousset, Jean; Lavaste, Françoise; Skalli, Wafa; Lafage, Virginie

    2011-11-01

    3D reconstruction of the spine may cover morphological, mechanical and functional aspects, among others. Since the computer era, rapid progress has been made in the development of practical applications, as well in the analysis of spinal pathophysiology during growth and aging. This technology is particularly usefulfor the planning, simulation and execution of corrective surgery, invention of new procedures, and therapeutic follow-up. PMID:22844745

  10. Delayed Esophageal Perforation after Cervical Spine Plating

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seong Jung; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Dong Min; Kim, Seok Won

    2013-01-01

    Although anterior approaches to the cervical spine are popular and safe, they cause some of complications. Esophageal perforation after anterior spinal fusion is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. We present a rare case of delayed esophageal perforation caused by a cervical screw placed via the anterior approach. A 43-year-old man, who had undergone surgery for complete cord injury at another orthopedic department 8 years previously, was admitted to our institute due to pai...

  11. Endoscopic approaches to the thoracic spine

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenthal, D

    2000-01-01

    Endoscopic surgery of the thoracic spine has up to now been considered as an experimental procedure. Reports published in recent years have shown that the results achieved with this technique are as good as, or for some indications superior to, those reported for classic open approaches. A review of the indications, limitations, advantages and disadvantages is presented. Although there is still resistance to acknowledging the effectiveness of this procedure, experience has shown that the resu...

  12. Posterior approach to the degenerative cervical spine

    OpenAIRE

    Yonenobu, Kazuo; Oda, Takenori

    2003-01-01

    Laminoplasty has been gradually accepted as a treatment for choice for cervical compression myelopathy. The historical perspective of laminoplasty is described. The aims of laminoplasty are to expand the spinal canal, to secure spinal stability, to preserve the protective function of the spine, and to preserve spinal mobility. Laminoplasty is indicated in myelopathic patients with a developmentally narrow spinal canal or multiple-level involvement combined with a relatively narrow canal. Seve...

  13. Pharyngocutaneous fistula after anterior cervical spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sansur, Charles A.; Early, Stephen; Reibel, James; Arlet, Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Pharyngocutaneous fistulae are rare complications of anterior spine surgery occurring in less than 0.1% of all anterior surgery cases. We report a case of a 19 year old female who sustained a C6 burst fracture with complete quadriplegia. She was treated urgently with a C6 corpectomy with anterior cage and plating followed by posterior cervical stabilization at another institution. Post operatively she developed a pharyngocutaneous fistula that failed to heal despite several attempts of closu...

  14. Rationale of Revision Lumbar Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Elgafy, Hossein; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Chapman, Jens R.; Dvorak, Marcel F.

    2012-01-01

    Revision lumbar spine surgeries are technically challenging with inconstant outcome results. This article discusses the preoperative, intraoperative, as well as postoperative management in these difficult patients. Successful intervention requires a detailed history and physical examination and carefully chosen diagnostic tests. Preoperative planning is paramount in these cases. The decision-making process should address the timing of the surgery, surgical approach, level of interbody fusion ...

  15. Supratentorial Intraparenchymal Haemorrhages during Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Gilberto Ka Kit; Chan, Johnny Ping Hon

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial haemorrhages are rare but potentially life-threatening complications of spine surgery. Most reported cases involved subdural or cerebellar haemorrhages; supratentorial parenchymal bleeding is very uncommon. We report a 28-year-old woman who underwent resection of a thoracic Ewing's sarcoma, and developed fatal haemorrhages around her cerebral metastases during surgery. The clinical presentations, possible pathogenesis and potential preventive measures are discussed. Patients with...

  16. Titanium mesh cages (TMC) in spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Grob, Dieter; Daehn, Sylvia; Mannion, Anne F.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of the titanium mesh cage (TMC) in spinal surgery has opened up a variety of applications that are realizable as a result of the versatility of the implant. Differing applications of TMCs in the whole spine are described in a series of 150 patients. Replacement and reinforcement of the anterior column represent the classic use of cylindrical TMCs. The TMC as a multisegmental concave support in kyphotic deformities and as a posterior interlaminar spacer or lamina replacement a...

  17. Rigid spine syndrome with respiratory failure.

    OpenAIRE

    Morita, H.; Kondo, K.; Hoshino, K; Maruyama, K; Yanagisawa, N

    1990-01-01

    The pathogenesis and therapy of respiratory failure in the rigid spine syndrome are discussed in two cases who improved with respiratory assistance. In both cases, the partial pressures of oxygen and carbon dioxide were reversed in arterial blood gas analysis and %VC was less than 30%. Remission from respiratory failure has been obtained by the use of a ventilator during the night. The cause of the respiratory failure in both cases was severe restrictive respiratory dysfunction due to extreme...

  18. Spine revisited: Principles and parlance redefined

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothari M

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A revised appreciation of the evolution and the nature of bone in general and of vertebrae in particular, allows revisiting the human spine to usher in some new principles and more rational parlance, that embody spine′s phylogeny, ontogeny, anatomy and physiology. Such an approach accords primacy to spine′s soft-tissues, and relegates to its bones a secondary place.

  19. Independent predictors of mortality following spine surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Rupen; Nayar, Gautam; Suresh, Visakha; Wang, Timothy Y; Loriaux, Daniel; Martin, Joel R; Gottfried, Oren N

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the effect of preoperative patient demographics and operative factors on mortality in the 30day postoperative period after spine surgery. Postoperative mortality from surgical interventions has significantly decreased with progressive improvement in surgical techniques and patient selection. Well-studied preoperative risk factors include age, obesity, emphysema, clotting disorders, renal failure, and cardiovascular disease. However, the prognostic implications of such risk factors after spine surgery specifically remain unknown. The medical records of all consecutive patients undergoing spine surgery from 2008-2010 at our institution were reviewed. Patient demographics, comorbidities, indication for operation, surgical details, postoperative complications, and mortalities were collected. The association between preoperative demographics or surgical details and postoperative mortality was assessed via logistic regression analysis. All 1344 consecutive patients (1153 elective, 191 emergency) met inclusion criteria for the study; 19 (1.4%) patients died in the 30days following surgery. Multivariable logistic regression found several predictive factors of mortality for all spine surgery patients: operation in the cervical area (odds ratio [OR]: 7.279, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.37-42.83, p=0.02), postoperative sepsis (OR: 5.75, 95% CI: 1.16-26.38, p=0.03), operation for neoplastic (OR: 7.68, 95% CI: 1.53-42.71, p=0.01) or traumatic (OR: 13.76, 95% CI: 2.40-88.68, p=0.03) etiology, and age as defined as a continuous variable (OR: 1.05, 95% CI: 1.01-1.10, p=0.03). This study demonstrates predictive factors to help identify and evaluate patients who are at higher risk for mortality from spinal surgery, and potentially devise methods to reduce this risk. PMID:26928158

  20. Rigid Spine Syndrome among Children in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roshan Koul

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Rigidity of the spine is common in adults but is rarely observed in children. The aim of this study was to report on rigid spine syndrome (RSS among children in Oman. Methods: Data on children diagnosed with RSS were collected consecutively at presentation between 1996 and 2014 at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH in Muscat, Oman. A diagnosis of RSS was based on the patient’s history, clinical examination, biochemical investigations, electrophysiological findings, neuro-imaging and muscle biopsy. Atrophy of the paraspinal muscles, particularly the erector spinae, was the diagnostic feature; this was noted using magnetic resonance imaging of the spine. Children with disease onset in the paraspinal muscles were labelled as having primary RSS or rigid spinal muscular dystrophy. Secondary RSS was classified as RSS due to the late involvement of other muscle diseases. Results: Over the 18-year period, 12 children were included in the study, with a maleto- female ratio of 9:3. A total of 10 children were found to have primary RSS or rigid spinal muscular dystrophy syndrome while two had secondary RSS. Onset of the disease ranged from birth to 18 months of age. A family history was noted, with two siblings from one family and three siblings from another (n = 5. On examination, children with primary RSS had typical features of severe spine rigidity at onset, with the rest of the neurological examination being normal. Conclusion: RSS is a rare disease with only 12 reported cases found at SQUH during the study period. Cases of primary RSS should be differentiated from the secondary type.

  1. Adult idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-01-01

    This article reports on an observational and treatment study using three case histories to describe common patterns of muscle and fascial asymmetry in adults with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) who have significant scoliotic curvatures that were not surgically corrected and who have chronic pain. Rather than being located in the paraspinal muscles, the myofascial trigger points (TrPs) apparently responsible for the pain were located at some distance from the spine, yet referred pain to locations throughout the thoracolumbar spine. Asymmetries in these muscles appear to tether the spine in such a way that they contribute to scoliotic curvatures. Evaluation also showed that each of these individuals had major ligamentous laxity and this may also have contributed to development of scoliotic curvatures. Treatment focused on release of TrPs found to refer pain into the spine, release of related fascia, and correction of related joint dysfunction. Treatment resulted in substantial relief of longstanding chronic pain. Treatment thus validated the diagnostic hypothesis that myofascial and fascial asymmetries were to some extent responsible for pain in adults with significant scoliotic curvatures. Treatment of these patterns of TrPs and muscle and fascial asymmetries and related joint dysfunction was also effective in relieving pain in each of these individuals after they were injured in auto accidents. Treatment of myofascial TrPs and asymmetrical fascial tension along with treatment of accompanying joint dysfunction is proposed as an effective approach to treating both chronic and acute pain in adults with scoliosis that has not been surgically corrected. PMID:24411157

  2. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson χ2 test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  3. Concomitant lower thoracic spine disc disease in lumbar spine MR imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arana, Estanislao; Marti-Bonmati, Luis; Dosda, Rosa; Molla, Enrique [Department of Radiology, Quiron Clinic, Avd. Blasco Ibanez, 14, 46010 Valencia (Spain)

    2002-11-01

    Our objective was to study the coexistence of lower thoracic-spine disc changes in patients with low back pain using a large field of view (FOV) in lumbar spine MR imaging. One hundred fifty patients with low back pain were referred to an MR examination. All patients were studied with a large FOV (27 cm), covering from the coccyx to at least the body of T11. Discs were coded as normal, protrusion, and extrusion (either epiphyseal or intervertebral). The relationship between disc disease and level was established with the Pearson {chi}{sup 2} test. The T11-12 was the most commonly affected level of the lower thoracic spine with 58 disc cases rated as abnormal. Abnormalities of T11-12 and T12-L1 discs were significantly related only to L1-L2 disease (p=0.001 and p=0.004, respectively) but unrelated to other disc disease, patient's gender, and age. No correlation was found between other discs. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine can detect a great amount of lower thoracic disease, although its clinical significance remains unknown. A statistically significant relation was found within the thoracolumbar junctional region (T11-L2), reflecting common pathoanatomical changes. The absence of relation with lower lumbar spine discs is probably due to differences in their pathomechanisms. (orig.)

  4. Paradoxical signaling regulates structural plasticity in dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael G; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-09-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3- to 5-min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium influx caused by NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks, and their role is to control both the activation and the inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion, including calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), RhoA, and Cdc42, and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics. PMID:27551076

  5. Barriers in the Brain: Resolving Dendritic Spine Morphology and Compartmentalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max eAdrian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are micron-sized protrusions that harbor the majority of excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. The head of the spine is connected to the dendritic shaft by a 50-400 nm thin membrane tube, called the spine neck, which has been hypothesized to confine biochemical and electric signals within the spine compartment. Such compartmentalization could minimize interspinal crosstalk and thereby support spine-specific synapse plasticity. However, to what extent compartmentalization is governed by spine morphology, and in particular the diameter of the spine neck, has remained unresolved. Here, we review recent advances in tool development - both experimental and theoretical - that facilitate studying the role of the spine neck in compartmentalization. Special emphasis is given to recent advances in microscopy methods and quantitative modeling applications as we discuss compartmentalization of biochemical signals, membrane receptors and electrical signals in spines. Multidisciplinary approaches should help to answer how dendritic spine architecture affects the cellular and molecular processes required for synapse maintenance and modulation.

  6. ATLS® and damage control in spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gosse Andreas

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Substantial inflammatory disturbances following major trauma have been found throughout the posttraumatic course of polytraumatized patients, which was confirmed in experimental models of trauma and in vitro settings. As a consequence, the principle of damage control surgery (DCS has developed over the last two decades and has been successfully introduced in the treatment of severely injured patients. The aim of damage control surgery and orthopaedics (DCO is to limit additional iatrogenic trauma in the vulnerable phase following major injury. Considering traumatic brain and acute lung injury, implants for quick stabilization like external fixators as well as decided surgical approaches with minimized potential for additional surgery-related impairment of the patient's immunologic state have been developed and used widely. It is obvious, that a similar approach should be undertaken in the case of spinal trauma in the polytraumatized patient. Yet, few data on damage control spine surgery are published to so far, controlled trials are missing and spinal injury is addressed only secondarily in the broadly used ATLS® polytrauma algorithm. This article reviews the literature on spine trauma assessment and treatment in the polytrauma setting, gives hints on how to assess the spine trauma patient regarding to the ATLS® protocol and recommendations on therapeutic strategies in spinal injury in the polytraumatized patient.

  7. Sports-related injuries of the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different sports show different patterns and frequencies of injuries, which are discussed in this paper. About 3% of all sports accidents relate to the spine. These injuries often have far-reaching consequences for the patients. A very early and extensive diagnosis of all changes is decisive for the start of an adequate therapy and thus for the prognosis of the injury. Radiological diagnosis is also of decisive importance for the documentation of late injuries and in the question of rehabilitation. Here special focus is put on MRT and CT diagnostics.A healthy spine of humans is normally able to resist all static and dynamic strains of the usual sports. However, anomalies and dysfunctions of the spine can reduce its capacity to resist strain. The recommendations of sporting activities are given according to the extent of deflection and the expected growth. The importance of radiology in primary diagnosis and in the follow-up due to typical changes like scoliosis, Morbus Scheuerman, spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis is discussed here as well. (orig.)

  8. Giant cell tumor of the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Toshifumi; Liljenqvist, Ulf; Halm, Henry; Hillmann, Axel; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried

    2002-08-01

    Six patients with giant cell tumor of the spine had surgery between 1981 and 1995. Three lesions were located in the scrum, two lesions were in the thoracic spine, and one lesion was in the lumbar spine. Preoperatively, all patients had local pain and neurologic symptoms. Two patients had cement implanted after curettage or intralesional excision of the sacral tumor; one patient had a local relapse. After the second curettage and cement implantation, the tumor was controlled. One patient with a sacral lesion had marginal excision and spondylodesis; no relapse developed. Two patients with thoracic lesions had planned marginal excision and spondylodesis; the margins finally became intralesional, but no relapse developed. One patient with a lumbar lesion had incomplete removal of the tumor and received postoperative irradiation. At the final followup (median, 69 months), five of six patients were disease-free and one patient died of disease progression. Two of the five surviving patients had pain after standing or neurologic problems. Although some contamination occurred, planning a marginal excision of the lesion seems beneficial for vertebral lesions above the sacrum. Total sacrectomy of a sacral lesion seems to be too invasive when cement implantation can control the lesion. PMID:12151896

  9. Ambulatory spine surgery: a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Evan O; Brietzke, Sasha C; Weinberg, Alan D; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Objective To assess the current practices of spine surgeons performing ambulatory surgery in the United States. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to members of the International Society for the Advancement of Spine Surgery. Data were initially examined in a univariate manner; variables with a p value ambulatory spine surgery, and 49.1% were investors in an ambulatory surgery center. Surgeon investors in ambulatory surgery centers were more likely to perform procedures of increased complexity than noninvestors, though limited data precluded a statistical correlation. Surgeons in private practice were more likely to perform ambulatory surgery (94.3%; p = 0.0176), and nonacademic surgeons were both more likely to invest in ambulatory surgery centers (p = 0.0024) and perform surgery at least part of the time in a surgery center (p = 0.0039). Conclusions Though the numbers were too few to calculate statistical significance, there was a trend toward the performance of high-risk procedures on an ambulatory basis being undertaken by those with investment status in an ambulatory center. It is possible that this plays a role in the decision to perform these procedures in this setting versus that of a hospital, where a patient may have better access to care should a complication arise requiring emergent assessment and treatment by a physician. This decision should divest itself of financial incentives and focus entirely on patient safety.

  10. Intrapartum Ultrasound Assessment of Fetal Spine Position

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Gizzo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of foetal spine position in the first and second labour stages to determine the probability of OPP detection at birth and the related obstetrical implications. We conducted an observational-longitudinal cohort study on uncomplicated cephalic single foetus pregnant women at term. We evaluated the accuracy of ultrasound in predicting occiput position at birth, influence of fetal spine in occiput position during labour, labour trend, analgesia request, type of delivery, and indication to CS. The accuracy of the foetal spinal position to predict the occiput position at birth was high at the first labour stage. At the second labour stage, CS (40.3% and operative vaginal deliveries (23.9% occurred more frequently in OPP than in occiput anterior position (7% and 15.2%, resp., especially in cases of the posterior spine. In concordant posterior positions labour length was greater than other ones, and analgesia request rate was 64.1% versus 14.7% for all the others. The assessment of spinal position could be useful in obstetrical management and counselling, both before and during labour. The detection of spinal position, more than OPP, is predictive of successful delivery. In concordant posterior positions, the labour length, analgesia request, operative delivery, and caesarean section rate are higher than in the other combination.

  11. Clinical significance of gas myelography and CT gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinaga, Haruhiko (Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan))

    1984-05-01

    Basic and clinical applications relating to air myelography of the cervical spine have already been studied and extensively been used as an adjuvant diagnostic method for diseases of the spine and the spinal cord. However, hardly any application and clinical evaluation have been made concerning gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine. The author examined X-ray findings of 183 cases with diseases of the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine, including contral cases. Gas X-ray photography included simple profile, forehead tomography, sagittal plane, and CT section. Morphological characteristics of normal X-ray pictures of the throacic spine and the lumbar spine were explained from 54 control cases, and all the diameters of the subarachnoidal space from the anterior to the posterior part were measured. X-ray findings were examined on pathological cases, namely 22 cases with diseases of the throacic spine and 107 cases with diseases of the lumbar spine, and as a result these were useful for pathological elucidation of spinal cord tumors, spinal carries, yellow ligament ossification, lumbar spinal canal stenosis, hernia of intervertebral disc, etc. Also, CT gas myelography was excellent in stereo observation of the spine and the spinal cord in spinal cord tumors, yellow ligament ossification, and spinal canal stenosis. On the other hand, it is not suitable for the diagnoses of intraspinal vascular abnormality, adhesive arachinitis, and running abnormality of the cauda equina nerve and radicle. Gas myelography of the thoracic spine and the lambar spine, is very useful in clinics when experienced techniques are used in photographic conditions, and diagnoses are made, well understanding the characteristics of gas pictures. Thus, its application has been opened to selection of an operative technique, determination of operative ranges, etc.

  12. Repositioning the patient: patient organizations, consumerism, and autonomy in Britain during the 1960s and 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how and why the patient came to be repositioned as a political actor within British health care during the 1960s and 1970s. Focusing on the role played by patient organizations, it is suggested that the repositioning of the patient needs to be seen in the light of growing demands for greater patient autonomy and the application of consumerist principles to health. Examining the activities of two patient groups-the National Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital (NAWCH) and the Patients Association (PA)-indicates that while such groups undoubtedly placed more emphasis on individual autonomy, collective concerns did not entirely fall away. The voices of patients, as well as the patient, continued to matter within British health care. PMID:23811711

  13. Repositioning the patient: patient organizations, consumerism, and autonomy in Britain during the 1960s and 1970s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mold, Alex

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how and why the patient came to be repositioned as a political actor within British health care during the 1960s and 1970s. Focusing on the role played by patient organizations, it is suggested that the repositioning of the patient needs to be seen in the light of growing demands for greater patient autonomy and the application of consumerist principles to health. Examining the activities of two patient groups-the National Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital (NAWCH) and the Patients Association (PA)-indicates that while such groups undoubtedly placed more emphasis on individual autonomy, collective concerns did not entirely fall away. The voices of patients, as well as the patient, continued to matter within British health care.

  14. Dry needling for the management of thoracic spine pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Layton, Michelle; Dommerholt, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Thoracic spine pain is as disabling as neck and low back pain without receiving the same level of attention in the scientific literature. Among the different structures that can refer pain to the thoracic spine, muscles often play a relevant role. Trigger points (TrPs) from neck, shoulder and spinal muscles can induce pain in the region of the thoracic spine. There is a lack of evidence reporting the presence of TrPs in the region of the thoracic spine, but clinical evidence suggests that TrPs can be a potential source of thoracic spine pain. The current paper discusses the role of TrPs in the thoracic spine and dry needling (DN) for the management of TrPs in the thoracic multifidi and longissimus thoracis. This paper also includes a brief discussion of the application of DN in other tissues such as tendons, ligaments and scars. PMID:26309385

  15. Jurisprudence. Repositioning of cables and pipes. Who decides and who pays?; Jurisprudentie. Kabels en leidingen verleggen. Wie bepaalt en betaalt?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roggenkamp, M. [Brinkhof Advocaten, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2011-09-15

    Underground cables and pipes sometimes need to be repositioned to make room for buildings. Can any exploiter of pipes be obliged to do this. And if this is the case, who should pay for it? Every year these questions are causing new disputes. [Dutch] Ondergrondse kabels en leidingen moeten soms worden verlegd om plaats te maken voor bebouwing. Kan een leidingexploitant hiertoe verplicht worden? En zo ja, wie moet dat betalen? Hierover ontstaan jaarlijks geschillen.

  16. Repositório de Informação do Município de Ponte de Lima (RIMPL)

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Cristiana

    2015-01-01

    Whereas the integration of information systems is one of the key factors for competitiveness and for creating added in organizations value, taking into account the satisfaction of the citizen / customer, the Ponte de Lima Municipality has implemented another project, pioneer in administration site entitled " Repositório de Informação do Município de Ponte de Lima (RIMPL)", which consists in providing a common graphical interface search the catalogs archive, Library and Municipal Museums, avoi...

  17. Muscle Repositioning: Combining Subjective and Objective Feedbacks in the Teaching and Practice of a Reflex-Based Myofascial Release Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Bertolucci, Luiz Fernando

    2010-01-01

    Muscle Repositioning (MR) is a new style of myofascial release that elicits involuntary motor reactions detectable by electromyography. This article* describes the principal theoretical and practical concepts of MR, and summarizes a workshop presented October 31, 2009, after the Second International Fascia Research Congress, held at Vrije Universitiet, Amsterdam. The manual mechanical input of MR integrates the client’s body segments into a block, which is evident as a result of the diagnosti...

  18. On comparison of manifold learning techniques for dendritic spine classification

    OpenAIRE

    Ghani, Muhammad Usman; Argunşah, Ali Özgür; Argunsah, Ali Ozgur; Israely, Inbal; Ünay, Devrim; Unay, Devrim; Taşdizen, Tolga; Tasdizen, Tolga; Çetin, Müjdat; Cetin, Mujdat

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are one of the key functional components of neurons. Their morphological changes are correlated with neuronal activity. Neuroscientists study spine shape variations to understand their relation with neuronal activity. Currently this analysis performed manually, the availability of reliable automated tools would assist neuroscientists and accelerate this research. Previously, morphological features based spine analysis has been performed and reported in the literature. In this...

  19. Risk factors for pulmonary complications after spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Imposti, Felix; Cizik, Amy; Bransford, Richard; Bellabarba, Carlo; Lee, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Study design:  Registry study with prospectively collected data Objective:  To determine risk factors for pulmonary complications in spine surgery. Methods:  The Spine End Results Registry 2003–2004 is an exhaustive database of 1,592 patients who underwent spine surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center or Harborview Medical Center. Detailed information regarding patient demographic, medical comorbidity, and comorbidities, surgical invasiveness and adverse outcomes were prospecti...

  20. Japanese 2011 nationwide survey on complications from spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Imajo, Yasuaki; TAGUCHI, TOSHIHIKO; Yone, Kazunori; Okawa, Atsushi; Otani, Koji; Ogata, Tadanori; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Shimada, Yoichi; Neo, Masashi; Iguchi, Tetsuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Background The Japanese Society for Spine Surgery and Related Research (JSSR) previously carried out two nationwide surveys in 1994 and 2001 on complications from spine and spinal cord surgery. More than 10 years have now elapsed since 2001. Rapidly ageing populations have major impacts on society, particularly in the medical field. The purpose of this study was therefore to examine the present situation for spine surgery in Japan. Methods The JSSR research team prepared a computerized questi...

  1. Risk of Complications in Spine Surgery: A Prospective Study

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Rodolfo Casimiro; de Oliveira, Matheus Fernandes; Rotta, José Marcus; Botelho, Ricardo Vieira

    2015-01-01

    Purpose : Complications are the chief concern of patients and physicians when considering spine surgery. The authors seek to assess the incidence of complications in patients undergoing spine surgery and identify risk factors for their occurrence. Methods : Prospective study of patients undergoing spine surgery from 1 February 2013 to 1 February 2014. Epidemiological characteristics and complications during the surgical hospitalization were recorded and analyzed. Results : The sample comprise...

  2. Incidental durotomy in lumbar spine surgery: incidence and management

    OpenAIRE

    Tafazal, Suhayl I.; Sell, Philip J

    2004-01-01

    There is increasing awareness of the need to inform patients of common complications that occur during surgical procedures. During lumbar spine surgery, incidental tear of the dural sac and subsequent cerebrospinal fluid leak is possibly the most frequently occurring complication. There is no consensus in the literature about the rate of dural tears in spine surgery. We have undertaken this study to evaluate the incidence of dural tears among spine surgeons in the United Kingdom for commonly ...

  3. Risk factors for cardiac complications after spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Guyot, Juan P.; Cizik, Amy; Bransford, Richard; Bellabarba, Carlo; Lee, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Study design:  Registry study using prospectively collected data Objective:  To determine risk factors for cardiac complications in spine surgery. Methods:  The Spine End Results Registry 2003–2004 is an exhaustive database of 1,592 patients who underwent spine surgery at the University of Washington Medical Center or Harborview Medical Center. Detailed information regarding patient demographic, medical comorbidity, surgical invasiveness and adverse outcomes were prospectively recorded. The p...

  4. Baastrup’s disease (kissing spines syndrome): a pictorial review

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios K. Filippiadis; Mazioti, Argyro; Argentos, S; Anselmetti, G.; Papakonstantinou, O.; Kelekis, N.; Kelekis, Alexis

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Excessive lordosis is a common finding and may produce mechanical pressure that causes repetitive strains of the interspinous ligament with subsequent degeneration and collapse. Baastrup’s disease (kissing spine syndrome) is a term referring to close approximation of adjacent spinous processes due to degenerative changes of the spine. Baastrup’s disease usually affects the lumbar spine, with L4-L5 being the most commonly affected level. There is higher occurrence at ages over 70 and ...

  5. Technical note: Electrocardiogram electrode repositioning for 320-row coronary CT angiography in patients with regular and recurrent premature ventricular contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Takeshi; Matsutani, Hideyuki; Groarke, John; Takamura, Kazuhisa; Fujimoto, Shinichiro; Rybicki, Frank J; Kumamaru, Kanako K

    2014-01-01

    Arrhythmias can compromise image quality and increase radiation exposure during coronary CT angiography (CTA). However, premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) can occur in a predictable recurrent and regular pattern (ie, bigeminy, trigeminy, quadrigeminy) with post-PVC compensatory pauses. Electrocardiographic (ECG) electrode repositioning can achieve relative amplification of the R waves of PVCs compared with R waves of sinus beats. This technical note describes how simple ECG electrode repositioning, combined with an absolute-delay strategy, facilitated selective R waves of PVC ECG triggering of image acquisition in 6 patients with PVC bigeminy or quadrigeminy at the time of 320-row coronary CTA. All 6 studies were single heartbeat acquisition scans with excellent image quality and a median effective radiation dose of 2.9 mSv (interquartile range, 2.1-3.8 mSv). Standard ECG electrode positions used for 2 patients with PVC bigeminy undergoing coronary CTA were associated with an acquisition over 2 heartbeats and effective radiation doses of 6.8 and 10.3 mSv, respectively. In conclusion, ECG electrode repositioning combined with an absolute-delay strategy for regularly recurring PVCs, such as ventricular bigeminy, facilitates high image quality and lower radiation dose during coronary CTA. This simple and straightforward technique can be considered for all patients with regular and recurrent PVCs undergoing coronary CTA.

  6. [Repositioning injuries of nerve root L5 after surgical treatment of high degree spondylolistheses and spondyloptosis--in vitro studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, S; Kleihues, H; Gill, C; Reinhardt, A; Noack, W

    1998-01-01

    Temporary or persistent paralysis of the fifth lumbar nerve root have been frequently reported as complications following reposition of high degree spondylolisthesis. According to an outcome analysis of sixty-four patients, we found an increased incidence of motor damages after reduction of Meyerding degree four anterolisthesis or spondyloptosis. There were no signs of intradural root compression or nerve injury tracable. In order to detect extraforaminal strictures, the anatomic course of the lumbosacral plexus and its relation to neighbouring structures, especially pelvivertebral connective tissue junctions were recorded in cadavric measurements. Beside an number of variations in origin and course of the iliolumbar ligament complex, we observed a junction between os sacrum and the anterior part of the fifth lumbar vertebrae in 14/30 specimen, constantly running anterior to the fifth lumbar nerve root. In addition the nerve was fixed to the sacral periostium a few centimeters distal this crossing in about 20% of all cases. Pathophysiological effects were measured in reposition trials, using a continuous pressure monitoring system. A reposition of more than 20 mm resulted in a perineural pressure > 30 mmHg. This caused a nerve fiber deformation at the edge of the compressed nerve segment. Increased pressure leads to a nodular displacement of perineural fat as well as intraneural fascicles. PMID:9615983

  7. Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Dendritic Spines in the Living Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chien eChen

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are ubiquitous postsynaptic sites of most excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain, and thus may serve as structural indicators of functional synapses. Recent works have suggested that neuronal coding of memories may be associated with rapid alterations in spine formation and elimination. Technological advances have enabled researchers to study spine dynamics in vivo during development as well as under various physiological and pathological conditions. We believe that better understanding of the spatiotemporal patterns of spine dynamics will help elucidate the principles of experience-dependent circuit modification and information processing in the living brain.

  8. Salmonella spondylodiscitis of the thoracic vertebrae mimicking spine tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamad Effendi, Ferdhany; Ibrahim, Mohd Ikraam; Mohd Miswan, Mohd Fairudz

    2016-01-01

    Extraintestinal Salmonella infection involving the thoracic spine is very rare. It commonly presents with non-specific chronic back pain and can occur with no gastrointestinal manifestation. Blood test results and imaging findings are often indistinguishable from more common chronic spine infections such as spine tuberculosis. Culture studies remain the key to establishing a definitive diagnosis and subsequently successful treatment. We report a case in which a patient presented with symptoms and signs suggestive of spine tuberculosis, yet the culture examination revealed otherwise. PMID:27381996

  9. Drug Repositioning and Pharmacophore Identification in the Discovery of Hookworm MIF Inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Cho; J Vermeire; J Merkel; L Leng; X Du; R Bucala; M Cappello; E Lolis

    2011-12-31

    The screening of bioactive compound libraries can be an effective approach for repositioning FDA-approved drugs or discovering new pharmacophores. Hookworms are blood-feeding, intestinal nematode parasites that infect up to 600 million people worldwide. Vaccination with recombinant Ancylostoma ceylanicum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (rAceMIF) provided partial protection from disease, thus establishing a 'proof-of-concept' for targeting AceMIF to prevent or treat infection. A high-throughput screen (HTS) against rAceMIF identified six AceMIF-specific inhibitors. A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sodium meclofenamate, could be tested in an animal model to assess the therapeutic efficacy in treating hookworm disease. Furosemide, an FDA-approved diuretic, exhibited submicromolar inhibition of rAceMIF tautomerase activity. Structure-activity relationships of a pharmacophore based on furosemide included one analog that binds similarly to the active site, yet does not inhibit the Na-K-Cl symporter (NKCC1) responsible for diuretic activity.

  10. Short Term Outcome of Anterior Lamellar Reposition in Treating Trachomatous Trichiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania A. Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the outcome of anterior lamellar reposition (ALR in treating trachomatous trichiasis. Methods. Patients with trachomatous trichiasis or entropion with short tarsus were treated by ALR between February 2009 and November 2013. This included splitting of the lid margin behind the aberrant lash line to separate the lid lamellae. The anterior lamella was recessed and fixated using 4/0 silk sutures. The extra lashes and their routes were excised. Sutures were removed by the 3rd week and patients completed 6 months of follow-up. Recurrence of ≤5 lashes was treated by electrolysis. Results. The study included 752 eyelids (445 patients; 58.4% females, 41.6% males, mean age 53.2 ± 6.9 y. 179 (25.1% lids had entropion while 287 (64.5% patients had corneal affection. By the third week, 2.66% lid had trichiasis while 30.8% had no rubbing lashes. By the 6th month, 14.9% of lids showed recurrence while 66.1% were completely cured (CI = 0.63–0.69 and 19% had partial success (CI = 0.16–0.21. Abnormal lid appearance persisted in 2.66% and 12.9% required another surgery. Conclusion. ALR is a good option for treating trachomatous trichiasis especially without cicatricial entropion. Excision of dysplastic lashes is thought to augment the surgical outcome.

  11. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haeseung Lee

    Full Text Available An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii rich information on drug's mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity.

  12. Drug Repositioning for Cancer Therapy Based on Large-Scale Drug-Induced Transcriptional Signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haeseung; Kang, Seungmin; Kim, Wankyu

    2016-01-01

    An in silico chemical genomics approach is developed to predict drug repositioning (DR) candidates for three types of cancer: glioblastoma, lung cancer, and breast cancer. It is based on a recent large-scale dataset of ~20,000 drug-induced expression profiles in multiple cancer cell lines, which provides i) a global impact of transcriptional perturbation of both known targets and unknown off-targets, and ii) rich information on drug's mode-of-action. First, the drug-induced expression profile is shown more effective than other information, such as the drug structure or known target, using multiple HTS datasets as unbiased benchmarks. Particularly, the utility of our method was robustly demonstrated in identifying novel DR candidates. Second, we predicted 14 high-scoring DR candidates solely based on expression signatures. Eight of the fourteen drugs showed significant anti-proliferative activity against glioblastoma; i.e., ivermectin, trifluridine, astemizole, amlodipine, maprotiline, apomorphine, mometasone, and nortriptyline. Our DR score strongly correlated with that of cell-based experimental results; the top seven DR candidates were positive, corresponding to an approximately 20-fold enrichment compared with conventional HTS. Despite diverse original indications and known targets, the perturbed pathways of active DR candidates show five distinct patterns that form tight clusters together with one or more known cancer drugs, suggesting common transcriptome-level mechanisms of anti-proliferative activity. PMID:26954019

  13. Drug Repositioning and Pharmacophore Identification in the Discovery of Hookworm MIF Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yoonsang; Vermeire, Jon J.; Merkel, Jane S.; Leng, Lin; Du, Xin; Bucala, Richard; Cappello, Michael; Lolis, Elias

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The screening of bioactive compound libraries can be an effective approach for repositioning FDA-approved drugs or discovering new pharmacophores. Hookworms are blood-feeding, intestinal nematode parasites that infect up to 600 million people worldwide. Vaccination with recombinant Ancylostoma ceylanicum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (rAceMIF) provided partial protection from disease, thus establishing a “proof-of-concept” for targeting AceMIF to prevent or treat infection. A high-throughput screen (HTS) against rAceMIF identified six AceMIF-specific inhibitors. A nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), sodium meclofenamate, could be tested in an animal model to assess the therapeutic efficacy in treating hookworm disease. Furosemide, an FDA-approved diuretic, exhibited submicromolar inhibition of rAceMIF tautomerase activity. Structure-activity relationships of a pharmacophore based on furosemide included one analog that binds similarly to the active site, yet does not inhibit the Na-K-Cl symporter (NKCC1) responsible for diuretic activity. PMID:21944748

  14. Cheaper faster drug development validated by the repositioning of drugs against neglected tropical diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kevin; Bilsland, Elizabeth; Sparkes, Andrew; Aubrey, Wayne; Young, Michael; Soldatova, Larisa N; De Grave, Kurt; Ramon, Jan; de Clare, Michaela; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Oliver, Stephen G; King, Ross D

    2015-03-01

    There is an urgent need to make drug discovery cheaper and faster. This will enable the development of treatments for diseases currently neglected for economic reasons, such as tropical and orphan diseases, and generally increase the supply of new drugs. Here, we report the Robot Scientist 'Eve' designed to make drug discovery more economical. A Robot Scientist is a laboratory automation system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to discover scientific knowledge through cycles of experimentation. Eve integrates and automates library-screening, hit-confirmation, and lead generation through cycles of quantitative structure activity relationship learning and testing. Using econometric modelling we demonstrate that the use of AI to select compounds economically outperforms standard drug screening. For further efficiency Eve uses a standardized form of assay to compute Boolean functions of compound properties. These assays can be quickly and cheaply engineered using synthetic biology, enabling more targets to be assayed for a given budget. Eve has repositioned several drugs against specific targets in parasites that cause tropical diseases. One validated discovery is that the anti-cancer compound TNP-470 is a potent inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase from the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium vivax. PMID:25652463

  15. Cheaper faster drug development validated by the repositioning of drugs against neglected tropical diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kevin; Bilsland, Elizabeth; Sparkes, Andrew; Aubrey, Wayne; Young, Michael; Soldatova, Larisa N.; De Grave, Kurt; Ramon, Jan; de Clare, Michaela; Sirawaraporn, Worachart; Oliver, Stephen G.; King, Ross D.

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to make drug discovery cheaper and faster. This will enable the development of treatments for diseases currently neglected for economic reasons, such as tropical and orphan diseases, and generally increase the supply of new drugs. Here, we report the Robot Scientist ‘Eve’ designed to make drug discovery more economical. A Robot Scientist is a laboratory automation system that uses artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to discover scientific knowledge through cycles of experimentation. Eve integrates and automates library-screening, hit-confirmation, and lead generation through cycles of quantitative structure activity relationship learning and testing. Using econometric modelling we demonstrate that the use of AI to select compounds economically outperforms standard drug screening. For further efficiency Eve uses a standardized form of assay to compute Boolean functions of compound properties. These assays can be quickly and cheaply engineered using synthetic biology, enabling more targets to be assayed for a given budget. Eve has repositioned several drugs against specific targets in parasites that cause tropical diseases. One validated discovery is that the anti-cancer compound TNP-470 is a potent inhibitor of dihydrofolate reductase from the malaria-causing parasite Plasmodium vivax. PMID:25652463

  16. Tubular foreign body or stent: safe retrieval or repositioning using the coaxial snare technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the utility and advantages of the coaxial snare technique in the retrieval of tubular foreign bodies. Using the coaxial snare technique, we attempted to retrieve tubular foreign bodies present in seven patients. The bodies were either stents which were malpositioned or had migrated from their correct position in the vascular system (n=2), a fragmented venous introducer sheath (n=1), fragmented drainage catheters in the biliary tree (n=2), or fractured external drainage catheters in the urinary tract (n=2). After passing a guidewire and/or a dilator through the lumina of these foreign bodies, we introduced a loop snare over the guidewire or dilator, thus capturing and retrieving them. In all cases, it was possible to retrieve or reposition the various items, using a minimum-sized introducer sheath or a tract. No folding was involved. In no case were surgical procedures required, and no complications were encountered. The coaxial snare technique, an application of the loop snare technique, is a useful and safe method for the retrieval of tubular foreign bodies, and one which involves minimal injury to the patient

  17. THE MANAGEMENT OF LIMITED MANDIBULAR MOVEMENT CAUSED BY CONDYLAR FRACTURE WITH REPOSITIONING SPLINT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ira Tanti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Fractures of the neck of condyle usually are the result of a blow to the mandible. A lateral blow to the body of the mandible commonly causes a contralateral condyle fracture. There are many signs and symptoms of a condylar fracture, for example crepitation, deviation of the mandible to the side of injury, and spasm of the associated group of muscles. These will result in a functional disability, which is usually seen as a limited mandibular movement. This paper reported a patient with a fracture of the condylar neck. Patient had been treated with closed reduction and immobilization for 2 months. After that, she felt that her bite was changed, she could not occlude her teeth well, and she had clicking sound in the right joint when she opened her mouth. Besides that, patient had difficulties to move the mandible to the left side, and she could not open her mouth widely. The patient was treated with a repositioning splint and she had to do some jaw exercises. The purposes were to regain the position of condyle, to reduce the muscle spasm and finally got the normal jaw movement.

  18. Argus II retinal prosthesis malrotation and repositioning with intraoperative optical coherence tomography in a posterior staphyloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seider MI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Michael I Seider, Paul Hahn Duke University Eye Center, Durham, NC, USA Introduction: The Argus II retinal prosthesis may improve visual function in patients with severe vision loss from retinitis pigmentosa. Optimal centration of the electrode array over the macula is important to achieve optimal visual results. Argus tack malrotation is a novel entity that may be encountered during placement, especially in patients with posterior staphyloma.Methods: Retrospective case review.Results: During tacking of the electronics array a clockwise rotation occurred resulting in malposition. We hypothesize this was secondary to undue rotation or posterior pressure applied during tack insertion in conjunction with placement over a previously unrecognized posterior staphyloma. Intraoperative optical coherence tomography, because of the cross-sectional images provided, was helpful in visualizing the distance between the electronics array and the retina, which was difficult to assess using the surgical microscope alone. Repositioning was achieved by adjusting the tack without removal. The patient experienced an improvement in vision as a result of the surgery.Conclusion: Malrotation may occur when tacking the Argus II prosthesis, and the presence of a posterior staphyloma may increase this risk. It is important to differentiate malrotation from tack misplacement – the former may be addressed with array unrotation or partial tack withdrawal and the latter may require tack removal and reinsertion. Also, intraoperative optical coherence tomography may be helpful in characterizing electronics array position during surgery. Keywords: Argus, retinitis pigmentosa, retinal tack

  19. Repositioning the use of the Bible towards a mission-oriented theological education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adekunle O. Dada

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available It is an undeniable fact that mission remains the cardinal essence of the Church. However, in Africa and in Nigeria, the Church seems to have lost focus regarding the main reason for its existence, namely mission. One of the factors responsible for this may be the form of theological education in vogue. In view of this anomaly, this paper reflects on how the study of the Bible, which serves as the primary basis for theological education in some institutions, can be repositioned to enhance a mission-oriented theological education. The importance of proper interpretation of the Bible in enhancing missions can be premised on the fact that a sound biblical hermeneutics is prerequisite to the formulation of an effective and functional theology of missions. If our theology of mission is faulty, the practice cannot be anything but flawed. In view of this, the paper explores ways in which the Bible can be meaningfully studied in order to promote a mission-oriented theological education.

  20. From periphery to the centre: Towards repositioning churches for a meaningful contribution to public health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vhumani Magezi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of communities in health care has gained prominence in the last few years. Churches as community structures have been identified as instrumental in health-care delivery. Whilst it is widely acknowledged that churches provide important health services, particularly in countries where there are poorly-developed health sectors, the role of churches in health care is poorly understood and often overlooked. This article discusses some causes of this lacuna and makes suggestions for repositioning churches for a meaningful contribution to health care. Firstly, the article provides a context by reviewing literature on the church and health care. Secondly, it clarifies the nature of interventions and the competencies of churches. Thirdly, it discusses the operational meaning of church and churches for assessing health-care contributions. Fourthly, it explores the health-care models that are discerned in church and health-care literature. Fifthly, it discusses the contribution of churches within a multidisciplinary health team. Sixthly, it proposes an appropriate motivation that should drive churches to be involved in health care and the ecclesiological design that underpins such health care interventions.

  1. Impact of intravenous acetaminophen therapy on the necessity of cervical spine imaging in patients with cervical spine trauma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koorosh Ahmadi; Amir Masoud Hashemian; Elham Pishbin; Mahdi Sharif-Alhoseini; Vafa Rahimi-Movaghar

    2014-01-01

    Objective:We evaluated a new hypothesis of acetaminophen therapy to reduce the necessity of imaging in patients with probable traumatic cervical spine injury.Methods:Patients with acute blunt trauma to the neck and just posterior midline cervical tenderness received acetaminophen (15 mg/kg) intravenously after cervical spine immobilization.Then,all the patients underwent plain radiography and computerized tomography of the cervical spine.The outcome measure was the presence of traumatic cervical spine injury.Sixty minutes after acetaminophen infusion,posterior midline cervical tendemess was reassessed.Results:Of 1 309 patients,41 had traumatic cervical spine injuries based on imaging.Sixty minutes after infusion,posterior midline cervical tenderness was eliminated in 1 041 patients,none of whom had abnormal imaging.Conclusion:Patients with cervical spine trauma do not need imaging if posterior midline cervical tendemess is eliminated after acetaminophen infusion.This analgesia could be considered as a diagnostic and therapeutic intervention.

  2. Lumbar spine degenerative disease : effect on bone mineral density measurements in the lumbar spine and femoral neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhng, Seon Kwan [Wonkwang Univ. School of Medicine, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Koplyay, Peter; Jeffrey Carr, J.; Lenchik, Leon [Wake Forest Univ. School of Medicine, Winston-salem (United States)

    2001-04-01

    To determine the effect of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine on bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck. We reviewed radiographs and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry scans of the lumbar spine and hip in 305 Caucasian women with suspected osteoporosis. One hundred and eight-six patient remained after excluding women less than 40 years of age (n=18) and those with hip osteoarthritis, scoliosis, lumbar spine fractures, lumbar spinal instrumentation, hip arthroplasty, metabolic bone disease other than osteoporosis, or medications known to influence bone metabolism (n=101). On the basis of lumbar spine radiographs, those with absent/mild degenerative disease were assigned to the control group and those with moderate/severe degenerative disease to the degenerative group. Spine radiographs were evaluated for degenerative disease by two radiologists working independently; discrepant evaluations were resolved by consensus. Lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density was compared between the two groups. Forty-five (24%) of 186 women were assigned to the degenerative group and 141 (76%) to the control group. IN the degenerative group, mean bone mineral density measured 1.075g/cm? in the spine and 0.788g/cm{sup 2} in the femoral neck, while for controls the corresponding figures were 0.989g/cm{sup 2} and 0.765g/cm{sup 2}. Adjusted for age, weight and height by means of analysis of variance, degenerative disease of the lumbar spine was a significant predictor of increased bone mineral density in the spine (p=0.0001) and femoral neck (p=0.0287). Our results indicate a positive relationship between degenerative disease of the lumbar spine and bone mineral density in the lumbar spine and femoral neck, and suggest that degenerative disease in that region, which leads to an intrinsic increase in bone mineral density in the femoral neck, may be a good negative predictor of osteoporotic hip fractures.

  3. Percutaneous spine injection: considerations for improving treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Joon Woo; Kim, Sung Hyun; Lee, In Sook; Choi, Jung Ah; Yoon, Chang Jin; Hwang, Sung Il; Kang, Heung Sik [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Bundang (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Ja Young; Koh, Young Hwan; Hong, Sung Hwan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-15

    To discuss the causes of treatment failure in percutaneous spine injections for low back pain or radiculopathy by analyzing patients who have experienced negative treatment effect on their first visit and a positive treatment effect on their second visit. The authors reviewed the cases of 24 patients who visited the pain intervention outpatient department in our hospital due to back pain or radiculopathy. All patients reviewed experienced a negative treatment effect following their first spine injection, but a positive treatment effect following the second injection. The dates of the cases range from June 2003 to May 2004. Two radiologists analyzed the possible causes of the negative treatment effect following the first injection therapies by considering clinical aspects as well as reviewing radiological images. The most common condition was the presence of the change in the level of the second selective nerve root block (n=13). In seven cases, the methods for administering the injections were changed to facet block (n=2), midline epidural block (n=1), selective nerve root block (n=3) and caudal epidural block (n=1). In four cases, there were no changes in the methods for administering the injections nor were there any changes in the level of the selective nerve root block between first and second visit. In those cases, after reviewing spot radiographs performed during injection, we attributed the causes of failure of injection therapy to an inappropriate distribution of drugs. We can improve the effect of percutaneous spine injections for low back pain or radioculopathy by determining the exact level of perineural root block, trying alternative methods, and insuring a good distribution of the injected drugs.

  4. Augmented reality visualization for thoracoscopic spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Frank; Vogt, Sebastian; Khamene, Ali; Heining, Sandro; Euler, Ekkehard; Schneberger, Marc; Zuerl, Konrad; Mutschler, Wolf

    2006-03-01

    We are developing an augmented reality (AR) image guidance system in which information derived from medical images is overlaid onto a video view of the patient. The centerpiece of the system is a head-mounted display custom fitted with two miniature color video cameras that capture the stereo view of the scene. Medical graphics is overlaid onto the video view and appears firmly anchored in the scene, without perceivable time lag or jitter. We have been testing the system for different clinical applications. In this paper we discuss minimally invasive thoracoscopic spine surgery as a promising new orthopedic application. In the standard approach, the thoracoscope - a rigid endoscope - provides visual feedback for the minimally invasive procedure of removing a damaged disc and fusing the two neighboring vertebrae. The navigation challenges are twofold. From a global perspective, the correct vertebrae on the spine have to be located with the inserted instruments. From a local perspective, the actual spine procedure has to be performed precisely. Visual feedback from the thoracoscope provides only limited support for both of these tasks. In the augmented reality approach, we give the surgeon additional anatomical context for the navigation. Before the surgery, we derive a model of the patient's anatomy from a CT scan, and during surgery we track the location of the surgical instruments in relation to patient and model. With this information, we can help the surgeon in both the global and local navigation, providing a global map and 3D information beyond the local 2D view of the thoracoscope. Augmented reality visualization is a particularly intuitive method of displaying this information to the surgeon. To adapt our augmented reality system to this application, we had to add an external optical tracking system, which works now in combination with our head-mounted tracking camera. The surgeon's feedback to the initial phantom experiments is very positive.

  5. Surgical Site Infections After Pediatric Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floccari, Lorena V; Milbrandt, Todd A

    2016-04-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) after spinal deformity surgery is a complication in the pediatric population resulting in high morbidity and cost. Despite modern surgical techniques and preventative strategies, the incidence remains substantial, especially in the neuromuscular population. This review focuses on recent advancements in identification of risk factors, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment strategies for acute and delayed pediatric spine infections. It reviews recent literature, including the best practice guidelines for infection prevention in high-risk patients. Targets of additional research are highlighted to assess efficacy of current practices to further reduce risk of SSI in pediatric patients with spinal deformity. PMID:26772947

  6. Return to Play After Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ralph W; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-10-01

    Surgical management of lumbar spine conditions can produce excellent outcomes in athletes. Microdiscectomy for lumbar disc herniation has favorable outcomes; most athletes return to play at preoperative performance levels. Direct pars repair is successful in younger athletes, with high rates of return to play for a variety of fixation techniques. Fusion in athletes with scoliosis is a negative predictor. There are few evidence-based return to play criteria. Athletes should demonstrate full resolution of symptoms and flexibility, endurance, and strength before returning to play. Deciding when to return an athlete to sport depends on particular injury sustained, sport, and individual factors. PMID:27543402

  7. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Jang-Gyu; Hong, Hyun-Sook [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Radiology, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Koh, Yoon-Woo [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Kim, Hee-Kyung [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Pathology, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea); Park, Jung-Mi [Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bucheon-Si, Gyeonggi-Do (Korea)

    2008-04-15

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  8. Candida albicans osteomyelitis of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fungal osteomyelitis is a rare infection that usually develops in immunocompromised patients. Additionally, involvement of the cervical spine by Candida albicans is extremely rare; only three previous cases of Candida vertebral osteomyelitis have been reported in the literature. The diagnosis may be delayed due to nonspecific radiologic findings and a slow progression. We report the CT, MRI, bone scan, and PET-CT findings in a patient who developed Candida osteomyelitis, which was initially misdiagnosed as metastasis, at the atlas and axis following treatment for nasopharyngeal cancer. (orig.)

  9. Management of Tuberculous Infection of the Spine

    Science.gov (United States)

    G., Vijayaraghavan; Jayaswal, Arvind

    2016-01-01

    Spinal tuberculosis accounts for nearly half of all cases of musculoskeletal tuberculosis. It is primarily a medical disease and treatment consists of a multidrug regimen for 9–12 months. Surgery is reserved for select cases of progressive deformity or where neurological deficit is not improved by anti-tubercular treatment. Technology refinements and improved surgical expertise have improved the operative treatment of spinal tuberculosis. The infected spine can be approached anteriorly or posteriorly, in a minimally invasive way. We review the various surgical techniques used in the management of spinal tuberculosis with focus on their indications and contraindications. PMID:27559464

  10. Automated 4D analysis of dendritic spine morphology: applications to stimulus-induced spine remodeling and pharmacological rescue in a disease model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swanger Sharon A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Uncovering the mechanisms that regulate dendritic spine morphology has been limited, in part, by the lack of efficient and unbiased methods for analyzing spines. Here, we describe an automated 3D spine morphometry method and its application to spine remodeling in live neurons and spine abnormalities in a disease model. We anticipate that this approach will advance studies of synapse structure and function in brain development, plasticity, and disease.

  11. Systemic transthyretin amyloidosis in a patient with bent spine syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, Kourosh; Pytel, Peter; Smit, Laurel J; Mastrianni, James; Dina, Michelle A; Highsmith, W Edward; Dogan, Ahmet

    2013-06-01

    Wild-type and mutant transthyretin (TTR) are implicated in systemic amyloidosis (ATTR). Myopathy is a rare complication of ATTR amyloidosis, however no patient with bent spine syndrome secondary to ATTR amyloidosis has been reported so far. We present the first case of bent spine syndrome in a patient with wild-type ATTR amyloidosis who also had concomitant Alzheimer's disease.

  12. Anterior maxillary osteotomy: A technical note for superior repositioning: A bird wing segment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Sadesh Kannan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of a single piece bird wing osteotectomy segment during anterior maxillary osteotomy (AMO markedly reduces the duration of the surgery by nearly one-half of the time during bone removal with the conventional method thereby reducing the kinking effect to the palatal pedicle and gives good perfusion to the anterior segment. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted at Karpaga Vinayaga Institute of Dental Sciences composing of 20 patients in which male: female ratio was 8:12, with a mean age of 25-30 years. This bird wing segment technique is performed following presurgical orthodontics under the guidance of clinical assessment of the gummy smile with an incisal show when the lip is at repose (vertical maxillary excess, especially for the calculated amount of superior repositioning. It is calculated by subtracting 2 mm from the total amount of an incisor show when the lip is at repose. The normal incisal show when the lip is at repose is 2 mm. After conventional primary AMO cut was performed, the precise calculated. Results: All our cases were tested positive for pulp vitality, no relapse, and minimal edema and with no changes in the bite or dentoalveolar relation followed until 1 year postoperatively indicating a good perfusion to the anterior segment and all the patients were satisfied esthetically and free of complaints. Conclusion: This simple technique allows the precise amount of calculated bone removal in a single piece from the nasal floor markedly reduces the duration of the surgery by nearly one-half of the time during bone removal with the conventional method there by reducing the kinking effect to the palatal pedicle and maintains good perfusion.

  13. Subliminal Reorientation and Repositioning in Immersive Virtual Environments using Saccadic Suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolte, Benjamin; Lappe, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Virtual reality strives to provide a user with an experience of a simulated world that feels as natural as the real world. Yet, to induce this feeling, sometimes it becomes necessary for technical reasons to deviate from a one-to-one correspondence between the real and the virtual world, and to reorient or reposition the user's viewpoint. Ideally, users should not notice the change of the viewpoint to avoid breaks in perceptual continuity. Saccades, the fast eye movements that we make in order to switch gaze from one object to another, produce a visual discontinuity on the retina, but this is not perceived because the visual system suppresses perception during saccades. As a consequence, our perception fails to detect rotations of the visual scene during saccades. We investigated whether saccadic suppression of image displacement (SSID) can be used in an immersive virtual environment (VE) to unconsciously rotate and translate the observer's viewpoint. To do this, the scene changes have to be precisely time-locked to the saccade onset. We used electrooculography (EOG) for eye movement tracking and assessed the performance of two modified eye movement classification algorithms for the challenging task of online saccade detection that is fast enough for SSID. We investigated the sensitivity of participants to translations (forward/backward) and rotations (in the transverse plane) during trans-saccadic scene changes. We found that participants were unable to detect approximately ±0.5m translations along the line of gaze and ±5° rotations in the transverse plane during saccades with an amplitude of 15°. If the user stands still, our approach exploiting SSID thus provides the means to unconsciously change the user's virtual position and/or orientation. For future research and applications, exploiting SSID has the potential to improve existing redirected walking and change blindness techniques for unlimited navigation through arbitrarily-sized VEs by real walking.

  14. Repositioning the Racial Gaze: Aboriginal Perspectives on Race, Race Relations and Governance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daphne Habibis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In Australia, public debate about recognition of the nation’s First Australians through constitutional change has highlighted the complexity and sensitivities surrounding Indigenous/state relations at even the most basic level of legal rights. But the unevenness of race relations has meant Aboriginal perspectives on race relations are not well known. This is an obstacle for reconciliation which, by definition, must be a reciprocal process. It is especially problematic in regions with substantial Aboriginal populations, where Indigenous visibility make race relations a matter of everyday experience and discussion. There has been considerable research on how settler Australians view Aboriginal people but little is known about how Aboriginal people view settler Australians or mainstream institutions. This paper presents the findings from an Australian Research Council project undertaken in partnership with Larrakia Nation Aboriginal Corporation. Drawing on in-depth interviews with a cross-section of Darwin’s Aboriginal residents and visitors, it aims to reverse the racial gaze by investigating how respondents view settler Australian politics, values, priorities and lifestyles. Through interviews with Aboriginal people this research provides a basis for settler Australians to discover how they are viewed from an Aboriginal perspective. It repositions the normativity of settler Australian culture, a prerequisite for a truly multicultural society. Our analysis argues the narratives of the participants produce a story of Aboriginal rejection of the White Australian neo-liberal deal of individual advancement through economic pathways of employment and hyper-consumption. The findings support Honneth’s arguments about the importance of intersubjective recognition by pointing to the way misrecognition creates and reinforces social exclusion.

  15. Sensitivity of lumbar spine loading to anatomical parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putzer, Michael; Ehrlich, Ingo; Rasmussen, John;

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal simulations of lumbar spine loading rely on a geometrical representation of the anatomy. However, this data has an inherent inaccuracy. This study evaluates the in uence of dened geometrical parameters on lumbar spine loading utilizing ve parametrized musculoskeletal lumbar spine...... models for four different postures. The in uence of the dimensions of vertebral body, disc, posterior parts of the vertebrae as well as the curvature of the lumbar spine were studied. Additionally, simulations with combinations of selected parameters were conducted. Changes in L4/L5 resultant joint force...... were used as outcome variable. Variations of the vertebral body height, disc height, transverse process width and the curvature of the lumbar spine were the most in uential. The results indicated that measuring these parameters from X-rays would be most important to morph an existing musculoskeletal...

  16. Effect of Spine Motion on Mobility in Quadruped Running

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qun

    2014-01-01

    Most of current running quadruped robots have similar construction: a stiff body and four compliant legs. Many researches have indicated that the stiff body without spine motion is a main factor in limitation of robots’ mobility. Therefore, investigating spine motion is very important to build robots with better mobility. A planar quadruped robot is designed based on cheetahs’ morphology. There is a spinal driving joint in the body of the robot. When the spinal driving joint acts, the robot has spine motion; otherwise, the robot has not spine motion. Six group prototype experiments with the robot are carried out to study the effect of spine motion on mobility. In each group, there are two comparative experiments: the spinal driving joint acts in one experiment but does not in the other experiment. The results of the prototype experiments indicate that the average speeds of the robot with spine motion are 8.7%–15.9% larger than those of the robot without spine motion. Furthermore, a simplified sagittal plane model of quadruped mammals is introduced. The simplified model also has a spinal driving joint. Using a similar process as the prototype experiments, six group simulation experiments with the simplified model are conducted. The results of the simulation experiments show that the maximum rear leg horizontal thrusts of the simplified mode with spine motion are 68.2%–71.3% larger than those of the simplified mode without spine motion. Hence, it is found that spine motion can increase the average running speed and the intrinsic reason of speed increase is the improvement of the maximum rear leg horizontal thrust.

  17. Remote Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Khorram, Siamak; Koch, Frank H; van der Wiele, Cynthia F

    2012-01-01

    Remote Sensing provides information on how remote sensing relates to the natural resources inventory, management, and monitoring, as well as environmental concerns. It explains the role of this new technology in current global challenges. "Remote Sensing" will discuss remotely sensed data application payloads and platforms, along with the methodologies involving image processing techniques as applied to remotely sensed data. This title provides information on image classification techniques and image registration, data integration, and data fusion techniques. How this technology applies to natural resources and environmental concerns will also be discussed.

  18. Evaluation of Multi Canister Overpack (MCO) Handling Machine Uplift Restraint for a Seismic Event During Repositioning Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SWENSON, C.E.

    2000-05-15

    Insertion of the Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) assemblies into the Canister Storage Building (CSB) storage tubes involves the use of the MCO Handling Machine (MHM). During MCO storage tube insertion operations, inadvertent movement of the MHM is prevented by engaging seismic restraints (''active restraints'') located adjacent to both the bridge and trolley wheels. During MHM repositioning operations, the active restraints are not engaged. When the active seismic restraints are not engaged, the only functioning seismic restraints are non-engageable (''passive'') wheel uplift restraints which function only if the wheel uplift is sufficient to close the nominal 0.5-inch gap at the uplift restraint interface. The MHM was designed and analyzed in accordance with ASME NOG-1-1995. The ALSTHOM seismic analysis reported seismic loads on the MHM uplift restraints and EDERER performed corresponding structural calculations to demonstrate structural adequacy of the seismic uplift restraint hardware. The ALSTHOM and EDERER calculations were performed for a parked MHM with the active seismic restraints engaged, resulting in uplift restraint loading only in the vertical direction. In support of development of the CSB Safety Analysis Report (SAR), an evaluation of the MHM seismic response was requested for the case where the active seismic restraints are not engaged. If a seismic event occurs during MHM repositioning operations, a moving contact at a seismic uplift restraint would introduce a friction load on the restraint in the direction of the movement. These potential horizontal friction loads on the uplift restraints were not included in the existing restraint hardware design calculations. One of the purposes of the current evaluation is to address the structural adequacy of the MHM seismic uplift restraints with the addition of the horizontal friction associated with MHM repositioning movements.

  19. Visual loss after spine surgery: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobar-Bustamante, Andrés E; Cahueque, Mario A; Caldera, Gustavo

    2016-12-01

    The presence of postoperative visual loss is a well-known complication, and described in various reports, its low incidence (0.028-0.2%) makes it extremely rare. Two main causes have been determined: Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy and central Retinal Artery Oclusion. The following is a case report of a 52-year-old patient that presented visual loss after elective spine surgery that had no complications that could initially explain this complication. Studies were performed and evaluations by ophthalmologists determined that the cause of Posterior Ischemic Optic Neuropathy due to multiple risk factors that the patient had previously and during the surgery. After 3 year follow-up the patient still has total visual loss and no other complications were reported. PMID:27408495

  20. Insufficient pain management after spine surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Vibeke; Fomsgaard, Jonna Storm; Dahl, Jørgen Berg;

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A prospective observational quality assurance study was performed at Glostrup Hospital, Denmark, to describe patients undergoing spine surgery with regard to perioperative analgesic management, post-operative pain, opioid consumption and side effects. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients...... eligible for the study were identified consecutively from the operation chart. The following data were registered: post-operative visual analogue (VAS) pain score at rest and during mobilisation, opioid consumption for the first 24 h, other analgesics administered and side effects. RESULTS: A total of 87...... patients were included. For instrumented lumbar fusion patients (n = 24), the VAS pain scores at 1, 4 and 24 h after surgery were (median (interquartile range)) 5 (0-7), 2.5 (0-8) and 5.5 (0-9) at rest and 5 (0-8), 3 (0-9) and 7 (3-9) during mobilisation, respectively. The other surgical subgroups...

  1. Children's experiences of the repositioning of their psychological birth order in a reconstituted family / Lizelle van Jaarsveld.

    OpenAIRE

    Van Jaarsveld, Lizelle

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore and describe children’s experiences of the repositioning of their psychological birth order in a reconstituted family. The aim of this study is also to contribute to a better understanding of this phenomenon to aid the parents of these children as well as professionals working with such families. The systems theory was used as the meta-theory of this study. Gestalt field theory formed the connection between the systems theory and Adlerian theory, to port...

  2. Strategic positioning and repositioning of oil companies in the upstream business: understanding the historical evolution of firms' strategic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the second article of a series whose objective is to use the analytical framework proposed by Michael Porter, from the University of Harvard, to study the global oil competition game and the competitive advantages of oil companies. The paper focuses on the historical changes in the positioning and behavior of various actors in the upstream oil industry. The authors start by describing the main oil actors and their initial strategic positioning before 1973. Then, the changes and the firm's strategic repositioning during the oil crisis in the 1970's and 1980's are analyzed. (author)

  3. MRI of cervical spine injuries complicating ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivikko, Mika P.; Koskinen, Seppo K. [Helsinki Medical Imaging Center, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Toeoeloe Hospital, Department of Radiology, Helsinki (Finland)

    2008-09-15

    The objective was to study characteristic MRI findings in cervical spine fractures complicating ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Technical issues related to MRI are also addressed. A review of 6,774 consecutive cervical spine multidetector CT (MDCT) scans obtained during 6.2 years revealed 33 ankylosed spines studied for suspected acute cervical spine injury complicating AS. Of these, 20 patients also underwent MRI. On MRI, of these 20 patients, 19 had a total of 29 cervical and upper thoracic spine fractures. Of 20 transverse fractures traversing both anterior and posterior columns, 7 were transdiskal and exhibited less bone marrow edema than did those traversing vertebral bodies. One Jefferson's, 1 atlas posterior arch (Jefferson's on MDCT), 2 odontoid process, and 5 non-contiguous spinous process fractures were detectable. MRI showed 2 fractures that were undetected by MDCT, and conversely, MDCT detected 6 fractures not seen on MRI; 16 patients had spinal cord findings ranging from impingement and contusion to complete transection. Magnetic resonance imaging can visualize unstable fractures of the cervical and upper thoracic spine. Paravertebral hemorrhages and any ligamentous injuries should alert radiologists to seek transverse fractures. Multiple fractures are common and often complicated by spinal cord injuries. Diagnostic images can be obtained with a flexible multipurpose coil if the use of standard spine array coil is impossible due to a rigid collar or excessive kyphosis. (orig.)

  4. Glucose Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Geddes, Chris D

    2006-01-01

    Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, Glucose Sensing is the eleventh volume in the popular series Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy, edited by Drs. Chris D. Geddes and Joseph R. Lakowicz. This volume incorporates authoritative analytical fluorescence-based glucose sensing reviews specialized enough to be attractive to professional researchers, yet also appealing to the wider audience of scientists in related disciplines of fluorescence. Glucose Sensing is an essential reference for any lab working in the analytical fluorescence glucose sensing field. All academics, bench scientists, and industry professionals wishing to take advantage of the latest and greatest in the continuously emerging field of glucose sensing, and diabetes care & management, will find this volume an invaluable resource. Topics in Fluorescence Spectroscopy Volume 11, Glucose Sensing Chapters include: Implantable Sensors for Interstitial Fluid Smart Tattoo Glucose Sensors Optical Enzyme-based Glucose Biosensors Plasmonic Glucose Sens...

  5. Force sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, David

    2007-01-01

    A young child can explore and learn and compensate for unknown dynamics by prodding, pushing, touching, grasping and feeling. Force sensing and software research could soon allow artificial mechanisms to do the same. Force sensing has its roots in strain gauges, piezoelectrics, Wheatstone bridges, automation, robotics, grippers and virtual reality. That force sensing research has now become commonplace and has expanded from those roots to include so much more: video games, athletic equipment,...

  6. Feasible Human-Spine Motion Simulators Based on Parallel Manipulators

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Si-Jun; Huang, Zhen; Zhao, Ming-Yang

    2008-01-01

    Considering the characteristics of a human spine including nearly isotropic kinematical performance, fast speed, available under both active and passive modes and reachable workspace, three 3R2T 5-DoF fully-symmetrical parallel manipulators with base-actuator, including 5-RRR(RR), 5-(RRR)RR, 5-(RRR)(RR) are adopted as feasible human spine motion simulators. To decrease machining difficulty and guarantee the machining precision, 5RRR(RR) is designed and manufactured as the prototype of spine m...

  7. Wrong-level surgery: A unique problem in spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiang, John

    2011-01-01

    Background: Even though a lot of effort has gone into preventing operating at the wrong site and wrong patient, wrong-level surgery is a unique problem in spine surgery. Methods: The current method to prevent wrong level spine surgery performed is mainly relied on intra-operative X-ray. Unfortunately, because of the unique features and anatomy of the spinal column, wrong level spine surgery still happens. There are situations that even with intraoperative X-ray, correct level still cannot be ...

  8. Contextual Learning Induces Dendritic Spine Clustering in Retrosplenial Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam C Frank

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular and electrophysiological studies find convergent evidence suggesting that plasticity within a dendritic tree is not randomly dispersed, but rather clustered into functional groups. Further, results from in silico neuronal modeling show that clustered plasticity is able to increase storage capacity 45 times compared to dispersed plasticity. Recent in vivo work utilizing chronic 2-photon microscopy tested the clustering hypothesis and showed that repetitive motor learning is able to induce clustered addition of new dendritic spines on apical dendrites of L5 neurons in primary motor cortex; moreover, clustered spines were found to be more stable than non-clustered spines, suggesting a physiological role for spine clustering. To further test this hypothesis we used in vivo 2-photon imaging in Thy1-YFP-H mice to chronically examine dendritic spine dynamics in retrosplenial cortex (RSC during spatial learning. RSC is a key component of an extended spatial learning and memory circuit that includes hippocampus and entorhinal cortex. Importantly, RSC is known from both lesion and immediate early gene studies to be critically involved in spatial learning and more specifically in contextual fear conditioning. We utilized a modified contextual fear conditioning protocol wherein animals received a mild foot shock each day for five days; this protocol induces gradual increases in context freezing over several days before the animals reach a behavioral plateau. We coupled behavioral training with four separate in vivo imaging sessions, two before training begins, one early in training, and a final session after training is complete. This allowed us to image spine dynamics before training as well as early in learning and after animals had reached behavioral asymptote. We find that this contextual learning protocol induces a statistically significant increase in the formation of clusters of new dendritic spines in trained animals when compared to home

  9. Acquired pathology of the pediatric spine and spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palasis, Susan; Hayes, Laura L. [Children' s Healthcare of Atlanta, Department of Radiology at Scottish Rite, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pediatric spine pathology poses a diagnostic challenge for radiologists. Acquired spine pathology often yields nonspecific signs and symptoms in children, especially in the younger age groups, and diagnostic delay can carry significant morbidity. This review is focused on some of the more common diagnostic dilemmas we face when attempting to evaluate and diagnose acquired pediatric spine anomalies in daily practice. An understanding of some of the key differentiating features of these disease processes in conjunction with pertinent history, physical exam, and advanced imaging techniques can indicate the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  10. Osteoid Osteoma of Cervical Spine in two adjacent Vertebrae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Etemadifar

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Osteoid osteoma is a benign bone tumor, mainly seen in 10-30 years male. Spine is a relatively common site and almost always, posterior elements are involved. Plain X-Ray-, CT scan and Isotope scan help to identify and localize spine lesions. We described one 18 years old boy with 3 years low neck pain. Isotope scan, MRI and CT scan showed two lesions in C7 and T1. Gross inspection and histopathology examination confirmed osteoid osteoma in two adjacent vertebrae which has not been reported elsewhere in the literature. Key words: Osteoid Osteoma, Spine, Multifocal

  11. Use of modified lip repositioning technique associated with esthetic crown lengthening for treatment of excessive gingival display: A case report of multiple etiologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Bortoluzzi Mantovani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive gingival display during smile can result in compromised esthetics. This study aims to report a case of excessive gingival display with multiple etiologies treated by means of modified lip repositioning technique associated with esthetic crown lengthening. A 23-year-old female patient, with 5-mm gingival display during smile caused by altered passive eruption and hypermobility of the upper lip, underwent the modified lip repositioning technique associated with gingivectomy followed by flap elevation and ostectomy/osteoplasty. Seven months after the second procedure, the patient had her esthetic complaint solved appearing stable in the observation period. The modified lip repositioning technique is an effective procedure employed to reduce gingival display and when associated with esthetic clinical crown lengthening, can appropriately treat cases of gummy smile.

  12. Use of modified lip repositioning technique associated with esthetic crown lengthening for treatment of excessive gingival display: A case report of multiple etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Matheus Bortoluzzi; Souza, Eduardo Clemente; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; Corrêa, Giovani Oliveira; Progiante, Patrícia Saram; Silva, Cléverson Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Excessive gingival display during smile can result in compromised esthetics. This study aims to report a case of excessive gingival display with multiple etiologies treated by means of modified lip repositioning technique associated with esthetic crown lengthening. A 23-year-old female patient, with 5-mm gingival display during smile caused by altered passive eruption and hypermobility of the upper lip, underwent the modified lip repositioning technique associated with gingivectomy followed by flap elevation and ostectomy/osteoplasty. Seven months after the second procedure, the patient had her esthetic complaint solved appearing stable in the observation period. The modified lip repositioning technique is an effective procedure employed to reduce gingival display and when associated with esthetic clinical crown lengthening, can appropriately treat cases of gummy smile.

  13. Use of modified lip repositioning technique associated with esthetic crown lengthening for treatment of excessive gingival display: A case report of multiple etiologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Matheus Bortoluzzi; Souza, Eduardo Clemente; Marson, Fabiano Carlos; Corrêa, Giovani Oliveira; Progiante, Patrícia Saram; Silva, Cléverson Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Excessive gingival display during smile can result in compromised esthetics. This study aims to report a case of excessive gingival display with multiple etiologies treated by means of modified lip repositioning technique associated with esthetic crown lengthening. A 23-year-old female patient, with 5-mm gingival display during smile caused by altered passive eruption and hypermobility of the upper lip, underwent the modified lip repositioning technique associated with gingivectomy followed by flap elevation and ostectomy/osteoplasty. Seven months after the second procedure, the patient had her esthetic complaint solved appearing stable in the observation period. The modified lip repositioning technique is an effective procedure employed to reduce gingival display and when associated with esthetic clinical crown lengthening, can appropriately treat cases of gummy smile. PMID:27041845

  14. Systematic drug repositioning for a wide range of diseases with integrative analyses of phenotypic and molecular data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwata, Hiroaki; Sawada, Ryusuke; Mizutani, Sayaka; Yamanishi, Yoshihiro

    2015-02-23

    Drug repositioning, or the application of known drugs to new indications, is a challenging issue in pharmaceutical science. In this study, we developed a new computational method to predict unknown drug indications for systematic drug repositioning in a framework of supervised network inference. We defined a descriptor for each drug-disease pair based on the phenotypic features of drugs (e.g., medicinal effects and side effects) and various molecular features of diseases (e.g., disease-causing genes, diagnostic markers, disease-related pathways, and environmental factors) and constructed a statistical model to predict new drug-disease associations for a wide range of diseases in the International Classification of Diseases. Our results show that the proposed method outperforms previous methods in terms of accuracy and applicability, and its performance does not depend on drug chemical structure similarity. Finally, we performed a comprehensive prediction of a drug-disease association network consisting of 2349 drugs and 858 diseases and described biologically meaningful examples of newly predicted drug indications for several types of cancers and nonhereditary diseases.

  15. Repositioning of Barcelona’s Image in the Light of a Redefinition of the Urban Tourism Planning Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep-Francesc Valls

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Barcelona’s city tourism model over the last fifteen years has chalked up many successes in terms of soaring tourist numbers, overnight stays, cruise liner passengers, hotel beds and visits to priced sights. Growth in city breaks has soared to the point where Barcelona has become one of Europe’s most visited cities. But this growth has come at a heavy price: mass tourism, concentration in certain neighbourhoods, competition for space between tourists and residents, lack of adequate inter-modal transport. All of these problems threaten Barcelona’s competitive position. The paper reviews the city’s competitiveness, comparing Barcelona to ten other European cities. Starting out from a qualitative analysis of internal players and a Delphi Study with external players, we find thecity’s tourism model needs correcting. We also identify the vectors and most important factors for achieving this repositioning. The vectors reinforce the competitiveness concerning the model’s sustainability, integrated management and governance, and client orientation. The proposed strategic repositioning will allow Barcelona to continue competing with Europe’s main cities.

  16. Remote Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard S., Jr.; Southworth, C. Scott

    1983-01-01

    The Landsat Program became the major event of 1982 in geological remote sensing with the successful launch of Landsat 4. Other 1982 remote sensing accomplishments, research, publications, (including a set of Landsat worldwide reference system index maps), and conferences are highlighted. (JN)

  17. Potential Conflicts of Interest of Editorial Board Members from Five Leading Spine Journals

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, Stein J.; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Dhert, Wouter; de Kleuver, Marinus; Oner, F. Cumhur; Verlaan, Jorrit-Jan

    2015-01-01

    Conflicts of interest arising from ties between pharmaceutical industry and physicians are common and may bias research. The extent to which these ties exist among editorial board members of medical journals is not known. This study aims to determine the prevalence and financial magnitude of potential conflicts of interest among editorial board members of five leading spine journals. The editorial boards of: The Spine Journal; Spine; European Spine Journal; Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine; and...

  18. Hough Forest-based Corner Detection for Cervical Spine Radiographs

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Arif, S. M.; Asad, M; Knapp, K.; Gundry, M.; Slabaugh, G. G.

    2015-01-01

    The cervical spine (neck region) is highly sensitive to trauma related injuries, which must be analysed carefully by emergency physicians. In this work, we propose a Hough Forest-based corner detection method for cervical spine radiographs, as a first step towards a computer-aided diagnostic tool. We propose a novel patch-based model based on two-stage supervised learning (classification and regression) to estimate the corners of cervical vertebral bodies. Our method is evaluated using 106 ce...

  19. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z.; Overley, Samuel C.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Caridi, John M.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck...

  20. Complications of the anterior approach to the cervical spine

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Lemos Vieira da Cunha; Francisco Alves de Araújo Júnior; Cássio Czottis Grapiglia; Denildo César Amaral Veríssimo; Roberta Rehder; Samir Ale Bark; Luis Alencar Biurrum Borba

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the complications of anterior approach to the cervical spine in patients who underwent cervical arthrodesis with instrumentation. METHODS: Prospective and descriptive study was conducted from January 2009 to April 2010. All patients who underwent arthrodesis of the cervical spine by anterior approach were included, regardless the diagnosis. Access was made by the anterior approach on the right side. We evaluated the number of operated levels (1, 2 or 3 levels) and,...

  1. 7T Human Spine Imaging Arrays With Adjustable Inductive Decoupling

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Bing; Wang, Chunsheng; Krug, Roland; Kelley, Douglas A.; Xu, Duan; Pang, Yong; Banerjee, Suchandrima; Daniel B Vigneron; Nelson, Sarah J.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Zhang, Xiaoliang

    2009-01-01

    Ultrahigh-field human spine RF transceiver coil arrays face daunting technical challenges in achieving large imaging coverage with sufficient B1 penetration and sensitivity, and in attaining robust decoupling among coil elements. In this paper, human spine coil arrays for ultrahigh field were built and studied. Transceiver arrays with loop-shaped microstrip transmission line were designed, fabricated, and tested for 7-tesla (7T)MRI. With the proposed adjustable inductive decoupling technique,...

  2. Repetitive fracturing during spine extrusion at Unzen volcano, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, O. D.; De Angelis, S.; Umakoshi, K.; Hornby, A. J.; Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallée, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Rhythmic seismicity associated with spine extrusion is a well-documented phenomenon at a number of dome-forming volcanic systems. At Unzen volcano, Japan, a 4-year dome-forming eruption concluded with the emplacement of a spine from October 1994 to February 1995, offering a valuable opportunity to further investigate seismogenic processes at dome-forming volcanoes. Using continuous data recorded at a seismic station located close to the dome, this study explores trends in the seismic activity during the extrusion of the spine. We identify a total of 12 208 volcano-seismic events in the period between October 1994 and February 1995. Hourly event counts indicate cyclic activity with periods of ∼ 40 to ∼ 100 h, attributed to pulsatory ascent defined by strain localisation and faulting at the conduit margins. Waveform correlation revealed two strong clusters (a.k.a. multiplets, families) which are attributed to fracturing along the margins of the shallow, ascending spine. Further analysis indicates variable seismic velocities during the spine extrusion as well as migration of the cluster sources along the spine margins. Our interpretation of the results from seismic data analyses is supported by previously published field and experimental observations, suggesting that the spine was extruded along an inclined conduit with brittle and ductile deformation occurring along the margins. We infer that changes in stress conditions acting on the upper and lower spine margins led to deepening and shallowing of the faulting sources, respectively. We demonstrate that the combination of geophysical, field and experimental evidence can help improve physical models of shallow conduit processes.

  3. Dendritic spine shape analysis using disjunctive normal shape models

    OpenAIRE

    Ghani, Muhammad Usman; Mesadi, Fitsum; Demir Kanık, Sümerya Ümmühan; Demir Kanik, Sumerya Ummuhan; Argunşah, Ali Özgür; Argunsah, Ali Ozgur; Israely, Inbal; Ünay, Devrim; Unay, Devrim; Taşdizen, Tolga; Tasdizen, Tolga; Çetin, Müjdat; Cetin, Mujdat

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of dendritic spines is an essential task to understand the functional behavior of neurons. Their shape variations are known to be closely linked with neuronal activities. Spine shape analysis in particular, can assist neuroscientists to identify this relationship. A novel shape representation has been proposed recently, called Disjunctive Normal Shape Models (DNSM). DNSM is a parametric shape representation and has proven to be successful in several segmentation problems. In this pap...

  4. Demoralization, Patient Activation, and the Outcome of Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Block, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that psychosocial factors can adversely impact the outcome of spine surgery. This article discusses in detail one such recently-identified “risk” factor: demoralization. Several studies conducted by the author indicate that demoralization, an emotional construct distinct from depression, is associated with poorer pain reduction, less functional improvement and decreased satisfaction among spine surgery patients. However, there are indications that the adverse impact...

  5. Complications of Anterior and Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin; Luk, Keith Dip-Kei

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spine surgery performed for the correct indications yields good results. However, surgeons need to be mindful of the many possible pitfalls. Complications may occur starting from the anaesthestic procedure and patient positioning to dura exposure and instrumentation. This review examines specific complications related to anterior and posterior cervical spine surgery, discusses their causes and considers methods to prevent or treat them. In general, avoiding complications is best achi...

  6. Spines of the Porcupine Fish: Structure, Composition, and Mechanical Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Frances Yenan

    2015-01-01

    This thesis explores the structure, composition, and mechanical properties of the porcupine fish spine for the first time. The spine was found to be composed of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite and protein that is most likely mainly type I collagen using X-ray diffraction, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. Microstructure that includes mineralized fiber sheets in the longitudinal direction and radial orientation of the sheets in the transverse direction were o...

  7. Lateral Mass Fixation in Subaxial Cervical Spine: Anatomic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed, Elrahmany; Ihab, Zidan; Moaz, Anwar; Ayman, Nabawi; Haitham, Abo-elw

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The cervical spine is a highly mobile segment of the spinal column, liable to a variety of diseases and susceptible to trauma. It is a complex region where many vital structures lie in close proximity. Lateral mass screw fixation has become the method of choice in stabilizing subaxial cervical spine among other posterior cervical fixation techniques whenever the posterior elements are absent or compromised. Objective This study examined cervical specimens of cadavers and cervical...

  8. The effect of breast shielding during lumbar spine radiography:

    OpenAIRE

    Žontar, Dejan; Škrk, Damijan; Mekiš, Nejc

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the study was to determine the influence of lead shielding on the dose to female breasts in conventional x-ray lumbar spine imaging. The correlation between the body mass index and the dose received by the breast was also investigated. Materials and methods Breast surface dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In the first phase measurements of breast dose with and without shielding from lumbar spine imaging in two projections were conducted on an anthr...

  9. Minimal Invasive Percutaneous Fixation of Thoracic and Lumbar Spine Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico De Iure

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied 122 patients with 163 fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine undergoing the surgical treatment by percutaneous transpedicular fixation and stabilization with minimally invasive technique. Patient followup ranged from 6 to 72 months (mean 38 months, and the patients were assessed by clinical and radiographic evaluation. The results show that percutaneous transpedicular fixation and stabilization with minimally invasive technique is an adequate and satisfactory procedure to be used in specific type of the thoracolumbar and lumbar spine fractures.

  10. A comparative morphometric study of the hominid lumbar spine.

    OpenAIRE

    Martelli, S. A.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis investigates the size/shape variation in the lumbar spine of extant and fossil hominoids. As a novelty, 3D coordinate data sets were obtained from the last five consecutive presacral vertebrae for comparative analyses. Size/shape variation of single vertebrae and patterns of metameric size/shape variation along the lumbar spine are investigated. Large samples of populations of Homo sapiens, Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes, and Pongo pygmaeus are investigated. The fossil sample in...

  11. Lumbar spine visualisation based on kinematic analysis from videofluoroscopic imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y; Nixon, M S; Allen, R

    2003-04-01

    Low back pain is a significant problem and its cost is enormous to society. However, diagnosis of the underlying causes remains problematic despite extensive study. Reasons for this arise from the deep-rooted situation of the spine and also from its structural complexity. Clinicians have to mentally convert 2-D image information into a 3-D form to gain a better understanding of structural integrity. Therefore, visualisation and animation may be helpful for understanding, diagnosis and for guiding therapy. Some low back pain originates from mechanical disorders, and study of the spine kinematics may provide an insight into the source of the problem. Digital videofluoroscopy was used in this study to provide 2-D image sequences of the spine in motion, but the images often suffer due to noise, exacerbated by the very low radiation dosage. Thus determining vertebrae position within the image sequence presents a considerable challenge. This paper describes a combination of spine kinematic measurements with a solid model of the human lumbar spine for visualisation of spine motion. Since determination of the spine kinematics provides the foundation and vertebral extraction is at the core, this is discussed in detail. Edge detection is a key feature of segmentation and it is shown that phase congruency performs better than most established methods with the rather low-grade image sequences from fluoroscopy. The Hough transform is then applied to determine the positions of vertebrae in each frame of a motion sequence. In the Hough transform, Fourier descriptors are used to represent the vertebral shapes. The results show that the Hough transform is a very promising technique for vertebral extraction from videofluoroscopic images. A dynamic visualisation package has been developed in order to view the moving lumbar spine from any angle and viewpoint. Wire frame models of the vertebrae were built by using CT images from the Visible Human Project and these models are scaled to

  12. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z; Overley, Samuel C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today.

  13. Setting the Equation: Establishing Value in Spine Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Daniel K.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Groman, Rachel F.; Ghogawala, Zoher

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Topic review Objective Describe value measurement in spine care and discuss the motivation for, methods for, and limitations of such measurement. Summary of Background Data Spinal disorders are common and are an important cause of pain and disability. Numerous complimentary and competing treatment strategies are used to treat spinal disorders and the costs of these treatments is substantial and continues to rise despite clear evidence of improved health status as a result of these expenditures. Methods The authors present the economic and legislative imperatives forcing the assessment of value in spine care. The definition of value in health care and methods to measure value specifically in spine care are presented. Limitations to the utility of value judgements and caveats to their use are presented. Results Examples of value calculations in spine care are presented and critiqued. Methods to improve and broaden the measurement of value across spine care are suggested and the role of prospective registries in measuring value is discussed. Conclusions Value can be measured in spine care through the use of appropriate economic measures and patient reported outcomes measures. Value must be interpreted in light of the perspective of the assessor, the duration of the assessment period, the degree of appropriate risk stratification, and the relative value of treatment alternatives. PMID:25299258

  14. Dendritic Spines in Depression: What We Learned from Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Depression, a severe psychiatric disorder, has been studied for decades, but the underlying mechanisms still remain largely unknown. Depression is closely associated with alterations in dendritic spine morphology and spine density. Therefore, understanding dendritic spines is vital for uncovering the mechanisms underlying depression. Several chronic stress models, including chronic restraint stress (CRS, chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS, and chronic social defeat stress (CSDS, have been used to recapitulate depression-like behaviors in rodents and study the underlying mechanisms. In comparison with CRS, CUMS overcomes the stress habituation and has been widely used to model depression-like behaviors. CSDS is one of the most frequently used models for depression, but it is limited to the study of male mice. Generally, chronic stress causes dendritic atrophy and spine loss in the neurons of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. Meanwhile, neurons of the amygdala and nucleus accumbens exhibit an increase in spine density. These alterations induced by chronic stress are often accompanied by depression-like behaviors. However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. This review summarizes our current understanding of the chronic stress-induced remodeling of dendritic spines in the hippocampus, prefrontal cortex, orbitofrontal cortex, amygdala, and nucleus accumbens and also discusses the putative underlying mechanisms.

  15. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Utilizing Cone-Beam CT Image-Guidance With a Robotic Couch: Intrafraction Motion Analysis Accounting for all Six Degrees of Freedom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the residual setup error and intrafraction motion following kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance, for immobilized spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, with positioning corrected for in all six degrees of freedom. Methods and Materials: Analysis is based on 42 consecutive patients (48 thoracic and/or lumbar metastases) treated with a total of 106 fractions and 307 image registrations. Following initial setup, a CBCT was acquired for patient alignment and a pretreatment CBCT taken to verify shifts and determine the residual setup error, followed by a midtreatment and posttreatment CBCT image. For 13 single-fraction SBRT patients, two midtreatment CBCT images were obtained. Initially, a 1.5-mm and 1° tolerance was used to reposition the patient following couch shifts which was subsequently reduced to 1 mm and 1° degree after the first 10 patients. Results: Small positioning errors after the initial CBCT setup were observed, with 90% occurring within 1 mm and 97% within 1°. In analyzing the impact of the time interval for verification imaging (10 ± 3 min) and subsequent image acquisitions (17 ± 4 min), the residual setup error was not significantly different (p > 0.05). A significant difference (p = 0.04) in the average three-dimensional intrafraction positional deviations favoring a more strict tolerance in translation (1 mm vs. 1.5 mm) was observed. The absolute intrafraction motion averaged over all patients and all directions along x, y, and z axis (± SD) were 0.7 ± 0.5 mm and 0.5 ± 0.4 mm for the 1.5 mm and 1 mm tolerance, respectively. Based on a 1-mm and 1° correction threshold, the target was localized to within 1.2 mm and 0.9° with 95% confidence. Conclusion: Near-rigid body immobilization, intrafraction CBCT imaging approximately every 15–20 min, and strict repositioning thresholds in six degrees of freedom yields minimal intrafraction motion allowing for safe spine SBRT delivery.

  16. Spine Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Utilizing Cone-Beam CT Image-Guidance With a Robotic Couch: Intrafraction Motion Analysis Accounting for all Six Degrees of Freedom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, Derek [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); British Columbia Cancer Agency, The Sindi Hawkins Cancer Centre for the Southern Interior, Kelowna (Canada); Lochray, Fiona; Korol, Renee; Davidson, Melanie; Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ma, Lijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Sahgal, Arjun, E-mail: Arjun.sahgal@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the residual setup error and intrafraction motion following kilovoltage cone-beam CT (CBCT) image guidance, for immobilized spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) patients, with positioning corrected for in all six degrees of freedom. Methods and Materials: Analysis is based on 42 consecutive patients (48 thoracic and/or lumbar metastases) treated with a total of 106 fractions and 307 image registrations. Following initial setup, a CBCT was acquired for patient alignment and a pretreatment CBCT taken to verify shifts and determine the residual setup error, followed by a midtreatment and posttreatment CBCT image. For 13 single-fraction SBRT patients, two midtreatment CBCT images were obtained. Initially, a 1.5-mm and 1 Degree-Sign tolerance was used to reposition the patient following couch shifts which was subsequently reduced to 1 mm and 1 Degree-Sign degree after the first 10 patients. Results: Small positioning errors after the initial CBCT setup were observed, with 90% occurring within 1 mm and 97% within 1 Degree-Sign . In analyzing the impact of the time interval for verification imaging (10 {+-} 3 min) and subsequent image acquisitions (17 {+-} 4 min), the residual setup error was not significantly different (p > 0.05). A significant difference (p = 0.04) in the average three-dimensional intrafraction positional deviations favoring a more strict tolerance in translation (1 mm vs. 1.5 mm) was observed. The absolute intrafraction motion averaged over all patients and all directions along x, y, and z axis ({+-} SD) were 0.7 {+-} 0.5 mm and 0.5 {+-} 0.4 mm for the 1.5 mm and 1 mm tolerance, respectively. Based on a 1-mm and 1 Degree-Sign correction threshold, the target was localized to within 1.2 mm and 0.9 Degree-Sign with 95% confidence. Conclusion: Near-rigid body immobilization, intrafraction CBCT imaging approximately every 15-20 min, and strict repositioning thresholds in six degrees of freedom yields minimal intrafraction motion

  17. Effect of Associative Learning on Memory Spine Formation in Mouse Barrel Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasinska, Malgorzata; Siucinska, Ewa; Jasek, Ewa; Litwin, Jan A; Pyza, Elzbieta; Kossut, Malgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Associative fear learning, in which stimulation of whiskers is paired with mild electric shock to the tail, modifies the barrel cortex, the functional representation of sensory receptors involved in the conditioning, by inducing formation of new inhibitory synapses on single-synapse spines of the cognate barrel hollows and thus producing double-synapse spines. In the barrel cortex of conditioned, pseudoconditioned, and untreated mice, we analyzed the number and morphological features of dendritic spines at various maturation and stability levels: sER-free spines, spines containing smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and spines containing spine apparatus. Using stereological analysis of serial sections examined by transmission electron microscopy, we found that the density of double-synapse spines containing spine apparatus was significantly increased in the conditioned mice. Learning also induced enhancement of the postsynaptic density area of inhibitory synapses as well as increase in the number of polyribosomes in such spines. In single-synapse spines, the effects of conditioning were less pronounced and included increase in the number of polyribosomes in sER-free spines. The results suggest that fear learning differentially affects single- and double-synapse spines in the barrel cortex: it promotes maturation and stabilization of double-synapse spines, which might possibly contribute to permanent memory formation, and upregulates protein synthesis in single-synapse spines. PMID:26819780

  18. Effect of Associative Learning on Memory Spine Formation in Mouse Barrel Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Jasinska

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Associative fear learning, in which stimulation of whiskers is paired with mild electric shock to the tail, modifies the barrel cortex, the functional representation of sensory receptors involved in the conditioning, by inducing formation of new inhibitory synapses on single-synapse spines of the cognate barrel hollows and thus producing double-synapse spines. In the barrel cortex of conditioned, pseudoconditioned, and untreated mice, we analyzed the number and morphological features of dendritic spines at various maturation and stability levels: sER-free spines, spines containing smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER, and spines containing spine apparatus. Using stereological analysis of serial sections examined by transmission electron microscopy, we found that the density of double-synapse spines containing spine apparatus was significantly increased in the conditioned mice. Learning also induced enhancement of the postsynaptic density area of inhibitory synapses as well as increase in the number of polyribosomes in such spines. In single-synapse spines, the effects of conditioning were less pronounced and included increase in the number of polyribosomes in sER-free spines. The results suggest that fear learning differentially affects single- and double-synapse spines in the barrel cortex: it promotes maturation and stabilization of double-synapse spines, which might possibly contribute to permanent memory formation, and upregulates protein synthesis in single-synapse spines.

  19. 'Serpent in the spine': a case of giant spinal ependymoma of cervicothoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrifin, Arlizan; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Keohane, Catherine; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2012-06-27

    We describe a case of giant spinal ependymoma of cervicothoracic spine in a 30-year-old lady who presented with progressive spastic paraparesis and significant combined upper and lower motor neuron signs in her lower limbs over a 1-year period. She also had upper limb small muscle wasting with absent reflexes and diminished sensation. She was wheel chair bound with involvement of sphincters. Neuroimaging revealed a uniformly enhancing intramedullary lesion from C2-T3 level with associated syringomyelia. She underwent a complete excision of this World Health Organisation (WHO) II cellular ependymoma, resulting in significant clinical outcome and improvement in bladder and bowel function.

  20. Sacral Insufficiency Fractures Mimicking Lumbar Spine Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, G; K L, Kalra; Acharya, Shankar; Chahal, Rupinder

    2016-06-01

    Sacral insufficiency fractures (SIFs) are a common cause of back pain in the elderly. SIFs mimic the symptoms of lumbar spine pathology and so are commonly missed or underdiagnosed. Here we present four cases of missed SIFs that were subsequently identified and treated. One patient was treated as mechanical lower back ache, another patient underwent root block and two patients underwent surgery for lumbar canal stenosis. None experienced relief of their symptoms after these procedures. Retrospective analysis of X-ray and magnetic resonance imaging data revealed SIFs that were confirmed by computed tomography scans. All four patients were treated for underlying osteoporosis. Two patients who underwent surgery were treated conservatively and other two were treated by sacroplasty involving injection of cement into the fracture. Sacroplasty produced immediate pain relief and early mobilization compared to the conservative group. SIFs should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of an elderly patient presenting with low back symptoms. Sacroplasty can be considered for immediate pain relief and rapid mobilization. PMID:27340538

  1. Technical note: spine loading in automotive seating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zenk, R; Franz, M; Bubb, H; Vink, P

    2012-03-01

    For car manufacturers, seat comfort is becoming more important in distinguishing themselves from their competitors. Therefore, many studies on participative seat comfort are carried out. In this paper, an objective assessment approach is reported which evaluates the concept of "optimal load distribution", based on the identification of a close relationship between the pressure on the seat and the discomfort felt by the person sitting. An in vivo measurement of the pressure in the spinal disc, which is an indicator of the load in the spine, was performed. For this research, a pressure sensor was implanted with a canula in the middle of the disc intervertebralis of a participant. The local pressure on the disc was established for the participant in an automobile seat set in various seat positions. The results indicate that in the seat position with the pressure distribution corresponding to the most comfortable posture the pressure in the intervertebral disc is lowest. The pressure in this position is 0.5 bar, while in the upright seated position the pressure is 1.6 bar.

  2. Longitudinal ligaments of the lumbar spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnosis of disruption of the posterior longitudinal ligament in disk herniation is important in deciding between surgical or percutaneous management of HNP. The normal ligaments studied on spine specimens are better seen on long repetition time (TR), short echo time (TE) images and appear as linear structures with very low signal intensity on all pulse sequences surrounding the outer anulus. The authors prospectively imaged 20 HNPs in 18 patients who underwent surgery. In eight cases, the posterior longitudinal ligament was seen intact around the HNP on both short TR, short TE and long TR, short TE images. All were subligamentous at surgery. MR imaging demonstrated disruption of the longitudinal ligament in ten cases because of interruption, absence around the disk fragment, or interposition between disk and fragment. The ligament was disrupted at surgery in only eight of these cases. The two false-positive images showed a pseudointerruption related to a chemical shift antifact. The two remaining studies were qualified as questionable. The overall sensitivity of MR imaging was 100%, and its specificity was 77%

  3. Sodium pump organization in dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Hans; Bernhem, Kristoffer; Brismar, Hjalmar

    2016-10-01

    Advancement in fluorescence imaging with the invention of several super-resolution microscopy modalities (e.g., PALM/STORM and STED) has opened up the possibility of deciphering molecular distributions on the nanoscale. In our quest to better elucidate postsynaptic protein distribution in dendritic spines, we have applied these nanoscopy methods, where generated results could help improve our understanding of neuronal functions. In particular, we have investigated the principal energy transformer in the brain, i.e., the [Formula: see text]-ATPase (or sodium pump), an essential protein responsible for maintaining resting membrane potential and a major controller of intracellular ion homeostasis. In these investigations, we have focused on estimates of protein amount, giving assessments of how variations may depend on labeling strategies, sample analysis, and choice of nanoscopic imaging method, concluding that all can be critical factors for quantification. We present a comparison of these results and discuss the influences this may have for homeostatic sodium regulation in neurons and energy consumption. PMID:27175374

  4. Rheumatic diseases of the spine: imaging diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, J A; Hernández-Gañán, J; Isern, J; Sánchez-Fernández, J J

    2016-04-01

    Spinal involvement is common both in the spondyloarthritides and in rheumatoid arthritis, in which the cervical segment is selectively affected. Rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine has characteristic radiologic manifestations, fundamentally different patterns of atlantoaxial instability. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the technique of choice for evaluating the possible repercussions of atlantoaxial instability on the spinal cord and/or nerve roots in patients with rheumatoid arthritis as well as for evaluating parameters indicative of active inflammation, such as bone edema and synovitis. Axial involvement is characteristic in the spondyloarthritides and has distinctive manifestations on plain-film X-rays, which reflect destructive and reparative phenomena. The use of MRI has changed the conception of spondyloarthritis because it is able to directly detect the inflammatory changes that form part of the disease, making it possible to establish the diagnosis early in the disease process, when plain-film X-ray findings are normal (non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis), to assess the prognosis of the disease, and to contribute to treatment planning.

  5. Collateral Adverse Outcomes After Lumbar Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Gundle, Kenneth; Hart, Robert A

    2016-01-01

    Collateral adverse outcomes are the expected or unavoidable results of a procedure that is performed in a standard manner and typically experienced by the patient. Collateral adverse outcomes do not result from errors, nor are they rare. Collateral adverse outcomes occur as the direct result of a surgical procedure and must be accepted as a trade-off to attain the intended benefits of the surgical procedure. As such, collateral adverse outcomes do not fit into the traditional definition of a complication or adverse event. Examples of collateral adverse outcomes after lumbar spine arthrodesis include lumbar stiffness, postoperative psychological stress, postoperative pain, peri-incisional numbness, paraspinal muscle denervation, and adjacent-level degeneration. Ideally, a comparison of interventions for the treatment of a clinical condition should include information on both the negative consequences (expected and unexpected) and potential benefits of the treatment options. The objective evaluation and reporting of collateral adverse outcomes will provide surgeons with a more complete picture of invasive interventions and, thus, the improved ability to assess alternative treatment options. PMID:27049197

  6. A Systematic Review of the Current Role of Minimally Invasive Spine Surgery in the Management of Metastatic Spine Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Molina, Camilo A.; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Sciubba, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Although increasingly aggressive decompression and resection methods have resulted in improved outcomes for patients with metastatic spine disease, these aggressive surgeries are not feasible for patients with numerous comorbid conditions. Such patients stand to benefit from management via minimally invasive spine surgery (MIS), given its association with decreased perioperative morbidity. We performed a systematic review of literature with the goal of evaluating the clinical efficacy and saf...

  7. SU-E-J-34: Setup Accuracy in Spine SBRT Using CBCT 6D Image Guidance in Comparison with 6D ExacTrac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Z; Yip, S; Lewis, J; Mannarino, E; Friesen, S; Wagar, M; Hacker, F [Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose Volumetric information of the spine captured on CBCT can potentially improve the accuracy in spine SBRT setup that has been commonly performed through 2D radiographs. This work evaluates the setup accuracy in spine SBRT using 6D CBCT image guidance that recently became available on Varian systems. Methods ExacTrac radiographs have been commonly used for Spine SBRT setup. The setup process involves first positioning patients with lasers followed by localization imaging, registration, and repositioning. Verification images are then taken providing the residual errors (ExacTracRE) before beam on. CBCT verification is also acquired in our institute. The availability of both ExacTrac and CBCT verifications allows a comparison study. 41 verification CBCT of 16 patients were retrospectively registered with the planning CT enabling 6D corrections, giving CBCT residual errors (CBCTRE) which were compared with ExacTracRE. Results The RMS discrepancies between CBCTRE and ExacTracRE are 1.70mm, 1.66mm, 1.56mm in vertical, longitudinal and lateral directions and 0.27°, 0.49°, 0.35° in yaw, roll and pitch respectively. The corresponding mean discrepancies (and standard deviation) are 0.62mm (1.60mm), 0.00mm (1.68mm), −0.80mm (1.36mm) and 0.05° (0.58°), 0.11° (0.48°), −0.16° (0.32°). Of the 41 CBCT, 17 had high-Z surgical implants. No significant difference in ExacTrac-to-CBCT discrepancy was observed between patients with and without the implants. Conclusion Multiple factors can contribute to the discrepancies between CBCT and ExacTrac: 1) the imaging iso-centers of the two systems, while calibrated to coincide, can be different; 2) the ROI used for registration can be different especially if ribs were included in ExacTrac images; 3) small patient motion can occur between the two verification image acquisitions; 4) the algorithms can be different between CBCT (volumetric) and ExacTrac (radiographic) registrations.

  8. Characteristics of Cervical Position Sense in Subjects with Forward Head Posture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mi-Young; Lee, Hae-Yong; Yong, Min-Sik

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of forward head posture (FHP) on proprioception by determining the cervical position-reposition error. [Subjects and Methods] A sample population was divided into two groups in accordance with the craniovertebral angle: the FHP group and the control group. We measured the craniovertebral angle, which is defined as the angle between a horizontal line passing through C7 and a line extending from the tragus of the ear to C7. The error value of the cervical position sense after cervical flexion, extension, and rotation was evaluated using the head repositioning accuracy test. [Results] There were significant differences in the error value of the joint position sense (cervical flexion, extension, and rotation) between the FHP and control groups. In addition, there was an inverse correlation between the craniovertebral angle and error value of the joint position sense. [Conclusion] FHP is associated with reduced proprioception. This result implies that the change in the muscle length caused by FHP decreases the joint position sense. Also, proprioception becomes worse as FHP becomes more severe. PMID:25435690

  9. Accuracy of combined maxillary and mandibular repositioning and of soft tissue prediction in relation to maxillary antero-superior repositioning combined with mandibular set back A computerized cephalometric evaluation of the immediate postsurgical outcome using the TIOPS planning system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donatsky, Ole; Bjørn-Jørgensen, Jens; Hermund, Niels Ulrich;

    2009-01-01

    . All patients were managed with rigid internal fixation (RIF) and without intermaxillary fixation (IMF). Preoperative cephalograms were analyzed and treatment plans and prediction tracings produced by computerized surgical interactive simulation. The planned horizontal and vertical hard tissue...... surgical planning system (TIOPS). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Out of 100 prospectively and consecutively treated patients, 52 patients manifested dentofacial deformities requiring bimaxillary orthognathic surgery with maxillary antero-superior repositioning combined with mandibular set back and so were included...... positional changes were transferred to model surgery on a three-dimensional articulator system (SAM) and finally to surgery. Five to six weeks after surgery, the actually obtained hard and soft tissue profile changes were cephalometricly assessed. RESULTS: The mean accuracy of the planned and predicted hard...

  10. Repositioning organohalogen drugs: a case study for identification of potent B-Raf V600E inhibitors via docking and bioassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yisu; Guo, Binbin; Xu, Zhijian; Li, Bo; Cai, Tingting; Zhang, Xinben; Yu, Yuqi; Wang, Heyao; Shi, Jiye; Zhu, Weiliang

    2016-01-01

    Drug repositioning has been attracting increasingly attention for its advantages of reducing costs and risks. Statistics showed that around one quarter of the marketed drugs are organohalogens. However, no study has been reported, to the best of our knowledge, to aim at efficiently repositioning organohalogen drugs, which may be attributed to the lack of accurate halogen bonding scoring function. Here, we present a study to show that two organohalogen drugs were successfully repositioned as potent B-Raf V600E inhibitors via molecular docking with halogen bonding scoring function, namely D(3)DOCKxb developed in our lab, and bioassay. After virtual screening by D(3)DOCKxb against the database CMC (Comprehensive Medicinal Chemistry), 3 organohalogen drugs that were predicted to form strong halogen bonding with B-Raf V600E were purchased and tested with ELISA-based assay. In the end, 2 of them, rafoxanide and closantel, were identified as potent inhibitors with IC50 values of 0.07 μM and 1.90 μM, respectively, which are comparable to that of vemurafenib (IC50: 0.17 μM), a marketed drug targeting B-Raf V600E. Single point mutagenesis experiments confirmed the conformations predicted by D(3)DOCKxb. And comparison experiment revealed that halogen bonding scoring function is essential for repositioning those drugs with heavy halogen atoms in their molecular structures. PMID:27501852

  11. Aesthetic management of gingival recession by root biomodification with carbon dioxide laser and subepithelial connective tissue graft with lateral repositioned flap technique

    OpenAIRE

    Rastogi, Pavitra Kumar; Lal, Nand; Garg, Nimit; Anand, Vishal; Singhal, Rameshwari

    2012-01-01

    Localised gingival recessions continue to represent an important aesthetic condition requiring treatment in periodontics. Various techniques have been tried to treat exposed root surfaces to improve aesthetics with high percentage of success and minimal discomfort. Root biomodification is done to improve the predictability of these procedures. This clinical report describes periodontal plastic procedure involving subepithelial connective tissue graft with lateral repositioned flap technique a...

  12. Repositioning of Endonuclear Receptors Binders as Potential Antibacterial and Antifungal Agents. Eptyloxìm: A Potential and Novel Gyrase B and Cytochrome Cyp51 Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrieri, Antonio; L'Abbate, Maria; Di Chicco, Mariangela; Rosato, Antonio; Carbonara, Giuseppe; Fracchiolla, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    A novel class of antibacterial and antifungal agents is here identified by means of dockings and virtual screening techniques. Biological data proved the initial effort, formulated on the structure similarity of nuclear receptors binders with known quinolones or thiazole derivatives, to reposition PPARs agonists as likely bacterial type II topoisomerases inhibitors. PMID:27546036

  13. Comparison of Cervical Spine Anatomy in Calves, Pigs and Humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Ren Sheng

    Full Text Available Animals are commonly used to model the human spine for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Many studies have investigated similarities and differences between animals and humans in the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. However, a quantitative anatomic comparison of calf, pig, and human cervical spines has not been reported.To compare fundamental structural similarities and differences in vertebral bodies from the cervical spines of commonly used experimental animal models and humans.Anatomical morphometric analysis was performed on cervical vertebra specimens harvested from humans and two common large animals (i.e., calves and pigs.Multiple morphometric parameters were directly measured from cervical spine specimens of twelve pigs, twelve calves and twelve human adult cadavers. The following anatomical parameters were measured: vertebral body width (VBW, vertebral body depth (VBD, vertebral body height (VBH, spinal canal width (SCW, spinal canal depth (SCD, pedicle width (PW, pedicle depth (PD, pedicle inclination (PI, dens width (DW, dens depth (DD, total vertebral width (TVW, and total vertebral depth (TVD.The atlantoaxial (C1-2 joint in pigs is similar to that in humans and could serve as a human substitute. The pig cervical spine is highly similar to the human cervical spine, except for two large transverse processes in the anterior regions ofC4-C6. The width and depth of the calf odontoid process were larger than those in humans. VBW and VBD of calf cervical vertebrae were larger than those in humans, but the spinal canal was smaller. Calf C7 was relatively similar to human C7, thus, it may be a good substitute.Pig cervical vertebrae were more suitable human substitutions than calf cervical vertebrae, especially with respect to C1, C2, and C7. The biomechanical properties of nerve vascular anatomy and various segment functions in pig and calf cervical vertebrae must be considered when selecting an animal model for research on the spine.

  14. SENILE DEGENERATIVE CHANGES IN ADULT LUMBAR SPINE! - A PROSPECTIVE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garjesh Singh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : BACKGROUND: Low back pain (LBP is a common presenting complaint affecting mostly middle aged and older person and traditionally considered as ageing process, but now-a-days large number of younger people are also affected by this debilitating chronic disorder. The cause of early onset of degenerative spine disease is multifactorial, but genetical predisposition plays very important role. AIMS AND OBJECTIVE: To find out association between genetic predisposition and degenerative spine disease in adult patients and to assess the pattern of MRI findings of various degenerative diseases in lumbo-sacral spine. MATERIAL AND METHOD: The present cross-sectional study had been performed among 100 selected patients in 1yr period, who presented with chief complaint of chronic low back pain. After taking detailed clinical and professional history, MRI of lumbosacral spine had been performed. Total 100 patients were divided in two groups on the basis of genetical predisposition. Prevalence and spectrum of degenerative changes were compared between both groups. RESULTS: Hundred patients of 20 to 35-year age had been selected with mean age of 27yr. Out of 100 patients; 47 were male and 53 were female. The most common degenerative findings were desiccation of disc (95% followed by disc bulge, herniation, spinal canal stenosis, ligamentum flavum hypertrophy, facet joint hypertrophy and modic changes. L4-L5 and L5- S1 were the most commonly involved spinal levels for any degenerative pathology. CONCLUSION: Good association is seen between early onset of degenerative spine disease and genetical predisposition in patients who have history of similar type degenerative spine disease in one or more first degree relatives in comparison to those patients who do not have any genetical predisposition. So it can be concluded that heredity play important role in early onset of degenerative spine disease in adults.

  15. Rehabilitation of Patient of Glass Cut Injury With Forehead Flap Repositioning and Implant-Retained Nasal Prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruthi, Gunjan; Bansal, Kirti; Sharma, Rakesh; Goel, Ruchi; Mangtani, Nidhi; Jain, Veena

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic injuries, especially in maxillofacial region, not only lead to physical debilitation but also cause severe psychological distress in the affected individuals. Complete cosmetic and functional rehabilitation of such patients is a challenging task and thus requires a strategic treatment planning and a multidisciplinary team to execute the treatment. This patient report presents a patient who suffered with a severe glass cut injury leading to massive avulsion of face involving forehead, nose, upper lip, and anterior teeth. Patient was rehabilitated with a combined surgical and prosthetic approach, which involved flap repositioning in forehead, nasal and lip regions and an implant-supported nasal prosthesis to replace missing nose. Missing anterior teeth were replaced with fixed dental prostheses. PMID:27391509

  16. Raziskovalni model strateškega repozicioniranja blagovne znamke = Research Model of Strategic Repositioning of the Brand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Vukasovič

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of the world food market has, in recent years, been markedby rapid, unexpected and complex changes. The world food industryis operating in an explicitly dynamic environment which demandsconstant adjustments and responses. Good familiarity with consumers,their habits, wishes, and motives for buying a certain product is becomingan increasingly important area and food companies have,therefore, devoted more attention to it. The paper uses case a studyof the brand Perutnina Ptuj to illustrate the importance of action elementsin repositioning a brand in competitive markets. The exampleis illustrated by using a research model of strategic repositioningof a brand. The results of the analysis of competitors, the analysis ofthe brand, the results of qualitative research, and the developmentand testing of possible concepts on international markets have offereda basic starting-point for a new positioning of the brand.

  17. Significance and suppression of redundant IL17 responses in acute allograft rejection by bioinformatics based drug repositioning of fenofibrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silke Roedder

    Full Text Available Despite advanced immunosuppression, redundancy in the molecular diversity of acute rejection (AR often results in incomplete resolution of the injury response. We present a bioinformatics based approach for identification of these redundant molecular pathways in AR and a drug repositioning approach to suppress these using FDA approved drugs currently available for non-transplant indications. Two independent microarray data-sets from human renal allograft biopsies (n = 101 from patients on majorly Th1/IFN-y immune response targeted immunosuppression, with and without AR, were profiled. Using gene-set analysis across 3305 biological pathways, significant enrichment was found for the IL17 pathway in AR in both data-sets. Recent evidence suggests IL17 pathway as an important escape mechanism when Th1/IFN-y mediated responses are suppressed. As current immunosuppressions do not specifically target the IL17 axis, 7200 molecular compounds were interrogated for FDA approved drugs with specific inhibition of this axis. A combined IL17/IFN-y suppressive role was predicted for the antilipidemic drug Fenofibrate. To assess the immunregulatory action of Fenofibrate, we conducted in-vitro treatment of anti-CD3/CD28 stimulated human peripheral blood cells (PBMC, and, as predicted, Fenofibrate reduced IL17 and IFN-γ gene expression in stimulated PMBC. In-vivo Fenofibrate treatment of an experimental rodent model of cardiac AR reduced infiltration of total leukocytes, reduced expression of IL17/IFN-y and their pathway related genes in allografts and recipients' spleens, and extended graft survival by 21 days (p<0.007. In conclusion, this study provides important proof of concept that meta-analyses of genomic data and drug databases can provide new insights into the redundancy of the rejection response and presents an economic methodology to reposition FDA approved drugs in organ transplantation.

  18. Diagnostic value of high resolutional computed tomography of spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S. M.; Im, S. K.; Sohn, M. H.; Lim, K. Y.; Kim, J. K.; Choi, K. C. [Jeonbug National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-03-15

    Non-enhanced high resolution computed tomography provide clear visualization of soft tissue in the canal and bony details of spine, particularly of the lumbar spine. We observed 70 cases of spine CT using GE CT/T 8800 scanner during the period from Dec. 1982 to Sep. 1983 at Jeonbug National University Hospital. The results were as follows: 1. The sex distribution of cases were 55 males and 15 females : age was from 17 years to 67 years; sites were 11 cervical spine, 5 thoracic spine and 54 lumbosacral spine. 2. CT diagnosis showed 44 cases of lumbar disc herniation, 7 cases of degenerative disease, 3 cases of spine fracture and each 1 cases of cord tumor, metastatic tumor, spontaneous epidural hemorrhage, epidural abscess, spine tbc., meningocele with diastematomyelia. 3. Sites of herniated nucleus pulposus were 34 cases (59.6%) between L4-5 interspace and 20 cases (35.1%) between L5-S1 interspace. 13 cases (29.5%) of lumbar disc herniation disclosed multiple lesions. Location of herniation were central type in 28 cases(49.1%), right-central type in 12 cases(21.2%), left-central type in 11 cases (19.2%) and far lateral type in 6 cases(10.5%). 4. CT findings of herniated nucleus pulposus were as follows : focal protrusion of posterior disc margin and obliteration of anterior epidural fat in all cases, dural sac indentation in 26 cases(45.6%), soft tissue mass in epidural fat in 21 cases(36.8%), displacement or compression of nerve root sheath in 12 cases(21%). 5. Multiplanar reformatted images and Blink mode provide more effective evaluation about definite level and longitudinal dimension of lesion, such as obscure disc herniation, spine fracture, cord tumor and epidural abscess. 6. Non-enhanced and enhanced high resolutional computed tomography were effectively useful in demonstrating compression or displacement of spinal cord and nerve root, examing congenital anomaly such as meningocele and primary or metastatic spinal lesions.

  19. Cervical spine trauma: Radiologic manifestations and imaging algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervical spine trauma is very critical injury that is incurred most frequently in automobile accidents, mining incidents, and war. Injuries of the cervical spine produce neurologic damage in approximately 40% of cases, whereas injuries of the thoracolumbar junction produce neurologic damage in 4% and injuries of the thoracic spine do so in 10%. Radiology has a fundamental role in the recognition and follow-up of patients. Radiologists should be quite familiar with the imaging algorithms and various radiologic manifestations of cervical spine injuries. In this paper, techniques of examining severely injured patients as well as those with slight or questionable injuries are demonstrated. Indications and limitations of various diagnostic procedures (plain film radiography, tomography, CT, and MR imaging) are discussed. A systematic plan for the study of the cervical spine with an emphasis on joints, bones, ligaments and soft tissues (JO-B-LI-ST) is introduced. Mechanisms of injury and the stability or instability of the injuries are presented. Plain radiography as well as other imaging modalities are used to demonstrate the most important forms of injuries at various levels. Follow-up of some of the treated cases is shown. The late complications of spinal cord damage in closed injuries and open wounds (urinary stones, myositis, ossificans, contractures, fractures, disuse atrophy, and bone infections) are presented at the end

  20. Dynamic sagittal flexibility coefficients of the human cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, Paul C; Ito, Shigeki; Panjabi, Manohar M

    2007-07-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine the dynamic sagittal flexibility coefficients, including coupling coefficients, throughout the human cervical spine using rear impacts. A biofidelic whole cervical spine model (n=6) with muscle force replication and surrogate head was rear impacted at 5 g peak horizontal accelerations of the T1 vertebra within a bench-top mini-sled. The dynamic main and coupling sagittal flexibility coefficients were calculated at each spinal level, head/C1 to C7/T1. The average flexibility coefficients were statistically compared (p<0.05) throughout the cervical spine. To validate the coefficients, the average computed displacement peaks, obtained using the average flexibility matrices and the measured load vectors, were statistically compared to the measured displacement peaks. The computed and measured displacement peaks showed good overall agreement, thus validating the computed flexibility coefficients. These peaks could not be statistically differentiated, with the exception of extension rotation at head/C1 and posterior shear translation at C7/T1. Head/C1 was significantly more flexible than all other spinal levels. The cervical spine was generally more flexible in posterior shear, as compared to axial compression. The coupling coefficients indicated that extension moment caused coupled posterior shear translation while posterior shear force caused coupled extension rotation. The present results may be used towards the designs of anthropometric test dummies and mathematical models that better simulate the cervical spine response during dynamic loading. PMID:17140545

  1. Functional diagnostics of the cervical spine by using computer tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dvorak, J.; Hayek, J.; Grob, D.; Penning, L.; Panjabi, M.M.; Zehnder, R.

    1988-04-01

    35 healthy adults and 137 patients after cervical spine injury were examined by functional CT. The range of axial rotation at the level occiput/atlas, atlas/axis and the segment below were measured in all subjects. A rotation occiput/atlas of more than 7/sup 0/, and C1/C2 more than 54/sup 0/ could refer to segmental hypermobility, a rotation at the segment C1/C2 less than 29/sup 0/ to hypomobility. According to the postulated normal values based upon a 98% confidence level, out of 137 patients examined after cervical spine injury and with therapy-resistant neck pain, 45 showed signs of segmental hypermobility of the upper cervical spine, 17 showed hyper- or hypomobility at different levels, 10 patients presented segmental hypomobility at C1/C2 level alone. In all patients, according to the clinical assessment, functional pathology was suspected in the upper cervical spine. Surgical correction of rotatory instability should be considered as a possible therapeutic procedure after successful diagnostic stabilisation of the cervical spine by minerva cast.

  2. Cervical Spine Involvement in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Michael; Langevin, Pierre; Fait, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is a lack of scientific evidence in the literature on the involvement of the cervical spine in mTBI; however, its involvement is clinically accepted. Objective. This paper reviews evidence for the involvement of the cervical spine in mTBI symptoms, the mechanisms of injury, and the efficacy of therapy for cervical spine with concussion-related symptoms. Methods. A keyword search was conducted on PubMed, ICL, SportDiscus, PEDro, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases for articles published since 1990. The reference lists of articles meeting the criteria (original data articles, literature reviews, and clinical guidelines) were also searched in the same databases. Results. 4,854 records were screened and 43 articles were retained. Those articles were used to describe different subjects such as mTBI's signs and symptoms, mechanisms of injury, and treatments of the cervical spine. Conclusions. The hypothesis of cervical spine involvement in post-mTBI symptoms and in PCS (postconcussion syndrome) is supported by increasing evidence and is widely accepted clinically. For the management and treatment of mTBIs, few articles were available in the literature, and relevant studies showed interesting results about manual therapy and exercises as efficient tools for health care practitioners. PMID:27529079

  3. Injuries of the spine sustained during rugby.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, J R; Gill, S

    1988-05-01

    In 1984 JR Silver reported on 63 patients who had sustained serious injuries of their cervical spine as a result of games of rugby between the years 1952 and 1982. In this paper his results have been brought up to date. A further 19 players who were treated personally are reported, sustaining their injuries between 1983 and 1987. The mechanism of injury was still blows to the head or the head being driven into the ground. Seven injuries occurred in the scrums all were front row forwards. One was injured when the players charged, two players were inexperienced and the other cases all followed a collapse of the scrum after which the second rows continued to push. Five players were injured while tackling, six players were injured in a ruck and maul situation--in each case they were pushed to the ground while stooping to pick up the ball, other players piled on top of them (one player broke from the scrum and he endeavoured to retrieve a low ball and then fell striking his head). Further research was carried out by circularising all the spinal units in the United Kingdom to obtain the overall figures. It has been found that there has been a reduction in the number of injuries from ten in 1983 to five in 1986/7, presumably from a change in the laws. In order to determine whether a further change in the laws was necessary or whether the existing laws were adequate, research was carried out by video recording several games of rugby and analysing the games later in slow motion and determining how injuries occurred. Most of the injuries in these small number of games occurred in the ruck and maul situation. It was concluded that the majority of such injuries were not due to bad luck but were caused by irresponsible actions. The laws were still being broken and not being enforced. The existing laws were adequate since there has been a reduction in the number of injuries overall, particularly at first class and schoolboy levels, but were not enforced at junior levels

  4. Flexible Robotic Spine Actuated by Shape Memory Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiquan Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available A flexible robotic spine actuated by shape memory alloy (SMA can achieve both bending motion and impact absorption, which will allow robots to realize a variety of postures. In this paper, the robotic spine is designed and simplified into a multi-segment dynamic model based on several verified assumptions. The SMA wire is modelled using the Seelecke-Muller-Acenbach theory. An iterative algorithm is developed to address the external forces distributed along the spine and compute the spine’s bending angle. Based on the dynamic model, we improve the simulation structure and search algorithm to achieve good efficiency and stable solutions. Experiments are conducted to verify the simulation and the results fit the simulation prediction well, with error of less than five degrees. Design optimization with our simulation tool based on several parameters is also discussed in this paper.

  5. The illness trajectory experienced by patients having spine fusion surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damsgaard, Janne Brammer; Bastrup, Lene; Norlyk, Annelise;

    The illness trajectory of spine fusion patients. A feeling of being (in)visible Background Research shows that being a back patient is associated with great personal cost, and that back patients who undergo so-called spine fusion often experience particularly long and uncoordinated trajectories....... The patients describe a feeling of being mistrusted and thrown around in the system. It is the aim of this study to examine how spine fusion patients experience their illness trajectory and hospitalisation. Methods The study is based on qualitative interviews, and the data analysis is inspired by the French...... philosopher Paul Ricoeur’s phenomenological hermeneutic theory of interpretation. Data were collected through observations and semi-structured interviews at an Elective Surgery Centre in a Danish regional hospital. Results The results show that experiences related to prolonged contact with the healthcare...

  6. Spinal CT scan, 2. Lumbar and sacral spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi (Aichi Medical Univ., Aichi (Japan))

    1982-08-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival.

  7. The degenerative spine: pattern recognition and guidelines to image interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizel, P M; Van Hoyweghen, A J L; Bali, A; Van Goethem, J; Van Den Hauwe, L

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine, in the form of intervertebral disc degeneration and bony growth, causing osteophytes and impinging upon the spinal canal and neural foramina, is the most frequent disorder affecting the spine. In this chapter we first discuss briefly the indications for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging in suspected degenerative spine disease. We then describe changes of disc height, signal intensity, and disc contour with aging and repeated microtrauma, as well as the imaging techniques most appropriate to image them. A grading system for lumbar disc changes is provided. Stenosis of the canal and neural foramina is reviewed next, concluding with a description of degenerative changes affecting the vertebral endplates and bone marrow.

  8. The degenerative spine: pattern recognition and guidelines to image interpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parizel, P M; Van Hoyweghen, A J L; Bali, A; Van Goethem, J; Van Den Hauwe, L

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine, in the form of intervertebral disc degeneration and bony growth, causing osteophytes and impinging upon the spinal canal and neural foramina, is the most frequent disorder affecting the spine. In this chapter we first discuss briefly the indications for computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging in suspected degenerative spine disease. We then describe changes of disc height, signal intensity, and disc contour with aging and repeated microtrauma, as well as the imaging techniques most appropriate to image them. A grading system for lumbar disc changes is provided. Stenosis of the canal and neural foramina is reviewed next, concluding with a description of degenerative changes affecting the vertebral endplates and bone marrow. PMID:27430442

  9. Mechanisms of calcium influx into hippocampal spines: heterogeneity among spines, coincidence detection by NMDA receptors, and optical quantal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuste, R; Majewska, A; Cash, S S; Denk, W

    1999-03-15

    Dendritic spines receive most excitatory inputs in the vertebrate brain, but their function is still poorly understood. Using two-photon calcium imaging of CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat hippocampal slices, we investigated the mechanisms by which calcium enters into individual spines in the stratum radiatum. We find three different pathways for calcium influx: high-threshold voltage-sensitive calcium channels, NMDA receptors, and an APV-resistant influx consistent with calcium-permeable AMPA or kainate receptors. These pathways vary among different populations of spines and are engaged under different stimulation conditions, with peak calcium concentrations reaching >10 microM. Furthermore, as a result of the biophysical properties of the NMDA receptor, the calcium dynamics of spines are exquisitely sensitive to the temporal coincidence of the input and output of the neuron. Our results confirm that individual spines are chemical compartments that can perform coincidence detection. Finally, we demonstrate that functional studies and optical quantal analysis of single, identified synapses is feasible in mammalian CNS neurons in brain slices.

  10. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z; Overley, Samuel C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today. PMID:26835204

  11. A validated classification for external immobilization of the cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holla, Micha; Huisman, Joske M R; Hosman, Allard J F

    2013-10-01

    Study Design Interobserver and intraobserver reliability study. Objective The aim of this study is to validate a new classification system of external cervical spine immobilization devices by measuring the interobserver and intraobserver agreement. Methods A classification system, with five main categories, based on the anatomical regions on which the device supports, was created. A total of 28 independent observers classified 50 photographs of different devices, designed to immobilize the cervical spine according to the new proposed classification system. At least 2 weeks later, the same devices were classified again in a new random order. Before and after the classification, all the participants answered questions about the usefulness of the proposed classification. Results The mean interobserver and intraobserver agreement Fleiss' kappa was 0.88 and 0.91, respectively. Both are, according to the interpretation described by Landis and Koch, "almost perfect." A majority of the participators answered that they needed a classification (89%) and considered the classification to be clear (96%). All the participants considered the classification to be useful in clinical practice. Conclusion This study showed that the new classification of external cervical spine immobilizers, based on anatomical support areas, has an excellent interobserver and intraobserver agreement. Furthermore, the study participants considered the proposed classification to be clear and useful in clinical practice. As the majority of patients with cervical spine injuries are treated with external immobilization devices, this new classification system can improve the closed treatment of cervical spine injuries in daily clinical practice. Furthermore, it makes reproducible comparisons between groups possible, which are essential for further evolution of evidence-based spine care. PMID:24436704

  12. Clinical implications of alignment of upper and lower cervical spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherekar S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The alignment of upper and lower cervical spine is presumed to be closely interrelated and the knowledge of this is mandatory when performing occipito-cervical and upper cervical fusions. The aim of this study was to establish standard values for upper and lower cervical spine alignment in the Indian population. Materials and Methods: Five hundred eighteen asymptomatic volunteers (261 males and 257 females between 12 and 80 years of age underwent lateral radiography with their neck in the neutral position. Angles for occipital to 2nd cervical (Oc-C2, 1st to 2nd cervical (C1-C2 and sagittal alignment of 2nd to 7th cervical vertebrae (C2-C7 were measured. Statistical analyses were performed using a statistical package SPSS 10 for windows and the students ′t′ test. Results: The mean Oc-C2, C1-C2 and C2--C7 angles were 14.66 + 9.5°, 25.6 + 7.9° and 16.8 + 12.7° in male, while same angles in female were 15.59 + 8.26°, 26.9 + 6.8° and 9.11 + 10.4° respectively. Weak statistically significant negative correlation was observed between the measured angles of the upper (Oc-C2 and C1-C2 and lower (C2-C7 cervical spines, which means if the lordosis of the occiput and upper cervical spine increases (if the Oc-C2 angle increases, the alignment of lower cervical spine becomes kyphotic and vice versa. This negative correlation was stronger between the Oc-C2 and C2-C7 angles than between the C1-C2 and C2-C7 angles. Conclusions: Relationship between alignment of the upper and the lower cervical spine should be taken into consideration when performing cervical fusion.

  13. Recurrent spine surgery patients in hospital administrative database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sami Walid

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hospital patient databases are typically used by administrative staff to estimate loss-profit ratios and to help with the allocation of hospital resources. These databases can also be very useful in following rehospitalization. This paper studies the recurrence of spine surgery patients in our hospital population based on administrative data analysis. Methods: Hospital data on 4,958 spine surgery patients operated between 2002 and 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. After sorting the cohort per ascending discharge date, the patient official name, consisting of first, middle and last names, was used as the variable determining duplicate cases in the SPSS statistical program, designating the first case in each group as primary. Yearly recurrence rate and change in procedure distribution were studied. In addition, hospital charges and length of stay were compared using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test. Results: Of 4,958 spine surgery patients 364 (7.3% were categorized as duplicate cases by SPSS. The number of primary cases from which duplicate cases emerged was 327 meaning that some patients had more than two spine surgeries. Among primary patients (N=327 the percentage of excision of intervertebral disk procedures was 33.3% and decreased to 15.1% in recurrent admissions of the same patients (N=364. This decrease was compensated by an increase in lumbar fusion procedures. On the other hand, the rate of cervical fusion remained the same. The difference in hospital charges between primary and duplicate patients was $2,234 for diskectomy, $6,319 for anterior cervical fusion, $8,942 for lumbar fusion – lateral technique, and $12,525 for lumbar fusion – posterior technique. Recurrent patients also stayed longer in hospital, up to 0.9 day in lumbar fusion – posterior technique patients. Conclusion: Spine surgery is associated with an increasing possibility of additional spine surgery with rising invasiveness and cost.

  14. Surgical treatment of multiple spine metastases from gastrinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Crabtree, Kelli L.; Anderson, Karen K.; Haynes, Neal G.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2011-01-01

    Study design: Case report. Clinical question: To report successful surgical therapy for spinal cord compression in a patient with spinal metastases from a pancreatic gastrinoma. Methods: A 43-year-old man presented three times within 4 years with cervical and upper thoracic spinal cord compression because of metastatic gastrinoma. He had two previous spine metastases to the lower thoracic and lumbar spine, a T11 compressive lesion which required a T9L1 fusion, and an L4 lesion that was treate...

  15. [Lumbar spine injuries in pediatric and adolescent athletes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, R Haluk

    2004-01-01

    During the past two decades, there has been a significant increase in sports participation by pediatric athletes. Spinal injuries thus have become a great concern. The unique nature of the pediatric spine should be well-recognized and low back pain in a pediatric athlete should therefore be taken seriously and evaluated thoroughly. In this review article, sports-related lumbar spine problems will be covered including overuse injuries, spondylolysis, pars stress fractures, spondylolysthesis, and lumbar disc herniation. Early identification of these problems will eventually minimize these injuries. PMID:15187460

  16. Enhanced Heat Exchanger with Offset Spine Fin Design

    OpenAIRE

    Kempiak, Michael; Junge, Brent

    2014-01-01

    An Offset Spine Fin Spine (segmented) fin coils have been used in certain applications as a result of their effective use of coil material. One can improve coil heat transfer performance by adding more fins per inch (FPI). This comes at the expense of air side pressure drop, which requires more fan energy to achieve the same air flow. When this type of fin is used in an evaporator, there is a secondary penalty associated with the fan heat that must be removed by the refrigeration system. Also...

  17. Bionic Control of Cheetah Bounding with a Segmented Spine

    OpenAIRE

    Chunlei Wang; Shigang Wang

    2016-01-01

    A cheetah model is built to mimic real cheetah and its mechanical and dimensional parameters are derived from the real cheetah. In particular, two joints in spine and four joints in a leg are used to realize the motion of segmented spine and segmented legs which are the key properties of the cheetah bounding. For actuating and stabilizing the bounding gait of cheetah, we present a bioinspired controller based on the state-machine. The controller mainly mimics the function of the cerebellum to...

  18. Destructive discovertebral degenerative disease of the lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charran, A K; Tony, G; Lalam, R; Tyrrell, P N M; Tins, B; Singh, J; Eisenstein, S M; Balain, B; Trivedi, J M; Cassar-Pullicino, V N

    2012-09-01

    The uncommon variant of degenerative hip joint disease, termed rapidly progressive osteoarthritis, and highlighted by severe joint space loss and osteochondral disintegration, is well established. We present a similar unusual subset in the lumbar spine termed destructive discovertebral degenerative disease (DDDD) with radiological features of vertebral malalignment, severe disc resorption, and "bone sand" formation secondary to vertebral fragmentation. Co-existing metabolic bone disease is likely to promote the development of DDDD of the lumbar spine, which presents with back pain and sciatica due to nerve root compression by the "bone sand" in the epidural space. MRI and CT play a complimentary role in making the diagnosis.

  19. EFFECT OF DIFFERENT LEVELS OF LOCALIZED MUSCLE FATIGUE ON KNEE POSITION SENSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William S. Gear

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available There is little information available regarding how proprioceptive abilities decline as the amount of exertion increases during exercise. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of different levels of fatigue on knee joint position sense. A repeated measures design was used to examine changes in active joint reposition sense (AJRS prior to and following three levels of fatigue. Eighteen participants performed knee extension and flexion isokinetic exercise until torque output was 90%, 70%, or 50% of the peak hamstring torque for three consecutive repetitions. Active joint reposition sense at 15, 30, or 45 degrees was tested following the isokinetic exercise session. Following testing of the first independent measure, participants were given a 20 minute rest period. Testing procedures were repeated for two more exercise sessions following the other levels of fatigue. Testing of each AJRS test angle was conducted on three separate days with 48 hours between test days. Significant main effect for fatigue was indicated (p = 0.001. Pairwise comparisons indicated a significant difference between the pre-test and following 90% of peak hamstring torque (p = 0.02 and between the pre-test and following 50% of peak hamstring torque (p = 0.02. Fatigue has long been theorized to be a contributing factor in decreased proprioceptive acuity, and therefore a contributing factor to joint injury. The findings of the present study indicate that fatigue may have an effect on proprioception following mild and maximum fatigue.

  20. Improved method for sectioning pectoral spines of catfish for age determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Marc A.; Hall, Glenda R.

    1990-01-01

    A modified low-speed saw provided fast and precise sectioning of catfish pectoral spines for use in aging studies. In one hour, 10–15 spines can be sectioned, the sections mounted, and the annuli counted.

  1. 78 FR 65451 - Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...- ] NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire).'' SUPPLEMENTARY...

  2. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy of Prickly Pear's Spines and Glochids: A qualitative analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A qualitative LIBS analysis of Prickly Pear is presented. The spectra for Q:Switch regime from cladode and spine are similar, while shows an intense electronic noise due the high absorption in spines for free-running regime

  3. Non Sense

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjort, Katrin

    2010-01-01

    ’t make sense but appeared extremely complicated and contradictionary. This article studies the school reform through the filter of discourse analysis. The reform represents an advances version of liberal management and is construed as an alliance between 4 conflicting regimes of practice. Consequently...

  4. The influence of muscle forces on the stress distribution in the lumbar spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, C; Rasmussen, J; Simonsen, Erik B.;

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Previous studies of bone stresses in the human lumbar spine have relied on simplified models when modeling the spinal musculature, even though muscle forces are likely major contributors to the stresses in the vertebral bones. Detailed musculoskeletal spine models have recently beco...... larger von Mises stress responses in the central and anterior part of the vertebral body, which can be tolerated in the young and healthy spine, but it would increase the risk of compression fractures in the elderly, osteoporotic spine....

  5. A non-proteinaceous toxin from the venomous spines of the lionfish Pterois volitans (Linnaeus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, M S; Cheung, P; Leong, I; Ruggieri, G D

    1985-01-01

    The venomous spines of P. volitans contain a non-proteinaceous ichthyotoxin of low molecular weight. This toxin could be isolated only from spines excised from the living fish; the toxin is apparently destroyed following death, as the extracts of the spines of the dead fish were non-toxic. PMID:4024148

  6. Is posterior fusion necessary with laminectomy in the cervical spine?

    OpenAIRE

    McAllister, Beck D.; Rebholz, Brandon J.; Wang, Jeffery C.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical decompressive laminectomy is a common procedure for addressing multilevel cervical spine pathology. The most common reasons for performing simultaneous posterior cervical fusion include the prevention of progressive postlaminectomy kyphotic deformity or other types of instability which can contribute to late neurological deterioration. Methods: The medical literature (Pub Med with MeSH) concerning cervical laminectomy, posterior cervical fusion, and complications of lamin...

  7. Conversion coefficients for determining organ doses in paediatric spine radiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidenbusch, Michael; Schneider, Karl [Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Institute of Clinical Radiology - Paediatric Radiology, Muenchen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    Knowledge of organ and effective doses achieved during paediatric x-ray examinations is an important prerequisite for assessment of radiation burden to the patient. Conversion coefficients for reconstruction of organ and effective doses from entrance doses for segmental spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients are provided regarding the Guidelines of Good Radiographic Technique of the European Commission. Using the personal computer program PCXMC developed by the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (Saeteilyturvakeskus STUK), conversion coefficients for conventional segmental spine radiographs were calculated performing Monte Carlo simulations in mathematical hermaphrodite phantom models describing patients of different ages. The clinical variation of beam collimation was taken into consideration by defining optimal and suboptimal radiation field settings. Conversion coefficients for the reconstruction of organ doses in about 40 organs and tissues from measured entrance doses during cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine radiographs of 0-, 1-, 5-, 10-, 15- and 30-year-old patients were calculated for the standard sagittal and lateral beam projections and the standard focus detector distance of 115 cm. The conversion coefficients presented may be used for organ dose assessments from entrance doses measured during spine radiographs of patients of all age groups and all field settings within the optimal and suboptimal standard field settings. (orig.)

  8. Cervical spine injuries in the pediatric and adolescent athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Martin J

    2006-01-01

    Injuries of the cervical spine in the pediatric and adolescent athlete are less common than other musculoskeletal injuries. Although many of these injuries are relatively minor, serious and potentially unstable or progressive spinal injury must be excluded. Important anatomic differences between the child younger than 10 years and older children and adolescents influence the types of injuries sustained and make assessment of the child's cervical spine sometimes difficult for practitioners accustomed to treating adolescent and adult athletes. Stable soft-tissue injuries of the cervical spine are the most common injuries that occur in all athletes. These injuries are responsive to symptomatic treatment and aggressive rehabilitation. Stingers are injuries of the brachial plexus and upper cervical roots that result from stretching or compressive forces associated with collision sports. Rapid return of sensory and motor dysfunction of a single upper extremity characterizes this entity; long-term disability is rare. Cervical cord neurapraxia (CCN) with transient quadriplegia is most commonly seen in football players. Most athletes fully recover. Cervical canal stenosis as defined by a Pavlov/Torg ratio of less than or equal to 0.8 is predictive of recurrent CCN. Young athletes sustain CCN secondary to hypermobility of the immature cervical spine. Return to play after these injuries is controversial. The athlete with Down syndrome and potential cervical hypermobility requires a careful cervical and neurologic evaluation prior to clearance for participation in sports. PMID:16958497

  9. Plasma cellular osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report the case of a young patient suffering from plasmacellular osteomyelitis of the thoracic spine, an unusual localisation of this type of chronic osteomyelitis. They discuss the role of imaging diagnostic modalities in this disease, focussing on MRI. (orig.)

  10. Geographic Origin of Publications in Major Spine Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutras, Christos; Antoniou, Stavros A; Heep, Hansjoerg

    2014-12-01

    Aim of the present study was to assess the contribution of each country in the field of spine surgery. Three major spine journals were included in our study and the search conducted in PubMed for a 5-year period (2007-2012). Publications on spine surgery were assessed according to the country. A total of 6312 articles were identified and 5842 were included. Fifteen countries generated 86.9% of publications, with 31.7% by the United States, followed by Japan (9.6%), China (8.1%) and Canada (5.2%). After correction for population size Switzerland (19 studies per 106 inhabitants), the Netherlands (10), Sweden (9), Canada (9) and Australia (6) ranked the top. The USA was placed 7th after correction for population size. Small European countries with modest research funding and non-native English speaking population are more productive in relation to their population size, despite the fact that the contribution of USA is the greatest in the field of the major peer-reviewed indexed spine surgery journals.

  11. Influence of perioperative resuscitation status on postoperative spine surgery complications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pull ter Gunne, A.F.; Skolasky, R.L.; Ross, H.; Laarhoven, C.J.H.M. van; Cohen, D.B.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND CONTEXT: Restrictive transfusion criteria have led to decreased morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients. Their use has been extended to other patient groups. In adult spine surgery, ongoing postoperative blood losses and soft-tissue trauma may make these patients not appropriat

  12. Spine surgery training and competence of European Neurosurgical Trainees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boszczyk, Bronek Maximilian; Mooij, Jan Jakob; Schmitt, Natascha; Di Rocco, Concezio; Fakouri, Baroum Baroum; Lindsay, Kenneth W.

    2009-01-01

    Little is known about the nature of spine surgery training received by European neurosurgical trainees during their residency and the level of competence they acquire in dealing with spinal disorders. A three-part questionnaire entailing 32 questions was devised and distributed to the neurosurgical

  13. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radatz, M; Jakubowski, J; Cooper, J; Powell, T

    1997-12-01

    Four cases of synovial cyst (ganglion) arising from the facet joints of the lumbar spine are reported. A typical presenting feature was exacerbation of pain on standing or walking, mimicking vascular claudication. MRI proved in all four cases to be the definitive investigation and surgery the treatment of choice, producing excellent results.

  14. Evaluation of spine boards for X-ray diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Spine boards are frequently used in preclinical emergency care. Different models were examined with regard to their feasibility for plain film radiography and computed tomography (CT). Methods: Five current spine board models were measured for their dimensions and weight. Transmission of radiation [μGyls] and dose area product [cGy x cm2] were determined with a patient equivalent aluminium phantom. Image artifacts, image quality and resolution of anatomic details were evaluated with an anthropomorphic Alderson phantom. Results: With only 6.3 kg new models show a 28% reduction in weight, three spine boards generate lateral artifacts due to a narrow width of 41 - 42 cm. Radiation transmission of all boards was similar, however dose area products differed by up to 59%. Image quality was impaired in 4 out 5 boards because of image artifacts, CT scanning was not impaired with all boards. Conclusion: Only one board (Ferno Millenia trademark) showed sufficient properties for plain film radiography and CT. There is no suitable spine board for preclinical and clinical applications as well as for trauma radiology, further improvements of current designs are essential. (orig.)

  15. MRI of degenerative cysts of the lumbar spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khalatbari, K. [Department of MRI, Iran Gamma Knife Centre, Iran University of Medial Sciences-Kamrani Charity Foundation, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: khalatbarik@yahoo.com; Ansari, H. [Department of Orthopaedics, Rassoul Akram University Hospital, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-03-15

    Degenerative cysts of the lumbar spine encompass a heterogeneous group of cystic lesions that are presumed to share a common aetiology. Some of these cysts may be incidental findings, whereas others may produce acute or chronic symptoms. These cysts have been categorized using various combinations of topographic and pathological characteristics and by their attachment to or communication with a specific spinal structure.

  16. On radiative acceleration in spine-sheath structured blazar jets

    CERN Document Server

    Chhotray, Atul; Ghisellini, Gabriele; Salafia, Om Sharan; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Lazzati, Davide

    2016-01-01

    It has been proposed that blazar jets are structured, with a fast spine surrounded by a slower sheath or layer. This structured jet model explains some properties of their emission and morphology. Because of their relative motion, the radiation produced by one component is seen amplified by the other, thus enhancing the inverse Compton emission of both. Radiation is emitted anisotropically in the comoving frames, and causes the emitting plasma to recoil. As seen in the observer frame, this corresponds to a deceleration of the fastest component (the spine) and an acceleration of the slower one (the layer). While the deceleration of the spine has already been investigated, here we study for the first time the acceleration of the sheath and find self-consistent velocity profile solutions for both the spine and the sheath while accounting for radiative cooling. We find that the sheath can be accelerated to the velocities required by the observations if its leptons remain energetic in the acceleration region, assu...

  17. Pathogenesis and treatment of spine disease in the mucopolysaccharidoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Sun H; Casal, Margret L; Malhotra, Neil R; Ficicioglu, Can; Smith, Lachlan J

    2016-08-01

    The mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS) are a family of lysosomal storage disorders characterized by deficient activity of enzymes that degrade glycosaminoglycans (GAGs). Skeletal disease is common in MPS patients, with the severity varying both within and between subtypes. Within the spectrum of skeletal disease, spinal manifestations are particularly prevalent. Developmental and degenerative abnormalities affecting the substructures of the spine can result in compression of the spinal cord and associated neural elements. Resulting neurological complications, including pain and paralysis, significantly reduce patient quality of life and life expectancy. Systemic therapies for MPS, such as hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and enzyme replacement therapy, have shown limited efficacy for improving spinal manifestations in patients and animal models. Therefore, there is a pressing need for new therapeutic approaches that specifically target this debilitating aspect of the disease. In this review, we examine how pathological abnormalities affecting the key substructures of the spine - the discs, vertebrae, odontoid process and dura - contribute to the progression of spinal deformity and symptomatic compression of neural elements. Specifically, we review current understanding of the underlying pathophysiology of spine disease in MPS, how the tissues of the spine respond to current clinical and experimental treatments, and discuss future strategies for improving the efficacy of these treatments. PMID:27296532

  18. Role of early minimal-invasive spine fixation in acute thoracic and lumbar spine trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Polytraumatized patients following a severe trauma suffer from substantial disturbances of the immune system. Secondary organ dysfunction syndromes due to early hyperinflammation and late immunparalysis contribute to adverse outcome. Consequently the principle of damage control surgery / orthopedics developed in the last two decades to limit secondary iatrogenic insult in these patients. New percutaneous internal fixators provide implants for a damage control approach of spinal trauma in polytraumatized patients. The goal of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of minimal-invasive instrumentation in the setting of minor and major trauma and to discuss the potential benefits and drawbacks of this procedure. Materials and Methods: The present study is a prospective analysis of 76 consecutive patients (mean age 53.3 years with thoracolumbar spine fractures following major or minor trauma from August 2003 to January 2007 who were subjected to minimal-invasive dorsal instrumentation using CD Horizon ® Sextant TM Rod Insertion System and Longitude TM Rod Insertion System (Medtronic ® Sofamor Danek. Perioperative and postoperative outcome measures including e.g. local and systemic complications were assessed and discussed. Results: Forty-nine patients (64.5% suffered from minor trauma (Injury Severity Score < 16. Polytraumatized patients (n=27; 35.5% had associated chest (n=20 and traumatic brain injuries (n=22. For mono- and bisegmental dorsal instrumentation the Sextant TM was used in 60 patients, whereas in 16 longer ranging instrumentations the (prototype Longitude TM system was implanted. Operation time was substantially lower than in conventional approach at minimum 22.5 min for Sextant and 36.2 min for Longitude TM , respectively. Geriatric patients with high perioperative risk according to ASA classification benefited from the less invasive approach and lack of approach-related complications including no substantial blood loss

  19. A biblioteca escolar e a organização de repositórios digitais: perspetivas teóricas

    OpenAIRE

    Aparício, João C.; Henriques, Susana, 1974-

    2012-01-01

    O presente trabalho apresenta algumas perspetivas teóricas quanto ao papel dos repositórios digitais de recursos educativos no ensino. Começa por fazer uma análise dos desafios que se colocam à escola e à biblioteca escolar no campo da literacia da informação, na gestão pedagógica de conteúdos e na criação de bibliotecas digitais. São abordados os fundamentos e principais características dos repositórios de recursos educativos e é ponderada a possibilidade da sua implementação na escola, em a...

  20. Exploring the pharmacogenomics knowledge base (PharmGKB) for repositioning breast cancer drugs by leveraging Web ontology language (OWL) and cheminformatics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qian; Tao, Cui; Shen, Feichen; Chute, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    Computational drug repositioning leverages computational technology and high volume of biomedical data to identify new indications for existing drugs. Since it does not require costly experiments that have a high risk of failure, it has attracted increasing interest from diverse fields such as biomedical, pharmaceutical, and informatics areas. In this study, we used pharmacogenomics data generated from pharmacogenomics studies, applied informatics and Semantic Web technologies to address the drug repositioning problem. Specifically, we explored PharmGKB to identify pharmacogenomics related associations as pharmacogenomics profiles for US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved breast cancer drugs. We then converted and represented these profiles in Semantic Web notations, which support automated semantic inference. We successfully evaluated the performance and efficacy of the breast cancer drug pharmacogenomics profiles by case studies. Our results demonstrate that combination of pharmacogenomics data and Semantic Web technology/Cheminformatics approaches yields better performance of new indication and possible adverse effects prediction for breast cancer drugs.

  1. Comparison of Three Prehospital Cervical Spine Protocols for Missed Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Hong

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We wanted to compare 3 existing emergency medical services (EMS immobilization protocols: the Prehospital Trauma Life Support (PHTLS, mechanism-based; the Domeier protocol (parallels the National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study [NEXUS] criteria; and the Hankins’ criteria (immobilization for patients 65 years, those with altered consciousness, focal neurologic deficit, distracting injury, or midline or paraspinal tenderness.To determine the proportion of patients who would require cervical immobilization per protocol and the number of missed cervical spine injuries, had each protocol been followed with 100% compliance. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study of patients ≥18 years transported by EMS post-traumatic mechanism to an inner city emergency department. Demographic and clinical/historical data obtained by physicians were recorded prior to radiologic imaging. Medical record review ascertained cervical spine injuries. Both physicians and EMS were blinded to the objective of the study. Results: Of 498 participants, 58% were male and mean age was 48 years. The following participants would have required cervical spine immobilization based on the respective protocol: PHTLS, 95.4% (95% CI: 93.1-96.9%; Domeier, 68.7% (95% CI: 64.5-72.6%; Hankins, 81.5% (95% CI: 77.9-84.7%. There were 18 cervical spine injuries: 12 vertebral fractures, 2 subluxations/dislocations and 4 spinal cord injuries. Compliance with each of the 3 protocols would have led to appropriate cervical spine immobilization of all injured patients. In practice, 2 injuries were missed when the PHTLS criteria were mis-applied. Conclusion: Although physician-determined presence of cervical spine immobilization criteria cannot be generalized to the findings obtained by EMS personnel, our findings suggest that the mechanism-based PHTLS criteria may result in unnecessary cervical spine immobilization without apparent benefit to injured patients. PHTLS

  2. Spine growth mechanisms: friction and seismicity at Mt. Unzen, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Adrian; Kendrick, Jackie; Hirose, Takehiro; Henton De Angelis, Sarah; De Angelis, Silvio; Umakoshi, Kodo; Miwa, Takahiro; Wadsworth, Fabian; Dingwell, Don; Lavallee, Yan

    2014-05-01

    The final episode of dome growth during the 1991-1995 eruption of Mt. Unzen was characterised by spine extrusion accompanied by repetitive seismicity. This type of cyclic activity has been observed at several dome-building volcanoes and recent work suggests a source mechanism of brittle failure of magma in the conduit. Spine growth may proceed by densification and closure of permeable pathways within the uppermost conduit magma, leading to sealing of the dome and inflation of the edifice. Amplified stresses on the wall rock and plug cause brittle failure near the conduit wall once static friction forces are overcome, and during spine growth these fractures may propagate to the dome surface. The preservation of these features is rare, and the conduit is typically inaccessible; therefore spines, the extruded manifestation of upper conduit material, provide the opportunity to study direct evidence of brittle processes in the conduit. At Mt. Unzen the spine retains evidence for brittle deformation and slip, however mechanical constraints on the formation of these features and their potential impact on eruption dynamics have not been well constrained. Here, we conduct an investigation into the process of episodic spine growth using high velocity friction apparatus at variable shear slip rate (0.4-1.5 m.s-1) and normal stress (0.4-3.5 MPa) on dome rock from Mt. Unzen, generating frictional melt at velocity >0.4 m.s-1 and normal stress >0.7 MPa. Our results show that the presence of frictional melt causes a deviation from Byerlee's frictional rule for rock friction. Melt generation is a disequilibrium process: initial amphibole breakdown leads to melt formation, followed by chemical homogenization of the melt layer. Ultimately, the experimentally generated frictional melts have a similar final chemistry, thickness and comminuted clast size distribution, thereby facilitating the extrapolation of a single viscoelastic model to describe melt-lubricated slip events at Mt

  3. HORIZON SENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Stolarczyk, Sc.D.

    2002-07-31

    Real-time horizon sensing (HS) on continuous mining (CM) machines is becoming an industry tool. Installation and testing of production-grade HS systems has been ongoing this quarter at Oxbow Mining Company, Monterey Coal Company (EXXON), FMC Trona, Twentymile Coal Company (RAG America), and SASOL Coal. Detailed monitoring of system function, user experience, and mining benefits is ongoing. All horizon sensor components have finished MSHA (United States) and IEC (International) certification.

  4. The 100 most cited articles in metastatic spine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathan; Alan, Nima; Zhou, James; Kojo Hamilton, D

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite the growing neurosurgical literature, a subset of pioneering studies have significantly impacted the field of metastatic spine disease. The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze the 100 most frequently cited articles in the field. METHODS A keyword search using the Thomson Reuters Web of Science was conducted to identify articles relevant to the field of metastatic spine disease. The results were filtered based on title and abstract analysis to identify the 100 most cited articles. Statistical analysis was used to characterize journal frequency, past and current citations, citation distribution over time, and author frequency. RESULTS The total number of citations for the final 100 articles ranged from 74 to 1169. Articles selected for the final list were published between 1940 and 2009. The years in which the greatest numbers of top-100 studies were published were 1990 and 2005, and the greatest number of citations occurred in 2012. The majority of articles were published in the journals Spine (15), Cancer (11), and the Journal of Neurosurgery (9). Forty-four individuals were listed as authors on 2 articles, 9 were listed as authors on 3 articles, and 2 were listed as authors on 4 articles in the top 100 list. The most cited article was the work by Batson (1169 citations) that was published in 1940 and described the role of the vertebral veins in the spread of metastases. The second most cited article was Patchell's 2005 study (594 citations) discussing decompressive resection of spinal cord metastases. The third most cited article was the 1978 study by Gilbert that evaluated treatment of epidural spinal cord compression due to metastatic tumor (560 citations). CONCLUSIONS The field of metastatic spine disease has witnessed numerous milestones and so it is increasingly important to recognize studies that have influenced the field. In this bibliographic study the authors identified and analyzed the most influential articles in the

  5. The use of spine stereotactic radiosurgery for oligometastatic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jennifer C; Tang, Chad; Deegan, Brian J; Allen, Pamela K; Jonasch, Eric; Amini, Behrang; Wang, Xin A; Li, Jing; Tatsui, Claudio E; Rhines, Laurence D; Brown, Paul D; Ghia, Amol J

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors investigated the outcomes following spine stereotactic radiosurgery (SSRS) for patients with oligometastatic disease of the spine. METHODS The study was a secondary analysis of 38 of 209 patients enrolled in 2 separate institutional Phase I/II prospective protocols and treated with SSRS between 2002 and 2011. Of these 38 patients, 33 (87%) were treated for a solitary spine metastasis, with no other history of metastatic disease. SSRS was prescribed to 24 Gy in 1 fraction (8%), 18 Gy in 1 fraction (18%), 16 Gy in 1 fraction (11%), 27 Gy in 3 fractions (53%), 30 Gy in 5 fractions (8%), or 20 Gy in 5 fractions (3%). Seventeen patients (45%) received prior conventional external beam radiation therapy. RESULTS The median overall survival (OS) was 75.7 months, and the 2- and 5-year OS rates were 84% and 60%, respectively. In multivariate analysis, patients who had prior spine surgery and a better Karnofsky Performance Scale score had an improved OS (HR 0.16, 95% CI 0.05-0.52, p < 0.01, and HR 0.33, 95% CI 0.13%-0.84%, p = 0.02, respectively), and those who had undergone prior radiation therapy had a worse OS (HR 3.6, 95% CI 1.2%-10%, p = 0.02). The 1-, 2-, and 5-year local progression-free survival rates were 85%, 82%, and 78%, respectively. The median time to systemic therapy modification was 41 months. Two patients (5%) experienced late Grade 3-4 toxicity. CONCLUSIONS Patients with oligometastatic disease of the spine treated with SSRS can experience long-term survival and a long time before needing a modification in systemic therapy. In addition, SSRS leads to excellent local control and minimal late toxicity. PMID:27035507

  6. The 100 most cited articles in metastatic spine disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathan; Alan, Nima; Zhou, James; Kojo Hamilton, D

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Despite the growing neurosurgical literature, a subset of pioneering studies have significantly impacted the field of metastatic spine disease. The purpose of this study was to identify and analyze the 100 most frequently cited articles in the field. METHODS A keyword search using the Thomson Reuters Web of Science was conducted to identify articles relevant to the field of metastatic spine disease. The results were filtered based on title and abstract analysis to identify the 100 most cited articles. Statistical analysis was used to characterize journal frequency, past and current citations, citation distribution over time, and author frequency. RESULTS The total number of citations for the final 100 articles ranged from 74 to 1169. Articles selected for the final list were published between 1940 and 2009. The years in which the greatest numbers of top-100 studies were published were 1990 and 2005, and the greatest number of citations occurred in 2012. The majority of articles were published in the journals Spine (15), Cancer (11), and the Journal of Neurosurgery (9). Forty-four individuals were listed as authors on 2 articles, 9 were listed as authors on 3 articles, and 2 were listed as authors on 4 articles in the top 100 list. The most cited article was the work by Batson (1169 citations) that was published in 1940 and described the role of the vertebral veins in the spread of metastases. The second most cited article was Patchell's 2005 study (594 citations) discussing decompressive resection of spinal cord metastases. The third most cited article was the 1978 study by Gilbert that evaluated treatment of epidural spinal cord compression due to metastatic tumor (560 citations). CONCLUSIONS The field of metastatic spine disease has witnessed numerous milestones and so it is increasingly important to recognize studies that have influenced the field. In this bibliographic study the authors identified and analyzed the most influential articles in the

  7. Spatial distribution of DARPP-32 in dendritic spines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Blom

    Full Text Available The phosphoprotein DARPP-32 (dopamine and cyclic adenosine 3´, 5´-monophosphate-regulated phosphoprotein, 32 kDa is an important component in the molecular regulation of postsynaptic signaling in neostriatum. Despite the importance of this phosphoprotein, there is as yet little known about the nanoscale distribution of DARPP-32. In this study we applied superresolution stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED to assess the expression and distribution of DARPP-32 in striatal neurons. Primary culture of striatal neurons were immunofluorescently labeled for DARPP-32 with Alexa-594 and for the dopamine D1 receptor (D1R with atto-647N. Dual-color STED microscopy revealed discrete localizations of DARPP-32 and D1R in the spine structure, with clustered distributions in both head and neck. Dissected spine structures reveal that the DARPP-32 signal rarely overlapped with the D1R signal. The D1R receptor is positioned in an "aggregated" manner primarily in the spine head and to some extent in the neck, while DARPP-32 forms several neighboring small nanoclusters spanning the whole spine structure. The DARPP-32 clusters have a mean size of 52 +/- 6 nm, which is close to the resolution limit of the microscope and corresponds to the physical size of a few individual phosphoprotein immunocomplexes. Dissection of synaptic proteins using superresolution microscopy gives possibilities to reveal in better detail biologically relevant information, as compared to diffraction-limited microscopy. In this work, the dissected postsynaptic topology of the DARPP-32 phosphoprotein provides strong evidence for a compartmentalized and confined distribution in dendritic spines. The protein topology and the relatively low copy number of phosphoprotein provides a conception of DARPP-32's possibilities to fine-tune the regulation of synaptic signaling, which should have an impact on the performance of the neuronal circuits in which it is expressed.

  8. Percutaneous vertebroplasty for multiple myeloma of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mont' Alverne, Francisco [Universite Paris VI, Department of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Sao Paulo University, Department of Radiology, Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil); Vallee, Jean-Noel; Guillevin, Remy; Cormier, Evelyne; Jean, Betty; Rose, Michelle; Chiras, Jacques [Universite Paris VI, Department of Neuroradiology, Groupe Hospitalier Pitie-Salpetriere, Paris Cedex 13 (France); Caldas, Jose Guilherme [Sao Paulo University, Department of Radiology, Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, S.P. (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    Spinal involvement is a common presentation of multiple myeloma (MM); however, the cervical spine is the least common site of myelomatous involvement. Few studies evaluate the results of percutaneous vertebroplasty (PV) in the treatment of MM of the spine. The purpose of this series is to report on the use of PV in the treatment of MM of the cervical spine and to review the literature. From January 1994 to October 2007, four patients (three men and one woman; mean age, 45 years) who underwent five PV for painful MM in the cervical spine were retrospectively reviewed. The pain was estimated by the patient on a verbal analogic scale. Clinical follow-up was available for all patients (mean, 27.5 months; range, 1-96 months). The mean volume of cement injected per vertebral body was 2.3 {+-} 0.8 mL (range, 1.0-4.0 mL) with a mean vertebral filling of 55.0 {+-} 12.0% (range, 40.0-75.0%). Analgesic efficacy was achieved in all patients. One patient had a spinal instability due to a progression of spinal deformity noted on follow-up radiographs, without clinical symptoms. Cement leakage was detected in three (60%) of the five treated vertebrae. There was no clinical complication. The present series suggests that PV for MM of the cervical spine is safe and effective for pain control; nonetheless, the detrimental impact of the disease on bone quality should prompt close radiological follow-up after PV owing to the risk of spinal instability. (orig.)

  9. Biomechanics of the spine. Part I: Spinal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, Roberto, E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guarnieri, Gianluigi, E-mail: gianluigiguarnieri@hotmail.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy); Guglielmi, Giuseppe, E-mail: g.gugliemi@unifg.it [Department of Radiology, University of Foggia, Foggia (Italy); Muto, Mario, E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, “A. Cardarelli” Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2013-01-15

    Biomechanics, the application of mechanical principles to living organisms, helps us to understand how all the bony and soft spinal components contribute individually and together to ensure spinal stability, and how traumas, tumours and degenerative disorders exert destabilizing effects. Spine stability is the basic requirement to protect nervous structures and prevent the early mechanical deterioration of spinal components. The literature reports a number of biomechanical and clinical definitions of spinal stability, but a consensus definition is lacking. Any vertebra in each spinal motion segment, the smallest functional unit of the spine, can perform various combinations of the main and coupled movements during which a number of bony and soft restraints maintain spine stability. Bones, disks and ligaments contribute by playing a structural role and by acting as transducers through their mechanoreceptors. Mechanoreceptors send proprioceptive impulses to the central nervous system which coordinates muscle tone, movement and reflexes. Damage to any spinal structure gives rise to some degree of instability. Instability is classically considered as a global increase in the movements associated with the occurrence of back and/or nerve root pain. The assessment of spinal instability remains a major challenge for diagnostic imaging experts. Knowledge of biomechanics is essential in view of the increasing involvement of radiologists and neuroradiologists in spinal interventional procedures and the ongoing development of new techniques and devices. Bioengineers and surgeons are currently focusing on mobile stabilization systems. These systems represent a new frontier in the treatment of painful degenerative spine and aim to neutralize noxious forces, restore the normal function of spinal segments and protect the adjacent segments. This review discusses the current concepts of spine stability.

  10. Relative Contribution of Upper and Lower Lumbar Spinal Segments to Flexion/Extension: Comparison between Normal Spines and Spines with Disc Disease in Asian Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Bali, Tarun; Kumar, Malhar N.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To evaluate the contribution of upper and lower lumbar segments to flexion and extension of the lumbar spine in normal and diseased spines. Overview of Literature The specific contributions of upper and lower lumbar segments during flexion/extension have rarely been reported. Furthermore, no comparisons between the flexion/extension behaviors of normal and diseased spines have been reported until now. Methods Flexion and extension lateral radiogr...

  11. Repositioning of the Maxillomandibular Complex Using Maxillary Template Adjusted Only by Maxillary Surface Configuration Without an Intermediate Splint in Orthognathic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jeong Joon; Yang, Hoon Joo; Hwang, Soon Jung

    2016-09-01

    Accurate repositioning of the maxillary and mandibular segment is essential to improve esthetics and function in orthognathic surgery. With the improvement of three-dimensional imaging technology and computer-aided design and manufacturing techniques, various computer-aided design and manufacturing templates have been developed as alternatives to the traditional error-prone and time-consuming intermediate splint. However, the majority of previously developed templates still use an intermediate splint or the structures connected to occlusal surface and transferred the preoperative virtual plan to the real operation field indirectly.Here, the authors introduce a technical note regarding maxillary surgical templates adjusted only by the maxillary surface configuration. These templates consist of osteotomy and repositioning guide templates that provide information about the osteotomy line, bony interference, and planned position and eliminate the need for an intermediate splint. Using these templates, the maxillomandibular complex can be successfully repositioned without using an intermediate splint. Further studies are needed to determine the accuracy and stability of maxillary templates. PMID:27438437

  12. Spatial positioning of all 24 chromosomes in the lymphocytes of six subjects: evidence of reproducible positioning and spatial repositioning following DNA damage with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Ioannou

    Full Text Available The higher-order organization of chromatin is well-established, with chromosomes occupying distinct positions within the interphase nucleus. Chromatin is susceptible to, and constantly assaulted by both endogenous and exogenous threats. However, the effects of DNA damage on the spatial topology of chromosomes are hitherto, poorly understood. This study investigates the organization of all 24 human chromosomes in lymphocytes from six individuals prior to- and following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents: hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B. This study is the first to report reproducible distinct hierarchical radial organization of chromosomes with little inter-individual differences between subjects. Perturbed nuclear organization was observed following genotoxic exposure for both agents; however a greater effect was observed for hydrogen peroxide including: 1 More peripheral radial organization; 2 Alterations in the global distribution of chromosomes; and 3 More events of chromosome repositioning (18 events involving 10 chromosomes vs. 11 events involving 9 chromosomes for hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet B respectively. Evidence is provided of chromosome repositioning and altered nuclear organization following in-vitro exposure to genotoxic agents, with notable differences observed between the two investigated agents. Repositioning of chromosomes following genotoxicity involved recurrent chromosomes and is most likely part of the genomes inherent response to DNA damage. The variances in nuclear organization observed between the two agents likely reflects differences in mobility and/or decondensation of chromatin as a result of differences in the type of DNA damage induced, chromatin regions targeted, and DNA repair mechanisms.

  13. Student apathy for classroom learning and need of repositioning in present andragogy in Indian dental schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dable Rajani A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the world of technology, when today's student is approaching the on-line /distance learning in the open universities and doing on-line self-assessment, the classroom learning is vanishing slowly. Globally, teachers are taking efforts to improve the pedagogy by implementing effective methods to retain the classroom teaching and student attendance. The present study aims at shedding some light on the need of changing the adult education strategies (andragogy, which can effectively improve the student attendance for lectures. Methods It is an observational study, and the conceptual framework of it is based on beliefs, opinions and personal experiences of the respondents. Triangulation method is used for collecting the data. The data is achieved from three groups of concerned population who could provide valid results to support the study. It is collected by interviewing 10 senior faculty members who are/were the 'education experts' in the universities, while the main concerned groups of present educational stream, i.e. 'institution-teachers' and the 'students', were given questionnaires. 570 teacher respondents and 200 student respondents are the main participants of this study. Results As per data, it has been observed that senior faculty (90% and students (93.25% feel need of student motivation more than the institutional teachers (52.44%. P-values were obtained using Chi-Square test for testing the significance of difference between agreement and disagreement for a specific question. Conclusions In India, Universities have already sensed the need of 'teacher development programmes'. But teachers in dental colleges, demand more efforts to be taken by universities and managements in this regard and expect better educational policies to give them accessibility to prove themselves.

  14. Metformin use and gynecological cancers: A novel treatment option emerging from drug repositioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadducci, Angiolo; Biglia, Nicoletta; Tana, Roberta; Cosio, Stefania; Gallo, Martina

    2016-09-01

    Metformin exerts antitumor effects mainly through AMP-activated protein kinase [AMPK] activation and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase [PI3K]-Akt-mammalian target of rapamycin [mTOR] inhibition. This drug leads to activation of the cellular energy-sensing liver kinase B1 [LKB1]/AMPK pathway. LKB1 is implicated as a tumor suppressor gene in molecular pathogenesis of different malignancies. AMPK is a serine/threonine protein kinase that acts as an ultra-sensitive cellular energy sensor maintaining the energy balance within the cell. AMPK activation inhibits mRNA translation and proliferation in cancer cells via down-regulation of PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. Moreover, metformin decreases the production of insulin, insulin-like growth factor, inflammatory cytokines and vascular endothelial growth factor, and therefore it exerts anti-mitotic, anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenetic effects. Recent in vitro and experimental data suggest that metformin electively targets cancer stem cells, and acts together with chemotherapy to block tumor growth in different cancers. Several epidemiological studies and meta-analysis have shown that metformin use is associated with decreased cancer risk and/or reduced cancer mortality for different malignancies. The present review analyzes the recent biological and clinical data suggesting a possible growth-static effect of metformin also in gynecological cancers. The large majority of available clinical data on the anti-cancer potential of metformin are based on observational studies. Therefore long-term phase II-III clinical trials are strongly warranted to further investigate metformin activity in gynecological cancers. PMID:27378194

  15. A novel balloon assisted two-stents telescoping technique for repositioning an embolized stent in the pulmonary conduit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Gowda, Srinath T; Forbes, Thomas J

    2014-08-01

    A 9-year-old male, with history of pulmonary atresia and ventricular septal defect, status post complete repair with a 16 mm pulmonary homograft in the right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT) underwent 3110 Palmaz stent placement for conduit stenosis. Following deployment the stent embolized proximally into the right ventricle (RV). We undertook the choice of repositioning the embolized stent into the conduit with a transcatheter approach. Using a second venous access, the embolized stent was carefully maneuvered into the proximal part of conduit with an inflated Tyshak balloon catheter. A second Palmaz 4010 stent was deployed in the distal conduit telescoping through the embolized stent. The Tyshak balloon catheter was kept inflated in the RV to stabilize the embolized stent in the proximal conduit until it was successfully latched up against the conduit with the deployment of the overlapping second stent. One year later, he underwent Melody valve implantation in the pre-stented conduit relieving conduit insufficiency. This novel balloon assisted two-stents telescoping technique is a feasible transcatheter option to secure an embolized stent from the RV to the RVOT.

  16. Muscle repositioning: combining subjective and objective feedbacks in the teaching and practice of a reflex-based myofascial release technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolucci, Luiz Fernando

    2010-03-17

    Muscle Repositioning (MR) is a new style of myofascial release that elicits involuntary motor reactions detectable by electromyography. This article describes the principal theoretical and practical concepts of MR, and summarizes a workshop presented October 31, 2009, after the Second International Fascia Research Congress, held at Vrije Universitiet, Amsterdam.The manual mechanical input of MR integrates the client's body segments into a block, which is evident as a result of the diagnostic manual oscillations the practitioner imparts to the client's body. Segmental integration is achieved when the client's body responds as a unit to the oscillatory assessment. It appears that manually sustaining the condition of segmental integration evokes involuntary muscle reactions, which reactions might correspond to mechanisms that maintain homeostasis, such as pandiculation. It might be that these reactions are part of the MR mechanism of action and underlie its clinically observed efficacy in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders.For the practitioner and the client alike, segmental integration provides unique sensations. In teaching MR, these paired sensations can be used as kinesthetic feedback resources, because quality of touch can be guided by the client's reported sensations, which should match the practitioner's sensations. Another form of feedback with respect to quality of touch is the visually discernable degree of segmental integration. Finally, because the involuntary motor activity elicited by the MR touch can be objectively monitored through electromyography and possibly other instrumented measurements, the MR approach might yield objectivity, precision, and reproducibility-features seldom found in manual therapies.

  17. Small-volume effect enables the spine robust, sensitive and efficient information transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Fujii, Masashi; Karasawa, Yasuaki; Hikichi, Minori; Kuroda, Shinya

    2016-01-01

    Why is the spine of a neuron so small that only small numbers of molecules can exist and reactions inevitably become stochastic? Despite such noisy conditions, we previously showed that the spine exhibits robust, sensitive and efficient features of information transfer using probability of Ca$^{2+}$ increase; however, their mechanisms remains unknown. Here we show that the small-volume effect enables robust, sensitive and efficient information transfer in the spine volume, but not in the cell volume. In the spine volume, intrinsic noise in reactions becomes larger than extrinsic noise of input, making robust information transfer against input fluctuation. Stochastic facilitation of Ca$^{2+}$ increase occurs in the spine volume, making higher sensitivity to lower intensity of input. Volume-dependency of information transfer enables efficient information transfer per input in the spine volume. Thus, we propose that the small-volume effect is the functional reasons why the spine has to be so small.

  18. HORIZON SENSING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry G. Stolarczyk

    2003-03-18

    With the aid of a DOE grant (No. DE-FC26-01NT41050), Stolar Research Corporation (Stolar) developed the Horizon Sensor (HS) to distinguish between the different layers of a coal seam. Mounted on mining machine cutter drums, HS units can detect or sense the horizon between the coal seam and the roof and floor rock, providing the opportunity to accurately mine the section of the seam most desired. HS also enables accurate cutting of minimum height if that is the operator's objective. Often when cutting is done out-of-seam, the head-positioning function facilitates a fixed mining height to minimize dilution. With this technology, miners can still be at a remote location, yet cut only the clean coal, resulting in a much more efficient overall process. The objectives of this project were to demonstrate the feasibility of horizon sensing on mining machines and demonstrate that Horizon Sensing can allow coal to be cut cleaner and more efficiently. Stolar's primary goal was to develop the Horizon Sensor (HS) into an enabling technology for full or partial automation or ''agile mining''. This technical innovation (R&D 100 Award Winner) is quickly demonstrating improvements in productivity and miner safety at several prominent coal mines in the United States. In addition, the HS system can enable the cutting of cleaner coal. Stolar has driven the HS program on the philosophy that cutting cleaner coal means burning cleaner coal. The sensor, located inches from the cutting bits, is based upon the physics principles of a Resonant Microstrip Patch Antenna (RMPA). When it is in proximity of the rock-coal interface, the RMPA impedance varies depending on the thickness of uncut coal. The impedance is measured by the computer-controlled electronics and then sent by radio waves to the mining machine. The worker at the machine can read the data via a Graphical User Interface, displaying a color-coded image of the coal being cut, and direct the machine

  19. Plasmonic sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Klaus Bo

    2015-01-01

    that cannot be obtained by traditional refractive index sensing, without the use of bioprobes. A simple modified Drude model is used to account for shifts in the plasmon band position due to electrical charging. Here, a screening parameter is introduced in the expression for the free electron density...... particle ensemble, thereby overcoming typical variations due to differences between samples. For small particle sizes, charge displacement/transfer processes at the particle surface can change the material properties and morphology of the NPs dramatically, resulting in, e.g., a decrease of and a blue shift...

  20. Dural ectasia and conventional radiography in the Marfan lumbosacral spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective. To determine how well conventional radiographic findings can predict the presence of dural ectasia in Marfan patients.Design and patients. Twelve Marfan patients without dural ectasia and 21 Marfan patients with dural ectasia were included in the study. Five radiographic measurements were made of the lumbosacral spine: interpediculate distance, scalloping value, sagittal canal diameter, vertebral body width, and transverse process width.Results. The following measurements were significantly larger in patients with dural ectasia: interpediculate distances at L3-L4 levels (P38.0 mm, sagittal diameter at S1 >18.0 mm, or scalloping value at L5 >5.5 mm.Conclusion. Dural ectasia in Marfan syndrome is commonly associated with several osseous changes that are observable on conventional radiographs of the lumbosacral spine. Conventional radiography can detect dural ectasia in patients with Marfan syndrome with a very high specificity (91.7%) but a low sensitivity (57.1%). (orig.)

  1. Degenerative spine disorders in the context of clinical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardly any other structure in the human body is held responsible for so many complaints, pain, and costs as the spine and its degenerative disorders. In the following article, the role of imaging procedures in diagnosing disorders of the spine is presented. Due to the fact that disk herniation represents the most frequent cause for degenerative disorders the anatomy of the intervertebral disk and the pathology of the entities that can cause diseases of the disks are described. In particular, the authors focus on the significance of radiological findings with respect to patient history, subjective symptoms, and objective clinical findings. In addition to presenting the technical procedures and their indications and contraindications also practical tips and tricks in conducting these examinations are presented in this paper

  2. Factors Related to Radiation Exposure during Lumbar Spine Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Moon Hyung; Choi, Byung Gil; Jung, Seung Eun; Byun, Jae Young

    2016-02-01

    Fluoroscopy guidance is useful to confirm anatomical landmark and needle location for spine intervention; however, it can lead to radiation exposure in patients, physicians, and medical staff. Physicians who used fluoroscopy should be cognizant of radiation exposure and intend to minimize radiation dose. We retrospectively reviewed three lumbar spine intervention procedures (nerve root block, medial branch block, and facet joint block) at our institution between June and December, 2014. We performed 268 procedures on 220 patients and found significant difference in radiation dose between two groups classified by performing physicians. The physician who controlled the fluoroscopy unit directly used significantly shorter fluoroscopy (6 seconds) that resulted in a smaller radiation dose (dose area product [DAP] 0.59 Gy∙cm(2)) than the physician supervising the radiographer controlling the fluoroscopy unit (72 seconds, DAP 5.31 Gy∙cm(2), P radiographer controls the fluoroscopy unit. PMID:26908989

  3. Degenerative spine disorders in the context of clinical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freund, Michael [Institut fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Aschaffenburg, Am Hasenkopf 1, 63739 Aschaffenburg (Germany) and Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: michael.freund@klinikum-aschaffenburg.de; Sartor, Klaus [Abteilung fuer Neuroradiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld 400, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-04-15

    Hardly any other structure in the human body is held responsible for so many complaints, pain, and costs as the spine and its degenerative disorders. In the following article, the role of imaging procedures in diagnosing disorders of the spine is presented. Due to the fact that disk herniation represents the most frequent cause for degenerative disorders the anatomy of the intervertebral disk and the pathology of the entities that can cause diseases of the disks are described. In particular, the authors focus on the significance of radiological findings with respect to patient history, subjective symptoms, and objective clinical findings. In addition to presenting the technical procedures and their indications and contraindications also practical tips and tricks in conducting these examinations are presented in this paper.

  4. Syndromes with chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis in the spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubaszewski, Łukasz; Wojdasiewicz, Piotr; Rożek, Marcin; Słowińska, Iwona E; Romanowska-Próchnicka, Katarzyna; Słowiński, Radosław; Poniatowski, Łukasz A; Gasik, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis (CNO) has been known for over of 40 years. It is an underrecognized entity due to the low number of described cases and poor propagation awareness of the problem. Chronic non-bacterial osteomyelitis is usually confused with infectious spondylodiscitis or malignant lesions, both primary and metastatic. Failing to consider CNO as one of possible lesions of the spine among an array of differential diagnoses may lead to a prolonged ineffective treatment increasing treatment-related morbidity. In this paper the authors describe these two syndromes, with a possible autoimmune background - chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) and SAPHO syndrome - that include CNO being among the manifestations. The authors present the spinal symptomatology of CNO for both syndromes published so far to help spine clinicians organize the information for better usage in everyday clinical practice.

  5. Magnetic resonance tomography for trauma of the cervical spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed. (orig.)

  6. [Magnetic resonance tomography in injuries of the cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meydam, K; Sehlen, S; Schlenkhoff, D; Kiricuta, J C; Beyer, H K

    1986-12-01

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed. PMID:3025951

  7. Magnetic resonance tomography for trauma of the cervical spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meydam, K.; Sehlen, S.; Schlenkhoff, D.; Kiricuta, J.C.; Beyer, H.K.

    1986-12-01

    Twenty patients who had suffered spinal trauma were examined by magnetic resonance tomography. Fifteen patients with first degree trauma in Erdmann's classification showed no abnormality. Magnetic resonance tomography of the cervical spine appears to be a suitable method for investigating patients with whiplash injuries. It is indicated following severe flexion injuries with subluxations and neurological symptoms, since it is the only method that can demonstrate the spinal cord directly and completely and show the extent of cord compression. For patients with thoracic trauma and rapidly developing neurological symptoms, magnetic resonance tomography is ideal for showing post-traumatic syringomyelia. Magnetic resonance tomography following whiplash injuries is recommended if plain films of the cervical spine show any abnormalities, as well as for the investigation of acute or sub-acute neurological abnormalities. The various findings are discussed.

  8. Modern posterior screw techniques in the pediatric cervical spine

    OpenAIRE

    Hedequist, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of children with cervical spine disorders requiring fusion is a challenging endeavor for a variety of reasons. The size of the patients, the corresponding abnormal bony anatomy, the inherent ligamentous laxity of children, and the relative rarity of the disorders all play a part in difficulty of treatment. The benefits of modern posterior cervical instrumentation in children, defined as rigid screw-rod systems, have been shown to be many including: improved arthrodesis rates, dimini...

  9. A Validated Classification for External Immobilization of the Cervical Spine

    OpenAIRE

    Holla, Micha; Huisman, Joske M. R.; Hosman, Allard J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Interobserver and intraobserver reliability study. Objective The aim of this study is to validate a new classification system of external cervical spine immobilization devices by measuring the interobserver and intraobserver agreement. Methods A classification system, with five main categories, based on the anatomical regions on which the device supports, was created. A total of 28 independent observers classified 50 photographs of different devices, designed to immobilize the ce...

  10. Ophaceous Gout Involving the Whole Spine: An Unusual Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Min Woo; Lee, Ji Hae; Cho, Woo Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Gout is a relatively common, crystal deposition disease, in which monosodium urate crystals are deposited in joint and periarticular tissues of the extremities. Involvement of the spine is exceedingly rare. Most patients with spinal gout present with symptomatic spinal cord compression. Diffuse involvement of tophi deposition inside the spinal central canal has not been reported. We now present a case of chronic tophaceous gout with extensive spinal involvement that resulted in diffuse spinal cord compression and led to paraplegia.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of diagnostic imaging of the spine in multiple myeloma were examined. Twenty-one patients with stage II-III multiple myeloma (male=12, female=9, mean age=64) underwent MRI of the spine. Other diagnostic imaging modalities used in these patients included, CT bone scintigraphy, and radiography. All images of the spine were assessed and compared with the MRI images. The type of progression was evaluated based on the tumor distribution classification established by Sezaki. T1-weighted images of all 21 patients showed low signals in vertebral bodies, including 14 cases with a focal low signal intensity and 7 cases with diffuse low signal intensity. On the T2-weighted images, 15 of the 21 cases (71%) showed equivalent signals, while T2*-weighted images obtained by the field-echo method yielded high signals in 10 out of 11 cases. It was difficult to differentiate between senile osteoporosis and multiple myeloma by MRI, but CT images clearly distinguished between them. The results suggested that fat-suppressive T1-contrast images and T2*-weighted images are useful in detecting lesions, especially focal low signal intensity lesions. Patients with the multiple-lesion-tumor type of disease were more likely to develop paralysis more than those with the diffuse myeloproliferative type. Thus, the tumor distribution classification established by Sezaki was useful in considering radiotherapy for the treatment of patients at risk of paralysis. Bone scintigraphy revealed accumulation only in spinal lesions caused by compression fractures, while CT appeared to be useful in localizing the diffuse myeloproliferative type of lesions. The problems associated with diagnosis by MRI are differentiation of multiple myeloma from senile osteoporosis and metastatic bone tumors of the spine. There are few specific findings in multiple myeloma. (K.H.)

  12. The patient’s perspective on complications after spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Grob, Dieter; Mannion, Anne F.

    2009-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a paradigm shift in relation to the assessment of outcome in spine surgery: multidimensional patient-centred questionnaires have superseded traditional surgeon-based ratings of outcome, and surgical registries have been developed to capitalise on the principle of “strength in numbers.” However, the assessment of complications has not enjoyed this same enlightened patient-centred approach. The present study investigated post-surgical complications from the patient’s...

  13. Dysphagia produced by cervical spine osteophyte. A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Silveri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 73-year-old male patient with progressive dysphagia, and hoarseness (irritability in the throat. He was studied with the appropriate imaging techniques, and esophagoscopy led to a diagnosis of extrinsic esophageal dysphagia for osteophyte obstruction of the cervical spine due to the arthrosis. A surgical resection was performed, without complications. Some considerations are given on this theme.

  14. Access related complications during anterior exposure of the lumbar spine

    OpenAIRE

    Fantini, Gary A; Pawar, Abhijit Y.

    2013-01-01

    The new millennium has witnessed the emergence of minimally invasive, non-posterior based surgery of the lumbar spine, in particular via lateral based methodologies to discectomy and fusion. In contrast, and perhaps for a variety of reasons, anterior motion preservation (non-fusion) technologies are playing a comparatively lesser, though incompletely defined, role at present. Lateral based motion preservation technologies await definition of their eventual role in the armamentarium of minimal...

  15. Bone graft substitutes for spine fusion: A brief review

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Ashim; Kukkar, Nitin; Sharif, Kevin; Main, Benjamin J; Albers, Christine E; El-Amin III, Saadiq F

    2015-01-01

    Bone graft substitutes are widely used in the field of orthopedics and are extensively used to promote vertebral fusion. Fusion is the most common technique in spine surgery and is used to treat morbidities and relieve discomfort. Allograft and autograft bone substitutes are currently the most commonly used bone grafts to promote fusion. These approaches pose limitations and present complications to the patient. Numerous alternative bone graft substitutes are on the market or have been develo...

  16. Complications in lumbar spine surgery: A retrospective analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Luca Proietti; Laura Scaramuzzo; Giuseppe R Schiro; Sergio Sessa; Carlo A Logroscino

    2013-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatment of adult lumbar spinal disorders is associated with a substantial risk of intraoperative and perioperative complications. There is no clearly defined medical literature on complication in lumbar spine surgery. Purpose of the study is to retrospectively evaluate intraoperative and perioperative complications who underwent various lumbar surgical procedures and to study the possible predisposing role of advanced age in increasing this rate. Materials and Metho...

  17. Treatment for the Lumbosacral Soft Tissue Defect after Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sun Jin; Lee, Chang Bum; Park, Hyung Taek; Park, Jong Hoon; Lee, Hyeong Seok; Kim, Yong Jin

    2010-01-01

    The lumbosacral area is one of the most frequently operated spine regions because of the prevalence of disease in that area. Although a lumbosacral soft tissue defect after surgery due to inflammation and other causes is rare, such soft tissue defects are difficult to treat. Therefore, suitable methods for treating lumbosacral soft tissue defects are necessary. Therefore, this study introduces a case-treated with a transverse lumbosacral rotational flap.

  18. Technical aspects of CT imaging of the spine

    OpenAIRE

    Tins, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    This review article discusses technical aspects of computed tomography (CT) imaging of the spine. Patient positioning, and its influence on image quality and movement artefact, is discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the choice of scan parameters and their relation to image quality and radiation burden to the patient. Strategies to reduce radiation burden and artefact from metal implants are outlined. Data acquisition, processing, image display and steps to reduce artefact are reviewed...

  19. SANTIAGO: Spine Association for Neuron Topology Improvement and Graph Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Roncal, William Gray; Lea, Colin; Baruah, Akira; Hager, Gregory D.

    2016-01-01

    Developing automated and semi-automated solutions for reconstructing wiring diagrams of the brain from electron micrographs is important for advancing the field of connectomics. While the ultimate goal is to generate a graph of neuron connectivity, most prior automated methods have focused on volume segmentation rather than explicit graph estimation. In these approaches, one of the key, commonly occurring error modes is dendritic shaft-spine fragmentation. We posit that directly addressing th...

  20. Antimicrobial and anticoagulant activities of the spine of stingray Himantura imbricata

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kaliyamoorthy Kalidasan; Velayudham Ravi; Sunil Kumar Sahu; Murugan Lakshmi Maheshwaran; Kathiresan Kandasamy

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To study the spine structure of stingray Himantura imbricata (H. imbricata) and to evaluate the anticoagulant properties of the spine extract obtained through various solvents extracts followed by antibacterial activity against human pathogens. Methods:Spines of H. imbricata were collected from Nagappattinam coast, Tamil Nadu, India and their spines were observed under the light microscope. The grounded spines were subjected to extraction of metabolites using methanol, ethanol, chloroform and acetone. Antibacterial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion technique against 10 human pathogens. Similarly, anticoagulant activity was also assessed by following United States Pharmacopeia method. Results:Light microscopic observation of spine revealed that the venom apparatus of the stingray H. imbricata consisted of two to three spines, glandular tissue and a sheath. The spine extract showed potent antibacterial activity against all tested pathogen. Maximum activity (14 mm) was found against Staphylococcus aureus. Crude extract showed 91.50 USP units/mg of anticoagulant activity. Conclusions: Microscopic observations gave new insight about the spine structure of the stingray. The spine extracts of H. imbricate showed potent activity against human pathogens revealed by the good zone of inhibition. Chloroform extracts conferred the most prominent antibacterial activity. The anticoagulant activity was also comparable with that of standard heparin.

  1. Antimicrobial and anticoagulant activities of the spine of stingray Himantura imbricata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliyamoorthy Kalidasan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the spine structure of stingray Himantura imbricata (H. imbricata and to evaluate the anticoagulant properties of the spine extract obtained through various solvents extracts followed by antibacterial activity against human pathogens. Methods: Spines of H. imbricata were collected from Nagappattinam coast, Tamil Nadu, India and their spines were observed under the light microscope. The grounded spines were subjected to extraction of metabolites using methanol, ethanol, chloroform and acetone. Antibacterial activity was evaluated by disc diffusion technique against 10 human pathogens. Similarly, anticoagulant activity was also assessed by following United States Pharmacopeia method. Results: Light microscopic observation of spine revealed that the venom apparatus of the stingray H. imbricata consisted of two to three spines, glandular tissue and a sheath. The spine extract showed potent antibacterial activity against all tested pathogen. Maximum activity (14 mm was found against Staphylococcus aureus. Crude extract showed 91.50 USP units/mg of anticoagulant activity. Conclusions: Microscopic observations gave new insight about the spine structure of the stingray. The spine extracts of H. imbricate showed potent activity against human pathogens revealed by the good zone of inhibition. Chloroform extracts conferred the most prominent antibacterial activity. The anticoagulant activity was also comparable with that of standard heparin.

  2. Drug-repositioning screening identified piperlongumine as a direct STAT3 inhibitor with potent activity against breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharadwaj, U; Eckols, T K; Kolosov, M; Kasembeli, M M; Adam, A; Torres, D; Zhang, X; Dobrolecki, L E; Wei, W; Lewis, M T; Dave, B; Chang, J C; Landis, M D; Creighton, C J; Mancini, M A; Tweardy, D J

    2015-03-12

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 regulates many cardinal features of cancer including cancer cell growth, apoptosis resistance, DNA damage response, metastasis, immune escape, tumor angiogenesis, the Warburg effect and oncogene addiction and has been validated as a drug target for cancer therapy. Several strategies have been used to identify agents that target Stat3 in breast cancer but none has yet entered into clinical use. We used a high-throughput fluorescence microscopy search strategy to identify compounds in a drug-repositioning library (Prestwick library) that block ligand-induced nuclear translocation of Stat3 and identified piperlongumine (PL), a natural product isolated from the fruit of the pepper Piper longum. PL inhibited Stat3 nuclear translocation, inhibited ligand-induced and constitutive Stat3 phosphorylation, and modulated expression of multiple Stat3-regulated genes. Surface plasmon resonance assay revealed that PL directly inhibited binding of Stat3 to its phosphotyrosyl peptide ligand. Phosphoprotein antibody array analysis revealed that PL does not modulate kinases known to activate Stat3 such as Janus kinases, Src kinase family members or receptor tyrosine kinases. PL inhibited anchorage-independent and anchorage-dependent growth of multiple breast cancer cell lines having increased pStat3 or total Stat3, and induced apoptosis. PL also inhibited mammosphere formation by tumor cells from patient-derived xenografts. PL's antitumorigenic function was causally linked to its Stat3-inhibitory effect. PL was non-toxic in mice up to a dose of 30 mg/kg/day for 14 days and caused regression of breast cancer cell line xenografts in nude mice. Thus, PL represents a promising new agent for rapid entry into the clinic for use in treating breast cancer, as well as other cancers in which Stat3 has a role. PMID:24681959

  3. Multidetector Computed Tomography of Cervical Spine Fractures in Ankylosing Spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivikko, M.P.; Kiuru, M.J.; Koskinen, S.K. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital, Toeoeloe Trauma Center (Finland). Dept. of Radiology

    2004-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) cervical spine findings in trauma patients with advanced ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Material and Methods: Using PACS, 2282 cervical spine MDCT examinations requested by emergency room physicians were found during a period of 3 years. Of these patients, 18 (16 M, aged 41-87, mean 57 years) had advanced AS. Primary imaging included radiography in 12 and MRI in 11 patients. Results: MDCT detected one facet joint subluxation and 31 fractures in 17 patients: 14 transverse fractures, 8 spinous process fractures, 2 Jefferson's fractures, 1 type I and 2 type II odontoid process fractures, and 1 each: atlanto-occipital joint fracture and C2 laminar fracture plus isolated transverse process and facet joint fractures. Radiographs detected 48% and MRI 60% of the fractures. MRI detected all transverse and odontoid fractures, demonstrating spinal cord abnormalities in 72%. Conclusion: MDCT is superior to plain radiographs or MRI, showing significantly more injuries and yielding more information on fracture morphology. MRI is valuable, however, in evaluating the spinal cord and soft-tissue injuries. Fractures in advanced AS often show an abnormal orientation and are frequently associated with spinal cord injuries. In these patients, for any suspected cervical spine injuries, MDCT is therefore the imaging modality of choice.

  4. Significance of prevertebral soft tissue measurement in cervical spine injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Liyang E-mail: lydai@etang.com

    2004-07-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of prevertebral soft tissue swelling in cervical spine injuries. Materials and methods: A group of 107 consecutive patients with suspected injuries of the cervical vertebrae were reviewed retrospectively to identify the presence of prevertebral soft tissue swelling and to investigate the association of prevertebral soft tissue swelling with the types and degrees of cervical spine injuries. Results: Prevertebral soft tissue swelling occurred in 47 (43.9%) patients. Of the 47 patients, 38 were found with bony injury and nine were without. The statistic difference was significant (P<0.05). No correlation was demonstrated between soft tissue swelling and either the injured level of the cervical vertebrae or the degree of the spinal cord injury (P>0.05). Anterior element injuries in the cervical vertebrae had widening of the prevertebral soft tissue more than posterior element injuries (P<0.05). Conclusion: The diagnostic value of prevertebral soft tissue swelling for cervical spine injuries is significant, but the absence of this sign does not mean that further image evaluation can be spared.

  5. Occurrence of cervical spine injuries during the rugby scrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzler, M J; Akpata, T; Laughlin, W; Levy, A S

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study of cervical spine injuries that occurred during the rugby scrum in the United States was undertaken. In the U.S., from 1970 to 1996, 36 (58%) of the 62 documented injured players injured their cervical spines during the scrum. Thirty-five men (97%) and one woman (3%) were injured. Twenty-three of the injuries (64%) occurred when the opposing packs came together (engagement), and 13 (36%) occurred when the scrum collapsed. Twenty-eight (78%) hookers, seven (19%) props, and one (3%) second-row player were injured. Twenty (56%) hookers and three (8%) props were hurt during engagement. Eight hookers (22%), four props (11%), and one second-row player (3%) were injured when the scrum collapsed. Significantly more injuries occurred during engagement than during collapse, and hookers were injured significantly more than props. We conclude that in the rugby scrum in the U.S., the hooker suffers most of the cervical spine injuries (78% in this study) and this position is by far the most vulnerable. This study should be used to develop rugby law (rule) changes and educate players, coaches, and referees in United States rugby. PMID:9548109

  6. Medical Management of Osteoporosis for Elective Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanzadeh, Hamid; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Dalkin, Alan C

    2016-05-01

    Over 50 million Americans have low bone mass. Poor bone quality is known to complicate spinal fusion surgery, which relies on strong bony purchase to be effective. Unfortunately, many spine surgeons do not perform routine workups for either osteoporosis or osteomalacia. Effective screening and risk factor assessment can allow for appropriate medical management of osteoporosis in the perioperative setting, improving outcomes. Medical management can be grouped into several different categories: vitamins and minerals, bisphosphonates, recombinant parathyroid hormone, estrogen replacement or modification, inhibitors of receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand (RANKL), and calcitonin. Calcium and vitamin D supplements are the least expensive to prescribe, with minimal side effects and promising animal studies, and thus should be provided to most osteoporotic patients. Recombinant parathyroid hormone can also be considered, as clinical studies have demonstrated impressive results in spine fusion patients. Bisphosphonates, estrogen therapy or selective estrogen receptor modulators, and calcitonin should all be avoided in this patient population given unproven benefit and potentially harmful side-effect profiles. Denosumab is potentially an option, but may not be first line given the general lack of supporting data for its use in perioperative management of spine surgery patients. PMID:27100945

  7. Imaging evaluation of traumatic thoracolumbar spine injuries: Radiological review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shivanand; Gamanagatti; Deepak; Rathinam; Krithika; Rangarajan; Atin; Kumar; Kamran; Farooque; Vijay; Sharma

    2015-01-01

    Spine fractures account for a large portion of musculoskeletal injuries worldwide. A classification of spine fractures is necessary in order to develop a common language for treatment indications and outcomes. Several classification systems have been developed based on injury anatomy or mechanisms of action, but they have demonstrated poor reliability, have yielded little prognostic information, and have not been widely used. For this reason, the Arbeitsgemeinschaftfür Osteosynthesefragen(AO) committee has classified thorocolumbar spine injuries based on the pathomorphological criteria into3 types(A: Compression; B: Distraction; C: Axial torque and rotational deformity). Each of these types is further divided into 3 groups and 3 subgroups reflecting progressive scale of morphological damage and the degree of instability. Because of its highly detailed sub classifications, the AO system has shown limited interobserver variability. It is similar to its predecessors in that it does not incorporate the patient’s neurologic status.The need for a reliable, reproducible, clinically relevant, prognostic classification system with an optimal balance of ease of use and detail of injury description contributed to the development of a new classification system, the thoracolumbar injury classification and severity score(TLICS). The TLICS defines injury based on three clinical characteristics: injury morphology, integrity of the posterior ligamentous complex, and neurologic status of the patient. The severity score offers prognostic information and is helpful in decision making about surgical vs nonsurgical management.

  8. [Biomechanics of whiplash injuries of the cervical spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, G

    1989-07-01

    1. The whiplash injury of the cervical spine is a typical, but not very often observed injury of occupants of automotive vehicles involved in moderate collisions. 2. There still exist great uncertainties in the elaboration of expertises concerning the minor whiplash injury, so that the great part of the disturbances cannot be objectivated under a clinical point of view. And on the other hand, serious whiplash injuries often are superposed or veiled by secondary injuries. 3. Thus, the aim of the present paper was to point out injury mechanisms, to give a rough scaling of the whiplash severity under biomechanical aspects and finally to set these injury mechanisms in correlation to the following criteria of accident: a) vehicle velocity change (energy equivalent speed--EES); b) deformation of vehicles on the impact-exposed structure; c) loading of occupants by acceleration or deceleration. 4. The tolerance limit of the cervical spine generally decreases to a lower limit, if the cervical spine is changed in a pathological way, e.g. by preexisting diseases. 5. It is evident and important, that the difficult work of giving an expert's opinion on this field must be performed in an interdisciplinary collaboration of engineers for collision-analysis and physicians experienced in accident-traumatology. PMID:2669311

  9. Patient positioning and spinal locking for lumbar spine rotation manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbons, P; Tehan, P

    2001-08-01

    High velocity low amplitude (HVLA) thrust techniques are widely used by many manual therapists to treat low back pain. There is increasing evidence that spinal manipulation produces positive patient outcomes for acute low back pain. HVLA thrust techniques are associated with an audible release in the form of a pop or cracking sound that is widely accepted to represent cavitation of a spinal zygapophyseal joint. This audible release distinguishes these techniques from other manual therapy interventions. When using long lever HVLA thrust techniques spinal locking is necessary to localize forces and achieve cavitation at a specific vertebral segment. A critical factor in applying lumbar spine manipulation with minimal force is patient positioning and spinal locking. A knowledge of coupled movements of the lumbar spine aids an understanding of the patient positioning required to achieve spinal locking consistent with maximal patient comfort and cooperation. Excessive rotation can result in pain, patient resistance and failed technique. This masterclass presents a model of patient positioning for the lumbar spine that minimizes excessive use of rotation to achieve spinal locking prior to the application of the thrust.

  10. Imaging evaluation of traumatic thoracolumbar spine injuries: Radiological review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Rathinam, Deepak; Rangarajan, Krithika; Kumar, Atin; Farooque, Kamran; Sharma, Vijay

    2015-09-28

    Spine fractures account for a large portion of musculoskeletal injuries worldwide. A classification of spine fractures is necessary in order to develop a common language for treatment indications and outcomes. Several classification systems have been developed based on injury anatomy or mechanisms of action, but they have demonstrated poor reliability, have yielded little prognostic information, and have not been widely used. For this reason, the Arbeitsgemeinschaftfür Osteosynthesefragen (AO) committee has classified thorocolumbar spine injuries based on the pathomorphological criteria into3 types (A: Compression; B: Distraction; C: Axial torque and rotational deformity). Each of these types is further divided into 3 groups and 3 subgroups reflecting progressive scale of morphological damage and the degree of instability. Because of its highly detailed sub classifications, the AO system has shown limited interobserver variability. It is similar to its predecessors in that it does not incorporate the patient's neurologic status.The need for a reliable, reproducible, clinically relevant, prognostic classification system with an optimal balance of ease of use and detail of injury description contributed to the development of a new classification system, the thoracolumbar injury classification and severity score (TLICS). The TLICS defines injury based on three clinical characteristics: injury morphology, integrity of the posterior ligamentous complex, and neurologic status of the patient. The severity score offers prognostic information and is helpful in decision making about surgical vs nonsurgical management. PMID:26435776

  11. Dimensional coordinate measurements: application in characterizing cervical spine motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Weilong; Li, Linan; Wang, Shibin; Wang, Zhiyong; Shi, Nianke; Xue, Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Cervical spine as a complicated part in the human body, the form of its movement is diverse. The movements of the segments of vertebrae are three-dimensional, and it is reflected in the changes of the angle between two joint and the displacement in different directions. Under normal conditions, cervical can flex, extend, lateral flex and rotate. For there is no relative motion between measuring marks fixed on one segment of cervical vertebra, the cervical vertebrae with three marked points can be seen as a body. Body's motion in space can be decomposed into translational movement and rotational movement around a base point .This study concerns the calculation of dimensional coordinate of the marked points pasted to the human body's cervical spine by an optical method. Afterward, these measures will allow the calculation of motion parameters for every spine segment. For this study, we choose a three-dimensional measurement method based on binocular stereo vision. The object with marked points is placed in front of the CCD camera. Through each shot, we will get there two parallax images taken from different cameras. According to the principle of binocular vision we can be realized three-dimensional measurements. Cameras are erected parallelly. This paper describes the layout of experimental system and a mathematical model to get the coordinates.

  12. Demoralization, Patient Activation, and the Outcome of Spine Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Andrew R

    2016-01-01

    It is now well established that psychosocial factors can adversely impact the outcome of spine surgery. This article discusses in detail one such recently-identified "risk" factor: demoralization. Several studies conducted by the author indicate that demoralization, an emotional construct distinct from depression, is associated with poorer pain reduction, less functional improvement and decreased satisfaction among spine surgery patients. However, there are indications that the adverse impact of risk factors such as demoralization can be mitigated by psychosocial "maximizing" factors-characteristics that propel the patient towards positive surgical results. One of these maximizing factors, patient activation, is discussed in depth. The patient activation measure (PAM), an inventory assessing the extent to which patients are active and engaged in their health care, is associated not only with improved spine surgery results, but with better outcomes across a broad range of medical conditions. Other maximizing factors are discussed in this article. The author concludes that the past research focus on psychosocial risk factors has limited the value of presurgical psychological screening, and that future research, as well as clinical assessment, should recognize that the importance of evaluating patients' strengths as well as their vulnerabilities. PMID:27417599

  13. General practitioners' willingness to request plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objectives: To examine general practitioners' attitudes to plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations. Design: A postal questionnaire consisting of questions on background data and doctors' opinions about plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations, as well as eight vignettes (imaginary patient cases) presenting indications for lumbar radiography, and five vignettes focusing on the doctors' willingness to request lumbar radiography on the basis of patients' age and duration of symptoms. The data were analysed according to the doctor's age, sex, workplace and the medical school of graduation. Setting: Finland. Subjects: Six hundred and fifteen randomly selected physicians working in primary health care (64% of original target group). Results: The vignettes revealed that the use of plain lumbar radiographic examination varied between 26 and 88%. Patient's age and radiation protection were the most prominent factors influencing doctors' decisions to request lumbar radiographies. Only slight differences were observed between the attitudes of male and female doctors, as well as between young and older doctors. Doctors' willingness to request lumbar radiographies increased with the patient's age in most vignettes. The duration of patients' symptoms had a dramatic effect on the doctor's decision: in all vignettes, doctors were more likely to request lumbar radiography when patient's symptoms had exceeded 4 weeks. Conclusions: General practitioners commonly use plain lumbar spine radiographic examinations, despite its limited value in the diagnosis of low back pain. Further consensus and medical education is needed to clarify the indications for plain lumbar radiographic examination

  14. Infrastructure sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kenichi; Schooling, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    Design, construction, maintenance and upgrading of civil engineering infrastructure requires fresh thinking to minimize use of materials, energy and labour. This can only be achieved by understanding the performance of the infrastructure, both during its construction and throughout its design life, through innovative monitoring. Advances in sensor systems offer intriguing possibilities to radically alter methods of condition assessment and monitoring of infrastructure. In this paper, it is hypothesized that the future of infrastructure relies on smarter information; the rich information obtained from embedded sensors within infrastructure will act as a catalyst for new design, construction, operation and maintenance processes for integrated infrastructure systems linked directly with user behaviour patterns. Some examples of emerging sensor technologies for infrastructure sensing are given. They include distributed fibre-optics sensors, computer vision, wireless sensor networks, low-power micro-electromechanical systems, energy harvesting and citizens as sensors.

  15. Infrastructure sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soga, Kenichi; Schooling, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    Design, construction, maintenance and upgrading of civil engineering infrastructure requires fresh thinking to minimize use of materials, energy and labour. This can only be achieved by understanding the performance of the infrastructure, both during its construction and throughout its design life, through innovative monitoring. Advances in sensor systems offer intriguing possibilities to radically alter methods of condition assessment and monitoring of infrastructure. In this paper, it is hypothesized that the future of infrastructure relies on smarter information; the rich information obtained from embedded sensors within infrastructure will act as a catalyst for new design, construction, operation and maintenance processes for integrated infrastructure systems linked directly with user behaviour patterns. Some examples of emerging sensor technologies for infrastructure sensing are given. They include distributed fibre-optics sensors, computer vision, wireless sensor networks, low-power micro-electromechanical systems, energy harvesting and citizens as sensors. PMID:27499845

  16. Sensing temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Piali; Garrity, Paul

    2013-04-22

    Temperature is an omnipresent physical variable reflecting the rotational, vibrational and translational motion of matter, what Richard Feynman called the "jiggling" of atoms. Temperature varies across space and time, and this variation has dramatic effects on the physiology of living cells. It changes the rate and nature of chemical reactions, and it alters the configuration of the atoms that make up nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and other biomolecules, significantly affecting their activity. While life may have started in a "warm little pond", as Charles Darwin mused, the organisms that surround us today have only made it this far by devising sophisticated systems for sensing and responding to variations in temperature, and by using these systems in ways that allow them to persist and thrive in the face of thermal fluctuation.

  17. Correlation of Ordered Cervical Spine X-rays in Emergency Department with NEXUS and Canadian C-Spine Rules; a Clinical Audit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Kariman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Evaluation of cervical spine injuries makes up a major part of trauma patient assessments. Based on the existing sources, more than 98% of the cervical spine X-rays show no positive findings. Therefore, the present clinical audit aimed to evaluate the correlation of ordered cervical spine X-rays in multiple trauma patients with NEXUS and Canadian c-spine clinical decision rules. Methods: The present clinical audit, evaluated the correlation of cervical spine imaging orders in multiple trauma patients presented to the emergency department, with NEXUS and Canadian c-spine rules. Initially, in a pilot study, the mentioned correlation was evaluated, and afterwards the results of this phase was analyzed. Since the correlation was low, an educational training was planned for all the physicians in charge. Finally, the calculated correlations for before and after training were compared using SPSS version 21. Results: Before and after training, cervical spine X-ray was ordered for 98 (62.82% and 85 (54.48% patients, respectively. Accuracy of cervical spine X-ray orders, based on the standard clinical decision rules, increased from 100 (64.1% cases before training, to 143 (91.7% cases after training (p < 0.001. Area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve regarding the correlation also raised from 52 (95% confidence interval (CI: 43 – 61 to 92 (95% CI: 87 – 97. Conclusion: Teaching NEXUS and Canadian c-spine clinical decision rules plays a significant role in improving the correlation of cervical spine X-ray orders in multiple trauma patients with the existing standards.

  18. Cervical Spine Alignment and Motion in the Acute Management of Potential Catastrophic Cervical Spine Injuries in Sport

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erik E Swartz

    2008-01-01

    @@ The incidence of spinal cord injury in the United States is estimated to be 11,000 new cases each year[1].Sport participation constitutes the fourth most common cause[1](approximately 8. 7%) of these injuries overall but is the second most common cause for those under the age of 30[2]. The majority of all cervical spine injuries since 2000 have occurred in individuals between the ages of 16 and 30[1].

  19. Human Spine Morphometry In The Post-Somitic Phase : Study Of 9 Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Floch-Prigent, Patrice P.; Mandarim de Lacerda, Carlos A.; Hureau, Jacques; Hidden, Genevieve

    1986-07-01

    The volume of the spine was measured in 9 embryos from 8 to 31 mm crown-rump length (complete series of sagittal sections). Spine morphometry was performed by planimetrical point counting of horizontal projections on a 5 mm square grid. Total spine volume was integrated by multiplication of the thickness by the area : V = t ET=1 Si. The integrated volumes (including the base of the skull around the foramen magnum) were aligned on the diagram semi-logarithmic volume v.s. linear crown-rump length. The correlation between the spine volume and the total weight of the spine is very high (r=0,94 ; pspinal growth for this embryonic phase. In contrast with linear data, the morphometrical method applied to the spine volume has proved to be very effective in quantitative studies for embryos of the post-somitic phase.

  20. Regulation of spine density and morphology by IQGAP1 protein domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jausoro

    Full Text Available IQGAP1 is a scaffolding protein that regulates spine number. We now show a differential role for IQGAP1 domains in spine morphogenesis, in which a region of the N-terminus that promotes Arp2/3-mediated actin polymerization and branching stimulates spine head formation while a region that binds to Cdc42 and Rac is required for stalk extension. Conversely, IQGAP1 rescues spine deficiency induced by expression of dominant negative Cdc42 by stimulating formation of stubby spines. Together, our observations place IQGAP1 as a crucial regulator of spine number and shape acting through the N-Wasp Arp2/3 complex, as well as upstream and downstream of Cdc42.

  1. ApoE4 delays dendritic spine formation during neuron development and accelerates loss of mature spines in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Nwabuisi‑Heath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ε4 allele of the gene that encodes apolipoprotein E (APOE4 is the greatest genetic risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD, while APOE2 reduces AD risk, compared to APOE3. The mechanism(s underlying the effects of APOE on AD pathology remains unclear. In vivo, dendritic spine density is lower in APOE4-targeted replacement (APOE-TR mice compared with APOE2- and APOE3-TR mice. To investigate whether this apoE4-induced decrease in spine density results from alterations in the formation or the loss of dendritic spines, the effects of neuron age and apoE isoform on the total number and subclasses of spines were examined in long-term wild-type neurons co-cultured with glia from APOE2-, APOE3- and APOE4-TR mice. Dendritic spine density and maturation were evaluated by immunocytochemistry via the presence of drebrin (an actin-binding protein with GluN1 (NMDA receptor subunit and GluA2 (AMPA receptor subunit clusters. ApoE isoform effects were analyzed via a method previously established that identifies phases of spine formation (day-in-vitro, DIV10–18, maintenance (DIV18–21 and loss (DIV21–26. In the formation phase, apoE4 delayed total spine formation. During the maintenance phase, the density of GluN1+GluA2 spines did not change with apoE2, while the density of these spines decreased with apoE4 compared to apoE3, primarily due to the loss of GluA2 in spines. During the loss phase, total spine density was lower in neurons with apoE4 compared to apoE3. Thus, apoE4 delays total spine formation and may induce early synaptic dysfunction via impaired regulation of GluA2 in spines.

  2. Target and peripheral dose from radiation sector motions accompanying couch repositioning of patient coordinates with the Gamma Knife® Perfexion™

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GammaPlan™ treatment planning system (TPS) does not fully account for shutter dose when multiple shots are required to deliver a patient’s treatment. The unaccounted exposures to the target site and its periphery are measured in this study. The collected data are compared to a similar effect from the Gamma Knife® model 4C. A stereotactic head frame was attached to a Leksell® 16 cm diameter spherical phantom; using a fiducial-box, CT images of the phantom were acquired and registered in the TPS. Measurements give the relationship of measured dose to the number of repositions with the patient positioning system (PPS) and to the collimator size. An absorbed dose of 10 Gy to the 50% isodose line was prescribed to the target site and all measurements were acquired with an ionization chamber. Measured dose increases with frequency of repositioning and with collimator size. As the radiation sectors transition between the beam on and beam off states, the target receives more shutter dose than the periphery. Shutter doses of 3.53±0.04 and 1.59±0.04 cGy/reposition to the target site are observed for the 16 and 8 mm collimators, respectively. The target periphery receives additional dose that varies depending on its position relative to the target. The radiation sector motions for the Gamma Knife® Perfexion™ result in an additional dose due to the shutter effect. The magnitude of this exposure is comparable to that measured for the model 4C

  3. Internal fixation on the lower cervical spine – biomechanics and clinical practice of procedures and implants

    OpenAIRE

    Ulrich, Chr.; Arand, M.; Nothwang, J.

    2001-01-01

    The decision to opt for a particular internal fixation procedure of a traumatized unstable lower cervical spine should be based on analysis and implementation of scientific and clinical data on the biomechanics of the intact, the unstable and the implant-fixed spine. The following recommendations for surgical stabilization of the lower cervical spine seem, therefore, to be justified. Firstly, the surgical procedure should be to bring about decompression, realignment, and stability. Secondly, ...

  4. Correlation of histopathological findings and magnetic resonance imaging in the spine of patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    OpenAIRE

    Appel, Heiner; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Grozdanovic, Zarko; Ebhardt, Harald; Dreimann, Marc; Hempfing, Axel; Stein, Harald; Metz-Stavenhagen, Peter; Rudwaleit, Martin; Sieper, Joachim

    2006-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease which affects primarily the sacroiliac joints and the spine. In patients with active disease, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine shows areas of bone marrow edema, the histopathological equivalent of which is unknown. In this study we correlate inflammation in the spine of patients with AS as revealed by histological examination with bone marrow edema as detected by MRI. We have compared the histopathological findings of ...

  5. THE STRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SPINES FROM THE CACTUS OPUNTIA FICUS-INDICA

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfgang Gindl-Altmutter,; Jozef Keckes

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical properties and structure of cactus Opuntia ficus-indica spines were characterised in bending and by means of x-ray diffraction. Using spruce wood cell walls for reference, the modulus of elasticity of Opuntia cactus spines was high in absolute terms, but comparable when specific values were considered, which can be explained by similarities in the cell wall structure of both materials. Differently from the modulus of elasticity, the bending strength of cactus spines was unexpec...

  6. SSEP analysis in surgery of idiopathic scoliosis: the influence of spine deformity and surgical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Hausmann, Oliver; Min, Kan; Böni, Thomas; Erni, Thomas; Dietz, Volker; Curt, Armin

    2002-01-01

    The study was conducted to assess the possible impact of spine deformity in patients with idiopathic scoliosis (IS) on tibial nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (t-SSEPs) and the influence of spine correction upon postoperative SSEP recordings. In 61 consecutive patients undergoing 64 spinal instrumentations, 129 pre- and postoperative SSEPs were analyzed. The degree of spine deformity was assessed by the pre-operative Cobb angle of the major scoliotic curve. In a control group, reference ...

  7. Positioning patients for spine surgery: Avoiding uncommon position-related complications

    OpenAIRE

    Kamel, Ihab; Barnette, Rodger

    2014-01-01

    Positioning patients for spine surgery is pivotal for optimal operating conditions and operative-site exposure. During spine surgery, patients are placed in positions that are not physiologic and may lead to complications. Perioperative peripheral nerve injury (PPNI) and postoperative visual loss (POVL) are rare complications related to patient positioning during spine surgery that result in significant patient disability and functional loss. PPNI is usually due to stretch or compression of t...

  8. Cranial irradiation alters dendritic spine density and morphology in the hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayanabha Chakraborti

    Full Text Available Therapeutic irradiation of the brain is a common treatment modality for brain tumors, but can lead to impairment of cognitive function. Dendritic spines are sites of excitatory synaptic transmission and changes in spine structure and number are thought to represent a morphological correlate of altered brain functions associated with hippocampal dependent learning and memory. To gain some insight into the temporal and sub region specific cellular changes in the hippocampus following brain irradiation, we investigated the effects of 10 Gy cranial irradiation on dendritic spines in young adult mice. One week or 1 month post irradiation, changes in spine density and morphology in dentate gyrus (DG granule and CA1 pyramidal neurons were quantified using Golgi staining. Our results showed that in the DG, there were significant reductions in spine density at both 1 week (11.9% and 1 month (26.9% after irradiation. In contrast, in the basal dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons, irradiation resulted in a significant reduction (18.7% in spine density only at 1 week post irradiation. Analysis of spine morphology showed that irradiation led to significant decreases in the proportion of mushroom spines at both time points in the DG as well as CA1 basal dendrites. The proportions of stubby spines were significantly increased in both the areas at 1 month post irradiation. Irradiation did not alter spine density in the CA1 apical dendrites, but there were significant changes in the proportion of thin and mushroom spines at both time points post irradiation. Although the mechanisms involved are not clear, these findings are the first to show that brain irradiation of young adult animals leads to alterations in dendritic spine density and morphology in the hippocampus in a time dependent and region specific manner.

  9. The future of spine surgery: New horizons in the treatment of spinal disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemi, Noojan; Crew, Laura K.; Tredway, Trent L.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Methods: As with any evolving surgical discipline, it is difficult to predict the future of the practice and science of spine surgery. In the last decade, there have been dramatic developments in both the techniques as well as the tools employed in the delivery of better outcomes to patients undergoing such surgery. In this article, we explore four specific areas in spine surgery: namely the role of minimally invasive spine surgery; motion preservation; robotic-aided surgery an...

  10. Patients Immobilized with a Long Spine Board Rarely Have Unstable Thoracolumbar Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemency, Brian M; Bart, Joseph A; Malhotra, Abhigyan; Klun, Taylor; Campanella, Veronica; Lindstrom, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Most Emergency Medical Services (EMS) protocols require spine immobilization with both a cervical collar and long spine board for patients with suspected spine injuries. The goal of this research was to determine the prevalence of unstable thoracolumbar spine injuries among patients receiving prehospital spine immobilization: a 4-year retrospective review of adult subjects who received prehospital spine immobilization and were transported to a trauma center. Prehospital and hospital records were linked. Data was reviewed to determine if spine imaging was ordered, whether acute thoracolumbar fractures, dislocations, or subluxations were present. Thoracolumbar injuries were classified as unstable if operative repair was performed. Prehospital spine immobilization was documented on 5,593 unique adult subjects transported to the study hospital. A total of 5,423 (97.0%) prehospital records were successfully linked to hospital records. The subjects were 60.2% male, with a mean age of 40.6 (SD = 17.5) years old. An total of 5,286 (97.4%) subjects had sustained blunt trauma. Hospital providers ordered imaging to rule out spine injury in 2,782 (51.3%) cases. An acute thoracolumbar fracture, dislocation, or subluxation was present in 233 (4.3%) cases. An unstable injury was present in 29 (0.5%) cases. No unstable injuries were found among the 951 subjects who were immobilized following ground level falls. Hospital providers ordered at least one spine x-ray or CT in most patients, and a thoracolumbar imaging in half of all patients immobilized. Only 0.5% of patients who received prehospital spine immobilization had an unstable thoracolumbar spine injury. PMID:27002350

  11. Imaging of acute cervical spine trauma: when to obtain which modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbrich, Erika J; Carrino, John A; Sturzenegger, Matthias; Farshad, Mazda

    2013-09-01

    The current knowledge and evidence around the merits of different imaging modalities for the evaluation of cervical spine injuries are reviewed. The National Emergency X-Radiography Use Study, Canadian Cervical Spine rule, and American College of Radiology appropriateness criteria are reviewed and summarized. The advantages and disadvantages of available imaging modalities for selected cervical spine injury patterns are also illuminated to simplify the decision making on when to use which modality. PMID:24101178

  12. Primary Epidural Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor of the Lumbar Spine: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Woo Jung; Lee, Seung Hun; Joo, Kyung Bin [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paik, Seung Sam; Jun, Young Jin [Dept. of Pathology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Ho [Dept. of Pediatrics, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    A primitive neuroectodermal tumor (PNET) is a highly malignant tumor in children and young adults, and extremely rare in the spine. We report a case of a primary epidural peripheral PNET of the lumbar spine. The present extremely rare case of primary epidural peripheral PNET of the lumbar spine illustrates the unexpected occurrence and should be included in differential diagnoses for patients with spinal tumors.

  13. Implanted central venous catheter-related acute superior vena cava syndrome: management by metallic stent and endovascular repositioning of the catheter tip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qanadli, S.D.; Mesurolle, B.; Sissakian, J.F.; Chagnon, S.; Lacombe, P. [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Ambroise Pare, 92 - Boulogne (France)

    2000-08-01

    We describe a case of a 49-year-old woman with stage-IIIB lung adenocarcinoma who experienced an acute superior vena cava syndrome related to an implanted central venous catheter without associated venous thrombosis. The catheter was surgically implanted for chemotherapy. Superior vena cava syndrome appeared after the procedure and was due to insertion of the catheter through a subclinical stenosis of the superior vena cava. Complete resolution of the patient's symptoms was obtained using stent placement and endovascular repositioning of the catheter tip. (orig.)

  14. The Effects of Repositioning as a process of Rebranding in terms of Brand Equity, Corporate Identity, and Brand Image : A case study on Lidl

    OpenAIRE

    Stensson, David; Strömberg, Alexandra; Alfredsson, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Background:                 Brands are associated with certain elements, including name, logo and slogan. Being understood as major parts of all brands, changing these would be considered as a vital event. The term ‘rebranding’ is an umbrella term for describing the three following processes; changing name, changing the aesthetics of the brand, and/or repositioning. Although rebranding often results in success, the process of rebranding is challenging and risky, and it is important for firms ...

  15. The Relationship of Unemployment and Depression with History of Spine Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Walid, M Sami; Zaytseva, Nadezhda

    2011-01-01

    Background: Chronic back pain is a known risk factor for unemployment, disability, and depression. This paper discusses the interaction of unemployment, depression, and history of prior spine surgery.

  16. Isoflurane reversibly destabilizes hippocampal dendritic spines by an actin-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimcy Platholi

    Full Text Available General anesthetics produce a reversible coma-like state through modulation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. Recent evidence suggests that anesthetic exposure can also lead to sustained cognitive dysfunction. However, the subcellular effects of anesthetics on the structure of established synapses are not known. We investigated effects of the widely used volatile anesthetic isoflurane on the structural stability of hippocampal dendritic spines, a postsynaptic structure critical to excitatory synaptic transmission in learning and memory. Exposure to clinical concentrations of isoflurane induced rapid and non-uniform shrinkage and loss of dendritic spines in mature cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Spine shrinkage was associated with a reduction in spine F-actin concentration. Spine loss was prevented by either jasplakinolide or cytochalasin D, drugs that prevent F-actin disassembly. Isoflurane-induced spine shrinkage and loss were reversible upon isoflurane elimination. Thus, isoflurane destabilizes spine F-actin, resulting in changes to dendritic spine morphology and number. These findings support an actin-based mechanism for isoflurane-induced alterations of synaptic structure in the hippocampus. These reversible alterations in dendritic spine structure have important implications for acute anesthetic effects on excitatory synaptic transmission and synaptic stability in the hippocampus, a locus for anesthetic-induced amnesia, and have important implications for anesthetic effects on synaptic plasticity.

  17. THE STRUCTURE AND MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SPINES FROM THE CACTUS OPUNTIA FICUS-INDICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Gindl-Altmutter,

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical properties and structure of cactus Opuntia ficus-indica spines were characterised in bending and by means of x-ray diffraction. Using spruce wood cell walls for reference, the modulus of elasticity of Opuntia cactus spines was high in absolute terms, but comparable when specific values were considered, which can be explained by similarities in the cell wall structure of both materials. Differently from the modulus of elasticity, the bending strength of cactus spines was unexpectedly high both in absolute and in specific terms. The unique cellulose-arabinan composite structure of cactus spines, together with high cellulose crystallinity, may explain this finding.

  18. 2004年欧洲脊柱周(Spine Week)简介

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘少喻

    2004-01-01

    欧洲脊柱周于2004年5月30日~6月5日在葡萄牙波尔多举行。本次大会由六个学会的会议组成,分别是:①The International Society for the Study of the Lumbar Spine(ISSLS)。②Spine Society of Europe(SSE)。③Cervical Spine Research Society European Section(CSRS-E)。④Brazilian Spine

  19. [Algorithm of the diagnostics of trauma and degenerative diseases of the spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchedrenok, V V; Sebelev, K I; Anikeev, N V; Tiul'kin, O N; Kaurova, T A; Moguchaia, O V

    2011-01-01

    Clinico-radial data were compared in 583 patients with trauma and degenerative diseases of the spine. The clinico-diagnostic complex included radiography of the spine (round-up and functional), magnetic resonance imaging, computerized helical tomography of the spine with spondylometric measurements. Indices of the measurements of the cross-section area of the vertebral artery canal at the level of C3-C6 vertebrae and the volume of the intervertebral canal at different levels in health among men and women are presented. An algorithm of radiation diagnostics in pathology of the spine is proposed.

  20. Extracellular matrix control of dendritic spine and synapse structure and plasticity in adulthood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D Levy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines are the receptive contacts at most excitatory synapses in the central nervous system. Spines are dynamic in the developing brain, changing shape as they mature as well as appearing and disappearing as they make and break connections. Spines become much more stable in adulthood, and spine structure must be actively maintained to support established circuit function. At the same time, adult spines must retain some plasticity so their structure can be modified by activity and experience. As such, the regulation of spine stability and remodeling in the adult animal is critical for normal function, and disruption of these processes is associated with a variety of late onset diseases including schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s disease. The extracellular matrix (ECM, composed of a meshwork of proteins and proteoglycans, is a critical regulator of spine and synapse stability and plasticity. While the role of ECM receptors in spine regulation has been extensively studied, considerably less research has focused directly on the role of specific ECM ligands. Here, we review the evidence for a role of several brain ECM ligands and remodeling proteases in the regulation of dendritic spine and synapse formation, plasticity, and stability in adults.

  1. Development of inhalable hyaluronan/mannitol composite dry powders for flucytosine repositioning in local therapy of lung infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costabile, G; d'Angelo, I; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, R; Mitidieri, E; Pompili, B; Del Porto, P; Leoni, L; Visca, P; Miro, A; Quaglia, F; Imperi, F; Sorrentino, R; Ungaro, F

    2016-09-28

    Flucytosine (5-fluorocytosine, 5-FC) is a fluorinated analogue of cytosine currently approved for the systemic treatment of fungal infections, which has recently demonstrated a very promising antivirulence activity against the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we propose novel inhalable hyaluronic acid (HA)/mannitol composite dry powders for repositioning 5-FC in the local treatment of lung infections, including those affecting cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Different dry powders were produced in one-step by spray-drying. Powder composition and process conditions were selected after in depth formulation studies aimed at selecting the 5-FC/HA/mannitol formulation with convenient aerosolization properties and drug release profile in simulated lung fluids. The optimized 5-FC/HA/mannitol powder for inhalation (HyaMan_FC#3) was effectively delivered from different breath-activated dry powder inhalers (DPI) already available to CF patients. Nevertheless, the aerodynamic assessment of fine particles suggested that the developed formulation well fit with a low-resistance DPI. HyaMan_FC#3 inhibited the growth of the fungus Candida albicans and the production of the virulence factor pyoverdine by P. aeruginosa at 5-FC concentrations that did not affect the viability of both wild type (16HBE14o-) and CF (CFBE41o-) human bronchial epithelial cells. Finally, pharmacokinetics of HyaMan_FC#3 inhalation powder and 5-FC solution after intratracheal administration in rats were compared. In vivo results clearly demonstrated that, when formulated as dry powder, 5-FC levels in both bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung tissue were significantly higher and sustained over time as compared to those obtained with the 5-FC solution. Of note, when the same 5-FC amount was administered intravenously, no significant drug amount was found in the lung at each time point from the injection. To realize a 5-FC lung concentration similar to that obtained by using HyaMan_FC#3

  2. Therapeutic strategy for traumatic instability of subaxial cervical spine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Peng; LIANG Yu; GONG Yao-cheng; ZHENG Tao; ZHANG Xin-kai; WU Wen-jian

    2008-01-01

    Background A simple, safe and effective therapeutic strategy for traumatic instability of the subaxial cervical spine, as well as its prognostic assessment, is still controversial.Methods The therapeutic options for 83 patients of traumatic instability of the subaxial cervical spine, whose average age was 35 years, were determined, according to the Allen-Ferguson classification, general health and concomitant traumatic conditions, neurological function, position of compression materials, concomitant traumatic disc herniation/damage, concomitant locked-facet dislocation, the involved numbers and position, and the patients' economic conditions. An anterior, posterior or combination approach was used to decompress and reconstruct the cervical spine. No operations with an anterior-posterior-anterior approach were performed.Results The average follow-up was three years and nine months. Distraction-flexion and compression-flexion were the most frequent injury subtypes. There were 46, 28 and 9 cases of anterior, posterior and combination operations, respectively. The average score of the Japanese Orthopaedics Association, visual analog scale and American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA) motor index improved from 11.2, 7.8 and 53.5, respectively, before operation, to 15.3, 2.6 and 67.8, respectively, at final follow-up. For incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI), the average ASIA neurological function scale was improved by 1-2 levels. Patients with complete SCI had no neurological recovery, but recovery of nerve root function occurred to different extents. After surgery, radiological parameters improved to different extents. Fusion was achieved in all patients and 12 developed complications.Conclusions The best surgical strategy should be determined by the type of subaxial cervical injury, patients' general health, local pathological anatomy and neurological function.

  3. Spine growth and seismogenic faulting at Mt. Unzen, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornby, Adrian J.; Kendrick, Jackie E.; Lamb, Oliver D.; Hirose, Takehiro; De Angelis, Silvio; Aulock, Felix W.; Umakoshi, Kodo; Miwa, Takahiro; Henton De Angelis, Sarah; Wadsworth, Fabian B.; Hess, Kai-Uwe; Dingwell, Donald B.; Lavallée, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The concluding episode of activity during the recent eruption of Mt. Unzen (October 1994 to February 1995) was characterized by incremental spine extrusion, accompanied by seismicity. Analysis of the seismic record reveals the occurrence of two dominant long-period event families associated with a repeating, nondestructive source mechanism, which we attribute to magma failure and fault-controlled ascent. We obtain constraints on the slip rate and distance of faulting events within these families. That analysis is complemented by an experimental thermomechanical investigation of fault friction in Mt. Unzen dacitic dome rock using a rotary-shear apparatus at variable slip rates and normal stresses. A power density threshold is found at 0.3 MW m-2, above which frictional melt forms and controls the shear resistance to slip, inducing a deviation from Byerlee's frictional law. Homogenized experimentally generated pseudotachylytes have a similar final chemistry, thickness, and crystal content, facilitating the construction of a rheological model for particle suspensions. This is compared to the viscosity constrained from the experimental data, to assess the viscous control on fault dynamics. The onset of frictional melt formation during spine growth is constrained to depths below 300 m for an average slip event. This combination of experimental data, viscosity modeling, and seismic analysis offers a new description of material response during conduit plug flow and spine growth, showing that volcanic pseudotachylyte may commonly form and modify fault friction during faulting of dome rock. This model furthers our understanding of faulting and seismicity during lava dome formation and is applicable to other eruption modes.

  4. Idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine II: post-surgical pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of severe chronic pain in young people following surgery for the correction of curvatures of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is presented through two case histories. Effective treatment involved release of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) known to refer pain into the spine, and treatment of related fascia and joint dysfunction. The TrPs found to be contributing to spinal area pain were located in muscles at some distance from the spine rather than in the paraspinal muscles. Referred pain from these TrPs apparently accounted for pain throughout the base of the neck and thoracolumbar spine. Exploratory surgery was considered for one patient to address pain following rod placement but the second surgery became unnecessary when the pain was controlled with treatment of the myofascial pain and joint dysfunction. The other individual had both scoliosis and hyperkyphosis, had undergone primary scoliosis surgery, and subsequently underwent a second surgery to remove hardware in an attempt to address her persistent pain following the initial surgery (and because of dislodged screws). The second surgery did not, however, reduce her pain. In both cases these individuals, with severe chronic pain following scoliosis corrective surgery, experienced a marked decrease of pain after myofascial treatment. As will be discussed below, despite the fact that a significant minority of individuals who have scoliosis corrective surgery are thought to require a second surgery, and despite the fact that pain is the most common reason leading to such revision surgery, myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) had apparently not previously been considered as a possible factor in their pain.

  5. Pediatric cervical spine marrow T2 hyperintensity: a systematic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gefen, Ron [Cooper University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Candem, NJ (United States); Schweitzer, Mark E. [The Ottawa Hospital and University of Ottawa, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Ottawa (Canada); Shabshin, Nogah [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Tel-HaShomer (Israel); Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2011-08-15

    Hyperintense areas of vertebral bone marrow on fluid-sensitive sequences are at times seen on pediatric MRI of the cervical spine in children without suspicious clinical conditions to explain marrow pathology. Although these likely have no clinical significance they may be mistaken for pathology. The purpose of this study is to systematically evaluate the locations and patterns of marrow T2 hyperintensity in the pediatric cervical spine, with respect to age. At 1.5 T, the C2 through T3 vertebrae of 82 children aged 0-17 years without clinically suspicious marrow abnormality were retrospectively reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists, who were blinded to patients' age. The frequency, intensity, and location of the foci of marrow T2 hyperintensity were recorded for each vertebra on a 12-point scoring system and were correlated with the patients' age. Foci of marrow hyperintensity were seen in 46/82 (56.1%) patients and in 241/734 (32.8%) vertebrae. Foci were most common in C4 (42% of patients), C5 (45.7%), and C6 (37.8%). The foci of T2 hyperintensity were more common inferiorly (188 foci) and adjacent to the anterior cortex (123). Analysis revealed no significant correlation between age and marrow score (Spearman = -0.147, P = 0.19), but did find a trend towards increased presence of marrow T2 hyperintensity in the ages of most rapid growth, 8-14 years (81.5% of patients). Vertebral body marrow T2 hyperintensity was most common endosteally and in the mid-cervical spine with a slight peak in adolescence. We therefore believe that these pediatric cervical marrow changes may be related to rapid bone growth at the point of maximal kyphotic stress. (orig.)

  6. Thoracic spine disc-related abnormalities: longitudinal MR imaging assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girard, Charles J.; Schweitzer, Mark E.; Morrison, William B.; Parellada, Joan A. [TJUH Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Carrino, J.A. [Department of Radiology ASB-1, Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, L1, Room 002B, 75 Francis Street, MA 02115, Boston (United States)

    2004-04-01

    To describe and characterize the temporal changes in disc-related disorders of the thoracic spine using MR imaging. A retrospective longitudinal cohort study was carried out of 40 patients with two sequential thoracic spine MR images at variable intervals. The images were assessed for baseline presence of, new incidence of and changes in disc herniation, degenerative disc disease, endplate marrow signal alteration and Schmorl nodes. The range of follow-up was 4-149 weeks. Baseline presence was: disc herniation, 10% (49/480); degenerative disc disease, 14% (66/480); endplate marrow signal alteration, 2.3% (11/480); Schmorl nodes 9.6% (46/480). Most pre-existing lesions tended to remain unchanged. Herniations showed the most change, tending to improve in 27%. New incidence was: disc herniation, 1.5% (7/480), degenerative disc disease, 2% (10/480); endplate marrow signal alteration, 1.6% (8/480); Schmorl nodes, 2.1% (10/480). Disc degeneration was first visible at an 11-week interval and once established almost never changed over many weeks to months. Endplate signal alterations (Modic changes) were uncommon. Schmorl nodes show no change from baseline for up to 2 1/2 years. All findings predominated in the lower intervertebral levels from T6 to T10. The most prevalent thoracic spine disc-related findings are degeneration and herniation. Disc herniations predominate in the lower segments and are a dynamic phenomenon. Disc degeneration can be rapidly evolving but tends to remain unchanged after occurrence. Endplate marrow signal changes were an uncommon manifestation of thoracic disc disease. Schmorl nodes showed the least change over time. (orig.)

  7. Idiopathic scoliosis: the tethered spine II: post-surgical pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte Ferguson, Lucy

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of severe chronic pain in young people following surgery for the correction of curvatures of idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is presented through two case histories. Effective treatment involved release of myofascial trigger points (TrPs) known to refer pain into the spine, and treatment of related fascia and joint dysfunction. The TrPs found to be contributing to spinal area pain were located in muscles at some distance from the spine rather than in the paraspinal muscles. Referred pain from these TrPs apparently accounted for pain throughout the base of the neck and thoracolumbar spine. Exploratory surgery was considered for one patient to address pain following rod placement but the second surgery became unnecessary when the pain was controlled with treatment of the myofascial pain and joint dysfunction. The other individual had both scoliosis and hyperkyphosis, had undergone primary scoliosis surgery, and subsequently underwent a second surgery to remove hardware in an attempt to address her persistent pain following the initial surgery (and because of dislodged screws). The second surgery did not, however, reduce her pain. In both cases these individuals, with severe chronic pain following scoliosis corrective surgery, experienced a marked decrease of pain after myofascial treatment. As will be discussed below, despite the fact that a significant minority of individuals who have scoliosis corrective surgery are thought to require a second surgery, and despite the fact that pain is the most common reason leading to such revision surgery, myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) had apparently not previously been considered as a possible factor in their pain. PMID:25440198

  8. Pediatric cervical spine marrow T2 hyperintensity: a systematic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyperintense areas of vertebral bone marrow on fluid-sensitive sequences are at times seen on pediatric MRI of the cervical spine in children without suspicious clinical conditions to explain marrow pathology. Although these likely have no clinical significance they may be mistaken for pathology. The purpose of this study is to systematically evaluate the locations and patterns of marrow T2 hyperintensity in the pediatric cervical spine, with respect to age. At 1.5 T, the C2 through T3 vertebrae of 82 children aged 0-17 years without clinically suspicious marrow abnormality were retrospectively reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists, who were blinded to patients' age. The frequency, intensity, and location of the foci of marrow T2 hyperintensity were recorded for each vertebra on a 12-point scoring system and were correlated with the patients' age. Foci of marrow hyperintensity were seen in 46/82 (56.1%) patients and in 241/734 (32.8%) vertebrae. Foci were most common in C4 (42% of patients), C5 (45.7%), and C6 (37.8%). The foci of T2 hyperintensity were more common inferiorly (188 foci) and adjacent to the anterior cortex (123). Analysis revealed no significant correlation between age and marrow score (Spearman = -0.147, P = 0.19), but did find a trend towards increased presence of marrow T2 hyperintensity in the ages of most rapid growth, 8-14 years (81.5% of patients). Vertebral body marrow T2 hyperintensity was most common endosteally and in the mid-cervical spine with a slight peak in adolescence. We therefore believe that these pediatric cervical marrow changes may be related to rapid bone growth at the point of maximal kyphotic stress. (orig.)

  9. Repositioning the G-8

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Following the recent high-level Group of Eight (G-8) summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, Yuan Zongze, Vice Director of the China International Affairs Research Institute, commented on China's relations with the G-8 in an article in People's Daily. He argued that China is unlikely to join this exclusive club of industrialized nations in the short term, but may establish closer contacts with it In an earlier article, he analyzed the background against which the summit was held, contending that the G-8 has be...

  10. Primitive neuroectodermal tumor of lumbar spine: case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Shi-sheng; ZHAO Jie; HAN Kai-wei; HOU Tie-sheng; Nazakat Hussain; ZHANG Shun-ming

    2007-01-01

    @@ Primitive neuroectodermal tumors (PNETs), derived from the primitive neural crest, are highly malignant and mainly exist in the central nervous system (CNS),chest wall, lower extremities, trunk, kidney, and orbit but rarely in the spine. Though multidisciplinary treatments have been well established as the standard therapy for intracranial PNETs, little is known about the optimal treatment strategy and therapeutic results for intraspinal PNETs. The following report illustrates the operative and non-operative management of an extradural PNET at the level of L5 in a young girl.

  11. Endovascular treatment of spine and spinal cord lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenstein, A. (New York Univ. - Bellevue Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Neurosurgery); Lasjaunias, P. (New York Univ., NY (United States) Hopital de Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France))

    1992-01-01

    Completing this comprehensive series on endovascular interventional angiography, Volume 5 focuses on the vascular abnormalities of the spine and spinal cord. It is based on the detailed functional vascular anatomy described in Volume 3 and the principles and function of endovascular treatment described in Volumes 1-4. As in the companion volumes, the unique approach gives view of the disease itself, its anatomical features and its clinical presentation. The technical aspects of the interventional or endovascular neuroradiology are built upon the solid analysis of the disease and its angioarchitecture. The recent developments in endovascular procedures, such as aneurysm treatment, angioplasty, and vascular recanalizations, are reviewed. (orig.). 118 figs. in 442 separate illustrations

  12. Cervical spine and crystal-associated diseases: imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feydy, Antoine; Chevrot, Alain; Drape, Jean-Luc [Hopital Cochin, Service de Radiologie B, Paris Cedex 14 (France); Liote, Frederic [Hopital Lariboisiere, Federation de Rhumatologie, Paris (France); Carlier, Robert [Hopital Raymond Poincare, Radiologie, Garches (France)

    2006-02-01

    The cervical spine may be specifically involved in crystal-associated arthropathies. In this article, we focus on the three common crystals and diseases: hydroxyapatite crystal deposition disease, calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) deposition disease, and monosodium urate crystals (gout). The cervical involvement in crystal-associated diseases may provoke a misleading clinical presentation with acute neck pain, fever, or neurological symptoms. Imaging allows an accurate diagnosis in typical cases with calcific deposits and destructive lesions of the discs and joints. Most of the cases are related to CPPD or hydroxyapatite crystal deposition; gout is much less common. (orig.)

  13. [MR investigation of spinal cord herniation in the thoracic spine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenéz, József; Barsi, Péter; Várallyay, György; Bobest, Mátyás; Veres, Róbert

    2002-05-20

    Transdural herniation of the spinal cord is thought to be previously extremely rare and very often misdiagnosed. Possible reasons may be iatrogenic and traumatic or in about one third of cases it may be unknown, where the probable origin might be a congenital dural defect. The pathology may show characteristic and misleading MR patterns of the thoracic spine, emphasising the importance of these patterns. This anomaly can lead to progressive Brown-Sequard syndrome. Surgical intervention, consisting the repair of the dural defect may result in improvement or even complete regression of the neurologic deficits.

  14. Spinal CT scan, 1. Cervical and thoracic spines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi (Aichi Medical Univ. (Japan))

    1982-01-01

    Methods of CT of the cervical and thoracic spines were explained, and normal CT pictures of them were described. Spinal CT was evaluated in comparison with other methods in various spinal diseases. Plain CT revealed stenosis due to spondylosis or ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament and hernia of intervertebral disc. CT took an important role in the diagnosis of spinal cord tumors with calcification and destruction of the bone. CT scan in combination with other methods was also useful for the diagnosis of spinal injuries, congenital anomalies and infections.

  15. Synovial cysts of the lumbar spine; Cistos sinoviais lombares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Ana Claudia Ferreira; Machado, Marcio Martins [Goias Univ., Goiania, GO (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Hospital das Clinicas]. E-mail: anaclaudiaferreira@ig.com.br; Figueiredo, Marco Antonio Junqueira [Hospital Sirio-Libanes, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Servico de Tomografia Computadorizada; Cerri, Giovanni Guido [Sao Paulo Univ., SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia

    2002-10-01

    Intraspinal synovial cysts of the lumbar spine are rare and commonly associated with osteoarthritis of the facet joints, particularly at level L4-L5. Symptoms are uncommon and may include low-back pain or sciatica. These cysts are accurately diagnosed by using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Diagnosis is essential for the correct management of the cysts. Several treatment options are available including rest and immobilization, computed tomography guided corticosteroid injection, and surgery in patients that are nonresponsive to other treatment methods. (author)

  16. Taxonomy Icon Data: three-spined stickleback [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available three-spined stickleback Gasterosteus aculeatus Chordata/Vertebrata/Pisciformes Gasteros...teus_aculeatus_L.png Gasterosteus_aculeatus_NL.png Gasterosteus_aculeatus_S.png Gasterosteus_aculeatus_...NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=L http://biosciencedbc.jp/t...axonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=NL http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxon...omy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Gasterosteus+aculeatus&t=NS ...

  17. Spine and spinal cord vascular malformations: pictorial essay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spine and spinal cord vascular malformations are an uncommon cause of acute, subacute, episodic or progressive myelopathy. They affect all age groups and constitute important clinical entities because of the high morbidity and even mortality associated with them if they are left untreated. These malformations are classified according to their anatomic location and angioarchitecture (Table 1). Today, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the initial radiologic screening procedure of choice for acute or progressive myelopathy. This pictorial essay reviews the radiologic work-up and the imaging features of spinal vascular malformations, as well as the clinical presentation, the probable pathophysiology and the different treatment modalities. (author)

  18. Multisegmental pneumatocysts of the lumbar spine mimic osteolytic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steingruber, I.E.; Buchberger, W. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Innsbruck (Austria); Bach, C.M.; Wimmer, C.; Nogler, M. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Innsbruck (Austria)

    2001-05-01

    Circumscribed radiolucencies within the vertebral bones can be due to a variety of changes including benign and malignant tumours or tumour-like lesions. Radiolucencies due to degenerative intraosseous pneumatocyst are very uncommon but have to be taken into the differential diagnosis in well-circumscribed lytic lesions of the vertebral bodies. We describe the first case of multisegmental pneumatocysts in the lumbar spine mimicking osteolytic lesions. On computed tomography, the air-equivalent attenuation values of the lesions and the close vicinity to the degenerated vertebral endplates with vacuum phenomenon led to the correct diagnosis. (orig.)

  19. Analysis of the Functional Independence Measure Value of Cervical Spine Injury Patients with Conservative Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zafrullah Arifin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Functional Independence Measure Value of Cervical Spine Injury Patients with Conservative Management. Cervical spine injury is one of the most common spinal cord injuries in trauma patients. From 100,000 spinal cord injury cases reported in the United States of America (2008, sixty seven percent involve cervical spine injury. American Spinal Cord Injury Association (ASIA impairment score is used as an initial assessment but not enough attention prognostic outcome of these patients was paid to. The objective of this study is to analyze the value of functional independence measure (FIM cervical spine injury patients with conservative management and its correlation with age, sex, type of trauma, onset of trauma, cervical abnormalities, type of cervical spine lesion and ASIA impairment score. A prospective cohort study was performed to all patients with cervical spine injury treated inNeurosurgery Department of Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital Bandung that fullfiled the inclusion criteria. The subjects were classified based on age, sex, single/multiple trauma, acute /chronic, cervical abnormalities, complete/incomplete lesion and ASIA impairment score. The FIM examination was performed in Outpatient clinic of Neurosurgery. T-test and chi-square test was done to analyze the data. There were 17 cervical spine injury patients treated in Neurosurgery Department of Dr. Hasan Sadikin Hospital during April 2009–April 2010. The average FIM value of cervical spine injury in those patients is 4+ 1.63 by cohort prospective study. There were no correlation between FIM value with age, sex, type of trauma, onset of trauma and cervical abnormalities. Significant correlations were found between FIM value with type of cervical spine lesion and ASIA impairment score in cervical spine patients. Type of cervical spine lesion and ASIA impairment score have significant correlation with FIM value of patients in 6 months after cervical injury.

  20. Contributions for repositioning a regional strategy for Healthy Municipalities, Cities and Communities (HM&C): results of a pan-American survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meresman, Sergio; Rice, Marilyn; Vizzotti, Carlos; Frassia, Romina; Vizzotti, Pablo; Akerman, Marco

    2010-09-01

    This article presents the results of the 1st Regional Survey of Healthy Municipalities, Cities and Communities (HM&C) carried out in 2008 by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) and ISALUD University of Argentina. It discusses the responses obtained from 12 countries in the Americas Region. Key informants in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, and Uruguay were selected and encouraged to answer the survey, while informants from Canada and Honduras answered voluntarily and were included in this analysis. The discussion of the results of the Survey provides insight into the current status of HM&C in the Region and suggests key topics for repositioning the Regional strategy relative to: (1) the conceptual identity and tools for HM&C; (2) challenging areas in the implementation process (scale, legal framework, and development of capacities); (3) related strategies and participatory processes such as the ways citizen empowerment in governance is supported; (4) the need to monitor and assess the impact of the HM&C strategy on the health and quality of life of the populations involved; and (5) the need for developing a strategic research and training agenda. The analysis and discussion of these results aims to provide useful input for repositioning the strategy in the Region and contributing to the emergence of a second generation of concepts and tools capable of meeting the developing priorities and needs currently faced by the HM&C strategy. PMID:20532989

  1. The use of piezoelectric surgery to lateralize the inferior alveolar nerve with simultaneous implant placement and immediate buccal cortical bone repositioning: a prospective clinical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vicente, J C; Peña, I; Braña, P; Hernández-Vallejo, G

    2016-07-01

    A prospective study was conducted to assess a variation of inferior alveolar nerve (IAN) lateralization. This study included 13 patients. An osteotomy was made with a piezoelectric device, and the IAN bundle was moved buccally. Dental implants were then inserted medial to the nerve bundle, and the inner surface of the buccal cortical bone plate was shaped to reduce its thickness. Finally, the bone plate was repositioned to restore the original shape and contour of the mandible. Neurosensory examinations of the lower lip and chin were performed using three tests: light touch, pain, and two-point discrimination. Three months after surgery, the function of the IAN was judged to be completely restored at 11 of the 13 surgical sites. Differences in the tests comparing the operated and non-operated sides were not significant. No implants were lost, and all patients were satisfied with the result. Although IAN lateralization in conjunction with dental implant placement is rarely indicated, the use of a piezoelectric device to perform a buccal osteotomy with final repositioning of the buccal cortical plate over the bony defect contributes to the recovery of the contour and shape of the mandible, without impairment of IAN function. PMID:26897328

  2. POSTERIOR STABILISATION OF BURST FRACTURES OF DORSOLUMBAR SPINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukharjee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Injury to spinal cord and spinal column are serious injuries causing death and disability in the young adult population. Spinal injuries have the lowest functional outcomes and lowest rates of return to work after injury of all major organ system. Although the incidence is relatively small, the impact is enormous as measured in terms of catastrophic physical disability, psychological consequences, and the tremendous cost and the demands on the health care system. With advances in medical technology and the increased experience with large number of spinal injuries, the impetus for the development of programmatic approaches in the management of these devastated victims was provided. The management of spinal injuries is continuously evolving. Many different approaches exist in the treatment of these patients; the comprehensive of spinal cord injuries, multidisciplinary speciality approaches which include orthopaedic surgeon, neurosurgeon, urologist, improvement and better quality of life. METHODS Pre-Operative Evaluation: Mode of injury, fracture level, Magerl’s type, preoperative neurologic status, pain experience, sagittal index, post-operative neurologic recovery, vertebral body compression ratio, Cobb’s angle, complications and rehabilitation were studied and compared with the other studies. Pre-operative MRI was done mandatorily in each case. Surgical Procedure: Under general anaesthesia through posterior midline approach to the spine, we exposed posterior elements of vertebrae one above and one below the fractured vertebra under image intensifier control, we inserted pedicle screws into the pedicles of normal vertebra above and below the fractured vertebra. [1] By compression and distraction manoeuvres, also by gentle manipulative manoeuvres we reduced the retropulsed, translated vertebrae, to achieve near anatomical restoration. We used Cotrel-Dubousset pedicle screw instrumentation for posterior spinal fusion one level above

  3. History of spine biomechanics: part I--the pre-Greco-Roman, Greco-Roman, and medieval roots of spine biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naderi, Sait; Andalkar, Niteen; Benzel, Edward C

    2007-02-01

    The roots of spine biomechanics reside in the Antiquity and the Medieval and Renaissance periods. A review of historical treatises reveals detailed information regarding this often historically neglected discipline. Ancient medical, philosophical, and physical documents were reviewed, as they pertained to the historical foundation of spine biomechanics. These included medical case reports and observations of nature and motion by ancient philosophers and scientists. These documents heavily influenced the portion of the scientific literature that we now regard as "spine biomechanics" up through the Renaissance. The focus of Part I of this two-part series is placed on the ancient and medieval biomechanics-related literature and on associated literature that influenced the development of the field of modern spine biomechanics.

  4. Sea Urchin Spines as a Model-System for Permeable, Light-Weight Ceramics with Graceful Failure Behavior. Part I. Mechanical Behavior of Sea Urchin Spines under Compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. Presser; S. Schultheiβ; C. Berthold; K. G. Nickel

    2009-01-01

    The spines of pencil and lance urchins Heterocentrotus mammillatus and Phyllacanthus imperialis were studied as a model of light-weight material with high impact resistance. The complex and variable skeleton construction ("stereom") of body and spines of sea urchins consists of highly porous Mg-bearing calcium carbonate. This basically brittle material with pronounced single-crystal cleavage does not fracture by spontaneous catastrophic device failure but by graceful failure over the range of tens of millimeter of bulk compression instead. This was observed in bulk compression tests and blunt indentation experiments on regular, infiltrated and latex coated sea urchin spine segments. Microstructural characterization was carried out using X-ray computer tomography, optical and scanning electron microscopy. The behavior is interpreted to result from the hierarchic structure of sea urchin spines from the macroscale down to the nanoscale. Guidelines derived from this study see ceramics with layered porosity as a possible biomimetic construction for appropriate applications.

  5. COMPARATIVE RETROSPECTIVE STUDY ON ANAESTHESIA APPROACHES FOR LUMBAR SPINE SURGERY

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    Rangalakshmi S

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE Lumbar spinal surgeries have been performed with either spinal or general anaesthesia. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the superiority of either spinal or general anaesthesia on lumbar spine surgery. METHODS After approval of institutional ethical committee, we retrospectively analysed 270 patients (ASA I and II undergoing surgery of lumbar spine from 2009 to 2015 by one surgeon. Of these 150 patients underwent general anaesthesia with controlled ventilation, 120 patients were offered spinal anaesthesia with conscious sedation. Patient records were reviewed to obtain demographic features, type of anaesthesia, baseline heart rate, mean arterial pressure, intraoperative maximum heart rate, mean arterial pressure, duration of surgery, amount of intravenous fluids, intraoperative blood loss, incidence of perioperative complications such as bleeding, nausea, vomiting, hypotension, bradycardia, and postoperative analgesic consumption. RESULTS Patient characteristics including baseline/intraoperative mean arterial pressure and heart rate values did not differ between groups. However, the spinal anaesthesia group experienced significantly shorter durations in the operating room and had a lower incidence of nausea, vomiting. Analgesic consumptions in general anaesthesia group was significantly higher than in spinal anaesthesia group. CONCLUSION The present study revealed that spinal anaesthesia is a safe and effective alternative to general anaesthesia for patients undergoing single level or two level lumbar laminectomy, discectomy, or even instrumentation below L2 level and has the advantage of decreased nausea, antiemetic, analgesic requirements, and fewer complications. It also ensures better postoperative recovery when compared to general anaesthesia

  6. Dural ectasia and conventional radiography in the Marfan lumbosacral spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, N.U. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore (United States); Johns Hopkins Outpatient Center, Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Baltimore, MD (United States); Nallamshetty, L.; Ahn, U.M.; Buchowski, J.M.; Kebaish, K.M.; Sponseller, P.D. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore (United States); Rose, P.S. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore (United States); National Human Genome Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Garrett, E.S. [Dept. of Oncology, Division of Biostatistics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Objective. To determine how well conventional radiographic findings can predict the presence of dural ectasia in Marfan patients.Design and patients. Twelve Marfan patients without dural ectasia and 21 Marfan patients with dural ectasia were included in the study. Five radiographic measurements were made of the lumbosacral spine: interpediculate distance, scalloping value, sagittal canal diameter, vertebral body width, and transverse process width.Results. The following measurements were significantly larger in patients with dural ectasia: interpediculate distances at L3-L4 levels (P<0.03); scalloping values at the L1 and L5 levels (P<0.05); sagittal diameters of the vertebral canal at L5-S1 (P<0.03); transverse process to width ratios at L2 (P<0.03). Criteria were developed for diagnosis of dural ectasia in Marfan patients. These included presence of one of the following: interpediculate distance at L4 >38.0 mm, sagittal diameter at S1 >18.0 mm, or scalloping value at L5 >5.5 mm.Conclusion. Dural ectasia in Marfan syndrome is commonly associated with several osseous changes that are observable on conventional radiographs of the lumbosacral spine. Conventional radiography can detect dural ectasia in patients with Marfan syndrome with a very high specificity (91.7%) but a low sensitivity (57.1%). (orig.)

  7. SPINET: A Parallel Computing Approach to Spine Simulations

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    Peter G. Kropf

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Research in scientitic programming enables us to realize more and more complex applications, and on the other hand, application-driven demands on computing methods and power are continuously growing. Therefore, interdisciplinary approaches become more widely used. The interdisciplinary SPINET project presented in this article applies modern scientific computing tools to biomechanical simulations: parallel computing and symbolic and modern functional programming. The target application is the human spine. Simulations of the spine help us to investigate and better understand the mechanisms of back pain and spinal injury. Two approaches have been used: the first uses the finite element method for high-performance simulations of static biomechanical models, and the second generates a simulation developmenttool for experimenting with different dynamic models. A finite element program for static analysis has been parallelized for the MUSIC machine. To solve the sparse system of linear equations, a conjugate gradient solver (iterative method and a frontal solver (direct method have been implemented. The preprocessor required for the frontal solver is written in the modern functional programming language SML, the solver itself in C, thus exploiting the characteristic advantages of both functional and imperative programming. The speedup analysis of both solvers show very satisfactory results for this irregular problem. A mixed symbolic-numeric environment for rigid body system simulations is presented. It automatically generates C code from a problem specification expressed by the Lagrange formalism using Maple.

  8. Complications of the anterior approach to the cervical spine

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    Marcelo Lemos Vieira da Cunha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the complications of anterior approach to the cervical spine in patients who underwent cervical arthrodesis with instrumentation. METHODS: Prospective and descriptive study was conducted from January 2009 to April 2010. All patients who underwent arthrodesis of the cervical spine by anterior approach were included, regardless the diagnosis. Access was made by the anterior approach on the right side. We evaluated the number of operated levels (1, 2 or 3 levels and, the type of procedure performed: discectomy and placement of cage and plate (D+C+P, discectomy with placement of a cage (D+C or corpectomy with placement of cage and plate (C+C+P. All complications related to surgical approach were reported. RESULTS: We studied 34 patients, 70% male. The average age was 50 years and mean follow-up was 8 months. Eighteen percent of patients had complications, distributed as follows: dysphasia (33% and dysphonic (67%. Among patients who developed complications, most underwent to D+C+P (83% and no complications were found in patients where no cervical plate was used. Regarding levels, both complications were identified in patients operated to one or two levels. However, in patients operated on three levels, only dysphonia was identified. CONCLUSION: The most frequent complication was dysphonia. Patients who presented more complications were those undergoing discectomy and fusion with cage and anterior cervical plate. All cases of dysphonia were in this group. The number of accessible levels does not seem to have affected the incidence of complications.

  9. MR distinction between multiple myeloma and metastasis involving the spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To differentiate multiple myeloma from metastasis involving the spine at MR imaging. Twenty-five patients with multiple myeloma and 37 with vertebral metastasis were included in this study. MR images were retrospectively analyzed with regard to imfiltration and enhancement patterns, signa. intensity, the involvement of three consecutive vertebrae, the number of lesions within one vertebra, and paraspinal and epidural masses. Using a 1.5-T imager, we obtained sagittal and axial, unenhanced and enhanced T1-weighted images, and fast spin-echo images. For statistical analysis, Fisher's exact test was used. All cases of multiple myeloma and metastasis showed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, and there were no significant differences in signal intensity on T1-weighted images, and there were no significant differences in signal intensities or enhancement patterns.Infilration and enhancement patterns were classified as focal (52% in multiple myeloma vs 68% in metastasis, p>0.05), diffuse (32% vs 32%, p>0.05) or salt and pepper (16% vs 0%, p0.05), isointensity (36% vs 3%. p0.05). Paraspinal and epidural masses played little part. The salt and pepper infiltration pattern, the presence of more than five lesions within one vertebra, and the involvement of more than three consecutive vertebrae were useful MR findings for differentiation between multiple myeloma and metastasis involving the spine. In most cases, hjowever, it is difficult to distinguish between the two conditions

  10. Spine Shape Predicts Vertebral Fractures in Postmenopausal Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Bruijne, Marleen; Pettersen, P.C.; A. Ghosh;

    2008-01-01

    of fragility fractures in the spine. The study included 568 elderly women of whom 455 maintained skeletal integrity during the mean observation period of 4.8 years and 113 sustained at least one vertebral fracture in the same period. At baseline, none of the women had experienced a previous osteoporotic...... fracture, and the two groups were not significantly different in terms of age (66.2 ± 0.2 vs. 66.1 ± 0.4), spine BMD (0.77 ± 0.004 vs. 0.76 ± 0.008), body weight (64.7 ± 0.4 vs. 64.6 ± 0.8), height (160.6 ± 0.3 vs. 161 ± 0.5), and number of years since menopause. A radiologist annotated the corner points...... and mid points of the vertebral end plates of each vertebra from L5 to T4 on digitized lateral radiographs taken at the baseline visit. These points together describe a combination of factors characterizing the spinal shape, including the shape and the size of individual vertebral bodies...

  11. Thickening of spine ligamentum flavum and facet tropism

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    Paulo Roberto Appolonio

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the thickening of the ligamentum flavum (LF and its correlation with facet tropism and its severity at different levels of the spine. METHOD: This retrospective study was performed with patients with chronic back pain consecutively admitted to a specialized spinal surgery service between January 2012 and January 2013. All patients underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI to measure the thickness of the LF and facet tropism severity (severe, moderate or absent according to the spine levels (L3 -L4, L4-L5, L5-S1. The association between the thickness of LF and facet tropism was analyzed. RESULTS: During the study period, 98 consecutive patients were enrolled with a mean age of 53.6 years, most women (59.2%. There was no significant difference between the thicknesses of the ligament and the presence of tropism in different spinal levels (p > 0.05. The thickness of LF was significantly associated with the severity of tropism only in L5-S1 level (p < 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that there is a positive relationship between severe facet tropism and increased thickness of the LF in the L5-S1 level.

  12. Crash Simulator: Brain-and-Spine Injury Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancevic, Vladimir G.; Reid, Darryn J.

    2015-11-01

    Recently, the first author has proposed a new coupled loading-rate hypothesis as a unique cause of both brain and spinal injuries, which states that they are both caused by a Euclidean jolt, an impulsive loading that strikes head and spine (or, any other part of the human body)- in several coupled degrees-of-freedom simultaneously. Injury never happens in a single direction only, nor is it ever caused by a static force. It is always an impulsive translational plus rotational force. The Euclidean jolt causes two basic forms of brain, spine and other musculo-skeletal injuries: (i) localized translational dislocations; and (ii) localized rotational disclinations. In the present Chapter, we first review this unique mechanics of a general human mechanical injury, and then describe how it can be predicted and controlled by a crash simulator toolbox. This rigorous Matlab toolbox has been developed using an existing thirdparty toolbox DiffMan, for accurately solving differential equations on smooth manifolds and mechanical Lie groups. The present crash simulator toolbox performs prediction/control of brain and spinal injuries within the framework of the Euclidean group SE(3) of rigid motions in our natural 3-dimensional space.

  13. Hyperlipidemia and statins affect neurological outcome in lumbar spine injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Wu-Fu; Liu, Shih-Wei; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Lin, Feng-Shu; Chen, Li-Fu; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chen, Yu-Chun; Liu, Laura; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich; Lo, Su-Shun

    2015-01-05

    The disabling pathophysiologic effects of lipid and neuroprotective effects of statins have recently been demonstrated for acute spinal cord injuries in animal models. This large scale population-based study aimed to investigate the effect hyperlipidemia and the use of statins in patients with lumbar spine injury. The National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan was used to identify patients with lumbar spine injury. A total of 2844 patients were grouped into three: no hyperlipidemia, hyperlipidemia using low-dose of statins (≤90 of the defined daily dosage (DDD)), and severe hyperlipidemia using high-dose of statins (>90 DDD). A Cox multiple regression model was used to compare the incidence rates of disability among the three groups. The results showed that patients with hyperlipidemia appeared a higher risk of permanent disability (adjusted HR = 1.38, p = 0.28). In subgroup analysis, patients with severe hyperlipidemia had a higher risk of disability (adjusted HR = 3.1, p hyperlipidemia using low-dose statins had a similar risk of permanently disability (adjusted HR = 0.83, p = 0.661). Hyperlipidemia adversely affected the neurological outcomes of lumbar spinal injury. Statins may have the potential to reverse this higher risk of disability. However, this beneficiary effect of statins only existed in patients using a lower dose (≤90 DDD).

  14. In vivo flexion/extension of the normal cervical spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dvorak, J; Panjabi, M M; Novotny, J E; Antinnes, J A

    1991-11-01

    Twenty-two women (age range 25-49 years, average 30.9 years) and twenty-two men (age range 23-42 years, average 31.6 years), all healthy and asymptomatic, underwent passive flexion/extension examinations of the cervical spine. Functional x-rays were taken and analyzed using a computer-assisted method that quantified intervertebral rotations, translations, and locations of the centers of rotation for each level C1-C2-C6-C7. The aim of the study was to establish values for these parameters for a normal population as related to age and gender. In the process, a statistically significant difference was found in the average value of rotation between male and female groups at the C5-C6 level. A new parameter, the ratio between translation and rotation, was also established and may prove useful for clinical diagnoses. This parameter has a smaller error associated with it than do pure translations and may aid the clinician by helping to account for the large variation in rotatory ranges of motion within the population. This translation/rotation ratio indicated highly significant differences in the lower segments of the cervical spine between gender groups. PMID:1919845

  15. Surgical Management of Subaxial Cervical Spine Trauma: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Emre Aydın

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available These days, as a consequence of the improvement in technology and increase in the use of motor vehicles, spine injuries have become common. Spine traumas, which often occur after motor vehicle accidents, are observed mostly in cervical regions, particularly in the subaxial cervical region, which is also known as the subcervical region, and neurological damage occurs in 70% of the patients. Despite still being controversial, the common ranging for neurological evaluation is the American Spinal Injury Association ranging, which includes the motor and sensory loss and accordingly, the impairment rate. In subaxial cervical traumas, acute neurological deterioration is an indication and therefore requires urgent surgical treatment. The choice of anterior or posterior approach substantially depends on the traumatization mechanism, affected tissues, and neurological deterioration occurring after. The state of patient and instability are the most two important factors affecting the treatment decision. Although the anterior approach is accepted as a routinely available and easily applicable surgical technique, it lacks in the burst fractures involving the three colons, which shows a stabilization disorder. The anterior plate screw technique and posterior lateral mass screw application applied in our clinic are reviewed in literature and are discussed in two cases. Although the best clinical results are achieved in cases where only anterior surgery is performed and in cases where instability is excessive, in unstable compression and blow-out fractures, even if neurological deficit and three colon involvement are not observed in the patient, the requirement of posterior fusion is observed.

  16. Superresolving dendritic spine morphology with STED microscopy under holographic photostimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Marcel Andreas; Guillon, Marc; Desnos, Claire; Khamsing, Dany; Jaffal, Zahra; Darchen, François; Emiliani, Valentina

    2016-10-01

    Emerging all-optical methods provide unique possibilities for noninvasive studies of physiological processes at the cellular and subcellular scale. On the one hand, superresolution microscopy enables observation of living samples with nanometer resolution. On the other hand, light can be used to stimulate cells due to the advent of optogenetics and photolyzable neurotransmitters. To exploit the full potential of optical stimulation, light must be delivered to specific cells or even parts of cells such as dendritic spines. This can be achieved with computer generated holography (CGH), which shapes light to arbitrary patterns by phase-only modulation. We demonstrate here in detail how CGH can be incorporated into a stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscope for photostimulation of neurons and monitoring of nanoscale morphological changes. We implement an original optical system to allow simultaneous holographic photostimulation and superresolution STED imaging. We present how synapses can be clearly visualized in live cells using membrane stains either with lipophilic organic dyes or with fluorescent proteins. We demonstrate the capabilities of this microscope to precisely monitor morphological changes of dendritic spines after stimulation. These all-optical methods for cell stimulation and monitoring are expected to spread to various fields of biological research in neuroscience and beyond. PMID:27413766

  17. Bionic Control of Cheetah Bounding with a Segmented Spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunlei; Wang, Shigang

    2016-01-01

    A cheetah model is built to mimic real cheetah and its mechanical and dimensional parameters are derived from the real cheetah. In particular, two joints in spine and four joints in a leg are used to realize the motion of segmented spine and segmented legs which are the key properties of the cheetah bounding. For actuating and stabilizing the bounding gait of cheetah, we present a bioinspired controller based on the state-machine. The controller mainly mimics the function of the cerebellum to plan the locomotion and keep the body balance. The haptic sensor and proprioception system are used to detect the trigger of the phase transition. Besides, the vestibular modulation could perceive the pitching angle of the trunk. At last, the cerebellum acts as the CPU to operate the information from the biological sensors. In addition, the calculated results are transmitted to the low-level controller to actuate and stabilize the cheetah bounding. Moreover, the delay feedback control method is employed to plan the motion of the leg joints to stabilize the pitching motion of trunk with the stability criterion. Finally, the cyclic cheetah bounding with biological properties is realized. Meanwhile, the stability and dynamic properties of the cheetah bounding gait are analyzed elaborately.

  18. Acromial and scapular spine fractures after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayne, Ian P; Bell, Simon N; Wright, Warwick; Coghlan, Jennifer A

    2016-04-01

    Acromial and scapular spine fractures after reverse total shoulder arthroplasty occur predominantly as a result of bony insufficiency secondary to patient and intra-operative technical factors. The spectrum of the pathology can range from a stress reaction to an undisplaced or displaced fracture. Prompt diagnosis of these fractures requires a high suspicion in the postoperative patient with a clinical presentation of acute onset of pain along the acromion or scapular spine and/or deterioration of shoulder function. Conventional shoulder radiographs are frequently unreliable in identifying these fractures, especially if they are undisplaced. Computed tomography (CT) and/or single photon emission computed tomography/CT scans are useful imaging modalities for obtaining a definitive diagnosis. Early diagnosis and non-operative treatment of a stress reaction or undisplaced fracture is essential for preventing further displacement and potential disability. The management of displaced fractures is challenging for the orthopaedic surgeon as a result of high rates of mal-union or non-union, decreased functional outcomes, and variable results after open reduction and internal fixation. Strategies for preventing these fractures include optimizing the patient's bone health, correct glenoid baseplate screw length and position, and avoiding excessive deltoid tension. Further research is required to identify the specific patient and fracture characteristics that will benefit from conservative versus operative management. PMID:27583005

  19. Biomechanical analysis of plate stabilization on cervical part of spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kiel

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main aim of the work was determination of biomechanical analysis of cervical spine – stabilizer system made of stainless steel (Cr-Ni-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.Design/methodology/approach: To define biomechanical characteristic of the system the finite elements method (FEM was applied. Geometric model of part of spine C5-C7 and stabilizer were discretized by SOLID95 element. Appropriate boundary conditions imitating phenomena in real system with appropriate accuracy were established.Findings: The result of biomechanical analysis was calculation of displacements and stresses in the vertebras and the stabilizer in a function of the applied loading: 50-300 N for the stabilizer made of stainless steel (Cr-Ni-Mo and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.Research limitations/implications: The result of biomechanical analysis for plate stabilizer obtained by FEM can be use to determine a construction features of the stabilizer, and to select mechanical properties of metallic biomaterial and estimation of stabilization quality. The calculation of displacements for part C5-C7 show that the proposed type of stabilizer enables correct stabilization used to clinical apply.Practical implications: The results of biomechanical analysis showed correct mechanical properties used to made the plate stabilizer.Originality/value: The obtained numerical results should be verified in “in vitro” tests.

  20. Uremic tumoral calcinosis in the cervical spine: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatehi, Mostafa; Ahuja, Christopher S; Wang, Shelly; Ginsberg, Howard J

    2016-07-01

    Tumoral calcinosis is an uncommon condition characterized by the calcification of periarticular soft tissue. In uremic patients the disease is secondary to metabolic disturbances in predisposed patients. The authors report the case of a 73-year-old woman who presented with a new painful cervical mass while undergoing continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis for long-standing end-stage renal disease (ESRD). A CT scan of the neck showed a lobulated, calcified mass in the left paraspinal soft tissue at C2-3. This mass affected the facet joint and also extended into the neural foramen but did not cause any neurological compromise. Due to the patient's significant medical comorbidities, resection was deferred and the patient was followed in the clinic. Subsequent repeat imaging has shown a significant decrease in the size of the mass. In the context of ESRD, a diagnosis of uremic tumoral calcinosis (UTC) was made. The authors conducted a search of the PubMed and EMBASE databases and identified 7 previously reported cases of UTC of the cervical spine. They present a summary of these cases and discuss the etiology, diagnosis, and management of the condition. Although the metabolic disturbances seen in patients undergoing dialysis can lead to tumoral calcinosis, most reported cases involve large joints such as the shoulder or the hip; however, the spine can also be affected and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with uremia as it can mimic aggressive bone-forming neoplasms. PMID:26943247