WorldWideScience

Sample records for spin trapping experiments

  1. High-spin nuclear traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, P.; Dracoulis, G.

    1994-01-01

    The reaction pathways in stars, where all the heavy elements in the Universe were formed, are inextricably linked with isomers that live long enough to capture a neutron or proton before they decay. These isomers usually have excitation energies below 0.1 MeV. It is also possible to find highly excited isomers, with several MeV of excitation energy, that are trapped because of their large angular momentum (or spin). But attempts to understand the long-lived highly excited isomers, sometimes known as ''spin traps'', have been hampered by the difficulty of producing this exotic form of nuclear matter. Now, a new generation of radioactive ion beams promises a revolution in the study of high-spin nuclear traps. (author)

  2. Spin trapping in γ-irradiated system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taniguchi, Hitoshi

    1998-01-01

    Spin trapping techniques, allowing one to visualize transient free radical populations by reacting short-lived radicals with a spin trap to produce persistent spin adduct radicals, require that the rate constant for parent radical addition to the spin trap be sufficiently large. The study on the rate of spin trapping reactions, dependent upon steric and electronic (polar) interactions in the complex, has been extended to nitrone spin trapping using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) as a spin trap. We concentrated on the trapping of carboxyalkyl radicals which feature strong hydrogen bonding between the hydroxyl group of the spin addend carboxyl function and the aminosyl oxygen, and a strongly electron withdrawing effect of the spin addend on the DMPO ring. These two features in these radicals, enhancing the polarization of the N 1 -C 2 bond to produce spin adduct fragmentation, were found to be significantly more pronounced than in the case of hydroxylalkyl radical adducts to DMPO. (J.P.N.)

  3. Lipid radicals: Properties and detection by spin trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolze, K.; Udilova, N.; Nohl, H.

    2000-01-01

    Unsaturated lipids are rapidly oxidized to toxic products such as lipid hydroperoxides, especially when transition metals such as iron or copper are present. In a Fenton-type reaction Fe 2+ converts lipid hydroperoxides to the very short-lived lipid alkoxyl radicals. The reaction was started upon the addition of Fe 2+ to an aqueous linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LOOH) emulsion and the spin trap in the absence of oxygen. Even when high concentrations of spin traps were added to the incubation mixture, only secondary radical adducts were detected, probably due to the rapid rearrangement of the primary alkoxyl radicals. With the commercially available nitroso spin trap MNP we observed a slightly immobilized ESR spectrum with only one hydrogen splitting, indicating the trapping of a methinyl fragment of a lipid radical. With DMPO or 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DEPMPO) adducts were detected with carbon-centered lipid radical, with acyl radical, and with the hydroxyl radical. We also synthesized lipophilic derivatives of the spin trap DEPMPO in order to detect lipid radical species generated in the lipid phase. With all spin traps studied a lipid-derived carbon-centered radical was obtained in the anaerobic incubation system Fe 2+ /LOOH indicating the trapping of a lipid radical, possibly generated as a secondary reaction product of the primary lipid alkoxyl radical formed. Under aerobic conditions an SOD-insensitive oxygen-centered radical adduct was formed with DEPMPO and its lipophilic derivatives. The observed ESR parameters were similar to those of alkoxyl radical adducts, which were independently synthesized in model experiments using Fe 3+ -catalyzed nucleophilic addition of methanol or t-butanol to the respective spin trap. (author)

  4. Spin-polarized deuterium in magnetic traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koelman, J.M.V.A.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J.; Walraven, J.T.M.

    1987-01-01

    We have calculated the spin-exchange two-body rate constants associated with the population dynamics of the hyperfine levels of atomic deuterium as a function of magnetic field in the Boltzmann zero-temperature limit. Results indicate that a gas of low-field--seeking deuterium atoms trapped in a static magnetic field minimum decays rapidly into an ultrastable gas of doubly spin-polarized deuterium. We also discuss the temperature dependence of various effects

  5. EPR spin trapping of protein radicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Hawkins, Clare Louise

    2004-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping was originally developed to aid the detection of low-molecular-mass radicals formed in chemical systems. It has subsequently found widespread use in biology and medicine for the direct detection of radical species formed during oxidative stress ...

  6. Controlling spin flips of molecules in an electromagnetic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reens, David; Wu, Hao; Langen, Tim; Ye, Jun

    2017-12-01

    Doubly dipolar molecules exhibit complex internal spin dynamics when electric and magnetic fields are both applied. Near magnetic trap minima, these spin dynamics lead to enhancements in Majorana spin-flip transitions by many orders of magnitude relative to atoms and are thus an important obstacle for progress in molecule trapping and cooling. We conclusively demonstrate and address this with OH molecules in a trap geometry where spin-flip losses can be tuned from over 200 s-1 to below our 2 s-1 vacuum-limited loss rate with only a simple external bias coil and with minimal impact on trap depth and gradient.

  7. Nonequilibrium Spin Dynamics in a Trapped Fermi Gas with Effective Spin-Orbit Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanescu, Tudor D.; Zhang Chuanwei; Galitski, Victor

    2007-01-01

    We consider a trapped atomic system in the presence of spatially varying laser fields. The laser-atom interaction generates a pseudospin degree of freedom (referred to simply as spin) and leads to an effective spin-orbit coupling for the fermions in the trap. Reflections of the fermions from the trap boundaries provide a physical mechanism for effective momentum relaxation and nontrivial spin dynamics due to the emergent spin-orbit coupling. We explicitly consider evolution of an initially spin-polarized Fermi gas in a two-dimensional harmonic trap and derive nonequilibrium behavior of the spin polarization. It shows periodic echoes with a frequency equal to the harmonic trapping frequency. Perturbations, such as an asymmetry of the trap, lead to the suppression of the spin echo amplitudes. We discuss a possible experimental setup to observe spin dynamics and provide numerical estimates of relevant parameters

  8. Linear spin waves in a trapped Bose gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikuni, T.; Williams, J.E.; Clark, C.W.

    2002-01-01

    An ultracold Bose gas of two-level atoms can be thought of as a spin-1/2 Bose gas. It supports spin-wave collective modes due to the exchange mean field. Such collective spin oscillations have been observed in recent experiments at JILA with 87 Rb atoms confined in a harmonic trap. We present a theory of the spin-wave collective modes based on the moment method for trapped gases. In the collisionless and hydrodynamic limits, we derive analytic expressions for the frequencies and damping rates of modes with dipole and quadrupole symmetry. We find that the frequency for a given mode is given by a temperature-independent function of the peak density n, and falls off as 1/n. We also find that, to a very good approximation, excitations in the radial and axial directions are decoupled. We compare our model to the numerical integration of a one-dimensional version of the kinetic equation and find very good qualitative agreement. The damping rates, however, show the largest deviation for intermediate densities, where one expects Landau damping--which is unaccounted for in our moment approach--to play a significant role

  9. Finding traps in nonlinear spin arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesniak, Marcin; Markiewicz, Marcin

    2010-01-01

    Precise knowledge of the Hamiltonian of a system is a key to many of its applications. Tasks such as the state transfer or quantum computation have been well studied with a linear chain, but rarely with systems, which do not possess a linear structure. While this difference does not disturb the end-to-end dynamics of a single excitation, the evolution is significantly changed in other subspaces. Here we quantify the difference between a linear chain and a pseudochain, which have more than one spin at some site (in such a case we will call the site a block). We show how to estimate a number of all spins in the system and the intrablock coupling constants. We also suggest how it is possible to eliminate excitations trapped in such blocks, which may disturb the state transfer. Importantly, one uses only at-ends data and needs to be able to put the system to either the maximally magnetized or the maximally mixed state. This can obtained by controlling a global decoherence parameter, such as temperature.

  10. Non-thermalization in trapped atomic ion spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, P. W.; Becker, P.; Kaplan, H. B.; Kyprianidis, A.; Lee, A. C.; Neyenhuis, B.; Pagano, G.; Richerme, P.; Senko, C.; Smith, J.; Tan, W. L.; Zhang, J.; Monroe, C.

    2017-10-01

    Linear arrays of trapped and laser-cooled atomic ions are a versatile platform for studying strongly interacting many-body quantum systems. Effective spins are encoded in long-lived electronic levels of each ion and made to interact through laser-mediated optical dipole forces. The advantages of experiments with cold trapped ions, including high spatio-temporal resolution, decoupling from the external environment and control over the system Hamiltonian, are used to measure quantum effects not always accessible in natural condensed matter samples. In this review, we highlight recent work using trapped ions to explore a variety of non-ergodic phenomena in long-range interacting spin models, effects that are heralded by the memory of out-of-equilibrium initial conditions. We observe long-lived memory in static magnetizations for quenched many-body localization and prethermalization, while memory is preserved in the periodic oscillations of a driven discrete time crystal state. This article is part of the themed issue 'Breakdown of ergodicity in quantum systems: from solids to synthetic matter'.

  11. Inverse engineering for fast transport and spin control of spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates in moving harmonic traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Jiang, Ruan-Lei; Li, Jing; Ban, Yue; Sherman, E. Ya.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate fast transport and spin manipulation of tunable spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates in a moving harmonic trap. Motivated by the concept of shortcuts to adiabaticity, we design inversely the time-dependent trap position and spin-orbit-coupling strength. By choosing appropriate boundary conditions we obtain fast transport and spin flip simultaneously. The nonadiabatic transport and relevant spin dynamics are illustrated with numerical examples and compared with the adiabatic transport with constant spin-orbit-coupling strength and velocity. Moreover, the influence of nonlinearity induced by interatomic interaction is discussed in terms of the Gross-Pitaevskii approach, showing the robustness of the proposed protocols. With the state-of-the-art experiments, such an inverse engineering technique paves the way for coherent control of spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates in harmonic traps.

  12. Spin squeezing and light entanglement in Coherent Population Trapping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dantan, Aurelien Romain; Cviklinski, Jean; Giacobino, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    We show that strong squeezing and entanglement can be generated at the output of a cavity containing atoms interacting with two fields in a coherent population trapping situation, on account of a nonlinear Faraday effect experienced by the fields close to a dark-state resonance in a cavity....... Moreover, the cavity provides a feedback mechanism allowing to reduce the quantum fluctuations of the ground state spin, resulting in strong steady state spin squeezing....

  13. Polar-core spin vortex of quasi-2D ferromagnetic spin-1 condensate in a flat-bottomed optical trap with a weak magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gong-Ping; Li, Pin; Li, Ting; Xue, Ya-Jie

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by the recent experiments realized in a flat-bottomed optical trap (Navon et al., 2015; Chomaz et al., 2015), we study the ground state of polar-core spin vortex of quasi-2D ferromagnetic spin-1 condensate in a finite-size homogeneous trap with a weak magnetic field. The exact spatial distribution of local spin is obtained with a variational method. Unlike the fully-magnetized planar spin texture with a zero-spin core, which was schematically demonstrated in previous studies for the ideal polar-core spin vortex in a homogeneous trap with infinitely large boundary, some plateaus and two-cores structure emerge in the distribution curves of spin magnitude in the polar-core spin vortex we obtained for the larger effective spin-dependent interaction. More importantly, the spin values of the plateaus are not 1 as expected in the fully-magnetized spin texture, except for the sufficiently large spin-dependent interaction and the weak-magnetic-field limit. We attribute the decrease of spin value to the effect of finite size of the system. The spin values of the plateaus can be controlled by the quadratic Zeeman energy q of the weak magnetic field, which decreases with the increase of q.

  14. Spin-polarized deuterium : stabilization in magnetic traps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelman, J.M.V.A.; Stoof, H.T.C.; Verhaar, B.J.; Walraven, J.T.M.

    1987-01-01

    We report on a calculation of the spin-exchange two-body rate constants associated with the population dynamics of the hyperfine levels of atomic deuterium as a function of magnetic field in the Boltzmann zero temperature limit. We find that a gas of low field seeking deuterium atoms trapped in a

  15. Characterization of beer flavour stability (EPR - spin trapping)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasko, A.; Liptakova, M.; Malik, F.

    1999-01-01

    The beer flavour stability is coupled with free radical degradation processes. Probably, aldehydes produced during the brewery but also generated by stalling are responsible for beer flavour as well as for its breaking down. The storing beer at the lower temperatures and in the dark place inhibits, and otherwise the rising temperature and illumination accelerate the rate of such radical processes. Beers contain naturally occurring radical scavengers - antioxidants which inhibit such unwanted reactions. Then depleting of scavengers results in the breaking down of the beer stability. EPR spin trapping technique was used as monitor such processes and for characterising so the flavour stability of beer. The probe was temperated at 60 grad C in the cavity of EPR spectrometer in the presence of spin trapping agent, N-tert.-butyl-α-phenyl nitrone (PBN) and EPR spectra were recorded for few hours. After beer antioxidants become depleted, free radicals formed by the beer degradation are scavenged by PBN spin trap and this point is characterised with a dramatically increased concentration of the free radicals trapped

  16. Mobile quantum sensing with spins in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awschalom, David D.

    2013-03-01

    The nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color center in diamond has emerged as a powerful, optically addressable, spin-based probe of electromagnetic fields and temperature. For nanoscale sensing applications, the NV center's atom-like nature enables the close-range interactions necessary for both high spatial resolution and the detection of fields generated by proximal nuclei, electrons, or molecules. Using a custom-designed optical tweezers apparatus, we demonstrate three-dimensional position control of nanodiamonds in solution with simultaneous optical measurement of electron spin resonance (ESR)[3]. Despite the motion and random orientation of NV centers suspended in the optical trap, we observe distinct peaks in the ESR spectra from the ground-state spin transitions. Accounting for the random dynamics of the trapped nanodiamonds, we model the ESR spectra observed in an applied magnetic field and estimate the dc magnetic sensitivity based on the ESR line shapes to be 50 μT/√{ Hz }. We utilize the optically trapped nanodiamonds to characterize the magnetic field generated by current-carrying wires and ferromagnetic structures in microfluidic circuits. These measurements provide a pathway to spin-based sensing in fluidic environments and biophysical systems that are inaccessible to existing scanning probe techniques, such as the interiors of living cells. This work is supported by AFOSR and DARPA.

  17. Chiral spin currents in a trapped-ion quantum simulator using Floquet engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graß, Tobias; Celi, Alessio; Pagano, Guido; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2018-01-01

    The most typical ingredient of topologically protected quantum states is magnetic fluxes. In a system of spins, complex-valued interaction parameters give rise to a flux, if their phases do not add up to zero along a closed loop. Here we apply periodic driving, a powerful tool for quantum engineering, to a trapped-ion quantum simulator in order to generate such spin-spin interactions. We consider a simple driving scheme, consisting of a repeated series of locally quenched fields, and demonstrate the feasibility of this approach by studying the dynamics of a small system. An emblematic hallmark of the flux, accessible in experiments, is the appearance of chiral spin currents. Strikingly, we find that in parameter regimes where, in the absence of fluxes, phonon excitations dramatically reduce the fidelity of the spin model simulation, the spin dynamics remains widely unaffected by the phonons when fluxes are present. Our work provides a realistic experimental recipe to engineer the minimal building block of a topological quantum system with a currently existing ion trap apparatus.

  18. An Atomic Abacus: Trapped ion quantum computing experiments at NIST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demarco, Brian

    2003-03-01

    Trapped atomic ions are an ideal system for exploring quantum information science because deterministic state preparation and efficient state detection are possible and coherent manipulation of atomic systems is relatively advanced. In our experiment, a few singly charged Be ions are confined by static and radio-frequency electric fields in a micro-machined linear Paul trap. The internal and motional states of the ions are coherently manipulated using applied laser light. Our current work focuses on demonstrating the necessary ingredients to produce a scalable quantum computing scheme and on simplifying and improving quantum logic gates. I will speak about a new set of experiments that was made possible by recent improvements in trap technology. A novel trap with multiple trapping regions was used to demonstrate the first steps towards a fully scalable quantum computing scheme. Single ions were ``shuttled" between trapping regions without disturbing the ion's motional and internal state, and two ions were separated from a single to two different trapping zones. Improvements in the trap manufacturing process has led to a reduction of nearly two orders of magnitude in the ion's motional heating rate, making possible two new improved logic gates. The first gate utilizes the wave-packet nature of the ions to tune the laser-atom interaction and achieve a controlled-NOT gate between a single ion's spin and motional states. The second, a two-ion phase gate, uses phase-space dynamics to produce a state-sensitive geometric phase. I will end with a quick look at experiments using a Mg ion to sympathetically cool a simultaneously trapped Be ion and a glimpse of the next generation of ions traps currently under construction.

  19. Spin trapping studies of essential oils in lipid systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarova Katerina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, we report the results of a spin trapping ESR study of four essential oils widely used for skin care products such as creams and bath salts. The studied essential oils are Rosmarini aetheroleum (rosemary, Menthae piperitae aetheroleum (mint, Lavandulae aetheroleum (lavender, and Thymi aetheroleum (thyme. Fenton reaction in the presence of ethanol was used to generate free radicals. The N-tert-butyl-α-phenylnitrone (PBN was used as a spin trap. In the Fenton reaction, the rosemary oil had the lowest effect on radical adduct formation as compared to the reference Fenton system. Since essential oils are known to be lipid soluble, we also conducted studies of essential oils in Fenton reaction in the presence of lipids. Two model lipids were used, namely 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC. The obtained results suggested that in the presence of DOPC lipids, the •OH and PBN/•CHCH3(OH radicals are formed in both phases, that is, water and lipids, and all the studied essential oils affected the Fenton reaction in a similar way. Whereas, in the DPPC system, the additional type of PBN/X (aN = 16.1 G, aH = 2.9 G radical adduct was generated. DFT calculations of hyperfine splittings were performed at B3LYP/6-311+G(d,p/EPR-II level of theory for the set of c-centered PBN adducts in order to identify PBN/X radical.

  20. Spinning magnetic trap for automated microfluidic assay systems†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbarg, Jasenka; Kamgar-Parsi, Kian; Shields, Adam R.; Howell, Peter B.; Ligler, Frances S.

    2012-01-01

    While sophisticated analyses have been performed using lab-on-chip devices, in most cases the sample preparation is still performed off chip. The global need for easy-to-use, disposable testing devices necessitates that sample processing is automated and that transport complexity between the processing and analytical components is minimal. We describe a complete sample manipulation unit for performing automated target capture, efficient mixing with reagents, and controlled target release in a microfluidic channel, using an array of spinning magnets. The “MagTrap” device consists of 6 pairs of magnets in a rotating wheel, situated immediately beneath the microchannel. Rotation of the wheel in the direction opposite to the continuous flow entraps and concentrates the bead-target complexes and separates them from the original sample matrix. As the wheel rotates and the active pair of magnets moves away from the microchannel, the beads are released and briefly flow downstream before being trapped and pulled upstream by the next pair of magnets. This dynamic and continuous movement of the beads ensures that the full surface area of each bead is exposed to reagents and prevents aggregation. The release of the target-bead complexes for further analysis is facilitated by reversing the rotational direction of the wheel to sweep the beads downstream. Sample processing with the MagTrap was demonstrated for the detection of E. coli in a range of concentrations (1 × 103, 1 × 104 and 1 × 106 cells ml−1). Results show that sample processing with the MagTrap outperformed the standard manual protocols, improving the detection capability while simultaneously reducing the processing time. PMID:22344487

  1. Quantum simulation of spin models on an arbitrary lattice with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenblit, S; Kafri, D; Campbell, W C; Islam, R; Edwards, E E; Monroe, C; Gong, Z-X; Lin, G-D; Duan, L-M; Kim, J; Kim, K

    2012-01-01

    A collection of trapped atomic ions represents one of the most attractive platforms for the quantum simulation of interacting spin networks and quantum magnetism. Spin-dependent optical dipole forces applied to an ion crystal create long-range effective spin–spin interactions and allow the simulation of spin Hamiltonians that possess nontrivial phases and dynamics. Here we show how the appropriate design of laser fields can provide for arbitrary multidimensional spin–spin interaction graphs even for the case of a linear spatial array of ions. This scheme uses currently available trap technology and is scalable to levels where the classical methods of simulation are intractable. (paper)

  2. Use of isotopically labelled spin-traps to determine definitively the presence or absence of non-radical addition artefacts in EPR spin-trapping systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, G S; Barlow, G K; Silvester, J A; Wei, X; Whitwood, A C

    1997-04-01

    EPR spin-trapping, although a powerful, sensitive technique for the study of free radicals, can be susceptible to artefacts; one of the most intractable to determine has been the non-radical addition of a substrate to a spin-trap followed by oxidation of the product to an EPR-detectable nitroxide. This work details how differentially isotopically labelled spin-traps (either nitroso or nitrone) may be used to determine the presence (or absence) of such artefacts, and provide a semi-quantitative measure of the extent of their contribution to the total EPR spectra in spin-trapping reactions. Artefactual 'ene' addition of the nitroso spin-trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitroso-benzenesulphonic acid (DBNBS) to tryptophan followed by oxidation to EPR-detectable products has been confirmed, as has its nucleophilic addition to the thiol of glutathione to give non-EPR detectable products. The nitrone α-phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN) exhibited no such reactivity.

  3. Kinetics and Mechanism of Ultrasonic Activation of Persulfate: An in Situ EPR Spin Trapping Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zongsu; Villamena, Frederick A; Weavers, Linda K

    2017-03-21

    Ultrasound (US) was shown to activate persulfate (PS) providing an alternative activation method to base or heat as an in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) method. The kinetics and mechanism of ultrasonic activation of PS were examined in aqueous solution using an in situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping technique and radical trapping with probe compounds. Using the spin trap, 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO), hydroxyl radical ( • OH) and sulfate radical anion (SO 4 •- ) were measured from ultrasonic activation of persulfate (US-PS). The yield of • OH was up to 1 order of magnitude greater than that of SO 4 •- . The comparatively high • OH yield was attributed to the hydrolysis of SO 4 •- in the warm interfacial region of cavitation bubbles formed from US. Using steady-state approximations, the dissociation rate of PS in cavitating bubble systems was determined to be 3 orders of magnitude greater than control experiments without sonication at ambient temperature. From calculations of the interfacial volume surrounding cavitation bubbles and using the Arrhenius equation, an effective mean temperature of 340 K at the bubble-water interface was estimated. Comparative studies using the probe compounds tert-butyl alcohol and nitrobenzene verified the bubble-water interface as the location for PS activation by high temperature with • OH contributing a minor role in activating PS to SO 4 •- . The mechanisms unveiled in this study provide a basis for optimizing US-PS as an ISCO technology.

  4. Detection of individual spin transitions of a single proton confined in a cryogenic Penning trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kracke, Holger

    2013-02-27

    The presented experiment for the determination of the magnetic moment of the proton is based on the measurement of the ratio of cyclotron frequency and Larmor frequency of a single proton confined in a cryogenic double-Penning trap. In the course of this thesis, the simultaneous non-destructive measurement of two of the three eigenfrequencies of the proton in thermal equilibrium with corresponding detection systems was demonstrated, which reduces the measurement time of the cyclotron frequency by a factor of two. Furthermore, this thesis presents the first detection of individual spin transitions of a single proton, which allows for the determination of the Larmor frequency. The continuous Stern-Gerlach effect is utilized to couple the magnetic moment to the axial mode of the trapped proton by means of a magnetic bottle. Thus, a spin flip causes a jump of the axial frequency, which can be measured non-destructively with highly-sensitive detection systems. However, not only the spin momentum is coupled to the axial motion but also the angular momentum. Thus, the main experimental challenge is the elimination of energy fluctuations in the radial modes in order to maintain spin flip resolution. Due to systematic studies on the stability of the axial frequency and a complete revision of the experimental setup, this goal was achieved. The spin state of the proton can be determined with very high fidelity for the very first time. Thus, this thesis represents an important step towards a high-precision determination of the magnetic moment of the proton.

  5. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-19

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  6. Proton polarimeters for spin transfer experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNaughton, M.W.

    1985-01-01

    The design and use of proton polarimeters for spin transfer (Wolfenstein parameter) measurements is discussed. Polarimeters are compared with polarized targets for spin dependent experiments. 32 refs., 4 figs

  7. Inhomogeneous Spin Diffusion in Traps with Cold Atoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heiselberg, Henning

    2012-01-01

    The spin diusion and damped oscillations are studied in the collision of two spin polarized clouds of cold atoms with resonant interactions. The strong density dependence of the diusion coecient leads to inhomogeneous spin diusion that changes from central to surface spin ow as the temperature...

  8. ESR-spin trapping studies on the interaction between anthraquinone triplets and aromatic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moger, G.; Rockenbauer, A.; Simon, P.

    1980-01-01

    The ESR spin trapping technique was used for the detection of transient C-centered radicals in the photochemical interaction between triplet anthraquinone and aromatic hydroperoxide and alcohol. (author)

  9. Repulsively interacting fermions in a two-dimensional deformed trap with spin-orbit coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchukov, O. V.; Fedorov, D. V.; Jensen, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a two-dimensional system of fermions with two internal (spin) degrees of freedom. It is confined by a deformed harmonic trap and subject to a Zeeman field, Rashba or Dresselhaus one-body spin-orbit couplings and two-body short range repulsion. We obtain self-consistent mean-field $N...

  10. Mapping trapped atomic gas with spin-orbit coupling to quantum Rabi-like model

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Haiping; Chen, Shu

    2013-01-01

    We construct a connection of the ultracold atomic system in a harmonic trap with Raman-induced spin-orbit coupling to the quantum Rabi-like model. By mapping the trapped atomic system to a Rabi-like model, we can get the exact solution of the Rabi-like model following the methods to solve the quantum Rabi model. The existence of such a mapping implies that we can study the basic model in quantum optics by using trapped atomic gases with spin-orbit coupling.

  11. Spin dynamics of large-spin fermions in a harmonic trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Junjun; Feng, Tongtong; Gu, Qiang, E-mail: qgu@ustb.edu.cn

    2017-04-15

    Understanding the collective dynamics in a many-body system has been a central task in condensed matter physics. To achieve this task, we develop a Hartree–Fock theory to study the collective oscillations of spinor Fermi system, motivated by recent experiment on spin-9/2 fermions. We observe an oscillation period shoulder for small rotation angles. Different from previous studies, where the shoulder is found connected to the resonance from periodic to running phase, here the system is always in a running phase in the two-body phase space. This shoulder survives even in the many-body oscillations, which could be tested in the experiments. We also show how these collective oscillations evolve from two- to many-body. Our theory provides an alternative way to understand the collective dynamics in large-spin Fermi systems.

  12. An EPR spin-probe and spin-trap study of the free radicals produced by plant plasma membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GORAN BACIC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Plant plasma membranes are known to produce superoxide radicals, while the production of hydroxyl radical is thought to occur only in the cell wall. In this work it was demonstrated using combined spin-trap and spin-probe EPR spectroscopic techniques, that plant plasma membranes do produce superoxide and hydroxyl radicals but by kinetically different mechanisms. The results show that superoxide and hydroxyl radicals can be detected by DMPO spin-trap and that the mechanisms and location of their production can be differentiated using the reduction of spin-probes Tempone and 7-DS. It was shown that the mechanism of production of oxygen reactive species is NADH dependent and diphenylene iodonium inhibited. The kinetics of the reduction of Tempone, combined with scavengers or the absence of NADH indicates that hydroxyl radicals are produced by a mechanism independent of that of superoxide production. It was shown that a combination of the spin-probe and spin-trap technique can be used in free radical studies of biological systems, with a number of advantages inherent to them.

  13. Potential Use of Spin Traps to Control ROS in Antipollution Cosmetics—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant D. Sawant

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Pollution from air and sunlight has adverse effects on human health, particularly skin health. It creates oxidative stress, which results in skin diseases, including skin cancer and aging. Different types of antioxidants are used as preventative actives in skin-care products. However, they have some limitations as they also scavenge oxygen. Recently, spin traps are being explored to trap free radicals before these radicals generating more free radicals (cascading effect and not the oxygen molecules. However, not all spin traps can be used in the topical cosmetic skin-care products due to their toxicity and regulatory issues. The present review focuses on the different pathways of reactive oxygen species (ROS generation due to pollution and the potential use of spin traps in anti-pollution cosmetics to control ROS.

  14. Imaging free radicals in organelles, cells, tissue, and in vivo with immuno-spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Ronald Paul

    2016-08-01

    The accurate and sensitive detection of biological free radicals in a reliable manner is required to define the mechanistic roles of such species in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. Most of the techniques currently available are either not appropriate to detect free radicals in cells and tissues due to sensitivity limitations (electron spin resonance, ESR) or subject to artifacts that make the validity of the results questionable (fluorescent probe-based analysis). The development of the immuno-spin trapping technique overcomes all these difficulties. This technique is based on the reaction of amino acid- and DNA base-derived radicals with the spin trap 5, 5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO) to form protein- and DNA-DMPO nitroxide radical adducts, respectively. These adducts have limited stability and decay to produce the very stable macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone product. This stable product can be detected by mass spectrometry, NMR or immunochemistry by the use of anti-DMPO nitrone antibodies. The formation of macromolecule-DMPO-nitrone adducts is based on the selective reaction of free radical addition to the spin trap and is thus not subject to artifacts frequently encountered with other methods for free radical detection. The selectivity of spin trapping for free radicals in biological systems has been proven by ESR. Immuno-spin trapping is proving to be a potent, sensitive (a million times higher sensitivity than ESR), and easy (not quantum mechanical) method to detect low levels of macromolecule-derived radicals produced in vitro and in vivo. Anti-DMPO antibodies have been used to determine the distribution of free radicals in cells and tissues and even in living animals. In summary, the invention of the immuno-spin trapping technique has had a major impact on the ability to accurately and sensitively detect biological free radicals and, subsequently, on our understanding of the role of free radicals in biochemistry, medicine and toxicology. Published by

  15. EPR investigation of zinc/iodine exchange between propargyl iodides and diethylzinc: detection of propargyl radical by spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maury, Julien; Jammi, Suribabu; Vibert, François; Marque, Sylvain R A; Siri, Didier; Feray, Laurence; Bertrand, Michèle

    2012-10-19

    The production of propargyl radicals in the reaction of dialkylzincs with propargyl iodides in nondegassed medium was investigated by EPR using tri-tert-butylnitrosobenzene (TTBNB) as a spin trap. The radical mechanism and the nature of the observed species were confirmed by the trapping of propargyl radicals generated by an alternative pathway: i.e., upon irradiation of propargyl iodides in the presence of hexa-n-butyldistannane. In dialkylzinc-mediated experiments a high concentration of adduct was instantaneously observed, whereas no spontaneous production of spin adduct was detected in a blank experiment performed with the propargylic iodide and TTBNB in the absence of diethylzinc. Under irradiation in the presence of distannane, two different species were observed at the very beginning of the irradiation; the nitroxide resulting from the trapping of propargyl radical at the propargyl carbon remained the only species detected after irradiating for several minutes. The absence of adducts resulting from the trapping of allenyl canonical forms was supported by DFT calculations and by the preparation of an authentic sample.

  16. Radical Intermediates in Photoinduced Reactions on TiO2 (An EPR Spin Trapping Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Dvoranová

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The radical intermediates formed upon UVA irradiation of titanium dioxide suspensions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments were investigated applying the EPR spin trapping technique. The results showed that the generation of reactive species and their consecutive reactions are influenced by the solvent properties (e.g., polarity, solubility of molecular oxygen, rate constant for the reaction of hydroxyl radicals with the solvent. The formation of hydroxyl radicals, evidenced as the corresponding spin-adducts, dominated in the irradiated TiO2 aqueous suspensions. The addition of 17O-enriched water caused changes in the EPR spectra reflecting the interaction of an unpaired electron with the 17O nucleus. The photoexcitation of TiO2 in non-aqueous solvents (dimethylsulfoxide, acetonitrile, methanol and ethanol in the presence of 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide spin trap displayed a stabilization of the superoxide radical anions generated via electron transfer reaction to molecular oxygen, and various oxygen- and carbon-centered radicals from the solvents were generated. The character and origin of the carbon-centered spin-adducts was confirmed using nitroso spin trapping agents.

  17. The combined field emission-spin trapping method for studying reactions of electrons in organic solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noda, Shoji; Ohta, Yasunari; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    1979-01-01

    The reactions of electrons injected by field emission into solutions have been investigated. Free radicals generated by the dissociative electron attachment to chlorinated solutes in benzene solutions were detected by the spin trapping-ESR method, using pentamethylnitrosobenzene as a spin trapping agent. Nondissociative electron attachment to styrene caused by the field emission was also evidenced by detecting the α-methylbenzyl radical generated secondarily from the styrene radical anion. The electrons field-emitted into the solutions are captured almost quantitatively by the electron scavenging solutes. The field emission method has been found to be useful for generating authentically free radicals and for studying the anionic reaction induced by electrons without interference of countercations and of any reaction intermediates from solvent molecules. As an example of the chemical utilization of the field emission technique, the ESR parameters of the spin adducts of several hydrocarbon radicals have been collected by this technique. (author)

  18. E.s.r. of spin-trapped radicals in aqueous solutions of amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rustgi, S.; Joshi, A.; Rieze, P.; Friedberg, F.

    1977-01-01

    The reactions of hydrated electrons (esub(aq) - ) with amino acids were investigated by the spin-trapping method and by electron spin resonance. Tertiary nitrosobutane was used as a spin-trap to stabilize the short-lived radicals. Hydrated electrons were produced by X-radiolysis of de-aerated aqueous solutions of amino acids in the presence of sodium formate or tertiary butanol to scavenge OH. Radicals produced by reductive deamination of 19 amino acids were identified. Radicals formed by scission of the CH 3 -S- and -S-CH 2 bonds of methionine as well as deamination were observed. In the case of phenylalanine the radical formed by electron addition followed by proton transfer was identified. The reaction of proline and of hydroxyproline with esub(aq) - resulted in the opening of the cyclic structure. (author)

  19. Engineered Two-Dimensional Ising Interactions on a Trapped-Ion Quantum Simulator with Hundreds of Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    this approach [6–14]. However, simulations of quantum magnetism allow- ing controlled, tunable interactions between spins localized on 2D and 3D ...antiferromagnetic Heisenberg interaction. The spin-liquid’s Figure 1. The Penning trap confines hundreds of spin-1/2 particles (qubits) on a two...simulations of quantum Ising and Heisenberg inter- actions with localized spins were done with neutral atoms in optical lattices [6, 11], atomic ions in Paul

  20. On the Equivalence of Trapped Colloids, Pinned Vortices, and Spin Ice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nisoli, Cristiano [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-04-23

    We investigate the recently reported analogies between pinned vortices in nano-structured superconductors or colloids in optical traps, and spin ice materials. The frustration of the two models, one describing colloids and vortices, the other describing spin ice, differs essentially. However, their effective energetics is made identical by the contribution of an emergent field associated to a topological charge. This equivalence extends to the local low-energy dynamics of the ice manifold, yet breaks down in lattices of mixed coordination, because of topological charge transfer between sub-latices.

  1. Spin Diffusion in Trapped Clouds of Cold Atoms with Resonant Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Georg Morten; Pethick, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    We show that puzzling recent experimental results on spin diffusion in a strongly interacting atomic gas may be understood in terms of the predicted spin diffusion coefficient for a generic strongly interacting system. Three important features play a central role: (a) Fick’s law for diffusion mus...... be modified to allow for the trapping potential; (b) the diffusion coefficient is inhomogeneous, due to the density variations in the cloud; and (c) the diffusion approximation fails in the outer parts of the cloud, where the mean free path is long....

  2. An ion trap - laser experiment at the INS cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katayama, I.; Wada, M.; Tanaka, J.

    1994-09-01

    A new nuclear instrument which comprises an ion guide behind a recoil mass separator, an RF trap, a Penning trap and a UV laser system is being built to perform a laser-microwave double resonance experiment. Initially the instrument will be used to measure hyperfine anomalies of Ca isotopes produced by a cyclotron beam. (author)

  3. Experiments on cold trap regeneration by NaH decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Skladzien, S.B.; Raue, D.J.

    1979-10-01

    Cold trap regeneration may be very important in future LMFBRs because of the expected high hydrogen source from the steam generators. This hydrogen precipitates as NaH in the cold trap and may fill the trap within one year of operation. Several methods of cold trap regeneration were considered, but the simplest and least expensive appears to be decomposition of NaH under vacuum at elevated temperatures. Experiments were done to assess the feasibility of this method for cold trap regeneration. Small-scale simulated cold traps (SCT) were located with NaH and NaH plus Na 2 O, and were heated both under vacuum and under a sweep gas at 100 kPa. The evolved hydrogen was converted to water by a CuO bed and collected in a weighting tube

  4. {alpha}-Tocopherol impact on oxy-radical induced free radical decomposition of DMSO: Spin trapping EPR and theoretical studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerzykiewicz, Maria, E-mail: Mariaj@wchuwr.pl [Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University, 14 F. Joliot-Curie St., 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland); Cwielag-Piasecka, Irmina; Witwicki, Maciej; Jezierski, Adam [Faculty of Chemistry, Wroclaw University, 14 F. Joliot-Curie St., 50-383 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2011-05-26

    Graphical abstract: {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3}. Display Omitted Highlights: {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of DMSO to {center_dot}CH{sub 3}. {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibits the oxidation of {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3}. {yields} {alpha}-Tocopherol does not inhibit the oxidation of PBN. {yields} The structures of observed spin adducts were theoretically confirmed. - Abstract: EPR spin trapping and theoretical methods such as density functional theory (DFT) as well as combined DFT and quadratic configuration interaction approach (DFT/QCISD) were used to identify the radicals produced in the reaction of oxy-radicals and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) in the presence and absence of {alpha}-tocopherol. Additionally, the mixtures of {alpha}-tocopherol with linolenic acid and glyceryl trilinoleate as well as bioglycerols (glycerol fractions from biodiesel production) were tested. {alpha}-Tocopherol inhibited oxidation of the main decomposition product of DMSO, {center_dot}CH{sub 3} to {center_dot}OCH{sub 3} but did not prevent the transformation process of N-t-butyl-{alpha}-phenylnitrone (PBN) into 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP). Theoretical investigations confirmed the structures of proposed spin adducts and allowed to correlate the EPR parameters observed in the experiment with the spin adducts electronic structure.

  5. Optimal proton trapping strategy for a neutron lifetime experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, Kevin J. [Statistical Engineering Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 325 Broadway, Boulder, C0 80305 (United States)]. E-mail: kevin.coakley@nist.gov

    2007-07-11

    In a neutron lifetime experiment conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, protons produced by neutron decay events are confined in a proton trap. In each run of the experiment, there is a trapping stage of duration {tau}. After the trapping stage, protons are purged from the trap. A proton detector provides incomplete information because it goes dead after detecting the first of any purged protons. Further, there is a dead time {delta} between the end of the trapping stage in one run and the beginning of the next trapping stage in the next run. Based on the fraction of runs where a proton is detected, I estimate the trapping rate {lambda} by the method of maximum likelihood. I show that the expected value of the maximum likelihood estimate is infinite. To obtain a maximum likelihood estimate with a finite expected value and a well-defined and finite variance, I restrict attention to a subsample of all realizations of the data. This subsample excludes an exceedingly rare realization that yields an infinite-valued estimate of {lambda}. I present asymptotically valid formulas for the bias, root-mean-square prediction error, and standard deviation of the maximum likelihood estimate of {lambda} for this subsample. Based on nominal values of {lambda} and the dead time {delta}, I determine the optimal duration of the trapping stage {tau} by minimizing the root-mean-square prediction error of the estimate.

  6. Strong coupling between a single nitrogen-vacancy spin and the rotational mode of diamonds levitating in an ion trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delord, T.; Nicolas, L.; Chassagneux, Y.; Hétet, G.

    2017-12-01

    A scheme for strong coupling between a single atomic spin and the rotational mode of levitating nanoparticles is proposed. The idea is based on spin readout of nitrogen-vacancy centers embedded in aspherical nanodiamonds levitating in an ion trap. We show that the asymmetry of the diamond induces a rotational confinement in the ion trap. Using a weak homogeneous magnetic field and a strong microwave driving we then demonstrate that the spin of the nitrogen-vacancy center can be strongly coupled to the rotational mode of the diamond.

  7. Experiments on trapping ytterbium atoms in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Min; Chen Ning; Zhang Xiao-Hang; Huang Liang-Yu; Yao Mao-Fei; Tian Jie; Gao Qi; Jiang Hai-Ling; Tang Hai-Yao; Xu Xin-Ye

    2013-01-01

    Experiments on trapping ytterbium atoms in various optical lattices are presented. After the two-stage cooling, first in a blue magneto—optical trap and then in a green magneto—optical trap, the ultracold 171 Yb atoms are successfully loaded into one-, two-, and three-dimensional optical lattices operating at the Stark-free wavelength, respectively. The temperature, number, and lifetime of cold 171 Yb atoms in one-dimensional lattice are measured. After optimization, the one-dimensional lattice with cold 171 Yb atoms is used for developing an ytterbium optical clock. (atomic and molecular physics)

  8. In vivo spin-trapping of the metabolites of 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iba, M.M.; Ghoshal, A.; Poyer, J.L.; Downs, P.; Massion, W.H.

    1990-01-01

    The carcinogen 3,3'-dichlorobenzidine (DCB) is bioactivated by liver enzymes to lipid-binding derivatives. To characterize the intermediates involved, male rats were treated with 14 C[U]DCB (100 mg, po and ip), followed 4 hr later by the spin trap ∝ phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrone [(PBN), 50 mg, po and ip]. The rats were sacrificed 30 min after PBN treatment and the livers isolated and homogenized in CHCl 3 :CH 3 OH (2:1, v:v). The Folch extracts were analyzed by electron spin resonance (esr) spectroscopy, TLC and HPLC. The solvent extract yielded a 6-line spectrum by esr spectroscopy characteristic of a PBN adduct of an aryl radical. HPLC analysis of the extract revealed the presence of benzidine and a paramagnetic fraction which contained a PBN adduct of a DCB derivative. It is concluded that DCB undergoes reductive dehalogenation with aryl radicals as intermediates

  9. Electron spin resonance of nitrogen-vacancy centers in optically trapped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Viva R.; Alemán, Benjamín J.; Christle, David J.; Cleland, Andrew N.; Awschalom, David D.

    2012-01-01

    Using an optical tweezers apparatus, we demonstrate three-dimensional control of nanodiamonds in solution with simultaneous readout of ground-state electron-spin resonance (ESR) transitions in an ensemble of diamond nitrogen-vacancy color centers. Despite the motion and random orientation of nitrogen-vacancy centers suspended in the optical trap, we observe distinct peaks in the measured ESR spectra qualitatively similar to the same measurement in bulk. Accounting for the random dynamics, we model the ESR spectra observed in an externally applied magnetic field to enable dc magnetometry in solution. We estimate the dc magnetic field sensitivity based on variations in ESR line shapes to be approximately . This technique may provide a pathway for spin-based magnetic, electric, and thermal sensing in fluidic environments and biophysical systems inaccessible to existing scanning probe techniques. PMID:22869706

  10. Spectral Gaps of Spin-orbit Coupled Particles in Deformed Traps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    V. Marchukov, O.; G. Volosniev, A.; V. Fedorov, D.

    2013-01-01

    the spectrum. The effect of a Zeeman term is also considered. Our results demonstrate that variable spectral gaps occur as a function of strength of the Rashba interaction and deformation of the harmonic trapping potential. The single-particle density of states and the critical strength for superfluidity vary...... tremendously with the interaction parameter. The strong variations with Rashba coupling and deformation implies that the few- and many-body physics of spin-orbit coupled systems can be manipulated by variation of these parameters....

  11. Use of the Spin-Trapping method to establish the radical steps in the reactions of organic compounds of zinc, cadmium, and mercury with various peroxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodonov, V.A.; Grishin, D.F.

    1985-01-01

    This paper uses the spin trapping method to investigate the homolytic reactions of group II organometallic compounds (OMC) with organic and heteroorganic peroxides. The radical reactions of the OMC with peroxides was investigated and the reactivity of the spin traps was examined with respect to compounds of zinc, cadmium, and mercury. Phenyl-tert-butylnitron (I), 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (II), and tri-bromonitrobenzene (III) were chosen as spin traps. The radicals formed are aable to initiate the polymerization of vinyl monomers

  12. The Penning trap system used by the BASE experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    A cut-away schematic of the Penning trap system used by BASE. The experiment receives antiprotons from CERN's AD; negative hydrogen ions are formed during injection into the apparatus. The set-up works with only a pair of particles at a time, while a cloud of a few hundred others are held in the reservoir trap, for future use. Here, an antiproton is in the measurement trap, while the negative hydyrogen ion is in held by the downstream park electrode. When the antiproton has been measured, it is moved to the upstream park electrode and the hydrogen ion is brought in to the measurement trap. This is repeated thousands of times, enabling a high-precision comparison of the charge-to-mass ratios of the two particles.

  13. In Vivo and In Situ Detection of Macromolecular Free Radicals Using Immuno-Spin Trapping and Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Smith, Nataliya

    2017-12-11

    In vivo free radical imaging in preclinical models of disease has become a reality. Free radicals have traditionally been characterized by electron spin resonance (ESR) or electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy coupled with spin trapping. The disadvantage of the ESR/EPR approach is that spin adducts are short-lived due to biological reductive and/or oxidative processes. Immuno-spin trapping (IST) involves the use of an antibody that recognizes macromolecular 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO) spin adducts (anti-DMPO antibody), regardless of the oxidative/reductive state of trapped radical adducts. Recent Advances: The IST approach has been extended to an in vivo application that combines IST with molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI). This combined IST-mMRI approach involves the use of a spin-trapping agent, DMPO, to trap free radicals in disease models, and administration of an mMRI probe, an anti-DMPO probe, which combines an antibody against DMPO-radical adducts and an MRI contrast agent, resulting in targeted free radical adduct detection. The combined IST-mMRI approach has been used in several rodent disease models, including diabetes, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), gliomas, and septic encephalopathy. The advantage of this approach is that heterogeneous levels of trapped free radicals can be detected directly in vivo and in situ to pin point where free radicals are formed in different tissues. The approach can also be used to assess therapeutic agents that are either free radical scavengers or generate free radicals. Smaller probe constructs and radical identification approaches are being considered. The focus of this review is on the different applications that have been studied, advantages and limitations, and future directions. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  14. Spin trapping of free radical products of CCl4 activation using pulse radiolysis and high energy radiation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasi, A.; Albano, E.; Lott, K.A.K.; Slater, T.F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors have studied the interaction of CCl 3 with the spin-trap phenylbutylnitrone in a simplified model system where the CCl 3 radicals are produced by a pulse of high energy electrons. They have previously obtained kinetic data on the reactivity of CCl 3 and its peroxy-derivative CCl 3 O 2 in this model system. These data, together with ESR analysis with 13 CCl 4 , allow them to unequivocally identify the spin-trap adducts of CCl 3 and CCl 3 O 2 ; identical spectra are also reported for microsomal systems, intact hepatocytes and under conditions in vivo. (Auth.)

  15. Use of a cocktail of spin traps for fingerprinting large range of free radicals in biological systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Valérie; Charlier, Nicolas; Verrax, Julien; Buc-Calderon, Pedro; Levêque, Philippe; Gallez, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that the formation of radical species centered on various atoms is involved in the mechanism leading to the development of several diseases or to the appearance of deleterious effects of toxic molecules. The detection of free radical is possible using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and the spin trapping technique. The classical EPR spin-trapping technique can be considered as a "hypothesis-driven" approach because it requires an a priori assumption regarding the nature of the free radical in order to select the most appropriate spin-trap. We here describe a "data-driven" approach using EPR and a cocktail of spin-traps. The rationale for using this cocktail was that it would cover a wide range of biologically relevant free radicals and have a large range of hydrophilicity and lipophilicity in order to trap free radicals produced in different cellular compartments. As a proof-of-concept, we validated the ability of the system to measure a large variety of free radicals (O-, N-, C-, or S- centered) in well characterized conditions, and we illustrated the ability of the technique to unambiguously detect free radical production in cells exposed to chemicals known to be radical-mediated toxic agents.

  16. Radiolysis of liquid cyclohexanol. Determination of yields and reactivity of radicals by spin traps method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Val'ter, A.I.; Zubarev, V.E.; Bugaenko, L.T.

    1986-01-01

    Using C-phenyl-N-tretbutylnitron (PBN) spin trap total yield of radicals Gsub(σR)=3.2+-0.2 rad/100 eV during cyclohexanol radiolysis ( 60 Co) in liquid phase is measured. 1-hydroxycyclohexyl RC[OH)R radical yield is Gsub(RC(OH)R)=1.2+-0.1 rad/100 eV, RC-HR radicals of H atom scission from the ones of C 2 , C 3 , C 4 -cyclohexane ring are formed with the yield Gsub(RC-HR)=2.0+-0.1 rad/100 eV. RC-HR radicals react with cyclohexanol molecules forming RC[OH)R. The rate constant ratio of RC-HR reactions with alcohol and PBN:Rsub(al)/ksub(PBN)=(3.6+-0.4)x10sup(-4) is determined

  17. Observation of Hopping and Blockade of Bosons in a Trapped Ion Spin Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, S.; Linke, N. M.; Wang, S.-T.; Figgatt, C.; Landsman, K. A.; Duan, L.-M.; Monroe, C.

    2018-02-01

    The local phonon modes in a Coulomb crystal of trapped ions can represent a Hubbard system of coupled bosons. We selectively prepare single excitations at each site and observe free hopping of a boson between sites, mediated by the long-range Coulomb interaction between ions. We then implement phonon blockades on targeted sites by driving a Jaynes-Cummings interaction on individually addressed ions to couple their internal spin to the local phonon mode. The resulting dressed states have energy splittings that can be tuned to suppress phonon hopping into the site. This new experimental approach opens up the possibility of realizing large-scale Hubbard systems from the bottom up with tunable interactions at the single-site level.

  18. Spin trapping study on the nature of radicals generated by X radiolysis and peroxidation of linolenic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azizova, O.A.; Osipov, A.N.; Zubarev, V.E.; Yakhyaev, A.V.; Vladimirov, Yu.A.; Savov, V.M.; Kagan, V.E.

    1983-01-01

    The radicals of linolenic acid and their spin adducts (SA) with PBN formed during X radiolysis of linolenic acid and in lipid peroxidation with ferrous ions were investigated and identified. It was found that in the absence of oxygen in pure linolenic acid at 77 K X irradiation produces alkyl and carboxyl radicals. In the presence of the spin trap alkyl radical spin adducts were formed. Irradiation of linolenic acid in the presence of oxygen at 77 K also resulted in the formation of alkyl radicals. These radicals were transformed into peroxy radicals in the interaction of alkyl radical with oxygen upon heating to 117 K. In the presence of spin trap X irradiation of linolenic acid and heating of the sample up to 300 K gave rise to EPR spectra of SA alkyl and unidentified radicals. Lipid peroxidation of linolenic acid induced by ferrous ions in the presence of spin trap also formed radicals and SA of linolenic acid. The spectral parameters of SA generated with ferrous ions in lipid peroxidation and of those generated during X radiolysis do not differ. The similarity of spectral parameters of SA in these two cases suggests a similarity in the structure of linolenic acid radicals. (author)

  19. The first muon spin rotation experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Garwin, Richard L

    2003-01-01

    The February 15, 1957 issue of Physical Review Letters shows the first muon precession curve resulting from the stopping of `85 MeV' muons in graphite, and the resulting counting rate in a gate of fixed delay, duration, and orientation, as a function of an applied vertical magnetic field. The purpose of the four-day experiment was to test the conservation of parity in the weak interactions. It involved the sudden recognition that existing muon beams would be polarized if parity were not conserved, together with the appreciation that the angular distribution of decay electrons from the population of stopped muons could be observed (much more reliably and sensitively) by the variation with time or current of the detections in a fixed counter telescope than by the measurement of the decay asymmetry of nominally fixed muon spins. This retrospective paper explains the context, the state of the art at the time, and what we expected as a consequence of this experiment. We went on to study more accurately the magneti...

  20. HITRAP: A Facility for Experiments with Trapped Highly Charged Ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quint, W.; Dilling, J.; Djekic, S.; Haeffner, H.; Hermanspahn, N.; Kluge, H.-J.; Marx, G.; Moore, R.; Rodriguez, D.; Schoenfelder, J.; Sikler, G.; Valenzuela, T.; Verdu, J.; Weber, C.; Werth, G.

    2001-01-01

    HITRAP is a planned ion trap facility for capturing and cooling of highly charged ions produced at GSI in the heavy-ion complex of the UNILAC-SIS accelerators and the ESR storage ring. In this facility heavy highly charged ions up to uranium will be available as bare nuclei, hydrogen-like ions or few-electron systems at low temperatures. The trap for receiving and studying these ions is designed for operation at extremely high vacuum by cooling to cryogenic temperatures. The stored highly charged ions can be investigated in the trap itself or can be extracted from the trap at energies up to about 10 keV/q. The proposed physics experiments are collision studies with highly charged ions at well-defined low energies (eV/u), high-accuracy measurements to determine the g-factor of the electron bound in a hydrogen-like heavy ion and the atomic binding energies of few-electron systems, laser spectroscopy of HFS transitions and X-ray spectroscopy

  1. Heisenberg spin glass experiments and the chiral ordering scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Ian A.; Petit, Dorothee C.M.C.

    2010-01-01

    An overview is given of experimental data on Heisenberg spin glass materials so as to make detailed comparisons with numerical results on model Heisenberg spin glasses, with particular reference to the chiral driven ordering transition scenario due to Kawamura and collaborators. On weak anisotropy systems, experiments show critical exponents which are very similar to those estimated numerically for the model Heisenberg chiral ordering transition but which are quite different from those at Ising spin glass transitions. Again on weak anisotropy Heisenberg spin glasses, experimental torque data show well defined in-field transverse ordering transitions up to strong applied fields, in contrast to Ising spin glasses where fields destroy ordering. When samples with stronger anisotropies are studied, critical and in-field behavior tend progressively towards the Ising limit. It can be concluded that the essential physics of laboratory Heisenberg spin glasses mirrors that of model Heisenberg spin glasses, where chiral ordering has been demonstrated numerically. (author)

  2. The first muon spin rotation experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garwin, Richard L.

    2003-01-01

    The February 15, 1957 issue of Physical Review Letters shows the first muon precession curve resulting from the stopping of '85 MeV' muons in graphite, and the resulting counting rate in a gate of fixed delay, duration, and orientation, as a function of an applied vertical magnetic field. The purpose of the four-day experiment was to test the conservation of parity in the weak interactions. It involved the sudden recognition that existing muon beams would be polarized if parity were not conserved, together with the appreciation that the angular distribution of decay electrons from the population of stopped muons could be observed (much more reliably and sensitively) by the variation with time or current of the detections in a fixed counter telescope than by the measurement of the decay asymmetry of nominally fixed muon spins. This retrospective paper explains the context, the state of the art at the time, and what we expected as a consequence of this experiment. We went on to study more accurately the magnetic moment of the muon, its gyromagnetic ratio--g --and only to a small extent used μSR to investigate the environment of the muon in matter. Much of the paper treats the instrumentation of the time--especially that adopted in the early 1950s. The essential tools of nanosecond-range coincidence circuits and adiabatic light pipes for scintillation counters are discussed. The paper closes with some later work of the author and his colleagues--measurements of the magnetic moment of the muon and especially the CERN measurement of muon g-2. An expanded version of this presentation is posted at http://www.fas.org/RLG

  3. Criticality experiments to provide benchmark data on neutron flux traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bierman, S.R.

    1988-06-01

    The experimental measurements covered by this report were designed to provide benchmark type data on water moderated LWR type fuel arrays containing neutron flux traps. The experiments were performed at the US Department of Energy Hanford Critical Mass Laboratory, operated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The experimental assemblies consisted of 2 /times/ 2 arrays of 4.31 wt % 235 U enriched UO 2 fuel rods, uniformly arranged in water on a 1.891 cm square center-to-center spacing. Neutron flux traps were created between the fuel units using metal plates containing varying amounts of boron. Measurements were made to determine the effect that boron loading and distance between the fuel and flux trap had on the amount of fuel required for criticality. Also, measurements were made, using the pulse neutron source technique, to determine the effect of boron loading on the effective neutron multiplications constant. On two assemblies, reaction rate measurements were made using solid state track recorders to determine absolute fission rates in 235 U and 238 U. 14 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs

  4. Precision measurements on trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S.

    2018-03-01

    Both the 1S-2S transition and the ground state hyperfine spectrum have been observed in trapped antihydrogen. The former constitutes the first observation of resonant interaction of light with an anti-atom, and the latter is the first detailed measurement of a spectral feature in antihydrogen. Owing to the narrow intrinsic linewidth of the 1S-2S transition and use of two-photon laser excitation, the transition energy can be precisely determined in both hydrogen and antihydrogen, allowing a direct comparison as a test of fundamental symmetry. The result is consistent with CPT invariance at a relative precision of around 2×10-10. This constitutes the most precise measurement of a property of antihydrogen. The hyperfine spectrum of antihydrogen is determined to a relative uncertainty of 4×10-4. The excited state and the hyperfine spectroscopy techniques currently both show sensitivity at the few 100 kHz level on the absolute scale. Here, the most recent work of the ALPHA collaboration on precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is presented together with an outlook on improving the precision of measurements involving lasers and microwave radiation. Prospects of measuring the Lamb shift and determining the antiproton charge radius in trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus are presented. Future perspectives of precision measurements of trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus when the ELENA facility becomes available to experiments at CERN are discussed. This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue `Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'.

  5. Electron spin resonance characterization of trapping centers in Unibond reg-sign buried oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, J.F. Jr.; Lenahan, P.M.; Wallace, B.D.

    1996-01-01

    Electron spin resonance and capacitance vs. voltage measurements are used to evaluate the radiation response of Unibond buried oxides. When damaged by hole injection, it is found that Unibond reg-sign buried oxides exhibit a rough correspondence between E' centers and positive charge as well as generation of P b centers at the Unibond buried oxide/Si interface. In these respects, Unibond buried oxides qualitatively resemble thermal SiO 2 . However, a hydrogen complexed E' center known as the 74 G doublet is also detected in the Unibond buried oxides. This defect is not detectable in thermal SiO 2 under similar circumstances. Since the presence of 74 G doublet center is generally indicative of very high hydrogen content and since hydrogen is clearly a significant participant in radiation damage, this result suggests a qualitative difference between the radiation response of Unibond and thermal SiO 2 . Unibond results are also compared and contrasted with similar investigations on separation-by-implanted-oxygen (SIMOX) buried oxides. Although the charge trapping response of Unibond buried oxides may be inferior to that of radiation hardened thermal SiO 2 , it appears to be more simple and superior to that of SIMOX buried oxides

  6. Spin-Orbit-Coupled Interferometry with Ring-Trapped Bose-Einstein Condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helm, J. L.; Billam, T. P.; Rakonjac, A.; Cornish, S. L.; Gardiner, S. A.

    2018-02-01

    We propose a method of atom interferometry using a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate with a time-varying magnetic field acting as a coherent beam splitter. Our protocol creates long-lived superpositional counterflow states, which are of fundamental interest and can be made sensitive to both the Sagnac effect and magnetic fields on the sub-μ G scale. We split a ring-trapped condensate, initially in the mf=0 hyperfine state, into superpositions of internal mf=±1 states and condensate superflow, which are spin-orbit coupled. After interrogation, the relative phase accumulation can be inferred from a population transfer to the mf=±1 states. The counterflow generation protocol is adiabatically deterministic and does not rely on coupling to additional optical fields or mechanical stirring techniques. Our protocol can maximize the classical Fisher information for any rotation, magnetic field, or interrogation time and so has the maximum sensitivity available to uncorrelated particles. Precision can increase with the interrogation time and so is limited only by the lifetime of the condensate.

  7. Electron Spin Resonance study of charge trapping in α-ZnMoO.sub.4./sub. single crystal scintillator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Buryi, Maksym; Spassky, D.A.; Hybler, Jiří; Laguta, Valentyn; Nikl, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 47, Sep (2015), 244-250 ISSN 0925- 3467 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1409; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GAP204/12/0805 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Electron Spin Resonance * scintillator * charge traps * zinc molybdate Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.183, year: 2015

  8. Application of spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometry to the Cosmic Axion Spin Precession Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Aybas, Deniz; Blanchard, John W.; Centers, Gary; Kelley, Sean R. O.'; Wickenbrock, Arne; Fang, Jiancheng; Budker, Dmitry

    2018-03-01

    The Cosmic Axion Spin Precession Experiment (CASPEr) seeks to measure oscillating torques on nuclear spins caused by axion or axion-like-particle (ALP) dark matter via nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques. A sample spin-polarized along a leading magnetic field experiences a resonance when the Larmor frequency matches the axion/ALP Compton frequency, generating precessing transverse nuclear magnetization. Here we demonstrate a Spin-Exchange Relaxation-Free (SERF) magnetometer with sensitivity ≈ 1 fT /√{ Hz } and an effective sensing volume of 0.1 cm3 that may be useful for NMR detection in CASPEr. A potential drawback of SERF-magnetometer-based NMR detection is the SERF's limited dynamic range. Use of a magnetic flux transformer to suppress the leading magnetic field is considered as a potential method to expand the SERF's dynamic range in order to probe higher axion/ALP Compton frequencies.

  9. OH-induced free radicals in purine nucleoside monophosphates: e.s.r. and spin-trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, W.; Kuwabara, M.; Sato, F.

    1989-01-01

    Free radicals produced by the reactions of OH radicals with six purine nucleoside monophosphates (3'-AMP, 5'-AMP, 5'-dAMP, 3'-GMP, 5'GMP and 5'-dGMP) were investigated by a method combining e.s.r. spin-trapping and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The N 2 O-saturated aqueous solutions of purine nucleoside monophosphates, containing 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane as a spin-trap, were X-irradiated and the resulting spin-adducts were separated by reverse-phase HPLC in the ion suppression mode. The separated spin-adducts were characterized by e.s.r. spectrometry and UV spectrophotometry. Consequently, the radicals due to H-abstraction at the C4' position of the sugar moiety were identified arising from 5'-dAMP and 5'-dGMP. In all cases, e.s.r. spectra consisting of a secondary doublet were observed and assigned to the radical due to H-abstraction at the C5' position of the sugar moiety. (author)

  10. Precision measurements on trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S

    2018-03-28

    Both the 1S-2S transition and the ground state hyperfine spectrum have been observed in trapped antihydrogen. The former constitutes the first observation of resonant interaction of light with an anti-atom, and the latter is the first detailed measurement of a spectral feature in antihydrogen. Owing to the narrow intrinsic linewidth of the 1S-2S transition and use of two-photon laser excitation, the transition energy can be precisely determined in both hydrogen and antihydrogen, allowing a direct comparison as a test of fundamental symmetry. The result is consistent with CPT invariance at a relative precision of around 2×10 -10 This constitutes the most precise measurement of a property of antihydrogen. The hyperfine spectrum of antihydrogen is determined to a relative uncertainty of 4×10 -4 The excited state and the hyperfine spectroscopy techniques currently both show sensitivity at the few 100 kHz level on the absolute scale. Here, the most recent work of the ALPHA collaboration on precision spectroscopy of antihydrogen is presented together with an outlook on improving the precision of measurements involving lasers and microwave radiation. Prospects of measuring the Lamb shift and determining the antiproton charge radius in trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus are presented. Future perspectives of precision measurements of trapped antihydrogen in the ALPHA apparatus when the ELENA facility becomes available to experiments at CERN are discussed.This article is part of the Theo Murphy meeting issue 'Antiproton physics in the ELENA era'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  11. Spin Asymmetries on Nucleon Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) of Jefferson Lab is a comprehensive measurement of double spin asymmetries of the proton for both parallel and almost perpendicular spin configurations of the proton spin and the electron beam polarization directions. The experiment will provide both spin structure functions, g2 and g1 and spin observable A2 and A1 of the proton over Q2 region from 2.5 to 6.5 GeV2/c2 and Bjorken x region of 0.3 to 0.8. Using the polarized electron beam of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the polarized frozen NH3 target, the data were taken early 2009 in Hall C of Jefferson Lab. Scattered electrons from the inclusive reaction were detected by the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), a new non-magnetic detector with a large acceptance of 194 msr. The current analysis effort is focused on the proton spin structure functions g2 and g1. Physics motivations with the experimental methods will be presented with an overvew of the current status of the data analysis.

  12. Electrochemical and Spin-Trapping Properties of para-substituted α-Phenyl-N-tert-butyl Nitrones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosselin, Marie; Tuccio, Béatrice; Pério, Pierre; Villamena, Frederick A.; Fabre, Paul-Louis; Durand, Grégory

    2016-01-01

    Nitrones are known both as therapeutic antioxidants and efficient spin-traps. In this work, the redox behavior of various para-substituted α-phenyl-N-tert-butyl nitrones (PBN) was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The polar effect of the substituents was found to correlate with the electrochemical properties of the nitronyl function. Compounds bearing an electron-withdrawing group were more easily reduced than those having an electron-donating group and an opposite trend was observed for the oxidation. Ease of oxidation was also computationally rationalized using DFT approach showing increased ease of oxidation with electron donating functionalities. Since electrochemical properties of nitrones are known to correlate with biological properties, this work provides insights in the design of potent nitrone antioxidants. Using cyclic voltammetry the relative rate of superoxide trapping by nitrones was investigated and compared to the classical antioxidant BHT. The determination of the relative rate of phenyl radical trapping was also carried out but showed no clear correlation with the nature of the substituents. This indicates the absence of a polar effect in agreement with previous data and further supports the intermediate nature, that is, non- or weakly nucleophile, of phenyl radical. On the contrary kinetics of hydroxymethyl radical trapping was found to correlate with the nature of the substituents, demonstrating the nucleophilic nature of its addition onto nitrones.

  13. Coherent structural trapping through wave packet dispersion during photoinduced spin state switching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemke, Henrik T.; Kjær, Kasper Skov; Hartsock, Robert

    2017-01-01

    is distinguished from the structural trapping dynamics, which launches a coherent oscillating wave packet (265 fs period), clearly identified as molecular breathing. Throughout the structural trapping, the dispersion of the wave packet along the reaction coordinate reveals details of intramolecular vibronic...

  14. Observation of ESR spin flip satellite lines of trapped hydrogen atoms in solid H2 at 4.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Iwata, Nobuchika; Fueki, Kenji; Hase, Hirotomo

    1990-01-01

    ESR spectra of H atoms, produced in γ-irradiated solid H 2 , were studied at 4.2 K. Two main lines of the ESR spectra of H atoms that are separated by about 500 G accompanied two weak satellite lines. Both satellite lines and main lines decrease with the same decay rate. In the D 2 -H 2 mixtures, the satellite-line intensity depends upon the number of matrix protons. The spacing of the satellites from the main lines is equal to that of the NMR proton resonance frequency. It was concluded that the satellite lines were not ascribable to paired atoms but to spin flip lines due to an interaction of H atoms with matrix protons. The analysis of the spin flip lines and the main lines suggests that H atoms in solid H 2 are trapped in the substitutional site

  15. Determination of trapping parameters and the chemical diffusion coefficient from hydrogen permeation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, J.; Mori, G.; Prethaler, A.; Fischer, F.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A modeling study for diffusion of hydrogen with traps is presented. • Introduction of a new chemical diffusion coefficient. • Density of traps and average depth of traps can be determined. • Lattice diffusion and sub-surface concentration of atomic hydrogen can be determined. - Abstract: An improved diffusion theory accounting for trapping effects is applied to evaluation of hydrogen permeation experiments performed for pure iron and pearlitic and martensitic steels. The trapping parameters as molar volume and depth of traps are determined by fitting experiments by simulations based on the theory. The concentration-dependent chemical diffusion coefficient of hydrogen is extracted indicating that the trapping effect on diffusion in pure iron and pearlitic steel is negligible. However, it is significant for martensitic steel, for which the chemical diffusion coefficient cannot be considered as concentration-independent as it is established in current standards

  16. Numerical experiments with rubble piles : equilibrium shapes and spins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Richardson, Derek C.; Elankumaran, Pradeep; Sanderson, Robyn E.

    2005-01-01

    We present numerical experiments investigating the shape and spin limits of self-gravitating "perfect" rubble piles that consist of identical, smooth, rigid, spherical particles with configurable normal coefficient of restitution and no sliding friction. Such constructs are currently employed in a

  17. Optical pump - nuclear resonance probe experiments on spin crossover complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakshath, S.; Jenni, K.; Scherthan, L.; Würtz, P.; Herlitschke, M.; Sergeev, I.; Strohm, C.; Wille, H.-C.; Röhlsberger, R.; Wolny, J. A.; Schünemann, V.

    2017-11-01

    A novel sample environment enabling optical pump - nuclear resonance probe experiments has been installed at the beamline P01, Petra III, DESY Hamburg. This set-up has been used to investigate optically induced spin state changes of spin crossover (SCO) complexes by nuclear resonant scattering immediately after excitation by an optical laser pulse. Here, we report the technical details as well as first results of the experiments performed at 290 K and 80 K on the SCO complexes [Fe (NH2trz)3]Cl2 and [Fe(PM-BiA)2(NCS)2], respectively. The 57Fe-enriched SCO complexes were excited by a 531 nm laser with a pulse length indicate the presence of high spin (HS) states when the complexes are excited by laser pulses and a pure low spin (LS) state in the absence of any laser pulse. Furthermore, the dependence of the optically excited HS-fraction has been determined as a function of the average optical power.

  18. Statistical properties of spectra in harmonically trapped spin-orbit coupled systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    V. Marchukov, O.; G. Volosniev, A.; V. Fedorov, D.

    2014-01-01

    distributions. The Brody and Wigner distributions characterize irregular motion and help identify quantum chaotic systems. We present a special choices of deformation and spin-orbit strengths without the Zeeman term which provide a fair reproduction of the fourth-power repelling Wigner distribution. By adding...

  19. Detection and characterisation of radicals using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin trapping and related methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy (also known as electron spin resonance, ESR, or electron magnetic resonance, EMR, spectroscopy) is often described as the “gold standard” for the detection and characterisation of radicals in chemical, biological and medical systems. The article...

  20. ESR and related experiments in spin-polarized atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yperen, G.H. van.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis deals with some experiments in (gaseous) spin-polarized atomic hydrogen. One uses the expression 'stabilized' atomic hydrogen, meaning that by choosing suitable conditions one can suppress the tendency of atoms to recombine into H 2 molecules, such that the lifetime of the atomic state is extended by many orders of magnitude. Research is focused at the study of processes that determine the decay rate of polarized H samples, with the ultimate goal of preparing samples of sufficiently high density and at low enough temperature to observe experimentally the behaviour of the (degenerate) quantum gas. ESR (Electron Spin Resonance) appears to be a very suitable measurement technique to study the properties of polarized H. This work describes the introduction of ESR as detection technique, and the first results of an experiment in polarized H using this technique. (orig.)

  1. Cryogenic linear Paul trap for cold highly charged ion experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwarz, Maria; Versolato, Oscar; Windberger, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Storage and cooling of highly charged ions require ultra-high vacuum levels obtainable by means of cryogenic methods. We have developed a linear Paul trap operating at 4 K capable of very long ion storage times of about 30 h. A conservative upper bound of the H2 partial pressure of about 10−15 mbar...

  2. EXPERIENCES IN THE AIR SPINNING TO MANUFACTURE MEDICAL DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARSAL Feliu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The work aims to determine, with scientific rigor, differences in key parameters of the yarns produced by conventional ring spinning systems, open-end and air spinning and its interrelation with the main parameters of those products that are intended for medical-sanitary sector. The experiences have been made in a Spanish company from short fibers sector that has three spinning systems, with tradition and prestige in world market, validating the results in Innotex Center laboratories of the Polytechnic University of Catalonia. Considering the results, it shows that the technology of manufacture of yarns by air is suitable for yarn, woven fabrics and knitting, structures to textile medical-sanitary application, by specific properties as well as enhanced competitiveness, due to the high production rate and shortened spinning process. The viscose yarns manufactured by air mass are more mass regular. The new DR parameter clearly indicates a better look of the finished fabric when we work with yarns produced by air technology.The significant reduction of the hairiness means less formation of loose fibres by friction, very important in the application of these yarns in the manufacture of textile structures for medical-sanitary use. Also no-table increase of about 15% in the absorption capacity of the fluids, especially water, from the yarns made by air. In the functionalization of fabrics obtained from spun yarn by air will need to apply a permanent smoothing.

  3. Dark matter spin determination with directional direct detection experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catena, Riccardo; Conrad, Jan; Döring, Christian; Ferella, Alfredo Davide; Krauss, Martin B.

    2018-01-01

    If dark matter has spin 0, only two WIMP-nucleon interaction operators can arise as leading operators from the nonrelativistic reduction of renormalizable single-mediator models for dark matter-quark interactions. Based on this crucial observation, we show that about 100 signal events at next generation directional detection experiments can be enough to enable a 2 σ rejection of the spin 0 dark matter hypothesis in favor of alternative hypotheses where the dark matter particle has spin 1 /2 or 1. In this context, directional sensitivity is crucial since anisotropy patterns in the sphere of nuclear recoil directions depend on the spin of the dark matter particle. For comparison, about 100 signal events are expected in a CF4 detector operating at a pressure of 30 torr with an exposure of approximately 26,000 cubic-meter-detector days for WIMPs of 100 GeV mass and a WIMP-fluorine scattering cross section of 0.25 pb. Comparable exposures require an array of cubic meter time projection chamber detectors.

  4. In vivo detection of free radicals in mouse septic encephalopathy using molecular MRI and immuno-spin trapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Garteiser, Philippe; Bozza, Fernando; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; d' Avila, Joana C P; Magno, Flora; Oliveira, Marcus F; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Lupu, Florea; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ramirez, Dario C; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E; Mason, Ronald P; Castro Faria-Neto, Hugo C

    2013-12-01

    Free radicals are known to play a major role in sepsis. Combined immuno-spin trapping and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to detect in vivo and in situ levels of free radicals in murine septic encephalopathy after cecal ligation and puncture (CLP). DMPO (5,5-dimethyl pyrroline N-oxide) was injected over 6h after CLP, before administration of an anti-DMPO probe (anti-DMPO antibody bound to albumin-gadolinium-diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid-biotin MRI targeting contrast agent). In vitro assessment of the anti-DMPO probe in oxidatively stressed mouse astrocytes significantly decreased T1 relaxation (p free radicals in murine septic encephalopathy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diffusion and trapping of muons in aluminium: New experiments and comparison with Kondo theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, O.; Karlsson, E.; Waeckelgaard, E.; Waeppling, R.; Hempelmann, R.; Niinikoski, T.O.

    1987-03-01

    The diffusion and trapping of positive muons in aluminium has been studied using the method of muon spin rotation. New measurements have been performed on Al-samples doped with Mg, Si, Ga and Ge-impurities (which trap the muons), and for comparison also on an Ag-sample doped with Er. Trapping rates and trapping site information were obtained for temperatures between 0.05 K and 50 K. A global fit to these and earlier published data for trapping by other impurities (Li, Mn, Ag) and vacancies has made it possible to deduce the temperature dependence of the intrinsic diffusion in Al for the range 0.05 - 200 K and to compare it with the recently developed theory by Kondo for light interstitial diffusion in metals. In the low temperature range (0.05 - 2 K) it shows a T -0.7 dependence, followed by an approximately linear T-dependence (2 - 20 K) and an exponential (activated) behaviour at higher temperatures. The theory for the low-T diffusion, which is based on tunneling with energy dissipation through the screening electrons, describes the experimental data with reasonable parameters. For the intermediate range there are strong indications of one phonon assisted diffusion. The trapping sites close to the impurities are discused with reference to the elastic distortions and the electronic density modifications introduced by the different impurities. (with 52 refs.) (author)

  6. Electron spin resonance of paramagnetic defects and related charge carrier traps in complex oxide scintillators

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Laguta, Valentyn; Nikl, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 250, č. 2 (2013), s. 254-260 ISSN 0370-1972 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029; GA ČR GAP204/12/0805; GA AV ČR IAA100100810 Grant - others:SAFMAT(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/22132 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : scintillators * point defects * electron spin resonance * polarons Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.605, year: 2013

  7. An in situ radiolysis EPR study of spin trapping by 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane: steric and electronic effects influencing the trapping of hydroxyalkyl radicals derived from pentanols and substituted pentanols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madden, K.P.; Taniguchi, Hitoshi

    1993-01-01

    The spin adducts formed by reaction of bulky hydroxyalkyl radicals with the nitroso spin trap 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) were studied using in-situ radiolysis EPR. Parent hydroxyalkyl radicals were produced in aqueous solution either by hydroxyl-radical reaction with unsubstituted and methyl-substituted alcohols (propanols, pentanols and cyclohexanols) or by reaction of the corresponding ketone with the hydrated electron. All but the bulkiest radicals reacted with MNP by addition at the nitroso nitrogen site to form the MNP-C(OH)RR' spin adduct. Steric interactions strongly modulated the yields of the spin adducts produced. Strongly reducing hydroxyalkyl radicals also reacted with MNP to produce the MNP-H adduct by direct reduction of MNP. Steric hindrance between the parent radical and MNP was sufficient in the most extreme case to shut off MNP-R production with concomitant production of MNP-H. Spin-adduct persistence was measured for the MNP-hydroxyalkyl and MNP-alkyl spin adducts. Hydroxyalkyl spin adduct lifetimes varied from seconds (MNP-1 -hydroxy-1-methylbutyl) to one year (MNP-1-hydroxycyclohexyl), correlating with the level of aminoxyl function shielding afforded by its substituent groups. MNP spin adducts formed from other non-hydroxyalkyl alcohol radicals had short lifetimes of less than 18 hours. (Author)

  8. Combined molecular MRI and immuno-spin-trapping for in vivo detection of free radicals in orthotopic mouse GL261 gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; De Souza, Patricia Coutinho; Henry, Leah; Lupu, Florea; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Mason, Ronald P; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E; Ramirez, Dario C

    2013-12-01

    Free radicals play a major role in gliomas. By combining immuno-spin-trapping (IST) and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI), in vivo levels of free radicals were detected within mice bearing orthotopic GL261 gliomas. The nitrone spin trap DMPO (5,5-dimethyl pyrroline N-oxide) was administered prior to injection of an anti-DMPO probe (anti-DMPO antibody covalently bound to a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-Gd (gadolinium)-DTPA (diethylene triamine penta acetic acid)-biotin MRI contrast agent) to trap tumor-associated free radicals. mMRI detected the presence of anti-DMPO adducts by either a significant sustained increase (pfree radicals from a glioma model. © 2013.

  9. Mats and LaSpec: High-precision experiments using ion traps and lasers at Fair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, D.; Lallena, A.M.; Blaum, K.; Bohm, C.; Cakirli, R.B.; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J.R.; Eliseev, S.; Ketelaer, J.; Kreim, M.S.; Kowalska, M.; Litvinov, Y.A.; Nagy, S.; Neidherr, D.; Repp, J.; Roux, C.; Schabinger, B.; Ullrich, J.; Nortershauser, W.; Eberhardt, K.; Geppert, C.; Kramer, J.; Krieger, A.; Sanchez, R.; Ahammed, M.; Das, P.; Ray, A.; Algora, A.; Rubio, B.; Tain, J.L.; Audi, G.; Lunney, D.; Naimi, S.; Aysto, J.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V.; Moore, I.; Beck, D.; Block, M.; Geissel, H.; Heinz, S.; Herfurth, F.; Litvinov, Y.A.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Plab, W.R.; Quint, W.; Scheidenberger, C.; Winkler, M.; Bender, M.; Billowes, J.; Campbell, P.; Flanagan, K.T.; Schwarz, S.; Bollen, G.; Ferrer, R.; George, S.; Kester, O.; Brodeur, M.; Brunner, T.; Delheij, P.; Dilling, J.; Ettenauer, S.; Lapierre, A.; Bushaw, B.A.; Cano-Ott, D.; Martinez, T.; Cortes, G.; Gomez-Hornillos, M.B.; Dax, A.; Herlert, A.; Yordanov, D.; De, A.; Dickel, T.; Geissel, H.; Jesch, C.; Kuhl, T.; Petrick, M.; PlaB, W.R.; Scheidenberger, C.; Garcia-Ramos, J.E.; Gartzke, E.; Habs, D.; Szerypo, J.; Thirolf, P.G.; Weber, C.; Gusev, Y.; Nesterenko, D.; Novikov, Y.N.; Popov, A.; Seliverstov, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vorobjev, G.; Heenen, P.H.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.; Ziegler, F.; Hobein, M.; Schuch, R.; Solders, A.; Suhonen, M.; Huber, G.; Wendt, K.; Huyse, M.; Koudriavtsev, I.; Neyens, G.; Van Duppen, P.; Le Blanc, F.; Matos, M.; Reinhard, P.G.; Schneider, D.

    2010-05-15

    Nuclear ground state properties including mass, charge radii, spins and moments can be determined by applying atomic physics techniques such as Penning-trap based mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The MATS and LaSpec setups at the low-energy beamline at FAIR will allow us to extend the knowledge of these properties further into the region far from stability. With MATS (Precision Measurements of very short-lived nuclei using an Advanced Trapping System for highly-charged ions) at FAIR we aim to apply several techniques to very short-lived radionuclides: High-accuracy mass measurements, in-trap conversion electron and alpha spectroscopy, and trap-assisted spectroscopy. The experimental setup of MATS is a unique combination of an electron beam ion trap for charge breeding, ion traps for beam preparation, and a high-precision Penning trap system for mass measurements and decay studies. For the mass measurements, MATS offers both a high accuracy and a high sensitivity. A relative mass uncertainty of 10{sup -9} can be reached by employing highly-charged ions and a non-destructive Fourier-Transform Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance (FT-ICR) detection technique on single stored ions. Decay studies in ion traps will become possible with MATS. Laser spectroscopy of radioactive isotopes and isomers is an efficient and model-independent approach for the determination of nuclear ground and isomeric state properties. Hyperfine structures and isotope shifts in electronic transitions exhibit readily accessible information on the nuclear spin, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments as well as root-mean-square charge radii. The accuracy of laser-spectroscopic-determined nuclear properties is very high while requirements concerning production rates are moderate. This Technical Design Report describes a new Penning trap mass spectrometry setup as well as a number of complementary experimental devices for laser spectroscopy. Since MATS and LaSpec require high-quality low

  10. Rabi resonance in spin systems: theory and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layton, Kelvin J; Tahayori, Bahman; Mareels, Iven M Y; Farrell, Peter M; Johnston, Leigh A

    2014-05-01

    The response of a magnetic resonance spin system is predicted and experimentally verified for the particular case of a continuous wave amplitude modulated radiofrequency excitation. The experimental results demonstrate phenomena not previously observed in magnetic resonance systems, including a secondary resonance condition when the amplitude of the excitation equals the modulation frequency. This secondary resonance produces a relatively large steady state magnetisation with Fourier components at harmonics of the modulation frequency. Experiments are in excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction derived from the Bloch equations, which provides a sound theoretical framework for future developments in NMR spectroscopy and imaging. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Spin precession experiments for light axionic dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W.; Kaplan, David E.; Mardon, Jeremy; Rajendran, Surjeet; Terrano, William A.; Trahms, Lutz; Wilkason, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    Axionlike particles are promising candidates to make up the dark matter of the Universe, but it is challenging to design experiments that can detect them over their entire allowed mass range. Dark matter in general, and, in particular, axionlike particles and hidden photons, can be as light as roughly 10-22 eV (˜10-8 Hz ), with astrophysical anomalies providing motivation for the lightest masses ("fuzzy dark matter"). We propose experimental techniques for direct detection of axionlike dark matter in the mass range from roughly 10-13 eV (˜102 Hz ) down to the lowest possible masses. In this range, these axionlike particles act as a time-oscillating magnetic field coupling only to spin, inducing effects such as a time-oscillating torque and periodic variations in the spin-precession frequency with the frequency and direction of these effects set by the axion field. We describe how these signals can be measured using existing experimental technology, including torsion pendulums, atomic magnetometers, and atom interferometry. These experiments demonstrate a strong discovery capability, with future iterations of these experiments capable of pushing several orders of magnitude past current astrophysical bounds.

  12. E.s.r. of spin-trapped radicals in γ-irradiated polycrystalline amino acids, N-acetyl amino acids and dipeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minegishi, A.; Bergene, R.; Riesz, P.

    1980-01-01

    The radicals produced in several polycrystalline amino acids, N-acetyl amino acids and dipeptides by γ-radiolysis at room temperature were investigated by spin-trapping. After irradiation in the solid state, the samples were dissolved in aqueous solutions of t-nitrosobutane and the trapped radicals identified by e.s.r. For α-amino acids, deamination radicals were found, and in some cases H-abstraction radicals were also observed. No decarboxylation radicals could be detected. For N-acetyl amino acids, except for N-acetylglycine, the major radical was the decarboxylation radical. For N-acetylglycine the H-abstraction radical from the glycine residue was observed. For dipeptides of the type x-glycine, the radical formed by removal of H from the α-carbon of the carboxyl-terminal residue was always spin-trapped. Some primary deamination radicals and minor amounts of decarboxylation radicals could also be observed. For dipeptides of the type x-alanine, glycine-x and alanine-x, the decarboxylation radical was always the major spin-trapped radical. Some primary and secondary deamination radicals were also detected. (author)

  13. Make it spin: individual trapping of sperm for analysis and recovery using micro-contact printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimat, J-P; Bronkhorst, M; de Wagenaar, B; Bomer, J G; van der Heijden, F; van den Berg, A; Segerink, L I

    2014-08-07

    In this article, we describe the development of a high throughput platform to spatially manipulate viable sperm for motility measurements and recovery of the best single sperm for fertilization purposes. Micro-contact printing was used to pattern islands of adhesive proteins (fibronectin) separated by sperm repellent species (Pluronic acid F-127) on commercially available polystyrene substrates. Following washing, arrays of viable single sperm were captured onto the islands demonstrating for the first time that sperm can be trapped by micro-contact printing with patterning efficiency of 90% while retaining 100% viability. These were then subjected to motility analysis whilst remaining spatially confined to the islands. Single sperm motility was assessed (n = 37) by software analysis measuring the number of rotations per second (degrees s⁻¹). The assignment of array coordinates allows the more active single sperm to be easily identified and recovered by a simple micromanipulator pipette aspiration step with automated possibility for assisted reproductive technologies or further quality correlation analysis. Taken together, we show for the first time a technique to simultaneously screen thousands of viable single sperm for motility assessment while retaining the ability for single species recovery for enhanced fertilization purposes.

  14. An ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer with high mass resolution for cold trapped ion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, P. C.; Greenberg, J.; Miller, M. I.; Loeffler, K.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2017-12-01

    Trapping molecular ions that have been sympathetically cooled with laser-cooled atomic ions is a useful platform for exploring cold ion chemistry. We designed and characterized a new experimental apparatus for probing chemical reaction dynamics between molecular cations and neutral radicals at temperatures below 1 K. The ions are trapped in a linear quadrupole radio-frequency trap and sympathetically cooled by co-trapped, laser-cooled, atomic ions. The ion trap is coupled to a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to readily identify product ion species and to accurately determine trapped ion numbers. We discuss, and present in detail, the design of this ion trap time-of-flight mass spectrometer and the electronics required for driving the trap and mass spectrometer. Furthermore, we measure the performance of this system, which yields mass resolutions of m/Δm ≥ 1100 over a wide mass range, and discuss its relevance for future measurements in chemical reaction kinetics and dynamics.

  15. The cryogenic pumping section of KATRIN and the test experiment TRAP

    CERN Document Server

    Eichelhardt, F

    2011-01-01

    The Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) employs a Cryogenic Pumping Section (CPS) at ~ 4.5 K to suppress the tritium penetration into the spectrometers. A test experiment (TRAP - Tritium Argon frost Pump) has been set up to investigate the tritium pumping performance of the CPS.

  16. In vivo detection of free radicals using molecular MRI and immuno-spin trapping in a mouse model for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Smith, Nataliya; Saunders, Debra; Lupu, Florea; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; West, Melinda; Ramirez, Dario C; Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E; Bonini, Marcelo G; Mason, Ronald P; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Hensley, Kenneth

    2013-10-01

    Free radicals associated with oxidative stress play a major role in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). By combining immuno-spin trapping and molecular magnetic resonance imaging, in vivo trapped radical adducts were detected in the spinal cords of SOD1(G93A)-transgenic (Tg) mice, a model for ALS. For this study, the nitrone spin trap DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) was administered (ip) over 5 days before administration (iv) of an anti-DMPO probe (anti-DMPO antibody covalently bound to an albumin-gadolinium-diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid-biotin MRI contrast agent) to trap free radicals. MRI was used to detect the presence of the anti-DMPO radical adducts by a significant sustained increase in MR signal intensities (p radical adducts in an ALS model. This novel, noninvasive, in vivo diagnostic method can be applied to investigate the involvement of free radical mechanisms in ALS rodent models. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Simulating the Long-Distance Propagation of Intense Beams in the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Gilson, Erik P; Davidson, Ronald C; Efthimion, Philip; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) makes use of a compact Paul trap configuration with quadrupolar oscillating wall voltages to simulate the propagation of intense charged particle beams over distances of many kilometers through magnetic alternating-gradient transport systems. The simulation is possible because of the similarity between the transverse dynamics of particles in the two systems. One-component pure cesium ion plasmas have been trapped that correspond to normalized intensity parameters s < 0.8, where s is the ratio of the square of the plasma frequency to twice the square of the average transverse focusing frequency. The PTSX device confines the plasma for hundreds of milliseconds, which is equivalent to beam propagation over tens of kilometers. Results are presented for experiments in which the amplitude of the oscillating confining voltage waveform has been modified as a function of time. A comparison is made between abrupt changes in amplitude and adiabatic changes in amplitude. T...

  18. Distinguishing between coherent magnetization rotation and generation of incoherent spin waves in a spin-transfer effect experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazaliy, Yaroslaw; Jones, Barbara

    2002-03-01

    Electric current flowing from one metallic ferromagnet to another induces an interaction between them [1,2]. This interaction is qualitatively different from the one observed in equilibrium and creates a so-called ``spin-transfer'' torque - a subject of recent interest in the field of spintronics. Technologically spin-transfer effect is very interesting due to its possible usefulness for the memory writing process based on ``current induced switching" in metallic magnetic structures. Physics of spin-transfer torque involves interesting issues of spin-injection, spin-accumulation and excitation of different types of magnetic modes in the ferromagnets. The result of spin-transfer torque action depends on which magnetic mode is most easily excited by the spin-polarized current. Currently there are two views on the nature of this mode. In one approach [1] it is assumed that a coherent rotation of magnetization is induced and in the other [2,3] - that incoherent spin waves are generated. While in a real experiment both modes are probably excited at the same time, intuitively it seems natural that coherent rotation is more likely to happen when the angle between injected spins and magnetization is large. On the contrary in a collinear case spin-wave generation is more likely to happen. In the experiments done so far [4] the effect of spin-transfer torque was studied in the collinear setup. In [5] we applied the general approach of Ref.1 to this experiment and were able to give exact predictions for the particular magnetic anisotropy of the experiment [4]. While those predictions do not completely agree with the experimental results, a theory based on spin-wave generation [6] also seems to be ruled out by [4]. Here we propose a relatively easy modification of experiment [4] in which the spin-polarization of incoming current is no longer collinear with magnetization and recalculate the switching behavior of the device. We expect that a better agreement with experiment will

  19. The new spin physics program of the COMPASS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS experiment, at CERN SPS, has been compiling for more than a decade successful and precise results on nucleon structure and hadron spectroscopy, leading to statistical errors much smaller than previously measured. The new COMPASS spin physics program, starting this year, aims to a rather complete nucleon structure description; this new representation goes beyond the collinear approximation by including the quark intrinsic transverse momentum distributions. The theoretical framework, for this new picture of the nucleon, is given by the Transverse Momentum Dependent distributions (TMDs and by the Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs. The TMDs, in particular Sivers, Boer-Mulders, pretzelosity and transversity functions will be obtained through the polarised Drell-Yan process, for the first time. The results will be complementary to those already obtained via polarised Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS. Also unpolarised SIDIS will be studied, allowing the knowledge improvement of the strange quark PDF and the access to the kaon fragmentation functions (FFs. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS off an unpolarised hydrogen target will be used to study the GPDs, in a kinematic region not yet covered by any existing experiment.

  20. Experiences obtained from camera trapping the European Wildcat in Sicily (Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Anile

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The wildcat is an elusive species that is threatened with extinction in many areas of its European distribution. In Sicily the wildcat lives in a wide range of habitats and this work was done on the Etna volcano. In the 2006, after an exploration of the study area, we used camera traps with the aim to obtain pictures of the wildcat. We conducted our experiment during two periods (April 11 to August 8 - September 26 to December 16 and we used an attractant only in the first period. Twelve of the eighteen trapping stations provided a total of 24 pictures of wildcats. 9 different wildcats were identified using natural-coat marking system and morphological criteria on an area of 660 ha. Our work remarks the goodness of the camera trapping in the monitoring of wildcat’s population, as it has been successfully used for many other felids in recent years.

  1. Trap Design and Construction for High-Power Multinuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rispoli, Joseph V; Dimitrov, Ivan E; Cheshkov, Sergey; Malloy, Craig; Wright, Steven M; McDougall, Mary P

    2016-10-01

    Performing multinuclear experiments requires one or more radiofrequency (RF) coils operating at both the proton and second-nucleus frequencies; however, inductive coupling between coils must be mitigated to retain proton sensitivity and coil tuning stability. The inclusion of trap circuits simplifies placement of multinuclear RF coils while maintaining inter-element isolation. Of the commonly investigated non-proton nuclei, perhaps the most technically demanding is carbon-13, particularly when applying a proton decoupling scheme to improve the resulting spectra. This work presents experimental data for trap circuits withstanding high-power broadband proton decoupling of carbon-13 at 7 T. The advantages and challenges of building trap circuits with various inductor and capacitor components are discussed. Multiple trap designs are evaluated on the bench and utilized on an RF coil at 7 T to detect broadband proton-decoupled carbon-13 spectra from a lipid phantom. A particular trap design, built from a coaxial stub inductor and high-voltage ceramic chip capacitors, is highlighted owing to both its performance and adaptability for planar array coil elements with diverse spatial orientations.

  2. Theoretical investigations of quantum correlations in NMR multiple-pulse spin-locking experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasev, S. A.; Fedorova, A. V.; Fel'dman, E. B.; Kuznetsova, E. I.

    2018-04-01

    Quantum correlations are investigated theoretically in a two-spin system with the dipole-dipole interactions in the NMR multiple-pulse spin-locking experiments. We consider two schemes of the multiple-pulse spin-locking. The first scheme consists of π /2-pulses only and the delays between the pulses can differ. The second scheme contains φ-pulses (0Quantum discord is obtained for the first scheme of the multiple-pulse spin-locking experiment at different temperatures.

  3. Immuno-spin-trapping of a post-translational carboxypeptidase B1 radical formed by a dual role of xanthine oxidase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase in acute septic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Saurabh; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Bhattacharjee, Suchandra; Deterding, Leesa J.; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Corbett, Jean; Kadiiska, Maria; Tomer, Kenneth B; Mason, Ronald P

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins due to exposure to radicals and other reactive species are markers of metabolic and inflammatory oxidative stress such as sepsis. This study uses the nitrone spin-trap DMPO and a combination of immuno-spin trapping and mass spectrometry to identify in vivo products of radical reactions in mice. We report the detection of dose-dependent production of DMPO-carboxypeptidase B1 (CPB1) adducts in the spleen of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Additionally, we report significant detection of DMPO-CPB1 adducts in mice experiencing normal physiological conditions. Treatments with inhibitors and experiments with knock-out mice indicate that xanthine oxidase and endothelial nitric oxide synthase are important sources of the reactive species that lead to CPB1 adduct formation. We also report a significant loss of CPB1 activity following LPS challenge in conjunction with an increase in CPB1 protein accumulation. This suggests the presence of a possible mechanism for CPB1 activity loss with compensatory protein production. PMID:19049863

  4. Polarization experiments with the SPIN setup at the ITEP synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, I G; Kanavets, V P; Koroleva, L I; Morozov, B V; Nesterov, V M; Ryltzov, V V; Svirida, D N; Sulimov, A D; Zhurkin, V V; Beloglasov, Yu A; Kovalev, A I; Kruglov, S P; Novinsky, D V; Shchedrov, V A; Sumachev, Yu V; Trautman, V Yu; Bazhanov, N A; Bunyatova, E I

    2002-01-01

    New experimental data on the spin-rotation parameters A and R measured for elastic pi /sup +or-/p scattering in the resonance region and on the asymmetry in pC scattering at primary momenta in the range 1.35-2.02 GeV/c, as well as in quasielastic proton scattering on nuclei in the same momentum range, are summarized., All these data were recently obtained by using the proton synchrotron installed at the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP, Moscow). The spectrum and features of seven isospin-3/2 baryon resonances that form a peak in the total cross section at a c.m. energy of 1.9 GeV are analyzed on the basis of new data on the parameters A and R, and the results of this analysis are presented. The experiments surveyed in this article were performed by a collaboration of researchers from ITEP and the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute (PNPI, Gatchina), the ITEP-PNPI collaboration. (29 refs).

  5. An effective method for trapping ion beams in superfluid helium for laser spectroscopy experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang X.F

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel laser spectroscopy technique -“OROCHI” (Optical Radioisotopes Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion-catcher has been proposed. This method aimed to investigate the structure of exotic nuclei systematically by measuring nuclear spins and moments. For in-situ laser spectroscopy of atoms in He II, a method to trap atoms precisely at the observation region of laser is highly needed. In this work, a setup composed of a degrader, two plastic scintillators and a photon detection system is further tested and verified for adjusting and checking the stopping position of 84–87Rb beam. Details of the current setup, experimental results using this method are presented.

  6. MATS and LaSpec: High-precision experiments using ion traps and lasers at FAIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, D.; Blaum, K.; Nörtershäuser, W.; Ahammed, M.; Algora, A.; Audi, G.; Äystö, J.; Beck, D.; Bender, M.; Billowes, J.; Block, M.; Böhm, C.; Bollen, G.; Brodeur, M.; Brunner, T.; Bushaw, B. A.; Cakirli, R. B.; Campbell, P.; Cano-Ott, D.; Cortés, G.; Crespo López-Urrutia, J. R.; Das, P.; Dax, A.; de, A.; Delheij, P.; Dickel, T.; Dilling, J.; Eberhardt, K.; Eliseev, S.; Ettenauer, S.; Flanagan, K. T.; Ferrer, R.; García-Ramos, J.-E.; Gartzke, E.; Geissel, H.; George, S.; Geppert, C.; Gómez-Hornillos, M. B.; Gusev, Y.; Habs, D.; Heenen, P.-H.; Heinz, S.; Herfurth, F.; Herlert, A.; Hobein, M.; Huber, G.; Huyse, M.; Jesch, C.; Jokinen, A.; Kester, O.; Ketelaer, J.; Kolhinen, V.; Koudriavtsev, I.; Kowalska, M.; Krämer, J.; Kreim, S.; Krieger, A.; Kühl, T.; Lallena, A. M.; Lapierre, A.; Le Blanc, F.; Litvinov, Y. A.; Lunney, D.; Martínez, T.; Marx, G.; Matos, M.; Minaya-Ramirez, E.; Moore, I.; Nagy, S.; Naimi, S.; Neidherr, D.; Nesterenko, D.; Neyens, G.; Novikov, Y. N.; Petrick, M.; Plaß, W. R.; Popov, A.; Quint, W.; Ray, A.; Reinhard, P.-G.; Repp, J.; Roux, C.; Rubio, B.; Sánchez, R.; Schabinger, B.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schneider, D.; Schuch, R.; Schwarz, S.; Schweikhard, L.; Seliverstov, M.; Solders, A.; Suhonen, M.; Szerypo, J.; Taín, J. L.; Thirolf, P. G.; Ullrich, J.; van Duppen, P.; Vasiliev, A.; Vorobjev, G.; Weber, C.; Wendt, K.; Winkler, M.; Yordanov, D.; Ziegler, F.

    2010-05-01

    Nuclear ground state properties including mass, charge radii, spins and moments can be determined by applying atomic physics techniques such as Penning-trap based mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The MATS and LaSpec setups at the low-energy beamline at FAIR will allow us to extend the knowledge of these properties further into the region far from stability. The mass and its inherent connection with the nuclear binding energy is a fundamental property of a nuclide, a unique “fingerprint”. Thus, precise mass values are important for a variety of applications, ranging from nuclear-structure studies like the investigation of shell closures and the onset of deformation, tests of nuclear mass models and mass formulas, to tests of the weak interaction and of the Standard Model. The required relative accuracy ranges from 10-5 to below 10-8 for radionuclides, which most often have half-lives well below 1 s. Substantial progress in Penning trap mass spectrometry has made this method a prime choice for precision measurements on rare isotopes. The technique has the potential to provide high accuracy and sensitivity even for very short-lived nuclides. Furthermore, ion traps can be used for precision decay studies and offer advantages over existing methods. With MATS (Precision Measurements of very short-lived nuclei using an A_dvanced Trapping System for highly-charged ions) at FAIR we aim to apply several techniques to very short-lived radionuclides: High-accuracy mass measurements, in-trap conversion electron and alpha spectroscopy, and trap-assisted spectroscopy. The experimental setup of MATS is a unique combination of an electron beam ion trap for charge breeding, ion traps for beam preparation, and a high-precision Penning trap system for mass measurements and decay studies. For the mass measurements, MATS offers both a high accuracy and a high sensitivity. A relative mass uncertainty of 10-9 can be reached by employing highly-charged ions and a non

  7. MATS and LaSpec: High-precision experiments using ion traps and lasers at FAIR

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, D; Scheidenberger, C; Kreim, S; Gomez-Hornillos, M B; Aysto, J; Dickel, T; Geppert, C; Novikov, Y N; Tain, J L; Garcia-Ramos, J E; Bollen, G; Hobein, M; Audi, G; Beck, D; Winkler, M; Jesch, C; Vasiliev, A; Sanchez, R; Neidherr, D; Huber, G; Weber, C; Suhonen, M; Reinhard, P G; Jokinen, A; Lapierre, A; Bender, M; Martinez, T; Solders, A; Huyse, M; Matos, M; Szerypo, J; Seliverstov, M; Cortes, G; Cakirli, R B; Van Duppen, P; George, S; Block, M; Ahammed, M; Herfurth, F; Neyens, G; Habs, D; Thirolf, P G; Flanagan, K T; Roux, C; Schneider, D; Brodeur, M; Yordanov, D; Marx, G; Koudriavtsev, I; De, A; Boehm, C; Noertershaeuser, W; Blaum, K; Schabinger, B; Ettenauer, S; Plass, W R; Wendt, K; Nagy, S; Vorobjev, G; Minaya-Ramirez, E; Heenen, P-H; Quint, W; Kester, O; Le Blanc, F; Ray, A; Billowes, J; Kuehl, T; Kraemer, J; Lunney, D; Kolhinen, V; Rubio, B; Brunner, T; Nesterenko, D; Ferrer, R; Algora, A; Repp, J; Naimi, S; Eberhardt, K; Ziegler, F; Popov, A; Krieger, A; Campbell, P; Gartzke, E; Ketelaer, J; Heinz, S; Delheij, P; Ullrich, J; Dax, A; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J R; Eliseev, S; Das, P; Cano-Ott, D; Petrick, M; Moore, I; Litvinov, Y A; Schwarz, S; Dilling, J; Geissel, H; Bushaw, B A; Gusev, Y; Lallena, A M; Schweikhard, L; Schuch, R; Herlert, A

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear ground state properties including mass, charge radii, spins and moments can be determined by applying atomic physics techniques such as Penning-trap based mass spectrometry and laser spectroscopy. The MATS and LaSpec setups at the low-energy beamline at FAIR will allow us to extend the knowledge of these properties further into the region far from stability. The mass and its inherent connection with the nuclear binding energy is a fundamental property of a nuclide, a unique ``fingerprint{''}. Thus, precise mass values are important for a variety of applications, ranging from nuclear-structure studies like the investigation of shell closures and the onset of deformation, tests of nuclear mass models and mass formulas, to tests of the weak interaction and of the Standard Model. The required relative accuracy ranges from 10(-5) to below 10(-8) for radionuclides, which most often have half-lives well below 1 s. Substantial progress in Penning trap mass spectrometry has made this method a prime choice for ...

  8. Effect of temperature on thermal oxidation of palmitic acid studied by combination of EPR spin trapping technique and SPME-GC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongjian; Wang, Yong; Cao, Peirang; Liu, Yuanfa

    2017-11-01

    Effect of temperatures on thermal oxidation of palmitic acid was studied by the combination of EPR and GC-MS/MS. DMPO was used as the spin trap. The experimental spectrum was simulated with alkyl and alkoxyl spin adducts. Total amount of spins, a parameter to indicate radical concentrations, detected at 180°C was nearly 10 times higher than that at 175°C. Besides, total amounts of spins detected at 180°C decreased rapidly because of the reaction between radical adducts and newly formed radicals. Signal intensities of alkyl radical adducts increased rapidly from 0.405 to 4.785 from 175°C to 180°C. Besides, more palmitic acid degraded to oxidized compounds from 175°C to 180°C than that of other temperature ranges. The C-C linkages between carbons 2 to 6 were easier to be oxidized at 180°C. The results all implied that oxidation rates of palmitic acid samples increased rapidly from 175°C to 180°C. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic for the Paul Trap Simulator Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Moses; Efthimion, Philip; Gilson, Erik P; Majeski, Richard; Startsev, Edward

    2005-01-01

    The Paul Trap Simulator Experiment (PTSX) is a cylindrical Paul trap whose purpose is to simulate the nonlinear dynamics of intense charged particle beam propagation in alternating-gradient magnetic transport systems. For the in-situ measurement of the transverse ion density profile in the PTSX device, which is essential for the study of beam mismatch and halo particle production, a laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic system is being developed. Instead of cesium, which has been used in the initial phase of the PTSX experiment, barium has been selected as the preferred ion for the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic. The installation of the barium ion source and the characterization of the tunable dye laser system are discussed. The design of the collection optics with an intensified CCD camera system is also discussed. Finally, initial test results using the laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic will be presented.

  10. Fracture analysis of the NESC-1 spinning cylinder experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents finite-element analyses of the cylinder specimen being used in the international Network for Evaluating Steel Components (NESC) large-scale spinning-cylinder project (NESC-1). The objective of the NESC-1 project is to focus on a complete process for assessing the structural integrity of aged reactor pressure vessels. A new cylinder specimen was reconstituted from segments of the previously tested SC-4 and SC-6 specimens because the relatively high fracture toughness of the original specimen might preclude achieving the test objectives. The wall thickness is greater for the reconstituted specimen when compared with the previous specimen geometry (175 vs 150 mm). Also, the initial and coolant temperatures for the proposed thermal shock may be reduced as much as 25 C to increase the probability of achieving cleavage initiation. Analyses were carried out to determine the combined effects of increasing the wall thickness and lowering the initial and coolant temperatures in the experiment. Estimates were made of the change in hoop strain on the clad inner surface directly above a subclad crack due to initiation and axial propagation of cladded cylinder were generated with 6:1 and 2:1 semielliptical 70-mm-deep subclad cracks. The cylinder specimen was subjected to thermal-shock and centrifugal loading conditions and analyzed with a thermo-elastic-plastic material model. The analytical results indicate that lowering the initial and coolant temperatures by 25 C will not significantly change the peak driving force, but will shift the stress-intensity factor (K I ) vs temperature curves so that the crack will become critical at an earlier time in the transient. The peak K I value occurs at a lower temperature, which increases the probability of achieving cleavage initiation. Also, the calculated hoop strains for the two crack aspect ratios provide an estimated change in hoop strain inn the range of 3 to 4% on the clad inner surface

  11. Fracture analysis of the NESC-1 spinning cylinder experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeney, J.A.; Bass, B.R.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents finite-element analyses of the cylinder specimen being used in the international Network for Evaluating Steel Components (NESC) large-scale spinning-cylinder project (NESC-1). The objective of the NESC-1 project is to focus on a complete process for assessing the structural integrity of aged reactor pressure vessels. A new cylinder specimen was reconstituted from segments of the previously tested SC-4 and SC-6 specimens because the relatively high fracture toughness of the original specimen might preclude achieving the test objectives. Also, the initial and coolant temperatures for the proposed thermal shock may be reduced as much as 25 C to increase the probability of achieving cleavage initiation. Analyses were carried out to determine the combined effects of increasing the wall thickness and lowering the initial and coolant temperatures in the experiment. Estimates were made of the change in hoop strain on the clad inner surface directly above a subclad crack due to initiation and axial propagation of the crack. Three-dimensional finite-element models of the cladded cylinder were generated with 6:1 and 2:1 semielliptical 70-mm-deep subclad cracks. The cylinder specimen was subjected to thermal-shock and centrifugal loading conditions and analyzed with a thermo-elastic-plastic material model. The analytical results indicate that lowering the initial and coolant temperatures by 25 C will not significantly change the peak driving force, but will shift the stress-intensity factor (K I ) vs temperature curves so that the crack will become critical at an earlier time in the transient. The peak K I value occurs at a lower temperature which increases the probability of achieving cleavage initiation

  12. Manifestations of classical physics in the quantum evolution of correlated spin states in pulsed NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligare, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Multiple-pulse NMR experiments are a powerful tool for the investigation of molecules with coupled nuclear spins. The product operator formalism provides a way to understand the quantum evolution of an ensemble of weakly coupled spins in such experiments using some of the more intuitive concepts of classical physics and semi-classical vector representations. In this paper I present a new way in which to interpret the quantum evolution of an ensemble of spins. I recast the quantum problem in terms of mixtures of pure states of two spins whose expectation values evolve identically to those of classical moments. Pictorial representations of these classically evolving states provide a way to calculate the time evolution of ensembles of weakly coupled spins without the full machinery of quantum mechanics, offering insight to anyone who understands precession of magnetic moments in magnetic fields.

  13. Free radical generation by non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma in alcohol–water mixtures: an EPR-spin trapping study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Ishikawa, Kenji; Zhao, Qing-Li; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Krishna, Murali C.; Ishijima, Tatsuo; Matsuya, Yuji; Hori, Masaru; Noguchi, Kyo; Kondo, Takashi

    2018-03-01

    Free radical species in aqueous solution—various alcohol–water reaction mixtures—by exposure to non-equilibrium cold atmospheric pressure Ar plasma (CAP), were monitored using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-trapping techniques with 3, 5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate as a water soluble nitroso spin trap. The major radical species were formed by H-abstraction from alcohol molecules due to ·OH radicals. In the ethanol–water mixture ·CH2CH2OH produced by H abstraction from CH3 group of the ethanol and ·CH3 radicals were detected. The latter was due to the decomposition of unstable CH3·CHOH to form the ·CH3 radicals and the stable formaldehyde by C–C bond fission. These intermediates are similar to those observed by reaction with ·OH radicals generation in the H2O2–UV photolysis of the reaction mixtures. The evidence of ·CH3 radical formation in the pyrolytic decomposition of the reaction mixtures by exposure to ultrasound or in methane irradiated with microwave plasma have been reported previously. However, the pyrolytic ·CH3 radicals were not found in both plasma and H2O2–UV photolysis condition. These results suggests that free radicals produced by Ar-CAP are most likely due to the reaction between abundant ·OH radicals and alcohol molecules.

  14. Auto- and cross-power spectral analysis of dual trap optical tweezer experiments using Bayesian inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hansen, Yann; Mehlich, Alexander; Pelz, Benjamin; Rief, Matthias; Netz, Roland R

    2012-09-01

    The thermal fluctuations of micron-sized beads in dual trap optical tweezer experiments contain complete dynamic information about the viscoelastic properties of the embedding medium and-if present-macromolecular constructs connecting the two beads. To quantitatively interpret the spectral properties of the measured signals, a detailed understanding of the instrumental characteristics is required. To this end, we present a theoretical description of the signal processing in a typical dual trap optical tweezer experiment accounting for polarization crosstalk and instrumental noise and discuss the effect of finite statistics. To infer the unknown parameters from experimental data, a maximum likelihood method based on the statistical properties of the stochastic signals is derived. In a first step, the method can be used for calibration purposes: We propose a scheme involving three consecutive measurements (both traps empty, first one occupied and second empty, and vice versa), by which all instrumental and physical parameters of the setup are determined. We test our approach for a simple model system, namely a pair of unconnected, but hydrodynamically interacting spheres. The comparison to theoretical predictions based on instantaneous as well as retarded hydrodynamics emphasizes the importance of hydrodynamic retardation effects due to vorticity diffusion in the fluid. For more complex experimental scenarios, where macromolecular constructs are tethered between the two beads, the same maximum likelihood method in conjunction with dynamic deconvolution theory will in a second step allow one to determine the viscoelastic properties of the tethered element connecting the two beads.

  15. Recent Spin Pump Experiments on Superfluid 3He-A1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, A.; Kamada, N.; Motoyama, G.; Sumiyama, A.; Aoki, Y.; Okuda, Y.; Kubota, M.; Kojima, H.

    2013-05-01

    The superfluid 3He A1 phase, containing a spin-polarized condensate allows us to explore the dynamics of superfluid spin current. In the mechano-spin effect (MSE), a mechanically applied pressure gradient and a superleak-spin filter enable one to directly boost spin polarization of 3He in a small chamber. We are developing new apparatus for achieving greater enhancement of spin density. A development of a new-type 3He-hydraulic actuator has been already reported. We present here the construction of new-type of superleak-spin-filter made of packed powder aluminum oxide (referred as PAP-SL). The PAP-SL is popular in the study of superfluid 4He, but has not been established for that of the superfluid 3He. The attempt to construct the PAP-SL for the spin pump experiment was made by using aluminum oxide powder with nominal 1 μm powder diameter and with packing fraction of 40 %. Before executing the experiment, the nuclear demagnetization cryostat of ISSP, Univ. Tokyo which has been used for this experimental activity, was heavily damaged by the 2011 Great East Japan (Higashi Nihon) Earthquake. The repair work and earthquake damage protection strengthening has just been accomplished.

  16. Experiment on the melting pressure of spin polarized He3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chapellier, M.; Olsen, M.; Rasmussen, Finn Berg

    1981-01-01

    In liquid He in a Pomeranchuk cell, the melting curve has been observed to be suppressed, presumably in regions with a strong local spin polarization. In the temperature range 30-50 mK the observed suppression was 60-80 kPa. The corresponding local polarization is estimated, in a crude model, to ...

  17. Development of a buffer gas trap for the confinement of positrons and study of positronium production in the GBAR experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2101248; van der Werf, Dirk

    The GBAR experiment relies on the production of antihydrogen positive ions to achieve its goal of measuring the gravitational acceleration of antimatter at rest. The ANTION project, included in the GBAR enterprise, is responsible for the production of these antimatter ions. Moreover, it also aims to measure the cross section of antihydrogen production throughout the collision of antiprotons and positronium atoms, as well as the matter cross sections of hydrogen and the hydrogen negative ion. These experiments imply the formation of a very dense positronium cloud, thus a large amount of positrons will be implanted on a positron/positronium converter material. This thesis reports the construction of a three stage buffer gas trap with the goal of trapping and accumulating positrons for the ANTION project. The combination of the Penning-type trap with a LINAC source constitutes a unique experimental setup. The trap was commissioned and optimized and is now fully operational. Trapping protocols were studied and...

  18. Polarisation in spin-echo experiments: Multi-point and lock-in measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamtögl, Anton; Davey, Benjamin; Ward, David J.; Jardine, Andrew P.; Ellis, John; Allison, William

    2018-02-01

    Spin-echo instruments are typically used to measure diffusive processes and the dynamics and motion in samples on ps and ns time scales. A key aspect of the spin-echo technique is to determine the polarisation of a particle beam. We present two methods for measuring the spin polarisation in spin-echo experiments. The current method in use is based on taking a number of discrete readings. The implementation of a new method involves continuously rotating the spin and measuring its polarisation after being scattered from the sample. A control system running on a microcontroller is used to perform the spin rotation and to calculate the polarisation of the scattered beam based on a lock-in amplifier. First experimental tests of the method on a helium spin-echo spectrometer show that it is clearly working and that it has advantages over the discrete approach, i.e., it can track changes of the beam properties throughout the experiment. Moreover, we show that real-time numerical simulations can perfectly describe a complex experiment and can be easily used to develop improved experimental methods prior to a first hardware implementation.

  19. Behavior of many ions in a Penning trap and results of the WITCH experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Porobic, Tomica

    Precision measurements of the beta−neutrino angular correlation in nuclear beta-decay provide a unique window into the physics beyond the Standard model. The WITCH (Weak Interaction Trap for CHarged particles) experiment aims to measure this correlation, a(beta-nu), in order to impose a more stringent constraint on the exotic scalar current admixture in the beta-decay Hamiltonian. The apparatus is situated at CERN/ISOLDE laboratory and consists of a unique combination of a retardation spectrometer and two Penning traps, with one of them serving as a scattering-free source. This configuration is suited for a precise measurement of the energy spectrum of 35Ar recoiled daughter ions. The shape of the spectrum then allows a determination of a(beta-nu) and consequently of the presence or absence of a scalar current. Radioactive 35Ar ions are created at ISOLDE by impinging 1.2 GeV protons on the target material. After being separated by a magnetic separator and bunched by REXTRAP, a high-capacity Penning trap, th...

  20. Nuclear spin relaxation in liquids theory, experiments, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalewski, Jozef

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used across many fields because of the rich data it produces, and some of the most valuable data come from the study of nuclear spin relaxation in solution. While described to varying degrees in all major NMR books, spin relaxation is often perceived as a difficult, if not obscure, topic, and an accessible, cohesive treatment has been nearly impossible to find.Collecting relaxation theory, experimental techniques, and illustrative applications into a single volume, this book clarifies the nature of the phenomenon, shows how to study it, and explains why such studies are worthwhile. Coverage ranges from basic to rigorous theory and from simple to sophisticated experimental methods, and the level of detail is somewhat greater than most other NMR texts. Topics include cross-relaxation, multispin phenomena, relaxation studies of molecular dynamics and structure, and special topics such as relaxation in systems with quadrupolar nuclei and paramagnetic systems.Avoiding ove...

  1. Canadian experience with spin-offs from nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lennox, C.G.; Garvey, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    The innovation process introduced into AECL's research laboratories is described, with its achievements in increased commercial and spin-off businesses. In particular, the role of the champion or entrepreneur is emphasized in the manner in which he/she interacts within a dedicated team to pursue each opportunity. Examples are provided of several commercial and business development opportunities resulting from the background research programs

  2. EPR-Spin Trapping and Flow Cytometric Studies of Free Radicals Generated Using Cold Atmospheric Argon Plasma and X-Ray Irradiation in Aqueous Solutions and Intracellular Milieu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Hidefumi; Zhao, Qing-Li; Hassan, Mariame Ali; Andocs, Gabor; Nojima, Nobuyuki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Hori, Masaru; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-spin trapping and flow cytometry were used to identify free radicals generated using argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP) in aqueous solutions and intracellularly in comparison with those generated by X-irradiation. Ar-CAP was generated using a high-voltage power supply unit with low-frequency excitation. The characteristics of Ar-CAP were estimated by vacuum UV absorption and emission spectra measurements. Hydroxyl (·OH) radicals and hydrogen (H) atoms in aqueous solutions were identified with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO), 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (M4PO), and phenyl N-t-butylnitrone (PBN). The occurrence of Ar-CAP-induced pyrolysis was evaluated using the spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS) in aqueous solutions of DNA constituents, sodium acetate, and L-alanine. Human lymphoma U937 cells were used to study intracellular oxidative stress using five fluorescent probes with different affinities to a number of reactive species. The analysis and quantification of EPR spectra revealed the formation of enormous amounts of ·OH radicals using Ar-CAP compared with that by X-irradiation. Very small amounts of H atoms were detected whereas nitric oxide was not found. The formation of ·OH radicals depended on the type of rare gas used and the yield correlated inversely with ionization energy in the order of krypton > argon = neon > helium. No pyrolysis radicals were detected in aqueous solutions exposed to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, ·OH, H2O2, which is the recombination product of ·OH, and OCl- were the most likely formed reactive oxygen species after exposure to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, there was no practical evidence for the formation of NO whereas very small amounts of superoxides were formed. Despite the superiority of Ar-CAP in forming ·OH radicals, the exposure to X-rays proved more lethal. The mechanism of free radical formation in aqueous solutions and an

  3. EPR-Spin Trapping and Flow Cytometric Studies of Free Radicals Generated Using Cold Atmospheric Argon Plasma and X-Ray Irradiation in Aqueous Solutions and Intracellular Milieu.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidefumi Uchiyama

    Full Text Available Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR-spin trapping and flow cytometry were used to identify free radicals generated using argon-cold atmospheric plasma (Ar-CAP in aqueous solutions and intracellularly in comparison with those generated by X-irradiation. Ar-CAP was generated using a high-voltage power supply unit with low-frequency excitation. The characteristics of Ar-CAP were estimated by vacuum UV absorption and emission spectra measurements. Hydroxyl (·OH radicals and hydrogen (H atoms in aqueous solutions were identified with the spin traps 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO, 3,3,5,5-tetramethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (M4PO, and phenyl N-t-butylnitrone (PBN. The occurrence of Ar-CAP-induced pyrolysis was evaluated using the spin trap 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate (DBNBS in aqueous solutions of DNA constituents, sodium acetate, and L-alanine. Human lymphoma U937 cells were used to study intracellular oxidative stress using five fluorescent probes with different affinities to a number of reactive species. The analysis and quantification of EPR spectra revealed the formation of enormous amounts of ·OH radicals using Ar-CAP compared with that by X-irradiation. Very small amounts of H atoms were detected whereas nitric oxide was not found. The formation of ·OH radicals depended on the type of rare gas used and the yield correlated inversely with ionization energy in the order of krypton > argon = neon > helium. No pyrolysis radicals were detected in aqueous solutions exposed to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, ·OH, H2O2, which is the recombination product of ·OH, and OCl- were the most likely formed reactive oxygen species after exposure to Ar-CAP. Intracellularly, there was no practical evidence for the formation of NO whereas very small amounts of superoxides were formed. Despite the superiority of Ar-CAP in forming ·OH radicals, the exposure to X-rays proved more lethal. The mechanism of free radical formation in aqueous solutions and

  4. Thomas-Fermi-von Weizsäcker theory for a harmonically trapped, two-dimensional, spin-polarized dipolar Fermi gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zyl, B. P.; Zaremba, E.; Pisarski, P.

    2013-04-01

    We systematically develop a density functional description for the equilibrium properties of a two-dimensional, harmonically trapped, spin-polarized dipolar Fermi gas based on the Thomas-Fermi-von Weizsäcker approximation. We pay particular attention to the construction of the two-dimensional kinetic energy functional, where corrections beyond the local density approximation must be motivated with care. We also present an intuitive derivation of the interaction energy functional associated with the dipolar interactions and provide physical insight into why it can be represented as a local functional. Finally, a simple and highly efficient self-consistent numerical procedure is developed to determine the equilibrium density of the system for a range of dipole interaction strengths.

  5. Neutron lifetime experiments using magnetically trapped neutrons: optimal background correction strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, K.J. E-mail: kevin.coakley@nist.gov

    2001-08-21

    In the first stage of each run of a neutron lifetime experiment, a magnetic trap is filled with neutrons. In the second stage of each run, decay events plus background events are observed. In a separate experiment, background is measured. The mean lifetime is estimated by fitting a two parameter exponential model to the background-corrected data. For two models of the background signal, I determine the optimal ratio of the number of 'background-only' measurements to the number of primary 'neutron decay plus background' measurements. Further, for each run, I determine the optimal allocation of time for filling and for observing decay events. For the case where the background consists of an activated material (aluminum) plus a stationary Poisson process, the asymptotic standard error of the lifetime estimate computed from the background-corrected data is lower than the asymptotic standard error computed from the uncorrected data. For the case where the background is a stationary Poisson process, background correction is desirable provided that the background intensity is sufficiently small compared to the rate at which neutrons enter the trap.

  6. Potential of EPR spin-trapping to investigate in situ free radicals generation from skin allergens in reconstructed human epidermis: cumene hydroperoxide as proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuresepi, Salen; Vileno, Bertrand; Turek, Philippe; Lepoittevin, Jean-Pierre; Giménez-Arnau, Elena

    2018-02-01

    The first step in the development of skin sensitisation to a chemical, and in the elicitation of further allergic contact dermatitis (ACD), is the binding of the allergen to skin proteins after penetrating into the epidermis. The so-formed antigenic adduct is then recognised by the immune system as foreign to the body. Sensitising organic hydroperoxides derived from autoxidation of natural terpenes are believed to form antigens through radical-mediated mechanisms, although this has not yet been established. So far, in vitro investigations on reactive radical intermediates derived from these skin sensitisers have been conducted in solution, yet with experimental conditions being far away from real-life sensitisation. Herein, we report for the first time, the potential use of EPR spin-trapping to study the in situ generation of free radicals derived from cumene hydroperoxide CumOOH in a 3D reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) model, thus much closer to what may happen in vivo. Among the undesirable effects associated with dermal exposure to CumOOH, it is described to cause allergic and irritant dermatitis, being reported as a significant sensitiser. We considered exploiting the usage of spin-trap DEPMPO as an extensive view of all sort of radicals derived from CumOOH were observed all at once in solution. We showed that in the Episkin TM RHE model, both by incubating in the assay medium and by topical application, carbon radicals are mainly formed by redox reactions suggesting the key role of CumOOH-derived carbon radicals in the antigen formation process.

  7. Design and performance of the spin asymmetries of the nucleon experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, J. D.; Armstrong, W. R.; Choi, S.; Jones, M. K.; Kang, H.; Liyanage, A.; Meziani, Z.-E.; Mulholland, J.; Ndukum, L.; Rondón, O. A.; Ahmidouch, A.; Albayrak, I.; Asaturyan, A.; Ates, O.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Boeglin, W.; Bosted, P.; Brash, E.; Brock, J.; Butuceanu, C.; Bychkov, M.; Carlin, C.; Carter, P.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Christy, M. E.; Covrig, S.; Crabb, D.; Danagoulian, S.; Daniel, A.; Davidenko, A. M.; Davis, B.; Day, D.; Deconinck, W.; Deur, A.; Dunne, J.; Dutta, D.; El Fassi, L.; Elaasar, M.; Ellis, C.; Ent, R.; Flay, D.; Frlez, E.; Gaskell, D.; Geagla, O.; German, J.; Gilman, R.; Gogami, T.; Gomez, J.; Goncharenko, Y. M.; Hashimoto, O.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Horn, T.; Huber, G. M.; Jones, M.; Kalantarians, N.; Kang, H. K.; Kawama, D.; Keith, C.; Keppel, C.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, Y.; King, P. M.; Kohl, M.; Kovacs, K.; Kubarovsky, V.; Li, Y.; Liyanage, N.; Luo, W.; Mamyan, V.; Markowitz, P.; Maruta, T.; Meekins, D.; Melnik, Y. M.; Mkrtchyan, A.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Mochalov, V. V.; Monaghan, P.; Narayan, A.; Nakamura, S. N.; Nuruzzaman; Pentchev, L.; Pocanic, D.; Posik, M.; Puckett, A.; Qiu, X.; Reinhold, J.; Riordan, S.; Roche, J.; Sawatzky, B.; Shabestari, M.; Slifer, K.; Smith, G.; Soloviev, L.; Solvignon, P.; Tadevosyan, V.; Tang, L.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Veilleux, M.; Walton, T.; Wesselmann, F.; Wood, S. A.; Yao, H.; Ye, Z.; Zhu, L.

    2018-03-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) performed inclusive, double-polarized electron scattering measurements of the proton at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Lab. A novel detector array observed scattered electrons of four-momentum transfer 2 . 5 experiment, and describes analysis techniques utilized to access the physics observables of interest.

  8. Review of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, James J.; Lewis, Raymond A.; Boise Pearson, J.; Sims, W. Herb; Chakrabarti, Suman; Fant, Gene; McDonald, Stan

    2003-10-01

    Many space propulsion concepts exist that use matter-antimatter reactions. Current antiproton production rates are enough to conduct proof-of-principle evaluation of these concepts. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, to transport antiprotons to experimental facilities. To address this need, HiPAT is being developed, with a design goal of containing 10^12 particles for up to 18 days. HiPAT is a Penning-Malmberg trap with a 4 Telsa superconductor, 20 kV electrodes, radio frequency (RF) network, and 10-13 Torr vacuum. "Normal" matter is being used to evaluate the system. An electron beam ionizes background gas in situ, and particle beams are captured dynamically. The experiment examines ion storage lifetimes, RF plasma diagnostics, charge exchange with background gases, and dynamic ion beam capture.

  9. Neutron lifetime experiments using magnetically trapped neutrons optimal background correction strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Coakley, K J

    2001-01-01

    In the first stage of each run of a neutron lifetime experiment, a magnetic trap is filled with neutrons. In the second stage of each run, decay events plus background events are observed. In a separate experiment, background is measured. The mean lifetime is estimated by fitting a two parameter exponential model to the background-corrected data. For two models of the background signal, I determine the optimal ratio of the number of 'background-only' measurements to the number of primary 'neutron decay plus background' measurements. Further, for each run, I determine the optimal allocation of time for filling and for observing decay events. For the case where the background consists of an activated material (aluminum) plus a stationary Poisson process, the asymptotic standard error of the lifetime estimate computed from the background-corrected data is lower than the asymptotic standard error computed from the uncorrected data. For the case where the background is a stationary Poisson process, background corr...

  10. Air trapping and arboreal locomotor adaptation in primates: a review of experiments on humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayama, Sugio; Honda, Kiyoshi; Oka, Hideo; Okada, Morihiko

    2002-03-01

    A review was made of experiments on humans in which air trapping by glottis closure during three-dimensional movements were examined in four subjects including former Olympic gymnasts. In brachiation and horizontal bar exercises, the behaviour of the larynx was monitored with a fiberoptic endoscope, and EMG-data were recorded from shoulder muscles. The results revealed that immobilization of the polyaxial connection between the shoulder girdle and the thorax by air trapping occurs in phases of extreme loading of the upper limbs. The closure of the airway by the larynx in humans serves three functions: first, the prevention of errors in deglutition; second, the production of vocal sounds; third, the retention of air inside the thoracic cavity. The latter function, air trapping, allows the immobilization of the rib cage for the muscular fixation of the shoulder blade on the trunk in movements that imply unusually high external forces acting on the upper limbs. This morphological-functional innovation probably has been made when early mammals invaded the three dimensional arboreal habitat, because it gave the tree-dwelling early primates the device to anchor themselves by the arms alone and to avoid falling out of trees. The specific functional characteristic of primates is the hermetic closure of the vocal and vestibular folds by rapidly contracting muscles in the folds. So the closure of the glottis, which in humans seems primarily an adaptation to the production of vocal tones, seems to go back to the adaptation of Tertiary arboreal primates to movements in a three-dimensional environment. Our conclusions are in agreement with the results of other contributions to this volume.

  11. Statistical planning for a neutron lifetime experiment using magnetically trapped neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coakley, K.J. [Nat. Inst. of Stand. and Technol., Boulder, CO (United States). Stat. Eng. Div.

    1998-04-11

    At the NIST cold neutron research facility, a two-stage experiment will be repeated many times. During the first stage of each run cycle, ultracold neutrons will be produced and confined in a magnetic trap filled with superfluid {sup 4}He. Ultracold neutrons will result when cold (8.9 A) neutrons undergo inelastic scattering in the superfluid helium. After filling the trap to a desired level, decay events will be recorded as a function of time. Detection is possible because the charged particles created by neutron decay generate detectable scintillations in the helium. In addition to neutron decay events, background events will be recorded. I model the background as a stationary Poisson process. By Monte Carlo methods, I study the performance of two nonlinear algorithms for estimating the mean lifetime of the neutron. In one method, the event time data are summarized as a histogram where the bin widths vary. I select the time endpoints of the bins so that the expected number of counts per bin contributed by the decay process is approximately constant. In the second method, the lifetime is estimated from the complete sequence of event times. The histogram method yields a less variable estimate than does the complete data estimation method. The allocation of time between the fill and decay stages affects the precision of the estimate. To get the optimal time allocation, I minimize the asymptotic variance of the estimated mean lifetime (estimated from the pooled histogram data from all cycles) given knowledge of the rate at which neutrons enter the trap and parameters which characterize the background. The mean lifetime estimate is biased. I observe bias reduction when estimating the lifetime from data pooled from many cycles (rather than averaging estimates from each of the cycles). (orig.) 14 refs.

  12. Spin trapping of radicals formed in gamma-irradiated methanol: effect of the irradiation temperature from 77K to 300K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlick, S.; Kevan, L.

    1976-01-01

    The neutral radicals formed in gamma-irradiated methanol were studied by spin trapping with phenyl-t-butylnitrone (PBN) in an attempt to probe the primary neutral radicals formed. In the temperature range from approximately 157 K to 300 K both CH 2 OH and CH 3 O spin adducts are observed and their limiting ratio at high PBN concentrations is CH 2 OH/CH 3 O=1.5 over this temperature range. Below approximately 157 K this ratio increases exponentially with decreasing temperature with an apparent activation energy of 5.8 kJ/mole (1.4 kcal/mole); this is consistent with the finding that only CH 2 OH radicals are formed by gamma radiolysis at 77 K. Several possible models for the primary neutral radicals formed in gamma-irradiated methanol and their subsequent reactions as a function of irradiation temperature are discussed. It is suggested that the primary radical formation mechanisms are similar in the gas and liquid phases and become temperature dependent when molecular motion is arrested in the solid. (Auth.)

  13. Improving the Optical Trapping Efficiency in the 225Ra Electric Dipole Moment Experiment via Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromm, Steven

    2017-09-01

    In an effort to study and improve the optical trapping efficiency of the 225Ra Electric Dipole Moment experiment, a fully parallelized Monte Carlo simulation of the laser cooling and trapping apparatus was created at Argonne National Laboratory and now maintained and upgraded at Michigan State University. The simulation allows us to study optimizations and upgrades without having to use limited quantities of 225Ra (15 day half-life) in experiment's apparatus. It predicts a trapping efficiency that differs from the observed value in the experiment by approximately a factor of thirty. The effects of varying oven geometry, background gas interactions, laboratory magnetic fields, MOT laser beam configurations and laser frequency noise were studied and ruled out as causes of the discrepancy between measured and predicted values of the overall trapping efficiency. Presently, the simulation is being used to help optimize a planned blue slower laser upgrade in the experiment's apparatus, which will increase the overall trapping efficiency by up to two orders of magnitude. This work is supported by Michigan State University, the Director's Research Scholars Program at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, and the U.S. DOE, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  14. Fused-Ring Derivatives of Quinoxalines: Spectroscopic Characterization and Photoinduced Processes Investigated by EPR Spin Trapping Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Barbieriková

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available 10-Ethyl-7-oxo-7,10-dihydropyrido[2,3-f]quinoxaline derivatives, synthesized as promising biologically/photobiologically active compounds were characterized by UV/vis, FT-IR and fluorescent spectroscopy. Photoinduced processes of these derivatives were studied by EPR spectroscopy, monitoring in situ the generation of reactive intermediates upon UVA (λmax = 365 nm irradiation. The formation of reactive oxygen species and further oxygen- and carbon-centered radical intermediates was detected and possible reaction routes were suggested. To quantify the investigated processes, the quantum yields of the superoxide radical anion spin-adduct and 4-oxo-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine N-oxyl generation were determined, reflecting the activation of molecular oxygen by the excited state of the quinoxaline derivative.

  15. Quantum simulations and experiments on Rabi oscillations of spin qubits : Intrinsic vs extrinsic damping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Raedt, Hans; Barbara, Bernard; Miyashita, Seiji; Michielsen, Kristel; Bertaina, Sylvain; Gambarelli, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance experiments show that the decay of Rabi oscillations of ensembles of spin qubits depends noticeably on the microwave power, and more precisely on the Rabi frequency, an effect recently called "driven decoherence." By direct numerical solution of the time-dependent

  16. Loophole-free Bell test using electron spins in diamond : Second experiment and additional analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, B.J.; Kalb, N.; Blok, M.S.; Dréau, A.E.; Reiserer, A.A.; Vermeulen, R.F.L.; Schouten, R.N.; Markham, M.; Twitchen, D.J.; Goodenough, K.D.; Elkouss Coronas, D.; Wehner, S.D.C.; Taminiau, T.H.; Hanson, R.

    2016-01-01

    The recently reported violation of a Bell inequality using entangled electronic spins in diamonds (Hensen et al., Nature 526, 682–686) provided the first loophole-free evidence against local-realist theories of nature. Here we report on data from a second Bell experiment using the same

  17. Photonic Structures for Light Trapping in Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells: Design and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Ding

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the foremost challenges in designing thin-film silicon solar cells (TFSC is devising efficient light-trapping schemes due to the short optical path length imposed by the thin absorber thickness. The strategy relies on a combination of a high-performance back reflector and an optimized texture surface, which are commonly used to reflect and scatter light effectively within the absorption layer, respectively. In this paper, highly promising light-trapping structures based on a photonic crystal (PC for TFSCs were investigated via simulation and experiment. Firstly, a highly-reflective one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D-PC was designed and fabricated. Then, two types of 1D-PC-based back reflectors (BRs were proposed: Flat 1D-PC with random-textured aluminum-doped zinc oxide (AZO or random-textured 1D-PC with AZO. These two newly-designed BRs demonstrated not only high reflectivity and sufficient conductivity, but also a strong light scattering property, which made them efficient candidates as the electrical contact and back reflector since the intrinsic losses due to the surface plasmon modes of the rough metal BRs can be avoided. Secondly, conical two-dimensional photonic crystal (2D-PC-based BRs were investigated and optimized for amorphous a-SiGe:H solar cells. The maximal absorption value can be obtained with an aspect ratio of 1/2 and a period of 0.75 µm. To improve the full-spectral optical properties of solar cells, a periodically-modulated PC back reflector was proposed and experimentally demonstrated in the a-SiGe:H solar cell. This periodically-modulated PC back reflector, also called the quasi-crystal structure (QCS, consists of a large periodic conical PC and a randomly-textured Ag layer with a feature size of 500–1000 nm. The large periodic conical PC enables conformal growth of the layer, while the small feature size of Ag can further enhance the light scattering. In summary, a comprehensive study of the design, simulation

  18. Transverse Single-Spin Asymmetries in Proton-Proton Collisions at the AFTER@LHC Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kanazawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present results for transverse single-spin asymmetries in proton-proton collisions at kinematics relevant for AFTER, a proposed fixed-target experiment at the Large Hadron Collider. These include predictions for pion, jet, and direct photon production from analytical formulas already available in the literature. We also discuss specific measurements that will benefit from the higher luminosity of AFTER, which could help resolve an almost 40-year puzzle of what causes transverse single-spin asymmetries in proton-proton collisions.

  19. Immuno-spin trapping detection of antioxidant/pro-oxidant properties of zinc or selenium on DNA and protein radical formation via hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deletioglu, Vedia; Tuncay, Erkan; Toy, Aysegul; Atalay, Mustafa; Turan, Belma

    2015-11-01

    Trace elements can participate in the catalysis of group-transfer reactions and can serve as their structural components. However, most of them including zinc and selenium have multifunctional roles in biological environments such as antioxidant and/or pro-oxidant effects, as concentration-dependent manner. Although it has been demonstrated the antioxidant actions of either selenium or zinc compounds, there are several documents pointing out their pro-oxidant/oxidant roles in biological systems. Here we have used ELISA-based immuno-spin trapping, a method for detection of free radical formation, to detect whether or not a zinc compound, Zn3(PO4)2, or a selenium compound, Na2SeO3, has antioxidant and/or pro-oxidant effect on 5,5-Dimethyl-1-Pyrroline-N-Oxide (DMPO)-DNA nitrone adducts induced with Cu(II)-H2O2-oxidizing system in in vitro preparations. Second, we examined whether this technique is capable to demonstrate the different DMPO-protein nitrone adduct productions in isolated protein crude of hearts from normal rats (CON) or rats with metabolic syndrome (MetS). Our data demonstrated that either Zn(2+) (100 µM) or SeO3(-2) (50 nM) has very strong antioxidant action against 200 µM H2O2-induced DMPO-DNA nitrone adduct production, whereas their higher concentrations have apparent pro-oxidant actions. We also used verification by Western blotting analysis whether immuno-spin trapping can be used to assess H2O2-induced DMPO-protein nitrone adducts in heart protein crudes. Our Western blot data further confirmed the ELISA-data from proteins and demonstrated how Zn(2+) or SeO3(-2) are dual-functioning ions such as antioxidant at lower concentrations while pro-oxidant at higher concentrations. Particularly, our present data with SeO3(-2) in DMPO-protein nitrone adducts, being in line with our previous observation on its dual-actions in ischemia/reperfusion-induced damaged heart, have shown that this ion has higher pro-oxidant actions over 50 nM in Met

  20. Strength trapped within weakness/ weakness trapped within strength: the influence of family of origin experiences on the lives of abused women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Eli; Birnbaum, Liora

    2010-06-01

    By conceptualizing abused women as victims or survivors, the literature offers two contradictory narratives of abused women. The aim of this article is to show that these two narratives are not mutually exclusive but rather can be used simultaneously to represent battered women's existential experiences. The study sample was comprised of 20 Israeli battered women. Three in-depth interviews were conducted with each participant-twice for data collection purposes and once for validating the themes that emerged from the content analysis. "Strength trapped in weakness/weakness trapped in strength" was found to be a dominant theme in the life narratives of the interviewees. Most interviewees grew up in families of origin in distress; most were abused physically and emotionally. Although this anguish colored their lives with pain and turmoil, their experiences were the key to their ability to overcome difficulties. From the onset, interviewees' lives were marked by a sense of threat and deprivation, but these very difficulties were also the source of a sense of power that emerged from the women's struggle with their past. In their attempts to cope with and transcend the legacies of their past, interviewees' feelings oscillated continuously between past and present, creating a unique powerful sense of simultaneously being victims and survivors. Implications for intervention are suggested.

  1. Averaging out magnetic forces with fast rf sweeps in an optical trap for metastable chromium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, Q.; Chicireanu, R.; Pouderous, A.; de Souza Melo, W.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.; Maréchal, E.; Vernac, L.; Keller, J. C.; Gorceix, O.

    2008-05-01

    We introduce a time-averaged trap in which the internal state of the atoms is rapidly modulated to modify the magnetic trapping potential. In our experiment, fast radio-frequency linear sweeps flip the spins of atoms at a fast rate, which averages out the magnetic forces. We use this procedure to optimize the accumulation of metastable chromium atoms in an optical dipole trap from a magneto-optical trap. The potential experienced by the metastable atoms is identical to the bare optical dipole potential, so that this procedure allows for trapping all magnetic sublevels, hence increasing by up to 80% the final number of accumulated atoms.

  2. Surface-sensitive molecular interferometry: beyond 3He spin echo experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantin, Joshua T.; Krems, Roman V.; Godsi, Oded; Maniv, Tsofar; Alexandrowicz, Gil

    2017-04-01

    3 He atoms can be used as surface-sensitive atomic interferometers in 3He spin echo experiments to measure surface morphology, molecular and atomic surface diffusion dynamics, and surface vibrations. However, using the hyperfine states of molecules gives experiments the potential to be less expensive, be more sensitive, and include angle-dependent interactions. The manifold of hyperfine states of molecules is large in comparison to the two nuclear spin states used in 3He spin echo experiments and allows for increased precision, while simultaneously complicating experimental interpretation. Here, we present the theoretical formulation required to interpret these experiments. In particular, we show how to determine the effect of magnetic lensing on the molecular hyperfine states and use a modified form of the transfer matrix method to quantum mechanically describe molecular propagation throughout the experiment. We also discuss how to determine the scattering matrix from the experimental observables via machine learning techniques. As an example, we perform numerical calculations using nine hyperfine states of ortho-hydrogen and compare the results to experiment. This work was funded by NSERC of Canada and the European Research Council under the European Union's seventh framework program (FP/2007-2013)/ERC Grant 307267.

  3. Longitudinal spin Seebeck effect contribution in transverse spin Seebeck effect experiments in Pt/YIG and Pt/NFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Daniel; Reinhardt, Daniel; van Straaten, Michael; Klewe, Christoph; Althammer, Matthias; Schreier, Michael; Goennenwein, Sebastian T. B.; Gupta, Arunava; Schmid, Maximilian; Back, Christian H.; Schmalhorst, Jan-Michael; Kuschel, Timo; Reiss, Günter

    2015-09-01

    The spin Seebeck effect, the generation of a spin current by a temperature gradient, has attracted great attention, but the interplay over a millimetre range along a thin ferromagnetic film as well as unintended side effects which hinder an unambiguous detection have evoked controversial discussions. Here, we investigate the inverse spin Hall voltage of a 10 nm thin Pt strip deposited on the magnetic insulators Y3Fe5O12 and NiFe2O4 with a temperature gradient in the film plane. We show characteristics typical of the spin Seebeck effect, although we do not observe the most striking features of the transverse spin Seebeck effect. Instead, we attribute the observed voltages to the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect generated by a contact tip induced parasitic out-of-plane temperature gradient, which depends on material, diameter and temperature of the tip.

  4. Interferometrically stable, enclosed, spinning sample cell for spectroscopic experiments on air-sensitive samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Dmitry; Hill, Robert J; Ryu, Jisu; Park, Samuel D; Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Carollo, Alexa R; Jonas, David M

    2017-01-01

    In experiments with high photon flux, it is necessary to rapidly remove the sample from the beam and to delay re-excitation until the sample has returned to equilibrium. Rapid and complete sample exchange has been a challenge for air-sensitive samples and for vibration-sensitive experiments. Here, a compact spinning sample cell for air and moisture sensitive liquid and thin film samples is described. The principal parts of the cell are a copper gasket sealed enclosure, a 2.5 in. hard disk drive motor, and a reusable, chemically inert glass sandwich cell. The enclosure provides an oxygen and water free environment at the 1 ppm level, as demonstrated by multi-day tests with sodium benzophenone ketyl radical. Inside the enclosure, the glass sandwich cell spins at ≈70 Hz to generate tangential speeds of 7-12 m/s that enable complete sample exchange at 100 kHz repetition rates. The spinning cell is acoustically silent and compatible with a ±1 nm rms displacement stability interferometer. In order to enable the use of the spinning cell, we discuss centrifugation and how to prevent it, introduce the cycle-averaged resampling rate to characterize repetitive excitation, and develop a figure of merit for a long-lived photoproduct buildup.

  5. Single well push-pull CO2 injection experiment for evaluating in-situ residual trapping at Heletz, Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Auli; Bensabat, Jacob; Fagerlund, Fritjof; Ronen, Rona; Goren, Yoni; Perez, Lily; Tsarfis, Igal; Joodaki, Saba; Yang, Zhibing; Liang, Tian; Sauter, Martin; Hassan, Jawad; Gouze, Philippe; Rasmusson, Kristina

    2017-04-01

    The Heletz sands is a depleted oil reservoir at 1.6 km depth with saline water at its edges. In the saline part of the reservoir a CO2 injection experiment site has been developed for the purpose of scientifically motivated injection experiments, especially in the context of EU FP7 projects MUSTANG and TRUST. This presentation describes the single-well CO2 injection experiment carried out in September 2016, with the objective of determining field scale values of key CO2 trapping mechanisms, the residual and dissolution trapping. The sequence consisted in creating a residually trapped CO2 zone as well as reference hydraulic and heater tests prior and after the establishment of the zone, in order to determine the in-situ residual trapping. Monitoring included down-hole pressure and temperature measurement, distributed temperature sensing along the well via an optical fiber (DTS), U-tube sampling and tracers. We here present the experimental sequence, the monitoring and sampling system, the key results as well as the first interpretations.

  6. On the discrepancy between theory and experiment for the F-F spin-spin coupling constant of difluoethyne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber, Rasmus; Sauer, Stephan P. A.

    2012-01-01

    The vicinal indirect nuclear spin-spin coupling constant (SSCC) between the two ¿uorine atoms in di¿uoroethyne has been reinvestigated. This coupling has previously proved dif¿cult to calculate accurately. In this study we have therefore systematically investigated the dependence of this coupling...

  7. The E142 SLAC experiment: measurement of the neutron gn1(x) spin structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roblin, Y.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes the E142 experiment which has been carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC), USA, from October to December 1992. This experiment of polarized inelastic scattering of a 22.6 GeV electron beam on a polarized helium 3 target has allowed the first measurement of the neutron g n 1 (x) spin structure function. The knowledge of this structure function gives informations on the nucleon spin structure. On the other hand, the g n 1 (x) structure function integral value on the 0 2 mean value of 2 GeV 2 after some extrapolations. This value is at about two standard deviations away from the theoretical predictions of the Ellis-Jaffe rule. Thanks to the existing experimental results for the proton (E143 experiment), the Bjorken sum rule has been precisely tested and is perfectly compatible with the theoretical value. The results have allowed to estimate the nucleon spin fraction carried by the quarks. (J.S.). 86 refs., 58 figs., 13 tabs

  8. Mathematical Descriptions of Axially Varying Penning Traps for the Antimatter Experiment: gravity, Interferometry, and Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Stephanie, Brown

    2015-01-01

    Antimatter, though proposed in 1933, is still not well understood. AEgIS aims to study the interaction of antihydrogen with the earth's gravitational field. This information will add to our understanding of the matter-antimatter asymmetry present in our universe. This paper discusses a Penning-Malmberg with a magnetic mirror that will hold $C_{2}^{-}$ that will be used for sympathetic cooling of antiprotons before the antihydrogen is created. The trap, which is critical to the cooling process of the antihydrogen, can be characterized by the separatrix between trapped and untrapped particles. This paper applies analytical processes used to define the separatrix of pure electron plasmas to a molecular plasma. Our work is based on the desire conditions (density, particle number, field strength, trap size) of the high field region. The initial application of a semi-analytical method applied to our trap defines the trap potential difference at \\~ 0.6V. The separatrix is defined in both the high and low fiel...

  9. Review of the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) Experiment at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, J. B.; Sims, Herb; Martin, James; Chakrabarti, Suman; Lewis, Raymond; Fant, Wallace

    2003-01-01

    The significant energy density of matter-antimatter annihilation is attractive to the designers of future space propulsion systems, with the potential to offer a highly compact source of power. Many propulsion concepts exist that could take advantage of matter-antimatter reactions, and current antiproton production rates are sufficient to support basic proof-of-principle evaluation of technology associated with antimatter- derived propulsion. One enabling technology for such experiments is portable storage of low energy antiprotons, allowing antiprotons to be trapped, stored, and transported for use at an experimental facility. To address this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Research Center is developing a storage system referred to as the High Performance Antiproton Trap (HiPAT) with a design goal of containing 10(exp 12) particles for up to 18 days. The HiPAT makes use of an electromagnetic system (Penning- Malmberg design) consisting of a 4 Telsa superconductor, high voltage electrode structure, radio frequency (RF) network, and ultra high vacuum system. To evaluate the system normal matter sources (both electron guns and ion sources) are used to generate charged particles. The electron beams ionize gas within the trapping region producing ions in situ, whereas the ion sources produce the particles external to the trapping region and required dynamic capture. A wide range of experiments has been performed examining factors such as ion storage lifetimes, effect of RF energy on storage lifetime, and ability to routinely perform dynamic ion capture. Current efforts have been focused on improving the FW rotating wall system to permit longer storage times and non-destructive diagnostics of stored ions. Typical particle detection is performed by extracting trapped ions from HiPAT and destructively colliding them with a micro-channel plate detector (providing number and energy information). This improved RF system has been used to detect various

  10. TRAPPED PROTON FLUXES AT LOW EARTH ORBITS MEASURED BY THE PAMELA EXPERIMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adriani, O.; Bongi, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Barbarino, G. C. [Department of Physics, University of Naples " Federico II," I-80126 Naples (Italy); Bazilevskaya, G. A. [Lebedev Physical Institute, RU-119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bellotti, R.; Bruno, A. [Department of Physics, University of Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Boezio, M.; Bonvicini, V.; Carbone, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Bogomolov, E. A. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RU-194021 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Bottai, S. [INFN, Sezione di Florence, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); Cafagna, F. [INFN, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Campana, D. [INFN, Sezione di Naples, I-80126 Naples (Italy); Carlson, P. [KTH, Department of Physics, and the Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Casolino, M.; De Donato, C.; De Santis, C.; De Simone, N.; Felice, V. Di [INFN, Sezione di Rome " Tor Vergata," I-00133 Rome (Italy); Castellini, G., E-mail: alessandro.bruno@ba.infn.it [IFAC, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); and others

    2015-01-20

    We report an accurate measurement of the geomagnetically trapped proton fluxes for kinetic energy above ∼70 MeV performed by the PAMELA mission at low Earth orbits (350 ÷ 610 km). Data were analyzed in the frame of the adiabatic theory of charged particle motion in the geomagnetic field. Flux properties were investigated in detail, providing a full characterization of the particle radiation in the South Atlantic Anomaly region, including locations, energy spectra, and pitch angle distributions. PAMELA results significantly improve the description of the Earth's radiation environment at low altitudes, placing important constraints on the trapping and interaction processes, and can be used to validate current trapped particle radiation models.

  11. Correlation between vestibular and autonomous function after 6 months of spaceflight: Data of the SPIN and GAZE-SPIN experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Floris; Clement, Gilles; Naumov, Ivan; Kornilova, Ludmila; Glukhikh, Dmitriy; Hallgren, Emma; MacDougall, Hamish; Migeotte, Pierre-Francois; Delière, Quentin; Weerts, Aurelie; Moore, Steven; Diedrich, Andre

    In 13 cosmonauts, the vestibulo-autonomic reflex was investigated before and after 6 months duration spaceflight. Cosmonauts were rotated on the mini-centrifuge VVIS, which is installed in Star City. Initially, this mini-centrifuge flew on board of the Neurolab mission (STS-90), and served to generate intermittent artificial gravity during that mission, with apparent very positive effects on the preservation of the orthostatic tolerance upon return to earth in the 4 crew members that were subjected to the rotations in space. The current experiments SPIN and GAZE-SPIN are control experiments to test the hypothesis that intermittent artificial gravity in space can serve as a counter measure against several deleterious effects of microgravity. Additionally, the effect of microgravity on the gaze holding system is studied as well. Cosmonauts from a long duration stay in the International Space Station were tested on the VVIS (1 g centripetal interaural acceleration; consecutive right-ear-out anti-clockwise and left-ear-out clockwise measurement) on 5 different days. Two measurements were scheduled about one month and a half prior to launch and the remaining three immediately after their return from space (typically on R+2, R+4, R+9; R = return day from space). The ocular counter roll (OCR) as a measure of otolith function was measured on before, during and after the rotation in the mini centrifuge, using infrared video goggles. The perception of verticality was monitored using an ultrasound system. Gaze holding was tested before, during and after rotation. After the centrifugation part, the crew was installed on a tilt table, and instrumented with several cardiovascular recording equipment (ECG, continuous blood pressure monitoring, respiratory monitoring), as well as with impedance measurement devices to investigate fluid redistribution throughout the operational tilt test. To measure heart rate variability parameters, imposed breathing periods were included in the

  12. A Study of Particle Beam Spin Dynamics for High Precision Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiedler, Andrew J. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States)

    2017-05-01

    In the search for physics beyond the Standard Model, high precision experiments to measure fundamental properties of particles are an important frontier. One group of such measurements involves magnetic dipole moment (MDM) values as well as searching for an electric dipole moment (EDM), both of which could provide insights about how particles interact with their environment at the quantum level and if there are undiscovered new particles. For these types of high precision experiments, minimizing statistical uncertainties in the measurements plays a critical role. \\\\ \\indent This work leverages computer simulations to quantify the effects of statistical uncertainty for experiments investigating spin dynamics. In it, analysis of beam properties and lattice design effects on the polarization of the beam is performed. As a case study, the beam lines that will provide polarized muon beams to the Fermilab Muon \\emph{g}-2 experiment are analyzed to determine the effects of correlations between the phase space variables and the overall polarization of the muon beam.

  13. HDice, Highly-Polarized Low-Background Frozen-Spin HD Targets for CLAS experiments at Jefferson Lab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large, portable frozen-spin HD (Deuterium-Hydride) targets have been developed for studying nucleon spin properties with low backgrounds. Protons and Deuterons in HD are polarized at low temperatures (∼10mK) inside a vertical dilution refrigerator (Oxford Kelvinox-1000) containing a high magnetic field (up to 17T). The targets reach a frozen-spin state within a few months, after which they can be cold transferred to an In-Beam Cryostat (IBC). The IBC, a thin-walled dilution refrigerator operating either horizontally or vertically, is use with quasi-4π detector systems in open geometries with minimal energy loss for exiting reaction products in nucleon structure experiments. The first application of this advanced target system has been used for Spin Sum Rule experiments at the LEGS facility in Brookhaven National Laboratory. An improved target production and handling system has been developed at Jefferson Lab for experiments with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, CLAS

  14. Study of the nucleon spin structure functions: the E154 experiment at SLAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabatie, Franck

    1998-01-01

    In experiment E154 at SLAC, the spin dependent structure function g 1 n was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 50 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized helium 3 target. We report the integral over the measured x range to be ∫ 0.014 0.7 g 1 n (x,5 GeV 2 )dx = -0.0348 ± 0.0033 ± 0.0043 ± 0.0014. We observe relatively large values of g 1 n at low x, calling into question the reliability of the data extrapolation down to x equal 0. Such a divergent behavior seems to disagree with the prediction of the Regge theory but can be quantitatively explained by perturbative QCD. Moreover, we have performed a NLO perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on g 1 , paying careful attention to both the theoretical hypothesis and the calculation of errors. Using a parametrization of the polarized parton distribution at a low scale, we can access the fraction of spin carried by quarks: ΔΣ = 29 ± 6 pc in the MS-bar scheme, and ΔΣ = 37 ± 7 pc in the AB scheme. The gluon contribution to the nucleon spin is not well enough constrained by the current data, but seems to lie between 0 and 2. This study allows us to extract the first moment of the g 1 structure function and we find agreement with the Bjorken sum rule expectations. (author) [fr

  15. Decoherence dynamics of a single spin versus spin ensemble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobrovitski, V.V.; Feiguin, A.E.; Awschalom, D.D.; Hanson, R.

    2008-01-01

    We study decoherence of central spins by a spin bath, focusing on the difference between measurement of a single central spin and measurement of a large number of central spins (as found in typical spin-resonance experiments). For a dilute spin bath, the single spin demonstrates Gaussian

  16. SPIN. First Digital Protection System Feedback of experience ... ... after 30 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosicki, M.; Pacuta, J.; Kamga, J.; Burel, J.-P.

    2010-01-01

    In this lecture Mr Burel presents experience with the software SPIN - the first digital protection system feedback. After thirty years of operation, the results are positive: - System is in correct operation and still maintained with spare parts available; - No spurious trip or actuation due to the system itself. A project for modernization is prepared to replace the digital part with a new digital technology designed with today's: - Components (SPINLINE 3); - methods and tools (Software development); - Standards (EMI/RFI - qualification), in order to allow customer to add some new functional needs and to keep the system in operation for thirty more years.

  17. First spin-resolved electron distributions in crystals from combined polarized neutron and X-ray diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxime Deutsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1980s it has been possible to probe crystallized matter, thanks to X-ray or neutron scattering techniques, to obtain an accurate charge density or spin distribution at the atomic scale. Despite the description of the same physical quantity (electron density and tremendous development of sources, detectors, data treatment software etc., these different techniques evolved separately with one model per experiment. However, a breakthrough was recently made by the development of a common model in order to combine information coming from all these different experiments. Here we report the first experimental determination of spin-resolved electron density obtained by a combined treatment of X-ray, neutron and polarized neutron diffraction data. These experimental spin up and spin down densities compare very well with density functional theory (DFT calculations and also confirm a theoretical prediction made in 1985 which claims that majority spin electrons should have a more contracted distribution around the nucleus than minority spin electrons. Topological analysis of the resulting experimental spin-resolved electron density is also briefly discussed.

  18. Mass of a spin vortex in a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ari M

    2009-08-21

    In contrast with charge vortices, spin vortices in a two-dimensional ferromagnetic condensate move inertially (if the condensate has zero magnetization along an axis). The Magnus force, which prevents the inertial motion of the charge vortices, cancels for spin vortices, because they are composed of two oppositely rotating vortices. The inertial mass of spin vortices varies inversely with the strength of spin-dependent interactions and directly with the width of the condensate layer, and can be measured as a part of experiments on how spin vortices orbit one another. For Rb87 in a 1 microm thick trap, mv approximately 10(-21) kg.

  19. Mediterranean fruit fly female attractant studies in support of the sterile insect technique: trapping experiments conducted on the island of Chios, Greece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsoyannos, B.I.; Papadopoulos, N.T.; Kouloussis, N.A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper contains information on a four-year research programme co-ordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The main objective of the programme was to develop a trapping system for females of the Mediterranean fruit fly (medfly), Ceratitis capitata (Diptera: Tephritidae), for practical use in Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) programs and to design and evaluate a trap to obtain eggs from wild female medflies in order to estimate sterility induction in the field population. The experiments were conducted from July to September 1994-1997 on the island of Chios, Greece, in citrus orchards with low to medium medfly populations. Different trap types and several trap treatments consisting of sex and food based attractants were tested, following a standard coordinated experimental protocol. The most extensively tested were three food based 'female' attractants (FA-3), namely ammonium acetate (AA), 1,4 diaminobutane (putrescine) and trimethylamine, all formulated in dispensers lasting one month. These attractants were evaluated in combinations of two (AA + putrescine, termed FA-2) or three (FA-3) dispensers in various traps, including dry (provided with DDVP) or wet (provided with water and 0.01% surfactant) plastic International Pheromone's McPhail traps (IPMT). Among the various traps and treatments tested, the most effective for medfly capture was the wet IPMT, baited with FA-3 attractants. This treatment captured predominantly females and was relatively selective for medflies. In dry IPMT traps, the FA-3 were as effective as the standard 300 ml aqueous solution of 9% of the protein NuLure and 3% borax, but much more medfly selective. Dry IPMT traps were also more selective than wet ones. FA-3 baited wet Tephri traps (a Spanish modification of the McPhail trap), performed somewhat poorer than IPMT traps. Other dry trap types tested were not effective. Additional experiments showed that certain insecticide formulations used in dry traps may have a repellent

  20. Kinetics of the human thyroid trap: experience in normal subjects and in thyroid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hays, M.T.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetics of the thyroid pertechnetate trap were assessed in 39 normal subjects, five untreated patients with Graves' disease (two before and after treatment), two hypothyroid patients, and in one patient each with Hashimoto's thyroiditis of recent onset, subacute thyroiditis, and massive anaplastic carcinoma. In normal subjects, the effects of sex, time of day, and order of experimental sessions were studied. A three-compartment model was assumed for all studies. Data on thyroidal and neck-background pertechnetate were collected with a multicrystal camera during 40 min after iv injection. The two thyroidal compartments in the model - the follicular cell, v 2 , and the colloidal plasma-equivalent space, V 3 - is a multi-exponential function of plasma radioactivity, V 1 . None of the model parameters was systematically affected by sex and order of session did not consistently alter any parameter, except for V 3 , which was greater in session 2 than in session 1. That increase was not consistent and is believed to be spurious. Time of day affected only the exit rate constant from the colloid Λ 23 , which was increased later in the day (P 2 is increased (P 3 and in Λ 21 (the clearance into the thyroid from serum) are more dramatic (P -8 ). After treatment, V 3 and Λ 21 fell toward normal. The hypothyroid patients showed no trap activity, and the trap was normal in the patient with early Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The patients with subacute thyroiditis and anaplastic carcinoma had increases in V 2 , V 3 , and Λ 21 , but the pattern differed from that of Graves' disease

  1. Critical experiment on a flux-trap-type hafnium control blade for BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, M.; Tanzawa, T.; Yoshioka, R.

    1987-01-01

    Boron carbide has been utilized as a neutron absorber in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and other types of reactors. It has a number of advantages, yet is not well suited for very high neutron exposure. An alternative long-lived control blade has therefore been sought. It is well known that hafnium may be best suited for this purpose, yet it has the disadvantage of heavy weight and low reactivity worth. This has been overcome by introducing a flux-trap-type all-hafnium control blade for BWRs. The blades are now involved in licensing procedures in some Japanese BWR plants

  2. Experiments Towards Mitigation of Motional Heating in Trapped Ion Quantum Information Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-27

    books and music recommendations. Maybe I’ll try watching The Wire now that I’ll have a bit of spare time. I cannot thank Robert McConnell enough for...are briefly highlighted. Section 3.1 explains why RF fields are nececary for trapping ions, and Section 3.2 provides a mathematical description of how...of motion: a high-amplitude, low-frequency ’secular’ motion and high-frequency, low-amplitude micromotion. Though thorough mathematical descriptions

  3. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  4. Identification of Copper(II) Complexes in Aqueous Solution by Electron Spin Resonance: An Undergraduate Coordination Chemistry Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micera, G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Background, procedures, and results are provided for an experiment which examines, through electron spin resonance spectroscopy, complex species formed by cupric and 2,6-dihydroxybenzoate ions in aqueous solutions. The experiment is illustrative of several aspects of inorganic and coordination chemistry, including the identification of species…

  5. Experiments in support of the Gas Dynamic Trap based facility for plasma–material interaction testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldatkina, E.I., E-mail: E.I.Soldatkina@inp.nsk.su [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Lavrentieva Prospect 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Street 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Arakcheev, A.S.; Bagryansky, P.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Lavrentieva Prospect 11, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Pirogova Street 2, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Measurement of plasma heat flux in the mirror of a GDT device had been conducted. • The power density up to 0.25 GW m{sup −2} was experimentally obtained. • Steady state operation has not been achieved due to short NBI pulse. • The possibility of creating the PMI setup based on GDT had been discussed. -- Abstract: The power density along the field lines in the scrape-off layer plasma in machines of the class of ITER, Wendelstein 7-X, NSTX-U is in the range of few hundreds megawatt per square meter. It is crucial for the future of tokamaks and stellarators to develop the plasma science and component technology to handle such high plasma heat fluxes. It would be valuable to produce parallel plasma heat fluxes at these power densities, impinging on test components at very shallow angles, as planned in tokamaks. The primary objective of this work is the direct measurement of plasma heat fluxes in the mirror throat of a Gas Dynamic Trap device. Options to develop a facility for plasma–material interaction testing based on the Gas Dynamic Trap are discussed.

  6. Electron Spin Resonance Experiments on a Single Electron in Silicon Implanted with Phosphorous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, Dwight R.; Nguyen, K.; Tracy, L. A.; Carr, S.; Borchardt, J.; Bishop, N.; Ten Eyck, G.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J.; Lilly, M. P.; Carroll, M. S.

    2015-03-01

    In this talk we will discuss the results of our ongoing experiments involving electron spin resonance (ESR) on a single electron in a natural silicon sample. The sample consists of an SET, defined by lithographic polysilicon gates, coupled to nearby phosphorous donors. The SET is used to detect charge transitions and readout the spin of the electron being investigated with ESR. The measurements were done with the sample at dilution refrigerator temperatures in the presence of a 1.3 T magnetic field. We will present data demonstrating Rabi oscillations of a single electron in this system as well as measurements of the coherence time, T2. We will also discuss our results using these and various other pulsing schemes in the context of a donor-SET system. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Structure and spin density of ferric low-spin heme complexes determined with high-resolution ESEEM experiments at 35 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rubio, Inés; Mitrikas, George

    2010-08-01

    The wide use of the heme group by nature is a consequence of its unusual "electronic flexibility." Major changes in the electronic structure of this molecule can result from small perturbations in its environment. To understand the way the electronic distribution is dictated by the structure of the heme site, it is extremely important to have methods to reliably determine both of them. In this work we propose a way to obtain this information in ferric low-spin heme centers via the determination of g, A, and Q tensors of the coordinated nitrogens using electron spin echo envelope modulation experiments at Q-band microwave frequencies. The results for two bisimidazole heme model complexes, namely, PPIX(Im)(2) and CPIII(Im)(2), where PPIX is protoporphyrin IX, CPIII is coproporphyrin III, and Im is imidazole, selectively labeled with (15)N on the heme or imidazole nitrogens are presented. The planes of the axial ligands were found to be parallel and oriented approximately along one of the N-Fe-N directions of the slightly ruffled porphyrin ring (approximately 10 degrees ). The spin density was determined to reside in an iron d orbital perpendicular to the heme plane and oriented along the other porphyrin N-Fe-N direction, perpendicular to the axial imidazoles. The benefit of the method presented here lies in the use of Q-band microwave frequencies, which improves the orientation selection, results in no/fewer combination lines in the spectra, and allows separation of the contributions of hyperfine and quadrupole interactions due to the fulfillment of the exact cancellation condition at g ( Z ) and the possibility of performing hyperfine decoupling experiments at the g ( X ) observer position. These experimental advantages make the interpretation of the spectra straightforward, which results in precise and reliable determination of the structure and spin distribution.

  8. Quadrupole Ion Traps

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    electron bound to the gravitational field, the 'geonium atom'. The first atomic hyperfine structure experiment on trapped ions was performed by Dehmelt's group using the stored-ion exchange-collision technique in a Paul trap which paved the way for some of the subsequent experiment for atomic frequency. A single atom at.

  9. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  10. Microfabricated Waveguide Atom Traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-09-01

    A nanoscale , microfabricated waveguide structure can in - principle be used to trap atoms in well - defined locations and enable strong photon-atom interactions . A neutral - atom platform based on this microfabrication technology will be prealigned , which is especially important for quantum - control applications. At present, there is still no reported demonstration of evanescent - field atom trapping using a microfabricated waveguide structure. We described the capabilities established by our team for future development of the waveguide atom - trapping technology at SNL and report our studies to overcome the technical challenges of loading cold atoms into the waveguide atom traps, efficient and broadband optical coupling to a waveguide, and the waveguide material for high - power optical transmission. From the atomic - physics and the waveguide modeling, w e have shown that a square nano-waveguide can be utilized t o achieve better atomic spin squeezing than using a nanofiber for first time.

  11. Experiments with a laser cooled cloud of atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natarajan, Vasant; Banerjee, Ayan; Rapol, Umakant

    1999-01-01

    We discuss two experiments that can be performed using a cloud of laser-cooled and trapped atoms, namely Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) and search for a permanent Electric Dipole Moment (EDM). BEC can be observed in Rb atoms in a magnetic trap by using forced evaporative cooling to continuously lower the temperature below the condensation limit. The cloud is cooled by preferentially ejecting the hottest atoms from a magnetic trap. The magnetic trap is loaded with laser-cooled atoms from a magneto-optic trap. The EDM experiment can be performed with a laser-cooled cloud of Yb atoms. The atoms are spin polarized and the precession of the spin is measured in the presence of a strong electric field applied perpendicular to the spin direction. The use of laser-cooled atoms should greatly enhance the sensitivity of the experiment. (author)

  12. Characteristics of trapped electrons and electron traps in single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budzinski, E.E.; Potter, W.R.; Potienko, G.; Box, H.C.

    1979-01-01

    Two additional carbohydrates are reported whose crystal structures trap electrons intermolecularly in single crystals x irradiated at low temperature, namely sucrose and rhamnose. Five carbohydrate and polyhydroxy compounds are now known which exhibit this phenomenon. The following characteristics of the phenomenon were investigated: (1) the hyperfine couplings of the electron with protons of the polarized hydroxy groups forming the trap; (2) the distances between these protons and the trapped electron; (3) the spin density of the electron at the protons and (4) the relative stabilities of the electron trapped in various crystal structures

  13. Trapped electrons in irradiated single crystals of polyhydroxy compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Box, H.C.; Budzinski, E.E.; Freund, H.G.; Potter, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    The intermolecular trapping of electrons has been observed in single crystals of dulcitol and L(+) arabinose x-irradiated at 4.2 0 K. Attribution of a major component of the ESR absorption to trapped electrons is based upon the character of the hyperfine pattern, which arises from multiple anisotropic hyperfine interactions with exchangeable protons, and on the g value of the absorption, which is always less than the free spin value. The removal of the trapped electron absorption upon irradiation with visible light has also been demonstrated. In these experiments all of the electrons are trapped in identical sites. This circumstance provides some important advantages in the study of the factors affecting the stabilization of charge in an environment of polarizable molecules

  14. Shrew trap efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambalemoke, Mbalitini; Mukinzi, Itoka; Amundala, Drazo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of four trap types (pitfall, Sherman LFA, Victor snap and Museum Special snap traps) to capture shrews. This experiment was conducted in five inter-riverine forest blocks in the region of Kisangani. The total trapping effort was 6,300, 9,240, 5,280 and 5,460 trap......-nights for the pitfall, Sherman, Victor and Museum Special traps, respectively. In total, we captured 366 shrews. The use of pitfall traps yielded the highest trapping success (4.1) with at least 18 shrew species identified. Trapping success and the number of species collected was lower for the Sherman (0.6, at least 11...... species), Victor (0.6, at least 8 species) and Museum Special (0.5, at least 6 species) traps. Although Crocidura olivieri and C. denti were caught using all four trap types, captures with different trap types did not produce a sample with the same taxonomic composition. In agreement with previous studies...

  15. Study of the mechanism of the gamma radiolysis of saccharose and its derivatives in aqueous or solid phase. Study by spin trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triolet, J.

    1991-01-01

    Powder or aqueous solutions of saccharose, deoxysaccharose and fructanes are irradiated. Radicals created during gamma radiolysis are converted into sugar-nitroxide radicals by reaction with 2 methyl 2 nitroso-propane. They are stable enough to be studied in solution by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) coupled or not to high performance liquid chromatography. EPR spectra obtained are simulated with the Voyons program for the determination of spectrocopic characteristics of trapped species. The study of glucosides, disaccharides and sugar labelled with carbon 13 allows to suggest a chemical structure for 5 out of the 7 species trapped during saccharose radiolysis. Influence of irradiation conditions is studied and mechanisms are proposed [fr

  16. Entrapment Bias of Arthropods in Miocene Amber Revealed by Trapping Experiments in a Tropical Forest in Chiapas, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solórzano Kraemer, Mónica M.; Kraemer, Atahualpa S.; Stebner, Frauke; Bickel, Daniel J.; Rust, Jes

    2015-01-01

    All entomological traps have a capturing bias, and amber, viewed as a trap, is no exception. Thus the fauna trapped in amber does not represent the total existing fauna of the former amber forest, rather the fauna living in and around the resin producing tree. In this paper we compare arthropods from a forest very similar to the reconstruction of the Miocene Mexican amber forest, and determine the bias of different trapping methods, including amber. We also show, using cluster analyses, measurements of the trapped arthropods, and guild distribution, that the amber trap is a complex entomological trap not comparable with a single artificial trap. At the order level, the most similar trap to amber is the sticky trap. However, in the case of Diptera, at the family level, the Malaise trap is also very similar to amber. Amber captured a higher diversity of arthropods than each of the artificial traps, based on our study of Mexican amber from the Middle Miocene, a time of climate optimum, where temperature and humidity were probably higher than in modern Central America. We conclude that the size bias is qualitatively independent of the kind of trap for non–extreme values. We suggest that frequent specimens in amber were not necessarily the most frequent arthropods in the former amber forest. Selected taxa with higher numbers of specimens appear in amber because of their ecology and behavior, usually closely related with a tree–inhabiting life. Finally, changes of diversity from the Middle Miocene to Recent time in Central and South America can be analyzed by comparing the rich amber faunas from Mexico and the Dominican Republic with the fauna trapped using sticky and Malaise traps in Central America. PMID:25785584

  17. Entrapment bias of arthropods in Miocene amber revealed by trapping experiments in a tropical forest in Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solórzano Kraemer, Mónica M; Kraemer, Mónica M Solórzano; Kraemer, Atahualpa S; Stebner, Frauke; Bickel, Daniel J; Rust, Jes

    2015-01-01

    All entomological traps have a capturing bias, and amber, viewed as a trap, is no exception. Thus the fauna trapped in amber does not represent the total existing fauna of the former amber forest, rather the fauna living in and around the resin producing tree. In this paper we compare arthropods from a forest very similar to the reconstruction of the Miocene Mexican amber forest, and determine the bias of different trapping methods, including amber. We also show, using cluster analyses, measurements of the trapped arthropods, and guild distribution, that the amber trap is a complex entomological trap not comparable with a single artificial trap. At the order level, the most similar trap to amber is the sticky trap. However, in the case of Diptera, at the family level, the Malaise trap is also very similar to amber. Amber captured a higher diversity of arthropods than each of the artificial traps, based on our study of Mexican amber from the Middle Miocene, a time of climate optimum, where temperature and humidity were probably higher than in modern Central America. We conclude that the size bias is qualitatively independent of the kind of trap for non-extreme values. We suggest that frequent specimens in amber were not necessarily the most frequent arthropods in the former amber forest. Selected taxa with higher numbers of specimens appear in amber because of their ecology and behavior, usually closely related with a tree-inhabiting life. Finally, changes of diversity from the Middle Miocene to Recent time in Central and South America can be analyzed by comparing the rich amber faunas from Mexico and the Dominican Republic with the fauna trapped using sticky and Malaise traps in Central America.

  18. Bias dependence of tunnel magnetoresistance in spin filtering tunnel junctions: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lüders, U.; Bibes, M.; Fusil, S.; Bouzehouane, K.; Jacquet, E.; Sommers, C. B.; Contour, J.-P.; Bobo, J.-F.; Barthélémy, A.; Fert, A.; Levy, P. M.

    2007-10-01

    A spin filter is a type of magnetic tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic and the insulating barrier is ferro- or ferrimagnetic. We report on spin-dependent transport measurements and their theoretical analysis in epitaxial spin filters integrating a tunnel barrier of the high-Curie-temperature ferrimagnetic spinel NiFe2O4 , with half-metallic La2/3Sr1/3MnO3 and Au electrodes. A positive tunnel magnetoresonance of up to ˜50% is obtained at low temperature, which we find decreases with bias voltage. In view of these experimental results, we propose a theoretical treatment of the transport properties of spin filters with epitaxial magnetic barriers, based on an elliptical variation of the decay rates within the spin-dependent gaps in analogy with what was calculated for nonmagnetic barrier materials such as MgO or SrTiO3 . Whereas the spin filtering efficiency for zero bias is of one sign, we show that this can easily change with bias; the degree of change hinges on the energy variation of the majority and minority spin decay rates of the transmission across the barrier. We point out some shortcomings of approaches based on models in which the transmission is related to spin-dependent barrier heights, and some implications for future experimental and theoretical research on spin filters.

  19. First application of the Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) for on-line experiments at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, D A; Imai, N; Blaum, K; Rothe, S; Sjoedin, M; Rossel, R E; Kron, T; Marsh, B A; Richter, S D; Cocolios, T E; Lecesne, N; Ghys, L; Pauwels, D; Rapisarda, E; Seliverstov, M D; Stora, T; Ramos, J P; Mendonca, T M; Fedosseev, V N; Lynch, K M; Wendt, K D A; Gottberg, A; Flanagan, K T; Van Beveren, C; Bastin, B; Fedorov, D V

    2013-01-01

    The Laser Ion Source and Trap (LIST) provides a new mode of operation for the resonance ionization laser ion source (RILIS) at ISOLDE/CERN, reducing the amount of surface-ionized isobaric contaminants by up to four orders of magnitude. After the first successful on-line test at ISOLDE in 2011 the LIST was further improved in terms of efficiency, selectivity, and reliability through several off-line tests at Mainz University and at ISOLDE. In September 2012, the first on-line physics experiments to use the LIST took place at ISOLDE. The measurements of the improved LIST indicate more than a twofold increase in efficiency compared to the LIST of the 2011 run. The suppression of surface-ionized francium contaminants has enabled the first in-source laser spectroscopy of Po-217 and Po-219. (C) 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. System design aspects and flight experience of the electrical interfaces across the Galileo spacecraft spin bearing assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landano, Matthew R.

    1993-01-01

    The Galileo spacecraft design uses a dual-spin general configuration with spun and despun sections; the mechanical connection between the two sections is accomplished by means of a spin bearing assembly (SBA) whose electrical interfacing uses both slip rings/brushes and rotary transformers that are located within the SBA. Attention is presently given to the design features of the SBA, the electrical interface flight anomaly and investigation experience with Galileo to date, and the responses of the Galileo Flight Team to those anomalies.

  1. The cosmic axion spin precession experiment (CASPEr): a dark-matter search with nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcon, Antoine; Aybas, Deniz; Blanchard, John W.; Centers, Gary; Figueroa, Nataniel L.; Graham, Peter W.; Kimball, Derek F. Jackson; Rajendran, Surjeet; Gil Sendra, Marina; Sushkov, Alexander O.; Trahms, Lutz; Wang, Tao; Wickenbrock, Arne; Wu, Teng; Budker, Dmitry

    2018-01-01

    The cosmic axion spin precession experiment (CASPEr) is a nuclear magnetic resonance experiment (NMR) seeking to detect axion and axion-like particles which could make up the dark matter present in the Universe. We review the predicted couplings of axions and axion-like particles with baryonic matter that enable their detection via NMR. We then describe two measurement schemes being implemented in CASPEr. The first method, presented in the original CASPEr proposal, consists of a resonant search via continuous-wave NMR spectroscopy. This method offers the highest sensitivity for frequencies ranging from a few Hz to hundreds of MHz, corresponding to masses {m}{{a}}∼ {10}-14–{10}-6 eV. Sub-Hz frequencies are typically difficult to probe with NMR due to the diminishing sensitivity of magnetometers in this region. To circumvent this limitation, we suggest new detection and data processing modalities. We describe a non-resonant frequency-modulation detection scheme, enabling searches from mHz to Hz frequencies ({m}{{a}}∼ {10}-17–{10}-14 eV), extending the detection bandwidth by three decades.

  2. Hydrogen isotope trapping on graphite collectors during an isotope exchange experiment in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpatrick, S.J.; Ulrickson, M.; Dylla, H.F.; Manos, D.M.; Ramsey, A.T.; Nygren, R.; Hirooka, Y.; Wampler, W.R.

    1989-03-01

    A rotatable collector probe was used to expose several graphite samples to a deuterium-to-hydrogen-to-deuterium exchange experiment in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the start of the 1988 operations period. This experiment proved the utility of helium conditioning discharges in accelerating the changeover process. Samples included portions of a tile taken from the inner bumper limiter (POCO AXF-5Q graphite) of TFTR during the recent machine opening, and coupons which had been conditioned in the Plasma Interactive Surface Component Experimental Station (PISCES) by exposure to a helium plasma. The samples were exposed to different groups of the /approximately/100 1.4 MA discharges that comprised the experiment. They were removed and analyzed for retained deuterium and impurities by nuclear reaction analysis and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Codeposited carbon layers had been formed with thicknesses up to several tenths of a micron. The inferred percentages of trapped hydrogenic species were in general agreement with spectroscopic data. The computed carbon fluence per D + discharge, 1.2 /times/ 10 17 C/cm 2 , is compared to recent measurements on limiter tiles removed from TFTR. 22 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  3. Hydrogen isotope trapping on graphite collectors during an isotope exchange experiment in the tokomak fusion test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpatrick, S.J.; Nygren, R.; Wampler, W.R.; Ulrickson, M.; Dylla, H.F.; Manos, D.M.; Ramsey, A.T.; Hirooka, Y.

    1988-01-01

    A rotatable collector probe was used to expose several graphite samples to a deuterium-to-hydrogen-to-deuterium exchange experiment in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the start of the 1988 operations period. This experiment proved the utility of helium conditioning discharges in accelerating the changeover process. Samples included portions of a tile taken from the inner bumper limiter (POCO AXF-5Q graphite) of TFTR during the recent machine opening, and coupons which had been conditioned in the Plasma Surface Interaction Experimental Facility (PISCES) by exposure to a helium plasma. The samples were exposed to different groups of the /approximately/100 1.4MA discharges that comprised the experiment. They were removed and analyzed for retained deuterium and impurities by nuclear reaction analysis and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Codeposited carbon layers had been formed with thicknesses up to several tenths of a micron. The inferred percentages of trapped hydrogenic species were in general agreement with spectroscopic data. The computed carbon fluence per D + discharge, 1.2 /times/ 10 17 C/cm 2 , is compared to recent measurements on limiter tiles removed from TFTR. 21 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  4. "Trapped in the Reform": Kindergarten Teachers' Experiences of Teacher Professionalisation in Buleleng, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulindrasari, Hani; Ujianti, Putu Rahayu

    2018-01-01

    Indonesia has been conducting a teacher reform program since 2005. Teachers' low status and the crisis of student achievement are the rationales of this reform. This paper investigates the implications of Indonesian neo-liberal teacher reform on kindergarten teachers' professional experiences and practices. The research was conducted in Buleleng…

  5. Weak Interaction Measurements with Optically Trapped Radioactive Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, D.J.; Crane, S.G.; Guckert, R.; Zhao, X.; Brice, S.J.; Goldschmidt, A.; Hime, A.; Tupa, D.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this project is to apply the latest in magneto-optical and pure magnetic trapping technology to concentrate, cool, confine, and polarize radioactive atoms for precise electroweak interaction measurements. In particular, the authors have concentrated their efforts on the trapping of 82 Rb for a parity-violating, beta-asymmetry measurement. Progress has been made in successfully trapping of up to 6 million 82 Rb(t 1/2 =75s) atoms in a magneto-optical trap coupled to a mass separator. This represents a two order of magnitude improvement in the number trapped radioactive atoms over all previous work. They have also measured the atomic hyperfine structure of 82 Rb and demonstrated the MOT-to-MOT transfer and accumulation of atoms in a second trap. Finally, they have constructed and tested a time-orbiting-potential magnetic trap that will serve as a rotating beacon of spin-polarized nuclei and a beta-telescope detection system. Prototype experiments are now underway with the initial goal of making a 1% measurements of the beta-asymmetry parameter A which would match the world's best measurements

  6. The experiences and adaptations of abortion providers practicing under a new TRAP law: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Rebecca J; Buchbinder, Mara; Bryant, Amy; Britton, Laura

    2015-06-01

    Abortion laws are proliferating in the United States, but little is known about their impact on abortion providers. In 2011, North Carolina instituted the Woman's Right to Know (WRTK) Act, which mandates a 24-h waiting period and counseling with state-prescribed information prior to abortion. We performed a qualitative study to explore the experiences of abortion providers practicing under this law. We conducted semistructured interviews with 31 abortion providers (17 physicians, 9 nurses, 1 physician assistant, 1 counselor and 3 clinic administrators) in North Carolina. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Interview transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach. We identified emergent themes, coded all transcripts and developed a thematic framework. Two major themes define provider experiences with the WRTK law: provider objections/challenges and provider adaptations. Most providers described the law in negative terms, though providers varied in the extent to which they were affected. Many providers described extensive alterations in clinic practices to balance compliance with minimization of burdens for patients. Providers indicated that biased language and inappropriate content in counseling can negatively impact the patient-physician relationship by interfering with trust and rapport. Most providers developed verbal strategies to mitigate the emotional impacts for patients. Abortion providers in North Carolina perceive WRTK to have a negative impact on their clinical practice. Compliance is burdensome, and providers perceive potential harm to patients. The overall impact of WRTK is shaped by interaction between the requirements of the law and the adaptations providers make in order to comply with the law while continuing to provide comprehensive abortion care. Laws like WRTK are burdensome for providers. Providers adapt their clinical practices not only to comply with laws but also to minimize the emotional and practical impacts on

  7. Atomic structure governed diversity of exchange-driven spin helices in Fe nanoislands: Experiment and theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jeison A.; Sandratskii, Leonid M.; Phark, Soo-hyon; Sander, Dirk; Parkin, Stuart

    2017-10-01

    We combine spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (SP-STM) and first-principles calculations to demonstrate the control of the wavelength of helical spin textures in Fe nanoislands by varying their atomic structure. We make use of the complexity of submonolayer growth of Fe on Cu(111) to prepare nanoislands characterized by different thickness and in-plane atomic structure. SP-STM results reveal that the magnetic states of different nanoislands are spin helices. The wavelength of the spin helices varies strongly. Calculations performed for Fe films with different thickness and in-plane atomic structure explain the strong variation of the wavelength by a subtle balance in the competition between ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic exchange interactions. We identify the crucial role of the effectively enhanced weak antiferromagnetic exchange interactions between distant atoms.

  8. Spin physics experiments at NICA-SPD with polarized proton and deuteron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savin, I.; Efremov, A.; Pshekhonov, D.; Kovalenko, A.; Teryaev, O.; Shevchenko, O.; Nagajcev, A.; Guskov, A.; Kukhtin, V.; Toplilin, N. [JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    This is a brief description of suggested measurements of asymmetries of the Drell-Yan (DY) pair production in collisions of non-polarized, longitudinally and transversally polarized protons and deuterons which provide an access to all leading-twist collinear and TMD PDFs of quarks and anti-quarks in nucleons. Other spin effects in hadronic and heavy-ion collisions may be also studied constituting the spin physics program at NICA. (orig.)

  9. Nuclear spin polarization of targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Happer, W.

    1990-01-01

    Lasers can be used to produce milligrams to grams of noble gas nuclei with spin polarizations in excess of 50%. These quantities are sufficient to be very useful targets in nuclear physics experiments. Alkali-metal atoms are used to capture the angular momentum of circularly polarized laser photons, and the alkali-metal atoms transfer their angular momentum to noble gas atoms in binary or three-body collisions. Non-radiative collisions between the excited alkali atoms and molecular quenching gases are essential to avoid radiation trapping. The spin exchange can involve gas-phase van der Waals molecules, consisting of a noble gas atom and an alkali metal atom. Surface chemistry is also of great importance in determining the wall-induced relaxation rates of the noble gases

  10. Pilot experiment to control Medfly, Ceratitis capitata (Wied.) (Diptera: Tephritidae) using mass trapping technique in a custard apple (Annona cherimolia Mill.) orchard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ros, J.P.; Escobar, I.; Garcia Tapia, F.J.; Aranda, G.

    2000-01-01

    Recently, as a result of assays coordinated by the International Atomic Energy Agency (and participated by Spain), it was decided that ammonium acetate, putrescine and trimethylamine be included in low release polyetilene bag dispensers (Biolure, Consep, Co) as the Mediterranean fruit fly (Medfly) females were greatly attracted by them. These synthetic substances are placed in traps at the frequency of one and a half months to two months. If Tephry traps are used, one DDVP wafer (containing Vapona or a similar substance) is enough to kill the flies that enter them. These attractants make it unnecessary to replenish the liquids in the Mcphail traps and remain effective throughout the entire fruit season. The Caja Rural de Granada (a bank of farmers) encourages all techniques that increase crop profits for farmers. It is even more desirable if such crop profitability can be achieved without the application of insecticides which may result in the likely presence of toxic residues. In the light of the results achieved by the attractants with regard to female Medflies, the Caja Rural de Granada, together with the National Institute of Agricultural Research Counselling (Agricultural Department), performed an experiment on mass trapping to confirm whether it is possible to protect a fruit plantation with the application of this biotechnical method. Due to the great risk of this initial experiment, the farmers were free to use insecticides as often as they deemed necessary so that no damages due to any plague could be blamed on the experiment

  11. Compact toroid challenge experiment with the increasing in the energy input into plasma and the level of trapped magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romadanov, I.V.; Ryzhkov, S.V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Compact torus formation method with high level of magnetic flux is proposed. • A compact torus is produced in a theta-pinch-coil with pulse mode of operation. • Key feature is a pulse of current in an axial direction. • We report a level of linked magnetic flux is higher than theta-pinch results. - Abstract: The present work reports on compact toroid hydrogen plasma creation by means of a specially designed discharge system and results of magnetic fields introduction. Experiments in the compact toroid challenge (CTC) device at P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute (FIAN) have been conducted since 2005. The CTC device differs from the conventional theta-pinch formation in the use of an axial current for enhanced efficiency. We have used a novel technique to maximize the flux linked to the plasma. The purpose of this method is to increase the energy input into the plasma and the level of trapped magnetic flux using an additional toroidal magnetic field. A study of compact torus formation with axial and toroidal currents was done and a new method is proposed and implemented.

  12. Fluxes of 234Th, 210Po and 210Pb determined by sediment trap experiments in pelagic oceans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harada, Koh; Tsunogai, Shizuo

    1986-01-01

    Sediment trap experiments were carried out in two oceans, the eastern Pacific Ocean and the Antarctic Ocean, which have very different biological productivities. The natural radionuclides, 234 Th, 210 Po and 210 Pb were used as tracers of reactive metals. Larger particulate fluxes of these radionuclides were found in the seas where total mass fluxes were larger, although the concentrations of these radionuclides in the settling particles were somewhat smaller. The concentrations of 234 Th in the settling particles varied widely and irregularly with depth, whereas the concentrations of 210 Po and 210 Pb in the settling particles steadily increased with increasing water depth. The ratios of 210 Po/ 210 Pb in the settling particulates were larger than unity which the ratio of 234 Th/excess 210 Po as larger than 234 Th/ 210 Po in the deep water. These results suggest that, when the particles sink through the water column, these radionuclides are being absorbed by settling particles in the order 234 Th > 210 Po > 210 Pb. The observed particulate fluxes of 210 Pb are about one eighth of those calculated from the disequilibria between 226 Ra and 210 Pb at the stations in the subtropical eastern Pacific, although the observed fluxes are the same as the calculated ones in the northern North Pacific and the Antarctic Ocean. Thus, there must be a horizontal flow carrying these reactive metals from the oligotorophic ocean to the biologically productive ocean where the metals are removed by settling particles even in deep water. (author)

  13. COLD TRAPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, W.I.

    1958-09-30

    A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

  14. The g$p\\atop{2}$ Experiment: A Measurement of the Proton's Spin Structure Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinski, Ryan B. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The E08-027 (g$p\\atop{2}$) experiment measured the spin structure functions of the proton at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, Va. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered from a transversely and longitudinally polarized solid ammonia target in Hall A, with the polarized NH$_3$ acting as an effective proton target. Focusing on small scattering angle events at the electron energies available at Jefferson Lab, the experiment covered a kinematic phase space of 0.02 GeV$^2$ $< Q^2 <$ 0.20 GeV$^2$ in the proton's resonance region. The spin structure functions, $g_{1}^p(x,Q^2)$ and $g_{2}^p(x,Q^2)$ , are extracted from an inclusive polarized cross section measurement of the electron-proton interaction. Integrated moments of $g_1(x,Q^2)$ are calculated and compared to theoretical predictions made by Chiral Perturbation Theory. The $g_1(x,Q^2)$ results are in agreement with previous measurements, but include a significant increase in statistical precision. The spin structure function contributions to the hyperfine energy levels in the hydrogen atom are also investigated. The $g_2(x,Q^2)$ measured contribution to the hyperfine splitting is the first ever experimental determination of this quantity. The results of this thesis suggest a disagreement of over 100% with previously published model results.

  15. Ultrafast optical control of individual quantum dot spin qubits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Greve, Kristiaan; Press, David; McMahon, Peter L; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-01-01

    Single spins in semiconductor quantum dots form a promising platform for solid-state quantum information processing. The spin-up and spin-down states of a single electron or hole, trapped inside a quantum dot, can represent a single qubit with a reasonably long decoherence time. The spin qubit can be optically coupled to excited (charged exciton) states that are also trapped in the quantum dot, which provides a mechanism to quickly initialize, manipulate and measure the spin state with optical pulses, and to interface between a stationary matter qubit and a ‘flying’ photonic qubit for quantum communication and distributed quantum information processing. The interaction of the spin qubit with light may be enhanced by placing the quantum dot inside a monolithic microcavity. An entire system, consisting of a two-dimensional array of quantum dots and a planar microcavity, may plausibly be constructed by modern semiconductor nano-fabrication technology and could offer a path toward chip-sized scalable quantum repeaters and quantum computers. This article reviews the recent experimental developments in optical control of single quantum dot spins for quantum information processing. We highlight demonstrations of a complete set of all-optical single-qubit operations on a single quantum dot spin: initialization, an arbitrary SU(2) gate, and measurement. We review the decoherence and dephasing mechanisms due to hyperfine interaction with the nuclear-spin bath, and show how the single-qubit operations can be combined to perform spin echo sequences that extend the qubit decoherence from a few nanoseconds to several microseconds, more than 5 orders of magnitude longer than the single-qubit gate time. Two-qubit coupling is discussed, both within a single chip by means of exchange coupling of nearby spins and optically induced geometric phases, as well as over longer-distances. Long-distance spin–spin entanglement can be generated if each spin can emit a photon that is

  16. Nucleon partonic spin structure to be explored by the unpolarized Drell-Yan program of COMPASS experiment at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Wen-Chen

    2016-01-01

    The observation of the violation of Lam-Tung relation in the $\\pi N$ Drell-Yan process triggered many theoretical speculations. The TMD Boer-Mulders functions characterizing the correlation of transverse momentum and transverse spin for partons in unpolarized hadrons could nicely account for the violation. The COMPASS experiment at CERN will measure the angular distributions of dimuons from the unpolarized Drell-Yan process over a wide kinematic region and study the beam particle dependence. Significant statistics is expected from a successful run in 2015 which will bring further understanding of the origin of the violation of Lam-Tung relation and of the partonic transverse spin structure of the nucleon.

  17. Simultaneous spin pumping and spin Seebeck experiments with thermal control of the magnetic damping in bilayers of yttrium iron garnet and heavy metals: YIG/Pt and YIG/IrMn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holanda, J.; Alves Santos, O.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2017-04-01

    We report experiments on the generation of spin currents by simultaneous spin pumping effect and spin Seebeck effect (SSE) in bilayers of yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/Pt and YIG/IrMn. The experiments are performed with the ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) in YIG excited by microwave radiation in the range of 2-6 GHz and subject to a temperature gradient as in studies of the longitudinal SSE. Measurements of the FMR linewidth show that the magnetic damping in YIG can be controlled by spin currents generated by the thermal gradient across the thickness of the bilayer. The simultaneous measurements allow the determination of the spin current generated by SSE and a quantitative comparison of the models proposed for thermal control of the magnetic damping with experimental data. We show that the model based on the flow of angular momentum into or out of the YIG film carried by the coherent part of the spin current influenced by the temperature gradient is the one that best accounts for the observed change in the damping.

  18. Thermal conduction effects in spin-lattice relaxation experiments on ytterbium chloride hexahydrate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flokstra, Jakob; Gerritsma, G.J.; Blokhuis, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    The anomalous behaviour of the spin-lattice relaxation observed for single crystals of ytterbium chloride hexahydrate at fields stronger than 5 kOe is due to the poor heat transfer in the liquid-helium bath. The thermal conduction effects can be explained by means of a thermal conduction model for

  19. IN15 ultra-high-resolution spin-echo project. First experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schleger, P.; Hayes, C. [Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France); Kollmar, A. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1997-04-01

    The IN15 project is a collaboration between the ILL, HMI (Berlin), and FZ (Juelich) to construct a spin-echo spectrometer with a fourier time-range surpassing half a microsecond. Three different operational modes are possible: normal, with neutron focusing, and time-of-flight. Present status of the project is described. (author). 3 refs.

  20. Depolarization of UCN stored in material traps

    CERN Document Server

    Serebrov, A; Lasakov, M; Rudnev, Y; Krasnoschekova, I A; Geltenbort, P; Butterworth, J; Bowles, T; Morris, C; Seestrom, S; Smith, D; Young, A R

    2000-01-01

    Depolarization of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) stored in material traps was first observed. The probability of UCN spin flip per reflection depends on the trap material and varies from 7x10 sup - sup 6 (beryllium) to 10 sup - sup 4 (glass).

  1. Depolarization of UCN stored in material traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serebrov, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Lasakov, M.; Rudnev, Yu.; Krasnoshekova, I.; Geltenbort, P.; Butterworth, J.; Bowles, T.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Smith, D.; Young, A.R

    2000-02-11

    Depolarization of ultra-cold neutrons (UCN) stored in material traps was first observed. The probability of UCN spin flip per reflection depends on the trap material and varies from 7x10{sup -6} (beryllium) to 10{sup -4} (glass)

  2. Measuring sunscreen protection against solar-simulated radiation-induced structural radical damage to skin using ESR/spin trapping: development of an ex vivo test method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Rachel; Volkov, Arsen; Andrady, Carima; Sayer, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The in vitro star system used for sunscreen UVA-testing is not an absolute measure of skin protection being a ratio of the total integrated UVA/UVB absorption. The in vivo persistent-pigment-darkening method requires human volunteers. We investigated the use of the ESR-detectable DMPO protein radical-adduct in solar-simulator-irradiated skin substitutes for sunscreen testing. Sunscreens SPF rated 20+ with UVA protection, reduced this adduct by 40-65% when applied at 2 mg/cm(2). SPF 15 Organic UVA-UVB (BMDBM-OMC) and TiO(2)-UVB filters and a novel UVA-TiO(2) filter reduced it by 21, 31 and 70% respectively. Conventional broad-spectrum sunscreens do not fully protect against protein radical-damage in skin due to possible visible-light contributions to damage or UVA-filter degradation. Anisotropic spectra of DMPO-trapped oxygen-centred radicals, proposed intermediates of lipid-oxidation, were detected in irradiated sunscreen and DMPO. Sunscreen protection might be improved by the consideration of visible-light protection and the design of filters to minimise radical leakage and lipid-oxidation.

  3. ROS production in homogenate from the body wall of sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus under UVA irradiation: ESR spin-trapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Hang; Dong, Xiu-fang; Zhao, Ya-ping; Li, Nan; Fu, Hui; Feng, Ding-ding; Liu, Li; Yu, Chen-xu

    2016-02-01

    Sea cucumber Stichopus japonicus (S. japonicus) shows a strong ability of autolysis, which leads to severe deterioration in sea cucumber quality during processing and storage. In this study, to further characterize the mechanism of sea cucumber autolysis, hydroxyl radical production induced by ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation was investigated. Homogenate from the body wall of S. japonicas was prepared and subjected to UVA irradiation at room temperature. Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectra of the treated samples were subsequently recorded. The results showed that hydroxyl radicals (OH) became more abundant while the time of UVA treatment and the homogenate concentration were increased. Addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, EDTA, desferal, NaN3 and D2O to the homogenate samples led to different degrees of inhibition on OH production. Metal cations and pH also showed different effects on OH production. These results indicated that OH was produced in the homogenate with a possible pathway as follows: O2(-) → H2O2 → OH, suggesting that OH might be a critical factor in UVA-induced S. japonicus autolysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Pairwise NMR experiments for the determination of protein backbone dihedral angle Φ based on cross-correlated spin relaxation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hideo; Shimada, Ichio

    2007-01-01

    Novel cross-correlated spin relaxation (CCR) experiments are described, which measure pairwise CCR rates for obtaining peptide dihedral angles Φ. The experiments utilize intra-HNCA type coherence transfer to refocus 2-bond J NCα coupling evolution and generate the N (i)-C α (i) or C'(i-1)-C α (i) multiple quantum coherences which are required for measuring the desired CCR rates. The contribution from other coherences is also discussed and an appropriate setting of the evolution delays is presented. These CCR experiments were applied to 15 N- and 13 C-labeled human ubiquitin. The relevant CCR rates showed a high degree of correlation with the Φ angles observed in the X-ray structure. By utilizing these CCR experiments in combination with those previously established for obtaining dihedral angle Ψ, we can determine high resolution structures of peptides that bind weakly to large target molecules

  5. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    stored ions,” Adv. Atom Mol. Phys., vol. Volume 3, pp. 53–72 1968. [48] P. H. Dawson, Quadrupole Mass Spectometry and Its Applications, Melville, NY... DATE December 2011 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Ion trap Quantum Computing 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6...researcher [30] that introduced the concept of ion traps in the 1950s. His experiments focused on separating atoms with different masses in order to

  6. HPN-07, a free radical spin trapping agent, protects against functional, cellular and electrophysiological changes in the cochlea induced by acute acoustic trauma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Ewert

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is considered a major cause of the structural and functional changes associated with auditory pathologies induced by exposure to acute acoustic trauma AAT. In the present study, we examined the otoprotective effects of 2,4-disulfophenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (HPN-07, a nitrone-based free radical trap, on the physiological and cellular changes in the auditory system of chinchilla following a six-hour exposure to 4 kHz octave band noise at 105 dB SPL. HPN-07 has been shown to suppress oxidative stress in biological models of a variety of disorders. Our results show that administration of HPN-07 beginning four hours after acoustic trauma accelerated and enhanced auditory/cochlear functional recovery, as measured by auditory brainstem responses (ABR, distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE, compound action potentials (CAP, and cochlear microphonics (CM. The normally tight correlation between the endocochlear potential (EP and evoked potentials of CAP and CM were persistently disrupted after noise trauma in untreated animals but returned to homeostatic conditions in HPN-07 treated animals. Histological analyses revealed several therapeutic advantages associated with HPN-07 treatment following AAT, including reductions in inner and outer hair cell loss; reductions in AAT-induced loss of calretinin-positive afferent nerve fibers in the spiral lamina; and reductions in fibrocyte loss within the spiral ligament. These findings support the conclusion that early intervention with HPN-07 following an AAT efficiently blocks the propagative ototoxic effects of oxidative stress, thereby preserving the homeostatic and functional integrity of the cochlea.

  7. HPN-07, a free radical spin trapping agent, protects against functional, cellular and electrophysiological changes in the cochlea induced by acute acoustic trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewert, Donald; Hu, Ning; Du, Xiaoping; Li, Wei; West, Matthew B; Choi, Chul-Hee; Floyd, Robert; Kopke, Richard D

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is considered a major cause of the structural and functional changes associated with auditory pathologies induced by exposure to acute acoustic trauma AAT). In the present study, we examined the otoprotective effects of 2,4-disulfophenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (HPN-07), a nitrone-based free radical trap, on the physiological and cellular changes in the auditory system of chinchilla following a six-hour exposure to 4 kHz octave band noise at 105 dB SPL. HPN-07 has been shown to suppress oxidative stress in biological models of a variety of disorders. Our results show that administration of HPN-07 beginning four hours after acoustic trauma accelerated and enhanced auditory/cochlear functional recovery, as measured by auditory brainstem responses (ABR), distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE), compound action potentials (CAP), and cochlear microphonics (CM). The normally tight correlation between the endocochlear potential (EP) and evoked potentials of CAP and CM were persistently disrupted after noise trauma in untreated animals but returned to homeostatic conditions in HPN-07 treated animals. Histological analyses revealed several therapeutic advantages associated with HPN-07 treatment following AAT, including reductions in inner and outer hair cell loss; reductions in AAT-induced loss of calretinin-positive afferent nerve fibers in the spiral lamina; and reductions in fibrocyte loss within the spiral ligament. These findings support the conclusion that early intervention with HPN-07 following an AAT efficiently blocks the propagative ototoxic effects of oxidative stress, thereby preserving the homeostatic and functional integrity of the cochlea.

  8. Spin-Mechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Mamoru; Saitoh, Eiji; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the interconversion phenomena between spin and mechanical angular momentum in moving objects. In particular, the recent results on spin manipulation and spin-current generation by mechanical motion are examined. In accelerating systems, spin-dependent gauge fields emerge, which enable the conversion from mechanical angular momentum into spins. Such a spin-mechanical effect is predicted by quantum theory in a non-inertial frame. Experiments which confirm the effect, i.e., the resonance frequency shift in nuclear magnetic resonance, the stray field measurement of rotating metals, and electric voltage generation in liquid metals, are discussed.

  9. The Spin Structure of the Neutron and 3HE:. AN Overview of the Jlab Experiments in Hall a

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziani, Z.-E.

    2001-02-01

    I shall discuss three experiments which form part of a comprehensive physics program aimed at the study of the spin structure of the neutron using a polarized 3He target and a polarized beam at JLab in Hall A. Results from the first experiment performed to evaluate the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) extended sum rule are presented and future approved measurements are discussed. The main goal of these experiments is to bridge our understanding of the strong interaction in the large Q2 regime where quarks and gluons are the relevant degrees of freedom to the low Q2 regime where constituent quarks and mesons seem to be more adequate for a description of the nucleon properties.

  10. Island of high-spin isomers near N = 82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, J.; Back, B.B.; Bernthal, F.M.; Bjornholm, S.; Borggreen, J.; Christensen, O.; Folkmann, F.; Herskind, B.; Khoo, T.L.; Neiman, M.; Puehlhofer, F.; Sletten, G.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments aimed at testing for the existence of yrast traps are reported. A search for delayed γ radiation of lifetimes longer than approx. 10 ns and of high multiplicity has been performed by producing more than 100 compound nuclei between Ba and Pb in bombardments with 40 Ar, 50 Ti, and 65 Cu projectiles. An island of high-spin isomers is found to exist in the region 64 or approx. = 71 and N < or approx. = 82

  11. Impurity Trapping of Positive Muons in Metals

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Polarized positive muons are implanted into metal samples. In an applied magnetic field the muon spin precession is studied. The line width in the precession frequency spectrum gives information about the static and dynamic properties of muons in a metal lattice. At temperatures where the muon is immobile within its lifetime the line width gives information about the site of location. At temperatures where the muon is mobile, the line width gives information on the diffusion process. It is known from experiments on quasi-elastic neutron scattering on hydrogen in niobium that interstitial impurities like nitrogen tend to act as traps for hydrogen. These trapping effects have now been studied systematically for muons in both f.c.c. metals (aluminium and copper) and b.c.c. metals (mainly niobium). Direct information on the trapping rates and the nature of the diffusion processes can be obtained since the muonic lifetime covers a time range where many of these processes occur.\\\\ \\\\ Mathematical models are set up ...

  12. Trapping ultracold atoms in a sub-micron-period triangular magnetic lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Tran, T.; Surendran, P.; Herrera, I.; Balcytis, A.; Nissen, D.; Albrecht, M.; Sidorov, A.; Hannaford, P.

    2017-07-01

    We report the trapping of ultracold 87Rb atoms in a 0.7-μ m-period two-dimensional triangular magnetic lattice on an atom chip. The magnetic lattice is created by a lithographically patterned magnetic Co/Pd multilayer film plus bias fields. Rubidium atoms in the |F =1 , mF=-1 > low-field seeking state are trapped at estimated distances down to about 100 nm from the chip surface and with calculated mean trapping frequencies up to about 800 kHz . The measured lifetimes of the atoms trapped in the magnetic lattice are in the range 0.4-1.7 ms , depending on distance from the chip surface. Model calculations suggest the trap lifetimes are currently limited mainly by losses due to one-dimensional thermal evaporation following loading of the atoms from the Z -wire trap into the very tight magnetic lattice traps, rather than by fundamental loss processes such as surface interactions, three-body recombination, or spin flips due to Johnson magnetic noise. The trapping of atoms in a 0.7 -μ m -period magnetic lattice represents a significant step toward using magnetic lattices for quantum tunneling experiments and to simulate condensed matter and many-body phenomena in nontrivial lattice geometries.

  13. The free radical spin-trap alpha-PBN attenuates periinfarct depolarizations following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats without reducing infarct volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, Torben; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2003-01-01

    (control: 28.3+/-16.3 mm3 vs. alpha-PBN 23.7+/-7.4 mm3). In the second series of experiments, periinfarct depolarizations (PIDs) were recorded with an extracellular DC electrode at two locations in the ischemic penumbra for the initial 3 h following MCAO. alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg, single dose in conjunction...... with occlusion) significantly reduced the total number (median value of 3 PIDs in the control groups vs. 1 PID in alpha-PBN groups, p...

  14. Predictive modelling-based design and experiments for synthesis and spinning of bioinspired silk fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronau, Greta; Jacobsen, Matthew M.; Huang, Wenwen; Rizzo, Daniel J.; Li, David; Staii, Cristian; Pugno, Nicola M.; Wong, Joyce Y.; Kaplan, David L.; Buehler, Markus J.

    2016-01-01

    Scalable computational modelling tools are required to guide the rational design of complex hierarchical materials with predictable functions. Here, we utilize mesoscopic modelling, integrated with genetic block copolymer synthesis and bioinspired spinning process, to demonstrate de novo materials design that incorporates chemistry, processing and material characterization. We find that intermediate hydrophobic/hydrophilic block ratios observed in natural spider silks and longer chain lengths lead to outstanding silk fibre formation. This design by nature is based on the optimal combination of protein solubility, self-assembled aggregate size and polymer network topology. The original homogeneous network structure becomes heterogeneous after spinning, enhancing the anisotropic network connectivity along the shear flow direction. Extending beyond the classical polymer theory, with insights from the percolation network model, we illustrate the direct proportionality between network conductance and fibre Young's modulus. This integrated approach provides a general path towards de novo functional network materials with enhanced mechanical properties and beyond (optical, electrical or thermal) as we have experimentally verified. PMID:26017575

  15. Predictive modelling-based design and experiments for synthesis and spinning of bioinspired silk fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shangchao; Ryu, Seunghwa; Tokareva, Olena; Gronau, Greta; Jacobsen, Matthew M; Huang, Wenwen; Rizzo, Daniel J; Li, David; Staii, Cristian; Pugno, Nicola M; Wong, Joyce Y; Kaplan, David L; Buehler, Markus J

    2015-05-28

    Scalable computational modelling tools are required to guide the rational design of complex hierarchical materials with predictable functions. Here, we utilize mesoscopic modelling, integrated with genetic block copolymer synthesis and bioinspired spinning process, to demonstrate de novo materials design that incorporates chemistry, processing and material characterization. We find that intermediate hydrophobic/hydrophilic block ratios observed in natural spider silks and longer chain lengths lead to outstanding silk fibre formation. This design by nature is based on the optimal combination of protein solubility, self-assembled aggregate size and polymer network topology. The original homogeneous network structure becomes heterogeneous after spinning, enhancing the anisotropic network connectivity along the shear flow direction. Extending beyond the classical polymer theory, with insights from the percolation network model, we illustrate the direct proportionality between network conductance and fibre Young's modulus. This integrated approach provides a general path towards de novo functional network materials with enhanced mechanical properties and beyond (optical, electrical or thermal) as we have experimentally verified.

  16. Angular Correlations Between Fragment Spin and Prompt Neutron Evaporation in Spontaneous Fission of 252Cf: CORA-Demon Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorova, E.; Gönnenwein, F.; Kopatch, Yu.; Mutterer, M.; Hanappe, F.; Kinnard, V.; Stuttgé, L.; Dorvaux, O.; Wollersheim, H.-J.

    2007-05-01

    A novel method to search for the anisotropic emission of prompt neutrons in the center-of-mass system of fission fragments is presented. The anisotropy is conjectured to be due to the large spins of fission fragments are known to carry. Triple neutron- neutron-fragment correlations in spontaneous fission of 252Cf were investigated in an exploratory experiment dubbed CORA-DEMON experiment. Fission fragments were intercepted in a double ionization chamber while neutrons were spotted in 2 two-dimensional cylindrical walls of Demon detectors with the target on the vertical cylinder axis. A new method of analysis of triple angular correlations between 2 neutrons and a fission fragment was applied. Preliminary results are reported.

  17. Strong coupling effects during X-pulse CPMG experiments recorded on heteronuclear ABX spin systems: artifacts and a simple solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallurupalli, Pramodh; Scott, Lincoln; Williamson, James R.; Kay, Lewis E.

    2007-01-01

    Simulation and experiment have been used to establish that significant artifacts can be generated in X-pulse CPMG relaxation dispersion experiments recorded on heteronuclear ABX spin-systems, such as 13 C i - 13 C j - 1 H, where 13 C i and 13 C j are strongly coupled. A qualitative explanation of the origin of these artifacts is presented along with a simple method to significantly reduce them. An application to the measurement of 1 H CPMG relaxation dispersion profiles in an HIV-2 TAR RNA molecule where all ribose sugars are protonated at the 2' position, deuterated at all other sugar positions and 13 C labeled at all sugar carbons is presented to illustrate the problems that strong 13 C- 13 C coupling introduces and a simple solution is proposed

  18. Nonlinear spectroscopy of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlawin, Frank; Gessner, Manuel; Mukamel, Shaul; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2014-08-01

    Nonlinear spectroscopy employs a series of laser pulses to interrogate dynamics in large interacting many-body systems, and it has become a highly successful method for experiments in chemical physics. Current quantum optical experiments approach system sizes and levels of complexity that require the development of efficient techniques to assess spectral and dynamical features with scalable experimental overhead. However, established methods from optical spectroscopy of macroscopic ensembles cannot be applied straightforwardly to few-atom systems. Based on the ideas proposed in M. Gessner et al., (arXiv:1312.3365), we develop a diagrammatic approach to construct nonlinear measurement protocols for controlled quantum systems, and we discuss experimental implementations with trapped ion technology in detail. These methods, in combination with distinct features of ultracold-matter systems, allow us to monitor and analyze excitation dynamics in both the electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom. They are independent of system size, and they can therefore reliably probe systems in which, e.g., quantum state tomography becomes prohibitively expensive. We propose signals that can probe steady-state currents, detect the influence of anharmonicities on phonon transport, and identify signatures of chaotic dynamics near a quantum phase transition in an Ising-type spin chain.

  19. Dynamic nuclear spin polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuhrmann, H.B. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

    1996-11-01

    Polarized neutron scattering from dynamic polarized targets has been applied to various hydrogenous materials at different laboratories. In situ structures of macromolecular components have been determined by nuclear spin contrast variation with an unprecedented precision. The experiments of selective nuclear spin depolarisation not only opened a new dimension to structural studies but also revealed phenomena related to propagation of nuclear spin polarization and the interplay of nuclear polarisation with the electronic spin system. The observation of electron spin label dependent nuclear spin polarisation domains by NMR and polarized neutron scattering opens a way to generalize the method of nuclear spin contrast variation and most importantly it avoids precontrasting by specific deuteration. It also likely might tell us more about the mechanism of dynamic nuclear spin polarisation. (author) 4 figs., refs.

  20. Search For Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, Gorm B.; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, William; Bowe, Paul D.; Bray, Crystal C.; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L.; Chapman, Steven; Charlton, Michael; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C.; Gill, David R.; Hangst, Jeffrey S.; Hardy, Walter N.; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Hayden, Michael E.; Humphries, Andrew J.; Hydomako, Richard; Jonsell, Svante; Jorgensen, Lars V.; Kurchaninov, Lenoid; Lambo, Ricardo; Madsen, Niels; Menary, Scott; Nolan, Paul; Olchanski, Konstantin; Olin, Art; Povilus, Alexander; Pusa, Petteri; Robicheaux, Francis; Sarid, Eli; Nasr, Sarah Seif El; Silveira, Daniel M.; So, Chukman; Storey, James W.; Thompson, Robert I.; van der Werf, Dirk P.; Wilding, Dean; Wurtele, Jonathan S.; Yamazaki, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of an experiment to search for trapped antihydrogen atoms with the ALPHA antihydrogen trap at the CERN Antiproton Decelerator. Sensitive diagnostics of the temperatures, sizes, and densities of the trapped antiproton and positron plasmas have been developed, which in turn permitted development of techniques to precisely and reproducibly control the initial experimental parameters. The use of a position-sensitive annihilation vertex detector, together with the capability of controllably quenching the superconducting magnetic minimum trap, enabled us to carry out a high-sensitivity and low-background search for trapped synthesised antihydrogen atoms. We aim to identify the annihilations of antihydrogen atoms held for at least 130 ms in the trap before being released over ~30 ms. After a three-week experimental run in 2009 involving mixing of 10^7 antiprotons with 1.3 10^9 positrons to produce 6 10^5 antihydrogen atoms, we have identified six antiproton annihilation events that are consist...

  1. The free radical spin-trap alpha-PBN attenuates periinfarct depolarizations following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in rats without reducing infarct volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas; Bruhn, Torben; Diemer, Nils Henrik

    2003-01-01

    (control: 28.3+/-16.3 mm3 vs. alpha-PBN 23.7+/-7.4 mm3). In the second series of experiments, periinfarct depolarizations (PIDs) were recorded with an extracellular DC electrode at two locations in the ischemic penumbra for the initial 3 h following MCAO. alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg, single dose in conjunction...... with occlusion) significantly reduced the total number (median value of 3 PIDs in the control groups vs. 1 PID in alpha-PBN groups, p...... with a single dose of alpha-PBN (100 mg/kg) or saline. Body temperature was measured and controlled for the first 24 h to obtain identical temperature curves in the two groups. Cortical infarct volumes were determined on histological sections 7 days later. alpha-PBN did not significantly reduce infarct volume...

  2. Laser spectroscopy of short-lived radionuclides in an ion trap: MIRACLS’ proof-of-principle experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Franziska Maria

    2017-01-01

    Since 1978 Collinear Laser Spectroscopy is done at COLLAPS [1], which is located at ISOLDE,CERN’sfacilityforsynthesizingradioactiveions,toexplorethenuclearshell structure of the most exotic atomic nuclides far away from stability. At COLLAPS a laser beam is overlapped with a radioactive ion beam. If the wavelength of the laser corresponds to the energy difference of the electronic transitions, the laser excites the ions. The excited ions decay back to the ionic ground state and emit fluorescence photons that can be detected with photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). By measuring the hyperfine structure of the involved ionic states one obtains information about the nuclear spin, the nuclear magnetic dipole moment and the nuclear electric quadrupole moment. This hyperfine splitting is caused by the interaction of the bound electrons withtheatomicnucleus. Theelectronsinduceanelectromagneticfieldattheplaceof the nucleus that interacts with the electromagnetic nuclear moments and the nuclear spin. By calculating th...

  3. Magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix: Tornado traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregood, B.P.; Lehnert, B.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given on the features of magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix, with special emphasis on Tornado spiral coil configurations. The confinement and heating of static plasms in Tornado traps is treated, including the topology of the magnetic field structure, the magneto-mechanical properties of the magnetic coil system, as well as the particle orbits and plasma behaviour in these traps. In addition, the mode of rotating plasma operation by crossed electric and magnetic fields is described. The results of experiments on static and rotating plasmas are summarized, and conclusions are drawn about future possibilities of Tornado traps in the creation and containment of hot plasmas. (orig.)

  4. The two-component spin-fermion model for high-Tc cuprates: its applications in neutron scattering and ARPES experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Yunkyu

    2012-01-01

    Motivated by neutron scattering experiments in high-T c cuprates, we propose the two-component spin-fermion model as a minimal phenomenological model, which has both local spins and itinerant fermions as independent degrees of freedom (d.o.f.). Our calculations of the dynamic spin correlation function provide a successful description of the puzzling neutron experiment data and show that: (i) the upward dispersion branch of magnetic excitations is mostly due to local spin excitations; (ii) the downward dispersion branch is from collective particle-hole excitations of fermions; and (iii) the resonance mode is a mixture of both d.o.f. Using the same model with the same set of parameters, we calculated the renormalized quasiparticle (q.p.) dispersion and successfully reproduced one of the key features of the angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments, namely the high-energy kink structure in the fermion q.p. dispersion, thus supporting the two-component spin-fermion phenomenology. (paper)

  5. Spin effects in high- and low-field magnetotransport experiments in semimagnetic Cd1-xMnxTe heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betthausen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of this PhD we report on the very first observation of the fractional Quantum Hall Effect (FQHE) in both, a non-magnetic CdTe and a semimagnetic Cd 1-x Mn x Te quantum well device. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first demonstration of this effect in the II-VI material family. Furthermore, our results reveal that the formation of fractional Quantum Hall states is not inhibited by the presence of magnetic impurities in a quantum structure. The second part of this thesis addresses an alternative route to realize efficient spin transistor action. Typically, spin transistor designs relying on spin-orbit interaction principally suffer from low signal levels due to limitations in spin injection efficiency and fast spin decay. Here we present an approach to realize spin transistor action in systems where spin information is protected by propagating it adiabatically. This is achieved by inducing tunable diabatic Landau-Zener transitions that lead to a backscattering of spins and hence allow controlling the transmission of spin-polarized charge carriers through the device, i.e. switching between 'on' and 'off' states. We demonstrate the validity of our approach in a Cd 1-x Mn x Te diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum well structure where efficient spin transport is observed over device distances of 50 μm. In contrast to other spin transistor designs we find that our concept is exceptionally tolerant against disorder.

  6. Development of an experiment for ultrahigh-precision g-factor measurements in a Penning-trap setup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alonso Otamendi, J.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the design and construction of an experimental setup aiming to perform ultrahigh-precision g-factor measurements on a bound electron in highly-charged ions. The g-factor of a particle is a dimensionless constant which determines the strength of its interaction with a magnetic field. In the case of an electron bound to a highly-charged ion, it serves as one of the most stringent tests of bound-state quantum electrodynamics (BS-QED). The measurement is based on a triple-Penning-trap system and the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect. The first part of the thesis is devoted to the current knowledge on magnetic moments and motivates the techniques and experimental setup used during the work described. As a major challenge to overcome, the charge breeding of the ions is dealt with in detail, along with the solution found, based on a field-emission-point array. The tools included allow for the measurement of ionization cross-sections by electron impact. The last part of the thesis is dedicated to the design and operation of the triple-Penning-trap setup and the detection schemes implemented. At present, all the experimental setup for the production of highly-charged ions and the corresponding g-factor measurement is completely finalized, including the control system needed for the first measurement stages, so the ion-creation and charge-breeding processes will be the next steps to be taken. (orig.)

  7. Development of an experiment for ultrahigh-precision g-factor measurements in a Penning-trap setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso Otamendi, J.

    2007-07-13

    This thesis is concerned with the design and construction of an experimental setup aiming to perform ultrahigh-precision g-factor measurements on a bound electron in highly-charged ions. The g-factor of a particle is a dimensionless constant which determines the strength of its interaction with a magnetic field. In the case of an electron bound to a highly-charged ion, it serves as one of the most stringent tests of bound-state quantum electrodynamics (BS-QED). The measurement is based on a triple-Penning-trap system and the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect. The first part of the thesis is devoted to the current knowledge on magnetic moments and motivates the techniques and experimental setup used during the work described. As a major challenge to overcome, the charge breeding of the ions is dealt with in detail, along with the solution found, based on a field-emission-point array. The tools included allow for the measurement of ionization cross-sections by electron impact. The last part of the thesis is dedicated to the design and operation of the triple-Penning-trap setup and the detection schemes implemented. At present, all the experimental setup for the production of highly-charged ions and the corresponding g-factor measurement is completely finalized, including the control system needed for the first measurement stages, so the ion-creation and charge-breeding processes will be the next steps to be taken. (orig.)

  8. Spin physics: A new twist on heavy-ion experiments at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Operation of RHIC with two beams of highly polarized protons (70%, either longitudinal or transverse) at high luminosity L = 2 · 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 for two months/year will allow high statistics studies of polarization phenomena in the perturbative region of hard scattering where both QCD and ElectroWeak theory make detailed predictions for polarization effects. The collision c.m. energy, √s = 50--500 GeV, represents a new domain for the study of spin. Direct photon production will be used to measure the gluon polarization in the polarized proton. A new twist comes from W-boson production which is expected to be 100% parity violating and will thus allow measurements of flavor separated quark and antiquark (u, anti u, d, anti d) polarization distributions. Searches for parity violation in strong interaction processes such as jet and leading particle production will be a sensitive way to look for new physics beyond the standard model, one possibility being quark substructure

  9. Spin physics at RHIC a new twist on the heavy ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Operation of RHIC with two beams of highly polarized protons (70%, either longitudinal or transverse) at high luminosity ???? = 2 circ 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 for two months/year will allow high statistics studies of polarization phenomena in the perturbative region of hard scattering where both QCD and ElectroWeak theory make detailed predictions for polarization effects. The collision c.m energy, √s = 200 - 500 GeV, represents a new domain for the study of spin. Direct photon production win be used to measure the gluon polarization in the polarized proton. A new twist comes from W-boson production which is expected to be 100% parity violating and will thus allow measurements of flavor separated quark and antiquark (u, u, d, d) polarization distributions. Searches for parity violation in strong interaction processes such as jet and leading particle production will be a sensitive way to look for new physics beyond the standard model, one possibility being quark substructure

  10. Shift in the species composition of the diatom community in the eutrophic Mauritanian coastal upwelling: Results from a multi-year sediment trap experiment (2003-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Oscar E.; Fischer, Gerhard

    2017-12-01

    A multiannual, continuous sediment trap experiment was conducted at the mooring site CBeu (Cape Blanc eutrophic, ca. 20 °N, ca. 18 °W; trap depth = 1256-1296 m) in the high-productive Mauritanian coastal upwelling. Here we present fluxes and the species-specific composition of the diatom assemblage, and fluxes of biogenic silica (BSi, opal) and total organic carbon (TOC) for the time interval June 2003-Feb 2010. Flux ranges of studied parameters are (i) total diatoms = 1.2 ∗ 108-4.7 ∗ 104 valves m-2 d-1 (average = 5.9 × 106 valves ± 1.4 × 107); (ii) BSi = 296-0.5 mg m-2 d-1 (average = 41.1 ± 53.5 mg m-2 d-1), and (iii) TOC = 97-1 mg m-2 d-1 (average = 20.5 ± 17.8 mg m-2 d-1). Throughout the experiment, the overall good match of total diatom, BSi and TOC fluxes is reasonably consistent and reflects well the temporal occurrence of the main Mauritanian upwelling season. Spring and summer are the most favorable seasons for diatom production and sedimentation: out of the recorded 14 diatom maxima of different magnitude, six occurred in spring and four in summer. The diverse diatom community at site CBeu is composed of four main assemblages: benthic, coastal upwelling, coastal planktonic and open-ocean diatoms, reflecting different productivity conditions and water masses. A striking feature of the temporal variability of the diatom populations is the persistent pattern of seasonal groups' contribution: benthic and coastal upwelling taxa dominated during the main upwelling season in spring, while open-ocean diatoms were more abundant in fall and winter, when the upper water column becomes stratified, upwelling relaxes and productivity decreases. The relative abundance of benthic diatoms strongly increased after 2006, yet their spring-summer contribution remained high until the end of the trap experiment. The occurrence of large populations of benthic diatoms at the hemipelagic CBeu site is interpreted to indicate transport from shallow waters via nepheloid

  11. Spin-engineered quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Fleurov, V.; Ivanov, V. A.; Peeters, F. M.; Vagner, I. D.

    2001-01-01

    Spatially nonhomogeneously spin polarized nuclei are proposed as a new mechanism to monitor electron states in a nanostructure, or as a means to createn and, if necessary, reshape such nanostructures in the course of the experiment. We found that a polarization of nulear spins may lift the spin polarization of the electron states in a nanostructure and, if sufficiently strong, leads to a polarization of the electron spins. Polarized nuclear spins may form an energy landscape capable of bindin...

  12. Spin-lattice relaxation attenuation coefficients for on-line nuclear orientation experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Vénos, D; Severijns, N

    2003-01-01

    In on-line nuclear orientation experiments the relaxation process is of great importance. During implantation of the radioactive beam, the nuclear sublevel populations attain a secular equilibrium. For this case secular orientation parameters are introduced: B sublambda(sec)=rho sublambda B sublambda(th). Previously attenuation coefficients rho sublambda have already been tabulated, but only for lambda=2,4. In the last few years the number of nuclear orientation experiments in which beta or alpha particles are studied has increased. For these experiments the terms with lambda=1,3,6, and 8 are also necessary. Therefore, we have calculated the values of rho sublambda in full scope.

  13. Vortex creation during magnetic trap manipulations of spinor Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itin, A. P.; Morishita, T.; Satoh, M.; Watanabe, S.; Tolstikhin, O. I.

    2006-01-01

    We investigate several mechanisms of vortex creation during splitting of a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a magnetic double-well trap controlled by a pair of current carrying wires and bias magnetic fields. Our study is motivated by a recent MIT experiment on splitting BECs with a similar trap [Y. Shin et al., Phys. Rev. A 72, 021604 (2005)], where an unexpected fork-like structure appeared in the interference fringes indicating the presence of a singly quantized vortex in one of the interfering condensates. It is well known that in a spin-1 BEC in a quadrupole trap, a doubly quantized vortex is topologically produced by a 'slow' reversal of bias magnetic field B z . Since in the experiment a doubly quantized vortex had never been seen, Shin et al. ruled out the topological mechanism and concentrated on the nonadiabatic mechanical mechanism for explanation of the vortex creation. We find, however, that in the magnetic trap considered both mechanisms are possible: singly quantized vortices can be formed in a spin-1 BEC topologically (for example, during the magnetic field switching-off process). We therefore provide a possible alternative explanation for the interference patterns observed in the experiment. We also present a numerical example of creation of singly quantized vortices due to 'fast' splitting; i.e., by a dynamical (nonadiabatic) mechanism

  14. The movable polarized target as a basic equipment for high energy spin physics experiments at the JINR-Dubna accelerator complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehar, F.; Adiasevich, B.; Androsov, V.P.; Angelov, N.; Anischenko, N.; Antonenko, V.; Ball, J.; Baryshevsky, V.G.; Bazhanov, N.A.; Belyaev, A.A.; Benda, B.; Bodyagin, V.; Borisov, N.; Borzunov, Yu.; Bradamante, F.; Bunyatova, E.; Burinov, V.; Chernykh, E.; Combet, M.; Datskov, A.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A.P.; Fontaine, J.M.; Get`man, V.A.; Giorgi, M.; Golovanov, L.; Grebenyuk, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gurevich, G.; Hasegawa, T.; Hill, D.; Horikawa, N.; Igo, G.; Janout, Z.; Kalinnikov, V.A.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kasprzyk, T.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Kirillov, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Kousmine, E.S.; Kovalenko, A.; Kovaljov, A.I.; Ladygin, V.P.; Lazarev, A.; Leconte, P.; Lesquen, A. de; Lukhanin, A.A.; Mango, S.; Martin, A.; Matafonov, V.N.; Matyushevsky, E.; Mironov, S.; Neganov, A.B.; Neganov, B.S.; Nomofilov, A.; Perelygin, V.; Plis, Yu.; Pilipenko, Yu.; Pisarev, I.L.; Piskunov, N.; Polunin, Yu.; Popkov, Yu.P.; Propov, A.A.; Prokofiev, A.N.; Rekalo, M.P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Sans, J.L.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sharov, V.; Shilov, S.; Shishov, Yu.; Sitnik, I.M.; Sorokin, P.V.; Spinka, H.; Sporov, E.A.; Strunov, L.N.; Svetov, A.; De Swart, J.J.; Telegin, Yu.P.; Tolmashov, I.; Trentalange, S.; Tsvinev, A.; Usov, Yu.A.; Vikhrov, V.V.; Whitten, C.A.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarubin, A.; Zhdanov, A.A.; Zolin, L. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee]|[I.V. Kurchatov Inst. of Atomic Energy, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)]|[Lab. of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)]|[Lab. of High Energy Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)]|[Lab. National SATURNE, CNRS, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Inst. of Physics, Belarus Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus)]|[Dept. of Physics, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    A movable polarized proton target is planned to be installed in polarized beams of the Synchrophasotron-Nuclotron complex in order to carry out a spin physics experimental program at Dubna. The project is described and the first proposed experiments are discussed. ((orig.))

  15. The movable polarized target as a basic equipment for high energy spin physics experiments at the JINR-Dubna accelerator complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehar, F.; Adiasevich, B.; Androsov, V.P.; Angelov, N.; Anischenko, N.; Antonenko, V.; Ball, J.; Baryshevsky, V.G.; Bazhanov, N.A.; Belyaev, A.A.; Benda, B.; Bodyagin, V.; Borisov, N.; Borzunov, Yu.; Bradamante, F.; Bunyatova, E.; Burinov, V.; Chernykh, E.; Combet, M.; Datskov, A.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A.P.; Fontaine, J.M.; Get'man, V.A.; Giorgi, M.; Golovanov, L.; Grebenyuk, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gurevich, G.; Hasegawa, T.; Hill, D.; Horikawa, N.; Igo, G.; Janout, Z.; Kalinnikov, V.A.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kasprzyk, T.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Kirillov, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Kousmine, E.S.; Kovalenko, A.; Kovaljov, A.I.; Ladygin, V.P.; Lazarev, A.; Leconte, P.; Lesquen, A. de; Lukhanin, A.A.; Mango, S.; Martin, A.; Matafonov, V.N.; Matyushevsky, E.; Mironov, S.; Neganov, A.B.; Neganov, B.S.; Nomofilov, A.; Perelygin, V.; Plis, Yu.; Pilipenko, Yu.; Pisarev, I.L.; Piskunov, N.; Polunin, Yu.; Popkov, Yu.P.; Propov, A.A.; Prokofiev, A.N.; Rekalo, M.P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Sans, J.L.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sharov, V.; Shilov, S.; Shishov, Yu.; Sitnik, I.M.; Sorokin, P.V.; Spinka, H.; Sporov, E.A.; Strunov, L.N.; Svetov, A.; De Swart, J.J.; Telegin, Yu.P.; Tolmashov, I.; Trentalange, S.; Tsvinev, A.; Usov, Yu.A.; Vikhrov, V.V.; Whitten, C.A.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarubin, A.; Zhdanov, A.A.; Zolin, L.

    1995-01-01

    A movable polarized proton target is planned to be installed in polarized beams of the Synchrophasotron-Nuclotron complex in order to carry out a spin physics experimental program at Dubna. The project is described and the first proposed experiments are discussed. ((orig.))

  16. The movable polarized target as a basic equipment for high energy spin physics experiments at the JINR-Dubna accelerator complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehar, F.; Adiasevich, B.; Androsov, V. P.; Angelov, N.; Anischenko, N.; Antonenko, V.; Ball, J.; Baryshevsky, V. G.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Belyaev, A. A.; Benda, B.; Bodyagin, V.; Borisov, N.; Borzunov, Yu.; Bradamante, F.; Bunyatova, E.; Burinov, V.; Chernykh, E.; Combet, M.; Datskov, A.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A. P.; Fontaine, J. M.; Get'man, V. A.; Giorgi, M.; Golovanov, L.; Grebenyuk, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gurevich, G.; Hasegawa, T.; Hill, D.; Horikawa, N.; Igo, G.; Janout, Z.; Kalinnikov, V. A.; Karnaukhov, I. M.; Kasprzyk, T.; Khachaturov, B. A.; Kirillov, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Kousmine, E. S.; Kovalenko, A.; Kovaljov, A. I.; Ladygin, V. P.; Lazarev, A.; Leconte, Ph.; de Lesquen, A.; Lukhanin, A. A.; Mango, S.; Martin, A.; Matafonov, V. N.; Matyushevsky, E.; Mironov, S.; Neganov, A. B.; Neganov, B. S.; Nomofilov, A.; Perelygin, V.; Plis, Yu.; Pilipenko, Yu.; Pisarev, I. L.; Piskunov, N.; Polunin, Yu.; Popkov, Yu. P.; Propov, A. A.; Prokofiev, A. N.; Rekalo, M. P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Sans, J. L.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sharov, V.; Shilov, S.; Shishov, Yu.; Sitnik, I. M.; Sorokin, P. V.; Spinka, H.; Sporov, E. A.; Strunov, L. N.; Svetov, A.; de Swart, J. J.; Telegin, Yu. P.; Tolmashov, I.; Trentalange, S.; Tsvinev, A.; Usov, Yu. A.; Vikhrov, V. V.; Whitten, C. A.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarubin, A.; Zhdanov, A. A.; Zolin, L.

    1995-02-01

    A movable polarized proton target is planned to be installed in polarized beams of the Synchrophasotron-Nuclotron complex in order to carry out a spin physics experimental program at Dubna. The project is described and the first proposed experiments are discussed.

  17. Multispectral 3D phase-encoded turbo spin-echo for imaging near metal : Limitations and possibilities demonstrated by simulations and phantom experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gorp, Jetse S.; Nizak, Razmara; Bouwman, Job G.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Seevinck, Peter R.

    2017-01-01

    To see improvements in the imaging performance near biomaterial implants we assessed a multispectral fully phase-encoded turbo spin-echo (ms3D-PE-TSE) sequence for artifact reduction capabilities and scan time efficiency in simulation and phantom experiments. For this purpose, ms3D-PE-TSE and

  18. A stochastic picture of spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faris, W.G.

    1981-01-01

    Dankel has shown how to incorporate spin into stochastic mechanics. The resulting non-local hidden variable theory gives an appealing picture of spin correlation experiments in which Bell's inequality is violated. (orig.)

  19. Evaporative cooling of trapped atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketterle, W.; Van Druten, N.J.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on evaporative cooling of trapped atoms: Theoretical models for evaporative cooling; the role of collisions for real atoms; experimental techniques and summary of evaporative cooling experiments. 166 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  20. A reservoir trap for antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Smorra, Christian; Franke, Kurt; Nagahama, Hiroki; Schneider, Georg; Higuchi, Takashi; Van Gorp, Simon; Blaum, Klaus; Matsuda, Yasuyuki; Quint, Wolfgang; Walz, Jochen; Yamazaki, Yasunori; Ulmer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    We have developed techniques to extract arbitrary fractions of antiprotons from an accumulated reservoir, and to inject them into a Penning-trap system for high-precision measurements. In our trap-system antiproton storage times > 1.08 years are estimated. The device is fail-safe against power-cuts of up to 10 hours. This makes our planned comparisons of the fundamental properties of protons and antiprotons independent from accelerator cycles, and will enable us to perform experiments during long accelerator shutdown periods when background magnetic noise is low. The demonstrated scheme has the potential to be applied in many other precision Penning trap experiments dealing with exotic particles.

  1. Optical control of the spin of a magnetic atom in a semiconductor quantum dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Besombes L.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The control of single spins in solids is a key but challenging step for any spin-based solid-state quantumcomputing device. Thanks to their expected long coherence time, localized spins on magnetic atoms in a semiconductor host could be an interesting media to store quantum information in the solid state. Optical probing and control of the spin of individual or pairs of Manganese (Mn atoms (S = 5/2 have been obtained in II-VI and IIIV semiconductor quantum dots during the last years. In this paper, we review recently developed optical control experiments of the spin of an individual Mn atoms in II-VI semiconductor self-assembled or strain-free quantum dots (QDs.We first show that the fine structure of the Mn atom and especially a strained induced magnetic anisotropy is the main parameter controlling the spin memory of the magnetic atom at zero magnetic field. We then demonstrate that the energy of any spin state of a Mn atom or pairs of Mn atom can be independently tuned by using the optical Stark effect induced by a resonant laser field. The strong coupling with the resonant laser field modifies the Mn fine structure and consequently its dynamics.We then describe the spin dynamics of a Mn atom under this strong resonant optical excitation. In addition to standard optical pumping expected for a resonant excitation, we show that the Mn spin population can be trapped in the state which is resonantly excited. This effect is modeled considering the coherent spin dynamics of the coupled electronic and nuclear spin of the Mn atom optically dressed by a resonant laser field. Finally, we discuss the spin dynamics of a Mn atom in strain-free QDs and show that these structures should permit a fast optical coherent control of an individual Mn spin.

  2. Calibration of the Breit-Rabi Polarimeter for the PAX Spin-Filtering Experiment at COSY/Jülich and AD/CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Barschel, Colin

    2010-01-01

    The PAX(PolarizedAntiproton eXperiment) experiment is proposed to polarize a stored antiproton beam for use at the planned High Energy Storage Ring (HESR) of the FAIR facility at GSI (Darmstadt, Germany). The polarization build-up will be achieved by spin-filtering, i.e., by a repetitive passage of the antiproton beam through a polarized atomic hydrogen or deuterium gas target. The experimental setup requires a Polarized Internal gas Target (PIT) surrounded with silicon detectors. The PIT includes an Atomic Beam Source (ABS), the target cell and a Breit-Rabi Polarimeter (BRP). The first phase of the Spin-Filtering Studies for PAX covers the commissioning of the PIT components and themeasurement of an absolute calibration standard for the BRP at the COSY ring in Jülich. The spin-filtering with protons aim at confirming the results of the FILTEX experiment and determine the pp hadronic spin dependent cross sections at 50MeV.The second phase will be realized in the Antiproton Decelerator ring (AD) at CERN to po...

  3. VACUUM TRAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, H.S.

    1959-09-15

    An improved adsorption vacuum trap for use in vacuum systems was designed. The distinguishing feature is the placement of a plurality of torsionally deformed metallic fins within a vacuum jacket extending from the walls to the central axis so that substantially all gas molecules pass through the jacket will impinge upon the fin surfaces. T fins are heated by direct metallic conduction, thereby ol taining a uniform temperature at the adeorbing surfaces so that essentially all of the condensible impurities from the evacuating gas are removed from the vacuum system.

  4. Sympathetic Cooling of Trapped Cd+ Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    Blinov, B. B.; Deslauriers, L.; Lee, P.; Madsen, M. J.; Miller, R.; Monroe, C.

    2001-01-01

    We sympathetically cool a trapped 112Cd+ ion by directly Doppler-cooling a 114Cd+ ion in the same trap. This is the first demonstration of optically addressing a single trapped ion being sympathetically cooled by a different species ion. Notably, the experiment uses a single laser source, and does not require strong focusing. This paves the way toward reducing decoherence in an ion trap quantum computer based on Cd+ isotopes.

  5. Spin glasses (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results of spin glass studies are reviewed and related to existing theories. Investigations of spin glasses are concentrated on atomic structure, metallurgical treatment, and high-temperature susceptibility of alloys, on magnetic properties at low temperature and near the freezing temperature, on anisotropy behaviour measured by ESR, NMR and torque, on specific heat, Moessbauer effect, neutron scattering and muon-spin depolarization experiments, ultrasound and transport properties. Some new theories of spin glasses are discussed which have been developed since Part I appeared

  6. Single-Qubit-Gate Error below 0.0001 in a Trapped Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    nuclear spins in liquid-state nuclear-magnetic resonance experiments [6] and with neutral atoms confined in optical lattices [7]; here we demonstrate...Single trapped ion 2.0(2)×10−5 Reference [6] (2009) Nuclear magnetic resonance 1.3(1)×10−4 Reference [7] (2010) Atoms in an optical lattice 1.4(1)×10...determined by comparing the qubit frequency measured in a Ramsey experiment with that of a Rabi experiment. Such back-to-back comparisons yielded values

  7. The Spin Structure Function of the Proton from SLAC Experiment E155

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKee, P

    2004-02-17

    Experiment E155 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) measured the longitudinal and transverse deep inelastic structure functions of the proton and deuteron using a polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam and solid polarized targets of ammonia ({sup 15}NH{sub 3}) for proton measurements and lithium deuteride ({sup 6}Li{sup 2}H) for deuteron measurements. Three electromagnetic spectrometers at angles of 2.75{sup o}, 5.5{sup o}, and 10.5{sup o} measured the scattered electrons. This work presents an analysis of the longitudinal structure function of the proton, g{sub 1}{sup p}(x, Q{sup 2}). Included is a re-analysis of the proton target polarization data that for the first time corrects a problem encountered which altered those measurements.

  8. Boosting Deuteron Polarization in HD Targets: Experience of moving spins between H and D with RF methods during the E06-101 experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei, Xiangdong; Bass, Christopher; D' Angelo, Annalisa; Deur, Alexandre; Dezern, Gary; Kageya, Tsuneo; Laine, Vivien; Lowry, Michael; Sandorfi, Andrew; Teachey, Robert; Wang, Haipeng; Whisnant, Charles

    2014-06-01

    Solid HDice targets are polarized by bringing the HD crystal to thermal equilibrium at low temperature and high magnetic field, typically 10-20 mK and 15 Tesla, at Jefferson Lab. In this regime, due to its smaller magnetic moment, the resulting polarization for D is always at least three times smaller than for H. The controlled amount of polarizing catalysts, o-H2 and p-D2, used in the process of reaching a frozen-spin state, further limit the maximum achievable D polarization. Nonetheless, H and D polarizations can be transferred from one to the other by connecting the H and D sub-states of the HD system with RF. In a large target, the RF power needed for such transitions is effectively limited by non-uniformities in the RF field. High efficiency transfers can require substantial RF power levels, and a tuned-RF circuit is needed to prevent large temperature excursions of the holding cryostat. In this paper, we compare the advantages and limitations of two different RF transfer methods to increase D polarization, Forbidden Adiabatic and Saturated Forbidden RF Transitions. The experience with the HD targets used during the recently completed E06-101 experiment in Hall-B of Jefferson Lab is discussed.

  9. Spin current

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, Sergio O; Saitoh, Eiji; Kimura, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In a new branch of physics and technology called spin-electronics or spintronics, the flow of electrical charge (usual current) as well as the flow of electron spin, the so-called 'spin current', are manipulated and controlled together. This book provides an introduction and guide to the new physics and application of spin current.

  10. Electromagnetic trapping of neutral atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metcalf, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Cooling and trapping of neutral atoms is a new branch of applied physics that has potential for application in many areas. The authors present an introduction to laser cooling and magnetic trapping. Some basic ideas and fundamental limitations are discussed, and the first successful experiments are reviewed. Trapping a neutral object depends on the interaction between an inhomogeneous electromagnetic field and a multiple moment that results in the exchange of kinetic for potential energy. In neutral atom traps, the potential energy must be stored as internal atomic energy, resulting in two immediate and extremely important consequences. First, the atomic energy levels will necessarily shift as the atoms move in the trap, and, second, practical traps for ground state neutral atoms atr necessarily very shallow compared to thermal energy. This small depth also dictates stringent vacuum requirements because a trapped atom cannot survive a single collision with a thermal energy background gas molecule. Neutral trapping, therefore, depends on substantial cooling of a thermal atomic sample and is inextricably connected with the cooling process

  11. Spin-trapping radikálových produktů přenosu vodíku z uhlíkatých donorů

    OpenAIRE

    Krkošková, Petra

    2008-01-01

    Na příkladu vhodně zvolených substituovaných kumarínů a také několika látek charakteru esterů a diesterů byla zkoumána možnost detekce uhlíkatých radikálů vznikajících odštěpením vodíku z -CHR- skupiny nacházející se mezi dvěma karbonylovými skupinami nebo mezi karbonylovou a imino skupinou. Jako vhodná látka, na jejímž povrchu se tyto sloučeniny rozkládají, byl použit PbO2.Využitím metody spin-trappingu byl stanoven charakter vznikajících nestabilních C-radikálů porovnáním experimentálních a...

  12. Observation of the spin Nernst effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, S.; Chen, Y.-T.; Wimmer, S.; Althammer, M.; Wimmer, T.; Schlitz, R.; Geprägs, S.; Huebl, H.; Ködderitzsch, D.; Ebert, H.; Bauer, G. E. W.; Gross, R.; Goennenwein, S. T. B.

    2017-10-01

    The observation of the spin Hall effect triggered intense research on pure spin current transport. With the spin Hall effect, the spin Seebeck effect and the spin Peltier effect already observed, our picture of pure spin current transport is almost complete. The only missing piece is the spin Nernst (-Ettingshausen) effect, which so far has been discussed only on theoretical grounds. Here, we report the observation of the spin Nernst effect. By applying a longitudinal temperature gradient, we generate a pure transverse spin current in a Pt thin film. For readout, we exploit the magnetization-orientation-dependent spin transfer to an adjacent yttrium iron garnet layer, converting the spin Nernst current in Pt into a controlled change of the longitudinal and transverse thermopower voltage. Our experiments show that the spin Nernst and the spin Hall effect in Pt are of comparable magnitude, but differ in sign, as corroborated by first-principles calculations.

  13. Measurement of transvers spin effects by means of two-hadron correlations in the COMPASS experiment; Messung transversaler Spineffekte mittels zwei Hadronen Korrelation am COMPASS-Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massmann, Frank Michael

    2008-06-23

    The quark structure of the nucleon can at neglection of intrinsic quark transverse momenta be completely described by two quark distribution functions. These are the unpolarized quark distribution function q(x), the helicity distribution function {delta}q(x), and the transvers quark-spin distribution function {delta}{sub T}q(x). This lastly mentioned function called transversity function, is chirallyn odd an can therefore only be measured in a combination with another chirally odd function. An access possibility to the transversity function {delta}{sub T}q(x) is the semi-inclusive two-hadron production in deep inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized target. Thereby the folding of the chirally odd two-hadron interference fragmentation function (IFF) H{sub 1} {sup angle} (z,M{sub h}{sup 2}) and the chirally odd transversity function. The IFF H{sub 1} {sup angle} (z,M{sub h}{sup 2}) is the spin-dependent part of a fragmentation function, which describes the fragmentation of a transversely polarized quark in two unpolarized hadrons. The production of the two hadrons pursues in an interference between different wave-state of the hadron pairs. Azimuthal asymmetries in the produced hadron pairs are measured. The measurements, which are described in this thesis, were performed in the COMPASS experiment at CERN in the years 2002-2004, which is a solid-state-target experiment at the SPS accelerator. After an introduction in chapter 2 the basing theoretical concepts for the measurement of the transversity function are presented. In chapter 3 the COMPASS experiment is described. Finally in chapter 4 the evaluation methods are discussed, the results of the azimuthal asymmetries shown and compared with theoretical predictions. [German] Die Quark-Struktur des Nukleons laesst sich bei Vernachlaessigung intrinsischer Quarktransversalimpulse vollstaendig durch drei Quark Verteilungsfunktionen beschreiben. Diese sind die unpolarisierte Quark Verteilungsfunktion q(x), die

  14. Optical and microwave control of germanium-vacancy center spins in diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siyushev, Petr; Metsch, Mathias H.; Ijaz, Aroosa; Binder, Jan M.; Bhaskar, Mihir K.; Sukachev, Denis D.; Sipahigil, Alp; Evans, Ruffin E.; Nguyen, Christian T.; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Hemmer, Philip R.; Palyanov, Yuri N.; Kupriyanov, Igor N.; Borzdov, Yuri M.; Rogers, Lachlan J.; Jelezko, Fedor

    2017-08-01

    A solid-state system combining a stable spin degree of freedom with an efficient optical interface is highly desirable as an element for integrated quantum-optical and quantum-information systems. We demonstrate a bright color center in diamond with excellent optical properties and controllable electronic spin states. Specifically, we carry out detailed optical spectroscopy of a germanium-vacancy (GeV ) color center demonstrating optical spectral stability. Using an external magnetic field to lift the electronic spin degeneracy, we explore the spin degree of freedom as a controllable qubit. Spin polarization is achieved using optical pumping, and a spin relaxation time in excess of 20 μ s is demonstrated. We report resonant microwave control of spin transitions, and use this as a probe to measure the Autler-Townes effect in a microwave-optical double-resonance experiment. Superposition spin states were prepared using coherent population trapping, and a pure dephasing time of about 19 ns was observed at a temperature of 2.0 K.

  15. Quantum logic gates using coherent population trapping states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A scheme is proposed for achieving a controlled phase gate using interaction between atomic spin dipoles. Further, the spin states are prepared in coherent population trap states (CPTs), which are robust against perturbations, laser fluctuations etc. We show that one-qubit and two-qubit operations can easily be obtained in ...

  16. Search for a spin-dependent short-range force between nucleons with a 3He/129Xe clock-comparison experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tullney, Kathlynne

    2014-01-01

    The standard model (SM) of particle physics describes all known particles and their interactions. However, the SM leaves many issues unresolved. For example, it only includes three of the four fundamental forces and does not clarify the question why in the strong interaction CP symmetry is violated due to its non-trivial vacuum structure is predicted (Θ-term), but experimentally unverifiable. The latter one is known as the strong CP-problem of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is solved by the Peccei-Quinn-Weinberg-Wilczek theory. This theory predicts a new and almost massless boson which is known as the axion. The axion feebly interacts with matter and therefore it is a good candidate for cold dark matter, too. Axions are produced by the Primakoff-effect, i.e. by conversion of photons which are scattered in the electromagnetic field, e.g. of atoms. The inverse Primakoff-effect, which converts axions to photons again, can be used for direct detection of galactic, solar, or laboratory axions. Cosmological and astrophysical observations constrain the mass of the axion from a few μeV to some meV (''axion mass window''). If the axion exists, then it mediates a CP violating, spin-dependent, short-range interaction between a fermion and the spin of another fermion. By verification of this interaction, the axion can be detected indirectly. In the framework of the present thesis an experiment to search for this spindependent short-range interaction was performed in the magnetically shielded room BMSR-2 of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt Berlin. An ultra-sensitive low-field co-magnetometer was employed which is based on the detection of free precession of 3 He and 129 Xe nuclear spins using SQUIDs as low-noise magnetic flux detectors. The two nuclear spin polarized gases are filled into a glass cell which is immersed in a low magnetic field of about B 0 = 0.35 μT with absolute field gradients in the order of pT/cm. The spin precession frequencies of 3 He and 129

  17. Cyclic Heating-Annealing and Boltzmann Distribution of Free Energies in a Spin-Glass System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Haijun

    2007-01-01

    Ergodicity of a spin-glass is broken at low temperatures; the system is trapped in one of many ergodic configurational domains. Transitions between different ergodic domains are achievable through a heating-annealing procedure. If this experiment is repeated infinite times, all ergodic configurational domains will be visited with frequences that decreasing exponentially with their free energies. The mean free energy density of a spin-glass system on a random graph is calculated based on this free energy Boltzmann distribution in the present work, by means of the cavity approach.

  18. Multi-Valued Spin Switch in a Semiconductor Microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraïso, T. K.; Wouters, M.; Léger, Y.; Morier-Genoud, F.; Deveaudhyphen; Plédran, B.

    2011-12-01

    In this work, we report on the first realization of multi-valued spin switching in the solid-state. We investigate the physics of spinor bistability with microcavity polaritons in a trap. Spinor interactions lead to special bistability regimes with decoupled thresholds for spin-up and spin-down polaritons. This allows us to establish state-of-the-art spin switching operations. We evidence polarization hysteresis and determine appropriate conditions to achieve spin multistability. For a given excitation condition, three stable spin states coexist for the system. These results open new pathways for the development of innovative spin-based logic gates and memory devices.

  19. Nonadiabatic transitions in electrostatically trapped ammonia molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirste, Moritz; Schnell, Melanie; Meijer, Gerard; Sartakov, Boris G.

    2009-01-01

    Nonadiabatic transitions are known to be major loss channels for atoms in magnetic traps but have thus far not been experimentally reported upon for trapped molecules. We have observed and quantified losses due to nonadiabatic transitions for three isotopologues of ammonia in electrostatic traps by comparing the trapping times in traps with a zero and a nonzero electric field at the center. Nonadiabatic transitions are seen to dominate the overall loss rate even for the present samples that are at relatively high temperatures of 30 mK. It is anticipated that losses due to nonadiabatic transitions in electric fields are omnipresent in ongoing experiments on cold molecules.

  20. Globalisation Trapped

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Caraça

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The promise of making society progress through the direct applications of science was finally fulfilled in the mid-20th century. Science progressed immensely, propelled by the effects of the two world wars. The first science-based technologies saw the daylight during the 1940s and their transformative power was such that neither the military, nor subsequently the markets, allowed science to return intact to its curiosity-driven nest. Technoscience was born then and (being progressively pulled away from curiosity-driven science was able to grow enormously, erecting a formidable structure of networks of institutions that impacted decisively on the economy. It is a paradox, or maybe a trap, that the fulfillment of science’s solemn promise of ‘transforming nature’ means seeing ourselves and our Western societies entangled in crises after crises with no clear outcome in view. A redistribution of geopolitical power is under way, along with the deployment of information and communication technologies, forcing dominant structures to oscillate, as knowledge about organization and methods, marketing, design, and software begins to challenge the role of technoscience as the main vector of economic growth and wealth accumulation. What ought to be done?

  1. Spinning cylinder experiments SC-I and SC-II: A review of results and analyses provided to the FALSIRE project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morland, E.; Sherry, A.H.

    1993-01-01

    A series of six large-scale experiments have been carried out at AEA Technology using the Spinning Cylinder test facility. Results from two of those experiments (SC-I and SC-II) have been provided to Project FALSIRE and are reviewed in this paper. The Spinning Cylinder tests were carried out using hollow cylinders of 1.4m outer diameter, 0.2m wall thickness and 1.3m length, containing full-length axial defects and fabricated from a modified A508 Class 3 steel. The first Spinning Cylinder test (SC-I) was an investigation of stable ductile growth induced via mechanical (primary) loading and under conditions of contained yielding. Mechanical loading was provided in the hoop direction by rotating the cylinder about its major axis within an enclosed oven. The second test (SC-II) investigated stable ductile growth under severe thermal shock (secondary) loading again under conditions of contained yielding. In this case thermal shock was produced by spraying cold water on the inside surface of the heated cylinder whilst it was rotating. For each experiment, results are presented in terms of a number of variables, eg. crack growth, temperature, stress, strain and applied K and J. In addition, an overview of the analyses of the FALSIRE Phase-1 report is also presented with respect to test SC-I and SC-II. 4 refs., 14 figs., 13 tabs

  2. Electric-field tunable spin waves in PMN-PT/NiFe heterostructure: Experiment and micromagnetic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziȩtek, Slawomir, E-mail: zietek@agh.edu.pl [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Chȩciński, Jakub [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); AGH University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland); Frankowski, Marek; Skowroński, Witold; Stobiecki, Tomasz [AGH University of Science and Technology, Department of Electronics, Al. Mickiewicza 30, 30-059 Kraków (Poland)

    2017-04-15

    We present a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study of voltage-controlled standing spin waves resonance (SSWR) in PMN-PT/NiFe multiferroic heterostructures patterned into microstrips. A spin-diode technique was used to observe ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) mode and SSWR in NiFe strip mechanically coupled with a piezoelectric substrate. Application of an electric field to a PMN-PT creates a strain in permalloy and thus shifts the FMR and SSWR fields due to the magnetostriction effect. The experimental results are compared with micromagnetic simulations and a good agreement between them is found for dynamics of FMR and SSWR with and without electric field. Moreover, micromagnetic simulations enable us to discuss the amplitude and phase spatial distributions of FMR and SSWR modes, which are not directly observable by means of spin diode detection technique.

  3. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  4. More spinoff from spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaike, Akira

    1993-01-01

    Despite playing a major role in today's Standard Model, spin - the intrinsic angular momentum carried by particles - is sometimes dismissed as an inessential complication. However several major spin questions with important implications for the Standard Model remain unanswered, and recent results and new technological developments made the 10th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics, held in Nagoya, Japan, in November, highly topical. The symposium covered a wide range of physics, reflecting the diversity of spin effects, however four main themes were - the spin content of the nucleon, tests of symmetries and physics beyond standard models, intermediate energy physics, and spin technologies. Opening the meeting, T. Kinoshita reviewed the status of measurements of the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) of the electron and the muon. The forthcoming experiment at Brookhaven (September 1991, page 23) will probe beyond the energy ranges open to existing electronpositron colliders. For example muon substructure will be opened up to 5 TeV and Ws to 2 TeV. R.L. Jaffe classified quark-parton distributions in terms of their spin dependence, pointing out their leftright attributes, and emphasized the importance of measuring transverse spin distributions through lepton pair production

  5. Single-Transverse-Spin-Asymmetry studies with a fixed-target experiment using the LHC beams (AFTER@LHC)

    CERN Document Server

    Lansberg, J.P.; Arnaldi, R.; Brodsky, S.J.; Chambert, V.; Da Silva, C.; Didelez, J.P.; Echevarria, M. G; Ferreiro, E.G.; Fleuret, F.; Gao, Y.; Genolini, B.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Kikola, D.; Klein, A.; Kurepin, A.; Kusina, A.; Lorcé, C.; Lyonnet, F.; Massacrier, L.; Nass, A.; Pisano, C.; Robbe, P.; Schienbein, I.; Schlegel, M.; Scomparin, E.; Seixas, J.; Shao, H.S.; Signori, A.; Steffens, E.; Topilskaya, N.; Trzeciak, B.; Uggerhøj, U.I.; Uras, A.; Ulrich, R.; Yang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the potential of AFTER@LHC to measure single-transverse-spin asymmetries in open-charm and bottomonium production. With a HERMES-like hydrogen polarised target, such measurements over a year can reach precisions close to the per cent level. This is particularly remarkable since these analyses can probably not be carried out anywhere else

  6. Case Study: Trap Crop with Pheromone Traps for Suppressing Euschistus servus (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae in Cotton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. G. Tillman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The brown stink bug, Euschistus servus (Say, can disperse from source habitats, including corn, Zea mays L., and peanut, Arachis hypogaea L., into cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. Therefore, a 2-year on-farm experiment was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L. Moench spp. bicolor trap crop, with or without Euschistus spp. pheromone traps, to suppress dispersal of this pest to cotton. In 2004, density of E. servus was lower in cotton fields with sorghum trap crops (with or without pheromone traps compared to control cotton fields. Similarly, in 2006, density of E. servus was lower in cotton fields with sorghum trap crops and pheromone traps compared to control cotton fields. Thus, the combination of the sorghum trap crop and pheromone traps effectively suppressed dispersal of E. servus into cotton. Inclusion of pheromone traps with trap crops potentially offers additional benefits, including: (1 reducing the density of E. servus adults in a trap crop, especially females, to possibly decrease the local population over time and reduce the overwintering population, (2 reducing dispersal of E. servus adults from the trap crop into cotton, and (3 potentially attracting more dispersing E. servus adults into a trap crop during a period of time when preferred food is not prevalent in the landscape.

  7. Intrinsic electron trapping in amorphous oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Jack; Kaviani, Moloud; Afanas’ev, Valeri V.; Lisoni, Judit G.; Shluger, Alexander L.

    2018-03-01

    We demonstrate that electron trapping at intrinsic precursor sites is endemic in non-glass-forming amorphous oxide films. The energy distributions of trapped electron states in ultra-pure prototype amorphous (a)-HfO2 insulator obtained from exhaustive photo-depopulation experiments demonstrate electron states in the energy range of 2–3 eV below the oxide conduction band. These energy distributions are compared to the results of density functional calculations of a-HfO2 models of realistic density. The experimental results can be explained by the presence of intrinsic charge trapping sites formed by under-coordinated Hf cations and elongated Hf–O bonds in a-HfO2. These charge trapping states can capture up to two electrons, forming polarons and bi-polarons. The corresponding trapping sites are different from the dangling-bond type defects responsible for trapping in glass-forming oxides, such as SiO2, in that the traps are formed without bonds being broken. Furthermore, introduction of hydrogen causes formation of somewhat energetically deeper electron traps when a proton is immobilized next to the trapped electron bi-polaron. The proposed novel mechanism of intrinsic charge trapping in a-HfO2 represents a new paradigm for charge trapping in a broad class of non-glass-forming amorphous insulators.

  8. SPINning parallel systems software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matlin, O.S.; Lusk, E.; McCune, W.

    2002-01-01

    We describe our experiences in using Spin to verify parts of the Multi Purpose Daemon (MPD) parallel process management system. MPD is a distributed collection of processes connected by Unix network sockets. MPD is dynamic processes and connections among them are created and destroyed as MPD is initialized, runs user processes, recovers from faults, and terminates. This dynamic nature is easily expressible in the Spin/Promela framework but poses performance and scalability challenges. We present here the results of expressing some of the parallel algorithms of MPD and executing both simulation and verification runs with Spin

  9. Potential and limitations of 2D sup 1 H- sup 1 H spin-exchange CRAMPS experiments to characterize structures of organic solids

    CERN Document Server

    Brus, J; Petrickova, H

    2002-01-01

    A brief overview of our recent results concerning the application of 2D CRAMPS experiments to investigate a wide range of materials is presented. The abilities of the 2D sup 1 H- sup 1 H spin-exchange technique to characterize the structure of organic solids as well as the limitations resulting from segmental mobility and from undesired coherence transfer are discussed. Basic principles of sup 1 H NMR line-narrowing and procedures for analysis of the spin-exchange process are introduced. We focused to the qualitative and quantitative analysis of complex spin-exchange process leading to the determination of domain sizes and morphology in heterogeneous multicomponent systems as well as the characterization of clustering of surface hydroxyl groups in polysiloxane networks. Particular attention is devoted to the determination of the sup 1 H- sup 1 H interatomic distances in the presence of local molecular motion. Finally we discuss limitations of the sup 1 sup 3 C- sup 1 sup 3 C correlation mediated by sup 1 H- s...

  10. Capture, Electron-Cooling and Compression of Antiprotons in a Large Penning-Trap for Physics Experiments with an Ultra-Low Energy Extracted Antiproton Beam

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % PS200 \\\\ \\\\The availability of ultra-low energy antiprotons is a crucial ingredient for the execution of the gravity measurements PS200. We have developed a method to provide such low energy antiprotons based on a large Penning trap (the PS200 catching trap). This system can accept a fast-extracted pulse from LEAR, reduce the energy of the antiprotons in the pulse from 5.9~MeV to several tens of kilovolts using a degrading foil, and then capture the antiprotons in a large Penning trap. These antiprotons are cooled by electrons previously admitted to the trap and are collected in a small region at the center of the trap. We have demonstrated our capability to capture up to 1~million antiprotons from LEAR in a single shot, electron cool these antiprotons, and transfer up to 95\\% of them into the inner, harmonic region. A storage time in excess of 1 hour was observed. These results have been obtained with the cryogenic trap vacuum coupled to a room temperature vacuum at about l0$ ^- ^{1} ^0 $ Torr, which is an...

  11. Spinning out a star.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Michael D; Mandel, Stanley W; Wager, Jeffrey D

    2002-06-01

    Spinouts rarely take off; most, in fact, fall into one or more of four traps that doom them from the start. Some companies spin out ventures that are too close to the core of their businesses, in effect selling off their crown jewels. Sometimes, a parent company uses the spinout primarily to pawn off debt or expenses or to quickly raise external capital for itself. Other times, a company may try to spin out an area of its business that lacks one or more of the critical legs of a successful company--a coherent business model, say, or a solid financial base. And in many cases, parent companies can't bring themselves to sever their ownership ties and give up control of their spinouts. R.J. Reynolds, the tobacco giant, managed to avoid these traps when it successfully spun out a most unlikely venture, the pharmaceutical company Targacept. As the story illustrates, the problem with spinouts is similar to the problem of rich children. Their parents have the wherewithal to spoil them or shelter them or cling to them, but what they need is tough love and discipline--much the same discipline that characterizes successful start-ups. R.J. Reynolds recognized that it didn't know that much about the pharmaceutical business and couldn't merely try to spin out a small clone of itself. It had to treat the venture as if it were essentially starting from scratch, with a passionate entrepreneurial leader, a solid business plan, help from outside partners in the industry, and ultimately substantial venture backing. That these lessons are less obvious to executives contemplating spinning out ventures closer to their core businesses may be why so many spinouts fail.

  12. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behr, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear β decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left up to other presenters

  13. Neutral atom traps of radioactives

    CERN Document Server

    Behr, J A

    2003-01-01

    Neutral atoms trapped with modern laser cooling techniques offer the promise of improving several broad classes of experiments with radioactive isotopes. In nuclear beta decay, neutrino spectroscopy from beta-recoil coincidences, along with highly polarized samples, enable experiments to search for non-Standard Model interactions, test whether parity symmetry is maximally violated, and search for new sources of time reversal violation. Ongoing efforts at TRIUMF, Los Alamos and Berkeley will be highlighted. The traps also offer bright sources for Doppler-free spectroscopy, particularly in high-Z atoms where precision measurements could measure the strength of weak neutral nucleon-nucleon and electron-nucleon interactions. Physics with francium atoms has been vigorously pursued at Stony Brook. Several facilities plan work with radioactive atom traps; concrete plans and efforts at KVI Groningen and Legnaro will be among those summarized. Contributions to the multidisciplinary field of trace analysis will be left...

  14. Spin current

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, Sergio O; Saitoh, Eiji; Kimura, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the giant magnetoresistance effect in magnetic multilayers in 1988, a new branch of physics and technology, called spin-electronics or spintronics, has emerged, where the flow of electrical charge as well as the flow of electron spin, the so-called “spin current,” are manipulated and controlled together. The physics of magnetism and the application of spin current have progressed in tandem with the nanofabrication technology of magnets and the engineering of interfaces and thin films. This book aims to provide an introduction and guide to the new physics and applications of spin current, with an emphasis on the interaction between spin and charge currents in magnetic nanostructures.

  15. Competing magnetic and spin-gapless semiconducting behavior in fully compensated ferrimagnetic CrVTiAl: Theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswara, Y.; Gupta, Sachin; Samatham, S. Shanmukharao; Varma, Manoj Raama; Enamullah, Suresh, K. G.; Alam, Aftab

    2018-02-01

    We report the structural, magnetic, and transport properties of the polycrystalline CrVTiAl alloy along with first-principles calculations. The alloy crystallizes in a LiMgPdSn-type structure with a lattice parameter of 6.14 Å at room temperature. The absence of the (111) peak along with the presence of a weak (200) peak indicates the antisite disorder of Al with Cr and V atoms, which is different from the pure DO3 type. Magnetization measurements reveal a magnetic transition near 710 K, a coercive field of ˜100 Oe at 3 K, and a moment of ˜10-3μB/f .u . These observations are indicative of fully compensated ferrimagnetism in the alloy, which is confirmed by theoretical modeling. The temperature coefficient of resistivity is found to be negative, signaling the semiconducting nature. However, the absence of exponential dependence indicates the semiconducting nature with gapless/spin-gapless behavior. Electronic and magnetic properties of CrVTiAl for all three possible crystallographic configurations are studied theoretically. All the configurations are found to be different forms of semiconductors. The ground-state configuration is a fully compensated ferrimagnet with band gaps of 0.58 and 0.30 eV for the spin-up and -down bands, respectively. The next-higher-energy configuration is also fully compensated ferrimagnetic but has a spin-gapless semiconducting nature. The highest-energy configuration corresponds to a nonmagnetic, gapless semiconductor. The energy differences among these configurations are quite small (account the theoretical and experimental findings, we conclude that CrVTiAl is a fully compensated ferrimagnet with a predominantly spin-gapless semiconducting nature.

  16. Transverse Single-Spin Asymmetries in Proton-Proton Collisions at the AFTER@LHC Experiment in a TMD Factorisation Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anselmino

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The inclusive large-pT production of a single pion, jet or direct photon, and Drell-Yan processes, are considered for proton-proton collisions in the kinematical range expected for the fixed-target experiment AFTER, proposed at LHC. For all these processes, predictions are given for the transverse single-spin asymmetry, AN, computed according to a Generalised Parton Model previously discussed in the literature and based on TMD factorisation. Comparisons with the results of a collinear twist-3 approach, recently presented, are made and discussed.

  17. Spin Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    applications, a ferromagnetic metal may be used as a source of spin-polarized electronics to be injected into a semiconductor, a superconductor or a...physical phenomena in II-VI and III-V semiconductors. In II-VI systems, the Mn2+ ions act to boost the electron spin precession up to terahertz ...conductors, proximity effect between ferromagnets and superconductors , and the effects of spin injection on the physical properties of the

  18. Spin doctoring

    OpenAIRE

    Vozková, Markéta

    2011-01-01

    1 ABSTRACT The aim of this text is to provide an analysis of the phenomenon of spin doctoring in the Euro-Atlantic area. Spin doctors are educated people in the fields of semiotics, cultural studies, public relations, political communication and especially familiar with the infrastructure and the functioning of the media industry. Critical reflection of manipulative communication techniques puts spin phenomenon in historical perspective and traces its practical use in today's social communica...

  19. Design of a marine sediment trap and accessories

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Janakiraman, G.; Fernando, V.; Venkatesan, R.; Rajaraman, V.S.

    The marine sediment trap and the mooring accessories were developed indigenously and were used successfully for the collection of settling sediments in the Arabian Sea The experience gained in using sediment trap and further improvements...

  20. Particle Fluxes and Bulk Geochemical Characterization of the Cabo Frio Upwelling System in Southeastern Brazil: Sediment Trap Experiments between Spring 2010 and Summer 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA LUIZA S. ALBUQUERQUE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical and biogeochemical processes in continental shelves act synergistically in both transporting and transforming suspended material, and ocean dynamics control the dispersion of particles by the coastal zone and their subsequent mixing and dilution within the shelf area constrained by oceanic boundary currents, followed by their gradual settling in a complex sedimentary scenario. One of these regions is the Cabo Frio Upwelling System located in a significantly productive area of Southeastern Brazil, under the control of the nutrient-poor western boundary Brazil Current but also with a wind-driven coastal upwelling zone, inducing cold-water intrusions of South Atlantic Central Water on the shelf. To understand these synergic interactions among physical and biogeochemical processes in the Cabo Frio shelf, a series of four experiments with a total of 98 discrete samples using sediment traps was performed from November 2010 to March 2012, located on the 145 m isobath on the edge of the continental shelf. The results showed that lateral transport might be relevant in some cases, especially in deep layers, although no clear seasonal cycle was detected. Two main physical-geochemical coupling scenarios were identified: singular downwelling events that can enhance particles fluxes and are potentially related to the Brazil Current oscillations; and events of significant fluxes related to the intrusion of the 18°C isotherm in the euphotic zone. The particulate matter settling in the Cabo Frio shelf area seems to belong to multiple marine and terrestrial sources, in which both Paraiba do Sul River and Guanabara Bay could be potential land-sources, although the particulate material might subject intense transformation (diagenesis during its trajectory to the shelf edge.

  1. Radiolysis of carbohydrates as studied by ESR and spin-trapping—II. Glycerol- d8 xylitol, dulcitol, d-sorbitol and d-mannitol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwabara, M.; Zhang, Z.-Y.; Inanami, O.; Yoshii, G.

    Studies concerning the radicals produced in glycerol by reactions with OH radicals have been carried out by investigating deuterated glycerol (glycerol-d 8) by spin-trapping with 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane. Free radicals produced in linear carbohydrates such as xylitol, dulcitol, D-sorbitol and D-mannitol by reactions with OH radicals as well as by direct γ-radiolysis have been also investigated by spin-trapping. The ESR spectra of the spin-trapped radicals were analysed on the basis of the results from ESR and spin-trapping experiments on glycerol and deuterated glycerol, and the formation of three radical species, CHO-CH-, CH 2-CO- and HO-CH-, due to both OH reactions and direct γ-radiolysis was confirmed for all compounds. The presence of a radical, -CO-CH-, was detected for xylitol, D-sorbitol and D-mannitol. General reactions processes induced by OH reactions or γ-radiolysis in the solid state are discussed.

  2. Stable fly (Stomoxys calcitrans: Diptera, Muscidae) trap response to changes in effective trap height caused by growing vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresford, D V; Sutcliffe, J F

    2008-06-01

    Stable flies (Stomoxys calcitrans L.) are blood-feeding pests of cattle, whose populations are often monitored using sticky traps. Trap responses at different heights were compared with: 1) a choice and no-choice test, with sticky cards set at 30 and 121 cm heights (above ground), and 2) tall (120 cm) traps placed in short (3 cm) and tall (40 cm) grass to assess how vegetation height affects trap catches. In the first experiment, the percentage of upper to lower trap catches were similar at choice (16%) and no-choice traps (15%). In the vegetation study, stable fly catch height data were fitted to gamma distributions to determine the most productive trap heights; 20 cm above short grass and 24 cm above tall grass (from lower edge of trap). The results indicate that traps used to monitor stable fly populations should be maintained at a constant distance above surrounding vegetation rather than ground surface, otherwise trap data can be misleading.

  3. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeffner, H.; Roos, C.F.; Blatt, R.

    2008-01-01

    Quantum computers hold the promise of solving certain computational tasks much more efficiently than classical computers. We review recent experimental advances towards a quantum computer with trapped ions. In particular, various implementations of qubits, quantum gates and some key experiments are discussed. Furthermore, we review some implementations of quantum algorithms such as a deterministic teleportation of quantum information and an error correction scheme

  4. Hydrodynamic properties and distribution of bait downstream of a zooplankton trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selander, Erik; Heuschele, Jan; Larsson, Ann I.

    2017-01-01

    The flow regime around a chemically baited trap is crucial for the trapping process and distribution of bait downstream of traps. We measured the flow field downstream of a trap prototype in flume experiments and mapped the distribution of bait using laser induced fluorescence. The trap produced ...

  5. Strong spin-photon coupling in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samkharadze, N; Zheng, G; Kalhor, N; Brousse, D; Sammak, A; Mendes, U C; Blais, A; Scappucci, G; Vandersypen, L M K

    2018-03-09

    Long coherence times of single spins in silicon quantum dots make these systems highly attractive for quantum computation, but how to scale up spin qubit systems remains an open question. As a first step to address this issue, we demonstrate the strong coupling of a single electron spin and a single microwave photon. The electron spin is trapped in a silicon double quantum dot, and the microwave photon is stored in an on-chip high-impedance superconducting resonator. The electric field component of the cavity photon couples directly to the charge dipole of the electron in the double dot, and indirectly to the electron spin, through a strong local magnetic field gradient from a nearby micromagnet. Our results provide a route to realizing large networks of quantum dot-based spin qubit registers. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  6. Quantum Spin Lenses in Atomic Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. W. Glaetzle

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We propose and discuss quantum spin lenses, where quantum states of delocalized spin excitations in an atomic medium are focused in space in a coherent quantum process down to (essentially single atoms. These can be employed to create controlled interactions in a quantum light-matter interface, where photonic qubits stored in an atomic ensemble are mapped to a quantum register represented by single atoms. We propose Hamiltonians for quantum spin lenses as inhomogeneous spin models on lattices, which can be realized with Rydberg atoms in 1D, 2D, and 3D, and with strings of trapped ions. We discuss both linear and nonlinear quantum spin lenses: in a nonlinear lens, repulsive spin-spin interactions lead to focusing dynamics conditional to the number of spin excitations. This allows the mapping of quantum superpositions of delocalized spin excitations to superpositions of spatial spin patterns, which can be addressed by light fields and manipulated. Finally, we propose multifocal quantum spin lenses as a way to generate and distribute entanglement between distant atoms in an atomic lattice array.

  7. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  8. Effects of Confinement on Conventional Spin Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marchukov, Oleksandr

    2015-01-01

    , Hubbard model, etc., which are nevertheless used to describe physical phenomena in various fields, such as condensed matter physics, nuclear physics, etc. This dissertation discusses the effects of the external confinement on some con- ventional spin problems. It consists of two parts: In the first part...... the effects of spin-orbit coupling on particles trapped in a two-dimensional harmonic oscilla- tor are considered. The influences of the deformation of the trap, interparticle interaction and external magnetic field are analyzed. The statistical analysis of the single-particle energy spectrum and its relation...

  9. Developing Density of Laser-Cooled Neutral Atoms and Molecules in a Linear Magnetic Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasquez, Joe, III; Walstrom, Peter; di Rosa, Michael

    2013-05-01

    In this poster we show that neutral particle injection and accumulation using laser-induced spin flips may be used to form dense ensembles of ultracold magnetic particles, i.e., laser-cooled paramagnetic atoms and molecules. Particles are injected in a field-seeking state, are switched by optical pumping to a field-repelled state, and are stored in the minimum-B trap. The analogous process in high-energy charged-particle accumulator rings is charge-exchange injection using stripper foils. The trap is a linear array of sextupoles capped by solenoids. Particle-tracking calculations and design of our linear accumulator along with related experiments involving 7Li will be presented. We test these concepts first with atoms in preparation for later work with selected molecules. Finally, we present our preliminary results with CaH, our candidate molecule for laser cooling. This project is funded by the LDRD program of Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  10. Spin currents in metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czeschka, Franz Dominik

    2011-09-05

    A pure spin current, i.e., a flow of angular momentum without accompanying net charge current, is a key ingredient in the field of spintronics. In this thesis, we experimentally investigated two different concepts for pure spin current sources suggested by theory. The first is based on a time-dependent magnetization precession which ''pumps'' a pure spin current into an adjacent non-magnetic conductor. Our experiments quantitatively corroborated important predictions expected theoretically for this approach, including the dependence of the spin current on the sample geometry and the microwave power. Even more important, we could show for the first time that the spin pumping concept is viable in a large variety of ferromagnetic materials and that it only depends on the magnetization damping. Therefore, our experiments established spin pumping as generic phenomenon and demonstrated that it is a powerful way to generate pure spin currents. The second theoretical concept is based on the conversion of charge currents into spin currents in non-magnetic nanostructures via the spin Hall effect. We experimentally investigated this approach in H-shaped, metallic nanodevices, and found that the predictions are linked to requirements not realizable with the present experimental techniques, neither in sample fabrication nor in measurement technique. Indeed, our experimental data could be consistently understood by a spin-independent transport model describing the transition from diffusive to ballistic transport. In addition, the implementation of advanced fabrication and measurement techniques allowed to discover a new non-local phenomenon, the non-local anisotropic magnetoresistance. Finally, we also studied spin-polarized supercurrents carried by spin-triplet Cooper pairs. We found that low resistance interfaces are a key requirement for further experiments in this direction. (orig.)

  11. Methods in mooring deep sea sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.; Fernando, V.; Rajaraman, V.S.; Janakiraman, G.

    The experience gained during the process of deployment and retrieval of nearly 39 sets of deep sea sediment trap moorings on various ships like FS Sonne, ORV Sagarkanya and DSV Nand Rachit are outlined. The various problems encountered...

  12. AEgIS antihydrogen production trap

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    During technical stop 2017 the AEgIS experiment was open for upgrades and maintenance. We had the opportunity to take some 360 images from inside and see where antiprotons are ¨trapped¨ and anti-Hydrogen produced.

  13. Superconductive analogue of spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feigel'man, M.; Ioffe, L.; Vinokur, V.; Larkin, A.

    1987-07-01

    The properties of granular superconductors in magnetic fields, namely the existence of a new superconductive state analogue of the low-temperature superconductive state in spin glasses are discussed in the frame of the infinite-range model and the finite-range models. Experiments for elucidation of spin-glass superconductive state in real systems are suggested. 30 refs

  14. Muon spin rotation and other microscopic probes of spin-glass dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLaughlin, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    A number of different microscopic probe techniques have been employed to investigate the onset of the spin-glass state in dilute magnetic alloys. Among these are Moessbauer-effect spectroscopy, neutron scattering, ESR of the impurity spins, host NMR and, most recently, muon spin rotation and depolarization. Spin probes yield information on the microscopic static and dynamic behavior of the impurity spins, and give insight into both the spin freezing process and the nature of low-lying excitations in the ordered state. Microscopic probe experiments in spin glasses are surveyed, and the unique advantages of muon studies are emphasized

  15. Electrical detection of spin current and spin relaxation in nonmagnetic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M Idrish

    2008-01-01

    We report an electrical method for the detection of spin current and spin relaxation in nonmagnetic semiconductors. Optically polarized spins are dragged by an electric field in GaAs. We use the anomalous Hall effect for the detection of spin current and spin relaxation. It is found that the effect depends on the electric field and doping density as well as on temperature, but not on the excitation power. A calculation for the effect is performed using the measured spin polarization by a pump-probe experiment. The results are also discussed in comparison with a quantitative evaluation of the spin lifetimes of the photogenerated electrons under drift in GaAs

  16. Electrical detection of spin current and spin relaxation in nonmagnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M Idrish [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au

    2008-09-21

    We report an electrical method for the detection of spin current and spin relaxation in nonmagnetic semiconductors. Optically polarized spins are dragged by an electric field in GaAs. We use the anomalous Hall effect for the detection of spin current and spin relaxation. It is found that the effect depends on the electric field and doping density as well as on temperature, but not on the excitation power. A calculation for the effect is performed using the measured spin polarization by a pump-probe experiment. The results are also discussed in comparison with a quantitative evaluation of the spin lifetimes of the photogenerated electrons under drift in GaAs.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Spin current, spin accumulation and spin Hall effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saburo Takahashi and Sadamichi Maekawa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlocal spin transport in nanostructured devices with ferromagnetic injector (F1 and detector (F2 electrodes connected to a normal conductor (N is studied. We reveal how the spin transport depends on interface resistance, electrode resistance, spin polarization and spin diffusion length, and obtain the conditions for efficient spin injection, spin accumulation and spin current in the device. It is demonstrated that the spin Hall effect is caused by spin–orbit scattering in nonmagnetic conductors and gives rise to the conversion between spin and charge currents in a nonlocal device. A method of evaluating spin–orbit coupling in nonmagnetic metals is proposed.

  18. Trapping Ions in an optical lattice for quantum simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grau, Matt; Fischer, Christoph; Wipfli, Oliver; Home, Jonathan

    2017-04-01

    Quantum many-body spin Hamiltonians are important tools for describing condensed matter systems, but many such Hamiltonians are difficult to simulate on classical computers. Quantum simulation offers an avenue for overcoming these limitations. Arrays of trapped ions are an attractive platform for quantum simulation due to the high level of control combined with the intrinsic long-range Coulomb interaction that can be used to engineer tunable spin-spin couplings. However, varying lattice geometry is challenging with current trapping techniques. We are developing a new apparatus to trap arrays of ions in optical lattices for the purpose of quantum simulation. This should allow trapping two and three-dimensional crystals with a designed geometry. I will present results of simulations of equilibrium positions and normal modes of such a system, which indicate that in a first design arrays of around 40 ions could be trapped with ion-ion distances of under 10 microns, and also with low residual heating rates due to off-resonant scattering and laser fluctuations. By using Magnesium ions, we expect to be able to cool and image the ions while trapped in a deep optical lattice formed by a high finesse optical cavity. Experimental progress towards these goals will be described.

  19. Spin electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Buhrman, Robert; Daughton, James; Molnár, Stephan; Roukes, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This report is a comparative review of spin electronics ("spintronics") research and development activities in the United States, Japan, and Western Europe conducted by a panel of leading U.S. experts in the field. It covers materials, fabrication and characterization of magnetic nanostructures, magnetism and spin control in magnetic nanostructures, magneto-optical properties of semiconductors, and magnetoelectronics and devices. The panel's conclusions are based on a literature review and a series of site visits to leading spin electronics research centers in Japan and Western Europe. The panel found that Japan is clearly the world leader in new material synthesis and characterization; it is also a leader in magneto-optical properties of semiconductor devices. Europe is strong in theory pertaining to spin electronics, including injection device structures such as tunneling devices, and band structure predictions of materials properties, and in development of magnetic semiconductors and semiconductor heterost...

  20. Spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.H.; Hertz, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Spin glasses, simply defined by the authors as a collection of spins (i.e., magnetic moments) whose low-temperature state is a frozen disordered one, represent one of the fascinating new fields of study in condensed matter physics, and this book is the first to offer a comprehensive account of the subject. Included are discussions of the most important developments in theory, experimental work, and computer modeling of spin glasses, all of which have taken place essentially within the last two decades. The first part of the book gives a general introduction to the basic concepts and a discussion of mean field theory, while the second half concentrates on experimental results, scaling theory, and computer simulation of the structure of spin glasses

  1. Spin-orbit coupling in periodically driven optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struck, J.; Simonet, J.; Sengstock, K.

    2014-09-01

    We propose a method for the emulation of artificial spin-orbit coupling in a system of ultracold, neutral atoms trapped in a tight-binding lattice. This scheme does not involve near-resonant laser fields, avoiding the heating processes connected to the spontaneous emission of photons. In our case, the necessary spin-dependent tunnel matrix elements are generated by a rapid, spin-dependent, periodic force, which can be described in the framework of an effective, time-averaged Hamiltonian. An additional radio-frequency coupling between the spin states leads to a mixing of the spin bands.

  2. QCD SPIN PHYSICS IN HADRONIC INTERACTIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VOGELSANG,W.

    2007-06-19

    We discuss spin phenomena in high-energy hadronic scattering, with a particular emphasis on the spin physics program now underway at the first polarized proton-proton collider, RHIC. Experiments at RHIC unravel the spin structure of the nucleon in new ways. Prime goals are to determine the contribution of gluon spins to the proton spin, to elucidate the flavor structure of quark and antiquark polarizations in the nucleon, and to help clarify the origin of transverse-spin phenomena in QCD. These lectures describe some aspects of this program and of the associated physics.

  3. Multiple acquisition of magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments using one receiver: Application to microcrystalline and membrane protein preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, T.; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of proteins is a notoriously low-throughput technique. Relatively low-sensitivity and poor resolution of protein samples require long acquisition times for multidimensional NMR experiments. To speed up data acquisition, we developed a family of experiments called Polarization Optimized Experiments (POE), in which we utilized the orphan spin operators that are discarded in classical multidimensional NMR experiments, recovering them to allow simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D experiments, all while using conventional probes with spectrometers equipped with one receiver. POE allow the concatenation of multiple 2D or 3D pulse sequences into a single experiment, thus potentially combining all of the aforementioned advances, boosting the capability of ssNMR spectrometers at least two-fold without the addition of any hardware. In this perspective, we describe the first generation of POE, such as dual acquisition MAS (or DUMAS) methods, and then illustrate the evolution of these experiments into MEIOSIS, a method that enables the simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D spectra. Using these new pulse schemes for the solid-state NMR investigation of biopolymers makes it possible to obtain sequential resonance assignments, as well as distance restraints, in about half the experimental time. While designed for acquisition of heteronuclei, these new experiments can be easily implemented for proton detection and coupled with other recent advancements, such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), to improve signal to noise. Finally, we illustrate the application of these methods to microcrystalline protein preparations as well as single and multi-span membrane proteins reconstituted in lipid membranes.

  4. Multiple acquisition of magic angle spinning solid-state NMR experiments using one receiver: application to microcrystalline and membrane protein preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, T; Veglia, Gianluigi

    2015-04-01

    Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of proteins is a notoriously low-throughput technique. Relatively low-sensitivity and poor resolution of protein samples require long acquisition times for multidimensional NMR experiments. To speed up data acquisition, we developed a family of experiments called Polarization Optimized Experiments (POE), in which we utilized the orphan spin operators that are discarded in classical multidimensional NMR experiments, recovering them to allow simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D experiments, all while using conventional probes with spectrometers equipped with one receiver. POE allow the concatenation of multiple 2D or 3D pulse sequences into a single experiment, thus potentially combining all of the aforementioned advances, boosting the capability of ssNMR spectrometers at least two-fold without the addition of any hardware. In this perspective, we describe the first generation of POE, such as dual acquisition MAS (or DUMAS) methods, and then illustrate the evolution of these experiments into MEIOSIS, a method that enables the simultaneous acquisition of multiple 2D and 3D spectra. Using these new pulse schemes for the solid-state NMR investigation of biopolymers makes it possible to obtain sequential resonance assignments, as well as distance restraints, in about half the experimental time. While designed for acquisition of heteronuclei, these new experiments can be easily implemented for proton detection and coupled with other recent advancements, such as dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP), to improve signal to noise. Finally, we illustrate the application of these methods to microcrystalline protein preparations as well as single and multi-span membrane proteins reconstituted in lipid membranes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Overview of longitudinal spin physics at PHENIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mingxiong

    2007-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the longitudinal spin physics program in the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL. The main goal is to study the longitudinal spin structure of the proton with strongly interacting probes at high energy to resolve the long standing 'spin crisis'. The latest results from PHENIX are presented. (author)

  6. Spin-glass transition in disordered terbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hauser, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    While crystalline Tb is a helix antiferromagnet with a Neel temperature of 229 K which becomes ferromagnetic at 222 K, disordered Tb exhibits a spin-glass transition. The spin-glass freezing temperature ranges from 183 to 53 K, the lowest temperatures corresponding to the greatest degree of atomic disorder. These experiments constitute the first evidence for an elemental spin-glass. (author)

  7. Trap style influences wild pig behavior and trapping success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B.L.; Holtfreter, R.W.; Ditchkoff, S.S.; Grand, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the efforts of many natural resource professionals, wild pig (Sus scrofa) populations are expanding in many areas of the world. Although many creative techniques for controlling pig populations are being explored, trapping has been and still is themost commonly usedmethod of population control formany public and private land managers. We conducted an observational study to examine the efficiency of 2 frequently used trap styles: a small, portable box-style trap and a larger, semi-permanent, corral-style trap.We used game cameras to examine patterns of trap entry by wild pigs around each style of trap, and we conducted a trapping session to compare trapping success between trap styles. Adult female and juvenile wild pigs entered both styles of trap more readily than did adult males, and adult males seemed particularly averse to entering box traps. Less than 10% of adult male visits to box traps resulted in entries, easily the least percentage of any class at any style of trap. Adult females entered corral traps approximately 2.2 times more often per visit than box traps and re-entered corral traps >2 times more frequently. Juveniles entered and reentered both box and corral traps at similar rates. Overall (all-class) entry-per-visit rates at corral traps (0.71) were nearly double that of box traps (0.37). Subsequent trapping data supported these preliminary entry data; the capture rate for corral traps was >4 times that of box traps. Our data suggest that corral traps are temporally and economically superior to box traps with respect to efficiency; that is, corral traps effectively trap more pigs per trap night at a lower cost per pig than do box traps. ?? 2011 The Wildlife Society.

  8. GAMMASPHERE: Correction technique for detector charge trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goulding, F.S.; Landis, D.A.

    1993-11-01

    GAMMASPHERE uses 110 very large germanium detectors. Such detectors exhibit charge trapping effects on energy resolution initially due to a native electron trap that is present in virtually all germanium. Furthermore, radiation damage is a serious problem in GAMMASPHERE experiments, producing hole traps that degrade resolution and eventually require annealing to restore the original performance. The technique discussed here uses the current pulse shape from a detector to develop a parameter related to the radius of the largest interaction in the ``track`` of a gamma ray in the detector. Since the charge trapping loss in a signal can be related to the distance carriers travel, the ``radius`` parameter can be used by software to apply a trap correction to the signal.

  9. Spin-polarized free electron beam interaction with radiation and superradiant spin-flip radiative emission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gover

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The problems of spin-polarized free-electron beam interaction with electromagnetic wave at electron-spin resonance conditions in a magnetic field and of superradiant spin-flip radiative emission are analyzed in the framework of a comprehensive classical model. The spontaneous emission of spin-flip radiation from electron beams is very weak. We show that the detectivity of electron spin resonant spin-flip and combined spin-flip/cyclotron-resonance-emission radiation can be substantially enhanced by operating with ultrashort spin-polarized electron beam bunches under conditions of superradiant (coherent emission. The proposed radiative spin-state modulation and the spin-flip radiative emission schemes can be used for control and noninvasive diagnostics of polarized electron/positron beams. Such schemes are of relevance in important scattering experiments off nucleons in nuclear physics and off magnetic targets in condensed matter physics.

  10. Neutral atom traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pack, Michael Vern

    2008-12-01

    This report describes progress in designing a neutral atom trap capable of trapping sub millikelvin atom in a magnetic trap and shuttling the atoms across the atom chip from a collection area to an optical cavity. The numerical simulation and atom chip design are discussed. Also, discussed are preliminary calculations of quantum noise sources in Kerr nonlinear optics measurements based on electromagnetically induced transparency. These types of measurements may be important for quantum nondemolition measurements at the few photon limit.

  11. Perfusion MR imaging with FAIR true FISP spin labeling in patients with and without renal artery stenosis: initial experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenchel, Michael; Martirosian, Petros; Langanke, Juergen; Giersch, Jenny; Miller, Stephan; Stauder, Norbert I; Kramer, Ulrich; Claussen, Claus D; Schick, Fritz

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to prospectively evaluate an arterial spin-labeling technique, flow-sensitive alternating inversion-recovery (FAIR) true fast imaging with steady-state precession (FISP), for noninvasive quantification of renal perfusion in patients without a history of renal artery stenosis (RAS) and in patients with proved RAS. The study was approved by the local ethics committee, and all participants provided written informed consent. Six patients with hypertension but no history of renal artery disease and 12 patients with RAS underwent FAIR true FISP magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in a whole-body 1.5-T unit. RAS grade and scintigraphic perfusion data served as the reference standards. On the FAIR true FISP perfusion images, severe RAS (>70% luminal narrowing) could be clearly distinguished from no or mild RAS and moderate RAS (FAIR perfusion data and stenosis grade (r = -0.76) and between FAIR and single photon emission computed tomographic perfusion values (r = 0.83) were observed. FAIR true FISP was found to be suitable for quantitative perfusion imaging of the kidneys in patients with RAS. Copyright RSNA, 2006.

  12. Arterial spin labeling MR imaging for characterisation of renal masses in patients with impaired renal function: initial experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrosa, Ivan [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); UT Southwestern Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States); Rafatzand, Khashayar; Robson, Philip; Alsop, David C. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Wagner, Andrew A. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Surgery, Division of Urology, Boston, MA (United States); Atkins, Michael B. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Hematology/Oncology, Boston, MA (United States); Rofsky, Neil M. [University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Departments of Radiology, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2012-02-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the feasibility of arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for the assessment of vascularity of renal masses in patients with impaired renal function. Between May 2007 and November 2008, 11/67 consecutive patients referred for MRI evaluation of a renal mass underwent unenhanced ASL-MRI due to moderate-to-severe chronic or acute renal failure. Mean blood flow in vascularised and non-vascularised lesions and the relation between blood flow and final diagnosis of malignancy were correlated with a 2-sided homogeneous variance t-test and the Fisher Exact Test, respectively. A p value <0.05 was considered statistically significant. Seventeen renal lesions were evaluated in 11 patients (8 male; mean age = 70 years) (range 57-86). The median eGFR was 24 mL/min/1.73 m{sup 2} (range 7-39). The average blood flow of 11 renal masses interpreted as ASL-positive (134 +/- 85.7 mL/100 g/min) was higher than that of 6 renal masses interpreted as ASL-negative (20.5 +/- 8.1 mL/100 g/min)(p = 0.015). ASL-positivity correlated with malignancy (n = 3) or epithelial atypia (n = 1) at histopathology or progression at follow up (n = 7). ASL detection of vascularity in renal masses in patients with impaired renal function is feasible and seems to indicate neoplasia although the technique requires further evaluation. (orig.)

  13. Electron Spin Dynamics in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, X.; Belhadj, T.; Urbaszek, B.; Amand, T.; Krebs, O.; Lemaitre, A.; Voisin, P.

    2011-01-01

    An electron spin confined to a semiconductor quantum dot is not subject to the classical spin relaxation mechanisms known for free carriers but it strongly interacts with the nuclear spin system via the hyperfine interaction. We show in time resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy experiments on ensembles of self assembled InAs quantum dots in GaAs that this interaction leads to strong electron spin dephasing.

  14. Spin gating electrical current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, C.; Zârbo, L. P.; Irvine, A. C.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, T.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2012-09-01

    The level of the chemical potential is a fundamental parameter of the electronic structure of a physical system, which consequently plays an important role in defining the properties of active electrical devices. We directly measure the chemical potential shift in the relativistic band structure of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As, controlled by changes in its magnetic order parameter. Our device comprises a non-magnetic aluminum single electron channel capacitively coupled to the (Ga,Mn)As gate electrode. The chemical potential shifts of the gate are directly read out from the shifts in the Coulomb blockade oscillations of the single electron transistor. The experiments introduce a concept of spin gating electrical current. In our spin transistor spin manipulation is completely removed from the electrical current carrying channel.

  15. Overview of spin physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1992-12-23

    Spin physics activities at medium and high energies became significantly active when polarized targets and polarized beams became accessible for hadron-hadron scattering experiments. My overview of spin physics will be inclined to the study of strong interaction using facilities at Argonne ZGS, Brookhaven AGS (including RHIC), CERN, Fermilab, LAMPF, an SATURNE. In 1960 accelerator physicists had already been convinced that the ZGS could be unique in accelerating a polarized beam; polarized beams were being accelerated through linear accelerators elsewhere at that time. However, there was much concern about going ahead with the construction of a polarized beam because (i) the source intensity was not high enough to accelerate in the accelerator, (ii) the use of the accelerator would be limited to only polarized-beam physics, that is, proton-proton interaction, and (iii) p-p elastic scattering was not the most popular topic in high-energy physics. In fact, within spin physics, [pi]-nucleon physics looked attractive, since the determination of spin and parity of possible [pi]p resonances attracted much attention. To proceed we needed more data beside total cross sections and elastic differential cross sections; measurements of polarization and other parameters were urgently needed. Polarization measurements had traditionally been performed by analyzing the spin of recoil protons. The drawbacks of this technique are: (i) it involves double scattering, resulting in poor accuracy of the data, and (ii) a carbon analyzer can only be used for a limited region of energy.

  16. Spin Currents and Spin Orbit Torques in Ferromagnets and Antiferromagnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Ming

    This thesis focuses on the interactions of spin currents and materials with magnetic order, e.g., ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic thin films. The spin current is generated in two ways. First by spin-polarized conduction-electrons associated with the spin Hall effect in heavy metals (HMs) and, second, by exciting spin-waves in ferrimagnetic insulators using a microwave frequency magnetic field. A conduction-electron spin current can be generated by spin-orbit coupling in a heavy non-magnetic metal and transfer its spin angular momentum to a ferromagnet, providing a means of reversing the magnetization of perpendicularly magnetized ultrathin films with currents that flow in the plane of the layers. The torques on the magnetization are known as spin-orbit torques (SOT). In the first part of my thesis project I investigated and contrasted the quasistatic (slowly swept current) and pulsed current-induced switching characteristics of micrometer scale Hall crosses consisting of very thin (thesis project studies and considers applications of SOT-driven domain wall (DW) motion in a perpendicularly magnetized ultrathin ferromagnet sandwiched between a heavy metal and an oxide. My experiment results demonstrate that the DW motion can be explained by a combination of the spin Hall effect, which generates a SOT, and Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction, which stabilizes chiral Neel-type DW. Based on SOT-driven DW motion and magnetic coupling between electrically isolated ferromagnetic elements, I proposed a new type of spin logic devices. I then demonstrate the device operation by using micromagnetic modeling which involves studying the magnetic coupling induced by fringe fields from chiral DWs in perpendicularly magnetized nanowires. The last part of my thesis project reports spin transport and spin-Hall magnetoresistance (SMR) in yttrium iron garnet Y3Fe5O 12 (YIG)/NiO/Pt trilayers with varied NiO thickness. To characterize the spin transport through NiO we excite

  17. Torque and optical traps

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... Optical traps are an important tool for research in the field of single molecule biophysics. Recent advances in optical trapping have extended their functionality from simple linear manipulation and measurement of forces, to now the ability to rotate objects and measure torques. This mini review summarizes ...

  18. Versatile electrostatic trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhoven, J.; Bethlem, H.L.; Schnell, M.; Meijer, G.

    2006-01-01

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of ND315 molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to

  19. Sodium hydride precipitation in sodium cold traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Raue, D.J.

    1980-06-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to test a calculational model for precipitation of NaH in sodium cold traps. The calculational model, called ACTMODEL, is a computer simulation that uses the system geometry and operating conditions as input to calculate a mass-transfer coefficient and the distribution of NaH in a cold trap. The ACTMODEL was tested using an analytical cold trap (ACT) that is simple and essentially one-dimensional. The ACT flow and temperature profile can be controlled at any desired condition. The ACT was analyzed destructively after each test to measure the actual NaH distribution. Excellent agreement was obtained between the ACTMODEL simulations and the experiments. Mass-transfer coefficients ranging upward from 6 x 10 -5 m/s were measured in both packless and packed traps. As much as a fourfold increase in precipitation surface area was observed with increasing amount of NaH deposited. 11 figures, 2 tables

  20. Loading an Optical Trap with Diamond Nanocrystals Containing Nitrogen-Vacancy Centers from a Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev; D'Urso, Brian R.

    2015-03-01

    We present a simple and effective method of loading particles into an optical trap. Our primary application of this method is loading photoluminescent material, such as diamond nanocrystals containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers, for coupling the mechanical motion of the trapped crystal with the spin of the NV centers. Highly absorptive material at the trapping laser frequency, such as tartrazine dye, is used as media to attach nanodiamonds and burn into a cloud of air-borne particles as the material is swept near the trapping laser focus on a glass slide. Particles are then trapped with the laser used for burning or transferred to a second laser trap at a different wavelength. Evidence of successful loading diamond nanocrystals into the trap presented includes high sensitivity of the photoluminecscence (PL) to the excitation laser and the PL spectra of the optically trapped particles

  1. Zero-momentum coupling induced transitions of ground states in Rashba spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jingjing; Zhang, Suying; Han, Wei

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the transitions of ground states induced by zero momentum (ZM) coupling in pseudospin-1/2 Rashba spin-orbit coupled Bose-Einstein condensates confined in a harmonic trap. In a weak harmonic trap, the condensate presents a plane wave (PW) state, a stripe state or a spin polarized ZM state, and the particle distribution of the stripe state is weighted equally at two points in the momentum space without ZM coupling. The presence of ZM coupling induces an imbalanced particle distribution in the momentum space, and leads to the decrease of the amplitude of the stripe state. When its strength exceeds a critical value, the system experiences the transition from stripe phase to PW phase. The boundary of these two phases is shifted and a new phase diagram spanned by the ZM coupling and the interatomic interactions is obtained. The presence of ZM coupling can also achieve the transition from ZM phase to PW phase. In a strong harmonic trap, the condensate exhibits a vortex lattice state without ZM coupling. For the positive effective Rabi frequency of ZM coupling, the condensate is driven from a vortex lattice state to a vortex-free lattice state and finally to a PW state with the increase of coupling strength. In addition, for the negative effective Rabi frequency, the condensate is driven from a vortex lattice state to a stripe state, and finally to a PW state. The stripe state found in the strong harmonic trap is different from that in previous works because of its nonzero superfluid velocity along the stripes. We also discuss the influences of the ZM coupling on the spin textures, and indicate that the spin textures are squeezed transversely by the ZM coupling.

  2. Optical trapping with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Anita; Dhamija, Shaina; De, Arijit K.

    2017-08-01

    Laser trapping of 100nm diameter polystyrene bead under high repetition rate ultrafast pulsed excitation is studied theoretically as well as experimentally. In our theoretical analysis, we explore the role of optical Kerr effect at 50mW average power under pulsed excitation. In our experiment, we use a CMOS camera to record two-photon fluorescence signal from the trapped particle which decays with time due to photo-bleaching.

  3. Spin diffusion and torques in disordered antiferromagnets

    KAUST Repository

    Manchon, Aurelien

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a drift-diffusion equation of spin transport in collinear bipartite metallic antiferromagnets. Starting from a model tight-binding Hamiltonian, we obtain the quantum kinetic equation within Keldysh formalism and expand it to the lowest order in spatial gradient using Wigner expansion method. In the diffusive limit, these equations track the spatio-temporal evolution of the spin accumulations and spin currents on each sublattice of the antiferromagnet. We use these equations to address the nature of the spin transfer torque in (i) a spin-valve composed of a ferromagnet and an antiferromagnet, (ii) a metallic bilayer consisting of an antiferromagnet adjacent to a heavy metal possessing spin Hall effect, and in (iii) a single antiferromagnet possessing spin Hall effect. We show that the latter can experience a self-torque thanks to the non-vanishing spin Hall effect in the antiferromagnet.

  4. Disorder and Quantum Spin Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, N.; Bonville, P.; Lhotel, E.; Guitteny, S.; Wildes, A.; Decorse, C.; Ciomaga Hatnean, M.; Balakrishnan, G.; Mirebeau, I.; Petit, S.

    2017-10-01

    We report on diffuse neutron scattering experiments providing evidence for the presence of random strains in the quantum spin-ice candidate Pr2Zr2O7 . Since Pr3 + is a non-Kramers ion, the strain deeply modifies the picture of Ising magnetic moments governing the low-temperature properties of this material. It is shown that the derived strain distribution accounts for the temperature dependence of the specific heat and of the spin-excitation spectra. Taking advantage of mean-field and spin-dynamics simulations, we argue that the randomness in Pr2Zr2O7 promotes a new state of matter, which is disordered yet characterized by short-range antiferroquadrupolar correlations, and from which emerge spin-ice-like excitations. Thus, this study gives an original research route in the field of quantum spin ice.

  5. Disorder and Quantum Spin Ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Martin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on diffuse neutron scattering experiments providing evidence for the presence of random strains in the quantum spin-ice candidate Pr_{2}Zr_{2}O_{7}. Since Pr^{3+} is a non-Kramers ion, the strain deeply modifies the picture of Ising magnetic moments governing the low-temperature properties of this material. It is shown that the derived strain distribution accounts for the temperature dependence of the specific heat and of the spin-excitation spectra. Taking advantage of mean-field and spin-dynamics simulations, we argue that the randomness in Pr_{2}Zr_{2}O_{7} promotes a new state of matter, which is disordered yet characterized by short-range antiferroquadrupolar correlations, and from which emerge spin-ice-like excitations. Thus, this study gives an original research route in the field of quantum spin ice.

  6. Interference Spins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popovski, Petar; Simeone, Osvaldo; Nielsen, Jimmy Jessen

    2015-01-01

    on traffic load and interference condition leads to performance gains. In this letter, a general network of multiple interfering two-way links is studied under the assumption of a balanced load in the two directions for each link. Using the notion of interference spin, we introduce an algebraic framework...

  7. Spinning worlds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwarz, H.

    2017-01-01

    The thesis "Spinning Worlds" is about the characterisation of two types of gas-giant exoplanets: Hot Jupiters, with orbital periods of fewer than five days, and young, wide-orbit gas giants, with orbital periods as long as thousands of years. The thesis is based on near-infrared observations of 1

  8. Direct observation of a single proton in a Penning trap. Towards a direct measurement of the proton g-factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreim, Susanne Waltraud

    2009-08-25

    This PhD thesis presents experiments performed on a single proton stored in a Penning trap. The eigenmotion of an isolated, free proton could be detected electronically via a coupling to a resonance circuit. This represents a non-destructive measurement, i.e. the particle is not lost during the measurement. The free cyclotron frequency emerging from the measured eigenfrequencies is one of the two frequencies required for the determination of the magnetic moment. This enables a direct determination of the g-factor contrary to already existing works. Design, developing, and commissioning of the experimental setup have been accomplished within the scope of this work leading to a measuring accuracy of 10{sup -7}. The technical challenges for the determination of the second frequency (the Larmor frequency) arising from the smallness of the magnetic moment were mastered. Since the spin state required for this measurement is an internal degree of freedom, it can only be accessed through a coupling of the magnetic moment to the eigenmotion. A novel, hybrid penning trap is presented in this work, which imprints the spin information onto the eigenmotion, thus, realizing a quantum jump spectrometer. Therewith, the frequency shift of the two spin states resulting from the magnetic coupling reaches for the first time an electronically detectable range. (orig.)

  9. Spin caloritronics, origin and outlook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Haiming, E-mail: haiming.yu@buaa.edu.cn [Fert Beijing Institute, School of Electronic and Information Engineering, BDBC, Beihang University (China); Brechet, Sylvain D. [Institute of Physics, station 3, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne-EPFL (Switzerland); Ansermet, Jean-Philippe, E-mail: jean-philippe.ansermet@epfl.ch [Institute of Physics, station 3, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne-EPFL (Switzerland)

    2017-03-03

    Spin caloritronics refers to research efforts in spintronics when a heat current plays a role. In this review, we start out by reviewing the predictions that can be drawn from the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. This serves as a conceptual framework in which to analyze the interplay of charge, spin and heat transport. This formalism predicts tensorial relations between vectorial quantities such as currents and gradients of chemical potentials or of temperature. Transverse effects such as the Nernst or Hall effects are predicted on the basis that these tensors can include an anti-symmetric contribution, which can be written with a vectorial cross-product. The local symmetry of the system may determine the direction of the vector defining such transverse effects, such as the surface of an isotropic medium. By including magnetization as state field in the thermodynamic description, spin currents appear naturally from the continuity equation for the magnetization, and dissipative spin torques are derived, which are charge-driven or heat-driven. Thermodynamics does not give the strength of these effects, but may provide relationships between them. Based on this framework, the review proceeds by showing how these effects have been observed in various systems. Spintronics has become a vast field of research, and the experiments highlighted in this review pertain only to heat effects on transport and magnetization dynamics, such as magneto-thermoelectric power, or the spin-dependence of the Seebeck effect, the spin-dependence of the Peltier effect, the spin Seebeck effect, the magnetic Seebeck effect, or the Nernst effect. The review concludes by pointing out predicted effects that are yet to be verified experimentally, and in what novel materials the standard thermal spin effects could be investigated. - Highlights: • Thermodynamic description of transport: three-current model. • Magneto-thermoelectric power and spin-dependent Peltier effects. • Thermal

  10. Spin effects in high- and low-field magnetotransport experiments in semimagnetic Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betthausen, Christian

    2012-07-09

    Within the framework of this PhD we report on the very first observation of the fractional Quantum Hall Effect (FQHE) in both, a non-magnetic CdTe and a semimagnetic Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te quantum well device. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first demonstration of this effect in the II-VI material family. Furthermore, our results reveal that the formation of fractional Quantum Hall states is not inhibited by the presence of magnetic impurities in a quantum structure. The second part of this thesis addresses an alternative route to realize efficient spin transistor action. Typically, spin transistor designs relying on spin-orbit interaction principally suffer from low signal levels due to limitations in spin injection efficiency and fast spin decay. Here we present an approach to realize spin transistor action in systems where spin information is protected by propagating it adiabatically. This is achieved by inducing tunable diabatic Landau-Zener transitions that lead to a backscattering of spins and hence allow controlling the transmission of spin-polarized charge carriers through the device, i.e. switching between 'on' and 'off' states. We demonstrate the validity of our approach in a Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum well structure where efficient spin transport is observed over device distances of 50 {mu}m. In contrast to other spin transistor designs we find that our concept is exceptionally tolerant against disorder.

  11. Nematode-Trapping Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique and intriguing group of carnivorous microorganisms that can trap and digest nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures. They can develop diverse trapping devices, such as adhesive hyphae, adhesive knobs, adhesive networks, constricting rings, and nonconstricting rings. Nematode-trapping fungi have been found in all regions of the world, from the tropics to Antarctica, from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. They play an important ecological role in regulating nematode dynamics in soil. Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the majority of nematode-trapping fungi belong to a monophyletic group in the order Orbiliales (Ascomycota). Nematode-trapping fungi serve as an excellent model system for understanding fungal evolution and interaction between fungi and nematodes. With the development of molecular techniques and genome sequencing, their evolutionary origins and divergence, and the mechanisms underlying fungus-nematode interactions have been well studied. In recent decades, an increasing concern about the environmental hazards of using chemical nematicides has led to the application of these biological control agents as a rapidly developing component of crop protection.

  12. First-In-Man Procedural Experience with the Novel EmboTrap® Revascularization Device for the Treatment of Ischemic Stroke-A European Multicenter Series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabbasch, C; Mpotsaris, A; Liebig, T

    2016-01-01

    -artery occlusion were treated in five European centers. Clinical and procedural data were collected; self-reported angiographic results and neurologic outcome (discharge and 90 days) were assessed in a standardized manner. RESULTS: The median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at admittance was 16.......8, with a mean procedural time to reperfusion of 54 min. One patient (2.5 %), who had not received IVT, experienced symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage post-interventionally. Procedural complications were encountered in 2 of 40 cases (5 %); both patients exhibited ICA dissection that was treated conservatively...... without clinical sequelae. There were no device-related complications. Of 23 available patients, 8 (35 %) had a good outcome after 90 days. CONCLUSION: The procedural results from these five centers suggest that EmboTrap is technically safe. Successful recanalization rates can be expected to be within...

  13. Numerical evidences of universal trap-like aging dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammarota, Chiara; Marinari, Enzo

    2018-04-01

    Trap models have been initially proposed as toy models for dynamical relaxation in extremely simplified rough potential energy landscapes. Their importance has recently grown considerably thanks to the discovery that the trap-like aging mechanism directly controls the out-of-equilibrium relaxation processes of more sophisticated spin models, that are considered as the solvable counterpart of real disordered systems. Further establishing the connection between these spin models, out-of-equilibrium behavior and the trap like aging mechanism could shed new light on the properties, which are still largely mysterious, for the activated out-of-equilibrium dynamics of disordered systems. In this work we discuss numerical evidence based on the computations of the permanence times of an emergent trap-like aging behavior in a variety of very simple disordered models—developed from the trap model paradigm. Our numerical results are backed by analytic derivations and heuristic discussions. Such exploration reveals some of the tricks needed to reveal the trap behavior in spite of the occurrence of secondary processes, of the existence of dynamical correlations and of strong finite system’s size effects.

  14. Modeling of thermal spin transport and spin-orbit effects in ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic mesoscopic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slachter, Abraham; Bakker, Frank Lennart; van Wees, Bart Jan

    2011-01-01

    In this article we extend the currently established diffusion theory of spin-dependent electrical conduction by including spin-dependent thermoelectricity and thermal transport. Using this theory, we propose experiments aimed at demonstrating novel effects such as the spin-Peltier effect, the

  15. The ALPHATRAP g-Factor Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapoglou, Ioanna; Egl, Alexander; Hocker, Martin; Kraemer, Sandro; Sailer, Tim; Weigel, Andreas; Crespo Lopez-Urrutia, J. R.; Wolf, Robert; Sturm, Sven; Blaum, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    ALPHATRAP is a high-precision Penning-trap experiment that aims for the most stringent test of bound-state quantum electrodynamics (BS-QED) in the strong field regime. These fields are provided by heavy highly-charged ions (HCI), such as hydrogen-like 208Pb81+ , where the electron is exposed to the strong binding potential of the nucleus. The storage and manipulation of the ions is achieved using a double Penning-trap system in which the electron's g-factor is deduced from measuring its magnetic moment. The setup includes several ion creation possibilities for offline ion production, additional to the online injection of heavy HCI from the Heidelberg Electron Beam Ion Trap. This will deliver the heavy HCI via an ion beam-line, to the cryogenic double Penning-trap system. The latter consists of the so called Precision Trap for high-precision measurements of the ion cyclotron frequency in a homogeneous magnetic field, and the Analysis Trap for spin state detection of the bound electron in a magnetic bottle configuration. This experimental setup not only enables high-precision tests of BS-QED, but also allows the determination of fundamental constants, such as the fine structure constant α and the atomic mass of the electron me, to competitive precision.

  16. Competing Spin Liquids and Hidden Spin-Nematic Order in Spin Ice with Frustrated Transverse Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Taillefumier

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Frustration in magnetic interactions can give rise to disordered ground states with subtle and beautiful properties. The spin ices Ho_{2}Ti_{2}O_{7} and Dy_{2}Ti_{2}O_{7} exemplify this phenomenon, displaying a classical spin-liquid state, with fractionalized magnetic-monopole excitations. Recently, there has been great interest in closely related “quantum spin-ice” materials, following the realization that anisotropic exchange interactions could convert spin ice into a massively entangled, quantum spin liquid, where magnetic monopoles become the charges of an emergent quantum electrodynamics. Here we show that even the simplest model of a quantum spin ice, the XXZ model on the pyrochlore lattice, can realize a still-richer scenario. Using a combination of classical Monte Carlo simulation, semiclassical molecular-dynamics simulation, and analytic field theory, we explore the properties of this model for frustrated transverse exchange. We find not one, but three competing forms of spin liquid, as well as a phase with hidden, spin-nematic order. We explore the experimental signatures of each of these different states, making explicit predictions for inelastic neutron scattering. These results show an intriguing similarity to experiments on a range of pyrochlore oxides.

  17. Competing Spin Liquids and Hidden Spin-Nematic Order in Spin Ice with Frustrated Transverse Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefumier, Mathieu; Benton, Owen; Yan, Han; Jaubert, L. D. C.; Shannon, Nic

    2017-10-01

    Frustration in magnetic interactions can give rise to disordered ground states with subtle and beautiful properties. The spin ices Ho2 Ti2 O7 and Dy2 Ti2 O7 exemplify this phenomenon, displaying a classical spin-liquid state, with fractionalized magnetic-monopole excitations. Recently, there has been great interest in closely related "quantum spin-ice" materials, following the realization that anisotropic exchange interactions could convert spin ice into a massively entangled, quantum spin liquid, where magnetic monopoles become the charges of an emergent quantum electrodynamics. Here we show that even the simplest model of a quantum spin ice, the XXZ model on the pyrochlore lattice, can realize a still-richer scenario. Using a combination of classical Monte Carlo simulation, semiclassical molecular-dynamics simulation, and analytic field theory, we explore the properties of this model for frustrated transverse exchange. We find not one, but three competing forms of spin liquid, as well as a phase with hidden, spin-nematic order. We explore the experimental signatures of each of these different states, making explicit predictions for inelastic neutron scattering. These results show an intriguing similarity to experiments on a range of pyrochlore oxides.

  18. Spin echo in synchrotrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander W. Chao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available As a polarized beam is accelerated through a depolarization resonance, its polarization is reduced by a well-defined calculable reduction factor. When the beam subsequently crosses a second resonance, the final beam polarization is considered to be reduced by the product of the two reduction factors corresponding to the two crossings, each calculated independently of the other. This is a good approximation when the spread of spin precession frequency Δν_{spin} of the beam (particularly due to its energy spread is sufficiently large that the spin precession phases of individual particles smear out completely during the time τ between the two crossings. This approximate picture, however, ignores two spin dynamics effects: an interference-overlap effect and a spin echo effect. This paper is to address these two effects. The interference-overlap effect occurs when Δν_{spin} is too small, or when τ is too short, to complete the smearing process. In this case, the two resonance crossings overlap each other, and the final polarization exhibits constructive or destructive interference patterns depending on the exact value of τ. Typically, the beam’s energy spread is large and this interference-overlap effect does not occur. To study this effect, therefore, it is necessary to reduce the beam energy spread and to consider two resonance crossings very close to each other. The other mechanism, also due to the interplay between two resonance crossings, is spin echo. It turns out that even when the precession phases appear to be completely smeared between the two crossings, there will still be a sudden and short-lived echo signal of beam polarization at a time τ after the second crossing; the magnitude of which can be as large as 57%. This echo signal exists even when the beam has a sizable energy spread and when τ is very large, and could be a sensitive (albeit challenging way to experimentally test the intricate spin dynamics in a synchrotron

  19. Spin squeezing of atomic ensembles via nuclear-electronic spin entanglement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernholz, Thomas; Krauter, Hanna; Jensen, Kasper

    2008-01-01

    quantum limit for quantum memory experiments and applications in quantum metrology and is thus a complementary alternative to spin squeezing obtained via inter-atom entanglement. Squeezing of the collective spin is verified by quantum state tomography.......We demonstrate spin squeezing in a room temperature ensemble of 1012 Cesium atoms using their internal structure, where the necessary entanglement is created between nuclear and electronic spins of each individual atom. This state provides improvement in measurement sensitivity beyond the standard...

  20. In a spin at Brookhaven spin physics

    CERN Document Server

    Makdisi, Y I

    2003-01-01

    The mysterious quantity that is spin took centre stage at Brookhaven for the SPIN2002 meeting last September. The 15th biennial International Spin Physics Symposium (SPIN2002) was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on 9-14 September 2002. Some 250 spin enthusiasts attended, including experimenters and theorists in both nuclear and high-energy physics, as well as accelerator physicists and polarized target and polarized source experts. The six-day symposium included 23 plenary talks and 150 parallel talks. SPIN2002 was preceded by a one-day spin physics tutorial for students, postdocs, and anyone else who felt the need for a refresher course. (2 refs).

  1. Cadmium-113 NMR spin-lattice relaxation and exchange kinetics in concanavalin A: A double saturation transfer experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Paul D.; Yang, Ping P.; Palmert, Allen R.

    The field dependence of the 113Cd relaxation rate in cadmium-substituted Concanavalin A was investigated at three magnetic field strengths, 2.3, 4.7, and 9.4 T. Because of the anomalously large relaxation rate observed for the resonance corresponding to free cadmium in the system and our prior knowledge that cadmium is undergoing chemical exchange in this system, a detailed analysis was undertaken of the relaxation data obtained at 9.4 T to investigate the relative importance of chemical exchange dynamics upon the observed relaxation time constants. The differential equations for the resulting restricted three-site exchange network can be solved in closed form by employing a double saturation transfer experiment in conjunction with a saturation-recovery T1 experiment. The analysis of these data demonstrate that chemical exchange processes contribute 14, 75, and 20% to the observed relaxation time constants for the 113Cd resonances for the S1 site, free cadmium and the S2 site respectively. If the possibility of exchange contributions to the NOE were ignored, then the observed field dependence of T1 could not be discussed in terms of conventional single correlation time theories of relaxation. In this case the data could be discussed in terms of correlation times involving overall motion of the protein coupled with correlation times describing "internal motions." These internal motions may be the result of the formation of "abortive" complexes with exogenous ligands for those metalloproteins where the metal can be readily removed from the protein. However, for Con A, it is shown that the weak field dependence observed for the heteronuclear NOE is not due to internal motions, but rather to exchange processes.

  2. Spin-Circuit Representation of Spin Pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kuntal

    2017-07-01

    Circuit theory has been tremendously successful in translating physical equations into circuit elements in an organized form for further analysis and proposing creative designs for applications. With the advent of new materials and phenomena in the field of spintronics and nanomagnetics, it is imperative to construct the spin-circuit representations for different materials and phenomena. Spin pumping is a phenomenon by which a pure spin current can be injected into the adjacent layers. If the adjacent layer is a material with a high spin-orbit coupling, a considerable amount of charge voltage can be generated via the inverse spin Hall effect allowing spin detection. Here we develop the spin-circuit representation of spin pumping. We then combine it with the spin-circuit representation for the materials having spin Hall effect to show that it reproduces the standard results as in the literature. We further show how complex multilayers can be analyzed by simply writing a netlist.

  3. Spin Coherence in Semiconductor Nanostructures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Flatte, Michael E

    2006-01-01

    ... dots, tuning of spin coherence times for electron spin, tuning of dipolar magnetic fields for nuclear spin, spontaneous spin polarization generation and new designs for spin-based teleportation and spin transistors...

  4. Comparative kinematical analyses of Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula snap traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Poppinga

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the Venus flytrap (Dionaea muscipula can be considered as one of the most extensively investigated carnivorous plants, knowledge is still scarce about diversity of the snap-trap motion, the functionality of snap traps under varying environmental conditions, and their opening motion. By conducting simple snap-trap closure experiments in air and under water, we present striking evidence that adult Dionaea snaps similarly fast in aerial and submersed states and, hence, is potentially able to gain nutrients from fast aquatic prey during seasonal inundation. We reveal three snapping modes of adult traps, all incorporating snap buckling, and show that millimeter-sized, much slower seedling traps do not yet incorporate such elastic instabilities. Moreover, opening kinematics of young and adult Dionaea snap traps reveal that reverse snap buckling is not performed, corroborating the assumption that growth takes place on certain trap lobe regions. Our findings are discussed in an evolutionary, biomechanical, functional–morphological and biomimetic context.

  5. T violating neutron spin rotation asymmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Yasushiro.

    1993-01-01

    A new experiment on T-violation is proposed, where a spin-rotating-neutron transmission through a polarized nuclear target is measuered. The method to control the neutron spin is discussed for the new T-violation experiment. The present method has possibility to provide us more accurate T-violation information than the neutron EDM measurement

  6. Controlling trapping potentials and stray electric fields in a microfabricated ion trap through design and compensation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charles Doret, S; Amini, Jason M; Wright, Kenneth; Volin, Curtis; Killian, Tyler; Ozakin, Arkadas; Denison, Douglas; Hayden, Harley; Pai, C-S; Slusher, Richart E; Harter, Alexa W

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in quantum information processing with trapped ions have demonstrated the need for new ion trap architectures capable of holding and manipulating chains of many (>10) ions. Here we present the design and detailed characterization of a new linear trap, microfabricated with scalable complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) techniques, that is well-suited to this challenge. Forty-four individually controlled dc electrodes provide the many degrees of freedom required to construct anharmonic potential wells, shuttle ions, merge and split ion chains, precisely tune secular mode frequencies, and adjust the orientation of trap axes. Microfabricated capacitors on dc electrodes suppress radio-frequency pickup and excess micromotion, while a top-level ground layer simplifies modeling of electric fields and protects trap structures underneath. A localized aperture in the substrate provides access to the trapping region from an oven below, permitting deterministic loading of particular isotopic/elemental sequences via species-selective photoionization. The shapes of the aperture and radio-frequency electrodes are optimized to minimize perturbation of the trapping pseudopotential. Laboratory experiments verify simulated potentials and characterize trapping lifetimes, stray electric fields, and ion heating rates, while measurement and cancellation of spatially-varying stray electric fields permits the formation of nearly-equally spaced ion chains. (paper)

  7. Medfly female attractant trapping studies in Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeronimo, F.; Rendon, P.; Villatoro, C.

    1999-01-01

    Experiments were conducted from 1994 - 1998 to test the attractiveness of combinations of food-based chemicals for C. capitata (medfly) in Guatemala. Most studies were done in coffee. The 1995 studies, using the FA-2 attractants (ammonium acetate and putrescine) showed that this combination was attractive for females and had potential for use in conjunction with a SIT program. The 1996 studies at three elevations demonstrated that, in general, these attractants, when used in either the Open Bottom Dry Trap (OBDT), Closed Bottom Dry Trap (CBDT), or International Pheromone's McPhail Trap (IPMT) performed better than the Jumbo McPhail trap (JMT) baited with NuLure and borax (NU+B) for capture of feral females. At the high elevation (1400 m), the IPMT with FA-2 and OBDT with FA-2 were best; at the middle elevation (1100 m), the ORDT, IPMT, and CBDT with FA-2 were best; and at low elevations (659 m), the IPMT with FA-2, JMT with NU+B and ORDT with FA-2 were equal in performance. At the middle elevation, using sterile flies, the OBDT with FA-2 worked best. When experiments were carried out in pear, the traps using the FA-2 attractants captured more female flies than the JMT, NU+B, but not significantly more. During the 1997 trials, a third component, trimethylamine was added to the two component lure (FA-3). This attractant was tested in a number of locally produced traps using 2 I soft drink bottles with different color bottoms. The dry versions of the traps contained a yellow sticky insert. All study sites were at low elevation 600 - 650 m, in coffee, testing both sterile and feral flies. With the feral flies during the first phase of the study at finca San Carlos, there were no significant differences between treatments, at finca San Luis, the clear local trap with sticky insert and the green local trap with sticky insert were best, and at finca Valapraiso, the green local trap with yellow sticky insert and yellow local trap with sticky insert captured more flies

  8. Cooling the Motion of Diamond Nanocrystals in a Magneto-Gravitational Trap in High Vacuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jen-Feng; Ji, Peng; Lewandowski, Charles W; D'Urso, Brian

    2016-07-22

    Levitated diamond nanocrystals with nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centres in high vacuum have been proposed as a unique system for experiments in fundamental quantum mechanics, including the generation of large quantum superposition states and tests of quantum gravity. This system promises extreme isolation from its environment while providing quantum control and sensing through the NV centre spin. While optical trapping has been the most explored method of levitation, recent results indicate that excessive optical heating of the nanodiamonds under vacuum may make the method impractical with currently available materials. Here, we study an alternative magneto-gravitational trap for diamagnetic particles, such as diamond nanocrystals, with stable levitation from atmospheric pressure to high vacuum. Magnetic field gradients from permanent magnets confine the particle in two dimensions, while confinement in the third dimension is gravitational. We demonstrate that feedback cooling of the centre-of-mass motion of a trapped nanodiamond cluster results in cooling of one degree of freedom to less than 1 K.

  9. Development of the Tagger Microscope & Analysis of Spin Density Matrix Elements in gamma-p -> phi-p for the GlueX Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnes, Alexander E. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2017-05-31

    The quark model has been successful in classifying the spectrum of mesons observed since the 1960s, however, it fails to explain some of the measured bound states. Lattice QCD predictions have shown that an excited gluonic field may contribute to the quantum numbers of the bound state and form hybrid mesons, qq-bar-g, where g is a constituent gluon. It is possible for some hybrids to possess quantum numbers forbidden by the quark model and are known as \\smoking gun" hybrids due to their lack of mixing with conventional qq-bar states. The GlueX photoproduction experiment at Jefferson Lab in Newport News, VA is designed to study hybrid mesons and to map their spectrum. A 12 GeV electron beam produces 9 GeV linearly polarized photons via coherent bremsstrahlung in a diamond radiator which are incident on a liquid H2 target. In order to determine the photon energy, the use of a tagging spectrometer which measures the energy of the post-bremsstrahlung electron is required. The tagger microscope is a scintillating fiber detector designed to measure the energy of electrons corresponding to the polarized photons. The main focus of this work is the design and construction of the tagger microscope electronics as well as the calibration of the microscope within the experiment. Additionally, the analysis of the reaction gamma-p -> phi-p, where phi (1020) -> K+K-, is discussed. This analysis provides a high-level calibration for GlueX in regards to understanding the acceptance and sensitivity of the detectors to mesons with strange quark content. By studying the phi with linearly polarized photons, information on the production mechanism can be extracted. The measurement of the phi spin-density matrix elements are shown and compared with past data which are found to be in agreement.

  10. COMMISSIONING SPIN ROTATORS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MACKAY, W.W.; AHRENS, L.; BAI, M.; COURANT, E.D.; FISCHER, W.; HUANG, H.; LUCCIO, A.; MONTAG, C.; PILAT, F.; PTITSYN, V.; ROSER, T.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.; VANZIEJTS, J.

    2003-01-01

    During the summer of 2002, eight superconducting helical spin rotators were installed into RHIC in order to control the polarization directions independently at the STAR and PHENIX experiments. Without the rotators, the orientation of polarization at the interaction points would only be vertical. With four rotators around each of the two experiments, we can rotate either or both beams from vertical into the horizontal plane through the interaction region and then back to vertical on the other side. This allows independent control for each beam with vertical, longitudinal, or radial polarization at the experiment. In this paper, we present results from the first run using the new spin rotators at PHENIX

  11. Urban fall traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia de Almeida Valsecchi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the repercussion of falls in the elderly peoplewho live in the city of São Paulo and address - though synthetically- some questions regarding the city and its relation to aging and thequality of life of the elderly. Methods: This is a qualitative study. As fordata collection, “in-depth individual interviews” were applied. Selectionof subjects was guided by a procedure named as “network”. Results:Ten interviews were performed, nine with elderly individuals who werevictims of falls and one with a public authority representative. Dataresulting from interviews confirmed that significant changes occurin live of the elderly, who are victims of what has been called “urbantraps”, and that, by extrapolating mobility and dependence contexts,invade feelings, emotions and desires. The inappropriate environmentprovided by the city of São Paulo is confirmed by absence of adequateurban planning and lack of commitment of public authorities. It alsorevealed that the particular way of being old and living an elderlylife, in addition to right to citizenship, is reflected by major or lesserdifficulties imposed to the elderly to fight for their rights and have theirpublic space respected. Conclusion: The city of São Paulo is not anideal locus for an older person to live in. To the traps that are found inpublic places one can add those that are found in private places andthat contribute to the hard experience of falls among the elderly, anexperience that is sometimes fatal. In Brazil, the attention is basicallyfocused on the consequences of falls and not on prevention, by meansof urban planning that should meet the needs of the most vulnerablegroups - the physically disabled and the elderly.

  12. Spin transport in epitaxial graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tbd, -

    2014-03-01

    Spintronics is a paradigm focusing on spin as the information vector in fast and ultra-low-power non volatile devices such as the new STT-MRAM. Beyond its widely distributed application in data storage it aims at providing more complex architectures and a powerful beyond CMOS solution for information processing. The recent discovery of graphene has opened novel exciting opportunities in terms of functionalities and performances for spintronics devices. We will present experimental results allowing us to assess the potential of graphene for spintronics. We will show that unprecedented highly efficient spin information transport can occur in epitaxial graphene leading to large spin signals and macroscopic spin diffusion lengths (~ 100 microns), a key enabler for the advent of envisioned beyond-CMOS spin-based logic architectures. We will also show that how the device behavior is well explained within the framework of the Valet-Fert drift-diffusion equations. Furthermore, we will show that a thin graphene passivation layer can prevent the oxidation of a ferromagnet, enabling its use in novel humide/ambient low-cost processes for spintronics devices, while keeping its highly surface sensitive spin current polarizer/analyzer behavior and adding new enhanced spin filtering property. These different experiments unveil promising uses of graphene for spintronics.

  13. Electron trapping during irradiation in reoxidized nitrided oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallik, A.; Vasi, J.; Chandorkar, A.N.

    1993-01-01

    Isochronal detrapping experiments have been performed following irradiation under different gate biases in reoxidized nitrided oxide (RNO) MOS capacitors. These show electron trapping by the nitridation-induced electron traps at low oxide fields during irradiation. A difference in the detrapping behavior of trapped holes and electrons is observed, with trapped holes being detrapped at relatively lower temperatures compared to trapped electrons. Electron trapping shows a strong dependence on tile magnitude of the applied gate bias during irradiation but is independent of its polarity. Conventional oxide devices, as expected, do not show any electron trapping during irradiation by the native electron traps. Finally, a comparison of the isochronal detrapping behavior following irradiation and following avalanche injection of electrons has been made to estimate the extent of electron trapping. The results show that electron trapping by the nitridation-induced electron traps does not play the dominant role in improving radiation performance of RNO, though its contribution cannot be completely neglected for low oxide field irradiations

  14. Progress Towards a Practical Multicell Positron Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    The physics and technology of positron confinement is central to a range of applications at the forefront of antimatter science. Progress in this area has been driven by the development of a suite of novel non-neutral plasma techniques whereby up to 4 ×109 positrons have now been trapped and stored. However the next generation of experiments will require orders of magnitude more positrons. This talk describes techniques to increase storage capacity to >=1012 using a novel multi-cell trap architecture. Plasmas will be stored in separate Penning-Malmberg traps (``cells'') arranged in parallel off the magnetic axis to maximize use of the magnetic field volume while minimizing the required confinement voltages. Experiments with electrons in a test structure will be described to explore the basic physics and technology of the multicell concept and to set the design of a 21-cell trap for 1012 positrons. Over 50% of a trapped plasma has been injected into an off-axis cell, and hour-long confinement of 2 ×108 particles has been achieved using rotating electric fields. Experiments are under way to identify the limits of the injection process and demonstrate confinement >1010 particles in a single off-axis cell using kilovolt confinement potentials. In collaboration with N. C. Hurst, C. J. Baker, and C. M. Surko. This work is supported by U.S. DTRA and the U.S. DOE/NSF plasma partnership.

  15. Strong Linear Dichroism in Spin-Polarized Photoemission from Spin-Orbit-Coupled Surface States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentmann, H; Maaß, H; Krasovskii, E E; Peixoto, T R F; Seibel, C; Leandersson, M; Balasubramanian, T; Reinert, F

    2017-09-08

    A comprehensive understanding of spin-polarized photoemission is crucial for accessing the electronic structure of spin-orbit coupled materials. Yet, the impact of the final state in the photoemission process on the photoelectron spin has been difficult to assess in these systems. We present experiments for the spin-orbit split states in a Bi-Ag surface alloy showing that the alteration of the final state with energy may cause a complete reversal of the photoelectron spin polarization. We explain the effect on the basis of ab initio one-step photoemission theory and describe how it originates from linear dichroism in the angular distribution of photoelectrons. Our analysis shows that the modulated photoelectron spin polarization reflects the intrinsic spin density of the surface state being sampled differently depending on the final state, and it indicates linear dichroism as a natural probe of spin-orbit coupling at surfaces.

  16. Spin-orbit-coupled transport and spin torque in a ferromagnetic heterostructure

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xuhui

    2014-02-07

    Ferromagnetic heterostructures provide an ideal platform to explore the nature of spin-orbit torques arising from the interplay mediated by itinerant electrons between a Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling and a ferromagnetic exchange interaction. For such a prototypic system, we develop a set of coupled diffusion equations to describe the diffusive spin dynamics and spin-orbit torques. We characterize the spin torque and its two prominent—out-of-plane and in-plane—components for a wide range of relative strength between the Rashba coupling and ferromagnetic exchange. The symmetry and angular dependence of the spin torque emerging from our simple Rashba model is in an agreement with experiments. The spin diffusion equation can be generalized to incorporate dynamic effects such as spin pumping and magnetic damping.

  17. Quality assurance plan for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Phase 1 -- Interim corrective measures and Phase 2 -- Purge and trap reactive gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-11-01

    This Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) identifies and describes the systems utilized by the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment Remediation Project (MSRERP) personnel to implement the requirements and associated applicable guidance contained in the Quality Program Description Y/QD-15 Rev. 2 (Energy Systems 1995f). This QAP defines the quality assurance (QA) requirements applicable to all activities and operations in and directly pertinent to the MSRERP Phase 1--Interim Corrective Measures and Phase 2--Purge and Trap objectives. This QAP will be reviewed, revised, and approved as necessary for Phase 3 and Phase 4 activities. This QAP identifies and describes the QA activities and procedures implemented by the various Oak Ridge National Laboratory support organizations and personnel to provide confidence that these activities meet the requirements of this project. Specific support organization (Division) quality requirements, including the degree of implementation of each, are contained in the appendixes of this plan

  18. Antihydrogen formation and trapping

    CERN Document Server

    Madsen, Niels

    2014-01-01

    Antihydrogen, the bound state of a positron and an antiproton, is the only neutral pure antimatter system available to date, and as such provides an excellent testbed for probing fundamental symmetries between matter and antimatter. In this chapter we will concentrate on the physics issues that were addressed in order to achieve the first trapping of antihydrogen. Antihydrogen can be created by merging antiprotons and positrons in a Penning–Malmberg trap. However, traps for antihydrogen are at best about ∼50 μeV deep and, as no readily available cooling techniques exist, the antihydrogen must be formed trapped. Antiprotons are sourced from an accelerator and arrive with a typical energy of 5.3 MeV. The large numbers of positrons needed means that the self-potential of the positrons are of order 2–5 V. With such energetic ingredients a range of plasma control and diagnostic techniques must be brought to bear on the particles to succeed in making any antihydrogen cold enough to be trapped.

  19. Coherent Control of a Single Trapped Rydberg Ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Gerard; Pokorny, Fabian; Zhang, Chi; Bodart, Quentin; Hennrich, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Trapped Rydberg ions are a promising novel approach to quantum computing and simulations. They are envisaged to combine the exquisite control of trapped ion qubits with the fast two-qubit Rydberg gates already demonstrated in neutral atom experiments. Coherent Rydberg excitation is a key requirement for these gates. Here, we carry out the first coherent Rydberg excitation of an ion and perform a single-qubit Rydberg gate, thus demonstrating basic elements of a trapped Rydberg ion quantum computer.

  20. Two Wien Filter Spin Flipper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grames, J M; Benesch, J F; Clark, J; Hansknecht, J; Kazimi, R; Machie, D; Poelker, M; Stutzman, M L; Suleiman, R

    2011-03-01

    A new 4pi spin manipulator composed of two Wien filters oriented orthogonally and separated by two solenoids has been installed at the CEBAF/Jefferson Lab photoinjector. The new spin manipulator is used to precisely set the electron spin direction at an experiment in any direction (in or out of plane of the accelerator) and provides the means to reverse, or flip, the helicity of the electron beam on a daily basis. This reversal is being employed to suppress systematic false asymmetries that can jeopardize challenging parity violation experiments that strive to measure increasingly small physics asymmetries [*,**,***]. The spin manipulator is part of the ultra-high vacuum polarized electron source beam line and has been successfully operated with 100keV and 130keV electron beam at high current (>100 microAmps). A unique feature of the device is that spin-flipping requires only the polarity of one solenoid magnet be changed. Performance characteristics of the Two Wien Filter Spin Flipper will be summarized.

  1. Muon spin rotation studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    The bulk of the muon spin rotation research work centered around the development of the muon spin rotation facility at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The collimation system was both designed and fabricated at Virginia State University. This improved collimation system, plus improvements in detectors and electronics enabled the acquisition of spectra free of background out to 15 microseconds. There were two runs at Brookhaven in 1984, one run was devoted primarily to beam development and the other run allowed several successful experiments to be performed. The effect of uniaxial strain on an Fe(Si) crystal at elevated temperature (360K) was measured and the results are incorporated herein. A complete analysis of Fe pulling data taken earlier is included.

  2. Thermoelectrically cooled water trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheels, Ronald H [Concord, MA

    2006-02-21

    A water trap system based on a thermoelectric cooling device is employed to remove a major fraction of the water from air samples, prior to analysis of these samples for chemical composition, by a variety of analytical techniques where water vapor interferes with the measurement process. These analytical techniques include infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, ion mobility spectrometry and gas chromatography. The thermoelectric system for trapping water present in air samples can substantially improve detection sensitivity in these analytical techniques when it is necessary to measure trace analytes with concentrations in the ppm (parts per million) or ppb (parts per billion) partial pressure range. The thermoelectric trap design is compact and amenable to use in a portable gas monitoring instrumentation.

  3. Selective One-Dimensional Total Correlation Spectroscopy Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Experiments for a Rapid Identification of Minor Components in the Lipid Fraction of Milk and Dairy Products: Toward Spin Chromatography?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanouil, Christina; Tsiafoulis, Constantinos G; Alivertis, Dimitrios; Tzamaloukas, Ouranios; Miltiadou, Despoina; Tzakos, Andreas G; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2015-06-10

    We report a rapid, direct, and unequivocal spin-chromatographic separation and identification of minor components in the lipid fraction of milk and common dairy products with the use of selective one-dimensional (1D) total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. The method allows for the complete backbone spin-coupling network to be elucidated even in strongly overlapped regions and in the presence of major components from 4 × 10(2) to 3 × 10(3) stronger NMR signal intensities. The proposed spin-chromatography method does not require any derivatization steps for the lipid fraction, is selective with excellent resolution, is sensitive with quantitation capability, and compares favorably to two-dimensional (2D) TOCSY and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) methods of analysis. The results of the present study demonstrated that the 1D TOCSY NMR spin-chromatography method can become a procedure of primary interest in food analysis and generally in complex mixture analysis.

  4. Sodium hydride precipitation in sodium cold traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Raue, D.J.

    1979-10-01

    A series of experiments have been performed to test a calculational model for precipitation of NaH in sodium cold traps. The calculational model, called ACTMODEL, is a computer simulation that uses the system geometry and operating conditions as input to calculate a mass transfer coefficient and the distribution of NaH in a cold trap. The ACTMODEL was tested using an analytical cold trap (ACT) that is simple and essentially one-dimensional. The ACT flow and temperature profile may be controlled at any desired condition. The ACT was analyzed destructively after each test to measure the actual NaH distribution. Excellent agreement was obtained between the ACTMODEL simulations and the experiments

  5. Spin-Swapping Transport and Torques in Ultrathin Magnetic Bilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Saidaoui, Hamed Ben Mohamed

    2016-07-12

    Planar spin transport in disordered ultrathin magnetic bilayers comprising a ferromagnet and a normal metal (typically used for spin pumping, spin Seebeck and spin-orbit torque experiments) is investigated theoretically. Using a tight-binding model that puts the extrinsic spin Hall effect and spin swapping on equal footing, we show that the nature of spin-orbit coupled transport dramatically depends on the ratio between the layer thickness d and the mean free path λ. While the spin Hall effect dominates in the diffusive limit (d≫λ), spin swapping dominates in the Knudsen regime (d≲λ). A remarkable consequence is that spin swapping induces a substantial fieldlike torque in the Knudsen regime.

  6. Heat and spin interconversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, Yuichi; Matsuo, Mamoru; Maekawa, Sadamichi; Saitoh, Eeiji

    2017-01-01

    Spin Seebeck and spin Peltier effects, which are mutual conversion phenomena of heat and spin, are discussed on the basis of the microscopic theory. First, the spin Seebeck effect, which is the spin-current generation due to heat current, is discussed. The recent progress in research on the spin Seebeck effect are introduced. We explain the origin of the observed sign changes of the spin Seebeck effect in compensated ferromagnets. Next, the spin Peltier effect, which is the heat-current generation due to spin current, is discussed. Finally, we show that the spin Seebeck and spin Peltier effects are summarized by Onsager's reciprocal relation and derive Kelvin's relation for the spin and heat transports. (author)

  7. Dynamics of Coupled Quantum Spin Chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, H.J.

    1996-01-01

    Static and dynamical properties of weakly coupled antiferromagnetic spin chains are treated using a mean-field approximation for the interchain coupling and exact results for the resulting effective one-dimensional problem. Results for staggered magnetization, Nacute eel temperature, and spin wave excitations are in agreement with experiments on KCuF 3 . The existence of a narrow longitudinal mode is predicted. The results are in agreement with general scaling arguments, contrary to spin wave theory. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  8. Spin noise measurement with diamagnetic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Ichihara, S.; Takano, T.; Kumakura, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We report the measurement of the atomic spin noise of the diamagnetic atom ytterbium (Yb). Yb has various merits for utilizing the quantum nature of the atomic spin ensemble compared with the paramagnetic atoms used in all previous experiments. From the magnitude of the noise level and dependence on the detuning, we concluded that we succeeded in the measurement of 171 Yb atomic spin noise in an atomic beam

  9. Flux trapping and shielding in irreversible superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, D.J.

    1978-05-01

    Flux trappings and shielding experiments were carried out on Pb, Nb, Pb-Bi, Nb-Sn, and Nb-Ti samples of various shapes. Movable Hall probes were used to measure fields near or inside the samples as a function of position and of applied field. The trapping of transverse multipole magnetic fields in tubular samples was accomplished by cooling the samples in an applied field and then smoothly reducing the applied field to zero. Transverse quadrupole and sextupole fields with gradients of over 2000 G/cm were trapped with typical fidelity to the original impressed field of a few percent. Transverse dipole fields of up to 17 kG were also trapped with similar fidelity. Shielding experiments were carried out by cooling the samples in zero field and then gradually applying an external field. Flux trapping and shielding abilities were found to be limited by two factors, the pinning strength of the material, and the susceptibility of a sample to flux jumping. The trapping and shielding behavior of flat disk samples in axial fields and thin-walled tubular samples in transverse fields was modeled. The models, which were based on the concept of the critical state, allowed a connection to be made between the pinning strength and critical current level, and the flux trapping and shielding abilities. Adiabatic and dynamic stability theories are discussed and applied to the materials tested. Good qualitative, but limited quantitative agreement was obtained between the predictions of the theoretical stability criteria and the observed flux jumping behavior

  10. Fast electrical switching of spin injection in nonlocal spin transport devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhrer, A.; Alvarado, S. F.; Salis, G.; Allenspach, R.

    2011-05-01

    We present spin-injection experiments in a nonlocal spin transport device where spin is injected from a ferromagnetic FeCo electrode into a GaAs epilayer. The magnetization of the injection contact is switched by Oersted fields generated by alternating current pulses. This enables fast and offset-free measurements of nonlocal spin signals. Due to a negligible time-averaged electron spin polarization, dynamic nuclear polarization effects are small and Hanle curves measured down to T =3 K can be fit very accurately by drift-diffusion theory if a small constant Overhauser field BN=0.4 mT is accounted for.

  11. Proposal for Verification of the Haldane Phase Using Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, I.; Retzker, A.

    2014-01-01

    A proposal to use trapped ions to implement spin-one XXZ antiferromagnetic chains as an experimental tool to explore the Haldane phase is presented. We explain how to reach the Haldane phase adiabatically, demonstrate the robustness of the ground states to noise in the magnetic field and Rabi frequencies, and propose a way to detect them using their characteristics: an excitation gap and exponentially decaying correlations, a nonvanishing nonlocal string order, and a double degenerate entanglement spectrum. Scaling up to higher dimensions and more frustrated lattices, we obtain richer phase diagrams, and we can reach spin liquid phase, which can be detected by its entanglement entropy which obeys the boundary law.

  12. Multispectral 3D phase-encoded turbo spin-echo for imaging near metal: Limitations and possibilities demonstrated by simulations and phantom experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gorp, Jetse S; Nizak, Razmara; Bouwman, Job G; Saris, Daniël B F; Seevinck, Peter R

    2017-06-01

    To see improvements in the imaging performance near biomaterial implants we assessed a multispectral fully phase-encoded turbo spin-echo (ms3D-PE-TSE) sequence for artifact reduction capabilities and scan time efficiency in simulation and phantom experiments. For this purpose, ms3D-PE-TSE and ms3D-TSE sequences were implemented to obtain multispectral images (±20kHz) of a cobalt-chromium (CoCr) knee implant embedded in agarose. In addition, a knee implant computer model and the acquired ms3D-PE-TSE images were used to investigate the possibilities for scan time acceleration using field-of-view (FOV) reduction for off-resonance frequency bins and compressed sensing reconstructions of undersampled data. Both acceleration methods were combined to acquire a +10kHz frequency bin in a second experiment. The obtained ms3D-PE-TSE images showed no susceptibility related artifacts, while ms3D-TSE images suffered from hyper-intensity artifacts. The limitations of ms3D-TSE were apparent in the far off-resonance regions (±[10-20]kHz) located close to the implant. The scan time calculations showed that ms3D-PE-TSE can be applied in a clinically relevant timeframe (~12min), when omitting the three central frequency bins. The feasibility of CS acceleration for ms3D-PE-TSE was demonstrated using retrospective reconstructions before combining CS and rFOV imaging to decrease the scan time for the +10kHz frequency bin from ~10.9min to ~3.5min, while also increasing the spatial resolution fourfold. The temporally resolved signal of ms3D-PE-TSE proved to be useful to decrease the intensity ripples after sum-of-squares reconstructions and increase the signal-to-noise ratio. The presented results suggest that the scan time limitations of ms3D-PE-TSE can be sufficiently addressed when focusing on signal acquisitions in the direct vicinity of metal implants. Because these regions cannot be measured with existing multispectral methods, the presented ms3D-PE-TSE method may enable the

  13. Redesigning octopus traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduarda Gomes

    2014-06-01

    In order to minimise the identified problems in the actual traps, the present work proposes a new design with the aim of reducing the volume and weight during transport, and also during onshore storage. Alternative materials to avoid corrosion and formation of encrustations were also proposed.

  14. Nuclear spin pumping and electron spin susceptibilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danon, J.; Nazarov, Y.V.

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present a new formalism to evaluate the nuclear spin dynamics driven by hyperfine interaction with nonequilibrium electron spins. To describe the dynamics up to second order in the hyperfine coupling it suffices to evaluate the susceptibility and fluctuations of the electron spin.

  15. Sodium removal and requalification of secondary loop cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, M.; Veerasamy, R.; Gurumoorthy, K.; Rajan, K.K.; Kale, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    The secondary loop cold trap of the Fast Breeder Test Reactor got plugged prematurely and was not removing impurities from the sodium. This cold trap was taken up for cleaning and modification of the internals. The cleaning operation was carried out successfully by hydride decomposition and vacuum distillation followed by steam cleaning method. Without dismantling, the cold trap internals were washed by circulating water. Subsequently the wire mesh was removed, examined and replaced, the internal modifications were carried (nit and the cold trap way qualified for reuse. The procedures followed and the experience gained are discussed. (author)

  16. Electron spin control and spin-libration coupling of a levitated nanodiamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Thai; Ma, Yue; Ahn, Jonghoon; Bang, Jaehoon; Robicheaux, Francis; Gong, Ming; Yin, Zhang-Qi; Li, Tongcang

    2017-04-01

    Hybrid spin-mechanical systems have great potentials in sensing, macroscopic quantum mechanics, and quantum information science. Recently, we optically levitated a nanodiamond and demonstrated electron spin control of its built-in nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in vacuum. We also observed the libration (torsional vibration) of a nanodiamond trapped by a linearly polarized laser beam in vacuum. We propose to achieve strong coupling between the electron spin of a NV center and the libration of a levitated nanodiamond with a uniform magnetic field. With a uniform magnetic field, multiple spins can couple to the torsional vibration at the same time. We propose to use this strong coupling to realize the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick (LMG) model and generate rotational superposition states. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1555035-PHY.

  17. Collisionless modes of a trapped Bose gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, M.J.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    1999-01-01

    We calculate the excitation frequencies of low-lying modes of a trapped Bose-condensed gas at nonzero temperatures. In our calculation we include the dynamics of the noncondensed cloud, and find agreement with experimental results if we assume that in the experiment both the in-phase and

  18. Collisionless modes of a trapped Bose gas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijlsma, M.J.; Stoof, H.T.C.

    1999-01-01

    We calculate the excitation frequencies of the low-lying modes of a trapped Bose-condensed gas at nonzero temperatures. We include in our calculation the dynamics of the noncondensed cloud, and find agreement with experimental results if we assume that in the experiment both the in-phase and

  19. A naturally occurring trap for antiprotons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eades, J.; Morita, N.; Ito, T.M.

    1993-05-01

    The phenomenon of delayed annihilation of antiprotons in helium is the first instance of a naturally occurring trap for antimatter in ordinary matter. Recent studies of this effect at CERN are summarized, and plans are described for laser excitation experiments to test its interpretation in terms of metastable exotic helium atom formation. (author)

  20. Experimental characterization of the Hitrap Cooler trap with highly charged ions.

    OpenAIRE

    Fedotova, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    The HITRAP (Highly charged Ions TRAP)facility is being set up and commissioned at GSI, Darmstadt. It will provide heavy, highly charged ions at low velocities to high-precision atomic physics experiments. Within this work the Cooler trap- the key element of the HITRAP facility was tested. The Cooler trap was assembled, aligned, and commissioned in trapping experiments with ions from off-line sources.The work performed within the scope of this thesis provided the baseline for further operation...

  1. Trapping metastable chromium atoms in a crossed optical dipole trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufils, Q.; Chicireanu, R.; Pouderous, A.; Laburthe-Tolra, B.; Maréchal, E.; Vernac, L.; Keller, J.-C.; Gorceix, O.

    We report the fast accumulation of up to 1 million 52Cr metastable atoms in a mixed trap formed by the superposition of a quadrupolar magnetic trap and a strongly confining optical trap. The cloud is at a temperature of 100 μK with a peak density of 1018 atoms/m3, which is a promising starting point to reach quantum degeneracy by forced evaporation in an optical trap.

  2. A live-trap and trapping technique for fossorial mammals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    injuries, the trauma involved in such capture does not promote acclimatization ... involved in the evolution of trap design for use in various field conditions and live capture of other fossorial mammals are discussed. Materials and Methods. Constructing the .... work of setting traps halved by placing only one trap instead of the ...

  3. Synthesis of Lead Sulfide Nanocrystals and Their Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectra in a Spinning Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, Dmitry

    This thesis describes new aspects of the synthesis and ultrafast spectroscopy of PbS nanocrystals. The first part of the thesis investigates two aspects of PbS nanocrystal synthesis: the identity and composition of oleylamine reagent and the nature of sulfur species in sulfur solutions in long-chain amines. Oleylamine, formally cis-9-octadecyl-1-amine, is a solvent, a reactant, and a ligand in the synthesis of high-quality PbS nanocrystals and other nanomaterials. It is shown that commercial oleylamine samples contain elaidylamine, trans-9-octadecen-1-amine. Sulfur solutions in long-chain amines (n-octylamine and oleylamine) are common precursors in metal sulfide nanomaterial synthesis. Resonance Raman experiments on sulfur-amine solutions established the presence of various polysulfide anions, which slowly equilibrate on the timescale of days, causing a change in reactivity of the sulfur precursor. This aging of sulfur-amine solutions is shown to be strongly correlated with irreproducibility in PbS nanocrystal syntheses. The second part of the thesis deals with non-linear optical experiments on sensitive samples, where vibrational stability, repetitive excitation, and sensitivity to air and moisture constitute a set of challenges often preventing an experiment without photoproduct contamination. As a solution to this problem, we designed, constructed and characterized a compact spinning sample cell suitable for liquid and thin film samples. The spinning sample cell, enclosed in a copper gasket sealed enclosure, enables complete sample exchange in optical experiments with up to 100 kHz repetition rates while maintaining an oxygen and water free environment at the 1 ppm level for over a month. The spinning sample cell was successfully used in a two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy experiment on PbS nanocrystals in solution, eliminating the buildup of the long-lived photoproducts and reducing trap emission in the spinning sample.

  4. Particle confinement in penning traps an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Manuel

    2018-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the field of Penning traps and related experimental techniques. It serves both as a primer for those entering the field, and as a quick reference for those working in it. The book is motivated by the observation that often a vast number of different resources have to be explored to gain a good overview of Penning trap principles. This is especially true for students who experience additional difficulty due to the different styles of presentation and notation. This volume provides a broad introductory overview in unified notation.

  5. Spin transport studies in encapsulated CVD graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avsar, Ahmet; You Tan, Jun; Ho, Yuda; Koon, Gavin; Oezyilmaz, Barbaros

    2013-03-01

    Spin transport studies in exfoliated graphene on SiO2/Si substrates have shown spin relaxation times that are orders of magnitude shorter than the theoretical predictions. Similar to the charge transport case, the underlying substrate is expected to be the limiting factor. The recent work Zomer, P. J. et al. shows that spin transport over lengths up to 20um is possible in high mobility exfoliated graphene devices on boron nitride (BN) substrates. Here we discuss our initial attempts to repeat such spin transport experiments with CVD graphene on BN substrates. The effect of encapsulation of such devices with an extra BN layer will be also discussed.

  6. Magnetic Nanostructures Spin Dynamics and Spin Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Farle, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Nanomagnetism and spintronics is a rapidly expanding and increasingly important field of research with many applications already on the market and many more to be expected in the near future. This field started in the mid-1980s with the discovery of the GMR effect, recently awarded with the Nobel prize to Albert Fert and Peter Grünberg. The present volume covers the most important and most timely aspects of magnetic heterostructures, including spin torque effects, spin injection, spin transport, spin fluctuations, proximity effects, and electrical control of spin valves. The chapters are written by internationally recognized experts in their respective fields and provide an overview of the latest status.

  7. Electron Spins in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, R.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes a series of experiments aimed at understanding and controlling the behavior of the spin degree of freedom of single electrons, confined in semiconductor quantum dots. This research work is motivated by the prospects of using the electron spin as a quantum bit (qubit), the basic

  8. Spin dynamics in high-Tc cuprates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuyama, H.; Kohno, H.; Normand, B.; Tanamoto, T.

    1995-01-01

    Characteristic features of the spin excitations in high-T c cuprates revealed by neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance experiments are summarised, and analysed on the basis of the slave-boson mean-field theory for the extended t-J model, placing special emphasis on the spin-gap phenomenon. (orig.)

  9. Optical trapping of gold aerosols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Regina K.; Pedersen, Liselotte Jauffred; Taheri, S. M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol trapping has proven challenging and was only recently demonstrated.1 This was accomplished by utilizing an air chamber designed to have a minimum of turbulence and a laser beam with a minimum of aberration. Individual gold nano-particles with diameters between 80 nm and 200 nm were trapped...... in air using a 1064 nm laser. The positions visited by the trapped gold nano-particle were quantified using a quadrant photo diode placed in the back focal plane. The time traces were analyzed and the trapping stiffness characterizing gold aerosol trapping determined and compared to aerosol trapping...... of nanometer sized silica and polystyrene particles. Based on our analysis, we concluded that gold nano-particles trap more strongly in air than similarly sized polystyrene and silica particles. We found that, in a certain power range, the trapping strength of polystyrene particles is linearly decreasing...

  10. 'I don't feel trapped anymore…I feel like a bird': People with Learning Disabilities' Experience of Psychological Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nicola; Lewis, Karin; Davies, Bronwen

    2016-09-01

    There are very few studies that investigate the qualitative experiences of people with a learning disability who have engaged in psychological therapy. Indeed, having a learning disability has traditionally been an exclusion criterion for good quality research about psychological treatments (Psychotherapy and Learning Disability. Council Report CR116. London: Royal College of Psychiatrists, 2004; Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 19, 2005 and 5). The current research was developed in response to a clinical psychology service recognizing the need to evaluate their psychological service and, as part of this evaluation, the importance of consulting with service users about their experience of psychological therapies. The overall aim of gaining this feedback would be to improve the service offered and to ensure that people receive the best psychological care. Six service users with a learning disability were interviewed about their experience of individual psychological therapy. The interviews were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Themes were generated from the interviews which highlighted both positive and negative feedback on the psychological therapy process. The feedback covered areas such as access to therapy, feelings about therapy, preparing for therapy, skill development and collaborative working, accessibility and making therapy fun, challenges to confidentiality, positive feelings towards the therapist, aspects of the therapeutic relationship, therapy being challenging but helpful, and positive outcomes. These results have contributed to the evidence base that people with a learning disability are able to meaningfully engage in research and provide essential feedback on the services that they receive. No longer can people be excluded from individual psychological therapy or research just because of their label. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Melanin in Fonsecaea pedrosoi: a trap for oxidative radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Souza Wanderley

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pathogenic fungus Fonsecaea pedrosoi constitutively produces the pigment melanin, an important virulence factor in fungi. Melanin is incorporated in the cell wall structure and provides chemical and physical protection for the fungus. We evaluated the production of nitric oxide (NO in macrophages, the oxidative burst and the inducible nitric oxide synthase (i-NOS activity in interactions between activated murine macrophages and F. pedrosoi. Experiments were carried out with or without tricyclazole (TC treatment, a selective inhibitor of the dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN-melanin biosynthesis pathway in F. pedrosoi. The paramagnetisms of melanin and the TC-melanin were analysed by electron spin resonance. The fungal growth responses to H2O2 and to S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP, a nitric oxide donor, were also evaluated. Results Melanised F. pedrosoi cells were more resistant to both H2O2 and NO. Nitrite was not detected in the supernatant of macrophages incubated with melanised fungal cells. However, i-NOS expression was unaffected by the presence of either untreated control F. pedrosoi or TC-treated F. pedrosoi. In addition, the inhibition of the DHN-melanin pathway by TC improved the oxidative burst capability of the macrophages. Conclusion The NO-trapping ability of F. pedrosoi melanin is an important mechanism to escape the oxidative burst of macrophages.

  12. Feedback trap using optical force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Yonggun; Pak, Hyuk Kyu

    Recently, the feedback trap using electrophoretic force (ABEL trap) has been used in the experimental study of non-equilibrium thermodynamics such as Landauer's erasure principle. This trap can trap and manipulate a small particle in solution by canceling the Brownian fluctuations. Here, we propose a simple way to control a bead using optical force with feedback and show the dynamics of a single particle in the virtual potential.

  13. Spin Hall effects in metallic antiferromagnets – perspectives for future spin-orbitronics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Sklenar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We investigate angular dependent spin-orbit torques from the spin Hall effect in a metallic antiferromagnet using the spin-torque ferromagnetic resonance technique. The large spin Hall effect exists in PtMn, a prototypical CuAu-I-type metallic antiferromagnet. By applying epitaxial growth, we previously reported an appreciable difference in spin-orbit torques for c- and a-axis orientated samples, implying anisotropic effects in magnetically ordered materials. In this work we demonstrate through bipolar-magnetic-field experiments a small but noticeable asymmetric behavior in the spin-transfer-torque that appears as a hysteresis effect. We also suggest that metallic antiferromagnets may be good candidates for the investigation of various unidirectional effects related to novel spin-orbitronics phenomena.

  14. Enhanced Spin-Orbit Torque via Modulation of Spin Current Absorption

    KAUST Repository

    Qiu, Xuepeng

    2016-11-18

    The magnitude of spin-orbit torque (SOT), exerted to a ferromagnet (FM) from an adjacent heavy metal (HM), strongly depends on the amount of spin current absorbed in the FM. We exploit the large spin absorption at the Ru interface to manipulate the SOTs in HM/FM/Ru multilayers. While the FM thickness is smaller than its spin dephasing length of 1.2 nm, the top Ru layer largely boosts the absorption of spin currents into the FM layer and substantially enhances the strength of SOT acting on the FM. Spin-pumping experiments induced by ferromagnetic resonance support our conclusions that the observed increase in the SOT efficiency can be attributed to an enhancement of the spin-current absorption. A theoretical model that considers both reflected and transmitted mixing conductances at the two interfaces of FM is developed to explain the results.

  15. Measuring the neutron lifetime using magnetically trapped neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Shaughnessy, C.M.; Golub, R.; Schelhammer, K.W.; Swank, C.M.; Seo, P.-N. [North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC (United States); Huffman, P.R., E-mail: Paul_Huffman@ncsu.ed [North Carolina State University, 2401 Stinson Drive, Raleigh, NC (United States); Dzhosyuk, S.N.; Mattoni, C.E.H.; Yang, L.; Doyle, J.M. [Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA (United States); Coakley, K.J.; Thompson, A.K.; Mumm, H.P. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Lamoreaux, S.K.; McKinsey, D.N. [Yale University, 217 Prospect Street, New Haven, CT (United States); Yang, G. [University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2009-12-11

    The neutron beta-decay lifetime plays an important role both in understanding weak interactions within the framework of the Standard Model and in theoretical predictions of the primordial abundance of {sup 4}He in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis. In previous work, we successfully demonstrated the trapping of ultracold neutrons in a conservative potential magnetic trap. A major upgrade of the apparatus is nearing completion at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research (NCNR). In our approach, a beam of 0.89 nm neutrons is incident on a superfluid {sup 4}He target within the minimum field region of an Ioffe-type magnetic trap. A fraction of the neutrons is downscattered in the helium to energies <200neV, and those in the appropriate spin state become trapped. The inverse process is suppressed by the low phonon density of helium at temperatures less than 200 mK, allowing the neutron to travel undisturbed. When the neutron decays the energetic electron ionizes the helium, producing scintillation light that is detected using photomultiplier tubes. Statistical limitations of the previous apparatus will be alleviated by significant increases in field strength and trap volume resulting in twenty times more trapped neutrons.

  16. Experimental pseudo-symmetric trap EPSILON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skovoroda, A.A.; Arsenin, V.V.; Dlougach, E.D.; Kulygin, V.M.; Kuyanov, A.Yu.; Timofeev, A.V.; Zhil'tsov, V.A.; Zvonkov, A.V.

    2001-01-01

    Within the framework of the conceptual project 'Adaptive Plasma EXperiment' a trap with the closed magnetic field lines 'Experimental Pseudo-Symmetric trap' is examined. The project APEX is directed at the theoretical and experimental development of physical foundations for stationary thermonuclear reactor on the basis of an alternative magnetic trap with tokamak-level confinement of high β plasma. The fundamental principle of magnetic field pseudosymmetry that should be satisfied for plasma to have tokamak-like confinement is discussed. The calculated in paraxial approximation examples of pseudosymmetric curvilinear elements with poloidal direction of B isolines are adduced. The EPSILON trap consisting of two straight axisymmetric mirrors linked by two curvilinear pseudosymmetric elements is considered. The plasma currents are short-circuited within the curvilinear element what increases the equilibrium β. The untraditional scheme of MHD stabilization of a trap with the closed field lines by the use of divertor inserted into axisymmetric mirror is analyzed. The experimental installation EPSILON-OME that is under construction for experimental check of divertor stabilization is discussed. The possibility of ECR plasma production in EPSILON-OME under conditions of high density and small magnetic field is examined. (author)

  17. Coupling a Surface Acoustic Wave to an Electron Spin in Diamond via a Dark State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Andrew Golter

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of quantum acoustics explores interactions between acoustic waves and artificial atoms and their applications in quantum information processing. In this experimental study, we demonstrate the coupling between a surface acoustic wave (SAW and an electron spin in diamond by taking advantage of the strong strain coupling of the excited states of a nitrogen vacancy center while avoiding the short lifetime of these states. The SAW-spin coupling takes place through a Λ-type three-level system where two ground spin states couple to a common excited state through a phonon-assisted as well as a direct dipole optical transition. Both coherent population trapping and optically driven spin transitions have been realized. The coherent population trapping demonstrates the coupling between a SAW and an electron spin coherence through a dark state. The optically driven spin transitions, which resemble the sideband transitions in a trapped-ion system, can enable the quantum control of both spin and mechanical degrees of freedom and potentially a trapped-ion-like solid-state system for applications in quantum computing. These results establish an experimental platform for spin-based quantum acoustics, bridging the gap between spintronics and quantum acoustics.

  18. Towards quantum networks of single spins: analysis of a quantum memory with an optical interface in diamond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blok, M S; Kalb, N; Reiserer, A; Taminiau, T H; Hanson, R

    2015-01-01

    Single defect centers in diamond have emerged as a powerful platform for quantum optics experiments and quantum information processing tasks. Connecting spatially separated nodes via optical photons into a quantum network will enable distributed quantum computing and long-range quantum communication. Initial experiments on trapped atoms and ions as well as defects in diamond have demonstrated entanglement between two nodes over several meters. To realize multi-node networks, additional quantum bit systems that store quantum states while new entanglement links are established are highly desirable. Such memories allow for entanglement distillation, purification and quantum repeater protocols that extend the size, speed and distance of the network. However, to be effective, the memory must be robust against the entanglement generation protocol, which typically must be repeated many times. Here we evaluate the prospects of using carbon nuclear spins in diamond as quantum memories that are compatible with quantum networks based on single nitrogen vacancy (NV) defects in diamond. We present a theoretical framework to describe the dephasing of the nuclear spins under repeated generation of NV spin-photon entanglement and show that quantum states can be stored during hundreds of repetitions using typical experimental coupling parameters. This result demonstrates that nuclear spins with weak hyperfine couplings are promising quantum memories for quantum networks.

  19. Escaping the tolerance trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammoudeh, S.; Madan, V.

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the implications of the weakening of OPEC's responsiveness in adjusting its production levels, this paper explicitly incorporates rigidity in the quantity adjustment mechanism, thereby extending previous research which assumed smooth quantity adjustments. The rigidity is manifested in a tolerance range for the discrepancy between the declared target price and that of the market. This environment gives rise to a 'tolerance trap' which impedes the convergence process and inevitably brings the market to a standstill before its reaches the targeted price and revenue objectives. OPEC's reaction to the standstill has important implications for the achievement of the target-based equilibrium and for the potential collapse of the market price. This paper examines OPEC's policy options in the tolerance trap and reveals that the optional policy in order to break this impasse and move closer to the equilibrium point is gradually to reduce output and not to flood the market. (Author)

  20. Trapped Ion Qubits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maunz, Peter Lukas Wilhelm

    2017-04-01

    Qubits can be encoded in clock states of trapped ions. These states are well isolated from the environment resulting in long coherence times [1] while enabling efficient high-fidelity qubit interactions mediated by the Coulomb coupled motion of the ions in the trap. Quantum states can be prepared with high fidelity and measured efficiently using fluorescence detection. State preparation and detection with 99.93% fidelity have been realized in multiple systems [1,2]. Single qubit gates have been demonstrated below rigorous fault-tolerance thresholds [1,3]. Two qubit gates have been realized with more than 99.9% fidelity [4,5]. Quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on systems of 5 to 15 qubits [6–8].

  1. Quantum computing with trapped ions, atoms and light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steane, Andrew M.

    2001-01-01

    We consider experimental issues relevant to quantum computing, and discuss the best way to achieve the essential requirements of reliable quantum memory and gate operations. Nuclear spins in trapped ions or atoms are a very promising candidate for the qubits. We estimate the parameters required to couple atoms using light via cavity QED in order to achieve quantum gates. We briefly comment on recent improvements to the Cirac-Zoller method for coupling trapped ions via their vibrational degree of freedom. Error processes result in a trade-off between quantum gate speed and failure probability. A useful quantum computer does appear to be feasible using a combination of ion trap and optical methods. The best understood method to stabilize a large computer relies on quantum error correction. The essential ideas of this are discussed, and recent estimates of the noise requirements in a quantum computing device are given

  2. Sediment Trapping in Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Hans; Schuttelaars, Henk M.; Ralston, David K.

    2018-01-01

    Estuarine turbidity maxima (ETMs) are generated by a large suite of hydrodynamic and sediment dynamic processes, leading to longitudinal convergence of cross-sectionally integrated and tidally averaged transport of cohesive and noncohesive suspended particulate matter (SPM). The relative importance of these processes for SPM trapping varies substantially among estuaries depending on topography, fluvial and tidal forcing, and SPM composition. The high-frequency dynamics of ETMs are constrained by interactions with the low-frequency dynamics of the bottom pool of easily erodible sediments. Here, we use a transport decomposition to present processes that lead to convergent SPM transport, and review trapping mechanisms that lead to ETMs at the landward limit of the salt intrusion, in the freshwater zone, at topographic transitions, and by lateral processes within the cross section. We use model simulations of example estuaries to demonstrate the complex concurrence of ETM formation mechanisms. We also discuss how changes in SPM trapping mechanisms, often caused by direct human interference, can lead to the generation of hyperturbid estuaries.

  3. Spin determination of fission resonances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyworth, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    The present status of available information on the channel quantum numbers for resonance fission and the most urgently needed additional experiments are examined. The role of spin in the 235 U + n system is emphasized. The discussion relies heavily on recent alignment measurements and polarization results

  4. Spin-polarized spin excitation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loth, Sebastian; Lutz, Christopher P; Heinrich, Andreas J

    2010-01-01

    We report on the spin dependence of elastic and inelastic electron tunneling through transition metal atoms. Mn, Fe and Cu atoms were deposited onto a monolayer of Cu 2 N on Cu(100) and individually addressed with the probe tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. Electrons tunneling between the tip and the substrate exchange energy and spin angular momentum with the surface-bound magnetic atoms. The conservation of energy during the tunneling process results in a distinct onset threshold voltage above which the tunneling electrons create spin excitations in the Mn and Fe atoms. Here we show that the additional conservation of spin angular momentum leads to different cross-sections for spin excitations depending on the relative alignment of the surface spin and the spin of the tunneling electron. For this purpose, we developed a technique for measuring the same local spin with a spin-polarized and a non-spin-polarized tip by exchanging the last apex atom of the probe tip between different transition metal atoms. We derive a quantitative model describing the observed excitation cross-sections on the basis of an exchange scattering process.

  5. Magnons, Spin Current and Spin Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2012-02-01

    When metals and semiconductors are placed in a temperature gradient, the electric voltage is generated. This mechanism to convert heat into electricity, the so-called Seebeck effect, has attracted much attention recently as the mechanism for utilizing wasted heat energy. [1]. Ferromagnetic insulators are good conductors of spin current, i.e., the flow of electron spins [2]. When they are placed in a temperature gradient, generated are magnons, spin current and the spin voltage [3], i.e., spin accumulation. Once the spin voltage is converted into the electric voltage by inverse spin Hall effect in attached metal films such as Pt, the electric voltage is obtained from heat energy [4-5]. This is called the spin Seebeck effect. Here, we present the linear-response theory of spin Seebeck effect based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem [6-8] and discuss a variety of the devices. [4pt] [1] S. Maekawa et al, Physics of Transition Metal Oxides (Springer, 2004). [0pt] [2] S. Maekawa: Nature Materials 8, 777 (2009). [0pt] [3] Concept in Spin Electronics, eds. S. Maekawa (Oxford University Press, 2006). [0pt] [4] K. Uchida et al., Nature 455, 778 (2008). [0pt] [5] K. Uchida et al., Nature Materials 9, 894 (2010) [0pt] [6] H. Adachi et al., APL 97, 252506 (2010) and Phys. Rev. B 83, 094410 (2011). [0pt] [7] J. Ohe et al., Phys. Rev. B (2011) [0pt] [8] K. Uchida et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 104419 (2010).

  6. Realistic Free-Spins Features Increase Preference for Slot Machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Lorance F; Macaskill, Anne C; Hunt, Maree J

    2017-06-01

    Despite increasing research into how the structural characteristics of slot machines influence gambling behaviour there have been no experimental investigations into the effect of free-spins bonus features-a structural characteristic that is commonly central to the design of slot machines. This series of three experiments investigated the free-spins feature using slot machine simulations to determine whether participants allocate more wagers to a machine with free spins, and, which components of free-spins features drive this preference. In each experiment, participants were exposed to two computer-simulated slot machines-one with a free-spins feature or similar bonus feature and one without. Participants then completed a testing phase where they could freely switch between the two machines. In Experiment 1, participants did not prefer the machine with a simple free-spins feature. In Experiment 2 the free-spins feature incorporated additional elements such as sounds, animations, and an increased win frequency; participants preferred to gamble on this machine. The Experiment 3 "bonus feature" machine resembled the free spins machine in Experiment 2 except spins were not free; participants showed a clear preference for this machine also. These findings indicate that (1) free-spins features have a major influence over machine choice and (2) the "freeness" of the free-spins bonus features is not an important driver of preference, contrary to self-report and interview research with gamblers.

  7. Electronic spin transport in graphene field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popinciuc, M.; Jozsa, C.; Zomer, P. J.; Tombros, N.; Veligura, A.; Jonkman, H. T.; van Wees, B. J.

    2009-01-01

    Spin transport experiments in graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms ordered in a honeycomb lattice, indicate spin-relaxation times that are significantly shorter than the theoretical predictions. We investigate experimentally whether these short spin-relaxation times are due to extrinsic factors,

  8. Multidimensional Josephson vortices in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates: Snake instability and decay through vortex dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallemí, A.; Guilleumas, M.; Mayol, R.; Mateo, A. Muñoz

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the dynamics of Josephson vortex states in two-component Bose-Einstein condensates with Rashba-Dresselhaus spin-orbit coupling by using the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. In one dimension, both in homogeneous and harmonically trapped systems, we report on stationary states containing doubly charged, static Josephson vortices. In multidimensional systems, we find stable Josephson vortices in a regime of parameters typical of current experiments with 87Rb atoms. In addition, we discuss the instability regime of Josephson vortices in disk-shaped condensates, where the snake instability operates and vortex dipoles emerge. We study the rich dynamics that they exhibit in different regimes of the spin-orbit-coupled condensate depending on the orientation of the Josephson vortices.

  9. Macroscopic description of spin transfer torque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnas, J.; Fert, A.; Gmitra, M.; Weymann, I.; Dugaev, V.K.

    2006-01-01

    A macroscopic description of the current-induced torque due to spin transfer has been developed for layered systems consisting of ferromagnetic films, separated by nonmagnetic layers. The description is based on the classical spin diffusion equations for the distribution functions used in the theory of current-perpendicular-to-plane giant magnetoresistance (CPP-GMR), and the relevant boundary conditions for the longitudinal and transverse components of the spin current and spin accumulation. The torque is expressed as a function of the usual parameters derived from CPP-GMR experiments and two additional parameters involved in the transverse boundary conditions. The model describes qualitatively the normal and inverse switching phenomena studied in recent experiments. We also discuss a structure for which the spin torque disappears at a noncollinear magnetic configuration

  10. Mosquito Traps: An Innovative, Environmentally Friendly Technique to Control Mosquitoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Poulin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We tested the use of mosquito traps as an alternative to spraying insecticide in Camargue (France following the significant impacts observed on the non-target fauna through Bti persistence and trophic perturbations. In a village of 600 inhabitants, 16 Techno Bam traps emitting CO2 and using octenol lures were set from April to November 2016. Trap performance was estimated at 70% overall based on mosquitoes landing on human bait in areas with and without traps. The reduction of Ochlerotatus caspius and Oc. detritus, the two species targeted by Bti spraying, was, respectively, 74% and 98%. Traps were less efficient against Anopheles hyrcanus (46%, which was more attracted by lactic acid than octenol lures based on previous tests. Nearly 300,000 mosquitoes from nine species were captured, with large variations among traps, emphasizing that trap performance is also influenced by surrounding factors. Environmental impact, based on the proportion of non-target insects captured, was mostly limited to small chironomids attracted by street lights. The breeding success of a house martin colony was not significantly affected by trap use, in contrast to Bti spraying. Our experiment confirms that the deployment of mosquito traps can offer a cost-effective alternative to Bti spraying for protecting local populations from mosquito nuisance in sensitive natural areas.

  11. Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2015-01-28

    A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

  12. Birefringence (spin rotation and spin dichroism) of high-energy deuterons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baryshevskij, V.G.; Rovba, A.A.

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of birefringence (spin rotation and spin dichroism) of high-energy deuterons, currently observed in experiments, is the macroscopic quantum effect similar to the birefringence effect known in optics. This paper considers the contribution coming to the spin dichroism effect from the interaction of deuteron electric quadrupole moment and nuclear electric field. The effect proves to be responsive to the behavior of deuteron ground state wave functions at a small distance. [ru

  13. Spin Interference in Rectangle Loop Based on Rashba and Dresselhaus Spin-Orbit Interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia-Ting, Ni; Bin, Chen; Xiao-Wan, Liang; Koga, T.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate the amplitude and spin polarization of AAS oscillation changing with Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) and Dresselhaus SOI. The amplitude and spin polarization of AB oscillation changing with Rashba SOI and Dresselhaus SOI are demonstrated as well. The ideal quasi-one-dimensional square loop does not exist in reality, therefore to match the experiment better we should consider the shape of the rectangle loop in theory

  14. Spin and charge transport study in single crystal organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Karthik V.; Mulder, Carlijn L.; Baldo, Marc A.; Moodera, Jagadeesh S.

    2009-03-01

    Spin transport studies in amorphous rubrene films have shown exciting and promising results [1]. A large spin diffusion length in these amorphous films has increased the motivation to perform spin transport study in high purity single crystal rubrene. This will provide the fundamental understanding on the spin transport behavior in OS; not influenced by defects or traps. We will present work on small channel single crystal rubrene FET device with magnetic electrodes. For example, our preliminary studies have show mobility for FET with Co electrode to be 0.014cm^2/V-s. A study on the spin and charge transport properties in single crystals of OS with magnetic electrodes is being done and the results will be reported. The influence of gate voltage and applied magnetic field on the transport properties will be discussed. [1] J.H. Shim et al., PRL 100, 226603 (2008)

  15. Spin-transfer torque in spin filter tunnel junctions

    KAUST Repository

    Ortiz Pauyac, Christian

    2014-12-08

    Spin-transfer torque in a class of magnetic tunnel junctions with noncollinear magnetizations, referred to as spin filter tunnel junctions, is studied within the tight-binding model using the nonequilibrium Green\\'s function technique within Keldysh formalism. These junctions consist of one ferromagnet (FM) adjacent to a magnetic insulator (MI) or two FM separated by a MI. We find that the presence of the magnetic insulator dramatically enhances the magnitude of the spin-torque components compared to conventional magnetic tunnel junctions. The fieldlike torque is driven by the spin-dependent reflection at the MI/FM interface, which results in a small reduction of its amplitude when an insulating spacer (S) is inserted to decouple MI and FM layers. Meanwhile, the dampinglike torque is dominated by the tunneling electrons that experience the lowest barrier height. We propose a device of the form FM/(S)/MI/(S)/FM that takes advantage of these characteristics and allows for tuning the spin-torque magnitudes over a wide range just by rotation of the magnetization of the insulating layer.

  16. Production of highly spin-polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium by spin-exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redsun, S.G.

    1990-01-01

    The first part of this work is a study of the production of highly spin-polarized atomic hydrogen and deuterium by spin-exchange optical pumping. A tunable ring dye laser is used to polarize rubidium atoms by optical pumping. The cell containing the rubidium vapor is coated with paraffin in order to reduce spin relaxation due to wall collisions. Hydrogen gas is dissociated in an inductive discharge and flows continuously through the cell, in which the hydrogen atoms are polarized by spin-exchange collisions with the polarized rubidium atoms. The hydrogen polarization is determined by a combination of fluorescence monitoring and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Atomic hydrogen polarization as high as 2 z > H = 0.72(6) has been observed, which is the highest degree of polarization yet produced by this method. However, the polarization may be limited to this value due to the depolarization of the rubidium by radiation trapping. The spin-relaxation rate of atomic hydrogen on a paraffin-coated cell is also measured for the first time, and corresponds to about 3,800 wall bounces before electron-spin randomization. The second part of this work is a theoretical analysis of the problem of radiation trapping in a dense optically pumped alkali vapor. A Monte Carlo routine is used to simulate the trajectories of multiply scattered photons. The average spin angular momentum transfer from the photons to the vapor is used to determine the equilibrium polarization of the vapor as a function of the alkali density and the frequency of the pumping light

  17. Digital quantum simulation, Schrödinger cat state spectroscopy and setting up a linear ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hempel, C.

    2014-01-01

    This PhD thesis reports on two experiments in the field of quantum information processing using trapped calcium ions. In addition, the text covers the setup and characterization of a new linear Paul trap accompanied by a novel implementation of single-ion addressing using an acousto-optic deflector. The first of the two experiments is concerned with the proof-of-principle implementation of digital quantum simulations using up to 6 ions and 100 gate operations. It investigates the scaling behavior of simulations of elementary models of magnetism in terms of the number of involved spins and the complexity of their mutual interactions. The second experiment introduces the application of a Schroedinger cat state in the indirect detection of photon scattering events on a broad electronic transition. The method is shown to have a sensitivity down to the single photon level in a proof-of-principle demonstration using a mixed-isotope crystal of 40Ca+ and 44Ca+. A brief outlook towards future experiments and extensions of the experimental setup concludes the manuscript.(author) [de

  18. Observation of the Spin Nernst Effect in Platinum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goennenwein, Sebastian

    Thermoelectric effects - arising from the interplay between thermal and charge transport phenomena - have been extensively studied and are considered well established. Upon taking into account the spin degree of freedom, however, qualitatively new phenomena arise. A prototype example for these so-called magneto-thermoelectric or spin-caloritronic effects is the spin Seebeck effect, in which a thermal gradient drives a pure spin current. In contrast to their thermoelectric counterparts, not all the spin-caloritronic effects predicted from theory have yet been observed in experiment. One of these `missing' phenomena is the spin Nernst effect, in which a thermal gradient gives rise to a transverse pure spin current. We have observed the spin Nernst effect in yttrium iron garnet/platinum (YIG/Pt) thin film bilayers. Upon applying a thermal gradient within the YIG/Pt bilayer plane, a pure spin current flows in the direction orthogonal to the thermal drive. We detect this spin current as a thermopower voltage, generated via magnetization-orientation dependent spin transfer into the adjacent YIG layer. Our data shows that the spin Nernst and the spin Hall effect in in Pt have different sign, but comparable magnitude, in agreement with first-principles calculations. Financial support via Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft Priority Programme SPP 1538 Spin-Caloric Transport is gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Half-metallic superconducting triplet spin multivalves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alidoust, Mohammad; Halterman, Klaus

    2018-02-01

    We study spin switching effects in finite-size superconducting multivalve structures. We examine F1F2SF3 and F1F2SF3F4 hybrids where a singlet superconductor (S) layer is sandwiched among ferromagnet (F) layers with differing thicknesses and magnetization orientations. Our results reveal a considerable number of experimentally viable spin-valve configurations that lead to on-off switching of the superconducting state. For S widths on the order of the superconducting coherence length ξ0, noncollinear magnetization orientations in adjacent F layers with multiple spin axes leads to a rich variety of triplet spin-valve effects. Motivated by recent experiments, we focus on samples where the magnetizations in the F1 and F4 layers exist in a fully spin-polarized half-metallic phase, and calculate the superconducting transition temperature, spatially and energy resolved density of states, and the spin-singlet and spin-triplet superconducting correlations. Our findings demonstrate that superconductivity in these devices can be completely switched on or off over a wide range of magnetization misalignment angles due to the generation of equal-spin and opposite-spin triplet pairings.

  20. RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

  1. Spin noise spectroscopy on donors in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernien, Hannes; Mueller, Georg; Roemer, Michael; Huebner, Jens; Oestreich, Michael [Institute for Solid State Physics, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University Hannover (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    In recent experiments spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) has proven to be a very sensitive technique to study electron spin dynamics in semiconductors at thermal equilibrium. Here we present SNS-measurements on donor bound electrons in very low doped bulk GaAs. In this environment the donors do not interact with each other and form artificial atoms. We discuss the detection of single donor bound electron spins, which should have extremely long spin relaxation times compared to ensemble spin relaxation times. In further experiments the electron bound to the donor will be used to probe and study the local nuclear magnetic field at the donor site.

  2. Spin coherence in silicon/silicon-germanium nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truitt, James L.

    This thesis investigates the spin coherence of electrons in silicon/silicon-germanium (Si/SiGe) quantum wells. With a long spin coherence time, an electron trapped in a quantum dot in Si/SiGe is a prime candidate for a quantum bit (qubit) in a solid state implementation of a quantum computer. In particular, the mechanisms responsible for decoherence are examined in a variety of Si/SiGe quantum wells, and it is seen that their behavior does not correspond to published theories of decoherence in these structures. Transport data are analyzed for all samples to determine the electrical properties of each, taking into account a parallel conduction path seen in all samples. Furthermore, the effect of confining the electrons into nanostructures of varying size in one of the samples is studied. All but one of the samples examined are grown by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. The nanostructures are patterned on a sample provided by IBM using the Nabity Pattern Generation Software (NPGS) on a LEO1530 Scanning Electron Microscope, and etched using SF6 in an STS reactive ion etcher. Continuous-wave electron spin resonance studies are done using a Bruker ESP300E spectrometer, with a 4.2K continuous flow cryostat and X-band cavity. In order to fully characterize the sample, electrical measurements were done. Hall bars are etched into the 2DEGs, and Ohmic contacts are annealed in to provide a current path through the 2DEG. Measurements are made both from room temperature down to 2K in a Physical Property Measurement System (PPMS), and at 300mK using a custom built probe in a one shot 3He cryostat made by Oxford Instruments. The custom built probe also allows high frequency excitations, facilitating electrically detected magnetic resonance (EDMR) experiments. In many of the samples, an orientationally dependent electron spin resonance linewidth is seen whose anisotropy is much larger at small angles than that predicted by

  3. Influence of local molecular motions on the determination of 1H-1H internuclear distances measured by 2D 1H spin-exchange experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brus, Jiří; Petříčková, H.; Dybal, Jiří

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2003), s. 183-197 ISSN 0926-2040 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAB4050203; GA AV ČR IAA4050208; GA ČR GA203/99/0067 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913 Keywords : H-1-H-1 spin exchange * interatomic distances * molecular motion Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.453, year: 2003

  4. Spin-drift transport in semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M Idrish [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong, Chittagong-4331 (Bangladesh)

    2008-02-07

    We present a study on spin transport in semiconductors under applied electric fields. Our experiments detect photoinjected electron spins and their relaxation during drift transport in intrinsic and moderately n-doped GaAs, based on the extraordinary Hall (eH) effect. For relatively low electric field (E), the optically spin-induced eH effect in n-doped GaAs is found to be enhanced with increasing doping density and not to depend much on E, indicating that a substantial amount of optical spin polarization is preserved during the drift transport in these extrinsic semiconductors. However, when the spin-oriented electrons are injected with a high E, a very significant decrease is observed in the eH voltage (V{sub eH}) due to an increase in the spin precession frequency of the hot electrons. Spin relaxation by the D'yakonov-Perel' mechanism is calculated, and is suggested to be the reason for such a rapid spin relaxation for hot electrons under a high E. However, in an intrinsic GaAs (i-GaAs), a much weaker V{sub eH} is observed and, as the electron spins scattered by holes due to the Coulomb interaction in i-GaAs, the spin relaxation by the Bir-Aronov-Pikus mechanism is considered. Skew scattering and side jump as possible mechanisms of the optically spin-induced transverse Hall currents are discussed. Based on a spin drift-diffusion model, drift and diffusion contributions to the V{sub eH} are examined. The results are also discussed in comparison with theoretical investigations.

  5. Electric field control of emergent electrodynamics in quantum spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantagne-Hurtubise, Étienne; Bhattacharjee, Subhro; Moessner, R.

    2017-09-01

    We study the coupling between conventional (Maxwell) and emergent electrodynamics in quantum spin ice, a 3+1-dimensional U (1 ) quantum spin liquid. We find that a uniform electric field can be used to tune the properties of both the ground state and excitations of the spin liquid. In particular, it induces emergent birefringence, rendering the speed of the emergent light anisotropic and polarization-dependent. A sufficiently strong electric field triggers a quantum phase transition into new U (1 ) quantum spin liquid phases, which trap emergent electric π fluxes. The flux patterns of these new phases depend on the direction of the electric field. Strikingly, some of the canonical pinch points in the spin structure factor, characteristic of classical spin ice, emerge near the phase transition, while they are absent in the quantum spin liquid phases. Estimating the electric field strength required, we find that this transition is potentially accessible experimentally. Finally, we propose a minimal mechanism by which an oscillating electric field can generate emergent radiation inside a quantum spin ice material with non-Kramers spin doublets.

  6. The Honey Trap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michael

    Michael F. Wagner: The Honey Trap –The democratization of leisure through automobilism The automobile has achieved a central position in modern everyday life as an essential artefact to mobility. This raises the question how automobiles have been mediated for mass consumption? The central thesis...... demonstrates the manner in which automobilism in Denmark was invented, constructed, represented, and appropriated as a leisure culture after 1900 through a mediation and consumption junction that was initiated and promoted by FDM. This is basically the story of unlimited access to Sunday driving or the daytrip...

  7. Atom trap trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z.-T.; Bailey, K.; Chen, C.-Y.; Du, X.; Li, Y.-M.; O' Connor, T. P.; Young, L.

    2000-05-25

    A new method of ultrasensitive trace-isotope analysis has been developed based upon the technique of laser manipulation of neutral atoms. It has been used to count individual {sup 85}Kr and {sup 81}Kr atoms present in a natural krypton sample with isotopic abundances in the range of 10{sup {minus}11} and 10{sup {minus}13}, respectively. The atom counts are free of contamination from other isotopes, elements,or molecules. The method is applicable to other trace-isotopes that can be efficiently captured with a magneto-optical trap, and has a broad range of potential applications.

  8. The transverse spin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artru, X. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, IN2P3-CNRS, Universite Claude Bernard, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this introduction, which is far from exhaustive, was to give an overview on the richness of transverse spin quantity and its differences in comparison with helicity. From the experimental point of view, the physics of quark transversity in deep inelastic reaction is still practically unexplored. This situation will certainly change rapidly, with planned experiments at DESY (HERMES), Brookhaven (RHIC) and CERN (COMPAS), but there is a long way before knowing the transversity distribution, {delta}q(x), as precisely as the helicity distribution, {delta}q(x), now. Unless polarized anti-proton beams become feasible, experiments probing quark transversity will rely mainly on 'quark polarimeters', like {lambda}'s or the Collins effect. These polarimeters will have to be calibrated at e{sup +}e{sup -} colliders. The Collins polarimeter will by the way allow the flavor decomposition of {delta}q(x), using mesons of various charging and strangeness. Quark polarimetry is by itself an interesting topic of non-perturbative QCD, and may teach us something about the breaking of chiral symmetry. Let us recall that, if chiral symmetry were unbroken, transversity would be undefined. The transversity physics program is not at all a 'remake' of the helicity one. Helicity and transversity probe rather different aspects of the hadron structure. Differences between {delta}q(x) and {delta}q(x) will reveal non-relativistic effects in the baryon wave function. Also {delta}q(x) does not couples to gluon distributions, thus it is free from anomaly. In that respect it is a more clean probe than {delta}q(x). In fact, the combination of helicity and transversity measurements will perhaps be the most interesting. Polarized parton densities taking only the helicity degree of freedom are almost 'classical'. Quantum aspects of spin correlations, like violation of Bell's inequality, can be found only when varying the spin quantification axis

  9. Evaluation of Anterior Ethmoidal Artery by 320-Slice CT Angiography with Comparison to Three-Dimensional Spin Digital Subtraction Angiography: Initial Experiences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Juan; Sun, Gang; Yu, Bling Bing; Li, Min; Li, Guo Ying; Peng, Zhao Hui; Zhang, Xu Ping [Dept. of Medical Imaging, Jinan Military General Hospital, Jinan (China); Lu, Yang [Dept. of Radiology, University of Illinois College of Medicine, Illinois (United States)

    2012-11-15

    To explore the usefulness of 320-slice CT angiography (CTA) for evaluating the course of the anterior ethmoidal artery (AEA) and its relationship with adjacent structures by using three-dimensional (3D) spin digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as standard reference. From December 2008 to December 2010, 32 patients with cerebrovascular disease, who underwent both cranial 3D spin DSA and 320-slice CTA within a 30 day period from each other, were retrospectively reviewed. AEA course in ethmoid was analyzed in DSA and CTA. In addition, adjacent bony landmarks (bony notch in medial orbital wall, anterior ethmoidal canal, and anterior ethmoidal sulcus) were evaluated with CTA using the MPR technique oriented along the axial, coronal and oblique coronal planes in all patients. The dose length product (DLP) for CTA and the dose-area product (DAP) for 3D spin DSA were recorded. Effective dose (ED) was calculated. The entire course of the AEA was seen in all 32 cases (100%) with 3D spine DSA and in 29 of 32 cases (90.1%) with 320-slice CTA, with no significant difference (p = 0.24). In three cases where AEA was not visualized on 320-slice CTA, two were due to the dominant posterior ethmoidal artery, while the remaining case was due to diminutive AEA. On MPR images of 320-slice CT, a bony notch in the orbital medial walls was detected in all cases (100%, 64 of 64); anterior ethmoidal canal was seen in 28 of 64 cases (43.8%), and the anterior ethmoidal sulcus was seen in 63 of 64 cases (98.4%). The mean effective dose in CTA was 0.6 {+-} 0.25 mSv, which was significantly lower than for 3D spin DSA (1.3 {+-} 0.01 mSv) (p < 0.001). 320-slice CTA has a similar detection rate for AEA to that of 3D spin DSA; however, it is noninvasive, and may be preferentially used for the evaluation of AEA and its adjacent bony variations and pathologic changes in preoperative patients with paranasal sinus diseases.

  10. Experimental study of the test module of the electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter for the ATLAS experiment. Study of the spin correlation in the production of pairs tt-bar; Etude experimentale des performances du module 0 du calorimetre electromagnetique bouchon d'ATLAS. Etude de la correlation de spin dans la production des paires tt-bar au LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinz, L

    2001-06-01

    LHC, the future CERN proton collider, will start in 2006. It will be devoted to a better understanding of the Standard Model and new physics research. With a 10 {integral}b{sup -1} per year at low luminosity during the first three years, then 100 {integral}b{sup -1} per year, and energy of 14 TeV in the center of mass, the LHC is designed to discover the Standard or SUSY Higgs boson, or probe signature of new physics. ATLAS, one of the four experiments at the LHC, can study a large physics range, as Higgs boson, top and bottom, gauge bosons and new particles expected by SUSY model or other models beyond the Standard Model. The CPPM laboratory is responsible of a part of the electromagnetic end-cap calorimeter for the ATLAS experiment. In 1999, an ATLAS-like prototype of module was stacked in Marseille and intensively tested at CERN. Description of the calorimeter and a part of test-beam results are presented in this PhD manuscript. In parallel, a study about potentiality of the tt-bar spin correlation measurement was done. The high tt-bar statistic produced at the LHC allows to explore the quark top properties in details and being sensitive to new physics phenomena. Signatures of such physics can be extracted from tt-bar decay product angular distributions which are sensitive to tt-bar spin correlation. (authors)

  11. A rapid spin exchange tightly bound alkali metal hybrid optical pumping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xulin; Chen, Yao; Quan, Wei; Fan, Wenfeng; Fang, Jiancheng

    2018-02-01

    We study effects of rapid spin exchange interaction between K and Cs spins in a K–Cs spin exchange hybrid optical pumping system. The behaviour of the atom spins directly pumped by laser light is investigated. The results show that the electron spins of the K atoms are coupled to the electron spins of the Cs atoms through spin exchange interaction. The K and Cs spins are aligned in the optical pumping system. In the experiment, we measured the Larmor precession frequency of the K atoms and found it to be approximately equal to that of the Cs atoms.

  12. Two-dimensional spin diffusion in multiterminal lateral spin valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, D.; Basu, D.; Holub, M.; Bhattacharya, P.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of two-dimensional spin diffusion on spin extraction in lateral semiconductor spin valves have been investigated experimentally and theoretically. A ferromagnetic collector terminal of variable size is placed between the ferromagnetic electron spin injector and detector of a conventional lateral spin valve for spin extraction. It is observed that transverse spin diffusion beneath the collector terminal plays an important role along with the conventional longitudinal spin diffusion in describing the overall transport of spin carriers. Two-dimensional spin diffusion reduces the perturbation of the channel electrochemical potentials and improves spin extraction.

  13. Selectivity of penaeid trap nets used in south eastern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt K. Broadhurst

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were done to estimate the selectivity of commercial and modified trap-net configurations in New South Wales (NSW, southeastern Australia. In the first experiment, a commercial trap net made entirely from 25 mm mesh and designed for use in shallow water was alternatively fished with a fine-meshed (9.5 mm netting trap net (used as a control. In the second experiment, two trap-net configurations designed for use in deeper water and comprising the same anterior section (made from 25 mm mesh, but with different bunts made from (i the conventional 25 mm mesh and (ii 31 mm mesh were alternately fished against the control. Both of the conventional trap nets (comprising 25 mm mesh throughout had low amounts of bycatch and similarly selected eastern king Penaeus plebejus, greasyback Metapenaeus bennettae and school prawns Metapenaeus macleayi across narrow selection ranges (< 3.4 mm and at 50% retention lengths (between 18.53 and 21.50 mm that were larger than the average commercially-accepted sizes (15-17 mm CL. Analyses of the selectivities and relative efficiencies of the trap-net configurations comprising the 25 and 31 mm bunts showed no benefit, in terms of maintaining prawn catches and reducing unwanted bycatch, associated with increasing mesh size in these gears. The utility of trap nets for selectively harvesting penaeids is discussed. We conclude that this type of fishing gear appears to have few deleterious impacts.

  14. MOS Capacitance—Voltage Characteristics: IV. Trapping Capacitance from 3-Charge-State Impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binbin, Jie; Chihtang, Sah

    2012-01-01

    Metal—Oxide—Semiconductor Capacitance—Voltage (MOSCV) characteristics containing giant carrier trapping capacitances from 3-charge-state or 2-energy-level impurities are presented for not-doped, n-doped, p-doped and compensated silicon containing the double-donor sulfur and iron, the double-acceptor zinc, and the amphoteric or one-donor and one-acceptor gold and silver impurities. These impurities provide giant trapping capacitances at trapping energies from 200 to 800 meV (50 to 200 THz and 6 to 1.5 μm), which suggest potential sub-millimeter, far-infrared and spin electronics applications.

  15. Resolving spin-orbit- and hyperfine-mediated electric dipole spin resonance in a quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiei, M; Nowack, K C; Reichl, C; Wegscheider, W; Vandersypen, L M K

    2013-03-08

    We investigate the electric manipulation of a single-electron spin in a single gate-defined quantum dot. We observe that so-far neglected differences between the hyperfine- and spin-orbit-mediated electric dipole spin resonance conditions have important consequences at high magnetic fields. In experiments using adiabatic rapid passage to invert the electron spin, we observe an unusually wide and asymmetric response as a function of the magnetic field. Simulations support the interpretation of the line shape in terms of four different resonance conditions. These findings may lead to isotope-selective control of dynamic nuclear polarization in quantum dots.

  16. Solute-Vacancy Clustering In Al-Mg-Si Alloys Studied By Muon Spin Relaxation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishimura K.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Zero-field muon spin relaxation experiments were carried out with Al-1.6%Mg2Si, Al-0.5%Mg, and Al-0.5%Si alloys. Observed relaxation spectra were compared with the calculated relaxation functions based on the Monte Carlo simulation to extract the dipolar width (Δ, trapping (νt, and detrapping rates (νd, with the initially trapped muon fraction (P0. The fitting analysis has elucidated that the muon trapping rates depended on the heat treatment and solute concentrations. The dissolved Mg in Al dominated the νt at lower temperatures below 120 K, therefore the similar temperature variations of νt were observed with the samples mixed with Mg. The νt around 200 K remarkably reflected the heat treatment effect on the samples, and the largest νt value was found with the sample annealed at 100°C among Al-1.6%Mg2Si alloys. The as-quenched Al-0.5%Si sample showed significant νt values between 80 and 280 K relating with Si-vacancy clusters, but such clusters disappeared with the natural aged Al-0.5%Si sample.

  17. Discrete interferometer with individual trapped atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Andreas; Alberti, Andrea; Alt, Wolfgang; Belmechri, Noomen; Hild, Sebastian; Karski, Michal; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter; Quantum Technology Team

    2011-05-01

    Coherent control and delocalization of individual atoms is a pivotal challenge in quantum technologies. As a new step on this road, we present an individual atom interferometer that is capable of splitting a trapped Cs atom by up to 10 μm , allowing us to measure potential gradients on the microscale. The atom is confined in a 1D optical lattice, which is capable of performing discrete state-dependent shifts to split the atom by the desired number of sites. We establish a high degree of control, as the initial atom position, vibrational state and spin state can all be prepared with above 95% fidelity. To unravel decoherence effects and phase influences, we have explored several basic interferometer geometries, among other things demonstrating a positional spin echo to cancel background effects. As a test case, an inertial force has been applied and successfully measured using the atomic phase. This will offer us a new tool to investigate the interaction between two atoms in a controlled model system.

  18. Antihydrogen Trapped in the ALPHA Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    The diagnostic techniques used to measure the diameter, number, density, and temperatures of both plasmas will be presented as will the methods developed to actively compress and cool of both plasma species to sizes and temperatur...

  19. Spin crossover properties of the [Fe(PM-BiA) sub 2 (NCS) sub 2] complex - phases I and II

    CERN Document Server

    Letard, J F; Nguyen, O; Marcen, S; Marchivie, M; Guionneau, P; Chasseau, D; Guetlich, P

    2003-01-01

    In the present review, we reexamine the photomagnetic properties of the [Fe (PM-BiA) sub 2 (NCS) sub 2], cis-bis(thiocyanato)-bis[(N-2'-pyridylmethylene)-4-(aminobiphenyl)] iron(II), compound which exhibits, depending on the synthetic method, an exceptionally abrupt spin transition (phase 1) with a very narrow hysteresis (T sub 1 sub / sub 2 arrow down = 168 K and T sub 1 sub / sub 2 arrow up = 173 K) or a gradual spin conversion (phase II) occurring at 190 K. In both cases, light irradiation in the tail of the sup 1 MLCT-LS absorption band, at 830 nm, results in the population of the high-spin state according to the light-induced excited spin-state trapping (LIESST) effect. The capacity of a compound to retain the light-induced HS information, estimated through the T(LIESST) experiment, is determined for both phases. Interestingly, the shape of the T(LIESST) curve is more gradual for the phase II than for the phase I and the T(LIESST) value is found considerably lower in the case of the phase II. The kinetic...

  20. Spin Complicates Eccentric BH-NS Mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2015-08-01

    When a neutron star (NS) has a glancing encounter with a black hole (BH), its spin has a significant effect on the outcome, according to new simulations run by William East of Stanford University and his collaborators. Spotting an Eccentric Merger. In a traditional BH-NS merger, the two objects orbit each other quasi-circularly as they spiral in. But there's another kind of merger that's possible in high-density environments like galactic nuclei or globular clusters: a dynamical capture merger, in which a NS and BH pass each other just close enough that the gravity of the black hole "catches" the NS, leading the two objects to merge with very eccentric orbits. During an eccentric merger, the NS can be torn apart -- at which point some fraction of the tidally-disrupted material will escape the system, while some fraction instead accretes back onto the BH. Knowing these fractions is important for being able to model the expected electromagnetic signatures for the merger: the unbound material can power transients like kilonovae, whereas the accreting material may be the cause of short gamma-ray bursts. The amount of material available for events like these would change their observable strengths. Testing the Effects of Spin. To see whether NS spin has an impact on the behavior of the merger, East and collaborators use a general-relativistic hydrodynamic code to simulate the glancing encounter of a BH and a NS with dimensionless spin between a=0 (non-spinning) and a=0.756 (rotation period of 1 ms). They also vary the separation of the first encounter. The group finds that changing the NS's spin can change a number of outcomes of the merger. To start with, it can affect whether the NS is captured by the BH, or if the encounter is glancing and then both objects carry on their merry way. And if the NS is trapped by the BH and torn apart, then the higher the NS's spin, the more matter outside of the BH ends up unbound, instead of getting trapped into an accretion disk

  1. Effect of quantum tunneling on spin Hall magnetoresistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ok, Seulgi; Chen, Wei; Sigrist, Manfred; Manske, Dirk

    2017-02-22

    We present a formalism that simultaneously incorporates the effect of quantum tunneling and spin diffusion on the spin Hall magnetoresistance observed in normal metal/ferromagnetic insulator bilayers (such as Pt/Y 3 Fe 5 O 12 ) and normal metal/ferromagnetic metal bilayers (such as Pt/Co), in which the angle of magnetization influences the magnetoresistance of the normal metal. In the normal metal side the spin diffusion is known to affect the landscape of the spin accumulation caused by spin Hall effect and subsequently the magnetoresistance, while on the ferromagnet side the quantum tunneling effect is detrimental to the interface spin current which also affects the spin accumulation. The influence of generic material properties such as spin diffusion length, layer thickness, interface coupling, and insulating gap can be quantified in a unified manner, and experiments that reveal the quantum feature of the magnetoresistance are suggested.

  2. A catalytic reactor for the trapping of free radicals from gas phase oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Marco; Wilson, Karen; Chechik, Victor

    2010-10-01

    A catalytic reactor for the trapping of free radicals originating from gas phase catalytic reactions is described and discussed. Radical trapping and identification were initially carried out using a known radical generator such as dicumyl peroxide. The trapping of radicals was further demonstrated by investigating genuine radical oxidation processes, e.g., benzaldehyde oxidation over manganese and cobalt salts. The efficiency of the reactor was finally proven by the partial oxidation of cyclohexane over MoO3, Cr2O3, and WO3, which allowed the identification of all the radical intermediates responsible for the formation of the products cyclohexanol and cyclohexanone. Assignment of the trapped radicals was carried out using spin trapping technique and X-band electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

  3. Optical system for trapping particles in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampmann, R; Chall, A K; Kleindienst, R; Sinzinger, S

    2014-02-01

    An innovative optical system for trapping particles in air is presented. We demonstrate an optical system specifically optimized for high precision positioning of objects with a size of several micrometers within a nanopositioning and nanomeasuring machine (NPMM). Based on a specification sheet, an initial system design was calculated and optimized in an iterative design process. By combining optical design software with optical force simulation tools, a highly efficient optical system was developed. Both components of the system, which include a refractive double axicon and a parabolic ring mirror, were fabricated by ultra-precision turning. The characterization of the optical elements and the whole system, especially the force simulations based on caustic measurements, represent an important interim result for the subsequently performed trapping experiments. The caustic of the trapping beam produced by the system was visualized with the help of image processing techniques. Finally, we demonstrated the unique efficiency of the configuration by reproducibly trapping fused silica spheres with a diameter of 10 μm at a distance of 2.05 mm from the final optical surface.

  4. Measurements of energy behaviour of spin-dependent np observables over a GeV region. Results and prospects. Dubna ``DELTA—SIGMA'' experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, V. I.; Adiasevich, B. P.; Anischenko, N. G.; Antonenko, V. G.; Averichev, S. A.; Azhgirey, L. S.; Bartenev, V. D.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Blinov, N. A.; Borisov, N. S.; Borzakov, S. B.; Borzunov, Yu. T.; Borzunova, T. N.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Burinov, V. F.; Bushuev, Yu. P.; Chernenko, L. P.; Chernykh, E. V.; Chumakov, V. F.; Dolgii, S. A.; Drobin, V. M.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A. P.; Fedorov, A. N.; Fimushkin, V. V.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Golovanov, L. B.; Gurevich, G. M.; Janata, A.; Khachaturov, B. A.; Kirillov, A. D.; Kochelev, N. I.; Kolomiets, V. G.; Konskii, I. G.; Kovalenko, A. D.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kuzmin, E. S.; Ladygin, V. P.; Lazarev, A. B.; Lehar, F.; de Lesquen, A.; Lukhanin, A. A.; Maniakov, P. K.; Matafonov, V. N.; Matyushevsky, E. A.; Motina, Z. P.; Neganov, A. B.; Nikolaevsky, G. P.; Nomofilov, A. A.; Orlova, V. V.; Panteleev, Tz.; Pavlova, T. F.; Pilipenko, Yu. K.; Pisarev, I. L.; Plis, Yu. A.; Polunin, Yu. P.; Polyakova, R. V.; Prokofiev, A. N.; Prytkov, V. Yu.; Rukoyatkin, P. A.; Schedrov, V. A.; Schevelev, O. N.; Shavrina, T. V.; Shilov, S. N.; Starikov, Yu. A.; Shutov, V. B.; Slunecka, M.; Slunečková, V.; Starikov, A. Yu.; Stoletov, G. D.; Strunov, L. N.; Svetov, A. L.; Usov, Yu. A.; Volkov, V. I.; Vorobiev, E. I.; Yershov, V. P.; Yudin, I. P.; Zaitsev, I. V.; Zaporozhets, S. A.; Zhdanov, A. A.; Zhmyrov, V. N.

    2001-01-01

    New data on the spin-dependent np observables measured with quasi-monochromatic polarized neutron beam in the energy region from 1.2 to 3.7 GeV are presented. Further measurements of np scattering observables using the JINR LHE polarization facility (longitudinal and transverse polarized neutron beams and a polarized proton target) are discussed. The aim of these studies is to determine the imaginary and real parts of the forward scattering amplitudes for np and for isospin I=0 systems above 1.1 GeV.

  5. Spin at Lausanne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    From 25 September to 1 October, some 150 spin enthusiasts gathered in Lausanne for the 1980 International Symposium on High Energy Physics with Polarized Beams and Polarized Targets. The programme was densely packed, covering physics interests with spin as well as the accelerator and target techniques which make spin physics possible

  6. Spin-torque transistor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bauer, G.E.W.; Brataas, A.; Tserkovnyak, Y.; Van Wees, B.J.

    2003-01-01

    A magnetoelectronic thin-film transistor is proposed that can display negative differential resistance and gain. The working principle is the modulation of the soure–drain current in a spin valve by the magnetization of a third electrode, which is rotated by the spin-torque created by a control spin

  7. Quantum interference from remotely trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, S; Rotter, D; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R; Rohde, F; Schuck, C; Almendros, M; Gehr, R; Dubin, F; Eschner, J

    2009-01-01

    We observe quantum interference of photons emitted by two continuously laser-excited single ions, independently trapped in distinct vacuum vessels. High contrast two-photon interference is observed in two experiments with different ion species, Ca + and Ba + . Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by Bloch equation calculations. In particular, we show that the coherence of the individual resonance fluorescence light field is determined from the observed interference.

  8. Quantum interference from remotely trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, S; Rotter, D; Hennrich, M; Blatt, R [Institute for Experimental Physics, University of Innsbruck, Technikerstr. 25, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Rohde, F; Schuck, C; Almendros, M; Gehr, R; Dubin, F; Eschner, J [ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av del Canal OlImpic, E-08860 Castelldefels (Spain)], E-mail: francois.dubin@icfo.es

    2009-01-15

    We observe quantum interference of photons emitted by two continuously laser-excited single ions, independently trapped in distinct vacuum vessels. High contrast two-photon interference is observed in two experiments with different ion species, Ca{sup +} and Ba{sup +}. Our experimental findings are quantitatively reproduced by Bloch equation calculations. In particular, we show that the coherence of the individual resonance fluorescence light field is determined from the observed interference.

  9. Progress towards microwave spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashkezari, Mohammad D.; Andresen, Gorm B.; Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo; Bertsche, Wil; Bowe, Paul D.; Butler, Eoin; Cesar, Claudio L.; Chapman, Steve; Charlton, Michael; Deller, Adam; Eriksson, Stefan; Fajans, Joel; Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C.; Gill, Dave R.; Gutierrez, Andrea; Hangst, Jeffrey S.; Hardy, Walter N.; Hayano, Ryugo S.; Hayden, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Precision comparisons of hyperfine intervals in atomic hydrogen and antihydrogen are expected to yield experimental tests of the CPT theorem. The CERN-based ALPHA collaboration has initiated a program of study focused on microwave spectroscopy of trapped ground-state antihydrogen atoms. This paper outlines some of the proposed experiments, and summarizes measurements that characterize microwave fields that have been injected into the ALPHA apparatus.

  10. Vortices in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radic, J.; Sedrakyan, T. A.; Galitski, V.; Spielman, I. B.

    2011-01-01

    Realistic methods to create vortices in spin-orbit-coupled Bose-Einstein condensates are discussed. It is shown that, contrary to common intuition, rotation of the trap containing a spin-orbit condensate does not lead to an equilibrium state with static vortex structures but gives rise instead to nonequilibrium behavior described by an intrinsically time-dependent Hamiltonian. We propose here the following alternative methods to induce thermodynamically stable static vortex configurations: (i) to rotate both the lasers and the anisotropic trap and (ii) to impose a synthetic Abelian field on top of synthetic spin-orbit interactions. Effective Hamiltonians for spin-orbit condensates under such perturbations are derived for most currently known realistic laser schemes that induce synthetic spin-orbit couplings. The Gross-Pitaevskii equation is solved for several experimentally relevant regimes. The new interesting effects include spatial separation of left- and right-moving spin-orbit condensates, the appearance of unusual vortex arrangements, and parity effects in vortex nucleation where the topological excitations are predicted to appear in pairs. All these phenomena are shown to be highly nonuniversal and depend strongly on a specific laser scheme and system parameters.

  11. AN IMPROVED TRAP TO CAPTURE ADULT CONTAINER-INHABITING MOSQUITOES

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARRERA, ROBERTO; MACKAY, ANDREW J.; AMADOR, MANUEL

    2015-01-01

    Although dengue viruses are thought to be transmitted by Aedes aegypti in Puerto Rico, Aedes mediovittatus, the Caribbean tree hole mosquito, is also a potential vector. This species is native to the Greater Antilles and has been shown to be a competent vector of dengue viruses in the laboratory. Consequently, it has been suggested that Ae. mediovittatus could be acting as a secondary vector or virus reservoir. This study was part of an ongoing investigation into this, and it aimed to determine whether BG-Sentinel traps (BGS traps) could be used to collect adults of this mosquito and could be modified to increase the number of captures of this species in the field. We conducted experiments to test the relative attractiveness of BGS traps to Ae. mediovittatus and Ae. aegypti and explored the effects of chemical lures (BG-Lure, CO2, octenol) and optical properties (color, size) on the capture rates of BGS traps in a large, outdoor cage in San Juan city, Puerto Rico. We also conducted field tests to compare modified BGS traps with the original traps in a rural community in Patillas municipality, Puerto Rico. Results obtained from the large, outdoor cage experiments indicated that trap captures of both mosquito species could be significantly enhanced by using black instead of white BGS traps combined with BG-Lure. Field experiments revealed that the modified traps captured a significantly greater number of Ae. aegypti, Ae. mediovittatus, and Culex quinquefasciatus, with greater sensitivity for the latter 2 species, and also captured a larger number of mosquito species and a smaller ratio of Ae. aegypti to Ae. mediovittatus, with greater than expected species co-occurrences. PMID:24551969

  12. Segmented trapped vortex cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grammel, Jr., Leonard Paul (Inventor); Pennekamp, David Lance (Inventor); Winslow, Jr., Ralph Henry (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An annular trapped vortex cavity assembly segment comprising includes a cavity forward wall, a cavity aft wall, and a cavity radially outer wall there between defining a cavity segment therein. A cavity opening extends between the forward and aft walls at a radially inner end of the assembly segment. Radially spaced apart pluralities of air injection first and second holes extend through the forward and aft walls respectively. The segment may include first and second expansion joint features at distal first and second ends respectively of the segment. The segment may include a forward subcomponent including the cavity forward wall attached to an aft subcomponent including the cavity aft wall. The forward and aft subcomponents include forward and aft portions of the cavity radially outer wall respectively. A ring of the segments may be circumferentially disposed about an axis to form an annular segmented vortex cavity assembly.

  13. A New Spin on Photoemission Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwiak, Chris [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-12-01

    The electronic spin degree of freedom is of general fundamental importance to all matter. Understanding its complex roles and behavior in the solid state, particularly in highly correlated and magnetic materials, has grown increasingly desirable as technology demands advanced devices and materials based on ever stricter comprehension and control of the electron spin. However, direct and efficient spin dependent probes of electronic structure are currently lacking. Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (ARPES) has become one of the most successful experimental tools for elucidating solid state electronic structures, bolstered by-continual breakthroughs in efficient instrumentation. In contrast, spin-resolved photoemission spectroscopy has lagged behind due to a lack of similar instrumental advances. The power of photoemission spectroscopy and the pertinence of electronic spin in the current research climate combine to make breakthroughs in Spin and Angle Resolved Photoemission Spectroscopy (SARPES) a high priority . This thesis details the development of a unique instrument for efficient SARPES and represents a radical departure from conventional methods. A custom designed spin polarimeter based on low energy exchange scattering is developed, with projected efficiency gains of two orders of magnitude over current state-of-the-art polarimeters. For energy analysis, the popular hemispherical analyzer is eschewed for a custom Time-of-Flight (TOF) analyzer offering an additional order of magnitude gain in efficiency. The combined instrument signifies the breakthrough needed to perform the high resolution SARPES experiments necessary for untangling the complex spin-dependent electronic structures central to today's condensed matter physics.

  14. Precision Tests of the Electroweak Interaction using Trapped Atoms and Ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melconian, Daniel George [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2017-06-21

    The objective of the proposed research is to study fundamental aspects of the electroweak interaction via precision measurements in beta decay to test our current understanding of fundamental particles and forces as contained in the so-called "Standard Model" of particle physics. By comparing elegant experiments to rigorous theoretical predictions, we will either confirm the Standard Model to a higher degree and rule out models which seek to extend it, or find evidence of new physics and help guide theorists in developing the New Standard Model. The use of ion and neutral atom traps at radioactive ion beam facilities has opened up a new vista in precision low-energy nuclear physics experiments. Traps provide an ideal source of decaying atoms: they can be extremely cold (~1 mK); they are compact (~1 mm^3); and perhaps most importantly, the daughter particles escape with negligible distortions to their momenta in a scattering-free, open environment. The project is taking advantage of these technologies and applying them to precision beta-decay studies at radioactive beam facilities. The program consists of two complementary efforts: 1) Ion traps are an extremely versatile tool for purifying, cooling and bunching low-energy beams of short-lived nuclei. A large-bore (210~mm) superconducting 7-Tesla solenoid is at the heart of a Penning trap system for which there is a dedicated beamline at T-REX, the upgraded radioactive beam facility at the Cyclotron Institute, Texas A&M University. In addition to providing a general-purpose decay station, the flagship program for this system is measuring the ft-values and beta-neutrino correlation parameters from isospin T=2 superallowed beta-delayed proton decays, complimenting and expanding the already strong program in fundamental interactions at the Institute. 2) A magneto-optical trap is being used at the TRIUMF Neutral Atom Trap facility to observe the (un)polarized angular distribution parameters of isotopes of potassium. We

  15. Effect of Lures and Colors on Capture of Lady Beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) in Tedders Pyramidal Traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, E A; Cottrell, T E

    2015-10-01

    Purposeful attraction and aggregation of adult Coccinellidae at target sites would be useful for sampling purposes and pest suppression. We field-tested 1) lures in yellow and black pyramidal traps and 2) pyramidal traps that had been painted one or two colors (without lures) to determine if lures or trap color affected capture of adult Coccinellidae. In only one experiment with lures did a single rate of limonene increase trap capture, whereas no other lure ever did. Yellow traps, regardless of using a lure, always captured significantly more lady beetles than black traps. When single-color red, orange, yellow, green, blue, purple, black, and white traps (without lures) were tested, yellow traps captured significantly more lady beetles. Of all species of Coccinellidae captured in these single-color traps, 95% were the exotic species Harmonia axyridis (Pallas) and Coccinella septempunctata L. H. axyridis alone dominated trap capture comprising 74.1% of all lady beetles. Two-color traps (yellow-green, yellow-orange, yellow-white, and yellow-black) never captured more than single-color yellow traps. These results demonstrate that yellow pyramidal traps can be used to purposefully attract, and when used without a collection device, possibly aggregate adult Coccinellidae at targeted field sites. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. Spin physics in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book offers an extensive introduction to the extremely rich and intriguing field of spin-related phenomena in semiconductors. In this second edition, all chapters have been updated to include the latest experimental and theoretical research. Furthermore, it covers the entire field: bulk semiconductors, two-dimensional semiconductor structures, quantum dots, optical and electric effects, spin-related effects, electron-nuclei spin interactions, Spin Hall effect, spin torques, etc. Thanks to its self-contained style, the book is ideally suited for graduate students and researchers new to the field.

  17. Spin Physics at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Bradamante, Franco

    2005-01-01

    COMPASS is a new fixed target experiment presently in operation at CERN. It has the goal to investigate hadron structure and hadron spectroscopy by using either muon or hadron beams. From measurements of various hadron asymmetries in polarized muon - nucleon scattering it will be possible to determine the contribution of the gluons to the nucleon spin. Main objective of the hadron program is the search of exotic states, and glueballs in particular. This physics programme is carried out with a two-stage magnetic spectrometer, with particle identification and calorimetry in both stages, which has started collecting physics data in 2002, and will run at the CERN SPS at least until 2010. Preliminary results from the 2002 run with a 160 GeV muon beam are presented for several physics channels under investigation.

  18. Effectiveness of pheromone traps for the European spruce bark beetle: a comparative study of four commercial products and two new models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galko Juraj

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Six types of pheromone traps were tested between 2012 and 2014 in the High Tatra Mountains, northern Slovakia. Traps were baited with lures for attracting the European spruce bark beetle (Ips typographus L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae, Scolytinae. Among the tested traps, four types are commercial products; Theysohn (T-trap, Ecotrap (E-trap, Lindgren funnel trap (L-trap, BEKA trap (B-trap and two are our newly developed models; Funnel trap (P-trap and Cross trap (K-trap. The traps were set up on ten selected sites and tested during three growing seasons (2012, 2013 and 2014. The newly developed models were compared to the commercially available models for trapping efficiency of target pest, easy to use and impact on non-target insect species. We found that the best commercially available model is the L-trap, however the bottom of L-trap is considered too shallow resulting in an accumulation of rainwater that increases the traps attractiveness for Silphids. In our experiment, the newly developed models; P-trap and K-trap performed better compared to commercially used models. P-trap caught 28% more I. typographus and K-trap caught 57% more beetles compared to T-trap in 2014. There are additional advantages of the newly developed traps such as easy handling, good rainwater drainage, higher collection container volume, and scale marking within the collection container. The results of this study have encouraged us to patent P-trap and K-trap as utility models.

  19. Scalable error correction in distributed ion trap computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oi, Daniel K. L.; Devitt, Simon J.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2006-01-01

    A major challenge for quantum computation in ion trap systems is scalable integration of error correction and fault tolerance. We analyze a distributed architecture with rapid high-fidelity local control within nodes and entangled links between nodes alleviating long-distance transport. We demonstrate fault-tolerant operator measurements which are used for error correction and nonlocal gates. This scheme is readily applied to linear ion traps which cannot be scaled up beyond a few ions per individual trap but which have access to a probabilistic entanglement mechanism. A proof-of-concept system is presented which is within the reach of current experiment

  20. Origin of traps and charge transport mechanism in hafnia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islamov, D. R., E-mail: damir@isp.nsc.ru; Gritsenko, V. A., E-mail: grits@isp.nsc.ru [Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Cheng, C. H. [Department of Mechatronic Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chin, A., E-mail: albert-achin@hotmail.com [National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that oxygen vacancies are responsible for the charge transport in HfO{sub 2}. Basing on the model of phonon-assisted tunneling between traps, and assuming that the electron traps are oxygen vacancies, good quantitative agreement between the experimental and theoretical data of current-voltage characteristics was achieved. The thermal trap energy of 1.25 eV in HfO{sub 2} was determined based on the charge transport experiments.

  1. Transmission and Trapping of Cold Electrons in Water Ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balog, Richard; Cicman, Peter; Field, David

    2011-01-01

    Experiments are reported that show currents of low energy (“cold”) electrons pass unattenuated through crystalline ice at 135 K for energies between zero and 650 meV, up to the maximum studied film thickness of 430 bilayers, showing negligible apparent trapping. By contrast, both porous amorphous...... ice and compact crystalline ice at 40 K show efficient electron trapping. Ice at intermediate temperatures reveals metastable trapping that decays within a few hundred seconds at 110 K. Our results are the first to demonstrate full transmission of cold electrons in high temperature water ice...

  2. Injection into electron plasma traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorgadze, Vladimir; Pasquini, Thomas A.; Fajans, Joel; Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2003-01-01

    Computational studies and experimental measurements of plasma injection into a Malmberg-Penning trap reveal that the number of trapped particles can be an order of magnitude higher than predicted by a simple estimates based on a ballistic trapping model. Enhanced trapping is associated with a rich nonlinear dynamics generated by the space-charge forces of the evolving trapped electron density. A particle-in-cell simulation is used to identify the physical mechanisms that lead to the increase in trapped electrons. The simulations initially show strong two-stream interactions between the electrons emitted from the cathode and those reflected off the end plug of the trap. This is followed by virtual cathode oscillations near the injection region. As electrons are trapped, the initially hollow longitudinal phase-space is filled, and the transverse radial density profile evolves so that the plasma potential matches that of the cathode. Simple theoretical arguments are given that describe the different dynamical regimes. Good agreement is found between simulation and theory

  3. Quantum computing with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, R.J.

    1998-01-01

    The significance of quantum computation for cryptography is discussed. Following a brief survey of the requirements for quantum computational hardware, an overview of the ion trap quantum computation project at Los Alamos is presented. The physical limitations to quantum computation with trapped ions are analyzed and an assessment of the computational potential of the technology is made.

  4. Spin-Hall nano-oscillator: A micromagnetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, A.; Azzerboni, B.; Finocchio, G. [Department of Electronic Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Engineering, University of Messina, C.da di Dio, I-98166 Messina (Italy); Carpentieri, M. [Department of Electrical and Information Engineering, Politecnico of Bari, via E. Orabona 4, I-70125 Bari (Italy); Laudani, A. [Department of Engineering, University of Roma Tre, via V. Volterra 62, I-00146 Roma (Italy); Gubbiotti, G. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali del CNR (CNR-IOM), Unità di Perugia c/o Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Via A. Pascoli, 06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2014-07-28

    This Letter studies the dynamical behavior of spin-Hall nanoscillators from a micromagnetic point of view. The model parameters have been identified by reproducing recent experimental data quantitatively. Our results indicate that a strongly localized mode is observed for in-plane bias fields such as in the experiments, while predict the excitation of an asymmetric propagating mode for large enough out-of plane bias field similarly to what observed in spin-torque nanocontact oscillators. Our findings show that spin-Hall nanoscillators can find application as spin-wave emitters for magnonic applications where spin waves are used for transmission and processing information on nanoscale.

  5. Spin-crossover behavior of polymeric iron(III) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Yonezo; Miyamoto, Makoto; Takashima, Yoshimasa; Oshio, Hiroaki

    1989-01-01

    Polymeric spin-crossover iron(III) complexes possessing poly(4-vinylpyridine), poly(N-vinylimidazole) or poly(octylmethacrylate-co-4-vinylpyridine) as ligand are prepared. In this experience enriched 57 Fe was used to get strong Moessbauer absorption. The enriched behavior of the complexes were examined by magnetic susceptibilities measurement, and Moessbauer and esr spectroscopies. Some of them show spin-state behavior over a wide range of temperature. Some of them show rapid spin-state interexchange compared to the Moessbauer time scale and others not. Spin-crossover behavior of polymeric complexes is characterized of wide spin-state transition temperature range

  6. Theory of spin Hall effect: extension of the Drude model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Eugene M

    2007-11-16

    An extension of the Drude model is proposed that accounts for the spin and spin-orbit interaction of charge carriers. Spin currents appear due to the combined action of the external electric field, crystal field, and scattering of charge carriers. The expression for the spin Hall conductivity is derived for metals and semiconductors that is independent of the scattering mechanism. In cubic metals, the spin Hall conductivity sigma s and charge conductivity sigma c are related through sigma s=[2pi variant /(3mc2)]sigma2c with m being the bare electron mass. The theoretically computed value is in agreement with experiment.

  7. Evaluation of BG-sentinel trap trapping efficacy for Aedes aegypti (Diptera: Culicidae) in a visually competitive environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Tamara S; Ritchie, Scott R

    2010-07-01

    The BG-Sentinel (BGS) trap uses visual and olfactory cues as well as convection currents to attract Aedes aegypti (L.). The impact of the visual environment on trapping efficacy of the BGS trap for Ae. aegypti was investigated. Four- to 5-d nulliparous female and male Ae. aegypti were released into a semicontrolled room to evaluate the effect of the presence, reflectance, and distribution of surrounding harborage sites on BGS trapping efficacy. Low-reflective (dark) harborage sites near the BGS had a negative effect on both male and nulliparous female recapture rates; however, a more pronounced effect was observed in males. The distribution (clustered versus scattered) of dark harborage sites did not significantly affect recapture rates in either sex. In a subsequent experiment, the impact of oviposition sites on the recapture rate of gravid females was investigated. Although gravid females went to the oviposition sites and deposited eggs, the efficacy of the BGS in recapturing gravid females was not compromised. Ae. aegypti sampling in the field will mostly occur in the urban environment, whereby the BGS will be among oviposition sites and dark harborage areas in the form of household items and outdoor clutter. In addition to understanding sampling biases of the BGS, estimations of the adult population size and structure can be further adjusted based on an understanding of the impact of dark harborage sites on trap captures. Outcomes from this suite of experiments provide us with important considerations for trap deployment and interpretation of Ae. aegypti samples from the BGS trap.

  8. Electromagnetic trapping of cold atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balykin, V.I.; Minogin, V.G.; Letokhov, V.S.

    2000-01-01

    This review describes the methods of trapping cold atoms in electromagnetic fields and in the combined electromagnetic and gravity fields. We discuss first the basic types of the dipole radiation forces used for cooling and trapping atoms in the laser fields. We outline next the fundamentals of the laser cooling of atoms and classify the temperature limits for basic laser cooling processes. The main body of the review is devoted to discussion of atom traps based on the dipole radiation forces, dipole magnetic forces, combined dipole radiation-magnetic forces, and the forces combined of the dipole radiation-magnetic and gravity forces. Physical fundamentals of atom traps operating as waveguides and cavities for cold atoms are also considered. The review ends with the applications of cold and trapped atoms in atomic, molecular and optical physics. (author)

  9. Properties of Trapped Electron Bunches in a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, Neil; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    Plasma-based accelerators use the propagation of a drive bunch through plasma to create large electric fields. Recent plasma wakefield accelerator (PWFA) experiments, carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), successfully doubled the energy for some of the 42 GeV drive bunch electrons in less than a meter; this feat would have required 3 km in the SLAC linac. This dissertation covers one phenomenon associated with the PWFA, electron trapping. Recently it was shown that PWFAs, operated in the nonlinear bubble regime, can trap electrons that are released by ionization inside the plasma wake and accelerate them to high energies. These trapped electrons occupy and can degrade the accelerating portion of the plasma wake, so it is important to understand their origins and how to remove them. Here, the onset of electron trapping is connected to the drive bunch properties. Additionally, the trapped electron bunches are observed with normalized transverse emittance divided by peak current, {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t}, below the level of 0.2 {micro}m/kA. A theoretical model of the trapped electron emittance, developed here, indicates that the emittance scales inversely with the square root of the plasma density in the non-linear 'bubble' regime of the PWFA. This model and simulations indicate that the observed values of {epsilon}{sub N,x}/I{sub t} result from multi-GeV trapped electron bunches with emittances of a few {micro}m and multi-kA peak currents. These properties make the trapped electrons a possible particle source for next generation light sources. This dissertation is organized as follows. The first chapter is an overview of the PWFA, which includes a review of the accelerating and focusing fields and a survey of the remaining issues for a plasma-based particle collider. Then, the second chapter examines the physics of electron trapping in the PWFA. The third chapter uses theory and simulations to analyze the properties of the trapped

  10. Camera traps as sensor networks for monitoring animal communities

    OpenAIRE

    Kays, R.W.; Kranstauber, B.; Jansen, P.A.; Carbone, C.; Rowcliffe, M.; Fountain, T.; Tilak, S.

    2009-01-01

    Studying animal movement and distribution is of critical importance to addressing environmental challenges including invasive species, infectious diseases, climate and land-use change. Motion sensitive camera traps offer a visual sensor to record the presence of a species at a location, recording their movement in the Eulerian sense. Modern digital camera traps that record video present new analytical opportunities, but also new data management challenges. This paper describes our experience ...

  11. Hyperfine spectra of trapped bosons in optical lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazzard, Kaden R. A.; Mueller, Erich J.

    2007-01-01

    We calculate the interaction induced inhomogeneous broadening of spectral lines in a trapped Bose gas as a function of the depth of a three-dimensional cubic optical lattice. As observed in recent experiments, we find that the terraced ''wedding-cake'' structure of Mott plateaus splits the spectrum into a series of discrete peaks. The spectra are extremely sensitive to density corrugations and trap anharmonicities. For example, even when the majority of the cloud is superfluid the spectrum displays discrete peaks

  12. Electron spin resonance characterization of a multi-nitrogen complex in diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Iakoubovskii, K

    2002-01-01

    The W27 centre has been characterized by means of electron spin resonance in natural diamond. The centre exhibits spin S=1, a large spin-spin coupling constant D=99 mT, and a complex hyperfine interaction structure interpreted as originating from interaction of an S=1 electronic system with five nitrogen atoms: two of these sites are equivalent and are located near the S = 1 electrons; three others are nearly equivalent and more remote. The centre is suggested to include a divacancy, where one vacancy, bound to two nitrogen atoms and one carbon atom, has trapped an extra electron, while the second vacancy is bound to three substitutional nitrogen atoms.

  13. PREFACE: SPIN2010 - Preface for Conference Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ströher, Hans; Rathmann, Frank

    2011-03-01

    SPIN2010, the 19th International Spin Physics Symposium, took place between 27 September and 2 October, 2010 on the campus of Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH (FZJ) in Jülich, Germany. The scientific program of this Symposium included many topics related to spin phenomena in particle and nuclear physics as well as those in related fields. The International Spin Physics Symposium series has combined the High Energy Spin Symposia and the Nuclear Polarization Conferences since 2000. The most recent two Symposia were held in Virginia, USA (October 2008) and in Kyoto, Japan (October 2006). The meeting was opened by the chairman of the Board of Management of Jülich Forschungszentrum, Professor Achim Bachem, who cordially welcomed the participants from all over the world and gave a brief introduction to the Center and the research conducted there. The scientific program consisted of plenary sessions and parallel sessions and included the following topics: Fundamental symmetries and spin Spin structure of hadrons Spin physics beyond the Standard Model Spin in hadronic reactions Spin physics with photons and leptons Spin physics in nuclear reactions and nuclei Acceleration, storage, and polarimetry of polarized beams Polarized ion and lepton sources and targets Future facilities and experiments Medical and technological applications of spin physics The 6-day symposium had about 300 participants. In total 35 plenary talks (including 3 summaries of other spin physics meetings) and 163 contributed talks were given. The contents of many of these can be found in the present contributions, arranged according to the above topics and the time sequence. In addition, a public lecture on "Drall in der Quantenwelt", presented by H O Meyer (Bloomington) was received very well. Participants had the option to visit the Cooler synchrotron COSY at the Nuclear Physics Institute (IKP) and the 9.4 T MRT-PET hybrid scanner at the Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine (INM), two unique

  14. Muon spin relaxation in random spin systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshimitsu Yamazaki

    1981-01-01

    The longitudinal relaxation function Gsub(z)(t) of the positive muon can reflect dynamical characters of local field in a unique way even when the correlation time is longer than the Larmor period of local field. This method has been applied to studies of spin dynamics in spin glass systems, revealing sharp but continuous temperature dependence of the correlation time. Its principle and applications are reviewed. (author)

  15. Materials science with muon spin rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    During this reporting period, the focus of activity in the Materials Science with Muon Spin Rotation (MSMSR) program was muon spin rotation studies of superconducting materials, in particular the high critical temperature and heavy-fermion materials. Apart from these studies, work was continued on the analysis of muon motion in metal hydrides. Results of these experiments are described in six papers included as appendices.

  16. Progress towards a practical multicell positron trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danielson, J. R. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093-0319 (United States); Hurst, N. C.; Surko, C. M. [Physics Department, University of California, San Diego La Jolla CA 92093-0319 (United States)

    2013-03-19

    Described here is progress in an experimental program to develop a 21 cell multicell trap for the accumulation and storage of {approx} 10{sup 12} positrons. The basic architecture is an arrangement of multiple Penning-Malmberg (PM) trapped plasmas (i.e., cells) arranged in parallel in a common vacuum system and magnetic field. Experiments are described that are intended to address several key issues, including the effects of large space charge potentials and high plasma densities on: plasma heating, deterioration of confinement, and decreased efficiency of rotating electric fields in producing plasma compression. The confinement of PM plasmas displaced both radially and toward the ends of the uniform magnetic field region will also be investigated.

  17. Trapped individual ion at absolute zero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan; Dehmelt, Hans; Nagourney, Warren

    1989-01-01

    Laser cooling and ion trapping have progressed to such an extent that one can now speak of realizing a confined atom at absolute zero temperature. In this short publication, we analyze an experiment toward such realization using a single Ba+ ion in a miniature rf trap. The Ba+ ion is first laser-cooled to the limit where the ion spends most of its time in the zero-point energy state. Then a test sequence allows one to verify whether or not the ion is actually in its zero-point state. The test sequence may also serve as a device for state selection of an atom at absolute zero temperature. PMID:16594054

  18. Ultrasonic trap for light scattering measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Petr; Pavlu, Jiri

    2017-04-01

    Light scattering is complex phenomenon occurring widely in space environments, including the dense dusty clouds, nebulas or even the upper atmosphere of the Earth. However, when the size of the dust (or of other scattering center) is close to the incident light wavelength, theoretical determination is difficult. In such case, Mie theory is to be used but there is a lack of the material constants for most space-related materials. For experimental measurement of light scattering, we designed unique apparatus, based on ultrasonic trap. Using acoustic levitation we are able to capture the dust grain in midair, irradiate it with laser, and observe scattering directly with goniometer-mounted photodiode. Advantage of this approach is ability to measure directly in the air (thus, no need for the carrier medium) and possibility to study non-spherical particles. Since the trap development is nearly finished and initial experiments are carried out, the paper presents first tests on water droplets.

  19. Trapped quintessential inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueno Sanchez, J.C.; Dimopoulos, K.

    2006-01-01

    Quintessential inflation is studied using a string modulus as the inflaton-quintessence field. The modulus begins its evolution at the steep part of its scalar potential, which is due to non-perturbative effects (e.g. gaugino condensation). It is assumed that the modulus crosses an enhanced symmetry point (ESP) in field space. Particle production at the ESP temporarily traps the modulus resulting in a brief period of inflation. More inflation follows, due to the flatness of the potential, since the ESP generates either an extremum (maximum or minimum) or a flat inflection point in the scalar potential. Eventually, the potential becomes steep again and inflation is terminated. After reheating the modulus freezes due to cosmological friction at a large value, such that its scalar potential is dominated by contributions due to fluxes in the extra dimensions or other effects. The modulus remains frozen until the present, when it can become quintessence and account for the dark energy necessary to explain the observed accelerated expansion

  20. Trap-mulching Argentine ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Jules; Sorenson, Clyde E; Waldvogel, Michael G

    2006-10-01

    Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr), management is constrained, in large part, by polydomy where nestmates are distributed extensively across urban landscapes, particularly within mulch. Management with trap-mulching is a novel approach derived from trap-cropping where ants are repelled from a broad domain of nest sites to smaller defined areas, which are subsequently treated with insecticide. This concept was field-tested with mulch surrounding ornamental trees replaced with a narrow band of pine (Pinus spp.) needle mulch (trap) within a much larger patch of repellent aromatic cedar (Juniperus spp.) mulch. After ants reestablished around the trees, the pine needle mulch band was treated with 0.06% fipronil (Termidor). Poor results were obtained when the trap extended from the tree trunk to the edge of the mulched area. When the trap was applied as a circular band around the tree trunk reductions in the number of foraging ants were recorded through 14 d compared with an untreated mulch control, but not for longer periods. Reductions in the number of ant nests within mulch were no different between the trap mulch and any of the other treatments. We conclude that trap-mulching offers limited benefits, and that successful management of Argentine ants will require implementation of complementary or perhaps alternative strategies.

  1. Equal-Spin Andreev Reflection on Junctions of Spin-Resolved Quantum Hall Bulk State and Spin-Singlet Superconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Sadashige; Ueda, Kento; Baba, Shoji; Kamata, Hiroshi; Tateno, Mizuki; Shabani, Javad; Palmstrøm, Christopher J; Tarucha, Seigo

    2018-02-22

    The recent development of superconducting spintronics has revealed the spin-triplet superconducting proximity effect from a spin-singlet superconductor into a spin-polarized normal metal. In addition recently superconducting junctions using semiconductors are in demand for highly controlled experiments to engineer topological superconductivity. Here we report experimental observation of Andreev reflection in junctions of spin-resolved quantum Hall (QH) states in an InAs quantum well and the spin-singlet superconductor NbTi. The measured conductance indicates a sub-gap feature and two peaks on the outer side of the sub-gap feature in the QH plateau-transition regime increases. The observed structures can be explained by considering transport with Andreev reflection from two channels, one originating from equal-spin Andreev reflection intermediated by spin-flip processes and second arising from normal Andreev reflection. This result indicates the possibility to induce the superconducting proximity gap in the the QH bulk state, and the possibility for the development of superconducting spintronics in semiconductor devices.

  2. The susceptibilities in the spin-S Ising model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainane, A.; Saber, M.

    1995-08-01

    The susceptibilities of the spin-S Ising model are evaluated using the effective field theory introduced by Tucker et al. for studying general spin-S Ising model. The susceptibilities are studied for all spin values from S = 1/2 to S = 5/2. (author). 12 refs, 4 figs

  3. A System For High Flexibility Entangling Gates With Trapped Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milne, Alistair; Edmunds, Claire; Mavadia, Sandeep; Green, Todd; Biercuk, Michael

    Trapped ion qubits may be entangled via coupling to shared modes of motion using spin-dependent forces generated by optical fields. Residual qubit-motional coupling at the conclusion of the entangling operation is the dominant source of infidelity in this type of gate. For synchronously entangling increasing numbers of ions, longer gate times are required to minimise this residual coupling. We present a scheme that enables the state of each qubit to be simultaneously decoupled from all motional modes in an arbitrarily chosen gate time, increasing the gate fidelity and scalability. This is achieved by implementing discrete phase shifts in the optical field moderating the entangling operation. We describe an experimental system based on trapped ytterbium ions and demonstrate this scheme for two-qubit entangling gates on ytterbium ion pairs.

  4. Robust quantum gates between trapped ions using shaped pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ping, E-mail: zouping@m.scnu.edu.cn; Zhang, Zhi-Ming, E-mail: zmzhang@scnu.edu.cn

    2015-12-18

    We improve two existing entangling gate schemes between trapped ion qubits immersed in a large linear crystal. Based on the existing two-qubit gate schemes by applying segmented forces on the individually addressed qubits, we present a systematic method to optimize the shapes of the forces to suppress the dominant source of infidelity. The spin-dependent forces in the scheme can be from periodic photon kicks or from continuous optical pulses. The entangling gates are fast, robust, and have high fidelity. They can be used to implement scalable quantum computation and quantum simulation. - Highlights: • We present a systematic method to optimize the shape of the pulses to decouple qubits from intermediary motional modes. • Our optimized scheme can be applied to both the ultrafast gate and fast gate. • Our optimized scheme can suppress the dominant source of infidelity to arbitrary order. • When the number of trapped ions increase, the number of needed segments increases slowly.

  5. ESR study on free radicals trapped in crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Tabata, Yoneho; Seguchi, Tadao

    1997-01-01

    Free radicals in crosslinked PTFE which formed by 60 Co γ-rays irradiation at 77 K and at room temperature were studied by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The crosslinked PTFE specimens with different crosslinking density were prepared by electron beam irradiation in the molten state. The ESR spectra observed in the irradiated crosslinked PTFE are much different from those in non-crosslinked PTFE (virgin); a broad singlet component increases with increasing the crosslinking density, G-value of radicals is much higher in crosslinked PTFE than in non-crosslinked one. Free radicals related to the broad component are trapped in the non-crystalline region of crosslinked PTFE and rather stable at room temperature, whereas radicals trapped in amorphous non-crosslinked PTFE are unstable at room temperature. It is thought that most of free radicals trapped in the crosslinked PTFE are formed in the crosslinked amorphous region. The trapped radicals decays around 383 K (110 o C) due to the molecular motion of α-relaxation. (Author)

  6. Higher spin gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Henneaux, Marc; Vasiliev, Mikhail A

    2017-01-01

    Symmetries play a fundamental role in physics. Non-Abelian gauge symmetries are the symmetries behind theories for massless spin-1 particles, while the reparametrization symmetry is behind Einstein's gravity theory for massless spin-2 particles. In supersymmetric theories these particles can be connected also to massless fermionic particles. Does Nature stop at spin-2 or can there also be massless higher spin theories. In the past strong indications have been given that such theories do not exist. However, in recent times ways to evade those constraints have been found and higher spin gauge theories have been constructed. With the advent of the AdS/CFT duality correspondence even stronger indications have been given that higher spin gauge theories play an important role in fundamental physics. All these issues were discussed at an international workshop in Singapore in November 2015 where the leading scientists in the field participated. This volume presents an up-to-date, detailed overview of the theories i...

  7. Spin caloritronics in graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Angsula; Frota, H. O. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Amazonas, Av. Rodrigo Octavio 3000-Japiim, 69077-000 Manaus, AM (Brazil)

    2015-06-14

    Spin caloritronics, the combination of spintronics with thermoelectrics, exploiting both the intrinsic spin of the electron and its associated magnetic moment in addition to its fundamental electronic charge and temperature, is an emerging technology mainly in the development of low-power-consumption technology. In this work, we study the thermoelectric properties of a Rashba dot attached to two single layer/bilayer graphene sheets as leads. The temperature difference on the two graphene leads induces a spin current, which depends on the temperature and chemical potential. We demonstrate that the Rashba dot behaves as a spin filter for selected values of the chemical potential and is able to filter electrons by their spin orientation. The spin thermopower has also been studied where the effects of the chemical potential, temperature, and also the Rashba term have been observed.

  8. Spin caloritronics in graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frota, H. O.; Ghosh, Angsula

    2014-08-01

    Spin caloritronics, the combination of spintronics with thermoelectrics, based on spin and heat transport has attracted a great attention mainly in the development of low-power-consumption technology. In this work we study the thermoelectric properties of a quantum dot attached to two single layer graphene sheets as leads. The temperature difference on the two graphene leads induces a spin current which depends on the temperature and chemical potential. We demonstrate that the quantum dot behaves as a spin filter for selected values of the chemical potential and is able to filter electrons by their spin orientation. The spin thermopower has also been studied where the effects of the chemical potential, temperature and also the Coulomb repulsion due to the double occupancy of an energy level have been observed.

  9. Influence of trap color and host volatiles on capture of the emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Damon J; Khrimian, Ashot; Cossé, Allard; Fraser, Ivich; Mastro, Victor C

    2012-04-01

    Field trapping assays were conducted in 2009 and 2010 throughout western Michigan, to evaluate lures for adult emerald ash borer, A. planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). Several ash tree volatiles were tested on purple prism traps in 2009, and a dark green prism trap in 2010. In 2009, six bark oil distillate lure treatments were tested against manuka oil lures (used in 2008 by USDA APHIS PPQ emerald ash borer cooperative program). Purple traps baited with 80/20 (manuka/phoebe oil) significantly increased beetle catch compared with traps baited with manuka oil alone. In 2010 we monitored emerald ash borer attraction to dark green traps baited with six lure combinations of 80/20 (manuka/phoebe), manuka oil, and (3Z)-hexenol. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol caught significantly more male and total count insects than traps baited with manuka oil alone. Traps baited with manuka oil and (3Z)-hexenol did not catch more beetles when compared with traps baited with (3Z)-hexenol alone. When compared with unbaited green traps our results show that (3Z)-hexenol improved male catch significantly in only one of three field experiments using dark green traps. Dark green traps caught a high number of A. planipennis when unbaited while (3Z)-hexenol was seen to have a minimal (nonsignificant) trap catch effect at several different release rates. We hypothesize that the previously reported kairomonal attractancy of (3Z)-hexenol (for males) on light green traps is not as obvious here because of improved male attractancy to the darker green trap.

  10. Spin polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szulczewski, Greg

    2012-01-01

    This chapter reviews tunneling of spin-polarized electrons through molecules positioned between ferromagnetic electrodes, which gives rise to tunneling magnetoresistance. Such measurements yield important insight into the factors governing spin-polarized electron injection into organic semiconductors, thereby offering the possibility to manipulate the quantum-mechanical spin degrees of freedom for charge carriers in optical/electrical devices. In the first section of the chapter a brief description of the Jullière model of spin-dependent electron tunneling is reviewed. Next, a brief description of device fabrication and characterization is presented. The bulk of the review highlights experimental studies on spin-polarized electron tunneling and magnetoresistance in molecular junctions. In addition, some experiments describing spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy on single molecules are mentioned. Finally, some general conclusions and prospectus on the impact of spin-polarized tunneling in molecular junctions are offered.

  11. Electric-field effects in optically generated spin transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish [Nanoscale Science and Technology Centre and School of Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au

    2009-05-25

    Transport of spin-polarized electrons in semiconductors is studied experimentally. Spins are generated by optical excitation because of the selection rules governing optical transitions from heavy-hole and light-hole states to conduction-band states. Experiments designed for the control of spins in semiconductors investigate the bias-dependent spin transport process and detect the spin-polarized electrons during transport. A strong bias dependence is observed. The electric-field effects on the spin-polarized electron transport are also found to be depended on the excitation photon energy and temperature. Based on a field-dependent spin relaxation mechanism, the electric-field effects in the transport process are discussed.

  12. Spin injection from a normal metal into a mesoscopic superconductor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Michael J.; Kolenda, Stefan [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, KIT, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Huebler, Florian [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, KIT, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Center for Functional Nanostructures, KIT, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, KIT, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Loehneysen, Hilbert v. [Center for Functional Nanostructures, KIT, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, KIT, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Physikalisches Institut, KIT, 76128 Karlsruhe (Germany); Beckmann, Detlef [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, KIT, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Center for Functional Nanostructures, KIT, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2013-07-01

    We report on nonlocal transport in superconductor hybrid structures, with ferromagnetic as well as normal-metal tunnel junctions attached to the superconductor. In the presence of a strong Zeeman splitting of the density of states, both charge and spin imbalance is injected into the superconductor. While previous experiments demonstrated spin injection from ferromagnetic electrodes, we show that spin imbalance is also created for normal-metal injector contacts. Using the combination of ferromagnetic and normal-metal detectors allows us to directly discriminate between charge and spin injection, and demonstrate a complete separation of charge and spin imbalance. The relaxation length of the spin imbalance is of the order of several μm and is found to increase with a magnetic field, but is independent of temperature. We further discuss possible relaxation mechanisms for the explanation of the spin relaxation length.

  13. Microstructured segmented Paul trap with tunable magnet field gradient; Mikrostrukturierte segmentierte Paul-Falle mit einstellbarem Magnetfeldgradienten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaufmann, Delia

    2012-02-03

    Strings of laser cooled ions stored in microstructured Paul traps (microtraps) have promising potential for quantum information science. They provide a system which can be screened from a decohering environment, accurately prepared, manipulated and state selectively detected with efficiency close to unity. Magnetic field gradients allow for addressing trapped ions in frequency space. Furthermore, coupling of the ions' motional and spin states and long range spin-spin coupling of the ions' internal states are induced by such a gradient. This method is called Magnetic Gradient Induced Coupling, MAGIC. In this thesis, the design, construction and first characterization of a novel microtrap with an integrated solenoid is reported. The solenoid is designed to create a high magnetic field gradient per dissipated heat. The microtrap consists of three layers stacked onto each other. The outer layers provide a trapping potential, while the inner layer creates the switchable magnetic field gradient. Another specialty of this trap is the 33 pairs of DC-electrodes, allowing to move the ions along the trap axis and to adjust the range and the strength of the ions' spin-spin interactions. The microtrap is fixed on top of a ceramic block that provides the necessary electrical connections via thick film printed wires, a technique adopted in the context of microtraps for the first time, and in addition acts as a vacuum interface. The volume of the vacuum chamber is quite small, allowing for pressures in the low 10{sup -11} mbar range. In this microtrap, {sup 172}Yb{sup +}-ions are trapped, cooled and shuttled over a distance of about 2 mm. Trapped ions are used as magnetic field gradient probes, with a relative magnetic field precision of {delta}B/B{sub 0}=7.10{sup -6}. The addressing of two ions with the MAGIC method in the solenoid's magnetic field gradient is demonstrated.

  14. Quantum simulations of quantum magnetism with hundreds of trapped ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Kevin; Bohnet, Justin; Jordan, Elena; Gaerttner, Martin; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Rey, Ana Maria; Bollinger, John

    2017-04-01

    Quantum simulators, where one well-controlled physical system mimics another complex system, may enable understanding of quantum many-body physics that cannot be fully studied using conventional techniques on classical computers. We describe quantum simulations of a network of interacting magnetic spins performed with 2-dimensional arrays of hundreds Be+ ions crystallized in a Penning trap. We discuss how we engineer a tunable transverse Ising model, and explain how we generate and observe far-from-equilibrium quantum spin dynamics, including signatures of entanglement. We summarize progress exploring optimized adiabatic protocols for preparing low energy states of the transverse Ising Hamiltonian and implementing a sub-Doppler cooling scheme for the drumhead modes of the ion array.

  15. Spin and Maximal Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Papini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the spin current tensor of a Dirac particle at accelerations close to the upper limit introduced by Caianiello. Continual interchange between particle spin and angular momentum is possible only when the acceleration is time-dependent. This represents a stringent limit on the effect that maximal acceleration may have on spin physics in astrophysical applications. We also investigate some dynamical consequences of maximal acceleration.

  16. Spin Hall effect devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Tomáš; Wunderlich, Joerg; Olejník, Kamil

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2012), s. 382-390 ISSN 1476-1122 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN; European Commission(XE) 215368 - SemiSpinNet Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : spin Hall effect * spintronics * spin transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 35.749, year: 2012

  17. Spin coating apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torczynski, John R.

    2000-01-01

    A spin coating apparatus requires less cleanroom air flow than prior spin coating apparatus to minimize cleanroom contamination. A shaped exhaust duct from the spin coater maintains process quality while requiring reduced cleanroom air flow. The exhaust duct can decrease in cross section as it extends from the wafer, minimizing eddy formation. The exhaust duct can conform to entrainment streamlines to minimize eddy formation and reduce interprocess contamination at minimal cleanroom air flow rates.

  18. Pattern of cerebral hyperperfusion in Alzheimer's disease and amnestic mild cognitive impairment using voxel-based analysis of 3D arterial spin-labeling imaging: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding B

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bei Ding,1 Hua-wei Ling,1 Yong Zhang,2 Juan Huang,1 Huan Zhang,1 Tao Wang,3 Fu Hua Yan11Department of Radiology, Ruijin Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Applied Science Laboratory, GE Healthcare, 3Department of Gerontology, Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaPurpose: A three-dimensional (3D continuous pulse arterial spin labeling (ASL technique was used to investigate cerebral blood flow (CBF changes in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI, and age- and sex-matched healthy controls.Materials and methods: Three groups were recruited for comparison, 24 AD patients, 17 MCI patients, and 21 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Three-dimensional ASL scans covering the entire brain were acquired with a 3.0 T magnetic resonance scanner. Spatial processing was performed with statistical parametric mapping 8. A second-level one-way analysis of variance analysis (threshold at P<0.05 was performed on the preprocessed ASL data. An average whole-brain CBF for each subject was also included as group-level covariates for the perfusion data, to control for individual CBF variations.Results: Significantly increased CBF was detected in bilateral frontal lobes and right temporal subgyral regions in aMCI compared with controls. When comparing AD with aMCI, the major hyperperfusion regions were the right limbic lobe and basal ganglia regions, including the putamen, caudate, lentiform nucleus, and thalamus, and hypoperfusion was found in the left medial frontal lobe, parietal cortex, the right middle temporo-occipital lobe, and particularly, the left anterior cingulate gyrus. We also found decreased CBF in the bilateral temporo-parieto-occipital cortices and left limbic lobe in AD patients, relative to the control group. aMCI subjects showed decreased blood flow in the left occipital lobe, bilateral inferior temporal cortex, and right middle temporal cortex

  19. Innovation: the classic traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, Rosabeth Moss

    2006-11-01

    these traps.

  20. A controllable spin prism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hakioglu, T

    2009-01-01

    Based on Khodas et al (2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 086602), we propose a device acting like a controllable prism for an incident spin. The device is a large quantum well where Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions are present and controlled by the plunger gate potential, the electric field and the barrier height. A totally destructive interference can be manipulated externally between the Rashba and Dresselhaus couplings. The spin-dependent transmission/reflection amplitudes are calculated as the control parameters are changed. The device operates as a spin prism/converter/filter in different regimes and may stimulate research in promising directions in spintronics in analogy with linear optics.