WorldWideScience

Sample records for spin physics measurements

  1. Overview of spin physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokosawa, A.

    1992-12-23

    Spin physics activities at medium and high energies became significantly active when polarized targets and polarized beams became accessible for hadron-hadron scattering experiments. My overview of spin physics will be inclined to the study of strong interaction using facilities at Argonne ZGS, Brookhaven AGS (including RHIC), CERN, Fermilab, LAMPF, an SATURNE. In 1960 accelerator physicists had already been convinced that the ZGS could be unique in accelerating a polarized beam; polarized beams were being accelerated through linear accelerators elsewhere at that time. However, there was much concern about going ahead with the construction of a polarized beam because (i) the source intensity was not high enough to accelerate in the accelerator, (ii) the use of the accelerator would be limited to only polarized-beam physics, that is, proton-proton interaction, and (iii) p-p elastic scattering was not the most popular topic in high-energy physics. In fact, within spin physics, [pi]-nucleon physics looked attractive, since the determination of spin and parity of possible [pi]p resonances attracted much attention. To proceed we needed more data beside total cross sections and elastic differential cross sections; measurements of polarization and other parameters were urgently needed. Polarization measurements had traditionally been performed by analyzing the spin of recoil protons. The drawbacks of this technique are: (i) it involves double scattering, resulting in poor accuracy of the data, and (ii) a carbon analyzer can only be used for a limited region of energy.

  2. In a spin at Brookhaven spin physics

    CERN Document Server

    Makdisi, Y I

    2003-01-01

    The mysterious quantity that is spin took centre stage at Brookhaven for the SPIN2002 meeting last September. The 15th biennial International Spin Physics Symposium (SPIN2002) was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on 9-14 September 2002. Some 250 spin enthusiasts attended, including experimenters and theorists in both nuclear and high-energy physics, as well as accelerator physicists and polarized target and polarized source experts. The six-day symposium included 23 plenary talks and 150 parallel talks. SPIN2002 was preceded by a one-day spin physics tutorial for students, postdocs, and anyone else who felt the need for a refresher course. (2 refs).

  3. Spin Physics at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Bradamante, Franco

    2005-01-01

    COMPASS is a new fixed target experiment presently in operation at CERN. It has the goal to investigate hadron structure and hadron spectroscopy by using either muon or hadron beams. From measurements of various hadron asymmetries in polarized muon - nucleon scattering it will be possible to determine the contribution of the gluons to the nucleon spin. Main objective of the hadron program is the search of exotic states, and glueballs in particular. This physics programme is carried out with a two-stage magnetic spectrometer, with particle identification and calorimetry in both stages, which has started collecting physics data in 2002, and will run at the CERN SPS at least until 2010. Preliminary results from the 2002 run with a 160 GeV muon beam are presented for several physics channels under investigation.

  4. Spin physics at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Operation of RHIC with two beams of highly polarized protons (70%, either longitudinal or transverse) at high luminosity L = 2 x 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 for two months/year will allow the STAR and PHENIX detectors to perform high statististics studies of polarization phenomena in the perturbative region of hard scattering where both QCD and ElectroWeak theory make detailed predictions for polarization effects. The collision c.m. energy, √s = 200 - 500 GeV, represents a new domain for the study of spin. Direct photon production will be used to measure the gluon polarization in the polarized proton. A new twist comes from W-boson production which is expected to be 100% parity violating and will thus allow measurements of flavor separated Quark and antiquark (u, bar u, d, bar d) polarization distributions. Searches for parity violation in strong interaction processes such as jet and leading particle production will be a sensitive way to look for new physics beyond the standard model, one possibility being quark substructure

  5. Prospects for spin physics at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinett, R.W.; Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA

    1995-06-01

    The proposal to perform polarized proton-proton collisions at collider energies at RHIC is reviewed. After a brief reminder of the desirability of high energy spin physics measurements, we discuss the machine parameters and detector features which are taken to define a program of spin physics at RHIC. Some of the many physics processes which can provide information on polarized parton distributions and the spin-dependence of QCD and the electroweak model at RHIC energies are discussed

  6. Black Hole Spin Measurement Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvesen, Greg; Begelman, Mitchell C.

    2018-01-01

    Angular momentum, or spin, is one of only two fundamental properties of astrophysical black holes, and measuring its value has numerous applications. For instance, obtaining reliable spin measurements could constrain the growth history of supermassive black holes and reveal whether relativistic jets are powered by tapping into the black hole spin reservoir. The two well-established techniques for measuring black hole spin can both be applied to X-ray binaries, but are in disagreement for cases of non-maximal spin. This discrepancy must be resolved if either technique is to be deemed robust. We show that the technique based on disc continuum fitting is sensitive to uncertainties regarding the disc atmosphere, which are observationally unconstrained. By incorporating reasonable uncertainties into black hole spin probability density functions, we demonstrate that the spin measured by disc continuum fitting can become highly uncertain. Future work toward understanding how the observed disc continuum is altered by atmospheric physics, particularly magnetic fields, will further strengthen black hole spin measurement techniques.

  7. Spin physics by the SMC

    CERN Document Server

    Le Goff, J M

    2000-01-01

    The Spin Muon Collaboration at CERN has covered a wide range of spin physics. The main aim of the collaboration was the measurement of the $g_{1}$ spin structure functions of the proton and the neutron (using deuteron targets) in the range $0.003spin structure functions $g_{2}$ were also measured, which allowed for a reduction on the error in $g_{1}$. Semi-inclusive data were analyzed in order to produce the first polarized quark distributions. Data obtained with a dedicated low $x$ trigger extend down to $x=6 \\times 10^{-5}$ for $Q^{2} \\geq$ 0.01 GeV$^{2}$. Some more specifics channels are still being analyzed, they include asymmetry in diffractive $\\rho$ production, hadron azimuthal asymmetry with a transversely polarized target, measurement of the longitudinal $\\Lambda$ polarization, and the asymmetry in high $P_{t}$ hadron pair production. This last asymmetry is related to the gluon polar...

  8. Hard Probes and Spin Physics at STAR

    CERN Document Server

    Tokarev, M V

    2004-01-01

    Spin is one of the most enigmatic and least understandable properties of elementary particles. The study of the proton spin puzzle is an important part of the physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) accelerating both nuclei and polarized protons. STAR is one of the two large detectors at RHIC. It has an excellent capability for spin physics. In the present work the overview of the STAR spin physics program is given. It includes the highest priority measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries allowing one to determine gluon contribution to proton spin, to separate sea and valence quark flavor polarizations, to measure quark transversity. A brief description of the RHIC accelerator complex, some detail of the STAR detector and its perfomance are presented.

  9. Spin physics in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book offers an extensive introduction to the extremely rich and intriguing field of spin-related phenomena in semiconductors. In this second edition, all chapters have been updated to include the latest experimental and theoretical research. Furthermore, it covers the entire field: bulk semiconductors, two-dimensional semiconductor structures, quantum dots, optical and electric effects, spin-related effects, electron-nuclei spin interactions, Spin Hall effect, spin torques, etc. Thanks to its self-contained style, the book is ideally suited for graduate students and researchers new to the field.

  10. Physics lab in spin

    CERN Multimedia

    Hawkes, N

    1999-01-01

    RAL is fostering commerical exploitation of its research and facilities in two main ways : spin-out companies exploit work done at the lab, spin-in companies work on site taking advantage of the facilities and the expertise available (1/2 page).

  11. SPIN PHYSICS: Lasers at work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Lasers are now an everyday tool in particle physics, particularly for the spin polarization of beams, targets, and even short-lived particles. Development has been boosted in recent years by the availability of reliable multiwatt tunable lasers to select spin in an experimentally useful sample

  12. [Spin dependent phenomena in medium energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souder, P.A.

    1992-11-01

    The Syracuse University Medium Energy Physics Group was actively engaged in several research projects. A laser was used to polarize muonic atoms with the goal of measuring fundamental spin-dependent parameters in the reaction μ - + 3 He → 3 H + ν. Time-averaged polarizations of 26.8±2.3% were achieved for the muon in muonic 3 He. The new approach uses atomic spin-dependent reactions between laser polarized Rb vapor and muonic helium. To exploit these high polarizations in a muon capture experiment an ion chamber which will detect the recoil tritons and also serve as a polarizing cell. Final data-taking will begin for an experiment to measure the spin-dependent structure functions of the neutron. A 288-element hodoscope system which features good timing and precise mechanical tolerances was constructed and evaluated

  13. QCD SPIN PHYSICS IN HADRONIC INTERACTIONS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VOGELSANG,W.

    2007-06-19

    We discuss spin phenomena in high-energy hadronic scattering, with a particular emphasis on the spin physics program now underway at the first polarized proton-proton collider, RHIC. Experiments at RHIC unravel the spin structure of the nucleon in new ways. Prime goals are to determine the contribution of gluon spins to the proton spin, to elucidate the flavor structure of quark and antiquark polarizations in the nucleon, and to help clarify the origin of transverse-spin phenomena in QCD. These lectures describe some aspects of this program and of the associated physics.

  14. Spin physics highlights from STAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson A.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the world’s only polarized proton collider, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC at Brookhaven plays an important role in understanding the spin structure of the proton. The STAR detector, with its large acceptance for calorimetry and tracking, has been used to study polarized proton collisions for more than a decade with a range of jet, meson, and boson probes. We will discuss jets, neutral pions, and W bosons as probes of the proton’s helicity structure. Here STAR measurements have significant impact on global fits of sea quark polarizations and have provided the first firm evidence of non-zero gluon polarization within the proton. We will discuss W/Z bosons, jets, pions, and pion-jet correlations as probes of the transverse spin structure of the proton, and we will use the example of a proposed dijet measurement with an upgraded STAR detector to peer into the future.

  15. Overview of longitudinal spin physics at PHENIX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Mingxiong

    2007-01-01

    We present a brief overview of the longitudinal spin physics program in the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL. The main goal is to study the longitudinal spin structure of the proton with strongly interacting probes at high energy to resolve the long standing 'spin crisis'. The latest results from PHENIX are presented. (author)

  16. 21st International Symposium on Spin Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Bo-Qiang; SPIN 2014; SPIN2014

    2016-01-01

    This special volume collected important papers written by leading experts, highlighting the latest research findings in various topics of spin phenomena in particle and nuclear physics. The contents are originated from the plenary talks at the latest symposium of the Spin Physics series (SPIN2014) which was held in Beijing, China, October 20-24, 2014.The volume also comprises a special collection of contributions in memory of the late Professor Michel Borghini, an outstanding physicist well remembered for his great contributions to the progress of high energy spin physics.

  17. Spin physics at RHIC: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    journal of. November 2003 physics pp. 859–864. Spin physics at RHIC: Present and future. ABHAY DESHPANDE. RIKEN BNL Research Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000, USA. Abstract. ..... [5] G Rakness et al, Proceedings of SPIN2002 Symposium (to be published by APS). [6] Y Fukao et al ...

  18. Electron spin resonance and spin-valley physics in a silicon double quantum dot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Xiaojie; Ruskov, Rusko; Xiao, Ming; Tahan, Charles; Jiang, HongWen

    2014-05-14

    Silicon quantum dots are a leading approach for solid-state quantum bits. However, developing this technology is complicated by the multi-valley nature of silicon. Here we observe transport of individual electrons in a silicon CMOS-based double quantum dot under electron spin resonance. An anticrossing of the driven dot energy levels is observed when the Zeeman and valley splittings coincide. A detected anticrossing splitting of 60 MHz is interpreted as a direct measure of spin and valley mixing, facilitated by spin-orbit interaction in the presence of non-ideal interfaces. A lower bound of spin dephasing time of 63 ns is extracted. We also describe a possible experimental evidence of an unconventional spin-valley blockade, despite the assumption of non-ideal interfaces. This understanding of silicon spin-valley physics should enable better control and read-out techniques for the spin qubits in an all CMOS silicon approach.

  19. Hardy's argument and successive spin-s measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahanj, Ali

    2010-01-01

    We consider a hidden-variable theoretic description of successive measurements of noncommuting spin observables on an input spin-s state. In this scenario, the hidden-variable theory leads to a Hardy-type argument that quantum predictions violate it. We show that the maximum probability of success of Hardy's argument in quantum theory is ((1/2)) 4s , which is more than in the spatial case.

  20. Measuring spin of black holes in the universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Measuring spin of black holes in the universe. Department of Physics Indian Institute of Science Bangalore. Notes: 74th Annual Meeting of Indian Academy of Science.

  1. A Probabilistic Model of Spin and Spin Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Arend

    2016-01-01

    Several theoretical publications on the Dirac equation published during the last decades have shown that, an interpretation is possible, which ascribes the origin of electron spin and magnetic moment to an autonomous circular motion of the point-like charged particle around a fixed centre. In more recent publications an extension of the original so called "Zitterbewegung Interpretation" of quantum mechanics was suggested, in which the spin results from an average of instantaneous spin vectors over a Zitterbewegung period. We argue that, the corresponding autonomous motion of the electron should, if it is real, determine non-relativistic spin measurements. Such a direct connection with the established formal quantum mechanical description of spin measurements, into which spin is introduced as a "non-classical" quantity has, to our knowledge, not been reported. In the present work we show that, under certain "model assumptions" concerning the proposed autonomous motion, results of spin measurements, including measurements of angular correlations in singlet systems, can indeed be correctly described using classical probabilities. The success of the model is evidence for the "reality" of the assumed autonomous motion. The resulting model violates the Bell—inequalities to the same extent as quantum mechanics.

  2. Gauge Physics of Spin Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Seng Ghee; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.; Ho, Cong Son; Siu, Zhuobin; Murakami, Shuichi

    2015-12-01

    Spin Hall effect (SHE) has been discussed in the context of Kubo formulation, geometric physics, spin orbit force, and numerous semi-classical treatments. It can be confusing if the different pictures have partial or overlapping claims of contribution to the SHE. In this article, we present a gauge-theoretic, time-momentum elucidation, which provides a general SHE equation of motion, that unifies under one theoretical framework, all contributions of SHE conductivity due to the kinetic, the spin orbit force (Yang-Mills), and the geometric (Murakami-Fujita) effects. Our work puts right an ambiguity surrounding previously partial treatments involving the Kubo, semiclassical, Berry curvatures, or the spin orbit force. Our full treatment shows the Rashba 2DEG SHE conductivity to be instead of -, and Rashba heavy hole instead of -. This renewed treatment suggests a need to re-derive and re-calculate previously studied SHE conductivity.

  3. 167th International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi" : Strangeness and Spin in Fundamental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Bressani, T; Feliciello, A; Ratcliffe, Ph G

    2008-01-01

    Strangeness and Spin in Fundamental Physics is dedicated to the discussion of the role played by two subtle and somehow puzzling quantum numbers, the strangeness and the spin, in fundamental physics. They both relate to basic properties of the fundamental quantum field theories describing strong and electro-weak interactions and to their phenomenological applications. In some instances, like the partonic spin structure of the proton, they are deeply correlated. The many puzzling results recently obtained by measuring several spin asymmetries have stimulated gigantic progresses in the study of the spin structure of protons and neutrons. Intense theoretical activity has discovered new features of non-perturbative QCD, like strong correlations between the spin and the intrinsic motions of quarks inside the nucleons. The purpose of this publication is that of providing a complete, updated and critical account of the most recent and relevant discoveries in the above fields, both from the experimental and theoretic...

  4. Spin physics at RHIC: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I will review the progress made by the RHIC spin program, followed by the physics goals for the next few years. After that I will present a brief overview of a proposal to build a high intensity polarized electron/positron beam facility at BNL which would enable deep inelastic scattering (DIS) experiments to be pursued at BNL ...

  5. 16th Workshop on High Energy Spin Physics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The Workshop will cover a wide range of spin phenomena at high and intermediate energies such as: recent experimental data on spin physics the nucleon spin structure and GPD's spin physics and QCD spin physics in the Standard Model and beyond T-odd spin effects polarization and heavy ion physics spin in gravity and astrophysics the future spin physics facilities spin physics at NICA polarimeters for high energy polarized beams acceleration and storage of polarized beams the new polarization technology related subjects The Workshop will be held in the Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics of the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna, Moscow Region, Russia. The program of the workshop will include plenary and parallel (if necessary) sessions. Plenary sessions will be held in the Conference Hall. Parallel sections will take place in the same building. There will be invited talks (up to 40 min) and original reports (20 min). The invited speakers will present new experimental and theoretical re...

  6. Spin and precision electroweak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marciano, W.J.

    1993-01-01

    A perspective on fundamental parameters and precision tests of the Standard Model is given. Weak neutral current reactions are discussed with emphasis on those processes involving (polarized) electrons. The role of electroweak radiative corrections in determining the top quark mass and probing for ''new physics'' is described

  7. Spin and precision electroweak physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marciano, W.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-01

    A perspective on fundamental parameters and precision tests of the Standard Model is given. Weak neutral current reactions are discussed with emphasis on those processes involving (polarized) electrons. The role of electroweak radiative corrections in determining the top quark mass and probing for {open_quotes}new physics{close_quotes} is described.

  8. Spin noise measurement with diamagnetic atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeuchi, M.; Ichihara, S.; Takano, T.; Kumakura, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2007-01-01

    We report the measurement of the atomic spin noise of the diamagnetic atom ytterbium (Yb). Yb has various merits for utilizing the quantum nature of the atomic spin ensemble compared with the paramagnetic atoms used in all previous experiments. From the magnitude of the noise level and dependence on the detuning, we concluded that we succeeded in the measurement of 171 Yb atomic spin noise in an atomic beam

  9. Physics of Resonating Valence Bond Spin Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildeboer, Julia Saskia

    This thesis will investigate various aspects of the physics of resonating valence bond spin liquids. After giving an introduction to the world that lies beyond Landau's priciple of symmetry breaking, e.g. giving an overview of exotic magnetic phases and how they can be described and (possibly) found, we will study a spin-rotationally invariant model system with a known parent Hamiltonian, and argue its ground state to lie within a highly sought after exotic phase, namely the Z2 quantum spin liquid phase. A newly developed numerical procedure --Pfaffian Monte Carlo-- will be introduced to amass evidence that our model Hamiltonian indeed exhibits a Z2 quantum spin liquid phase. Subsequently, we will prove a useful mathematical property of the resonating valence bond states: these states are shown to be linearly independent. Various lattices are investigated concerning this property, and its applications and usefullness are discussed. Eventually, we present a simplified model system describing the interplay of the well known Heisenberg interaction and the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction term acting on a sawtooth chain. The effect of the interplay between the two interaction couplings on the phase diagram is investigated. To do so, we employ modern techniques such as the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) scheme. We find that for weak DM interaction the system exhibits valence bond order. However, a strong enough DM coupling destroys this order.

  10. Magnetic field devices for neutron spin transport and manipulation in precise neutron spin rotation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado-Velázquez, M. [Posgrado en Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510 (Mexico); Barrón-Palos, L., E-mail: libertad@fisica.unam.mx [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 20-364, 01000 (Mexico); Crawford, C. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Snow, W.M. [Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2017-05-11

    The neutron spin is a critical degree of freedom for many precision measurements using low-energy neutrons. Fundamental symmetries and interactions can be studied using polarized neutrons. Parity-violation (PV) in the hadronic weak interaction and the search for exotic forces that depend on the relative spin and velocity, are two questions of fundamental physics that can be studied via the neutron spin rotations that arise from the interaction of polarized cold neutrons and unpolarized matter. The Neutron Spin Rotation (NSR) collaboration developed a neutron polarimeter, capable of determining neutron spin rotations of the order of 10{sup −7} rad per meter of traversed material. This paper describes two key components of the NSR apparatus, responsible for the transport and manipulation of the spin of the neutrons before and after the target region, which is surrounded by magnetic shielding and where residual magnetic fields need to be below 100 μG. These magnetic field devices, called input and output coils, provide the magnetic field for adiabatic transport of the neutron spin in the regions outside the magnetic shielding while producing a sharp nonadiabatic transition of the neutron spin when entering/exiting the low-magnetic-field region. In addition, the coils are self contained, forcing the return magnetic flux into a compact region of space to minimize fringe fields outside. The design of the input and output coils is based on the magnetic scalar potential method.

  11. Physics and application of persistent spin helix state in semiconductor heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohda, Makoto; Salis, Gian

    2017-07-01

    In order to utilize the spin degree of freedom in semiconductors, control of spin states and transfer of the spin information are fundamental requirements for future spintronic devices and quantum computing. Spin orbit (SO) interaction generates an effective magnetic field for moving electrons and enables spin generation, spin manipulation and spin detection without using external magnetic field and magnetic materials. However, spin relaxation also takes place due to a momentum dependent SO-induced effective magnetic field. As a result, SO interaction is considered to be a double-edged sword facilitating spin control but preventing spin transport over long distances. The persistent spin helix (PSH) state solves this problem since uniaxial alignment of the SO field with SU(2) symmetry enables the suppression of spin relaxation while spin precession can still be controlled. Consequently, understanding the PSH becomes an important step towards future spintronic technologies for classical and quantum applications. Here, we review recent progress of PSH in semiconductor heterostructures and its device application. Fundamental physics of SO interaction and the conditions of a PSH state in semiconductor heterostructures are discussed. We introduce experimental techniques to observe a PSH and explain both optical and electrical measurements for detecting a long spin relaxation time and the formation of a helical spin texture. After emphasizing the bulk Dresselhaus SO coefficient γ, the application of PSH states for spin transistors and logic circuits are discussed.

  12. Self-organization of physical fields and spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestov, I.B.

    2008-01-01

    The subject of the present investigation is the laws of intrinsic self-organization of fundamental physical fields. In the framework of the Theory of Self-Organization the geometrical and physical nature of spin phenomena is uncovered. The key points are spin symmetry (the fundamental realization of the concept of geometrical internal symmetry) and the spinning field (space of defining representation of spin symmetry). It is shown that the essence of spin is the bipolar structure of spin symmetry induced by the gravitational potentials. The bipolar structure provides natural violation of spin symmetry and leads to spinstatics (theory of spinning field outside the time) and spindynamics. The equations of spinstatics and spindynamics are derived. It is shown that Sommerfeld's formula can be derived from the equations of spindynamics and hence the correspondence principle is valid. This means that the Theory of Self-Organization provides the new understanding of spin phenomena

  13. RESEARCH PLAN FOR SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AIDALA, C.; BUNCE, G.; ET AL.

    2005-02-01

    In this report we present the research plan for the RHIC spin program. The report covers (1) the science of the RHIC spin program in a world-wide context; (2) the collider performance requirements for the RHIC spin program; (3) the detector upgrades required, including timelines; (4) time evolution of the spin program.

  14. Resilience Evaluation of Demand Response as Spinning Reserve under Cyber-Physical Threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anas AlMajali

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the future, automated demand response mechanisms will be used as spinning reserve. Demand response in the smart grid must be resilient to cyber-physical threats. In this paper, we evaluate the resilience of demand response when used as spinning reserve in the presence of cyber-physical threats. We quantify this evaluation by correlating the stability of the system in the presence of attacks measured by system frequency (Hz and attack level measured by the amount of load (MW that responds to the demand response event. The results demonstrate the importance of anticipating the dependability of demand response before it can be relied upon as spinning reserve.

  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physical Activity Basics Needs for Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for ... Adding Physical Activity to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical ...

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines ... Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend ...

  17. Measuring the spins of accreting black holes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClintock, Jeffrey E; Narayan, Ramesh; Gou, Lijun; Kulkarni, Akshay; Penna, Robert F; Steiner, James F; Davis, Shane W; Orosz, Jerome A; Remillard, Ronald A

    2011-01-01

    A typical galaxy is thought to contain tens of millions of stellar-mass black holes, the collapsed remnants of once massive stars, and a single nuclear supermassive black hole. Both classes of black holes accrete gas from their environments. The accreting gas forms a flattened orbiting structure known as an accretion disk. During the past several years, it has become possible to obtain measurements of the spins of the two classes of black holes by modeling the x-ray emission from their accretion disks. Two methods are employed, both of which depend upon identifying the inner radius of the accretion disk with the innermost stable circular orbit, whose radius depends only on the mass and spin of the black hole. In the Fe Kα method, which applies to both classes of black holes, one models the profile of the relativistically broadened iron line with a special focus on the gravitationally redshifted red wing of the line. In the continuum-fitting (CF) method, which has so far only been applied to stellar-mass black holes, one models the thermal x-ray continuum spectrum of the accretion disk. We discuss both methods, with a strong emphasis on the CF method and its application to stellar-mass black holes. Spin results for eight stellar-mass black holes are summarized. These data are used to argue that the high spins of at least some of these black holes are natal, and that the presence or absence of relativistic jets in accreting black holes is not entirely determined by the spin of the black hole.

  18. Vibration dependence of the tensor spin-spin and scalar spin-spin hyperfine interactions by precision measurement of hyperfine structures of 127I2 near 532 nm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong Fenglei; Zhang Yun; Ishikawa, Jun; Onae, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Hirokazu

    2002-01-01

    Hyperfine structures of the R(87)33-0, R(145)37-0, and P(132)36-0 transitions of molecular iodine near 532 nm are measured by observing the heterodyne beat-note signal of two I 2 -stabilized lasers, whose frequencies are bridged by an optical frequency comb generator. The measured hyperfine splittings are fit to a four-term Hamiltonian, which includes the electric quadrupole, spin-rotation, tensor spin-spin, and scalar spin-spin interactions, with an accuracy of ∼720 Hz. High-accurate hyperfine constants are obtained from this fit. Vibration dependences of the tensor spin-spin and scalar spin-spin hyperfine constants are determined for molecular iodine, for the first time to our knowledge. The observed hyperfine transitions are good optical frequency references in the 532-nm region

  19. Scientific articles of the RBRC/CCAST Symposium on Spin Physics Lattice QCD and RHIC Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This volume comprises scientific articles of the symposium on spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC physics organized by RIKEN BNL research center (RBRC) and China center of advanced science and technology (CCAST). The talks were discussing the spin structure of nucleons and other problems of RHIC physics

  20. RHIC spin physics: Proceedings. Volume 7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This proceedings compiles one-page summaries and five transparencies for each talk, with the intention that the speaker should include a web location for additional information in the summary. Also, email addresses are given with the participant list. The order follows the agenda: gluon, polarimetry, accelerator, W production and quark/antiquark polarization, parity violation searches, transversity, single transverse spin, small angle elastic scattering, and the final talk on ep collisions at RHIC. The authors begin the Proceedings with the full set of transparencies from Bob Jaffe`s colloquium on spin, by popular request.

  1. RHIC spin physics: Proceedings. Volume 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This proceedings compiles one-page summaries and five transparencies for each talk, with the intention that the speaker should include a web location for additional information in the summary. Also, email addresses are given with the participant list. The order follows the agenda: gluon, polarimetry, accelerator, W production and quark/antiquark polarization, parity violation searches, transversity, single transverse spin, small angle elastic scattering, and the final talk on ep collisions at RHIC. The authors begin the Proceedings with the full set of transparencies from Bob Jaffe's colloquium on spin, by popular request

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gov . Physical Activity Physical Activity Basics Needs for Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for ... Adding Physical Activity to Your Life Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart ...

  3. Spin physics at RHIC: Present and future

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a high intensity polarized electron/positron beam facility at BNL which would enable deep inelastic scattering (DIS) ... written down by Bjorken a couple of decades earlier, using operator product expansion. (OPE). The relation, known .... at RHIC via the production of mesons as well as Drell–Yan process. Other single-spin.

  4. Dynamical measurements of the Spin Hall angle

    OpenAIRE

    Talalaevskyy, Oleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Broad study of magnetic properties of YIG films is performed. This thesis covers the whole path from YIG sample growth to characterization of magnetization dynamics. In the sub-chapter 5.1, full magnetic characterization of the thin sputtered YIG films is given. A batch of YIG samples with thicknesses of 19, 29, 38 and 49 nanometer is grown by magnetron sputtering for the spin waves experiment. The thickness and the surface roughness are controlled by XRR and AFM measurements. The obtained sa...

  5. Spin formalism and applications to new physics searches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haber, H.E. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    An introduction to spin techniques in particle physics is given. Among the topics covered are: helicity formalism and its applications to the decay and scattering of spin-1/2 and spin-1 particles, techniques for evaluating helicity amplitudes (including projection operator methods and the spinor helicity method), and density matrix techniques. The utility of polarization and spin correlations for untangling new physics beyond the Standard Model at future colliders such as the LHC and a high energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider is then considered. A number of detailed examples are explored including the search for low-energy supersymmetry, a non-minimal Higgs boson sector, and new gauge bosons beyond the W{sup {+-}} and Z.

  6. Spin-offs of high energy physics to society

    CERN Document Server

    Amaldi, Ugo

    2000-01-01

    Scientists are more and more frequently asked about the spin-offs of fundamental research. To answer effectively, it is important to organise the multiple aspects of knowledge and technology transfer in a coherent scheme. In this paper the spin-offs of particle physics to other fields of science and to industries are grouped in four streams: usable knowledge, people, methods and technologies. After treating these four items, with examples and suggestions of ways to improve the quality and quantity of the spin-offs, the pathways through which the results and the techniques of fundamental science percolate to society are discussed. (33 refs).

  7. On fractional spin symmetries and statistical physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saidi, E.H.

    1995-09-01

    The partition function Z and the quantum distribution of systems Σ of identical particles of fractional spin s = 1/k mod 1, k ≥ 2, generalizing the well-known Bose and Fermi ones, are derived. The generalized Sommerfeld development of the distribution around T = O deg. K is given. The low temperature analysis of statistical systems Σ is made. Known results are recovered. (author). 26 refs, 6 figs

  8. Measuring slepton spin at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00064725

    2006-01-01

    A new method is presented for measuring the spin of selectrons and smuons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), using an angular variable which is sensitive to the polar angle in direct slepton pair production. This variable is invariant under boosts along the beam axis, so it can be used at the LHC despite the fact that the longitudinal boost of the centre-of-mass frame cannot be determined. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that, using this method, the LHC can distinguish between the supersymmetric production angular distribution and phase space, or between supersymmetry and the production angular distribution of universal extra dimensions. An integrated luminosity of about 100 to 300 inverse fb provides sufficient statistics to measure the slepton spin for points which had left-handed slepton masses in the range 202 to 338 GeV, and right-handed sleptons in the range 143 to 252 GeV. Good sensitivity was found in the `bulk' and `stau co-annihilation' regions of the cMSSM favoured by cosmological relic densit...

  9. Nanoscale Measurements of Magnetism & Spin Coherence in Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-17

    Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 spin polarized measurements, single spins, single spin manipulation REPORT DOCUMENTATION...Received Paper 6.00 Ali Yazdani. Visualizing Majorana fermions in a chain of magnetic atoms on a superconductor, Nobel Symposium 156, New forms of...level and also for the first time probe spin orbit coupling. This system led to first direct visualization of a Majorana fermion in a condensed

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  11. Spin physics experiments at NICA-SPD with polarized proton and deuteron beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savin, I.; Efremov, A.; Pshekhonov, D.; Kovalenko, A.; Teryaev, O.; Shevchenko, O.; Nagajcev, A.; Guskov, A.; Kukhtin, V.; Toplilin, N. [JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-15

    This is a brief description of suggested measurements of asymmetries of the Drell-Yan (DY) pair production in collisions of non-polarized, longitudinally and transversally polarized protons and deuterons which provide an access to all leading-twist collinear and TMD PDFs of quarks and anti-quarks in nucleons. Other spin effects in hadronic and heavy-ion collisions may be also studied constituting the spin physics program at NICA. (orig.)

  12. (Medium energy spin physics with lasers)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cates, G.D.

    1992-01-01

    During the first two years of this program, we have successfully investigated two new methods for the production of polarized muonic helium. This work was done at LAMPF in collarboration with a group from Syracuse University. Traditionally, polarized muonic helium has been formed by stopping polarized muons in unpolarized atoms. Unfortunately, because of depolarization in the muon cascade to the ground state, residual polarizations are only {approximately}3%. The two methods we have developed both achieve much higher muon polarizations. To accomplish our goals, we first developed an appropriate muon beam for use with our small gas targets. During the summer of 1990, we stopped unpolarized negative muons in nuclear polarized {sup 3}He. The muons were polarized in the cascade to the ground state through the hyperfine interaction with the nucleus. The resulting muon polarizations were 7.2 {plus minus} 0.8% for a 100% nuclear polarized target. While higher polarizations are clearly desirable for practical purposes, this experiment yielded important insights on spin interactions that occur in muonic atoms. Also, the ability to rapidly reverse the target polarization gave the experiment good sensitivity with minimal systematic effects. Last summer, we completed an experiment in which we polarized muonic helium by direct spin interaction with an optically pumped Rb vapor. In this technique, the muonic helium atom is polarized through a combination of charge exchange and spin exchange with the polarized valence electron of the Rb vapor. In contrast to the technique described in appendix A, the {sup 3}He nuclei are not polarized. This last technique yielded dramatic polarizations approaching 50%.

  13. Spin Transport Measurements in Hydrogenated Graphene Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koon, Gavin; Balakrishnan, Jayakumar; Oezyilmaz, Barbaros

    2013-03-01

    Graphene with all its extraordinary properties still fall short when it comes to manipulation of electron spins. Chemically modified Graphene has been explored by many to further enhance Graphene properties, tailoring it to suit desired application purposes. Here we study the effects of hydrogenation rate on graphene spin transport, spin relaxation time and length in this defected system. These findings are important for future theoretical and experimental studies on other adatoms modified Graphene.

  14. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test is a simple way to measure relative intensity. ...

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Activities for Children Activities for Older Adults Overcoming Barriers Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Target Heart Rate & Estimated ... YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act ...

  17. Safeguards and physics measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carchon, R.

    2002-01-01

    SCK-CEN's programme on safeguards and physics measurements involves gamma and neutron dosimetry, calibrations and irradiations, electronic support, metrology of various samples including internal contamination of human beings, of waste barrels and of fissile materials, neutron activation analysis, and radioisotope source preparation. The document reports on the main activities and achievements of the sections 'Instrumentation, Calibration and Dosimetry' and 'Safeguards and Nuclear Physics Measurements'

  18. Measurement of spin observables using a storage ring with polarized beam and polarized internal gas target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, K.; Miller, M.A.; Smith, A.; Hansen, J.; Bloch, C.; van den Brand, J.F.J.; Bulten, H.J.; Ent, R.; Goodman, C.D.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jones, C.E.; Korsch, W.; Leuschner, M.; Lorenzon, W.; Marchlenski, D.; Meyer, H.O.; Milner, R.G.; Neal, J.S.; Pancella, P.V.; Pate, S.F.; Pitts, W.K.; von Przewoski, B.; Rinckel, T.; Sowinski, J.; Sperisen, F.; Sugarbaker, E.; Tschalaer, C.; Unal, O.; Zhou, Z.

    1993-01-01

    We report the first measurement of analyzing powers and spin correlation parameters using a storage ring with both beam and internal target polarized. Spin observables were measured for elastic scattering of 45 and 198 MeV protons from polarized 3 He nuclei in a new laser-pumped internal gas target at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility Cooler Ring. Scattered protons and recoil 3 He nuclei were detected in coincidence with large acceptance plastic scintillators and silicon detectors. The internal-target technique demonstrated in this experiment has broad applicability to the measurement of spin-dependent scattering in nuclear and particle physics

  19. SLAC workshop on high energy electroproduction and spin physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    These Proceedings contain copies of the transparencies presented at the Workshop on High Energy Electroproduction and Spin Physics held at SLAC on February 5--8, 1992. The purpose of this Workshop was to bring people together to discuss the possibilities for new experiments using the SLAC high intensity electron and photon beams and the facilities of End Station A

  20. The spin-valve transistor: Fabrication, characterization and physics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, R.; van 't Erve, O.M.J.; Kim, S.D.; Vlutters, R.; Anil Kumar, P.S.; Lodder, J.C.

    2001-01-01

    An overview is given of the fabrication, basic properties, and physics of the spin-valve transistor. We describe the layout of this three-terminal ferromagnet/semiconductor hybrid device, as well as the operating principle. Fabrication technologies are discussed, including vacuum metal bonding. We

  1. Spin diffusion in bulk GaN measured with MnAs spin injector

    KAUST Repository

    Jahangir, Shafat

    2012-07-16

    Spin injection and precession in bulk wurtzite n-GaN with different doping densities are demonstrated with a ferromagnetic MnAs contact using the three-terminal Hanle measurement technique. Theoretical analysis using minimum fitting parameters indicates that the spin accumulation is primarily in the n-GaN channel rather than at the ferromagnet (FM)/semiconductor (SC) interface states. Spin relaxation in GaN is interpreted in terms of the D’yakonov-Perel mechanism, yielding a maximum spin lifetime of 44 ps and a spin diffusion length of 175 nm at room temperature. Our results indicate that epitaxial ferromagnetic MnAs is a suitable high-temperature spin injector for GaN.

  2. Thin Scintillating Polarized Targets for Spin Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.

    2003-07-01

    At PSI polarized scintillating targets are available since 1996. Proton polarizations of more than 80%, and deuteron polarizations of 25% in polystyrene-based scintillators can be reached under optimum conditions in a vertical dilution refrigerator with optical access, suited for nuclear and particle physics experiments. New preparation procedures allow to provide very thin polarizable scintillating targets and widen the spectrum of conceivable experiments.

  3. Model of the electron spin in stochastic physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spavieri, Gianfranco

    1990-01-01

    The electron is conceived here as a complex structure composed of a subparticle that is bound to a nearly circular motion. Although in quantum mechanics the spin is not representable, in classical stochastic physics this corresponds to the angular momentum of the subparticle. In fact, assuming Schrödinger-type hydrodynamic equations of motion for the subparticle, the spin-1/2 representation in configuration space and the corresponding Pauli matrices for the electron are obtained. The Hamiltonian of Pauli's theory as the nonrelativistic limit of Dirac's equation is also derived.

  4. Inferences about Supernova Physics from Gravitational-Wave Measurements: GW151226 Spin Misalignment as an Indicator of Strong Black-Hole Natal Kicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Gerosa, Davide; Wysocki, Daniel

    2017-07-07

    The inferred parameters of the binary black hole GW151226 are consistent with nonzero spin for the most massive black hole, misaligned from the binary's orbital angular momentum. If the black holes formed through isolated binary evolution from an initially aligned binary star, this misalignment would then arise from a natal kick imparted to the first-born black hole at its birth during stellar collapse. We use simple kinematic arguments to constrain the characteristic magnitude of this kick, and find that a natal kick v_{k}≳50  km/s must be imparted to the black hole at birth to produce misalignments consistent with GW151226. Such large natal kicks exceed those adopted by default in most of the current supernova and binary evolution models.

  5. Physical processes in spin polarized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulsrud, R.M.; Valeo, E.J.; Cowley, S.

    1984-05-01

    If the plasma in a nuclear fusion reactor is polarized, the nuclear reactions are modified in such a way as to enhance the reactor performance. We calculate in detail the modification of these nuclear reactions by different modes of polarization of the nuclear fuel. We also consider in detail the various physical processes that can lead to depolarization and show that they are by and large slow enough that a high degree of polarization can be maintained.

  6. Measurement of the Spin of the Omega- Hyperon at Babar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aubert, B.

    2006-01-01

    A measurement of the spin of the (Omega) - hyperon produced through the exclusive process Ξ c 0 → (Omega) - K + is presented using a total integrated luminosity of 116 fb -1 recorded with the BABAR detector at the e + e - asymmetric-energy B-Factory at SLAC. Under the assumption that the Ξ c 0 has spin 1/2, the angular distribution of the Λ from (Omega) - → ΛK - decay is inconsistent with all half-integer (Omega) - spin values other than 3/2. Lower statistics data for the process (Omega) c 0 → (Omega) - π + from a 230 fb -1 sample are also found to be consistent with (Omega) - spin 3/2. If the Ξ c 0 spin were 3/2, an (Omega) - spin of 5/2 cannot be excluded

  7. Measuring spin of black holes in the universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Table of contents. Measuring spin of black holes in the universe · What is black hole? Accretion Disk and Jet · What is black hole's spin? Accretion Disk · Black Hole's Potential · Light Curves: Photon Count Rate Vs Time · Quasi-Periodic Oscillation · Slide 9 · Model · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Summary.

  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and Local Programs Measuring Physical Activity Intensity Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, 4:48 More videos Here are some ...

  9. The new spin physics program of the COMPASS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Luís

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The COMPASS experiment, at CERN SPS, has been compiling for more than a decade successful and precise results on nucleon structure and hadron spectroscopy, leading to statistical errors much smaller than previously measured. The new COMPASS spin physics program, starting this year, aims to a rather complete nucleon structure description; this new representation goes beyond the collinear approximation by including the quark intrinsic transverse momentum distributions. The theoretical framework, for this new picture of the nucleon, is given by the Transverse Momentum Dependent distributions (TMDs and by the Generalised Parton Distributions (GPDs. The TMDs, in particular Sivers, Boer-Mulders, pretzelosity and transversity functions will be obtained through the polarised Drell-Yan process, for the first time. The results will be complementary to those already obtained via polarised Semi-Inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering (SIDIS. Also unpolarised SIDIS will be studied, allowing the knowledge improvement of the strange quark PDF and the access to the kaon fragmentation functions (FFs. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS off an unpolarised hydrogen target will be used to study the GPDs, in a kinematic region not yet covered by any existing experiment.

  10. Generalized Spin Coherent States: Construction and Some Physical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrada, K.; El Baz, M.; Hassouni, Y.

    2009-12-01

    A generalized deformation of the su(2) algebra and a scheme for constructing associated spin coherent states is developed. The problem of resolving the unity operator in terms of these states is addressed and solved for some particular cases. The construction is carried using a deformation of Holstein-Primakoff realization of the su(2) algebra. The physical properties of these states is studied through the calculation of Mandel's parameter. (author)

  11. Analysis of low energy AGS polarimeter data and potential consequences for RHIC spin physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadman, R.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.; Yokosawa, A.; Huang, H.

    2001-01-01

    The small asymmetries measured at G γ = 7.5 during the RHIC spin commissioning were a serious concern. In earlier runs, asymmetries double those from the spin commissioning time (September 2000) had sometimes been observed, and there had been few changes to the AGS polarimeter hardware or operating conditions. Recently, the observed changes in the asymmetries measured at G γ = 7:5 have been ascribed to contamination of the carbon target asymmetry with that from the fishline target and vice-versa, because of the sizeable beam spot size compared to the separation of the targets. This note addresses this hypothesis using the observed asymmetries. This problem could directly impact spin physics at RHIC

  12. Spin Physics with Photons — Technical Highlights and Spin-Offs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, A.

    2016-02-01

    The spin, as a fundamental property of a particle, has been a main object of investigation in particle and nuclear physics research in recent decades. For complete spin investigation, one requires a polarized target in addition to polarized beams and a recoil polarimeter. The advent of advanced beam and large acceptance detector technologies has driven the development of highly polarized, full angular acceptance targets. The Crystal Ball detector with its unique capability to cope with multi photon final states is used in Mainz at the A2 real photon facility in combination with a frozen spin polarized target. Technical highlights from the development of thin superconducting magnets to provide a longitudinal and transverse polarization are presented. A continuous polarization in the ‘DNP’-mode is on the way. Another promising technology investigation is going in the direction of ‘Active Polarized Targets’ to use the target as an intrinsic part of the detector. This requires from the scintillating material and front-end electronics to operate at cryogenic temperatures.

  13. Measurement of Projectile Rate of Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-02-12

    an~d Idendtir by block nsmbor) Projectile *Yaw Cards *SabotN rSpin *New 1%A@SrACT (Clod~aw - a’u M abe oft% p N mfseFsid tim flr 6r. black n~mbw) 1...a distance that permits about five revolutions of behe projectile between It and the first camera. Additional cameras may beused to increase the...or in "dark boxes ." Microflash techniques may be used to obtain adequate lighting tinder these conditions. The projectile is momentarily illuminated

  14. Cloning and joint measurements of incompatible components of spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brougham, Thomas; Andersson, Erika; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2006-01-01

    A joint measurement of two observables is a simultaneous measurement of both quantities upon the same quantum system. When two quantum-mechanical observables do not commute, then a joint measurement of these observables cannot be accomplished directly by projective measurements alone. In this paper we shall discuss the use of quantum cloning to perform a joint measurement of two components of spin associated with a qubit system. We introduce cloning schemes which are optimal with respect to this task. The cloning schemes may be thought to work by cloning two components of spin onto their outputs. We compare the proposed cloning machines to existing cloners

  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... gov . Physical Activity Physical Activity Basics Needs for Adults Needs for Children What Counts Needs for Older Adults Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & ...

  16. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Needs for Pregnant or Postpartum Women Physical Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your Life Activities for ... Tools Community Strategies Worksite Physical Activity Steps to Wellness Walkability Audit Tool Sample Audit Glossary Selected References ...

  17. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies Worksite Physical Activity Steps to Wellness ...

  18. The Proton Spin, Semi-Inclusive processes, and measurements at a future Electron Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abhay, Deshpande

    2018-01-12

    We discuss spin physics, Guido’s contribution to it, and what we still have to learn. We set out in particular a programme for incorporating constraints from semi-inclusive data into global fits of polarized PDFs, and discuss the need for the EIC to increase the precision and kinematic coverage of current measurements.

  19. QCD spin physics: Status and prospects for relativistic heavy-ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review some of the recent developments in QCD spin physics and highlight the spin physics program now underway at RHIC. Author Affiliations. Werner Vogelsang1. RIKEN-BNL Research Center and BNL Nuclear Theory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA. Pramana – Journal of Physics.

  20. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity MMWR Data Highlights State Indicator Report on Physical Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & ...

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and ... Button Our Division About Us Nutrition Physical Activity Overweight & Obesity Healthy Weight Breastfeeding Micronutrient Malnutrition State and ...

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  3. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps Surveillance Systems Resources & Publications Reports Adults Need More Physical Activity ... Email CDC-INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov Top

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  10. Measurements of $t\\overline{t}$ Spin Correlations in CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Beernaert, Kelly Simone

    2014-01-01

    We present an overview of the measurements of $t\\bar{t}$ spin correlations in the CMS Collaboration. We present two analyses both in the dilepton channel using proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}\\, =\\, 7$ TeV based on an integrated luminosity of 5.0 fb$^{-1}$. The spin correlations and polarization are measured using angular asymmetries. The results are consistent with unpolarized top quarks and Standard Model spin correlation. The second analysis sets a limit on the real part of the top-quark chromo-magnetic dipole moment of $-0.043\\, <\\, Re({\\hat{\\mu}}_{t})\\, <\\, 0.117$ at $95\\,%$ confidence level through the measured azimuthal angle difference between the two charged leptons from $t\\bar{t}$ production.

  11. Measurement of Physical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dishman, Rod K.; Washburn, Richard A.; Schoeller, Dale A.

    2001-01-01

    Valid assessment of physical activity must be unobtrusive, practical to administer, and specific about physical activity type, frequency, duration, and intensity. Assessment methods can be categorized according to whether they provide direct or indirect (e.g., self-report) observation of physical activity, body motion, physiological response…

  12. First Measurements of Spin Correlation Using Semi-leptonic $t\\bar{t}$ Events at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Lemmer, Boris; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The top quark decays before it hadronizes. Before its spin state can be changed in a process of strong interaction, it is directly transferred to the top quark decay products. The top quark spin can be deduced by studying angular distributions of the decay products. The Standard Model predicts the top/anti-top quark ($t\\bar{t}$) pairs to have correlated spins. The degree is sensitive to the spin and the production mechanisms of the top quark. Measuring the spin correlation allows to test the predictions. New physics effects can be reflected in deviations from the prediction. The measurement of the spin correlation of $t\\bar{t}$ pairs, produced at the LHC with a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ TeV and reconstructed with the ATLAS detector, is presented. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 $\\textrm{fb}^{-1}$. $t\\bar{t}$ pairs are reconstructed in the $\\ell$+jets channel using a kinematic likelihood fit offering the identification of light up- and down-type quarks from the $t \\righ...

  13. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Content source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram ...

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  15. Measuring Children's Physical Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneller, Mikkel Bo; Bentsen, Peter; Nielsen, Glen

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Accelerometer-based physical activity monitoring has become the method of choice in many large-scale physical activity (PA) studies. However, there is an ongoing debate regarding the placement of the device, the determination of device wear time, and how to solve a lack of participant...

  16. Preclinical Arterial Spin Labeling Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, Eric R

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has been utilized as a quantitative and noninvasive method to image blood flow. Arterial spin labeling (ASL) is an MRI technique that images blood flow using arterial blood water as an endogenous tracer. Herein we describe the use of ASL to measure cerebral blood flow completely noninvasively in rodents, including methods, analysis, and important considerations when utilizing this technique.

  17. np elastic spin transfer measurements at 788 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNaughton, M.W.; Koch, K.; Supek, I.; Tanaka, N.; McNaughton, K.H.; Riley, P.J.; Ambrose, D.A.; Johnson, J.D.; Smith, A.; Glass, G.; Hiebert, J.C.; Northcliffe, L.C.; Simon, A.J.; Adams, D.L.; Ransome, R.D.; Clayton, D.B.; Spinka, H.M.; Jeppeson, R.H.; Tripard, G.E.

    1991-01-01

    We have measured the spin-transfer parameters K LL , K SL , K LS , and K SS at 788 MeV from 47 degree to 177 degree c.m., and also uncovered a 10--16 % normalization discrepancy which affects all previous np elastic spin data from LAMPF. Results disagree significantly from previous phase-shift predictions. With the inclusion of these new data the NN phase shifts and amplitudes (isospin 0 and 1) become well determined for the first time near 800 MeV

  18. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  19. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . ... Activity & Health Adding Physical Activity to Your Life Activities for ...

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    Full Text Available ... an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ... Obesity , National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch ...

  4. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... activity: relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity The level of effort required by a person to do an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ...

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    Full Text Available ... Search The CDC Physical Activity Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. For ... Email CDC-INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov Top

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    Full Text Available ... Audit Tool Sample Audit Glossary Selected References Discount Fitness Club Network Assessing Need and Interest Selecting a ... pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. The talk test is a ...

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    Full Text Available ... 2015 Page last updated: June 4, 2015 Content source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity , National ... INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov Top

  8. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... 45 David, Age 65 Harold, Age 67 Data & Statistics Facts About Physical Activity Data, Trends and Maps ... by the body per minute of activity. The table below lists examples of activities classified as moderate- ...

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    Full Text Available ... When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate and breathing. ... Malnutrition State and Local Programs File Formats Help: How do I view different file formats (PDF, DOC, ...

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    Full Text Available ... Activity, 2014 Recommendations & Guidelines Fact Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies Worksite Physical Activity Steps to ... counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, 4:48 More videos Here are some ...

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    Full Text Available ... Sheets & Infographics Social Media Tools Community Strategies Worksite Physical Activity Steps to Wellness Walkability Audit Tool Sample Audit Glossary Selected References Discount Fitness Club Network Assessing Need and Interest Selecting a ...

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC IN YEAR-1 AND BEYOND.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLAND, L.; BOER, D.; SAITO, N.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2001-05-14

    The much anticipated RHIC spin physics program will commence this fall when the first physics run with colliding beams of polarized protons is expected. More specifically, the planned year-1 RHIC-Spin measurements are (1) the double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} in production of pions by collisions of longitudinally polarized protons (in order to obtain first information on the proton's spin-dependent gluon density, {Delta}g); (2) the transverse single-spin asymmetry A{sub N}{sup {pi}} for pion production. These two reactions provided part of the motivation for our workshop. On the first day there were informative talks on the specific plans of STAR (by Rakness) and PHENIX (by Goto) for the polarized run of Year-1. Some of the theoretical questions related to the double-spin asymmetry A{sub LL}{sup {pi}} were discussed on the first day by Vogelsang and Kretzer, which centered mostly around the questions of how well the unpolarized fragmentation functions are known, the need for next-to-leading order calculations, and on how sensitive the asymmetry is to the possible {Delta}g distributions. Vetterli presented HERMES measurements of fragmentation functions, which overlap in Q{sup 2} with the future lower-p{sub T} measurements at RHIC.

  13. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON SPIN PHYSICS AT RHIC IN YEAR-1 AND BEYOND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BLAND, L.; BOER, D.; SAITO, N.; VOGELSANG, W.

    2001-01-01

    The much anticipated RHIC spin physics program will commence this fall when the first physics run with colliding beams of polarized protons is expected. More specifically, the planned year-1 RHIC-Spin measurements are (1) the double-spin asymmetry A LL π in production of pions by collisions of longitudinally polarized protons (in order to obtain first information on the proton's spin-dependent gluon density, Δg); (2) the transverse single-spin asymmetry A N π for pion production. These two reactions provided part of the motivation for our workshop. On the first day there were informative talks on the specific plans of STAR (by Rakness) and PHENIX (by Goto) for the polarized run of Year-1. Some of the theoretical questions related to the double-spin asymmetry A LL π were discussed on the first day by Vogelsang and Kretzer, which centered mostly around the questions of how well the unpolarized fragmentation functions are known, the need for next-to-leading order calculations, and on how sensitive the asymmetry is to the possible Δg distributions. Vetterli presented HERMES measurements of fragmentation functions, which overlap in Q 2 with the future lower-p T measurements at RHIC

  14. Measurement of the $t\\bar{t}$ spin correlations and top quark polarization in dileptonic channel

    CERN Document Server

    Khatiwada, Ajeeta

    2017-01-01

    The degree of top polarization and strength of $t\\bar{t}$ correlation are dependent on production dynamics, decay mechanism, and choice of the observables. At the LHC, measurement of the top polarization and spin correlations in $t\\bar{t}$ production is possible through various observables related to the angular distribution of decay leptons. A measurement of differential distribution provides a precision test of the standard model of particle physics and probes for deviations, which could be a sign of new physics. In particular, the phase space for the super-symmetric partner of the top quark can be constrained. Results from the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) collaboration for top quark polarization and spin correlation in the dileptonic channel are reviewed briefly in this proceeding. The measurements are obtained using 19.5 fb$^{-1}$ of data collected in pp collisions at the center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV.

  15. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... videos Here are some ways to understand and measure the intensity of aerobic activity: relative intensity and ... The talk test is a simple way to measure relative intensity. In general, if you're doing ...

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    Full Text Available ... Search Form Controls Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Physical Activity Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported by your browser. For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. For more information about this message, please visit this page: About ...

  17. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... CDC’s Example StairWELL Stairwell Appearance Motivational Signs Installing Music Other Ideas to Consider Tracking Stair Usage Project ... an activity. When using relative intensity, people pay attention to how physical activity affects their heart rate ...

  18. Physical measures of complexity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lloyd, S.

    1990-01-01

    The author discusses the physics of information. He states that if A is initially in one of the states α with probability p α , then to put A in a particular state with probability of one requires either an increase in entropy of -summation α p α logp α , elsewhere, or an increase of the same amount of information that some other system has

  19. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Word file Microsoft Excel file Audio/Video file Apple Quicktime file RealPlayer file Text file Zip Archive file SAS file ePub file RIS file Page last reviewed: June 4, 2015 Page last updated: June 4, 2015 Content source: Division of Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity , ...

  20. Measuring children's physical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneller, Mikkel Bo; Bentsen, Peter; Nielsen, Glen

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Accelerometer-based physical activity monitoring has become the method of choice in many large-scale physical activity (PA) studies. However, there is an ongoing debate regarding the placement of the device, the determination of device wear time, and how to solve a lack of participant...... on the thigh (n=903) and one on the lower back (n= 856), for up to ten consecutive days. Participants were instructed not to reattach an accelerometer should it fall off. Simple and multiple linear regression were used to determine associations between accelerometer wear time and age, sex, BMI percentiles......, and PA level. RESULTS: Over 65% had >7 days of uninterrupted, 24h wear time for the thigh location, and 59.5% for the lower back location. From multiple linear regressions, PA levels showed the strongest association with lower wear time (thigh: β=-.231, R=.066; lower back: β=-.454, R=.126). In addition...

  1. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Hiking uphill or with a heavy backpack Other Methods of Measuring Intensity Target Heart Rate and Estimated ... YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs Funding LEGAL Policies Privacy FOIA No Fear Act ...

  2. Measuring Physical Activity Intensity

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    Full Text Available ... Compartir For more help with what counts as aerobic activity, watch this video: Windows Media Player, 4: ... ways to understand and measure the intensity of aerobic activity: relative intensity and absolute intensity. Relative Intensity ...

  3. A Near Perfect Spin Balance (Measurement in Chaos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luntz, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    The stringent spin balance requirements arise from the predecessor of SSMIS, the SSMI. The SSMI sensor spinning portion weighed only 85 pounds and contained 7 channels of radiometric data. The Aerospace Corporation recommended to pass on the same requirements from the smaller SSMI to our larger SSMIS (with slight change for increased weight). The SSMIS spinning portion will weigh about 155 pounds and contain 24 channels of radiometeric data. The SSMIS, on orbit, spins a CCW direction at 31.6 RPM its own drive motor. The packaging of this SSMIS is unique, as it combines three sensor into one unit. This combination allows for concurrently reading data in one beam. The unit will have a polar orbit about 500 miles above the earths surface. One of the primary influences for our receipt of the follow-on contract for the next generation sensor, was the ability to package 24 channels of radiometeric data into about the some volume as its predecessor. The data from SSMIS will be used to measure the following: (1) Ocean surface wind speed, (2) Rain over land an ocean, (3) Cloud water over Ocean, (4) Soil moisture, (5) Ice Concentration, (6) Ice age, (7) Ice Edge and snow edge, (8) Water vapor over Ocean, (9) Surface type, (10) Snow water content, (11) Land surface Temperature, (12) Cloud amount over ocean.

  4. Measuring exchange interactions between atomic spins using electron spin resonance STM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Paul, William; Natterer, Fabian; Choi, Taeyoung; Heinrich, Andreas; Lutz, Christopher

    Exchange interactions between neighboring atoms give rise to magnetic order in magnetic materials. As the size of the electronic device is miniaturized toward the limit of single atoms, magnetic nanostructures such as coupled atomic dimers and clusters are explored more as prototypes for possible data storage, spintronics as well as quantum computing applications. Characterizing inter-atom exchange interactions calls for increasing spatial resolution and higher energy sensitivity to better understand this fundamental interaction. Here, using spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), we studied a magnetically coupled atomic dimer consisting of two 3d transition metal atoms, with one adsorbed on an insulating layer (MgO) and the other attached to the STM tip. We demonstrate the ability to measure the short-range exchange interaction between the two atomic spins with orders-of-magnitude variation ranging from milli-eV all the way to micro-eV. This is realized by the successful combination of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) and electron spin resonance (ESR) techniques in STM implemented at different energy scales. We unambiguously confirm the exponential decay behavior of the direct exchange interaction.

  5. Electron Spin Resonance Measurement with Microinductor on Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Kitagawa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The detection of radicals on a chip is demonstrated. The proposed method is based on electron spin resonance (ESR spectroscopy and the measurement of high-frequency impedance of the microinductor fabricated on the chip. The measurement was by using a frequency sweep of approximately 100 MHz. The ESR spectra of di(phenyl-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyliminoazanium (DPPH dropped on the microinductor which is fabricated with CMOS 350-nm technology were observed at room temperature. The volume of the DPPH ethanol solution was 2 μL, and the number of spins on the micro-inductor was estimated at about 1014. The sensitivity is not higher than that of the standard ESR spectrometers. However, the result indicates the feasibility of a near field radical sensor in which the microinductor as a probe head and ESR signal processing circuit are integrated.

  6. Nonlocal spin-transport measurement of superconductor-ferromagnet nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolenda, Stefan; Wolf, Michael J.; Huebler, Florian; Beckmann, Detlef [Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    We present measurements of the nonlocal conductance of nanostructures with several ferromagnetic electrodes lying perpendicular on a superconducting wire. In these structures nonlocal conductance is mostly given by diffusion of quasiparticles, which are injected by one of the electrodes and detected by an other one. Applying a magnetic field induces a Zeeman splitting in the quasiparticles density of states, which suppresses the relaxation of injected spin imbalance, thus spin transport over distances of several micrometers is found. While in the previous experiments the magnetic field was aligned parallel to the ferromagnetic electrodes, we also show measurements applying the magnetic field noncollinear with the magnetization of the ferromagnetic electrodes. We compare our results to the previous case.

  7. Ferromagnetic domain structures and spin configurations measured in doped manganite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, J.Q.; Volkov, V.V.; Beleggia, Marco

    2010-01-01

    We report on measurements of the spin configuration across ferromagnetic domains in La0.325Pr0.3Ca0.375MnO3 films obtained by means of low-temperature Lorentz electron microscopy with in situ magnetizing capabilities. Due to the particular crystal symmetry of the material, we observe two sets of ...... and the crystal symmetry might affect the magnetoresistivity under an applied magnetic field in a strongly correlated electron system....

  8. Birefringent neutron prisms for spin echo scattering angle measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pynn, Roger; Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Lee, W. T.; Stonaha, P.; Shah, V. R.; Washington, A. L.; Kirby, B. J.; Majkrzak, C. F.; Maranville, B. B.

    2009-09-01

    In the first decade of the 19th century, an English chemist, William Wollaston, invented an arrangement of birefringent prisms that splits a beam of light into two spatially separated beams with orthogonal polarizations. We have constructed similar devices for neutrons using triangular cross-section solenoids and employed them for Spin Echo Scattering Angle Measurement (SESAME). A key difference between birefringent neutron prisms and their optical analogues is that it is hard to embed the former in a medium which has absolutely no birefringence because this implies the removal of all magnetic fields. We have overcome this problem by using the symmetry properties of the Wollaston neutron prisms and of the overall spin echo arrangement. These symmetries cause a cancellation of Larmor phase aberrations and provide robust coding of neutron scattering angles with simple equipment.

  9. Measurement of the spin structure of the neutron using polarised deep inelastic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Ralf Bernd

    The measurement of the spin structure function g1p of the proton and its integral Γ1p by the EMC experiment at C scERN in 1988 indicated that only 12% ± 17% of the proton spin is carried by quarks. This unexpected result-the so called 'spin crisis'-lead to a series of new experimental proposals. One of these, the H scERMES experiment, uses the polarised positron beam of the H scERA accelerator together with a polarised internal gas target of hydrogen, deuterium or 3He for the study of the spin structure of the nucleon. The scattered positrons and other products of the reaction are detected in a forward spectrometer with large acceptance. This thesis focuses on three topics, after a review of the relevant theory and an overview of the H scERMES experiment: The H scERMES transition radiation detector (TRD), which is used to distinguish high energy positrons from hadrons, the H scERMES particle identification (PID) system and the measurement of the spin structure function g1n of the neutron. The H scERMES TRD is the main Canadian contribution to the apparatus of the experiment. The H scERMES PID system allows the identification of positrons from deep inelastic scattering with an efficiency of 99% and a hadron contamination of less than 0.5%. The first physics result from the 1995 H scERMES data is the measurement of the spin structure function g1n(x) of the neutron. The value of the resulting integral Γ1n=∫01g1n(x)/ dx confirms previous measurements at SLAC and violates the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule by about one sigma. The contribution of the quarks to the spin of the neutron can be calculated in the framework of the quark parton model to be 37 ± 16%, indicating that less than half of the spin of the neutron is carried by quarks.

  10. Health-physics Measurements: Services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardeman, F.; Hurtgen, C.; Vanhavere, F.; Vanmarcke, H.

    1998-01-01

    SCK-CEN's programme on health-physics (1) offers complete services in health-physics measurements according to international quality standards; (2) contributes to improve continuously these measurement techniques and follows up international recommendations and legislation concerning the surveillance of workers; (3) provides support and advise to nuclear and non-nuclear industry on issues of radioactive contamination. Progress and achievements in 1997 are summarised

  11. Muon spin-relaxation measurements of spin-correlation decay in spin-glass AgMn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heffner, R.H.; Cooke, D.W.; Leon, M.; Schillaci, M.E.; MacLaughlin, D.E.; Gupta, L.C.

    1983-01-01

    The field (H) dependence of the muon longitudinal spin-lattice relaxation rate well below the spin-glass temperature in AgMn is found to obey an algebraic form given by (H)/sup nu-1/, with nu = 0.54 +- 0.05. This suggests that Mn spin correlations decay with time as t - /sup nu/, in agreement with mean field theories of spin-glass dynamics which yield nu less than or equal to 0.5. Near the glass temperature the agreement between the data and theory is not as good

  12. Spin dynamics and exchange interactions in CuO measured by neutron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, H.; Gaw, S. M.; Princep, A. J.; Hamilton, E.; Tóth, S.; Ewings, R. A.; Enderle, M.; Wheeler, E. M. Hétroy; Prabhakaran, D.; Boothroyd, A. T.

    2018-04-01

    The magnetic properties of CuO encompass several contemporary themes in condensed-matter physics, including quantum magnetism, magnetic frustration, magnetically-induced ferroelectricity, and orbital currents. Here we report polarized and unpolarized neutron inelastic scattering measurements which provide a comprehensive map of the cooperative spin dynamics in the low-temperature antiferromagnetic (AFM) phase of CuO throughout much of the Brillouin zone. At high energies (E ≳100 meV ), the spectrum displays continuum features consistent with the des Cloizeax-Pearson dispersion for an ideal S =1/2 Heisenberg AFM chain. At lower energies, the spectrum becomes more three dimensional, and we find that a linear spin-wave model for a Heisenberg AFM provides a very good description of the data, allowing for an accurate determination of the relevant exchange constants in an effective spin Hamiltonian for CuO. In the high-temperature helicoidal phase, there are features in the measured low-energy spectrum that we could not reproduce with a spin-only model. We discuss how these might be associated with the magnetically-induced multiferroic behavior observed in this phase.

  13. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  14. A measurement of the absolute neutron beam polarization produced by an optically pumped 3He neutron spin filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, D.R.; Bowman, J.D.; Crawford, B.E.; Delheij, P.P.J.; Espy, M.A.; Haseyama, T.; Jones, G.; Keith, C.D.; Knudson, J.; Leuschner, M.B.; Masaike, A.; Masuda, Y.; Matsuda, Y.; Penttilae, S.I.; Pomeroy, V.R.; Smith, D.A.; Snow, W.M.; Szymanski, J.J.; Stephenson, S.L.; Thompson, A.K.; Yuan, V.

    2002-01-01

    The capability of performing accurate absolute measurements of neutron beam polarization opens a number of exciting opportunities in fundamental neutron physics and in neutron scattering. At the LANSCE pulsed neutron source we have measured the neutron beam polarization with an absolute accuracy of 0.3% in the neutron energy range from 40 meV to 10 eV using an optically pumped polarized 3 He spin filter and a relative transmission measurement technique. 3 He was polarized using the Rb spin-exchange method. We describe the measurement technique, present our results, and discuss some of the systematic effects associated with the method

  15. Measuring gas temperature during spin-exchange optical pumping process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normand, E.; Jiang, C. Y.; Brown, D. R.; Robertson, L.; Crow, L.; Tong, X.

    2016-04-01

    The gas temperature inside a Spin-Exchange Optical Pumping (SEOP) laser-pumping polarized 3He cell has long been a mystery. Different experimental methods were employed to measure this temperature but all were based on either modelling or indirect measurement. To date there has not been any direct experimental measurement of this quantity. Here we present the first direct measurement using neutron transmission to accurately determine the number density of 3He, the temperature is obtained using the ideal gas law. Our result showed a surprisingly high gas temperature of 380°C, compared to the 245°C of the 3He cell wall temperature and 178°C of the optical pumping oven temperature. This experiment result may be used to further investigate the unsolved puzzle of the "X-factor" in the SEOP process which places an upper bound to the 3He polarization that can be achieved. Additional spin relaxation mechanisms might exist due to the high gas temperature, which could explain the origin of the X-factor.

  16. Spin and Valley Physics in Two Dimensional Systems: Graphene and Superconducting Transition Metal Dichalcogenides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosenko, Evan Boyd

    Recent focus on two dimensional materials and spin-coupled phenomena holds future potential for fast, efficient, flexible, and transparent devices. The fundamental operation of a spintronic device depends on the injection, transmission, and detection of spins in a conducting channel. Long spin lifetimes during transit are critical for realizing this technology. An attractive platform for this purpose is graphene, which has high mobilities and low spin-orbit coupling. Unfortunately, measured spin lifetimes are orders of magnitude smaller than theoretically expected. A source of spin loss is the resistance mismatch between the ferromagnetic electrodes and graphene. While this has been studied numerically, here we provide a closed form expression for Hanle spin precession which is the standard method of measuring spin lifetimes. This allows for a detailed characterization of the nonlocal spin valve device. Strong spin-orbit interaction has the potential to engender unconventional superconducting states. A cousin to graphene, two dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides entwine interaction, spin-orbit coupling, and topology. The noninteracting electronic states have multiple valleys in the energy dispersion and are topologically nontrivial. We report on the possible superconducting states of hole-doped systems, and analyze to what extent the correlated phase inherits the topological aspects of the parent crystal. We find that local attractive interactions or proximal coupling to s-wave superconductors lead to a pairing which is an equal mixture of a spin singlet and the m = 0 spin triplet. Its topology allows quasiparticle excitations of net nonzero Berry curvature via pair-breaking by circularly polarized light. The valley contrasting optical response, where oppositely circularly polarized light couples to different valleys, is present even in the superconducting state, though with smaller magnitude.

  17. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g 1 n (x, Q 2 ) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized 3 He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 ≤ x ≤ 0.7 with an average Q 2 of 5 GeV 2 . The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be ∫ 0.014 0.7 dx g 1 n (x, 5 GeV 2 ) = -0.036 ± 0.004(stat.) ± 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g 1 n at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x → 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g 1 p and g 1 n paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q 2 = 5 GeV 2 , determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule

  18. Precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolomensky, Y.G.

    1997-02-01

    In experiment E154 at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center the spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n} (x, Q{sup 2}) of the neutron was measured by scattering longitudinally polarized 48.3 GeV electrons off a longitudinally polarized {sup 3}He target. The high beam energy allowed the author to extend the kinematic coverage compared to the previous SLAC experiments to 0.014 {le} x {le} 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 GeV{sup 2}. The author reports the integral of the spin dependent structure function in the measured range to be {integral}{sub 0.014}{sup 0.7} dx g{sub 1}{sup n}(x, 5 GeV{sup 2}) = {minus}0.036 {+-} 0.004(stat.) {+-} 0.005(syst.). The author observes relatively large values of g{sub 1}{sup n} at low x that call into question the reliability of data extrapolation to x {r_arrow} 0. Such divergent behavior disagrees with predictions of the conventional Regge theory, but is qualitatively explained by perturbative QCD. The author performs a Next-to-Leading Order perturbative QCD analysis of the world data on the nucleon spin dependent structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 1}{sup n} paying careful attention to the experimental and theoretical uncertainties. Using the parameterizations of the helicity-dependent parton distributions obtained in the analysis, the author evolves the data to Q{sup 2} = 5 GeV{sup 2}, determines the first moments of the polarized structure functions of the proton and neutron, and finds agreement with the Bjorken sum rule.

  19. Magnetic Resonance Imaging: From Spin Physics to Medical Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacher, Pierre-Jean

    Two rather similar historical evolutions are evoked, each one originating in fundamental spin studies by physicists, and ending as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a set of invaluable tools for clinical diagnosis in the hands of medical doctors. The first one starts with the early work on nuclear magnetic resonance, the founding stone of the usual proton-based MRI, of which the basic principles are described. The second one starts with the optical pumping developments made to study the effects of spin polarization in various fundamental problems. Its unexpected outcome is a unique imaging modality, also based on MRI, for the study of lung physiology and pathologies.

  20. Phase measurement for driven spin oscillations in a storage ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempelmann, N.; Hejny, V.; Pretz, J.; Soltner, H.; Augustyniak, W.; Bagdasarian, Z.; Bai, M.; Barion, L.; Berz, M.; Chekmenev, S.; Ciullo, G.; Dymov, S.; Eversmann, D.; Gaisser, M.; Gebel, R.; Grigoryev, K.; Grzonka, D.; Guidoboni, G.; Heberling, D.; Hetzel, J.; Hinder, F.; Kacharava, A.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Keshelashvili, I.; Koop, I.; Kulikov, A.; Lehrach, A.; Lenisa, P.; Lomidze, N.; Lorentz, B.; Maanen, P.; Macharashvili, G.; Magiera, A.; Mchedlishvili, D.; Mey, S.; Müller, F.; Nass, A.; Nikolaev, N. N.; Nioradze, M.; Pesce, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Rathmann, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Saleev, A.; Schmidt, V.; Semertzidis, Y.; Senichev, Y.; Shmakova, V.; Silenko, A.; Slim, J.; Stahl, A.; Stassen, R.; Stephenson, E.; Stockhorst, H.; Ströher, H.; Tabidze, M.; Tagliente, G.; Talman, R.; Thörngren Engblom, P.; Trinkel, F.; Uzikov, Yu.; Valdau, Yu.; Valetov, E.; Vassiliev, A.; Weidemann, C.; Wrońska, A.; Wüstner, P.; Zuprański, P.; Żurek, M.; JEDI Collaboration

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports the first simultaneous measurement of the horizontal and vertical components of the polarization vector in a storage ring under the influence of a radio frequency (rf) solenoid. The experiments were performed at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY in Jülich using a vector polarized, bunched 0.97 GeV /c deuteron beam. Using the new spin feedback system, we set the initial phase difference between the solenoid field and the precession of the polarization vector to a predefined value. The feedback system was then switched off, allowing the phase difference to change over time, and the solenoid was switched on to rotate the polarization vector. We observed an oscillation of the vertical polarization component and the phase difference. The oscillations can be described using an analytical model. The results of this experiment also apply to other rf devices with horizontal magnetic fields, such as Wien filters. The precise manipulation of particle spins in storage rings is a prerequisite for measuring the electric dipole moment (EDM) of charged particles.

  1. Joint measurements of spin, operational locality and uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, E.; Barnett, S.M.; Aspect, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Joint measurements of non-commuting observables are possible within quantum mechanics, if one accepts an increase in the variances of the jointly measured observables. In this contribution, we discuss joint measurements of spin 1/2 along any two directions. Starting from an operational locality principle, we show how to obtain the known bound on how sharp the joint measurement can be. Operational locality here means, that no operation performed at a quantum system at one location can instantaneously affect a system at another location. The measurement bound is general and is here obtained without reference to any quantum measurement formalism. We find that the bound is formally identical to a Bell inequality of the CHSH type, and we also give a direct interpretation of the measurement bound in terms of an uncertainty relation. A simple way to realise the joint measurement for the case of photon polarization is presented. Further to their fundamental interest, quantum joint measurements of non-commuting observables can be related to state estimation. They are also of interest in quantum information, e.g. as strategies for eavesdropping in quantum cryptography. (author)

  2. Measurement of the spin-spin correlation parameter C/sub LL/(THETA) in proton-proton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stuart, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    The experimental procedures and methods of data analysis used to measure the spin-spin correlation parameter C/sub LL/(THETA) in proton-proton scattering at thirteen different energies in the range 300 to 800 MeV are presented. The results compare favorably with previous data. Good agreement is found with phase shift predictions at energies below 500 MeV

  3. Manifestations of classical physics in the quantum evolution of correlated spin states in pulsed NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligare, Martin

    2016-05-01

    Multiple-pulse NMR experiments are a powerful tool for the investigation of molecules with coupled nuclear spins. The product operator formalism provides a way to understand the quantum evolution of an ensemble of weakly coupled spins in such experiments using some of the more intuitive concepts of classical physics and semi-classical vector representations. In this paper I present a new way in which to interpret the quantum evolution of an ensemble of spins. I recast the quantum problem in terms of mixtures of pure states of two spins whose expectation values evolve identically to those of classical moments. Pictorial representations of these classically evolving states provide a way to calculate the time evolution of ensembles of weakly coupled spins without the full machinery of quantum mechanics, offering insight to anyone who understands precession of magnetic moments in magnetic fields.

  4. Top quark physics: Future measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frey, R. [Univ. of Oregon, Eugene, OR (United States). Dept. of Physics; Vejcik, S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Berger, E.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-04

    The authors discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top`s large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. They emphasize measurements of the top quark`s mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  5. Neuromorphic computing enabled by physics of electron spins: Prospects and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Abhronil; Roy, Kaushik

    2018-03-01

    “Spintronics” refers to the understanding of the physics of electron spin-related phenomena. While most of the significant advancements in this field has been driven primarily by memory, recent research has demonstrated that various facets of the underlying physics of spin transport and manipulation can directly mimic the functionalities of the computational primitives in neuromorphic computation, i.e., the neurons and synapses. Given the potential of these spintronic devices to implement bio-mimetic computations at very low terminal voltages, several spin-device structures have been proposed as the core building blocks of neuromorphic circuits and systems to implement brain-inspired computing. Such an approach is expected to play a key role in circumventing the problems of ever-increasing power dissipation and hardware requirements for implementing neuro-inspired algorithms in conventional digital CMOS technology. Perspectives on spin-enabled neuromorphic computing, its status, and challenges and future prospects are outlined in this review article.

  6. Observation of spin Hall effect in photon tunneling via weak measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinxing; Ling, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhiyou; Luo, Hailu; Wen, Shuangchun

    2014-12-09

    Photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) manifesting itself as spin-dependent splitting escapes detection in previous photon tunneling experiments due to the fact that the induced beam centroid shift is restricted to a fraction of wavelength. In this work, we report on the first observation of this tiny effect in photon tunneling via weak measurements based on preselection and postselection technique on the spin states. We find that the spin-dependent splitting is even larger than the potential barrier thickness when spin-polarized photons tunneling through a potential barrier. This photonic SHE is attributed to spin-redirection Berry phase which can be described as a consequence of the spin-orbit coupling. These findings provide new insight into photon tunneling effect and thereby offer the possibility of developing spin-based nanophotonic applications.

  7. Summary of the 8th international symposium on high energy spin physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunce, G.

    1988-01-01

    The series of conferences on high energy spin physics dates back to Argonne, 1974, and the first use of the polarized proton beam at the ZGS. This conference is unique in that it is concerned both with the technology of spin and with particle physics: particle physicists need to know what experiments might be possible and target/beam/source physicists want to know what their work will lead to, and get new ideas. In many cases, and I believe that this is central to the success of spin physics and of this conference series, these are the same people. This summary will have three basic parts: where we are now relative to Argonne in 1974; a discussion of new experiments and theory---there were many new and intriguing results presented here; and new ideas for polarized sources, beams, and targets which point toward an exciting future program of particle physics. 13 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Geometrically Confined Spin Vortices: from Fundamental Physics to Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novosad, Valentyn

    2011-03-01

    The magnetic ground state of magnetically soft thin film ferromagnets in confined geometries (on the micrometer scale) consists of a curling spin configuration, known as a magnetic vortex state. We have recently demonstrated that the magnetic vortex microdisks can be successfully used as multifunctional magnetic carriers for biomedicine. In particular, we will report on successful interfacing of ferromagnetic nanomaterials with a spin vortex ground state and biomaterials (antibody, whole cell). Namely, the gold-coated lithographically defined microdisks with an Fe-Ni magnetic core were biofunctionalized with anti-human-IL13a2R antibody for specifically targeting human glioblastoma cells. When an alternating magnetic field is applied the vortices shift, leading to the microdisks oscillation that causes a mechanical force to be transmitted to the cell. Cytotoxicity assays, along with optical and atomic force microscopy studies, show that the spin vortex-mediated stimulus creates two dramatic effects: (a) membrane disturbance and compromising, and (b) cellular signal transduction and amplification, leading to robust DNA fragmentation and, finally, programmed cell death. The experiments reveals that by employing biofunctionalized magnetic vortex microdisks the magnetic fields of low frequency of ~a few tens of Hz ~and of small amplitude of 100 Oe applied during only 10 minutes was sufficient to achieve ~90% cancer cells destruction.

  9. QCD spin physics: Status and prospects for relativistic heavy-ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 1251–1267. QCD spin physics: Status and prospects for relativistic heavy-ion collider. WERNER VOGELSANG. RIKEN-BNL Research Center and BNL Nuclear Theory, Brookhaven National. Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, USA ... showed [4] that their total angular momenta may be extracted from deeply-virtual.

  10. N-N(over-bar) physics at GSI in single and double spin interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maggiora, M.; Abazov, V.; Alexeev, G.; Amoroso, A.; Angelov, N.; Baginyan, S.; Balestra, F.; Baranov, V.A.; Batusov, Y.; Belolaptikov, I.; Bertini, R.; Bianconi, A.; Birsa, R.; Blokhintseva, T.; Bonyushkina, A.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Bussa, M.P.; Butenko, V.; Chiosso, M.; Colantoni, M.; Corradini, M.; Torre, S.D.; Demyanov, A.; Denisov, O.; Drozdov, V.; Dupák, Jan; Erusalimtsev, G.; Fava, L.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Frolov, V.; Garfagnini, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gorchakov, O.; Grasso, A.; Grebenyuk, V.; Ivanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Kalinnikov, V.A.; Kharzheev, Y.; Kisselev, Y.; Khomutov, N.V.; Kirilov, A.; Komissarov, E.; Kotzinian, A.; Korenchenko, A.S.; Kovalenko, V.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Kuchinski, N.A.; Rizzini, E.L.; Lyashenko, V.; Malyshev, V.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Merekov, Y.; Moiseenko, A.S.; Olchevski, A.; Panyushkin, V.; Panzieri, D.; Piragino, G.; Pontecorvo, G.B.; Popov, A.; Porokhovoy, S.; Pryanichnikov, V.; Radici, M.; Rekalo, M.P.; Rozhdestvensky, A.; Russakovich, N.; Schiavon, P.; Shevchenko, O.; Shishkin, A.; Sidorkin, V.A.; Skachkov, N.; Slunecka, M.; Sosio, S.; Srnka, Aleš; Tchalyshev, V.; Tessarotto, F.; Tomasi, E.; Tosello, F.; Velicheva, E.P.; Venturell, L.; Vertogradov, L.; Virius, M.; Zosi, G.; Zurlo, N.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 56, Suppl. C (2006), C75-C83 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 492 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : spin physics * antiproton * parton distribution functions * transversity Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 0.568, year: 2006

  11. Measurement of the Double Spin Asymmetry in π+ electroproduction with CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vita, Raffaella De [Univ. of Genoa (Italy)

    2000-12-01

    The present thesis describes the measurement of the double spin asymmetry in the ep → eπ+n reaction. This represents the only existing measurement for this observable. The reaction is identified detecting the scattered electron and the emitted pion and using the missing mass technique to identify the neutron. The asymmetry is evaluated as a function of the four-momentum transfer Q2, the invariant mass W and the pion center of mass angle θ*. These are in fact the variables that determine the transition amplitudes for the process. The W range of this measurement varies from the pion threshold to a maximum value of 1.8 GeV, exploring the full resonance region. The results obtained with this analysis in the evaluation of the spin asymmetry are presented. The outline of the thesis can be summarized as follows. The first chapter describes the physics motivation that are at the basis of this experiment. The second and third chapters illustrate the design of the CLAS detector and the polarized target. The fourth chapter gives a description of the event reconstruction and to the event selection while the analysis procedure is described in chapter five. Chapter six discusses the results of this measurement, including the evaluation of the systematic uncertainty and the comparison with a physics model.

  12. Magnetorheology of hybrid colloids measured by spin coating and classical rheometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad Aslam, Raheema; Shahrivar, Keshwad; Álvarez-Manzaneda, Juan De Vicente; González-Viñas, Wenceslao

    Hybrid colloids composed of micron-sized ferromagnetic and diamagnetic particles constitute a promising category of magnetorheological fluids with enhanced field-induced apparent yield stress. However, the physical mechanism explaining this stress enhancement is currently lacking. For the first time, we measure and compare the magnetic field-dependent viscosity of hybrid diluted colloids using spin-coating and magnetorheometry. In the former technique, a magnetic field is applied during the spin coating of the colloidal suspension involving evaporation of the solvent. The viscosity of the colloidal suspension at applied field can be derived from the surface coverage of the dry spin-coated deposits and from the viscosity of the colloid at zero field. In the latter, its viscosity is measured with a torsional parallel plate magnetorheometer under uniaxial magnetic fields aligned in the gradient direction of a steady shearing flow. The experimental results under different conditions and the effect of each component on the magnetorheological properties of the resulting colloid will be discussed. This work is partly supported by the Spanish MINECO (FIS201454101-P).

  13. Spin current

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, Sergio O; Saitoh, Eiji; Kimura, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    In a new branch of physics and technology called spin-electronics or spintronics, the flow of electrical charge (usual current) as well as the flow of electron spin, the so-called 'spin current', are manipulated and controlled together. This book provides an introduction and guide to the new physics and application of spin current.

  14. Effective suppression of thermoelectric voltage in nonlocal spin-valve measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariki, Taisei; Nomura, Tatsuya; Ohnishi, Kohei; Kimura, Takashi

    2017-06-01

    We demonstrate that the background signal in the nonlocal spin-valve measurement can be sufficiently suppressed by optimizing the electrode design of the lateral spin valve. A relatively long length scale of heat propagation produces spin-independent thermoelectric signals under the combination of the Peltier and Seebeck effects. These unfavorable signals can be reduced by mixing the Peltier effects in two transparent ferromagnetic/nonmagnetic junctions. Proper understanding of the contribution from the heat current in no spin-current area is a key for effective reduction of the spin-independent background signal.

  15. Top Quark Physics: Future Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaros, John A

    2003-05-09

    We discuss the study of the top quark at future experiments and machines. Top's large mass makes it a unique probe of physics at the natural electroweak scale. We emphasize measurements of the top quark's mass, width, and couplings, as well as searches for rare or nonstandard decays, and discuss the complementary roles played by hadron and lepton colliders.

  16. A Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Functions Using a Polarized HE-3 Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T

    2003-11-05

    This thesis describes a precision measurement of the neutron spin dependent structure function, g{sub 1}{sup n}(x). The measurement was made by the E154 collaboration at SLAC using a longitudinally polarized, 48.3 GeV electron beam, and a {sup 3}He target polarized by spin exchange with optically pumped rubidium. A target polarization as high as 50% was achieved. The elements of the experiment which pertain to the polarized {sup 3}He target will be described in detail in this thesis. To achieve a precision measurement, it has been necessary to minimize the systematic error from the uncertainty in the target parameters. All of the parameters of the target have been carefully measured, and the most important parameters of the target have been measured using multiple techniques. The polarization of the target was measured using nuclear magnetic resonance techniques, and has been calibrated using both proton NMR and by measuring the shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance frequency due to the {sup 3}He polarization. The fraction of events which originated in the {sup 3}He, as measured by the spectrometers, has been determined using a physical model of the target and the spectrometers. It was also measured during the experiment using a variable pressure {sup 3}He reference cell in place of the polarized {sup 3}He target. The spin dependent structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(z) was measured in the Bjorken x range of 0.014 < x < 0.7 with an average Q{sup 2} of 5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. One of the primary motivations for this experiment was to test the Bjorken sum rule. Because the experiment had smaller statistical errors and a broader kinematic coverage than previous experiments, the behavior of the spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) could be studied in detail at low values of the Bjorken scaling variable x. It was found that g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) has a strongly divergent behavior at low values of x, calling into question the methods commonly used to extrapolate the value of g

  17. Measuring Pancharatnam's relative phase for SO(3) evolutions using spin polarimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larsson, Peter; Sjoeqvist, Erik

    2003-01-01

    In polarimetry, a superposition of internal quantal states is exposed to a single Hamiltonian and information about the evolution of the quantal states is inferred from projection measurements on the final superposition. In this framework, we here extend the polarimetric test of Pancharatnam's relative phase for spin-(1/2) proposed by Wagh and Rakhecha [Phys. Lett. A 197, 112 (1995)] to spin j≥1 undergoing noncyclic SO(3) evolution. We demonstrate that the output intensity for higher spin values is a polynomial function of the corresponding spin-(1/2) intensity. We further propose a general method to extract the noncyclic SO(3) phase and visibility by rigid translation of two π/2 spin flippers. Polarimetry on higher spin states may in practice be done with spin polarized atomic beams

  18. Corrections to nucleon spin structure asymmetries measured on nuclear polarized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rondon, O.A.

    1999-01-01

    The nucleon spin structure functions have been extracted from measurements of asymmetries in deep inelastic scattering of polarized leptons on polarized nuclei. The polarized nuclei present in practical targets: H, 2 H, 3 He, 14 N, 15 N, 6 Li, and 7 Li, are, with the exception of hydrogen, systems of bound nucleons, some of which can attain significant degrees of alignment. All the aligned nucleons contribute to the asymmetries. The contributions of each nuclear species to the asymmetry have to be carefully determined, before a reliable value for the net nucleon asymmetry is obtained. For this purpose, the spin component of the nuclear angular momentum for every nuclear state and the probability of each state have to be known with sufficient accuracy. In this paper I discuss the basic corrections used to estimate the contributions of the different nuclei, with emphasis on the A=6 and 7 Li isotopes present in the Li 2 H polarized target used during SLAC Experiment 155 to study the deuteron spin structure. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  19. Measurement of the spin-dependent structure-functions of the proton and the deuteron

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % NA47 %title \\\\ \\\\The physics motivation of the experiments of the Spin Muon Collaboration is to better understand how the nucleon spin is built-up by its partons and to test the fundamental Bjorken sum rule. \\\\ \\\\The spin-dependent structure functions $g _{1}(x)$ of the proton and the deuteron are determined from the measured cross section asymmetries for deep inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized muons from longitudinally polarized nucleons. The experiment is similar to the NA2 one of the European Muon Collaboration in which the violation of the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule for the proton was found. \\\\ \\\\The apparatus is the upgraded forward spectrometer which was used originally by the European and New Muon Collaborations. To minimize the systematic uncertainties the target contains two oppositely polarized cells, which were exposed to the muon beam simultaneously. For the experiments in 1991 and 1992 the original EMC polarized target was reinstalled. In 1993 a new polarized target was put into operati...

  20. Measurement of the spin-dependent structure-functions of the proton and the deuteron

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    % NA47 %title \\\\ \\\\The physics motivation of the experiments of the Spin Muon Collaboration is to better understand how the nucleon spin is built-up by its partons and to test the fundamental Bjorken sum rule. \\\\ \\\\The spin-dependent stucture functions g$ _{1} $(x) of the proton and the deuteron are determined from the measured cross section asymmetries for deep inelastic scattering of longitudinally polarized muons from longitudinally polarized nucleons. The experiment is similar to the NA2 one of the European Muon Collaboration in which the violation of the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule for the proton was found. \\\\ \\\\The apparatus is the upgraded forward spectrometer which was used originally by the European and New Muon Collaborations. To minimize the systematic uncertainties the target contains two oppositely polarized cells, which were exposed to the muon beam simultaneously. For the experiments in 1991 and 1992 the original EMC polarized target was reinstalled. In 1993 a new polarized target was put into operati...

  1. Physical Quantities, Measurement Sets, Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viallefond, F.

    2012-09-01

    A methodology is proposed to develop efficient, robust and expressive data models. The idea is to transform objects described using our human language into mathematical objects which can then be used efficiently in information systems. This is done using topological spaces and algebras to model data types. Technically it is implemented using parametric polymorphism. Two examples are shown, 1) a simple well known object, the physical quantities, and 2) a data-base object, the measurement sets which bind the measurements to their experimental contexts. This leads to theories. The result is high expressiveness by formulating equations and data base operations by means of λ calculi. The theory of the measurement set encapsulates the relational model. Using topoi it is a generalization, a category above the sets.

  2. A proposed measurement of optical orbital and spin angular momentum and its implications for photon angular momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, Elliot

    2018-04-01

    The expression for the total angular momentum carried by a laser optical vortex beam, splits, in the paraxial approximation, into two terms which seem to represent orbital and spin angular momentum respectively. There are, however, two very different competing versions of the formula for the spin angular momentum, one based on the use of the Poynting vector, as in classical electrodynamics, the other related to the canonical expression for the angular momentum which occurs in Quantum Electrodynamics. I analyze the possibility that a sufficiently sensitive optical measurement could decide which of these corresponds to the actual physical angular momentum carried by the beam.

  3. Application of magnetic resonance force microscopy cyclic adiabatic inversion for a single-spin measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Berman, G P; Chapline, G; Gurvitz, S A; Hammel, P C; Pelekhov, D V; Suter, A; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2003-01-01

    We consider the process of a single-spin measurement using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) with a cyclic adiabatic inversion (CAI). This technique is also important for different applications, including a measurement of a qubit state in quantum computation. The measurement takes place through the interaction of a single spin with a cantilever modelled by a quantum oscillator in a coherent state in a quasi-classical range of parameters. The entire system is treated rigorously within the framework of the Schroedinger equation. For a many-spin system our equations accurately describe conventional MRFM experiments involving CAI of the spin system. Our computer simulations of the quantum spin-cantilever dynamics show that the probability distribution for the cantilever position develops two asymmetric peaks with the total relative probabilities mainly dependent on the initial angle between the directions of the average spin and the effective magnetic field, in the rotating frame. We show that each of th...

  4. Attempt to explain black hole spin in X-ray binaries by new physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bambi, Cosimo

    2015-01-01

    It is widely believed that the spin of black holes in X-ray binaries is mainly natal. A significant spin-up from accretion is not possible. If the secondary has a low mass, the black hole spin cannot change too much even if the black hole swallows the whole stellar companion. If the secondary has a high mass, its lifetime is too short to transfer the necessary amount of matter and spin the black hole up. However, while black holes formed from the collapse of a massive star with solarmetallicity are expected to have low birth spin, current spin measurements show that some black holes in X-ray binaries are rotating very rapidly. Here we show that, if these objects are not the Kerr black holes of general relativity, the accretion of a small amount of matter (∝2 M s un) can make them look like very fast-rotating Kerr black holes. Such a possibility is not in contradiction with any observation and it can explain current spin measurements in a very simple way. (orig.)

  5. Constraining new resonant physics with top spin polarisation information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englert, Christoph; Nordstroem, Karl [University of Glasgow, SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ferrando, James [DESY Hamburg, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    We provide a comprehensive analysis of the power of including top quark-polarisation information to kinematically challenging top pair resonance searches, for which ATLAS and CMS start losing sensitivity. Following the general modelling and analysis strategies pursued by the experiments, we analyse the semi-leptonic and the di-lepton channels and show that including polarisation information can lead to large improvements in the limit setting procedures with large data sets. This will allow us to set stronger limits for parameter choices where sensitivity from the invariant mass of the top pair is not sufficient. This highlights the importance of spin observables as part of a more comprehensive set of observables to gain sensitivity to BSM resonance searches. (orig.)

  6. The Spin Structure of the Proton at Low Q2: A Measurement of the Structure Function g2p

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Chao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The spin structure of the nucleon has remained as one of the key points of interest in hadronic physics, which has attracted many efforts from both experimentalists and theorists. Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) is the fundamental theory that describes the strong interaction. It has been verified in the asymptotically free region. However, the non-perturbative confinement of quarks within the nucleon is still not well understood within QCD. In the non-perturbative regime, low-energy effective field theories such as chiral perturbation theory (XPT) provide predictions for the spin structure functions. The neutron spin structure functions, gp1 and gp2 , and the proton spin structure function, gp1, have been measured over a wide kinematic range and compared with the theoretical predictions. However, the proton spin structure function, gp2, remains largely unmeasured. The E08-027 collaboration successfully performed the first measurement of the inclusive electron-proton scattering in the kinematic range 0.02 < Q2 < 0.2 GeV2. The experiment took place in experimental Hall A at Jefferson Lab in 2012. A longitudinally polarized electron beam with incident energies between 1.1 GeV and 3.3 GeV was scattered from a longitudinally or transversely polarized NH3 target. Asymmetries and polarized cross-section differences were measured in the resonance region to extract the proton spin structure functions g2. The results allow us to obtain the generalized spin polarizabilities γ0 and δLT and test the Burkhardtt-Cottingham (BC) sum rule. Chiral perturbation theory is expected to work in this kinematic range and this measurement of δLT will give a benchmark test to XPT calculations. This thesis will discuss preliminary results from the E08-027 data analysis.

  7. New measurements of transverse spin asymmetries at COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Sozzi, F

    2012-01-01

    The study of transverse momentum effects and transverse spin structure of the nucleon is an important part of the scientific program of COMPASS, a fixed target experiment at the CERN SPS. The transverse effects are investigated via semi inclusive DIS reactions with a 160 GeV /c muon beam impinging on transversely polarised targets. The hadrons produced in the reactions are detected in a wide momentum and angular range by a two-stage spectrometer. A deuterium target has been used in the first part of COMPASS data taking from 2002 to 2004, while a proton target has been used in 2007 and 2010. Here we present the recent results obtained from the 2010 data on different channels, involving the azimuthal distribution of single hadrons and the azimuthal dependence of the plane cont aining hadron pairs. The results confirm the published results of the 2007 data taking with an improved statistical significance; the measured azimuthal asymmetries are clearly non zero, at variance with those measured on a deuterium targ...

  8. Physical Properties of AR-Glass Fibers in Continuous Fiber Spinning Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ji-Sun; Lee, MiJai; Lim, Tae-Young; Lee, Youngjin; Jeon, Dae-Woo; Kim, Jin-Ho [Korea Institute of Ceramic Engineering and Technology, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Hyun, Soong-Keun [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    In this study, a glass fiber is fabricated using a continuous spinning process from alkali resistant (AR) glass with 4 wt%zirconia. In order to confirm the melting properties of the marble glass, the raw material is placed into a Pt crucible and melted at 1650 ℃ for 2 h, and then annealed. In order to confirm the transparency of the clear marble glass, the visible transmittance is measured and the fiber spinning condition is investigated by using high temperature viscosity measurements. A change in the diameter is observed according to the winding speed in the range of 100–900 rpm; it is also verified as a function of the fiberizing temperature in the range of 1200–1260 ℃. The optimum winding speed and spinning temperature are 500 rpm and 1240 ℃, respectively. The properties of the prepared spinning fiber are confirmed using optical microscope, tensile strength, modulus, and alkali-resistant tests.

  9. A measure of monopole inertia in the quantum spin ice Yb2Ti2O7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lidong; Laurita, N. J.; Ross, Kate A.; Gaulin, Bruce D.; Armitage, N. P.

    2016-04-01

    An important and continuing theme of modern solid state physics is the realization of exotic excitations in materials, known as quasiparticles, that have no analogy in the actual physical vacuum of free space. Although they are not fundamental, such quasiparticles do constitute the most basic description of the excited states of the `vacuum' in which they reside. In this regard the magnetic textures of the excited states of spin ices, magnetic pyrochlore oxides with dominant Ising interactions, have been proposed to behave as effective magnetic charge monopoles. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments have established the pyrochlore material Yb2Ti2O7 (YbTO) as a quantum spin ice, where, in addition to the Ising interactions, there are substantial transverse terms that may induce quantum dynamics and--in principle--coherent monopole motion. Here we report a combined time-domain terahertz spectroscopy (TDTS) and microwave cavity study of YbTO to probe its complex dynamic magnetic susceptibility. We find that the form of the susceptibility is consistent with that of a monopole gas, and a magnetic monopole conductivity can be defined and measured. Using the phase sensitive capabilities of these techniques, we observe a sign change in the reactive part of the magnetic response. In generic models of magnetic excitations this is possible only by introducing inertial effects, such as a mass-dependent term, to the equations of motion. Analogous to conventional electric charge systems, measurement of the conductivity's spectral weight allows us to derive a value for the magnetic monopole mass. Our results support the idea of magnetic monopoles of quantum spin ice as the true coherently propagating quasiparticles of this system.

  10. Spin correlation and entanglement detection in Cooper pair splitters by current measurements using magnetic detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busz, Piotr; Tomaszewski, Damian; Martinek, Jan

    2017-08-01

    We analyze a model of a double quantum dot Cooper pair splitter coupled to two ferromagnetic detectors and demonstrate the possibility of determination of spin correlation by current measurements. We use perturbation theory, taking account of the exchange interaction with the detectors, which leads to complex spin dynamics in the dots. This affects the measured spin and restricts the use of ferromagnetic detectors to the nonlinear current-voltage characteristic regime at the current plateau, where the relevant spin projection is conserved, in contrast to the linear current-voltage characteristic regime, in which the spin information is distorted. Moreover, we show that for separable states the spin correlation can only be determined in a limited parameter regime, much more restricted than in the case of entangled states. We propose an entanglement test based on the Bell inequality.

  11. Spin-mechatronics [Journal of the Physical Society of Japan, ISSN 0031-9015, Jan 2017, v. 86(1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Mamoru; Saitoh, Eiji; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the interconversion phenomena between spin and mechanical angular momentum in moving objects. In particular, the recent results on spin manipulation and spin-current generation by mechanical motion are examined. In accelerating systems, spin-dependent gauge fields emerge, which enable the conversion from mechanical angular momentum into spins. Such a spin-mechanical effect is predicted by quantum theory in a non-inertial frame. Experiments which confirm the effect, i.e., the resonance frequency shift in nuclear magnetic resonance, the stray field measurement of rotating metals, and electric voltage generation in liquid metals, are discussed. (author)

  12. Beam Spin Asymmetry Measurements for Two Pion Photoproduction at CLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Mark D. [Univ. of Glasgow, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-01

    The overarching goal of this analysis, and many like it, is to develop our understanding of the strong force interactions within the nucleon by examining the nature of their excitation spectra. As the resonances of these spectra have very short lifetimes (tau = 1x10-23 s) and often have very similar masses, it is often impossible to directly observe resonances in the excitation spectra of nucleons. Polarization observables allow us to study the resonances by looking at how they affect the spin state of final state particles. The beam asymmetry is a polarization observable that allows us to detect the sensitivity of these resonances, and other transition mechanisms, to the electric vector orientation of incident photons. Presented in this thesis are first measurements of the beam asymmetries in the resonant region for the reaction channel pgamma p --> p π+ π-focusing on the intermediate mesonic states rho^0 and f^0, and the final state pions. The analysis used data from the g8b experiment undertaken at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), the first experiment at JLab to use a linearly polarized photon beam. Using the coherent Bremsstrahlung facility and the CLAS detector of Hall B at JLab allowed for many multi-channel reactions to be detected and the first measurements of many polarization observables including those presented here. A brief overview of the theoretical framework used to undertake this analysis is given, followed by a description of the experimental details of the facilities used, then a description of the calibration of the Bremsstrahlung tagging facility which the author undertook, and finally the analysis is presented and the resulting measurements.

  13. Physics Colloquium: Theory of the spin wave Seebeck effect in magnetic insulators

    CERN Multimedia

    Université de Genève

    2011-01-01

    Geneva University Physics Department 24, quai Ernest-Ansermet CH-1211 Geneva 4 Lundi 28 février 2011 17h00 - École de Physique, Auditoire Stückelberg Theory of the spin wave Seebeck effect in magnetic insulators Prof. Gerrit Bauer Delft University of Technology The subfield of spin caloritronics addresses the coupling of heat, charge and spin currents in nanostructures. In the center of interest is here the spin Seebeck effect, which was discovered in an iron-nickel alloy. Uchida et al. recently observed the effect also in an electrically insulating Yttrium Iron Garnett (YIG) thin magnetic film. To our knowledge this is the first observation of a Seebeck effect generated by an insulator, implying that the physics is fundamentally different from the conventional Seebeck effect in metals. We explain the experiments by the pumping of a spin current into the detecting contacts by the thermally excited magnetization dynamics. In this talk I will give a brief overview over the state o...

  14. Physical limitations to efficient high-speed spin-torque switching in magnetic tunnel junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heindl, R.; Rippard, W. H.; Russek, S. E.; Kos, A. B.

    2011-02-01

    We have investigated the physical limitations to efficient high-speed spin-torque switching by means of write error rates both experimentally as well as through macrospin simulations. The spin-torque-induced write operations were performed on in-plane MgO magnetic tunnel junctions. The write error rates were determined from up to 106 switching events as a function of pulse amplitude and duration (5 to 100 ns) for devices with different thermal stability factors. Both experiments and simulations show qualitatively similar results. In particular, the write error rates as a function of pulse voltage amplitude increase at higher rates for pulse durations below ≈50 ns. Simulations show that the write error rates can be reduced only to some extent by the use of materials with perpendicular anisotropy and reduced damping, whereas noncollinear orientation of the spin current polarization and the magnetic easy axis increases the write error rates. The cause for the write error rates is related to the underlying physics of spin-torque switching and the occurrence of the stagnation point on the magnetization switching trajectory where the spin-torque disappears and the device loses the energy needed to switch. The stagnation point can be accessed either during the initial magnetization distribution or by thermal diffusion during the switching process.

  15. Measurement of np elastic scattering spin-spin correlation parameters at 484, 634, and 788 MeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnett, R.W.

    1989-03-01

    The spin-spin correlation parameters C/sub LL/ and C/sub SL/ were measured for np elastic scattering at the incident neutron kinetic energy of 634 MeV. Good agreement was obtained with previously measured data. Additionally, the first measurement of the correlation parameter C/sub SS/ was made at the three energies, 484, 634, and 788 MeV. It was found that the new values, in general, do not agree well with phase shift predictions. A study was carried out to determine which of the isospin-0 partial waves will be affected by this new data. It was found that the /sup 1/P/sub 1/ partial wave will be affected significantly at all three measurement energies. At 634 and 788 MeV, the /sup 3/S/sub 1/ phase shifts will also change. 29 refs., 21 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Measurement of np elastic scattering spin-spin correlation parameters at 484, 634, and 788 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, R.W.

    1989-03-01

    The spin-spin correlation parameters C/sub LL/ and C/sub SL/ were measured for np elastic scattering at the incident neutron kinetic energy of 634 MeV. Good agreement was obtained with previously measured data. Additionally, the first measurement of the correlation parameter C/sub SS/ was made at the three energies, 484, 634, and 788 MeV. It was found that the new values, in general, do not agree well with phase shift predictions. A study was carried out to determine which of the isospin-0 partial waves will be affected by this new data. It was found that the 1 P 1 partial wave will be affected significantly at all three measurement energies. At 634 and 788 MeV, the 3 S 1 phase shifts will also change. 29 refs., 21 figs., 16 tabs

  17. Spin structure measurements from E143 at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the proton and deuteron spin structure functions, g{sub 1}{sup p} at beam energies of 29.1, 16.2, and 9.7 GeV, and g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} at a beam energy of 29.1 GeV. The integrals {Gamma}{sub p} = {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup p} (x, Q{sup 2})dx and {Gamma}{sub d} = {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup d}(x, Q{sup 2})dx have been evaluated at fixed Q{sup 2} = 3 (GeV/c){sup 2} using the 29.1 GeV data to yield {Gamma}{sub p} = 0.127 {+-} 0.004(stat.) {+-} 0.010(syst.) and {Gamma}{sub d} = 0.041 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.004. The Q{sup 2} dependence of the ratio g{sub 1}/F{sub 1} has been studied and is found to be small for Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Within experimental precision, the g{sub 2} data are well-described by the twist-2 contribution, g{sub 2}{sup ww}. Twist-3 matrix elements have been extracted and are compared to theoretical predictions. The asymmetry A{sub 2} has also been measured and is found to be significantly smaller than the positivity limit {radical}R for both targets A{sub 2}{sup p} is found to be positive and inconsistent with zero.

  18. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP CIRCUM-PAN-PACIFIC RIKEN SYMPOSIUM ON HIGH ENERGY SPIN PHYSICS, VOLUME 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KUMANO,S.; SHIBATA,T.A.; YAZAKI,K.

    2000-06-28

    The Circum-Pan-Pacific Riken Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Oukouchi Memorial Hall in Riken from November 3 through 6, 1999. It was held as a joint meeting of the 2nd Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics and the 3rd of the series of Riken Symposia related to the RHIC-SPIN. The 1st Circum-Pan-Pacific Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics was held at Kobe in 1996 and the RHIC-SPIN Riken Symposia had been held every two years since 1995. As Prof. Ozaki mentioned in his talk at the beginning of this meeting, the RHIC was ready for the first beam, physics experiments scheduled in 2000, and the RHIC-SPIN would start in 2001. It was therefore considered to be very timely for the researchers in the field of high energy spin physics to get together, clarifying the present status of the field and discussing interesting and important topics as well as experimental subjects to be pursued. It is especially important for the success of the RHIC-SPIN project that the researchers in the neighboring countries surrounding the Pacific are actively involved in it. This is why the above two series were joined in this. symposium. The subjects discussed in the symposium include: Hard processes probing spin-structure functions, polarization mechanisms in high energy reactions, lattice studies of polarized structure functions, theoretical models for the nucleon and its spin structure, RHIC and RHIC-SPIN projects, results and future projects of existing experimental facilities. Totally 73 scientists participated in the symposium, 27 from abroad and 46 from Japan. it consisted of 13 main sessions, with 33 invited and contributed talks, and 4 discussion sessions covering recent experimental and theoretical developments and important topics in high energy spin physics and closely related fields.

  19. Laser - Polarized HE-3 Target Used for a Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romalis, M

    2003-11-05

    two methods, one relying on traditional NMR techniques and the other on the shift of the Rb Zeeman resonance frequency due to the {sup 3}He polarization. To calibrate the frequency shift polarimetry, we performed an accurate measurement of a Rb-{sup 3}He spin exchange parameter, significantly improving on previous results. A part of the thesis is devoted to the analysis of the high energy data. We present an algorithm for electron-pion discrimination based on the lateral shape of their shower in the electromagnetic calorimeter. The calculation of the radiative corrections to the deep inelastic scattering and, especially, their effect on the experimental errors is also discussed. The last chapter is devoted to the interpretation of our results in the framework of perturbative QCD. We present a physically intuitive description of the ambiguities arising in Next to Leading Order (NLO) analysis of the spin structure functions. Using such analysis we describe the implications of our data.

  20. Progress in Scintillating Polarized Targets for Spin Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Brandt, B.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.; Bunyatova, E. I.

    2003-06-01

    At PSI polarized scintillating targets have been operated in several particle physics experiments over extended periods of time. They proved to be very robust and reliable. Proton polarizations of more than 80%, and deuteron polarizations of 25% in fully deuterated polystyrene based scintillator have been reached in a vertical dilution refrigerator with optical access. New choices of materials and preparation procedures show potential for an improvement of the scintillation and polarization properties.

  1. Measuring the spin of black holes in binary systems using gravitational waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Salvatore; Lynch, Ryan; Veitch, John; Raymond, Vivien; Sturani, Riccardo

    2014-06-27

    Compact binary coalescences are the most promising sources of gravitational waves (GWs) for ground-based detectors. Binary systems containing one or two spinning black holes are particularly interesting due to spin-orbit (and eventual spin-spin) interactions and the opportunity of measuring spins directly through GW observations. In this Letter, we analyze simulated signals emitted by spinning binaries with several values of masses, spins, orientations, and signal-to-noise ratios, as detected by an advanced LIGO-Virgo network. We find that for moderate or high signal-to-noise ratio the spin magnitudes can be estimated with errors of a few percent (5%-30%) for neutron star-black hole (black hole-black hole) systems. Spins' tilt angle can be estimated with errors of 0.04 rad in the best cases, but typical values will be above 0.1 rad. Errors will be larger for signals barely above the threshold for detection. The difference in the azimuth angles of the spins, which may be used to check if spins are locked into resonant configurations, cannot be constrained. We observe that the best performances are obtained when the line of sight is perpendicular to the system's total angular momentum and that a sudden change of behavior occurs when a system is observed from angles such that the plane of the orbit can be seen both from above and below during the time the signal is in band. This study suggests that direct measurement of black hole spin by means of GWs can be as precise as what can be obtained from x-ray binaries.

  2. The measurable distinction between the spin and orbital angular momenta of electromagnetic radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James H. Crichton

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available We show how the angular momentum of electromagnetic radiation may be decomposed into spin and orbital parts, of which the spin part is measurable in terms of Stokes parameters, thereby providing an unambiguous, gauge-invariant, distinction between the two parts.

  3. Edge physics of the quantum spin Hall insulator from a quantum dot excited by optical absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Romain; Moore, Joel E

    2014-04-11

    The gapless edge modes of the quantum spin Hall insulator form a helical liquid in which the direction of motion along the edge is determined by the spin orientation of the electrons. In order to probe the Luttinger liquid physics of these edge states and their interaction with a magnetic (Kondo) impurity, we consider a setup where the helical liquid is tunnel coupled to a semiconductor quantum dot that is excited by optical absorption, thereby inducing an effective quantum quench of the tunneling. At low energy, the absorption spectrum is dominated by a power-law singularity. The corresponding exponent is directly related to the interaction strength (Luttinger parameter) and can be computed exactly using boundary conformal field theory thanks to the unique nature of the quantum spin Hall edge.

  4. LISS: Planning for spin physics with multi-GeV nucleon beams at IUCF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigdor, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    The technology developed in recent years to facilitate experiments with stored, cooled polarized beams bombarding internal targets (including polarized gaseous targets) has natural and novel applications at multi-GeV energies. At IUCF we are preparing a proposal for a Light-Ion Spin Synchrotron (LISS) that would adapt this technology to the exploration of nucleon spin physics in the non-perturbative QCD regime from 1 endash 20 GeV. I will describe the research goals of such a facility, with emphasis on a few contemplated experiments, chosen to illustrate both the range of physics issues to be addressed and the considerable advantages offered by storage ring techniques. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  5. Application of magnetic resonance force microscopy cyclic adiabatic inversion for a single-spin measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berman, G P; Borgonovi, F; Chapline, G; Gurvitz, S A; Hammel, P C; Pelekhov, D V; Suter, A; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2003-01-01

    We consider the process of a single-spin measurement using magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM) with a cyclic adiabatic inversion (CAI). This technique is also important for different applications, including a measurement of a qubit state in quantum computation. The measurement takes place through the interaction of a single spin with a cantilever modelled by a quantum oscillator in a coherent state in a quasi-classical range of parameters. The entire system is treated rigorously within the framework of the Schroedinger equation. For a many-spin system our equations accurately describe conventional MRFM experiments involving CAI of the spin system. Our computer simulations of the quantum spin-cantilever dynamics show that the probability distribution for the cantilever position develops two asymmetric peaks with the total relative probabilities mainly dependent on the initial angle between the directions of the average spin and the effective magnetic field, in the rotating frame. We show that each of the peaks is correlated with the direction of the average spin (being along or opposite to the direction of the effective magnetic field). This generates two possible outcomes of a single-spin measurement, similar to the Stern-Gerlach effect. We demonstrate that the generation of the second peak can be significantly suppressed by turning on adiabatically the amplitude of the rf magnetic field. We also show that MRFM CAI can be used both for detecting a signal from a single spin, and for measuring the single-spin state by measuring the phase of the cantilever driving oscillations

  6. Sum rule measurements of the spin-dependent compton amplitude (nucleon spin structure at Q2 = 0)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babusci, D.; Giordano, G.; Baghaei, H.; Cichocki, A.; Blecher, M.; Breuer, M.; Commeaux, C.; Didelez, J.P.; Caracappa, A.; Fan, Q.

    1995-01-01

    Energy weighted integrals of the difference in helicity-dependent photo-production cross sections (σ 1/2 - σ 3/2 ) provide information on the nucleon's Spin-dependent Polarizability (γ), and on the spin-dependent part of the asymptotic forward Compton amplitude through the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov (DHG) sum rule. (The latter forms the Q 2 =0 limit of recent spin-asymmetry experiments in deep-inelastic lepton-scattering.) There are no direct measurements of σ 1/2 or σ 3/2 , for either the proton or the neutron. Estimates from current π-photo-production multipole analyses, particularly for the proton-neutron difference, are in good agreement with relativistic-l-loop Chiral calculations (χPT) for γ but predict large deviations from the DHG sum rule. Either (a) both the 2-loop corrections to the Spin-Polarizability are large and the existing multipoles are wrong, or (b) modifications to the Drell-Hearn-Gerasimov sum rule are required to fully describe the isospin structure of the nucleon. The helicity-dependent photo-reaction amplitudes, for both the proton and the neutron, will be measured at LEGS from pion-threshold to 470 MeV. In these double-polarization experiments, circularly polarized photons from LEGS will be used with SPHICE, a new frozen-spin target consisting of rvec H · rvec D in the solid phase. Reaction channels will be identified in SASY, a large detector array covering about 80% of 4π. A high degree of symmetry in both target and detector will be used to minimize systematic uncertainties

  7. Probing Nuclear Spin Effects on Electronic Spin Coherence via EPR Measurements of Vanadium(IV) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael J; Krzyaniak, Matthew D; Wasielewski, Michael R; Freedman, Danna E

    2017-07-17

    Quantum information processing (QIP) has the potential to transform numerous fields from cryptography, to finance, to the simulation of quantum systems. A promising implementation of QIP employs unpaired electronic spins as qubits, the fundamental units of information. Though molecular electronic spins offer many advantages, including chemical tunability and facile addressability, the development of design principles for the synthesis of complexes that exhibit long qubit superposition lifetimes (also known as coherence times, or T 2 ) remains a challenge. As nuclear spins in the local qubit environment are a primary cause of shortened superposition lifetimes, we recently conducted a study which employed a modular spin-free ligand scaffold to place a spin-laden propyl moiety at a series of fixed distances from an S = 1 / 2 vanadium(IV) ion in a series of vanadyl complexes. We found that, within a radius of 4.0(4)-6.6(6) Å from the metal center, nuclei did not contribute to decoherence. To assess the generality of this important design principle and test its efficacy in a different coordination geometry, we synthesized and investigated three vanadium tris(dithiolene) complexes with the same ligand set employed in our previous study: K 2 [V(C 5 H 6 S 4 ) 3 ] (1), K 2 [V(C 7 H 6 S 6 ) 3 ] (2), and K 2 [V(C 9 H 6 S 8 ) 3 ] (3). We specifically interrogated solutions of these complexes in DMF-d 7 /toluene-d 8 with pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy and electron nuclear double resonance spectroscopy and found that the distance dependence present in the previously synthesized vanadyl complexes holds true in this series. We further examined the coherence properties of the series in a different solvent, MeCN-d 3 /toluene-d 8 , and found that an additional property, the charge density of the complex, also affects decoherence across the series. These results highlight a previously unknown design principle for augmenting T 2 and open new pathways for the

  8. Measuring Quasar Spin via X-ray Continuum Fitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Matthew; Pooley, David; Rappaport, Saul; Steiner, Jack

    2018-01-01

    We have identified several quasars whose X-ray spectra appear very soft. When fit with power-law models, the best-fit indices are greater than 3. This is very suggestive of thermal disk emission, indicating that the X-ray spectrum is dominated by the disk component. Galactic black hole binaries in such states have been successfully fit with disk-blackbody models to constrain the inner radius, which also constrains the spin of the black hole. We have fit those models to XMM-Newton spectra of several of our identified soft X-ray quasars to place constraints on the spins of the supermassive black holes.

  9. Spin physics: A new twist on heavy-ion experiments at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Operation of RHIC with two beams of highly polarized protons (70%, either longitudinal or transverse) at high luminosity L = 2 · 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 for two months/year will allow high statistics studies of polarization phenomena in the perturbative region of hard scattering where both QCD and ElectroWeak theory make detailed predictions for polarization effects. The collision c.m. energy, √s = 50--500 GeV, represents a new domain for the study of spin. Direct photon production will be used to measure the gluon polarization in the polarized proton. A new twist comes from W-boson production which is expected to be 100% parity violating and will thus allow measurements of flavor separated quark and antiquark (u, anti u, d, anti d) polarization distributions. Searches for parity violation in strong interaction processes such as jet and leading particle production will be a sensitive way to look for new physics beyond the standard model, one possibility being quark substructure

  10. Spin physics at RHIC a new twist on the heavy ion experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannenbaum, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    Operation of RHIC with two beams of highly polarized protons (70%, either longitudinal or transverse) at high luminosity ???? = 2 circ 10 32 cm -2 sec -1 for two months/year will allow high statistics studies of polarization phenomena in the perturbative region of hard scattering where both QCD and ElectroWeak theory make detailed predictions for polarization effects. The collision c.m energy, √s = 200 - 500 GeV, represents a new domain for the study of spin. Direct photon production win be used to measure the gluon polarization in the polarized proton. A new twist comes from W-boson production which is expected to be 100% parity violating and will thus allow measurements of flavor separated quark and antiquark (u, u, d, d) polarization distributions. Searches for parity violation in strong interaction processes such as jet and leading particle production will be a sensitive way to look for new physics beyond the standard model, one possibility being quark substructure

  11. Spinning the Innovation and Entrepreneurship Mindset: A Modern Physics Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roughani, Bahram

    2010-04-01

    Topics in Modern Physics course from relativity to quantum mechanics were examined in the context of innovation as part of the recent Kettering University program on ``Entrepreneurship Across Curriculum-EAC.'' The main goals were (a) to introduce innovation and entrepreneurship without eliminating any topics from this course, (b) to use EAC as a vehicle for intentional education that produces graduates with innovative mindsets, (c) to enrich the students learning experience aligned with the desired educational outcomes, and (d) to highlight the impact of scientific innovation in the society, while encouraging students to re-think how entrepreneurship mindset could maximize their impact in the society through innovation. Ideas such as principles behind innovation and innovative ideas, disciplines of innovations, formation of innovation teams, and effective methods for analyzing innovative value propositions were introduced in this course. Most of the implementation were achieved through out of class activities, and communicated through in class presentations, papers or weekly laboratory reports.

  12. Spin polarization of (Ga,Mn)As measured by Andreev spectroscopy: the role of spin-active scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Piano, S.; Grein, R.; Mellor, C.J.; Výborný, Karel; Campion, R.; Wang, M.; Eschrig, M.; Gallagher, B. L.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 83, č. 8 (2011), 081305/1-081305/4 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100100802; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E08087 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 214499 - NAMASTE; European Commission(XE) 237375 - SemiSpinNano Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Andreev spectroscopy * magnetic semiconductors Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.691, year: 2011

  13. SPIN-UP and Preparing Undergraduate Physics Majors for Careers in Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Ruth

    2011-03-01

    Seven years ago, the Strategic Programs for Innovations in Undergraduate Physics (SPIN-UP) Report produced by the National Task Force on Undergraduate Physics identified several key characteristics of thriving undergraduate physics departments including steps these departments had taken to prepare students better for careers in industry. Today statistical data from AIP shows that almost 40% of students graduating with a degree in physics seek employment as soon as they graduate. Successful undergraduate physics programs have taken steps to adapt their rigorous physics programs to ensure that graduating seniors have the skills they need to enter the industrial workplace as well as to go on to graduate school in physics. Typical strategies noted during a series of SPIN-UP workshops funded by a grant from NSF to APS, AAPT, and AIP include flexible curricula, early introduction of undergraduates to research techniques, revised laboratory experiences that provide students with skills they need to move directly into jobs, and increased emphasis on ``soft'' skills such as communication and team work. Despite significant success, undergraduate programs face continuing challenges in preparing students to work in industry, most significantly the fact that there is no job called ``physicist'' at the undergraduate level. supported by grant NSF DUE-0741560.

  14. Measuring the spin Chern number in time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter optical lattices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dan-Wei, E-mail: zdanwei@126.com [Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Quantum Engineering and Quantum Materials, SPTE, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Cao, Shuai, E-mail: shuaicao2004@163.com [Department of Applied Physics, College of Electronic Engineering, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 China (China)

    2016-10-14

    We propose an experimental scheme to directly measure the spin Chern number of the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter model in optical lattices. We first show that this model can be realized by using ultracold Fermi atoms with two pseudo-spin states encoded by the internal Zeeman states in a square optical lattice and the corresponding topological Bloch bands are characterized by the spin Chern number. We then propose and numerically demonstrate that this topological invariant can be extracted from the shift of the hybrid Wannier center in the optical lattice. By spin-resolved in situ detection of the atomic densities along the transverse direction combined with time-of-flight measurement along another spatial direction, the spin Chern number in this system is directly measured. - Highlights: • The cold-atom optical-lattice scheme for realizing the time-reversal-invariant Hofstadter model is proposed. • The intrinsic spin Chern number related to the hybrid Wannier center in the optical lattice is investigated. • Direct measurement of the spin Chern number in the proposed system is theoretically demonstrated.

  15. More spinoff from spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masaike, Akira

    1993-01-01

    Despite playing a major role in today's Standard Model, spin - the intrinsic angular momentum carried by particles - is sometimes dismissed as an inessential complication. However several major spin questions with important implications for the Standard Model remain unanswered, and recent results and new technological developments made the 10th International Symposium on High Energy Spin Physics, held in Nagoya, Japan, in November, highly topical. The symposium covered a wide range of physics, reflecting the diversity of spin effects, however four main themes were - the spin content of the nucleon, tests of symmetries and physics beyond standard models, intermediate energy physics, and spin technologies. Opening the meeting, T. Kinoshita reviewed the status of measurements of the anomalous magnetic moment (g-2) of the electron and the muon. The forthcoming experiment at Brookhaven (September 1991, page 23) will probe beyond the energy ranges open to existing electronpositron colliders. For example muon substructure will be opened up to 5 TeV and Ws to 2 TeV. R.L. Jaffe classified quark-parton distributions in terms of their spin dependence, pointing out their leftright attributes, and emphasized the importance of measuring transverse spin distributions through lepton pair production

  16. Measuring spin-dependent structure functions at CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A. [Universitaet Frankfurt (Germany)

    1994-04-01

    The author analyses whether CEBAF with a 10 GeV beam could contribute significantly to the understanding of spin-dependent deep-inelastic scattering as well as semi-inclusive reactions. The main advantage of CEBAF is the much better attainable statistics, its great disadvantage its comparably low energy, which limits the accessible x-range to about 0.15 to 0.7. Within these constraints CEBAF could provide (1) high precision data which would be very valuable to understand the Q{sup 2} dependence of the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1}(x) and G{sub 2}(x) and (2) the by far most precise determination of the third moments of g{sub 1}(x) and g{sub 2}(x) the latter of which the author argues to be related to a fundamental property of the nucleon.

  17. Polarisation in spin-echo experiments: Multi-point and lock-in measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamtögl, Anton; Davey, Benjamin; Ward, David J.; Jardine, Andrew P.; Ellis, John; Allison, William

    2018-02-01

    Spin-echo instruments are typically used to measure diffusive processes and the dynamics and motion in samples on ps and ns time scales. A key aspect of the spin-echo technique is to determine the polarisation of a particle beam. We present two methods for measuring the spin polarisation in spin-echo experiments. The current method in use is based on taking a number of discrete readings. The implementation of a new method involves continuously rotating the spin and measuring its polarisation after being scattered from the sample. A control system running on a microcontroller is used to perform the spin rotation and to calculate the polarisation of the scattered beam based on a lock-in amplifier. First experimental tests of the method on a helium spin-echo spectrometer show that it is clearly working and that it has advantages over the discrete approach, i.e., it can track changes of the beam properties throughout the experiment. Moreover, we show that real-time numerical simulations can perfectly describe a complex experiment and can be easily used to develop improved experimental methods prior to a first hardware implementation.

  18. Application of Roll-Isolated Inertial Measurement Units to the Instrumentation of Spinning Vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BEADER,MARK E.

    2000-12-01

    Roll-isolated inertial measurement units are developed at Sandia for use in the instrumentation, guidance, and control of rapidly spinning vehicles. Roll-isolation is accomplished by supporting the inertial instrument cluster (gyros and accelerometers) on a single gimbal, the axis of which is parallel to the vehicle's spin axis. A rotary motor on the gimbal is driven by a servo loop to null the roll gyro output, thus inertially stabilizing the gimbal and instrument cluster while the vehicle spins around it. Roll-isolation prevents saturation of the roll gyro by the high vehicle spin rate, and vastly reduces measurement errors arising from gyro scale factor and alignment uncertainties. Nine versions of Sandia-developed roll-isolated inertial measurement units have been flown on a total of 27 flight tests since 1972.

  19. Measurements of lifetimes and feeding times for high spin states in 156Dy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.; Andrews, H.R.; Haeusser, O.; El Masri, Y.; Aleonard, M.M.; Yang-Lee, I.; Diamond, R.; Stephens, F.S.; Butler, P.A.

    1979-01-01

    The inverse reaction 24 Mg( 136 Xe, 4n) 156 Dy at 595 MeV has been used to populate high spin states in 156 Dy. A recoil distance technique was applied to measure lifetimes and feeding times in both the ground state band, and a band of anomalously high moment of intertia. Values for the intrinsic quadrupole moments, Q 0 , were derived to spin 22 + . The limit of centrifugal stretching appeared to be reached at spin 14 + . The results are discussed in terms of band mixing. (orig.)

  20. Spin Transport in Semiconductor heterostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinescu, Domnita Catalina

    2011-01-01

    The focus of the research performed under this grant has been the investigation of spin transport in magnetic semiconductor heterostructures. The interest in these systems is motivated both by their intriguing physical properties, as the physical embodiment of a spin-polarized Fermi liquid, as well as by their potential applications as spintronics devices. In our work we have analyzed several different problems that affect the spin dynamics in single and bi-layer spin-polarized two-dimensional (2D) systems. The topics of interests ranged from the fundamental aspects of the electron-electron interactions, to collective spin and charge density excitations and spin transport in the presence of the spin-orbit coupling. The common denominator of these subjects is the impact at the macroscopic scale of the spin-dependent electron-electron interaction, which plays a much more subtle role than in unpolarized electron systems. Our calculations of several measurable parameters, such as the excitation frequencies of magneto-plasma modes, the spin mass, and the spin transresistivity, propose realistic theoretical estimates of the opposite-spin many-body effects, in particular opposite-spin correlations, that can be directly connected with experimental measurements.

  1. Temperature and concentration dependent spin noise measurements in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemer, Michael; Mueller, Georg; Huebner, Jens; Oestreich, Michael [Institute for Solid State Physics, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz University Hannover (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy is an elegant method to access electron properties of direct gap semiconductors in thermal equilibrium while avoiding carrier heating and excitation of electron hole pairs. This technique is used to examine the electron spin lifetime and noise power in GaAs in dependence of electron doping concentration, sample temperature, and the probe laser wavelength. The measured power of the spin noise signal is used to extract information about the electron statistics and the position of the electrons in the conduction band. The measured data can be well explained using a model based on the change of the index of refraction due to the ever present thermal fluctuations of the electron spin.

  2. Measurement of spin observables in exclusive $pp \\to \\Lambda \\Lambda$ production

    CERN Document Server

    Paschke, K

    2000-01-01

    The PS185 experiment at LEAR has produced a wealth of high precision measurements of cross-sections and final state polarization observables in near-threshold antihyperon-hyperon production from antiproton-proton annihilation. In its most recent run, PS185/3 extended its capabilities by utilizing a transversely polarized frozen spin target to measure exclusive Lambda Lambda production. This allows access to a broad set of spin observables involving initial state spin. Competing theoretical models for this reaction have differing predictions for some of these newly accessible spin observables, most notably the depolarization D/sub nn/. This data is expected to provide a rigorous test of these models. Current results from the analysis of this data are presented. (5 refs).

  3. Symmetry, Spin Dynamics and the Properties of Nanostructures : Lecture Notes of the 11th International School on Theoretical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wal, Andrzej; Barnaś, Józef

    2016-01-01

    This book is a collection of lecture notes which were presented by invited speakers at the Eleventh School on Theoretical Physics "Symmetry and Structural Properties of Condensed Matter SSPCM 2014" in Rzeszów (Poland) in September 2014. The main challenge for the lecturers was the objective to present their subject as a review as well as in the form of introduction for beginners. Topics considered in the volume concentrate on: spin dynamics and spin transport in magnetic and non-magnetic structures, spin-orbit interaction in two-dimensional systems and graphene, and new mathematical method used in the condensed matter physics.

  4. Pure spin-3/2 propagator for use in particle and nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiano, J.; Clymton, S.; Mart, T.

    2017-11-01

    We propose the use of a pure spin-3/2 propagator in the (3 /2 ,0 )⊕(0 ,3 /2 ) representation in particle and nuclear physics. To formulate the propagator in a covariant form we use the antisymmetric tensor spinor representation and we consider the Δ resonance contribution to the elastic π N scattering as an example. We find that the use of a conventional gauge-invariant interaction Lagrangian leads to a problem: the obtained scattering amplitude does not exhibit the resonance behavior. To overcome this problem we modify the interaction by adding a momentum dependence. As in the case of the Rarita-Schwinger formalism, we find that a perfect resonance description could be obtained in the pure spin-3/2 formulation only if hadronic form factors were considered in the interactions.

  5. Spin polarized solid target as a prospective tool for radioactive ion beam physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urrego-Blanco, J. P.; van den Brandt, B.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Hautle, P.; Konter, J. A.

    2005-12-01

    Spin polarized probes are used in a wide range of experiments in nuclear physics including the determination of spin structure functions and tests of fundamental symmetries. At low energies, light stable polarized beams have been used for spectroscopic purposes. We propose to extend these types of experiments to nuclei far from stability by using radioactive ion beams (RIBs) and polarized targets. Towards this goal we intend to develop a solid polarized proton and/or deuterium target in the thickness range between 20 μm and 100 μm based on a scintillating (active) polymeric foil. Such a target would be a useful tool in the determination of excitation functions in resonant reactions, in studies of one-nucleon transfer reactions using RIBs as well as in probing the matter density of atomic nuclei. If scintillating, it could also help remove the background associated with the scattering of the radioactive beam.

  6. Spin polarized solid target as a prospective tool for radioactive ion beam physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urrego-Blanco, J.P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States); Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Brandt, B. van den [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bunyatova, E.I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Head P.O. Box 79, 101000 Moscow (Russian Federation); Galindo-Uribarri, A. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6371 (United States)]. E-mail: uribarri@mail.phy.ornl.gov; Hautle, P. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Konter, J.A. [Paul Scherrer Institute, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2005-12-15

    Spin polarized probes are used in a wide range of experiments in nuclear physics including the determination of spin structure functions and tests of fundamental symmetries. At low energies, light stable polarized beams have been used for spectroscopic purposes. We propose to extend these types of experiments to nuclei far from stability by using radioactive ion beams (RIBs) and polarized targets. Towards this goal we intend to develop a solid polarized proton and/or deuterium target in the thickness range between 20 {mu}m and 100 {mu}m based on a scintillating (active) polymeric foil. Such a target would be a useful tool in the determination of excitation functions in resonant reactions, in studies of one-nucleon transfer reactions using RIBs as well as in probing the matter density of atomic nuclei. If scintillating, it could also help remove the background associated with the scattering of the radioactive beam.

  7. Spin structure function measurements with polarized protons and electrons at HERA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.D.; Deshpande, A.; Forte, S.; Hughes, V.W.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Ridolfi, G.

    1995-01-01

    Useful insights into the spin structure functions of the nucleon can be achieved by measurements of spin-dependent asymmetries in inclusive scattering of high energy polarized electrons by high energy polarized protons at HERA. Such an experiment would be a natural extension of the polarized lepton-nucleon scattering experiments presently carried out at CERN and SLAC. We present here estimates of possible data in the extended kinematic range of HERA and associated statistical errors. (orig.)

  8. A measurement of the proton’s spin structure function g2 at low Q2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Pengjia [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China)

    2015-10-21

    JLab E08-027, a measurement of g2p and the longitudinal-transverse (LT) spin polarizability, successfully collected data from March to May, 2012. Nucleon spin structure study has been an active research area, which has attracted a very large effort from both experimentalists and theorists. The spin structure study for the last 2 decades has provided us with many exciting and often surprising results. Recently, new precision results in the low-to-intermediate momentum transfer Q2 region from JLab have provided extensive information on the nucleon structure in the confinement region and the transition region between asymptotic free to confinement. In particular, the extensive comparisons of experimental results with Chiral Perturbation Theory (the effective theory of QCD at low energy) calculations show general good agreements, but strong disagreement in the case of the neutron LT spin polarizability. This experiment completed the measurements of gp2 and the LT spin polarizability on the proton in the low-to-intermediate Q2 region. The experiment used a polarized proton (NH3) target for the first time in Hall A. Scattered electrons were detected by a pair of Hall A high resolution spectrometer (HRS) with a pair of septum magnets. To avoid too much depolarization of the target, beam current was limited to 50-100 nA during the experiment. Since the existing beam current monitors (BCMs), beam position monitors (BPMs) and calibration methods did not work at such a low current range, new BPM and BCM receivers were designed and used for current condition. A pair of super-harps and a tungsten calorimeter were installed to calibrate the BPMs and BCMs. To compensate for the effect of the 2.5/5T transverse magnet field, two chicane dipole magnets were installed. A pair of slow rasters were installed for the first time in Hall A, combining with a pair of fast raster. The standard Hall A DAQ system and the improved high resolution DAQ system were used to record the detector

  9. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biological functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.

  10. Measurement of spin correlation in ttbar production using a matrix element approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 107, č. 3 (2011), "032001-1"-"032001-7" ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08047 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : D0 * Tevatron * dilepton * anti-p p * spin Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 7.370, year: 2011

  11. Measuring Parameters of Massive Black Hole Binaries with Partially Aligned Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ryan N.; Hughes, Scott A.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2011-01-01

    The future space-based gravitational wave detector LISA will be able to measure parameters of coalescing massive black hole binaries, often to extremely high accuracy. Previous work has demonstrated that the black hole spins can have a strong impact on the accuracy of parameter measurement. Relativistic spin-induced precession modulates the waveform in a manner which can break degeneracies between parameters, in principle significantly improving how well they are measured. Recent studies have indicated, however, that spin precession may be weak for an important subset of astrophysical binary black holes: those in which the spins are aligned due to interactions with gas. In this paper, we examine how well a binary's parameters can be measured when its spins are partially aligned and compare results using waveforms that include higher post-Newtonian harmonics to those that are truncated at leading quadrupole order. We find that the weakened precession can substantially degrade parameter estimation, particularly for the "extrinsic" parameters sky position and distance. Absent higher harmonics, LISA typically localizes the sky position of a nearly aligned binary about an order of magnitude less accurately than one for which the spin orientations are random. Our knowledge of a source's sky position will thus be worst for the gas-rich systems which are most likely to produce electromagnetic counterparts. Fortunately, higher harmonics of the waveform can make up for this degradation. By including harmonics beyond the quadrupole in our waveform model, we find that the accuracy with which most of the binary's parameters are measured can be substantially improved. In some cases, the improvement is such that they are measured almost as well as when the binary spins are randomly aligned.

  12. pedometer-measured physical activity, self-reported physical activity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. The association between self-perceived and actual physical activity, with particular reference to physical activity guidelines, ... were 6 574 (3 541). Of a total of 312 participants' self-reported data, those meeting guidelines (n=63) ... of the limitations of recall-and-response bias evident in indirect measures.

  13. Spin-transfer measurements of the π rvec d→ rvec pp reaction at energies spanning the Δ resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feltham, A.; Jones, G.; Olszewski, R.; Pavan, M.; Sevior, M.; Trelle, R.P.; Weber, P.; Lolos, G.J.; Mathie, E.L.; Papandreou, Z.; Rui, R.; Gill, D.; Healey, D.; Ottewell, D.; Sheffer, G.; Smith, G.R.; Sossi, V.; Wait, G.; Walden, P.

    1997-01-01

    The first spin-transfer experiment performed for the π rvec d→ rvec pp reaction is described. Three spin-transfer parameters for this π-absorption process were determined, K LS a , K SS a , and K NN a , which correspond to the π-production parameters, K SL p , K SS p , and K NN p , of the time-reversed rvec pp→ rvec dπ process. Each observable was measured at a single angle for a number of energies spanning the Δ resonance of this system. The results are compared with the predictions of published partial wave amplitude fits which are primarily based on existing data for the time-reversed pp→dπ reaction, and also with the predictions of two current theories. The failure of these theories to describe the fundamental features of the data clearly demonstrates the need for further theoretical work in this area. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  14. Quantum measurements between a single spin and a torsional nanomechanical resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Urso, B.; Gurudev Dutt, M. V.; Dhingra, S.; Nusran, N. M.

    2011-04-01

    While the motions of macroscopic objects must ultimately be governed by quantum mechanics, the distinctive features of quantum mechanics can be hidden or washed out by thermal excitations and coupling to the environment. We propose a system consisting of a graphene nanomechanical oscillator (NMO) coupled with a single spin through a uniform external magnetic field, which could become the building block for a wide range of quantum nanomechanical devices. The choice of graphene as the NMO material is critical for minimizing the moment of inertia of the oscillator. The spin originates from a nitrogen-vacancy (NV) center in a diamond nanocrystal that is positioned on the NMO. This coupling results in quantum non-demolition (QND) measurements of the oscillator and spin states, enabling a bridge between the quantum and classical worlds for a simple readout of the NV center spin and observation of the discrete states of the NMO.

  15. Thermographic measurements of the spin Peltier effect in metal/yttrium-iron-garnet junction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimon, Shunsuke; Uchida, Ken-ichi; Iguchi, Ryo; Hioki, Tomosato; Saitoh, Eiji

    2017-07-01

    The spin Peltier effect (SPE), heat-current generation due to spin-current injection, in various metal (Pt, W, and Au single layers and Pt/Cu bilayer)/ferrimagnetic insulator [yttrium-iron-garnet (YIG)] junction systems has been investigated by means of a lock-in thermography (LIT) method. The SPE is excited by a spin current across the metal/YIG interface, which is generated by applying a charge current to the metallic layer via the spin Hall effect. The LIT method enables the thermal imaging of the SPE free from the Joule-heating contribution. Importantly, we observed spin-current-induced temperature modulation not only in the Pt/YIG and W/YIG systems, but also in the Au/YIG and Pt/Cu/YIG systems, excluding the possible contamination by anomalous Ettingshausen effects due to proximity-induced ferromagnetism near the metal/YIG interface. As demonstrated in our previous study, the SPE signals are confined only in the vicinity of the metal/YIG interface; we buttress this conclusion by reducing a spatial blur due to thermal diffusion in an infrared-emission layer on the sample surface used for the LIT measurements. We also found that the YIG-thickness dependence of the SPE is similar to that of the spin Seebeck effect measured in the same Pt/YIG sample, implying the reciprocal relation between them.

  16. Simultaneous measurements of spin observables AN and ANN in elastic pp scattering (extension of the SPASCHARM program at U-70).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramov, V. V.; Bogdanov, A. A.; Chetvertkov, M. A.; Chetvertkova, V. A.; Mochalov, V. V.; Moiseev, V. V.; Novikov, K. D.; Nurushev, S. B.; Nurusheva, M. B.; Okorokov, V. A.; Semenov, P. A.; Strikhanov, M. N.; Vasiliev, A. N.

    2017-12-01

    We propose to measure spin observables AN and ANN in elastic pp scattering by using the transversely polarized proton beam and target at momenta p = 12-45 GeV/c. Existence of both polarized target and beam gives us unique possibility to measure AN simultaneously and independently for polarized beam (AB) and target (AT) to carry out and verify experimental measurements of single-spin and double-spin (ANN) measurements in diffractive region.

  17. Research program in nuclear and solid state physics. [including pion absorption spectra and muon spin precession

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The survey of negative pion absorption reactions on light and medium nuclei was continued. Muon spin precession was studied using an iron target. An impulse approximation model of the pion absorption process implied that the ion will absorb almost exclusively on nucleon pairs, single nucleon absorption being suppressed by energy and momentum conservation requirements. For measurements on both paramagnetic and ferromagnetic iron, the external magnetic field was supplied by a large C-type electromagnet carrying a current of about 100 amperes.

  18. Physical states and BRST operators for higher-spin W strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yu-Xiao; Wei, Shao-Wen; Ren, Ji-Rong; Zhang, Li-Jie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we mainly investigate the W 2,s M x W 2,s L system, in which the matter and the Liouville subsystems generate the W 2,s M and W 2,s L algebras, respectively. We first give a brief discussion of the physical states for the corresponding W strings. The lower states are given by freezing the spin-2 and spin-s currents. Then, introducing two pairs of ghost-like fields, we give the realizations of the W 1,2,s algebras. Based on these linear realizations, the BRST operators for the W 2,s algebras are obtained. Finally, we construct new BRST charges of the Liouville system for the W 2,s L strings at the specific values of the central charges c: c=-(22)/(5) for the W 2,3 L algebra, c=-24 for the W 2,4 L algebra and c=-2,-(286)/(3) for the W 2,6 L algebra, at which the corresponding W 2,s L algebras are singular. (orig.)

  19. A High-Spin Rate Measurement Method for Projectiles Using a Magnetoresistive Sensor Based on Time-Frequency Domain Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Jianyu; Deng, Zhihong; Fu, Mengyin; Wang, Shunting

    2016-06-16

    Traditional artillery guidance can significantly improve the attack accuracy and overall combat efficiency of projectiles, which makes it more adaptable to the information warfare of the future. Obviously, the accurate measurement of artillery spin rate, which has long been regarded as a daunting task, is the basis of precise guidance and control. Magnetoresistive (MR) sensors can be applied to spin rate measurement, especially in the high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment. In this paper, based on the theory of a MR sensor measuring spin rate, the mathematical relationship model between the frequency of MR sensor output and projectile spin rate was established through a fundamental derivation. By analyzing the characteristics of MR sensor output whose frequency varies with time, this paper proposed the Chirp z-Transform (CZT) time-frequency (TF) domain analysis method based on the rolling window of a Blackman window function (BCZT) which can accurately extract the projectile spin rate. To put it into practice, BCZT was applied to measure the spin rate of 155 mm artillery projectile. After extracting the spin rate, the impact that launch rotational angular velocity and aspect angle have on the extraction accuracy of the spin rate was analyzed. Simulation results show that the BCZT TF domain analysis method can effectively and accurately measure the projectile spin rate, especially in a high-spin and high-g projectile launch environment.

  20. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop, RHIC Spin Physics V, Volume 32, February 21, 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BUNCE, G.; SAITO, N.; VIGDOR, S.; ROSER, T.; SPINKA, H.; ENYO, H.; BLAND, L.C.; GURYN, W.

    2001-01-01

    The RIKEN BNL Research Center (RBRC) was established in April 1997 at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is funded by the ''Rikagaku Kenkysho'' (RIKEN, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) of Japan. The Center is dedicated to the study of strong interactions, including spin physics, lattice QCD and RHIC physics through the nurturing of a new generation of young physicists. During the fast year, the Center had only a Theory Group. In the second year, an Experimental Group was also established at the Center. At present, there are seven Fellows and nine post dots in these two groups. During the third year, we started a new Tenure Track Strong Interaction Theory RHIC Physics Fellow Program, with six positions in the academic year 1999-2000; this program will increase to include eleven theorists in the next academic year, and, in the year after, also be extended to experimental physics. In addition, the Center has an active workshop program on strong interaction physics, about ten workshops a year, with each workshop focused on a specific physics problem. Each workshop speaker is encouraged to select few of the most important transparencies from his or her presentation, accompanied by a page of explanation. This material is collected at the end of the workshop by the organizer to form proceedings, which can therefore be available within a short time. The construction of a 0.6 teraflop parallel processor, which was begun at the Center on February 19, 1998, was completed on August 28, 1998

  1. An overview of recent nucleon spin structure measurements at Jefferson Lab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allada, Kalyan [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Jefferson Lab have made significant contributions to improve our knowledge of the longitudinal spin structure by measuring polarized structure functions, g1 and g2, down to Q2 = 0.02 GeV2. The low Q2 data is especially useful in testing the Chiral Perturbation theory (cPT) calculations. The spin-dependent sum rules and the spin polarizabilities, constructed from the moments of g1 and g2, provide an important tool to study the longitudinal spin structure. We will present an overview of the experimental program to measure these structure functions at Jefferson Lab, and present some recent results on the neutron polarizabilities, proton g1 at low Q2, and proton and neutron d2 measurement. In addition to this, we will discuss the transverse spin structure of the nucleon which can be accessed using chiral-odd transversity distribution (h1), and show some results from measurements done on polarized 3He target in Hall A.

  2. Lock-in thermography measurements of the spin Peltier effect in a compensated ferrimagnet and its comparison to the spin Seebeck effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagmur, A.; Iguchi, R.; Geprägs, S.; Erb, A.; Daimon, S.; Saitoh, E.; Gross, R.; Uchida, K.

    2018-05-01

    The spin Peltier effect (SPE) in a junction comprising a gadolinium-iron-garnet (GdIG) slab and a Pt film has been investigated around the magnetization compensation temperature of GdIG by means of the lock-in thermography method. When a charge current is applied to the Pt layer, a spin current is generated across the Pt/GdIG interface via the spin Hall effect in Pt. This spin current induces a heat current and a measurable temperature change near the Pt/GdIG interface due to the SPE. The SPE signal in the Pt/GdIG junction shows a sign change around the magnetization compensation temperature, demonstrating the similar temperature dependence of the SPE and the spin Seebeck effect for the Pt/GdIG hybrid system.

  3. Measurement of the proton $A_1$ and $A_2$ spin asymmetries. Probing Color Forces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Whitney [Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) measured the proton spin structure function $g_2$ in a range of Bjorken x, 0.3 < x < 0.8, where extraction of the twist-3 matrix element $d_2^p$ (an integral of $g_2$ weighted by $x^2$) is most sensitive. The data was taken from $Q^2$ equal to 2.5 $GeV^2$ up to 6.5 $GeV^2$. In this polarized electron scattering off a polarized hydrogen target experiment, two double spin asymmetries, A∥ and A⊥ were measured using the BETA (Big Electron Telescope Array) Detector. BETA consisted of a scintillator hodoscope, gas Cerenkov counter, lucite hodoscope and a large lead glass electromagnetic calorimeter. With a unique open geometry, a threshold gas Cerenkov detector allowed BETA to cleanly identify electrons for this inclusive experiment. A measurement of $d_2^p$ is compared to lattice QCD calculations.

  4. A 3% Measurement of the Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Qweak Setup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waidyawansa, Dinayadura Buddhini [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    2013-08-01

    The beam normal single spin asymmetry generated in the scattering of transversely polarized electrons from unpolarized nucleons is an observable of the imaginary part of the two-photon exchange process. Moreover, it is a potential source of false asymmetry in parity violating electron scattering experiments. The Q{sub weak} experiment uses parity violating electron scattering to make a direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton. The targeted 4% measurement of the weak charge of the proton probes for parity violating new physics beyond the Standard Model. The beam normal single spin asymmetry at Q{sub weak} kinematics is at least three orders of magnitude larger than 5 ppb precision of the parity violating asymmetry. To better understand this parity conserving background, the Q{sub weak} Collaboration has performed elastic scattering measurements with fully transversely polarized electron beam on the proton and aluminum. This dissertation presents the analysis of the 3% measurement (1.3% statistical and 2.6% systematic) of beam normal single spin asymmetry in electronproton scattering at a Q2 of 0.025 (GeV/c)2. It is the most precise existing measurement of beam normal single spin asymmetry available at the time. A measurement of this precision helps to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process.

  5. What can we learn about the dynamics of transported spins by measuring shot noise in spin–orbit-coupled nanostructures?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolić, Branislav K; Dragomirova, Ralitsa L

    2009-01-01

    We review recent studies of the shot noise of spin-polarized charge currents and pure spin currents in multiterminal semiconductor nanostructures, while focusing on the effects brought by the intrinsic Rashba spin–orbit (SO) coupling and/or extrinsic SO scattering off impurities in two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) based devices. By generalizing the scattering theory of quantum shot noise to include the full spin-density matrix of electrons injected from a spin-filtering electrode, we show how decoherence and dephasing in the course of spin precession can lead to the substantial enhancement of the Fano factor (noise-to-current ratio) of spin-polarized charge currents. These processes are suppressed by decreasing the width of the diffusive Rashba wire, so that purely electrical measurement of the shot noise in a ferromagnet|SO-coupled-diffusive-wire|paramagnet setup can quantify the degree of quantum coherence of transported spin through a remarkable one-to-one correspondence between the purity of the spin state and the Fano factor. In four-terminal SO-coupled nanostructures, injection of unpolarized charge current through the longitudinal leads is responsible not only for the pure spin Hall current in the transverse leads, but also for nonequilibrium random time-dependent current fluctuations. The analysis of the shot noise of transverse pure spin Hall current and zero charge current, or transverse spin current and non-zero charge Hall current, driven by unpolarized or spin-polarized injected longitudinal charge current, respectively, reveals a unique experimental tool to differentiate between the intrinsic Rashba and extrinsic SO mechanisms underlying the spin Hall effect in 2DEG devices. When the intrinsic mechanisms responsible for spin precession start to dominate the spin Hall effect, they also enhance the shot noise of transverse spin and charge transport in multiterminal geometries. Finally, we discuss the shot noise of transverse spin and zero charge

  6. Measurement units of physical values

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debraine, P.

    1955-01-01

    The aim of this paper is twofold: 1) to give an analysis of the formation conditions of the various systems of units, 2) to show how the practical problems involving changes of units can be solved. This analysis leads to the conception of 'types' of systems, which is very useful to clarity the question of rationalized and non rationalized systems. The second point which consists essentially in: 1) finding the relationship between the measures of a given quantity in different systems, 2) deriving practical formulas, 3) deriving formulas in various 'types' of systems, is made easier by use of sets of: * definition formulas, * transformation formulas, * units of the various practical systems with useful numerical information covering the following fields: ** geometry, ** kinematics, ** mechanics, ** electricity and magnetism, ** thermodynamics, ** radiation, ** photometry, These sets being printed on coloured paper can be easily found. A number of numerical examples (21) show in a detailed way how to solve the various problems likely to occur. A chapter is particularly devoted to the Giorgi MKS system. (author) [fr

  7. Spin correlation tensor for measurement of quantum entanglement in electron-electron scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurikov, D. E.; Samarin, S. N.; Williams, J. F.; Artamonov, O. M.

    2017-04-01

    We consider the problem of correct measurement of a quantum entanglement in the two-body electron-electron scattering. An expression is derived for a spin correlation tensor of a pure two-electron state. A geometric measure of a quantum entanglement as the distance between two forms of this tensor in entangled and separable cases is presented. Due to such definition, one does not need to look for the closest separable state to the analyzed state. We prove that introduced measure satisfies properties of a valid entanglement measure: nonnegativity, discriminance, normalization, non-growth under local operations and classical communication. This measure is calculated for a problem of electron-electron scattering. We prove that it does not depend on the azimuthal rotation angle of the second electron spin relative to the first electron spin before scattering. We specify how to find a spin correlation tensor and the related measure of a quantum entanglement in an experiment with electron-electron scattering. Finally, the introduced measure is extended to the mixed states.

  8. Spin Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-08-01

    applications, a ferromagnetic metal may be used as a source of spin-polarized electronics to be injected into a semiconductor, a superconductor or a...physical phenomena in II-VI and III-V semiconductors. In II-VI systems, the Mn2+ ions act to boost the electron spin precession up to terahertz ...conductors, proximity effect between ferromagnets and superconductors , and the effects of spin injection on the physical properties of the

  9. Measuring Parameters of Massive Black Hole Binaries with Partially-Aligned Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Ryan N.; Hughes, Scott A.; Cornish, Neil J.

    2010-01-01

    It is important to understand how well the gravitational-wave observatory LISA can measure parameters of massive black hole binaries. It has been shown that including spin precession in the waveform breaks degeneracies and produces smaller expected parameter errors than a simpler, precession-free analysis. However, recent work has shown that gas in binaries can partially align the spins with the orbital angular momentum, thus reducing the precession effect. We show how this degrades the earlier results, producing more pessimistic errors in gaseous mergers. However, we then add higher harmonics to the signal model; these also break degeneracies, but they are not affected by the presence of gas. The harmonics often restore the errors in partially-aligned binaries to the same as, or better than/ those that are obtained for fully precessing binaries with no harmonics. Finally, we investigate what LISA measurements of spin alignment can tell us about the nature of gas around a binary,

  10. Spin current

    CERN Document Server

    Valenzuela, Sergio O; Saitoh, Eiji; Kimura, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the giant magnetoresistance effect in magnetic multilayers in 1988, a new branch of physics and technology, called spin-electronics or spintronics, has emerged, where the flow of electrical charge as well as the flow of electron spin, the so-called “spin current,” are manipulated and controlled together. The physics of magnetism and the application of spin current have progressed in tandem with the nanofabrication technology of magnets and the engineering of interfaces and thin films. This book aims to provide an introduction and guide to the new physics and applications of spin current, with an emphasis on the interaction between spin and charge currents in magnetic nanostructures.

  11. Measurements of decreasing lattice thermal conductivity of ferropericlase across the high-spin to mixed-spin state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, C. P.; Sawchuk, K. L. S.; Kavner, A.

    2017-12-01

    The thermal conductivity of lower mantle minerals depends on crystal structure and phase, with important implications for the style of convection in the mantle and the heat flow across the core-mantle boundary. In this study, we demonstrate how measurements of temperature in the laser-heated diamond anvil cell (LHDAC) can be used to determine relative changes in thermal conductivity across a pressure-induced phase change. A finite-element 3D heat flow model of the LHDAC is used to simulate experimental conditions. Results from modeling show that the peak temperature in the cell is primarily controlled by the geometry, sample thermal conductivity and heat input due to laser heating. Controlling for geometry, the model can output expected temperature versus laser-power curves for an increase or decrease in thermal conductivity with pressure. The modeled temperature differences indicate that we can experimentally distinguish the sign and magnitude of a thermal conductivity change due to a pressure-induced phase change. We perform a series of experiments to test our models. In one set of experiments, we measure temperature versus laser-power as a function of pressure for the NaCl B1-B2 phase transition, over the pressure range 18 to 54 GPa. A decrease in thermal conductivity across the NaCl B1-B2 phase transition (dκ/dP = -1.6 +/- 0.2 W/(mK GPa)) is needed to explain our measurements. This result is consistent with thermal conductivity measurements of other ionic salts, which undergo the B1-B2 phase transition at much lower pressure. We apply this experiment design to investigate the effect of spin transition on an iron-bearing magnesium oxide sample. In a series of experiments, we measure temperature vs. laser power for (Mg,Fe)O with 24 mol% Fe, loaded in Ne, over a pressure range from 22 to 60 GPa. We observe an increase in thermal conductivity between 22 and 42 GPa. But between 42 and 60 GPa, a pressure range consistent with previously reported mixed-spin state

  12. Separation of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions using crystal direction dependent transport measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho Park, Youn; Kim, Hyung-jun; Chang, Joonyeon; Hee Han, Suk; Eom, Jonghwa; Choi, Heon-Jin; Cheol Koo, Hyun

    2013-01-01

    The Rashba spin-orbit interaction effective field is always in the plane of the two-dimensional electron gas and perpendicular to the carrier wavevector but the direction of the Dresselhaus field depends on the crystal orientation. These two spin-orbit interaction parameters can be determined separately by measuring and analyzing the Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations for various crystal directions. In the InAs quantum well system investigated, the Dresselhaus term is just 5% of the Rashba term. The gate dependence of the oscillation patterns clearly shows that only the Rashba term is modulated by an external electric field

  13. Measurement of the Spin Structure of the Deuteron in the DIS Region

    CERN Document Server

    Ageev, E.S.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berglund, P.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Bytchkov, V.N.; Cerini, L.; Chapiro, A.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.L.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz Kavka, V.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Dolgopolov, A.V.; Donskov, S.V.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Ehlers, J.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Fabro, M.; Faessler, M.; Falaleev, V.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchs, U.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.M.; Grajek, O.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Grunemaier, A.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Ijaduola, R.B.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.I.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N.I.; Kabuss, E.; Kalinnikov, V.; Kang, D.; Karstens, F.; Kastaun, W.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Khomutov, N.V.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, Kay; Konoplyannikov, A.K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korentchenko, A.S.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Koutchinski, N.A.; Kowalik, K.; Kravchuk, N.P.; Krivokhizhin, G.V.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.E.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.M.; Leberig, M.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Manuilov, I.V.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.N.; Medved, K.S.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Nahle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Neyret, D.P.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Nozdrin, A.A.; Obraztsov, V.F.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pereira, H.D.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Platzer, K.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Popov, A.A.; Pretz, J.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Rebourgeard, P.C.; Reicherz, G.; Reymann, J.; Rith, K.; Rojdestvenski, A.M.; Rondio, E.; Sadovski, A.B.; Saller, E.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Savin, Igor A.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitt, L.; Schmitt, H.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Shishkin, A.A.; Siebert, H.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Skachkova, A.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sugonyaev, V.P.; Srnka, A.; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Takabayashi, N.; Tchalishev, V.V.; Thers, D.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Toeda, T.; Tretyak, V.I.; Trusov, Sergey V.; Varanda, M.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Wagner, M.; Walcher, T.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Wiesmann, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wirth, S.; Wislicki, W.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zaremba, K.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Zvyagin, A.

    2005-01-01

    We present a new measurement of the longitudinal spin asymmetry A_1^d and the spin-dependent structure function g_1^d of the deuteron in the range 1 GeV^2 < Q^2 < 100 GeV^2 and 0.004< x <0.7. The data were obtained by the COMPASS experiment at CERN using a 160 GeV polarised muon beam and a large polarised 6-LiD target. The results are in agreement with those from previous experiments and improve considerably the statistical accuracy in the region 0.004 < x < 0.03.

  14. Photoexcited Muon Spin Spectroscopy: A New Method for Measuring Excess Carrier Lifetime in Bulk Silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, K; Lord, J S; Miao, J; Murahari, P; Drew, A J

    2017-12-01

    We have measured excess carrier lifetime in silicon using photoexcited muon spin spectroscopy. Positive muons implanted deep in a wafer can interact with the optically injected excess carriers and directly probe the bulk carrier lifetime while minimizing the effect from surface recombination. The method is based on the relaxation rate of muon spin asymmetry, which depends on the excess carrier density. The underlying microscopic mechanism has been understood by simulating the four-state muonium model in Si under illumination. We apply the technique to different injection levels and temperatures, and demonstrate its ability for injection- and temperature-dependent lifetime spectroscopy.

  15. Spin Measurements of n+Sr-87 for Level Density Studies

    CERN Document Server

    Gunsing, F; Mathelie, M; Valenta, S; Bečvář, F; Rusev, G; Tonchev, A P; Mitchell, G; Baramsai, B; Altstadt, S; Andrzejewski, J; Audouin, L; Barbagallo, M; Bécares, V; Belloni, F; Berthoumieux, E; Billowes, J; Boccone, V; Bosnar, D; Brugger, M; Calviani, M; Calviño, F; Cano-Ott, D; Carrapiço, C; Cerutti, F; Chiaveri, E; Chin, M; Colonna, N; Cortés, G; Cortés-Giraldo, M A; Diakaki, M; Domingo-Pardo, C; Duran, I; Dressler, R; Eleftheriadis, C; Ferrari, A; Ganesan, S; García, A R; Giubrone, G; Gonçalves, I.F.; González-Romero, E; Griesmayer, E; Guerrero, C; Hernández-Prieto, A; Jenkins, D G; Jericha, E; Kadi, Y; Käppeler, F; Karadimos, D; Koehler, P; Kokkoris, M; Krtička, M; Kroll, J; Lampoudis, C; Langer, C; Leal-Cidoncha, E; Lederer, C; Leeb, H; Leong, L S; Losito, R; Manousos, A; Marganiec, J; Martínez, T; Massimi, C; Mastinu, P F; Mastromarco, M; Mendoza, E; Mengoni, A; Milazzo, P M; Mingrone, F; Mirea, M; Mondalaers, W; Paradela, C; Pavlik, A; Perkowski, J; Plompen, A; Praena, J; Quesada, J M; Rauscher, T; Reifarth, R; Riego, A; Robles, M S; Rubbia, C; Sabaté-Gilarte, M; Sarmento, R; Saxena, A; Schillebeeckx, P; Schmidt, S; Schumann, D; Tagliente, G; Tain, J L; Tarrío, D; Tassan-Got, L; Tsinganis, A; Vannini, G; Variale, V; Vaz, P; Ventura, A; Vermeulen, M J; Vlachoudis, V; Vlastou, R; Wallner, A; Ware, T; Weigand, M; Weiß, C; Wright, T; Žugec, P

    2014-01-01

    We have used the 4 pi BaF2 gamma-ray detector array at the n\\_TOF neutron time-of-flight facility at CERN for an experiment in order to determine the spins of resonances of n+Sr-87 by measuring the gamma-ray spectra and multiplicity distributions. The first results are presented here. We have assigned the orbital momentum l to all evaluated resonances on the basis of their neutron widths. Further we have assigned the spin J to 16 s-wave resonances on based the population of low-lying levels.

  16. Negative muon spin precession measurement of the hyperfine states of muonic sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brewer, J.H.; Ghandi, K.; Froese, A.M.; Fryer, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Both hyperfine states of muonic 23 Na and the rate R of conversion between them have been observed directly in a high field negative muon spin precession experiment using a backward muon beam with transverse spin polarization. The result in metallic sodium, R=13.7±2.2 μs -1 , is consistent with Winston's prediction in 1963 based on Auger emission of core electrons, and with the measurements of Gorringe et al. in Na metal, but not with their smaller result in NaF. In NaOH we find R=23.5±8 μs -1 , leaving medium-dependent effects ambiguous

  17. Measurement of the transverse spin correlations in the decay $Z \\rightarrow \\tau^+\\tau^-$

    CERN Document Server

    Barate, R; Décamp, D; Ghez, P; Goy, C; Lees, J P; Lucotte, A; Minard, M N; Nief, J Y; Pietrzyk, B; Casado, M P; Chmeissani, M; Comas, P; Crespo, J M; Delfino, M C; Fernández, E; Fernández-Bosman, M; Garrido, L; Juste, A; Martínez, M; Miquel, R; Mir, L M; Orteu, S; Padilla, C; Park, I C; Pascual, A; Perlas, J A; Riu, I; Sánchez, F; Teubert, F; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; De Palma, M; Gelao, G; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Marinelli, N; Nuzzo, S; Ranieri, A; Raso, G; Ruggieri, F; Selvaggi, G; Silvestris, L; Tempesta, P; Tricomi, A; Zito, G; Huang, X; Lin, J; Ouyang, Q; Wang, T; Xie, Y; Xu, R; Xue, S; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, W; Abbaneo, D; Alemany, R; Becker, U; Bazarko, A O; Bright-Thomas, P G; Cattaneo, M; Cerutti, F; Dissertori, G; Drevermann, H; Forty, Roger W; Frank, M; Hagelberg, R; Hansen, J B; Harvey, J; Janot, P; Jost, B; Kneringer, E; Knobloch, J; Lehraus, Ivan; Lutters, G; Mato, P; Minten, Adolf G; Moneta, L; Pacheco, A; Pusztaszeri, J F; Ranjard, F; Rizzo, G; Rolandi, Luigi; Rousseau, D; Schlatter, W D; Schmitt, M; Schneider, O; Tejessy, W; Tomalin, I R; Wachsmuth, H W; Wagner, A; Ajaltouni, Ziad J; Barrès, A; Boyer, C; Falvard, A; Ferdi, C; Gay, P; Guicheney, C; Henrard, P; Jousset, J; Michel, B; Monteil, S; Montret, J C; Pallin, D; Perret, P; Podlyski, F; Proriol, J; Rosnet, P; Rossignol, J M; Fearnley, Tom; Hansen, J D; Hansen, J R; Hansen, P H; Nilsson, B S; Rensch, B; Wäänänen, A; Daskalakis, G; Kyriakis, A; Markou, C; Simopoulou, Errietta; Siotis, I; Vayaki, Anna; Blondel, A; Bonneaud, G R; Brient, J C; Bourdon, P; Rougé, A; Rumpf, M; Valassi, Andrea; Verderi, M; Videau, H L; Candlin, D J; Parsons, M I; Focardi, E; Parrini, G; Zachariadou, K; Corden, M; Georgiopoulos, C H; Jaffe, D E; Antonelli, A; Bencivenni, G; Bologna, G; Bossi, F; Campana, P; Capon, G; Casper, David William; Chiarella, V; Felici, G; Laurelli, P; Mannocchi, G; Murtas, F; Murtas, G P; Passalacqua, L; Pepé-Altarelli, M; Curtis, L; Dorris, S J; Halley, A W; Knowles, I G; Lynch, J G; O'Shea, V; Raine, C; Scarr, J M; Smith, K; Teixeira-Dias, P; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thomson, F; Turnbull, R M; Geweniger, C; Graefe, G; Hanke, P; Hansper, G; Hepp, V; Kluge, E E; Putzer, A; Schmidt, M; Sommer, J; Tittel, K; Werner, S; Wunsch, M; Beuselinck, R; Binnie, David M; Cameron, W; Dornan, Peter J; Girone, M; Goodsir, S M; Martin, E B; Moutoussi, A; Nash, J; Sedgbeer, J K; Spagnolo, P; Stacey, A M; Williams, M D; Ghete, V M; Girtler, P; Kuhn, D; Rudolph, G; Betteridge, A P; Bowdery, C K; Colrain, P; Crawford, G; Finch, A J; Foster, F; Hughes, G; Jones, R W L; Sloan, Terence; Williams, M I; Galla, A; Giehl, I; Greene, A M; Hoffmann, C; Jakobs, K; Kleinknecht, K; Quast, G; Renk, B; Rohne, E; Sander, H G; Van Gemmeren, P; Zeitnitz, C; Aubert, Jean-Jacques; Benchouk, C; Bonissent, A; Bujosa, G; Calvet, D; Carr, J; Coyle, P; Diaconu, C A; Etienne, F; Konstantinidis, N P; Leroy, O; Motsch, F; Payre, P; Talby, M; Sadouki, A; Thulasidas, M; Trabelsi, K; Aleppo, M; Ragusa, F; Berlich, R; Blum, Walter; Büscher, V; Dietl, H; Ganis, G; Gotzhein, C; Kroha, H; Lütjens, G; Lutz, Gerhard; Männer, W; Moser, H G; Richter, R H; Rosado-Schlosser, A; Schael, S; Settles, Ronald; Seywerd, H C J; Saint-Denis, R; Stenzel, H; Wiedenmann, W; Wolf, G; Boucrot, J; Callot, O; Chen, S; Choi, Y; Cordier, A; Davier, M; Duflot, L; Grivaz, J F; Heusse, P; Höcker, A; Jacholkowska, A; Jacquet, M; Kim, D W; Le Diberder, F R; Lefrançois, J; Lutz, A M; Nikolic, I A; Schune, M H; Simion, S; Tournefier, E; Veillet, J J; Videau, I; Zerwas, D; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bozzi, C; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Ciocci, M A; Ciulli, V; Dell'Orso, R; Fantechi, R; Ferrante, I; Foà, L; Forti, F; Giassi, A; Giorgi, M A; Gregorio, A; Ligabue, F; Lusiani, A; Marrocchesi, P S; Messineo, A; Palla, Fabrizio; Sanguinetti, G; Sciabà, A; Steinberger, Jack; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, G; Vannini, C; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Blair, G A; Bryant, L M; Chambers, J T; Gao, Y; Green, M G; Medcalf, T; Perrodo, P; Strong, J A; Von Wimmersperg-Töller, J H; Botterill, David R; Clifft, R W; Edgecock, T R; Haywood, S; Maley, P; Norton, P R; Thompson, J C; Wright, A E; Bloch-Devaux, B; Colas, P; Emery, S; Kozanecki, Witold; Lançon, E; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Pérez, P; Rander, J; Renardy, J F; Roussarie, A; Schuller, J P; Schwindling, J; Trabelsi, A; Vallage, B; Black, S N; Dann, J H; Johnson, R P; Kim, H Y; Litke, A M; McNeil, M A; Taylor, G; Booth, C N; Boswell, R; Brew, C A J; Cartwright, S L; Combley, F; Kelly, M S; Lehto, M H; Newton, W M; Reeve, J; Thompson, L F; Böhrer, A; Brandt, S; Cowan, G D; Grupen, Claus; Saraiva, P; Smolik, L; Stephan, F; Apollonio, M; Bosisio, L; Della Marina, R; Giannini, G; Gobbo, B; Musolino, G; Rothberg, J E; Wasserbaech, S R; Armstrong, S R; Charles, E; Elmer, P; Ferguson, D P S; González, S; Greening, T C; Hayes, O J; Hu, H; Jin, S; McNamara, P A; Nachtman, J M; Nielsen, J; Orejudos, W; Pan, Y B; Saadi, Y; Scott, I J; Walsh, J; Wu Sau Lan; Wu, X; Yamartino, J M; Zobernig, G

    1997-01-01

    For tau leptons produced in e^+e^- -> tau^+ tau^- interactions there are, in addition to the longitudinal spin correlations, two independent transverse spin correlations associated with the transverse (within the production plane) and normal (to the production plane) polarization components. A measurement of the transverse-transverse and transverse-normal tau spin correlations in the decay Z -> tau^+ tau^-, C_{TT} and C_{TN}, is presented based on the aplanarity angle of the decay products of both tau leptons. Using 80 pb^{-1} of data collected by ALEPH on the peak of the Z resonance, the results are C_{TT} = 1.06 +- 0.13 (stat) +- 0.05 (syst), and C_{TN} = 0.08 +- 0.13 (stat) +- 0.04 (syst). These values are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions, C_{TT} = 0.99 and C_{TN} = -0.01.

  18. Measurement of the transverse spin correlations in the decay Z -> τ+τ-

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barate, R.; Buskulic, D.; Decamp, D.; Ghez, P.; Coy, C.; Lees, J.-P.; Lucotte, A.; Minard, M.-N.; Nief, J.-Y.; Pietrzyk, B.; Casado, M. P.; Chmeissani, M.; Comas, P.; Crespo, J. M.; Delfino, M.; Fernandez, E.; Fernandez-Bosman, M.; Garrido, Ll.; Juste, A.; Martinez, M.; Miquel, R.; Mir, Ll. M.; Orteu, S.; Padilla, C.; Park, I. C.; Pascual, A.; Perlas, J. A.; Riu, I.; Sanchez, F.; Teubert, F.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; de Palma, M.; Gelao, G.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Marinelli, N.; Nuzzo, S.; Ranieri, A.; Raso, G.; Ruggieri, F.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Tricomi, A.; Zito, G.; Huang, X.; Lin, J.; Ouyang, Q.; Wang, T.; Xie, Y.; Xu, R.; Xue, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhao, W.; Abbaneo, D.; Alemany, R.; Becker, U.; Bazarko, A. O.; Bright-Thomas, P.; Cattaneo, M.; Cerutti, F.; Dissertori, G.; Drevermann, H.; Forty, R. W.; Frank, M.; Hagelberg, R.; Hansen, J. B.; Harvey, J.; Janot, P.; Jost, B.; Kneringer, E.; Knobloch, J.; Lehraus, I.; Lutters, G.; Mato, P.; Minten, A.; Moneta, L.; Pacheco, A.; Pusztaszeri, J.-F.; Ranjard, F.; Rizzo, G.; Rolandi, L.; Rousseau, D.; Schlatter, D.; Schmitt, M.; Schneider, O.; Tejessy, W.; Tomalin, I. R.; Wachsmuth, H.; Wagner, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Barrès, A.; Boyer, C.; Falvard, A.; Ferdi, C.; Gay, P.; Guicheney, C.; Henrard, P.; Jousset, J.; Michel, B.; Monteil, S.; Montret, J.-C.; Pallin, D.; Perret, P.; Podlyski, F.; Proriol, J.; Rosnet, P.; Rossignol, J.-M.; Fearnley, T.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, P. H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Rensch, B.; Wäänänen, A.; Daskalakis, G.; Kyriakis, A.; Markou, C.; Simopoulou, E.; Siotis, I.; Vayaki, A.; Blondel, A.; Bonneaud, G.; Brient, J. C.; Bourdon, P.; Rougé, A.; Rumpf, M.; Valassi, A.; Verderi, M.; Videau, H.; Candlin, D. J.; Parsons, M. I.; Focardi, E.; Parrini, G.; Zachariadou, K.; Corden, M.; Georgiopoulos, C.; Jaffe, D. E.; Antonelli, A.; Bencivenni, G.; Bologna, G.; Bossi, F.; Campana, P.; Capon, G.; Casper, D.; Chiarella, V.; Felici, G.; Laurelli, P.; Mannocchi, G.; Murtas, F.; Murtas, G. P.; Passalacqua, L.; Pepe-Altarelli, M.; Curtis, L.; Dorris, S. J.; Halley, A. W.; Knowles, I. G.; Lynch, J. G.; O'Shea, V.; Raine, C.; Scarr, J. M.; Smith, K.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, F.; Turnbull, R. M.; Geweniger, C.; Graefe, G.; Hanke, P.; Hansper, G.; Hepp, V.; Kluge, E. E.; Putzer, A.; Schmidt, M.; Sommer, J.; Tittel, K.; Werner, S.; Wunsch, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Binnie, D. M.; Cameron, W.; Dornan, P. J.; Girone, M.; Goodsir, S.; Martin, E. B.; Moutoussi, A.; Nash, J.; Sedgbeer, J. K.; Spagnolo, P.; Stacey, A. M.; Williams, M. D.; Ghete, V. M.; Girtler, P.; Kuhn, D.; Rudolph, G.; Betteridge, A. P.; Bowdery, C. K.; Colrain, P.; Crawford, G.; Finch, A. J.; Foster, F.; Hughes, G.; Jones, R. W.; Sloan, T.; Williams, M. I.; Galla, A.; Giehl, I.; Greene, A. M.; Hoffmann, C.; Jakobs, K.; Kleinknecht, K.; Quast, G.; Renk, B.; Rohne, E.; Sander, H.-G.; van Gemmeren, P.; Zeitnitz, C.; Aubert, J. J.; Benchouk, C.; Bonissent, A.; Bujosa, G.; Calvet, D.; Carr, J.; Coyle, P.; Diaconu, C.; Etienne, F.; Konstantinidis, N.; Leroy, O.; Motsch, F.; Payre, P.; Talby, M.; Sadouki, A.; Thulasidas, M.; Trabelsi, K.; Aleppo, M.; Ragusa, F.; Berlich, R.; Blum, W.; Büscher, V.; Dietl, H.; Ganis, G.; Gotzhein, C.; Kroha, H.; Lütjens, G.; Lutz, G.; Männer, W.; Moser, H.-G.; Richter, R.; Rosado-Schlosser, A.; Schael, S.; Settles, R.; Seywerd, H.; St. Denis, R.; Stenzel, H.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wolf, G.; Boucrot, J.; Callot, O.; Chen, S.; Choi, Y.; Cordier, A.; Davier, M.; Duflot, L.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Heusse, Ph.; Höcker, A.; Jacholkowska, A.; Jacquet, M.; Kim, D. W.; Le Diberder, F.; Lefrançois, J.; Lutz, A.-M.; Nikolic, I.; Schune, M.-H.; Simion, S.; Tournefier, E.; Veillet, J.-J.; Videau, I.; Zerwas, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bozzi, C.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Ciocci, M. A.; Ciulli, V.; dell'Orso, R.; Fantechi, R.; Ferrante, I.; Foà, L.; Forti, F.; Giassi, A.; Giorgi, M. A.; Gregorio, A.; Ligabue, F.; Lusiani, A.; Marrocchesi, P. S.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sciabà, A.; Steinberger, J.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Vannini, C.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Blair, G. A.; Bryant, L. M.; Chambers, J. T.; Gao, Y.; Green, M. G.; Medcalf, T.; Perrodo, P.; Strong, J. A.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Botterill, D. R.; Clifft, R. W.; Edgecock, T. R.; Haywood, S.; Maley, P.; Norton, P. R.; Thompson, J. C.; Wright, A. E.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Colas, P.; Emery, S.; Kozanecki, W.; Lançon, E.; Lemaire, M. C.; Locci, E.; Perez, P.; Rander, J.; Renardy, J.-F.; Roussarie, A.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schwindling, J.; Trabelsi, A.; Vallage, B.; Black, S. N.; Dann, J. H.; Johnson, R. P.; Kim, H. Y.; Litke, A. M.; McNeil, M. A.; Taylor, G.; Booth, C. N.; Boswell, R.; Brew, C. A. J.; Cartwright, S.; Combley, F.; Kelly, M. S.; Lehto, M.; Newton, W. M.; Reeve, J.; Thompson, L. F.; Böhrer, A.; Brandt, S.; Cowan, G.; Grupen, C.; Saraiva, P.; Smolik, L.; Stephan, F.; Apollonio, M.; Bosisio, L.; della Marina, R.; Giannini, G.; Gobbo, B.; Musolino, G.; Rothberg, J.; Wasserbaech, S.; Armstrong, S. R.; Charles, E.; Elmer, P.; Ferguson, D. P. S.; González, S.; Greening, T. C.; Hayes, O. J.; Hu, H.; Jin, S.; McNamara, P. A.; Nachtman, J. M.; Nielsen, J.; Orejudos, W.; Pan, Y. B.; Saadi, Y.; Scott, I. J.; Walsh, J.; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, X.; Yamartino, J. M.; Zobernig, G.

    1997-02-01

    For τ leptons produced in e+e- -> τ+τ- interactions there are, in addition to the longitudinal spin correlations, two independent transverse spin correlations associated with the transverse (within the production plane) and normal (to the production plane) polarization components. A measurement of the transverse-transverse and transverse-normal τ spin correlations in the decay Z -> τ+τ-, CTT and CTN, is presented based on the aplanarity angle of the decay products of both τ leptons. Using 80 pb-1 of data collected by ALEPH on the peak of the Z resonance, the results are CTT = 1.06 +/- 0.13 (stat) +/- 0.05 (syst), and CTN = 0.08 +/- 0.13 (stat) +/- 0.04 (syst). These values are in agreement with the Standard Model predictions, CTT = 0.99 and CTN = -0.01.

  19. Spin and torsion in gravitation

    CERN Document Server

    De Sabbata, Venzo

    1994-01-01

    This book gives an exposition of both the old and new results of spin and torsion effects on gravitational interactions with implications for particle physics, cosmology etc. Physical aspects are stressed and measurable effects in relation to other areas of physics are discussed.Among the topics discussed are: alternative ways of unifying gravity with electroweak and strong interactions by an energy dependent spin torsion coupling constant; the idea that all interactions can be understood as originating from spin curvature coupling; the possibility of cosmological models with torsion providing

  20. New Measurements of Upsilon Spin Alignment at the Tevatron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Matthew

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a new analysis of γ(nS → μ+μ− decays collected in pp¯ $par p$ collisions with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. This analysis measures the angular distributions of the final state muons in the γ rest frame, providing new information about γ production polarization. We find the angular distributions to be nearly isotropic up to γ pT of 40 GeV/c, consistent with previous measurements by CDF, but inconsistent with results obtained by the D0 experiment. The results are compared with recent NLO calculations based on color-singlet matrix elements and non-relativistic QCD with color-octet matrix elements.

  1. Unique electron polarimeter analyzing power comparison and precision spin-based energy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joseph Grames; Charles Sinclair; Joseph Mitchell; Eugene Chudakov; Howard Fenker; Arne Freyberger; Douglas Higinbotham; Poelker, B.; Michael Steigerwald; Michael Tiefenback; Christian Cavata; Stephanie Escoffier; Frederic Marie; Thierry Pussieux; Pascal Vernin; Samuel Danagoulian; Kahanawita Dharmawardane; Renee Fatemi; Kyungseon Joo; Markus Zeier; Viktor Gorbenko; Rakhsha Nasseripour; Brian Raue; Riad Suleiman; Benedikt Zihlmann

    2004-01-01

    Precision measurements of the relative analyzing powers of five electron beam polarimeters, based on Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering, have been performed using the CEBAF accelerator at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Laboratory). A Wien filter in the 100 keV beamline of the injector was used to vary the electron spin orientation exiting the injector. High statistical precision measurements of the scattering asymmetry as a function of the spin orientation were made with each polarimeter. Since each polarimeter receives beam with the same magnitude of polarization, these asymmetry measurements permit a high statistical precision comparison of the relative analyzing powers of the five polarimeters. This is the first time a precise comparison of the analyzing powers of Compton, Moller, and Mott scattering polarimeters has been made. Statistically significant disagreements among the values of the beam polarization calculated from the asymmetry measurements made with each polarimeter reveal either errors in the values of the analyzing power, or failure to correctly include all systematic effects. The measurements reported here represent a first step toward understanding the systematic effects of these electron polarimeters. Such studies are necessary to realize high absolute accuracy (ca. 1%) electron polarization measurements, as required for some parity violation measurements planned at Jefferson Laboratory. Finally, a comparison of the value of the spin orientation exiting the injector that provides maximum longitudinal polarization in each experimental hall leads to an independent and very precise (better than 10-4) absolute measurement of the final electron beam energy

  2. Measuring physical neighborhood quality related to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollings, Kimberly A; Wells, Nancy M; Evans, Gary W

    2015-04-29

    Although sociodemographic factors are one aspect of understanding the effects of neighborhood environments on health, equating neighborhood quality with socioeconomic status ignores the important role of physical neighborhood attributes. Prior work on neighborhood environments and health has relied primarily on level of socioeconomic disadvantage as the indicator of neighborhood quality without attention to physical neighborhood quality. A small but increasing number of studies have assessed neighborhood physical characteristics. Findings generally indicate that there is an association between living in deprived neighborhoods and poor health outcomes, but rigorous evidence linking specific physical neighborhood attributes to particular health outcomes is lacking. This paper discusses the methodological challenges and limitations of measuring physical neighborhood environments relevant to health and concludes with proposed directions for future work.

  3. Mapping the Ultrafast Changes of Continuous Shape Measures in Photoexcited Spin Crossover Complexes without Long-Range Order

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canton, S. E. [Department; Zhang, X. [X-ray; Lawson Daku, M. L. [Département; Liu, Y. [Centre; Zhang, J. [School; Alvarez, S. [Departament

    2015-01-30

    Establishing a tractable yet complete reaction coordinate for the spin-state interconversion in d(4)-d(7) transition metal complexes is an integral aspect of controlling the dynamics that govern their functionality. For spin crossover phenomena, the limitations of a single-mode approximation that solely accounts for an isotropic increase in the metal-ligand bond length have long been recognized for all but the simple octahedral monodentate FeII compounds. However, identifying the coupled deformations that also impact on the unimolecular rate constants remains experimentally and theoretically challenging, especially for samples that do not display long-range order or when crystallization profoundly alters the dynamics. Owing to the rapid progress in ultrafast X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), it is now possible to obtain transient structural information in any physical phase with unprecedented details. Using picosecond XAS and DFT modeling, the structure adopted by the photoinduced high-spin state of solvated [Fe(terpy)(2)](2+) (terpy: 2,2':6',2 ''-terpyridine) has been recently established. Based on these results, the methodology of the continuous shape measure is applied to classify and quantify the short-lived distortion of the first coordination shell. The reaction coordinate of the spin-state interconversion is clearly identified as a double axial bending. This finding sets a benchmark for gauging the influence of first-sphere and second-sphere interactions in the family of FeII complexes that incorporate terpy derivatives. Some implications for the optimization of related photoactive FeII complexes are also outlined.

  4. Physics measurements on WWER-440 diagnostic assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dach, K.; Jirousek, V.; Kott, J.; Horak, J.; Teren, S.; Nemec, J.

    1980-01-01

    The aims of physics measurements using diagnostic assemblies are the development of neutron noise diagnostics methods, the improvement of knowledge of the physical properties of the WWER reactor cores, the testing of computer programs, and the specification of nuclear safety criteria and the obtaining of information allowing the optimum nuclear fuel economy. The instrumentation of diagnostic assemblies is briefly described, including miniature fission chambers, SPN detectors and calorimeters. The method of evaluating and experimental testing is shown. (M.S.)

  5. Attosecond physics attosecond measurements and control of physical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Torres, Ricardo; Zaïr, Amelle

    2013-01-01

    Attophysics is an emerging field in physics devoted to the study and characterization of matter dynamics in the sub-femtosecond time scale. This book gives coverage of a broad set of selected topics in this field, exciting by their novelty and their potential impact. The book is written review-like. It also includes fundamental chapters as introduction to the field for non-specialist physicists. The book is structured in four sections: basics, attosecond pulse technology, applications to measurements and control of physical processes and future perspectives. It is a valuable reference tool for researchers in the field as well as a concise introduction to non-specialist readers.

  6. Munition Mass Properties Measurement Procedures Using a Spin Balance Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-09

    climatic adjustments made. For example, the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning ( HVAC ) may need to be turned off to reduce air flow around the...machine’s mass properties computer is programmed to average moment readings at each of the quadrant positions (0°, 90°, 180° and 270°). The motor drive...2 I1 = MOI of Control Surface I2 = MOI of Machine Motor I3 = MOI of Fixture Tare Measurement Eq. 2 MOI = I2 + I3 = (KT2 )2

  7. Electron Paramagnetic Resonance Measurements of Reactive Oxygen Species by Cyclic Hydroxylamine Spin Probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Polienko, Yuliya F; Kirilyuk, Igor

    2017-11-17

    Oxidative stress contributes to numerous pathophysiological conditions such as development of cancer, neurodegenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. A variety of measurements of oxidative stress markers in biological systems have been developed; however, many of these methods are not specific, can produce artifacts, and do not directly detect the free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause oxidative stress. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) is a unique tool that allows direct measurements of free radical species. Cyclic hydroxylamines are useful and convenient molecular probes that readily react with ROS to produce stable nitroxide radicals, which can be quantitatively measured by EPR. In this work, we critically review recent applications of various cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes in biology to study oxidative stress, their advantages, and the shortcomings. Recent Advances: In the past decade, a number of new cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes have been developed and their successful application for ROS measurement using EPR has been published. These new state-of-the-art methods provide improved selectivity and sensitivity for in vitro and in vivo studies. Although cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes EPR application has been previously described, there has been lack of translation of these new methods into biomedical research, limiting their widespread use. This work summarizes "best practice" in applications of cyclic hydroxylamine spin probes to assist with EPR studies of oxidative stress. Additional studies to advance hydroxylamine spin probes from the "basic science" to biomedical applications are needed and could lead to better understanding of pathological conditions associated with oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  8. Advances in Measurement Technology at NIST's Physical Measurement Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmer, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    The NIST mission is to promote U.S. innovation and industrial competitiveness by advancing measurement science, standards, and technology. The Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML) has responsibility for maintaining national standards for two dozen physical quantities needed for international trade; and, importantly, it carries out advanced research at the frontiers of measurement science to enable extending innovation into new realms and new markets. This talk will highlight advances being made across several sectors of technology; and it will describe how PML interacts with its many collaborators and clients in industry, government, and academe.

  9. Decoherence dynamics of a single spin versus spin ensemble

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobrovitski, V.V.; Feiguin, A.E.; Awschalom, D.D.; Hanson, R.

    2008-01-01

    We study decoherence of central spins by a spin bath, focusing on the difference between measurement of a single central spin and measurement of a large number of central spins (as found in typical spin-resonance experiments). For a dilute spin bath, the single spin demonstrates Gaussian

  10. Measurements of the nuclear spin-spin relaxation times for commensurate {sup 3}He-Ne films adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, C; Sullivan, N S [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Stachowiak, P [Institute of Low Temperature and Structure Research, Polish Academy of Sciences, PO Box 1410, 50-950 Wroclaw (Poland)], E-mail: Sullivan@phys.ufl.edu

    2009-02-01

    Measurements of the {sup 3}He nuclear spin-spin relaxation time, T{sub 2}, have been carried out for commensurate layers of {sup 3}He-Ne mixtures adsorbed on hexagonal boron nitride for temperatures 0.2< T <10 K. A temperature independent relaxation is observed at low temperatures and is interpreted in terms of the effective exchange frequencies for {sup 3}He particle exchange on the surface. The results show a strong dependence on the fraction of neon in the adsorbed layer. This variation is discussed in terms of a multiple spin exchange model for {sup 3}He in a monolayer. The contributions to T{sub 2} from different components of the exchange, 2-spin exchange (J{sub 2}), 3-spin exchange (J{sub 3}), 4-spin exchange (J{sub 4}) and higher exchange permutations depend on the {sup 3}He coverage and thus permit the separation of the amplitudes of the different exchange rates, and in particular allow one to deduce the relative strengths of 2-atom and 3-atom exchange where other methods are sensitive only to the effective two-particle term J{sub eff} = J{sub 2} - 2J{sub 3}.

  11. Measurement of the neutrino-spin correlation parameter B neutron decay using ultracold neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilburn, Wesley S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We present a new approach to measuring the neutrino-spin correlation parameter B in neutron decay. The approach combines the technology of large-area ion-implanted silicon detectors being developed for the abBA experiment, with an ultracold neutron source to provide more precise neutron polarimetry. The technique detects both proton and electron from the neutron decay in coincidence. B is determined from an electron-energy-dependent measurement of the proton spin asymmetry. This approach will provide a statistical precision of 1 x 10-4 . The systematic precision is still being evaluated, but is expected to be below 1 x 10-3 , and could approach 1 x 10-4 . A measurement of B with this precision would place constraints on supersymmetric extensions to the Standard Model.

  12. Atomic physics precise measurements and ultracold matter

    CERN Document Server

    Inguscio, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Atomic Physics provides an expert guide to two spectacular new landscapes in physics: precision measurements, which have been revolutionized by the advent of the optical frequency comb, and atomic physics, which has been revolutionized by laser cooling. These advances are not incremental but transformative: they have generated a consilience between atomic and many-body physics, precipitated an explosion of scientific and technological applications, opened new areas of research, and attracted a brilliant generation of younger scientists. The research is advancing so rapidly, the barrage of applications is so dazzling, that students can be bewildered. For both students and experienced scientists, this book provides an invaluable description of basic principles, experimental methods, and scientific applications.

  13. Polarized neutron beam properties for measuring parity-violating spin rotation in liquid {sup 4}He

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micherdzinska, A.M., E-mail: amicherd@gwu.ed [Indiana University/IU Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Bass, C.D. [Indiana University/IU Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Bass, T.D. [Indiana University/IU Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Gan, K. [George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Luo, D. [Indiana University/IU Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Markoff, D.M. [North Carolina Central University, Durham, NC 27707 (United States); Mumm, H.P.; Nico, J.S. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Opper, A.K. [George Washington University, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Sharapov, E.I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna 141980 (Russian Federation); Snow, W.M. [Indiana University/IU Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Swanson, H.E. [University of Washington/CENPA, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Zhumabekova, V. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, Al-Farabi Ave. 71, 050038 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2011-03-01

    Measurements of parity-violating neutron spin rotation can provide insight into the poorly understood nucleon-nucleon weak interaction. Because the expected rotation angle per unit length is small (10{sup -7} rad/m), several properties of the polarized cold neutron beam phase space and the neutron optical elements of the polarimeter must be measured to quantify possible systematic effects. This paper presents (1) an analysis of a class of possible systematic uncertainties in neutron spin rotation measurements associated with the neutron polarimetry, and (2) measurements of the relevant neutron beam properties (intensity distribution, energy spectrum, and the product of the neutron beam polarization and the analyzing power as a function of the beam phase space properties) on the NG-6 cold neutron beam-line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology Center for Neutron Research. We conclude that the phase space nonuniformities of the polarimeter in this beam are small enough that a parity-violating neutron spin rotation measurement in n-{sup 4}He with systematic uncertainties at the 10{sup -7} rad/m level is possible.

  14. Measuring absolute spin polarization in dissolution-DNP by Spin PolarimetrY Magnetic Resonance (SPY-MR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Chappuis, Quentin; Bornet, Aurélien; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization at 1.2 K and 6.7 T allows one to achieve spin temperatures on the order of a few millikelvin, so that the high-temperature approximation (ΔEPolarimetrY Magnetic Resonance (SPY-MR), is illustrated for various pairs of (13)C spins (I, S) in acetate and pyruvate. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Optical Transient-Grating Measurements of Spin Diffusion and Relaxation in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Christopher P.

    2005-01-01

    Spin diffusion in n-GaAs quantum wells, as measured by our optical transient-grating technique, is strongly suppressed relative to that of charge. Over a broad range of temperatures and dopings, the suppression of Ds relative to Dc agrees quantitatively with the prediction of ''spin Coulomb dra'' theory, which takes into account the exchange of spin in electron-electron collisions. Moreover, the spin-diffusion length, Ls, is a nearly constant 1 micrometer over the same range of T and n, despite Ds's varying by nearly two orders of magnitude. This constancy supports the D'yakonov-Perel'-Kachorovskii model of spin relaxation through interrupted precessional dephasing in the spin-orbit field

  16. Optical Transient-Grating Measurements of Spin Diffusion andRelaxation in a Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Christopher Phillip [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Spin diffusion in n-GaAs quantum wells, as measured by our optical transient-grating technique, is strongly suppressed relative to that of charge. Over a broad range of temperatures and dopings, the suppression of Ds relative to Dc agrees quantitatively with the prediction of ''spin Coulomb dra'' theory, which takes into account the exchange of spin in electron-electron collisions. Moreover, the spin-diffusion length, Ls, is a nearly constant 1 micrometer over the same range of T and n, despite Ds's varying by nearly two orders of magnitude. This constancy supports the D'yakonov-Perel'-Kachorovskii model of spin relaxation through interrupted precessional dephasing in the spin-orbit field.

  17. Spin Qubits in GaAs Heterostructures and Gating of InAs Nanowires for Lowtemperature Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter Dahl

    of the contenders in the race to build a large-scale quantum computer, is such a component, and research aiming to build, manipulate and couple spin qubits is looking at many materials systems to nd one where the requirements for fast control and long coherence time can be combined with ecient coupling between...... from screening effects. We find that simple, alternating spin filling is not followed. Furthermore, measurement of the exchange splitting, J, indicate two magnetic field dependent transitions lifting spin blockade which is likewise inconsistent with the simplest model for spin filling. The effect...

  18. Methodological considerations of electron spin resonance spin trapping techniques for measuring reactive oxygen species generated from metal oxide nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Min Sook; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Chung, Hyun Hoon; Park, Soo Jin; Lee, Ah Young; Song, Mi Ryoung; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Jun Sung

    2016-05-19

    Qualitative and quantitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated on the surfaces of nanomaterials are important for understanding their toxicity and toxic mechanisms, which are in turn beneficial for manufacturing more biocompatible nanomaterials in many industrial fields. Electron spin resonance (ESR) is a useful tool for detecting ROS formation. However, using this technique without first considering the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials and proper conditions of the spin trapping agent (such as incubation time) may lead to misinterpretation of the resulting data. In this report, we suggest methodological considerations for ESR as pertains to magnetism, sample preparation and proper incubation time with spin trapping agents. Based on our results, each spin trapping agent should be given the proper incubation time. For nanomaterials having magnetic properties, it is useful to remove these nanomaterials via centrifugation after reacting with spin trapping agents. Sonication for the purpose of sample dispersion and sample light exposure should be controlled during ESR in order to enhance the obtained ROS signal. This report will allow researchers to better design ESR spin trapping applications involving nanomaterials.

  19. Spin Measurements of an Electron Bound to a Single Phosphorous Donor in Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhman, D. R.; Nguyen, K.; Tracy, L. A.; Carr, S. M.; Borchardt, J.; Bishop, N. C.; Ten Eyck, G. A.; Pluym, T.; Wendt, J.; Carroll, M. S.; Lilly, M. P.

    2014-03-01

    The spin of an electron bound to a single donor implanted in silicon is potentially useful for quantum information processing. We report on our efforts to measure and manipulate the spin of an electron bound to a single P donor in silicon. A low number of P donors are implanted using a self-aligned process into a silicon substrate in close proximity to a single-electron-transistor (SET) defined by lithographically patterned polysilicon gates. The SET is used to sense the occupancy of the electron on the donor and for spin read-out. An adjacent transmission line allows the application of microwave pulses to rotate the spin of the electron. We will present data from various experiments designed to exploit these capabilities. This work was performed, in part, at the Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, a U.S. DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences user facility. The work was supported by Sandia National Laboratories Directed Research and Development Program. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin Company, for the U. S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Measurements of double-polarized compton scattering asymmetries and extraction of the proton spin polarizabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, P P; Miskimen, R; Aguar-Bartolome, P; Ahrens, J; Akondi, C S; Annand, J R M; Arends, H J; Barnes, W; Beck, R; Bernstein, A; Borisov, N; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Cherepnya, S; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Denig, A; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Fil'kov, L V; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gradl, W; Gurevich, G; Hall Barrientos, P; Hamilton, D; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Huber, G M; Jude, T C; Kaeser, A; Kashevarov, V L; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Krusche, B; Lazarev, A; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J D; Mancell, J; Manley, D M; Meyer, W; Middleton, D G; Mushkarenkov, A; Nefkens, B M K; Neganov, A; Nikolaev, A; Oberle, M; Ortega Spina, H; Ostrick, M; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Polyansky, V; Prakhov, S; Rajabi, A; Reicherz, G; Rostomyan, T; Sarty, A; Schrauf, S; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Steffen, O; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, T; Supek, I; Thiel, M; Tiator, L; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Usov, Y; Watts, D P; Witthauer, L; Werthmüller, D; Wolfes, M

    2015-03-20

    The spin polarizabilities of the nucleon describe how the spin of the nucleon responds to an incident polarized photon. The most model-independent way to extract the nucleon spin polarizabilities is through polarized Compton scattering. Double-polarized Compton scattering asymmetries on the proton were measured in the Δ(1232) region using circularly polarized incident photons and a transversely polarized proton target at the Mainz Microtron. Fits to asymmetry data were performed using a dispersion model calculation and a baryon chiral perturbation theory calculation, and a separation of all four proton spin polarizabilities in the multipole basis was achieved. The analysis based on a dispersion model calculation yields γ(E1E1)=-3.5±1.2, γ(M1M1)=3.16±0.85, γ(E1M2)=-0.7±1.2, and γ(M1E2)=1.99±0.29, in units of 10(-4)  fm(4).

  1. Polarization measurement of atomic hydrogen beam spin-exchanged with optically oriented sodium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, Akira; Ogura, Kouichi; Wakuta, Yoshihisa; Kumabe, Isao

    1988-01-01

    The spin-exchange reaction between hydrogen atoms and optically oriented sodium atoms was used to produce a polarized atomic hydrogen beam. The electron-spin polarization of the atomic hydrogen beam, which underwent the spin-exchange reaction with the optically oriented sodium atoms, was measured. A beam polarization of -(8.0±0.6)% was obtained when the thickness and polarization of the sodium target were (5.78±0.23)x10 13 atoms/cm 2 and -(39.6±1.6)%, respectively. The value of the spin-exchange cross section in the forward scattering direction, whose scattering angle in the laboratory system was less than 1.0 0 , was obtained from the experimental results as Δσ ex =(3.39±0.34)x10 -15 cm 2 . This value is almost seven times larger than the theoretical value calculated from the Na-H potential. The potential was computed quantum mechanically in the space of the appropriate wave functions of the hydrogen and the sodium atoms. (orig./HSI)

  2. Spin motion determination of the Envisat satellite through laser ranging measurements from a single pass measured by a single station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittet, Jean-Noël; Šilha, Jiří; Schildknecht, Thomas

    2018-02-01

    The Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technology is used to accurately determine the position of space objects equipped with so-called retro-reflectors or retro-reflector arrays (RRA). This type of measurement allows to measure the range to the spacecraft with high precision, which leads to determination of very accurate orbits for these targets. Non-active spacecraft, which are not attitude controlled any longer, tend to start to spin or tumble under influence of the external and internal torques and forces. If the return signal is measured for a non-spherical non-active rotating object, the signal in the range residuals with respect to the reference orbit is more complex. For rotating objects the return signal shows an oscillating pattern or patterns caused by the RRA moving around the satellite's centre of mass. This behaviour is projected onto the radial component measured by the SLR. In our work, we demonstrate how the SLR ranging technique from one sensor to a satellite equipped with a RRA can be used to precisely determine its spin motion during one passage. Multiple SLR measurements of one target over time allow to accurately monitor spin motion changes which can be further used for attitude predictions. We show our solutions of the spin motion determined for the non-active ESA satellite Envisat obtained from measurements acquired during years 2013-2015 by the Zimmerwald SLR station, Switzerland. All the necessary parameters are defined for our own so-called point-like model which describes the motion of a point in space around the satellite centre of mass.

  3. A measure of statistical complexity based on predictive information with application to finite spin systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdallah, Samer A., E-mail: samer.abdallah@eecs.qmul.ac.uk [School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom); Plumbley, Mark D., E-mail: mark.plumbley@eecs.qmul.ac.uk [School of Electronic Engineering and Computer Science, Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-09

    We propose the binding information as an information theoretic measure of complexity between multiple random variables, such as those found in the Ising or Potts models of interacting spins, and compare it with several previously proposed measures of statistical complexity, including excess entropy, Bialek et al.'s predictive information, and the multi-information. We discuss and prove some of the properties of binding information, particularly in relation to multi-information and entropy, and show that, in the case of binary random variables, the processes which maximise binding information are the ‘parity’ processes. The computation of binding information is demonstrated on Ising models of finite spin systems, showing that various upper and lower bounds are respected and also that there is a strong relationship between the introduction of high-order interactions and an increase of binding-information. Finally we discuss some of the implications this has for the use of the binding information as a measure of complexity. -- Highlights: ► We introduce ‘binding information’ as a entropic/statistical measure of complexity. ► Binding information (BI) is related to earlier notions of predictive information. ► We derive upper and lower bounds of BI relation to entropy and multi-information. ► Parity processes found to maximise BI in finite sets of binary random variables. ► Application to spin glasses shows highest BI obtained with high-order interactions.

  4. PROCEEDINGS OF RIKEN BNL RESEARCH CENTER WORKSHOP ON RHIC SPIN PHYSICS III AND IV, POLARIZED PARTONS AT HIGH Q2 REGION, AUGUST 3, 2000 AT BNL, OCTOBER 14, 2000 AT KYOTO UNIVERSITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUNCE, G.; VIGDOR, S.

    2001-03-15

    International workshop on II Polarized Partons at High Q2 region 11 was held at the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan on October 13-14, 2000, as a satellite of the international conference ''SPIN 2000'' (Osaka, Japan, October 16-21,2000). This workshop was supported by RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research) and by Yukawa Institute. The scientific program was focused on the upcoming polarized collider RHIC. The workshop was also an annual meeting of RHIC Spin Collaboration (RSC). The number of participants was 55, including 28 foreign visitors and 8 foreign-resident Japanese participants, reflecting the international nature of the RHIC spin program. At the workshop there were 25 oral presentations in four sessions, (1) RHIC Spin Commissioning, (2) Polarized Partons, Present and Future, (3) New Ideas on Polarization Phenomena, (4) Strategy for the Coming Spin Running. In (1) the successful polarized proton commissioning and the readiness of the accelerator for the physics program impressed us. In (2) and (3) active discussions were made on the new structure function to be firstly measured at RHIC, and several new theoretical ideas were presented. In session (4) we have established a plan for the beam time requirement toward the first collision of polarized protons. These proceedings include the transparencies presented at the workshop. The discussion on ''Strategy for the Coming Spin Running'' was summarized by the chairman of the session, S. Vigdor and G. Bunce.

  5. Measurements of spin-lattice relaxation time in mixed alkali halide crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tannus, A.

    1983-01-01

    Using magneto-optic techniques the ground state spin-lattice relaxation times (T1) of 'F' centers in mixed Alkali Halide cristals (KCl-KBr), was studied. A computer assisted system to optically measure short relaxation times (approx. = 1mS), was described. The technique is based on the measurement of the Magnetic Circular Dicroism (MCD) presented by F centers. The T1 magnetic field dependency at 2 K (up to 65 KGauss), was obtained as well as the MCD spectra for different relative concentration at the mixed matrices. The theory developed by Panepucci and Mollenauer for F centers spin-lattice relaxation in pure matrices was modified to explain the behaviour of T1 in mixed cristals. The Direct Process results (T approx. = 2.0 K) compared against that theory shows that the main relaxation mecanism, up to 25 KGauss, continues to be phonon modulation of the hiperfine iteraction between F electrons and surrounding nuclei. (Author) [pt

  6. Physical properties of the spin Hamiltonian on honeycomb lattice samples with Kekulé and vacuum polarization corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Ricardo Spagnuolo; Konstantinova, Elena; Belich, Humberto; Helayël-Neto, José Abdalla

    2017-11-01

    Magnetic and thermodynamical properties of a system of spins in a honeycomb lattice, such as magnetization, magnetic susceptibility and specific heat, in a low-temperature regime are investigated by considering the effects of a Kekulé scalar exchange and QED vacuum polarization corrections to the interparticle potential. The spin lattice calculations are carried out by means of Monte Carlo simulations. We present a number of comparative plots of all the physical quantities we have considered and a detailed analysis is presented to illustrate the main features and the variation profiles of the properties with the applied external magnetic field and temperature.

  7. Radio frequency measurements of tunnel couplings and singlet–triplet spin states in Si:P quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, M. G.; Kobayashi, T.; Weber, B.; Hile, S. J.; Watson, T. F.; van der Heijden, J.; Rogge, S.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Spin states of the electrons and nuclei of phosphorus donors in silicon are strong candidates for quantum information processing applications given their excellent coherence times. Designing a scalable donor-based quantum computer will require both knowledge of the relationship between device geometry and electron tunnel couplings, and a spin readout strategy that uses minimal physical space in the device. Here we use radio frequency reflectometry to measure singlet–triplet states of a few-donor Si:P double quantum dot and demonstrate that the exchange energy can be tuned by at least two orders of magnitude, from 20 μeV to 8 meV. We measure dot–lead tunnel rates by analysis of the reflected signal and show that they change from 100 MHz to 22 GHz as the number of electrons on a quantum dot is increased from 1 to 4. These techniques present an approach for characterizing, operating and engineering scalable qubit devices based on donors in silicon. PMID:26548556

  8. Measurement of the transverse spin correlation in $Z \\to \\tau^+\\tau^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Abreu, P; Adye, T; Ajinenko, I; Alekseev, G D; Alemany, R; Allport, P P; Almehed, S; Amaldi, Ugo; Amato, S; Andersson, P; Andreazza, A; Antilogus, P; Apel, W D; Åsman, B; Augustin, J E; Augustinus, A; Baillon, Paul; Bambade, P; Barão, F; Barbi, M S; Bardin, Dimitri Yuri; Barker, G; Baroncelli, A; Bärring, O; Bates, M J; Battaglia, Marco; Baubillier, M; Baudot, J; Becks, K H; Begalli, M; Beillière, P; Belokopytov, Yu A; Belous, K S; Benvenuti, Alberto C; Berggren, M; Bertini, D; Bertrand, D; Besançon, M; Bianchi, F; Bigi, M; Bilenky, S M; Billoir, P; Bizouard, M A; Bloch, D; Blume, M; Bonesini, M; Bonivento, W; Booth, P S L; Borgland, A W; Borisov, G; Bosio, C; Botner, O; Boudinov, E; Bouquet, B; Bourdarios, C; Bowcock, T J V; Bozovic, I; Bozzo, M; Branchini, P; Brand, K D; Brenke, T; Brenner, R A; Bricman, C; Brown, R C A; Brückman, P; Brunet, J M; Bugge, L; Buran, T; Burgsmüller, T; Buschmann, P; Cabrera, S; Caccia, M; Calvi, M; Camacho-Rozas, A J; Camporesi, T; Canale, V; Canepa, M; Cao, F; Carena, F; Carroll, L; Caso, Carlo; Castillo-Gimenez, M V; Cattai, A; Cavallo, F R; Chabaud, V; Charpentier, P; Chaussard, L; Checchia, P; Chelkov, G A; Chen, M; Chierici, R; Chliapnikov, P V; Chochula, P; Chorowicz, V; Cindro, V; Collins, P; Contri, R; Cortina, E; Cosme, G; Cossutti, F; Cowell, J H; Crawley, H B; Crennell, D J; Crosetti, G; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Czellar, S; Dahm, J; D'Almagne, B; Dam, M; Damgaard, G; Dauncey, P D; Davenport, Martyn; Da Silva, W; Deghorain, A; Della Ricca, G; Delpierre, P A; Demaria, N; De Angelis, A; de Boer, Wim; De Brabandere, S; De Clercq, C; La Vaissière, C de; De Lotto, B; De Min, A; De Paula, L S; Dijkstra, H; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Diodato, A; Djannati, A; Dolbeau, J; Doroba, K; Dracos, M; Drees, J; Drees, K A; Dris, M; Durand, J D; Edsall, D M; Ehret, R; Eigen, G; Ekelöf, T J C; Ekspong, Gösta; Elsing, M; Engel, J P; Erzen, B; Espirito-Santo, M C; Falk, E; Fanourakis, G K; Fassouliotis, D; Feindt, Michael; Ferrari, P; Ferrer, A; Fichet, S; Filippas-Tassos, A; Firestone, A; Fischer, P A; Föth, H; Fokitis, E; Fontanelli, F; Formenti, F; Franek, B J; Frodesen, A G; Frühwirth, R; Fulda-Quenzer, F; Fuster, J A; Galloni, A; Gamba, D; Gandelman, M; García, C; García, J; Gaspar, C; Gasparini, U; Gavillet, P; Gazis, E N; Gelé, D; Gerber, J P; Gokieli, R; Golob, B; Gonçalves, P; Gopal, Gian P; Gorn, L; Górski, M; Guz, Yu; Gracco, Valerio; Graziani, E; Green, C; Grefrath, A; Gris, P; Grosdidier, G; Grzelak, K; Gumenyuk, S A; Günther, M; Guy, J; Hahn, F; Hahn, S; Hajduk, Z; Hallgren, A; Hamacher, K; Harris, F J; Hedberg, V; Henriques, R P; Hernández, J J; Herquet, P; Herr, H; Hessing, T L; Heuser, J M; Higón, E; Hilke, Hans Jürgen; Holmgren, S O; Holt, P J; Holthuizen, D J; Hoorelbeke, S; Houlden, M A; Hrubec, Josef; Huet, K; Hultqvist, K; Jackson, J N; Jacobsson, R; Jalocha, P; Janik, R; Jarlskog, C; Jarlskog, G; Jarry, P; Jean-Marie, B; Johansson, E K; Jönsson, L B; Jönsson, P E; Joram, Christian; Juillot, P; Kaiser, M; Kapusta, F; Karafasoulis, K; Karlsson, M; Katsanevas, S; Katsoufis, E C; Keränen, R; Khokhlov, Yu A; Khomenko, B A; Khovanskii, N N; King, B J; Kjaer, N J; Klapp, O; Klein, H; Kluit, P M; Knoblauch, D; Köne, B; Kokkinias, P; Konoplyannikov, A K; Koratzinos, M; Korcyl, K; Kostyukhin, V; Kourkoumelis, C; Kuznetsov, O; Krammer, Manfred; Kreuter, C; Kronkvist, I J; Krumshtein, Z; Krupinski, W; Kubinec, P; Kucewicz, W; Kurvinen, K L; Lacasta, C; Laktineh, I; Lamsa, J; Lanceri, L; Lane, D W; Langefeld, P; Laugier, J P; Lauhakangas, R; Leder, Gerhard; Ledroit, F; Lefébure, V; Legan, C K; Leisos, A; Leitner, R; Lemonne, J; Lenzen, Georg; Lepeltier, V; Lesiak, T; Libby, J; Liko, D; Lindner, R; Lipniacka, A; Lippi, I; Lörstad, B; Loken, J G; López, J M; Loukas, D; Lutz, P; Lyons, L; MacNaughton, J N; Maehlum, G; Mahon, J R; Maio, A; Malmgren, T G M; Malychev, V; Mandl, F; Marco, J; Marco, R P; Maréchal, B; Margoni, M; Marin, J C; Mariotti, C; Markou, A; Martínez-Rivero, C; Martínez-Vidal, F; Martí i García, S; Matorras, F; Matteuzzi, C; Matthiae, Giorgio; Mazzucato, M; McCubbin, M L; McKay, R; McNulty, R; Medbo, J; Merk, M; Meroni, C; Meyer, S; Meyer, W T; Myagkov, A; Michelotto, M; Migliore, E; Mirabito, L; Mitaroff, Winfried A; Mjörnmark, U; Moa, T; Møller, R; Mönig, K; Monge, M R; Morettini, P; Müller, H; Münich, K; Mulders, M; Mundim, L M; Murray, W J; Muryn, B; Myatt, Gerald; Naraghi, F; Navarria, Francesco Luigi; Navas, S; Nawrocki, K; Negri, P; Némécek, S; Neumann, W; Neumeister, N; Nicolaidou, R; Nielsen, B S; Nieuwenhuizen, M; Nikolaenko, V; Nikolenko, M; Niss, P; Nomerotski, A; Normand, Ainsley; Novák, M; Oberschulte-Beckmann, W; Obraztsov, V F; Olshevskii, A G; Onofre, A; Orava, Risto; Orazi, G; Österberg, K; Ouraou, A; Paganini, P; Paganoni, M; Pagès, P; Pain, R; Palka, H; Papadopoulou, T D; Papageorgiou, K; Pape, L; Parkes, C; Parodi, F; Passeri, A; Pegoraro, M; Peralta, L; Pernegger, H; Pernicka, Manfred; Perrotta, A; Petridou, C; Petrolini, A; Phillips, H T; Piana, G; Pierre, F; Pimenta, M; Podobnik, T; Podobrin, O; Pol, M E; Polok, G; Poropat, P; Pozdnyakov, V; Privitera, P; Pukhaeva, N; Pullia, Antonio; Radojicic, D; Ragazzi, S; Rahmani, H; Rames, J; Ratoff, P N; Read, A L; Reale, M; Rebecchi, P; Redaelli, N G; Reid, D; Reinhardt, R; Renton, P B; Resvanis, L K; Richard, F; Richardson, J; Rídky, J; Rinaudo, G; Romero, A; Roncagliolo, I; Ronchese, P; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Roudeau, Patrick; Rovelli, T; Rückstuhl, W; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V; Ruiz, A; Rybicki, K; Saarikko, H; Sacquin, Yu; Sadovskii, A; Sahr, O; Sajot, G; Salt, J; Sannino, M; Schneider, H; Schwickerath, U; Schyns, M A E; Sciolla, G; Scuri, F; Seager, P; Sedykh, Yu; Segar, A M; Seitz, A; Sekulin, R L; Serbelloni, L; Shellard, R C; Siegrist, P; Silvestre, R; Simonetto, F; Sissakian, A N; Sitár, B; Skaali, T B; Smadja, G; Smirnov, N; Smirnova, O G; Smith, G R; Sokolov, A; Solovyanov, O; Sosnowski, R; Souza-Santos, D; Spassoff, Tz; Spiriti, E; Sponholz, P; Squarcia, S; Stampfer, D; Stanescu, C; Stanic, S; Stapnes, Steinar; Stavitski, I; Stevenson, K; Stocchi, A; Strauss, J; Strub, R; Stugu, B; Szczekowski, M; Szeptycka, M; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tavernet, J P; Chikilev, O G; Tegenfeldt, F; Terranova, F; Thomas, J; Tilquin, A; Timmermans, J; Tkatchev, L G; Todorov, T; Todorova, S; Toet, D Z; Tomaradze, A G; Tomé, B; Tonazzo, A; Tortora, L; Tranströmer, G; Treille, D; Tristram, G; Trombini, A; Troncon, C; Tsirou, A L; Turluer, M L; Tyapkin, I A; Tyndel, M; Tzamarias, S; Überschär, B; Ullaland, O; Uvarov, V; Valenti, G; Vallazza, E; Van der Velde, C; van Apeldoorn, G W; van Dam, P; Van Doninck, W K; Van Eldik, J; Van Lysebetten, A; Vassilopoulos, N; Vegni, G; Ventura, L; Venus, W A; Verbeure, F; Verlato, M; Vertogradov, L S; Vilanova, D; Vincent, P; Vitale, L; Vodopyanov, A S; Vrba, V; Wahlen, H; Walck, C; Waldner, F; Weilhammer, Peter; Weiser, C; Wetherell, Alan M; Wicke, D; Wickens, J H; Wielers, M; Wilkinson, G R; Williams, W S C; Winter, M; Witek, M; Wlodek, T; Yi, J; Yip, K; Yushchenko, O P; Zach, F; Zaitsev, A; Zalewska-Bak, A; Zalewski, Piotr; Zavrtanik, D; Zevgolatakos, E; Zimin, N I; Zontar, D; Zucchelli, G C; Zumerle, G

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of the correlation between the transverse spin components of $\\tau^+\\tau^-$ pairs collected during 1992 to 1994 with the DELPHI detector at LEP1 is presented. A value \\begin{center} $C_{TT}$~=~0.87~$\\pm$~0.20~(stat.)~$^{+~0.10}_{-~0.12}$~(syst.) \\end{center} was obtained for the correlation parameter, in agreement with the St1AU LYi,

  9. Measurement of proton and nitrogen polarization in ammonia and a test of equal spin temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Adeva, B; Arvidson, A; Badelek, B; Baum, G; Berglund, P; Betev, L; De Botton, N R; Bradamante, Franco; Bradtke, C; Bravar, A; Bültmann, S; Crabb, D; Cranshaw, J; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; Dalla Torre, S; Van Dantzig, R; Derro, B R; Dreshpande, A; Dhawan, S K; Dulya, C M; Dutz, H; Eichblatt, S; Fasching, D; Feinstein, F; Fernández, C; Forthmann, S; Frois, Bernard; Gallas, A; Garzón, J A; Gehring, R; Gilly, H; Giorgi, M A; Görtz, S; Gracia, G; De Groot, N; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Haft, K; Harmsen, J; Von Harrach, D; Hasegawa, T; Hautle, P; Hayashi, N; Heusch, C A; Horikawa, N; Hughes, V W; Igo, G; Ishimoto, S; Iwata, T; Kabuss, E M; Kageya, T; Karev, A G; Ketel, T; Kiryluk, J; Kiselev, Yu F; Kok, E; Krämer, Dietrich; Kröger, W; Kurek, K; Kyynäräinen, J; Lamanna, M; Landgraf, U; Le Goff, J M; Lehár, F; de Lesquen, A; Lichtenstadt, J; Litmaath, M; Magnon, A; Mallot, G K; Martin, A; Matsuda, T; Mayes, B W; McCarthy, J S; Medved, K S; Meyer, W T; Van Middelkoop, G; Miller, D; Miyachi, Y; Mori, K; Nassalski, J P; Niinikoski, T O; Oberski, J; Ogawa, A; Parks, D P; Pereira da Costa, H D; Perrot-Kunne, F; Peshekhonov, V D; Pinsky, L; Platchkov, S K; Pló, M; Plückthun, M; Polec, J; Pose, D; Postma, H; Pretz, J; Puntaferro, R; Rädel, G; Reicherz, G; Rijllart, A; Rodríguez, M; Rondio, Ewa; Sandacz, A; Savin, I A; Schiavon, R P; Schiller, A; Sichtermann, E P; Simeoni, F; Smirnov, G I; Staude, A; Steinmetz, A; Stiegler, U; Stuhrmann, H B; Tessarotto, F; Tlaczala, W; Tripet, A; Ünel, G; Velasco, M; Vogt, J; Voss, Rüdiger; Whitten, C; Windmolders, R; Wislicki, W; Witzmann, A; Ylöstalo, J; Zanetti, A M; Zaremba, K

    1998-01-01

    The 1996 data taking of the SMC experiment used polarized protons to measure the spin dependent structure function $g_1$ of the proton. Three liters of solid granular ammonia were irradiated at the Bonn electron linac in order to create the paramagnetic radicals which are needed for polarizing the protons. Proton polarizations of $\\pm(90\\pm2.5)\\,\\%$ were routinely reached. An analysis based on a theoretical line-shape for spin-1 systems with large quadrupolar broadening was developed which allowed the nitrogen polarization in the ammonia to be determined with a 10\\,\\% relative error. The measured quadrupolar coupling constant of $^{14}$N agrees well with earlier extrapolated values. The polarization of the nitrogen nuclei was measured as a function of the proton polarization in order to provide a test of the equal spin temperature (EST) hypothesis. It was found to be closely valid under the dynamic nuclear polarization conditions with which the protons are polarized. Large deviations from EST could be induced...

  10. Spin glasses

    CERN Document Server

    Bovier, Anton

    2007-01-01

    Spin glass theory is going through a stunning period of progress while finding exciting new applications in areas beyond theoretical physics, in particular in combinatorics and computer science. This collection of state-of-the-art review papers written by leading experts in the field covers the topic from a wide variety of angles. The topics covered are mean field spin glasses, including a pedagogical account of Talagrand's proof of the Parisi solution, short range spin glasses, emphasizing the open problem of the relevance of the mean-field theory for lattice models, and the dynamics of spin glasses, in particular the problem of ageing in mean field models. The book will serve as a concise introduction to the state of the art of spin glass theory, usefull to both graduate students and young researchers, as well as to anyone curious to know what is going on in this exciting area of mathematical physics.

  11. Spin measurements for 147Sm+n resonances: Further evidence for nonstatistical effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koehler, P. E.; Ullmann, J. L.; Bredeweg, T. A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.

    2007-01-01

    We have determined the spins J of resonances in the 147 Sm(n,γ) reaction by measuring multiplicities of γ-ray cascades following neutron capture. Using this technique, we were able to determine J values for all but 14 of the 141 known resonances below E n =1 keV, including 41 firm J assignments for resonances whose spins previously were either unknown or tentative. These new spin assignments, together with previously determined resonance parameters, allowed us to extract level spacings (D 0,3 =11.76±0.93 and D 0,4 =11.21±0.85 eV) and neutron strength functions (10 4 S 0,3 =4.70±0.91 and 10 4 S 0,4 =4.93±0.92) for J=3 and 4 resonances, respectively. Furthermore, cumulative numbers of resonances and cumulative reduced neutron widths as functions of resonance energy indicate that very few resonances of either spin have been missed below E n =700 eV. This conclusion is strengthened by the facts that, over this energy range, Wigner distributions calculated using these D 0 values agree with the measured nearest-neighbor level spacings to within the experimental uncertainties, and that the Δ 3 values calculated from the data also agree with the expected values. Because a nonstatistical effect recently was reported near E n =350 eV from an analysis of 147 Sm(n,α) data, we divided the data into two regions; 0 n n n 0 distribution for resonances below 350 eV is consistent with the expected Porter-Thomas distribution. However, we found that Γ n 0 data in the 350 n 2 distribution having ν≥2 We discuss possible explanations for these observed nonstatistical effects and their possible relation to similar effects previously observed in other nuclides

  12. Dynamic viscoelasticity measurement under alternative torque using electromagnetically spinning method with quadruple electromagnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Yusuke; Hirano, Taichi; Sakai, Keiji

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we developed a novel type of rheological measurement system. Here, a spherical probe is driven to rotate periodically by applying torques using quadruple electromagnets in a noncontact manner. Moreover, this system is an enhancement of our electromagnetically spinning (EMS) viscometer, which is widely used for measuring rheological flow curves in various industrial fields. The quadruple EMS method provides the frequency spectrum of viscoelasticity, in addition to shear viscosity, in a steady flow by switching the operation modes of the driving torque. We show the results obtained for Newtonian fluids and viscoelastic materials and demonstrate the validity of the system.

  13. Nicholas Metropolis Award for Outstanding Doctoral Thesis Work in Computational Physics Lecture: The Janus computer, a new window into spin-glass physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yllanes, David

    2013-03-01

    Spin glasses are a longstanding model for the sluggish dynamics that appears at the glass transition. They enjoy a privileged status in this context, as they provide the simplest model system both for theoretical and experimental studies of glassy dynamics. However, in spite of forty years of intensive investigation, spin glasses still pose a formidable challenge to theoretical, computational and experimental physics. The main difficulty lies in their incredibly slow dynamics. A recent breakthrough has been made possible by our custom-built computer, Janus, designed and built in a collaboration formed by five universities in Spain and Italy. By employing a purpose-driven architecture, capable of fully exploiting the parallelization possibilities intrinsic to these simulations, Janus outperforms conventional computers by several orders of magnitude. After a brief introduction to spin glasses, the talk will focus on the new physics unearthed by Janus. In particular, we recall our numerical study of the nonequilibrium dynamics of the Edwards-Anderson Ising Spin Glass, for a time that spans eleven orders of magnitude, thus approaching the experimentally relevant scale (i.e. seconds). We have also studied the equilibrium properties of the spin-glass phase, with an emphasis on the quantitative matching between non-equilibrium and equilibrium correlation functions, through a time-length dictionary. Last but not least, we have clarified the existence of a glass transition in the presence of a magnetic field for a finite-range spin glass (the so-called de Almeida-Thouless line). We will finally mention some of the currently ongoing work of the collaboration, such as the characterization of the non-equilibrium dynamics in a magnetic field and the existence of a statics-dynamics dictionary in these conditions.

  14. Spin shifts scale of gravitational interaction, opening new path to particle physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burinskii, Alexander

    2017-12-01

    We argue that spin deforms space along with mass, and the great spin/mass ratio of the elementary particles shifts gravitational interaction from Planck to Compton scale, opening new way to unification of gravity with quantum theory, based on the supersymmetric bag model.

  15. Directly Measured Physical Function in Cardiac Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rengo, Jason L; Savage, Patrick D; Shaw, Joan C; Ades, Philip A

    2017-05-01

    The Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) is a strong predictor for risk of physical disability in older adults. Roughly half of individuals participating in phase II cardiac rehabilitation (CR) are 65 years or older, many presenting with low aerobic capacities and may be at increased risk for physical disability. The cohort consisted of 196 consecutive patients (136 men), aged 65 years or older, entering CR who were prospectively evaluated by the SPPB. Data were also obtained for age, self-reported physical function (Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 questionnaire), and peak aerobic capacity. Measures were repeated upon completion of CR for those individuals who completed the program. The average age of patients was 74 ± 0.5 years. At baseline, total SPPB score was 9.7 ± 0.2 (out of 12). Followup data were obtained on 133 (68%) patients, with a mean improvement of 0.8 ± 0.1 (P speed (0.5 ± 0.1, P vs 17.5 ± 0.4 mL/kg/min, P speed and leg strength (chair-stand).

  16. Spin at Lausanne

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    From 25 September to 1 October, some 150 spin enthusiasts gathered in Lausanne for the 1980 International Symposium on High Energy Physics with Polarized Beams and Polarized Targets. The programme was densely packed, covering physics interests with spin as well as the accelerator and target techniques which make spin physics possible

  17. Quantum non demolition measurement of a single nuclear spin in a room temperature solid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Phillip; Beck, Johannes; Steiner, Matthias; Rathgen, Helmut; Rempp, Florian; Zarrabi, Navid; Dolde, Florian; Jelezko, Fedor; Wrachtrup, Joerg [Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Hemmer, Philip [A and M University, Texas (United States)

    2010-07-01

    The measurement process and its interpretation are in the focus of quantum mechanics since its early days. Today's ability to isolate single quantum objects allows experimental demonstration of former ''gedankenexperiments'' like measurement induced quantum state collaps. Rapidly growing quantum technologies explore fundamental aspects of measurements in quantum computing, however for solid state systems such experiments require operation at very low temperatures. Here we show that projective quantum measurement can be performed on a single nuclear spin in diamond under ambient conditions. Using quantum non demolition (QND) readout we are able to detect quantum jumps and the quantum Zeno effect emphasising the addressability of fundamental questions of quantum mechanics in solids. Single shot measurements with fidelities exceeding 0.9 enable efficient state initialization, quantum error correction and entanglement pumping that is crucial for quantum information processing including measurement based schemes and distributed quantum networks.

  18. A remark on the infinite-volume Gibbs measures of spin glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguin, Louis-Pierre

    2008-12-01

    In this note, we point out that infinite-volume Gibbs measures of spin glass models on the hypercube can be identified as random probability measures on the unit ball of a Hilbert space. This simple observation follows from a result of Dovbysh and Sudakov on weakly exchangeable random matrices. Limiting Gibbs measures can then be studied as single well-defined objects. This approach naturally extends the space of random overlap structures as defined by Aizenman et al. We discuss the Ruelle probability cascades and the stochastic stability within this framework. As an application, we use an idea of Parisi and Talagrand to prove that if a sequence of finite-volume Gibbs measures satisfies the Ghirlanda-Guerra identities, then the infinite-volume measure must be singular as a measure on a Hilbert space.

  19. Measurement of the charge and current of magnetic monopoles in spin ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramwell, S T; Giblin, S R; Calder, S; Aldus, R; Prabhakaran, D; Fennell, T

    2009-10-15

    The transport of electrically charged quasiparticles (based on electrons or ions) plays a pivotal role in modern technology as well as in determining the essential functions of biological organisms. In contrast, the transport of magnetic charges has barely been explored experimentally, mainly because magnetic charges, in contrast to electric ones, are generally considered at best to be convenient macroscopic parameters, rather than well-defined quasiparticles. However, it was recently proposed that magnetic charges can exist in certain materials in the form of emergent excitations that manifest like point charges, or magnetic monopoles. Here we address the question of whether such magnetic charges and their associated currents-'magnetricity'-can be measured directly in experiment, without recourse to any material-specific theory. By mapping the problem onto Onsager's theory of electrolytes, we show that this is indeed possible, and devise an appropriate method for the measurement of magnetic charges and their dynamics. Using muon spin rotation as a suitable local probe, we apply the method to a real material, the 'spin ice' Dy(2)Ti(2)O(7) (refs 5-8). Our experimental measurements prove that magnetic charges exist in this material, interact via a Coulomb potential, and have measurable currents. We further characterize deviations from Ohm's law, and determine the elementary unit of magnetic charge to be 5 mu(B) A(-1), which is equal to that recently predicted using the microscopic theory of spin ice. Our measurement of magnetic charge and magnetic current establishes an instance of a perfect symmetry between electricity and magnetism.

  20. The E142 SLAC experiment: measurement of the neutron gn1(x) spin structure function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roblin, Y.

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes the E142 experiment which has been carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC), USA, from October to December 1992. This experiment of polarized inelastic scattering of a 22.6 GeV electron beam on a polarized helium 3 target has allowed the first measurement of the neutron g n 1 (x) spin structure function. The knowledge of this structure function gives informations on the nucleon spin structure. On the other hand, the g n 1 (x) structure function integral value on the 0 2 mean value of 2 GeV 2 after some extrapolations. This value is at about two standard deviations away from the theoretical predictions of the Ellis-Jaffe rule. Thanks to the existing experimental results for the proton (E143 experiment), the Bjorken sum rule has been precisely tested and is perfectly compatible with the theoretical value. The results have allowed to estimate the nucleon spin fraction carried by the quarks. (J.S.). 86 refs., 58 figs., 13 tabs

  1. Measurement Theory, Nomological Machine And Measurement Uncertainties (In Classical Physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ave Mets

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Measurement is said to be the basis of exact sciences as the process of assigning numbers to matter (things or their attributes, thus making it possible to apply the mathematically formulated laws of nature to the empirical world. Mathematics and empiria are best accorded to each other in laboratory experiments which function as what Nancy Cartwright calls nomological machine: an arrangement generating (mathematical regularities. On the basis of accounts of measurement errors and uncertainties, I will argue for two claims: 1 Both fundamental laws of physics, corresponding to ideal nomological machine, and phenomenological laws, corresponding to material nomological machine, lie, being highly idealised relative to the empirical reality; and also laboratory measurement data do not describe properties inherent to the world independently of human understanding of it. 2 Therefore the naive, representational view of measurement and experimentation should be replaced with a more pragmatic or practice-based view.

  2. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Functions G1 and G2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, Al

    2003-04-02

    The SLAC experiment E155 was a deep-inelastic scattering experiment that scattered polarized electrons off polarized proton and deuteron targets in the effort to measure precisely the proton and deuteron spin structure functions. The nucleon structure functions g{sub 1} and g{sub 2} are important quantities that help test our present models of nucleon structure. Such information can help quantify the constituent contributions to the nucleon spin. The structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and G{sub 1}{sup d} have been measured over the kinematic range 0.01 {le} x {le} 0.9 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 40 GeV{sup 2} by scattering 48.4 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off longitudinally polarized protons and deuterons. In addition, the structure functions g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} have been measured over the kinematic range 0.01 {le} x {le} 0.7 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 17 GeV{sup 2} by scattering 38.8 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons off transversely polarized protons and deuterons. The measurements of g{sub 1} confirm the Bjorken sum rule and find the net quark polarization to be {Delta}{Sigma} = 0.23 {+-} 0.04 {+-} 0.6 while g{sub 2} is found to be consistent with the g{sub 2}{sup WW} model.

  3. Spin-Circuit Representation of Spin Pumping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Kuntal

    2017-07-01

    Circuit theory has been tremendously successful in translating physical equations into circuit elements in an organized form for further analysis and proposing creative designs for applications. With the advent of new materials and phenomena in the field of spintronics and nanomagnetics, it is imperative to construct the spin-circuit representations for different materials and phenomena. Spin pumping is a phenomenon by which a pure spin current can be injected into the adjacent layers. If the adjacent layer is a material with a high spin-orbit coupling, a considerable amount of charge voltage can be generated via the inverse spin Hall effect allowing spin detection. Here we develop the spin-circuit representation of spin pumping. We then combine it with the spin-circuit representation for the materials having spin Hall effect to show that it reproduces the standard results as in the literature. We further show how complex multilayers can be analyzed by simply writing a netlist.

  4. Quantum spin quadrumer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatua, Subhankar; Shankar, R.; Ganesh, R.

    2018-02-01

    A fundamental motif in frustrated magnetism is the fully mutually coupled cluster of N spins, with each spin coupled to every other spin. Clusters with N =2 and 3 have been extensively studied as building blocks of square and triangular lattice antiferromagnets. In both cases, large-S semiclassical descriptions have been fruitfully constructed, providing insights into the physics of macroscopic magnetic systems. Here, we develop a semiclassical theory for the N =4 cluster. This problem has rich mathematical structure with a ground-state space that has nontrivial topology. We show that ground states are appropriately parametrized by a unit vector order parameter and a rotation matrix. Remarkably, in the low-energy description, the physics of the cluster reduces to that of an emergent free spin-S spin and a rigid rotor. This successfully explains the spectrum of the quadrumer and its associated degeneracies. However, this mapping does not hold in the vicinity of collinear ground states due to a subtle effect that arises from the nonmanifold nature of the ground-state space. We demonstrate this by an analysis of soft fluctuations, showing that collinear states have a larger number of soft modes. Nevertheless, as these singularities only occur on a subset of measure zero, the mapping to a spin and a rotor provides a good description of the quadrumer. We interpret thermodynamic properties of the quadrumer that are accessible in molecular magnets, in terms of the rotor and spin degrees of freedom. Our study paves the way for field theoretic descriptions of systems such as pyrochlore magnets.

  5. Mass and Spin Measurement with M{sub T2} and MAOS Momentum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Won Sang [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kiwoon [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeong Gyun [Physics Division, Korea Institute for Advanced Study, Seoul 130-722 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Chan Beom [Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-15

    We discuss the M{sub T2}-kink method to determine the masses of both the dark matter WIMP and its mother particle produced at the LHC. We then introduce a new kinematic variable, the M{sub T2}-Assisted-On-Shell (MAOS) momentum, that provides a systematic approximation to the invisible particle momenta in hadron collider events producing a pair of invisible particles, and apply it to certain SUSY processes and their UED equivalents to determine the spin of gluino/KK-gluon and of slepton/KK-lepton. An application of the MAOS momentum to the SM Higgs mass measurement is briefly discussed also.

  6. Multichannel spin polarimeter for energy- and angle-dispersive photoemission measurements; Vielkanal-Spinpolarimeter fuer energie- und winkeldispersive Photoemissionsmessungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbe, Michaela

    2011-09-09

    Spin polarization measurements of free electrons remain challenging since their first realization by Mott. The relevant quantity of a spin polarimeter is its figure of merit, FoM=S{sup 2}I/I{sub 0}, with the asymmetry function S and the ratio between scattered and primary intensity I/I{sub 0}. State-of-the-art devices are based on single-channel scattering (spin-orbit or exchange interaction) which is characterized by FoM {approx_equal}10{sup -4}. On the other hand, modern hemispherical analyzers feature an efficient multichannel detection of spin-integral intensity with more than 10{sup 4} data points simultaneously. In comparison between spin-resolved and spin-integral electron spectroscopy we are thus faced with a difference in counting efficiency by 8 orders of magnitude. The present work concentrates on the development and investigation of a novel technique for increasing the efficiency in spin-resolved electron spectroscopy by multichannel detection. The spin detector was integrated in a {mu}-metal shielded UHV-chamber and mounted behind a conventional hemispherical analyzer. The electrostatic lens system's geometry was determined by electron-optical simulations. The basic concept is the k {sub parallel} -conserving elastic scattering of the (0,0)-beam on a W(100) scattering crystal under 45 impact angle. It could be demonstrated that app. 960 data points (15 energy and 64 angular points) could be displayed simultaneously on a delayline detector in an energy interval of {approx_equal}3 eV. This leads to a two-dimensional figure of merit of FoM{sub 2D}=1.7. Compared to conventional spin detectors, the new type is thus characterized by a gain in efficiency of 4 orders of magnitude. The operational reliability of the new spin polarimeter could be proven by measurements with a Fe/MgO(100) and O p(1 x 1)/Fe(100)-sample, where results from the literature were reproduced with strongly decreased measuring time. Due to the high intensity it becomes possible, to

  7. Optically-detected spin-echo method for relaxation times measurements in a Rb atomic vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharavipour, M.; Affolderbach, C.; Gruet, F.; Radojičić, I. S.; Krmpot, A. J.; Jelenković, B. M.; Mileti, G.

    2017-06-01

    We introduce and demonstrate an experimental method, optically-detected spin-echo (ODSE), to measure ground-state relaxation times of a rubidium (Rb) atomic vapor held in a glass cell with buffer-gas. The work is motivated by our studies on high-performance Rb atomic clocks, where both population and coherence relaxation times (T 1 and T 2, respectively) of the ‘clock transition’ (52S1/2 | {F}g = 1,{m}F=0> ≤ftrightarrow | {F}g=2,{m}F=0> ) are relevant. Our ODSE method is inspired by classical nuclear magnetic resonance spin-echo method, combined with optical detection. In contrast to other existing methods, like continuous-wave double-resonance (CW-DR) and Ramsey-DR, principles of the ODSE method allow suppression of decoherence arising from the inhomogeneity of the static magnetic field across the vapor cell, thus enabling measurements of intrinsic relaxation rates, as properties of the cell alone. Our experimental result for the coherence relaxation time, specific for the clock transition, measured with the ODSE method is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction, and the ODSE results are validated by comparison to those obtained with Franzen, CW-DR and Ramsey-DR methods. The method is of interest for a wide variety of quantum optics experiments with optical signal readout.

  8. Measurements of spin alignment of vector mesons and global polarization of hyperons with ALICE at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Bedangadas

    2018-02-01

    We present the measurements related to global polarization of Λ hyperons and spin alignment of K*0 vector mesons at mid-rapidity for Pb-Pb collisions at = 2.76 TeV using the ALICE detector at the LHC. The global polarization measurements are carried out with respect to the first order event plane while the spin alignment measurements are carried out with respect to the production plane. No global polarization signal for Λ is observed for 5-15% and 15-50% central Pb-Pb collisions. The spin density matrix element ρ00 is found to have values slightly below ⅓ at low transverse momentum (pT) for K*0 mesons, while it is consistent with ⅓ (no spin alignment) at higher pT. No spin alignment is observed for K*0 in pp collisions at √s = 13 TeV and for the spin zero hadron K0S in 20-40% Pb-Pb collisions at = 2.76 TeV.

  9. The Precision Measurement of the Neutron Spin Structure Function Using Polarized HE-3 Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X

    2004-01-05

    Using a 48.6 GeV polarized electron beam scattering off a polarized {sup 3}He target at Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC), they measured the neutron spin structure function g{sub 1}{sup n} over kinematic(x) ranging 0.014 < x <0.7 and 1 < Q{sup 2} < 17GeV{sup 2}. The measurement gave the integral result over the neutron spin structure function {integral}{sub 0.014}{sup 0.7} g{sub 1}{sup n}(x)dx = -0.036 {+-} 0.004(stat) {+-} 0.005(syst) at an average Q{sup 2} = 5GeV{sup 2}. Along with the proton results from SLAC E143 experiment (0.03 < x) and SMC experiment (0.014 < x < 0.03), they find the Bjorken sum rule appears to be largely saturated by the data integrated down to x of 0.014. However, they observe relatively large values for g{sub 1}{sup n} at low x. The result calls into question the usual methods (Regge theory) for extrapolating to x = 0 to find the full neutron integral {integral}{sub 0}{sup t} g{sub 1}{sup n}(x) dx, needed for testing the Quark-Parton Model (QMP).

  10. Noninvasive measurements of regional cerebral perfusion in preterm and term neonates by magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda Gimenez-Ricco, Maria Jo; Olofsson, K; Sidaros, Karam

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term-born neon......Magnetic resonance arterial spin labeling (ASL) at 3 Tesla has been investigated as a quantitative technique for measuring regional cerebral perfusion (RCP) in newborn infants. RCP values were measured in 49 healthy neonates: 32 preterm infants born before 34 wk of gestation and 17 term...

  11. Stability of trans-fermium elements at high spin: Measuring the fission barrier of 254No

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Super heavy nuclei provide opportunities to study nuclear structure near three simultaneous limits: in charge Z, spin I and excitation energy E*. These nuclei exist only because of a fission barrier, created by shell effects. It is therefore important to determine the fission barrier and its spin dependence B f (I), which gives information on the shell energy E(shell)(I). Theoretical calculations predict different fission barrier heights from B f (I = 0) = 6.8 MeV for a macro-microscopic model to 8.7 MeV for Density Functional Theory calculations using the Gogny or Skyrme interactions. Hence, a measurement of B f provides a test for theories.To investigate the fission barrier, an established method is to measure the rise of fission with excitation energy, characterized by the ratio of decay widths Γ(fission)/Γ(total), using transfer reactions. However, for heavy elements such as 254 No, there is no suitable target for a transfer reaction. We therefore rely on the complementary decay widths ratio Γ γ /Γ(fission) and its spin dependence, deduced from the entry distribution (I, E*).Measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity and total energy for 254 No have been performed with beam energies of 219 and 223 MeV in the reaction 208 Pb( 48 Ca,2n) at ATLAS (Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System). The 254 No gamma rays were detected using the Gammasphere array as a calorimeter - as well as the usual high resolution γ-ray detector. Coincidences with evaporation residues at the Fragment Mass Analyzer focal plane separated 254 No gamma rays from those from fission fragments, which are ≥ 10 6 more intense. From this measurement, the entry distribution - i.e. the initial distribution of I and E* - is constructed. Each point (I,E*) of the entry distribution is a point where gamma decay wins over fission and, therefore, gives information on the fission barrier. The measured entry distributions show an increase in the maximum spin and excitation energy from 219 to 223 Me

  12. Widespread spin polarization effects in photoemission from topological insulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jozwiak, C.; Chen, Y. L.; Fedorov, A. V.; Analytis, J. G.; Rotundu, C. R.; Schmid, A. K.; Denlinger, J. D.; Chuang, Y.-D.; Lee, D.-H.; Fisher, I. R.; Birgeneau, R. J.; Shen, Z.-X.; Hussain, Z.; Lanzara, A.

    2011-06-22

    High-resolution spin- and angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (spin-ARPES) was performed on the three-dimensional topological insulator Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} using a recently developed high-efficiency spectrometer. The topological surface state's helical spin structure is observed, in agreement with theoretical prediction. Spin textures of both chiralities, at energies above and below the Dirac point, are observed, and the spin structure is found to persist at room temperature. The measurements reveal additional unexpected spin polarization effects, which also originate from the spin-orbit interaction, but are well differentiated from topological physics by contrasting momentum and photon energy and polarization dependencies. These observations demonstrate significant deviations of photoelectron and quasiparticle spin polarizations. Our findings illustrate the inherent complexity of spin-resolved ARPES and demonstrate key considerations for interpreting experimental results.

  13. Spin transport at the international linear collider and its impact on the measurement of polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Moritz

    2013-12-15

    At the planned International Linear Collider (ILC), the longitudinal beam polarization needs to be determined with an unprecedented precision. For that purpose, the beam delivery systems (BDS) are equipped with two laser Compton polarimeters each, which are foreseen to achieve a systematic uncertainty of {<=} 0.25 %. The polarimeters are located 1.6 km upstream and 150 m downstream of the e{sup +}e{sup -} interaction point (IP). The average luminosity-weighted longitudinal polarization P{sup lumi}{sub z}, which is the decisive quantity for the experiments, has to be determined from these measurements with the best possible precision. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the spin transport in the BDS is mandatory to estimate how precise the longitudinal polarization at the IP is known from the polarimeter measurements. The envisaged precision for the propagation of the measurement value is {<=} 0.1 %. This thesis scrutinizes the spin transport in view of the achievable precision. A detailed beamline simulation for the BDS has been developed, including the simulation of the beam-beam collisions at the IP. The following factors which might limit the achievable precision is investigated: a variation of the beam parameters, the beam alignment precision at the polarimeters and the IP, the bunch rotation at the IP, the detector magnets, the beam-beam collisions, the emission of synchrotron radiation and misalignments of the beamline elements. In absence of collisions, a precision of 0.085% on the propagation of the measured longitudinal polarization has been found achievable. This result however depends mainly on the presumed precisions for the parallel alignment of the beam at the polarimeters and for the alignment of polarization vector. In presence of collisions, the measurement at the downstream polarimeter depends strongly on the intensity of the collision and the size of the polarimeter laser spot. Therefore, a more detailed study of the laser-bunch interaction is

  14. Measurement of transverse single-spin asymmetries in inclusive electroproduction at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Ruiz, Alejandro

    2012-12-15

    This dissertation describes the measurement of two single-spin asymmetries (SSAs) in the production of particles from inelastic lepton-proton collisions. SSAs are a convenient observable for investigating the spin-dependent part of the electron-proton cross section. The analyzed data were taken by the HERMES experiment at DESY, using a 27.6 GeV electron/positron beam and a static hydrogen target in which the proton spin was polarized transversely to the direction of the beam. In the first case, SSAs were investigated in the inclusive electroproduction of charged pions and kaons. The asymmetries were studied as a function of the hadron momentum, p{sub T}, relative to the direction of the incident beam, and the Feynman variable x{sub F}. In the kinematic range 0.08 GeVmeasured for positive hadrons, rising from zero at low p{sub T} up to about 6% (8%) for pions (kaons) and then decrease again with increasing p{sub T}. For negative hadrons the asymmetries were of much smaller magnitude, sometimes positive and sometimes negative. When binned simultaneously in p{sub T} and x{sub F}, the asymmetries were found to be essentially independent of x{sub F} in each slice of p{sub T}. The analyzed data were manifestly dominated by hadrons from quasi-real photoproduction. In these reactions, the asymmetry can be related to the hadronic component of the photon and thus to the asymmetry A{sub N} observed in hadronic collisions at different energies but not yet fully understood. However, the largest contribution to the measured SSAs are from hadrons produced in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) reactions, related to the Sivers function, which describes the asymmetric distribution of unpolarized quarks in a transversely polarized proton. Transverse SSAs were also measured in inclusive DIS, where only the scattered beam lepton is detected. In this case, non-zero SSAs would arise from two-photon exchange contributions to

  15. Spin Qubits in GaAs Heterostructures and Gating of InAs Nanowires for Lowtemperature Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Peter Dahl

    from screening effects. We find that simple, alternating spin filling is not followed. Furthermore, measurement of the exchange splitting, J, indicate two magnetic field dependent transitions lifting spin blockade which is likewise inconsistent with the simplest model for spin filling. The effect...... in lateral quantum dots. First, we incorporate ferromagnetic metal in the depletion gates making them double as micro-magnets supplying magnetic eld gradients allowing spin qubit operation. We demonstrate full tunability of the electron occupation with the magnetic gate structure, combined with a magnetic...... of the magnetic field gradients from the micro-magnet could play a role in the observed differences between the multi- and the few-electron double dots....

  16. Measurement of the spin-dependent structure function g$_{1}$(x) of the proton

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, D.; Arik, E.; Arvidson, A.; Badelek, B.; Ballintijn, M.K.; Bardin, G.; Baum, Guenter; Berglund, P.; Betev, L.; Bird, I.G.; Birsa, R.; Bjorkholm, P.; Bonner, B.E.; de Botton, N.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Brull, A.; Bueltmann, Stephen L.; Burtin, E.; Cavata, C.; Clocchiatti, M.; Corcoran, M.D.; Crabb, D.; Cranshaw, J.; Crawford, M.; Cuhadar, T.; Dalla Torre, S.; van Dantzig, R.; Dhawan, S.; Dulya, C.; Dyring, A.; Eichblatt, S.; Faivre, J.C.; Fasching, D.; Feinstein, F.; Fernandez, C.; Frois, B.; Garzon, J.A.; Gaussiran, T.; Giorgi, M.; von Goeler, E.; Gracia, G.; de Groot, N.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gulmez, Erhan; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hautle, P.; Hayashi, N.; Heusch, C.A.; Horikawa, N.; Hughes, V.W.; Igo, G.; Ishimoto, S.; Iwata, T.; Kabuss, E.M.; Kaiser, R.; Karev, A.; Kessler, H.J.; Ketel, T.J.; Kishi, A.; Kiselev, Yu.; Klostermann, L.; Kramer, D.; Krivokhijine, V.; Kukhtin, V.; Kyynarainen, J.; Lamanna, M.; Landgraf, U.; Lau, K.; Layda, T.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lehar, F.; de Lesquen, A.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Lindqvist, T.; Litmaath, M.; Lopez-Ponte, S.; Lowe, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Marie, F.; Martin, A.; Martino, J.; Matsuda, T.; Mayes, B.; McCarthy, J.S.; Medved, K.; van Middelkoop, G.; Miller, D.; Mori, K.; Moromisato, J.; Nagaitsev, A.; Nassalski, J.; Naumann, L.; Niinikoski, T.O.; Oberski, J.E.J.; Parks, D.P.; Penzo, A.; Perez, G.; Kunne, F.; Peshekhonov, D.; Piegaia, R.; Pinsky, Lawrence S.; Platchkov, S.; Plo, M.; Pose, D.; Postma, H.; Pretz, J.; Pussieux, T.; Pyrlik, J.; Reyhancan, I.; Rieubland, J.M.; Rijllart, A.; Roberts, J.B.; Rock, S.; Rodriguez, M.; Rondio, E.; Rosado, A.; Sabo, I.; Saborido, J.; Sandacz, A.; Savin, Igor A.; Schiavon, P.; Schuler, P.; Segel, R.; Seitz, R.; Semertzidis, Y.; Sever, F.; Shanahan, P.; Shumeiko, N.; Smirnov, G.; Staude, A.; Steinmetz, A.; Stiegler, U.; Stuhrmann, H.; Teichert, K.M.; Tessarotto, F.; Velasco, M.; Vogt, J.; Voss, R.; Weinstein, R.; Whitten, C.; Windmolders, R.; Willumeit, R.; Wislicki, W.; Witzmann, A.; Zanetti, A.M.; Zhao, J.; the SMC

    1994-01-01

    Abstract : We have measured the spin-dependent structure function g_1^p of the proton in deep inelastic scattering of polarized muons off polarized protons, in the kinematic range 0.003measurements. A combined analysis of all available proton, deuteron and neutron data confirms the Bjorken sum rule to within 10\\% of the theoretical value.

  17. Measurement of variable magnetic reversal paths in electrically contacted pseudo-spin-valve rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, T J; Llandro, J; Schackert, F D O; Morecroft, D; Balsod, R B; Bland, J A C; Castano, F J; Ross, C A

    2007-01-01

    In this work we show that the measurement of single magnetic reversal events is of critical importance in order to correctly characterize the switching of magnetic microstructures. Magnetoresistance measurements are performed on two pseudo-spin-valve ring structures with high enough signal to noise to allow the probing of single reversal events. Using this technique we acquire 'switching spectra' which demonstrate that the rings exhibit a range of variable reversal paths, including a bistable reversal mechanism of the hard layer, where the two switching routes have substantially different switching fields. The signature of the variable reversal paths would have been obscured in field cycle averaged data and in the bistable case would cause a fundamental misinterpretation of the reversal behaviour

  18. Measurement of transverse single-spin asymmetries in inclusive electroproduction at HERMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Ruiz, Alejandro

    2012-12-01

    This dissertation describes the measurement of two single-spin asymmetries (SSAs) in the production of particles from inelastic lepton-proton collisions. SSAs are a convenient observable for investigating the spin-dependent part of the electron-proton cross section. The analyzed data were taken by the HERMES experiment at DESY, using a 27.6 GeV electron/positron beam and a static hydrogen target in which the proton spin was polarized transversely to the direction of the beam. In the first case, SSAs were investigated in the inclusive electroproduction of charged pions and kaons. The asymmetries were studied as a function of the hadron momentum, p T , relative to the direction of the incident beam, and the Feynman variable x F . In the kinematic range 0.08 GeV T F T up to about 6% (8%) for pions (kaons) and then decrease again with increasing p T . For negative hadrons the asymmetries were of much smaller magnitude, sometimes positive and sometimes negative. When binned simultaneously in p T and x F , the asymmetries were found to be essentially independent of x F in each slice of p T . The analyzed data were manifestly dominated by hadrons from quasi-real photoproduction. In these reactions, the asymmetry can be related to the hadronic component of the photon and thus to the asymmetry A N observed in hadronic collisions at different energies but not yet fully understood. However, the largest contribution to the measured SSAs are from hadrons produced in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) reactions, related to the Sivers function, which describes the asymmetric distribution of unpolarized quarks in a transversely polarized proton. Transverse SSAs were also measured in inclusive DIS, where only the scattered beam lepton is detected. In this case, non-zero SSAs would arise from two-photon exchange contributions to the electron-proton cross section. This observable is thus a check of the validity of the one-photon exchange approximation, commonly used in theoretical

  19. Stacked bilayer phosphorene: strain-induced quantum spin Hall state and optical measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Lin, Jia-He; Yu, Yan-Mei; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Bilayer phosphorene attracted considerable interest, giving a potential application in nanoelectronics owing to its natural bandgap and high carrier mobility. However, very little is known regarding the possible usefulness in spintronics as a quantum spin Hall (QSH) state of material characterized by a bulk energy gap and gapless spin-filtered edge states. Here, we report a strain-induced topological phase transition from normal to QSH state in bilayer phosphorene, accompanied by band-inversion that changes number from 0 to 1, which is highly dependent on interlayer stacking. When the bottom layer is shifted by 1/2 unit-cell along zigzag/armchair direction with respect to the top layer, the maximum topological bandgap 92.5 meV is sufficiently large to realize QSH effect even at room-temperature. An optical measurement of QSH effect is therefore suggested in view of the wide optical absorption spectrum extending to far infra-red, making bilayer phosphorene a promising candidate for opto-spintronic devices. PMID:26370771

  20. Stacked bilayer phosphorene: strain-induced quantum spin Hall state and optical measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tian; Lin, Jia-He; Yu, Yan-Mei; Chen, Xiang-Rong; Liu, Wu-Ming

    2015-09-15

    Bilayer phosphorene attracted considerable interest, giving a potential application in nanoelectronics owing to its natural bandgap and high carrier mobility. However, very little is known regarding the possible usefulness in spintronics as a quantum spin Hall (QSH) state of material characterized by a bulk energy gap and gapless spin-filtered edge states. Here, we report a strain-induced topological phase transition from normal to QSH state in bilayer phosphorene, accompanied by band-inversion that changes number from 0 to 1, which is highly dependent on interlayer stacking. When the bottom layer is shifted by 1/2 unit-cell along zigzag/armchair direction with respect to the top layer, the maximum topological bandgap 92.5 meV is sufficiently large to realize QSH effect even at room-temperature. An optical measurement of QSH effect is therefore suggested in view of the wide optical absorption spectrum extending to far infra-red, making bilayer phosphorene a promising candidate for opto-spintronic devices.

  1. Determination of the physical parameters distribution in spin transition compounds using experimental FORC diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanasa, Radu; Linares, Jorge; Enachescu, Cristian; Varret, Francois; Stancu, Alexandru

    2006-01-01

    Spin transitions materials are characterized with an innovative experimental method, i.e. first-order reversal curve (FORC) diagram. The interpretation of the results is performed in the framework of two different Ising-like models: a mean-field approach and the exact solution done by the Monte Carlo entropic sampling (MCES) method

  2. Youth Physical Activity Resources Use and Activity Measured by Accelerometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andréa L.; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine whether utilization of physical activity resources (eg, parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. Methods 111 adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported utilization of a physical activity resource (none/1+ resources). The main outcomes were total minutes spent in daily 1) moderate-vigorous physical activity and 2) vigorous physical activity. Results Utilizing a physical activity resource was significantly associated with total minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity. African-Americans and males had significantly greater moderate-vigorous physical activity. Conclusions Results from this study support the development and use of physical activity resources. PMID:21204684

  3. Youth physical activity resource use and activity measured by accelerometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslow, Andréa L; Colabianchi, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    To examine whether use of physical activity resources (eg, parks) was associated with daily physical activity measured by accelerometry. One hundred eleven adolescents completed a travel diary with concurrent accelerometry. The main exposure was self-reported use of a physical activity resource (none /1+ resources). The main outcomes were total minutes spent in daily (1) moderate-vigorous physical activity and (2) vigorous physical activity. Using a physical activity resource was significantly associated with total minutes in moderate-vigorous physical activity. African Americans and males had significantly greater moderate-vigorous physical activity. Results from this study support the development and use of physical activity resources.

  4. Simultaneous tracking of spin angle and amplitude beyond classical limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo, Giorgio; Ciurana, Ferran Martin; Bianchet, Lorena C.; Sewell, Robert J.; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2017-03-01

    Measurement of spin precession is central to extreme sensing in physics, geophysics, chemistry, nanotechnology and neuroscience, and underlies magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Because there is no spin-angle operator, any measurement of spin precession is necessarily indirect, for example, it may be inferred from spin projectors at different times. Such projectors do not commute, and so quantum measurement back-action—the random change in a quantum state due to measurement—necessarily enters the spin measurement record, introducing errors and limiting sensitivity. Here we show that this disturbance in the spin projector can be reduced below N1/2—the classical limit for N spins—by directing the quantum measurement back-action almost entirely into an unmeasured spin component. This generates a planar squeezed state that, because spins obey non-Heisenberg uncertainty relations, enables simultaneous precise knowledge of spin angle and spin amplitude. We use high-dynamic-range optical quantum non-demolition measurements applied to a precessing magnetic spin ensemble to demonstrate spin tracking with steady-state angular sensitivity 2.9 decibels below the standard quantum limit, simultaneously with amplitude sensitivity 7.0 decibels below the Poissonian variance. The standard quantum limit and Poissonian variance indicate the best possible sensitivity with independent particles. Our method surpasses these limits in non-commuting observables, enabling orders-of-magnitude improvements in sensitivity for state-of-the-art sensing and spectroscopy.

  5. Spin gating electrical current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccarelli, C.; Zârbo, L. P.; Irvine, A. C.; Campion, R. P.; Gallagher, B. L.; Wunderlich, J.; Jungwirth, T.; Ferguson, A. J.

    2012-09-01

    The level of the chemical potential is a fundamental parameter of the electronic structure of a physical system, which consequently plays an important role in defining the properties of active electrical devices. We directly measure the chemical potential shift in the relativistic band structure of the ferromagnetic semiconductor (Ga,Mn)As, controlled by changes in its magnetic order parameter. Our device comprises a non-magnetic aluminum single electron channel capacitively coupled to the (Ga,Mn)As gate electrode. The chemical potential shifts of the gate are directly read out from the shifts in the Coulomb blockade oscillations of the single electron transistor. The experiments introduce a concept of spin gating electrical current. In our spin transistor spin manipulation is completely removed from the electrical current carrying channel.

  6. Spin glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.H.; Hertz, J.A.

    1993-01-01

    Spin glasses, simply defined by the authors as a collection of spins (i.e., magnetic moments) whose low-temperature state is a frozen disordered one, represent one of the fascinating new fields of study in condensed matter physics, and this book is the first to offer a comprehensive account of the subject. Included are discussions of the most important developments in theory, experimental work, and computer modeling of spin glasses, all of which have taken place essentially within the last two decades. The first part of the book gives a general introduction to the basic concepts and a discussion of mean field theory, while the second half concentrates on experimental results, scaling theory, and computer simulation of the structure of spin glasses

  7. Measurements of $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} }$ spin correlations and top quark polarization using dilepton final states in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=$ 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Khachatryan, V.; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aşılar, Ece; Bergauer, Thomas; Brandstetter, Johannes; Brondolin, Erica; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Flechl, Martin; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hartl, Christian; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Knünz, Valentin; König, Axel; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Matsushita, Takashi; Mikulec, Ivan; Rabady, Dinyar; Rad, Navid; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schieck, Jochen; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Treberer-Treberspurg, Wolfgang; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Alderweireldt, Sara; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Knutsson, Albert; Lauwers, Jasper; Luyckx, Sten; Van De Klundert, Merijn; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Abu Zeid, Shimaa; Blekman, Freya; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Daci, Nadir; De Bruyn, Isabelle; Deroover, Kevin; Heracleous, Natalie; Keaveney, James; Lowette, Steven; Moreels, Lieselotte; Olbrechts, Annik; Python, Quentin; Strom, Derek; Tavernier, Stefaan; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Van Parijs, Isis; Barria, Patrizia; Brun, Hugues; Caillol, Cécile; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Fang, Wenxing; Fasanella, Giuseppe; Favart, Laurent; Goldouzian, Reza; Grebenyuk, Anastasia; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lenzi, Thomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Maerschalk, Thierry; Marinov, Andrey; Perniè, Luca; Randle-conde, Aidan; Seva, Tomislav; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Yonamine, Ryo; Zenoni, Florian; Zhang, Fengwangdong; Beernaert, Kelly; Benucci, Leonardo; Cimmino, Anna; Crucy, Shannon; Dobur, Didar; Fagot, Alexis; Garcia, Guillaume; Gul, Muhammad; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Poyraz, Deniz; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Salva Diblen, Sinem; Sigamani, Michael; Tytgat, Michael; Van Driessche, Ward; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Beluffi, Camille; Bondu, Olivier; Brochet, Sébastien; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Adrien; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Jafari, Abideh; Jez, Pavel; Komm, Matthias; Lemaitre, Vincent; Mertens, Alexandre; Musich, Marco; Nuttens, Claude; Perrini, Lucia; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Popov, Andrey; Quertenmont, Loic; Selvaggi, Michele; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Beliy, Nikita; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Alves, Fábio Lúcio; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; Hamer, Matthias; Hensel, Carsten; Moraes, Arthur; Pol, Maria Elena; Rebello Teles, Patricia; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, Ewerton; Carvalho, Wagner; Chinellato, Jose; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Huertas Guativa, Lina Milena; Malbouisson, Helena; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mora Herrera, Clemencia; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Sznajder, Andre; Tonelli Manganote, Edmilson José; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Ahuja, Sudha; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Souza Santos, Angelo; Dogra, Sunil; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Mercadante, Pedro G; Moon, Chang-Seong; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Romero Abad, David; Ruiz Vargas, José Cupertino; Aleksandrov, Aleksandar; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Glushkov, Ivan; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Ahmad, Muhammad; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Du, Ran; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Leggat, Duncan; Plestina, Roko; Romeo, Francesco; Shaheen, Sarmad Masood; Spiezia, Aniello; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Chunjie; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Huaqiao; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Li, Qiang; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Wang, Dayong; Xu, Zijun; Avila, Carlos; Cabrera, Andrés; Chaparro Sierra, Luisa Fernanda; Florez, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Puljak, Ivica; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Micanovic, Sasa; Sudic, Lucija; Attikis, Alexandros; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Rykaczewski, Hans; Bodlak, Martin; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Awad, Adel; Mahrous, Ayman; Radi, Amr; Calpas, Betty; Kadastik, Mario; Murumaa, Marion; Raidal, Martti; Tiko, Andres; Veelken, Christian; Eerola, Paula; Pekkanen, Juska; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Peltola, Timo; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Wendland, Lauri; Talvitie, Joonas; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Couderc, Fabrice; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Favaro, Carlotta; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Machet, Martina; Malcles, Julie; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Titov, Maksym; Zghiche, Amina; Antropov, Iurii; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Busson, Philippe; Cadamuro, Luca; Chapon, Emilien; Charlot, Claude; Davignon, Olivier; Filipovic, Nicolas; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Jo, Mihee; Lisniak, Stanislav; Mastrolorenzo, Luca; Miné, Philippe; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Ortona, Giacomo; Paganini, Pascal; Pigard, Philipp; Regnard, Simon; Salerno, Roberto; Sauvan, Jean-Baptiste; Sirois, Yves; Strebler, Thomas; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Aubin, Alexandre; Bloch, Daniel; Brom, Jean-Marie; Buttignol, Michael; Chabert, Eric Christian; Chanon, Nicolas; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Coubez, Xavier; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Goetzmann, Christophe; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Merlin, Jeremie Alexandre; Skovpen, Kirill; Van Hove, Pierre; Gadrat, Sébastien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Bernet, Colin; Boudoul, Gaelle; Bouvier, Elvire; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Courbon, Benoit; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fan, Jiawei; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Lagarde, Francois; Laktineh, Imad Baptiste; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Pequegnot, Anne-Laure; Perries, Stephane; Ruiz Alvarez, José David; Sabes, David; Sgandurra, Louis; Sordini, Viola; Vander Donckt, Muriel; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Toriashvili, Tengizi; Lomidze, David; Autermann, Christian; Beranek, Sarah; Feld, Lutz; Heister, Arno; Kiesel, Maximilian Knut; Klein, Katja; Lipinski, Martin; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Preuten, Marius; Raupach, Frank; Schael, Stefan; Schulte, Jan-Frederik; Verlage, Tobias; Weber, Hendrik; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Brodski, Michael; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Endres, Matthias; Erdmann, Martin; Erdweg, Sören; Esch, Thomas; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Knutzen, Simon; Kreuzer, Peter; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Millet, Philipp; Mukherjee, Swagata; Olschewski, Mark; Padeken, Klaas; Papacz, Paul; Pook, Tobias; Radziej, Markus; Reithler, Hans; Rieger, Marcel; Scheuch, Florian; Sonnenschein, Lars; Teyssier, Daniel; Thüer, Sebastian; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Erdogan, Yusuf; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Künsken, Andreas; Lingemann, Joschka; Nehrkorn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Nugent, Ian Michael; Pistone, Claudia; Pooth, Oliver; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Asin, Ivan; Bartosik, Nazar; Behnke, Olaf; Behrens, Ulf; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Campbell, Alan; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Costanza, Francesco; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Dolinska, Ganna; Dooling, Samantha; Dorland, Tyler; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Eichhorn, Thomas; Flucke, Gero; Gallo, Elisabetta; Garay Garcia, Jasone; Geiser, Achim; Gizhko, Andrii; Gunnellini, Paolo; Hauk, Johannes; Hempel, Maria; Jung, Hannes; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Karacheban, Olena; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kieseler, Jan; Kleinwort, Claus; Korol, Ievgen; Lange, Wolfgang; Leonard, Jessica; Lipka, Katerina; Lobanov, Artur; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Mankel, Rainer; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mittag, Gregor; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nayak, Aruna; Ntomari, Eleni; Perrey, Hanno; Pitzl, Daniel; Placakyte, Ringaile; Raspereza, Alexei; Roland, Benoit; Sahin, Mehmet Özgür; Saxena, Pooja; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Seitz, Claudia; Spannagel, Simon; Stefaniuk, Nazar; Trippkewitz, Karim Damun; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Blobel, Volker; Centis Vignali, Matteo; Draeger, Arne-Rasmus; Erfle, Joachim; Garutti, Erika; Goebel, Kristin; Gonzalez, Daniel; Görner, Martin; Haller, Johannes; Hoffmann, Malte; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Junkes, Alexandra; Klanner, Robert; Kogler, Roman; Kovalchuk, Nataliia; Lapsien, Tobias; Lenz, Teresa; Marchesini, Ivan; Marconi, Daniele; Meyer, Mareike; Nowatschin, Dominik; Ott, Jochen; Pantaleo, Felice; Peiffer, Thomas; Perieanu, Adrian; Pietsch, Niklas; Poehlsen, Jennifer; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Scharf, Christian; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schumann, Svenja; Schwandt, Joern; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Tholen, Heiner; Troendle, Daniel; Usai, Emanuele; Vanelderen, Lukas; Vanhoefer, Annika; Vormwald, Benedikt; Barth, Christian; Baus, Colin; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Butz, Erik; Chwalek, Thorsten; Colombo, Fabio; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Fink, Simon; Frensch, Felix; Friese, Raphael; Giffels, Manuel; Gilbert, Andrew; Haitz, Dominik; Hartmann, Frank; Heindl, Stefan Michael; Husemann, Ulrich; Katkov, Igor; Kornmayer, Andreas; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Maier, Benedikt; Mildner, Hannes; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Müller, Thomas; Müller, Thomas; Plagge, Michael; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Röcker, Steffen; Roscher, Frank; Schröder, Matthias; Sieber, Georg; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weber, Marc; Weiler, Thomas; Williamson, Shawn; Wöhrmann, Clemens; Wolf, Roger; Anagnostou, Georgios; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Giakoumopoulou, Viktoria Athina; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Psallidas, Andreas; Topsis-Giotis, Iasonas; Agapitos, Antonis; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Tziaferi, Eirini; Evangelou, Ioannis; Flouris, Giannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Loukas, Nikitas; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Paradas, Evangelos; Strologas, John; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hazi, Andras; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Zsigmond, Anna Julia; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Karancsi, János; Molnar, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Bartók, Márton; Makovec, Alajos; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Choudhury, Somnath; Mal, Prolay; Mandal, Koushik; Sahoo, Deepak Kumar; Sahoo, Niladribihari; Swain, Sanjay Kumar; Bansal, Sunil; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Chawla, Ridhi; Gupta, Ruchi; Bhawandeep, Bhawandeep; Kalsi, Amandeep Kaur; Kaur, Anterpreet; Kaur, Manjit; Kumar, Ramandeep; Mehta, Ankita; Mittal, Monika; Singh, Jasbir; Walia, Genius; Kumar, Ashok; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Garg, Rocky Bala; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Nishu, Nishu; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Ramkrishna; Sharma, Varun; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Chatterjee, Kalyanmoy; Dey, Sourav; Dutta, Suchandra; Majumdar, Nayana; Modak, Atanu; Mondal, Kuntal; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Roy, Ashim; Roy, Debarati; Roy Chowdhury, Suvankar; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Chudasama, Ruchi; Dutta, Dipanwita; Jha, Vishwajeet; Kumar, Vineet; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Topkar, Anita; Aziz, Tariq; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhowmik, Sandeep; Chatterjee, Rajdeep Mohan; Dewanjee, Ram Krishna; Dugad, Shashikant; Ganguly, Sanmay; Ghosh, Saranya; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Jain, Sandhya; Kole, Gouranga; Kumar, Sanjeev; Mahakud, Bibhuprasad; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mitra, Soureek; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sarkar, Tanmay; Sur, Nairit; Sutar, Bajrang; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Chauhan, Shubhanshu; Dube, Sourabh; Kapoor, Anshul; Kothekar, Kunal; Sharma, Seema; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Behnamian, Hadi; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Naseri, Mohsen; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, Ferdos; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Felcini, Marta; Grunewald, Martin; Abbrescia, Marcello; Calabria, Cesare; Caputo, Claudio; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; Cristella, Leonardo; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Miniello, Giorgia; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Radogna, Raffaella; Ranieri, Antonio; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Venditti, Rosamaria; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Battilana, Carlo; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Campanini, Renato; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Codispoti, Giuseppe; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Perrotta, Andrea; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Tosi, Nicolò; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Giordano, Ferdinando; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Gori, Valentina; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Viliani, Lorenzo; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Primavera, Federica; Calvelli, Valerio; Ferro, Fabrizio; Lo Vetere, Maurizio; Monge, Maria Roberta; Robutti, Enrico; Tosi, Silvano; Brianza, Luca; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Gerosa, Raffaele; Ghezzi, Alessio; Govoni, Pietro; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Marzocchi, Badder; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Cavallo, Nicola; Di Guida, Salvatore; Esposito, Marco; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lanza, Giuseppe; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Sciacca, Crisostomo; Thyssen, Filip; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Benato, Lisa; Bisello, Dario; Boletti, Alessio; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dall'Osso, Martino; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Zanetti, Marco; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zucchetta, Alberto; Zumerle, Gianni; Braghieri, Alessandro; Magnani, Alice; Montagna, Paolo; Ratti, Sergio P; Re, Valerio; Riccardi, Cristina; Salvini, Paola; Vai, Ilaria; Vitulo, Paolo; Alunni Solestizi, Luisa; Bilei, Gian Mario; Ciangottini, Diego; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Androsov, Konstantin; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Castaldi, Rino; Ciocci, Maria Agnese; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Donato, Silvio; Fedi, Giacomo; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Grippo, Maria Teresa; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Savoy-Navarro, Aurore; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; D'imperio, Giulia; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Gelli, Simone; Jorda, Clara; Longo, Egidio; Margaroli, Fabrizio; Meridiani, Paolo; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Preiato, Federico; Rahatlou, Shahram; Rovelli, Chiara; Santanastasio, Francesco; Traczyk, Piotr; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Bellan, Riccardo; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Covarelli, Roberto; Degano, Alessandro; Demaria, Natale; Finco, Linda; Kiani, Bilal; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Monteil, Ennio; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pacher, Luca; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Pinna Angioni, Gian Luca; Ravera, Fabio; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Casarsa, Massimo; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; La Licata, Chiara; Marone, Matteo; Schizzi, Andrea; Zanetti, Anna; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Min Suk; Kong, Dae Jung; Lee, Sangeun; Oh, Young Do; Sakharov, Alexandre; Son, Dong-Chul; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Kim, Hyunsoo; Kim, Tae Jeong; Song, Sanghyeon; Cho, Sungwoong; Choi, Suyong; Go, Yeonju; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Yongsun; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Kisoo; Lee, Kyong Sei; Lee, Songkyo; Lim, Jaehoon; Park, Sung Keun; Roh, Youn; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu; Ryu, Geonmo; Ryu, Min Sang; Choi, Young-Il; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Jongseok; Yu, Intae; Dudenas, Vytautas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Vaitkus, Juozas; Ahmed, Ijaz; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Md Ali, Mohd Adli Bin; Mohamad Idris, Faridah; Wan Abdullah, Wan Ahmad Tajuddin; Yusli, Mohd Nizam; Zolkapli, Zukhaimira; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Hernandez-Almada, Alberto; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Sánchez Hernández, Alberto; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Pedraza, Isabel; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Uribe Estrada, Cecilia; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Krofcheck, David; Butler, Philip H; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahmad, Muhammad; Hassan, Qamar; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Shoaib, Muhammad; Waqas, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Bluj, Michal; Boimska, Bożena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Byszuk, Adrian; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Misiura, Maciej; Olszewski, Michal; Walczak, Marek; Bargassa, Pedrame; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, Cristóvão; Di Francesco, Agostino; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Hollar, Jonathan; Leonardo, Nuno; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Nguyen, Federico; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Seixas, Joao; Toldaiev, Oleksii; Vadruccio, Daniele; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Afanasiev, Serguei; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Matveev, Viktor; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Shulha, Siarhei; Skatchkov, Nikolai; Smirnov, Vitaly; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Karneyeu, Anton; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Pozdnyakov, Ivan; Safronov, Grigory; Spiridonov, Alexander; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Bylinkin, Alexander; Chadeeva, Marina; Chistov, Ruslan; Danilov, Mikhail; Rusinov, Vladimir; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Baskakov, Alexey; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Bunichev, Viacheslav; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Gribushin, Andrey; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Korneeva, Natalia; Lokhtin, Igor; Miagkov, Igor; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Savrin, Viktor; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Kachanov, Vassili; Kalinin, Alexey; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Cirkovic, Predrag; Devetak, Damir; Milosevic, Jovan; Rekovic, Vladimir; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Escalante Del Valle, Alberto; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Navarro De Martino, Eduardo; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, Antonio María; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Albajar, Carmen; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Missiroli, Marino; Moran, Dermot; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Castiñeiras De Saa, Juan Ramon; De Castro Manzano, Pablo; Fernandez, Marcos; Garcia-Ferrero, Juan; Gomez, Gervasio; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Trevisani, Nicolò; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Bachtis, Michail; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benaglia, Andrea; Bendavid, Joshua; Benhabib, Lamia; Berruti, Gaia Maria; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Castello, Roberto; Cerminara, Gianluca; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; Daponte, Vincenzo; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; De Gruttola, Michele; De Guio, Federico; De Roeck, Albert; De Visscher, Simon; Di Marco, Emanuele; Dobson, Marc; Dordevic, Milos; Dorney, Brian; Du Pree, Tristan; Duggan, Daniel; Dünser, Marc; Dupont, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Franzoni, Giovanni; Fulcher, Jonathan; Funk, Wolfgang; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Girone, Maria; Glege, Frank; Guida, Roberto; Gundacker, Stefan; Guthoff, Moritz; Hammer, Josef; Harris, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kirschenmann, Henning; Kortelainen, Matti J; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Krajczar, Krisztian; Lecoq, Paul; Lourenco, Carlos; Lucchini, Marco Toliman; Magini, Nicolo; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Martelli, Arabella; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moortgat, Filip; Morovic, Srecko; Mulders, Martijn; Nemallapudi, Mythra Varun; Neugebauer, Hannes; Orfanelli, Styliani; Orsini, Luciano; Pape, Luc; Perez, Emmanuelle; Peruzzi, Marco; Petrilli, Achille; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Piparo, Danilo; Racz, Attila; Reis, Thomas; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovere, Marco; Ruan, Manqi; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Seidel, Markus; Sharma, Archana; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Steggemann, Jan; Stieger, Benjamin; Stoye, Markus; Takahashi, Yuta; Treille, Daniel; Triossi, Andrea; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Wardle, Nicholas; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Zagoździńska, Agnieszka; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Rohe, Tilman; Bachmair, Felix; Bäni, Lukas; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Casal, Bruno; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Eller, Philipp; Grab, Christoph; Heidegger, Constantin; Hits, Dmitry; Hoss, Jan; Kasieczka, Gregor; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Mangano, Boris; Marionneau, Matthieu; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Masciovecchio, Mario; Meinhard, Maren Tabea; Meister, Daniel; Micheli, Francesco; Musella, Pasquale; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pata, Joosep; Pauss, Felicitas; Perrozzi, Luca; Quittnat, Milena; Rossini, Marco; Schönenberger, Myriam; Starodumov, Andrei; Takahashi, Maiko; Tavolaro, Vittorio Raoul; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Wallny, Rainer; Aarrestad, Thea Klaeboe; Amsler, Claude; Caminada, Lea; Canelli, Maria Florencia; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Cosa, Annapaola; Galloni, Camilla; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hreus, Tomas; Kilminster, Benjamin; Lange, Clemens; Ngadiuba, Jennifer; Pinna, Deborah; Rauco, Giorgia; Robmann, Peter; Salerno, Daniel; Yang, Yong; Cardaci, Marco; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Doan, Thi Hien; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Konyushikhin, Maxim; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Lin, Willis; Lu, Yun-Ju; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Yu, Shin-Shan; Kumar, Arun; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Chen, Po-Hsun; Dietz, Charles; Fiori, Francesco; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Miñano Moya, Mercedes; Petrakou, Eleni; Tsai, Jui-fa; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Asavapibhop, Burin; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Singh, Gurpreet; Srimanobhas, Norraphat; Suwonjandee, Narumon; Adiguzel, Aytul; Cerci, Salim; Damarseckin, Serdal; Demiroglu, Zuhal Seyma; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Gecit, Fehime Hayal; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Guler, Yalcin; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozcan, Merve; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Zorbilmez, Caglar; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Isildak, Bora; Karapinar, Guler; Yalvac, Metin; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Yetkin, Elif Asli; Yetkin, Taylan; Cakir, Altan; Cankocak, Kerem; Sen, Sercan; Vardarlı, Fuat Ilkehan; Grynyov, Boris; Levchuk, Leonid; Sorokin, Pavel; Aggleton, Robin; Ball, Fionn; Beck, Lana; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Jacob, Jeson; Kreczko, Lukasz; Lucas, Chris; Meng, Zhaoxia; Newbold, Dave M; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Poll, Anthony; Sakuma, Tai; Seif El Nasr-storey, Sarah; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Dominic; Smith, Vincent J; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Calligaris, Luigi; Cieri, Davide; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Thea, Alessandro; Tomalin, Ian R; Williams, Thomas; Worm, Steven; Baber, Mark; Bainbridge, Robert; Buchmuller, Oliver; Bundock, Aaron; Burton, Darren; Casasso, Stefano; Citron, Matthew; Colling, David; Corpe, Louie; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; De Wit, Adinda; Della Negra, Michel; Dunne, Patrick; Elwood, Adam; Futyan, David; Hall, Geoffrey; Iles, Gregory; Lane, Rebecca; Lucas, Robyn; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Malik, Sarah; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Raymond, David Mark; Richards, Alexander; Rose, Andrew; Seez, Christopher; Tapper, Alexander; Uchida, Kirika; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Zenz, Seth Conrad; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leslie, Dawn; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Borzou, Ahmad; Call, Kenneth; Dittmann, Jay; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Pastika, Nathaniel; Charaf, Otman; Cooper, Seth; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Arcaro, Daniel; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Gastler, Daniel; Rankin, Dylan; Richardson, Clint; Rohlf, James; Sulak, Lawrence; Zou, David; Alimena, Juliette; Benelli, Gabriele; Berry, Edmund; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Garabedian, Alex; Hakala, John; Heintz, Ulrich; Jesus, Orduna; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Mao, Zaixing; Narain, Meenakshi; Piperov, Stefan; Sagir, Sinan; Syarif, Rizki; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Erbacher, Robin; Funk, Garrett; Gardner, Michael; Ko, Winston; Lander, Richard; Mclean, Christine; Mulhearn, Michael; Pellett, Dave; Pilot, Justin; Ricci-Tam, Francesca; Shalhout, Shalhout; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Stolp, Dustin; Tripathi, Mani; Wilbur, Scott; Yohay, Rachel; Cousins, Robert; Everaerts, Pieter; Florent, Alice; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Saltzberg, David; Takasugi, Eric; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Burt, Kira; Clare, Robert; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Hanson, Gail; Heilman, Jesse; Paneva, Mirena Ivova; Jandir, Pawandeep; Kennedy, Elizabeth; Lacroix, Florent; Long, Owen Rosser; Malberti, Martina; Olmedo Negrete, Manuel; Shrinivas, Amithabh; Wei, Hua; Wimpenny, Stephen; Yates, Brent; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Derdzinski, Mark; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Klein, Daniel; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Olivito, Dominick; Padhi, Sanjay; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Tadel, Matevz; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Welke, Charles; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Zevi Della Porta, Giovanni; Bradmiller-Feld, John; Campagnari, Claudio; Dishaw, Adam; Dutta, Valentina; Flowers, Kristen; Franco Sevilla, Manuel; Geffert, Paul; George, Christopher; Golf, Frank; Gouskos, Loukas; Gran, Jason; Incandela, Joe; Mccoll, Nickolas; Mullin, Sam Daniel; Richman, Jeffrey; Stuart, David; Suarez, Indara; West, Christopher; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Anderson, Dustin; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Bunn, Julian; Chen, Yi; Duarte, Javier; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Pena, Cristian; Spiropulu, Maria; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Xie, Si; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Andrews, Michael Benjamin; Azzolini, Virginia; Calamba, Aristotle; Carlson, Benjamin; Ferguson, Thomas; Paulini, Manfred; Russ, James; Sun, Menglei; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Jensen, Frank; Johnson, Andrew; Krohn, Michael; Mulholland, Troy; Nauenberg, Uriel; Stenson, Kevin; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Chaves, Jorge; Chu, Jennifer; Dittmer, Susan; Eggert, Nicholas; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Ryd, Anders; Skinnari, Louise; Soffi, Livia; Sun, Werner; Tan, Shao Min; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Weng, Yao; Wittich, Peter; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Apollinari, Giorgio; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bolla, Gino; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Cihangir, Selcuk; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gottschalk, Erik; Gray, Lindsey; Green, Dan; Grünendahl, Stefan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Hare, Daryl; Harris, Robert M; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hirschauer, James; Hu, Zhen; Jayatilaka, Bodhitha; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Klima, Boaz; Kreis, Benjamin; Lammel, Stephan; Lewis, Jonathan; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Liu, Tiehui; Lopes De Sá, Rafael; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Merkel, Petra; Mrenna, Stephen; Nahn, Steve; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Pedro, Kevin; Prokofyev, Oleg; Rakness, Gregory; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Soha, Aron; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Stoynev, Stoyan; Strobbe, Nadja; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vernieri, Caterina; Verzocchi, Marco; Vidal, Richard; Wang, Michael; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Whitbeck, Andrew; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Carnes, Andrew; Carver, Matthew; Curry, David; Das, Souvik; Field, Richard D; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kotov, Khristian; Ma, Peisen; Matchev, Konstantin; Mei, Hualin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Rank, Douglas; Rossin, Roberto; Shchutska, Lesya; Snowball, Matthew; Sperka, David; Terentyev, Nikolay; Thomas, Laurent; Wang, Jian; Wang, Sean-Jiun; Yelton, John; Hewamanage, Samantha; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Ackert, Andrew; Adams, Jordon Rowe; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bein, Samuel; Bochenek, Joseph; Diamond, Brendan; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Johnson, Kurtis F; Khatiwada, Ajeeta; Prosper, Harrison; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Bhopatkar, Vallary; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Noonan, Daniel; Roy, Titas; Yumiceva, Francisco; Adams, Mark Raymond; Apanasevich, Leonard; Berry, Douglas; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Cavanaugh, Richard; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Kurt, Pelin; O'Brien, Christine; Sandoval Gonzalez, Irving Daniel; Turner, Paul; Varelas, Nikos; Wu, Zhenbin; Zakaria, Mohammed; Zhang, Jingyu; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Dilsiz, Kamuran; Durgut, Süleyman; Gandrajula, Reddy Pratap; Haytmyradov, Maksat; Khristenko, Viktor; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Ogul, Hasan; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Penzo, Aldo; Snyder, Christina; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yi, Kai; Anderson, Ian; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Eminizer, Nicholas; Fehling, David; Feng, Lei; Gritsan, Andrei; Maksimovic, Petar; Osherson, Marc; Roskes, Jeffrey; Cocoros, Alice; Sarica, Ulascan; Swartz, Morris; Xiao, Meng; Xin, Yongjie; You, Can; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Bruner, Christopher; Kenny III, Raymond Patrick; Majumder, Devdatta; Malek, Magdalena; Mcbrayer, William; Murray, Michael; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wang, Quan; Ivanov, Andrew; Kaadze, Ketino; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Toda, Sachiko; Lange, David; Rebassoo, Finn; Wright, Douglas; Anelli, Christopher; Baden, Drew; Baron, Owen; Belloni, Alberto; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferraioli, Charles; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Kellogg, Richard G; Kolberg, Ted; Kunkle, Joshua; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Shin, Young Ho; Skuja, Andris; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Apyan, Aram; Barbieri, Richard; Baty, Austin; Bi, Ran; Bierwagen, Katharina; Brandt, Stephanie; Busza, Wit; Cali, Ivan Amos; Demiragli, Zeynep; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Gulhan, Doga; Iiyama, Yutaro; Innocenti, Gian Michele; Klute, Markus; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Lai, Yue Shi; Lee, Yen-Jie; Levin, Andrew; Luckey, Paul David; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Mcginn, Christopher; Mironov, Camelia; Narayanan, Siddharth; Niu, Xinmei; Paus, Christoph; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Stephans, George; Sumorok, Konstanty; Varma, Mukund; Velicanu, Dragos; Veverka, Jan; Wang, Jing; Wang, Ta-Wei; Wyslouch, Bolek; Yang, Mingming; Zhukova, Victoria; Benvenuti, Alberto; Dahmes, Bryan; Evans, Andrew; Finkel, Alexey; Gude, Alexander; Hansen, Peter; Kalafut, Sean; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Lesko, Zachary; Mans, Jeremy; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Ruckstuhl, Nicole; Rusack, Roger; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Acosta, John Gabriel; Oliveros, Sandra; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bartek, Rachel; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Fangmeier, Caleb; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kamalieddin, Rami; Knowlton, Dan; Kravchenko, Ilya; Meier, Frank; Monroy, Jose; Ratnikov, Fedor; Siado, Joaquin Emilo; Snow, Gregory R; Alyari, Maral; Dolen, James; George, Jimin; Godshalk, Andrew; Harrington, Charles; Iashvili, Ia; Kaisen, Josh; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Roozbahani, Bahareh; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Hortiangtham, Apichart; Massironi, Andrea; Morse, David Michael; Nash, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Teixeira De Lima, Rafael; Trocino, Daniele; Wang, Ren-Jie; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kubik, Andrew; Low, Jia Fu; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Pollack, Brian; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Sung, Kevin; Trovato, Marco; Velasco, Mayda; Dev, Nabarun; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kellams, Nathan; Lannon, Kevin; Marinelli, Nancy; Meng, Fanbo; Mueller, Charles; Musienko, Yuri; Planer, Michael; Reinsvold, Allison; Ruchti, Randy; Smith, Geoffrey; Taroni, Silvia; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Woodard, Anna; Antonelli, Louis; Brinson, Jessica; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Flowers, Sean; Hart, Andrew; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Ji, Weifeng; Ling, Ta-Yung; Liu, Bingxuan; Luo, Wuming; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Winer, Brian L; Wulsin, Howard Wells; Driga, Olga; Elmer, Peter; Hardenbrook, Joshua; Hebda, Philip; Koay, Sue Ann; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Palmer, Christopher; Piroué, Pierre; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Zuranski, Andrzej; Malik, Sudhir; Barker, Anthony; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bortoletto, Daniela; Gutay, Laszlo; Jha, Manoj; Jones, Matthew; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, Kurt; Kumar, Ajay; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shi, Xin; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Sun, Jian; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Wang, Fuqiang; Xie, Wei; Xu, Lingshan; Parashar, Neeti; Stupak, John; Adair, Antony; Akgun, Bora; Chen, Zhenyu; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Guilbaud, Maxime; Li, Wei; Michlin, Benjamin; Northup, Michael; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Rorie, Jamal; Tu, Zhoudunming; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Ferbel, Thomas; Galanti, Mario; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Hindrichs, Otto; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Lo, Kin Ho; Petrillo, Gianluca; Tan, Ping; Verzetti, Mauro; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Halkiadakis, Eva; Heindl, Maximilian; Hidas, Dean; Hughes, Elliot; Kaplan, Steven; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, Raghav; Lath, Amitabh; Nash, Kevin; Saka, Halil; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Sheffield, David; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Thomassen, Peter; Walker, Matthew; Foerster, Mark; Riley, Grant; Rose, Keith; Spanier, Stefan; Thapa, Krishna; Bouhali, Othmane; Castaneda Hernandez, Alfredo; Celik, Ali; Dalchenko, Mykhailo; De Mattia, Marco; Delgado, Andrea; Dildick, Sven; Eusebi, Ricardo; Gilmore, Jason; Huang, Tao; Kamon, Teruki; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Mueller, Ryan; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Patel, Rishi; Perloff, Alexx; Rose, Anthony; Safonov, Alexei; Tatarinov, Aysen; Ulmer, Keith; Akchurin, Nural; Cowden, Christopher; Damgov, Jordan; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Faulkner, James; Kunori, Shuichi; Lamichhane, Kamal; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Undleeb, Sonaina; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Janjam, Ravi; Johns, Willard; Maguire, Charles; Mao, Yaxian; Melo, Andrew; Ni, Hong; Sheldon, Paul; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Xu, Qiao; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Li, Hengne; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Sun, Xin; Wang, Yanchu; Wolfe, Evan; Wood, John; Xia, Fan; Clarke, Christopher; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sturdy, Jared; Belknap, Donald; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Dodd, Laura; Duric, Senka; Gomber, Bhawna; Grothe, Monika; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Lanaro, Armando; Levine, Aaron; Long, Kenneth; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Perry, Thomas; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Polese, Giovanni; Ruggles, Tyler; Sarangi, Tapas; Savin, Alexander; Sharma, Archana; Smith, Nicholas; Smith, Wesley H; Taylor, Devin; Verwilligen, Piet; Woods, Nathaniel

    2016-03-09

    Measurements of the top quark-antiquark ($\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} }$) spin correlations and the top quark polarization are presented for $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} }$ pairs produced in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}= $ 8 TeV. The data correspond to an integrated luminosity of 19.5 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The measurements are performed using events with two oppositely charged leptons (electrons or muons) and two or more jets, where at least one of the jets is identified as originating from a bottom quark. The spin correlations and polarization are measured from the angular distributions of the two selected leptons, both inclusively and differentially, with respect to the invariant mass, rapidity, and transverse momentum of the $\\mathrm{ t \\bar{t} }$ system. The measurements are unfolded to the parton level and found to be in agreement with predictions of the standard model. A search for new physics in the form of anomalous top quark chromo moments is performed. No evidence of new physics is obser...

  8. Measurement of ep-->ep[pi]0 beam spin asymmetries above the resonance region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Masi, Rita; Garcon, Michel; Zhao, Bo; Amaryan, Moscov; Amaryan, Moskov; Ambrozewicz, Pawel; Anghinolfi, Marco; Asryan, Gegham; Avagyan, Harutyun; Baghdasaryan, Hovhannes; Baillie, Nathan; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, J.P.; Ball, Jacques; Ball, James; Baltzell, Nathan; Baturin, Vitaly; Battaglieri, Marco; Bedlinskiy, Ivan; Bellis, Matthew; Benmouna, Nawal; Berman, Barry; Bertin, Pierre; Biselli, Angela; Blaszczyk, Lukasz; Bouchigny, Sylvain; Boyarinov, Sergey; Bradford, Robert; Branford, Derek; Briscoe, William; Brooks, William; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Bultmann, S.; Bueltmann, Stephen; Burkert, Volker; Butuceanu, Cornel; Calarco, John; Careccia, Sharon; Carman, Daniel; Casey, Liam; Chen, Shifeng; Cheng, Lu; Cole, Philip; Collins, Patrick; Coltharp, Philip; Crabb, Donald; Crede, Volker; Dashyan, Natalya; De Sanctis, Enzo; De Vita, Raffaella; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Deur, Alexandre; Dharmawardane, Kahanawita; Dickson, Richard; Djalali, Chaden; Dodge, Gail; Donnelly, Joseph; Doughty, David; Dugger, Michael; Dzyubak, Oleksandr; Egiyan, Hovanes; Egiyan, Kim; Elfassi, Lamiaa; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eugenio, Paul; Fedotov, Gleb; Feldman, Gerald; Fradi, Ahmed; Funsten, Herbert; Gavalian, Gagik; Gilfoyle, Gerard; Giovanetti, Kevin; Girod, Francois-Xavier; Goetz, John; Gonenc, Atilla; Gothe, Ralf; Griffioen, Keith; Guidal, Michel; Guler, Nevzat; Guo, Lei; Gyurjyan, Vardan; Hafidi, Kawtar; Hakobyan, Hayk; Hanretty, Charles; Hersman, F.; Hicks, Kenneth; Hleiqawi, Ishaq; Holtrop, Maurik; Hyde, Charles; Ilieva, Yordanka; Ireland, David; Ishkhanov, Boris; Isupov, Evgeny; Ito, Mark; Jenkins, David; Jo, Hyon-Suk; Johnstone, John; Joo, Kyungseon; Juengst, Henry; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kellie, James; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kim, Wooyoung; Klein, Andreas; Klein, Franz; Klimenko, Alexei; Kossov, Mikhail; Krahn, Zebulun; Kramer, Laird; Kubarovsky, Valery; Kuhn, Joachim; Kuhn, Sebastian; Kuleshov, Sergey; Lachniet, Jeff; Laget, Jean; Langheinrich, Jorn; Lawrence, David; Lee, Tsung-Shung; Livingston, Kenneth; Lu, Haiyun; MacCormick, Marion; Markov, Nikolai; Mattione, Paul; Mazouz, Malek; McKinnon, Bryan; Mecking, Bernhard; Mestayer, Mac; Meyer, Curtis; Mibe, Tsutomu; Michel, Bernard; Mikhaylov, Konstantin; Mirazita, Marco; Miskimen, Rory; Mokeev, Viktor; Moreno, Brahim; Moriya, Kei; Morrow, Steven; Moteabbed, Maryam; Munevar Espitia, Edwin; Mutchler, Gordon; Nadel-Turonski, Pawel; Nasseripour, Rakhsha; Niccolai, Silvia; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Niczyporuk, Bogdan; Niroula, Megh; Niyazov, Rustam; Nozar, Mina; Osipenko, Mikhail; Ostrovidov, Alexander; Park, Kijun; Pasyuk, Evgueni; Paterson, Craig; Pereira, Sergio; Pierce, Joshua; Pivnyuk, Nikolay; Pocanic, Dinko; Pogorelko, Oleg; Pozdnyakov, Sergey; Price, John; Procureur, Sebastien; Prok, Yelena; Protopopescu, Dan; Raue, Brian; Ricco, Giovanni; Ripani, Marco; Ritchie, Barry; Ronchetti, Federico; Rosner, Guenther; Rossi, Patrizia; Sabatie, Franck; Salamanca, Julian; Salgado, Carlos; Santoro, Joseph; Sapunenko, Vladimir; Schumacher, Reinhard; Serov, Vladimir; Sharabian, Youri; Sharov, Dmitri; Shvedunov, Nikolay; Smith, Elton; Smith, Lee; Sober, Daniel; Sokhan, Daria; Stavinsky, Aleksey; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stepanyan, Stepan; Stokes, Burnham; Stoler, Paul; Strakovski, Igor; Strauch, Steffen; Taiuti, Mauro; Tedeschi, David; Tkabladze, Avtandil; Tkachenko, Svyatoslav; Tur, Clarisse; Ungaro, Maurizio; Vineyard, Michael; Vlassov, Alexander; Voutier, Eric; Watts, Daniel; Weinstein, Lawrence; Weygand, Dennis; Williams, Michael; Wolin, Elliott; Wood, Michael; Yegneswaran, Amrit; Zana, Lorenzo; Zhang, Jixie; Zhao, Zhiwen

    2008-04-01

    The beam spin asymmetry (BSA) in the exclusive reaction e-vector p-->eppi0 was measured with the CEBAF 5.77 GeV polarized electron beam and Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The xB,Q2,t, and phi dependences of the pi0 BSA are presented in the deep inelastic regime. The asymmetries are fitted with a sinphi function and their amplitudes are extracted. Overall, they are of the order of 0.04â 0.11 and roughly independent of t. This is the signature of a nonzero longitudinal-transverse interference. The implications concerning the applicability of a formalism based on generalized parton distributions, as well as the extension of a Regge formalism at high photon virtualities, are discussed.

  9. Spin-flip measurements in the proton inelastic scattering on 12C and giant resonance effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Leo, R.; D'Erasmo, G.; Ferrero, F.; Pantaleo, A.; Pignanelli, M.

    1975-01-01

    Differential cross sections and spin-flip probabilities (SFP) for the inelastic scattering of protons, exciting the 2 + state at 4.43 MeV in 12 C, have been measured at several incident energies between 15.9 and 37.6 MeV. The changes in the shape of the SFP angular distributions are rather limited, while the absolute values show a pronounced increase, resonant like, in two energy regions centered at about 20 and 29 MeV. The second resonance reproduces very closely the energy dependence of the E2 giant quadrupole strength found in a previous experiment. The resonance at 20 MeV should correspond to a substructure of the E1 giant dipole resonance. (Auth.)

  10. Spin-State-Selective Excitation. Application for E.COSY-Type Measurement of JHHCoupling Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Axel; Duus, Jens ø.; Sørensen, Ole Winneche

    1997-09-01

    A new pulse sequence element, spin-state-selective excitation (S3E), is introduced and combined with E.COSY-type techniques for measurement of1H-1HJcoupling constants. S3E edits the two resonances of a doublet prior to an evolution period of a multidimensional experiment and results in a subspectrum for each resonance. Due to this editing the large heteronuclear one-bond coupling constants normally exploited for separation of submultiplets in E.COSY-type experiments can be suppressed in experiments employing S3E. Hence there is a concomitant effective increase in resolution. Apart from pulse imperfections and relaxation during a delay (4J)-1S3E causes no loss of sensitivity in comparison to conventional experiments. Experimental confirmation is done using the protein RAP 17-97 (N-terminal domain of α2-macroglobulin receptor associated protein).

  11. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Function g1 in the Resonance Region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Akagi, T.; Perry Anthony; Antonov, R.; Arnold, R.G.; Todd Averett; Band, H.R.; Bauer, J.M.; Borel, H.; Peter Bosted; Vincent Breton; Button-Shafer, J.; Jian-Ping Chen; T.E. Chupp; J. Clendenin; C. Comptour; K.P. Coulter; G. Court; Donald Crabb; M. Daoudi; Donal Day; F.S. Dietrich; James Dunne; H. Dutz; R. Erbacher; J. Fellbaum; Andrew Feltham; Helene Fonvieille; Emil Frlez; D. Garvey; R. Gearhart; Javier Gomez; P. Grenier; Keith Griffioen; S. Hoeibraten; Emlyn Hughes; Charles Hyde-Wright; J.R. Johnson; D. Kawall; Andreas Klein; Sebastian Kuhn; M. Kuriki; Richard Lindgren; T.J. Liu; R.M. Lombard-Nelsen; Jacques Marroncle; Tomoyuki Maruyama; X.K. Maruyama; James Mccarthy; Werner Meyer; Zein-Eddine Meziani; Ralph Minehart; Joseph Mitchell; J. Morgenstern; Gerassimos Petratos; R. Pitthan; Dinko Pocanic; C. Prescott; R. Prepost; P. Raines; Brian Raue; D. Reyna; A. Rijllart; Yves Roblin; L. Rochester; Stephen Rock; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Ingo Sick; Lee Smith; Tim Smith; M. Spengos; F. Staley; P. Steiner; S. St. Lorant; L.M. Stuart; F. Suekane; Z.M. Szalata; Huabin Tang; Y. Terrien; Tracy Usher; Dieter Walz; Frank Wesselmann; J.L. White; K. Witte; C. Young; Brad Youngman; Haruo Yuta; G. Zapalac; Benedikt Zihlmann; Zimmermann, D.

    1997-01-01

    We have measured the proton and deuteron spin structure functions g 1 p and g 1 d in the region of the nucleon resonances for W 2 2 and Q 2 ≅ 0.5 and Q 2 ≅ 1.2 GeV 2 by inelastically scattering 9.7 GeV polarized electrons off polarized 15 NH 3 and 15 ND 3 targets. We observe significant structure in g 1 p in the resonance region. We have used the present results, together with the deep-inelastic data at higher W 2 , to extract Γ(Q 2 ) (triple b ond) ∫ 0 1 g 1 (x,Q 2 ) dx. This is the first information on the low-Q 2 evolution of Gamma toward the Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn limit at Q 2 = 0

  12. Pairwise correlations via quantum discord and its geometric measure in a four-qubit spin chain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel-Baset A. Mohamed

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic of pairwise correlations, including quantum entanglement (QE and discord (QD with geometric measure of quantum discord (GMQD, are shown in the four-qubit Heisenberg XX spin chain. The results show that the effect of the entanglement degree of the initial state on the pairwise correlations is stronger for alternate qubits than it is for nearest-neighbor qubits. This parameter results in sudden death for QE, but it cannot do so for QD and GMQD. With different values for this entanglement parameter of the initial state, QD and GMQD differ and are sensitive for any change in this parameter. It is found that GMQD is more robust than both QD and QE to describe correlations with nonzero values, which offers a valuable resource for quantum computation.

  13. Spin structure in high energy processes: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePorcel, L.; Dunwoodie, C. [eds.

    1994-12-01

    This report contains papers as the following topics: Spin, Mass, and Symmetry; physics with polarized Z{sup 0}s; spin and precision electroweak physics; polarized electron sources; polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics; polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; polarized targets in high energy physics; spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators; spin formalism and applications to new physics searches; precision electroweak physics at LEP; recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990--1992 data; precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions; preliminary results on heavy flavor physics at SLD; QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams; recent results from TRISTAN at KEK; recent B physics results from CLEO; searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven; recent results from the compton observatory; the spin structure of the deuteron; spin structure of the neutron ({sup 3}HE) and the Bjoerken sum rule; a consumer`s guide to lattice QCD results; top ten models constrained by b {yields} sy; a review of the Fermilab fixed target program; results from the D0 experiment; results from CDF at FNAL; quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung; report from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA; physics from the first year of H1 at HERA, and hard diffraction. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere.

  14. Spin structure in high energy processes: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DePorcel, L.; Dunwoodie, C.

    1994-12-01

    This report contains papers as the following topics: Spin, Mass, and Symmetry; physics with polarized Z 0 s; spin and precision electroweak physics; polarized electron sources; polarization phenomena in quantum chromodynamics; polarized lepton-nucleon scattering; polarized targets in high energy physics; spin dynamics in storage rings and linear accelerators; spin formalism and applications to new physics searches; precision electroweak physics at LEP; recent results on heavy flavor physics from LEP experiments using 1990--1992 data; precise measurement of the left-right cross section asymmetry in Z boson production by electron-positron collisions; preliminary results on heavy flavor physics at SLD; QCD tests with SLD and polarized beams; recent results from TRISTAN at KEK; recent B physics results from CLEO; searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven; recent results from the compton observatory; the spin structure of the deuteron; spin structure of the neutron ( 3 HE) and the Bjoerken sum rule; a consumer's guide to lattice QCD results; top ten models constrained by b → sy; a review of the Fermilab fixed target program; results from the D0 experiment; results from CDF at FNAL; quantum-mechanical suppression of bremsstrahlung; report from the ZEUS collaboration at HERA; physics from the first year of H1 at HERA, and hard diffraction. These papers have been cataloged separately elsewhere

  15. Measurement of the longitudinal deuteron spin-structure function in deep-inelastic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, J.M.

    1996-09-01

    Experiment E143 at SLAC performed deep-inelastic scattering measurements with polarized electrons incident on polarized protons and deuterons. The data for the beam energy of 29 GeV cover the kinematical range of x Bj > 0.03 and 1 2 2 . From these data, the spin-dependent structure functions g 1 were determined. This dissertation describes the experiment and its analysis and discusses the results. The measured integral of g 1 d over x from x = 0 to x = 1 is Γ 1 d = 0.046 ± 0.003 (stat)±0.004 (syst) at Q 2 = 3 GeV 2 and disagrees by more than three standard deviations with the prediction of the Ellis-Jaffe, sum rule. The data suggest that the quark contribution to the nucleon helicity is 0.35 ± 0.05. From the proton data of the same experiment, the integral over the proton spin-structure functional g 1 d was determined to be Γ 1 p = 0.127 ± 0.003(stat)±0.008(syst). By Combining the deuteron data with the proton data, the integral Γ 1 n was extracted as -0.027 ± 0.008 (stat)±0.010 (syst). The integral Γ 1 p - Γ 1 n is 0.154±0.010(stat) ±0.016 (syst) according to the E143 analysis. This result agrees with the important Bjorken sum rule of 0.171 ± 0.009 at Q 2 = 3 GeV 2 within less than one standard deviation. Furthermore, results of a separate analysis involving GLAP evolution equations are shown. Data were also collected for beam energies of 16.2 and 9.7 GeV, Results for g 1 at these energies are presented

  16. Measurement of spin correlations in $t\\bar{t}$ events from $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV in the lepton + jets final state with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lemmer, Boris; Quadt, Arnulf; Kröninger, Kevin; Shabalina, Elizaveta

    2014-01-01

    The top quark decays before it hadronises. Before its spin state can be changed in a process of strong interaction, it is directly transferred to the top quark decay products. The top quark spin can be deduced by studying angular distributions of the decay products. The Standard Model predicts the top/anti-top quark ($t\\bar{t}$) pairs to have correlated spins. The degree is sensitive to the spin and the production mechanisms of the top quark. Measuring the spin correlation allows to test the predictions. New physics effects can be reflected in deviations from the prediction. In this thesis the spin correlation of $t\\bar{t}$ pairs, produced at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,$TeV and reconstructed with the ATLAS detector, is measured. The dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $4.6~\\text{fb}^{-1}$. $t\\bar{t}$ pairs are reconstructed in the $\\ell$+jets channel using a kinematic likelihood fit offering the identification of light up- and down-type quarks from the $t \\rightarrow bW \\rightar...

  17. Extraction of the neutron electric form factor from measurements of inclusive double spin asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulkosky, V.; Jin, G.; Long, E.; Zhang, Y.-W.; Mihovilovic, M.; Kelleher, A.; Anderson, B.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Širca, S.; Allada, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Bertozzi, W.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; Camsonne, A.; Canan, M.; Cates, G. D.; Chen, C.; Chen, J.-P.; Chudakov, E.; De Leo, R.; Deng, X.; Deur, A.; Dutta, C.; El Fassi, L.; Flay, D.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gao, H.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Golge, S.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, J.-O.; Holmstrom, T.; Huang, J.; Ibrahim, H.; de Jager, C. W.; Jensen, E.; Jiang, X.; Jones, M.; Kang, H.; Katich, J.; Khanal, H. P.; King, P.; Korsch, W.; LeRose, J.; Lindgren, R.; Lu, H.-J.; Luo, W.; Markowitz, P.; Meekins, D.; Meziane, M.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muangma, N.; Nanda, S.; Norum, B. E.; Pan, K.; Parno, D.; Piasetzky, E.; Posik, M.; Punjabi, V.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Qian, X.; Qiang, Y.; Qui, X.; Riordan, S.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Shabestari, M.; Shahinyan, A.; Shoenrock, B.; John, J. St.; Subedi, R.; Tobias, W. A.; Tireman, W.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Wang, D.; Wang, K.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Ye, Z.; Zhan, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zheng, X.; Zhao, B.; Zhu, L.; Jefferson Lab Hall A Collaboration

    2017-12-01

    Background: Measurements of the neutron charge form factor, GEn, are challenging because the neutron has no net charge. In addition, measurements of the neutron form factors must use nuclear targets which require accurately accounting for nuclear effects. Extracting GEn with different targets and techniques provides an important test of our handling of these effects. Purpose: The goal of the measurement was to use an inclusive asymmetry measurement technique to extract the neutron charge form factor at a four-momentum transfer of 1 (GeV/c ) 2 . This technique has very different systematic uncertainties than traditional exclusive measurements and thus serves as an independent check of whether nuclear effects have been taken into account correctly. Method: The inclusive quasielastic reaction 3He ⃗(e ⃗,e') was measured at Jefferson Laboratory. The neutron electric form factor, GEn, was extracted at Q2=0.98 (GeV/c ) 2 from ratios of electron-polarization asymmetries measured for two orthogonal target spin orientations. This Q2 is high enough that the sensitivity to GEn is not overwhelmed by the neutron magnetic contribution, and yet low enough that explicit neutron detection is not required to suppress pion production. Results: The neutron electric form factor, GEn, was determined to be 0.0414 ±0.0077 (stat)±0.0022 (syst) , providing the first high-precision inclusive extraction of the neutron's charge form factor. Conclusions: The use of the inclusive quasielastic 3He ⃗(e ⃗,e') with a four-momentum transfer near 1 (GeV/c ) 2 has been used to provide a unique measurement of GEn. This new result provides a systematically independent validation of the exclusive extraction technique results and implies that the nuclear corrections are understood. This is contrary to the proton form factor where asymmetry and differential cross section measurements have been shown to have large systematic differences.

  18. Novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium for measurement of spins and moments of exotic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furukawa, Takeshi; Wakui, Takashi; Yang, Xiaofei; Fujita, Tomomi; Imamura, Kei; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro; Tetsuka, Hiroki; Tsutsui, Yoshiki; Mitsuya, Yosuke; Ichikawa, Yuichi; Ishibashi, Yoko; Yoshida, Naoki; Shirai, Hazuki; Ebara, Yuta; Hayasaka, Miki; Arai, Shino; Muramoto, Sosuke

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Development of a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium. • Observation of the Zeeman resonance with the 85 Rb beam introduced into helium. • Demonstration of deducing the nuclear spins from the observed resonance spectrum. -- Abstract: We have been developing a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method “OROCHI” for determining spins and moments of exotic radioisotopes. In this method, we use superfluid helium as a stopping material of energetic radioisotope beams and then stopped radioisotope atoms are subjected to in situ laser spectroscopy in superfluid helium. To confirm the feasibility of this method for rare radioisotopes, we carried out a test experiment using a 85 Rb beam. In this experiment, we have successfully measured the Zeeman resonance signals from the 85 Rb atoms stopped in superfluid helium by laser-RF double resonance spectroscopy. This method is efficient for the measurement of spins and moments of more exotic nuclei

  19. Novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium for measurement of spins and moments of exotic nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furukawa, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshi@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Wakui, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, 6-3 Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan); Yang, Xiaofei [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Physics, Peking University, Chengfu Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100871 (China); Fujita, Tomomi [Department of Physics, Osaka University, 1-1 Machikaneyama, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Imamura, Kei; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Tetsuka, Hiroki; Tsutsui, Yoshiki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501,Japan (Japan); Mitsuya, Yosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); Ichikawa, Yuichi [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ishibashi, Yoko [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Yoshida, Naoki; Shirai, Hazuki [RIKEN Nishina Center, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ebara, Yuta; Hayasaka, Miki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Gakugei University, 4-1-1 Nukuikitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8501,Japan (Japan); Arai, Shino; Muramoto, Sosuke [Department of Physics, Meiji University, 1-1-1 Higashi-Mita, Tama, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 214-8571 (Japan); and others

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Development of a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method using superfluid helium. • Observation of the Zeeman resonance with the {sup 85}Rb beam introduced into helium. • Demonstration of deducing the nuclear spins from the observed resonance spectrum. -- Abstract: We have been developing a novel nuclear laser spectroscopy method “OROCHI” for determining spins and moments of exotic radioisotopes. In this method, we use superfluid helium as a stopping material of energetic radioisotope beams and then stopped radioisotope atoms are subjected to in situ laser spectroscopy in superfluid helium. To confirm the feasibility of this method for rare radioisotopes, we carried out a test experiment using a {sup 85}Rb beam. In this experiment, we have successfully measured the Zeeman resonance signals from the {sup 85}Rb atoms stopped in superfluid helium by laser-RF double resonance spectroscopy. This method is efficient for the measurement of spins and moments of more exotic nuclei.

  20. Measurement of double-spin asymmetries associated with deeply virtual Compton scattering on a transversely polarized hydrogen target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Airapetian, A. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Randall Laboratory of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1040 (United States); Akopov, N. [Yerevan Physics Institute, 375036 Yerevan (Armenia); Akopov, Z. [DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Aschenauer, E.C. [DESY, 15738 Zeuthen (Germany); Augustyniak, W. [Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, 00-689 Warsaw (Poland); Avakian, R.; Avetissian, A. [Yerevan Physics Institute, 375036 Yerevan (Armenia); Avetisyan, E. [DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Belostotski, S. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina, Leningrad region 188300 (Russian Federation); Bianchi, N. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Blok, H.P. [National Institute for Subatomic Physics (Nikhef), 1009 DB Amsterdam (Netherlands); Department of Physics and Astronomy, VU University, 1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Borissov, A. [DESY, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Bowles, J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Brodski, I. [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany); Bryzgalov, V. [Institute for High Energy Physics, Protvino, Moscow region 142281 (Russian Federation); Burns, J. [SUPA, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Capiluppi, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Capitani, G.P. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Cisbani, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Roma, gruppo Sanita and Istituto Superiore di Sanita, 00161 Rome (Italy); Ciullo, G. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Ferrara and Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Ferrara, 44100 Ferrara (Italy)

    2011-10-05

    Double-spin asymmetries in exclusive electroproduction of real photons from a transversely polarized hydrogen target are measured with respect to the product of target polarization with beam helicity and beam charge, and with respect to the product of target polarization with beam helicity alone. The asymmetries arise from the deeply virtual Compton scattering process and its interference with the Bethe-Heitler process. They are related to the real part of the same combination of Compton form factors as that determining the previously published transverse target single-spin asymmetries through the imaginary part. The results for the double-spin asymmetries are found to be compatible with zero within the uncertainties of the measurement, and are not incompatible with the predictions of the only available GPD-based calculation.

  1. Measurement of the strange quark contribution to the proton spin using neutral kaons at HERMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Shaojun

    2007-03-01

    This thesis reports a new ''isoscalar'' measurement of Δs + Δ anti s. Because strange quarks carry no isospin, the strange seas in the proton and neutron are identical. In the deuteron, an isoscalar target, the fragmentation process in DIS can be described without any assumptions regarding isospin dependent fragmentation. In the isoscalar extraction of Δs + Δ anti s only the spin asymmetry for K 0 s A K 0 s 1,d (x,Q 2 , z) and the inclusive asymmetry A 1,d (x,Q 2 ) are used. An accurate measurement of the total non-strange quark polarisation ΔQ = Δu + Δ anti u + Δd + Δ anti d comes directly from A 1,d (x,Q 2 ). The fragmentation functions needed for a leading order (LO) extraction of ΔS = Δs + Δ anti s are measured directly at HERMES kinematics using the same data. As a result of this analysis, the helicity densities for the strange quarks are consistent with zero with the experimental uncertainty over the measured x kinematic range. (orig.)

  2. Measurement of the strange quark contribution to the proton spin using neutral kaons at HERMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shaojun

    2007-03-15

    This thesis reports a new ''isoscalar'' measurement of {delta}s + {delta} anti s. Because strange quarks carry no isospin, the strange seas in the proton and neutron are identical. In the deuteron, an isoscalar target, the fragmentation process in DIS can be described without any assumptions regarding isospin dependent fragmentation. In the isoscalar extraction of {delta}s + {delta} anti s only the spin asymmetry for K{sup 0}{sub s} A{sup K{sup 0}{sub s1,d}} (x,Q{sup 2}, z) and the inclusive asymmetry A{sub 1,d}(x,Q{sup 2}) are used. An accurate measurement of the total non-strange quark polarisation {delta}Q = {delta}u + {delta} anti u + {delta}d + {delta} anti d comes directly from A{sub 1,d}(x,Q{sup 2}). The fragmentation functions needed for a leading order (LO) extraction of {delta}S = {delta}s + {delta} anti s are measured directly at HERMES kinematics using the same data. As a result of this analysis, the helicity densities for the strange quarks are consistent with zero with the experimental uncertainty over the measured x kinematic range. (orig.)

  3. Demonstration of a Sensitive Method to Measure Nuclear-Spin-Dependent Parity Violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntaş, Emine; Ammon, Jeffrey; Cahn, Sidney B.; DeMille, David

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects in atoms and molecules arise from Z0 boson exchange between electrons and the nucleus, and from the magnetic interaction between electrons and the parity-violating nuclear anapole moment. We demonstrate measurements of NSD-PV that use an enhancement of the effect in diatomic molecules, here using the test system 138Ba 19. Our sensitivity surpasses that of any previous atomic parity violation measurement. We show that systematic errors can be suppressed to at least the level of the present statistical sensitivity. We measure the matrix element W of the NSD-PV interaction with total uncertainty δ W /(2 π )<0.7 Hz , for each of two configurations where W must have different signs. This sensitivity would be sufficient to measure NSD-PV effects of the size anticipated across a wide range of nuclei including 137Ba in 137BaF, where |W |/(2 π )≈5 Hz is expected.

  4. The impact of atomic precision measurements in high energy physics

    OpenAIRE

    Casalbuoni, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    In this talk I discuss the relevance of atomic physics in understanding some important questions about elementary particle physics. A particular attention is devoted to atomic parity violation measurements which seem to suggest new physics beyond the Standard Model. Atomic physics might also be relevant in discovering possible violations of the CPT symmetry.

  5. High-Density Physical Random Number Generator Using Spin Signals in Multidomain Ferromagnetic Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sungwoo Chun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A high-density random number generator (RNG based on spin signals in a multidomain ferromagnetic layer in a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ is proposed and fabricated. Unlike conventional spin-based RNGs, the proposed method does not require one to control an applied current, leading to a time delay in the system. RNG demonstrations are performed at room temperature. The randomness of the bit sequences generated by the proposed RNG is verified using the FIPS 140-2 statistical test suite provided by the NIST. The test results validate the effectiveness of the proposed RNGs. Our results suggest that we can obtain high-density, ultrafast RNGs if we can achieve high integration on the chip.

  6. Controlling Luttinger liquid physics in spin ladders under a magnetic field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klanjsek, M; Mayaffre, H; Berthier, C; Horvatić, M; Chiari, B; Piovesana, O; Bouillot, P; Kollath, C; Orignac, E; Citro, R; Giamarchi, T

    2008-09-26

    We present a 14N nuclear magnetic resonance study of a single crystal of CuBr4(C5H12N)2 (BPCB) consisting of weakly coupled spin-1/2 Heisenberg antiferromagnetic ladders. Treating ladders in the gapless phase as Luttinger liquids, we are able to fully account for (i) the magnetic field dependence of the nuclear spin-lattice relaxation rate T1(-1) at 250 mK and for (ii) the phase transition to a 3D ordered phase occurring below 110 mK due to weak interladder exchange coupling. BPCB is thus an excellent model system where the possibility to control Luttinger liquid parameters in a continuous manner is demonstrated and the Luttinger liquid model tested in detail over the whole fermion band.

  7. The physical boundary Hilbert space and volume operator in the Lorentzian new spin-foam theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding You; Rovelli, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    A covariant spin-foam formulation of quantum gravity has been recently developed, characterized by a kinematics which appears to match well the one of canonical loop quantum gravity. In this paper we reconsider the implementation of the constraints that defines the model. We define in a simple way the boundary Hilbert space of the theory, introducing a slight modification of the embedding of the SU(2) representations into the SL(2,C) ones. We then show directly that all constraints vanish on this space in a weak sense. The vanishing is exact (and not just in the large quantum number limit). We also generalize the definition of the volume operator in the spin-foam model to the Lorentzian signature and show that it matches the one of loop quantum gravity, as in the Euclidean case.

  8. Numerical study on physical mechanism of vortex breakdown occurrence in spin-up process

    OpenAIRE

    "小出, 輝明"; Teruaki", "Koide

    2008-01-01

    "A Numerical study presented on a vortex breakdown in spin-up process in an enclosed cylindrical container. In a transitional state, momentary vortex breakdowns can occur for particular parameter values ofthe Reynolds number and aspect ratio where no vortex breakdown appears in a steady state. This transient vortex breakdown flow is convenient to consider a mechanism for the occurrence of a vortex breakdown. It isdiscussed that periodical increase and decrease of angular momentum in upstream ...

  9. Coupled Spins in Diamond: From Quantum Control to Metrology and Many-Body Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Kucsko, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The study of quantum mechanics, together with the ability to coherently control and manipulate quantum systems in the lab has led to a myriad of discoveries and real world applications. In this thesis we present experiments demonstrating precise control of an individual long-lived spin qubit as well as sensing applications for biology and investigation of quantum many-body dynamics. Stable quantum bits, capable both of storing quantum information for macroscopic time scales and of integra...

  10. Graphene on transition-metal dichalcogenides: a platform for proximity spin-orbit physics and optospintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    Hybrids of graphene and two dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) have the potential to bring graphene spintronics to the next level. As we show here by performing first-principles calculations of graphene on monolayer MoS$_2$, there are several advantages of such hybrids over pristine graphene. First, Dirac electrons in graphene exhibit a giant global proximity spin-orbit coupling, without compromising the semimetallic character of the whole system at zero field. Remarkably, th...

  11. A Precision Measurement of the Spin Structure of the Proton at SLAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erbacher, Robin D

    1999-09-22

    E143 at SLAC Endstation A performed deep-inelastic scattering measurements of polarized electrons from polarized protons and deuterons within cryogenic {sup 15}NH{sub 3} and {sup 15}ND{sub 3}, respectively. Data were taken at incident energies of 29.1, 16.2 and 9.7 GeV, and covered the kinematical range x > 0:03 and 0:3 < Q{sup 2} < 12 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The scattered electrons were detected by two spectrometers at angles of 4.5{sup o} and 7.0{sup o}. From these data, the spin-dependent structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p}(x; Q{sup 2}) and g{sub 1}{sup d}(x; Q{sup 2}) were determined. This dissertation describes the experiment, with emphasis on the results on the proton spin structure. The integral of g{sub 1} over the range 0 < x < 1 was found to be {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p} = 0.130 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.008 for the proton and {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup d} = 0.044 {+-} 0.003 {+-} 0.004 for the deuteron. Both values are in agreement with world data, and violate the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule by more than 3 standard deviations. The neutron structure function was obtained by combining proton and deuteron results, giving {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} = [0.035 {+-} 0.007 {+-} 0.010]. From this the integral {Gamma}{sub 1}{sup p}-{Gamma}{sub 1}{sup n} followed, yielding 0.165 {+-} 0.009 {+-} 0.016 at Q{sup 2} = 3 (GeV/c){sup 2}, in agreement with the Bjorken sum rule to within one standard deviation. The Q{sup 2}-dependence of the ratio g{sub 1}/F{sub 1} was determined to be small for Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, validating the assumption of no Q{sup 2}-dependence used in obtaining the integrals. A small rise with increasing Q{sup 2} was seen in the ratio for Q{sup 2} < 1 (GeV/c){sup 2}, however. The total quark contribution to the spin was found to be {Delta}q = 0.28 {+-} 0.09 for the proton, and {Delta}q = 0.32 {+-} 0.05 for the deuteron. Furthermore, a large negative spin contribution from the strange sea quarks was measured for both nucleons, giving {Delta}s = 0.10 {+-} 0.03 and {Delta}s = -0

  12. Measuring teacher effectiveness in physical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rink, Judith E

    2013-12-01

    This article summarizes the research base on teacher effectiveness in physical education from a historical perspective and explores the implications of the recent emphasis on student performance and teacher observation systems to evaluate teachers for physical education. The problems and the potential positive effects of using student performance scores as well as establishing a comprehensive evaluation program are explored with supportive evidence that some level of accountability is necessary in our field to make significant change.

  13. A Precision Measurement of the Spin Structure Function G(2)(P)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benmouna, N

    2004-01-05

    The spin structure function g{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) and the virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 2}(x,Q{sup 2}) were measured for the proton using deep inelastic scattering. The experiment was conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), where longitudinally polarized electrons at 29.1 and 32.3 GeV were scattered from a transversely polarized NH{sub 3} target. Large data sets were accumulated using three independent spectrometers covering a kinematic range 0.02 {le} x {le} 0.8 and 1 {le} Q{sup 2} {le} 20 (GeV/c){sup 2}. This new data is the first data precise enough to distinguish between current models for the proton. The structure function g{sub 2}{sup p} was found to be reasonably consistent with the twist-2 Wandzura-Wilczek calculation. The Q{sup 2} dependence of g{sub 2} approximately follows the Q{sup 2} dependence of g{sub 2}{sup WW}, although the data are not precise enough to rule out no Q{sup 2} dependence. The absolute value for A{sub 2}{sup p} was found to be significantly smaller than the Soffer limit over the measured range. The virtual photon asymmetry A{sub 2} was also found to be inconsistent with zero over much of the measured range.

  14. Measuring nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation with molecules: Experimental methods and analysis of systematic errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altuntaş, Emine; Ammon, Jeffrey; Cahn, Sidney B.; DeMille, David

    2018-04-01

    Nuclear-spin-dependent parity violation (NSD-PV) effects in atoms and molecules arise from Z0 boson exchange between electrons and the nucleus and from the magnetic interaction between electrons and the parity-violating nuclear anapole moment. It has been proposed to study NSD-PV effects using an enhancement of the observable effect in diatomic molecules [D. DeMille et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 023003 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.023003]. Here we demonstrate highly sensitive measurements of this type, using the test system 138Ba19F. We show that systematic errors associated with our technique can be suppressed to at least the level of the present statistical sensitivity. With ˜170 h of data, we measure the matrix element W of the NSD-PV interaction with uncertainty δ W /(2 π )<0.7 Hz for each of two configurations where W must have different signs. This sensitivity would be sufficient to measure NSD-PV effects of the size anticipated across a wide range of nuclei.

  15. Spin density measurement of water-bridged Co-dimer using polarized neutrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard-Møller, Emil; Overgaard, Jacob; Chilton, Nick

    present an experimentally determined spin density using polarized neutron diffraction in a simple water-bridged cobalt dimer [Co2(H2O)(piv)4(Hpiv)2(py)2] which is known to have a small ferromagnetic coupling between the spin centers. Visualizing the SDD could get us one step further in understanding...

  16. Summary of measurements of the spin dependence in NN interactions from 2 to 12 GeV/c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, D.R.

    1975-01-01

    The status of experimental measurements of the spin dependence in NN interactions from 2 to 12 GeV/c as of June 1975 is summarized. Older data have been left out if more accurate or more complete results are available

  17. Standards for reference reactor physics measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, D.R.; Cokinos, D.M.; Uotinen, V.

    1990-01-01

    Reactor physics analysis methods require experimental testing and confirmation over the range of practical reactor configurations and states. This range is somewhat limited by practical fuel types such as actinide oxides or carbides enclosed in metal cladding. On the other hand, this range continues to broaden because of the trend of using higher enrichment, if only slightly enriched, electric utility fuel. The need for experimental testing of the reactor physics analysis methods arises in part because of the continual broadening of the range of core designs, and in part because of the nature of the analysis methods. Reactor physics analyses are directed primarily at the determination of core reactivities and reaction rates, the former largely for reasons of reactor control, and the latter largely to ensure that material limitations are not violated. Errors in these analyses can be regarded as being from numerics, from the data base, and from human factors. For numerical, data base, and human factor reasons, then, it is prudent and customary to qualify reactor physical analysis methods against experiments. These experiments can be treated as being at low power or at high power, and each of these types is subject to an American National Standards Institute standard. The purpose of these standards is to aid in improving and maintaining adequate quality in reactor physics methods, and it is from this point of view that the standards are examined here

  18. Spin cutoff parameters for 28Si, 29Si, and 30P: Comparison of measurements with spectral distribution calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimes, S.M.; Poppe, C.H.; Wong, C.; Dalton, B.J.

    1978-01-01

    Spin cutoff parameters for 28 Si, 29 Si, and 30 P have been deduced from angular distribution measurements for (α,n) reactions on 25 Mg, 26 Mg, and 27 Al. Calculations of the spin cutoff parameter which include the effect of two body interactions are made using the theory of spectral distributions. The results obtained by dividing the space into subspaces and expanding the strength distribution of each in a Gaussian are found to be more reliable than calculating a single Gaussian for the entire space. The comparisons in this study indicate a need for the inclusion of higher moments of the Hamiltonian in the level density expansion

  19. J/ψ spin-alignment measurement in pp collisions at √s = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Munwes, Yonathan

    The J/ψ and Υ mesons were discovered about forty years ago. Since then, the study of qq bound states provide significant input for the understanding of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). Although the J/ψ is one of the simplest systems in QCD, it is difficult to describe in detail its production mechanism. A measurement of the J/ψ spin-alignment could shed light on our understanding, and help to distinguish between the different proposed theoretical models. A precise measurement of the spin-alignment of J/ψs decaying into two muons in pp collisions at a centre of mass energy of √s = 8 TeV at the LHC is presented. This is the first measurement of this quantity at this energy regime. The current study is based on integrated luminosity of 14/fb of data collected by the ATLAS experiment in 2012. As an input for this analysis, a measurement of the production ratio of prompt to non-prompt J/ψ was done. From this measurement we extract the fractions of three physical processes in our signal region, the fraction of...

  20. Structural and photo-physical properties of spin-coated poly (3-hexylthiophene) thin films

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motaung, DE

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophenes) (P3HTs) and its blends were studied regarding their structural and photo-physical properties using fullerene as an electron acceptor material. Photo-physical and structural characteristics of the polymer blends...

  1. [Medium energy spin physics with lasers]. Final technical report, February 15, 1990--February 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cates, G.D.

    1992-03-01

    During the first two years of this program, we have successfully investigated two new methods for the production of polarized muonic helium. This work was done at LAMPF in collarboration with a group from Syracuse University. Traditionally, polarized muonic helium has been formed by stopping polarized muons in unpolarized atoms. Unfortunately, because of depolarization in the muon cascade to the ground state, residual polarizations are only {approximately}3%. The two methods we have developed both achieve much higher muon polarizations. To accomplish our goals, we first developed an appropriate muon beam for use with our small gas targets. During the summer of 1990, we stopped unpolarized negative muons in nuclear polarized {sup 3}He. The muons were polarized in the cascade to the ground state through the hyperfine interaction with the nucleus. The resulting muon polarizations were 7.2 {plus_minus} 0.8% for a 100% nuclear polarized target. While higher polarizations are clearly desirable for practical purposes, this experiment yielded important insights on spin interactions that occur in muonic atoms. Also, the ability to rapidly reverse the target polarization gave the experiment good sensitivity with minimal systematic effects. Last summer, we completed an experiment in which we polarized muonic helium by direct spin interaction with an optically pumped Rb vapor. In this technique, the muonic helium atom is polarized through a combination of charge exchange and spin exchange with the polarized valence electron of the Rb vapor. In contrast to the technique described in appendix A, the {sup 3}He nuclei are not polarized. This last technique yielded dramatic polarizations approaching 50%.

  2. Recovery Act - Measurement of Parity Violation in Deep Inelastic Scattering and Studies of the Nucleon Spin Structure at JLab 6 and 11 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Xiaochao [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Jesse Beams Lab.

    2016-03-10

    The program proposed contains two ingredients which aim to address aspects of two of the three research frontiers of nuclear science as identified in the 2007 NSAC Long Range Plan. The first topic, a test of the current Standard Model, is an ongoing project focusing on measurements of the parity-violating asymmetry in ~e-2H deep inelastic scattering (PVDIS). The PVDIS measurement is complementary to other completed or ongoing low- to medium-energy tests of the Standard Model. As the first, exploratory, step, an experiment using a 6 GeV electron beam will be carried out from October to December 2009 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab). Meanwhile, a program using the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam is being planned. The PVDIS program as a whole will provide the first precision data on the axial quark neutral-weak coupling constants. This will either put the current Standard Model to a test that has never been done before, or reveal information on where to look for New Physics beyond the current Standard Model. The PVDIS program will also provide results on hadronic physics effects such as charge symmetry violation. The second part of the proposed program uses spin observables to address the research frontier concerning QCD and structure of the nucleon. An experiment using the JLab 6 GeV beam in 2001 showed that, contrary to predictions from perturbative quantum chromodynamics (pQCD), while the valence up quark’s spin is parallel to the nucleon’s spin, the valence down quark’s spin is not. In order to test the limit of QCD in describing the nucleon spin structure to a region beyond the 6 GeV kinematics, this measurement will be extended to a more energetic, “deeper” valence quark region using the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam with a polarized 3He target. Although the two topics of the proposed program appear to focus on different physics, for the upgraded JLab 11 GeV beam, both will utilize a new, yet-to-be-built large acceptance

  3. Materials and Physics Challenges for Spin Transfer Torque Magnetic Random Access Memories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinonen, O.

    2014-10-05

    Magnetic random access memories utilizing the spin transfer torque effect for writing information are a strong contender for non-volatile memories scalable to the 20 nm node, and perhaps beyond. I will here examine how these devices behave as the device size is scaled down from 70 nm size to 20 nm. As device sizes go below ~50 nm, the size becomes comparable to intrinsic magnetic length scales and the device behavior does not simply scale with size. This has implications for the device design and puts additional constraints on the materials in the device.

  4. Measuring the quark contribution to the proton spin through νp → νp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louis, W.C.

    1991-01-01

    The LSND (Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector) experiment will be performed at LAMPF in the next several years. The main goal of the experiment is to search for ν μ -ν e oscillations with high sensitivity; however, an increasingly important by-product of this search is to measure νp → νp elastic scattering and determine the strange quark contribution, Δs, to the spin of the proton. With the 800-MeV proton energy of LAMPF, neutrinos are produced from pion decay-in-flight with an average energy of about 150 MeV. This energy is sufficiently high so that the νp → νp cross section is large and is sufficiently low so that the low Q 2 approximation (Q 2 much-lt m p 2 ) is valid and the cross section can be expressed in a simple form dependent upon Δs as the only unknown. LAMPF with its 1-mA proton intensity is, therefore, an ideal accelerator to perform this measurement. 12 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Measurement of a hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shift in atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsworth, R.L.; Silvera, I.F.; Mattison, E.M.; Vessot, R.F.C.

    1992-01-01

    We have measured a hyperfine-induced spin-exchange frequency shift in the atomic-hydrogen ground-state hyperfine transition. A recent quantum-mechanical treatment of low-energy hydrogen-hydrogen scattering by Koelman et al. [Phys. Rev. A 38, 3535 (1988)] predicts such frequency shifts to become large at low temperature, and to affect the performance of atomic clocks such as the cryogenic hydrogen maser. The experiment reported here was performed with a hydrogen maser operating near room temperature, where the reported hyperfine effects are predicted to be small, but measurable. Using an adiabatic fast passage (AFP) technique to vary the incoming atomic population in the masing states from approximately 100% (AFP on) to 50% (AFP off), we determined the change in the dimensionless hyperfine-induced frequency-shift parameter Ω to be Ω on -Ω off =5.38 (1.06)x10 -4 . The theoretical prediction at this temperature is Ω on -Ω off =-0.76x10 -4 to -1.12x10 -4 , for the range of masing-state populations used in the present experiment. We review the relevant theory, report our experimental method and results, and discuss possible reasons for the discrepancy between experiment and theory

  6. Measurement of the Proton and Deuteron Spin Structure Functions g2 and Asymmetry A2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry Anthony; R.G. Arnold; Todd Averett; H.R. Band; M.C. Berisso; H. Borel; Peter Bosted; Stephen Bueltmann; M. Buenerd; T. Chupp; Steve Churchwell; G.R. Court; Donald Crabb; Donal Day; Piotr Decowski; P. DePietro; Robin D. Erbacher; R. Erickson; Andrew Feltham; Helene Fonvieille; Emil Frlez; R. Gearhart; V. Ghazikhanian; Javier Gomez; Keith Griffioen; C. Harris; M.A. Houlden; E.W. Hughes; Charles Hyde-Wright; G. Igo; Sebastien Incerti; John Jensen; J.K. Johnson; Paul King; Yu.G. Kolomensky; Sebastian Kuhn; Richard Lindgren; R.M. Lombard-Nelsen; Jacques Marroncle; James Mccarthy; Paul McKee; W. Meyer; Gregory Mitchell; Joseph Mitchell; Michael Olson; S. Penttila; Gerald Peterson; Gerassimos Petratos; R. Pitthan; Dinko Pocanic; R. Prepost; C. Prescott; Liming Qin; Brian Raue; D. Reyna; L.S. Rochester; Stephen Rock; Oscar Rondon-Aramayo; Franck Sabatie; Ingo Sick; T. Smith; L. Sorrell; F. Staley; S. St. Lorant; L.M. Stuart; Z. Szalata; Y. Terrien; William Tobias; Luminita Todor; T. Toole; S. Trentalange; Dieter Walz; Robert Welsh; Frank Wesselmann; T.R. Wright; C.C. Young; Markus Zeier; Hong Guo Zhu; Benedikt Zihlmann

    1999-07-15

    We have measured the spin structure functions g{sub 2}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup d} and the virtual photon asymmetries A{sub 2}{sup p} and A{sub 2}{sup d} over the kinematic range 0.02 < x < 0.8 and 1.0 < Q{sup 2} {le} 30(GeV/c){sup 2} by scattering 38.8 GeV longitudinally polarized electrons from transversely polarized NH{sub 3} and {sup 6}LiD targets.The absolute value of A{sub 2} is significantly smaller than the {radical}R positivity limit over the measured range, while g{sub 2} is consistent with the twist-2 Wandzura-Wilczek calculation. We obtain results for the twist-3 reduced matrix elements d{sub 2}{sup p}, d{sub 2}{sup d} and d{sub 2}{sup n}. The Burkhardt-Cottingham sum rule integral (g{sub 2}(x)dx) is reported for the range 0.02 {le} x {le} 0.8.

  7. Measuring student responsibility in Physical Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Contextual Self-Responsibility Questionnaire (CSRQ) and Personal and Social Responsibility Questionnaire (PSRQ) were developed to meausre student responsibility within the field of physical education. In the present study, the factor structure of the CSRQ and PSRQ was examined. Unlike previous structure ...

  8. S3 HMBC: Spin-State-Selective HMBC for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants. Application to strychnine yielding thirteen hitherto unreported JHH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerulff, Louise; Benie, Andrew J.; Hoeck, Casper

    2016-01-01

    A novel method, Spin-State-Selective (S3) HMBC, for accurate measurement of homonuclear coupling constants is introduced. As characteristic for S3 techniques, S3 HMBC yields independent subspectra corresponding to particular passive spin states and thus allows determination of coupling constants ...... are demonstrated by an application to strychnine where thirteen JHH coupling constants not previously reported could be measured....

  9. Incomplete fusion reactions in 16O+159Tb system: Spin distribution measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Vijay R.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the reaction modes on the basis of their entry state spin population, an experiment has been done by employing particle-γ coincidence technique carried out at the Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi. The preliminary analysis conclusively demonstrates, spin distribution for some reaction products populated via complete and/or incomplete fusion of 16O with 159Tb system found to be distinctly different. Further, the existence of incomplete fusion at low bombarding energies indicates the possibility to populate high spin states.

  10. Ballistic spin filtering across the ferromagnetic-semiconductor interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.H. Li

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ballistic spin-filter effect from a ferromagnetic metal into a semiconductor has theoretically been studied with an intention of detecting the spin polarizability of density of states in FM layer at a higher energy level. The physical model for the ballistic spin filtering across the interface between ferromagnetic metals and semiconductor superlattice is developed by exciting the spin polarized electrons into n-type AlAs/GaAs superlattice layer at a much higher energy level and then ballistically tunneling through the barrier into the ferromagnetic film. Since both the helicity-modulated and static photocurrent responses are experimentally measurable quantities, the physical quantity of interest, the relative asymmetry of spin-polarized tunneling conductance, could be extracted experimentally in a more straightforward way, as compared with previous models. The present physical model serves guidance for studying spin detection with advanced performance in the future.

  11. Measurement of Workload: Physics, Psychophysics, and Metaphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopher, D.

    1984-01-01

    The present paper reviews the results of two experiments in which workload analysis was conducted based upon performance measures, brain evoked potentials and magnitude estimations of subjective load. The three types of measures were jointly applied to the description of the behavior of subjects in a wide battery of experimental tasks. Data analysis shows both instances of association and dissociation between types of measures. A general conceptual framework and methodological guidelines are proposed to account for these findings.

  12. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in MAS solid-state NMR provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanoseconds-to-milliseconds (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear (13C, 15N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radio-frequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins has been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely (i) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR), and (ii) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e. proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable, and that this cross-correlated relaxation rate constant depends on ns-ms motions, and can thus itself provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin-diffusion attenuates this cross-correlated relaxation, due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and the present manuscript reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  13. Spiral spin state in high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors: evidence from neutron scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2005-11-18

    An effective spiral spin phase ground state provides a new paradigm for the high-temperature superconducting cuprates. It accounts for the recent neutron scattering observations of spin excitations regarding both the energy dispersion and the intensities, including the "universal" rotation by 45 degrees around the resonance energy . The intensity has a 2D character even in a single twin crystal. The value of is related to the nesting properties of the Fermi surface. The excitations above are shown to be due to in-plane spin fluctuations, a testable difference from the stripe model. The form of the exchange interaction function reveals the effects of the Fermi surface, and the unique shape predicts large quantum spin fluctuations in the ground state.

  14. Quantum Measurements using Diamond Spins : From Fundamental Tests to Long-Distance Teleportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, R.

    2014-01-01

    Spin qubits in diamond provide an excellent platform both for fundamental tests and for realizing extended quantum networks . Here we present our latest results, including the deterministic teleportation over three meters.

  15. A possible scheme for measuring gravitational waves by using a spinful quantum fluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A method is proposed for measuring gravitational waves (GWs from the collective electromagnetic (EM response of a spinful quantum fluid, based on recent studies of the long-lived Mössbauer state 93mNb in a pure Nb crystal. A pronounced EM response was found for the geometric phase by rotating the sample in a magnetic field, suggesting that GWs could also be detected. It was recently suggested that the macroscopic wave functions confined in two twisted nonspherical superconductors would give a geometrical phase oscillation induced by GWs. The sensitivity to GWs would be inversely proportional to the square of the bound length, which is the detector size. The proposed sensitivity to GWs would be dramatically enhanced by changing the characteristic size, i.e., using the microscopic size of a non-spherical particle instead of the macroscopic detector size of a scalar quantum fluid. The collective EM response from the quantum fluid would allow the macroscopic geometrical phase to be read from microscopic particles. GWs in the millihertz range, with amplitude of 10−22, would be detectable.

  16. Spin dynamics of the LAGEOS satellite in support of a measurement of the Earth's gravitomagnetism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habib, S. (Theoretical Astrophysics Group (T-6, MS B288), Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Holz, D.E. (Department of Physics, Enrico Fermi Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States) Theoretical Astrophysics Group (T-6, MS B288), Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Kheyfets, A. (Department of Mathematics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695-8205 (United States)); Matzner, R.A. (Center for Relativity and Physics Department, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712-1081 (United States) Applied Research Laboratories, The University of Texas at Austin, P.O. Box 8029, Austin, Texas 78713-8209 (United States)); Miller, W.A. (Theoretical Astrophysics Group (T-6, MS B288), Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) Astrodynamics Bran

    1994-11-15

    LAGEOS is an accurately tracked, dense spherical satellite covered with 426 retroreflectors. Ciufolini has suggested the launch of an additional satellite (LAGEOS-3) into an orbit supplementary to that of the 1976-launched LAGEOS-1. In addition to providing a more accurate real-time measurement of the Earth's length of day and polar wobble, this paired-satellite experiment would provide the first direct measurement of the general relativistic frame-dragging effect. Of the five dominant error sources in this experiment, the largest one involves surface forces on the satellite, and their consequent impact on the orbital nodal precession. The surface forces are a function of the spin dynamics of the satellite. Consequently, we undertake here a theoretical effort to model the spin dynamics of LAGEOS. In this paper we derive, and solve numerically, a set of Euler equations that evolve the angular momentum vector for a slightly oblate spheroid of brass orbiting an Earth-like mass, idealized as being a perfect sphere and having a perfect polar-oriented dipole magnetic field. We have identified three phases of the rotational dynamics---a fast spin phase, a spin-orbit resonance phase, and an asymptotic (tidally locked) phase. From our numerical runs we give analytic expressions for this tidally locked phase.

  17. Manual for soil physical measurements; Version 3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolte, J.

    1997-01-01

    Manuals are given for several laboratory methods for determining hydraulic conductivity, water retention and shrinkage characteristics of soil. Measurement techniques described are: the constant-head and falling-head methods for saturated conductivitythe drip infiltrometer for unsaturated

  18. Measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms using nuclear magnetic resonance frequency shifts of noble gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. H. Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel method of measuring the spin polarization of alkali-metal atoms by detecting the NMR frequency shifts of noble gases. We calculated the profile of 87Rb D1 line absorption cross sections. We then measured the absorption profile of the sample cell, from which we calculated the 87Rb number densities at different temperatures. Then we measured the frequency shifts resulted from the spin polarization of the 87Rb atoms and calculated its polarization degrees at different temperatures. The behavior of frequency shifts versus temperature in experiment was consistent with theoretical calculation, which may be used as compensative signal for the NMRG closed-loop control system.

  19. EVIDENCE FOR LOW BLACK HOLE SPIN AND PHYSICALLY MOTIVATED ACCRETION MODELS FROM MILLIMETER-VLBI OBSERVATIONS OF SAGITTARIUS A*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broderick, Avery E.; Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Loeb, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Millimeter very long baseline interferometry (mm-VLBI) provides the novel capacity to probe the emission region of a handful of supermassive black holes on sub-horizon scales. For Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way, this provides access to the region in the immediate vicinity of the horizon. Broderick et al. have already shown that by leveraging spectral and polarization information as well as accretion theory, it is possible to extract accretion-model parameters (including black hole spin) from mm-VLBI experiments containing only a handful of telescopes. Here we repeat this analysis with the most recent mm-VLBI data, considering a class of aligned, radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) models. We find that the combined data set rules out symmetric models for Sgr A*'s flux distribution at the 3.9σ level, strongly favoring length-to-width ratios of roughly 2.4:1. More importantly, we find that physically motivated accretion flow models provide a significantly better fit to the mm-VLBI observations than phenomenological models, at the 2.9σ level. This implies that not only is mm-VLBI presently capable of distinguishing between potential physical models for Sgr A*'s emission, but further that it is sensitive to the strong gravitational lensing associated with the propagation of photons near the black hole. Based upon this analysis we find that the most probable magnitude, viewing angle, and position angle for the black hole spin are a = 0.0 +0.64+0.86 , θ=68 o+5 o +9 o -20 o -28 o , and ξ=-52 o+17 o +33 o -15 o -24 o east of north, where the errors quoted are the 1σ and 2σ uncertainties.

  20. Calorimetry energy measurement in particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wigmans, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Particle physics is the science that pursues the age-old quest for the innermost structure of matter and the fundamental interactions between its constituents. Modern experiments in this field rely increasingly on calorimetry, a detection technique in which the particles of interest are absorbed in the detector. Calorimeters are very intricate instruments. Their performance characteristics depend on subtle, sometimes counter-intuitive design details. This book, written by one of the world's foremost experts, is the first comprehensive text on this topic. It provides a fundamental and systematic introduction to calorimetry. It describes the state of the art in terms of both the fundamental understanding of calorimetric particle detection, and the actual detectors that have been or are being built and operated in experiments. The last chapter discusses landmark scientific discoveries in which calorimetry has played an important role. This book summarizes and puts into perspective the work described in some 900...

  1. Associations of objectively and subjectively measured physical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Accelerometer-measured moderate and vigorous habitual PA is associated with indices of cortical bone size and geometry in children, whereas light PA has no detectable association. Furthermore, the bone-specific questionnaire appears to be more strongly associated with bone outcomes than accelerometer-derived ...

  2. First Measurement of the T-Odd Correlation Between the Z0 Spin and the Three-Jet Plane Orientation in Polarized Z0 Decays to Three Jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baird, Kenneth G.

    1996-08-01

    We present the first measurement of the correlation between the Z 0 spin and the event plane orientation in polarized Z 0 decays into three jets in the SLD experiment at SLAC utilizing a longitudinally polarized electron beam. The CP even and T odd triple product rvec S Z · (rvec k 1 x rvec k 2 ) formed from the two fastest jet momenta, rvec k 1 and rvec k 2 , and the Z 0 polarization vector rvec S Z , is sensitive to physics beyond the Standard Model. We measure the expectation value of this quantity to be consistent with zero and Set 95% C.L. limits of -0.022< β <0.039 on the correlation

  3. Performance assessment of a new laser system for efficient spin exchange optical pumping in a spin maser measurement of 129Xe EDM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funayama, C.; Furukawa, T.; Sato, T.; Ichikawa, Y.; Ohtomo, Y.; Sakamoto, Y.; Kojima, S.; Suzuki, T.; Hirao, C.; Chikamori, M.; Hikota, E.; Tsuchiya, M.; Yoshimi, A.; Bidinosti, C. P.; Ino, T.; Ueno, H.; Matsuo, Y.; Fukuyama, T.; Asahi, K.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate spin-exchange optical pumping of 129 Xe atoms with our newly made laser system. The new laser system was prepared to provide higher laser power required for the stable operation of spin maser oscillations in the 129 Xe EDM experiment. We studied the optimum cell temperature and pumping laser power to improve the degree of 129 Xe spin polarization. The best performance was achieved at the cell temperature of 100 ∘ C with the presently available laser power of 1 W. The results show that a more intense laser is required for further improvement of the spin polarization at higher cell temperatures in our experiment

  4. Spin- (1)/(2) Heisenberg ladder: Variation of entanglement and fidelity measures close to quantum critical points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribedi, Amit; Bose, Indrani

    2009-01-01

    We consider a two-chain, spin- (1)/(2) antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin ladder in an external magnetic field H . The spin ladder is known to undergo second-order quantum phase transitions (QPTs) at two critical values Hc1 and Hc2 of the magnetic field. There are now known examples of strongly coupled (where the rung exchange interaction is much stronger than the nearest-neighbor intrachain exchange interaction) organic ladder compounds in which QPTs have been experimentally observed. In this paper, we investigate whether well-known bipartite entanglement meaures such as one-site von Neumann entropy, two-site von Neumann entropy, and concurrence develop special features close to the quantum critical points. As suggested by an earlier theorem, the first derivatives of the measures with respect to magnetic field are expected to diverge as H→Hc1 and H→Hc2 . Based on numerical diagonalization data and a mapping of the strongly coupled ladder Hamiltonian onto the XXZ chain Hamiltonian, for which several analytical results are known, we find that the derivatives of the entanglement measures diverge as H→Hc2 but remain finite as H→Hc1 . The reason for this discrepancy is analyzed. We further calculate two recently proposed quantum information theoretic measures, the reduced fidelity and reduced fidelity susceptibility, and show that these measures provide appropriate signatures of the QPTs occuring at the critical points H=Hc1 and H=Hc2 .

  5. The g$p\\atop{2}$ Experiment: A Measurement of the Proton's Spin Structure Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zielinski, Ryan B. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The E08-027 (g$p\\atop{2}$) experiment measured the spin structure functions of the proton at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, Va. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered from a transversely and longitudinally polarized solid ammonia target in Hall A, with the polarized NH$_3$ acting as an effective proton target. Focusing on small scattering angle events at the electron energies available at Jefferson Lab, the experiment covered a kinematic phase space of 0.02 GeV$^2$ $< Q^2 <$ 0.20 GeV$^2$ in the proton's resonance region. The spin structure functions, $g_{1}^p(x,Q^2)$ and $g_{2}^p(x,Q^2)$ , are extracted from an inclusive polarized cross section measurement of the electron-proton interaction. Integrated moments of $g_1(x,Q^2)$ are calculated and compared to theoretical predictions made by Chiral Perturbation Theory. The $g_1(x,Q^2)$ results are in agreement with previous measurements, but include a significant increase in statistical precision. The spin structure function contributions to the hyperfine energy levels in the hydrogen atom are also investigated. The $g_2(x,Q^2)$ measured contribution to the hyperfine splitting is the first ever experimental determination of this quantity. The results of this thesis suggest a disagreement of over 100% with previously published model results.

  6. Spin physics and transport in narrow-gap III-V based heterostructures and epilayers

    CERN Document Server

    Rowe, A C H

    2000-01-01

    mixing of the first subband SdH series and a magneto-intersubband oscillation, the onset of which occurs when the Fermi energy is close to the bottom of the second subband. It is only at the lowest concentrations where the well asymmetry is minimal that beat patterns due to two narrowly split SdH series are observed. This splitting energy is found to be dependent on magnetic field, dropping from approx 4.8 meV at B = 0 T to approx 3.2 meV at B 1.3 T. In contrast, no beating is found in gated InAs/AISb wells at 4.2K over the largest concentration range yet reported in a single sample (4.8x10 sup 1 sup 1 cm sup - sup 2 < n < 2.4x10 sup 1 sup 2 cm sup - sup 2). The Heusler alloy NiMnSb is identified as a candidate for an electrical spin injector for InAs. A simple technique for the fabrication of bulk NiMnSb targets for laser ablation is detailed, and attempts at laser ablation of NiMnSb thin films are reported. Oxygen is identified as the major contaminant for the production of stoichiometric films. High ...

  7. Spinning, drawing and physical properties of polypropylene nanocomposite fibers with fumed nanosilica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Dabrowska

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nanocomposite fibers of isotactic polypropylene – fumed silica AR805 were prepared by melt compounding using a two-step process: melt-spinning and hot drawing at various draw ratios up to 15. Transmission electron microscopy revealed uniform dispersion of the silica nanoparticles in polypropylene matrix, although at higher concentrations and lower draw ratios the nanoparticles showed increasing tendency to form small agglomerates. On the other hand, at low concentrations the uniform distribution of fumed silica improved mechanical properties of the composite fibers, especially at higher draw ratios. Crystallinity and melting temperature of fibers were found to significantly increase after drawing. Elastic modulus at draw ratio = 10 rose from 5.3 GPa for neat PP up to 6.2–8.1 GPa for compositions in the range 0.25–2 vol% of the filler. Moreover, higher tensile strength and creep resistance were achieved, while strain at break was rather insensitive to the filler fraction. Considering all experimental results, a failure model was proposed to explain the toughness improvement during the drawing process by the induced orientation of polymer chains and the formation of voids.

  8. Pre-Town Meeting on spin physics at an Electron-Ion Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, Elke-Caroline; Bland, Leslie; Huang, Jin; Tarasov, Andrey [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Physics Department, Upton, NY (United States); Balitsky, Ian; Radyushkin, Anatoly [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Brodsky, Stanley J. [Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA (United States); Burkardt, Matthias [New Mexico State University, Department of Physics, Las Cruces, NM (United States); Burkert, Volker; Chen, Jian-Ping; Kubarovsky, Valery; Melnitchouk, Wally; Qiu, Jian-Wei; Richards, David [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Deshpande, Abhay [Brookhaven National Laboratory, RIKEN BNL Research Center, Upton, NY (United States); Stony Brook University, SUNY, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Diehl, Markus [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchroton DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Gamberg, Leonard [Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Grosse Perdekamp, Matthias [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States); Hyde, Charles [Old Dominion University, Physics Department, Norfolk, VA (United States); Ji, Xiangdong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, INPAC, Department of Physics, and Shanghai Key Lab for Particle Physics and Cosmology, Shanghai (China); Peking University, Center for High-Energy Physics, Beijing (China); University of Maryland, Maryland Center for Fundamental Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Jiang, Xiaodong; Liu, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kang, Zhong-Bo [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Los Angeles, CA (United States); University of California, Mani L. Bhaumik Institute for Theoretical Physics, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lajoie, John [Iowa State University, Ames, IA (United States); Liu, Keh-Fei [University of Kentucky, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy Center for Computational Sciences, Lexington, KY (United States); Liuti, Simonetta [University of Virginia, Department of Physics, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Mulders, Piet [VU University Amsterdam, Nikhef and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Prokudin, Alexei [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA (United States); Penn State University-Berks, Division of Science, Reading, PA (United States); Sichtermann, Ernst; Yuan, Feng [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Stratmann, Marco; Vogelsang, Werner [Tuebingen University, Institute for Theoretical Physics, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2017-04-15

    A polarized ep/eA collider (Electron-Ion Collider, or EIC), with polarized proton and light-ion beams and unpolarized heavy-ion beams with a variable center-of-mass energy √(s) ∝ 20 to ∝ 100 GeV (upgradable to ∝ 150 GeV) and a luminosity up to ∝ 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, would be uniquely suited to address several outstanding questions of Quantum Chromodynamics, and thereby lead to new qualitative and quantitative information on the microscopic structure of hadrons and nuclei. During this meeting at Jefferson Lab we addressed recent theoretical and experimental developments in the spin and the three-dimensional structure of the nucleon (sea quark and gluon spatial distributions, orbital motion, polarization, and their correlations). This mini-review contains a short update on progress in these areas since the EIC White paper (A. Accardi et al., Eur. Phys. J. A 52, 268 (2016)). (orig.)

  9. The movable polarized target as a basic equipment for high energy spin physics experiments at the JINR-Dubna accelerator complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehar, F.; Adiasevich, B.; Androsov, V.P.; Angelov, N.; Anischenko, N.; Antonenko, V.; Ball, J.; Baryshevsky, V.G.; Bazhanov, N.A.; Belyaev, A.A.; Benda, B.; Bodyagin, V.; Borisov, N.; Borzunov, Yu.; Bradamante, F.; Bunyatova, E.; Burinov, V.; Chernykh, E.; Combet, M.; Datskov, A.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A.P.; Fontaine, J.M.; Get`man, V.A.; Giorgi, M.; Golovanov, L.; Grebenyuk, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gurevich, G.; Hasegawa, T.; Hill, D.; Horikawa, N.; Igo, G.; Janout, Z.; Kalinnikov, V.A.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kasprzyk, T.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Kirillov, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Kousmine, E.S.; Kovalenko, A.; Kovaljov, A.I.; Ladygin, V.P.; Lazarev, A.; Leconte, P.; Lesquen, A. de; Lukhanin, A.A.; Mango, S.; Martin, A.; Matafonov, V.N.; Matyushevsky, E.; Mironov, S.; Neganov, A.B.; Neganov, B.S.; Nomofilov, A.; Perelygin, V.; Plis, Yu.; Pilipenko, Yu.; Pisarev, I.L.; Piskunov, N.; Polunin, Yu.; Popkov, Yu.P.; Propov, A.A.; Prokofiev, A.N.; Rekalo, M.P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Sans, J.L.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sharov, V.; Shilov, S.; Shishov, Yu.; Sitnik, I.M.; Sorokin, P.V.; Spinka, H.; Sporov, E.A.; Strunov, L.N.; Svetov, A.; De Swart, J.J.; Telegin, Yu.P.; Tolmashov, I.; Trentalange, S.; Tsvinev, A.; Usov, Yu.A.; Vikhrov, V.V.; Whitten, C.A.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarubin, A.; Zhdanov, A.A.; Zolin, L. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de Physique des Particules, de Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee]|[I.V. Kurchatov Inst. of Atomic Energy, Moscow (Russian Federation)]|[Kharkov Inst. of Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)]|[Lab. of Nuclear Problems, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)]|[Lab. of High Energy Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation)]|[Lab. National SATURNE, CNRS, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[Inst. of Physics, Belarus Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus)]|[Dept. of Physics, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Inst., Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    A movable polarized proton target is planned to be installed in polarized beams of the Synchrophasotron-Nuclotron complex in order to carry out a spin physics experimental program at Dubna. The project is described and the first proposed experiments are discussed. ((orig.))

  10. The movable polarized target as a basic equipment for high energy spin physics experiments at the JINR-Dubna accelerator complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehar, F.; Adiasevich, B.; Androsov, V.P.; Angelov, N.; Anischenko, N.; Antonenko, V.; Ball, J.; Baryshevsky, V.G.; Bazhanov, N.A.; Belyaev, A.A.; Benda, B.; Bodyagin, V.; Borisov, N.; Borzunov, Yu.; Bradamante, F.; Bunyatova, E.; Burinov, V.; Chernykh, E.; Combet, M.; Datskov, A.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A.P.; Fontaine, J.M.; Get'man, V.A.; Giorgi, M.; Golovanov, L.; Grebenyuk, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gurevich, G.; Hasegawa, T.; Hill, D.; Horikawa, N.; Igo, G.; Janout, Z.; Kalinnikov, V.A.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Kasprzyk, T.; Khachaturov, B.A.; Kirillov, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Kousmine, E.S.; Kovalenko, A.; Kovaljov, A.I.; Ladygin, V.P.; Lazarev, A.; Leconte, P.; Lesquen, A. de; Lukhanin, A.A.; Mango, S.; Martin, A.; Matafonov, V.N.; Matyushevsky, E.; Mironov, S.; Neganov, A.B.; Neganov, B.S.; Nomofilov, A.; Perelygin, V.; Plis, Yu.; Pilipenko, Yu.; Pisarev, I.L.; Piskunov, N.; Polunin, Yu.; Popkov, Yu.P.; Propov, A.A.; Prokofiev, A.N.; Rekalo, M.P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Sans, J.L.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sharov, V.; Shilov, S.; Shishov, Yu.; Sitnik, I.M.; Sorokin, P.V.; Spinka, H.; Sporov, E.A.; Strunov, L.N.; Svetov, A.; De Swart, J.J.; Telegin, Yu.P.; Tolmashov, I.; Trentalange, S.; Tsvinev, A.; Usov, Yu.A.; Vikhrov, V.V.; Whitten, C.A.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarubin, A.; Zhdanov, A.A.; Zolin, L.

    1995-01-01

    A movable polarized proton target is planned to be installed in polarized beams of the Synchrophasotron-Nuclotron complex in order to carry out a spin physics experimental program at Dubna. The project is described and the first proposed experiments are discussed. ((orig.))

  11. The movable polarized target as a basic equipment for high energy spin physics experiments at the JINR-Dubna accelerator complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehar, F.; Adiasevich, B.; Androsov, V. P.; Angelov, N.; Anischenko, N.; Antonenko, V.; Ball, J.; Baryshevsky, V. G.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Belyaev, A. A.; Benda, B.; Bodyagin, V.; Borisov, N.; Borzunov, Yu.; Bradamante, F.; Bunyatova, E.; Burinov, V.; Chernykh, E.; Combet, M.; Datskov, A.; Durand, G.; Dzyubak, A. P.; Fontaine, J. M.; Get'man, V. A.; Giorgi, M.; Golovanov, L.; Grebenyuk, V.; Grosnick, D.; Gurevich, G.; Hasegawa, T.; Hill, D.; Horikawa, N.; Igo, G.; Janout, Z.; Kalinnikov, V. A.; Karnaukhov, I. M.; Kasprzyk, T.; Khachaturov, B. A.; Kirillov, A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Kousmine, E. S.; Kovalenko, A.; Kovaljov, A. I.; Ladygin, V. P.; Lazarev, A.; Leconte, Ph.; de Lesquen, A.; Lukhanin, A. A.; Mango, S.; Martin, A.; Matafonov, V. N.; Matyushevsky, E.; Mironov, S.; Neganov, A. B.; Neganov, B. S.; Nomofilov, A.; Perelygin, V.; Plis, Yu.; Pilipenko, Yu.; Pisarev, I. L.; Piskunov, N.; Polunin, Yu.; Popkov, Yu. P.; Propov, A. A.; Prokofiev, A. N.; Rekalo, M. P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Sans, J. L.; Sapozhnikov, M. G.; Sharov, V.; Shilov, S.; Shishov, Yu.; Sitnik, I. M.; Sorokin, P. V.; Spinka, H.; Sporov, E. A.; Strunov, L. N.; Svetov, A.; de Swart, J. J.; Telegin, Yu. P.; Tolmashov, I.; Trentalange, S.; Tsvinev, A.; Usov, Yu. A.; Vikhrov, V. V.; Whitten, C. A.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zarubin, A.; Zhdanov, A. A.; Zolin, L.

    1995-02-01

    A movable polarized proton target is planned to be installed in polarized beams of the Synchrophasotron-Nuclotron complex in order to carry out a spin physics experimental program at Dubna. The project is described and the first proposed experiments are discussed.

  12. Single and double spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering measured with CLAS and a longitudinally polarized proton target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pisano, S.; Biselli, A.; Niccolai, S.; Seder, E.; Guidal, M.; Mirazita, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bosted, P.; Briscoe, B.; Brock, J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Carlin, C.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Compton, N.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crabb, D. G.; Crede, V.; D' Angelo, A.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keith, C. D.; Keller, D.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacCormick, M.; MacGregor, Ian J. D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meekins, D. G.; Meyer, C. A.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moody, C. I.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Puckett, A. J. R.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, G. D.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Turisini, M.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-03-19

    Single-beam, single-target, and double-spin asymmetries for hard exclusive photon production on the proton e→p→e'p'γ are presented. The data were taken at Jefferson Lab using the CLAS detector and a longitudinally polarized 14NH3 target. The three asymmetries were measured in 165 4-dimensional kinematic bins, covering the widest kinematic range ever explored simultaneously for beam and target-polarization observables in the valence quark region. The kinematic dependences of the obtained asymmetries are discussed and compared to the predictions of models of Generalized Parton Distributions. As a result, the measurement of three DVCS spin observables at the same kinematic points allows a quasi-model-independent extraction of the imaginary parts of the H and H~ Compton Form Factors, which give insight into the electric and axial charge distributions of valence quarks in the proton.

  13. Spin-Mechatronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Mamoru; Saitoh, Eiji; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the interconversion phenomena between spin and mechanical angular momentum in moving objects. In particular, the recent results on spin manipulation and spin-current generation by mechanical motion are examined. In accelerating systems, spin-dependent gauge fields emerge, which enable the conversion from mechanical angular momentum into spins. Such a spin-mechanical effect is predicted by quantum theory in a non-inertial frame. Experiments which confirm the effect, i.e., the resonance frequency shift in nuclear magnetic resonance, the stray field measurement of rotating metals, and electric voltage generation in liquid metals, are discussed.

  14. A technique for measurement of vector and tensor polarization in solid spin one polarized targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielhorn, W.F.

    1991-06-01

    Vector and tensor polarizations are explicitly defined and used to characterize the polarization states of spin one polarized targets, and a technique for extracting these polarizations from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data is developed. This technique is independent of assumptions about spin temperature, but assumes the target's crystal structure induces a quadrupole interaction with the spin one particles. Analysis of the NMR signals involves a computer curve fitting algorithm implemented with a fast Fourier transform method which speeds and simplifies curve fitting algorithms used previously. For accurate curve fitting, the NMR electronic circuit must be modeled by the fitting algorithm. Details of a circuit, its model, and data collected from this circuit are given for a solid deuterated ammonia target. 37 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. A technique for measurement of vector and tensor polarization in solid spin one polarized targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kielhorn, W.F.

    1991-06-01

    Vector and tensor polarizations are explicitly defined and used to characterize the polarization states of spin one polarized targets, and a technique for extracting these polarizations from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data is developed. This technique is independent of assumptions about spin temperature, but assumes the target's crystal structure induces a quadrupole interaction with the spin one particles. Analysis of the NMR signals involves a computer curve fitting algorithm implemented with a fast Fourier transform method which speeds and simplifies curve fitting algorithms used previously. For accurate curve fitting, the NMR electronic circuit must be modeled by the fitting algorithm. Details of a circuit, its model, and data collected from this circuit are given for a solid deuterated ammonia target. 37 refs., 19 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Design and Simulation of a Spin Rotator for Longitudinal Field Measurements in the Low Energy Muons Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Z.; Prokscha, T.; Keller, P.; Morenzoni, E.; Saadaoui, H.; Sedlak, K.; Shiroka, T.; Sidorov, S.; Suter, A.; Vrankovic, V.; Weber, H.-P.

    We usedGeant4 to accurately model the low energy muons (LEM) beam line, including scattering due to the 10-nm thin carbon foil in the trigger detector. Simulations of the beam line transmission give excellent agreement with experimental results for beam energies higher than ∼ 12keV.We use these simulations to design and model the operation of a spin rotator for the LEM spectrometer, which will enable longitudinal field measurements in the near future.

  17. Measurements Of Spin Observables In Pseudoscalar-Meson Photo-Production Using Polarized Neutrons In Solid HD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kageya, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Psuedo-scalar meson photo production measurements have been carried out with longitudinally-polarized neutrons using the circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and the CLAS at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jlab). The experiment aims to obtain a complete set of spin observables on an efficient neutron target. Preliminary E asymmetries for the exclusive reaction, gamma + n(p)--> pi- + p(p), selecting quasi free neutron kinematics are discussed.

  18. Measurements of spin rotation parameter /A in pion-proton elastic scattering at 1.62 GeV/c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Svirida, D. N.; Sulimov, A. D.; Zhurkin, V. V.; Beloglazov, Y. A.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kruglov, S. P.; Novinsky, D. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Sumachev, V. V.; Trautman, V. Y.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Bunyatova, E. I.

    2000-07-01

    The ITEP-PNPI Collaboration presents the results of the measurements of the spin rotation parameter /A in the elastic scattering of positive and negative pions on protons at Pbeam=1.62 GeV/c. The setup included a longitudinally-polarized proton target with superconductive magnet, multiwire spark chambers and a carbon polarimeter with thick filter. Results are compared with the predictions of partial wave analyses. The experiment was performed at the ITEP proton synchrotron, Moscow.

  19. Measurements of spin rotation parameter A in pion-proton elastic scattering at 1.62 GeV/c

    OpenAIRE

    Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Svirida, D. N.; Sulimov, A. D.; Zhurkin, V. V.; Beloglazov, Yu. A.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kruglov, S. P.; Novinsky, D. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.

    2000-01-01

    The ITEP-PNPI collaboration presents the results of the measurements of the spin rotation parameter A in the elastic scattering of positive and negative pions on protons at P_beam = 1.62 GeV/c. The setup included a longitudinally-polarized proton target with superconductive magnet, multiwire spark chambers and a carbon polarimeter with thick filter. Results are compared to the predictions of partial wave analyses. The experiment was performed at the ITEP proton synchrotron, Moscow.

  20. Measuring the contribution of low Bjorken-x gluons to the proton spin with polarized proton-proton collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolin, Scott Justin

    The PHENIX experiment is one of two detectors located at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory in Upton, NY. Understanding the spin structure of the proton is a central goal at RHIC, the only polarized proton-on-proton collider in existence. The PHENIX spin program has two primary objectives. The first is to improve the constraints on the polarized parton distributions of the anti-u and anti-d quarks within the proton. The second objective is to improve the constraint on the gluon spin contribution to the proton spin, DeltaG. The focus of this thesis is the second objective. PHENIX experiment has been successful at providing the first meaningful constraints on DeltaG, along with STAR, the other detector located at RHIC. These constraints have, in fact, eliminated the extreme scenarios for gluon polarization through measurements of the double spin asymmetry, ALL, between the cross section of like and unlike sign helicity pp interactions. ALL measurements can be performed with a variety of final states at PHENIX. Until 2009, these final states were only measured for pseudo-rapidities of |eta| car crashing into a slow moving car and the debris ending up mostly along the line of motion of the fast moving car, the debris of a high-x quark interacting with a low-x gluon will result in debris at forward rapidity at small angles to the initial quark momentum. The Muon Piston Calorimeter (MPC) was installed in 2006 and 2007 at forward rapidity, 3.1 Following this, an electronics upgrade to the MPC will be described which enables the selection of events with two hadrons detected in the MPC. This requirement favors gluons at even lower x than the single hadron event selection. The di-hadron measurement that this upgrade makes possible will allow PHENIX to produce an ALL measurement that constrains Deltag(x) in the range of 5 x 10-4 < x < 0.01. Finally, we discuss the most important systematic uncertainty common to all ALL measurements

  1. Measurement of longitudinal spin asymmetries for weak boson production in polarized proton-proton collisions at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Alford, J; Anson, C D; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Averichev, G S; Balewski, J; Banerjee, A; Beavis, D R; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bichsel, H; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Borowski, W; Bouchet, J; Brandin, A V; Brovko, S G; Bültmann, S; Bunzarov, I; Burton, T P; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Cendejas, R; Cervantes, M C; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, H F; Chen, J H; Chen, L; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Chikanian, A; Christie, W; Chwastowski, J; Codrington, M J M; Contin, G; Cramer, J G; Crawford, H J; Cui, X; Das, S; Davila Leyva, A; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; Derradi de Souza, R; Dhamija, S; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Ding, F; Djawotho, P; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Engle, K S; Eppley, G; Eun, L; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Fedorisin, J; Filip, P; Finch, E; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Gagliardi, C A; Gangadharan, D R; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Gliske, S; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Haag, B; Hamed, A; Han, L-X; Haque, R; Harris, J W; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, B; Huang, H Z; Huang, X; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Kesich, A; Khan, Z H; Kikola, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Koetke, D D; Kollegger, T; Konzer, J; Koralt, I; Kosarzewski, L K; Kotchenda, L; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kulakov, I; Kumar, L; Kycia, R A; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; LeVine, M J; Li, C; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Li, Y; Li, Z M; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Madagodagettige Don, D M M D; Mahapatra, D P; Majka, R; Margetis, S; Markert, C; Masui, H; Matis, H S; McDonald, D; McShane, T S; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nelson, J M; Nigmatkulov, G; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Ohlson, A; Okorokov, V; Oldag, E W; Olvitt, D L; Pachr, M; Page, B S; Pal, S K; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlak, T; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Peryt, W; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Pluta, J; Poljak, N; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Przybycien, M; Pujahari, P R; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Riley, C K; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Ross, J F; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sangaline, E; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Singaraju, R N; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solanki, D; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stevens, J R; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Sun, X; Sun, X M; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Symons, T J M; Szelezniak, M A; Takahashi, J; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Trzeciak, B A; Tsai, O D; Turnau, J; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Vanfossen, J A; Varma, R; Vasconcelos, G M S; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Viyogi, Y P; Vokal, S; Vossen, A; Wada, M; Wang, F; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, J S; Wang, X L; Wang, Y; Wang, Y; Webb, G; Webb, J C; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y F; Xiao, Z; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, H; Xu, J; Xu, N; Xu, Q H; Xu, Y; Xu, Z; Yan, W; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zawisza, Y; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, J B; Zhang, J L; Zhang, S; Zhang, X P; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, F; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhu, X; Zhu, Y H; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2014-08-15

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W^{±} and Z/γ^{*} boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at sqrt[s]=510  GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W^{±} were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  2. Measurement of Longitudinal Spin Asymmetries for Weak Boson Production in Polarized Proton-Proton Collisions at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-08-01

    We report measurements of single- and double-spin asymmetries for W± and Z/γ* boson production in longitudinally polarized p+p collisions at √s =510 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The asymmetries for W± were measured as a function of the decay lepton pseudorapidity, which provides a theoretically clean probe of the proton's polarized quark distributions at the scale of the W mass. The results are compared to theoretical predictions, constrained by polarized deep inelastic scattering measurements, and show a preference for a sizable, positive up antiquark polarization in the range 0.05

  3. Measuring physical activity and sedentary behaviour at work: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Retamal, Marcelo; Hinckson, Erica A

    2011-01-01

    To identify methods used to assess physical activity and sedentary behaviour at the workplace and review the validity and reliability of these measures. Databases were searched for relevant published articles including MEDLINE, SPORT Discus, ProQuest and Google Scholar. Keywords used were physical-activity, workplace, sedentary-behaviour, measurement and questionnaire. Studies included were original, written in English, published between 1990 and 2009, and focused on validated physical activity and sedentary behaviour measures at work. Eleven papers were identified in which three used criterion standards, three objective measures, and five subjective measures. The most common method of data collection was through self-report, surveys or questionnaires. Physical activity measured with motion sensors, ranged from 4,422 to 10,334 steps/day (pedometers) and sedentary time ranged from 1.8 to 6 hours/day (h/d) (accelerometers). Self-report measures provided information relevant to the perception of physical activity at work (∼ 0.5 h/d), sitting time (> 3 h/d) and calculated energy expenditure (< 800 kcal/d). Physical activity levels at work were low while sedentary behaviour was high. This was largely a function of occupation (white-collar vs. blue-collar). None of the studies assessed validity or reliability of measures used however, instruments as assessed by others showed moderate to strong validity and reliability values.

  4. Two Wien Filter Spin Flipper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grames, J M; Benesch, J F; Clark, J; Hansknecht, J; Kazimi, R; Machie, D; Poelker, M; Stutzman, M L; Suleiman, R

    2011-03-01

    A new 4pi spin manipulator composed of two Wien filters oriented orthogonally and separated by two solenoids has been installed at the CEBAF/Jefferson Lab photoinjector. The new spin manipulator is used to precisely set the electron spin direction at an experiment in any direction (in or out of plane of the accelerator) and provides the means to reverse, or flip, the helicity of the electron beam on a daily basis. This reversal is being employed to suppress systematic false asymmetries that can jeopardize challenging parity violation experiments that strive to measure increasingly small physics asymmetries [*,**,***]. The spin manipulator is part of the ultra-high vacuum polarized electron source beam line and has been successfully operated with 100keV and 130keV electron beam at high current (>100 microAmps). A unique feature of the device is that spin-flipping requires only the polarity of one solenoid magnet be changed. Performance characteristics of the Two Wien Filter Spin Flipper will be summarized.

  5. Magnons, Spin Current and Spin Seebeck Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2012-02-01

    When metals and semiconductors are placed in a temperature gradient, the electric voltage is generated. This mechanism to convert heat into electricity, the so-called Seebeck effect, has attracted much attention recently as the mechanism for utilizing wasted heat energy. [1]. Ferromagnetic insulators are good conductors of spin current, i.e., the flow of electron spins [2]. When they are placed in a temperature gradient, generated are magnons, spin current and the spin voltage [3], i.e., spin accumulation. Once the spin voltage is converted into the electric voltage by inverse spin Hall effect in attached metal films such as Pt, the electric voltage is obtained from heat energy [4-5]. This is called the spin Seebeck effect. Here, we present the linear-response theory of spin Seebeck effect based on the fluctuation-dissipation theorem [6-8] and discuss a variety of the devices. [4pt] [1] S. Maekawa et al, Physics of Transition Metal Oxides (Springer, 2004). [0pt] [2] S. Maekawa: Nature Materials 8, 777 (2009). [0pt] [3] Concept in Spin Electronics, eds. S. Maekawa (Oxford University Press, 2006). [0pt] [4] K. Uchida et al., Nature 455, 778 (2008). [0pt] [5] K. Uchida et al., Nature Materials 9, 894 (2010) [0pt] [6] H. Adachi et al., APL 97, 252506 (2010) and Phys. Rev. B 83, 094410 (2011). [0pt] [7] J. Ohe et al., Phys. Rev. B (2011) [0pt] [8] K. Uchida et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 104419 (2010).

  6. Spiral spin state in high-temperature copper-oxide superconductors: Evidence from neutron scattering measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2005-01-01

    degrees around the resonance energy E-res. The intensity has a 2D character even in a single twin crystal. The value of E-res is related to the nesting properties of the Fermi surface. The excitations above E-res are shown to be due to in-plane spin fluctuations, a testable difference from the stripe...

  7. Measurement of Spin Correlation in Top Quark Pair Production at ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    McLaughlan, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents a study of spin correlation in tt ̄ production in the ATLAS detector, in proton-proton collisions, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.7 fb$^{−1}$, with a centre of mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. Both the dilepton and single lepton channels are considered, the latter providing a greater challenge due to the neccessity to reconstruct the down-type quark resulting from the W boson decay. A simple technique is employed to reconstruct single lepton $t\\bar{t}$ events, with the transverse angle between the charged lepton and down-type quark used as a probe of the spin correlation. In the dilepton channel, the transverse angle between both charged leptons is used. The extracted value of spin correlation in each channel is consistent with Standard Model predictions, with the result in the eμ channel alone sufficient to exclude a model without spin correlation at 7.8$\\sigma$. Also described is the author’s contribution to the maintenance and development of the Atlantis Event D...

  8. Reliability and Validity Testing of the Physical Resilience Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Galik, Elizabeth; Dorsey, Susan; Scheve, Ann; Gutkin, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to test reliability and validity of the Physical Resilience Scale. Methods: A single-group repeated measure design was used and 130 older adults from three different housing sites participated. Participants completed the Physical Resilience Scale, Hardy-Gill Resilience Scale, 14-item Resilience Scale,…

  9. Structural and photo-physical properties of spin-coated poly(3-hexylthiophene) thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motaung, David E.; Malgas, Gerald F.; Arendse, Christopher J.; Mavundla, Sipho E.; Knoesen, D.

    2009-01-01

    Regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophenes) (P3HTs) and its blends were studied regarding their structural and photo-physical properties using fullerene as an electron acceptor material. Photo-physical and structural characteristics of the polymer blends were studied using UV-vis spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL), Fourier transform infrared absorption (FTIR) spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy analysis. Films based on the polymer blends with C 60 showed photo-induced absorption characteristic for charged excitations. The absorption spectra of the rr-P3HT exhibit a shift to higher energies (blue shift) of the π-π* inter-band transition upon mixing with C 60 . A distinctive photoluminescence quenching effect is observed indicating photo-induced electron transfer. The complete reduction of PL of P3HT after mixing with C 60 in a 1:1 weight ratio indicates an effective charge transfer from P3HT to C 60 .

  10. Microscopic understanding of spin current probed by shot noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakawa, Tomonori

    The spin currents is one of key issue in the spintronics field and the generation and detection of those have been intensively studied by using various materials. The analysis of experiments, however, relies on phenomenological parameters such as spin relaxation length and spin flip time. The microscopic nature of the spin current such as energy distribution and energy relaxation mechanism, has not yet well understood. To establish a better microscopic understanding of spin currents, I focused on the shot noise measurement which is well established technique in the field of mesoscopic physics [Y. M. Blanter and M. B üttiker, Phys. Rep. 336, 1 (2000).]. Although there are many theoretically works about shot noise in the presence of spin currents, for example detection of spin accumulation [J. Meair, P. Stano, and P. Jacquod, Phys. Rev. B 84 (2011).], estimation of spin flip currents, and so on, these predictions have never been experimentally confirmed. In this context, we reported the first experimental detention of shot noise in the presence of the spin accumulation in a (Ga,Mn)As/tunnel barrier/n-GaAs based lateral spin valve device [T. Arakawa et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 016601 (2015).]. Together with this result, we found however that the effective temperature of the spin current drastically increases due to the spin injection process. This heating of electron system could be a big problem to realize future spin current devices by using quantum coherence, because the effective temperature rise directly related to the destruction of the coherence of the spin current. Therefore, then we focused on the mechanism of this heating and the energy relaxation in a diffusive channel. By measuring current noise and the DC offset voltage in the usual non-local spin valve signal as a function of the spin diffusion channel length, we clarified that the electron-electron interaction length, which is the characteristic length for the relaxation of the electron system, is

  11. THE MEASUREMENT AND INTERPRETATION OF CHILDREN'S PHYSICAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann V. Rowlands

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The accurate and reliable assessment of physical activity is necessary for any research study where physical activity is either an outcome measure or an intervention. The aim of this review is to examine the use of objective measurement techniques for the assessment and interpretation of children's physical activity. Accurate measurement of children's activity is challenging, as the activity is characteristically sporadic and intermittent, consisting of frequent, short bouts. Objective measures of physical activity include heart rate telemetry, pedometry and accelerometry, and each of these methods has strengths and limitations. Heart rate is suited to the measurement of sustained periods of moderate and vigorous activity, pedometry provides a valid measure of total activity, and accelerometry provides a valid measure of total activity as well as the pattern and intensity of activity. As the weaknesses of heart rate and accelerometry for the assessment of activity are not inter-correlated, a combination of the two methods may be more accurate than either method alone. Recent evidence suggests that the Actiheart, an integrated accelerometer and heart rate unit, provides a more accurate prediction of children's energy expenditure than either heart rate or accelerometry alone. However, the cost of the Actiheart is prohibitive for large-scale studies. The pedometer is recommended when only the total amount of physical activity is of interest. When the intensity or the pattern of activity is of interest, accelerometry is the recommended measurement tool

  12. A comparative study of physical performance measures in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanji, Haruko; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Anderson, Karen E; Pretzer-Aboff, Ingrid; Reich, Stephen G; Fishman, Paul S; Weiner, William J; Shulman, Lisa M

    2008-10-15

    The objective of this study is to compare physical performance measures for their ability to discriminate between levels of disability and disease severity in Parkinson's disease (PD). Disability in PD is commonly assessed by patient self-report, which may be limited by patient insight. Seventy-nine patients with PD were tested with seven performance measures: Physical Performance Test (PPT), modified Physical Performance Test (mPPT), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Performance Test of Activities of Daily Living (PADL), Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Timed Up and Go (TUG), and Functional Reach (FR). These measures were compared with patient-reported disability on the Older Americans Resource and Services Disability subscale (OARS) and disease severity on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The performance measures were more sensitive to levels of disease severity than disability. Four measures discriminated across quartiles of disability (PPT, mPPT, BBS, TUG: P mPPT, BBS, TUG, FR: P < 0.01; SPPB, PADL: P < 0.05). However, no measure consistently discriminated between subgroups with a range of early and advanced disease severity. The seven physical performance measures showed different profiles of strengths and weaknesses in assessing disability and disease severity. The results of this study will facilitate choosing performance measures for clinical care and clinical trials in PD. (c) 2008 Movement Disorder Society.

  13. Communication: spin-orbit splittings in degenerate open-shell states via Mukherjee's multireference coupled-cluster theory: a measure for the coupling contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mück, Leonie Anna; Gauss, Jürgen

    2012-03-21

    We propose a generally applicable scheme for the computation of spin-orbit (SO) splittings in degenerate open-shell systems using multireference coupled-cluster (MRCC) theory. As a specific method, Mukherjee's version of MRCC (Mk-MRCC) in conjunction with an effective mean-field SO operator is adapted for this purpose. An expression for the SO splittings is derived and implemented using Mk-MRCC analytic derivative techniques. The computed SO splittings are found to be in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Due to the symmetry properties of the SO operator, SO splittings can be considered a quality measure for the coupling between reference determinants in Jeziorski-Monkhorst based MRCC methods. We thus provide numerical insights into the coupling problem of Mk-MRCC theory. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  14. Medium energy elementary particle physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: muon beam development at LAMPF; muon physics; a new precision measurement of the muon g-2 value; measurement of the spin-dependent structure functions of the neutron and proton; and meson factories. (LSP)

  15. Measurement of vortex motion in a type-II superconductor: A novel use of the neutron spin-echo technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forgan; Kealey; Johnson; Pautrat; Simon; Lee; Aegerter; Cubitt; Farago; Schleger

    2000-10-16

    We have used the neutron spin-echo technique to measure the small energy change of neutrons which are diffracted by a moving vortex lattice in a low-pinning Nb-Ta superconducting sample. A transport current was passed in the mixed state to cause flux line movement. In the case of uniform motion, the flux velocity v(L) was given as expected by the values of electric and magnetic fields, via E = -v(L)wedgeB. We show that with a nonuniformly moving vortex lattice, one can measure the dispersion of the velocities, opening up new possibilities for investigating moving vortex lines.

  16. Measurement of the Transverse Single-Spin Asymmetry in p^{↑}+p→W^{±}/Z^{0} at RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L; Adkins, J K; Agakishiev, G; Aggarwal, M M; Ahammed, Z; Alekseev, I; Aparin, A; Arkhipkin, D; Aschenauer, E C; Attri, A; Averichev, G S; Bai, X; Bairathi, V; Banerjee, A; Bellwied, R; Bhasin, A; Bhati, A K; Bhattarai, P; Bielcik, J; Bielcikova, J; Bland, L C; Bordyuzhin, I G; Bouchet, J; Brandenburg, J D; Brandin, A V; Bunzarov, I; Butterworth, J; Caines, H; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M; Campbell, J M; Cebra, D; Chakaberia, I; Chaloupka, P; Chang, Z; Chattopadhyay, S; Chen, X; Chen, J H; Cheng, J; Cherney, M; Christie, W; Contin, G; Crawford, H J; Das, S; De Silva, L C; Debbe, R R; Dedovich, T G; Deng, J; Derevschikov, A A; di Ruzza, B; Didenko, L; Dilks, C; Dong, X; Drachenberg, J L; Draper, J E; Du, C M; Dunkelberger, L E; Dunlop, J C; Efimov, L G; Engelage, J; Eppley, G; Esha, R; Evdokimov, O; Eyser, O; Fatemi, R; Fazio, S; Federic, P; Fedorisin, J; Feng, Z; Filip, P; Fisyak, Y; Flores, C E; Fulek, L; Gagliardi, C A; Garand, D; Geurts, F; Gibson, A; Girard, M; Greiner, L; Grosnick, D; Gunarathne, D S; Guo, Y; Gupta, A; Gupta, S; Guryn, W; Hamad, A; Hamed, A; Haque, R; Harris, J W; He, L; Heppelmann, S; Heppelmann, S; Hirsch, A; Hoffmann, G W; Hofman, D J; Horvat, S; Huang, X; Huang, H Z; Huang, B; Huang, T; Huck, P; Humanic, T J; Igo, G; Jacobs, W W; Jang, H; Jentsch, A; Jia, J; Jiang, K; Judd, E G; Kabana, S; Kalinkin, D; Kang, K; Kauder, K; Ke, H W; Keane, D; Kechechyan, A; Khan, Z H; Kikoła, D P; Kisel, I; Kisiel, A; Kochenda, L; Koetke, D D; Kosarzewski, L K; Kraishan, A F; Kravtsov, P; Krueger, K; Kumar, L; Lamont, M A C; Landgraf, J M; Landry, K D; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lednicky, R; Lee, J H; Li, C; Li, Y; Li, W; Li, X; Li, X; Lin, T; Lisa, M A; Liu, F; Ljubicic, T; Llope, W J; Lomnitz, M; Longacre, R S; Luo, X; Ma, R; Ma, L; Ma, G L; Ma, Y G; Magdy, N; Majka, R; Manion, A; Margetis, S; Markert, C; McDonald, D; Meehan, K; Mei, J C; Minaev, N G; Mioduszewski, S; Mishra, D; Mohanty, B; Mondal, M M; Morozov, D A; Mustafa, M K; Nandi, B K; Nasim, Md; Nayak, T K; Nigmatkulov, G; Niida, T; Nogach, L V; Noh, S Y; Novak, J; Nurushev, S B; Odyniec, G; Ogawa, A; Oh, K; Okorokov, V A; Olvitt, D; Page, B S; Pak, R; Pan, Y X; Pandit, Y; Panebratsev, Y; Pawlik, B; Pei, H; Perkins, C; Pile, P; Pluta, J; Poniatowska, K; Porter, J; Posik, M; Poskanzer, A M; Pruthi, N K; Putschke, J; Qiu, H; Quintero, A; Ramachandran, S; Raniwala, R; Raniwala, S; Ray, R L; Ritter, H G; Roberts, J B; Rogachevskiy, O V; Romero, J L; Roy, A; Ruan, L; Rusnak, J; Rusnakova, O; Sahoo, N R; Sahu, P K; Sakrejda, I; Salur, S; Sandweiss, J; Sarkar, A; Schambach, J; Scharenberg, R P; Schmah, A M; Schmidke, W B; Schmitz, N; Seger, J; Seyboth, P; Shah, N; Shahaliev, E; Shanmuganathan, P V; Shao, M; Sharma, M K; Sharma, B; Shen, W Q; Shi, Z; Shi, S S; Shou, Q Y; Sichtermann, E P; Sikora, R; Simko, M; Singha, S; Skoby, M J; Smirnov, D; Smirnov, N; Solyst, W; Song, L; Sorensen, P; Spinka, H M; Srivastava, B; Stanislaus, T D S; Stepanov, M; Stock, R; Strikhanov, M; Stringfellow, B; Sumbera, M; Summa, B; Sun, Y; Sun, Z; Sun, X M; Surrow, B; Svirida, D N; Tang, A H; Tang, Z; Tarnowsky, T; Tawfik, A; Thäder, J; Thomas, J H; Timmins, A R; Tlusty, D; Todoroki, T; Tokarev, M; Trentalange, S; Tribble, R E; Tribedy, P; Tripathy, S K; Tsai, O D; Ullrich, T; Underwood, D G; Upsal, I; Van Buren, G; van Nieuwenhuizen, G; Vandenbroucke, M; Varma, R; Vasiliev, A N; Vertesi, R; Videbæk, F; Vokal, S; Voloshin, S A; Vossen, A; Wang, J S; Wang, Y; Wang, F; Wang, Y; Wang, H; Wang, G; Webb, J C; Webb, G; Wen, L; Westfall, G D; Wieman, H; Wissink, S W; Witt, R; Wu, Y; Xiao, Z G; Xie, X; Xie, W; Xin, K; Xu, N; Xu, Y F; Xu, Z; Xu, Q H; Xu, J; Xu, H; Yang, Q; Yang, Y; Yang, S; Yang, Y; Yang, C; Yang, Y; Ye, Z; Ye, Z; Yepes, P; Yi, L; Yip, K; Yoo, I-K; Yu, N; Zbroszczyk, H; Zha, W; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Zhang, S; Zhang, J B; Zhang, Y; Zhang, J; Zhang, J; Zhang, X P; Zhao, J; Zhong, C; Zhou, L; Zhu, X; Zoulkarneeva, Y; Zyzak, M

    2016-04-01

    We present the measurement of the transverse single-spin asymmetry of weak boson production in transversely polarized proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s]=500  GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The measured observable is sensitive to the Sivers function, one of the transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution functions, which is predicted to have the opposite sign in proton-proton collisions from that observed in deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering. These data provide the first experimental investigation of the nonuniversality of the Sivers function, fundamental to our understanding of QCD.

  17. Measurement of the Transverse Single-Spin Asymmetry in p↑+p →W±/Z0 at RHIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, X.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, T.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, L.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M. K.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, G.; Webb, J. C.; Webb, G.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, X.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, N.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, J.; Xu, H.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    We present the measurement of the transverse single-spin asymmetry of weak boson production in transversely polarized proton-proton collisions at √{s }=500 GeV by the STAR experiment at RHIC. The measured observable is sensitive to the Sivers function, one of the transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution functions, which is predicted to have the opposite sign in proton-proton collisions from that observed in deep inelastic lepton-proton scattering. These data provide the first experimental investigation of the nonuniversality of the Sivers function, fundamental to our understanding of QCD.

  18. Measurement of Function Post Hip Fracture: Testing a Comprehensive Measurement Model of Physical Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnick, Barbara; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Hicks, Gregory; Ostir, Glen; Klinedinst, N Jennifer; Orwig, Denise; Magaziner, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Measurement of physical function post hip fracture has been conceptualized using multiple different measures. This study tested a comprehensive measurement model of physical function. This was a descriptive secondary data analysis including 168 men and 171 women post hip fracture. Using structural equation modeling, a measurement model of physical function which included grip strength, activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and performance was tested for fit at 2 and 12 months post hip fracture, and among male and female participants. Validity of the measurement model of physical function was evaluated based on how well the model explained physical activity, exercise, and social activities post hip fracture. The measurement model of physical function fit the data. The amount of variance the model or individual factors of the model explained varied depending on the activity. Decisions about the ideal way in which to measure physical function should be based on outcomes considered and participants. The measurement model of physical function is a reliable and valid method to comprehensively measure physical function across the hip fracture recovery trajectory. © 2015 Association of Rehabilitation Nurses.

  19. Measurement of the neutron electric dipole moment: simultaneous spin analysis and preliminary data analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helaine, Victor

    2014-01-01

    In the framework of the neutron Electric Dipole Moment (nEDM) experiment at the Paul Scherrer Institut (Switzerland), this thesis deals with the development of a new system of spin analysis. The goal here is to simultaneously detect the two spin components of ultracold neutrons in order to increase the number of detected neutrons and therefore lower the nEDM statistical error. Such a system has been designed using Geant4-UCN simulations, built at LPC Caen and then tested as part of the experiment. In parallel to this work, the 2013 nEDM data taken at PSI have been analysed. Finally, methods to recover magnetic observables of first interest to control nEDM systematic errors have been studied and possible improvements are proposed. (author) [fr

  20. Higher spin gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Henneaux, Marc; Vasiliev, Mikhail A

    2017-01-01

    Symmetries play a fundamental role in physics. Non-Abelian gauge symmetries are the symmetries behind theories for massless spin-1 particles, while the reparametrization symmetry is behind Einstein's gravity theory for massless spin-2 particles. In supersymmetric theories these particles can be connected also to massless fermionic particles. Does Nature stop at spin-2 or can there also be massless higher spin theories. In the past strong indications have been given that such theories do not exist. However, in recent times ways to evade those constraints have been found and higher spin gauge theories have been constructed. With the advent of the AdS/CFT duality correspondence even stronger indications have been given that higher spin gauge theories play an important role in fundamental physics. All these issues were discussed at an international workshop in Singapore in November 2015 where the leading scientists in the field participated. This volume presents an up-to-date, detailed overview of the theories i...

  1. Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of a single nuclear spin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, F; Fernández-Rossier, J

    2011-08-12

    Detection of a single nuclear spin constitutes an outstanding problem in different fields of physics such as quantum computing or magnetic imaging. Here we show that the energy levels of a single nuclear spin can be measured by means of inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS). We consider two different systems, a magnetic adatom probed with scanning tunneling microscopy and a single Bi dopant in a silicon nanotransistor. We find that the hyperfine coupling opens new transport channels which can be resolved at experimentally accessible temperatures. Our simulations evince that IETS yields information about the occupations of the nuclear spin states, paving the way towards transport-detected single nuclear spin resonance.

  2. The local physical structure of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide: insights from magic angle spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette, Michelle M; Li, Wenjing; Sky Driver, M; Karki, Sudarshan; Caruso, A N; Oyler, Nathan A

    2011-11-02

    Magic angle spinning solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy techniques are applied to the elucidation of the local physical structure of an intermediate product in the plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition of thin-film amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (B(x)C:H(y)) from an orthocarborane precursor. Experimental chemical shifts are compared with theoretical shift predictions from ab initio calculations of model molecular compounds to assign atomic chemical environments, while Lee-Goldburg cross-polarization and heteronuclear recoupling experiments are used to confirm atomic connectivities. A model for the B(x)C:H(y) intermediate is proposed wherein the solid is dominated by predominantly hydrogenated carborane icosahedra that are lightly cross-linked via nonhydrogenated intraicosahedral B atoms, either directly through B-B bonds or through extraicosahedral hydrocarbon chains. While there is no clear evidence for extraicosahedral B aside from boron oxides, ∼40% of the C is found to exist as extraicosahedral hydrocarbon species that are intimately bound within the icosahedral network rather than in segregated phases.

  3. Spin and Maximal Acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Papini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We study the spin current tensor of a Dirac particle at accelerations close to the upper limit introduced by Caianiello. Continual interchange between particle spin and angular momentum is possible only when the acceleration is time-dependent. This represents a stringent limit on the effect that maximal acceleration may have on spin physics in astrophysical applications. We also investigate some dynamical consequences of maximal acceleration.

  4. Spin Hall effect devices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jungwirth, Tomáš; Wunderlich, Joerg; Olejník, Kamil

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 5 (2012), s. 382-390 ISSN 1476-1122 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 268066 - 0MSPIN; European Commission(XE) 215368 - SemiSpinNet Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : spin Hall effect * spintronics * spin transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 35.749, year: 2012

  5. Physics Results from COMPASS

    CERN Document Server

    Bressan, A.

    2005-01-01

    The COMPASS Experiment at the CERN SPS has a broad physics program focused on the nucleon spin structure and on hadron spectroscopy, using muon and hadron beams. Main objectives for the spin program with the muon beam are the direct measurement of the gluon contribution to the spin of the nucleon, semi-inclusive measurements, and the measurement of the transverse spin distribution $\\Delta_T q$. The COMPASS apparatus consists of a two-stage large acceptance spectrometer designed for high data rates and equipped with high-resolution tracking, particle identification and electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry. The data taking is ongoing since 2002 and till now was mainly devoted to the spin programme using a 160 GeV$/c$ naturally polarized, $\\mu^+$ beam and a polarized $^{6}$LiD target. First physics results from the 2002 and 2003 runs are presented.

  6. Brownian Motion as a Limit to Physical Measuring Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niss, Martin

    2016-01-01

    formulated a general conclusion concerning the nature of physical measurements, namely that there is a definite limit to the ultimate sensitivity of measuring instruments beyond which we cannot advance, and that this limit is determined by Brownian motion. Ising’s conclusion agreed with experiments......, physicists in particular saw the work as an indication that noise is of practical relevance for their enterprise...

  7. Physical Activity Measurement Device Agreement: Pedometer Steps/Minute and Physical Activity Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scruggs, Philip W.; Mungen, Jonathan D.; Oh, Yoonsin

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine agreement between the Walk4Life DUO pedometer (W4L; Walk4Life, Plainfield, Illinois, USA) and two criterion instruments in the measurement of physical activity. Participants (N = 189, M = 16.74 years, SD = 0.99) in high school physical education concurrently wore the DUO (i.e., comparison instrument) and…

  8. The World is Spinning: Constraining the Origin of Supermassive Gas Giant Planets at Wide Separations Using Planetary Spin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Marta; Knutson, Heather; Batygin, Konstantin; Benneke, Björn; Bowler, Brendan

    2017-01-01

    Planetary spin can inform our understanding of planet accretion histories, which determine final masses and atmospheric compositions, as well as the formation of moons and rings. At present, the physics behind how gas giant planets spin up is still very poorly understood. We know that when giant planets form, they accrete material and angular momentum via a circumplanetary disk, causing the planet to spin up. In order to prevent planet spins from reaching break-up velocity, some mechanism must regulate these spins. However, there is currently no well-formulated picture for how planet spins evolve. This is in part due to the fact that there are very few measurements of giant planet spin rates currently available. Outside the solar system, to date there has only been one published spin measurement of a directly imaged planet, beta Pic b. We use Keck/NIRSPEC to measure spin rates for a sample of bound and free-floating directly imaged planetary mass objects, providing a first look at the distribution of spin rates for these objects.

  9. Measurement of electron-spin transports in GaAs quantum wells using a transmission-grating-sampled circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Hua-Liang; Fang, Shaoyin; Wen, Jinhui; Lai, Tianshu

    2014-01-01

    A transmission-grating-sampled circular dichroism absorption spectroscopy (TGS-CDAS) and its theoretical model are developed sensitively to measure decay dynamics of a transient spin grating (TSG). A binary transmission grating with the same period as TSG is set behind TSG. It allows only a same small part of each period in TSG measured by circular dichroism absorption effect of a probe. In this way, the zero average of spin-dependent effects measured over a whole period in TSG is avoided so that TGS-CDAS has a high sensitivity to spin evolution in TSG. Spin transport experiments are performed on GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells. Experimental results prove the feasibility and reliability of TGS-CDAS

  10. Spin-polarized spin excitation spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loth, Sebastian; Lutz, Christopher P; Heinrich, Andreas J

    2010-01-01

    We report on the spin dependence of elastic and inelastic electron tunneling through transition metal atoms. Mn, Fe and Cu atoms were deposited onto a monolayer of Cu 2 N on Cu(100) and individually addressed with the probe tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. Electrons tunneling between the tip and the substrate exchange energy and spin angular momentum with the surface-bound magnetic atoms. The conservation of energy during the tunneling process results in a distinct onset threshold voltage above which the tunneling electrons create spin excitations in the Mn and Fe atoms. Here we show that the additional conservation of spin angular momentum leads to different cross-sections for spin excitations depending on the relative alignment of the surface spin and the spin of the tunneling electron. For this purpose, we developed a technique for measuring the same local spin with a spin-polarized and a non-spin-polarized tip by exchanging the last apex atom of the probe tip between different transition metal atoms. We derive a quantitative model describing the observed excitation cross-sections on the basis of an exchange scattering process.

  11. Reliability of the spin-T cervical goniometer in measuring cervical range of motion in an asymptomatic Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shabnam; Allison, Garry T; Singer, Kevin P

    2005-09-01

    To examine the intratester reliability of the Spin-T goniometer, a cervical range of motion device, in a normal Indian population. Subjects comprised 30 healthy adults with mean age of 34 years (range, 18-65 years). The subjects were stabilized in the sitting position and the Spin-T goniometer mounted on the head of the subject. The study design was a within-subject repeated intratester reliability trial conducted for cervical range of motion in 6 directions of movement. Three measurements were taken in each direction (flexion, extension lateral flexion, and lateral rotation) per participant. Reliability coefficients, intraclass correlation coefficients, and 95% confidence interval were derived from repeated-measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). Where differences in ANOVA were detected, a paired t test was conducted and the typical error values and coefficient of variance were calculated. All repeated measures showed high intraclass correlation coefficients (all >0.96, P goniometer proved to be a reliable measuring instrument for cervical range of movement in an Indian population. The use of a laser pointer fixed to the instrument ensured a consistent neutral start position.

  12. Measuring Students' Beliefs about Physics in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhadlaq, H.; Alshaya, F.; Alabdulkareem, S.; Perkins, K. K.; Adams, W. K.; Wieman, C. E.

    2009-11-01

    Over the last decade, science education researchers in the US have studied students' beliefs about science and learning science and measured how these beliefs change in response to classroom instruction in science. In this paper, we present an Arabic version of the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey (CLASS) which was developed to measure students' beliefs about physics at King Saud University (KSU) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We describe the translation process, which included review by four experts in physics and science education and ten student interviews to ensure that the statements remained valid after translation. We have administered the Arabic CLASS to over 300 students in introductory physics courses at KSU's men's and women's campuses. We present a summary of students' beliefs about physics at KSU and compare these results to similar students in the US.

  13. Probing Proton Spin Structure: A Measurement of g2 at Four-momentum Transfer of 2 to 6 GeV2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, James [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2011-12-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment investigated the spin structure of the proton via inclusive electron scattering at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility at Jefferson Laboratory in Newport News, VA. A double-polarization measurement of polarized asymmetries was performed using the University of Virginia solid polarized ammonia target with target polarization aligned longitudinal and near transverse to the electron beam, allowing the extraction of the spin asymmetries A1 and A2, and spin structure functions g1 and g2. Polarized electrons of energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV were scattered to be viewed by a novel, non-magnetic array of detectors observing a four-momentum transfer range of 2 to 6 GeV2. This document addresses the extraction of the spin asymmetries and spin structure functions, with a focus on spin structure function g2, which we have measured as a function of x and W in four Q2 bins.

  14. A measurement of spin asymmetries in quasi-real photo-production of hadrons with high transverse momentum at COMPASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, R.

    2007-07-01

    During 2002-2004, the COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has recorded 1.5 fb -1 of deep inelastic scattering events with polarized muon beam and polarized deuterium target. The cross section for single-inclusive charged hadron production in dependence on the hadron's transverse momentum p T is extracted. A PYTHIA and GEANT simulation is used to obtain the acceptance correction factors. The double spin asymmetry A LL b,d is measured in the region 1 GeV/c T T dependence of which is connected to the gluon polarization ΔG. (orig.)

  15. Measurements of the Double-Spin Asymmetry A1 on Helium-3: Toward a Precise Measurement of the Neutron A1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parno, Diana Seymour [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2011-04-01

    The spin structure of protons and neutrons has been an open question for nearly twenty-five years, after surprising experimental results disproved the simple model in which valence quarks were responsible for nearly 100% of the nucleon spin. Diverse theoretical approaches have been brought to bear on the problem, but a shortage of precise data - especially on neutron spin structure - has prevented a thorough understanding. Experiment E06-014, conducted in Hall A of Jefferson Laboratory in 2009, presented an opportunity to add to the world data set for the neutron in the poorly covered valence-quark region. Jefferson Laboratory's highly polarized electron beam, combined with Hall A's facilities for a high-density, highly polarized 3He target, allowed a high-luminosity double-polarized experiment, while the large acceptance of the BigBite spectrometer gave coverage over a wide kinematic range: 0.15 < x < 0.95. In this work, we present the analysis of a portion of the E06-014 data, measured with an incident beam energy of 4.74 GeV and spanning 1.5 < Q2 < 5.5 (GeV/c)2. From these data, we extract the longitudinal asymmetry in virtual photon-nucleon scattering, A1, on the 3He nucleus. Combined with the remaining E06-014 data, this will form the basis of a measurement of the neutron asymmetry Aη1 that will extend the kinematic range of the data available to test models of spin-dependent parton distributions in the nucleon.

  16. Detection of irradiated food: Electron spin resonance measurement of irradiated meat, fish and nuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linke, B.; Helle, N.; Mager, M.; Schreiber, G.A.; Boegl, K.W.

    1993-01-01

    In an intercomparison study organized by the German Federal Health Office (BGA) the use of electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy as a routine method according to paragraph 35 of the German Food Legislation (LMBG) was tested for bone containing meat, fish and nuts (shells). Each participating laboratory examined six chicken, six rainbow trout and four pistachio samples. The examinations were successful, only three samples were not identified correctly and moreover these mistakes were caused by misinterpretation of the ESR spectra. 13 out of 18 participating laboratories used a new routine ESR spectrometer and all samples were identified correctly with this instrument. (orig.) [de

  17. Measurement of transverse emittance at the source of spin-polarized electrons at the S-DALINAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckardt, Christian; Barday, Roman; Bonnes, Uwe; Eichhorn, Ralf; Enders, Joachim; Hessler, Christoph; Patalakha, Oleksandr; Platz, Markus; Poltoratska, Yuliya; Rick, Wolfgang [Institut fuer Kernphysik, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Ackermann, Wolfgang; Mueller, Wolfgang F.O.; Steiner, Bastian; Weiland, Thomas [Institut fuer Theorie Elektromagnetischer Felder, TU Darmstadt (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    A new injector concept for 100 keV spin-polarized electrons (SPIN) at the S-DALINAC has been developed. The transverse emittance was measured for beam characterization. The emittance is a quantity concerning the quality of the beam, describing the phase space area. Determination of the emittance requires measurement of the beam profile and knowledge of the focal length of a beam focussing device. A wire scanner unit consisting of two 50 {mu}m diameter tungsten wires is used for the beam-profile measurement. Data analysis is performed by fitting a gaussian model distribution to estimate the 1{sigma} beam radius. Each determined beam width is correlated to the corresponding focal length of a magnetic lens, and a parabola fit is applied to calculate the parameters of the {sigma}-matrix. The square root of the determinant of the {sigma}-matrix defines the emittance. The results of the calculation are presented and the emittance is compared to theoretical estimates.

  18. Measuring presenteeism: which questionnaire to use in physical activity research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Helen Elizabeth; Burton, Nicola; Gilson, Nicholas David; Brown, Wendy

    2014-02-01

    An emerging area of interest in workplace health is presenteeism; the measurable extent to which physical or psychosocial symptoms, conditions and disease adversely affect the work productivity of those who choose to remain at work. Given established links between presenteeism and health, and health and physical activity, presenteeism could be an important outcome in workplace physical activity research. This study provides a narrative review of questionnaires for use in such research. Eight self-report measures of presenteeism were identified. Information regarding development, constructs measured and psychometric properties was extracted from relevant articles. Questionnaires were largely self-administered, had 4-44 items, and recall periods ranging from 1 week to 1 year. Items were identified as assessing work performance, physical tolerance, psychological well-being and social or role functioning. Samples used to test questionnaires were predominantly American male employees, with an age range of 30-59 years. All instruments had undergone psychometric assessment, most commonly discriminant and construct validity. Based on instrument characteristics, the range of conceptual foci covered and acceptable measurement properties, the Health and Work Questionnaire, Work Ability Index, and Work Limitations Questionnaire are suggested as most suitable for further exploring the relationship between physical activity and presenteeism.

  19. The uncertainty in physical measurements an introduction to data analysis in the physics laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Fornasini, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    All measurements of physical quantities are affected by uncertainty. Understanding the origin of uncertainty, evaluating its extent and suitably taking it into account in data analysis is essential for assessing the degree of accuracy of phenomenological relationships and physical laws in both scientific research and technological applications. The Uncertainty in Physical Measurements: An Introduction to Data Analysis in the Physics Laboratory presents an introduction to uncertainty and to some of the most common procedures of data analysis. This book will serve the reader well by filling the gap between tutorial textbooks and highly specialized monographs. The book is divided into three parts. The first part is a phenomenological introduction to measurement and uncertainty: properties of instruments, different causes and corresponding expressions of uncertainty, histograms and distributions, and unified expression of uncertainty. The second part contains an introduction to probability theory, random variable...

  20. New Measurements of the Beam Normal Spin Asymmetries at Large Backward Angles with Hydrogen and Deuterium Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, D. Balaguer; Aulenbacher, K.; Baunack, S.; Diefenbach, J.; Gläser, B.; von Harrach, D.; Imai, Y.; Kabuß, E.-M.; Kothe, R.; Lee, J. H.; Merkel, H.; Mora Espí, M. C.; Müller, U.; Schilling, E.; Weinrich, C.; Capozza, L.; Maas, F. E.; Arvieux, J.; El-Yakoubi, M. A.; Frascaria, R.; Kunne, R.; Morlet, M.; Ong, S.; van de Wiele, J.; Kowalski, S.; Prok, Y.

    2017-07-01

    New measurements of the beam normal single spin asymmetry in the electron elastic and quasielastic scattering on the proton and deuteron, respectively, at large backward angles and at ⟨Q2⟩ =0.22 (GeV /c )2 and ⟨Q2⟩ =0.35 ( GeV /c )2 are reported. The experimentally observed asymmetries are compared with the theoretical calculation of Pasquini and Vanderhaeghen [Phys. Rev. C 70, 045206 (2004)., 10.1103/PhysRevC.70.045206]. The agreement of the measurements with the theoretical calculations shows a dominance of the inelastic intermediate excited states of the nucleon, π N and the Δ resonance. The measurements explore a new, important parameter region of the exchanged virtual photon virtualities.

  1. Improving quantum state transfer efficiency and entanglement distribution in binary tree spin network through incomplete collapsing measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Naghi; Ahansaz, Bahram

    2018-04-01

    We propose a mechanism for quantum state transfer (QST) over a binary tree spin network on the basis of incomplete collapsing measurements. To this aim, we perform initially a weak measurement (WM) on the central qubit of the binary tree network where the state of our concern has been prepared on that qubit. After the time evolution of the whole system, a quantum measurement reversal (QMR) is performed on a chosen target qubit. By taking optimal value for the strength of QMR, it is shown that the QST quality from the sending qubit to any typical target qubit on the binary tree is considerably improved in terms of the WM strength. Also, we show that how high-quality entanglement distribution over the binary tree network is achievable by using this approach.

  2. Enhancement and destruction of spin-Peierls physics in a one-dimensional quantum magnet under pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundu, Costel R.; Wen, Jiajia; He, Wei; Choi, Yongseong; Haskel, Daniel; Lee, Young S.

    2018-02-01

    The application of pressure reveals a rich phase diagram for the quantum S =1 /2 spin chain material TiOCl. We performed x-ray diffraction on single-crystal samples in a diamond-anvil cell down to T =4 K and pressures up to 14.5 GPa. Remarkably, the magnetic interaction scale increases dramatically with increasing pressure, as indicated by the high onset temperature of the spin-Peierls phase. The spin-Peierls phase was probed at ˜6 GPa up to 215 K but possibly extends in temperature to above T =300 K, indicating the possibility of a quantum singlet state at room temperature. Near the critical pressure for the transition to the more metallic phase, coexisting phases are exemplified by incommensurate order in two directions. Further comparisons are made with the phase diagrams of related spin-Peierls systems that display metallicity and superconductivity under pressure.

  3. Spin-orbital physics for p orbitals in alkali RO2 hyperoxides—Generalization of the Goodenough-Kanamori rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlfeld, K.; Daghofer, M.; Oleś, A. M.

    2011-10-01

    We derive a realistic spin-orbital model at finite Hund's exchange for alkali hyperoxides. We find that, due to the geometric frustration of the oxygen lattice, spin and orbital waves destabilize both spin and p-orbital order in almost all potential ground states. We show that the orbital order induced by the lattice overrules the one favoured by superexchange and that this, together with the large interorbital hopping, leads to generalized Goodenough-Kanamori rules. They i) lift the geometric frustration of the lattice, and ii) explain the observed layered C-type antiferromagnetic order in alkali hyperoxides. This is confirmed by a spin-wave dispersion with no soft-mode behavior presented here as a prediction for future experiments.

  4. Objectively measured physical activity and sedentary time in youth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooper, Ashley R; Goodman, Anna; Page, Angie S

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Physical activity and sedentary behaviour in youth have been reported to vary by sex, age, weight status and country. However, supporting data are often self-reported and/or do not encompass a wide range of ages or geographical locations. This study aimed to describe objectively......-measured physical activity and sedentary time patterns in youth. METHODS: The International Children's Accelerometry Database (ICAD) consists of ActiGraph accelerometer data from 20 studies in ten countries, processed using common data reduction procedures. Analyses were conducted on 27,637 participants (2......, overweight/obese participants were less active than their normal weight counterparts. Physical activity varied between samples from different countries, with a 15-20 % difference between the highest and lowest countries at age 9-10 and a 26-28 % difference at age 12-13. CONCLUSIONS: Physical activity...

  5. Spin and charge transport in the presence of spin-orbit interaction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 2. Spin and ... We present the study of spin and charge transport in nanostructures in the presence of spin-orbit (SO) interaction. ... Using these tight binding Hamiltonians and spin resolved Landauer–Büttiker formula, spin and charge transport is studied.

  6. Optically Driven Spin Based Quantum Dots for Quantum Computing - Research Area 6 Physics 6.3.2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-15

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This program conducted experimental and theoretical research aimed at developing an optically driven quantum dot quantum ...computer, where, the qubit is the spin of the electron trapped in a self-assembled quantum dot in InAs. Optical manipulation using the trion state...reports. In this reporting period, we discovered the nuclear spin quieting first discovered in 2008 is present in vertically coupled quantum dots but

  7. Design and optimization of a modular setup for measurements of three-dimensional spin polarization with ultrafast pulsed sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pincelli, T., E-mail: pincelli@iom.cnr.it; Rossi, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli studi di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14 km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Petrov, V. N. [Saint Petersburg State Polytechnical University, Politechnicheskaya Street 29, 195251 Saint Petersburg (Russian Federation); Brajnik, G.; Carrato, S. [Università degli Studi di Trieste, Piazzale Europa 1, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Ciprian, R.; Torelli, P.; Krizmancic, D.; Salvador, F.; De Luisa, A.; Panaccione, G. [Laboratorio TASC, IOM-CNR, S.S. 14 km 163.5, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Lollobrigida, V. [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica, Università Roma Tre, I-00146 Rome (Italy); Sergo, R.; Gubertini, A.; Cautero, G. [Sincrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A, Strada Statale 14-km 163.5 in AREA Science Park, Basovizza, 34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    ULTRASPIN is an apparatus devoted to the measurement of the spin polarization (SP) of electrons ejected from solid surfaces in a UHV environment. It is designed to exploit ultrafast light sources (free electron laser or laser high harmonic generation) and to perform (photo)electron spin analysis by an arrangement of Mott scattering polarimeters that measure the full SP vector. The system consists of two interconnected UHV vessels: one for surface science sample cleaning treatments, e-beam deposition of ultrathin films, and low energy electron diffraction/AES characterization. The sample environment in the polarimeter allows for cryogenic cooling and in-operando application of electric and magnetic fields. The photoelectrons are collected by an electrostatic accelerator and transport lens that form a periaxial beam that is subsequently directed by a Y-shaped electrostatic deflector to either one of the two orthogonal Mott polarimeters. The apparatus has been designed to operate in the extreme conditions of ultraintense single-X-ray pulses as originated by free electron lasers (up to 1 kHz), but it allows also for the single electron counting mode suitable when using statistical sources such as synchrotron radiation, cw-laser, or e-gun beams (up to 150 kcps).

  8. Design and optimization of a modular setup for measurements of three-dimensional spin polarization with ultrafast pulsed sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincelli, T.; Petrov, V. N.; Brajnik, G.; Ciprian, R.; Lollobrigida, V.; Torelli, P.; Krizmancic, D.; Salvador, F.; De Luisa, A.; Sergo, R.; Gubertini, A.; Cautero, G.; Carrato, S.; Rossi, G.; Panaccione, G.

    2016-03-01

    ULTRASPIN is an apparatus devoted to the measurement of the spin polarization (SP) of electrons ejected from solid surfaces in a UHV environment. It is designed to exploit ultrafast light sources (free electron laser or laser high harmonic generation) and to perform (photo)electron spin analysis by an arrangement of Mott scattering polarimeters that measure the full SP vector. The system consists of two interconnected UHV vessels: one for surface science sample cleaning treatments, e-beam deposition of ultrathin films, and low energy electron diffraction/AES characterization. The sample environment in the polarimeter allows for cryogenic cooling and in-operando application of electric and magnetic fields. The photoelectrons are collected by an electrostatic accelerator and transport lens that form a periaxial beam that is subsequently directed by a Y-shaped electrostatic deflector to either one of the two orthogonal Mott polarimeters. The apparatus has been designed to operate in the extreme conditions of ultraintense single-X-ray pulses as originated by free electron lasers (up to 1 kHz), but it allows also for the single electron counting mode suitable when using statistical sources such as synchrotron radiation, cw-laser, or e-gun beams (up to 150 kcps).

  9. Measuring and assessing the physical impact of beam trawling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Depestele, J.; Ivanovic, A.; Esmaelli, M.; Polet, H.; Roche, M.; Summerbell, K.; Teal, L.R.; Vanelslander, B.; O'Neill, F.G.

    2016-01-01

    Beam trawling causes physical disruption of the seabed through contact of the gear components with the sediment and the resuspension of sediment into the water column in the turbulent wake of the gear. To be able to measure and quantify these impacts is important so that gears of reduced impact can

  10. Physical and performance measures of university cricket players ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability to throw a ball at high velocity and with great accuracy is critical for successful performance in many ball sports. This study examines the physical characteristics and performance measurements amongst university cricketers. A convenient sample of 40 male cricketers from four teams at the University of the ...

  11. What stellar orbit is needed to measure the spin of the Galactic center black hole from astrometric data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waisberg, Idel; Dexter, Jason; Gillessen, Stefan; Pfuhl, Oliver; Eisenhauer, Frank; Plewa, Phillip M.; Bauböck, Michi; Jimenez-Rosales, Alejandra; Habibi, Maryam; Ott, Thomas; von Fellenberg, Sebastiano; Gao, Feng; Widmann, Felix; Genzel, Reinhard

    2018-02-01

    Astrometric and spectroscopic monitoring of individual stars orbiting the supermassive black hole in the Galactic Center offer a promising way to detect general relativistic effects. While low-order effects are expected to be detected following the periastron passage of S2 in Spring 2018, detecting higher-order effects due to black hole spin will require the discovery of closer stars. In this paper, we set out to determine the requirements such a star would have to satisfy to allow the detection of black hole spin. We focus on the instrument GRAVITY, which saw first light in 2016 and which is expected to achieve astrometric accuracies 10 - 100μas. For an observing campaign with duration T years, Nobs total observations, astrometric precision σx and normalized black hole spin χ, we find that a_{orb}(1-e^2)^{3/4} ≲ 300 R_S √{T/4 years} (N_{obs}/120)^{0.25} √{10 μ as/σ _x} √{χ /0.9} is needed. For χ = 0.9 and a potential observing campaign with σx = 10μas, 30 observations/year and duration 4-10 years, we expect ˜0.1 star with K stellar population in the central 1". We also propose a method through which GRAVITY could potentially measure radial velocities with precision ˜50 km/s. If the astrometric precision can be maintained, adding radial velocity information increases the expected number of stars by roughly a factor of two. While we focus on GRAVITY, the results can also be scaled to parameters relevant for future extremely large telescopes.

  12. Anisotropic phase diagram and spin fluctuations of the hyperkagome magnet Gd3Ga5O12 as revealed by sound velocity measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Alexandre; Parent, Jean-Michel; Quilliam, Jeffrey A.

    2017-08-01

    Sound velocity and attenuation measurements on the frustrated garnet material Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG) are presented as a function of field and temperature, with two different magnetic field orientations: [100 ] and [110 ] . We demonstrate that the phase diagram is highly anisotropic, with two distinct field-induced ordered phases for H ||[110 ] and only one for H ||[100 ] . Extensive lattice softening is found to occur at low fields, which can be associated with spin fluctuations. However, deep within the spin liquid phase a low-temperature stiffening of the lattice and reduced attenuation provide evidence for a spin gap which may be related to short-range antiferromagnetic correlations over minimal ten-spin loops.

  13. Microscopic studies of nonlocal spin dynamics and spin transport (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adur, Rohan; Du, Chunhui; Cardellino, Jeremy; Scozzaro, Nicolas; Wolfe, Christopher S.; Wang, Hailong; Herman, Michael; Bhallamudi, Vidya P.; Pelekhov, Denis V.; Yang, Fengyuan; Hammel, P. Chris, E-mail: hammel@physics.osu.edu [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    Understanding the behavior of spins coupling across interfaces in the study of spin current generation and transport is a fundamental challenge that is important for spintronics applications. The transfer of spin angular momentum from a ferromagnet into an adjacent normal material as a consequence of the precession of the magnetization of the ferromagnet is a process known as spin pumping. We find that, in certain circumstances, the insertion of an intervening normal metal can enhance spin pumping between an excited ferromagnetic magnetization and a normal metal layer as a consequence of improved spin conductance matching. We have studied this using inverse spin Hall effect and enhanced damping measurements. Scanned probe magnetic resonance techniques are a complementary tool in this context offering high resolution magnetic resonance imaging, localized spin excitation, and direct measurement of spin lifetimes or damping. Localized magnetic resonance studies of size-dependent spin dynamics in the absence of lithographic confinement in both ferromagnets and paramagnets reveal the close relationship between spin transport and spin lifetime at microscopic length scales. Finally, detection of ferromagnetic resonance of a ferromagnetic film using the photoluminescence of nitrogen vacancy spins in neighboring nanodiamonds demonstrates long-range spin transport between insulating materials, indicating the complexity and generality of spin transport in diverse, spatially separated, material systems.

  14. Field of first magnetic flux entry and pinning strength of superconductors for rf application measured with muon spin rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junginger, T.; Abidi, S. H.; Maffett, R. D.; Buck, T.; Dehn, M. H.; Gheidi, S.; Kiefl, R.; Kolb, P.; Storey, D.; Thoeng, E.; Wasserman, W.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2018-03-01

    The performance of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities used for particle accelerators depends on two characteristic material parameters: field of first flux entry Hentry and pinning strength. The former sets the limit for the maximum achievable accelerating gradient, while the latter determines how efficiently flux can be expelled related to the maximum achievable quality factor. In this paper, a method based on muon spin rotation (μ SR ) is developed to probe these parameters on samples. It combines measurements from two different spectrometers, one being specifically built for these studies and samples of different geometries. It is found that annealing at 1400 °C virtually eliminates all pinning. Such an annealed substrate is ideally suited to measure Hentry of layered superconductors, which might enable accelerating gradients beyond bulk niobium technology.

  15. Positive associations between physical and cognitive performance measures in fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Barbara J; Zettel-Watson, Laura; Chang, Jennifer C; Shimizu, Renee; Rutledge, Dana N; Jones, C Jessie

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the associations between perceived physical function (self-report) and physical and cognitive performance (objective assessments) in persons with fibromyalgia (FM). Correlational study. Exercise testing laboratory in Southern California. Community-residing ambulatory adults meeting the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria for FM (N=68; mean age, 59.5y). Not applicable. Composite Physical Function scale, Senior Fitness Test (3 items), Fullerton Advanced Balance scale, 30-foot walk, Trail Making Test parts A and B, Digit Symbol Substitution Test, a composite score of these 3 cognitive measures, attention/executive function composite, processing speed composite, problem solving, inhibition, and episodic memory composite. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that after controlling for age and FM symptoms, better physical performance (based on assessments, not self-report) was associated with higher cognitive function in attention/executive function, processing speed, problem solving, and inhibition. Researchers should continue to investigate the relationship between physical and cognitive function in both clinical and nonclinical populations, as well as explore changes across time. Because physical activity has been associated with neural improvements, further research may identify whether particular mechanisms, such as neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, or changes in inflammatory marker levels, are involved. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Proposal of measuring of physical education in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Rodriguez-Rodriguez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to design a new proposal as a means of evaluating the quality of Physical Education classes. The proposed variables are: Cardiovascular Endurance, Muscular Strength, Agility and Coordination, Open Skills and Motor Expression. The validation of this instrument was made by experts who evaluated and contributed to the research also a pilot application in three educational institutions was carried out. After each pilot application, modifications were made to achieve an improvement in the evaluation proposal and to project a comprehensive assessment tool to measure the quality of Physical Education classes for students in eighth grade, which can be applied effectively in different educational contexts.

  17. Measurements of the Neutron Longitudinal Spin Asymmetry A1n and Flavor Decomposition in the Valence Quark Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flay, David J. [Temple University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    The current data for the nucleon-virtual photon longitudinal spin asymmetry A1 on the proton and neutron have shown that the ratio of the polarized-to-unpolarized down-quarkparton distribution functions,Dd=d, tends towards -1/2 at large x, in disagreement with the perturbative QCD prediction that Dd/d approaches 1 but more in line with constituent quark models. As a part of experiment E06-014 in Hall A of Jefferson Lab, double-spin asymmetries were measured in the scattering of a longitudinally polarized electron beam of energies 4.74 and 5.89 GeV from a longitudinally and transversely polarized 3He target in the deep inelastic scattering and resonance region, allowing for the extraction of the neutron asymmetry An1 and the ratios Dd/d and Du/u. We will discuss our analysis of the data and present results for A1 and g1/F1 on both 3He and the neutron, and the resulting quark ratios for the up and down quarks in the kinematic range of 0.2

  18. Measuring physical capacity and performance in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Sarah E; Keene, David J

    2017-04-01

    We highlight the important differences between the concepts of capacity and performance and highlight the development of measures and their application in common conditions encountered in health care practice with older people. A number of expert consensus projects have concluded that mobility, balance, muscle strength and dexterity are core domains for capacity measurement in older people. Instruments with evidence of adequate psychometric properties for the evaluation of capacity in response to intervention programmes include the Short Physical Performance Battery, hand grip strength, mini-BEST and 9-hole pegboard test. Measures that can track individual change and convey information that can be used to inform clinical decision-making, individual prognosis or prediction of events require greater precision. However, few such measures are available. Performance measurement usually focuses on basic or instrumental (advanced) Activities of Daily Living performed by people in their usual environments. Finally, we discuss the limitations of physical performance and capacity measures and future developments that may enhance the use of these measures in health and clinical care. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Algorithmic randomness, physical entropy, measurements, and the second law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zurek, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    Algorithmic information content is equal to the size -- in the number of bits -- of the shortest program for a universal Turing machine which can reproduce a state of a physical system. In contrast to the statistical Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy, which measures ignorance, the algorithmic information content is a measure of the available information. It is defined without a recourse to probabilities and can be regarded as a measure of randomness of a definite microstate. I suggest that the physical entropy S -- that is, the quantity which determines the amount of the work ΔW which can be extracted in the cyclic isothermal expansion process through the equation ΔW = k B TΔS -- is a sum of two contributions: the mission information measured by the usual statistical entropy and the known randomness measured by the algorithmic information content. The sum of these two contributions is a ''constant of motion'' in the process of a dissipation less measurement on an equilibrium ensemble. This conservation under a measurement, which can be traced back to the noiseless coding theorem of Shannon, is necessary to rule out existence of a successful Maxwell's demon. 17 refs., 3 figs

  20. Measurement of the physical properties of the snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinar, N. J.; Pomeroy, J. W.

    2015-06-01

    This paper reviews measurement techniques and corresponding devices used to determine the physical properties of the seasonal snowpack from distances close to the ground surface. The review is placed in the context of the need for scientific observations of snowpack variables that provide inputs for predictive hydrological models that help to advance scientific understanding of geophysical processes related to snow in the near-surface cryosphere. Many of these devices used to measure snow are invasive and require the snowpack to be disrupted, thereby precluding the possibility for multiple measurements to be made at the same sampling location. Moreover, many devices rely on the use of empirical calibration equations that may not be valid at all geographic locations. The spatial density of observations with most snow measurement devices is often inadequate. There is a need for improved automation of snowpack measurement instrumentation with an emphasis on field-based feedback of measurement validity in lieu of postprocessing of samples or data at a lab or office location. The scientific future of snow measurement instrumentation thereby requires a synthesis between science and engineering principles that takes into consideration geophysics and the physics of device operation.

  1. Optimal Control of Large Spin Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessen, Poul

    2008-05-01

    Laboratory techniques to manipulate and observe ultracold atoms make these an attractive platform for testing new ideas in quantum control and measurement. I will discuss recent experiments in which we use tensor AC Stark shifts and magnetic fields to drive non-trivial quantum dynamics of a large spin-angular momentum associated with an atomic hyperfine ground state. The nonlinear spin Hamiltonian is sufficiently general to achieve universal quantum control over the 2F+1 dimensional state space, and allows us to generate arbitrary spin states and perform a full quantum state reconstruction of the result. We have implemented and verified time optimal controls to generate a broad variety of spin states, as well as an adiabatic scheme to generate spin-squeezed states for metrology. Most recently we have used our control and measurement tools to realize a common paradigm for quantum chaos known as the quantum kicked top. Direct observation of the phase space dynamics of this system has given an unprecedented look at quantum/classical correspondence. In the future we hope to use coherent optical feedback on atomic ensembles to extend our toolbox for control and measurement to collective spins. Applications include quantum metrology, quantum information processing and simulations of quantum manybody physics.

  2. First Measurement of Transverse-Spin-Dependent Azimuthal Asymmetries in the Drell-Yan Process

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aghasyan, M.; Akhunzyanov, R.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alexeev, M.; Amoroso, A.; Andrieux, V.; Anfimov, N. V.; Anosov, V.; Antoshkin, A.; Augsten, K.; Augustyniak, W.; Austregesilo, A.; Azevedo, C.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, M.; Barth, J.; Beck, R.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bicker, K.; Bielert, E. R.; Birsa, R.; Bodlák, M.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Büchele, M.; Chang, W.-C.; Chatterjee, C.; Chiosso, M.; Choi, I.; Chung, S. U.; Cicuttin, A.; Crespo, M.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; Dasgupta, S.; Denisov, O. Yu.; Dhara, L.; Donskov, S. V.; Doshita, N.; Dreisbach, Ch.; Dünnweber, W.; Dziewiecki, M.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, D.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger jr., M.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Fresne von Hohenesche, N.; Friedrich, J. M.; Frolov, V.; Fuchey, E.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O. P.; Gerassimov, S.; Giarra, J.; Giordano, F.; Gnesi, I.; Gorzellik, M.; Grasso, A.; Grosse-Perdekapm, M.; Grube, B.; Grussenmeyer, T.; Guskov, A.; Hahne, D.; Hamar, G.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F.; Heitz, R.; Herrmann, F.; Horikawa, N.; d'Hose, N.; Hsieh, C.-Yu.; Huber, S.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iwata, T.; Jarý, V.; Joosten, R.; Joerg, P.; Kabuss, E.; Kerbizi, A.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G. V.; Khokhlov, Yu. A.; Kisselev, Y.; Klein, F.; Koivuniemi, J. H.; Kolosov, V. N.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V. F.; Kotzinian, A. M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Král, Z.; Krämer, M.; Kremser, P.; Krinner, F.; Kroumchtein, Z. V.; Kulinich, Y.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Kurjata, R. P.; Květoň, A.; Lednev, A. A.; Levillain, M.; Levorato, S.; Lian, Y.-S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Longo, R.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Makins, N.; Makke, N.; Mallot, G. K.; Marianski, B.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matoušek, J.; Matsuda, H.; Matsuda, T.; Meshcheryakov, G.; Meyer, M.; Meyer, W.; Mikhailov, Yu. V.; Mikhasenko, M.; Mitrofanov, E.; Mitrofanov, N.; Miyachi, Y.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Nový, J.; Nowak, W. D.; Nukazuka, G.; Nunes, A.S.; Olshevsky, A. G.; Orlov, I.; Ostrick, M.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, F.; Pešek, M.; Peshekhonov, D. V.; Pierre, N.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V. A.; Pretz, J.; Quaresma, M.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Regali, C.; Reicherz, G.; Riedl, C.; Rogacheva, N. S.; Roskot, M.; Ryabchikov, D.; Rybnikov, A.; Rychter, A.; Salač, R.; Samoylenko, V. D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, C.; Sarkar, S.; Savin, I. A.; Sawada, T.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schmidt, K.; Schmieden, H.; Schönning, K.; Seder, E.; Selyunin, A.; Shevchenko, O. Yu.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sirtl, S.; Slunecka, M.; Smolík, J.; Srnka, Aleš; Steffen, D.; Stolarski, M.; Subrt, O.; Šulc, M.; Suzuki, H.; Szabelski, A.; Szameitat, T.; Sznajder, P.; Takewaka, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Tessaro, S.; Terca, G.; Tessarotto, F.; Thiel, A.; Tomsa, J.; Tosello, F.; Tskhay, V.; Uhl, S.; Vauth, A.; Veloso, J.; Virius, M.; Vít, M.; Vondra, J.; Wallner, S.; Weisrock, T.; Wilfert, M.; Ter Wolbeek, J.; Zaremba, K.; Závada, P.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Zhuravlev, N.; Ziembicki, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 11 (2017), s. 1-7, č. článku 112002. ISSN 0031-9007 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : deep-inelastic scattering * sivers asymmetries * angular-distributions Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Nuclear physics Impact factor: 8.462, year: 2016

  3. Lilith: a tool for constraining new physics from Higgs measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernon, Jérémy; Dumont, Béranger

    2015-09-01

    The properties of the observed Higgs boson with mass around 125 GeV can be affected in a variety of ways by new physics beyond the Standard Model (SM). The wealth of experimental results, targeting the different combinations for the production and decay of a Higgs boson, makes it a non-trivial task to assess the patibility of a non-SM-like Higgs boson with all available results. In this paper we present Lilith, a new public tool for constraining new physics from signal strength measurements performed at the LHC and the Tevatron. Lilith is a Python library that can also be used in C and C++/ ROOT programs. The Higgs likelihood is based on experimental results stored in an easily extensible XML database, and is evaluated from the user input, given in XML format in terms of reduced couplings or signal strengths.The results of Lilith can be used to constrain a wide class of new physics scenarios.

  4. The Danish Physical Activity Cohort with Objective measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marie Birk; Lagersted-Olsen, Julie; Villumsen, Morten

    2016-01-01

    -collar occupations. Analyses of the representativeness of the study populationindicated that it was representative of the background target population, exceptthat women were slightly more likely to consent to participate. Objective measurementdevices were mounted on 909 workers in total and response rate......Background. Current available research on the association between physical work demandsand musculoskeletal pain has been criticized for using self-reported data, crosssectionaldesign, insufficient adjustment for potential confounders and inadequate followup on the recurrent and fluctuating pattern...... of musculoskeletal pain. In this abstract, wereport on the profile of the Danish Physical Activity Cohort with Objective Measurements(DPhacto). DPhacto investigated the association between objective diurnal field measurementsof physical activities and provides follow up on pain. Methods. Eligible workers (n=2...

  5. Positron scattering measurements for application to medical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, James

    2015-09-01

    While the use of positrons in medical imaging is now well established, there is still much to learn regarding the transport of positrons through the body, and the subsequent damage induced. Current models of dosimetry use only a crude approximation of the collision physics involved, and at low energies misrepresent the thermalisation process to a considerable degree. Recently, collaborative work has commenced to attempt to refine these models, incorporating a better representation of the underlying physics and trying to gain a better understanding of the damage done after the emission of a positron from a medical radioisotope. This problem is being attacked from several different angles, with new models being developed based upon established techniques in plasma and swarm physics. For all these models, a realistic representation of the collision processes of positrons with relevant molecular species is required. At the Australian National University, we have undertaken a program of measurements of positron scattering from a range of molecules that are important in biological systems, with a focus on analogs to DNA. This talk will present measurements of positron scattering from a range of these molecules, as well as describing the experimental techniques employed to make such measurements. Targets have been measured that are both liquid and solid at room temperature, and new approaches have been developed to get absolute cross section data. The application of the data to various models of positron thermalisation will also be described.

  6. Constraining new physics with collider measurements of Standard Model signatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterworth, Jonathan M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Grellscheid, David [IPPP, Department of Physics, Durham University,Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Krämer, Michael; Sarrazin, Björn [Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology, RWTH Aachen University,Sommerfeldstr. 16, 52056 Aachen (Germany); Yallup, David [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London,Gower St., London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2017-03-14

    A new method providing general consistency constraints for Beyond-the-Standard-Model (BSM) theories, using measurements at particle colliders, is presented. The method, ‘Constraints On New Theories Using Rivet’, CONTUR, exploits the fact that particle-level differential measurements made in fiducial regions of phase-space have a high degree of model-independence. These measurements can therefore be compared to BSM physics implemented in Monte Carlo generators in a very generic way, allowing a wider array of final states to be considered than is typically the case. The CONTUR approach should be seen as complementary to the discovery potential of direct searches, being designed to eliminate inconsistent BSM proposals in a context where many (but perhaps not all) measurements are consistent with the Standard Model. We demonstrate, using a competitive simplified dark matter model, the power of this approach. The CONTUR method is highly scaleable to other models and future measurements.

  7. Comparison of cone beam computed tomography imaging with physical measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratemann, S A; Huang, J C; Maki, K; Miller, A J; Hatcher, D C

    2008-02-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the accuracy of measuring linear distances between landmarks commonly used in orthodontic analysis on a human skull using two cone beam CT (CBCT) systems. Measurements of length were taken using volumetric data from two CBCT systems and were compared with physical measures using a calliper applied to one human adult skull. Landmarks were identified with chromium steel balls embedded at 32 cranial and 33 mandibular landmarks and the linear measures were taken with a digital calliper. The skull was then scanned with two different CBCT systems: the NewTom QR DVT 9000 (Aperio Inc, Sarasota, FL) and the Hitachi MercuRay (Hitachi Medico Technology, Tokyo, Japan). CT data including the landmark point data were threshold segmented using CyberMed's CB Works software (CB Works 1.0, CyberMed Inc., Seoul, Korea). The resulting segmentations were exported from CB Works as VRML (WRL) files to Amira software (Amira 3.1, Mercury Computer Systems GmbH, Berlin, Germany). The error was small compared with the gold standard of the physical calliper measures for both the NewTom (0.07+/-0.41 mm) and CB MercuRay (0.00+/-0.22 mm) generated data. Absolute error to the gold standard was slightly positive, indicating minor compression relative to the calliper measurement. The error was slightly smaller in the CB MercuRay than in the NewTom, probably related to a broader greyscale range for describing beam attenuation in 12-bit vs 8-bit data. The volumetric data rendered with both CBCT systems provided highly accurate data compared with the gold standard of physical measures directly from the skulls, with less than 1% relative error.

  8. Parent-child relationship of directly measured physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mâsse Louise C

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on parent-child correlations of physical activity have been mixed. Few studies have examined concurrent temporal patterns of physical activity and sedentary behaviors in parents and children using direct measures. The purpose of this study was to examine parent-child activity correlations by gender, day of week, and time of day, using accelerometers - a method for direct assessment of physical activity. Methods Accelerometers were used to assess physical activity and sedentary time in 45 fathers, 45 mothers and their children (23 boys, 22 girls, mean age 9.9 years over the course of 4 days (Thursday - Sunday. Participants were instructed to wear accelerometers for 24 hours per day. Data from accelerometers were aggregated into waking hours on weekdays and weekends (6:00 am to midnight and weekday after-school hours (3:00 - 7:00 pm. Results Across the 4 days, the mean minutes per day of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA for fathers was 30.0 (s.d. = 17.3, for mothers was 30.1 (s.d. = 20.1 and for children was 145.47 (s.d. = 51.64. Mothers' and fathers' minutes of MVPA and minutes of sedentary time were positively correlated with child physical activity and sedentary time (all ps Conclusions Greater parental MVPA was associated with increased child MVPA. In addition, having two parents with higher levels of MVPA was associated with greater levels of activity in children. Sedentary time in children was not as strongly correlated with that of their parents. Findings lend support to the notion that to increase childhood activity levels it may be fruitful to improve physical activity among parents.

  9. Learning in a Physics Classroom Community: Physics Learning Identity Construct Development, Measurement and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sissi L.

    At the university level, introductory science courses usually have high student to teacher ratios which increases the challenge to meaningfully connect with students. Various curricula have been developed in physics education to actively engage students in learning through social interactions with peers and instructors in class. This learning environment demands not only conceptual understanding but also learning to be a scientist. However, the success of student learning is typically measured in test performance and course grades while assessment of student development as science learners is largely ignored. This dissertation addresses this issue with the development of an instrument towards a measure of physics learning identity (PLI) which is used to guide and complement case studies through student interviews and in class observations. Using the conceptual framework based on Etienne Wenger's communities of practice (1998), I examine the relationship between science learning and learning identity from a situated perspective in the context of a large enrollment science class as a community of practice. This conceptual framework emphasizes the central role of identity in the practices negotiated in the classroom community and in the way students figure out their trajectory as members. Using this framework, I seek to understand how the changes in student learning identity are supported by active engagement based instruction. In turn, this understanding can better facilitate the building of a productive learning community and provide a measure for achievement of the curricular learning goals in active engagement strategies. Based on the conceptual framework, I developed and validated an instrument for measuring physics learning identity in terms of student learning preferences, self-efficacy for learning physics, and self-image as a physics learner. The instrument was pilot tested with a population of Oregon State University students taking calculus based

  10. Spin Hall effect and spin swapping in diffusive superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espedal, Camilla; Lange, Peter; Sadjina, Severin; Mal'shukov, A. G.; Brataas, Arne

    2017-02-01

    We consider the spin-orbit-induced spin Hall effect and spin swapping in diffusive superconductors. By employing the nonequilibrium Keldysh Green's function technique in the quasiclassical approximation, we derive coupled transport equations for the spectral spin and particle distributions and for the energy density in the elastic scattering regime. We compute four contributions to the spin Hall conductivity, namely, skew scattering, side jump, anomalous velocity, and the Yafet contribution. The reduced density of states in the superconductor causes a renormalization of the spin Hall angle. We demonstrate that all four of these contributions to the spin Hall conductivity are renormalized in the same way in the superconducting state. In its simplest manifestation, spin swapping transforms a primary spin current into a secondary spin current with swapped current and polarization directions. We find that the spin-swapping coefficient is not explicitly but only implicitly affected by the superconducting gap through the renormalized diffusion coefficients. We discuss experimental consequences for measurements of the (inverse) spin Hall effect and spin swapping in four-terminal geometries. In our geometry, below the superconducting transition temperature, the spin-swapping signal is increased an order of magnitude while changes in the (inverse) spin Hall signal are moderate.

  11. Calorimeters for Precision Timing Measurements in High Energy Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornheim, Adolf; Apresyan, Artur; Duarte, Javier; Pena, Cristian; Ronzhin, Anatoly; Spiropulu, Maria; Xie, Si

    2015-02-01

    Current and future high energy physics particle colliders are capable to provide instantaneous luminosities of 1034 cm-2s-1 and above. The high center of mass energy, the large number of simultaneous collision of beam particles in the experiments and the very high repetition rates of the collision events pose huge challenges. They result in extremely high particle fluxes, causing very high occupancies in the particle physics detectors operating at these machines. To reconstruct the physics events, the detectors have to make as much information as possible available on the final state particles. We discuss how timing information with a precision of around 10 ps and below can aid the reconstruction of the physics events under such challenging conditions. High energy photons play a crucial role in this context. About one third of the particle flux originating from high energy hadron collisions is detected as photons, stemming from the decays of neutral mesons. In addition, many key physics signatures under study are identified by high energy photons in the final state. They pose a particular challenge in that they can only be detected once they convert in the detector material. The particular challenge in measuring the time of arrival of a high energy photon lies in the stochastic component of the distance to the initial conversion and the size of the electromagnetic shower. They extend spatially over distances which propagation times of the initial photon and the subsequent electromagnetic shower which are large compared to the desired precision. We present studies and measurements from test beams and a cosmic muon test stand for calorimeter based timing measurements to explore the ultimate timing precision achievable for high energy photons of 10 GeV and above. We put particular focus on techniques to measure the timing with a precision of about 10 ps in association with the energy of the photon. For calorimeters utilizing scintillating materials and light guiding

  12. Postpartum Physical Activity: Measuring Theory of Planned Behavior Constructs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Derek; Evenson, Kelly R.; Wen, Fang; Wilcox, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Objective top develop and examine evidence for factor validity and longitudinal invariance of scales used to measure theory of planned behavior constructs applied to physical activity. Methods Self-report questionnaires were administered at 3- (n=267) and 12-months (n=333) postpartum. Longitudinal data were available for 185 of these women. Results A single factor model fit data from the normative beliefs, perceived behavioral control, and behavioral beliefs scales. Attitude and control beliefs were found to be multidimensional. Longitudinal invariance of all scales was supported. Conclusions Each scale had strong validity evidence. Future research using these measures will help identify areas for intervention and reveal how changes in constructs influence physical activity over time. PMID:20218751

  13. Measurement of the Longitudinal Spin Transfer to Lambda and Anti-Lambda Hyperons in Polarised Muon DIS

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, M.; Alexandrov, Yu.; Alexeev, G.D.; Amoroso, A.; Austregesilo, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Barth, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Bernhard, J.; Bertini, R.; Bettinelli, M.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Brona, G.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.P.; Chapiro, A.; Chiosso, M.; Chung, S.U.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Crespo, M.L.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dafni, T.; Das, S.; Dasgupta, S.S.; Denisov, O.Yu.; Dhara, L.; Diaz, V.; Dinkelbach, A.M.; Donskov, S.V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dunnweber, W.; Efremov, A.; Eversheim, P.D.; Eyrich, W.; Faessler, M.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.Jr.; Fischer, H.; Franco, C.; Friedrich, J.M.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.P.; Gazda, R.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Grabmuller, S.; Grajek, O.A.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Gushterski, R.; Guskov, A.; Haas, F.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Heckmann, J.; Heinsius, F.H.; Hermann, M.; Hermann, R.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; Horikawa, N.; Hoppner, Ch.; d'Hose, N.; Ilgner, C.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Ivanshin, Yu.; Iven, B.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Jasinski, P.; Jegou, G.; Joosten, R.; Kabuss, E.; Kang, D.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.V.; Khokhlov, Yu.A.; Kisselev, Yu.; Klein, F.; Klimaszewski, K.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.H.; Kolosov, V.N.; Komissarov, E.V.; Kondo, K.; Konigsmann, K.; Konopka, R.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.F.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.M.; Kouznetsov, O.; Kowalik, K.; Kramer, M.; Kral, A.; Kroumchtein, Z.V.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Le Goff, J.M.; Lednev, A.A.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.K.; Mann, A.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Massmann, F.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.N.; Meyer, W.; Michigami, T.; Mikhailov, Yu.V.; Moinester, M.A.; Mutter, A.; Nagaytsev, A.; Nagel, T.; Nassalski, J.; Negrini, S.; Nerling, F.; Neubert, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.I.; Olshevsky, A.G.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Panknin, R.; Panzieri, D.; Parsamyan, B.; Paul, S.; Pawlukiewicz-Kaminska, B.; Perevalova, E.; Pesaro, G.; Peshekhonov, D.V.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polak, J.; Polyakov, V.A.; Pontecorvo, G.; Pretz, J.; Quintans, C.; Rajotte, J.F.; Ramos, S.; Rapatsky, V.; Reicherz, G.; Reggiani, D.; Richter, A.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Rondio, E.; Ryabchikov, D.I.; Samoylenko, V.D.; Sandacz, A.; Santos, H.; Sapozhnikov, M.G.; Sarkar, S.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmitt, L.; Schroder, W.; Shevchenko, O.Yu.; Siebert, H.W.; Silva, L.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.N.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.I.; Sosio, S.; Sozzi, F.; Srnka, A.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Takekawa, S.; Tessaro, S.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Tkatchev, L.G.; Venugopal, G.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.V.; Vossen, A.; Weitzel, Q.; Windmolders, R.; Wislicki, W.; Wollny, H.; Zaremba, K.; Zemlyanichkina, E.; Ziembicki, M.; Zhao, J.; Zhuravlev, N.; Zvyagin, A.

    2009-01-01

    The longitudinal polarisation transfer from muons to lambda and anti-lambda hyperons, D_LL, has been studied in deep inelastic scattering off an unpolarised isoscalar target at the COMPASS experiment at CERN. The spin transfers to lambda and anti-lambda produced in the current fragmentation region exhibit different behaviours as a function of x and xF . The measured x and xF dependences of D^lambda_LL are compatible with zero, while D^anti-lambda_LL tends to increase with xF, reaching values of 0.4 - 0.5. The resulting average values are D^lambda_LL = -0.012 +- 0.047 +- 0.024 and D^anti-lambda_LL = 0.249 +- 0.056 +- 0.049. These results are discussed in the frame of recent model calculations.

  14. A measurement of spin asymmetries in quasi-real photo-production of hadrons with high transverse momentum at COMPASS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, R.

    2007-07-15

    During 2002-2004, the COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has recorded 1.5 fb{sup -1} of deep inelastic scattering events with polarized muon beam and polarized deuterium target. The cross section for single-inclusive charged hadron production in dependence on the hadron's transverse momentum p{sub T} is extracted. A PYTHIA and GEANT simulation is used to obtain the acceptance correction factors. The double spin asymmetry A{sub LL}{sup b,d} is measured in the region 1 GeV/c

  15. Measurement of Spin Dependent Observables in the $\\overline pN$ Elastic Scattering from 300 to 700 MeV/c

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to measure @*N spin obssservables using a frozen spin target and a high resolution spectrometer (SPES II). The &bar.NN scattering is usually described with NN potentials transformed by G-parity, where the large annihilation cross section (@s^a^n/@s^e^l$>$2) is taken into account. The different theoretical approaches fit reasonably well the existing data on spin integrated cross sections. For the spin dependent observables, the predictions depend consistently on the theoretical inputs.\\\\ \\\\ A strong energy dependence of the @*p polarization Ay(@q) is predicted. We plan to check it measuring the angular distribution of Ay(@q) for @* momenta between 300 and 700 MV/c. Using a deuterium target, measurements of Ay(@q) for @*d in the same energy range will provide information on @*n scattering.\\\\ \\\\ The @* beam hits a 5 mm thick frozen spin target which has a large opening aperture. We expect a polarization of @=~80\\% with a low holding field of (.35Tm). The incident trajectory is de...

  16. Summary of ORSphere Critical and Reactor Physics Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Margaret A.; Bess, John D.

    2016-09-01

    In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J. J. Lynn, and J. R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s. The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. This critical configuration has been evaluated. Preliminary results were presented at ND2013. Since then, the evaluation was finalized and judged to be an acceptable benchmark experiment for the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Project (ICSBEP). Additionally, reactor physics measurements were performed to determine surface button worths, central void worth, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron decay constant, fission density and neutron importance. These measurements have been evaluated and found to be acceptable experiments and are discussed in full detail in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments. The purpose of this paper is summary summarize all the critical and reactor physics measurements evaluations and, when possible, to compare them to GODIVA experiment results.

  17. Summary of ORSphere critical and reactor physics measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Margaret A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader, J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF with highly enriched uranium (HEU metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s. The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. This critical configuration has been evaluated. Preliminary results were presented at ND2013. Since then, the evaluation was finalized and judged to be an acceptable benchmark experiment for the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Project (ICSBEP. Additionally, reactor physics measurements were performed to determine surface button worths, central void worth, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron decay constant, fission density and neutron importance. These measurements have been evaluated and found to be acceptable experiments and are discussed in full detail in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments. The purpose of this paper is to summarize all the evaluated critical and reactor physics measurements evaluations.

  18. Teaching environmental physics with a field measurement campaign

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boman, Johan; Dynefors, Bertil; Kuehlmann-Berenzon, Sharon

    2003-01-01

    With 15 years of experience of teaching environmental physics, we still need to develop our curriculum. In this paper we present our findings from teaching environmental physics in close association with mathematical statistics in an applied field measurement campaign. Here not only environmental physics is taught, but also the concept of experimental planning, design, implementation, and evaluation of a field measurement campaign. The field measurement gives the students the opportunity to follow the whole process starting from experimental planning, including formulating the questions to answer, through design of the experiment, sample collection, analysis, and evaluation, together with the writing of a final report. All possible aspects of the problem that the students are working on can be carefully investigated, but the emphasis has been on understanding the whole process of carrying out a field campaign. This holistic view gives the students more interest in and better motivation for exploring the subject. This course gave the students insight into the field of interdisciplinary environmental research, promoted their creativity, and also gave the teachers a feeling of satisfaction

  19. Summary of ORSphere critical and reactor physics measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Margaret A.; Bess, John D.

    2017-09-01

    In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s. The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. This critical configuration has been evaluated. Preliminary results were presented at ND2013. Since then, the evaluation was finalized and judged to be an acceptable benchmark experiment for the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Project (ICSBEP). Additionally, reactor physics measurements were performed to determine surface button worths, central void worth, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron decay constant, fission density and neutron importance. These measurements have been evaluated and found to be acceptable experiments and are discussed in full detail in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments. The purpose of this paper is to summarize all the evaluated critical and reactor physics measurements evaluations.

  20. Cloud Physics Lidar: Instrument Description and Initial Measurement Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Matthew; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; Scott, V. Stanley; Spinhirne, James; Schmid, Beat

    2002-01-01

    The Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) is a new custom-built instrument for the NASA ER-2 high-altitude aircraft. The CPL can provide multiwavelength measurements of cirrus, subvisual cirrus, and aerosols with high temporal and spatial resolution. Its state-of-the-art technology gives it a high repetition rate, and photon-counting detection, and includes a low-pulse-energy laser. The CPL was first deployed at the Southern African Regional Science Initiative's 2000 field campaign during August and September 2000. This paper provides an overview of the instrument and initial data results to illustrate the measurement capability of the CPL.

  1. The Cloud Physics Lidar: Instrument Description and Initial Measurement Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Matthew; Hlavka, Dennis; Hart, William; Spinhirne, James; Scott, V. Stanley; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The new Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) has been built for use on the NASA ER-2 high altitude aircraft. The purpose of the CPL is to provide multi-wavelength measurements of cirrus, subvisual cirrus, and aerosols with high temporal and spatial resolution. The CPL utilizes state-of-the-art technology with a high repetition rate, a low pulse energy laser, and photon-counting detection. The first deployment for the CPL was the SAFARI-2000 field campaign during August-September 2000. We provide here an overview of the instrument and initial data results to illustrate the measurement capability of the CPL.

  2. Accuracy enhancement of magnetic field distribution measurements within a large cell spin-exchange relaxation-free magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusarov, Alexander; Ben-Amar Baranga, Andrei; Levron, David; Shuker, Reuben

    2018-04-01

    The factorial design technique is implemented to achieve greater accuracy in the determination of magnetic field distribution within a single cell of spin-exchange relaxation-free atomic magnetometer. Three-dimensional magnetic field distribution within a single vapor cell can be found by consecutively pumping, layer by layer, all the cell volumes perpendicular to the probe laser beam, detected by a photodiode array. Thus each element of the array collects information about the magnetic field in the small volume (voxel) which forms when the corresponding part of the probe beam and optically pumped layer cross. One of the most effective ways to enhance measurement accuracy is repeated pumping of the layers and averaging the measured results. However, the measurement time is multiplied several times due to the repeated scanning of the cell volume. The suggested technique enables increased measurement accuracy of each voxel while preserving the number of measurements. Magnetic field distribution is determined by the illumination of the cell layers one by one or simultaneously, according to a special algorithm, with subsequent multifactorial analysis of the obtained results.

  3. Impact of measurable physical phenomena on contact thermal comfort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fojtlín, Miloš; Pokorný, Jan; Fišer, Jan; Toma, Róbert; Tuhovčák, Ján

    Cabin HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air-conditioning) systems have become an essential part of personal vehicles as demands for comfortable transport are still rising. In fact, 85 % of the car trips in Europe are shorter than 18 km and last only up to 30 minutes. Under such conditions, the HVAC unit cannot often ensure desired cabin environment and passengers are prone to experience thermal stress. For this reason, additional comfort systems, such as heated or ventilated seats, are available on the market. However, there is no straightforward method to evaluate thermal comfort at the contact surfaces nowadays. The aim of this work is to summarise information about heated and ventilated seats. These technologies use electrical heating and fan driven air to contact area in order to achieve enhanced comfort. It is also expected, that such measures may contribute to lower energy consumption. Yet, in real conditions it is almost impossible to measure the airflow through the ventilated seat directly. Therefore, there is a need for an approach that would correlate measurable physical phenomena with thermal comfort. For this reason, a method that exploits a measurement of temperatures and humidity at the contact area is proposed. Preliminary results that correlate comfort with measurable physical phenomena are demonstrated.

  4. Impact of measurable physical phenomena on contact thermal comfort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fojtlín Miloš

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cabin HVAC (Heating Ventilation and Air-conditioning systems have become an essential part of personal vehicles as demands for comfortable transport are still rising. In fact, 85 % of the car trips in Europe are shorter than 18 km and last only up to 30 minutes. Under such conditions, the HVAC unit cannot often ensure desired cabin environment and passengers are prone to experience thermal stress. For this reason, additional comfort systems, such as heated or ventilated seats, are available on the market. However, there is no straightforward method to evaluate thermal comfort at the contact surfaces nowadays. The aim of this work is to summarise information about heated and ventilated seats. These technologies use electrical heating and fan driven air to contact area in order to achieve enhanced comfort. It is also expected, that such measures may contribute to lower energy consumption. Yet, in real conditions it is almost impossible to measure the airflow through the ventilated seat directly. Therefore, there is a need for an approach that would correlate measurable physical phenomena with thermal comfort. For this reason, a method that exploits a measurement of temperatures and humidity at the contact area is proposed. Preliminary results that correlate comfort with measurable physical phenomena are demonstrated.

  5. Physical quantities, their role and treatment in gasflow measurement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narjes, L.

    1977-06-01

    We begin by taking a closer look at the concepts physical quantity, dimension and unit of measurement. Then a survey is given of the physical quantities applied in gasflow measurement techniques. Here the volume-, as well as the mass-flow rate, as derived quantities are of particular interest. The application of these quantities in relation to the legal units of measurement is specifically described. In addition the quantity equation and further the quantity equation adapted to the use of suitable units and their modes of application are compared. In the appendix four examples clarify these modes. Special attention is paid to the quantity equation adapted to practically oriented units. The applications of this type of equation in VDI regulations, standards and other technical guidelines for measurement of flow are mentioned. Moreover, the meaning of the standard state for the comparison of flows of gaseous fluids is illustrated. The difficulties concerning an international agreement on uniform standard temperature are explained. Starting from there, the advantages of the fundamental quantity 'amount of substance' applied to the measurement of flow are described. The use of this quantity for the thermodynamic state of ideal and real gases, respectively gas mixtures, is demonstrated in the appendix by an example. (orig.) [de

  6. Measurement of Transverse Single-Spin Asymmetries for Di-JetProduction in Proton-Proton Collisions at sqrt s = 200 GeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev, V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2007-10-02

    We report the first measurement of the opening angledistribution between pairs of jets produced in high-energy collisions oftransversely polarized protons. The measurement probes (Sivers)correlations between the transverse spin orientation of a proton and thetransverse momentum directions of its partons. With both beams polarized,the wide pseudorapidity (-1 leq eta leq +2) coverage for jets permitsseparation of Sivers functions for the valence and sea regions. Theresulting asymmetries are all consistent with zero and considerablysmaller than Sivers effects observed in semi-inclusive deep inelasticscattering (SIDIS). We discuss theoretical attempts to reconcile the newresults with the sizable transverse spin effects seen in SIDIS andforward hadron production in pp collisions.

  7. Measurement of the spin structure of the deuteron in the DIS region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ageev, E.; Alexakhin, V.; Alexandrov, Y.; Alexeev, G.; Amoroso, A.; Badelek, B.; Balestra, F.; Ball, J.; Baum, G.; Bedfer, Y.; Berglund, P.; Bernet, C.; Bertini, R.; Birsa, R.; Bisplinghoff, J.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bravar, A.; Bressan, A.; Burtin, E.; Bussa, M.; Bytchkov, V.; Cerini, L.; Chapiro, A.; Cicuttin, A.; Colantoni, M.; Colavita, A.; Costa, S.; Crespo, M.; d'Hose, N.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. S.; De Masi, R.; Dedek, N.; Denisov, O.; Dhara, L.; Diaz Kavka, V.; Dinkelbach, A.; Dolgopolov, A.; Donskov, S.; Dorofeev, V.; Doshita, N.; Duic, V.; Dünnweber, W.; Ehlers, J.; Eversheim, P.; Eyrich, W.; Fabro, M.; Faessler, M.; Falaleev, V.; Fauland, P.; Ferrero, A.; Ferrero, L.; Finger, M.; Finger jr., M.; Fischer, H.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, J.; Frolov, V.; Fuchs, U.; Garfagnini, R.; Gautheron, F.; Gavrichtchouk, O.; Gerassimov, S.; Geyer, R.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Goertz, S.; Gorin, A.; Grajek, O.; Grasso, A.; Grube, B.; Grünemaier, A.; Hannappel, J.; von Harrach, D.; Hasegawa, T.; Hedicke, S.; Heinsius, F.; Hermann, R.; Hess, C.; Hinterberger, F.; von Hodenberg, M.; Horikawa, N.; Horikawa, S.; Ijaduola, R.; Ilgner, C.; Ioukaev, A.; Ishimoto, S.; Ivanov, O.; Iwata, T.; Jahn, R.; Janata, A.; Joosten, R.; Jouravlev, N. I.; Kabuss, E.; Kalinnikov, V.; Kang, D.; Karstens, F.; Kastaun, W.; Ketzer, B.; Khaustov, G.; Khokhlov, Y.; Khomutov, N.; Kisselev, Y.; Klein, F.; Koblitz, S.; Koivuniemi, J.; Kolosov, V.; Komissarov, E.; Kondo, K.; Königsmann, K.; Konoplyannikov, A.; Konorov, I.; Konstantinov, V.; Korentchenko, A.; Korzenev, A.; Kotzinian, A.; Koutchinski, N.; Kowalik, K.; Kravchuk, N.; Krivokhizhin, G.; Kroumchtein, Z.; Kuhn, R.; Kunne, F.; Kurek, K.; Ladygin, M.; Lamanna, M.; Le Goff, J.; Leberig, M.; Lichtenstadt, J.; Liska, T.; Ludwig, I.; Maggiora, A.; Maggiora, M.; Magnon, A.; Mallot, G.; Manuilov, I.; Marchand, C.; Marroncle, J.; Martin, A.; Marzec, J.; Matsuda, T.; Maximov, A.; Medved, K.; Meyer, W.; Mielech, A.; Mikhailov, Y.; Moinester, M.; Nähle, O.; Nassalski, J.; Neliba, S.; Neyret, D.; Nikolaenko, V.; Nozdrin, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Olshevsky, A.; Ostrick, M.; Padee, A.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pereira, H.; Peshekhonov, D.; Peshekhonov, V.; Piragino, G.; Platchkov, S.; Platzer, K.; Pochodzalla, J.; Polyakov, V.; Popov, A.; Pretz, J.; Quintans, C.; Ramos, S.; Rebourgeard, P.; Reicherz, G.; Reymann, J.; Rith, K.; Rozhdestvensky, A.; Rondio, E.; Sadovski, A.; Saller, E.; Samoylenko, V.; Sandacz, A.; Sans, M.; Sapozhnikov, M.; Savin, I.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitt, H.; Schmitt, L.; Shevchenko, O.; Shishkin, A.; Siebert, H.; Sinha, L.; Sissakian, A.; Skachkova, A.; Slunecka, M.; Smirnov, G.; Sozzi, F.; Sugonyaev, V.; Srnka, Aleš; Stinzing, F.; Stolarski, M.; Sulc, M.; Sulej, R.; Takabayashi, N.; Tchalishev, V.; Tassarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Thers, D.; Tkatchev, L.; Toeda, T.; Tretyak, V.; Trousov, S.; Varanda, M.; Virius, M.; Vlassov, N.; Wagner, M.; Webb, R.; Weise, E.; Weitzel, Q.; Wiedner, U.; Wiesmann, M.; Windmolders, R.; Wirth, S.; Wislicki, W.; Zanetti, A.; Zaremba, K.; Zhao, J.; Ziegler, R.; Zvyagin, A.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 612, 3-4 (2005), s. 154-164 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME 492 Keywords : deep inelastic scattering * structure functions Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.301, year: 2005

  8. Measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in hip and knee osteoarthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dobson, F; Hinman, R S; Hall, M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To systematically review the measurement properties of performance-based measures to assess physical function in people with hip and/or knee osteoarthritis (OA). METHODS: Electronic searches were performed in MEDLINE, CINAHL, Embase, and PsycINFO up to the end of June 2012. Two...

  9. Anisotropic Rotational Diffusion Studied by Nuclear Spin Relaxation and Molecular Dynamics Simulation: An Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuson, Michael M.

    2017-01-01

    Laboratories studying the anisotropic rotational diffusion of bromobenzene using nuclear spin relaxation and molecular dynamics simulations are described. For many undergraduates, visualizing molecular motion is challenging. Undergraduates rarely encounter laboratories that directly assess molecular motion, and so the concept remains an…

  10. Spin glasses (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    Experimental results of spin glass studies are reviewed and related to existing theories. Investigations of spin glasses are concentrated on atomic structure, metallurgical treatment, and high-temperature susceptibility of alloys, on magnetic properties at low temperature and near the freezing temperature, on anisotropy behaviour measured by ESR, NMR and torque, on specific heat, Moessbauer effect, neutron scattering and muon-spin depolarization experiments, ultrasound and transport properties. Some new theories of spin glasses are discussed which have been developed since Part I appeared

  11. Spin-1/2 Heisenberg ladder: variation of entanglement and fidelity measures close to quantum critical points

    OpenAIRE

    Tribedi, Amit; Bose, Indrani

    2008-01-01

    We consider a two-chain, spin-1/2 antiferromagnetic Heisenberg spin ladder in an external magnetic field H. The spin ladder is known to undergo second order quantum phase transitions (QPTs) at two critical values, Hc1 and Hc2, of the magnetic field. There are now known examples of strongly coupled (rung exchange interaction much stronger than nearest-neighbour intrachain exchange interaction) organic ladder compounds in which QPTs have been experimentally observed. In this paper, we investiga...

  12. Optical spin generation/detection and spin transport lifetimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miah, M. Idrish

    2011-01-01

    We generate electron spins in semiconductors by optical pumping. The detection of them is also performed by optical technique using time-resolved pump-probe photoluminescence polarization measurements in the presence of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the generated spin. The spin polarization in dependences of the pulse length, pump-probe delay and external magnetic field is studied. From the dependence of spin-polarization on the delay of the probe, the electronic spin transport lifetimes and the spin relaxation frequencies as a function of the strength of the magnetic field are estimated. The results are discussed based on hyperfine effects for interacting electrons.

  13. Optical spin generation/detection and spin transport lifetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M. Idrish, E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au [Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2011-02-25

    We generate electron spins in semiconductors by optical pumping. The detection of them is also performed by optical technique using time-resolved pump-probe photoluminescence polarization measurements in the presence of an external magnetic field perpendicular to the generated spin. The spin polarization in dependences of the pulse length, pump-probe delay and external magnetic field is studied. From the dependence of spin-polarization on the delay of the probe, the electronic spin transport lifetimes and the spin relaxation frequencies as a function of the strength of the magnetic field are estimated. The results are discussed based on hyperfine effects for interacting electrons.

  14. Principles of Technology Student Achievement in Advanced Physics Measured by a Normed Physics Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, James Alan

    1991-02-01

    The Principles of Technology (PT) curriculum, now in approximately 1,200 schools, has produced a profound change in the delivery of applied physics. If high school PT programs and traditional physics courses deliver comparable student outcomes, as some research suggests, the PT curriculum may find wider acceptance in vocational programs and postsecondary schools may have rationale for accepting PT as physics. This study measured PT student performance on an advanced physics test, after they have had one year (7 units) of PT. The 1988R version of the National Association of Physics Teachers and National Science Teachers Association physics test, with more than 7500 copies sold, was selected as the research instrument. This test covers advanced aspects of traditional high school physics. A secondary enquiry included an attempt to link PT teacher preparation and credentialing and/or PT site demographics to variation in PT student scores on the 1988R test. The 10 PT sites in this study were self-selected from the 29 PT field study schools, the most mature PT sites. The researcher determined, that the 1988R physics test lacked content validity for the PT students tested. The PT students tested had a composite mean score of 17.67 questions correct out of 80, (below the second percentile), not statistically different than a chance score. No differences were found between site mean scores. Interpretation of the results regarding the effect of teachers, or demographics was not justified. The value of PT to the vocational-technical programs that it was designed for was not measured, nor was the awarding of general science credit for PT completion. One year of the PT curriculum, at the sampled schools, has not prepared students in the advanced scientific aspects of traditional physics found on the 1988R examination. The primary implication is that educators should not expect year one PT to prepare students for classes or curricula that include traditional physics as a

  15. Measuring verbal communication in initial physical therapy encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Lisa C; Whittle, Christopher T; Cleland, Jennifer; Wald, Mike

    2013-04-01

    Communication in clinical encounters is vital in ensuring a positive experience and outcome for both patient and clinician. The purpose of this study was to measure verbal communication between physical therapists and patients with back pain during their initial consultation and trial management of the data using a novel, Web-based application. A cross-sectional study was conducted. Nine musculoskeletal physical therapists and 27 patients with back pain participated in this study. Twenty-five initial consultations were observed, audio recorded, and categorized using the Medical Communications Behavior System. Data were managed using Synote, a freely available application enabling synchronization of audio recordings with transcripts and coded notes. In this sample, physical therapists spoke for 49.5% of the encounter and patients for 33.1%. Providers and patients spent little time overtly discussing emotions (1.4% and 0.9%, respectively). More-experienced clinicians used more "history/background probes," more "advice/suggestion," and less "restatement" than less-experienced staff, although they demonstrated a greater prevalence of talking concurrently and interrupting patients (7.6% compared with 2.6%). Although studies measuring actual behavior are considered to be the gold standard, audio recordings do not enable nonverbal behaviors to be recorded. This study investigated a method for measuring the verbal content of clinical encounters in a physical therapy outpatient setting. The study has directly contributed to developing a research-friendly version of the application (i.e., Synote Researcher). Given the pivotal role of communication in ensuring a positive experience and outcome for both patient and provider, investing time in further developing communication skills should be an on-going priority for providers. Further work is needed to explore affective behaviors and the prevalence of interrupting patients, considering differences in sex and provider

  16. Noise in tunneling spin current across coupled quantum spin chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aftergood, Joshua; Takei, So

    2018-01-01

    We theoretically study the spin current and its dc noise generated between two spin-1 /2 spin chains weakly coupled at a single site in the presence of an over-population of spin excitations and a temperature elevation in one subsystem relative to the other, and we compare the corresponding transport quantities across two weakly coupled magnetic insulators hosting magnons. In the spin chain scenario, we find that applying a temperature bias exclusively leads to a vanishing spin current and a concomitant divergence in the spin Fano factor, defined as the spin current noise-to-signal ratio. This divergence is shown to have an exact analogy to the physics of electron scattering between fractional quantum Hall edge states and not to arise in the magnon scenario. We also reveal a suppression in the spin current noise that exclusively arises in the spin chain scenario due to the fermion nature of the spin-1/2 operators. We discuss how the spin Fano factor may be extracted experimentally via the inverse spin Hall effect used extensively in spintronics.

  17. Lattice constant changes leading to significant changes of the spin-gapless features and physical nature in a inverse Heusler compound Zr2MnGa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaotian; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Khenata, Rabah; Wu, Yang; Wang, Liying; Liu, Guodong

    2017-12-01

    The spin-gapless semiconductors with parabolic energy dispersions [1-3] have been recently proposed as a new class of materials for potential applications in spintronic devices. In this work, according to the Slater-Pauling rule, we report the fully-compensated ferrimagnetic (FCF) behavior and spin-gapless semiconducting (SGS) properties for a new inverse Heusler compound Zr2MnGa by means of the plane-wave pseudo-potential method based on density functional theory. With the help of GGA-PBE, the electronic structures and the magnetism of Zr2MnGa compound at its equilibrium and strained lattice constants are systematically studied. The calculated results show that the Zr2MnGa is a new SGS at its equilibrium lattice constant: there is an energy gap between the conduction and valence bands for both the majority and minority electrons, while there is no gap between the majority electrons in the valence band and the minority electrons in the conduction band. Remarkably, not only a diverse physical nature transition, but also different types of spin-gapless features can be observed with the change of the lattice constants. Our calculated results of Zr2MnGa compound indicate that this material has great application potential in spintronic devices.

  18. Fairy-Tale Physics Farewell to Reality Bankrupting Physics: Baggott-Unzicker-Jones Critiques Shame Physics' Shameless Media-Hype P.R. Spin-Doctoring Touting Sci-Fi Veracity-Abandonment ``Show-Biz'' Spectacle: Caveat Emptor!!!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Edward

    2014-03-01

    Baggott[Farewell to Reality: How Fairy-Tale Physics Betrayed Search For Scientific Truth]-Unzicker [Bankrupting Physics: How Top Scientists Are Gambling Away Credibility] shame physics shameless rock-star media-hype P.R. spin-doctoring veracity-abandoning touting sci-fi show-biz aided by online proliferation of uncritical pop-sci science-writers verbal diarrhea, all spectacle vs little truth, lacking Kant-Popper skepticism/ falsification, lemming-like stampedes to truth abandonment, qualified by vague adverbs: might, could, should, may,...vs factual is! Physics, motivated by financial greed, swept up in its very own hype, touts whatever next big thing/cutting-edge bombast ad infinitum/ad nauseum, turning it into mere trendy carney sideshow, full of fury(FOF) but signifying absolutely nothing! Witness: GIGO claims string-theory holographic-universe causes cuprates optical conductivity; failed Anderson RVB cuprates theory vs. Keimer discovery all cuprates ``paramagnons'' bosons aka Overhauser SDWs; Overbye NYT holographic-universe jargonial-obfuscation comments including one from APS journals editor-in-chief re. its unintelligibility, FOF but signifying absolutely nothing INTELLIGIBLE!; Bak/BNL SOC tad late rediscovery of F =ma mere renaming of Siegel acoustic-emission!; 2007 physics Nobel-prize Fert-Gruenberg rediscovery of Siegel[JMMM 7,312(78); https://www.flickr.com/search/?q = GIANT-MAGNETORESISTANCE] GMR. Each trendy latest big thing modulo lack of prior attribution aka out and out bombastic chicanery! Siegel caveat emptor ``Buzzwordism, Bandwagonism, Sloganeering for Fun Profit Survival Ego'' sociological-dysfunctionality thrives!

  19. Measuring (bio)physical tree properties using accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Emmerik, Tim; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Hut, Rolf; Gentine, Pierre; Selker, John; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-04-01

    Trees play a crucial role in the water, carbon and nitrogen cycle on local, regional and global scales. Understanding the exchange of heat, water, and CO2 between trees and the atmosphere is important to assess the impact of drought, deforestation and climate change. Unfortunately, ground measurements of tree dynamics are often expensive, or difficult due to challenging environments. We demonstrate the potential of measuring (bio)physical properties of trees using robust and affordable acceleration sensors. Tree sway is dependent on e.g. mass and wind energy absorption of the tree. By measuring tree acceleration we can relate the tree motion to external loads (e.g. precipitation), and tree (bio)physical properties (e.g. mass). Using five months of acceleration data of 19 trees in the Brazilian Amazon, we show that the frequency spectrum of tree sway is related to mass, precipitation, and canopy drag. This presentation aims to show the concept of using accelerometers to measure tree dynamics, and we acknowledge that the presented example applications is not an exhaustive list. Further analyses are the scope of current research, and we hope to inspire others to explore additional applications.

  20. Measuring the spin of the primary black hole in OJ287

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valtonen, M.J.; Mikkola, S.; Merritt, D.; Gopakumar, A.; Lehto, H.J.; Hyvönen, L. T.; Rampadarath, H.; Saunders, R.; Bašta, Milan; Hudec, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 709, č. 2 (2010), s. 725-732 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/1207 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GA102/09/0997 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : black hole physics * BL Lacertae objects * individual (OJ287) Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 7.436, year: 2010

  1. PREFACE: Spin Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieny, B.; Sousa, R.; Prejbeanu, L.

    2007-04-01

    tunnel junctions were introduced as memory elements in new types of non-volatile magnetic memories (MRAM). A first 4Mbit product was launched by Freescale in July 2006. Future generations of memories are being developed by academic groups or companies. the combination of magnetic elements with CMOS components opens a whole new paradigm in hybrid electronic components which can change the common conception of the architecture of complex electronic components with a much tighter integration of logic and memory. the steady magnetic excitations stimulated by spin-transfer might be used in a variety of microwave components provided the output power can be increased. Intense research and development efforts are being aimed at increasing this power by the synchronization of oscillators. The articles compiled in this special issue of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter, devoted to spin electronics, review these recent developments. All the contributors are greatly acknowledged.

  2. Spin Hall noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamra, A.; Witek, F.P.; Meyer, S.; Huebl, H.; Geprägs, S.; Gross, R.; Bauer, G.E.W.; Goennenwein, S.T.B.

    2014-01-01

    We measure the low-frequency thermal fluctuations of pure spin current in a platinum film deposited on yttrium iron garnet via the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE)-mediated voltage noise as a function of the angle ? between the magnetization and the transport direction. The results are consistent

  3. Recent measurements for hadrontherapy and space radiation: nuclear physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.

    2001-01-01

    The particles and energies commonly used for hadron therapy overlap the low end of the charge and energy range of greatest interest for space radiation applications, Z=1-26 and approximately 100-1000 MeV/nucleon. It has been known for some time that the nuclear interactions of the incident ions must be taken into account both in treatment planning and in understanding and addressing the effects of galactic cosmic ray ions on humans in space. Until relatively recently, most of the studies of nuclear fragmentation and transport in matter were driven by the interests of the nuclear physics and later, the hadron therapy communities. However, the experimental and theoretical methods and the accelerator facilities developed for use in heavy ion nuclear physics are directly applicable to radiotherapy and space radiation studies. I will briefly review relevant data taken recently at various accelerators, and discuss the implications of the measurements for radiotherapy, radiobiology and space radiation research.

  4. System for measurements and data processing in neutron physics researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadashevich, V.I.; Kondurov, I.A.; Nikolaev, S.N.; Ryabov, Yu.F.

    1976-01-01

    A system of measuring and computing means created for automation of studies in the field of the neutron physics is discussed. Within the framework of this system each experiment is provided with its individual measuring station which consists of a set of analog and digital modules implemented in accordance with the CAMAC standard. On the higher level of this system there are measuring-computing centres (MCC) which simultaneously serve a number of physical installations. These MCCs are based on ''Minsk-22'' computers whose computational facilities are used for the preliminary processing and for creation of temporary data archives. In its turn, all the MCCs are users of the time-sharing system on the basis of the ''Minsk-32'' computers. This system extends possibilities for user's fast data processing, archive creation and provides transfer of required information to the main computing system based on the BESM-6 computer. Transfer of information and preliminary processing are performed by remote terminals with the help of a special directive language

  5. Spin, mass, and symmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peskin, M.E. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    When the strong interactions were a mystery, spin seemed to be just a complication on top of an already puzzling set of phenomena. But now that particle physicists have understood the strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions, to be gauge theories, with matter built of quarks and leptons, it is recognized that the special properties of spin 1/2 and spin 1 particles have taken central role in the understanding of Nature. The lectures in this summer school will be devoted to the use of spin in unravelling detailed questions about the fundamental interactions. Thus, why not begin by posing a deeper question: Why is there spin? More precisely, why do the basic pointlike constituents of Nature carry intrinsic nonzero quanta of angular momentum? Though the authos has found no definite answer to this question, the pursuit of an answer has led through a wonderful tangle of speculations on the deep structure of Nature. Is spin constructed or is it fundamental? Is it the requirement of symmetry? In the furthest flights taken, it seems that space-time itself is too restrictive a notion, and that this must be generalized in order to gain a full appreciation of spin. In any case, there is no doubt that spin must play a central role in unlocking the mysteries of fundamental physics.

  6. Spin, mass, and symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peskin, M.E.

    1994-01-01

    When the strong interactions were a mystery, spin seemed to be just a complication on top of an already puzzling set of phenomena. But now that particle physicists have understood the strong, weak, and electromagnetic interactions, to be gauge theories, with matter built of quarks and leptons, it is recognized that the special properties of spin 1/2 and spin 1 particles have taken central role in the understanding of Nature. The lectures in this summer school will be devoted to the use of spin in unravelling detailed questions about the fundamental interactions. Thus, why not begin by posing a deeper question: Why is there spin? More precisely, why do the basic pointlike constituents of Nature carry intrinsic nonzero quanta of angular momentum? Though the authos has found no definite answer to this question, the pursuit of an answer has led through a wonderful tangle of speculations on the deep structure of Nature. Is spin constructed or is it fundamental? Is it the requirement of symmetry? In the furthest flights taken, it seems that space-time itself is too restrictive a notion, and that this must be generalized in order to gain a full appreciation of spin. In any case, there is no doubt that spin must play a central role in unlocking the mysteries of fundamental physics

  7. Gas viscosity measurement with diamagnetic-levitation viscometer based on electromagnetically spinning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Y.; Matsuura, Y.; Hirano, T.; Sakai, K.

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing a graphite-disk probe attached with a thin aluminum disk, we have developed a friction-free viscosity measurement system. The probe is levitated above a NdFeB magnet because of diamagnetic effect and rotated by an electromagnetically induced torque. The probe is absolutely free form mechanical friction, and therefore, the accurate measurements of the viscosity of gases can be achieved. To demonstrate the accuracy and sensitivity of our method, we measured the viscosity of 8 kinds of gases and its temperature change from 278 K to 318 K, and we confirmed a good agreement between the obtained values and literature values. This paper demonstrates that our method has the ability to measure the fluid viscosity in the order of μPa ṡ s.

  8. Gas viscosity measurement with diamagnetic-levitation viscometer based on electromagnetically spinning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimokawa, Y; Matsuura, Y; Hirano, T; Sakai, K

    2016-12-01

    Utilizing a graphite-disk probe attached with a thin aluminum disk, we have developed a friction-free viscosity measurement system. The probe is levitated above a NdFeB magnet because of diamagnetic effect and rotated by an electromagnetically induced torque. The probe is absolutely free form mechanical friction, and therefore, the accurate measurements of the viscosity of gases can be achieved. To demonstrate the accuracy and sensitivity of our method, we measured the viscosity of 8 kinds of gases and its temperature change from 278 K to 318 K, and we confirmed a good agreement between the obtained values and literature values. This paper demonstrates that our method has the ability to measure the fluid viscosity in the order of μPa ⋅ s.

  9. Spin noise spectroscopy from acoustic to GHz frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, Jens

    2010-03-01

    Performing perturbation free measurements on semiconductor quantum systems has long been banished to textbooks on quantum mechanics. The emergent technique of spin noise spectroscopy is challenging this restriction. Empowered only by the ever present intrinsic spin fluctuation dynamics in thermal equilibrium, spin noise spectroscopy is capable to directly deduce several physical properties of carriers spins in semiconductors from these fluctuations. Originating from spin noise measurements on alkali metal vapors in quantum optics [1] the method has become a powerful technique to unravel the intrinsic spin dynamics in semiconductors [2]. In this talk I will present the recent progress of spin noise spectroscopy and how it is used to monitor the spin dynamic in semiconductor quantum wells at thermal equilibrium and as a consequence thereof directly detect the spatial dynamics of the carriers being marked with their own spin on a microscopic scale [3]. Further I will present measurements of how the non-perturbative nature of spin noise spectroscopy gives valuable insight into the delicate dependence of the spin relaxation time of electrons on doping density and temperature in semiconductors n-doped in the vicinity of the metal-insulator transition where hyperfine and intra-band depolarization compete [4]. Also the measurement bandwidth can be extended to GHz frequencies by ultrafast optical probing [5] yielding in conjunction with depth resolved spin noise measurements insights into the origin of inhomogeneous spin dephasing effects at high magnetic fields [5]. Additionally I will present how spin noise spectroscopy can be employed to spatially depth resolve doping profiles with optical resolution [6] and give a summary on easy to implement techniques of spin noise spectroscopy at acoustic frequencies in alkali metal vapors. [4pt] [1] E. Aleksandrov and V. Zapassky, Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 81, 132 (1981); S. A. Crooker, D. G. Rickel, A. V. Balatsky, and D. L. Smith

  10. Higher-order spin and charge dynamics in a quantum dot-lead hybrid system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R; Amaha, Shinichi; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Allison, Giles; Stano, Peter; Noiri, Akito; Ito, Takumi; Loss, Daniel; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D; Tarucha, Seigo

    2017-09-22

    Understanding the dynamics of open quantum systems is important and challenging in basic physics and applications for quantum devices and quantum computing. Semiconductor quantum dots offer a good platform to explore the physics of open quantum systems because we can tune parameters including the coupling to the environment or leads. Here, we apply the fast single-shot measurement techniques from spin qubit experiments to explore the spin and charge dynamics due to tunnel coupling to a lead in a quantum dot-lead hybrid system. We experimentally observe both spin and charge time evolution via first- and second-order tunneling processes, and reveal the dynamics of the spin-flip through the intermediate state. These results enable and stimulate the exploration of spin dynamics in dot-lead hybrid systems, and may offer useful resources for spin manipulation and simulation of open quantum systems.

  11. Spins in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    McWeeny, Roy

    2004-01-01

    Originally delivered as a series of lectures, this volume systematically traces the evolution of the ""spin"" concept from its role in quantum mechanics to its assimilation into the field of chemistry. Author Roy McWeeny presents an in-depth illustration of the deductive methods of quantum theory and their application to spins in chemistry, following the path from the earliest concepts to the sophisticated physical methods employed in the investigation of molecular structure and properties. Starting with the origin and development of the spin concept, the text advances to an examination of sp

  12. Spin Hall effect transistor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wunderlich, Joerg; Park, B.G.; Irvine, A.C.; Zarbo, Liviu; Rozkotová, E.; Němec, P.; Novák, Vít; Sinova, Jairo; Jungwirth, Tomáš

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 330, č. 6012 (2010), s. 1801-1804 ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN400100652; GA MŠk LC510 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 215368 - SemiSpinNet Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP0801 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : spin Hall effect * spintronics * spin transistor Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 31.364, year: 2010

  13. On-board system for physical and microphysical measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravaut, M.; Allet, C.; Dole, B.; Gribkoff, A.; Schibler, P.; Charpentier, C.

    1981-10-01

    This report presents the system of physical and microphysical measurement instrumentation on board the HUREL-DUBOIS HD 34 aircraft, built in cooperation with the Institut National d'Astronomie et de Geophysique (I.N.A.G.) and the Institut Geographique National (I.G.N.). The feasibility study of the system was carried out in the first half of 1978 and took shape in an on-site proving campaign in November 1979. As a result, the on-board system was able to participate in the BUGEY experimental campaign of March 1980, a glimpse of which is given in this report [fr

  14. Protocol for Objective Measurement of Infants' Physical Activity using Accelerometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricardo, Luiza Isnardi Cardoso; DA Silva, Inácio Crochemore Mohnsam; Martins, Rafaela Costa; Wendt, Andrea; Gonçalves, Helen; Hallal, Pedro Rodrigues Curi; Wehrmeister, Fernando César

    2018-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate methods for infants' physical activity measurement based on accelerometry, including the minimum number of measurement days and placement of a wrist or ankle device. We also evaluated the acceptability of the device among infants and mothers. A cross-sectional mixed-methods study was conducted on a convenience sample of 90 infants. Physical activity was measured using the Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometer placed on the wrist and/or ankle for 7 consecutive days (worn for 24 h), and a qualitative interview was performed to verify acceptability. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) method and the Bland and Altman's dispersion diagram were used to verify the minimum number of measurement days. All analyses were stratified by walking status. The mean (SD) age was 12.9 (1.70) months; the mean acceleration varied between 25.8 mg (95% confidence interval (CI), 14.3-52.7) and 27.3 mg (95% CI, 17.9-44.5) using the wrist placement, and between 24.9 mg (95% CI, 10.6-48.4) and 26.2 mg (95% CI, 11.7-65.6) using the ankle placement. The ICC results showed a lower acceleration variability between days among infants incapable of walking; they achieved an ICC of 0.80 with 1 d of measurement in both placements. Among those capable of walking, the minimum number of days to achieve an ICC of 0.80 was 2 d measured at the wrist (0.85; 95% CI, 0.71-0.93) and 3 d measured at the ankle (0.92; 95% CI, 0.84-0.96). The qualitative results pointed to the wrist placement as the preferred placement among the overall sample. Two and three measurement days with the accelerometer placed on the wrist and ankle, respectively, seemed to adequately represent a week of measurement. The accelerometer placed on the wrist had better acceptance by the infants and mothers.

  15. Long-term reliable physically unclonable function based on oxide tunnel barrier breakdown on two-transistors two-magnetic-tunnel-junctions cell-based embedded spin transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaya, Satoshi; Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Noguchi, Hiroki; Ikegami, Kazutaka; Abe, Keiko; Fujita, Shinobu

    2017-04-01

    Among the diverse applications of spintronics, security for internet-of-things (IoT) devices is one of the most important. A physically unclonable function (PUF) with a spin device (spin transfer torque magnetoresistive random access memory, STT-MRAM) is presented. Oxide tunnel barrier breakdown is used to realize long-term stability for PUFs. A secure PUF has been confirmed by evaluating the Hamming distance of a 32-bit STT-MRAM-PUF fabricated using 65 nm CMOS technology.

  16. Measurement of the spin rotation parameter A in the elastic pion-proton scattering at 1.43 GeV/c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, I.G.; Budkovsky, P.E.; Kanavets, V.P.; Koroleva, L.I.; Morozov, B.V.; Nesterov, V.M.; Ryltsov, V.V.; Sulimov, A.D.; Svirida, D.N.; Zhurkin, V.V. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Bazhanov, N.A.; Bunyatova, E.I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kovalev, A.I.; Kruglov, S.P.; Novinsky, D.V.; Shchedrov, V.A.; Sumachev, V.V.; Trautman, V. Yu. [Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Gatchina (Russian Federation)

    2006-02-01

    The ITEP-PNPI collaboration presents new results of the measurements of the spin rotation parameter A in the elastic scattering of negative pions on protons at P{sub beam}=1.43 GeV/c. The results are compared to the predictions of several partial wave analyses. The experiment was performed at the ITEP proton synchrotron, Moscow. (orig.)

  17. Measurement of the spin rotation parameter Ain the elastic pion-proton scattering at 1.43 GeV/c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, I. G.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Kanavets, V. P.; Kovalev, A. I.; Koroleva, L. I.; Kruglov, S. P.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Novinsky, D. V.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Sulimov, A. D.; Sumachev, V. V.; Svirida, D. N.; Trautman, V. Yu; Zhurkin, V. V.

    2006-02-01

    The ITEP-PNPI collaboration presents new results of the measurements of the spin rotation parameter A in the elastic scattering of negative pions on protons at P beam = 1.43 GeV/c. The results are compared to the predictions of several partial wave analyses. The experiment was performed at the ITEP proton synchrotron, Moscow.

  18. Measurement of the spin rotation parameter A in the elastic pion- proton scattering at 1.43 GeV/c

    CERN Document Server

    Alekseev, I G; Budkovsky, P E; Bunyatova, E I; Kanavets, V P; Koroleva, L I; Kovalev, A I; Kruglov, S P; Morozov, B V; Nesterov, V M; Novinsky, D V; Ryltzov, V V; Shchedrov, V A; Sulimov, A D; Sumachev, V V; Svirida, D N; Trautman, V Yu; Zhurkin, V V

    2004-01-01

    The ITEP-PNPI collaboration presents new results of the measurements of the spin rotation parameter A in the elastic scattering of negative pions on protons at P/sub beam/ = 1.43 GeV/c. The results are compared to the predictions of the different partial wave analyses. The experiment was performed at the ITEP proton synchrotron, Moscow.

  19. Measurement of the Spin Rotation Parameter A in the Elastic Pion-proton Scattering at 1.43 GeV/c

    OpenAIRE

    Alekseev, I. G.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Kanavets, V. P.; Kovalev, A. I.; Koroleva, L. I.; Kruglov, S. P.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Novinsky, D. V.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Sulimov, A. D.; Sumachev, V. V.

    2005-01-01

    The ITEP-PNPI collaboration presents new results of the measurements of the spin rotation parameter A in the elastic scattering of negative pions on protons at P_beam=1.43 GeV/c. The results are compared to the predictions of several partial wave analyses. The experiment was performed at the ITEP proton synchrotron, Moscow.

  20. Spin-Mechanical Inertia in Antiferromagnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Ran; Wu, Xiaochuan; Xiao, Di

    Interplay between spin dynamics and mechanical motions is responsible for numerous striking phenomena, which has shaped a rapidly expanding field known as spin-mechanics. The guiding principle of this field has been the conservation of angular momentum that involves both quantum spins and classical mechanical rotations. However, in an antiferromagnet, the macroscopic magnetization vanishes while the order parameter (Néel order) does not carry an angular momentum. It is therefore not clear whether the order parameter dynamics has any mechanical consequence as its ferromagnetic counterparts. Here we demonstrate that the Néel order dynamics affects the mechanical motion of a rigid body by modifying its inertia tensor in the presence of strong magnetocrystalline anisotropy. This effect depends on temperature when magnon excitations are considered. Such a spin-mechanical inertia can produce measurable consequences at nanometer scales. Our discovery establishes spin-mechanical inertia as an essential ingredient to properly describe spin-mechanical effects in AFs, which supplements the known governing physics from angular momentum conservation. This work was supported by the DOE, Basic Energy Sciences, Grant No. DE-SC0012509. D.X. also acknowledges support from a Research Corporation for Science Advancement Cottrell Scholar Award.