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Sample records for spi proof-of-principle test

  1. Report for slot cutter proof-of-principle test, Buried Waste Containment System project. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Several million cubic feet of hazardous and radioactive waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches within many US Department of Energy (US DOE) sites. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. Many of the hazardous materials in these waste sites are migrating into groundwater systems through plumes and leaching. On-site containment is one of the options being considered for prevention of waste migration. This report describes the results of a proof-of-principle test conducted to demonstrate technology for containing waste. This proof-of-principle test, conducted at the RAHCO International, Inc., facility in the summer of 1997, evaluated equipment techniques for cutting a horizontal slot beneath an existing waste site. The slot would theoretically be used by complementary equipment designed to place a cement barrier under the waste. The technology evaluated consisted of a slot cutting mechanism, muck handling system, thrust system, and instrumentation. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate the performance parameters

  2. Report for slot cutter proof-of-principle test, Buried Waste Containment System project. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-21

    Several million cubic feet of hazardous and radioactive waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches within many US Department of Energy (US DOE) sites. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. Many of the hazardous materials in these waste sites are migrating into groundwater systems through plumes and leaching. On-site containment is one of the options being considered for prevention of waste migration. This report describes the results of a proof-of-principle test conducted to demonstrate technology for containing waste. This proof-of-principle test, conducted at the RAHCO International, Inc., facility in the summer of 1997, evaluated equipment techniques for cutting a horizontal slot beneath an existing waste site. The slot would theoretically be used by complementary equipment designed to place a cement barrier under the waste. The technology evaluated consisted of a slot cutting mechanism, muck handling system, thrust system, and instrumentation. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate the performance parameters.

  3. Axial focusing of impact energy in the Earth's interior: Proof-of-principle tests of a new hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boslough, M. B.; Chael, E. P.; Trucano, T. G.; Kipp, M. E.; Crawford, D. A.

    1994-01-01

    A causal link between major impact events and global processes would probably require a significant change in the thermal state of the Earth's interior, presumably brought about by coupling of impact energy. One possible mechanism for such energy coupling from the surface to the deep interior would be through focusing due to axial symmetry. Antipodal focusing of surface and body waves from earthquakes is a well-known phenomenon which has previously been exploited by seismologists in studies of the Earth's deep interior. Antipodal focusing from impacts on the Moon, Mercury, and icy satellites has also been invoked by planetary scientists to explain unusual surface features opposite some of the large impact structures on these bodies. For example, 'disrupted' terrains have been observed antipodal to the Caloris impact basis on Mercury and Imbrium Basin on the Moon. Very recently there have been speculations that antipodal focusing of impact energy within the mantle may lead to flood basalt and hotspot activity, but there has not yet been an attempt at a rigorous model. A new hypothesis was proposed and preliminary proof-of-principle tests for the coupling of energy from major impacts to the mantle by axial focusing of seismic waves was performed. Because of the axial symmetry of the explosive source, the phases and amplitudes are dependent only on ray parameter (or takeoff angle) and are independent of azimuthal angle. For a symmetric and homogeneous Earth, all the seismic energy radiated by the impact at a given takeoff angle will be refocused (minus attenuation) on the axis of symmetry, regardless of the number of reflections and refractions it has experienced. Mantle material near the axis of symmetry will experience more strain cycles with much greater amplitude than elsewhere and will therefore experience more irreversible heating. The situation is very different than for a giant earthquake, which in addition to having less energy, has an asymmetric focal

  4. Cognitive Testing in People at Increased Risk of Dementia Using a Smartphone App: The iVitality Proof-of-Principle Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongstra, Susan; Wijsman, Liselotte Willemijn; Cachucho, Ricardo; Hoevenaar-Blom, Marieke Peternella; Mooijaart, Simon Pieter; Richard, Edo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Smartphone-assisted technologies potentially provide the opportunity for large-scale, long-term, repeated monitoring of cognitive functioning at home. Objective: The aim of this proof-of-principle study was to evaluate the feasibility and validity of performing cognitive tests in people

  5. Controlled-air and rotary-kiln proof-of-principle tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedahl, T.G.

    1982-05-01

    Although the incinerator tests did not represent optimized processing, general system design characteristics were established. The test results indicated that the rotary kiln incinerator would be most applicable in the Transuranic Waste Treatment Facility (TWTF) for the following reasons: (1) The rotary kiln is more capable of achieving near-complete combustion of the combustibles in the waste mixed with a high proportion of metal and noncombustible waste. Complete combustion of the combustible waste is preferred in order to reduce waste volume and ensure the production of a stable, immobilized waste form. (2) The rotary kiln processing appears to be more flexible. Kiln rotation rate, kiln incline, and waste feed rate and method are system variables which can be altered to meet the needs of processing variable waste compositions. The advantages of the rotary kiln system allow for a practical concept for processing a majority of the radioactive waste at the INEL. However, further engineering tests must be performed to determine the necessary processing angles and design information for TWTF waste processing

  6. Proof-of-principle test of coherent-state continuous variable quantum key distribution through turbulent atmosphere (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkach, Ivan D.; Peuntinger, Christian; Ruppert, László; Heim, Bettina; Gunthner, Kevin; Usenko, Vladyslav C.; Elser, Dominique; Marquardt, Christoph; Filip, Radim; Leuchs, Gerd

    2016-10-01

    Continuous-variable quantum key distribution is a practical application of quantum information theory that is aimed at generation of secret cryptographic key between two remote trusted parties and that uses multi-photon quantum states as carriers of key bits. Remote parties share the secret key via a quantum channel, that presumably is under control of of an eavesdropper, and which properties must be taken into account in the security analysis. Well-studied fiber-optical quantum channels commonly possess stable transmittance and low noise levels, while free-space channels represent a simpler, less demanding and more flexible alternative, but suffer from atmospheric effects such as turbulence that in particular causes a non-uniform transmittance distribution referred to as fading. Nonetheless free-space channels, providing an unobstructed line-of-sight, are more apt for short, mid-range and potentially long-range (using satellites) communication and will play an important role in the future development and implementation of QKD networks. It was previously theoretically shown that coherent-state CV QKD should be in principle possible to implement over a free-space fading channel, but strong transmittance fluctuations result in the significant modulation-dependent channel excess noise. In this regime the post-selection of highly transmitting sub-channels may be needed, which can even restore the security of the protocol in the strongly turbulent channels. We now report the first proof-of-principle experimental test of coherent state CV QKD protocol using different levels Gaussian modulation over a mid-range (1.6-kilometer long) free-space atmospheric quantum channel. The transmittance of the link was characterized using intensity measurements for the reference but channel estimation using the modulated coherent states was also studied. We consider security against Gaussian collective attacks, that were shown to be optimal against CV QKD protocols . We assumed a

  7. IFA proof of principle experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, C.L.

    1979-01-01

    IFA proof of principle experiments is discussed. Controlled beam front motion experiments are reported, which demonstrate that accurate IFA programming of the motion of the potential well at the head of an IREB has been achieved. The status of IFA ion experiments is also discussed

  8. Experimental implementation and proof of principle for a radionuclidic purity test solely based on half-life measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas; Jensen, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    have developed an GUI application for use as an easy and automated test tool in the production procedure.The test results show that this method fully complies with the requirements in the European Pharmacopoeia (Eur. Ph.) for RNP of FDG and F-18 Sodium Fluoride. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights......In this paper we present the results of an experimental implementation of the method (Jorgensen et al., 2012) for testing the radionuclidic purity (RNP) of F-18 compounds.The overall limitations of the experimental methods and their possible impacts on RNP detectability have been identified. We...

  9. Attention, interpretation, and memory biases in subclinical depression: a proof-of-principle test of the combined cognitive biases hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everaert, Jonas; Duyck, Wouter; Koster, Ernst H W

    2014-04-01

    Emotional biases in attention, interpretation, and memory are viewed as important cognitive processes underlying symptoms of depression. To date, there is a limited understanding of the interplay among these processing biases. This study tested the dependence of memory on depression-related biases in attention and interpretation. Subclinically depressed and nondepressed participants completed a computerized version of the scrambled sentences test (measuring interpretation bias) while their eye movements were recorded (measuring attention bias). This task was followed by an incidental free recall test of previously constructed interpretations (measuring memory bias). Path analysis revealed a good fit for the model in which selective orienting of attention was associated with interpretation bias, which in turn was associated with a congruent bias in memory. Also, a good fit was observed for a path model in which biases in the maintenance of attention and interpretation were associated with memory bias. Both path models attained a superior fit compared with path models without the theorized functional relations among processing biases. These findings enhance understanding of how mechanisms of attention and interpretation regulate what is remembered. As such, they offer support for the combined cognitive biases hypothesis or the notion that emotionally biased cognitive processes are not isolated mechanisms but instead influence each other. Implications for theoretical models and emotion regulation across the spectrum of depressive symptoms are discussed.

  10. Tritium proof-of-principle injector experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, P.W.; Milora, S.L.; Combs, S.K.; Carlson, R.V.; Coffin, D.O.

    1988-01-01

    The Tritium Proof-of-Principle (TPOP) pellet injector was designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to evaluate the production and acceleration of tritium pellets for fueling future fision reactors. The injector uses the pipe-gun concept to form pellets directly in a short liquid-helium-cooled section of the barrel. Pellets are accelerated by using high-pressure hydrogen supplied from a fast solenoid valve. A versatile, tritium-compatible gas-handling system provides all of the functions needed to operate the gun, including feed gas pressure control and flow control, plus helium separation and preparation of mixtures. These systems are contained in a glovebox for secondary containment of tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). 18 refs., 3 figs

  11. Tritium proof-of-principle pellet injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, P.W.

    1991-07-01

    The tritium proof-of-principle (TPOP) experiment was designed and built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the formation and acceleration of the world's first tritium pellets for fueling of future fusion reactors. The experiment was first used to produce hydrogen and deuterium pellets at ORNL. It was then moved to the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the production of tritium pellets. The injector used in situ condensation to produce cylindrical pellets in a 1-m-long, 4-mm-ID barrel. A cryogenic 3 He separator, which was an integral part of the gun assembly, was capable of lowering 3 He levels in the feed gas to <0.005%. The experiment was housed to a glovebox for tritium containment. Nearly 1500 pellets were produced during the course of the experiment, and about a third of these were pure tritium or mixtures of deuterium and tritium. Over 100 kCi of tritium was processed through the experiment without incident. Tritium pellet velocities of 1400 m/s were achieved with high-pressure hydrogen propellant. The design, operation, and results of this experiment are summarized. 34 refs., 44 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Soft magnetic tweezers: a proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosconi, Francesco; Allemand, Jean François; Croquette, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    We present here the principle of soft magnetic tweezers which improve the traditional magnetic tweezers allowing the simultaneous application and measurement of an arbitrary torque to a deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecule. They take advantage of a nonlinear coupling regime that appears when a fast rotating magnetic field is applied to a superparamagnetic bead immersed in a viscous fluid. In this work, we present the development of the technique and we compare it with other techniques capable of measuring the torque applied to the DNA molecule. In this proof of principle, we use standard electromagnets to achieve our experiments. Despite technical difficulties related to the present implementation of these electromagnets, the agreement of measurements with previous experiments is remarkable. Finally, we propose a simple way to modify the experimental design of electromagnets that should bring the performances of the device to a competitive level.

  13. Risk based requirements for long term stewardship: A proof-of-principle analysis of an analytic method tested on selected Hanford locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, T.T.; Andrews, W.B.; Buck, J.W.

    1998-03-01

    Since 1989, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program has managed the environmental legacy of US nuclear weapons production, research and testing at 137 facilities in 31 states and one US territory. The EM program has conducted several studies on the public risks posed by contaminated sites at these facilities. In Risks and the Risk Debate [DOE, 1995a], the Department analyzed the risks at sites before, during, and after remediation work by the EM program. The results indicated that aside from a few urgent risks, most hazards present little inherent risk because physical and active site management controls limit both the releases of site contaminants, and public access to these hazards. Without these controls, these sites would pose greater risks to the public. Past risk reports, however, provided little information about post-cleanup risk, primarily because of uncertainty about future site uses and site characteristics at the end of planned cleanup activities. This is of concern because in many cases current cleanup technologies, and remedies, will last a shorter period of time than the waste itself and the resulting contamination will remain hazardous

  14. Risk Based Requirements for Long Term Stewardship: A Proof-of-Principle Analysis of an Analytic Method Tested on Selected Hanford Locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GM Gelston; JW Buck; LR Huesties; MS Peffers; TB Miley; TT Jarvis; WB Andrews

    1998-12-03

    Since 1989, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) Program has managed the environmental legacy of US nuclear weapons production research and testing at 137 facilities in 31 states and one US territory. The EM program has conducted several studies on the public risks posed by contaminated sites at these facilities. In Risks and the Risk Debate DOE, 1995a, the Department analyzed the risks at sites before, during, and after remediation work by the EM program. The results indicated that aside from a few urgent risks, most hazards present little inherent risk because physical and active site management controls limit both the releases of site contaminants, and public access to these hazards. Without these controls, these sites would pose greater risks to the public. Past risk reports, however, provided little irdiormation about post- cleanup risk, primarily because of uncertainty about fiture site uses and site characteristics at the end of planned cleanup activities. This is of concern because in many cases current cleanup technologies, and remedies, will last a shorter period of time than the waste itself and the resulting contamination will remain hazardous.

  15. Tritium proof-of-principle pellet injector results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, P.W.; Fehling, D.T.; Gouge, M.J.; Milora, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    The tritium proof-of-principle (TPOP) experiment was built by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to demonstrate the feasibility of forming solid tritium pellets and accelerating them to high velocities for fueling future fusion reactors. TPOP used a pneumatic pipe-gun with a 4-mm-i.d. by 1-m-long barrel. Nearly 1500 pellets were fired by the gun during the course of the experiment; about a third of these were tritium or mixtures of deuterium and tritium. The system also contained a cryogenic 3 He separator that reduced the 3 He level to <0.005%. Pure tritium pellets were accelerated to 1400 m/s. Experiments evaluated the effect of cryostat temperature and fill pressure on pellet size, the production of pellets from mixtures of tritium and deuterium, and the effect of aging on pellet integrity. The tritium phase of these experiments was performed at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. About 100 kCi of tritium was processed through the apparatus without incident. 8 refs., 7 figs

  16. TOREX-4: a torsatron proof of principle experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Politzer, P.A.; Lidsky, L.M.; Montgomery, D.B.

    1979-03-01

    TOREX-4 is a torsatron Proof of Principle experiment designed to simultaneously achieve ntau approx. = to 5 x 10 13 , n approx. = to 5 x 10 14 /cm 3 , and T greater than or equal to 1 keV. TOREX-4 is capable of operating without externally driven currents; sufficient neutral beam power to reach betas of 2 to 5% is provided. The unique 4(+2) constant pitch angle winding configuration allows the reliable design of large systems with far greater experimental flexibility than can be achieved in conventional stellarators of comparable size. This will allow investigation of the basic physics questions of the torsatron configuration over a wide range of plasma properties and field configurations without sacrifice of the Proof of Principle goals

  17. Proof-of-principle functionals for the shape function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayers, Paul W.

    2005-01-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the density per particle, or shape function, determines all the properties of molecules and, more generally, finite Coulomb systems (e.g., clusters). Here, we provide numerical evidence for this 'existence' theorem, showing that atomic properties (specifically the kinetic energy and exchange energy) have simple approximate expressions in terms of the shape function. While the accuracy of our results is limited, this provides 'proof-of-principle' evidence that shape-functional theory represents an alternative to density-functional theory for finite Coulomb systems

  18. Proof of principle for epitope-focused vaccine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Bruno E.; Bates, John T.; Loomis, Rebecca J.; Baneyx, Gretchen; Carrico, Chris; Jardine, Joseph G.; Rupert, Peter; Correnti, Colin; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Vittal, Vinayak; Connell, Mary J.; Stevens, Eric; Schroeter, Alexandria; Chen, Man; MacPherson, Skye; Serra, Andreia M.; Adachi, Yumiko; Holmes, Margaret A.; Li, Yuxing; Klevit, Rachel E.; Graham, Barney S.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Baker, David; Strong, Roland K.; Crowe, James E.; Johnson, Philip R.; Schief, William R.

    2014-03-01

    Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Several major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus, that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for the research and development of a human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets, including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and influenza.

  19. Proof of Principle for Electronic Collimation of a Gamma Ray Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ERDC TN-EQT-16-1 January 2016 Proof of Principle for Electronic Collimation of a Gamma...in achieving the proof of principle of the technique, which is intended to be further developed. A gamma ray detector system utilizing electronic...waveforms from longitudinal (along the axis) waveforms yield proof of principle . TECHNOLOGY DESCRIPTION: The component detector technologies were

  20. A new proof-of-principle contraband detection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sredniawski, J.J.; Debiak, T.; Kamykowski, E.; Rathke, J. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (United States). Advanced Technology and Development Center; Schmor, P.; Altman, A.; Rogers, J.; Boyd, J. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility; Brondo, J. [Scientific Innovations, Inc., East Hampton, NY (United States)

    1995-12-01

    A new concept for a CDS has been developed under a Phase I ARPA funded program; it uses gamma resonance absorption (GRA) to detect certain illegal drugs that may be transported in man-portable containers. A high detection probability for heroin and cocaine is possible with a device that is also searching for explosives. Elemental detection of both N and Cl is utilized, and with tomography, a 3D density image of the elements is generated. Total density image is also developed. These two together may be used with considerable confidence in determining if heroin or cocaine is present in the interrogated containers in a small quantity (1 kg). The CDS employs a high current ({ge}10 mA) DC accelerator that produces a beam of 1.75 or 1.89 MeV protons. These protons impact a target with coatings of {sup 13}C and {sup 34}S. Depending on the coating, the resultant resonant gamma rays are preferentially absorbed in either {sup 14}N or {sup 35}Cl. The resonant gammas come off the target in a conical fan at 80.7{degree} for N and 82{degree} for Cl; a common array of segmented BGO detectors is used over an arc of 53{degree} to provide input to an imaging subsystem. The tomography makes use of rotation and vertical translation of a baggage carousel holding typically 18 average sized bags for batch processing of the contents. The single proton accelerator and target can supply multiple detection stations with the appropriate gammas, a feature that may lead to very high throughput potential approaching 2000 bags/hr. Each detection station can operate somewhat independently from the others. This paper presents the overall requirements, design, operating principles, and characteristics of the CDS proof-of-principle device developed in the Phase I program.

  1. Determining paediatric patient thickness from a single digital radiograph-a proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrall, Mark; Vinnicombe, Sarah; Sutton, David G

    2018-04-05

    This work presents a proof of principle for a method of estimating the thickness of an attenuator from a single radiograph using the image, the exposure factors with which it was acquired and a priori knowledge of the characteristics of the X-ray unit and detector used for the exposure. It is intended this could be developed into a clinical tool to assist with paediatric patient dose audit, for which a measurement of patient size is required. The proof of principle used measured pixel value and effective linear attenuation coefficient to estimate the thickness of a Solid Water attenuator. The kerma at the detector was estimated using a measurement of pixel value on the image and measured detector calibrations. The initial kerma was estimated using a lookup table of measured output values. The effective linear attenuation coefficient was measured for Solid Water at varying kV p . 11 test images of known and varying thicknesses of Solid Water were acquired at 60, 70 and 81 kV p . Estimates of attenuator thickness were made using the model and the results compared to the known thickness. Estimates of attenuator thickness made using the model differed from the known thickness by 3.8 mm (3.2%) on average, with a range of 0.5-10.8 mm (0.5-9%). A proof of principle is presented for a method of estimating the thickness of an attenuator using a single radiograph of the attenuator. The method has been shown to be accurate using a Solid Water attenuator, with a maximum difference between estimated and known attenuator thickness of 10.8 mm (9%). The method shows promise as a clinical tool for estimating abdominal paediatric patient thickness for paediatric patient dose audit, and is only contingent on the type of data routinely collected by Medical Physics departments. Advances in knowledge: A computational model has been created that is capable of accurately estimating the thickness of a uniform attenuator using only the radiographic image, the exposure factors with which

  2. X-ray diffraction without sample preparation: Proof-of-principle experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansford, Graeme M.

    2013-01-01

    The properties of a novel X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique having very low sensitivity to the sample morphology were previously elucidated through theoretical considerations and model simulations (Hansford, 2011). This technique opens up the possibility of mineralogical analysis by XRD without sample preparation. Here, the results of proof-of-principle experimental tests are presented. Two sets of experiments were performed using a vacuum chamber equipped with an X-ray tube source, sample holder and charge-coupled detector. Firstly, a pressed-powder pellet of α-quartz was placed in three different positions relative to the X-ray source and detector. The changes in position represent gross sample movements which would be inconceivable in conventional XRD analysis. The resulting back-reflection energy-dispersive spectra show a very high degree of correspondence other than an overall intensity factor dependent on the distance between the sample and detector. Secondly, the back-reflection spectrum of an unprepared limestone hand specimen, having mm-scale surface morphology, was compared to the spectrum of a calcite pressed-powder pellet. The correspondence of the diffraction peaks in the spectra demonstrate that the limestone is comprised dominantly of calcite. In both cases, the claims of the earlier paper are fully supported by the results of these experimental tests. -- Highlights: • Proof-of-principle tests of a novel X-ray diffraction (XRD) method were conducted. • Very low sensitivity to sample position and orientation was demonstrated. • Insensitivity to sample morphology is inferred. • A simple analysis of an unprepared limestone hand specimen was performed. • This technique enables mineralogical analysis by XRD without sample preparation

  3. Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor for proton radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seco, Joao; Depauw, Nicolas

    2011-02-01

    Proof of principle study of the use of a CMOS active pixel sensor (APS) in producing proton radiographic images using the proton beam at the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). A CMOS APS, previously tested for use in s-ray radiation therapy applications, was used for proton beam radiographic imaging at the MGH. Two different setups were used as a proof of principle that CMOS can be used as proton imaging device: (i) a pen with two metal screws to assess spatial resolution of the CMOS and (ii) a phantom with lung tissue, bone tissue, and water to assess tissue contrast of the CMOS. The sensor was then traversed by a double scattered monoenergetic proton beam at 117 MeV, and the energy deposition inside the detector was recorded to assess its energy response. Conventional x-ray images with similar setup at voltages of 70 kVp and proton images using commercial Gafchromic EBT 2 and Kodak X-Omat V films were also taken for comparison purposes. Images were successfully acquired and compared to x-ray kVp and proton EBT2/X-Omat film images. The spatial resolution of the CMOS detector image is subjectively comparable to the EBT2 and Kodak X-Omat V film images obtained at the same object-detector distance. X-rays have apparent higher spatial resolution than the CMOS. However, further studies with different commercial films using proton beam irradiation demonstrate that the distance of the detector to the object is important to the amount of proton scatter contributing to the proton image. Proton images obtained with films at different distances from the source indicate that proton scatter significantly affects the CMOS image quality. Proton radiographic images were successfully acquired at MGH using a CMOS active pixel sensor detector. The CMOS demonstrated spatial resolution subjectively comparable to films at the same object-detector distance. Further work will be done in order to establish the spatial and energy resolution of the CMOS detector for protons. The

  4. Single Sensor Gait Analysis to Detect Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Proof of Principle Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Esser

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explored the potential utility of gait analysis using a single sensor unit (inertial measurement unit [IMU] as a simple tool to detect peripheral neuropathy in people with diabetes. Seventeen people (14 men aged 63±9 years (mean±SD with diabetic peripheral neuropathy performed a 10-m walk test instrumented with an IMU on the lower back. Compared to a reference healthy control data set (matched by gender, age, and body mass index both spatiotemporal and gait control variables were different between groups, with walking speed, step time, and SDa (gait control parameter demonstrating good discriminatory power (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve >0.8. These results provide a proof of principle of this relatively simple approach which, when applied in clinical practice, can detect a signal from those with known diabetes peripheral neuropathy. The technology has the potential to be used both routinely in the clinic and for tele-health applications. Further research should focus on investigating its efficacy as an early indicator of or effectiveness of the management of peripheral neuropathy. This could support the development of interventions to prevent complications such as foot ulceration or Charcot's foot.

  5. Single Sensor Gait Analysis to Detect Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Proof of Principle Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esser, Patrick; Collett, Johnny; Maynard, Kevin; Steins, Dax; Hillier, Angela; Buckingham, Jodie; Tan, Garry D; King, Laurie; Dawes, Helen

    2018-02-01

    This study explored the potential utility of gait analysis using a single sensor unit (inertial measurement unit [IMU]) as a simple tool to detect peripheral neuropathy in people with diabetes. Seventeen people (14 men) aged 63±9 years (mean±SD) with diabetic peripheral neuropathy performed a 10-m walk test instrumented with an IMU on the lower back. Compared to a reference healthy control data set (matched by gender, age, and body mass index) both spatiotemporal and gait control variables were different between groups, with walking speed, step time, and SDa (gait control parameter) demonstrating good discriminatory power (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve >0.8). These results provide a proof of principle of this relatively simple approach which, when applied in clinical practice, can detect a signal from those with known diabetes peripheral neuropathy. The technology has the potential to be used both routinely in the clinic and for tele-health applications. Further research should focus on investigating its efficacy as an early indicator of or effectiveness of the management of peripheral neuropathy. This could support the development of interventions to prevent complications such as foot ulceration or Charcot's foot. Copyright © 2018 Korean Diabetes Association.

  6. A contraband detection system proof-of-principle device using electrostatic acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sredniawski, Joseph J.; Debiak, T.W.; Kamykowski, E.; Rathke, J.; Milton, B.; Rogers, J.; Schmor, P.; Stanford, G.; Brando, J.

    1996-01-01

    A new Contraband Detection System (CDS) Proof-of- Principle (POP) device is nearing completion at Northrop Grumman's Advanced Technology and Development Center. We employ gamma resonance absorption (GRA) to detect nitrogen or chlorine in explosives and certain forms of illegal drugs. Using tomography, 3-D images of the total density and selected element density are generated. These characteristics together may be utilized with considerable confidence in determining if contraband is present in baggage or cargo. The CDS employs a high current (10 mA) DC electrostatic accelerator that provides a beam of protons at either 1.75 or 1.89 MeV. These high energy particles impinge upon a target coated with 13 C or 34 S. The resultant resonant gamma rays are preferentially absorbed in either 14 N or 35 Cl. Because of the penetrating power of the gamma rays, this approach can be utilized for inspection of fully loaded aircraft containers such as the LD3. Our current program calls for testing of the POP CDS by late 1996. This paper presents the overall design and characteristics of the CDS POP. (author)

  7. Discrimination Training Reduces High Rate Social Approach Behaviors in Angelman Syndrome: Proof of Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, M.; Allen, D.; Villa, D.; Oliver, C.

    2013-01-01

    This proof of principle study was designed to evaluate whether excessively high rates of social approach behaviors in children with Angelman syndrome (AS) can be modified using a multiple schedule design. Four children with AS were exposed to a multiple schedule arrangement, in which social reinforcement and extinction, cued using a novel…

  8. A proof of principle experiment of laser wakefield accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, K.; Enomoto, A.; Nakanishi, H.; Ogata, A.; Kato, Y.; Kitagawa, Y.; Mima, K.; Shiraga, H.; Yamakawa, K.; Downer, M.; Horton, W.; Newberger, B.; Tajima, T.

    1992-01-01

    Ultrashort super-intense lasers allow us to test a principle of the laser wakefield particle acceleration. The peak power of 30 TW and the pulse width of 1 ps produced by the Nd:glass laser system is capable of creating a highly-ionized plasma of a moderate density gas in an ultrafast time scale and generating a large amplitude plasma wave with the accelerating gradient of 2.5 GeV/m. Particle acceleration can be demonstrated by injecting a few MeV electrons emitted from a solid target by intense laser irradiation. (Author) 2 figs., 5 refs

  9. Vane fabrication for the proof-of-principle radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S.W.; Potter, J.M.

    1981-01-01

    The electrodes for the Proof-of-Principle (POP) Radio-Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator were machined on a numerically controlled, three-axis, vertical mill. These pole tips, or vanes, were prepared for, and used, in the successful demonstration of RFQ practicality at Los Alamos National Laboratory in February 1980. The data set that described the vanes contained about 10 million bits of tool position data. The vanes were cut from OFHC copper blanks. The tolerances achieved were approximately +- 0.005 cm. The design and manufacturing procedures are described

  10. Immune responses accelerate ageing: proof-of-principle in an insect model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Rhiannon Pursall

    Full Text Available The pathology of many of the world's most important infectious diseases is caused by the immune response. Additionally age-related disease is often attributed to inflammatory responses. Consequently a reduction in infections and hence inflammation early in life has been hypothesized to explain the rise in lifespan in industrialized societies. Here we demonstrate experimentally for the first time that eliciting an immune response early in life accelerates ageing. We use the beetle Tenebrio molitor as an inflammation model. We provide a proof of principle for the effects of early infection on morbidity late in life and demonstrate a long-lasting cost of immunopathology. Along with presenting a proof-of-principle study, we discuss a mechanism for the apparently counter-adaptive persistence of immunopathology in natural populations. If immunopathology from early immune response only becomes costly later in life, natural selection on reducing self-harm would be relaxed, which could explain the presence of immune self-harm in nature.

  11. Light ion ignitors for inertial confinement fusion: progress toward proof-of-principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Kuswa, G.W.

    1981-01-01

    From the inception of the REB effort, it was recognized that light ion beams offered substantial advantages as an ICF driver, and as the pulse power driver program progressed the possibilities of using light ion beams became increasingly evident. Because of the rapid progress made in the available power in these light ion beams, their superior target deposition characteristics, the fact that nonrelativistic ion beams can readily be bunched by a factor of 2 to 4, and the favorable scaling relations leading toward reactor levels, Sandia shifted its ICF emphasis from electrons to ions in 1979. The progress which has been made toward proof-of-principle using light ion ignitors, as well as the remaining problems, will be detailed in this paper

  12. Human genetics of infectious diseases: between proof of principle and paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaïs, Alexandre; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2009-09-01

    The observation that only a fraction of individuals infected by infectious agents develop clinical disease raises fundamental questions about the actual pathogenesis of infectious diseases. Epidemiological and experimental evidence is accumulating to suggest that human genetics plays a major role in this process. As we discuss here, human predisposition to infectious diseases seems to cover a continuous spectrum from monogenic to polygenic inheritance. Although many studies have provided proof of principle that infectious diseases may result from various types of inborn errors of immunity, the genetic determinism of most infectious diseases in most patients remains unclear. However, in the future, studies in human genetics are likely to establish a new paradigm for infectious diseases.

  13. Does brain creatine content rely on exogenous creatine in healthy youth? A proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merege-Filho, Carlos Alberto Abujabra; Otaduy, Maria Concepción Garcia; de Sá-Pinto, Ana Lúcia; de Oliveira, Maira Okada; de Souza Gonçalves, Lívia; Hayashi, Ana Paula Tanaka; Roschel, Hamilton; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Silva, Clovis Artur; Brucki, Sonia Maria Dozzi; da Costa Leite, Claudia; Gualano, Bruno

    2017-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that dietary creatine could influence cognitive performance by increasing brain creatine in developing individuals. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, proof-of-principle study aimed to investigate the effects of creatine supplementation on cognitive function and brain creatine content in healthy youth. The sample comprised 67 healthy participants aged 10 to 12 years. The participants were given creatine or placebo supplementation for 7 days. At baseline and after the intervention, participants undertook a battery of cognitive tests. In a random subsample of participants, brain creatine content was also assessed in the regions of left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left hippocampus, and occipital lobe by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) technique. The scores obtained from verbal learning and executive functions tests did not significantly differ between groups at baseline or after the intervention (all p > 0.05). Creatine content was not significantly different between groups in left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left hippocampus, and occipital lobe (all p > 0.05). In conclusion, a 7-day creatine supplementation protocol did not elicit improvements in brain creatine content or cognitive performance in healthy youth, suggesting that this population mainly relies on brain creatine synthesis rather than exogenous creatine intake to maintain brain creatine homeostasis.

  14. LED lighting and the Next Generation of Greenhouse for Tomatoes. Proof of Principle; LED belichting en Het Nieuwe Telen bij tomaat. Proof of Principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, T.; Janse, J.; Eveleens, B. [Wageningen UR Glastuinbouw, Wageningen (Netherlands); Nieboer, S.; Valstar, W.; Grootscholten, M. [GreenQ Improvement Centre, Bleiswijk (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    In this Proof of Principle project a tomato crop was grown under artificial lighting with the aim of 30% energy saving at the same level of production. Tomatoes (cultivar Komeett) were illuminated with 110 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} HPS (High Pressure Sodium) above the crop and 85 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} LED interlighting. The LEDs hung in 2 rows, approximately 40 cm above the lower leaves and the second strand at 40 or 70 cm above that. There were two types of LEDs used: production LEDs (light efficiency 1.6 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, 87% red/13% blue) and inter-lighting LEDs (light efficiency 1.9 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}, 95% red/5% blue), with the same light intensity. At the start, the crop was given as much light as it could handle, and because the crop developed so well, the stem density was increased relatively early. This resulted in high fruit load, while insufficient light was available to compensate for the low levels of sunlight in the winter. In the 192 cm row spacing system the plants were too close to each other. Additional problems occurred with trace elements, lesser bumble bee activity, and a moist greenhouse climate which weakened the crop in the winter. Thus Botrytis occurred on the leaves and stems. The crop struggled with its recovery until early spring with more sunlight. Compared to a reference crop with 79 kg m{sup -2} tomatoes, 75 kg m{sup -2} were produced under-production LEDs, and 80 kg m{sup -2} under the interlighting LEDs, mainly because latter LEDs were used longer during the summer. 30% of the energy for dehumidification and heat energy, and 27% of the electricity was saved, relative to the reference crop. Thus it appears possible to save 30% energy with a near identical production [Dutch] In dit Proof of Principle project is een belichte tomatenteelt geteeld met als doel 30% energiebesparing bij een gelijke productie. Tomaten van het ras Komeett werden belicht met 110 {mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1} SON-T belichting boven

  15. How predictive are photosensitive epilepsy models as proof of principle trials for epilepsy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Eunice S M; Sims, John R

    2014-06-01

    Human photosensitive epilepsy models have been used as proof of principle (POP) trials for epilepsy. Photosensitive patients are exposed to intermittent photic stimulation and the reduction in sensitivity to the number of standard visual stimulation frequencies is used as an endpoint. The aim of this research was to quantify the predictive capabilities of photosensitive POP trials, through a survey of current literature. A literature search was undertaken to identify articles describing photosensitive POP trials. Minimally efficacious doses (MEDs) in epilepsy were compared to doses in the POP trials that produced 50-100% response (ED50-100). Ratios of these doses were calculated and summarised statistically. The search identified ten articles describing a total of 17 anti-epileptic drugs. Of these, data for both MED and ED50-100 were available for 13 anti-epileptic drugs. The average ratio of MED to ED50-100 was 0.95 (95% CI 0.60-1.30). The difference in MED to ED50-100 ratios between partial epilepsy (0.82) was not significantly different from that of generalised epilepsy (1.08) (p=0.51). Photosensitive POP trials are a useful tool to quantitatively predict efficacy in epilepsy, and can be useful as early and informative indicators in anti-epileptic drug discovery and development. Copyright © 2014 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Proof-of-principle experiment of the vacuum beat wave accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, A.; Krushelnick, K.; Esarey, E.; Sprangle, P.

    1997-01-01

    The vacuum beat wave accelerator (VBWA) is discussed and design parameters for proof-of-principle experiment are presented. The VBWA utilizes two focused laser beams of differing wavelengths to generate a beat wave that can impart a net acceleration to charged particles. Theory and simulations show that the single-stage energy gain of the VBWA is limited by diffraction of the laser beams, particle slippage in phase and velocity, and radial walk-off. In the simulations the particles are synchronous with the beat wave for a short interval of time and the energy gain has the nature of an impulse delivered near the focal region. Simulations also show that the problem of radial walk-off may be ameliorated by using a converging beam of particles. For terawatt-level laser beams, with wavelengths 1 μm and 0.5 μm, and a 4.5 MeV finite-emittance electron beam the energy can be increased to ∼12.5MeV in a non-synchronous interaction over a distance of under 4 mm, with a peak acceleration gradient >15GeV/m and an estimated trapping fraction of -1%. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. Psychosocial and Psychological Vulnerability in Adolescents with Gender Dysphoria: A "Proof of Principle" Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechard, Melanie; VanderLaan, Doug P; Wood, Hayley; Wasserman, Lori; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2017-10-03

    For adolescents with gender dysphoria, it has become common to be offered hormonal treatment to either delay or suppress pubertal development and/or to masculinize or feminize the body. At the same time, it has been our clinical impression that the psychological vulnerability of at least some of these youth has been overlooked. Fifty consecutive referrals of adolescents with a DSM-IV-TR diagnosis of gender identity disorder (GID) constituted the sample. Information obtained at intake was coded for the presence or absence of 15 psychosocial and psychological vulnerability factors. The mean number of psychosocial/psychological vulnerability factors coded as present was 5.56 (range, 0-13). Over half of the sample had six or more of the vulnerability factors. The number of factors coded as present was significantly correlated with behavioral and emotional problems on the Youth Self-Report Form and the Child Behavior Checklist, but not with demographic variables or IQ. The findings supported the clinical impression that a large percentage of adolescents referred for gender dysphoria have a substantial co-occurring history of psychosocial and psychological vulnerability, thus supporting a "proof of principle" for the importance of a comprehensive psychologic/psychiatric assessment that goes beyond an evaluation of gender dysphoria per se.

  18. Design of a speed meter interferometer proof-of-principle experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gräf, C; Barr, B W; Bell, A S; Campbell, F; Cumming, A V; Gordon, N A; Hammond, G D; Hennig, J; Houston, E A; Huttner, S H; Jones, R A; Leavey, S S; Macarthur, J; Marwick, M; Rigby, S; Sorazu, B; Spencer, A; Danilishin, S L; Lück, H; Schilling, R

    2014-01-01

    The second generation of large scale interferometric gravitational wave (GW) detectors will be limited by quantum noise over a wide frequency range in their detection band. Further sensitivity improvements for future upgrades or new detectors beyond the second generation motivate the development of measurement schemes to mitigate the impact of quantum noise in these instruments. Two strands of development are being pursued to reach this goal, focusing both on modifications of the well-established Michelson detector configuration and development of different detector topologies. In this paper, we present the design of the world's first Sagnac speed meter (SSM) interferometer, which is currently being constructed at the University of Glasgow. With this proof-of-principle experiment we aim to demonstrate the theoretically predicted lower quantum noise in a Sagnac interferometer compared to an equivalent Michelson interferometer, to qualify SSM for further research towards an implementation in a future generation large scale GW detector, such as the planned Einstein telescope observatory. (paper)

  19. Quantification of the Robusta fraction in a coffee blend via Raman spectroscopy: proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wermelinger, Thomas; D'Ambrosio, Lucio; Klopprogge, Babette; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2011-09-14

    Among the 100 different known Coffea species, Coffea arabica L. (Arabica) and Coffea canephora Pierre (Robusta) are the only two of commercial interest. They differ in a range of agronomic, genetic, and chemical properties. Due to the significant price difference between Arabica and Robusta, there is an economic incentive to illicitly replace Arabica with Robusta. Therefore, it is crucial to have accurate methods to determine the Robusta-to-Arabica-ratio in blends. This paper presents the proof of principle of a new and fast approach to determine the Robusta fraction in a blend based on Raman spectroscopy. The oils of two references (a pure Robusta and pure Arabica coffee) and six blends thereof consisting of different Robusta and Arabica fractions were extracted using a Soxhlet system. The solutes were analyzed by means of Raman spectroscopy without further workup. Using the intensity ratio between two Raman peaks, one characteristic for kahweol and one characteristic for fatty acids, allowed determinination of the Robusta content in a given mixture. The intensity ratio is linearly dependent on the Robusta content of the compound. Above a Robusta content of 75 wt %, kahweol was not detectable. The Raman data are in agreement with results obtained from the very time-consuming multistep DIN 10777 procedures based on HPLC.

  20. Voluntary control of corticomuscular coherence through neurofeedback: a proof-of-principle study in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Carlowitz-Ghori, K; Bayraktaroglu, Z; Waterstraat, G; Curio, G; Nikulin, V V

    2015-04-02

    Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) relates to synchronization between activity in the motor cortex and the muscle activity. The strength of CMC can be affected by motor behavior. In a proof-of-principle study, we examined whether independent of motor output parameters, healthy subjects are able to voluntarily modulate CMC in a neurofeedback paradigm. Subjects received visual online feedback of their instantaneous CMC strength, which was calculated between an optimized spatial projection of multichannel electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) in an individually defined target frequency range. The neurofeedback training consisted of either increasing or decreasing CMC strength using a self-chosen mental strategy while performing a simple motor task. Evaluation of instantaneous coherence showed that CMC strength was significantly larger when subjects had to increase than when to decrease CMC; this difference between the two task conditions did not depend on motor performance. The exclusion of confounding factors such as motor performance, attention and task complexity in study design provides evidence that subjects were able to voluntarily modify CMC independent of motor output parameters. Additional analysis further strengthened the assumption that the subjects' response was specifically shaped by the neurofeedback. In perspective, we suggest that CMC-based neurofeedback could provide a therapeutic approach in clinical conditions, such as motor stroke, where CMC is altered. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Single-energy computed tomography-based pulmonary perfusion imaging: Proof-of-principle in a canine model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro, E-mail: toyamamoto@ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States); Kent, Michael S.; Wisner, Erik R. [Department of Surgical and Radiological Sciences, University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Johnson, Lynelle R.; Stern, Joshua A. [Department of Medicine and Epidemiology, University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Qi, Lihong [Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Fujita, Yukio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokai University, Isehara, Kanagawa 259-1193 (Japan); Boone, John M. [Department of Radiology, University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) that selectively avoids irradiating highly functional lung regions may reduce pulmonary toxicity, which is substantial in lung cancer RT. Single-energy computed tomography (CT) pulmonary perfusion imaging has several advantages (e.g., higher resolution) over other modalities and has great potential for widespread clinical implementation, particularly in RT. The purpose of this study was to establish proof-of-principle for single-energy CT perfusion imaging. Methods: Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on the following: (1) acquisition of end-inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agents, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) for spatial mapping of those two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the precontrast image data set from the postcontrast image data set, yielding a map of regional Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement, a surrogate for regional perfusion. In a protocol approved by the institutional animal care and use committee, the authors acquired CT scans in the prone position for a total of 14 anesthetized canines (seven canines with normal lungs and seven canines with diseased lungs). The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The accuracy of DIR was evaluated based on the target registration error (TRE) of 50 anatomic pulmonary landmarks per subject for 10 randomly selected subjects as well as on singularities (i.e., regions where the displacement vector field is not bijective). Prior to perfusion computation, HUs of the precontrast end-inspiratory image were corrected for variation in the lung inflation level between the precontrast and postcontrast end-inspiratory CT scans, using a model built from two additional precontrast CT scans at end-expiration and midinspiration. The authors also assessed spatial heterogeneity and gravitationally directed gradients of regional perfusion for normal lung subjects and diseased lung subjects using a two-sample two-tailed t-test

  2. Single-energy computed tomography-based pulmonary perfusion imaging: Proof-of-principle in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kent, Michael S; Wisner, Erik R; Johnson, Lynelle R; Stern, Joshua A; Qi, Lihong; Fujita, Yukio; Boone, John M

    2016-07-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) that selectively avoids irradiating highly functional lung regions may reduce pulmonary toxicity, which is substantial in lung cancer RT. Single-energy computed tomography (CT) pulmonary perfusion imaging has several advantages (e.g., higher resolution) over other modalities and has great potential for widespread clinical implementation, particularly in RT. The purpose of this study was to establish proof-of-principle for single-energy CT perfusion imaging. Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on the following: (1) acquisition of end-inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agents, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) for spatial mapping of those two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the precontrast image data set from the postcontrast image data set, yielding a map of regional Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement, a surrogate for regional perfusion. In a protocol approved by the institutional animal care and use committee, the authors acquired CT scans in the prone position for a total of 14 anesthetized canines (seven canines with normal lungs and seven canines with diseased lungs). The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The accuracy of DIR was evaluated based on the target registration error (TRE) of 50 anatomic pulmonary landmarks per subject for 10 randomly selected subjects as well as on singularities (i.e., regions where the displacement vector field is not bijective). Prior to perfusion computation, HUs of the precontrast end-inspiratory image were corrected for variation in the lung inflation level between the precontrast and postcontrast end-inspiratory CT scans, using a model built from two additional precontrast CT scans at end-expiration and midinspiration. The authors also assessed spatial heterogeneity and gravitationally directed gradients of regional perfusion for normal lung subjects and diseased lung subjects using a two-sample two-tailed t-test. The mean TRE

  3. Single-energy computed tomography-based pulmonary perfusion imaging: Proof-of-principle in a canine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Tokihiro; Kent, Michael S.; Wisner, Erik R.; Johnson, Lynelle R.; Stern, Joshua A.; Qi, Lihong; Fujita, Yukio; Boone, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) that selectively avoids irradiating highly functional lung regions may reduce pulmonary toxicity, which is substantial in lung cancer RT. Single-energy computed tomography (CT) pulmonary perfusion imaging has several advantages (e.g., higher resolution) over other modalities and has great potential for widespread clinical implementation, particularly in RT. The purpose of this study was to establish proof-of-principle for single-energy CT perfusion imaging. Methods: Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on the following: (1) acquisition of end-inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agents, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) for spatial mapping of those two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the precontrast image data set from the postcontrast image data set, yielding a map of regional Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement, a surrogate for regional perfusion. In a protocol approved by the institutional animal care and use committee, the authors acquired CT scans in the prone position for a total of 14 anesthetized canines (seven canines with normal lungs and seven canines with diseased lungs). The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The accuracy of DIR was evaluated based on the target registration error (TRE) of 50 anatomic pulmonary landmarks per subject for 10 randomly selected subjects as well as on singularities (i.e., regions where the displacement vector field is not bijective). Prior to perfusion computation, HUs of the precontrast end-inspiratory image were corrected for variation in the lung inflation level between the precontrast and postcontrast end-inspiratory CT scans, using a model built from two additional precontrast CT scans at end-expiration and midinspiration. The authors also assessed spatial heterogeneity and gravitationally directed gradients of regional perfusion for normal lung subjects and diseased lung subjects using a two-sample two-tailed t-test

  4. Reducing intrusive traumatic memories after emergency caesarean section: A proof-of-principle randomized controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, Antje; Vial, Yvan; Favrod, Céline; Harari, Mathilde Morisod; Blackwell, Simon E; Watson, Peter; Iyadurai, Lalitha; Bonsall, Michael B; Holmes, Emily A

    2017-07-01

    Preventative psychological interventions to aid women after traumatic childbirth are needed. This proof-of-principle randomized controlled study evaluated whether the number of intrusive traumatic memories mothers experience after emergency caesarean section (ECS) could be reduced by a brief cognitive intervention. 56 women after ECS were randomized to one of two parallel groups in a 1:1 ratio: intervention (usual care plus cognitive task procedure) or control (usual care). The intervention group engaged in a visuospatial task (computer-game 'Tetris' via a handheld gaming device) for 15 min within six hours following their ECS. The primary outcome was the number of intrusive traumatic memories related to the ECS recorded in a diary for the week post-ECS. As predicted, compared with controls, the intervention group reported fewer intrusive traumatic memories (M = 4.77, SD = 10.71 vs. M = 9.22, SD = 10.69, d = 0.647 [95% CI: 0.106, 1.182]) over 1 week (intention-to-treat analyses, primary outcome). There was a trend towards reduced acute stress re-experiencing symptoms (d = 0.503 [95% CI: -0.032, 1.033]) after 1 week (intention-to-treat analyses). Times series analysis on daily intrusions data confirmed the predicted difference between groups. 72% of women rated the intervention "rather" to "extremely" acceptable. This represents a first step in the development of an early (and potentially universal) intervention to prevent postnatal posttraumatic stress symptoms that may benefit both mother and child. ClinicalTrials.gov, www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02502513. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Proof-of-principle of high-fidelity coupled CRUD deposition and cycle depletion simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, Daniel J.; Kendrick, Brian K.; Petrov, Victor; Manera, Annalisa; Collins, Benjamin; Downar, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A multiphysics framework for the high-fidelity simulation of CRUD deposition is developed to better understand the coupled physics and their respective feedback mechanisms. This framework includes the primary physics of lattice depletion, computational fluid dynamics, and CRUD chemistry. The three physics are coupled together via the operator-splitting technique, where predictor–corrector and fixed-point iteration schemes are utilized to converge the nonlinear solution. High-fidelity simulations may provide a means to predict and assess potential operating issues, including CRUD induced power shift and CRUD induced localized corrosion, known as CIPS and CILC, respectively. As a proof-of-principle, a coupled 500-day cycle depletion simulation of a pressurized water reactor fuel pin cell was performed using the coupled code suite; a burnup of 31 MWd/kgHM was reached. The simulation recreated the classic striped CRUD pattern often seen on pulled fuel rods containing CRUD. It is concluded that the striping is caused by the flow swirl induced by spacer grid mixing vanes. Two anti-correlated effects contribute to the striping: (1) the flow swirl yields significant azimuthal temperature variations, which impact the locations where CRUD deposits, and (2) the flow swirl is correlated to increased shear stress along the cladding surface and subsequent erosion of the CRUD layer. The CIPS condition of the core is concluded to be primarily controlled by lithium tetraborate precipitation, referred to as boron hideout, which occurs in regions experiencing subcooled nucleate boiling as soluble boron and lithium species reach their solubility limit within the CRUD layer. Subsequently, a localized reduction in power occurs due to the high neutron absorption cross section of boron-10

  6. MRI-guided robotic system for transperineal prostate interventions: proof of principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bosch, Michiel R; Moman, Maaike R; Van Vulpen, Marco; Battermann, Jan J; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Moerland, Marinus A; Duiveman, Ed; Van Schelven, Leonard J; De Leeuw, Hendrik

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the proof of principle of the University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU) robot dedicated to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided interventions in patients. The UMCU robot consists of polymers and non-ferromagnetic materials. For transperineal prostate interventions, it can be placed between the patient's legs inside a closed bore 1.5T MR scanner. The robot can manually be translated and rotated resulting in five degrees of freedom. It contains a pneumatically driven tapping device to automatically insert a needle stepwise into the prostate using a controller unit outside the scanning room. To define the target positions and to verify the needle insertion point and the needle trajectory, a high-resolution 3D balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) scan that provides a T2/T1-weighted contrast is acquired. During the needle insertion fast 2D bSSFP images are generated to track the needle on-line. When the target position is reached, the radiation oncologist manually places a fiducial gold marker (small seed) at this location. In total two needle trajectories are used to place all markers. Afterwards, a high-resolution 3D bSSFP scan is acquired to visualize the fiducial gold markers. Four fiducial gold markers were placed transperineally into the prostate of a patient with a clinical stage T3 prostate cancer. In the generated scans, it was possible to discriminate the patient's anatomy, the needle and the markers. All markers were delivered inside the prostate. The procedure time was 1.5 h. This study proves that MRI-guided needle placement and seed delivery in the prostate with the UMCU robot are feasible. (note)

  7. The Influence of Perceived Stress on Cortical Reactivity: A Proof-Of-Principle Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosan Luijcks

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate how perceived stress may affect electroencephalographical (EEG activity in a stress paradigm in a sample of 76 healthy participants. EEG activity was analyzed using multilevel modeling, allowing estimation of nested effects (EEG time segments within subjects. The stress paradigm consisted of a 3-minute pre-stimulus stress period and a 2-minute post-stimulus phase. At t=3 minutes, a single electrical stimulus was delivered. Participants were unaware of the precise moment of stimulus delivery and its intensity level. In the EEG time course of alpha activity, a stronger increase was observed during the post-stimulus period as compared to the pre-stimulus period. An opposite time course effect was apparent for gamma activity. Both effects were in line with a priori expectations and support the validity of this experimental EEG-stress paradigm. Secondly, we investigated whether interaction effects of stress and coping, as measured with the Perceived Stress Scale-10 questionnaire (PSS-10, could be demonstrated. A higher perceived stress score was accompanied by a greater increase in delta- and theta-activity during the post-stimulus phase, compared to low scores. In contrast, low coping capacity was associated with a stronger decrease in slow beta, fast beta and gamma activity during the post-stimulus phase. The results of the present article may be interpreted as proof-of-principle that EEG stress-related activity depends on the level of subjectively reported perceived stress. The inclusion of psychosocial variables measuring coping styles as well as stress-related personality aspects permits further examination of the interconnection between mind and body and may inform on the process of transformation from acute to chronic stress.

  8. Milk Sweetened with Xylitol: A Proof-of-Principle Caries Prevention Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Donald L; Zegarra, Graciela; Vasquez Huerta, Elsa C; Castillo, Jorge L; Milgrom, Peter; Roberts, Marilyn C; Cabrera-Matta, Ailin R; Merino, Ana P

    2016-09-15

    To evaluate the efficacy of xylitol-sweetened milk as a caries-preventive strategy. In this nine-month prospective proof-of-principle trial, Peruvian schoolchildren were randomized to one of five different milk groups: (1) eight g of xylitol per 200 mL milk once per day; (2) four g of xylitol per 100 mL milk twice per day; (3) eight g of sorbitol per 200 mL milk once per day; (4) four g of sorbitol per 100 mL milk twice per day; or (5) eight g of sucrose per 200 mL milk once per day. The primary outcome was plaque mutans streptococci (MS) at nine months. A secondary outcome was caries incidence. We hypothesized that children in the xylitol groups would have a greater MS decline and lower caries incidence. One hundred fifty-three children were randomized in the intent-to-treat analyses. Children receiving xylitol had a greater decline in MS than children receiving sucrose (P=0.02) but were not different from children receiving sorbitol (P=0.07). Dental caries incidence for xylitol once per day or twice per day was 5.3±3.4 and 4.3±4.0 surfaces, respectively, compared to sorbitol once per day, sorbitol twice per day, or sucrose (4.1±2.8, 3.7±4.2, and 3.2±3.4 surfaces, respectively). There were no differences in caries incidence between xylitol and sucrose (rate ratio [RR] = 1.51; 95 percent confidence interval [CI] = 0.88, 2.59; P=0.13) or between xylitol and sorbitol (RR = 1.28; 95 percent CI = 0.90, 1.83; P=0.16). Xylitol-sweetened milk significantly reduced mutans streptococci levels compared to sucrose-sweetened milk, but differences in caries incidence were not detected.

  9. MRI-guided robotic system for transperineal prostate interventions: proof of principle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van den Bosch, Michiel R; Moman, Maaike R; Van Vulpen, Marco; Battermann, Jan J; Lagendijk, Jan J W; Moerland, Marinus A [Department of Radiotherapy, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); Duiveman, Ed; Van Schelven, Leonard J [Medical Technology and Clinical Physics, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands); De Leeuw, Hendrik [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX, Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: M.R.vandenBosch@umcutrecht.nl

    2010-03-07

    In this study, we demonstrate the proof of principle of the University Medical Center Utrecht (UMCU) robot dedicated to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided interventions in patients. The UMCU robot consists of polymers and non-ferromagnetic materials. For transperineal prostate interventions, it can be placed between the patient's legs inside a closed bore 1.5T MR scanner. The robot can manually be translated and rotated resulting in five degrees of freedom. It contains a pneumatically driven tapping device to automatically insert a needle stepwise into the prostate using a controller unit outside the scanning room. To define the target positions and to verify the needle insertion point and the needle trajectory, a high-resolution 3D balanced steady state free precession (bSSFP) scan that provides a T2/T1-weighted contrast is acquired. During the needle insertion fast 2D bSSFP images are generated to track the needle on-line. When the target position is reached, the radiation oncologist manually places a fiducial gold marker (small seed) at this location. In total two needle trajectories are used to place all markers. Afterwards, a high-resolution 3D bSSFP scan is acquired to visualize the fiducial gold markers. Four fiducial gold markers were placed transperineally into the prostate of a patient with a clinical stage T3 prostate cancer. In the generated scans, it was possible to discriminate the patient's anatomy, the needle and the markers. All markers were delivered inside the prostate. The procedure time was 1.5 h. This study proves that MRI-guided needle placement and seed delivery in the prostate with the UMCU robot are feasible. (note)

  10. Thermal Shock Experiment (TSEX): a ''proof-of-principle'' evaluation of the use of electron beam heating to simulate the thermal mechanical environment anticipated for the first wall of the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, P.E.; Krakowski, R.A.

    1977-06-01

    The results of a ''proof-of-principle'' Thermal Shock Experiment (TSEX), designed to simulate the thermal mechanical response of insulator-metal composite first walls anticipated for pulsed high-density fusion reactors, are given. A programmable 10-kV, 1.0-A electron beam was used to pulse repeatedly (0.30-mm)Al 2 O 3 /(1.0-mm) Nb-1Zr composite samples 200 to 300 K, relative to a base-line temperature of 1000 K. The experimental goals of TSEX were established relative to the first-wall environment anticipated for the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR). A detailed description of the TSEX ''proof-of-principle'' apparatus, experimental procedure, and diagnostics is given. The results of extensive thermal analyses are given, which are used to estimate the thermal stresses generated. Although little or no control was exercised over the sample fabrication and thermal history, one sample experienced in excess of 800 thermal cycles of approximately 250 K at approximately 1000 K, and the results of optical and SEM examination of this specimen are presented. The resistance of this sample to macroscopic failure was truly impressive. Recommendations for the construction of an apparatus dedicated to extensive testing of first-wall composites are given on the basis of these ''proof-of-principle'' TSEX results

  11. Multidisciplinary management of very advanced stage III and IV melanoma: Proof-of-principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Haim; Ben-Ami, Eytan; Shapira-Frommer, Roni; Schachter, Jacob

    2012-08-01

    study may be considered a proof-of-principle investigation, enabling long-term remissions by combining induction therapy and surgery.

  12. Engineering Protein Hydrogels Using SpyCatcher-SpyTag Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xiaoye; Fang, Jie; Xue, Bin; Fu, Linglan; Li, Hongbin

    2016-09-12

    Constructing hydrogels from engineered proteins has attracted significant attention within the material sciences, owing to their myriad potential applications in biomedical engineering. Developing efficient methods to cross-link tailored protein building blocks into hydrogels with desirable mechanical, physical, and functional properties is of paramount importance. By making use of the recently developed SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry, we successfully engineered protein hydrogels on the basis of engineered tandem modular elastomeric proteins. Our resultant protein hydrogels are soft but stable, and show excellent biocompatibility. As the first step, we tested the use of these hydrogels as a drug carrier, as well as in encapsulating human lung fibroblast cells. Our results demonstrate the robustness of the SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry, even when the SpyTag (or SpyCatcher) is flanked by folded globular domains. These results demonstrate that SpyCatcher-SpyTag chemistry can be used to engineer protein hydrogels from tandem modular elastomeric proteins that can find applications in tissue engineering, in fundamental mechano-biological studies, and as a controlled drug release vehicle.

  13. Fast-wave ion cyclotron current drive for ITER and prospects for near-term proof-of-principle experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swain, D.W.; Batchelor, D.B.; Carter, M.D.; Jaeger, E.F.; Ryan, P.M.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1989-01-01

    Low-frequency fast-wave current drive (FWCD) with frequencies in the range from 30 to 100 MHz looks promising for current drive in ITER. Its theoretical efficiencies are comparable to other current-drive techniques, and it could be significantly cheaper than other proposed current drive methods because of the ready availability of inexpensive (<$1/W), efficient, multi-megawatt rf power sources. The most critical issues for FWCD are concerns about the acceptability and survivability of an appropriate antenna launching system and the lack of an experimental demonstration of FWCD in a large tokamak. We describe an antenna array that is flush with the first wall of ITER and should be able to survive in the plasma environment, present theoretical calculations of FWCD in ITER, and show results from a brief survey of some present-day tokamaks in which it might be possible to carry out FWCD proof-of-principle experiments. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  14. Proof of principle in vitro study of a prototype ultrasound technology to size stone fragments during ureteroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Mathew D; Teichman, Joel M H; Bailey, Michael R

    2009-07-01

    Proof-of-principle in vitro experiments evaluated a prototype ultrasound technology to size kidney stone fragments. Nineteen human stones were measured using manual calipers. A 10-MHz, 1/8'' (10F) ultrasound transducer probe pinged each stone on a kidney tissue phantom submerged in water using two methods. In Method 1, the instrument was aligned such that the ultrasound pulse traveled through the stone. In Method 2, the instrument was aligned partially over the stone such that the ultrasound pulse traveled through water. For Method 1, the correlation between caliper- and ultrasound-determined stone size was r(2) = 0.71 (P stone measurements were accurate and precise to within 1 mm. For Method 2, the correlation was r(2) = 0.99 (P stone size with good accuracy and precision. This technology may be possible to incorporate into ureteroscopy.

  15. Use of advanced programmable logic controllers to monitor and control the Elmo Bumpy Torus-proof-of-principle device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyd, B.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Elmo Bumpy Torus - Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) device is designed with an instrumentation and control system based upon the use of an advanced Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). The modern PLC incorporates many advanced programming features not available in earlier PLC's intended for application to conventional relay logic replacement. The additional power and flexibility of these modern PLC's is especially applicable to an experimental device such as EBT-P which is made up of several complex interrelated subsystems whose operational characteristics will be evolving throughout the lifetime of the device. The rationale for the selection of advanced PLC's for EBT-P and the approach taken to design of the software developed to control EBT-P are the topics addressed in this paper

  16. Design and implementation of an array of micro-electrochemical detectors for two-dimensional liquid chromatography--proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abia, Jude A; Putnam, Joel; Mriziq, Khaled; Guiochon, Georges A

    2010-03-05

    Simultaneous two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) is an implementation of two-dimensional liquid chromatography which has the potential to provide very fast, yet highly efficient separations. It is based on the use of time x space and space x space separation systems. The basic principle of this instrument has been validated long ago by the success of two-dimensional thin layer chromatography. The construction of a pressurized wide and flat column (100 mm x 100 mm x 1 mm) operated under an inlet pressure of up to 50 bar was described previously. However, to become a modern analytical method, simultaneous 2D-LC requires the development of detectors suitable for the monitoring of the composition of the eluent of this pressurized planar, wide column. An array of five equidistant micro-electrochemical sensors was built for this purpose and tested. Each sensor is a three-electrode system, with the working electrode being a 25 microm polished platinum micro-electrode. The auxiliary electrode is a thin platinum wire and the reference electrode an Ag/AgCl (3M sat. KCl) electrode. In this first implementation, proof of principle is demonstrated, but the final instrument will require a much larger array. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of the Use of Home Blood Pressure Measurement Using Mobile Phone-Assisted Technology: The iVitality Proof-of-Principle Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, L.W.; Richard, E.; Cachucho, R.; Craen, A.J. de; Jongstra, S.; Mooijaart, S.P.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mobile phone-assisted technologies provide the opportunity to optimize the feasibility of long-term blood pressure (BP) monitoring at home, with the potential of large-scale data collection. OBJECTIVE: In this proof-of-principle study, we evaluated the feasibility of home BP monitoring

  18. Evaluation of the Use of Home Blood Pressure Measurement Using Mobile Phone-Assisted Technology: The iVitality Proof-of-Principle Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijsman, Liselotte W.; Richard, Edo; Cachucho, Ricardo; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Jongstra, Susan; Mooijaart, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phone-assisted technologies provide the opportunity to optimize the feasibility of long-term blood pressure (BP) monitoring at home, with the potential of large-scale data collection. In this proof-of-principle study, we evaluated the feasibility of home BP monitoring using mobile

  19. Test-retest reliability and agreement of the SPI-Questionnaire to detect symptoms of digital ischemia in elite volleyball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Pol, Daan; Zacharian, Tigran; Maas, Mario; Kuijer, P Paul F M

    2017-06-01

    The Shoulder posterior circumflex humeral artery Pathology and digital Ischemia - questionnaire (SPI-Q) has been developed to enable periodic surveillance of elite volleyball players, who are at risk for digital ischemia. Prior to implementation, assessing reliability is mandatory. Therefore, the test-retest reliability and agreement of the SPI-Q were evaluated among the population at risk. A questionnaire survey was performed with a 2-week interval among 65 elite male volleyball players assessing symptoms of cold, pale and blue digits in the dominant hand during or after practice or competition using a 4-point Likert scale (never, sometimes, often and always). Kappa (κ) and percentage of agreement (POA) were calculated for individual symptoms, and to distinguish symptomatic and asymptomatic players. For the individual symptoms, κ ranged from "poor" (0.25) to "good" (0.63), and POA ranged from "moderate" (78%) to "good" (97%). To classify symptomatic players, the SPI-Q showed "good" reliability (κ = 0.83; 95%CI 0.69-0.97) and "good" agreement (POA = 92%). The current study has proven the SPI-Q to be reliable for detecting elite male indoor volleyball players with symptoms of digital ischemia.

  20. A coupled RELAPS-3D/CFD methodology with a proof-of-principle calculation; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aumiller, D.L.; Tomlinson, E.T.; Bauer, R.C.

    2000-01-01

    The RELAP5-3D computer code was modified to make the explicit coupling capability in the code fully functional. As a test of the modified code, a coupled RELAP5/RELAP5 analysis of the Edwards-O'Brien blowdown problem was performed which showed no significant deviations from the standard RELAP5-3D predictions. In addition, a multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code was modified to permit explicit coupling to RELAP5-3D. Several calculations were performed with this code. The first analysis used the experimental pressure history from a point just upstream of the break as a boundary condition. This analysis showed that a multiphase CFD code could calculate the thermodynamic and hydrodynamic conditions during a rapid blowdown transient. Finally, a coupled RELAP5/CFD analysis was performed. The results are presented in this paper

  1. Extraluminal biodegradable splint to treat upper airway anterior malacia: A preclinical proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorostidi, François; Courbon, Cécile; Burki, Marco; Reinhard, Antoine; Sandu, Kishore

    2018-02-01

    Upper airway malacia highly complicates the treatment of benign laryngotracheal stenosis, and no ideal option is available to date. We here explore the use of extraluminal biodegradable splints in an animal model of long-segment anterior tracheomalacia (TM). We show the efficacy, as well as the tissue tolerance, of a custom-made biodegradable extraluminal device surgically inserted around the trachea. Preclinical animal study. Anterior TM was induced in rabbits through an anterior neck approach by removing eight consecutive anterior tracheal rings without damaging the underlying mucosa. Malacia was corrected during the same surgery by pexy sutures, suspending the tracheal mucosa to an experimental biodegradable device. Symptoms, survival, and tissue reaction were compared to healthy and sham surgery controls. The model induced death by respiratory failure within minutes. Ten animals received the experimental treatment, and those who survived the perioperative period remained asymptomatic with a maximum follow-up of 221 days. Histological studies at programmed euthanasia showed complete degradation of the prosthesis, with significant remnant fibrosis around the trachea. However, the tracheal stiffness of test segments was comparatively less than that of control segments. Extraluminal biodegradable splints rescued animals with a condition otherwise incompatible with life. It was well tolerated, leaving peritracheal fibrosis that was not as stiff as normal trachea. The external tracheal stiffening was sufficient for the test animals to live through the phase of severe acute hypercollapsibility. This represents a valid option to help pediatric patients with laryngotracheal stenosis and associated cartilaginous airway malacia. NA. Laryngoscope, 128:E53-E58, 2018. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  2. Quantification of Hand Motor Symptoms in Parkinson's Disease: A Proof-of-Principle Study Using Inertial and Force Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Noort, Josien C; Verhagen, Rens; van Dijk, Kees J; Veltink, Peter H; Vos, Michelle C P M; de Bie, Rob M A; Bour, Lo J; Heida, Ciska T

    2017-10-01

    This proof-of-principle study describes the methodology and explores and demonstrates the applicability of a system, existing of miniature inertial sensors on the hand and a separate force sensor, to objectively quantify hand motor symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) in a clinical setting (off- and on-medication condition). Four PD patients were measured in off- and on- dopaminergic medication condition. Finger tapping, rapid hand opening/closing, hand pro/supination, tremor during rest, mental task and kinetic task, and wrist rigidity movements were measured with the system (called the PowerGlove). To demonstrate applicability, various outcome parameters of measured hand motor symptoms of the patients in off- vs. on-medication condition are presented. The methodology described and results presented show applicability of the PowerGlove in a clinical research setting, to objectively quantify hand bradykinesia, tremor and rigidity in PD patients, using a single system. The PowerGlove measured a difference in off- vs. on-medication condition in all tasks in the presented patients with most of its outcome parameters. Further study into the validity and reliability of the outcome parameters is required in a larger cohort of patients, to arrive at an optimal set of parameters that can assist in clinical evaluation and decision-making.

  3. Proof-of-principle experimental realization of a qubit-like qudit-based quantum key distribution scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuang; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chau, H. F.; Chen, Wei; Wang, Chao; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2018-04-01

    In comparison to qubit-based protocols, qudit-based quantum key distribution ones generally allow two cooperative parties to share unconditionally secure keys under a higher channel noise. However, it is very hard to prepare and measure the required quantum states in qudit-based protocols in general. One exception is the recently proposed highly error tolerant qudit-based protocol known as the Chau15 (Chau 2015 Phys. Rev. A 92 062324). Remarkably, the state preparation and measurement in this protocol can be done relatively easily since the required states are phase encoded almost like the diagonal basis states of a qubit. Here we report the first proof-of-principle demonstration of the Chau15 protocol. One highlight of our experiment is that its post-processing is based on practical one-way manner, while the original proposal in Chau (2015 Phys. Rev. A 92 062324) relies on complicated two-way post-processing, which is a great challenge in experiment. In addition, by manipulating time-bin qudit and measurement with a variable delay interferometer, our realization is extensible to qudit with high-dimensionality and confirms the experimental feasibility of the Chau15 protocol.

  4. Proof-of-principle for SERS imaging of Aspergillus nidulans hyphae using in vivo synthesis of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prusinkiewicz, Martin A; Farazkhorasani, Fatemeh; Dynes, James J; Wang, Jian; Gough, Kathleen M; Kaminskyj, Susan G W

    2012-11-07

    High spatial resolution methods to assess the physiology of growing cells should permit analysis of fungal biochemical composition. Whole colony methods cannot capture the details of physiology and organism-environment interaction, in part because the structure, function and composition of fungal hyphae vary within individual cells depending on their distance from the growing apex. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) can provide chemical information on materials that are in close contact with appropriate metal substrates, such as nanopatterned gold surfaces and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Since nanoparticles can be generated by living cells, we have created conditions for AuNP formation within and on the surface of Aspergillus nidulans hyphae in order to explore their potential for SERS analysis. AuNP distribution and composition have been assessed by UV-Vis spectroscopy, fluorescence light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy. AuNPs were often associated with hyphal walls, both in the peripheral cytoplasm and on the outer wall surface. Interpretation of SERS spectra is challenging, and will require validation for the diversity of organic molecules present. Here, we show proof-of-principle that it is possible to generate SERS spectra from nanoparticles grown in situ by living hyphae.

  5. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb3Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q0 applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posen, S.; Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L.

    2015-02-01

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb3Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb3Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q0 out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q0 at quench of 8 × 109. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above Hc1, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q0 values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb3Sn cavities in future applications.

  6. Proof-of-principle study of a small animal PET/field-cycled MRI combined system using conventional PMT technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng Hao; Handler, William B.; Scholl, Timothy J.; Simpson, P.J.; Chronik, Blaine A.

    2010-01-01

    There are currently several approaches to the development of combined PET/MRI systems, all of which need to address adverse interactions between the two systems. Of particular relevance to the majority of proposed PET/MRI systems is the effect that static and dynamic magnetic fields have on the performance of PET detection systems based on photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). In the work reported in this paper, performance of two conventional PMTs has been systematically investigated and characterized as a function of magnetic field exposure conditions. Detector gain, energy resolution, time resolution, and efficiency were measured for static field exposures between 0 and 6.3 mT. Additionally, the short-term recovery and long-term stability of gain and energy resolution were measured in the presence of repeatedly applied dynamic magnetic fields changing at 4 T/s. It was found that the detectors recovered normal operation within several milliseconds following the end of large pulsed magnetic fields. In addition, the repeated applications of large pulsed magnetic fields did not significantly affect detector stability. Based on these results, we implemented a proof-of-principle PET/field-cycled MRI (FCMRI) system for small animal imaging using commercial PMT-based PET detectors. The first PET images acquired within the PET/FCMRI system are presented. The image quality, in terms of spatial resolution, was compared between standalone PET and the PET/FCMRI system. Finally, the relevance of these results to various aspects of PET/MRI system design is discussed.

  7. Rapid and accurate detection of urinary pathogens by mobile IMS-based electronic nose: a proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roine, Antti; Saviauk, Taavi; Kumpulainen, Pekka; Karjalainen, Markus; Tuokko, Antti; Aittoniemi, Janne; Vuento, Risto; Lekkala, Jukka; Lehtimäki, Terho; Tammela, Teuvo L; Oksala, Niku K J

    2014-01-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is a common disease with significant morbidity and economic burden, accounting for a significant part of the workload in clinical microbiology laboratories. Current clinical chemisty point-of-care diagnostics rely on imperfect dipstick analysis which only provides indirect and insensitive evidence of urinary bacterial pathogens. An electronic nose (eNose) is a handheld device mimicking mammalian olfaction that potentially offers affordable and rapid analysis of samples without preparation at athmospheric pressure. In this study we demonstrate the applicability of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) -based eNose to discriminate the most common UTI pathogens from gaseous headspace of culture plates rapidly and without sample preparation. We gathered a total of 101 culture samples containing four most common UTI bacteries: E. coli, S. saprophyticus, E. faecalis, Klebsiella spp and sterile culture plates. The samples were analyzed using ChemPro 100i device, consisting of IMS cell and six semiconductor sensors. Data analysis was conducted by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) and logistic regression (LR). The results were validated by leave-one-out and 5-fold cross validation analysis. In discrimination of sterile and bacterial samples sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 97% were achieved. The bacterial species were identified with sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 96% using eNose as compared to urine bacterial cultures. These findings strongly demonstrate the ability of our eNose to discriminate bacterial cultures and provides a proof of principle to use this method in urinanalysis of UTI.

  8. Rapid and accurate detection of urinary pathogens by mobile IMS-based electronic nose: a proof-of-principle study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antti Roine

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infection (UTI is a common disease with significant morbidity and economic burden, accounting for a significant part of the workload in clinical microbiology laboratories. Current clinical chemisty point-of-care diagnostics rely on imperfect dipstick analysis which only provides indirect and insensitive evidence of urinary bacterial pathogens. An electronic nose (eNose is a handheld device mimicking mammalian olfaction that potentially offers affordable and rapid analysis of samples without preparation at athmospheric pressure. In this study we demonstrate the applicability of ion mobility spectrometry (IMS -based eNose to discriminate the most common UTI pathogens from gaseous headspace of culture plates rapidly and without sample preparation. We gathered a total of 101 culture samples containing four most common UTI bacteries: E. coli, S. saprophyticus, E. faecalis, Klebsiella spp and sterile culture plates. The samples were analyzed using ChemPro 100i device, consisting of IMS cell and six semiconductor sensors. Data analysis was conducted by linear discriminant analysis (LDA and logistic regression (LR. The results were validated by leave-one-out and 5-fold cross validation analysis. In discrimination of sterile and bacterial samples sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 97% were achieved. The bacterial species were identified with sensitivity of 95% and specificity of 96% using eNose as compared to urine bacterial cultures.These findings strongly demonstrate the ability of our eNose to discriminate bacterial cultures and provides a proof of principle to use this method in urinanalysis of UTI.

  9. Diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders using a channelized Hotelling observer model: Proof of principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bal, H.; Bal, G.; Acton, P. D.

    2007-01-01

    Imaging dopamine transporters using PET and SPECT probes is a powerful technique for the early diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders. In order to perform automated accurate diagnosis of these diseases, a channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) based model was developed and evaluated using the SPECT tracer [Tc-99m]TRODAT-1. Computer simulations were performed using a digitized striatal phantom to characterize early stages of the disease (20 lesion-present cases with varying lesion size and contrast). Projection data, modeling the effects of attenuation and geometric response function, were obtained for each case. Statistical noise levels corresponding to those observed clinically were added to the projection data to obtain 100 noise realizations for each case. All the projection data were reconstructed, and a subset of the transaxial slices containing the striatum was summed and used for further analysis. CHO models, using the Laguerre-Gaussian functions as channels, were designed for two cases: (1) By training the model using individual lesion-present samples and (2) by training the model using pooled lesion-present samples. A decision threshold obtained for each CHO model was used to classify the study population (n=40). It was observed that individual lesion trained CHO models gave high diagnostic accuracy for lesions that were larger than those used to train the model and vice-versa. On the other hand, the pooled CHO model was found to give a high diagnostic accuracy for all the lesion cases (average diagnostic accuracy=0.95±0.07; p<0.0001 Fisher's exact test). Based on our results, we conclude that a CHO model has the potential to provide early and accurate diagnosis of Parkinsonian disorders, thereby improving patient management

  10. Human-derived nanoparticles and vascular response to injury in rabbit carotid arteries: Proof of principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A K Schwartz

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Maria A K Schwartz1, John C Lieske2, Vivek Kumar2, Gerard Farell-Baril2, Virginia M Miller1,31Departments of Physiology and Biomedical Engineering, Internal Medicine; 2Division of Nephrology, and 3Surgery, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USAAbstract: Self-calcifying, self-replicating nanoparticles have been isolated from calcified human tissues. However, it is unclear if these nanoparticles participate in disease processes. Therefore, this study was designed to preliminarily test the hypothesis that human-derived nanoparticles are causal to arterial disease processes. One carotid artery of 3 kg male rabbits was denuded of endothelium; the contralateral artery remained unoperated as a control. Each rabbit was injected intravenously with either saline, calcified, or decalcified nanoparticles cultured from calcified human arteries or kidney stones. After 35 days, both injured and control arteries were removed for histological examination. Injured arteries from rabbits injected with saline showed minimal, eccentric intimal hyperplasia. Injured arteries from rabbits injected with calcified kidney stone- and arterial-derived nanoparticles occluded, sometimes with canalization. The calcified kidney stone-derived nanoparticles caused calcifications within the occlusion. Responses to injury in rabbits injected with decalcified kidney stone-derived nanoparticles were similar to those observed in saline-injected animals. However, decalcified arterial-derived nanoparticles produced intimal hyperplasia that varied from moderate to occlusion with canalization and calcifi cation. This study offers the first evidence that there may be a causal relationship between human-derived nanoparticles and response to injury including calcification in arteries with damaged endothelium.Keywords: arterial calcification, endothelial injury, intimal hyperplasia

  11. Proof-of-Principle of Onchocerciasis Elimination with Ivermectin Treatment in Endemic Foci in Africa: Final Results of a Study in Mali and Senegal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traore, Mamadou O.; Sarr, Moussa D.; Badji, Alioune; Bissan, Yiriba; Diawara, Lamine; Doumbia, Konimba; Goita, Soula F.; Konate, Lassana; Mounkoro, Kalifa; Seck, Amadou F.; Toe, Laurent; Toure, Seyni; Remme, Jan H. F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Mass treatment with ivermectin controls onchocerciasis as a public health problem, but it was not known if it could also interrupt transmission and eliminate the parasite in endemic foci in Africa where vectors are highly efficient. A longitudinal study was undertaken in three hyperendemic foci in Mali and Senegal with 15 to 17 years of annual or six-monthly ivermectin treatment in order to assess residual levels of infection and transmission, and test whether treatment could be safely stopped. This article reports the results of the final evaluations up to 5 years after the last treatment. Methodology/Principal Findings Skin snip surveys were undertaken in 131 villages where 29,753 people were examined and 492,600 blackflies were analyzed for the presence of Onchocerca volvulus larva using a specific DNA probe. There was a declining trend in infection and transmission levels after the last treatment. In two sites the prevalence of microfilaria and vector infectivity rate were zero 3 to 4 years after the last treatment. In the third site, where infection levels were comparatively high before stopping treatment, there was also a consistent decline in infection and transmission to very low levels 3 to 5 years after stopping treatment. All infection and transmission indicators were below postulated thresholds for elimination. Conclusion/Significance The study has established the proof of principle that onchocerciasis elimination with ivermectin treatment is feasible in at least some endemic foci in Africa. The study results have been instrumental for the current evolution from onchocerciasis control to elimination in Africa. PMID:23029586

  12. Urinary volatile compounds as biomarkers for lung cancer: a proof of principle study using odor signatures in mouse models of lung cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichi Matsumura

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A potential strategy for diagnosing lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related death, is to identify metabolic signatures (biomarkers of the disease. Although data supports the hypothesis that volatile compounds can be detected in the breath of lung cancer patients by the sense of smell or through bioanalytical techniques, analysis of breath samples is cumbersome and technically challenging, thus limiting its applicability. The hypothesis explored here is that variations in small molecular weight volatile organic compounds ("odorants" in urine could be used as biomarkers for lung cancer. To demonstrate the presence and chemical structures of volatile biomarkers, we studied mouse olfactory-guided behavior and metabolomics of volatile constituents of urine. Sensor mice could be trained to discriminate between odors of mice with and without experimental tumors demonstrating that volatile odorants are sufficient to identify tumor-bearing mice. Consistent with this result, chemical analyses of urinary volatiles demonstrated that the amounts of several compounds were dramatically different between tumor and control mice. Using principal component analysis and supervised machine-learning, we accurately discriminated between tumor and control groups, a result that was cross validated with novel test groups. Although there were shared differences between experimental and control animals in the two tumor models, we also found chemical differences between these models, demonstrating tumor-based specificity. The success of these studies provides a novel proof-of-principle demonstration of lung tumor diagnosis through urinary volatile odorants. This work should provide an impetus for similar searches for volatile diagnostic biomarkers in the urine of human lung cancer patients.

  13. Can repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increase muscle strength in functional neurological paresis? A proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broersma, M; Koops, E A; Vroomen, P C; Van der Hoeven, J H; Aleman, A; Leenders, K L; Maurits, N M; van Beilen, M

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic options are limited in functional neurological paresis disorder. Earlier intervention studies did not control for a placebo effect, hampering assessment of effectivity. A proof-of-principle investigation was conducted into the therapeutic potential of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS), using a single-blind two-period placebo-controlled cross-over design. Eleven patients received active 15 Hz rTMS over the contralateral motor cortex (hand area), in two periods of 5 days, for 30 min once a day at 80% of resting motor threshold, with a train length of 2 s and an intertrain interval of 4 s. Eight of these eleven patients were also included in the placebo treatment condition. Primary outcome measure was change in muscle strength as measured by dynamometry after treatment. Secondary outcome measure was the subjective change in muscle strength after treatment. In patients who received both treatments, active rTMS induced a significantly larger median increase in objectively measured muscle strength (24%) compared to placebo rTMS (6%; P difference due to treatment, i.e. patients did not perceive these objectively measured motor improvements (P = 0.40). Our findings suggest that rTMS by itself can potentially improve muscle weakness in functional neurological paresis disorder. Whereas patients' muscle strength increased as measured with dynamometry, patients did not report increased functioning of the affected hand, subjectively. The results may indicate that decreased muscle strength is not the core symptom and that rTMS should be added to behavioral approaches in functional neurological paresis. © 2015 EAN.

  14. Abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Proof of principle in an experimental model of colon cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivillin, Veronica A.; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Schwint, Amanda E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Radiobiology, B1650KNA San Martin, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Pozzi, Emiliano C.C.; Curotto, Paula [Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Research and Production Reactors, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Colombo, Lucas L. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Oncologia Angel H. Roffo, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Thorp, Silvia I.; Farias, Ruben O. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Instrumentation and Control, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Garabalino, Marcela A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Radiobiology, B1650KNA San Martin, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gonzalez, Sara J. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Instrumentation and Control, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Santa Cruz, Gustavo A. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (CNEA), Department of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, Provincia Buenos Aires (Argentina); Carando, Daniel G. [Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Faculty of Exact and Natural Sciences, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2017-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, for the first time, the abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Twenty-six BDIX rats were inoculated subcutaneously with 1 x 10{sup 6} DHD/K12/TRb syngeneic colon cancer cells in the right hind flank. Three weeks post-inoculation, the right leg of 12 rats bearing the tumor nodule was treated with BPA-BNCT (BPA-Boronophenylalanine) at the RA-3 nuclear reactor located in Buenos Aires, Argentina, at an absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy to skin as the dose-limiting tissue. The remaining group of 14 tumor-bearing rats were left untreated and used as control. Two weeks post-BNCT, 1 x 10{sup 6} DHD/K12/TRb cells were injected subcutaneously in the contralateral left hind flank of each of the 26 BDIX rats. Tumor volume in both legs was measured weekly for 7 weeks to determine response to BNCT in the right leg and to assess a potential influence of BNCT in the right leg on tumor development in the left leg. Within the BNCT group, a statistically significant reduction was observed in contralateral left tumor volume in animals whose right leg tumor responded to BNCT (post-treatment/pre-treatment tumor volume <1) versus animals who failed to respond (post/pre ≥1), i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 271 ± 128 mm{sup 3}. In addition, a statistically significant reduction in contralateral left leg tumor volume was observed in BNCT-responsive animals (post/pre <1) vs untreated animals, i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 254 ± 251 mm{sup 3}. The present study performed in a simple animal model provides proof of principle that the positive response of a tumor to BNCT is capable of inducing an abscopal effect. (orig.)

  15. Big Data Analyses for Continuous Evaluation of Pharmacotherapy: A Proof of Principle with Doxapram in Preterm Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Robert B; Weteringen, Willem van; Voller, Swantje; Poppe, Jarinda A; Koch, Birgit C P; de Groot, Ronald; Tibboel, Dick; Knibbe, Catherijne A J; Reiss, Irwin K M; Simons, Sinno H P; Dino Research Group

    2017-01-01

    Drug effect evaluation is often based on subjective interpretation of a selection of patient data. Continuous analyses of high frequency patient monitor data are a valuable source to measuring drug effects. However, these have not yet been fully explored in clinical care. We aim to evaluate the usefulness and applicability of high frequency physiological data for analyses of pharmacotherapy. As a proof of principle, the effects of doxapram, a respiratory stimulant, on the oxygenation in preterm infants were studied. Second-to-second physiological data were collected from 12 hours before until 36 hours after start of doxapram loading dose plus continuous maintenance dose in seven preterm infants. Besides physiological data, plasma concentrations of doxapram and keto-doxapram were measured. Arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2) increased after the start of doxapram treatment alongside an increase in heart rate. The respiratory rate remained unaffected. The number of saturation dips and the time below a saturation of 80%, as well as the area under the 80%-saturation-time curve (AUC), were significantly lowered after the start of doxapram. The AUC under 90% saturation also significantly improved after start of doxapram. Plasma concentrations of doxapram and keto-doxapram were measured. Using high-frequency monitoring data, we showed the detailed effects over time of pharmacotherapy. We could objectively determine the respiratory condition and the effects of doxapram treatment in preterm infants. This type of analysis might help to develop individualized drug treatments with tailored dose adjustments based on a closed-loop algorithm. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Large Neutral Amino Acid Supplementation Exerts Its Effect through Three Synergistic Mechanisms: Proof of Principle in Phenylketonuria Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danique van Vliet

    Full Text Available Phenylketonuria (PKU was the first disorder in which severe neurocognitive dysfunction could be prevented by dietary treatment. However, despite this effect, neuropsychological outcome in PKU still remains suboptimal and the phenylalanine-restricted diet is very demanding. To improve neuropsychological outcome and relieve the dietary restrictions for PKU patients, supplementation of large neutral amino acids (LNAA is suggested as alternative treatment strategy that might correct all brain biochemical disturbances caused by high blood phenylalanine, and thereby improve neurocognitive functioning.As a proof-of-principle, this study aimed to investigate all hypothesized biochemical treatment objectives of LNAA supplementation (normalizing brain phenylalanine, non-phenylalanine LNAA, and monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations in PKU mice.C57Bl/6 Pah-enu2 (PKU mice and wild-type mice received a LNAA supplemented diet, an isonitrogenic/isocaloric high-protein control diet, or normal chow. After six weeks of dietary treatment, blood and brain amino acid and monoaminergic neurotransmitter concentrations were assessed.In PKU mice, the investigated LNAA supplementation regimen significantly reduced blood and brain phenylalanine concentrations by 33% and 26%, respectively, compared to normal chow (p<0.01, while alleviating brain deficiencies of some but not all supplemented LNAA. Moreover, LNAA supplementation in PKU mice significantly increased brain serotonin and norepinephrine concentrations from 35% to 71% and from 57% to 86% of wild-type concentrations (p<0.01, respectively, but not brain dopamine concentrations (p = 0.307.This study shows that LNAA supplementation without dietary phenylalanine restriction in PKU mice improves brain biochemistry through all three hypothesized biochemical mechanisms. Thereby, these data provide proof-of-concept for LNAA supplementation as a valuable alternative dietary treatment strategy in PKU. Based on these

  17. Abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Proof of principle in an experimental model of colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trivillin, Veronica A.; Monti Hughes, Andrea; Schwint, Amanda E.; Pozzi, Emiliano C.C.; Curotto, Paula; Colombo, Lucas L.; Thorp, Silvia I.; Farias, Ruben O.; Garabalino, Marcela A.; Gonzalez, Sara J.; Santa Cruz, Gustavo A.; Carando, Daniel G.

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate, for the first time, the abscopal effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). Twenty-six BDIX rats were inoculated subcutaneously with 1 x 10 6 DHD/K12/TRb syngeneic colon cancer cells in the right hind flank. Three weeks post-inoculation, the right leg of 12 rats bearing the tumor nodule was treated with BPA-BNCT (BPA-Boronophenylalanine) at the RA-3 nuclear reactor located in Buenos Aires, Argentina, at an absorbed dose of 7.5 Gy to skin as the dose-limiting tissue. The remaining group of 14 tumor-bearing rats were left untreated and used as control. Two weeks post-BNCT, 1 x 10 6 DHD/K12/TRb cells were injected subcutaneously in the contralateral left hind flank of each of the 26 BDIX rats. Tumor volume in both legs was measured weekly for 7 weeks to determine response to BNCT in the right leg and to assess a potential influence of BNCT in the right leg on tumor development in the left leg. Within the BNCT group, a statistically significant reduction was observed in contralateral left tumor volume in animals whose right leg tumor responded to BNCT (post-treatment/pre-treatment tumor volume <1) versus animals who failed to respond (post/pre ≥1), i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 271 ± 128 mm 3 . In addition, a statistically significant reduction in contralateral left leg tumor volume was observed in BNCT-responsive animals (post/pre <1) vs untreated animals, i.e., 13 ± 15 vs 254 ± 251 mm 3 . The present study performed in a simple animal model provides proof of principle that the positive response of a tumor to BNCT is capable of inducing an abscopal effect. (orig.)

  18. High-speed tapping-mode atomic force microscopy using a Q-controlled regular cantilever acting as the actuator: Proof-of-principle experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balantekin, M., E-mail: mujdatbalantekin@iyte.edu.tr [Electrical and Electronics Engineering, İzmir Institute of Technology, Urla, İzmir 35430 (Turkey); Satır, S.; Torello, D.; Değertekin, F. L. [Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0405 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    We present the proof-of-principle experiments of a high-speed actuation method to be used in tapping-mode atomic force microscopes (AFM). In this method, we do not employ a piezotube actuator to move the tip or the sample as in conventional AFM systems, but, we utilize a Q-controlled eigenmode of a cantilever to perform the fast actuation. We show that the actuation speed can be increased even with a regular cantilever.

  19. Identification of lymphogranuloma venereum-associated Chlamydia trachomatis serovars by fluorescence in situ hybridisation--a proof-of-principle analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frickmann, Hagen; Essig, Andreas; Poppert, Sven

    2014-04-01

    We describe a proof-of-principle evaluation of a fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH) procedure to identify Chlamydia trachomatis serovars L1-L3, the causative agents of lymphogranuloma venereum, in cell cultures based on newly designed DNA probes. Rapid and easy-to-perform FISH could facilitate the diagnosis of lymphogranuloma venereum without nucleic acid amplification or serotyping, but requires broader evaluation studies, for example, in tropical high-endemicity regions. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Laser all-ceramic crown removal and pulpal temperature--a laboratory proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechmann, P; Buu, N C H; Rechmann, B M T; Finzen, F C

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this proof-of-principle laboratory pilot study was to evaluate the temperature increase in the pulp chamber in a worst case scenario during Er:YAG laser debonding of all-ceramic crowns. Twenty extracted molars were prepared to receive all-ceramic IPS E.max CAD full contour crowns. The crowns were bonded to the teeth with Ivoclar Multilink Automix. Times for laser debonding and temperature rise in the pulp chamber using micro-thermocouples were measured. The Er:YAG was used with 560 mJ/pulse. The irradiation was applied at a distance of 5 mm from the crown surface. Additional air-water spray for cooling was utilized. Each all-ceramic crown was successfully laser debonded with an average debonding time of 135 ± 35 s. No crown fractured, and no damage to the underlying dentin was detected. The bonding cement deteriorated, but no carbonization at the dentin/cement interface occurred. The temperature rise in the pulp chamber averaged 5.4° ± 2.2 °C. During 8 out of the 20 crown removals, the temperature rise exceeded 5.5 °C, lasting 5 to 43 s (average 18.8 ± 11.6 s). A temperature rise of 11.5 °C occurred only once, while seven times the temperature rise was limited to 6.8 ± 0.5 °C. Temperature rises above 5.5 °C occurred only when the laser was applied from one side and additional cooling from the side opposite the irradiation. Er:YAG laser energy can successfully be used to efficiently debond all-ceramic crowns from natural teeth. Temperature rises exceeding 5.5 °C only occur when an additional air/water cooling from a dental syringe is inaccurately directed. To avoid possible thermal damage and to allow further heat diffusion, clinically temperature-reduced water might be applied.

  1. Proposal for the theoretical investigation of the relativistic beam-plasma interaction with application to the proof-of-principle electron beam-heated linear solenoidal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thode, L.E.

    1978-09-01

    A 36-month program to study the linear relativistic electron beam-plasma interaction is proposed. This program is part of a joint proposal between the Physics International Company (PI) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) that combines the advanced electron beam generator technology at PI with the highly developed computer simulation technology at LASL. The proposed LASL program includes direct support for 1- and 3-m beam-plasma interaction experiments planned at PI and development of theory relevant for design of a 10-m proof-of-principle electron beam-driven linear solenoidal reactor

  2. Setup and proof of principle of SAPIS (Stored Atoms Polarized Ion Source), a novel source of polarized H-/D- ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmerich, R.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this work was the setup and the proof-of-principle of a new type of negative polarized hydrogen or deuterium ion source, which is based on the charge-exchange reaction vectorH 0 +Cs 0 →vectorH - +Cs + , as for instance the Colliding-Beams-Source (CBS) at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY in Juelich. In contrast to the CBS, the use of a storage cell for the charge-exchange region promises an increase in H - current by at least an order of magnitude without considerable polarization losses. For these purposes, a new laboratory was equipped and both a polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source and an intense neutral cesium-beam source have been build-on. A Lambshift polarimeter, which allows the measurement of the nuclear polarization of the atomic as well as ionic beams, was completed with the construction of a new spin-filter. After commissioning and optimizing each of these sources, a storage cell was developed and installed in the charge-exchange region with a magnetic field. Additionally, components for the extraction, detection and analysis of the negative ion beam were installed. Following the decisive proof of principle, investigation of the properties of the storage cell, especially as to H recombination and depolarisation, was begun. Furthermore, a number of software programs was developed for the control and monitoring of different components of the sources as well as a universal measuring software for the complete installation, including the measurement and calculation of the beam polarization. At the same time, the remote control system of the Cologne source of polarized ions LASCO at the FN tandem accelerator was completely modernized. (orig.)

  3. TU-CD-BRA-08: Single-Energy Computed Tomography-Based Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging: Proof-Of-Principle in a Canine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T; Boone, J [University of California Davis School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA (United States); Kent, M; Wisner, E [University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, Davis, CA (United States); Fujita, Y [Tokai University, Isehara (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pulmonary perfusion imaging has provided significant insights into pulmonary diseases, and can be useful in radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to prospectively establish proof-of-principle in a canine model for single-energy CT-based perfusion imaging, which has the potential for widespread clinical implementation. Methods: Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on: (1) acquisition of inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast medium, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) of the two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the pre-contrast image from post-contrast image, yielding a map of Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement. These subtraction image data sets hypothetically represent perfused blood volume, a surrogate for perfusion. In an IACUC-approved clinical trial, we acquired pre- and post-contrast CT scans in the prone posture for six anesthetized, mechanically-ventilated dogs. The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The registration accuracy was quantified using the target registration errors (TREs) for 50 pulmonary landmarks in each dog. The gradient of HU enhancement between gravity-dependent (ventral) and non-dependent (dorsal) regions was evaluated to quantify the known effect of gravity, i.e., greater perfusion in ventral regions. Results: The lung volume difference between the two scans was 4.3±3.5% on average (range 0.3%–10.1%). DIR demonstrated an average TRE of 0.7±1.0 mm. HU enhancement in lung parenchyma was 34±10 HU on average and varied considerably between individual dogs, indicating the need for improvement of the contrast injection protocol. HU enhancement in ventral (gravity-dependent) regions was found to be greater than in dorsal regions. A population average ventral-to-dorsal gradient of HU enhancement was strong (R{sup 2}=0.94) and statistically significant (p<0.01). Conclusion: This canine study demonstrated relatively accurate DIR and a strong ventral

  4. TU-CD-BRA-08: Single-Energy Computed Tomography-Based Pulmonary Perfusion Imaging: Proof-Of-Principle in a Canine Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, T; Boone, J; Kent, M; Wisner, E; Fujita, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Pulmonary perfusion imaging has provided significant insights into pulmonary diseases, and can be useful in radiotherapy. The purpose of this study was to prospectively establish proof-of-principle in a canine model for single-energy CT-based perfusion imaging, which has the potential for widespread clinical implementation. Methods: Single-energy CT perfusion imaging is based on: (1) acquisition of inspiratory breath-hold CT scans before and after intravenous injection of iodinated contrast medium, (2) deformable image registration (DIR) of the two CT image data sets, and (3) subtraction of the pre-contrast image from post-contrast image, yielding a map of Hounsfield unit (HU) enhancement. These subtraction image data sets hypothetically represent perfused blood volume, a surrogate for perfusion. In an IACUC-approved clinical trial, we acquired pre- and post-contrast CT scans in the prone posture for six anesthetized, mechanically-ventilated dogs. The elastix algorithm was used for DIR. The registration accuracy was quantified using the target registration errors (TREs) for 50 pulmonary landmarks in each dog. The gradient of HU enhancement between gravity-dependent (ventral) and non-dependent (dorsal) regions was evaluated to quantify the known effect of gravity, i.e., greater perfusion in ventral regions. Results: The lung volume difference between the two scans was 4.3±3.5% on average (range 0.3%–10.1%). DIR demonstrated an average TRE of 0.7±1.0 mm. HU enhancement in lung parenchyma was 34±10 HU on average and varied considerably between individual dogs, indicating the need for improvement of the contrast injection protocol. HU enhancement in ventral (gravity-dependent) regions was found to be greater than in dorsal regions. A population average ventral-to-dorsal gradient of HU enhancement was strong (R"2=0.94) and statistically significant (p<0.01). Conclusion: This canine study demonstrated relatively accurate DIR and a strong ventral

  5. Correlation of Serum and Dried Blood Spot Results for Quantitation of Schistosoma Circulating Anodic Antigen: a Proof of Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Jennifer A.; Corstjens, Paul L.A.M.; Mngara, Julius; Lutonja, Peter; Isingo, Raphael; Urassa, Mark; Kornelis, Dieuwke; van Dam, Govert J.

    2015-01-01

    Circulating Anodic Antigen (CAA) testing is a powerful, increasingly-used tool for diagnosis of active schistosome infection. We sought to determine the feasibility and reliability of measuring CAA in blood spots collected on Whatman 903 Protein Saver cards, which are the predominant filter papers used worldwide for dried blood spot (DBS) research and clinical care. CAA was eluted from blood spots collected from 19 individuals onto Whatman 903 cards in Mwanza, Tanzania, and the assay was optimized to achieve CAA ratios comparable to those obtained from the spots’ corresponding serum samples. The optimized assay was then used to determine the correlation of serum samples (n=16) with DBS from cards that had been stored for 8 years at ambient temperature.Using a DBS volume equivalent to approximately four times the quantity of serum, CAA testing in DBS had a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 79% compared to CAA testing in serum. CAA testing was reliable in samples eluted from Whatman 903 cards that had been stored for 8 years at ambient temperature. The overall kappa coefficient was 0.53 (standard error 0.17, p<0.001). We conclude that CAA can be reliably and accurately measured in DBS collected onto the filter paper that is most commonly used for clinical care and research, and that can be stored for prolonged periods of time. This finding opens new avenues for future work among more than 700 million individuals living in areas worldwide in which schistosomes are endemic. PMID:26149541

  6. Effectiveness of virtual reality using Wii gaming technology in stroke rehabilitation: a pilot randomized clinical trial and proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saposnik, Gustavo; Teasell, Robert; Mamdani, Muhammad; Hall, Judith; McIlroy, William; Cheung, Donna; Thorpe, Kevin E; Cohen, Leonardo G; Bayley, Mark

    2010-07-01

    Hemiparesis resulting in functional limitation of an upper extremity is common among stroke survivors. Although existing evidence suggests that increasing intensity of stroke rehabilitation therapy results in better motor recovery, limited evidence is available on the efficacy of virtual reality for stroke rehabilitation. In this pilot, randomized, single-blinded clinical trial with 2 parallel groups involving stroke patients within 2 months, we compared the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of virtual reality using the Nintendo Wii gaming system (VRWii) versus recreational therapy (playing cards, bingo, or "Jenga") among those receiving standard rehabilitation to evaluate arm motor improvement. The primary feasibility outcome was the total time receiving the intervention. The primary safety outcome was the proportion of patients experiencing intervention-related adverse events during the study period. Efficacy, a secondary outcome measure, was evaluated with the Wolf Motor Function Test, Box and Block Test, and Stroke Impact Scale at 4 weeks after intervention. Overall, 22 of 110 (20%) of screened patients were randomized. The mean age (range) was 61.3 (41 to 83) years. Two participants dropped out after a training session. The interventions were successfully delivered in 9 of 10 participants in the VRWii and 8 of 10 in the recreational therapy arm. The mean total session time was 388 minutes in the recreational therapy group compared with 364 minutes in the VRWii group (P=0.75). There were no serious adverse events in any group. Relative to the recreational therapy group, participants in the VRWii arm had a significant improvement in mean motor function of 7 seconds (Wolf Motor Function Test, 7.4 seconds; 95% CI, -14.5, -0.2) after adjustment for age, baseline functional status (Wolf Motor Function Test), and stroke severity. VRWii gaming technology represents a safe, feasible, and potentially effective alternative to facilitate rehabilitation therapy and promote

  7. Impairment-targeted exercises for older adults with knee pain: protocol for a proof-of-principle study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Elaine

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise therapy for knee pain and osteoarthritis remains a key element of conservative treatment, recommended in clinical guidelines. Yet systematic reviews point to only modest benefits from exercise interventions. One reason for this might be that clinical trials tend to use a one-size-fits-all approach to exercise, effectively disregarding the details of their participants' clinical presentations. This uncontrolled before-after study (TargET-Knee-Pain aims to test the principle that exercises targeted at the specific physical impairments of older adults with knee pain may be able to significantly improve those impairments. It is a first step towards testing the effectiveness of this more individually-tailored approach. Methods/Design We aim to recruit 60 participants from an existing observational cohort of community-dwelling older adults with knee pain. Participants will all have at least one of the three physical impairments of weak quadriceps, a reduced range of knee flexion and poor standing balance. Each participant will be asked to undertake a programme of exercises, targeted at their particular combination and degree of impairment(s, over the course of twelve weeks. The exercises will be taught and progressed by an experienced physiotherapist, with reference to a "menu" of agreed exercises for each of the impairments, over the course of six fortnightly home visits, alternating with six fortnightly telephone calls. Primary outcome measures will be isometric quadriceps strength, knee flexion range of motion, timed single-leg standing balance and the "Four Balance Test Scale" at 12 weeks. Key secondary outcome measures will be self-reported levels of pain, stiffness and difficulties with day-to-day functional tasks (WOMAC. Outcome measures will be taken at three time-points (baseline, six weeks and twelve weeks by a study nurse blinded to the exercise status of the participants. Discussion This study (Targ

  8. Collaboration between a human group and artificial intelligence can improve prediction of multiple sclerosis course: a proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacchella, Andrea; Romano, Silvia; Ferraldeschi, Michela; Salvetti, Marco; Zaccaria, Andrea; Crisanti, Andrea; Grassi, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    Background: Multiple sclerosis has an extremely variable natural course. In most patients, disease starts with a relapsing-remitting (RR) phase, which proceeds to a secondary progressive (SP) form. The duration of the RR phase is hard to predict, and to date predictions on the rate of disease progression remain suboptimal. This limits the opportunity to tailor therapy on an individual patient's prognosis, in spite of the choice of several therapeutic options. Approaches to improve clinical decisions, such as collective intelligence of human groups and machine learning algorithms are widely investigated. Methods: Medical students and a machine learning algorithm predicted the course of disease on the basis of randomly chosen clinical records of patients that attended at the Multiple Sclerosis service of Sant'Andrea hospital in Rome. Results: A significant improvement of predictive ability was obtained when predictions were combined with a weight that depends on the consistence of human (or algorithm) forecasts on a given clinical record. Conclusions: In this work we present proof-of-principle that human-machine hybrid predictions yield better prognoses than machine learning algorithms or groups of humans alone. To strengthen this preliminary result, we propose a crowdsourcing initiative to collect prognoses by physicians on an expanded set of patients.

  9. Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy to Probe State- and Trait-Like Conditions in Chronic Tinnitus: A Proof-of-Principle Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Schecklmann

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Several neuroscience tools showed the involvement of auditory cortex in chronic tinnitus. In this proof-of-principle study we probed the capability of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS for the measurement of brain oxygenation in auditory cortex in dependence from chronic tinnitus and from intervention with transcranial magnetic stimulation. Methods. Twenty-three patients received continuous theta burst stimulation over the left primary auditory cortex in a randomized sham-controlled neuronavigated trial (verum = 12; placebo = 11. Before and after treatment, sound-evoked brain oxygenation in temporal areas was measured with fNIRS. Brain oxygenation was measured once in healthy controls (n=12. Results. Sound-evoked activity in right temporal areas was increased in the patients in contrast to healthy controls. Left-sided temporal activity under the stimulated area changed over the course of the trial; high baseline oxygenation was reduced and vice versa. Conclusions. By demonstrating that rTMS interacts with auditory evoked brain activity, our results confirm earlier electrophysiological findings and indicate the sensitivity of fNIRS for detecting rTMS induced changes in brain activity. Moreover, our findings of trait- and state-related oxygenation changes indicate the potential of fNIRS for the investigation of tinnitus pathophysiology and treatment response.

  10. Molecular imaging of the human pulmonary vascular endothelium in pulmonary hypertension: a phase II safety and proof of principle trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harel, Francois [Montreal Heart Institute, Research Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Universite de Montreal, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Langleben, David; Abikhzer, Gad [McGill University, Lady Davis Institute and Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Provencher, Steve; Guimond, Jean [Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Quebec, Quebec (Canada); Fournier, Alain; Letourneau, Myriam [INRS-Institut Armand-Frappier, Laval, Quebec (Canada); Finnerty, Vincent; Nguyen, Quang T.; Levac, Xavier [Montreal Heart Institute, Research Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Mansour, Asmaa; Guertin, Marie-Claude [Montreal Health Innovation Coordination Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Dupuis, Jocelyn [Montreal Heart Institute, Research Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Universite de Montreal, Department of Medicine, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2017-07-15

    The adrenomedullin receptor is densely expressed in the pulmonary vascular endothelium. PulmoBind, an adrenomedullin receptor ligand, was developed for molecular diagnosis of pulmonary vascular disease. We evaluated the safety of PulmoBind SPECT imaging and its capacity to detect pulmonary vascular disease associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH) in a human phase II study. Thirty patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH, n = 23) or chronic thromboembolic PH (CTEPH, n = 7) in WHO functional class II (n = 26) or III (n = 4) were compared to 15 healthy controls. Lung SPECT was performed after injection of 15 mCi {sup 99m}Tc-PulmoBind in supine position. Qualitative and semi-quantitative analyses of lung uptake were performed. Reproducibility of repeated testing was evaluated in controls after 1 month. PulmoBind injection was well tolerated without any serious adverse event. Imaging was markedly abnormal in PH with ∝50% of subjects showing moderate to severe heterogeneity of moderate to severe extent. The abnormalities were unevenly distributed between the right and left lungs as well as within each lung. Segmental defects compatible with pulmonary embolism were present in 7/7 subjects with CTEPH and in 2/23 subjects with PAH. There were no segmental defects in controls. The PulmoBind activity distribution index, a parameter indicative of heterogeneity, was elevated in PH (65% ± 28%) vs. controls (41% ± 13%, p = 0.0003). In the only subject with vasodilator-responsive idiopathic PAH, PulmoBind lung SPECT was completely normal. Repeated testing 1 month later in healthy controls was well tolerated and showed no significant variability of PulmoBind distribution. In this phase II study, molecular SPECT imaging of the pulmonary vascular endothelium using {sup 99m}Tc-PulmoBind was safe. PulmoBind showed potential to detect both pulmonary embolism and abnormalities indicative of pulmonary vascular disease in PAH. Phase III studies with this novel tracer and

  11. The use of mobile phones for demographic surveillance of mobile pastoralists and their animals in Chad: proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jean-Richard, Vreni; Crump, Lisa; Moto Daugla, Doumagoum; Hattendorf, Jan; Schelling, Esther; Zinsstag, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    Demographic information is foundational for the planning and management of social programmes, in particular health services. The existing INDEPTH network surveillance sites are limited to coverage of sedentary populations. Including mobile populations in this approach would be expensive, time consuming and possibly low in accuracy. Very little is known about the demography of mobile pastoralists and their animals, so innovative approaches are urgently needed. To test and evaluate a mobile demographic surveillance system for mobile pastoralist households, including livestock herds, using mobile phones. Mobile pastoralist camps were monitored (10 for 12 months and 10 for 18 months) using biweekly mobile phone calls with camp leaders and their wives to conduct interviews about the households and livestock. The collected information was validated through personal visits, GPS data and a livestock demographic model. The study showed the feasibility of mobile phone surveillance for mobile pastoralist camps, providing usable, valid information on human and livestock population structures, pregnancy outcomes and herd dynamics, as well as migration patterns. The approach was low-cost and applicable with the existing local resources. Demographic surveillance in mobile populations is feasible using mobile phones. Expansion of the small-scale system into a full mobile demographic surveillance system is warranted and would likely lead to improved planning and provision of human and animal health care.

  12. A comparison of some anthropometric parameters between an Italian and a UK population: 'proof of principle' of a European project using MammoGrid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.; Thompson, D.; Del Frate, C.; Cordell, M.; Highnam, R.; Tromans, C.; Warsi, I.; Ding, J.; Sala, E.; Estrella, F.; Solomonides, A.E.; Odeh, M.; McClatchey, R.; Bazzocchi, M.; Amendolia, S.R.; Brady, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To demonstrate the use of grid technology to produce a database of mammograms and supporting patient data, specifically using breast density as a biomarker of risk for breast cancer, for epidemiological purposes. Method: The cohort comprised 1737 women from the UK and Italy, aged 28-87 years, mean 54.7 years, who underwent mammography after giving consent to the use of their data in the project. Information regarding height, weight, and exposure data (mAs and kV) was recorded. The computer program Generate-SMF was applied to all films in the database to measure breast volume, dense breast volume, and thereby percentage density. Visual readings of density using a six-category classification system were also available for 596 women. Results: The UK and Italian participants were similar in height, but the UK women were significantly heavier with a slightly higher body mass index (BMI), despite being younger. Both absolute and percentage breast density were significantly higher in the Udine cohort. Images from the medio-lateral projection (MLO) give a significantly lower percentage density than cranio-caudal (CC) images (p < 0.0001). Total breast volume is negatively associated with percentage density, as are BMI and age (p < 0.0001 for all), although 80% of the variability in percentage density remains unexplained. Conclusion: The study offers proof of principle that confederated databases generated using Grid technology provide a useful and adaptable environment for large quantities of image, numerical, and qualitative data suitable for epidemiological research using the example of mammographic density as a biomarker of risk for breast cancer

  13. Proof-of-principle demonstration of Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting radiofrequency cavities for high Q{sub 0} applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posen, S., E-mail: sep93@cornell.edu; Liepe, M.; Hall, D. L. [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Many future particle accelerators require hundreds of superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavities operating with high duty factor. The large dynamic heat load of the cavities causes the cryogenic plant to make up a significant part of the overall cost of the facility. This contribution can be reduced by replacing standard niobium cavities with ones coated with a low-dissipation superconductor such as Nb{sub 3}Sn. In this paper, we present results for single cell cavities coated with Nb{sub 3}Sn at Cornell. Five coatings were carried out, showing that at 4.2 K, high Q{sub 0} out to medium fields was reproducible, resulting in an average quench field of 14 MV/m and an average 4.2 K Q{sub 0} at quench of 8 × 10{sup 9}. In each case, the peak surface magnetic field at quench was well above H{sub c1}, showing that it is not a limiting field in these cavities. The coating with the best performance had a quench field of 17 MV/m, exceeding gradient requirements for state-of-the-art high duty factor SRF accelerators. It is also shown that—taking into account the thermodynamic efficiency of the cryogenic plant—the 4.2 K Q{sub 0} values obtained meet the AC power consumption requirements of state-of-the-art high duty factor accelerators, making this a proof-of-principle demonstration for Nb{sub 3}Sn cavities in future applications.

  14. Evaluation of the Use of Home Blood Pressure Measurement Using Mobile Phone-Assisted Technology: The iVitality Proof-of-Principle Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijsman, Liselotte W; Richard, Edo; Cachucho, Ricardo; de Craen, Anton Jm; Jongstra, Susan; Mooijaart, Simon P

    2016-06-13

    Mobile phone-assisted technologies provide the opportunity to optimize the feasibility of long-term blood pressure (BP) monitoring at home, with the potential of large-scale data collection. In this proof-of-principle study, we evaluated the feasibility of home BP monitoring using mobile phone-assisted technology, by investigating (1) the association between study center and home BP measurements; (2) adherence to reminders on the mobile phone to perform home BP measurements; and (3) referrals, treatment consequences and BP reduction after a raised home BP was diagnosed. We used iVitality, a research platform that comprises a Website, a mobile phone-based app, and health sensors, to measure BP and several other health characteristics during a 6-month period. BP was measured twice at baseline at the study center. Home BP was measured on 4 days during the first week, and thereafter, at semimonthly or monthly intervals, for which participants received reminders on their mobile phone. In the monthly protocol, measurements were performed during 2 consecutive days. In the semimonthly protocol, BP was measured at 1 day. We included 151 participants (mean age [standard deviation] 57.3 [5.3] years). BP measured at the study center was systematically higher when compared with home BP measurements (mean difference systolic BP [standard error] 8.72 [1.08] and diastolic BP 5.81 [0.68] mm Hg, respectively). Correlation of study center and home measurements of BP was high (R=0.72 for systolic BP and 0.72 for diastolic BP, both PMobile phone-assisted technology is a reliable and promising method with good adherence to measure BP at home during a 6-month period. This provides a possibility for implementation in large-scale studies and can potentially contribute to BP reduction.

  15. Infrared laser induced population transfer and parity selection in (14)NH3: A proof of principle experiment towards detecting parity violation in chiral molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietiker, P; Miloglyadov, E; Quack, M; Schneider, A; Seyfang, G

    2015-12-28

    We have set up an experiment for the efficient population transfer by a sequential two photon-absorption and stimulated emission-process in a molecular beam to prepare quantum states of well defined parity and their subsequent sensitive detection. This provides a proof of principle for an experiment which would allow for parity selection and measurement of the time evolution of parity in chiral molecules, resulting in a measurement of the parity violating energy difference ΔpvE between enantiomers of chiral molecules. Here, we present first results on a simple achiral molecule demonstrating efficient population transfer (about 80% on the average for each step) and unperturbed persistence of a selected excited parity level over flight times of about 1.3 ms in the beam. In agreement with model calculations with and without including nuclear hyperfine structure, efficient population transfer can be achieved by a rather simple implementation of the rapid adiabatic passage method of Reuss and coworkers and considering also the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage technique of Bergmann and coworkers as an alternative. The preparation step uses two powerful single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillators of high frequency stability and accuracy. The detection uses a sensitive resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization method after free flight lengths of up to 0.8 m in the molecular beam. Using this technique, we were able to also resolve the nuclear hyperfine structure in the rovibrational levels of the ν1 and ν3 fundamentals as well as the 2ν4 overtone of (14)NH3, for which no previous data with hyperfine resolution were available. We present our new results on the quadrupole coupling constants for the ν1, ν3, and 2ν4 levels in the context of previously known data for ν2 and its overtone, as well as ν4, and the ground state. Thus, now, (14)N quadrupole coupling constants for all fundamentals and some overtones of (14)NH3 are known and can be used for

  16. Computer-generated direct perception displays for supporting PWR feedwater system start-up and fault management: a proof-of-principle in design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reising, D.V.C.; Jones, B.G.; Shaheen, S.; Moray, N.; Sanderson, P.M.; Rasmussen, J.

    1998-01-01

    difficult problems which have not yet been investigated in extending the proposed approach to fault management. In the present research Rasmussen et al's framework was used for designing computer-generated graphical displays that support pressurized water reactor (PWR) start-up. Specifically, a suite of displays was developed to support a PWR's feedwater (FW) system start-up as a proof-of-principle. The suite of displays demonstrate the theoretical design approach and are not meant to represent a fully implementable interface for FW system control. (author)

  17. A proof-of-principle simulation for closed-loop control based on preexisting experimental thalamic DBS-enhanced instrumental learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ching-Fu; Yang, Shih-Hung; Lin, Sheng-Huang; Chen, Po-Chuan; Lo, Yu-Chun; Pan, Han-Chi; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Lun-De; Lin, Hui-Ching; Chen, Hsu-Yan; Huang, Wei-Chen; Huang, Wun-Jhu; Chen, You-Yin

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been applied as an effective therapy for treating Parkinson's disease or essential tremor. Several open-loop DBS control strategies have been developed for clinical experiments, but they are limited by short battery life and inefficient therapy. Therefore, many closed-loop DBS control systems have been designed to tackle these problems by automatically adjusting the stimulation parameters via feedback from neural signals, which has been reported to reduce the power consumption. However, when the association between the biomarkers of the model and stimulation is unclear, it is difficult to develop an optimal control scheme for other DBS applications, i.e., DBS-enhanced instrumental learning. Furthermore, few studies have investigated the effect of closed-loop DBS control for cognition function, such as instrumental skill learning, and have been implemented in simulation environments. In this paper, we proposed a proof-of-principle design for a closed-loop DBS system, cognitive-enhancing DBS (ceDBS), which enhanced skill learning based on in vivo experimental data. The ceDBS acquired local field potential (LFP) signal from the thalamic central lateral (CL) nuclei of animals through a neural signal processing system. A strong coupling of the theta oscillation (4-7 Hz) and the learning period was found in the water reward-related lever-pressing learning task. Therefore, the theta-band power ratio, which was the averaged theta band to averaged total band (1-55 Hz) power ratio, could be used as a physiological marker for enhancement of instrumental skill learning. The on-line extraction of the theta-band power ratio was implemented on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA). An autoregressive with exogenous inputs (ARX)-based predictor was designed to construct a CL-thalamic DBS model and forecast the future physiological marker according to the past physiological marker and applied DBS. The prediction could further assist the design of

  18. Infrared laser induced population transfer and parity selection in {sup 14}NH{sub 3}: A proof of principle experiment towards detecting parity violation in chiral molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dietiker, P.; Miloglyadov, E.; Quack, M., E-mail: Martin@Quack.ch; Schneider, A.; Seyfang, G. [Physical Chemistry, ETH Zürich, CH-8093 Zürich (Switzerland)

    2015-12-28

    We have set up an experiment for the efficient population transfer by a sequential two photon—absorption and stimulated emission—process in a molecular beam to prepare quantum states of well defined parity and their subsequent sensitive detection. This provides a proof of principle for an experiment which would allow for parity selection and measurement of the time evolution of parity in chiral molecules, resulting in a measurement of the parity violating energy difference Δ{sub pv}E between enantiomers of chiral molecules. Here, we present first results on a simple achiral molecule demonstrating efficient population transfer (about 80% on the average for each step) and unperturbed persistence of a selected excited parity level over flight times of about 1.3 ms in the beam. In agreement with model calculations with and without including nuclear hyperfine structure, efficient population transfer can be achieved by a rather simple implementation of the rapid adiabatic passage method of Reuss and coworkers and considering also the stimulated Raman adiabatic passage technique of Bergmann and coworkers as an alternative. The preparation step uses two powerful single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillators of high frequency stability and accuracy. The detection uses a sensitive resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization method after free flight lengths of up to 0.8 m in the molecular beam. Using this technique, we were able to also resolve the nuclear hyperfine structure in the rovibrational levels of the ν{sub 1} and ν{sub 3} fundamentals as well as the 2ν{sub 4} overtone of {sup 14}NH{sub 3}, for which no previous data with hyperfine resolution were available. We present our new results on the quadrupole coupling constants for the ν{sub 1}, ν{sub 3}, and 2ν{sub 4} levels in the context of previously known data for ν{sub 2} and its overtone, as well as ν{sub 4}, and the ground state. Thus, now, {sup 14}N quadrupole coupling constants for all

  19. Penerapan Metoda Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI pada Rancang Bangun Data Logger berbasis SD card

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RATNA SUSANA

    2018-03-01

    sensor data. Research results show, that the SPI method applied in this study has the properties will do repeated testing on MISO pin to the command sent by the microcontroller through the MOSI pin. The read / write data on the SD Card data logger has a 100% success, because the SD Card has been initialized in SPI mode through the reset and init SD Card command.  This communication can be established using crystal 4 Mhz - 20 Mhz. At SPI configuration testing, only the Independent Slave Configuration can be used in SPI communication with 2 SD card as a slave. Keywords: Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI, Data Logger, SD card, FAT16

  20. Design, construction, establishment of proof of principle, and testing of a spectrometer to permit spectroelectrochemical investigations of actinides in a confined system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, P.K.; Li, J.

    1999-02-01

    This study examines the design, construction, and performance of a spectrometer that was designed and built for UV-visible absorption spectroscopic studies in molten salt media. Contrary to previous designs in the literature, the authors found that furnace and chemical components can be located away from the instrument and electronics. In studying the performance of the spectrometer, they used a potassium chloride eutectic mixture as the molten salt medium. They found that UV-visible absorption spectroscopic studies can be conveniently created in a molten alkali halide media with inexpensive equipment coupled with good sensitivity and precision. Further research will focus on designing a suitable fiber optic probe that will allow the authors to monitor the molten salt process on-line

  1. The Spy in Early America: The Emergence of a Genre

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weir, Alison

    1998-01-01

    ... after the Revolution through the antebellum period. By examining the paradoxical figure of the heroic spy, the dissertation explores how the spy story emerged as the adventure tale of the Revolution, the spy became a potential hero, and how the...

  2. Extending the Constant Power Speed Range of the Brushless DC Motor through Dual Mode Inverter Control - Part II: Laboratory Proof-of-Principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawler, J.S.

    2001-01-01

    Previous theoretical work has shown that when all loss mechanisms are neglected the constant power speed range (CPSR) of a brushless dc motor (BDCM) is infinite when the motor is driven by the dual-mode inverter control (DMIC)[1,2]. In a physical drive, losses, particularly speed-sensitive losses, will limit the CPSR to a finite value. In this paper we report the results of laboratory testing of a low-inductance, 7.5-hp BDCM driven by the DMIC. The speed rating of the test motor rotor limited the upper speed of the testing, and the results show that the CPSR of the test machine is greater than 6:1 when driven by the DMIC. Current wave shape, peak, and rms values remained controlled and within rating over the entire speed range. The laboratory measurements allowed the speed-sensitive losses to be quantified and incorporated into computer simulation models, which then accurately reproduce the results of lab testing. The simulator shows that the limiting CPSR of the test motor is 8:1. These results confirm that the DMIC is capable of driving low-inductance BDCMs over the wide CPSR that would be required in electric vehicle applications

  3. Preemptive mobile code protection using spy agents

    OpenAIRE

    Kalogridis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    This thesis introduces 'spy agents' as a new security paradigm for evaluating trust in remote hosts in mobile code scenarios. In this security paradigm, a spy agent, i.e. a mobile agent which circulates amongst a number of remote hosts, can employ a variety of techniques in order to both appear 'normal' and suggest to a malicious host that it can 'misuse' the agent's data or code without being held accountable. A framework for the operation and deployment of such spy agents is described. ...

  4. InSpiRe - Intelligent Spine Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøg, Kasper Hafstrøm; Helms, Niels Henrik; Kjær, Per

    Rapport on InSpiRe-projektet: InSpiRe er et nationalt netværk, der skal fremme mulighederne for intelligent genoptræning i forhold til ryglidelser. I netværket mødes forskere, virksomheder, kiropraktorer og fysioterapeuter for at udvikle nye genoptrænings og/eller behandlingsteknologier.......Rapport on InSpiRe-projektet: InSpiRe er et nationalt netværk, der skal fremme mulighederne for intelligent genoptræning i forhold til ryglidelser. I netværket mødes forskere, virksomheder, kiropraktorer og fysioterapeuter for at udvikle nye genoptrænings og/eller behandlingsteknologier....

  5. Development of Short-Form Versions of the Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain-Revised (SOAPP-R): A Proof-of-Principle Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelman, Matthew D; Smits, Niels; Kulich, Ronald J; Zacharoff, Kevin L; Magnuson, Britta E; Chang, Hong; Dong, Jinghui; Butler, Stephen F

    2017-07-01

    The Screener and Opioid Assessment for Patients with Pain-Revised (SOAPP-R) is a 24-item questionnaire designed to assess risk of aberrant medication-related behaviors in chronic pain patients. The introduction of short forms of the SOAPP-R may save time and increase utilization by practitioners. To develop and evaluate candidate SOAPP-R short forms. Retrospective study. Pain centers. Four hundred and twenty-eight patients with chronic noncancer pain. Subjects had previously been administered the full-length version of the SOAPP-R and been categorized as positive or negative for aberrant medication-related behaviors via the Aberrant Drug Behavior Index (ADBI). Short forms of the SOAPP-R were developed using lasso logistic regression. Sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve (AUC) of all forms were calculated with respect to the ADBI using the complete data set, training-test analysis, and 10-fold cross-validation. The coefficient alpha of each form was also calculated. An external set of 12 pain practitioners reviewed the forms for content. In the complete data set analysis, a form of 12 items exhibited sensitivity, specificity, and AUC greater than or equal to those of the full-length SOAPP-R (which were 0.74, 0.67, and 0.76, respectively). The short form had a coefficient alpha of 0.76. In the training-test analysis and 10-fold cross-validation, it exhibited an AUC value within 0.01 of that of the full-length SOAPP-R. The majority of external practitioners reported a preference for this short form. The 12-item version of the SOAPP-R has potential as a short risk screener and should be tested prospectively. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  6. Transcranial magnetic stimulation in mild to severe hemiparesis early after stroke: a proof of principle and novel approach to improve motor function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anjos, Sarah M.; Saposnik, Gustavo; Mello, Eduardo A.; Nagaya, Erina M.; Santos, Waldyr; Ferreiro, Karina N.; Melo, Eduardo S.; Reis, Felipe I.; Scaff, Milberto; Cohen, Leonardo G.

    2016-01-01

    Low-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) of the unaffected hemisphere can enhance function of the paretic hand in patients with mild motor impairment. Effects of low-frequency rTMS to the contralesional motor cortex at an early stage of mild to severe hemiparesis after stroke are unknown. In this pilot, randomized, double-blind clinical trial we compared the effects of low-frequency rTMS or sham rTMS as add-on therapies to outpatient customary rehabilitation, in 30 patients within 5–45 days after ischemic stroke, and mild to severe hand paresis. The primary feasibility outcome was compliance with the interventions. The primary safety outcome was the proportion of intervention-related adverse events. Performance of the paretic hand in the Jebsen–Taylor test and pinch strength were secondary outcomes. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, after ten sessions of treatment administered over 2 weeks and at 1 month after end of treatment. Baseline clinical features were comparable across groups. For the primary feasibility outcome, compliance with treatment was 100% in the active group and 94% in the sham group. There were no serious intervention-related adverse events. There were significant improvements in performance in the Jebsen–Taylor test (mean, 12.3% 1 month after treatment) and pinch force (mean, 0.5 Newtons) in the active group, but not in the sham group. Low-frequency rTMS to the contralesional motor cortex early after stroke is feasible, safe and potentially effective to improve function of the paretic hand, in patients with mild to severe hemiparesis. These promising results will be valuable to design larger randomized clinical trials. PMID:22173953

  7. The use of twin-ring Ilizarov external fixator constructs: application and biomechanical proof-of principle with possible clinical indications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnissalis Evangelos A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In peri- or intra-articular fractures of the tibia or femur, the presence of short metaphyseal bone fragments may make the application of an Ilizarov external fixator (IEF challenging. In such cases, it may be necessary to bridge the adjacent joint in order to ensure stable fixation. The twin-ring (TR module of circular external fixation is proposed as an alternative method that avoids joint bridging, without compromising stability of fixation. The aim of this study is to present the experimental tests performed to compare the biomechanical characteristics of the single- and TR IEF modules. The clinical application of the TR module in select patients is also presented and the merits of this technique are discussed. Methods In this experimental study, the passive stiffness and stability of the single-ring (SR and twin-ring (TR IEF modules were tested under axial and shear loading conditions. In each module, two perpendicular wires on the upper surface and another two wires on the lower surface of the rings were used for fixation of the rings on plastic acetal cylinders simulating long bones. Results In axial loading, the main outcome measure was stiffness and the SR module proved stiffer than the TR. In shear loading, the main outcome measure was stability, the TR module proving more stable than the SR. Discussion The TR configuration, being stiffer in shear loading, may make joint bridging unnecessary when an IEF is applied. If it is still required, TR frames allow for an earlier discontinuation of bridging; either case is in favour of a successful final outcome. Conclusion The application of the TR module has led to satisfactory clinical outcomes and should be considered as an alternative in select trauma patients treated with an IEF. Biomechanically, the TR module possesses features which enhance fracture healing and at the same time obviate the need for bridging adjacent joints, thereby significantly reducing patient

  8. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF SOY PROTEIN ISOLATE(SPI)/MONTMORILLONITE(MMT) BIONANOCOMPOSITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅强

    2009-01-01

    The bionanocomposites of soy protein isolate(SPI)/montmorillonite(MMT) have been prepared successfully via simple melt mixing,in which MMT was used as nanofiller and glycerol was used as plasticizer.Their structures and properties were characterized with X-ray diffraction(XRD),differential scanning calorimetry(DSC),scanning electron microscopy(SEM),thermogravimetric analysis and tensile testing.XRD、TEM and SEM results indicated that the MMT layers could be easily intercalated by the SPI matrix even by si...

  9. Proof of Principle for a Real-Time Pathogen Isolation Media Diagnostic: The Use of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy to Discriminate Bacterial Pathogens and Antimicrobial-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains Grown on Blood Agar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalie A. Multari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS is a rapid, in situ, diagnostic technique in which light emissions from a laser plasma formed on the sample are used for analysis allowing automated analysis results to be available in seconds to minutes. This speed of analysis coupled with little or no sample preparation makes LIBS an attractive detection tool. In this study, it is demonstrated that LIBS can be utilized to discriminate both the bacterial species and strains of bacterial colonies grown on blood agar. A discrimination algorithm was created based on multivariate regression analysis of spectral data. The algorithm was deployed on a simulated LIBS instrument system to demonstrate discrimination capability using 6 species. Genetically altered Staphylococcus aureus strains grown on BA, including isogenic sets that differed only by the acquisition of mutations that increase fusidic acid or vancomycin resistance, were also discriminated. The algorithm successfully identified all thirteen cultures used in this study in a time period of 2 minutes. This work provides proof of principle for a LIBS instrumentation system that could be developed for the rapid discrimination of bacterial species and strains demonstrating relatively minor genomic alterations using data collected directly from pathogen isolation media.

  10. Collaboration between a human group and artificial intelligence can improve prediction of multiple sclerosis course: a proof-of-principle study [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Tacchella

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multiple sclerosis has an extremely variable natural course. In most patients, disease starts with a relapsing-remitting (RR phase, which proceeds to a secondary progressive (SP form. The duration of the RR phase is hard to predict, and to date predictions on the rate of disease progression remain suboptimal. This limits the opportunity to tailor therapy on an individual patient's prognosis, in spite of the choice of several therapeutic options. Approaches to improve clinical decisions, such as collective intelligence of human groups and machine learning algorithms are widely investigated. Methods: Medical students and a machine learning algorithm predicted the course of disease on the basis of randomly chosen clinical records of patients that attended at the Multiple Sclerosis service of Sant'Andrea hospital in Rome. Results: A significant improvement of predictive ability was obtained when predictions were combined with a weight that depends on the consistence of human (or algorithm forecasts on a given clinical record. Conclusions: In this work we present proof-of-principle that human-machine hybrid predictions yield better prognoses than machine learning algorithms or groups of humans alone. To strengthen this preliminary result, we propose a crowdsourcing initiative to collect prognoses by physicians on an expanded set of patients.

  11. Home-based nerve stimulation to enhance effects of motor training in patients in the chronic phase after stroke: a proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos-Fontes, Renata Laurenti; Ferreiro de Andrade, Karina Nocelo; Sterr, Annette; Conforto, Adriana Bastos

    2013-01-01

    Somatosensory stimulation in the form of repetitive peripheral nerve stimulation (RPSS) is a promising strategy to improve motor function of the upper limb in chronic stroke. Home-based RPSS may be an alternative to hospital-based RPSS. To investigate the feasibility and safety of an innovative program of home-based RPSS combined with motor training and to collect preliminary data on the efficacy of this program to enhance hand motor function in patients in the chronic phase after stroke. Twenty patients were randomized to either active or sham RPSS associated with daily motor training performed at home over 4 consecutive weeks. All the patients were able to perform tasks of the Jebsen-Taylor Test (JTT). The primary outcome measures were feasibility, evaluated by self-reported compliance with the intervention, and safety (adverse events). Secondary outcomes comprised improvements in hand function in the JTT after end of treatment and after a 4-month follow-up period. There were no relevant adverse events. Compliance with RPSS and motor training was significantly greater in the active group than in the sham group. Upper extremity performance improved significantly more in the active group compared with the sham group at the end of treatment. This difference remained significant 4 months later, even when differences in compliance with motor training were considered. Home-based active RPSS associated with motor training was feasible, was safe, and led to long-lasting enhancement of paretic arm performance in the chronic phase after stroke for those who can perform the JTT. These results point to the need for an efficacy trial.

  12. Use of a Ca-Citrate-Phosphate Solution to Form Hydroxyapatite for Uranium Stabilization of Old Rifle Sediments: Laboratory Proof of Principle Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szescody, James E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moore, Robert C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rigali, Mark J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vermeul, Vincent R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Luellen, Jon [AECOM, Denver, CO (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Old Rifle Site is a former vanadium and uranium ore-processing facility located adjacent to the Colorado River and approximately 0.3 miles east of the city of Rifle, CO. The former processing facilities have been removed and the site uranium mill tailings are interned at a disposal cell north of the city of Rifle. However, some low level remnant uranium contamination still exists at the Old Rifle site. In 2002, the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) concurred with United States Department of Energy (US DOE) on a groundwater compliance strategy of natural flushing with institutional controls to decrease contaminant concentrations in the aquifer. In addition to active monitoring of contaminant concentrations, the site is also used for DOE Legacy Management (LM) and other DOE-funded small-scale field tests of remediation technologies. The purpose of this laboratory scale study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) permeable reactive barrier and source area treatment in Old Rifle sediments. Phosphate treatment impact was evaluated by comparing uranium leaching and surface phase changes in untreated to PO4-treated sediments. The impact of the amount of phosphate precipitation in the sediment on uranium mobility was evaluated with three different phosphate loadings. A range of flow velocity and uranium concentration conditions (i.e., uranium flux through the phosphate-treated sediment) was also evaluated to quantify the uranium uptake mass and rate by the phosphate precipitate.

  13. SU-E-T-33: A Feasibility-Seeking Algorithm Applied to Planning of Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy: A Proof of Principle Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penfold, S; Casiraghi, M; Dou, T; Schulte, R; Censor, Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the applicability of feasibility-seeking cyclic orthogonal projections to the field of intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) inverse planning. Feasibility of constraints only, as opposed to optimization of a merit function, is less demanding algorithmically and holds a promise of parallel computations capability with non-cyclic orthogonal projections algorithms such as string-averaging or block-iterative strategies. Methods: A virtual 2D geometry was designed containing a C-shaped planning target volume (PTV) surrounding an organ at risk (OAR). The geometry was pixelized into 1 mm pixels. Four beams containing a subset of proton pencil beams were simulated in Geant4 to provide the system matrix A whose elements a-ij correspond to the dose delivered to pixel i by a unit intensity pencil beam j. A cyclic orthogonal projections algorithm was applied with the goal of finding a pencil beam intensity distribution that would meet the following dose requirements: D-OAR < 54 Gy and 57 Gy < D-PTV < 64.2 Gy. The cyclic algorithm was based on the concept of orthogonal projections onto half-spaces according to the Agmon-Motzkin-Schoenberg algorithm, also known as ‘ART for inequalities’. Results: The cyclic orthogonal projections algorithm resulted in less than 5% of the PTV pixels and less than 1% of OAR pixels violating their dose constraints, respectively. Because of the abutting OAR-PTV geometry and the realistic modelling of the pencil beam penumbra, complete satisfaction of the dose objectives was not achieved, although this would be a clinically acceptable plan for a meningioma abutting the brainstem, for example. Conclusion: The cyclic orthogonal projections algorithm was demonstrated to be an effective tool for inverse IMPT planning in the 2D test geometry described. We plan to further develop this linear algorithm to be capable of incorporating dose-volume constraints into the feasibility-seeking algorithm

  14. Metrological traceability in mass spectrometry-based targeted protein quantitation: a proof-of-principle study for serum apolipoproteins A-I and B100.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Nico P M; Romijn, Fred P H T M; van den Broek, Irene; Drijfhout, Jan W; Haex, Martin; van der Laarse, Arnoud; van der Burgt, Yuri E M; Cobbaert, Christa M

    2014-09-23

    In this study, we have followed up on previous liquid chromatography (LC) multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometry (MS) approaches for measurement of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I and apo B100 in serum aiming for implementation of a multiplexed assay in a clinical chemistry laboratory with full metrological traceability. Signature peptides were selected and detected by dynamic MRM, and stable isotope labeled (SIL)-peptides were used as internal standards. Five apo A-I and four apo B100 peptides were measured in serum digests with linearity (R(2)>0.992) in the physiologically relevant concentration ranges. Linearity with regard to protein concentration was ascertained at five concentration levels (R(2)>0.926 and R(2)>0.965, for the apo A-I and apo B100 peptides, respectively). Three native value-assigned sera were used as external calibrators for further method verification. Imprecision values on sample preparation and LC-MS/MS acquisition were below the established minimal specifications for apo A-I and apo B100 (5.0% and 5.3%, respectively). Correlation of LC-MS/MS results with immunoturbidimetric assay results, for normo- and hypertriglyceridemic samples, showed R(2)>0.944 for apo A-I and R(2)>0.964 for apo B100. This LC-MS/MS method has potential for clinical application in normo- and dyslipidemic patients. Measurement of apo A-I and apo B100 may offer an alternative to high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c and LDL-c) methods for cardiovascular disease risk assessment in dyslipidemic patients [1]. An LC-MS/MS method for apo A-I and apo B100 has the advantage of antibody independent and specific detection of protein signature peptides. The introduction of an LC-MS/MS method for apo A-I and apo B100 can serve as an example for many existing and newly developed (multiplex) biomarker methods in quantitative clinical chemistry proteomics (qCCP). Such LC-MS/MS methods should meet basic clinical chemistry principles with regard to test evaluation

  15. BrachyView: Proof-of-principle of a novel in-body gamma camera for low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petasecca, M.; Loo, K. J.; Safavi-Naeini, M.; Han, Z.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Lerch, M. L. F.; Qi, Y.; Rosenfeld, A. B.; Meikle, S.; Pospisil, S.; Jakubek, J.; Bucci, J. A.; Zaider, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The conformity of the achieved dose distribution to the treatment plan strongly correlates with the accuracy of seed implantation in a prostate brachytherapy treatment procedure. Incorrect seed placement leads to both short and long term complications, including urethral and rectal toxicity. The authors present BrachyView, a novel concept of a fast intraoperative treatment planning system, to provide real-time seed placement information based on in-body gamma camera data. BrachyView combines the high spatial resolution of a pixellated silicon detector (Medipix2) with the volumetric information acquired by a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). The two systems will be embedded in the same probe so as to provide anatomically correct seed positions for intraoperative planning and postimplant dosimetry. Dosimetric calculations are based on the TG-43 method using the real position of the seeds. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of BrachyView using the Medipix2 pixel detector and a pinhole collimator to reconstruct the real-time 3D position of low dose-rate brachytherapy seeds in a phantom. Methods: BrachyView incorporates three Medipix2 detectors coupled to a multipinhole collimator. Three-dimensionally triangulated seed positions from multiple planar images are used to determine the seed placement in a PMMA prostate phantom in real time. MATLAB codes were used to test the reconstruction method and to optimize the device geometry. Results: The results presented in this paper show a 3D position reconstruction accuracy of the seed in the range of 0.5–3 mm for a 10–60 mm seed-to-detector distance interval (Z direction), respectively. The BrachyView system also demonstrates a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm in the XY plane for sources at 10 mm distance from Medipix2 detector plane, comparable to the theoretical value calculated for an equivalent gamma camera arrangement. The authors successfully demonstrated the capability of BrachyView for

  16. BrachyView: proof-of-principle of a novel in-body gamma camera for low dose-rate prostate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petasecca, M; Loo, K J; Safavi-Naeini, M; Han, Z; Metcalfe, P E; Meikle, S; Pospisil, S; Jakubek, J; Bucci, J A; Zaider, M; Lerch, M L F; Qi, Y; Rosenfeld, A B

    2013-04-01

    The conformity of the achieved dose distribution to the treatment plan strongly correlates with the accuracy of seed implantation in a prostate brachytherapy treatment procedure. Incorrect seed placement leads to both short and long term complications, including urethral and rectal toxicity. The authors present BrachyView, a novel concept of a fast intraoperative treatment planning system, to provide real-time seed placement information based on in-body gamma camera data. BrachyView combines the high spatial resolution of a pixellated silicon detector (Medipix2) with the volumetric information acquired by a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS). The two systems will be embedded in the same probe so as to provide anatomically correct seed positions for intraoperative planning and postimplant dosimetry. Dosimetric calculations are based on the TG-43 method using the real position of the seeds. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the feasibility of BrachyView using the Medipix2 pixel detector and a pinhole collimator to reconstruct the real-time 3D position of low dose-rate brachytherapy seeds in a phantom. BrachyView incorporates three Medipix2 detectors coupled to a multipinhole collimator. Three-dimensionally triangulated seed positions from multiple planar images are used to determine the seed placement in a PMMA prostate phantom in real time. MATLAB codes were used to test the reconstruction method and to optimize the device geometry. The results presented in this paper show a 3D position reconstruction accuracy of the seed in the range of 0.5-3 mm for a 10-60 mm seed-to-detector distance interval (Z direction), respectively. The BrachyView system also demonstrates a spatial resolution of 0.25 mm in the XY plane for sources at 10 mm distance from Medipix2 detector plane, comparable to the theoretical value calculated for an equivalent gamma camera arrangement. The authors successfully demonstrated the capability of BrachyView for real-time imaging (using a 3 s

  17. Acceptance and usability of a home-based monitoring tool of health indicators in children of people with dementia: a Proof of Principle (POP study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boessen AB

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available April BCG Boessen,1 Joan Vermeulen,2 Luc P de Witte3 1Research Centre for Technology in Care, Faculty of Health, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, the Netherlands; 2Lunet zorg, Eindhoven, the Netherlands; 3The Innovation Centre, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK Background: Large-scale cohort studies are needed to confirm the relation between dementia and its possible risk factors. The inclusion of people with dementia in research is a challenge, however, children of people with dementia are at risk and are highly motivated to participate in dementia research. For technologies to support home-based data collection during large-scale studies, participants should be able and willing to use technology for a longer period of time. Objective: This study investigated acceptance and usability of iVitality, a research platform for home-based monitoring of dementia health indicators, in 151 children of people with dementia and investigated which frequency of measurements is acceptable for them. Methods: Participants were randomized to fortnightly or monthly measurements. At baseline and after 3 months, participants completed an online questionnaire regarding the acceptance (Technology Acceptance Model; 38 items and usability (Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire; 24 items of iVitality. Items were rated from 1 (I totally disagree to 7 (I totally agree. Participants were also invited to take part in an online focus group (OFG after 3 months of follow-up. Descriptive statistics and both two-sample/independent and paired t-tests were used to analyze the online questionnaires and a directed content analysis was used to analyze the OFGs. Results: Children of people with dementia accept iVitality after long-term use and evaluate iVitality as a user-friendly, useful, and trusted technology, despite some suggestions for improvement. Overall, mean scores on acceptance and usability were higher than 5 (I somewhat agree, although the

  18. Involvement of SPI-2-encoded SpiC in flagellum synthesis in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugita Asami

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SpiC encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 on the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium chromosome is required for survival within macrophages and systemic infection in mice. Additionally, SpiC contributes to Salmonella-induced activation of the signal transduction pathways in macrophages by affecting the expression of FliC, a component of flagella filaments. Here, we show the contribution of SpiC in flagellum synthesis. Results Quantitative RT-PCR shows that the expression levels of the class 3 fliD and motA genes that encode for the flagella cap and motor torque proteins, respectively, were lower for a spiC mutant strain than for the wild-type Salmonella. Further, this mutant had lower expression levels of the class 2 genes including the fliA gene encoding the flagellar-specific alternative sigma factor. We also found differences in flagella assembly between the wild-type strain and the spiC mutant. Many flagella filaments were observed on the bacterial surface of the wild-type strain, whereas the spiC mutant had only few flagella. The absence of spiC led to reduced expression of the FlhD protein, which functions as the master regulator in flagella gene expression, although no significant difference at the transcription level of the flhDC operon was observed between the wild-type strain and the spiC mutant. Conclusion The data show that SpiC is involved in flagella assembly by affecting the post-transcription expression of flhDC.

  19. SPiDer: Smart Pill Dispenser

    OpenAIRE

    Moreno Vázquez, Jonatan

    2013-01-01

    Aquest projecte proposa el sistema SPiDer el qual te l'objectiu d'assistir a la gent gran en el procés de medicar-se evitant els problemes associats amb la baixa adherència existent actualment amb els calendaris farmacològics receptats pels doctors.

  20. Correction: The role of coupled positive feedback in the expression of the SPI1 type three secretion system in Salmonella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supreet Saini

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a common food-borne pathogen that induces inflammatory diarrhea and invades intestinal epithelial cells using a type three secretion system (T3SS encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI1. The genes encoding the SPI1 T3SS are tightly regulated by a network of interacting transcriptional regulators involving three coupled positive feedback loops. While the core architecture of the SPI1 gene circuit has been determined, the relative roles of these interacting regulators and associated feedback loops are still unknown. To determine the function of this circuit, we measured gene expression dynamics at both population and single-cell resolution in a number of SPI1 regulatory mutants. Using these data, we constructed a mathematical model of the SPI1 gene circuit. Analysis of the model predicted that the circuit serves two functions. The first is to place a threshold on SPI1 activation, ensuring that the genes encoding the T3SS are expressed only in response to the appropriate combination of environmental and cellular cues. The second is to amplify SPI1 gene expression. To experimentally test these predictions, we rewired the SPI1 genetic circuit by changing its regulatory architecture. This enabled us to directly test our predictions regarding the function of the circuit by varying the strength and dynamics of the activating signal. Collectively, our experimental and computational results enable us to deconstruct this complex circuit and determine the role of its individual components in regulating SPI1 gene expression dynamics.

  1. Learning and Organizational Change in SPI Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Marikka

    Explaining how organizations chance has been a central and enduring quest of management scholars and many other disciplines. In order to be successful change requires not only a new process or technology but also the engagement and participation of the people involved. In this vein the change process results in new behavior and is routinized in practical daily business life of the company. Change management provides a framework for managing the human side of these changes. In this article we present a literature review on the change management in the context of Software Process Improvement. The traditional view of learning, as a “lessons learned” or post-mortem reporting activity is often apparent in SPI literature. However, learning can also be viewed as a continuous change process where specific learning cycle starts with creative conflict and ends up in formal norms and systems. Since this perspective has almost no visibility in SPI literature of past it could show a new direction to the future development of change management in SPI.

  2. Positron astronomy with SPI/INTEGRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidenspointner, G.; Diehl, R.; Strong, A.; Weidenspointner, G.; Skinner, G.K.; Skinner, G.K.; Jean, P.; Knoedlseder, J.; Von Ballmoos, P.; Cordier, B.; Schanne, S.; Winkler, C.

    2008-01-01

    We provide an overview of positron astronomy results that have been obtained using the INTEGRAL spectrometer SPI, and discuss their implications for the still mysterious origin of positrons in our Galaxy. It has long been known that the 511 keV positron annihilation emission is strongest from the central region of our Galaxy. Recently, it has been discovered with the SPI spectrometer that the weaker 511 keV line emission from the inner Galactic disk appears to be asymmetric, with the emission to the west of the Galactic center being about twice as strong than that to the east. This distribution of positron annihilation resembles that of low mass X-ray binaries as observed with the INTEGRAL imager IBIS at hard X-ray energies, suggesting that these systems could provide a significant portion of the positrons in our Galaxy. In addition, the spectrometer SPI has permitted unprecedented spectroscopy of annihilation radiation from the bulge and disk regions of the Galaxy, which commences to yield important insights into the conditions of the medium in which the positrons annihilate. (authors)

  3. The Impact of Female Attractiveness in Spy

    OpenAIRE

    Pangjaya, Veronika Juliani; Handojo, Priska Febrinia

    2017-01-01

    This thesis discusses the impact of female attractiveness on the female character which is related to the way Spy sees attractive women and what the impacts to them are. There are criteria for female attractiveness that are displayed by the film such as physical attributes and traits. In order to show the criteria of attractive women and the responses that they get, I use stereotyping theory. Women who are physically attractive get better treatment, but in order to get that, they have to dres...

  4. InSpiRe - Intelligent Spine Rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøg, Kasper Hafstrøm; Helms, Niels Henrik; Kjær, Per

    InSpiRe er et projekt, der har haft omdrejningspunkt i etableringen af et nyt netværk indenfor intelligent genoptræning med særligt fokus på rygsmerter. Projektet er gennemført i perioden 1/3 2011 2011-1/3 2012, med støtte fra Syddansk Vækstforum, og er blevet drevet af projektparterne Knowledge ...... Lab, Syddansk Universitet (SDU), Institut for Idræt og Biomekanik (IoB), SDU, samt University College Lillebælt....

  5. A hierarchy of SPI activities for software SMEs: results from ISO/IEC 12207-based SPI assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Paul; O'Connor, Rory; Yilmaz, Murat

    2012-01-01

    peer-reviewed In an assessment of software process improvement (SPI) in 15 software small- and ???medium-sized enterprises (software SMEs), we applied the broad spectrum of software specific and system context processes in ISO/IEC 12207 to the task of examining SPI in practice. Using the data collected in the study, we developed a four-tiered pyramidal hierarchy of SPI for software SMEs, with processes in the higher tiers undergoing SPI in more companies than processes on lower level tiers...

  6. Towards Model Checking a Spi-Calculus Dialect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gnesi, S.; Latella, D.; Lenzini, Gabriele

    We present a model checking framework for a spi-calculus dialect which uses a linear time temporal logic for expressing security properties. We have provided our spi-calculus dialect, called SPID, with a semantics based on labeled transition systems (LTS), where the intruder is modeled in the

  7. How Do Artifact Models Help Direct SPI Projects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhrmann, Marco; Richardson, Ita

    2015-01-01

    To overcome shortcomings associated with software process improvement (SPI), we previously recommended that process engineers focus on the artifacts to be developed in SPI projects. These artifacts should define desired outcomes, rather than specific methods. During this prior research, we develo...

  8. The Spy VI child : A newly discovered Neandertal infant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crevecoeur, Isabelle; Bayle, Priscilla; Rougier, Helene; Maureille, Bruno; Higham, Thomas; van der Plicht, Johannes; De Clerck, Nora; Semal, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Spy cave (Jemeppe-sur-Sambre Belgium) is reputed for the two adult Neandertal individuals discovered in situ in 1886 Recent reassessment of the Spy collections has allowed direct radiocarbon dating of these individuals The sorting of all of the faunal collections has also led to the discovery of the

  9. Improved Mobility Control for Carbon Dioxide (CO{sub 2}) Enhanced Oil Recovery Using Silica-Polymer-Initiator (SPI) Gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oglesby, Kenneth

    2014-01-31

    SPI gels are multi-component silicate based gels for improving (areal and vertical) conformance in oilfield enhanced recovery operations, including water-floods and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) floods, as well as other applications. SPI mixtures are like-water when pumped, but form light up to very thick, paste-like gels in contact with CO{sub 2}. When formed they are 3 to 10 times stronger than any gelled polyacrylamide gel now available, however, they are not as strong as cement or epoxy, allowing them to be washed / jetted out of the wellbore without drilling. This DOE funded project allowed 8 SPI field treatments to be performed in 6 wells (5 injection wells and 1 production well) in 2 different fields with different operators, in 2 different basins (Gulf Coast and Permian) and in 2 different rock types (sandstone and dolomite). Field A was in a central Mississippi sandstone that injected CO{sub 2} as an immiscible process. Field B was in the west Texas San Andres dolomite formation with a mature water-alternating-gas miscible CO{sub 2} flood. Field A treatments are now over 1 year old while Field B treatments have only 4 months data available under variable WAG conditions. Both fields had other operational events and well work occurring before/ during / after the treatments making definitive evaluation difficult. Laboratory static beaker and dynamic sand pack tests were performed with Ottawa sand and both fields’ core material, brines and crude oils to improve SPI chemistry, optimize SPI formulations, ensure SPI mix compatibility with field rocks and fluids, optimize SPI treatment field treatment volumes and methods, and ensure that strong gels set in the reservoir. Field quality control procedures were designed and utilized. Pre-treatment well (surface) injectivities ranged from 0.39 to 7.9 MMCF/psi. The SPI treatment volumes ranged from 20.7 cubic meters (m{sup 3}, 5460 gallons/ 130 bbls) to 691 m{sup 3} (182,658 gallons/ 4349 bbls). Various size and types

  10. Setup and proof of principle of SAPIS (Stored Atoms Polarized Ion Source), a novel source of polarized H{sup -}/D{sup -} ions; Aufbau und Funktionsnachweis von SAPIS (Stored Atoms Polarized Ion Source), einer neuartigen Quelle polarisierter H{sup -}/D{sup -}-Ionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmerich, R.

    2007-02-14

    The objective of this work was the setup and the proof-of-principle of a new type of negative polarized hydrogen or deuterium ion source, which is based on the charge-exchange reaction (vector)H{sup 0}+Cs{sup 0}{yields}(vector)H{sup -}+Cs{sup +}, as for instance the Colliding-Beams-Source (CBS) at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY in Juelich. In contrast to the CBS, the use of a storage cell for the charge-exchange region promises an increase in H{sup -} current by at least an order of magnitude without considerable polarization losses. For these purposes, a new laboratory was equipped and both a polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source and an intense neutral cesium-beam source have been build-on. A Lambshift polarimeter, which allows the measurement of the nuclear polarization of the atomic as well as ionic beams, was completed with the construction of a new spin-filter. After commissioning and optimizing each of these sources, a storage cell was developed and installed in the charge-exchange region with a magnetic field. Additionally, components for the extraction, detection and analysis of the negative ion beam were installed. Following the decisive proof of principle, investigation of the properties of the storage cell, especially as to H recombination and depolarisation, was begun. Furthermore, a number of software programs was developed for the control and monitoring of different components of the sources as well as a universal measuring software for the complete installation, including the measurement and calculation of the beam polarization. At the same time, the remote control system of the Cologne source of polarized ions LASCO at the FN tandem accelerator was completely modernized. (orig.)

  11. The Birth, Death, and Resurrection of an SPI Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Sven; Schönström, Mikael

    Commentators on contemporary themes of strategic management and firm competitiveness stress that a firm's competitive advantage flows from its unique knowledge and how it manages knowledge, and for many firms their ability to create, share, exchange, and use knowledge have a major impact on their competitiveness (Nonaka & Teece 2001). In software development, knowledge management (KM) plays an increasingly important role. It has been argued that the KM-field is an important source for creating new perspectives on the software development process (Iivari 2000). Several Software Process Improvement (SPI) approaches stress the importance of managing knowledge and experiences as a way for improving software processes (Ahem et al. 2001). Another SPI-trend is the use of ideas from process management like in the Capability Maturity Model (CMM). Unfortunately, little research on the effects of the use of process management ideas in SPI exists. Given the influx of process management ideas to SPI, the impact of these ideas should be addressed.

  12. Protocols to test the activity of antimicrobial peptides against the honey bee pathogen Paenibacillus larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khilnani, Jasmin C; Wing, Helen J

    2015-10-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causal agent of the honey bee disease American Foulbrood. Two enhanced protocols that allow the activity of antimicrobial peptides to be tested against P. larvae are presented. Proof of principle experiments demonstrate that the honey bee antimicrobial peptide defensin 1 is active in both assays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. SPI Project Criticality Task Force initial review and assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinley, K.B.; Cannon, J.W.; Marsden, R.S.; Worle, H.A.

    1980-03-01

    The Slagging Pyrolysis Incinerator (SPI) Facility is being developed to process transuranic waste stored and buried at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) into a chemically inert, physically stable, basalt-like residue acceptable for a Federal Repository. A task force was established by the SPI Project Division to review and assess all aspects of criticality safety for the SPI Facility. This document presents the initial review, evaluations, and recommendations of the task force and includes the following: background information on waste characterization, and criticality control approaches and philosophies, a description of the SPI Facility Waste Processing Building, a review and assessment of potentially relevant codes and regulations; a review and assessment of the present state of criticality and assaying/monitoring studies, and recommendations for changes in and additions to these studies. The review and assessment of potentially relevant codes and regulations indicate that ERDAM 0530, Nuclear Criticality Safety should be the controlling document for criticality safety for the SPI Project. In general, the criticality control approaches and philosophies for the SPI Project comply with this document

  14. A framework for plasticity implementation on the SpiNNaker neural architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluppi, Francesco; Lagorce, Xavier; Stromatias, Evangelos; Pfeiffer, Michael; Plana, Luis A; Furber, Steve B; Benosman, Ryad B

    2014-01-01

    Many of the precise biological mechanisms of synaptic plasticity remain elusive, but simulations of neural networks have greatly enhanced our understanding of how specific global functions arise from the massively parallel computation of neurons and local Hebbian or spike-timing dependent plasticity rules. For simulating large portions of neural tissue, this has created an increasingly strong need for large scale simulations of plastic neural networks on special purpose hardware platforms, because synaptic transmissions and updates are badly matched to computing style supported by current architectures. Because of the great diversity of biological plasticity phenomena and the corresponding diversity of models, there is a great need for testing various hypotheses about plasticity before committing to one hardware implementation. Here we present a novel framework for investigating different plasticity approaches on the SpiNNaker distributed digital neural simulation platform. The key innovation of the proposed architecture is to exploit the reconfigurability of the ARM processors inside SpiNNaker, dedicating a subset of them exclusively to process synaptic plasticity updates, while the rest perform the usual neural and synaptic simulations. We demonstrate the flexibility of the proposed approach by showing the implementation of a variety of spike- and rate-based learning rules, including standard Spike-Timing dependent plasticity (STDP), voltage-dependent STDP, and the rate-based BCM rule. We analyze their performance and validate them by running classical learning experiments in real time on a 4-chip SpiNNaker board. The result is an efficient, modular, flexible and scalable framework, which provides a valuable tool for the fast and easy exploration of learning models of very different kinds on the parallel and reconfigurable SpiNNaker system.

  15. Application of the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI in Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christos A. Karavitis

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The main premise of the current effort is that the use of a drought index, such as Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI, may lead to a more appropriate understanding of drought duration, magnitude and spatial extent in semi-arid areas like Greece. The importance of the Index may be marked in its simplicity and its ability to identify the beginning and end of a drought event. Thus, it may point towards drought contingency planning and through it to drought alert mechanisms. In this context, Greece, as it very often faces the hazardous impacts of droughts, presents an almost ideal case for the SPI application. The present approach examines the SPI drought index application for all of Greece and it is evaluated accordingly by historical precipitation data. Different time series of data from 46 precipitation stations, covering the period 1947–2004, and for time scales of 1, 3, 6, 12 and 24 months, were used. The computation of the index was achieved by the appropriate usage of a pertinent software tool. Then, spatial representation of the SPI values was carried out with geo-statistical methods using the SURFER 9 software package. The results underline the potential that the SPI usage exhibits in a drought alert and forecasting effort as part of a drought contingency planning posture.

  16. iSpy: a powerful and lightweight event display

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alverson, G.; Eulisse, G.; McCauley, T.; Taylor, L.

    2012-12-01

    iSpy is a general-purpose event data and detector visualization program that was developed as an event display for the CMS experiment at the LHC and has seen use by the general public and teachers and students in the context of education and outreach. Central to the iSpy design philosophy is ease of installation, use, and extensibility. The application itself uses the open-access packages Qt4 and Open Inventor and is distributed either as a fully-bound executable or a standard installer package: one can simply download and double-click to begin. Mac OSX, Linux, and Windows are supported. iSpy renders the standard 2D, 3D, and tabular views, and the architecture allows for a generic approach to production of new views and projections. iSpy reads and displays data in the ig format: event information is written in compressed JSON format files designed for distribution over a network. This format is easily extensible and makes the iSpy client indifferent to the original input data source. The ig format is the one used for release of approved CMS data to the public.

  17. iSpy: a powerful and lightweight event display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alverson, G; Eulisse, G; McCauley, T; Taylor, L

    2012-01-01

    iSpy is a general-purpose event data and detector visualization program that was developed as an event display for the CMS experiment at the LHC and has seen use by the general public and teachers and students in the context of education and outreach. Central to the iSpy design philosophy is ease of installation, use, and extensibility. The application itself uses the open-access packages Qt4 and Open Inventor and is distributed either as a fully-bound executable or a standard installer package: one can simply download and double-click to begin. Mac OSX, Linux, and Windows are supported. iSpy renders the standard 2D, 3D, and tabular views, and the architecture allows for a generic approach to production of new views and projections. iSpy reads and displays data in the ig format: event information is written in compressed JSON format files designed for distribution over a network. This format is easily extensible and makes the iSpy client indifferent to the original input data source. The ig format is the one used for release of approved CMS data to the public.

  18. HUBBLE SPIES MOST DISTANT SUPERNOVA EVER SEEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers pinpointed a blaze of light from the farthest supernova ever seen, a dying star that exploded 10 billion years ago. The detection and analysis of this supernova, called 1997ff, is greatly bolstering the case for the existence of a mysterious form of dark energy pervading the cosmos, making galaxies hurl ever faster away from each other. The supernova also offers the first glimpse of the universe slowing down soon after the Big Bang, before it began speeding up. This panel of images, taken with the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2, shows the supernova's cosmic neighborhood; its home galaxy; and the dying star itself. Astronomers found this supernova in 1997 during a second look at the northern Hubble Deep Field [top panel], a tiny region of sky first explored by the Hubble telescope in 1995. The image shows the myriad of galaxies Hubble spied when it peered across more than 10 billion years of time and space. The white box marks the area where the supernova dwells. The photo at bottom left is a close-up view of that region. The white arrow points to the exploding star's home galaxy, a faint elliptical. Its redness is due to the billions of old stars residing there. The picture at bottom right shows the supernova itself, distinguished by the white dot in the center. Although this stellar explosion is among the brightest beacons in the universe, it could not be seen directly in the Hubble images. The stellar blast is so distant from Earth that its light is buried in the glow of its host galaxy. To find the supernova, astronomers compared two pictures of the 'deep field' taken two years apart. One image was of the original Hubble Deep Field; the other, the follow-up deep-field picture taken in 1997. Using special computer software, astronomers then measured the light from the galaxies in both images. Noting any changes in light output between the two pictures, the computer identified a blob of light in the 1997 picture

  19. SPI Conformance Gel Applications in Geothermal Zonal Isolation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Lyle [Clean Tech Innovations, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    2017-08-08

    Zonal isolation in geothermal injection and producing wells is important while drilling the wells when highly fractured geothermal zones are encountered and there is a need to keep the fluids from interfering with the drilling operation. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) objectives are to advance technologies to make it more cost effective to develop, produce, and monitor geothermal reservoirs and produce geothermal energy. Thus, zonal isolation is critical to well cost, reservoir evaluation and operations. Traditional cementing off of the lost circulation or thief zones during drilling is often done to stem the drilling mud losses. This is an expensive and generally unsuccessful technique losing the potential of the remaining fracture system. Selective placement of strong SPI gels into only the offending fractures can maintain and even improve operational efficiency and resource life. The SPI gel system is a unique silicate based gel system that offers a promising solution to thief zones and conformance problems with water and CO2 floods and potentially geothermal operations. This gel system remains a low viscosity fluid until an initiator (either internal such as an additive or external such as CO2) triggers gelation. This is a clear improvement over current mechanical methods of using packers, plugs, liners and cementing technologies that often severely damage the highly fractured area that is isolated. In the SPI gels, the initiator sets up the fluid into a water-like (not a precipitate) gel and when the isolated zone needs to be reopened, the SPI gel may be removed with an alkaline solution without formation damage occurring. In addition, the SPI gel in commercial quantities is expected to be less expensive than competing mechanical systems and has unique deep placement possibilities. This project seeks to improve upon the SPI gel integrity by modifying the various components to impart temperature stability for use in

  20. INTEGRAL/SPI γ-ray line spectroscopy. Response and background characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Roland; Siegert, Thomas; Greiner, Jochen; Krause, Martin; Kretschmer, Karsten; Lang, Michael; Pleintinger, Moritz; Strong, Andrew W.; Weinberger, Christoph; Zhang, Xiaoling

    2018-03-01

    Context. The space based γ-ray observatory INTEGRAL of the European Space Agency (ESA) includes the spectrometer instrument "SPI". This is a coded mask telescope featuring a 19-element Germanium detector array for high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy, encapsulated in a scintillation detector assembly that provides a veto for background from charged particles. In space, cosmic rays irradiate spacecraft and instruments, which, in spite of the vetoing detectors, results in a large instrumental background from activation of those materials, and leads to deterioration of the charge collection properties of the Ge detectors. Aim. We aim to determine the measurement characteristics of our detectors and their evolution with time, that is, their spectral response and instrumental background. These incur systematic variations in the SPI signal from celestial photons, hence their determination from a broad empirical database enables a reduction of underlying systematics in data analysis. For this, we explore compromises balancing temporal and spectral resolution within statistical limitations. Our goal is to enable modelling of background applicable to spectroscopic studies of the sky, accounting separately for changes of the spectral response and of instrumental background. Methods: We use 13.5 years of INTEGRAL/SPI data, which consist of spectra for each detector and for each pointing of the satellite. Spectral fits to each such spectrum, with independent but coherent treatment of continuum and line backgrounds, provides us with details about separated background components. From the strongest background lines, we first determine how the spectral response changes with time. Applying symmetry and long-term stability tests, we eliminate degeneracies and reduce statistical fluctuations of background parameters, with the aim of providing a self-consistent description of the spectral response for each individual detector. Accounting for this, we then determine how the

  1. Navy Needs to Establish Effective Metrics to Achieve Desired Outcomes for SPY1 Radar Sustainment (Redacted)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    subsystems in the AEGIS Weapon System that searches, detects, and tracks air and surface targets to support Anti -Air Warfare and Ballistic Missile... System that searches, detects, and tracks air and surface targets to support Anti -Air Warfare and Ballistic Missile Defense missions. The SPY-1 radar...a series on SPY-1 radar spare parts. The SPY-1 radar is an advanced, automatic detect and track radar system . The SPY-1 radar is one of 13 major

  2. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France); Rustin, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.rustin@inserm.fr [Inserm U676, Hopital Robert Debre, F-75019 Paris (France); Universite Paris 7, Faculte de medecine Denis Diderot, IFR02 Paris (France)

    2011-10-22

    Highlights: {yields} NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. {yields} Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. {yields} Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  3. The NDUFB6 subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I is required for electron transfer activity: A proof of principle study on stable and controlled RNA interference in human cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loublier, Sandrine; Bayot, Aurelien; Rak, Malgorzata; El-Khoury, Riyad; Benit, Paule; Rustin, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → NDUFB6 is required for activity of mitochondrial complex I in human cell lines. → Lentivirus based RNA interference results in frequent off target insertions. → Flp-In recombinase mediated miRNA insertion allows gene-specific extinction. -- Abstract: Molecular bases of inherited deficiencies of mitochondrial respiratory chain complex I are still unknown in a high proportion of patients. Among 45 subunits making up this large complex, more than half has unknown function(s). Understanding the function of these subunits would contribute to our knowledge on mitochondrial physiology but might also reveal that some of these subunits are not required for the catalytic activity of the complex. A direct consequence of this finding would be the reduction of the number of candidate genes to be sequenced in patients with decreased complex I activity. In this study, we tested two different methods to stably extinct complex I subunits in cultured cells. We first found that lentivirus-mediated shRNA expression frequently resulted in the unpredicted extinction of additional gene(s) beside targeted ones. This can be ascribed to uncontrolled genetic material insertions in the genome of the host cell. This approach thus appeared inappropriate to study unknown functions of a gene. Next, we found it possible to specifically extinct a CI subunit gene by direct insertion of a miR targeting CI subunits in a Flp site (HEK293 Flp-In cells). By using this strategy we unambiguously demonstrated that the NDUFB6 subunit is required for complex I activity, and defined conditions suitable to undertake a systematic and stable extinction of the different supernumerary subunits in human cells.

  4. Macrophage-specific gene functions in Spi1-directed innate immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zakrzewska, Anna; Cui, Chao; Stockhammer, Oliver W.; Benard, Erica L.; Spaink, Herman P.; Meijer, Annemarie H.

    2010-01-01

    The Spi1/Pu.1 transcription factor plays a crucial role in myeloid cell development in vertebrates. Despite extensive studies of Spi1, the controlled gene group remains largely unknown. To identify genes dependent on Spi1, we used a microarray strategy using a knockdown approach in zebrafish embryos

  5. klanke, voëlgeluide en musiek in die digkuns van Lina Spies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    27 Jan 2006 ... 1999: 11-23), maak Spies self ook nie melding van musiek as tema nie; sy noem die. Afrikaanse digteres se “siening van die natuur, die religie, die politiek, medekunste- naars, verwantskap, digterskap” (Spies 1999: 22). Maar die digter verklaar in 'n onder- houd (Spies 2004b) dat sy drie groot passies het: ...

  6. Structural basis of divergent cyclin-dependent kinase activation by Spy1/RINGO proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGrath, Denise A.; Fifield, Bre-Anne; Marceau, Aimee H.; Tripathi, Sarvind; Porter, Lisa A.; Rubin, Seth M. (UCSC); (Windsor)

    2017-06-30

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are principal drivers of cell division and are an important therapeutic target to inhibit aberrant proliferation. Cdk enzymatic activity is tightly controlled through cyclin interactions, posttranslational modifications, and binding of inhibitors such as the p27 tumor suppressor protein. Spy1/RINGO (Spy1) proteins bind and activate Cdk but are resistant to canonical regulatory mechanisms that establish cell-cycle checkpoints. Cancer cells exploit Spy1 to stimulate proliferation through inappropriate activation of Cdks, yet the mechanism is unknown. We have determined crystal structures of the Cdk2-Spy1 and p27-Cdk2-Spy1 complexes that reveal how Spy1 activates Cdk. We find that Spy1 confers structural changes to Cdk2 that obviate the requirement of Cdk activation loop phosphorylation. Spy1 lacks the cyclin-binding site that mediates p27 and substrate affinity, explaining why Cdk-Spy1 is poorly inhibited by p27 and lacks specificity for substrates with cyclin-docking sites. We identify mutations in Spy1 that ablate its ability to activate Cdk2 and to proliferate cells. Our structural description of Spy1 provides important mechanistic insights that may be utilized for targeting upregulated Spy1 in cancer.

  7. SPI Trend Analysis of New Zealand Applying the ITA Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Caloiero

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A natural temporary imbalance of water availability, consisting of persistent lower-than-average or higher-than-average precipitation, can cause extreme dry and wet conditions that adversely impact agricultural yields, water resources, infrastructure, and human systems. In this study, dry and wet periods in New Zealand were expressed using the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI. First, both the short term (3 and 6 months and the long term (12 and 24 months SPI were estimated, and then, possible trends in the SPI values were detected by means of a new graphical technique, the Innovative Trend Analysis (ITA, which allows the trend identification of the low, medium, and high values of a series. Results show that, in every area currently subject to drought, an increase in this phenomenon can be expected. Specifically, the results of this paper highlight that agricultural regions on the eastern side of the South Island, as well as the north-eastern regions of the North Island, are the most consistently vulnerable areas. In fact, in these regions, the trend analysis mainly showed a general reduction in all the values of the SPI: that is, a tendency toward heavier droughts and weaker wet periods.

  8. Assessment of meteorological drought using SPI in West Azarbaijan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    2017-05-13

    May 13, 2017 ... The basis of drought indices is often based on measuring the deviation of precipitation values from long-term mean, during a specific period of time. The standard precipitation index (SPI) can be used for indicating the associated temporal and spatial variations. The aim of this research is the assessment of ...

  9. The Sneaky Sneaker Spies and the Mysterious Black Ink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savran, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes the process of making "The Sneaky Sneaker Spies and the Mysterious Black Ink," a six-minute animation starring five art students who form a detective club. This animation is available online for art teachers to use in their own classrooms. After showing this video in class, art teachers could have students try…

  10. Neuromodulated Synaptic Plasticity on the SpiNNaker Neuromorphic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantas Mikaitis

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available SpiNNaker is a digital neuromorphic architecture, designed specifically for the low power simulation of large-scale spiking neural networks at speeds close to biological real-time. Unlike other neuromorphic systems, SpiNNaker allows users to develop their own neuron and synapse models as well as specify arbitrary connectivity. As a result SpiNNaker has proved to be a powerful tool for studying different neuron models as well as synaptic plasticity—believed to be one of the main mechanisms behind learning and memory in the brain. A number of Spike-Timing-Dependent-Plasticity(STDP rules have already been implemented on SpiNNaker and have been shown to be capable of solving various learning tasks in real-time. However, while STDP is an important biological theory of learning, it is a form of Hebbian or unsupervised learning and therefore does not explain behaviors that depend on feedback from the environment. Instead, learning rules based on neuromodulated STDP (three-factor learning rules have been shown to be capable of solving reinforcement learning tasks in a biologically plausible manner. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time how a model of three-factor STDP, with the third-factor representing spikes from dopaminergic neurons, can be implemented on the SpiNNaker neuromorphic system. Using this learning rule we first show how reward and punishment signals can be delivered to a single synapse before going on to demonstrate it in a larger network which solves the credit assignment problem in a Pavlovian conditioning experiment. Because of its extra complexity, we find that our three-factor learning rule requires approximately 2× as much processing time as the existing SpiNNaker STDP learning rules. However, we show that it is still possible to run our Pavlovian conditioning model with up to 1 × 104 neurons in real-time, opening up new research opportunities for modeling behavioral learning on SpiNNaker.

  11. Battle Management Language: Proof of Principle and Future Developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reus, N. M.de; Krom, P.P.J. de; Schade, U.; Pullen, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    The NATO Modeling and Simulation Group Technical Activity 048 (MSG-048) was chartered in 2006 to investigate the potential of a Coalition Battle Management Language (C-BML) for Multinational and NATO interoperation of command and control systems with Modeling and Simulation. At its May, 2007

  12. Proof-of-Principle Polymer Engine-Generator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pelrine, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    ... in excess of 1000 C, more than sufficient to produce high potential efficiencies. Over 10000 cycles (the project target) were successfully demonstrated using propane and butane fuels, and much longer lifetimes are undoubtedly feasible...

  13. Magnetic particle imaging: from proof of principle to preclinical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopp, T.; Gdaniec, N.; Möddel, M.

    2017-07-01

    Tomographic imaging has become a mandatory tool for the diagnosis of a majority of diseases in clinical routine. Since each method has its pros and cons, a variety of them is regularly used in clinics to satisfy all application needs. Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a relatively new tomographic imaging technique that images magnetic nanoparticles with a high spatiotemporal resolution in a quantitative way, and in turn is highly suited for vascular and targeted imaging. MPI was introduced in 2005 and now enters the preclinical research phase, where medical researchers get access to this new technology and exploit its potential under physiological conditions. Within this paper, we review the development of MPI since its introduction in 2005. Besides an in-depth description of the basic principles, we provide detailed discussions on imaging sequences, reconstruction algorithms, scanner instrumentation and potential medical applications.

  14. Profiling the origin of ammonium nitrate: proof-of-principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carol-Visser, J.; Farmache, M.A.; Heijden, A.E.D.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    In many Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs) the main charge consists of ammonium nitrate (AN). For forensic reasons, screening for the origin of AN is of importance. By assessing specifi c characteristics, diff erent AN batches can be profi led, in this way providing extra information which could

  15. Proof-of-Principle Dermal Decontamination Experiments: Swine Skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    cycles and the measurements taken after each cycle were recorded. All water rinses were performed using tap water and applied using a gentle stream...uniform and highly reproducible. EpiDermFT ( EFT ) consists of organized basal, spinous, granular, and cornified epidermal layers analogous to those found...in vivo. The dermal compartment is composed of a collagen matrix containing viable normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF). EFT is mitotically and

  16. IJzerrijk drinkwaterslib en verschraling landbouwgronden: een proof of principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucassen, E.C.H.E.T.; Chardon, W.J.; Dorland, E.; Sluys, van der M.L.; Poelen, M.D.M.; Smolders, Alfons J.P.

    2015-01-01

    Bij de inrichting van het Natuurnetwerk Nederland en van Natura 2000-gebieden worden op grote schaal landbouwgronden heringericht als soortenrijke natuur. Om op korte termijn fosfaatarme bodemcondities te krijgen wordt op locaties waar de bodem te rijk is via maaibeheer en/of uitmijnen te bereiken,

  17. A new proof-of-principle contraband detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sredniawski, J.J.; Debiak, T.; Kamykowski, E.

    1995-12-01

    An accelerator-based technique is being developed to detect contraband materials in large containers. The source, which uses a low-energy proton beam to generate high-energy gamma rays, uses the gamma resonance absorption technique to detect nitrogen-14 and chlorine-35 in containers. Both these materials are commonly found in contraband drugs as well as in explosives. Through the use of segmented BGO detectors to detect the resonant gamma rays a quantity as low as ∼ 1 kg can be located with a considerable degree of confidence. Several stations at a port of entry can be operated with one accelerator, as described

  18. Identification of cognate host targets and specific ubiquitylation sites on the Salmonella SPI-1 effector SopB/SigD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rogers, Lindsay D; Kristensen, Anders R; Boyle, Erin C

    2008-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a bacterial pathogen responsible for enteritis and typhoid fever. Virulence is linked to two Salmonella pathogenicity islands (SPI-1 and SPI-2) on the bacterial chromosome, each of which encodes a type III secretion system. While both the SPI-1 and SPI-2 systems secrete...

  19. INTEGRAL: In flight behavior of ISGRI and SPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lebrun, F.; Roques, J.-P.; Sauvageon, A.; Terrier, R.; Laurent, P.; Limousin, O.; Lugiez, F.; Claret, A.

    2005-01-01

    The payload of INTEGRAL, the space gamma-ray observatory launched in October 2002, features two gamma-ray telescopes that take advantage of the semiconductor technologies. The spectrometer SPI, is equipped with 19 high-purity germanium detectors cooled at 85 K. We will report on the SPI in-flight background, performance, the detector evolution and the annealings performed every 6 months. The INTEGRAL Soft Gamma-Ray Imager (ISGRI) is the low-energy camera of the IBIS telescope. It is the first large camera equipped with CdTe detectors. We will present some system aspects, in particular the noisy pixel handling and will report on its in-flight background, performance and their evolution

  20. SPYING FOR THE RIGHT REASONS: CONTESTED NORMS IN CYBERSPACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    Understanding international law is difficult because it is based upon a different philosophy than domestic law. Domestic laws in Western democracies are very...relations and protects nations from a hostile intent.24 In summary, this essay is based on the assumption that espionage is legitimate in legal and moral ...espionage from EMCE.32 It appears that the moral aspects of spying among allies are hardly researched at all. Leif-Eric Easley examined the factor of

  1. The Spies and the Gran Turco (XVI Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennaro Varriale

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This present essay focuses on the information that Hispanic spies collected in the Levant during the sixteenth-century. Based on archival and literary sources, the study is built around the typical structure of a lyric opera to show the worth of the secret correspondence such as archetype of European perception about the Ottoman Empire and, more generally, about all the Islam.

  2. The γ-ray burst-detection system of SPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lichti, G.G.; Georgii, R.; Kienlin, A. von; Schoenfelder, V.; Wunderer, C.; Jung, H.-J.; Hurley, K.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of precise locations of γ-ray bursts is a crucial task of γ-ray astronomy. Although γ-ray burst locations can be obtained nowadays from single experiments (BATSE, COMPTEL, BeppoSax) the location of bursts via triangulation using the interplanetary network is still important because not all bursts will be located precisely enough by these single instruments. In order to get location accuracies down to arcseconds via triangulation one needs long baselines. At the beginning of the next decade several spacecrafts which explore the outer planetary system (the Mars-Surveyor-2001 Orbiter and probably Ulysses) will carry γ-ray burst instruments. INTEGRAL as a near-earth spacecraft is the ideal counterpart for these satellites. The massive anticoincidence shield of the INTEGRAL-spectrometer SPI allows the measurement of γ-ray bursts with a high sensitivity. Estimations have shown that with SPI some hundred γ-ray bursts per year on the 5σ level can be measured. This is equivalent to the BATSE sensitivity. We describe the γ-ray burst-detection system of SPI, present its technical features and assess the scientific capabilities

  3. Seeing is believing -- SpyJack system investigates field problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Meara, D.

    1998-01-01

    The SpyJack Remote Monitoring System, a stand-alone, single-site remote well monitoring system that works off its own embedded controller is described. The supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) unit, developed by CORE Technologies Inc., has an integrated voice/alarm system, monitoring sensors installed at remote well sites continuously 24 hours a day with a digital camera, with 300 degrees of visual confirmation capability. It can also be used as a surveillance tool against terrorism as has been shown in the case of some recent debilitating attacks on remote wells in Alberta. SpyJack monitors flow rates and pressures, pumpjack stroke rates, sucker rod temperature, load cell and engine shut-off relay, as well as ambient temperature, tank levels, and motion detection. At the office, SpyJack Well Management Interface uses nine drop-down screens to take users through the remote monitoring and control of each site. The screens include production sensors, line sensors, dyno chart, environmental/safety sensors and sensor information and set up. Currently under development is the unsolicited dial-out capability. When implemented the system will send out information at pre-determined times, such as every four hours, or at specific times during the day. Compressing images to enable speedier downloading is also being planned

  4. Rainfall characterisation by application of standardised precipitation index (SPI) in Peninsular Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Fadhilah; Hui-Mean, Foo; Suhaila, Jamaludin; Yusop, Zulkifli; Ching-Yee, Kong

    2014-02-01

    The interpretations of trend behaviour for dry and wet events are analysed in order to verify the dryness and wetness episodes. The fitting distribution of rainfall is computed to classify the dry and wet events by applying the standardised precipitation index (SPI). The rainfall amount for each station is categorised into seven categories, namely extremely wet, severely wet, moderately wet, near normal, moderately dry, severely dry and extremely dry. The computation of the SPI is based on the monsoon periods, which include the northeast monsoon, southwest monsoon and inter-monsoon. The trends of the dry and wet periods were then detected using the Mann-Kendall trend test and the results indicate that the major parts of Peninsular Malaysia are characterised by increasing droughts rather than wet events. The annual trends of drought and wet events of the randomly selected stations from each region also yield similar results. Hence, the northwest and southwest regions are predicted to have a higher probability of drought occurrence during a dry event and not much rain during the wet event. The east and west regions, on the other hand, are going through a significant upward trend that implies lower rainfall during the drought episodes and heavy rainfall during the wet events.

  5. Employees' Motivation for SPI: Case Study in a Small Finnish Software Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtanen, Anu; Sihvonen, Hanna-Miina

    In small software companies the resources available for SPI are often limited. With limited resources, the motivation of the employees becomes one of the key factors for SPI. In this article, the motivational factors affecting a small company's SPI efforts are discussed. In the research, we carried out interviews and a survey in a small Finnish software company considering the motivation towards SPI. The results are presented here and compared with earlier motivation research. There were differences revealed while comparing the motivating factors of smaller companies to those of larger ones. In large companies the focus seems to be on the business related motivators and in small ones the motivators related to comfortability of work are emphasized. Motivation survey and the interviews proved to be useful tools in planning the future SPI strategy. A lot of valuable information was discovered for planning and implementing the next steps of SPI.

  6. Understanding surveillance technologies spy devices, their origins & applications

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, JK

    2001-01-01

    From electronic wire taps to baby monitors and long-distance video and listening devices, startling changes occur everyday in how we gather, interpret, and transmit information. An extraordinary range of powerful new technologies has come into existence to meet the requirements of this expanding field.Your search for a comprehensive resource for surveillance devices is over. Understanding Surveillance Technologies: Spy Devices, Their Origins and Applications serves as a provocative, broad-based, and visually appealing reference that introduces and describes the technologies rapidly moving into

  7. [Nurses and spies during the First World War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halioua, Bruno

    2014-06-01

    During the First World War, some nurses distinguished themselves by playing a significant role in spy networks, using their activity as a cover. They took an active part in the setting up of escape routes for allied prisoners of war and the gathering of intelligence on the positions of German troops, in particular in Belgium and northern France. Among them Edith Cavell, Gabrielle Petit, Louise de Bettignies, Marie-Léonie Vanhoutte, Marthe Cocknaert and Emilienne-Rose Ducimetière are considered as heroines.

  8. Minox Digital Spy Camera数码相机

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Digital Spy Camera是一种间谍框机,看起来更像是一个小MP3,重量只有60g,非常便携.非常迷你,内置320万像素cmos传感器.42mm定焦镜头最大光圈130.还有一个外接的闪光灯.其外形尺寸86mm×29mm×20mm.呈现细长形结构.

  9. Droughts in a warming climate: A global assessment of Standardized precipitation index (SPI) and Reconnaissance drought index (RDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi Zarch, Mohammad Amin; Sivakumar, Bellie; Sharma, Ashish

    2015-07-01

    Both drought and aridity indicate imbalance in water availability. While drought is a natural temporal hazard, aridity is a constant climatic feature. This paper investigates the changes in drought characteristics across different aridity zones with and without consideration of potential evapotranspiration (PET), as a means to better assess drought in a warming climate. Two drought indexes are employed: (1) Standardized precipitation index (SPI), which is solely based on precipitation; and (2) Reconnaissance drought index (RDI), which, in addition to precipitation, takes PET into account. The two indexes are first employed to observed precipitation and PET data for the period 1960-2009 from the CRU (Climate Research Unit, University of East Anglia) TS 3.1 database. The results indicate that although all the aridity zones experience both downward and upward drought trends, no significant trend is found over large parts of the zones. However, the agreement between SPI and RDI reduces from the hyper-arid zone on one extreme toward the humid zone on the other. In the three more humid zones (i.e. semi-arid, sub-humid, and humid), the indexes exhibit different trends, with RDI showing more decreasing trends (i.e. becoming drier). While SPI generally shows more drought prone areas than RDI for the pre-1998 period, the opposite is observed for the post-1998 period. Given the known changes to PET in observed records, and also expected increases as global warming intensifies, these results suggest that RDI will be consistently different to the SPI as global warming intensifies. This hypothesis is further tested for historic and future climate projections from the CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia) Mk3.6 global climate model (GCM), with use of the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) and RCP8.5 (Representative Concentration Pathways). In this case, PET is calculated using FAO56-PM model for assessment of

  10. Harnessing ISO/IEC 12207 to Examine the Extent of SPI Activity in an Organisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Paul; O'Connor, Rory

    The quality of the software development process directly affects the quality of the software product. To be successful, software development organisations must respond to changes in technology and business circumstances, and therefore software process improvement (SPI) is required. SPI activity relates to any modification that is performed to the software process in order to improve an aspect of the process. Although multiple process assessments could be employed to examine SPI activity, they present an inefficient tool for such an examination. This paper presents an overview of a new survey-based resource that utilises the process reference model in ISO/IEC 12207 in order to expressly and directly determine the level of SPI activity in a software development organisation. This survey instrument can be used by practitioners, auditors and researchers who are interested in determining the extent of SPI activity in an organisation.

  11. SailSpy: a vision system for yacht sail shape measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Olof J.; Power, P. Wayne; Bowman, Chris C.; Palmer, G. Terry; Clist, Roger S.

    1992-11-01

    SailSpy is a real-time vision system which we have developed for automatically measuring sail shapes and masthead rotation on racing yachts. Versions have been used by the New Zealand team in two America's Cup challenges in 1988 and 1992. SailSpy uses four miniature video cameras mounted at the top of the mast to provide views of the headsail and mainsail on either tack. The cameras are connected to the SailSpy computer below deck using lightweight cables mounted inside the mast. Images received from the cameras are automatically analyzed by the SailSpy computer, and sail shape and mast rotation parameters are calculated. The sail shape parameters are calculated by recognizing sail markers (ellipses) that have been attached to the sails, and the mast rotation parameters by recognizing deck markers painted on the deck. This paper describes the SailSpy system and some of the vision algorithms used.

  12. Robotics Test Rig

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuurmans, P.

    2007-01-01

    The experimental Accelerator Driven System XT-ADS is being developed within the European 6th framework programme EUROTRANS using the MYRRHA DRAFT-2 as starting point. The aim for the XT-ADS is to demonstrate the feasibility of the ADS concept at reasonable power levels and to serve as a high performance, multi-purpose experimental irradiation device. One of the fundamental design options that has been taken is to do all maintenance and in-service inspection and repair duties by remote handling. Outside the XT-ADS vessel in a controlled though radio-active environment, remote handling concepts as those already in use at e.g. the Joint European Torus (JET) can be used. Extrapolation to remote handling inside the lead-bismuth eutectic filled main vessel of the XT-ADS is in principle feasible as was shown in a 2003 study performed by Oxford Technologies ltd for the case of MYRRHA. Nevertheless, it is clear that all critical remote handling components need to be qualified for use in liquid LBE. Thus, as a first step, a proof of principle (POP) experimental test rig is require. The principal goal of this work is to identify the critical technological issues that must be resolved to allow operation of remote handling manipulators inside the LBE filled main vessel of the XT-ADS and to propose a concept design and specification catalogue for a proof of principle test rig that is able to experimentally verify the main aspects of manipulator design

  13. Conceptual design for the field test and evaluation of the gas-phase UF6 enrichment meter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strittmatter, R.B.; Leavitt, J.N.; Slice, R.W.

    1980-12-01

    An in-line enrichment monitor is being developed to provide real-time enrichment data for the gas-phase UF 6 feed stream of an enrichment plant. Data from proof-of-principle measurements using a laboratory prototype system are presented. A conceptual design for an enrichment monitor to be field tested and evaluated at the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant is reported

  14. Assessment of the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) in Tegal City, Central Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramudya, Y.; Onishi, T.

    2018-03-01

    One of the adverse impacts of climate change is drought, which occurs more frequently in Tegal city, Indonesia. The application of drought index analysis is useful for drought assessment to consider adaptation and mitigation method in order to deal with climate change. By figuring out the level and duration of the drought. In order to analyze drought in the specific area, Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) is an index to quantify the rainfall deficit for multiple timescales. In 2015, Indonesia experienced severe drought, which has not been analyzed, yet. Thus, it is important to assess a quantitative evaluation of the drought condition. The study shows that from all deficit periods, the most severe drought in duration and peak took place in 2015, with each drought index as follows: 1 month deficit or SPI-1 (-3.11) in 1985 (-2.51) in 2015, 3 month deficit or SPI-3 (-2.291) in 1995 (-1.82) in 2015, 6 month deficit or SPI-6 (-2.40) in 1997 and (-1.84) in 2015, 9 month deficit or SPI-9 (-1.12) in 2015, 12 month deficit or SPI-12 (-1.19) in 2015. The result underlines the potential that SPI exhibits in drought identification and the use of the rainfall strongly linked to drought relief policy and measure implementation in Tegal city.

  15. Latest development of high-power fiber lasers in SPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Stephen; Zervas, Mikhail N.; Appleyard, Andrew; Durkin, Michael K.; Horley, Ray; Varnham, Malcolm P.; Nilsson, Johan; Jeong, Yoonchan

    2004-06-01

    High Power Fiber Lasers (HPFLs) and High Power Fiber Amplifiers (HPFAs) promise a number of benefits in terms of their high optical efficiency, degree of integration, beam quality, reliability, spatial compactness and thermal management. These benefits are driving the rapid adoption of HPFLs in an increasingly wide range of applications and power levels ranging from a few Watts, in for example analytical applications, to high-power >1kW materials processing (machining and welding) applications. This paper describes SPI"s innovative technologies, HPFL products and their performance capabilities. The paper highlights key aspects of the design basis and provides an overview of the applications space in both the industrial and aerospace domains. Single-fiber CW lasers delivering 1kW output power at 1080nm have been demonstrated and are being commercialized for aerospace and industrial applications with wall-plug efficiencies in the range 20 to 25%, and with beam parameter products in the range 0.5 to 100 mm.mrad (corresponding to M2 = 1.5 to 300) tailored to application requirements. At power levels in the 1 - 200 W range, SPI"s proprietary cladding-pumping technology, GTWaveTM, has been employed to produce completely fiber-integrated systems using single-emitter broad-stripe multimode pump diodes. This modular construction enables an agile and flexible approach to the configuration of a range of fiber laser / amplifier systems for operation in the 1080nm and 1550nm wavelength ranges. Reliability modeling is applied to determine Systems martins such that performance specifications are robustly met throughout the designed product lifetime. An extensive Qualification and Reliability-proving programme is underway to qualify the technology building blocks that are utilized for the fiber laser cavity, pump modules, pump-driver systems and thermo-mechanical management. In addition to the CW products, pulsed fiber lasers with pulse energies exceeding 1mJ with peak pulse

  16. The SPI-1-like Type III secretion system: more roles than you think

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Frank; Barret, Matthieu; O’Gara, Fergal

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a protein delivery system which is involved in a wide spectrum of interactions, from mutualism to pathogenesis, between Gram negative bacteria and various eukaryotes, including plants, fungi, protozoa and mammals. Various phylogenetic families of the T3SS have been described, including the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 family (SPI-1). The SPI-1 T3SS was initially associated with the virulence of enteric pathogens, but is actually found in a diverse array of bacterial species, where it can play roles in processes as different as symbiotic interactions with insects and colonization of plants. We review the multiple roles of the SPI-1 T3SS and discuss both how these discoveries are changing our perception of the SPI-1 family and what impacts this has on our understanding of the specialization of the T3SS in general. PMID:24575107

  17. The SPI-1-like Type III secretion system: more roles than you think.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Frank; Barret, Matthieu; O'Gara, Fergal

    2014-01-01

    The type III secretion system (T3SS) is a protein delivery system which is involved in a wide spectrum of interactions, from mutualism to pathogenesis, between Gram negative bacteria and various eukaryotes, including plants, fungi, protozoa and mammals. Various phylogenetic families of the T3SS have been described, including the Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 1 family (SPI-1). The SPI-1 T3SS was initially associated with the virulence of enteric pathogens, but is actually found in a diverse array of bacterial species, where it can play roles in processes as different as symbiotic interactions with insects and colonization of plants. We review the multiple roles of the SPI-1 T3SS and discuss both how these discoveries are changing our perception of the SPI-1 family and what impacts this has on our understanding of the specialization of the T3SS in general.

  18. A Half-Day Workshop on ``Smarter Investment by Aligning SPI Initiatives, Capabilities and Stakeholder Values''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selioukova, Yana; Frühwirth, Christian

    Software companies who want to improve software process capabilities (SPCs)a systematic method to make informed investment decisions on software process improvement (SPI) initiatives. Such decisions should aim at creating maximum stakeholder values. To address this problem, we present a method with tool support that may help companies align stakeholder values with SPCs and SPI initiatives. The proposed method has been developed based on the well-established “Quality Function Deployment” (QFD) approach. The experience with the proposed method suggests that it particularly helps to reduce the risk of misalignment by identifying those SPI initiatives that are most beneficial to stakeholders. The tool support provided with the proposed method also generated positive experiences in increasing the usability of the method and helped companies in the elicitation and prioritization of stakeholder values. Therefore, we propose a workshop for the method work out named “Smarter Investment by Aligning SPI Initiatives, Capabilities and Stakeholder Values” in hypothetical case company.

  19. Mapping of SPI drought index in South-Eastern Europe, theory and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihari, Z.; Szentimrey, T.; Lakatos, M.; Gregorič, G.; Likso, T.

    2010-09-01

    In recent decades drought has a major impact on the economy in South-Eastern Europe (SEE). The annual precipitation has decreased from the beginning of 20th century. Additional problem is that the intensity of precipitation increases in average. The part of runoff became larger, and greater part of the precipitation runs to the rivers, streamlets, and less part infiltrates into the soil. Therefore, the available water reduces for vegetation. Summarized, the drought tendency increases in the region. The Drought Management Centre for South East Europe was established to deal with these events and try to improve drought management and policy. One method to calculate the extent of a drought event is the application of drought indices. Several indices are used for this purpose, one of them is the Standard Precipitation Index (SPI) developed by McKee et al. The SPI is based only on precipitation and can be used to monitor conditions on a variety of time scales. The SPI calculation for any location is based on long-term precipitation record for a desired period. This long-term record is fitted to a gamma probability distribution, which is then transformed into the standard normal distribution. In the practice SPI is calculated mainly for 1, 3, 6 months. The SPI calculator which is offered on the project page of DMCSEE is applied for SPI calculations in this study. For the interpolation of SPI we use the MISH interpolation method developed at Hungarian Meteorological Service (Meteorological Interpolation based on Surface Homogenized Data Basis; Szentimrey, Bihari, 2007). The interpolation can be realized in to ways: 1. The SPI values are calculated in grid points after gridding (by gridding part of MISH) the station precipitation data series 2. The station based SPI values are interpolated by method MISH One of the main feature of MISH is that it use longtime data series for modelling of the necessary climate statistical parameters while the SPI calculations are also based

  20. Harnessing ISO/IEC 12207 to examine the extent of SPI activity in an organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Paul; O'Connor, Rory

    2010-01-01

    peer-reviewed The quality of the software development process directly affects the quality of the software product. To be successful, software development organisations must respond to changes in technology and business circumstances, and therefore software process improvement (SPI) is required. SPI activity relates to any modification that is performed to the software process in order to improve an aspect of the process. Although multiple process assessments could be employed to examine S...

  1. Towards the identification of the influence of SPI on the successful evolution of software SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Paul; O'Connor, Rory

    2010-01-01

    peer-reviewed Software development requires multi-stage processes in order to organise the software development effort. Each software development project should implement a development process that is appropriate to the project setting. Since business needs and technologies are subject to change, software process improvement (SPI) actions are required so as to harmonise the process with the emerging business and technology needs. SPI frameworks such as the Capability Maturity Model Integra...

  2. Mysteries and Conspiracies: Detective Stories, Spy Novels And The Making Of Modern Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ossandón, José

    2016-01-01

    Book review of: Mysteries and Conspiracies: Detective Stories, Spy Novels and the Making of Modern Societies. By Luc Boltanski (trans. C Porter). Cambridge: Polity Press, 2014. xviii+340 pp. £18.99/€23.80. ISBN: 9780745664057.......Book review of: Mysteries and Conspiracies: Detective Stories, Spy Novels and the Making of Modern Societies. By Luc Boltanski (trans. C Porter). Cambridge: Polity Press, 2014. xviii+340 pp. £18.99/€23.80. ISBN: 9780745664057....

  3. SpyRings Declassified: A Blueprint for Using Isopeptide-Mediated Cyclization to Enhance Enzyme Thermal Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoene, C; Bennett, S P; Howarth, M

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes often have marginal stability, with unfolding typically leading to irreversible denaturation. This sensitivity is a major barrier, both for de novo enzyme development and for expanding enzyme impact beyond the laboratory. Seeking an approach to enhance resilience to denaturation that could be applied to a range of different enzymes, we developed SpyRing cyclization. SpyRings contain genetically encoded SpyTag (13 amino acids) on the N-terminus and SpyCatcher (12kDa) on the C-terminus of the enzyme, so that the Spy partners spontaneously react together through an irreversible isopeptide bond. SpyRing cyclization gave major increases in thermal resilience, including on a model for enzyme evolution, β-lactamase, and an industrially important enzyme in agriculture and nutrition, phytase. We outline the SpyRing rationale, including comparison of SpyRing cyclization to other cyclization strategies. The cloning strategy is presented for the simple insertion of enzyme genes for recombinant expression. We discuss structure-based approaches to select suitable enzyme cyclization targets. Approaches to evaluate the cyclization reaction and its effect on enzyme resilience are described. We also highlight the use of differential scanning calorimetry to understand how SpyRing cyclization promotes enzyme refolding. Efficiently searching sequence space will continue to be important for enzyme improvement, but the SpyRing platform may be a valuable rational adjunct for conferring resilience. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Salmonella Typhimurium induces SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulated and strain dependent downregulation of MHC II expression on porcine alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Parys Alexander

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Foodborne salmonellosis is one of the most important bacterial zoonotic diseases worldwide. Salmonella Typhimurium is the serovar most frequently isolated from persistently infected slaughter pigs in Europe. Circumvention of the host’s immune system by Salmonella might contribute to persistent infection of pigs. In the present study, we found that Salmonella Typhimurium strain 112910a specifically downregulated MHC II, but not MHC I, expression on porcine alveolar macrophages in a Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI-1 and SPI-2 dependent way. Salmonella induced downregulation of MHC II expression and intracellular proliferation of Salmonella in macrophages were significantly impaired after opsonization with Salmonella specific antibodies prior to inoculation. Furthermore, the capacity to downregulate MHC II expression on macrophages differed significantly among Salmonella strains, independently of strain specific differences in invasion capacity, Salmonella induced cytotoxicity and altered macrophage activation status. The fact that strain specific differences in MHC II downregulation did not correlate with the extent of in vitro SPI-1 or SPI-2 gene expression indicates that other factors are involved in MHC II downregulation as well. Since Salmonella strain dependent interference with the pig’s immune response through downregulation of MHC II expression might indicate that certain Salmonella strains are more likely to escape serological detection, our findings are of major interest for Salmonella monitoring programs primarily based on serology.

  5. Spy and Counterspy as a “Cultural Hero” in the Soviet Cinema of the Cold War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktoria Sukovataya

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article aim to analyze the evolution of the Soviet spy cinema of the Cold War in the context of the cultural history and the social changes in the USA and the Soviet Union, and the relations with the political opponents. The public reception of the Soviet spy and spying was evolved in the Soviet Union and it was reflected in the cinema plots and characters transformations.

  6. Reliability and validity of the Korean standard pattern identification for stroke (K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Byoung-Kab

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was conducted to examine the reliability and validity of the ‘Korean Standard Pattern Identification for Stroke (K-SPI-Stroke’, which was developed and evaluated within the context of traditional Korean medicine (TKM. Methods Between September 2006 and December 2010, 2,905 patients from 11 Korean medical hospitals were asked to complete the K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire as a part of project ' Fundamental study for the standardization and objectification of pattern identification in traditional Korean medicine for stroke (SOPI-Stroke. Each patient was independently diagnosed by two TKM physicians from the same site according to one of four patterns, as suggested by the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine: 1 a Qi deficiency pattern, 2 a Dampness-phlegm pattern, 3 a Yin deficiency pattern, or 4 a Fire-heat pattern. We estimated the internal consistency using Cronbach’s α coefficient, the discriminant validity using the means score of patterns, and the predictive validity using the classification accuracy of the K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire. Results The K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire had satisfactory internal consistency (α = 0.700 and validity, with significant differences in the mean of scores among the four patterns. The overall classification accuracy of this questionnaire was 65.2 %. Conclusion These results suggest that the K-SPI-Stroke questionnaire is a reliable and valid instrument for estimating the severity of the four patterns.

  7. WebSpy: An Architecture for Monitoring Web Server Availability in a Multi-Platform Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhan Mohan Thirukonda

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available For an electronic business (e-business, customer satisfaction can be the difference between long-term success and short-term failure. Customer satisfaction is highly impacted by Web server availability, as customers expect a Web site to be available twenty-four hours a day and seven days a week. Unfortunately, unscheduled Web server downtime is often beyond the control of the organization. What is needed is an effective means of identifying and recovering from Web server downtime in order to minimize the negative impact on the customer. An automated architecture, called WebSpy, has been developed to notify administration and to take immediate action when Web server downtime is detected. This paper describes the WebSpy architecture and differentiates it from other popular Web monitoring tools. The results of a case study are presented as a means of demonstrating WebSpy's effectiveness in monitoring Web server availability.

  8. Characterization of the in-flight degradation of the INTEGRAL/SPI detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonjou, V.; Roques, J.P.; Ballmoos, P. von; Jean, P.; Knodlseder, J.; Skinner, G.; Thevenin, A.; Weidenspointner, G.

    2005-01-01

    SPI is a high spectral resolution gamma ray telescope which was launched on 2002 October 17 on-board INTEGRAL (INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory). The SPI camera consists of 19 high-purity germanium detectors that cover an energy range of 20 keV-8 MeV with an energy resolution of 2-8 keV FWHM. We describe the methods used for the determination of the effects of radiation damage on the SPI detectors. Degradation rate and recovery by annealing are quantified. Using instrumental background lines due to radioisotopes from natural decay chains and from cosmic ray interactions, we found that the variations of detectors efficiency are low. Finally, the impact of the detector degradation on the energy calibration has been investigated

  9. Testing aspects of advanced coherent electron cooling technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvinenko, V.; Jing, Y.; Pinayev, I.; Wang, G.; Samulyak, R.; Ratner, D.

    2015-05-03

    An advanced version of the Coherent-electron Cooling (CeC) based on the micro-bunching instability was proposed. This approach promises significant increase in the bandwidth of the CeC system and, therefore, significant shortening of cooling time in high-energy hadron colliders. In this paper we present our plans of simulating and testing the key aspects of this proposed technique using the set-up of the coherent-electron-cooling proof-of-principle experiment at BNL.

  10. Synapse-centric mapping of cortical models to the SpiNNaker neuromorphic architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Courtney Knight

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available While the adult human brain has approximately 8.8x10^10 neurons, this number is dwarfed by its 1x10^15 synapses. From the point of view of neuromorphic engineering and neural simulation in general this makes the simulation of these synapses a particularly complex problem. SpiNNaker is a digital, neuromorphic architecture designed for simulating large-scale spiking neural networks at speeds close to biological real-time. Current solutions for simulating spiking neural networks on SpiNNaker are heavily inspired by work on distributed high-performance computing. However, while SpiNNaker shares many characteristics with such distributed systems, its component nodes have much more limited resources and, as the system lacks global synchronization, the computation performed on each node must complete within a fixed time step. We first analyze the performance of the current SpiNNaker neural simulation software and identify several problems that occur when it is used to simulate networks of the type often used to model the cortex which contain large numbers of sparsely connected synapses. We then present a new, more flexible approach for mapping the simulation of such networks to SpiNNaker which solves many of these problems. Finally we analyze the performance of our new approach using both benchmarks, designed to represent cortical connectivity, and larger, functional cortical models. In a benchmark network where neurons receive input from 8000 STDP synapses, our new approach allows more neurons to be simulated on each SpiNNaker core than has been previously possible. We also demonstrate that the largest plastic neural network previously simulated on neuromorphic hardware can be run in real time using our new approach: double the speed that was previously achieved. Additionally this network contains two types of plastic synapse which previously had to be trained separately but, using our new approach, can be trained simultaneously.

  11. Effect of soy protein isolate in the diet on retention by the rat of iron from radiolabeled test meals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.B.; Erdman, J.W. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of soy protein isolate (SPI) in the diet on whole-body retention of extrinsically radiolabeled iron from test meals containing or not containing SPI was evaluated in marginally iron-deficient weanling rats. In experiment 1 SPI was compared with casein in a 2 X 2 factorial design: diets and test meals were either SPI-based or casein-based. Diets were fed for 13 days prior to the test meal and for 7 days subsequent to the test meal. Rats fed the SPI-based diet retained less iron from test meals than did rats fed the casein-based diet (66.1 vs. 74.8%, P less than 0.01). Experiment 2 showed that an SPI-based diet fed during the final 4 days of a 14-day pre-test meal period and subsequent to the test meal led to less iron retention compared to a casein-based diet. In addition to the observed diet effect, experiment 1 showed that iron retention was less from an SPI-based test meal than from a casein-based test meal, confirming previous reports of adverse effects of SPI on iron retention. The present experiments show that SPI can adversely affect from retention in two ways: by its presence in the diet before and after a test meal, and by its presence in a test meal

  12. Engineering testing and technology projects FY 1996 Site Support Program Plan, WBS 6.3.3 and 6.3.8. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, L.C.

    1995-10-01

    The engineering laboratory services for development, assembly, testing, and evaluation to support the resolution of WHC, Hanford, and DOE complex wide engineering issues for 1996 are presented. Primary customers are: TWRS, spent nuclear fuels, transition projects, liquid effluent program, and other Hanford contractors and programs. Products and services provided include: fabrication and assembly facilities for prototype and test equipment, development testing, proof of principle testing, instrumentation testing, nondestructive examination application development and testing, prototype equipment design and assembly, chemical engineering unit operations testing, engineering test system disposal, and safety issue resolution

  13. Assessment Tools as Drivers for SPI: Short-term Benefits and Long-term Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mûller, Sune Dueholm; Nørbjerg, Jacob; Cho, Hiu Ngan

    2007-01-01

    Full scale software process maturity assessments are costly, can have large organizational impact, and are carried out at long (12-24 months) intervals. Consequently, there is a need for techniques and tools to monitor and help manage an SPI project through inexpensive, ongoing progress assessments....... In this paper we present findings from two cases of using such a tool. We have found that the tool does provide useful snapshots of the status of SPI projects, but that long-term use of the tool introduces costs and challenges related to modifying and tailoring the tool to both the organizational context...

  14. The UNCCD Science-Policy Interface (SPI) - Exploring the sustainable land management nexus among the Rio Conventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safriel, Uriel; Akhtar-Schuster, Mariam; Abraham, Elena Maria; Cowie, Annette; Daradur, Mihail; de Vente, Joris; Dema Dorji, Karma; Kust, German; Metternicht, Graciela; Orr, Barron; Pietragalla, Vanina

    2015-04-01

    At its 11th meeting in Windhoek/Namibia, in September 2013, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) Conference of the Parties (COP) decided to establish a Science-Policy Interface (SPI)* (decision 23/COP.11). The goal of the SPI is to facilitate a two-way dialogue between scientists and policy makers in order to ensure the delivery of policy-relevant information, knowledge and advice on desertification/land degradation and drought (DLDD). The SPI established several initial objectives, including working with the scientific community to bring to the UNCCD and the other Rio conventions (climate change and biodiversity) the scientific evidence for the contribution of sustainable land use and management to climate change adaptation/mitigation and to safeguarding biodiversity and ecosystem services. *For more on the SPI see: http://www.unccd.int/en/programmes/Science/International-Scientific-Advice/Pages/SPI.aspx?HighlightID=282

  15. A four channel time-to-digital converter ASIC with in-built calibration and SPI interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hari Prasad, K.; Sukhwani, Menka; Saxena, Pooja; Chandratre, V.B.; Pithawa, C.K.

    2014-01-01

    A design of high resolution, wide dynamic range Time-to-Digital Converter (TDC) ASIC, implemented in 0.35 µm commercial CMOS technology is presented. The ASIC features four channel TDC with an in-built calibration and Serial Peripheral Interconnect (SPI) slave interface. The TDC is based on the vernier ring oscillator method in order to achieve both high resolution and wide dynamic range. This TDC ASIC is tested and found to have resolution of 127 ps (LSB), dynamic range of 1.8 µs and precision (σ) of 74 ps. The measured values of differential non-linearity (DNL) and integral non-linearity (INL) are 350 ps and 300 ps respectively

  16. The digital ASIC for the digital front end electronics of the SPI astrophysics gamma-ray experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lafond, E.; Mur, M.; Schanne, S.

    1998-01-01

    The SPI spectrometer is one of the gamma-ray astronomy instruments that will be installed on the ESA INTEGRAL satellite, intended to be launched in 2001 by the European Space Agency. The Digital Front-End Electronics sub-system (DFEE) is in charge of the real time data processing of the various measurements produced by the Germanium (Ge) detectors and the Bismuth Germanate (BGO) anti-coincidence shield. The central processing unit of the DFEE is implemented in a digital ASIC circuit, which provides the real time association of the various time signals, acquires the associated energy measurements, and classifies the various types of physics events. The paper gives the system constraints of the DFEE, the architecture of the ASIC circuit, the technology requirements, and the strategy for test and integration. Emphasis is given to the high level language development and simulation, the automatic circuit synthesis approach, and the performance estimation

  17. Google and the "Twisted Cyber Spy" Affair: US-Chinese Communication in an Age of Globalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnett, Stephen John

    2011-01-01

    The "twisted cyber spy" affair began in 2010, when Google was attacked by Chinese cyber-warriors charged with stealing Google's intellectual property, planting viruses in its computers, and hacking the accounts of Chinese human rights activists. In the ensuing international embroglio, the US mainstream press, corporate leaders, and White…

  18. A novel approach for modelling the cluster detector and the SPI ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    detectors and for performing experimental studies with the SPI spectrometer for high-energy γ -rays. Keywords. ... corresponds to the complete absorption of incident γ energy and gets contributions from. Pramana – J. Phys. ..... For a γ-ray of energy Eγ , let us first define the ratio of the single-detector hit events to the total full ...

  19. The zebrafish spi1 promoter drives myeloid-specific expression in stable transgenic fish

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ward, AC; McPhee, DO; Condron, MM; Varma, S; Cody, SH; Onnebo, SMN; Paw, BH; Zon, LI; Lieschke, GJ

    2003-01-01

    The spi1 (pu.1) gene has recently been identified as a useful marker of early myeloid cells in zebrafish. To enhance the versatility of this organism as a model for studying myeloid development, the promoter of this gene has been isolated and characterized. Transient transgenesis revealed that a 5.3

  20. Modified intracellular-associated phenotypes in a recombinant Salmonella Typhi expressing S. Typhimurium SPI-3 sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricio Retamal

    Full Text Available A bioinformatics comparison of Salmonella Pathogenicity Island 3 sequences from S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium serovars showed that ten genes are highly conserved. However three of them are pseudogenes in S. Typhi. Our aim was to understand what functions are lost in S. Typhi due to pseudogenes by constructing a S. Typhi genetic hybrid carrying the SPI-3 region of S. Typhimurium instead of its own SPI-3. We observed that under stressful conditions the hybrid strain showed a clear impairment in resistance to hydrogen peroxide and decreased survival within U937 culture monocytes. We hypothesized that the marT-fidL operon, encoded in SPI-3, was responsible for the new phenotypes because marT is a pseudogen in S. Typhi and has a demonstrated role as a transcriptional regulator in S. Typhimurium. Therefore we cloned and transferred the S. Typhimurium marT-fidL operon into S. Typhi and confirmed that invasion of monocytes was dramatically decreased. Finally, our findings suggest that the genomic and functional differences between SPI-3 sequences have implications in the host specificity of Typhi and Typhimurium serovars.

  1. Product focused software process improvement (P-SPI) : concepts and their application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Solingen, van D.M.; Kusters, R.J.; Trienekens, J.J.M.; Uijtrecht, van A.

    1999-01-01

    Management problems in the development of software have been addressed over recent years by a focus on improvement of the development process. This paper states that software process improvement (SPI) should have an explicit product focus. The practical implementation of a method for product-focused

  2. CWI cryptanalyst discovers new cryptographic attack variant in Flame spy malware

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.J. Stevens (Marc); R.J.F. Cramer (Ronald)

    2012-01-01

    htmlabstractCryptanalyst Marc Stevens from the Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica (CWI) in Amsterdam, known for breaking the https security in 2008 using a cryptanalytic attack on MD5, analyzed the recent Flame virus this week. He discovered that for this spy malware an as yet unknown cryptographic

  3. TargetSpy: a supervised machine learning approach for microRNA target prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Martin; Hackenberg, Michael; Langenberger, David; Frishman, Dmitrij

    2010-05-28

    Virtually all currently available microRNA target site prediction algorithms require the presence of a (conserved) seed match to the 5' end of the microRNA. Recently however, it has been shown that this requirement might be too stringent, leading to a substantial number of missed target sites. We developed TargetSpy, a novel computational approach for predicting target sites regardless of the presence of a seed match. It is based on machine learning and automatic feature selection using a wide spectrum of compositional, structural, and base pairing features covering current biological knowledge. Our model does not rely on evolutionary conservation, which allows the detection of species-specific interactions and makes TargetSpy suitable for analyzing unconserved genomic sequences.In order to allow for an unbiased comparison of TargetSpy to other methods, we classified all algorithms into three groups: I) no seed match requirement, II) seed match requirement, and III) conserved seed match requirement. TargetSpy predictions for classes II and III are generated by appropriate postfiltering. On a human dataset revealing fold-change in protein production for five selected microRNAs our method shows superior performance in all classes. In Drosophila melanogaster not only our class II and III predictions are on par with other algorithms, but notably the class I (no-seed) predictions are just marginally less accurate. We estimate that TargetSpy predicts between 26 and 112 functional target sites without a seed match per microRNA that are missed by all other currently available algorithms. Only a few algorithms can predict target sites without demanding a seed match and TargetSpy demonstrates a substantial improvement in prediction accuracy in that class. Furthermore, when conservation and the presence of a seed match are required, the performance is comparable with state-of-the-art algorithms. TargetSpy was trained on mouse and performs well in human and drosophila

  4. TargetSpy: a supervised machine learning approach for microRNA target prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Langenberger David

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virtually all currently available microRNA target site prediction algorithms require the presence of a (conserved seed match to the 5' end of the microRNA. Recently however, it has been shown that this requirement might be too stringent, leading to a substantial number of missed target sites. Results We developed TargetSpy, a novel computational approach for predicting target sites regardless of the presence of a seed match. It is based on machine learning and automatic feature selection using a wide spectrum of compositional, structural, and base pairing features covering current biological knowledge. Our model does not rely on evolutionary conservation, which allows the detection of species-specific interactions and makes TargetSpy suitable for analyzing unconserved genomic sequences. In order to allow for an unbiased comparison of TargetSpy to other methods, we classified all algorithms into three groups: I no seed match requirement, II seed match requirement, and III conserved seed match requirement. TargetSpy predictions for classes II and III are generated by appropriate postfiltering. On a human dataset revealing fold-change in protein production for five selected microRNAs our method shows superior performance in all classes. In Drosophila melanogaster not only our class II and III predictions are on par with other algorithms, but notably the class I (no-seed predictions are just marginally less accurate. We estimate that TargetSpy predicts between 26 and 112 functional target sites without a seed match per microRNA that are missed by all other currently available algorithms. Conclusion Only a few algorithms can predict target sites without demanding a seed match and TargetSpy demonstrates a substantial improvement in prediction accuracy in that class. Furthermore, when conservation and the presence of a seed match are required, the performance is comparable with state-of-the-art algorithms. TargetSpy was trained on

  5. Integration of a complex regulatory cascade involving the SirA/BarA and Csr global regulatory systems that controls expression of the Salmonella SPI-1 and SPI-2 virulence regulons through HilD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Luary C; Yakhnin, Helen; Camacho, Martha I; Georgellis, Dimitris; Babitzke, Paul; Puente, José L; Bustamante, Víctor H

    2011-06-01

    Salmonella pathogenicity islands 1 and 2 (SPI-1 and SPI-2) play key roles in the pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica. Previously, we showed that when Salmonella grows in Luria-Bertani medium, HilD, encoded in SPI-1, first induces the expression of hilA, located in SPI-1, and subsequently of the ssrAB operon, located in SPI-2. These genes code for HilA and the SsrA/B two-component system, the positive regulators of the SPI-1 and SPI-2 regulons respectively. In this study, we demonstrate that CsrA, a global regulatory RNA binding protein, post-transcriptionally regulates hilD expression by directly binding near the Shine-Dalgarno and translation initiation codon sequences of the hilD mRNA, preventing its translation and leading to its accelerated turnover. Negative regulation is counteracted by the global SirA/BarA two-component system, which directly activates the expression of CsrB and CsrC, two non-coding regulatory RNAs that sequester CsrA, thereby preventing it from binding to its target mRNAs. Our results illustrate the integration of global and specific regulators into a multifactorial regulatory cascade controlling the expression of virulence genes acquired by horizontal transfer events. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Crystal structure of Spy0129, a Streptococcus pyogenes class B sortase involved in pilus assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Joo Kang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sortase enzymes are cysteine transpeptidases that mediate the covalent attachment of substrate proteins to the cell walls of gram-positive bacteria, and thereby play a crucial role in virulence, infection and colonisation by pathogens. Many cell-surface proteins are anchored by the housekeeping sortase SrtA but other more specialised sortases exist that attach sub-sets of proteins or function in pilus assembly. The sortase Spy0129, or SrtC1, from the M1 SF370 strain of Streptococcus pyogenes is responsible for generating the covalent linkages between the pilin subunits in the pili of this organism. The crystal structure of Spy0129 has been determined at 2.3 Å resolution (R = 20.4%, Rfree  = 26.0%. The structure shows that Spy0129 is a class B sortase, in contrast to other characterised pilin polymerases, which belong to class C. Spy0129 lacks a flap believed to function in substrate recognition in class C enzymes and instead has an elaborated β6/β7 loop. The two independent Spy0129 molecules in the crystal show differences in the positions and orientations of the catalytic Cys and His residues, Cys221 and His126, correlated with movements of the β7/β8 and β4/β5 loops that respectively follow these residues. Bound zinc ions stabilise these alternative conformations in the crystal. This conformational variability is likely to be important for function although there is no evidence that zinc is involved in vivo.

  7. Crystal structure of Spy0129, a Streptococcus pyogenes class B sortase involved in pilus assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hae Joo; Coulibaly, Fasséli; Proft, Thomas; Baker, Edward N

    2011-01-11

    Sortase enzymes are cysteine transpeptidases that mediate the covalent attachment of substrate proteins to the cell walls of gram-positive bacteria, and thereby play a crucial role in virulence, infection and colonisation by pathogens. Many cell-surface proteins are anchored by the housekeeping sortase SrtA but other more specialised sortases exist that attach sub-sets of proteins or function in pilus assembly. The sortase Spy0129, or SrtC1, from the M1 SF370 strain of Streptococcus pyogenes is responsible for generating the covalent linkages between the pilin subunits in the pili of this organism. The crystal structure of Spy0129 has been determined at 2.3 Å resolution (R = 20.4%, Rfree  = 26.0%). The structure shows that Spy0129 is a class B sortase, in contrast to other characterised pilin polymerases, which belong to class C. Spy0129 lacks a flap believed to function in substrate recognition in class C enzymes and instead has an elaborated β6/β7 loop. The two independent Spy0129 molecules in the crystal show differences in the positions and orientations of the catalytic Cys and His residues, Cys221 and His126, correlated with movements of the β7/β8 and β4/β5 loops that respectively follow these residues. Bound zinc ions stabilise these alternative conformations in the crystal. This conformational variability is likely to be important for function although there is no evidence that zinc is involved in vivo.

  8. Experimental test of a new technique of background suppression in digital mammography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bisogni, M.G.; Bottari, S.; Ciocci, M.A.; Fantacci, M.E.; Maestro, P.; Malakhov, N.; Marrocchesi, P.S. E-mail: marrocchesi@pi.infn.it; Novelli, M.; Quattrocchi, M.; Pilo, F.; Rosso, V.; Turini, N.; Zucca, S

    2002-02-01

    A multiple-exposure technique in digital mammography has been developed to suppress the physical background in the image due to Compton scattering in the body. A pair of X-ray masks, shaped in a projective geometry and positioned upstream and downstream the patient, are coupled mechanically and moved in four steps along a square pattern in order to irradiate the full area in four consecutive short exposures. A proof-of-principle apparatus is under test with a breast phantom and a standard mammographic X-ray unit. Results are reported.

  9. Experimental test of a new technique of background suppression in digital mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bisogni, M.G.; Bottari, S.; Ciocci, M.A.; Fantacci, M.E.; Maestro, P.; Malakhov, N.; Marrocchesi, P.S.; Novelli, M.; Quattrocchi, M.; Pilo, F.; Rosso, V.; Turini, N.; Zucca, S.

    2002-01-01

    A multiple-exposure technique in digital mammography has been developed to suppress the physical background in the image due to Compton scattering in the body. A pair of X-ray masks, shaped in a projective geometry and positioned upstream and downstream the patient, are coupled mechanically and moved in four steps along a square pattern in order to irradiate the full area in four consecutive short exposures. A proof-of-principle apparatus is under test with a breast phantom and a standard mammographic X-ray unit. Results are reported

  10. The papain inhibitor (SPI) of Streptomyces mobaraensis inhibits bacterial cysteine proteases and is an antagonist of bacterial growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Zindel (Stephan); W.E. Kaman (Wendy); S. Fröls (Sabrina); F. Pfeifer (Felicitas); A. Peters (Annette); J.P. Hays (John); H.-L. Fuchsbauer (Hans-Lothar)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractA novel papain inhibitory protein (SPI) from Streptomyces mobaraensis was studied to measure its inhibitory effect on bacterial cysteine protease activity (Staphylococcus aureus SspB) and culture supernatants (Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacillus anthracis). Further, growth of Bacillus

  11. Environmental sensing by mature B cells is controlled by the transcription factors PU.1 and SpiB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Simon N; Tellier, Julie; Liao, Yang; Trezise, Stephanie; Light, Amanda; O'Donnell, Kristy; Garrett-Sinha, Lee Ann; Shi, Wei; Tarlinton, David M; Nutt, Stephen L

    2017-11-10

    Humoral immunity requires B cells to respond to multiple stimuli, including antigen, membrane and soluble ligands, and microbial products. Ets family transcription factors regulate many aspects of haematopoiesis, although their functions in humoral immunity are difficult to decipher as a result of redundancy between the family members. Here we show that mice lacking both PU.1 and SpiB in mature B cells do not generate germinal centers and high-affinity antibody after protein immunization. PU.1 and SpiB double-deficient B cells have a survival defect after engagement of CD40 or Toll-like receptors (TLR), despite paradoxically enhanced plasma cell differentiation. PU.1 and SpiB regulate the expression of many components of the B cell receptor signaling pathway and the receptors for CD40L, BAFF and TLR ligands. Thus, PU.1 and SpiB enable B cells to appropriately respond to environmental cues.

  12. A novel approach for modeling the cluster detector and the SPI spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kshetri, Ritesh

    2013-01-01

    Using available experimental data on cluster detector, predictions for the peak-to-total ratio have been given for energy region having no direct experimental information about them. The predictions for the fold distribution are found to be in agreement with the experimental data. The formulation here does not include ad-hoc fits, but expressions that are justifiable by probability flow arguments. Instead of using an empirical method or simulation, a novel approach for calculating the peak-to-total ratio of the cluster detector and the SPI spectrometer for high gamma energies has been presented here. This could provide guidance in designing new composite detectors and in performing experimental studies with the SPI spectrometer for high energy gamma-rays

  13. Spatial and temporal analysis of drought in greece using the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livada, I.; Assimakopoulos, V. D.

    2007-07-01

    In the present study the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI) is used to detect drought events in spatial and temporal basis. Using monthly precipitation data from 23 stations well spread over Greece and for a period of 51 years, a classification of drought is performed, based on its intensity and duration. Results indicate that, mild and moderate droughts reduce from north to south and from west to east on the 3- and 6-months time scale, while for the class of severe drought, the frequencies in the southern part of Greece are higher than in the other parts of the country. Furthermore the frequency of occurrence of severe and extreme drought conditions is very low over the whole Greek territory on the 12-month running time scale. Finally SPI was compared to the “de Martonne aridity index (I)” and a satisfactory correlation between them was found.

  14. Exploring Managerial Commitment towards SPI in Small and Very Small Enterprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Rory V.; Basri, Shuib; Coleman, Gerry

    This paper compares and contrasts the results of two similar studies into the software process practices in Irish Small and Very Small Enterprises. The first study contains rich findings in relation to the role and influence of managerial experience and style, with particular respect to the company founder and software development managers in small to medium seized enterprises (SMEs), whilst the second study contains extensive findings in relation to people and management involvement / commitment and SPI goal planning in very small enterprises (VSEs). By combining these results of these two studies of Irish SMEs/VSEs we can develop a rich picture of managerial commitment towards SPI and in particular explore the similarities between Small and Very Small Enterprises.

  15. Observation of the decay $B_c^+ \\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^+$

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Oyanguren Campos, M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lohn, S; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Mcnab, A; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    The decay $B_c^+ \\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^+$ with $\\psi(2S) \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-$ is observed with a significance of $5.2\\,\\sigma$ using $pp$ collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.0 $fb^{-1}$ collected by the LHCb experiment. The branching fraction of $B_c^+ \\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^+$ decays relative to that of the $B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+$ mode is measured to be \\begin{equation*} \\frac{\\mathcal{B}(B_c^+ \\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^+)}{\\mathcal{B}(B_c^+ \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+)} = 0.250 \\pm 0.068 \\,\\text{stat} \\pm 0.014 \\,\\text{\\syst} \\pm 0.006 \\,(\\mathcal{B}). \\end{equation*} The last term is the uncertainty on the ratio $\\mathcal{B}(\\psi(2S) \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-)/\\mathcal{B}(J/\\psi \\to \\mu^+\\mu^-)$.

  16. Drought Forecasting by SPI Index and ANFIS Model Using Fuzzy C-mean Clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mehdi Komasi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Drought is the interaction between environment and water cycle in the world and affects natural environment of an area when it persists for a longer period. So, developing a suitable index to forecast the spatial and temporal distribution of drought plays an important role in the planning and management of natural resources and water resource systems. In this article, firstly, the drought concept and drought indexes were introduced and then the fuzzy neural networks and fuzzy C-mean clustering were applied to forecast drought via standardized precipitation index (SPI. The results of this research indicate that the SPI index is more capable than the other indexes such as PDSI (Palmer Drought Severity Index, PAI (Palfai Aridity Index and etc. in drought forecasting process. Moreover, application of adaptive nero-fuzzy network accomplished by C-mean clustering has high efficiency in the drought forecasting.

  17. SPY: a new scission-point model based on microscopic inputs to predict fission fragment properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panebianco, Stefano; Lemaître, Jean-Francois; Sida, Jean-Luc [CEA Centre de Saclay, Gif-sur-Ivette (France); Dubray, Noëel [CEA, DAM, DIF, Arpajon (France); Goriely, Stephane [Institut d' Astronomie et d' Astrophisique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium)

    2014-07-01

    Despite the difficulty in describing the whole fission dynamics, the main fragment characteristics can be determined in a static approach based on a so-called scission-point model. Within this framework, a new Scission-Point model for the calculations of fission fragment Yields (SPY) has been developed. This model, initially based on the approach developed by Wilkins in the late seventies, consists in performing a static energy balance at scission, where the two fragments are supposed to be completely separated so that their macroscopic properties (mass and charge) can be considered as fixed. Given the knowledge of the system state density, averaged quantities such as mass and charge yields, mean kinetic and excitation energy can then be extracted in the framework of a microcanonical statistical description. The main advantage of the SPY model is the introduction of one of the most up-to-date microscopic descriptions of the nucleus for the individual energy of each fragment and, in the future, for their state density. These quantities are obtained in the framework of HFB calculations using the Gogny nucleon-nucleon interaction, ensuring an overall coherence of the model. Starting from a description of the SPY model and its main features, a comparison between the SPY predictions and experimental data will be discussed for some specific cases, from light nuclei around mercury to major actinides. Moreover, extensive predictions over the whole chart of nuclides will be discussed, with particular attention to their implication in stellar nucleosynthesis. Finally, future developments, mainly concerning the introduction of microscopic state densities, will be briefly discussed. (author)

  18. Development of SPIES (Space Intelligent Eyeing System) for smart vehicle tracing and tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Suzanah; Ariffin Osoman, Muhammad; Guan Liyong, Chua; Zulfadhli Mohd Noor, Mohd; Mohamed, Ikhwan

    2016-06-01

    SPIES or Space-based Intelligent Eyeing System is an intelligent technology which can be utilized for various applications such as gathering spatial information of features on Earth, tracking system for the movement of an object, tracing system to trace the history information, monitoring driving behavior, security and alarm system as an observer in real time and many more. SPIES as will be developed and supplied modularly will encourage the usage based on needs and affordability of users. SPIES are a complete system with camera, GSM, GPS/GNSS and G-Sensor modules with intelligent function and capabilities. Mainly the camera is used to capture pictures and video and sometimes with audio of an event. Its usage is not limited to normal use for nostalgic purpose but can be used as a reference for security and material of evidence when an undesirable event such as crime occurs. When integrated with space based technology of the Global Navigational Satellite System (GNSS), photos and videos can be recorded together with positioning information. A product of the integration of these technologies when integrated with Information, Communication and Technology (ICT) and Geographic Information System (GIS) will produce innovation in the form of information gathering methods in still picture or video with positioning information that can be conveyed in real time via the web to display location on the map hence creating an intelligent eyeing system based on space technology. The importance of providing global positioning information is a challenge but overcome by SPIES even in areas without GNSS signal reception for the purpose of continuous tracking and tracing capability

  19. Nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler supplementary testing - AEAT doc 2926-2-002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REICH, F.R.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of cold testing, completed by AEAT, as part of the proof-of-principle testing for a proposed nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampling system. This sampling system will provide waste samples from the PHMC feed tank to support the privatization contract with BNFL. Proof-of-principle tests were completed with 2 wt% and 10 wt% sand/water and 25 wt% kaolin clay/water simulants with a test setup that spanned the 24 ft to 57 ft height required in the feed tank. The tests demonstrated that the system could pump and sample waste materials with low and with high solids content. In addition, the tests demonstrated a need for some design upgrades to the sampling system, as there was material loss when the sample bottle was removed from the sampling needle. These were complementary tests, completed as part of an EM-50 Tank Focus Area (TFA) to develop a sampling system for validating LAW and HLW waste batches for the Privatization Contract

  20. Nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampler supplementary testing - AEAT doc 2926-2-002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REICH, F.R.

    1999-03-11

    This report summarizes the results of cold testing, completed by AEAT, as part of the proof-of-principle testing for a proposed nested, fixed-depth fluidic sampling system. This sampling system will provide waste samples from the PHMC feed tank to support the privatization contract with BNFL. Proof-of-principle tests were completed with 2 wt% and 10 wt% sand/water and 25 wt% kaolin clay/water simulants with a test setup that spanned the 24 ft to 57 ft height required in the feed tank. The tests demonstrated that the system could pump and sample waste materials with low and with high solids content. In addition, the tests demonstrated a need for some design upgrades to the sampling system, as there was material loss when the sample bottle was removed from the sampling needle. These were complementary tests, completed as part of an EM-50 Tank Focus Area (TFA) to develop a sampling system for validating LAW and HLW waste batches for the Privatization Contract.

  1. Characterization of the SPI-1 and Rsp type three secretion systems in Pseudomonas fluorescens F113.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Matthieu; Egan, Frank; Moynihan, Jennifer; Morrissey, John P; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; O'Gara, Fergal

    2013-06-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens F113 is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) isolated from the sugar beet rhizosphere. The recent annotation of the F113 genome sequence has revealed that this strain encodes a wide array of secretion systems, including two complete type three secretion systems (T3SSs) belonging to the Hrp1 and SPI-1 families. While Hrp1 T3SSs are frequently encoded in other P. fluorescens strains, the presence of a SPI-1 T3SS in a plant-beneficial bacterial strain was unexpected. In this work, the genetic organization and expression of these two T3SS loci have been analysed by a combination of transcriptional reporter fusions and transcriptome analyses. Overexpression of two transcriptional activators has shown a number of genes encoding putative T3 effectors. In addition, the influence of these two T3SSs during the interaction of P. fluorescens F113 with some bacterial predators was also assessed. Our data revealed that the transcriptional activator hilA is induced by amoeba and that the SPI-1 T3SS could potentially be involved in resistance to amoeboid grazing. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Application of the SPI (Saliva Precipitation Index) to the evaluation of red wine astringency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, Alessandra; Gambuti, Angelita; Moio, Luigi

    2012-12-15

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the astringency of red wines by means of a SDS-PAGE based-method. The optimization of the in vitro assay, named SPI (Saliva Precipitation Index) that measured the reactivity of salivary proteins towards wine polyphenols, has been performed. Improvements included the choice of saliva:wine ratio, saliva typology (resting or stimulated saliva), and temperature of binding. The LOD (0.05 g/L of condensed tannin) and LOQ (0.1g/L of condensed tannin) for the binding reaction between salivary proteins and tannins added in white wine were also determined. Fifty-seven red wines were analysed by the optimised SPI, the Folin-Ciocalteu Index, the gelatine index, the content of total tannins and the sensory quantitative evaluation of astringency. A significant correlation between the SPI and the astringency of red wines was found (R(2)=0.969), thus indicating that this assay may be useful as estimator of astringency. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. SpyRing interrogation: analyzing how enzyme resilience can be achieved with phytase and distinct cyclization chemistries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoene, Christopher; Bennett, S. Paul; Howarth, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes catalyze reactions with exceptional selectivity and rate acceleration but are often limited by instability. Towards a generic route to thermo-resilience, we established the SpyRing approach, cyclizing enzymes by sandwiching between SpyTag and SpyCatcher (peptide and protein partners which lock together via a spontaneous isopeptide bond). Here we first investigated the basis for this resilience, comparing alternative reactive peptide/protein pairs we engineered from Gram-positive bacteria. Both SnoopRing and PilinRing cyclization gave dramatic enzyme resilience, but SpyRing cyclization was the best. Differential scanning calorimetry for each ring showed that cyclization did not inhibit unfolding of the inserted β-lactamase. Cyclization conferred resilience even at 100 °C, where the cyclizing domains themselves were unfolded. Phytases hydrolyze phytic acid and improve dietary absorption of phosphate and essential metal ions, important for agriculture and with potential against human malnutrition. SpyRing phytase (PhyC) resisted aggregation and retained catalytic activity even following heating at 100 °C. In addition, SpyRing cyclization made it possible to purify phytase simply by heating the cell lysate, to drive aggregation of non-cyclized proteins. Cyclization via domains forming spontaneous isopeptide bonds is a general strategy to generate resilient enzymes and may extend the range of conditions for isolation and application of enzymes. PMID:26861173

  4. Pore Water Extraction Test Near 241-SX Tank Farm at the Hanford Site, Washington, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberlein, Susan J.; Parker, Danny L.; Tabor, Cynthia L.; Holm, Melissa J.

    2013-01-01

    A proof-of-principle test is underway near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. The test will evaluate a potential remediation technology that will use tank farm-deployable equipment to remove contaminated pore water from vadose zone soils. The test system was designed and built to address the constraints of working within a tank farm. Due to radioactive soil contamination and limitations in drilling near tanks, small-diameter direct push drilling techniques applicable to tank farms are being utilized for well placement. To address space and weight limitations in working around tanks and obstacles within tank farms, the above ground portions of the test system have been constructed to allow deployment flexibility. The test system utilizes low vacuum over a sealed well screen to establish flow into an extraction well. Extracted pore water is collected in a well sump,and then pumped to the surface using a small-diameter bladder pump.If pore water extraction using this system can be successfully demonstrated, it may be possible to target local contamination in the vadose zone around underground storage tanks. It is anticipated that the results of this proof-of-principle test will support future decision making regarding interim and final actions for soil contamination within the tank farms

  5. Aqueous ethanol extraction of dietary soy protein isolate improves 59Fe absorption by the rat from a casein-based test meal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    A commercial soy protein isolate (SPI) was further processed in an attempt to understand how a diet based on SPI can cause decreased iron retention by the rat from a separately administered casein-based test meal. Groups of eight rats were fed either a casein-based diet or a diet based on SPI. The acid-precipitated SPI was incorporated into diets as such, after neutralization, after 60% (v/v) ethanol extraction and neutralization, or after 60% ethanol exposure and neutralization. All dietary SPI was heat-treated by exposure to steam at 108 degrees C for 30 min. Rats were fed their respective diets, each containing 25 mg Fe/kg, for 13 d, and then all rats were fed a 59 Fe-radiolabeled 2.5-g casein test meal containing 64 micrograms of iron. Ingested radioactivity was determined following the meal, and retained radioactivity over the subsequent 10-d period. Absorption was not distinguishable for groups fed the casein-based (78.3 ± 3.6%) and the ethanol-extracted, SPI-based diet (80.2 ± 5.4%). Absorption was lower (P less than 0.01) for groups fed each of the other SPI-based diets: SPI as such (68.3 ± 8.9%), neutralized SPI (69.8 ± 5.0%) and ethanol-exposed SPI (67.6 ± 4.8%). An ethanol-extractable component of SPI may be responsible for decreased iron absorption by animals fed SPI prior to a radiolabeled test meal

  6. Gas cooled fast reactor control rod drive mechanism deceleration unit. Test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, T.H.

    1981-10-01

    This report presents the results of the airtesting portion of the proof-of-principle testing of a Control Rod Scram Deceleration Device developed for use in the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR). The device utilizes a grooved flywheel to decelerate the translating assembly (T/A). Two cam followers on the translating assembly travel in the flywheel grooves and transfer the energy of the T/A to the flywheel. The grooves in the flywheel are straight for most of the flywheel length. Near the bottom of the T/A stroke the grooves are spiraled in a decreasing slope helix so that the cam followers accelerate the flywheel as they transfer the energy of the falling T/A. To expedite proof-of-principle testing, some of the materials used in the fabrication of certain test article components were not prototypic. With these exceptions the concept appears to be acceptable. The initial test of 300 scrams was completed with only one failure and the failure was that of a non-prototypic cam follower outer sleeve material

  7. Canine status epilepticus treated with fosphenytoin: A proof of principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Edward E; Leppik, Ilo E; Coles, Lisa D; Podell, Michael; Vite, Charles H; Bush, William; Cloyd, James C

    2015-06-01

    There are a limited number of marketed intravenous antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) available to treat status epilepticus (SE). All were first developed for chronic therapy of epilepsy, not specifically for SE. Epilepsy and canine SE (CSE) occur naturally in dogs, with prevalence, presentation, and percentage of refractory cases similar to human epilepsy. The objective of this study was to determine if CSE treated with fosphenytoin (FOS) results in a similar responder rate as for people. A randomized clinical trial was performed for dogs with CSE. Dogs who presented during a seizure or who had additional seizures after enrolling received intravenous (i.v.) benzodiazepine (BZD) followed immediately by intravenous infusion of 15 mg/kg phenytoin equivalent (PE) of fosphenytoin (FOS) or saline placebo (PBO). If seizures continued, additional AEDs were administered per the standard of care for veterinary patients. Total and unbound plasma phenytoin (PHT) concentrations were measured. Consent was obtained for 50 dogs with CSE. Thirty-one had additional motor seizures and were randomized to the study intervention (22 FOS and 9 PBO). There was a statistically significant difference in the 12 h responder rate, with 63% in the FOS group versus 22% in the placebo group (p = 0.043) having no further seizures. The unbound PHT concentrations at 30 and 60 min were within the therapeutic concentrations for people (1-2 μg/ml) with the exception of one dog. There was mild vomiting in 36% of the FOS group (7/22) within 20 min of FOS administration and none of the placebo group (0/9) (p = 0.064). This proof of concept study provides the first evidence that FOS is tolerated and effective in canine SE at PHT concentrations clinically relevant for human SE. Furthermore, naturally occurring CSE can be utilized as a translational platform for future studies of novel SE compounds. © 2015 The Authors. Epilepsia published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International League Against Epilepsy.

  8. Semi-automatic assessment of skin capillary density: proof of principle and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronenschild, E H B M; Muris, D M J; Schram, M T; Karaca, U; Stehouwer, C D A; Houben, A J H M

    2013-11-01

    Skin capillary density and recruitment have been proven to be relevant measures of microvascular function. Unfortunately, the assessment of skin capillary density from movie files is very time-consuming, since this is done manually. This impedes the use of this technique in large-scale studies. We aimed to develop a (semi-) automated assessment of skin capillary density. CapiAna (Capillary Analysis) is a newly developed semi-automatic image analysis application. The technique involves four steps: 1) movement correction, 2) selection of the frame range and positioning of the region of interest (ROI), 3) automatic detection of capillaries, and 4) manual correction of detected capillaries. To gain insight into the performance of the technique, skin capillary density was measured in twenty participants (ten women; mean age 56.2 [42-72] years). To investigate the agreement between CapiAna and the classic manual counting procedure, we used weighted Deming regression and Bland-Altman analyses. In addition, intra- and inter-observer coefficients of variation (CVs), and differences in analysis time were assessed. We found a good agreement between CapiAna and the classic manual method, with a Pearson's correlation coefficient (r) of 0.95 (Pdifferences between the two methods, with an intercept of the Deming regression of 1.75 (-6.04; 9.54), while the Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference (bias) of 2.0 (-13.5; 18.4) capillaries/mm(2). The intra- and inter-observer CVs of CapiAna were 2.5% and 5.6% respectively, while for the classic manual counting procedure these were 3.2% and 7.2%, respectively. Finally, the analysis time for CapiAna ranged between 25 and 35min versus 80 and 95min for the manual counting procedure. We have developed a semi-automatic image analysis application (CapiAna) for the assessment of skin capillary density, which agrees well with the classic manual counting procedure, is time-saving, and has a better reproducibility as compared to the classic manual counting procedure. As a result, the use of skin capillaroscopy is feasible in large-scale studies, which importantly extends the possibilities to perform microcirculation research in humans. © 2013.

  9. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume II. Toroidal vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The Toroidal Vessel provides the vacuum enclosure for containing the high temperature steady state plasma. In addition, the Toroidal Vessel must provide several viewing ports for plasma diagnostics, vacuum pumping ports for both high vacuum and roughing vacuum, feed-through ports for ECRH waveguides, limiter feed throughs for cooling and supporting the limiters, and ports for ion gages. The vessel must operate in an intense environment comprised of x-rays, microwaves, magnetic fields and plasma heat loads as well as the atmosphere pressure and gravity loads and the internal thermal stress loads due to heating and cooling of the torus. A key issue addressed was the choice of vacuum vessel seal and wall materials. In addition, during the course of the study, ORNL requested that horsecollar diagnostic ports be incorporated in the design. A comprehensive trade study was performed considering the vessel material issues in concert with the impact of the horsecollar port design. A change in baseline from an aluminum vessel with elastomer seals and circular diagnostic ports to austenitic stainless steel vessel with metal seals and horsecollar ports was agreed upon by both MDAC and ORNL towards the end of Title I

  10. Placebo in sports nutrition: a proof-of-principle study involving caffeine supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, B; de Oliveira, L F; da Silva, R P; de Salles Painelli, V; Gonçalves, L S; Yamaguchi, G; Mutti, T; Maciel, E; Roschel, H; Artioli, G G; Gualano, B

    2017-11-01

    We investigated the effects of supplement identification on exercise performance with caffeine supplementation. Forty-two trained cyclists (age 37 ± 8 years, body mass [BM] 74.3 ± 8.4 kg, height 1.76 ± 0.06 m, maximum oxygen uptake 50.0 ± 6.8 mL/kg/min) performed a ~30 min cycling time-trial 1 h following either 6 mg/kgBM caffeine (CAF) or placebo (PLA) supplementation and one control (CON) session without supplementation. Participants identified which supplement they believed they had ingested ("caffeine", "placebo", "don't know") pre- and post-exercise. Subsequently, participants were allocated to subgroups for analysis according to their identifications. Overall and subgroup analyses were performed using mixed-model and magnitude-based inference analyses. Caffeine improved performance vs PLA and CON (P ≤ 0.001). Correct pre- and post-exercise identification of caffeine in CAF improved exercise performance (+4.8 and +6.5%) vs CON, with slightly greater relative increases than the overall effect of caffeine (+4.1%). Performance was not different between PLA and CON within subgroups (all P > 0.05), although there was a tendency toward improved performance when participants believed they had ingested caffeine post-exercise (P = 0.06; 87% likely beneficial). Participants who correctly identified placebo in PLA showed possible harmful effects on performance compared to CON. Supplement identification appeared to influence exercise outcome and may be a source of bias in sports nutrition. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging of the active second stage of labour: Proof of principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guettler, F.V.; Heinrich, A.; Rump, J.; Bucourt, M. de; Hamm, B.; Teichgraeber, U.K.; Schnackenburg, B.; Bamberg, C.

    2012-01-01

    To prove that magnetic resonance imaging of foetal anatomy during the active second stage of vaginal delivery is feasible. Initially, five pregnant volunteers around the 30th week of gestation were examined in an open MRI. Based on the findings, one vaginal delivery was acquired under real-time imaging. To monitor the birth status during image acquisition, an MR-compatible wireless cardiotocography (CTG) system was built. Single-shot sequence parameters were optimised to compensate motion artefacts during labour. Safety requirements to monitor the birth process under real-time MR imaging were met. High-resolution MR images were acquired immediately before and after delivery. In one patient, TSE single-shot cinematic sequences of the active second stage of labour were obtained. All sequences were adapted to tolerate movement of the mother and infant, as well as residual noise from the CTG. Furthermore, the MR imaging during labour showed only minor image artefacts. CTG-monitored acquisition of MRI series during the active second stage of delivery is feasible. Image quality should allow various further studies to improve models for birth simulation as well as potential investigation of obstructed labour and obstetric complications. (orig.)

  12. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle. Phase II - title 1 report. Volume I. Device summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, D.W.

    1982-02-01

    This document presents a summary of the EBT-P Preliminary Design (Title I) effort. The work was performed, under the direction of ORNL, for the Department of Energy by MDAC-St. Louis. Major subcontractors assisting MDAC included General Dynamics for the magnet system, Gilbert Associates for the device utilities and facility architecture and engineering, and Lockheed - Oak Ridge for engineering support services. The Title I period of performance was from 1 October 1980 to 1 March 1982

  13. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume VII. Cryogenic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poteat, T.J.

    1982-01-01

    This document, Volume VII EBT-P Cryogenic System Title I Design Report, describes the system that resulted from the Title I Preliminary Design effort. It is a self-contained document that can be read apart from the other Volumes comprising the EBT-P Title I Report. This document is a contract deliverable item and provides the detail necessary to support the Cryogenic System design contained in the EBT-P Baseline Design Data Book

  14. Proof-of-principle measurements for an NDA-based core discharge monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbig, J.K.; Monticone, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    The feasibility of using nondestructive assay instruments as a core discharge monitor for CANDU reactors was investigated at the Ontario Hydro Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A, Unit 3, in Ontario, Canada. The measurements were made to determine if radiation signatures from discharged irradiated fuel could be measured unambiguously and used to count the number of fuel pushes from a reactor face. Detectors using the (γ,n) reaction thresholds of beryllium and deuterium collected the data, but data from shielded and unshielded ion chambers were collected as well. The detectors were placed on a fueling trolley that carried the fueling machine between the reactors and the central service area. A microprocessor-based electronics system (the GRAND-I, which also resided on the trolley) provided detector biases and preamplifier power and acquired and transferred the data. It was connected by an RS-232 serial link to a lap-top computer adjacent to the fueling control console in the main-reactor control room. The lap-top computer collected and archived the data on a 3.5-in. floppy disk. The results clearly showed such an approach to be a adaptable as a core discharge monitor. 4 refs., 8 figs

  15. Proof of Principle for Active Detection of Fissionable Material Using Intense, Pulsed-Bremsstrahlung-Induced Photofission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-07

    September 2012 Defense Threat Reduction Agency 8725 John Kingman Road Ft. Belvoir, VA 22060 Office of Naval Research One Liberty Center 875 North...from cosmic rays) can accumulate with long measurement time. An alternative to the linac approach relies on the use of TW-level pulsed-power...Without their considerable effort, this work would not have been possible. This work was funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Office of

  16. Mathematical and empirical proof of principle for an on-body personal lift augmentation device (PLAD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdoli-Eramaki, Mohammad; Stevenson, Joan M; Reid, Susan A; Bryant, Timothy J

    2007-01-01

    In our laboratory, we have developed a prototype of a personal lift augmentation device (PLAD) that can be worn by workers during manual handling tasks involving lifting or lowering or static holding in symmetric and asymmetric postures. Our concept was to develop a human-speed on-body assistive device that would reduce the required lumbar moment by 20-30% without negative consequences on other joints or lifting kinematics. This paper provides mathematical proof using simplified free body diagrams and two-dimensional moment balance equations. Empirical proof is also provided based on lifting trials with nine male subjects who executed sagittal plane lifts using three lifting styles (stoop, squat, free) and three different loads (5, 15, and 25kg) under two conditions (PLAD, No-PLAD). Nine Fastrak sensors and six in-line strap force sensors were used to estimate the reduction of compressive and shear forces on L4/L5 as well as estimate the forces transferred to the shoulders and knees. Depending on lifting technique, the PLAD applied an added 23-36Nm of torque to assist the back muscles during lifting tasks. The peak pelvic girdle contact forces were estimated and their magnitudes ranged from 221.3+/-11.2N for stoop lifting, 324.3+/-17.2N for freestyle lifts to 468.47+/-23.2N for squat lifting. The PLAD was able to reduce the compression and shear forces about 23-29% and 7.9-8.5%, respectively.

  17. Shutting down sensorimotor interferences after stroke: A proof-of-principle SMR neurofeedback study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Louise Reichert

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neurofeedback training aims at learning self-regulation of brain activity underlying cognitive, emotional or physiological functions. Despite of promising investigations on neurofeedback as a tool for cognitive rehabilitation in neurological diseases, such as after stroke, there is still a lack of research on feasibility and efficiency of neurofeedback in this field. Methods: The present study aimed at investigating behavioral and electrophysiological effects of 10 sessions of sensorimotor rhythm (SMR neurofeedback in a 74-year-old stroke patient (UG20. Based on previous results in healthy young participants, we hypothesized that SMR neurofeedback leads to a decrease in sensorimotor interferences and improved stimulus processing, reflected by changes in event-related potentials and electrophysiological coherence. To assess whether UG20 benefited from the training as much as healthy persons of a similar age, a healthy control group of N = 10 elderly persons was trained as well. Before and after neurofeedback training, participants took part in a multichannel EEG measurement conducted during a nonverbal and a verbal learning task. Results: Both UG20 and the healthy controls were able to regulate their SMR activity during neurofeedback training. Moreover, in a nonverbal learning task, changes in event-related potentials and coherence were observed after training: UG20 showed a better performance in the nonverbal learning task and a higher P3 amplitude after training than before, and coherence between central and parietal electrodes decreased after training. The control group also showed a behavioral improvement in the nonverbal learning task and tendencies for higher P3 amplitudes and decreased central-parietal coherence after training. Single-case analyses indicated that the changes observed in UG20 were not smaller than the changes in healthy controls. Conclusions: Neurofeedback can be successfully applied in a stroke patient and in healthy elderly persons. We suggest that SMR neurofeedback leads to a shutting-down of sensorimotor interferences which benefits semantic encoding and retrieval.

  18. Boron neutron capture therapy for oral precancer: proof of principle in an experimental animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Monti Hughes; ECC Pozzi; S. Thorp; M. A. Garabalino; R. O. Farias; S. J. Gonzalez; E. M. Heber; M. E. Itoiz; R. F. Aromando; A. J. Molinari; M. Miller; D. W. Nigg; P. Curotto; V. A. Trivillin; A. E. Schwint

    2013-11-01

    Field-cancerized tissue can give rise to second primary tumours, causing therapeutic failure. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on biological targeting and would serve to treat undetectable foci of malignant transformation. The aim of this study was to optimize BNCT for the integral treatment for oral cancer, with particular emphasis on the inhibitory effect on tumour development originating in precancerous conditions, and radiotoxicity of different BNCT protocols in a hamster cheek pouch oral precancer model.

  19. Report on the Concept Review Committee recommendations for proof-of-principle alternate concept programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-03-01

    The report is organized as follows: Section II contains a discussion of the meeting procedures used on October 16--18, 1978, and the rules employed for technical consultants and advisors to the CRC. Section III contains a discussion of the CRC recommendations and some of the factors taken into consideration by the Committee. Section IV briefly discusses where do we go from here in DOE's alternate concepts program

  20. Defining Glioblastoma Resectability Through the Wisdom of the Crowd: A Proof-of-Principle Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonabend, Adam M; Zacharia, Brad E; Cloney, Michael B; Sonabend, Aarón; Showers, Christopher; Ebiana, Victoria; Nazarian, Matthew; Swanson, Kristin R; Baldock, Anne; Brem, Henry; Bruce, Jeffrey N; Butler, William; Cahill, Daniel P; Carter, Bob; Orringer, Daniel A; Roberts, David W; Sagher, Oren; Sanai, Nader; Schwartz, Theodore H; Silbergeld, Daniel L; Sisti, Michael B; Thompson, Reid C; Waziri, Allen E; McKhann, Guy

    2017-04-01

    Extent of resection (EOR) correlates with glioblastoma outcomes. Resectability and EOR depend on anatomical, clinical, and surgeon factors. Resectability likely influences outcome in and of itself, but an accurate measurement of resectability remains elusive. An understanding of resectability and the factors that influence it may provide a means to control a confounder in clinical trials and provide reference for decision making. To provide proof of concept of the use of the collective wisdom of experienced brain tumor surgeons in assessing glioblastoma resectability. We surveyed 13 academic tumor neurosurgeons nationwide to assess the resectability of newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Participants reviewed 20 cases, including digital imaging and communications in medicine-formatted pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance images and clinical vignettes. The selected cases involved a variety of anatomical locations and a range of EOR. Participants were asked about surgical goal, eg, gross total resection, subtotal resection (STR), or biopsy, and rationale for their decision. We calculated a "resectability index" for each lesion by pooling responses from all 13 surgeons. Neurosurgeons' individual surgical goals varied significantly ( P = .015), but the resectability index calculated from the surgeons' pooled responses was strongly correlated with the percentage of contrast-enhancing residual tumor ( R = 0.817, P < .001). The collective STR goal predicted intraoperative decision of intentional STR documented on operative notes ( P < .01) and nonresectable residual ( P < .01), but not resectable residual. In this pilot study, we demonstrate the feasibility of measuring the resectability of glioblastoma through crowdsourcing. This tool could be used to quantify resectability, a potential confounder in neuro-oncology clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 by the Congress of Neurological Surgeons

  1. Shutting Down Sensorimotor Interferences after Stroke: A Proof-of-Principle SMR Neurofeedback Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Johanna L.; Kober, Silvia E.; Schweiger, Daniela; Grieshofer, Peter; Neuper, Christa; Wood, Guilherme

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Neurofeedback training aims at learning self-regulation of brain activity underlying cognitive, emotional or physiological functions. Despite of promising investigations on neurofeedback as a tool for cognitive rehabilitation in neurological diseases, such as after stroke, there is still a lack of research on feasibility and efficiency of neurofeedback in this field. Methods: The present study aimed at investigating behavioral and electrophysiological effects of 10 sessions of sensorimotor rhythm (SMR) neurofeedback in a 74-years-old stroke patient (UG20). Based on previous results in healthy young participants, we hypothesized that SMR neurofeedback leads to a decrease in sensorimotor interferences and improved stimulus processing, reflected by changes in event-related potentials (ERPs) and electrophysiological coherence. To assess whether UG20 benefited from the training as much as healthy persons of a similar age, a healthy control group of N = 10 elderly persons was trained as well. Before and after neurofeedback training, participants took part in a multichannel electroencephalography measurement conducted during a non-verbal and a verbal learning task. Results: Both UG20 and the healthy controls were able to regulate their SMR activity during neurofeedback training. Moreover, in a non-verbal learning task, changes in ERPs and coherence were observed after training: UG20 showed a better performance in the non-verbal learning task and a higher P3 amplitude after training than before, and coherence between central and parietal electrodes decreased after training. The control group also showed a behavioral improvement in the non-verbal learning task and tendencies for higher P3 amplitudes and decreased central-parietal coherence after training. Single-case analyses indicated that the changes observed in UG20 were not smaller than the changes in healthy controls. Conclusion: Neurofeedback can be successfully applied in a stroke patient and in healthy elderly persons. We suggest that SMR neurofeedback leads to a shutting-down of sensorimotor interferences which benefits semantic encoding and retrieval. PMID:27471456

  2. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume VIII. Device utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, D.T.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the activities conducted during the Preliminary Design Period for the Device Utilities Systems. All GAI preliminary specifications, drawings, and reports (listed in Section 4.0) have been transmitted to ORNL for review and approval. Device Utility Systems Descriptions are also presented in Section 4.0. The GAI Device Enclosure Gamma Radiation Analysis is presented in Appendix B. Pending design criteria revisions are described in Section 6.0. A type B Change Notice Request (CNR) has been transmitted to GAI. The Type B CNR authorizes cost and schedule assessment for each revision identified. Formal Proposed Design Changes (PDC's) will be provided to ORNL when this data is available

  3. A novel method for passing cerebrospinal fluid shunt tubing: a proof of principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubbs, R Shane; Goodrich, Dylan; Tubbs, Isaiah; Loukas, Marios; Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A

    2014-12-01

    Few innovations in the method of tunneling shunt tubing for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunt diversion have been made since this treatment of hydrocephalus was first developed. Therefore, this feasibility study was performed with the hope of identifying an improved technique that could potentially carry fewer complications. On 10 cadaver sides and when placed in the supine position, small skin incisions were made at the clavicle and ipsilateral subcostal region, and magnets were used to pass standard shunt tubing between the two incisions. Nickel-plated magnets were less effective in pulling the shunt tubing below the skin compared with ceramic magnets. Of these, magnets with pull strengths of 150-200 lbs were the most effective in dragging the subcutaneous tubing between the two incisions. No obvious damage to the skin from the overlying magnet was seen in any specimen. Few options exist for tunneling distal shunt tubing for CSF shunt procedures. Future patient studies are needed to determine if the technique described herein is superior to current methods, particularly when examining patient groups that are at a greater risk for injury during tunneling shunt catheters.

  4. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume IX. Support structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conlee, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    The EBT-P support structure provides structural support for the 36 mirror coil magnets, magnet protection system, the toroidal vessel, and much of the device ancillary equipment. The structure is comprised of a primary support and a superstructure. The primary support is a reinforced concrete ring located directly inboard of the torus and is supported by nine columns. The toroidal vessel and the mirror coil magnets are cantilevered from the ring with the centerline of the torus located eight feet above the floor. The superstructure is an aluminum truss structure that rests on the concrete ring. The superstructure provides support for the device ancillary equipment. Engineering drawings of the support structure are given

  5. Cellular telephones measure activity and lifespace in community-dwelling adults: proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Ana Katrin; Witbrodt, Bradley C; Hoarty, Carrie A; Carlson, Richard H; Goulding, Evan H; Potter, Jane F; Bonasera, Stephen J

    2011-02-01

    To describe a system that uses off-the-shelf sensor and telecommunication technologies to continuously measure individual lifespace and activity levels in a novel way. Proof of concept involving three field trials of 30, 30, and 21 days. Omaha, Nebraska, metropolitan and surrounding rural region. Three participants (48-year-old man, 33-year-old woman, and 27-year-old male), none with any functional limitations. Cellular telephones were used to detect in-home position and in-community location and to measure physical activity. Within the home, cellular telephones and Bluetooth transmitters (beacons) were used to locate participants at room-level resolution. Outside the home, the same cellular telephones and global positioning system (GPS) technology were used to locate participants at a community-level resolution. Physical activity was simultaneously measured using the cellular telephone accelerometer. This approach had face validity to measure activity and lifespace. More importantly, this system could measure the spatial and temporal organization of these metrics. For example, an individual's lifespace was automatically calculated across multiple time intervals. Behavioral time budgets showing how people allocate time to specific regions within the home were also automatically generated. Mobile monitoring shows much promise as an easily deployed system to quantify activity and lifespace, important indicators of function, in community-dwelling adults. © 2011, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Conductive plastic film electrodes for Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) treatment : A proof of principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roodenburg, B.; Haan, S.W.H. de; Boxtel, L.B.J. van; Hatt, V.; Wouters, P.C.; Coronel, P.; Ferreira, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays Pulsed Electric Field (PEF) treatment of food needs to be performed prior to packaging, either hygienic or aseptic packaging is necessary. New techniques for PEF treatment after packaging can be considered when plastic conductive (film) electrodes can be integrated within the package, so

  7. A proof-of-principle for frequency-domain vibration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mobley, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    The economic and regulatory pressures on operating utilities to improve efficiency, availability, and reliability and to extend the effective operating life of existing electric power generating plants have created a real need for instrumentation, systems, and programs that can monitor, analyze, and provide the means to correct incipient machine and process problems. Predictive maintenance programs, properly utilized, can be one key to achieving these goals. Recent developments in microprocessor technology have provided the ability to routinely monitor the actual mechanical condition of all rotating and reciprocating machinery and process variables (i.e., pressure, temperature, flow, etc.) of other process equipment within an operating electric power generating plant. This direct correlation between frequency-domain vibration and actual mechanical condition of machinery and trending process variables of nonrotating equipment can provide the key to improving availability, reliability, and thermal efficiency and can provide the baseline information necessary for developing a realistic plan for extending the useful life of power plants. The premise of utilizing microprocessor-based predictive maintenance to improve power plant operation has been proven by a number of utilities

  8. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume VIII. Device utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, D.T.

    1982-02-26

    This report describes the activities conducted during the Preliminary Design Period for the Device Utilities Systems. All GAI preliminary specifications, drawings, and reports (listed in Section 4.0) have been transmitted to ORNL for review and approval. Device Utility Systems Descriptions are also presented in Section 4.0. The GAI Device Enclosure Gamma Radiation Analysis is presented in Appendix B. Pending design criteria revisions are described in Section 6.0. A type B Change Notice Request (CNR) has been transmitted to GAI. The Type B CNR authorizes cost and schedule assessment for each revision identified. Formal Proposed Design Changes (PDC's) will be provided to ORNL when this data is available.

  9. Genetic Epidemiology of Polyautoimmunity and Common Autoimmunity in Colombia — Proof of Principle

    OpenAIRE

    Castiblanco Quinche, John Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: Las enfermedades autoinmunes (EA) son responsables de una gran porción de discapacidad y morbilidad a nivel mundial. Generalmente, las investigaciones científicas se centran en una sola enfermedad, aunque los fenotipos autoinmunes podrían estar representados por efectos pleiotrópicos en genes no-específicos al presentar mecanismos inmunogenéticos similares. Múltiples casos de una sola enfermedad dentro de familia son evidentes, y aún más sorprendente son los individuos en aquell...

  10. Proof-of-principle that a decoy virus protects oncolytic measles virus against neutralizing antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Xu C; Goß AV; Dorneburg C; Debatin KM; Wei J; Beltinger C

    2018-01-01

    Chun Xu,1,2,* Annika Verena Goß,1,* Carmen Dorneburg,1 Klaus-Michael Debatin,1 Jiwu Wei,2 Christian Beltinger1 1Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Section of Experimental Pediatric Oncology, University Medical Center Ulm, Ulm, Germany; 2Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Medicine, Medical School of Nanjing University, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Attenuated oncolytic measles virus (OMV) is a promising antitumor agent in early-phase cl...

  11. Human genetics of infectious diseases: between proof of principle and paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Alcaïs, Alexandre; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2009-01-01

    The observation that only a fraction of individuals infected by infectious agents develop clinical disease raises fundamental questions about the actual pathogenesis of infectious diseases. Epidemiological and experimental evidence is accumulating to suggest that human genetics plays a major role in this process. As we discuss here, human predisposition to infectious diseases seems to cover a continuous spectrum from monogenic to polygenic inheritance. Although many studies have provided proo...

  12. Higher-level fusion for military operations based on abductive inference: proof of principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleev, Aleksandar V.; Josephson, John

    2006-04-01

    The ability of contemporary military commanders to estimate and understand complicated situations already suffers from information overload, and the situation can only grow worse. We describe a prototype application that uses abductive inferencing to fuse information from multiple sensors to evaluate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses that are close to the levels of abstraction needed for decision making (approximately JDL levels 2 and 3). Abductive inference (abduction, inference to the best explanation) is a pattern of reasoning that occurs naturally in diverse settings such as medical diagnosis, criminal investigations, scientific theory formation, and military intelligence analysis. Because abduction is part of common-sense reasoning, implementations of it can produce reasoning traces that are very human understandable. Automated abductive inferencing can be deployed to augment human reasoning, taking advantage of computation to process large amounts of information, and to bypass limits to human attention and short-term memory. We illustrate the workings of the prototype system by describing an example of its use for small-unit military operations in an urban setting. Knowledge was encoded as it might be captured prior to engagement from a standard military decision making process (MDMP) and analysis of commander's priority intelligence requirements (PIR). The system is able to reasonably estimate the evidence for higher-level hypotheses based on information from multiple sensors. Its inference processes can be examined closely to verify correctness. Decision makers can override conclusions at any level and changes will propagate appropriately.

  13. Peptide bond detection via graphene nanogaps: a proof of principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Aldo Eugenio; Gala, Fabrizio; Chinappi, Mauro; Zollo, Giuseppe

    2018-03-29

    Solid-state nanopores and nanogaps are emerging as promising tools for single molecule analysis. 2D materials, such as graphene, can potentially reach the spatial resolution needed for nucleic acid and protein sequencing. In the context of the density functional theory, atomistic modeling and non-equilibrium Green's function calculation, we show that glycine based polypeptide chains translocating across a nano-gap between two semi-infinite graphene nano-ribbons leave a specific transverse current signature for each peptide bond. The projected density of states and bond current analyses reveal a complex scenario with a role played by the adjacent α-carbons and side chains and by the orbitals of the partially resonant double bond involving C, N and O atoms of the peptide bond. In this context, specific fingerprints of the atoms involved in the peptide bonds are found. The same scenario is evidenced also for peptides involving alanine residues. The signal measured can be considered as a specific fingerprint of peptide bonds between small and neutral amino acids with no polar/charge effects. On this basis, a newly conceived nano-device made of a graphene based array of nano-gap is proposed as a possible route to approach peptide sequencing with atomic resolution.

  14. A proof-of-principle experiment of a novel harmonics separation optics for synchrotron facilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oberta, Peter; Mikulík, P.; Hrdý, Jaromír

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 6 (2012), s. 1012-1014 ISSN 0909-0495 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : harmonics separation * diffractive-refractive optics * nclined geometry Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.186, year: 2012

  15. Proton-counting radiography for proton therapy: a proof of principle using CMOS APS technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poludniowski, G; Esposito, M; Evans, P M; Allinson, N M; Anaxagoras, T; Green, S; Parker, D J; Price, T; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J

    2014-01-01

    Despite the early recognition of the potential of proton imaging to assist proton therapy (Cormack 1963 J. Appl. Phys. 34 2722), the modality is still removed from clinical practice, with various approaches in development. For proton-counting radiography applications such as computed tomography (CT), the water-equivalent-path-length that each proton has travelled through an imaged object must be inferred. Typically, scintillator-based technology has been used in various energy/range telescope designs. Here we propose a very different alternative of using radiation-hard CMOS active pixel sensor technology. The ability of such a sensor to resolve the passage of individual protons in a therapy beam has not been previously shown. Here, such capability is demonstrated using a 36 MeV cyclotron beam (University of Birmingham Cyclotron, Birmingham, UK) and a 200 MeV clinical radiotherapy beam (iThemba LABS, Cape Town, SA). The feasibility of tracking individual protons through multiple CMOS layers is also demonstrated using a two-layer stack of sensors. The chief advantages of this solution are the spatial discrimination of events intrinsic to pixelated sensors, combined with the potential provision of information on both the range and residual energy of a proton. The challenges in developing a practical system are discussed. (paper)

  16. Proton-counting radiography for proton therapy: a proof of principle using CMOS APS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poludniowski, G; Allinson, N M; Anaxagoras, T; Esposito, M; Green, S; Manolopoulos, S; Nieto-Camero, J; Parker, D J; Price, T; Evans, P M

    2014-06-07

    Despite the early recognition of the potential of proton imaging to assist proton therapy (Cormack 1963 J. Appl. Phys. 34 2722), the modality is still removed from clinical practice, with various approaches in development. For proton-counting radiography applications such as computed tomography (CT), the water-equivalent-path-length that each proton has travelled through an imaged object must be inferred. Typically, scintillator-based technology has been used in various energy/range telescope designs. Here we propose a very different alternative of using radiation-hard CMOS active pixel sensor technology. The ability of such a sensor to resolve the passage of individual protons in a therapy beam has not been previously shown. Here, such capability is demonstrated using a 36 MeV cyclotron beam (University of Birmingham Cyclotron, Birmingham, UK) and a 200 MeV clinical radiotherapy beam (iThemba LABS, Cape Town, SA). The feasibility of tracking individual protons through multiple CMOS layers is also demonstrated using a two-layer stack of sensors. The chief advantages of this solution are the spatial discrimination of events intrinsic to pixelated sensors, combined with the potential provision of information on both the range and residual energy of a proton. The challenges in developing a practical system are discussed.

  17. A new respiratory monitoring and processing system based on Wii remote: proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Y; Vedam, S; Gao, S; Balter, P

    2013-07-01

    To create a patient respiratory management system and patient self-practice tool using the Wii remote, a widely available consumer hardware product. The Wii remote (Wiimote) (Nintendo, Redmond, WA) contains an infrared (IR) camera that can track up to four spots whose coordinates are reported to a host computer via Bluetooth. The Wiimote is capable of tracking a fiducial box currently used by a commercial monitoring system [Real-time Position Management(TM) (RPM) system, Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA], if the correct IR source is used. The authors validated the Wiimote tracking by comparing the amplitude and frequency of signals among those reported by Wiimote with known movements from an inhouse servo-driven respiratory simulator, as well as with those measured using the RPM. The simulator comparison was done using standard sinusoid signals with amplitude of 2.0 cm as well as recorded patient respiratory traces. The RPM comparisons were done by simultaneously recording the RPM reflective box position with the Wiimote and the RPM. Timing was compared between these two systems by using the digital beam-on signal from the CT scanner, for the 4DCT to synchronize these acquisitions. The data acquisition rate from the Wiimote was 100.0 ± 0.4 Hz with a version 2.1 Bluetooth adaptor. The standard deviation of the height of the motion extrema was 0.06 and 1.1 mm when comparing those measured by the Wiimote and the servomotor encoder for standard sinusoid signal and prerecorded patient respiratory signal, respectively. The standard deviation of the amplitude of motion extrema between the Wiimote and RPM was 0.9 mm and the timing difference was 253 ms. The performance of Wiimote shows promise for respiratory monitoring for its faster sampling rate as well as the potential optical and GPU abilities. If used with care it can deliver reasonable spatial and temporal accuracy.

  18. Power potential and the energy in the Spiš region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Major Michal

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The contribution is a short review of the energy power information about three districts: Spišská Nová Ves, Gelnica and Levoèa. These districts are parts of the county of Košice and Prešov. The contribution contains a summary of basic illustration information about the sources of energy and about a consumption of electric and heat energy in the area. In the area of the region, there is no standard thermal power station and no nuclear power station. From own sources of the region, there is especially a water energy. The majority of heat and electric energy, which is necessary in the region, comes from outside sources. The sources of power are situated in Spišská Nová Ves and Gelnica districts. The Levoèa district has no own source of energy.In the Spišská Nová Ves district, there is one industrial establishment, which produces the heat and electric energy for the own use and also for the export. With the exception of this one establishment, in Spišská district, there are 3 little hydro - electric power plants with the total installed power capacity 138 kW. And there is also one energy unit for the output of electricity and heat with the installed power capacity 400 kW. In the area of Gelnica, there is one hydro – electric power plant, in the water reservoir named Ružín. It has installed the power capacity 2x30 MW. There are also 7 little hydro - electric power plants with the total installed power capacity 528 kW and one energy unit for the output of electricity and heat with installed power capacity 1100 kW.The future development of own energy sources in the region is oriented to the exploitation of natural energy sources, especially to the water energy and energy from biological gas. There is project of using the biological gas for the power purpose from one dump in the Spišská Nová Ves district. It will be realised in the time period of 10 years. In all listed above districts measurements are realized, which will show if

  19. [Assisted reproductive medicine in Poland, 2011--SPiN PTG report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka, Anna; Spaczyński, Robert Z; Kurzawa, Rafał

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this report is to present data concerning results and complications related to infertility treatment using assisted reproductive technology (ART) and insemination (IUI) in Poland in 2011. The report was prepared by the Fertility and Sterility Special Interest Group of the Polish Gynaecological Society (SPiN PTG), based on individual data provided by fertility clinics in Poland. Reporting was voluntary and the provided data was not subject to external control. The report presents the availability and the structure of infertility treatment services, the number of procedures performed, their effectiveness and the most common complications. In 2013, 33 Polish fertility clinics provided information to the SPiN PTG report, presenting data from the year 2011. The total number of reported treatment cycles using ART was 15,340 (incl. 10,011 IVF/ICSI procedures) and 15,627 IUI procedures. The rate of clinical pregnancies in terms of a cycle was 34.2% in case of IVF/ ICSI procedures and 13.4% in case of IUI. The prevalence of multiple births was 20.2% and 8.3% respectively in case of IVF/ICSI and IUI methods. The most frequent complication in the course of treatment using ART was ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS). The SPiN PTG report allows to find out the average effectiveness and safety of assisted reproduction technologies and is currently the only proof of responsibility and due diligence of fertility centres in Poland. However due to the lack of a central register of fertility clinics, facultative participation in the report as well as incomplete information on pregnancy and delivery the collected data does not reflect the full spectrum of the Polish reproductive medicine.

  20. INTEGRAL SPI Limits on Electron-Positron Annihilation Radiation from the Galactic Plane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Watanabe, K.; Jean, P.

    2005-01-01

    ‐Ray Astrophysics Laboratory) mission, launched in 2002 October, is the detailed study of this radiation. The Spectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) is a high‐resolution, coded‐aperture gamma‐ray telescope with an unprecedented combination of sensitivity, angular resolution, and energy resolution. We report results from...... the first 10 months of observation. During this period a significant fraction of the observing time was spent in or near the Galactic plane. No positive annihilation flux was detected outside of the central region () of our Galaxy. In this paper we describe the observations and data analysis methods...

  1. The sample of INTEGRAL SPI-ACS gamma-ray bursts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, A.; Kienlin, A. von; Licht, G.G.; Hurley, K.

    2005-01-01

    The anti-coincidence system of the spectrometer on board INTEGRAL is operated as a nearly omni directional gamma-ray burst detector above ∼ 75 KeV. During the elapsed mission time 324 burst candidates were detected. As part of the 3rd Interplanetary Network of gamma-ray detectors the cosmic origin of 115 burst was confirmed. Here we present a preliminary analysis of the SPI-ACS gamma-ray burst sample. In particular we discuss the origin of a significant population of short events (duration < 0.2 s) and a possible method for a flux calibration of the data

  2. SpiCAD: Integrated environment for circuitry simulation with SPICE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amore, D; Padovini, G; Santomauro, M [Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dip. di Elettronica

    1991-11-01

    SPICE is one of the most commonly used programs for the simulation of the behaviour of electronic circuits. This article describes in detail the key design characteristics and capabilities of a computer environment called SpiCAD which integrates all the different phases of SPICE based circuitry simulation on a personal computer, i.e., the tracing of the electronics scheme, simulation and visualization of the results so as to help define semiconductor device models, determine input signals, construct macro-models and convert design sketches into formats acceptable to graphic systems.

  3. PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seabury, E.H.; Caffrey, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

  4. “Habits of employees”: smoking, spies, and shopfloor culture at Hammermill Paper Company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    As cigarette smoking expanded dramatically during the early twentieth century, it brought more and more workers into conflict with the policies and demands of the manufacturers who employed them. As this paper shows, addiction to nicotine ignited daily struggles over workers’ shopfloor rights and the ability of employers to set rules, establish discipline, and monitor behavior. A specific set of records from the archives of the Hammermill Paper Company, a paper manufacturer once based in Erie, Pennsylvania, provide a unique opportunity to explore the impact of cigarette consumption on labor relations during the era of mass production, as two nosy factory spies probed and documented worker actions and attitudes in the summer of 1915. As a result of their intelligence gathering, the spies discovered a factory-wide work culture rooted in the addictive pleasure of cigarette smoke. This discovery worried them. Worker-smokers needed to dampen their hunger for nicotine with frequent, and often clandestine, breaks from work, typically in defiance of “no-smoking” rules, employer designations for the uses of factory space, and bosses’ demands for continuous production. Highlighting the intersections of the histories of labor, smoking, and addiction, this paper argues that cigarettes were a key battleground in workers’ and managers’ intensifying struggles over who really controlled the industrial shopfloor during the early 1900s.

  5. MEJORA DE PROCESOS DE SOFTWARE ÁGIL CON AGILE - SPI PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÉSAR PARDO

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivar la aplicación de proyectos de mejora de procesos en las empresas de desarrollo de software iberoamericanas, en su gran mayoría Micro, Pequeñas y Medianas Empresas Desarrolladoras de Software (MiPyMEs_DS es una necesidad imperante para la búsqueda de una industria de software que sea competitiva no solo en contextos regionales sino también internacionales. Los modelos internacionalmente reconocidos, representan alto riesgo en su aplicación para una MiPyMES_DS, esto debido quizá a su gran inversión en dinero, tiempo, recursos, difícil gestión, además de la complejidad de las recomendaciones y un retorno de la inversión a largo plazo. El objetivo de este trabajo es presentar a Agile SPI - Process como un proceso de mejora de procesos basado principalmente en metodologías y principios ágiles, requerimientos livianos y adaptaciones de modelos internacionales. De la misma manera en el artículo se presentan los resultados obtenidos en la implementación de Agile SPI - Process en varias MiPyMEs_DS de Iberoamérica y el sur occidente de Colombia.

  6. Monitoring and quantifying future climate projections of dryness and wetness extremes: SPI bias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sienz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The adequacy of the gamma distribution (GD for monthly precipitation totals is reconsidered. The motivation for this study is the observation that the GD fails to represent precipitation in considerable areas of global observed and simulated data. This misrepresentation may lead to erroneous estimates of the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI, evaluations of models, and assessments of climate change. In this study, the GD is compared to the Weibull (WD, Burr Type III (BD, exponentiated Weibull (EWD and generalised gamma (GGD distribution. These distributions extend the GD in terms of possible shapes (skewness and kurtosis and the behaviour for large arguments. The comparison is based on the Akaike information criterion, which maximises information entropy and reveals a trade-off between deviation and the numbers of parameters used. We use monthly sums of observed and simulated precipitation for 12 calendar months of the year. Assessing observed and simulated data, (i the Weibull type distributions give distinctly improved fits compared to the GD and (ii the SPI resulting from the GD overestimates (underestimates extreme dryness (wetness.

  7. Comparing Image Perception of Bladder Tumors in Four Different Storz Professional Image Enhancement System Modalities Using the íSPIES App

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamphuis, Guido M.; de Bruin, D. Martijn; Brandt, Martin J.; Knoll, Thomas; Conort, Pierre; Lapini, Alberto; Dominguez-Escrig, Jose L.; de La Rosette, Jean J. M. C. H.

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the variation of interpretation of the same bladder urothelium image in different Storz Professional Image Enhancement System (SPIES) modalities. SPIES contains a White light (WL), Spectra A (SA), Spectra B (SB), and Clara and Chroma combined (CC) modality. An App for the iPAD retina was

  8. Spin echo SPI methods for quantitative analysis of fluids in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Linqing; Han, Hui; Balcom, Bruce J

    2009-06-01

    Fluid density imaging is highly desirable in a wide variety of porous media measurements. The SPRITE class of MRI methods has proven to be robust and general in their ability to generate density images in porous media, however the short encoding times required, with correspondingly high magnetic field gradient strengths and filter widths, and low flip angle RF pulses, yield sub-optimal S/N images, especially at low static field strength. This paper explores two implementations of pure phase encode spin echo 1D imaging, with application to a proposed new petroleum reservoir core analysis measurement. In the first implementation of the pulse sequence, we modify the spin echo single point imaging (SE-SPI) technique to acquire the k-space origin data point, with a near zero evolution time, from the free induction decay (FID) following a 90 degrees excitation pulse. Subsequent k-space data points are acquired by separately phase encoding individual echoes in a multi-echo acquisition. T(2) attenuation of the echo train yields an image convolution which causes blurring. The T(2) blur effect is moderate for porous media with T(2) lifetime distributions longer than 5 ms. As a robust, high S/N, and fast 1D imaging method, this method will be highly complementary to SPRITE techniques for the quantitative analysis of fluid content in porous media. In the second implementation of the SE-SPI pulse sequence, modification of the basic measurement permits fast determination of spatially resolved T(2) distributions in porous media through separately phase encoding each echo in a multi-echo CPMG pulse train. An individual T(2) weighted image may be acquired from each echo. The echo time (TE) of each T(2) weighted image may be reduced to 500 micros or less. These profiles can be fit to extract a T(2) distribution from each pixel employing a variety of standard inverse Laplace transform methods. Fluid content 1D images are produced as an essential by product of determining the

  9. Development and evaluation of a magnetic immunochromatographic test to detect Taenia solium, which causes taeniasis and neurocysticercosis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handali, Sukwan; Klarman, Molly; Gaspard, Amanda N; Dong, X Fan; Laborde, Ronald; Noh, John; Lee, Yeuk-Mui; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzalez, Armando E; Garcia, Hector H; Gilman, Robert H; Tsang, Victor C W; Wilkins, Patricia P

    2010-04-01

    Taeniasis/cysticercosis caused by Taenia solium is a frequent parasitic infection of the human brain in most of the world. Rapid and simple screening tools to identify taeniasis and cysticercosis cases are needed for control programs, mostly to identify tapeworm carriers which are the source of infection and need to be treated, or as tools for point-of-care case detection or confirmation. These screening assays should be affordable, reliable, rapid, and easy to perform. Immunochromatographic tests meet these criteria. To demonstrate proof of principle, we developed and evaluated two magnetic immunochromatographic tests (MICTs) for detection of human Taenia solium taeniasis antibodies (ES33-MICT) and neurocysticercosis antibodies (T24-MICT). These assays detected stage-specific antibodies by using two recombinant proteins, rES33 for detection of taeniasis antibodies and rT24H for detection of cysticercosis antibodies. The sensitivity and specificity of the ES33-MICT to detect taeniasis infections were 94.5% and 96%, respectively, and those of the T24-MICT to detect cases of human cysticercosis with two or more viable brain cysts were 93.9% and 98.9%, respectively. These data provide proof of principle that the ES33- and T24-MICTs provide rapid and suitable methods to identify individuals with taeniasis and cysticercosis.

  10. Development and Evaluation of a Magnetic Immunochromatographic Test To Detect Taenia solium, Which Causes Taeniasis and Neurocysticercosis in Humans▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handali, Sukwan; Klarman, Molly; Gaspard, Amanda N.; Dong, X. Fan; LaBorde, Ronald; Noh, John; Lee, Yeuk-Mui; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzalez, Armando E.; Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.; Tsang, Victor C. W.; Wilkins, Patricia P.

    2010-01-01

    Taeniasis/cysticercosis caused by Taenia solium is a frequent parasitic infection of the human brain in most of the world. Rapid and simple screening tools to identify taeniasis and cysticercosis cases are needed for control programs, mostly to identify tapeworm carriers which are the source of infection and need to be treated, or as tools for point-of-care case detection or confirmation. These screening assays should be affordable, reliable, rapid, and easy to perform. Immunochromatographic tests meet these criteria. To demonstrate proof of principle, we developed and evaluated two magnetic immunochromatographic tests (MICTs) for detection of human Taenia solium taeniasis antibodies (ES33-MICT) and neurocysticercosis antibodies (T24-MICT). These assays detected stage-specific antibodies by using two recombinant proteins, rES33 for detection of taeniasis antibodies and rT24H for detection of cysticercosis antibodies. The sensitivity and specificity of the ES33-MICT to detect taeniasis infections were 94.5% and 96%, respectively, and those of the T24-MICT to detect cases of human cysticercosis with two or more viable brain cysts were 93.9% and 98.9%, respectively. These data provide proof of principle that the ES33- and T24-MICTs provide rapid and suitable methods to identify individuals with taeniasis and cysticercosis. PMID:20181766

  11. Characteristics and drivers of drought in Europe-a summary of the DROUGHT-R&SPI project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tallaksen, Lena M.; Stagge, James H.; Stahl, Kerstin; Gudmundsson, Lukas; Orth, Rene; Seneviratne, Sonia I.; Loon, van Anne F.; Lanen, van Henny A.J.

    2015-01-01

    A prerequisite to mitigate the wide range of drought impacts is to establish a good understanding of the drought generating mechanisms from their initiation as a meteorological drought through to their development as soil moisture and hydrological drought. The DROUGHT-R&SPI project has

  12. State Transition and Flaring Activity of IGR J17464-3213/H1743-322 with INTEGRAL SPI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joinet, A.; Jourdain, E.; Malzac, J.; Roques, J. P.; Schönfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Capitanio, F.

    2005-08-01

    IGR J17464-3213, already known as the HEAO 1 transient source H1743-322, has been detected during a state transition by INTEGRAL SPI. We describe the spectral evolution and flaring activity of IGR J17464-3213/H1743-322 from 2003 March 21 to 2003 April 22. During the first part, the source followed a continuous spectral softening, with the peak of the spectral energy distribution shifting from 100 keV down to ~a few keV. However, the thermal disk and the hard X-ray components had a similar intensity, indicating that the source was in an intermediate state throughout our observations and evolving toward the soft state. In the second part of our observations, the RXTE ASM and INTEGRAL SPI light curves showed a strong flaring activity. Two flare events lasting about 1 day each have been detected with SPI and are probably due to instabilities in the accretion disk associated with the state transition. During these flares, the low (1.5-12 keV) and high (20-200 keV) energy fluxes monitored with the RXTE ASM and INTEGRAL SPI are correlated, and the spectral shape (above 20 keV) remains unchanged while the luminosity increases by a factor greater than 2.

  13. Engineering a thalamo-cortico-thalamic circuit on SpiNNaker: a preliminary study towards modelling sleep and wakefulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basabdatta Sen Bhattacharya

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a preliminary study of a thalamo-cortico-thalamic (TCT implementation on SpiNNaker (Spiking Neural Network architecture, a brain inspired hardware platform designed to incorporate the inherent biological properties of parallelism, fault tolerance and energy efficiency. These attributes make SpiNNaker an ideal platform for simulating biologically plausible computational models. Our focus in this work is to design a TCT framework that can be simulated on SpiNNaker to mimic dynamical behaviour similar to Electroencephalogram (EEG time and power-spectra signatures in sleep-wake transition. The scale of the model is minimised for simplicity in this proof-of-concept study; thus the total number of spiking neurons is approximately 1000 and represents a `mini-column' of the thalamocortical tissue. All data on model structure, synaptic layout and parameters is inspired from previous studies and abstracted at a level that is appropriate to the aims of the current study as well as computationally suitable for model simulation on a small 4-chip SpiNNaker system. The initial results from selective deletion of synaptic connectivity parameters in the model show similarity with EEG time series characteristics of sleep and wakefulness. These observations provide a positive perspective and a basis for future implementation of a very large scale biologically plausible model of thalamo-cortico-thalamic interactivity---the essential brain circuit that regulates the biological sleep-wake cycle and associated EEG rhythms.

  14. Treatment Using the SpyGlass Digital System in a Patient with Hepatolithiasis after a Whipple Procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harima, Hirofumi; Hamabe, Kouichi; Hisano, Fusako; Matsuzaki, Yuko; Itoh, Tadahiko; Sanuki, Kazutoshi; Sakaida, Isao

    2018-05-23

    An 89-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment of hepatolithiasis causing recurrent cholangitis. He had undergone a prior Whipple procedure. Computed tomography demonstrated left-sided hepatolithiasis. First, we conducted peroral direct cholangioscopy (PDCS) using an ultraslim endoscope. Although PDCS was successfully conducted, it was unsuccessful in removing all the stones. The stones located in the B2 segment were difficult to remove because the endoscope could not be inserted deeply into this segment due to the small size of the intrahepatic bile duct. Next, we substituted the endoscope with an upper gastrointestinal endoscope. After positioning the endoscope, the SpyGlass digital system (SPY-DS) was successfully inserted deep into the B2 segment. Upon visualizing the residual stones, we conducted SPY-DS-guided electrohydraulic lithotripsy. The stones were disintegrated and completely removed. In cases of PDCS failure, a treatment strategy using the SPY-DS can be considered for patients with hepatolithiasis after a Whipple procedure.

  15. Forecasting SPEI and SPI Drought Indices Using the Integrated Artificial Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Maca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented paper compares forecast of drought indices based on two different models of artificial neural networks. The first model is based on feedforward multilayer perceptron, sANN, and the second one is the integrated neural network model, hANN. The analyzed drought indices are the standardized precipitation index (SPI and the standardized precipitation evaporation index (SPEI and were derived for the period of 1948–2002 on two US catchments. The meteorological and hydrological data were obtained from MOPEX experiment. The training of both neural network models was made by the adaptive version of differential evolution, JADE. The comparison of models was based on six model performance measures. The results of drought indices forecast, explained by the values of four model performance indices, show that the integrated neural network model was superior to the feedforward multilayer perceptron with one hidden layer of neurons.

  16. INTEGRAL IBIS, SPI, and JEM-X observations of LVT151012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savchenko, V.; Bazzano, A.; Bozzo, E.

    2017-01-01

    favorable location of the counterpart for a detection by the omni-directionalinstruments. These results can be interpreted as a tight constrain on the ratio of the isotropic equivalent energy releasedin the electromagnetic emission to the total energy of the gravitational waves: E75−2000 keV /EGW ...During the first observing run of LIGO, two gravitational wave events and one lower-significance trigger (LVT151012) were reported by the LIGO/Virgo collaboration. At the time of LVT151012, the INTErnational Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) was pointing at a region of the sky coincident...... with the high localization probability area of the event and thus permitted us to search for its electromagnetic counterpart (both prompt and afterglow emission). The imaging instruments on-board INTEGRAL (IBIS/ISGRI, IBIS/PICsIT, SPI, and the two JEM-X modules)have been exploited to attempt the detection...

  17. Discourse of simulacra in Kovacević's drama Balkan Spy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milojević Snežana J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on a reading of the famous Dušan Kovačević's drama Balkan Spy, contextualized by postulates of simulacra. The starting point for finding symbols that corresponded to the system of the non-referent world (and each such system creates its own reality, and proceeds from its own frame in which it must be interpreted is a book of Jean Baudrillard 'Simulacrum and Simulation'. Through chapters that accentuate simulacrum-like phenomena for proving the actual through imaginary and cloned, as well as defining the world of literary text as a kind of Disneyland, it becomes evident soundness of this idea that confirms the quality of this drama.

  18. Gravity Spy - Integrating LIGO detector characterization, citizen science, and machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevin, Michael; Gravity Spy

    2016-06-01

    On September 14th 2015, the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (aLIGO) made the first direct observation of gravitational waves and opened a new field of observational astronomy. However, being the most complicated and sensitve experiment ever undertaken in gravitational physics, aLIGO is susceptible to various sources of environmental and instrumental noise that hinder the search for more gravitational waves.Of particular concern are transient, non-Gaussian noise features known as glitches. Glitches can mimic true astrophysical gravitational waves, occur at a high enough frequency to be coherent between the two detectors, and generally worsen aLIGO's detection capabilities. The proper classification and charaterization of glitches is paramount in optimizing aLIGO's ability to detect gravitational waves. However, teaching computers to identify and morphologically classify these artifacts is exceedingly difficult.Human intuition has proven to be a useful tool in classifcation probelms such as this. Gravity Spy is an innovative, interdisciplinary project hosted by Zooniverse that combines aLIGO detector characterization, citizen science, machine learning, and social science. In this project, citizen scientists and computers will work together in a sybiotic relationship that leverages human pattern recognition and the ability of machine learning to process large amounts of data systematically: volunteers classify triggers from the aLIGO data steam that are constantly updated as aLIGO takes in new data, and these classifications are used to train machine learning algorithms which proceed to classify the bulk of aLIGO data and feed questionable glithces back to the users.In this talk, I will discuss the workflow and initial results of the Gravity Spy project with regard to aLIGO's future observing runs and highlight the potential of such citizen science projects in promoting nascent fields such as gravitational wave astrophysics.

  19. Study of the high energy emission of accreting compact objects with SPI/INTEGRAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droulans, R.

    2011-01-01

    The study of the high energy emission is essential for understanding the radiative processes inherent to accretion flows onto compact objects (black holes and neutron stars). The X/γ-ray continuum of these systems is successfully interpreted in terms of two components. The first component corresponds to blackbody emission from a geometrically thin optically thick accretion disk while the second component is generally associated to Compton scattering of the thermal disk flux off hot electrons. Despite considerable advances throughout the years, the heating mechanisms as well as the structure of the hot Comptonizing plasma remain poorly understood. In order to shed light on the physical processes that govern the innermost regions of the accretion flow, we take advantage of the data archive accumulated by the SPI instrument, a high energy spectrometer (20 keV - 8 MeV) developed at the CESR (now IRAP, Toulouse, France) for the INTEGRAL mission. Above 150 keV, SPI combines a unique spectral resolution with unequalled sensitivity, being thus an ideal tool to study the high energy emission of accreting compact objects. The thesis manuscript reports on the results of timing and spectral studies of three particular systems. First, I address the high energy emission of the enigmatic micro-quasar GRS 1915+105, a source characterized by colossal luminosity and strong chaotic variability in X-rays. On a timescale of about one day, the photon index of the 20 - 200 keV spectrum varies between 2.7 and 3.5; at higher energies (≥150 keV), SPI unveils the systematic presence of an additional emission component, extending without folding energy up to ∼ 500 keV. Second, I study the high energy emission of GX 339-4, a source whose spectral properties are representative of black hole transients. The spectrum of the luminous hard state of this system shows a variable high energy tail (≥150 keV), with significant flux changes on a short timescale (several hours). I explain the

  20. Oak Ridge rf Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; McCurdy, H.C.; McManamy, T.J.; Moeller, J.A.; Ryan, P.M.

    1985-01-01

    The rf Test Facility (RFTF) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a national facility for the testing and evaluation of steady-state, high-power (approx.1.0-MW) ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) systems and components. The facility consists of a vacuum vessel and two fully tested superconducting development magnets from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program. These are arranged as a simple mirror with a mirror ratio of 4.8. The axial centerline distance between magnet throat centers is 112 cm. The vacuum vessel cavity has a large port (74 by 163 cm) and a test volume adequate for testing prototypic launchers for Doublet III-D (DIII-D), Tore Supra, and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). Attached to the internal vessel walls are water-cooled panels for removing the injected rf power. The magnets are capable of generating a steady-state field of approx.3 T on axis in the magnet throats. Steady-state plasmas are generated in the facility by cyclotron resonance breakdown using a dedicated 200-kW, 28-GHz gyrotron. Available rf sources cover a frequency range of 2 to 200 MHz at 1.5 kW and 3 to 18 MHz at 200 kW, with several sources at intermediate parameters. Available in July 1986 will be a >1.0-MW, cw source spanning 40 to 80 MHz. 5 figs

  1. A 1MeV, 1A negative ion accelerator test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanada, M.; Dairaku, M.; Inoue, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Ohara, Y.; Okumura, Y.; Watanabe, K.; Yokoyama, K.

    1995-01-01

    For the Proof-of-Principle test of negative ion acceleration up to 1 MeV, the beam energy required for ITER, a negative ion test facility named MeV Test Facility (MTF) and an ion source/accelerator have been designed and constructed. They are designed to produce a 1 MeV H- beam at a low source pressure of 0.13Pa. The MTF has a power supply system, which constituts of a 1MV, 1A, 60 s Cockcroft-Walton type dc high energy generator and power supplies for negative ion generation and extraction (ion source power supplies). The negative ion source/accelerator is composed of a cesiated volume source and a 5-stage, multi-aperture, electrostatic accelerator. The MTF and the ion source/accelerator have been completed, and the accelertion test up to 1 MeV of the H- ions has started. (orig.)

  2. The Application of Box–Cox Transformation to Determine the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI, the Standardised Discharge Index (SDI and to Identify Drought Events: Case Study in Eastern Kujawy (Central Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartczak Arkadiusz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of research into the transformation of series of hydro-meteorological data for determining dry periods with the Standardised Precipitation Index (SPI and the Standardised Discharge Index (SDI. Time series from eight precipitation stations and five series of river discharge data in Eastern Kujawy (central Poland were analysed for 1951–2010. The frequency distribution of the series for their convergence with the normal distribution was tested with the Shapiro–Wilk test and homogeneity with the Bartlett's test. The transformation of the series was done with the Box–Cox technique, which made it possible to homogenise the series in terms of variance. In Poland, the technique has never been used to determine the SPI. After the transformation the distributions of virtually all series complied with the normal distribution and were homogeneous. Moreover, a statistically significant correlation between the δ transformation parameter and the skewness of the series of monthly precipitation was observed. It was similar for the series of mean monthly discharges in the winter half-year and the hydrological year. The analysis indicates an alternate occurrence of dry and wet periods both in case of precipitation and run-offs. Drought periods coincided with low flow periods. Thus, the fluctuations tend to affect the development of agriculture more than long-term ones.

  3. Occurrence Probabilities of Wet and Dry Periods in Southern Italy through the SPI Evaluated on Synthetic Monthly Precipitation Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Caloiero

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The present article investigates dry and wet periods in a large area of the Mediterranean basin. First, a stochastic model was applied to a homogeneous database of monthly precipitation values of 46 rain gauges in five regions of southern Italy. In particular, after estimating the model parameters, a set of 104 years of monthly precipitation for each rain gauge was generated by means of a Monte Carlo technique. Then, dry and wet periods were analyzed through the application of the standardized precipitation index (SPI over 3-month and 6-month timespan (short-term and 12-month and 24-month period (long-term. As a result of the SPI application on the generated monthly precipitation series, higher occurrence probabilities of dry conditions than wet conditions have been detected, especially when long-term precipitation scales are considered.

  4. Measuring absolute spin polarization in dissolution-DNP by Spin PolarimetrY Magnetic Resonance (SPY-MR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuichoud, Basile; Milani, Jonas; Chappuis, Quentin; Bornet, Aurélien; Bodenhausen, Geoffrey; Jannin, Sami

    2015-11-01

    Dynamic nuclear polarization at 1.2 K and 6.7 T allows one to achieve spin temperatures on the order of a few millikelvin, so that the high-temperature approximation (ΔEPolarimetrY Magnetic Resonance (SPY-MR), is illustrated for various pairs of (13)C spins (I, S) in acetate and pyruvate. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. History of the formerly top secret KH-9 Hexagon spy satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressel, Phil

    2014-12-01

    This paper is about the development, design, fabrication and use of the KH-9 Hexagon spy in the sky satellite camera system that was finally declassified by the National Reconnaissance Office on September 17, 2011 twenty five years after the program ended. It was the last film based reconnaissance camera and was known by experts in the field as "the most complicated system ever put up in orbit." It provided important intelligence for the United States government and was the reason that President Nixon was able to sign the SALT treaty, and when President Reagan said "Trust but Verify" it provided the means of verification. Each satellite weighed 30,000 pounds and carried two cameras thereby permitting photographs of the entire landmass of the earth to be taken in stereo. Each camera carried up to 30 miles of film for a total of 60 miles of film. Ultra-complex mechanisms controlled the structurally "wimpy" film that traveled at speeds up to 204 inches per second at the focal plane and was perfectly synchronized to the optical image.

  6. Using Stochastic Spiking Neural Networks on SpiNNaker to Solve Constraint Satisfaction Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A. Fonseca Guerra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Constraint satisfaction problems (CSP are at the core of numerous scientific and technological applications. However, CSPs belong to the NP-complete complexity class, for which the existence (or not of efficient algorithms remains a major unsolved question in computational complexity theory. In the face of this fundamental difficulty heuristics and approximation methods are used to approach instances of NP (e.g., decision and hard optimization problems. The human brain efficiently handles CSPs both in perception and behavior using spiking neural networks (SNNs, and recent studies have demonstrated that the noise embedded within an SNN can be used as a computational resource to solve CSPs. Here, we provide a software framework for the implementation of such noisy neural solvers on the SpiNNaker massively parallel neuromorphic hardware, further demonstrating their potential to implement a stochastic search that solves instances of P and NP problems expressed as CSPs. This facilitates the exploration of new optimization strategies and the understanding of the computational abilities of SNNs. We demonstrate the basic principles of the framework by solving difficult instances of the Sudoku puzzle and of the map color problem, and explore its application to spin glasses. The solver works as a stochastic dynamical system, which is attracted by the configuration that solves the CSP. The noise allows an optimal exploration of the space of configurations, looking for the satisfiability of all the constraints; if applied discontinuously, it can also force the system to leap to a new random configuration effectively causing a restart.

  7. jSPyDB, an open source database-independent tool for data management

    CERN Document Server

    Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, the number of commercial tools available for accessing Databases, built on Java or .Net, is increasing. However, many of these applications have several drawbacks: usually they are not open-source, they provide interfaces only with a specific kind of database, they are platform-dependent and very CPU and memory consuming. jSPyDB is a free web based tool written using Python and Javascript. It relies on jQuery and python libraries, and is intended to provide a simple handler to different Database technologies inside a local web browser. Such a tool, exploiting fast access libraries such as SQLAlchemy, is easy to install, and to configure. The design of this tool envisages three layers. The front-end client side in the local web browser communicates with a backend server. Only the server is able to connect to the different databases for the purposes of performing data definition and manipulation. The server makes the data available to the client, so that the user can display and handle them safely. ...

  8. jSPyDB, an open source database-independent tool for data management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Cavallari, Francesca; Di Guida, Salvatore; Innocente, Vincenzo

    2011-12-01

    Nowadays, the number of commercial tools available for accessing Databases, built on Java or .Net, is increasing. However, many of these applications have several drawbacks: usually they are not open-source, they provide interfaces only with a specific kind of database, they are platform-dependent and very CPU and memory consuming. jSPyDB is a free web-based tool written using Python and Javascript. It relies on jQuery and python libraries, and is intended to provide a simple handler to different database technologies inside a local web browser. Such a tool, exploiting fast access libraries such as SQLAlchemy, is easy to install, and to configure. The design of this tool envisages three layers. The front-end client side in the local web browser communicates with a backend server. Only the server is able to connect to the different databases for the purposes of performing data definition and manipulation. The server makes the data available to the client, so that the user can display and handle them safely. Moreover, thanks to jQuery libraries, this tool supports export of data in different formats, such as XML and JSON. Finally, by using a set of pre-defined functions, users are allowed to create their customized views for a better data visualization. In this way, we optimize the performance of database servers by avoiding short connections and concurrent sessions. In addition, security is enforced since we do not provide users the possibility to directly execute any SQL statement.

  9. Half Life: The Divided Life of Bruno Pontecorvo, Physicist or Spy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Close, Frank

    2016-01-01

    It was at the height of the Cold War, in the summer of 1950, when Bruno Pontecorvo mysteriously vanished behind the Iron Curtain. Who was he, and what caused him to disappear? Was he simply a physicist, or also a spy and communist radical? A protege of Enrico Fermi, Pontecorvo was one of the most promising nuclear physicists in the world. He spent years hunting for the Higgs boson of his day - the neutrino - a nearly massless particle thought to be essential to the process of particle decay. His work on the Manhattan Project helped to usher in the nuclear age, and confirmed his reputation as a brilliant physicist. Why, then, would he disappear as he stood on the cusp of true greatness, perhaps even the Nobel Prize? In this book, physicist and historian Frank Close offers a heretofore untold history of Pontecorvo's life, based on unprecedented access to Pontecorvo's friends and family and the Russian scientists with whom he would later work. Close takes a microscope to Pontecorvo's life, combining a thorough biography of one of the most important scientists of the twentieth century with the drama of Cold War espionage. With all the elements of a Cold War thriller - classified atomic research, an infamous double agent, a possible kidnapping by Soviet operatives - this book is a history of nuclear physics at perhaps its most powerful: when it created the bomb

  10. jSPyDB, an open source database-independent tool for data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Cavallari, Francesca; Di Guida, Salvatore; Innocente, Vincenzo

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays, the number of commercial tools available for accessing Databases, built on Java or .Net, is increasing. However, many of these applications have several drawbacks: usually they are not open-source, they provide interfaces only with a specific kind of database, they are platform-dependent and very CPU and memory consuming. jSPyDB is a free web-based tool written using Python and Javascript. It relies on jQuery and python libraries, and is intended to provide a simple handler to different database technologies inside a local web browser. Such a tool, exploiting fast access libraries such as SQLAlchemy, is easy to install, and to configure. The design of this tool envisages three layers. The front-end client side in the local web browser communicates with a backend server. Only the server is able to connect to the different databases for the purposes of performing data definition and manipulation. The server makes the data available to the client, so that the user can display and handle them safely. Moreover, thanks to jQuery libraries, this tool supports export of data in different formats, such as XML and JSON. Finally, by using a set of pre-defined functions, users are allowed to create their customized views for a better data visualization. In this way, we optimize the performance of database servers by avoiding short connections and concurrent sessions. In addition, security is enforced since we do not provide users the possibility to directly execute any SQL statement.

  11. Using Stochastic Spiking Neural Networks on SpiNNaker to Solve Constraint Satisfaction Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca Guerra, Gabriel A; Furber, Steve B

    2017-01-01

    Constraint satisfaction problems (CSP) are at the core of numerous scientific and technological applications. However, CSPs belong to the NP-complete complexity class, for which the existence (or not) of efficient algorithms remains a major unsolved question in computational complexity theory. In the face of this fundamental difficulty heuristics and approximation methods are used to approach instances of NP (e.g., decision and hard optimization problems). The human brain efficiently handles CSPs both in perception and behavior using spiking neural networks (SNNs), and recent studies have demonstrated that the noise embedded within an SNN can be used as a computational resource to solve CSPs. Here, we provide a software framework for the implementation of such noisy neural solvers on the SpiNNaker massively parallel neuromorphic hardware, further demonstrating their potential to implement a stochastic search that solves instances of P and NP problems expressed as CSPs. This facilitates the exploration of new optimization strategies and the understanding of the computational abilities of SNNs. We demonstrate the basic principles of the framework by solving difficult instances of the Sudoku puzzle and of the map color problem, and explore its application to spin glasses. The solver works as a stochastic dynamical system, which is attracted by the configuration that solves the CSP. The noise allows an optimal exploration of the space of configurations, looking for the satisfiability of all the constraints; if applied discontinuously, it can also force the system to leap to a new random configuration effectively causing a restart.

  12. Design, prototyping, and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Binping; Alberty, Luis; Belomestnykh, Sergey; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Cullen, Chris; Capatina, Ofelia; Hammons, Lee; Li, Zenghai; Marques, Carlos; Skaritka, John; Verdu-Andres, Silvia; Wu, Qiong

    2015-04-01

    We proposed a novel design for a compact superconducting crab cavity with a double quarter wave (DQWCC) shape. After fabrication and surface treatments, this niobium proof-of-principle cavity was tested cryogenically in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service in the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The cavity's electromagnetic properties are well suited for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the required 3.34 MV for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC. In this paper, we present the design, prototyping, and results from testing the DQWCC.

  13. Design, prototyping, and testing of a compact superconducting double quarter wave crab cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binping Xiao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We proposed a novel design for a compact superconducting crab cavity with a double quarter wave (DQWCC shape. After fabrication and surface treatments, this niobium proof-of-principle cavity was tested cryogenically in a vertical cryostat. The cavity is extremely compact yet has a low frequency of 400 MHz, an essential property for service in the Large Hadron Collider luminosity upgrade. The cavity’s electromagnetic properties are well suited for this demanding task. The demonstrated deflecting voltage of 4.6 MV is well above the required 3.34 MV for a crab cavity in the future High Luminosity LHC. In this paper, we present the design, prototyping, and results from testing the DQWCC.

  14. Cold crucible induction melter test for crystalline ceramic waste form fabrication: A feasibility assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, Jake W., E-mail: jake.amoroso@srnl.doe.gov [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Marra, James; Dandeneau, Christopher S. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brinkman, Kyle; Xu, Yun [Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Tang, Ming [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Maio, Vince [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Webb, Samuel M. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94086 (United States); Chiu, Wilson K.S. [University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut 06269-3139 (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The first scaled proof-of-principle cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test to process a multiphase ceramic waste form from a simulated combined (Cs/Sr, lanthanide and transition metal fission products) commercial used nuclear fuel waste stream was recently conducted in the United States. X-ray diffraction, 2-D X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for Cs), and product consistency tests were used to characterize the fabricated CCIM material. Characterization analyses confirmed that a crystalline ceramic with a desirable phase assemblage was produced from a melt using a CCIM. Primary hollandite, pyrochlore/zirconolite, and perovskite phases were identified in addition to minor phases rich in Fe, Al, or Cs. The material produced in the CCIM was chemically homogeneous and displayed a uniform phase assemblage with acceptable aqueous chemical durability.

  15. Development of a synchrotron radiation beam monitor for the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scarpelli, Andrea [Univ. of Ferrara (Italy)

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear integrable optics applied to beam dynamics may mitigate multi-particle instabilities, but proof of principle experiments have never been carried out. The Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) is an electron and proton storage ring currently being built at Fermilab, which addresses tests of nonlinear lattice elements in a real machine in addition to experiments on optical stochastic cooling and on the single-electron wave function. These experiments require an outstanding control over the lattice parameters, achievable with fast and precise beam monitoring systems. This work describes the steps for designing and building a beam monitor for IOTA based on synchrotron radiation, able to measure intensity, position and transverse cross-section beam.

  16. The heavy metals content in wild growing mushrooms from burdened Spiš area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Slávik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we evaluated the rate of entry of heavy metals into the edible parts of wild mushrooms, from central Spiš area. The area is characterized by extremely high content of heavy metals particularly mercury in abiotic and biotic components of ecosystems. The toxicity of heavy metals is well known and described. Known is also the ability of fungi to accumulate contaminants from substrates in which mushrooms grow. We have collected commonly consumed species of mushrooms (Russula vesca., Macrolepiota procera, Lycoperdon pyriforme, Lecinum piceinum, Boletus reticulatus. Sampling was conducted for two years 2012 and 2013. The samples taken mushrooms and substrates on which to grow, we determined heavy metal content (Cd, Pb, Cu, including total mercury content modified by atomic absorption spectrometry (AMA - 254. In the substrate, we determined the humus content and pH value. The heavy metal content in soils were evaluated according to Law no. 220/2004 Z.z The exceedance limit values of Cd, Pb, Cu and Hg was recorded. Most significantly the respective limit was recorded in soil samples in the case of mercury. The determined concentration Hg was 39.01 mg.kg-1. From the results, we evaluated the degree of ability to bioaccumulate heavy metals different kinds of fungi. We also evaluated the health safety of the consumption of these fungi on the comparison with the limit values provided in the food code of SR. We recorded a high rate of accumulation of mercury in the species Boletus reticulatus and Macrolepiota procera. For these types we recorded the most significant than allowed concentrations of mercury in mushrooms. The highest recorded concentration reached 17.64 mg.kg-1 Hg in fresh matter. The limit value was exceeded also in the case of copper. We do not recommend to increased consumption of wild mushrooms in the reference area.

  17. The influence of shrinkage-cracking on the drying behaviour of White Portland cement using Single-Point Imaging (SPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyea, S D; Balcom, B J; Bremner, T W; Prado, P J; Cross, A R; Armstrong, R L; Grattan-Bellew, P E

    1998-11-01

    The removal of water from pores in hardened cement paste smaller than 50 nm results in cracking of the cement matrix due to the tensile stresses induced by drying shrinkage. Cracks in the matrix fundamentally alter the permeability of the material, and therefore directly affect the drying behaviour. Using Single-Point Imaging (SPI), we obtain one-dimensional moisture profiles of hydrated White Portland cement cylinders as a function of drying time. The drying behaviour of White Portland cement, is distinctly different from the drying behaviour of related concrete materials containing aggregates.

  18. Spi2 gene polymorphism is not associated with recurrent airway obstruction and inflammatory airway disease in thoroughbred horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Correa da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to detect the presence of polymorphisms at exons 1, 2, 3 and 4 of the Spi2 gene, and evaluate a possible association between them and recurrent airway obstruction (RAO or inflammatory airway disease (IAD in thoroughbred horses, through single-strand conformational-polymorphism (SSCP screening. Although polymorphism was not detected in exons 1, 2 and 3, three alleles and six genotypes were identified in exon 4. The frequencies of allele A (0.6388 and genotype AA (0.3888 were higher in horses affected by RAO, although no association was found between polymorphism and horses with either RAO or IAD.

  19. Recent palladium membrane reactor development at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, W.R.; Birdsell, S.A.; Wilhelm, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The palladium membrane reactor (PMR) is being investigated as a means for recovering hydrogen isotopes (including tritium) from compounds such as water and methane. Previous work with protiated water and methane showed that this device can be used to obtain high hydrogen recovery efficiencies using a single processing pass and with essentially no waste production. With these successful proof-of-principle results completed, recent work has focused on PMR development. This included studies of various geometries and testing with tritium. The results, which are reported here, have led to a better understanding of the PMR and will lead to the ultimate goal of building a production PMR and putting it into practical tritium processing service. 3 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  20. Breaking The Millisecond Barrier On SpiNNaker: Implementing Asynchronous Event-Based Plastic Models With Microsecond Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier eLagorce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Spike-based neuromorphic sensors such as retinas and cochleas, change the way in which the world is sampled. Instead of producing data sampled at a constant rate, these sensors output spikes that are asynchronous and event driven. The event-based nature of neuromorphic sensors implies a complete paradigm shift in current perception algorithms towards those that emphasize the importance of precise timing. The spikes produced by these sensors usually have a time resolution in the order of microseconds. This high temporal resolution is a crucial factor in learning tasks. It is also widely used in the field of biological neural networks. Sound localization for instance relies on detecting time lags between the two ears which, in the barn owl, reaches a temporal resolution of 5 microseconds. Current available neuromorphic computation platforms such as SpiNNaker often limit their users to a time resolution in the order of milliseconds that is not compatible with the asynchronous outputs of neuromorphic sensors. To overcome these limitations and allow for the exploration of new types of neuromorphic computing architectures, we introduce a novel software framework on the SpiNNaker platform. This framework allows for simulations of spiking networks and plasticity mechanisms using a completely asynchronous and event-based scheme running with a microsecond time resolution. Results on two example networks using this new implementation are presented.

  1. The man, who wasn't a spy. The life of the communist and scientist Klaus Fuchs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedmann, R.

    2005-01-01

    In 1949 the Sovjet Union ignited her first atomic bomb, many years earlyer than expected by western secret services. A decisive role played the German physicist Klaus Fuchs. From 1943 to 1946 he cooperated in the US atomic bomb program, called Manhatten Project. All knowledge he yield, all information he got, he passed on secret ways to the Sovjet Union. In 1950 he was exposed and condemned because of spying. This book is worldwide the first comprehensive biography of a man, who had been regarded as the ''most dangerous spy of the 20th century'' in the western world, and his work had been kept a secret in the East lasting for decades. The author evaluated an extensive source material from the USA, Great Britain and the Sovjet Union, released to pubication not till after 1990. Furtheron he could rely on the memory of many actors in the surrounding of Klaus Fuchs, who also found the way to the publicity after the end of the East-West-Conflict. (GL)

  2. Vanda Shrenger Weiss - the Croatian pioneer between two worlds: Her role in the birth of the Italian Psychoanalytic Society (SPI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsa, Rita

    2017-08-01

    In this paper the author sheds light on Vanda Shrenger Weiss, a forgotten pioneer of the international psychoanalytic movement. Vanda Shrenger was born into a large Jewish family in Croatia (1892), and her life was thoroughly intertwined with the great tragedies of European history: the First World War, the anti-Semitic persecution within Eastern Europe, which entailed the decimation of her extended family in Croatia. Finally, the introduction of fascist laws in Italy led to her and her husband - Edoardo Weiss, the founder of the Italian Psychoanalytic Society - seeking refuge in the United States of America. During her time spent in Italy (1919-39), Vanda Shrenger, doctor and paediatrician, dedicated herself to psychoanalysis. She played a crucial part in the reconstruction of the Italian Psychoanalytic Society (SPI), whilst also being a founding member of the Rivista Italiana di Psicoanalisi (Rome, 1932). Vanda was the first woman to be a member of the SPI as well as to present a paper for it. This insightful and extensive analysis relating to this pioneer of the psychoanalytic world, has been meticulously accomplished by use of a combination of original archival materials, along with access to previously unpublished documents and personal details, kindly made available to the author by Marianna, the daughter of Vanda and Edoardo Weiss, who still lives in the United States today. Copyright © 2016 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  3. Ecological niche of Neanderthals from Spy Cave revealed by nitrogen isotopes of individual amino acids in collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yuichi I; Chikaraishi, Yoshito; Drucker, Dorothée G; Ohkouchi, Naohiko; Semal, Patrick; Wißing, Christoph; Bocherens, Hervé

    2016-04-01

    This study provides a refined view on the diet and ecological niche of Neanderthals. The traditional view is that Neanderthals obtained most of their dietary protein from terrestrial animals, especially from large herbivores that roamed the open landscapes. Evidence based on the conventional carbon and nitrogen isotopic composition of bulk collagen has supported this view, although recent findings based on plant remains in the tooth calculus, microwear analyses, and small game and marine animal remains from archaeological sites have raised some questions regarding this assumption. However, the lack of a protein source other than meat in the Neanderthal diet may be due to methodological difficulties in defining the isotopic composition of plants. Based on the nitrogen isotopic composition of glutamic acid and phenylalanine in collagen for Neanderthals from Spy Cave (Belgium), we show that i) there was an inter-individual dietary heterogeneity even within one archaeological site that has not been evident in bulk collagen isotopic compositions, ii) they occupied an ecological niche different from those of hyenas, and iii) they could rely on plants for up to ∼20% of their protein source. These results are consistent with the evidence found of plant consumption by the Spy Neanderthals, suggesting a broader subsistence strategy than previously considered. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Understanding a Deep Learning Technique through a Neuromorphic System a Case Study with SpiNNaker Neuromorphic Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugiarto Indar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Deep learning (DL has been considered as a breakthrough technique in the field of artificial intelligence and machine learning. Conceptually, it relies on a many-layer network that exhibits a hierarchically non-linear processing capability. Some DL architectures such as deep neural networks, deep belief networks and recurrent neural networks have been developed and applied to many fields with incredible results, even comparable to human intelligence. However, many researchers are still sceptical about its true capability: can the intelligence demonstrated by deep learning technique be applied for general tasks? This question motivates the emergence of another research discipline: neuromorphic computing (NC. In NC, researchers try to identify the most fundamental ingredients that construct intelligence behaviour produced by the brain itself. To achieve this, neuromorphic systems are developed to mimic the brain functionality down to cellular level. In this paper, a neuromorphic platform called SpiNNaker is described and evaluated in order to understand its potential use as a platform for a deep learning approach. This paper is a literature review that contains comparative study on algorithms that have been implemented in SpiNNaker.

  5. Reconstructing cone-beam CT with spatially varying qualities for adaptive radiotherapy: a proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wenting; Yan, Hao; Gu, Xuejun; Tian, Zhen; Luo, Ouyang; Yang, Liu; Zhou, Linghong; Cervino, Laura; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2014-10-21

    With the aim of maximally reducing imaging dose while meeting requirements for adaptive radiation therapy (ART), we propose in this paper a new cone beam CT (CBCT) acquisition and reconstruction method that delivers images with a low noise level inside a region of interest (ROI) and a relatively high noise level outside the ROI. The acquired projection images include two groups: densely sampled projections at a low exposure with a large field of view (FOV) and sparsely sampled projections at a high exposure with a small FOV corresponding to the ROI. A new algorithm combining the conventional filtered back-projection algorithm and the tight-frame iterative reconstruction algorithm is also designed to reconstruct the CBCT based on these projection data. We have validated our method on a simulated head-and-neck (HN) patient case, a semi-real experiment conducted on a HN cancer patient under a full-fan scan mode, as well as a Catphan phantom under a half-fan scan mode. Relative root-mean-square errors (RRMSEs) of less than 3% for the entire image and ~1% within the ROI compared to the ground truth have been observed. These numbers demonstrate the ability of our proposed method to reconstruct high-quality images inside the ROI. As for the part outside ROI, although the images are relatively noisy, it can still provide sufficient information for radiation dose calculations in ART. Dose distributions calculated on our CBCT image and on a standard CBCT image are in agreement, with a mean relative difference of 0.082% inside the ROI and 0.038% outside the ROI. Compared with the standard clinical CBCT scheme, an imaging dose reduction of approximately 3-6 times inside the ROI was achieved, as well as an 8 times outside the ROI. Regarding computational efficiency, it takes 1-3 min to reconstruct a CBCT image depending on the number of projections used. These results indicate that the proposed method has the potential for application in ART.

  6. A randomised controlled trial of intravenous zoledronic acid in malignant pleural disease: a proof of principle pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clive, Amelia O; Hooper, Clare E; Edey, Anthony J; Morley, Anna J; Zahan-Evans, Natalie; Hall, David; Lyburn, Iain; White, Paul; Braybrooke, Jeremy P; Sequeiros, Iara; Lyen, Stephen M; Milton, Tim; Kahan, Brennan C; Maskell, Nick A

    2015-01-01

    Animal studies have shown Zoledronic Acid (ZA) may diminish pleural fluid accumulation and tumour bulk in malignant pleural disease (MPD). We performed a pilot study to evaluate its effects in humans. We undertook a single centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in adults with MPD. Patients were randomised (1:1) to receive 2 doses of intravenous ZA or placebo, 3 weeks apart and were followed-up for 6 weeks. The co-primary outcomes were change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score measured breathlessness during trial follow-up and change in the initial area under the curve (iAUC) on thoracic Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) from randomisation to week 5. Multiple secondary endpoints were also evaluated. Between January 2010 and May 2013, 30 patients were enrolled, 24 randomised and 4 withdrew after randomisation (1 withdrew consent; 3 had a clinical decline). At baseline, the ZA group were more breathless, had more advanced disease on radiology and worse quality of life than the placebo group. There was no significant difference between the groups with regards change in breathlessness (Adjusted mean difference (AMD) 4.16 (95%CI -4.7 to 13.0)) or change in DCE-MRI iAUC (AMD -15.4 (95%CI -58.1 to 27.3). Two of nine (22%) in the ZA arm had a >10% improvement by modified RECIST (vs 0/11 who received placebo). There was no significant difference in quality of life measured by the QLQ-C30 score (global QOL: AMD -4.1 (-13.0 to 4.9)), side effects or serious adverse event rates. This is the first human study to evaluate ZA in MPD. The study is limited by small numbers and imbalanced baseline characteristics. Although no convincing treatment effect was identified, potential benefits for specific subgroups of patients cannot be excluded. This study provides important information regarding the feasibility of future trials to evaluate the effects of ZA further. UK Clinical Research Network ID 8877 ISRCTN17030426 www.isrctn.com.

  7. Anti-spastic effects of footbaths in post-stroke patients: a proof-of-principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Shuji; Shimodozono, Megumi; Etoh, Seiji; Noma, Tomokazu; Uema, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Keiko; Miyara, Kodai; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Kawahira, Kazumi

    2014-12-01

    To investigate whether a footbath inhibits spasticity in the hemiplegic lower limbs of post-stroke patients. Randomized, controlled study. Rehabilitation education and research hospital. Twenty-two post-stroke patients were randomly allocated to control or experimental groups. After relaxing in a supine posture for 30min, the experimental group subject's legs were immersed in 41°C water below the knee joint for 15min, while the control group remained in a resting posture. Modified Ashworth Scale (MAS) scores of the affected triceps surae muscle and F-wave parameters (i.e., F-wave amplitude, F/M ratio, and F-wave persistence) were recorded before, immediately after, and 30min after each intervention. Physiological parameters were simultaneously monitored to determine the thermo-therapeutic mechanisms and side effects of footbath usage. At the time immediately after the intervention, F-wave amplitudes decreased significantly in the experimental group, compared to the control group (pdifference: -106.8; 95% CI; -181.58 to -32.09). F-wave amplitudes decreased significantly after 30-min intervention in the experimental group, with a total reduction of 161.2μV being recorded compared to 8.8μV increase in the control group (pdifference: -170.0; 95% CI; -252.73 to -87.33). There were also significant differences between the experimental and control group for both F/M ratio and F-wave persistence, immediately after and 30min after the intervention. Further, there were significant differences between the experimental and control group for the MAS scores immediately after the intervention (pdifference: -0.72; 95% CI; -1.262 to -0.193), and 30min after the intervention (pdifference: -0.73; 95% CI; -1.162 to -0.293). These findings demonstrate that the use of footbaths is an effective non-pharmacological anti-spastic treatment for use in stroke rehabilitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Engineering challenges encountered in the design of the ELMO BUMPY TORUS proof-of-principle fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dillow, C.F.; Imster, H.F.

    1982-01-01

    This paper first provides a summary of the history and current status of the Elmo Bumpy Torus (EBT) fusion concept. A brief description of the EBT-P is then provided in which the many unique features of this fusion device are highlighted. This description will provide the technical background for the following discussions of some of the more challenging mechanical engineering problems encountered to date in the evolution of the EBT-P design. The problems discussed are: optimization of the device primary structure design, optimization of the superconducting magnet x-ray shield design, design of the liquid helium supply and distribution system, and selection of high vacuum seals and pumps and their protection from the high power microwave environment. The common challenge in each of these design issues was to assure adequate performance at minimum cost

  9. A Default Option to Enhance Nutrition within Financial Constraints: A Randomized, Controlled Proof-of-Principle Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffino, Jaime A; Hormes, Julia M

    2018-03-31

    This study aimed to examine the feasibility and initial efficacy of a novel default option intervention targeting nutritional quality of online grocery purchases within the financial constraints of food insecurity. Female undergraduates (n = 59) without eating disorder symptoms or dietary restrictions selected foods online with a budget corresponding to maximum Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits. Before completing the task again, participants were randomly assigned to receive a $10 incentive for selecting nutritious groceries (n = 17), education about nutrition (n = 24), or a default online shopping cart containing a nutritionally balanced selection of groceries (n = 18) to which they could make changes. Nutritional quality was quantified by using the Thrifty Food Plan Calculator. Compared with the education condition, participants in the default condition selected significantly more whole grains and fruits and foods lower in cholesterol, saturated fats, sodium, and overall calories. There were no statistically significant differences in nutritional outcomes between the incentive condition and the other two groups. Findings provide initial support for the efficacy of a default option in facilitating healthier food choice behaviors within financial constraints. © 2018 The Obesity Society.

  10. Ecological Momentary Assessments and Automated Time Series Analysis to Promote Tailored Health Care : A Proof-of-Principle Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Krieke, Lian; Emerencia, Ando C; Bos, Elisabeth H; Rosmalen, Judith Gm; Riese, Harriëtte; Aiello, Marco; Sytema, Sjoerd; de Jonge, Peter

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Health promotion can be tailored by combining ecological momentary assessments (EMA) with time series analysis. This combined method allows for studying the temporal order of dynamic relationships among variables, which may provide concrete indications for intervention. However,

  11. Implosion scaling and hydro dynamically equivalent target design - Strategy for proof of principle of high gain inertial fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, M.; Nishihara, K.; Azechi, H.; Nakatsuka, M.; Kanabe, T.; Miyanaga, N.

    2003-01-01

    Scaling laws for hydro dynamically similar implosions are derived by applying Lie group analysis to the set of partial differential equations for the hydrodynamic system. Physically this implies that any fluid system belonging to a common similarity group evolves quite in the same manner including hydrodynamic instabilities. The scalings strongly depend on the description of the energy transport, i.e., whether the fluid system is heat conductive or adiabatic. Under a fully specified group transformation including prescriptions on the laser wavelength and the ionization state, the hydrodynamic similarity can still be preserved even when the system is cooperated with such other energy sources as classical laser absorption, hot electrons, local alpha heating, and bremsstrahlung loss. The results are expected to give the basis of target design and diagnostics for scaled high gain experiments in future. (author)

  12. Technical Note: A respiratory monitoring and processing system based on computer vision: prototype and proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, Nicolas; Atallah, Vincent; Escarmant, Patrick; Vinh-Hung, Vincent

    2016-09-08

    Monitoring and controlling respiratory motion is a challenge for the accuracy and safety of therapeutic irradiation of thoracic tumors. Various commercial systems based on the monitoring of internal or external surrogates have been developed but remain costly. In this article we describe and validate Madibreast, an in-house-made respiratory monitoring and processing device based on optical tracking of external markers. We designed an optical apparatus to ensure real-time submillimetric image resolution at 4 m. Using OpenCv libraries, we optically tracked high-contrast markers set on patients' breasts. Validation of spatial and time accuracy was performed on a mechanical phantom and on human breast. Madibreast was able to track motion of markers up to a 5 cm/s speed, at a frame rate of 30 fps, with submillimetric accuracy on mechanical phantom and human breasts. Latency was below 100 ms. Concomitant monitoring of three different locations on the breast showed discrepancies in axial motion up to 4 mm for deep-breathing patterns. This low-cost, computer-vision system for real-time motion monitoring of the irradiation of breast cancer patients showed submillimetric accuracy and acceptable latency. It allowed the authors to highlight differences in surface motion that may be correlated to tumor motion.v. © 2016 The Authors.

  13. Office of Fusion Energy recommendations on the Elmo Bumpy Torus proof-of-principle experiment site selection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This report provies background information and rationale for the procedures used and decisions made up to this point. A brief history and technical description of the EBT concept are given. The OFE recommendations as to siting are included

  14. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle. Phase II. Title 1 report. Volume III. Magnet system. Preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ackerman, S.

    1982-01-01

    During Title I, General Dynamics' principal role as a subcontractor to the McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company (MDAC) is to assist in the further development of a low-cost superconducting magnet mirror coil system for the EBT-P program consistent with long life and dependable operation. The activity can best be defined as an extension of ORNL's previous development program with further joint ORNL/MDAC/GDC refining of the mirror coil components. MDAC/GDC participation for the entire program can be subdivided into four distinct elements as follows: (1) design, development, and fabrication of two dewar subassemblies to enclose the ORNL developed and fabricated cold mass assemblies; (2) design, development, and fabrication of a production prototype magnet system including conductor (procurement), cold mass components, dewar and x-ray shield. This prototype would form the basis for the production of 36 magnets for the torus and three spares. (3) design, development, and fabrication of an electrical/electronic system including quench protection, instrumentation and control, and power supply to power and protect the mirror coil system during its operation in the torus; (4) fabrication of the 39 production magnets

  15. Giardiasis as zoonosis: between proof of principle and paradigm in the Northwestern region of São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cardoso Caseca Volotão

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In order to evaluate the potential zoonotic transmission of Giardia duodenalis, isolates from humans and dogs in the Northwestern region of the São Paulo State, Brazil were characterized based on the β-giardin gene. METHODS: The samples were analyzed by sequencing of the Nested-PCR products. RESULTS: The A1 and A2 subgenotypes were detected in human and dogs. Cysts of assemblage B, C and D have not been found in any isolates studied. CONCLUSIONS: These results are consistent with the view that giardiasis in the largest endemic region of the Brazil should not be seen as a single entity.

  16. Laser spectroscopy of short-lived radionuclides in an ion trap: MIRACLS’ proof-of-principle experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Maier, Franziska Maria

    2017-01-01

    Since 1978 Collinear Laser Spectroscopy is done at COLLAPS [1], which is located at ISOLDE,CERN’sfacilityforsynthesizingradioactiveions,toexplorethenuclearshell structure of the most exotic atomic nuclides far away from stability. At COLLAPS a laser beam is overlapped with a radioactive ion beam. If the wavelength of the laser corresponds to the energy difference of the electronic transitions, the laser excites the ions. The excited ions decay back to the ionic ground state and emit fluorescence photons that can be detected with photomultiplier tubes (PMTs). By measuring the hyperfine structure of the involved ionic states one obtains information about the nuclear spin, the nuclear magnetic dipole moment and the nuclear electric quadrupole moment. This hyperfine splitting is caused by the interaction of the bound electrons withtheatomicnucleus. Theelectronsinduceanelectromagneticfieldattheplaceof the nucleus that interacts with the electromagnetic nuclear moments and the nuclear spin. By calculating th...

  17. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume IV. Microwave system. Preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    The EBT-P Microwave System provides microwaves for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) to both stabilize and heat the EBT-P plasma. A 28 gigahertz (GHz) system is required to form the hot electron annulus plasma that provides MHD stabilization to the core plasma. A 60 GHz system is required to heat the core plasma and will provide some second harmonic heating of the hot electron annulus. The principal microwave system elements and their design characteristics are summarized. The microwave system includes 200 kilowatt (kW) gyrotrons at 60 GHz for core heating and 200 kW gyrotrons at 28 GHz for annulus heating. The basic operating complement will be six (6) 60 GHz tubes and two (2) 28 GHz tubes. PACE (Plant and Capital Equipment) procurement will include four (4) 60 GHz gyrotrons with two (2) GHz tubes procured under operations and the two (2) 28 GHz tubes will be provided, with mounts, from the EBT-S program. Each tube is rigidly mounted on an oil filled tank assembly which provides electrical isolation and cooling. All tubes and mounts will be located in the lower level of the torus enclosure. An extensive demineralized water flow system is required to provide gyrotron cooling

  18. Modulation of iTBS after-effects via concurrent directional TDCS: A proof of principle study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Sara; Hannah, Ricci; Rawji, Vishal; Rothwell, John C

    Polarising currents can modulate membrane potentials in animals, affecting the after-effect of theta burst stimulation (TBS) on synaptic strength. We examined whether a similar phenomenon could also be observed in human motor cortex (M1) using transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) during monophasic intermittent TBS (iTBS). TDCS was applied during posterior-anterior iTBS using three different conditions: posterior-anterior TDCS (anode 3.5 cm posterior to M1, cathode 3.5 cm anterior to M1), anterior-posterior TDCS (cathode 3.5 cm posterior to M1, anode 3.5 cm anterior to M1), and sham TDCS. When the direction of TDCS (posterior-anterior) matched the direction of the electrical field induced by iTBS, we found a 19% non-significant increase in excitability changes in comparison with iTBS combined with sham TDCS. When the TDCS was reversed (anterior-posterior), the excitatory effect of iTBS was abolished. Our findings suggest that excitatory after-effects of iTBS can be modulated by directionally-specific TDCS. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A method for evaluating cognitively informed micro-targeted campaign strategies: An agent-based model proof of principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Jens Koed; Pilditch, Toby D

    2018-01-01

    In political campaigns, perceived candidate credibility influences the persuasiveness of messages. In campaigns aiming to influence people's beliefs, micro-targeted campaigns (MTCs) that target specific voters using their psychological profile have become increasingly prevalent. It remains open how effective MTCs are, notably in comparison to population-targeted campaign strategies. Using an agent-based model, the paper applies recent insights from cognitive models of persuasion, extending them to the societal level in a novel framework for exploring political campaigning. The paper provides an initial treatment of the complex dynamics of population level political campaigning in a psychologically informed manner. Model simulations show that MTCs can take advantage of the psychology of the electorate by targeting voters favourable disposed towards the candidate. Relative to broad campaigning, MTCs allow for efficient and adaptive management of complex campaigns. Findings show that disliked MTC candidates can beat liked population-targeting candidates, pointing to societal questions concerning campaign regulations.

  20. Effects of adipose stem cell sheets on colon anastomotic leakage in an experimental model: Proof of principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sukho, Panithi; Boersema, Geesien S A; Cohen, Abigael; Kops, Nicole; Lange, Johan F; Kirpensteijn, Jolle; Hesselink, Jan Willem; Bastiaansen-Jenniskens, Yvonne M; Verseijden, Femke

    2017-01-01

    The most dreaded complication of colorectal surgery is anastomotic leakage. Adipose tissue-derived stem cell sheets (ASC sheets) prepared from temperature-responsive culture surfaces can be easily transplanted onto tissues. These sheets are proposed to improve cell transplant efficiency and enhance

  1. Tissue Discrimination by Uncorrected Autofluorescence Spectra: A Proof-of-Principle Study for Tissue-Specific Laser Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Tangermann-Gerk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Laser surgery provides a number of advantages over conventional surgery. However, it implies large risks for sensitive tissue structures due to its characteristic non-tissue-specific ablation. The present study investigates the discrimination of nine different ex vivo tissue types by using uncorrected (raw autofluorescence spectra for the development of a remote feedback control system for tissue-selective laser surgery. Autofluorescence spectra (excitation wavelength 377 ± 50 nm were measured from nine different ex vivo tissue types, obtained from 15 domestic pig cadavers. For data analysis, a wavelength range between 450 nm and 650 nm was investigated. Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA were used to discriminate the tissue types. ROC analysis showed that PCA, followed by QDA, could differentiate all investigated tissue types with AUC results between 1.00 and 0.97. Sensitivity reached values between 93% and 100% and specificity values between 94% and 100%. This ex vivo study shows a high differentiation potential for physiological tissue types when performing autofluorescence spectroscopy followed by PCA and QDA. The uncorrected autofluorescence spectra are suitable for reliable tissue discrimination and have a high potential to meet the challenges necessary for an optical feedback system for tissue-specific laser surgery.

  2. A randomised controlled trial of intravenous zoledronic acid in malignant pleural disease: a proof of principle pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia O Clive

    Full Text Available Animal studies have shown Zoledronic Acid (ZA may diminish pleural fluid accumulation and tumour bulk in malignant pleural disease (MPD. We performed a pilot study to evaluate its effects in humans.We undertook a single centre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in adults with MPD. Patients were randomised (1:1 to receive 2 doses of intravenous ZA or placebo, 3 weeks apart and were followed-up for 6 weeks. The co-primary outcomes were change in Visual Analogue Scale (VAS score measured breathlessness during trial follow-up and change in the initial area under the curve (iAUC on thoracic Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI from randomisation to week 5. Multiple secondary endpoints were also evaluated.Between January 2010 and May 2013, 30 patients were enrolled, 24 randomised and 4 withdrew after randomisation (1 withdrew consent; 3 had a clinical decline. At baseline, the ZA group were more breathless, had more advanced disease on radiology and worse quality of life than the placebo group. There was no significant difference between the groups with regards change in breathlessness (Adjusted mean difference (AMD 4.16 (95%CI -4.7 to 13.0 or change in DCE-MRI iAUC (AMD -15.4 (95%CI -58.1 to 27.3. Two of nine (22% in the ZA arm had a >10% improvement by modified RECIST (vs 0/11 who received placebo. There was no significant difference in quality of life measured by the QLQ-C30 score (global QOL: AMD -4.1 (-13.0 to 4.9, side effects or serious adverse event rates.This is the first human study to evaluate ZA in MPD. The study is limited by small numbers and imbalanced baseline characteristics. Although no convincing treatment effect was identified, potential benefits for specific subgroups of patients cannot be excluded. This study provides important information regarding the feasibility of future trials to evaluate the effects of ZA further.UK Clinical Research Network ID 8877 ISRCTN17030426 www.isrctn.com.

  3. Elmo Bumpy Torus proof of principle, Phase II: Title 1 report. Volume V. Vacuum-pumping system. Preliminary design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report summarizes Title I Preliminary Design of the EBT-P Vacuum Pumping System. The Vacuum Pumping System has been designed by the McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co. - St. Louis (MDAC). It includes the necessary vacuum pumps and vacuum valves to evacuate the torus, the Mirror Coil Dewars (MC Dewars), and the Gyrotron Magnet Dewars. The pumping ducts, manifolds, and microwave protection system are also included. A summary of the function of each subsystem and a description of its principle components is provided below. The analyses performed during the system design are also identified

  4. Engineering a pH-Regulated Switch in the Major Light-Harvesting Complex of Plants (LHCII): Proof of Principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, Nicoletta; Natali, Alberto; Croce, Roberta

    2016-12-15

    Under excess light, photosynthetic organisms employ feedback mechanisms to avoid photodamage. Photoprotection is triggered by acidification of the lumen of the photosynthetic membrane following saturation of the metabolic activity. A low pH triggers thermal dissipation of excess absorbed energy by the light-harvesting complexes (LHCs). LHCs are not able to sense pH variations, and their switch to a dissipative mode depends on stress-related proteins and allosteric cofactors. In green algae the trigger is the pigment-protein complex LHCSR3. Its C-terminus is responsible for a pH-driven conformational change from a light-harvesting to a quenched state. Here, we show that by replacing the C-terminus of the main LHC of plants with that of LHCSR3, it is possible to regulate its excited-state lifetime solely via protonation, demonstrating that the protein template of LHCs can be modified to activate reversible quenching mechanisms independent of external cofactors and triggers.

  5. Systemic Endoradiotherapy with Carrier Added 4 [131I] Iodo LPhenylalanine: Clinical Proof of principle in Refractory Glioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Richard P.; Schuchardt, Christiane; Senftleben, Stephan; Gildehaus, Franz Josef; Samnick, Samuel; Kluge, Andreas; Bronzel, Marcus; Schmidt, Karl

    2011-01-01

    To explore feasibility, tolerability, dosimetry and probable efficacy of intravenous endoradiotherapy with carrier added 4 [ 131I ]iodo Lp henylalanine (c.a. 131I IPA) in refractory high grade glioma. Two male patients (45 and 50 years), with long standing, extensively pretreated gliomas and evidence of progression underwent single intravenous injections of 2 and 4 GBq of c.a. 131I IPA, respectively. Tumor targeting was verified by 131I IPA single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Metabolic and morphological changes indicative of tumour response were assessed by sequential [ 18F ] fluoroethyltyrosine ( 18F FET) positron emission tomography (PET) and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following therapy. Further monitoring included clinical state, safety laboratory, quality of life and dosimetry. Absorbed mean organ and whole body doses were determined according to the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) scheme using OLINDAEXM based on serial planar scintigraphy. Both patients tolerated the treatment well. No evidence of acute of delayed organ toxicity was observed. 131I IPA accumulated in the tumour recurrences identified by MRI/ 18F FET. In patient 1, PET showed progressively decreasing maximum standardised uptake values (SUVmax) over 10 months, indicating metabolic response, paralleled by reduced contrast enhancement and tumour volume on MRI. Progression occurred 18 months after therapy. Treatment was repeated using 6.6 GBq of 131I IPA, to which no response was observed. Patient 2, followed up for 3 months after therapy, showed stable disease on MRI and PET. Mean absorbed whole body doses ranged from 0.13 to 0.17 mSv/MBq, with the highest absorbed organ doses to kidneys, bladder and heart (0.86-1.23; 0.49-0.6 and 0.45-0.56 mSv/MBq). Systemic endoradiotherapy using up to 6.6 GBq of c.a. 131I IPA is not associated with clinically detectable toxicity. Measurable anti tumour effects in gliomas were observed. 131I IPA warrants further evaluation as glioma therapy.

  6. Volatile Organic Compound (VOC) Analysis For Disease Detection: Proof Of Principle For Field Studies Detecting Paratuberculosis And Brucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knobloch, Henri; Köhler, Heike; Nicola, Commander; Reinhold, Petra; Turner, Claire; Chambers, Mark

    2009-05-01

    A proof of concept investigation was performed to demonstrate that two independent infectious diseases of cattle result in different patterns of volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the headspace of serum samples detectable using an electronic nose (e-nose). A total of 117 sera from cattle naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (paraTB, n = 43) or Brucella sp. (n = 26) and sera from corresponding control animals (n = 48) were randomly and analysed blind to infection status using a ST214 e-nose (Scensive Ltd, Leeds, UK). Samples were collected under non-standardised conditions on different farms from the UK (brucellosis) and Germany (paraTB). The e-nose could differentiate the sera from brucellosis infected, paraTB infected and healthy animals at the population level, but the technology used was not suitable for determination of the disease status of individual animals. Nevertheless, the data indicate that there are differences in the sensor responses depending on the disease status, and therefore, it shows the potential of VOC analysis from serum headspace samples for disease detection.

  7. Review: Thomas Bierschenk and Eva Spies (eds, 50 Jahre Unabhängigkeit in Afrika: Kontinuitäten, Brüche, Perspektiven (2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert Castryck

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Review of the edited volume: Thomas Bierschenk and Eva Spies (eds, 50 Jahre Unabhängigkeit in Afrika: Kontinuitäten, Brüche, Perspektiven, Cologne: Rüdiger Köppe Verlag, 2012, ISBN 9783896458292, 572 pages

  8. The Use Of Standardized Indicators (SPI And SPEI In Predicting Droughts Over The Republic Of Moldova Territory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedealcov M.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The drought events frequent manifestation over the Republic of Moldova territory, in the context of climate change requires a scientific monitoring adjusted to international researchers. In recent years, internationally, the estimation of this phenomenon occurs through standardized indexes. The most used of these, being the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI. Since there is no a unified definition of drought, the World Meteorological Organization proposes to calculate the indexes, through developed calculation software. Thus, based on multi-annual data (1980-2014 a regional spatio-temporal estimation concerning drought in the Republic of Moldova was performed, thereby realizing the regional investigations framing in the international ones.

  9. Apartheid Spies: The Character, the Reader, and the Censor in André Brink’s A Dry White Season

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Iannaccaro

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available André Brink’s novel A Dry White Season (1979 is strictly connected with the time and place in which it was written. Its dialogue with the real Johannesburg of the late Seventies is manifest: characters and plot are grafted on real events, like the youth riots in Soweto (1976 and the death of Steve Biko in the hands of the Security Police (1977. Brink’s early novels have been commended for their political commitment, but also criticized for being ‘easily’ documentary. Yet, A Dry White Season’s structure is rather complex, and its fabricated nature is shown to the reader through the device of the double internal narrator and the considerable number of ‘documents’ discovered and employed – each telling its own truth. The metaphor of the ‘spying gaze’ proposed here is useful in order to point out the interconnections between story and history, as it shows the way in which a complex and multi-layered narrative structure succeeds in both reflecting and exposing the intricate apartheid system devised to control and ‘discipline’ its own citizens. In the novel, most of the characters intrude into the life of the others and are intruded upon, included peaceful citizens who are obliged to defend themselves from an oppressive and violent police State. At the same time, also the reader is drawn into the dangerous spying game, above all when he/she is introduced into that notorious site of interrogation, torture and detention which was the Johannesburg Police Station in John Vorster Square. The last part of the essay takes into consideration the South African censorship system in force at the time, to show that the activity of surveillance is both intrinsic to the narration and external, related to the conditions of the novel’s composition and appearance on the literary market.

  10. Design study of prototype accelerator and MeV test facility for demonstration of 1 MeV, 1 A negative ion beam production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takashi; Hanada, Masaya; Miyamoto, Kenji; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Okumura, Yoshikazu; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Maeno, Shuichi.

    1994-08-01

    In fusion reactors such as ITER, a neutral beam injector of MeV class beam energy and several tens MW class power is required as one of candidates of heating and current drive systems. However, the beam energy of existing high power accelerators are one order of magnitude lower than the required value. In order to realize a neutral beam injector for the fusion reactor, 'Proof-of-Principle' of such high energy acceleration is a critical issue at a reactor relevant beam current and pulse length. An accelerator and an accelerator facility which are necessary to demonstrate the Proof-of-Principle acceleration of negative ion beams up to 1 MeV, have been designed in the present study. The accelerator is composed of a cesium-volume type ion source and a multi-stage electrostatic acceleration system [Prototype Accelerator]. A negative hydrogen ion beam with the current of about one ampere (1 A) can be accelerated up to 1 MeV at a low operating pressure. Two types of acceleration system, a multi-multi type and a multi-single type, have been studied. The test facility has sufficient capability for the test of the Prototype Accelerator [MeV Test Facility]. The dc high voltage generator for negative ion acceleration is a Cockcroft-Walton type and capable of delivering 1 A at 1 MV (=1 MW) for 60 s. High voltage components including Prototype Accelerator are installed in a SF 6 vessel pressurized at 6 kg/cm 2 to overcome high voltage gradients. The vessel and the beamline are installed in a X-ray shield. (author)

  11. Program management plan for development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts associated with Oak Ridge Reservation's Land Disposal Restrictions Federal Facility Compliance Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, T.B.

    1994-04-01

    This program management plan covers the development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation efforts necessary to identify treatment methods for all the waste listed in Appendix B of the ORR's LDR/FFCA as well as any new wastes which meet Appendix B criteria. To successfully identify a treatment method, at least a proof-of-principle level of understanding must be obtained: that is, the candidate processes must be demonstrated as effective in treating the wastes to the LDR; however, an optimized process is not required. Where applicable and deemed necessary and where the budgets will support them, pilot-scale demonstrations will be pursued. The overall strategy being adopted in this program will be composed of the following activities: Scoping of the study; characterization; development and screening of alternatives; treatability investigations; and detailed analysis of alternatives

  12. Expression of OsSPY and 14-3-3 genes involved in plant height variations of ion-beam-induced KDML 105 rice mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phanchaisri, Boonrak [Science and Technology Research Institute, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Samsang, Nuananong [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, Liang Deng; Singkarat, Somsorn [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Anuntalabhochai, Somboon, E-mail: soanu.1@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand)

    2012-06-01

    The culm length of two semidwarf rice mutants (PKOS1, HyKOS1) obtained from low-energy N-ion beam bombardments of dehusked Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105) seeds showed 25.7% and 21.5% height reductions and one spindly rice mutant (TKOS4) showed 21.4% increase in comparison with that of the KDML 105 control. A cDNA-RAPD analysis identified differential gene expression in internode tissues of the rice mutants. Two genes identified from the cDNA-RAPD were OsSPY and 14-3-3, possibly associated with stem height variations of the semidwarf and spindly mutants, respectively. The OsSPY gene encoded the SPY protein which is considered to be a negative regulator of gibberellin (GA). On the other hand, the 14-3-3 encoded a signaling protein which can bind and prevent the RSG (repression of shoot growth) protein function as a transcriptional repressor of the kaurene oxidase (KO) gene in the GA biosynthetic pathway. Expression analysis of OsSPY, 14-3-3, RSG, KO, and SLR1 was confirmed in rice internode tissues during the reproductive stage of the plants by semi-quantitative RT-PCR technique. The expression analysis showed a clear increase of the levels of OsSPY transcripts in PKOS1 and HyKOS1 tissue samples compared to that of the KDML 105 and TKOS4 samples at the age of 50-60 days which were at the ages of internode elongation. The 14-3-3 expression had the highest increase in the TKOS4 samples compared to those in KDML 105, PKOS1 and HyKOS1 samples. The expression analysis of RSG and KO showed an increase in TKOS4 samples compared to that of the KDML 105 and that of the two semidwarf mutants. These results indicate that changes of OsSPY and 14-3-3 expression could affect internode elongation and cause the phenotypic changes of semidwarf and spindly rice mutants, respectively.

  13. Expression of OsSPY and 14-3-3 genes involved in plant height variations of ion-beam-induced KDML 105 rice mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phanchaisri, Boonrak; Samsang, Nuananong; Yu, Liang Deng; Singkarat, Somsorn; Anuntalabhochai, Somboon

    2012-01-01

    The culm length of two semidwarf rice mutants (PKOS1, HyKOS1) obtained from low-energy N-ion beam bombardments of dehusked Thai jasmine rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. KDML 105) seeds showed 25.7% and 21.5% height reductions and one spindly rice mutant (TKOS4) showed 21.4% increase in comparison with that of the KDML 105 control. A cDNA-RAPD analysis identified differential gene expression in internode tissues of the rice mutants. Two genes identified from the cDNA-RAPD were OsSPY and 14-3-3, possibly associated with stem height variations of the semidwarf and spindly mutants, respectively. The OsSPY gene encoded the SPY protein which is considered to be a negative regulator of gibberellin (GA). On the other hand, the 14-3-3 encoded a signaling protein which can bind and prevent the RSG (repression of shoot growth) protein function as a transcriptional repressor of the kaurene oxidase (KO) gene in the GA biosynthetic pathway. Expression analysis of OsSPY, 14-3-3, RSG, KO, and SLR1 was confirmed in rice internode tissues during the reproductive stage of the plants by semi-quantitative RT-PCR technique. The expression analysis showed a clear increase of the levels of OsSPY transcripts in PKOS1 and HyKOS1 tissue samples compared to that of the KDML 105 and TKOS4 samples at the age of 50–60 days which were at the ages of internode elongation. The 14-3-3 expression had the highest increase in the TKOS4 samples compared to those in KDML 105, PKOS1 and HyKOS1 samples. The expression analysis of RSG and KO showed an increase in TKOS4 samples compared to that of the KDML 105 and that of the two semidwarf mutants. These results indicate that changes of OsSPY and 14-3-3 expression could affect internode elongation and cause the phenotypic changes of semidwarf and spindly rice mutants, respectively.

  14. Pre Cold War British Spy Fiction, the “albatross of self” and lines of flight in Gravity’s Rainbow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Wishart Smith

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In his introduction to 'Slow Learner' Thomas Pynchon suggests that an influence in his short story ‘Under the Rose’ was the spy fiction he had read as a child.  What he takes from the form, he says, is an enjoyment of  “lurking, spying, false identities, psychological games.” I hope to show that this youthful reading has interesting things to tell us about Pynchon’s writing beyond ‘Under the Rose’ and in more complex ways than his quote suggests. To do this I want to focus on that perennial issue of spy fiction - the maintenance and manipulation of identity. Negotiating ideas of subjectivity is a core concern in Pynchon’s work and to consider it I want to use the four spy novelists he mentions in the 'Slow Learner' introduction - John Buchan, E. Phillips Oppenheim, Helen MacInnes and Geoffrey Household. This is a more disparate quartet of authors than Pynchon’s grouping suggests and I want to employ them to consider a variety of strategies used to ‘build character’ and the way Pynchon’s work approaches these strategies.  This allows a reflection on questions of disguise, doubles, animals and the nomad within the context of a variety of postcolonial theories and aspects of Deleuze and Guattari’s “nomadology”. 'V 'would appear an obvious place to see connections to spy fiction, but, though I touch on some aspects of this novel, my focus will be very much on 'Gravity’s Rainbow' because it has a much more concerted focus on the subject of Empire. Some intriguing echoes are to be found in the work of Pynchon in these authors and I hope to show how Pynchon’s attempts to formulate US “superimperialism” (Aijaz Ahmad are reflected in the imperial concerns of what I would term the pre-Cold War British Spy fiction that engaged Pynchon in his youth.

  15. OPATs: Omnibus P-value association tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Wei; Yang, Hsin-Chou

    2017-07-10

    Combining statistical significances (P-values) from a set of single-locus association tests in genome-wide association studies is a proof-of-principle method for identifying disease-associated genomic segments, functional genes and biological pathways. We review P-value combinations for genome-wide association studies and introduce an integrated analysis tool, Omnibus P-value Association Tests (OPATs), which provides popular analysis methods of P-value combinations. The software OPATs programmed in R and R graphical user interface features a user-friendly interface. In addition to analysis modules for data quality control and single-locus association tests, OPATs provides three types of set-based association test: window-, gene- and biopathway-based association tests. P-value combinations with or without threshold and rank truncation are provided. The significance of a set-based association test is evaluated by using resampling procedures. Performance of the set-based association tests in OPATs has been evaluated by simulation studies and real data analyses. These set-based association tests help boost the statistical power, alleviate the multiple-testing problem, reduce the impact of genetic heterogeneity, increase the replication efficiency of association tests and facilitate the interpretation of association signals by streamlining the testing procedures and integrating the genetic effects of multiple variants in genomic regions of biological relevance. In summary, P-value combinations facilitate the identification of marker sets associated with disease susceptibility and uncover missing heritability in association studies, thereby establishing a foundation for the genetic dissection of complex diseases and traits. OPATs provides an easy-to-use and statistically powerful analysis tool for P-value combinations. OPATs, examples, and user guide can be downloaded from http://www.stat.sinica.edu.tw/hsinchou/genetics/association/OPATs.htm. © The Author 2017

  16. Establishing a novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure for the direct detection of gene doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiter, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martina; Fragasso, Annunziata; Armeanu, Sorin; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Su, Hua; Young, William L; Niess, Andreas M; Simon, Perikles

    2008-01-01

    So far, the abuse of gene transfer technology in sport, so-called gene doping, is undetectable. However, recent studies in somatic gene therapy indicate that long-term presence of transgenic DNA (tDNA) following various gene transfer protocols can be found in DNA isolated from whole blood using conventional PCR protocols. Application of these protocols for the direct detection of gene doping would require almost complete knowledge about the sequence of the genetic information that has been transferred. Here, we develop and describe the novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure that overcomes this difficulty. Apart from the interesting perspectives that this spiPCR procedure offers in the fight against gene doping, this technology could also be of interest in biodistribution and biosafety studies for gene therapeutic applications.

  17. Pentalum SpiDAR Deployment at SWiFT FY17.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westergaard, Carsten [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pol, Suhas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pereira, Tassia [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Castillo, Ricardo [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The Texas Tech University ( TTU ) research group is actively studying the wake development of wind turbines, as part of developing innovative wake control strategies to improve the performance of wind farms. Recently, the team received a set of five new gro und lidars to perform field measurements at the Sandia National Laboratories SWiFT site. This document describes tests details including configurations, timeframe, hardware, and the required collaboration from the Sandia team. This test plan will facili tate the coordination between both TTU and the Sandia team in terms of site accessibility, staff training, and data sharing to meet the specific objectives of the tests.

  18. Determination of the Integral/SPI instrumental response and his application to the observation of gamma ray lines in the Vela region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attie, D.

    2005-01-01

    The INTEGRAL/SPI spectrometer was designed to observe the sky in the energy band of 20 keV to 8 MeV. The specificity of instrument SPI rests on the excellent spectral resolution (2.3 keV with 1 MeV) of its detecting plan, composed of 19 cooled germanium crystals; covering an effective area of 508 cm 2 . The use of a coded mask, located at 1.7 m above the detection plan ensures to it a resolving power of 2.5 degrees. The aim of this thesis, begun before the INTEGRAL launch, is made up of two parts. The first part relates to the analysis of the spectrometer calibration data. The objective was to measure and check the performances of the telescope, in particular to validate simulations of the INTEGRAL/SPI instrument response. This objective was successfully achieved. This analysis also highlights the presence of a significant instrumental background noise. Whereas, the second part concentrates on the data analysis of the Vela region observations. I have approached two astrophysical topics dealing with: - the search for radioactive decays lines of titanium-44, which is produced by explosive nucleosynthesis, in the supernova remnant of Vela Junior and, - the search of cyclotron resonance scattering features expected towards 25 keV and 52 keV in the accreting pulsar spectrum of the x-ray binary star Vela X-1. Putting forward the hypothesis that the result obtained previously by COMPTEL is correct and considering the no-detection of the titanium-44 lines by SPI, we give a lower limit at 4500 km s -1 for the ejecta velocity from Vela Junior. The analysis on the research of the cyclotron lines have shown that the results are very sensitive to the instrumental background. Thorough studies will be necessary to guarantee an unambiguous detection of these lines. (author)

  19. High-energy test of proton radiography concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amann, J.F.; Atencio, L.G.; Espinoza, C.J.

    1997-01-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The goal of this work was to demonstrate the use of high energy protons to produce radiographs of heavy metal test objects. The authors executed a proof-of-principle experiment using GeV proton beams available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The experiment produced proton radiographs of a suitably dense, unclassified test object. The experiment tested capabilities in data collection, image reconstruction, and hydro-code simulation and validated models of high-energy proton radiography. A lens was designed using existing quadrupole magnets, constructed on the A1 beam line of the AGS and used to image 10-GeV protons. The results include: (1) images made with an integrating detector, (2) measurements of the background and measurements of the resolution functions, and (3) forward model fits to the transmission data. In all cases the results agree with initial estimates and provide strong support for the utility of proton radiography as a new hydrotest diagnostic

  20. Design for the National RF Test Facility at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardner, W.L.; Hoffman, D.J.; Becraft, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Conceptual and preliminary engineering design for the National RF Test Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been completed. The facility will comprise a single mirror configuration embodying two superconducting development coils from the ELMO Bumpy Torus Proof-of-Principle (EBT-P) program on either side of a cavity designed for full-scale antenna testing. The coils are capable of generating a 1.2-T field at the axial midpoint between the coils separated by 1.0 m. The vacuum vessel will be a stainless steel, water-cooled structure having an 85-cm-radius central cavity. The facility will have the use of a number of continuous wave (cw), radio-frequency (rf) sources at levels including 600 kW at 80 MHz and 100 kW at 28 GHz. Several plasma sources will provide a wide range of plasma environments, including densities as high as approx. 5 x 10 13 cm -3 and temperatures on the order of approx. 10 eV. Furthermore, a wide range of diagnostics will be available to the experimenter for accurate appraisal of rf testing

  1. Enhanced H- ion source testing capabilities at LANSCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingalls, W.B.; Hardy, M.W.; Prichard, B.A.; Sander, O.R.; Stelzer, J.E.; Stevens, R.R.; Leung, K.N.; Williams, M.D.

    1998-01-01

    As part of the on-going beam-current upgrade in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), the current available from the H - injector will be increased from the present 16 to 18 mA to as much as 40 mA. A collaboration between the Ion Beam Technology Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the Ion Sources and Injectors section of LANSCE-2 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been formed to develop and evaluate a new ion source. A new Ion Source Test Stand (ISTS) has been constructed at LANSCE to evaluate candidate ion sources. The ISTS has been constructed to duplicate as closely as possible the beam transport and ancillary systems presently in use in the LANSCE H - injector, while incorporating additional beam diagnostics for source testing. The construction and commissioning of the ISTS will be described, preliminary results for the proof-of-principle ion source developed by the Berkeley group will be presented, and future plans for the extension of the test stand will be presented

  2. Current clinical trials testing combinations of immunotherapy and radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crittenden, Marka; Kohrt, Holbrook; Levy, Ronald; Jones, Jennifer; Camphausen, Kevin; Dicker, Adam; Demaria, Sandra; Formenti, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Preclinical evidence of successful combinations of ionizing radiation with immunotherapy has inspired testing the translation of these results to the clinic. Interestingly, the preclinical work has consistently predicted the responses encountered in clinical trials. The first example came from a proof-of-principle trial started in 2001 that tested the concept that growth factors acting on antigen-presenting cells improve presentation of tumor antigens released by radiation and induce an abscopal effect. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor was administered during radiotherapy to a metastatic site in patients with metastatic solid tumors to translate evidence obtained in a murine model of syngeneic mammary carcinoma treated with cytokine FLT-3L and radiation. Subsequent clinical availability of vaccines and immune checkpoint inhibitors has triggered a wave of enthusiasm for testing them in combination with radiotherapy. Examples of ongoing clinical trials are described in this report. Importantly, most of these trials include careful immune monitoring of the patients enrolled and will generate important data about the proimmunogenic effects of radiation in combination with a variety of immune modulators, in different disease settings. Results of these studies are building a platform of evidence for radiotherapy as an adjuvant to immunotherapy and encourage the growth of this novel field of radiation oncology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemical Method to Improve CO{sub 2} Flooding Sweep Efficiency for Oil Recovery Using SPI-CO{sub 2} Gels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Lyle D.

    2009-04-14

    The problem in CO{sub 2} flooding lies with its higher mobility causing low conformance or sweep efficiency. This is an issue in oilfield applications where an injected fluid or gas used to mobilize and produce the oil in a marginal field has substantially higher mobility (function of viscosity and density and relative permeability) relative to the crude oil promoting fingering and early breakthrough. Conformance is particularly critical in CO{sub 2} oilfield floods where the end result is less oil recovered and substantially higher costs related to the CO{sub 2}. The SPI-CO{sub 2} (here after called “SPI”) gel system is a unique silicate based gel system that offers a technically effective solution to the conformance problem with CO{sub 2} floods. This SPI gel system remains a low viscosity fluid until an external initiator (CO{sub 2}) triggers gelation. This is a clear improvement over current technologies where the gels set up as a function of time, regardless of where it is placed in the reservoir. In those current systems, the internal initiator is included in the injected fluid for water shut off applications. In this new research effort, the CO{sub 2} is an external initiator contacted after SPI gel solution placement. This concept ensures in the proper water wet reservoir environment that the SPI gel sets up in the precise high permeability path followed by the CO{sub 2}, therefore improving sweep efficiency to a greater degree than conventional systems. In addition, the final SPI product in commercial quantities is expected to be low cost over the competing systems. This Phase I research effort provided “proof of concept” that SPI gels possess strength and may be formed in a sand pack reducing the permeability to brine and CO{sub 2} flow. This SPI technology is a natural extension of prior R & D and the Phase I effort that together show a high potential for success in a Phase II follow-on project. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a major by-product of

  4. Analysis of Gridded SPI in Hawai`i from 1920 to 2012 and Management Responses to Drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, A. G.; Lucas, M.; Giardina, C. P.; Giambelluca, T. W.; Trauernicht, C.; Miura, T.

    2017-12-01

    Drought is a prominent feature of Hawai`i's climate with severe impacts in multiple sectors. Over the last century, Hawai`i has experienced downward trends in rainfall and stream baseflow, upward trends in the number of consecutive dry days and wildfire incidents, and regional projections show that unusually severe dry seasons will become increasingly common on the leeward side of all Hawaiian Islands. Many recent studies have examined different aspects of drought in Hawai`i, however, there has not been a complete synthesis of historical drought since 1991. To assess historical drought regimes in Hawai`i, a gridded Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) product was developed and analyzed for the period 1920 to 2012 at 250 m resolution. Results show that the last decade has been the driest on record, with statewide drought conditions present 90% of the time between December 2006 and December 2012. Strong spatial variations were found between islands, with higher peak intensities found on Maui and Hawai`i Island, and shorter duration droughts on Kaua`i. The most severe droughts are typically associated with El Niño events, and in recent decades, the leeward coast of Hawai`i Island has been the most drought-prone area in the state. This study also assessed historical drought specifically for federal and state conservation lands, and examined management actions during recent events. Severe droughts have shaped management plans, affecting responses including ungulate control, fuel reductions, native plant restoration, and protection of endangered species. This spatially explicit retrospective analysis provides the historical context needed to understand future projections, and contributes to more effective policy and management of natural, cultural, hydrological and agricultural resources.

  5. Test plan for evaluating the performance of the in-tank fluidic sampling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BOGER, R.M.

    1999-01-01

    The PHMC will provide Low Activity Wastes (LAW) tank wastes for final treatment by a privatization contractor from double-shell feed tanks, 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104, Concerns about the inability of the baseline ''grab'' sampling to provide large volume samples within time constraints has led to the development of a conceptual sampling system that would be deployed in a feed tank riser, This sampling system will provide large volume, representative samples without the environmental, radiation exposure, and sample volume impacts of the current base-line ''grab'' sampling method. This test plan identifies ''proof-of-principle'' cold tests for the conceptual sampling system using simulant materials. The need for additional testing was identified as a result of completing tests described in the revision test plan document, Revision 1 outlines tests that will evaluate the performance and ability to provide samples that are representative of a tanks' content within a 95 percent confidence interval, to recovery from plugging, to sample supernatant wastes with over 25 wt% solids content, and to evaluate the impact of sampling at different heights within the feed tank. The test plan also identifies operating parameters that will optimize the performance of the sampling system

  6. Study of the electron-positron annihilation in the galactic center region with the Integral/SPI spectrometer; Etude de l'annihilation electron-positon dans la region du centre galactique avec le spectrometre INTEGRAL/SPI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizun, P

    2007-04-15

    A spectral feature was detected in 1970 in the gamma-ray emission from the central regions of the Milky Way, during balloon flight observations. Located near 511 keV, this feature was soon attributed to the gamma-ray line tracing the annihilation of electrons with their anti-particles, positrons. However, none of the multiple astrophysical scenarios contemplated to explain the production of positrons in the Galactic bulge has been able to reproduce the high injection rate deduced from the flux of the 511 keV line, close to 10{sup 43} positrons per second. Launched in 2002, the European gamma-ray satellite INTEGRAL was provided with a spectrometer, SPI, whose unprecedented imaging and spectral capabilities in this energy range enable us to further study the source of the 511 keV line detected in the Galactic centre region. Indeed, a better determination of the spatial extent of the source, the intrinsic width of the line and the fraction of positrons annihilating in-flight, directly or via the formation of ortho-Positronium atoms would improve our knowledge of both the annihilation medium and the initial source of positrons, and could allow us to discriminate between the various explanatory scenarios. The first part of this thesis deals with a key ingredient in the extraction of the annihilation spectrum: the optimization of the instrumental background model. New data screening and tracer selection procedures are presented. Classical multi-linear models are compared to neural and Bayesian networks. Finally, three years of observation are used to constrain the width of the source and derive its spectrum. The second part of the thesis focuses on one of the possible scenarios explaining the high positron injection rate deduced from the flux of the 511 keV line: the annihilation of light dark matter particles into electron-positron pairs. The various radiation mechanisms involved are modeled and confronted to observations in order to set an upper limit on the injection

  7. Determination of the Integral/SPI instrumental response and his application to the observation of gamma ray lines in the Vela region; Determination de la reponse instrumentale du spectrometre INTEGRAL/SPI et application a l'observation des raies gamma de la region des Voiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attie, D

    2005-01-15

    The INTEGRAL/SPI spectrometer was designed to observe the sky in the energy band of 20 keV to 8 MeV. The specificity of instrument SPI rests on the excellent spectral resolution (2.3 keV with 1 MeV) of its detecting plan, composed of 19 cooled germanium crystals; covering an effective area of 508 cm{sup 2}. The use of a coded mask, located at 1.7 m above the detection plan ensures to it a resolving power of 2.5 degrees. The aim of this thesis, begun before the INTEGRAL launch, is made up of two parts. The first part relates to the analysis of the spectrometer calibration data. The objective was to measure and check the performances of the telescope, in particular to validate simulations of the INTEGRAL/SPI instrument response. This objective was successfully achieved. This analysis also highlights the presence of a significant instrumental background noise. Whereas, the second part concentrates on the data analysis of the Vela region observations. I have approached two astrophysical topics dealing with: - the search for radioactive decays lines of titanium-44, which is produced by explosive nucleosynthesis, in the supernova remnant of Vela Junior and, - the search of cyclotron resonance scattering features expected towards 25 keV and 52 keV in the accreting pulsar spectrum of the x-ray binary star Vela X-1. Putting forward the hypothesis that the result obtained previously by COMPTEL is correct and considering the no-detection of the titanium-44 lines by SPI, we give a lower limit at 4500 km s{sup -1} for the ejecta velocity from Vela Junior. The analysis on the research of the cyclotron lines have shown that the results are very sensitive to the instrumental background. Thorough studies will be necessary to guarantee an unambiguous detection of these lines. (author)

  8. Binaries discovered by the SPY project V. GD 687 - a massive double degenerate binary progenitor that will merge within a Hubble time

    OpenAIRE

    Geier, S.; Heber, U.; Kupfer, T.; Napiwotzki, R.

    2010-01-01

    Aims. The ESO SN Ia Progenitor Survey (SPY) aims at finding merging double degenerate binaries as candidates for supernova type Ia (SN Ia) explosions. A white dwarf merger has also been suggested to explain the formation of rare types of stars like R CrB, extreme helium or He sdO stars. Here we present the hot subdwarf B binary GD 687, which will merge in less than a Hubble time. Methods. The orbital parameters of the close binary have been determined from time resolved spectroscopy. Since GD...

  9. Study of the electron-positron annihilation in the galactic center region with the Integral/SPI spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sizun, P.

    2007-04-01

    A spectral feature was detected in 1970 in the gamma-ray emission from the central regions of the Milky Way, during balloon flight observations. Located near 511 keV, this feature was soon attributed to the gamma-ray line tracing the annihilation of electrons with their anti-particles, positrons. However, none of the multiple astrophysical scenarios contemplated to explain the production of positrons in the Galactic bulge has been able to reproduce the high injection rate deduced from the flux of the 511 keV line, close to 10 43 positrons per second. Launched in 2002, the European gamma-ray satellite INTEGRAL was provided with a spectrometer, SPI, whose unprecedented imaging and spectral capabilities in this energy range enable us to further study the source of the 511 keV line detected in the Galactic centre region. Indeed, a better determination of the spatial extent of the source, the intrinsic width of the line and the fraction of positrons annihilating in-flight, directly or via the formation of ortho-Positronium atoms would improve our knowledge of both the annihilation medium and the initial source of positrons, and could allow us to discriminate between the various explanatory scenarios. The first part of this thesis deals with a key ingredient in the extraction of the annihilation spectrum: the optimization of the instrumental background model. New data screening and tracer selection procedures are presented. Classical multi-linear models are compared to neural and Bayesian networks. Finally, three years of observation are used to constrain the width of the source and derive its spectrum. The second part of the thesis focuses on one of the possible scenarios explaining the high positron injection rate deduced from the flux of the 511 keV line: the annihilation of light dark matter particles into electron-positron pairs. The various radiation mechanisms involved are modeled and confronted to observations in order to set an upper limit on the injection

  10. Spie, mandarini, bramini: i gesuiti e i loro travestimenti / Spies, Mandarins, Brahmins. The Jesuits and their disguises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Pavone

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nella prima età moderna l’abito degli ordini religiosi rappresenta un importante fattore di identità immediatamente riconoscibile. È per questo motivo che i gesuiti vennero visti con sospetto: essi erano infatti vestiti come preti secolari. Ignazio di Loyola decise di non avere alcun segno distintivo poiché voleva vivere nel mondo, ma la sua scelta venne male interpretata e intesa come una forma di dissimulazione: la mancanza di un abito specifico fu vista come strumentale all’assunzione di ogni tipo di travestimento e presto, in determinati contesti, i gesuiti vennero considerati vere e proprie spie. Ai loro occhi infatti indossare l’abito del paese che si accingevano a evangelizzare era anche il modo migliore, certo non l’unico, per entrare in contatto con le altre culture. In questo saggio si vuole prendere in esame tanto l’uso dell’abito come elemento della pratica evangelizzatrice nelle missioni quanto la leggenda nera che dalle origini circondò i gesuiti e vide proprio nell’abito uno dei segni più importanti della loro attitudine al travestimento.   In the early modern age, the religious orders habit represent a very significant factor of identity to be immediately recognised, that’s why the Jesuits were looked with suspicion: in fact they were dressed as secular priests. Ignazio of Loyola decided not to have any distinctive sign because he wanted to live inside the world, but this choice was misinterpreted as a way of dissimulation: the lack of an habit was considered as a manner to assume any kind of disguise and soon Jesuits were considered as spies. In their opinion, to take the habit of the country they wanted to evangelize, was also the best way to be brought into contact with others cultures. In this paper I would like to consider either the Jesuits evangelisation practice in missions or the black legend that since the origins surrounded them considering also the habit one of the most important signal of their

  11. Field Test Design Simulations of Pore-Water Extraction for the SX Tank Farm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truex, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Oostrom, Martinus [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    A proof of principle test of pore water extraction is being performed by Washington River Protection Solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of River Protection. This test is being conducted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (HFFACO) (Ecology et al. 1989) Milestone M 045-20, and is described in RPP-PLAN-53808, 200 West Area Tank Farms Interim Measures Investigation Work Plan. To support design of this test, numerical simulations were conducted to help define equipment and operational parameters. The modeling effort builds from information collected in laboratory studies and from field characterization information collected at the test site near the Hanford Site 241-SX Tank Farm. Numerical simulations were used to evaluate pore-water extraction performance as a function of the test site properties and for the type of extraction well configuration that can be constructed using the direct-push installation technique. Output of simulations included rates of water and soil-gas production as a function of operational conditions for use in supporting field equipment design. The simulations also investigated the impact of subsurface heterogeneities in sediment properties and moisture distribution on pore-water extraction performance. Phenomena near the extraction well were also investigated because of their importance for pore-water extraction performance.

  12. Recent palladium membrane reactor development at the tritium systems test assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willms, R.S.; Birdsell, S.A.; Wilhelm, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The palladium membrane reactor (PMR) is proving to be a simple and effective means for recovering hydrogen isotopes from fusion fuel impurities such as methane and water. This device directly combines two techniques which have long been utilized for hydrogen processing, namely catalytic shift reactions and palladium/silver permeators. A proof-of-principle (PMR) has been constructed and tested at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The first tests with this device showed that is was effective for the proposed purpose. Initial work concluded that a nickel catalyst was an appropriate choice for use in a PMR. More detailed testing of the PMR with such a catalyst was performed and reported in other works. It was shown that a nickel catalyst-packed PMR did, indeed, recover hydrogen from water and methane with efficiencies approaching 100% in a single processing pass. These experiments were conducted over an extended period of time and no failure or need for regeneration was encountered. These positive results have prompted further PMR development. Topics addressed include alternate PMR geometries and initial testing of the PMR with tritium. These are the subjects of this paper

  13. Secrets and spies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jeff

    2009-11-01

    There is no shortage of popular histories of the creation of nuclear weapons. From the mid-1940s to the present day, scientists, historians and others have tried to explain the genesis of these awesome and awful weapons, and the reasons for their use against Japan at the end of the Second World War. From the official 1945 Smyth Report on the Manhattan Project to Richard Rhodes' 1986 Pulitzer Prize-winning The Making of the Atomic Bomb and beyond, the history of nuclear weapons and the Cold War continues to exert a powerful and sometimes macabre fascination for those interested in the history of modern science.

  14. Spying on volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Matthew

    2017-07-01

    Active volcanoes can be incredibly dangerous, especially to those who live nearby, but how do you get close enough to observe one in action? Matthew Watson explains how artificial drones are providing volcanologists with insights that could one day save human lives

  15. Giovanni Paolo Marana’s Turkish Spy and the Police of Louis XIV: the Fear of Being Secretly Observed by Trained Agents in Early Modern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Porada

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni Paolo Marana’s epistolary novel, entitled l’Espion du Grand-Seigneur and published for the first time in the 1680s, was a pioneering work of a genre that was to flourish much later, namely spy story. The story features an Arab who comes to Paris in 1637 and spends the next 45 years collecting information about French government’s activity without being ever identified by French counter-intelligence. The main character was an undercover agent of a Muslim empire, who watched Christians with contempt - and yet the book that pretended to be just a bunch of his letters, accidentally found and translated from Arabic by Marana, was a bestseller in late seventeenth- and then eighteenth-century Western Europe. The paper presents the fates of the work and discusses the reasons of its huge success. Apart from the fact that the novel was written in a brilliant style, and published at the time when the ongoing Habsburg-Turkish war had triggered intensive interest in the Muslim East, one of these reasons was the fact that it was published in the time when in France a modern police force was created. Its tasks included collecting information about political opinions, religious practices and intimate lives of the Sun King’s subjects. The new feeling of being observed by the government’s men and informers certainly prepared the ground for the success of the first spy story of the West.

  16. Analogue spies in a digital world : changing technology and attitudes on confidentiality make an oilfield scout's job harder than ever

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stastny, P.

    2009-04-15

    Spying amongst oil companies is now declining as a result of cultural shifts in how privacy is viewed as well as by new court decisions on how confidential information is used to gain competitive advantages. In the 1970s, oil company scouts used visual monitoring as a means of gaining information related to oil field technologies. New digital communications processes mean that scouts can no longer eavesdrop on analogue communications equipment using radio equipment. Energy companies are now enjoying an unprecedented level of security. Satellite digital communications minimize the risk of in-field interception by sending signals directly upward from a localized point. Although cellphone scanning equipment is available, it is illegal in Canada. New privacy rules state that listening to a cell phone conversation without the consent of the people talking is now illegal. Devices have also been designed to intercept communications of new digital mobile units. However, the equipment is costly and civilian use of it is illegal. Cellphone technologies are advancing at such a rapid rate that many new spying devices become obsolete very quickly. It was concluded that a recent case in which a small oil and gas operator bid on leases days before a larger company won when the larger company proved that the bid was based on the misuse of confidential data. 3 figs.

  17. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  18. Characterization of Ceramic Material Produced From a Cold Crucible Induction Melter Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-30

    This report summarizes the results from characterization of samples from a melt processed surrogate ceramic waste form. Completed in October of 2014, the first scaled proof of principle cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test was conducted to process a Fe-hollandite-rich titanate ceramic for treatment of high level nuclear waste. X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy for Cs), and product consistency tests were used to characterize the CCIM material produced. Core samples at various radial locations from the center of the CCIM were taken. These samples were also sectioned and analyzed vertically. Together, the various samples were intended to provide an indication of the homogeneity throughout the CCIM with respect to phase assemblage, chemical composition, and chemical durability. Characterization analyses confirmed that a crystalline ceramic with desirable phase assemblage was produced from a melt using a CCIM. Hollandite and zirconolite were identified in addition to possible highly-substituted pyrochlore and perovskite. Minor phases rich in Fe, Al, or Cs were also identified. Remarkably only minor differences were observed vertically or radially in the CCIM material with respect to chemical composition, phase assemblage, and durability. This recent CCIM test and the resulting characterization in conjunction with demonstrated compositional improvements support continuation of CCIM testing with an improved feed composition and improved melter system.

  19. Book review: The Sympathizer. A Vietnamese spy novel and the attempt to de-americanize our view on the war

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmitz, Britta

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available 1975, the Vietnam War has just ended, but the cold war and the clash of ideologies are still going on. This would of course be the perfect background for some run-of-the-mill thriller written by a white American for a Western audience. And without knowing anything further, we might first think that The Sympathizer, which was recently translated into German and marketed as a “thriller” and “spy novel”, would be just one of those. However, things and people are all too often not what they seem to be – an adage which has never been more true than in this story. Far more than simply a thriller, it is also a political novel, a satirical story, refugee literature and a critique of modern mass media, all interspersed with discursive passages and spiced with literary references and aphorisms. Furthermore, the author is not a white American. The Sympathizer is the debut novel of Vietnamese-American Viet Thanh Nguyen, which won him the Pulitzer Prize in 2016 along with a great many other awards. Nguyen was born in Vietnam and grew up in the USA from where he experienced both cultures and had insight to both perspectives on the Vietnam War. He is a Professor of English and American Studies and Ethnicity primarily focused on “Americanization”, how the American perspective continues to dominate film, literature and pop culture. His book is a critique of this prevailing view and includes the issues of acculturation and identity crisis of immigrants, along with the importance of loyalty and relationships (or the lack of those. The narrator and protagonist of the story is a man who has no name and is only referred to as “the captain” throughout the book. We encounter him fleeing Saigon, accompanying a general of the South Vietnamese army, we know already that he has a secret. In the very first lines he reveals that he is a sleeper agent and actually working for the Viet Cong and spying on the South Vietnamese military and the CIA. The captain

  20. Manufacturing and testing of a copper/CFC divertor mock-up for JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brossa, M.; Ciric, D.; Deksnis, E.; Falter, H.; Guerreschi, U.; Peacock, A.; Pick, M.; Rossi, M.; Shen, Y.; Zacchia, F.

    1995-01-01

    An actively cooled divertor is a possible option for future developments at The Joint European Torus (JET). A proof of principle actively cooled tile has been produced in order to qualify the relevant manufacturing technologies and the non destructive control processes. In this frame Ansaldo Ricerche (ARI) has been involved in the construction of a mock-up comprising 6 OFHC copper tubes for water cooling that are brazed to a plate made out of carbon fibre composite (CFC). The final objective was the high heat flux testing of the mock-up at JET in order to evaluate the general behaviour of the component under relevant operating conditions. The key point of the work was the realisation of a sound joint by adapting the expertise gained in ARI in previous R and D activities on brazing heterogeneous materials. Reliable methods for ultrasonic examinations of the pieces were also set up. For successful application to the JET pumped divertor a water-cooled CFC target plate must show surface temperatures of 2 . Furthermore, global hydraulic considerations specific to JET limit the system pressure to 0.7 MPa. In such a design, critical heat flux is not the key limit, rather the reliability of the CFC-copper joint in terms of extent of wetting. First tests in the neutral beam test bed at JET show an adequate response for fluxes up to 15 MW/m 2 . (orig.)

  1. Laser weld reconstitution of conventional Charpy and Miniaturized Notch Test (MNT) specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manahan, M.P.; Williams, J.; Martukanitz, R.P.

    1993-01-01

    As nuclear power plants approach end-of-license (EOL) and consideration is given to license renewal, there is an ever increasing need to expand the amount of data obtainable from the original surveillance specimens. A laser welding technique to reconstitute broken Charpy specimens is being developed to produce both conventional and miniaturized Charpy specimens. This paper reports on early laser welding development efforts and summarizes previous proof-of-principle experiments on a 1/16 scale miniaturized Charpy test. In order to benchmark the laser welding procedure, the laser-reconstituted specimen data have been compared with the original specimen data. In addition, the microstructure after welding has been examined to ensure that the material in the vicinity of the notch is essentially unchanged after the welding process. Data which characterize the thermal transient during welding are obtained by attaching thermocouples to the specimens. Other important considerations include perturbation of the stress field near the notch, dynamic stress waves, and contact of the weld region with the tup. Precise control of welding parameters has been demonstrated, heat-affected zones as small as 0.25 mm can be achieved, and sufficient penetration depth can be obtained to enable welding thick sections (1T or greater) to yield conventional Charpy specimens or fracture toughness specimens and thin sections (∼5 mm) to yield Miniaturized Notch Test (MNT) specimens

  2. Collimation system for the VUV free-electron laser at the TESLA test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlarb, H.

    2001-11-01

    To perform a proof-of-principle experiment for a Free Electron Laser operating at VUV wavelengths an undulator has been installed in the TESLA Test Facility linac phase I. To meet the requirements on the magnetic field quality in the undulator, a hybrid type structure with NdFeB permanent magnets has been chosen. The permanent magnets are sensitive to radiation by high energy particles. In order to perform the various experiments planned at the TESLA Test Facility linac, a collimator section has been installed to protect the undulator from radiation. In this thesis the design, performance and required steps for commissioning the collimator system are presented. To identify potential difficulties for the linac operation, the beam halo and the dark current transport through the entire linac is discussed. Losses of primary electrons caused by technical failures, component misalignments, and operation errors are investigated by tracking simulations, in order to derive a complete understanding of the absorbed dose in the permanent magnets of the undulator. Various topics related to a collimator system such as the removal of secondary particles produced at the collimators, generation and shielding of neutrons, excitation of wake fields, and beam based alignment concepts are important subjects of this thesis. (orig.)

  3. Test Results for HD1, a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lietzke, A.F.; Bartlett, S.; Bish, P.; Caspi, S.; Chiesa, L.; Dietderich, D.; Ferracin, P.; Gourlay, S.A.; Goli, M.; Hafalia, R.R.; Higley, H.; Hannaford, R.; Lau, W.; Liggens, N.; Mattafirri, S.; McInturff, A.; Nyman, M.; Sabbi, G.; Scanlan, R.; Swanson, J.

    2003-01-01

    The Superconducting Magnet Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been developing the technology for using brittle superconductor in high-field accelerator magnets. HD1, the latest in a series of magnets, contains two, double-layer Nb 3 Sn flat racetrack coils. This single-bore dipole configuration, using the highest performance conductor available, was designed and assembled for a 16 tesla conductor/structure/pre-stress proof-of-principle. With the combination of brittle conductor and high Lorentz stress, considerable care was taken to predict the magnet's mechanical responses to pre-stress, cool-down, and excitation. Subsequent cold testing satisfied expectations: Training started at 13.6 T, 83% of 'short-sample', achieved 90% in 10 quenches, and reached its peak bore field (16 T) after 19 quenches. The average plateau, ∼92% of 'short-sample', appeared to be limited by 'stick-slip' conductor motions, consistent with the 16.2 T conductor 'lift-off' pre-stress that was chosen for this first test. Some lessons learned and some implications for future conductor and magnet technology development are presented and discussed.

  4. Assisted reproductive medicine in Poland --Fertility and Sterility Special Interest Group of the Polish Gynaecological Society (SPiN PTG) 2012 report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janicka, Anna; Spaczyńiski, Robert Z; Kurzawa, Rafał

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this report is to present data concerning results and complications related to infertility treatment using assisted reproductive technology (ART) and insemination (IUI) in Poland in 2012. The report was prepared by the Fertility and Sterility Special Interest Group of the Polish Gynaecological Society (SPiN PTG), based on individual data provided by fertility clinics. Reporting was voluntary data were not subject to external verification. The report presents the availability and the structure of infertility treatment services, the number of procedures performed, their effectiveness and the most common complications. In 2014, 34 Polish fertility clinics provided information to the report, presenting data from 2012. The total number of reported treatment cycles using ART was 17,116 (incl. 10,714 fresh IVF/ICSI) and 14,727 IUI. The clinical pregnancy rate per cycle was on average 33.7% for fresh IVF/ICSI and 13.3% for IUI. The prevalence of multiple births was 15.7% and 6.2%, in case of IVF/ICSI and IUI methods respectively The most frequent complication in the course of treatment using ART was ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS)--severe OHSS constituted 0.68% of all stimulated cycles. The SPiN PTG report shows the average effectiveness and safety of ART and was the only proof of responsibility and due diligence of fertility centres in Poland. However, due to the lack of a central register of fertility clinics, facultative participation in the report as well as incomplete information on pregnancy and delivery rate, the collected data do not reflect the full spectrum of Polish reproductive medicine.

  5. The type VI secretion system encoded in SPI-6 plays a role in gastrointestinal colonization and systemic spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pezoa

    Full Text Available The role of the Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands (SPIs in pathogenesis of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium infection in the chicken is poorly studied, while many studies have been completed in murine models. The Type VI Secretion System (T6SS is a recently described protein secretion system in Gram-negative bacteria. The genus Salmonella contains five phylogenetically distinct T6SS encoded in differentially distributed genomic islands. S. Typhimurium harbors a T6SS encoded in SPI-6 (T6SSSPI-6, which contributes to the ability of Salmonella to colonize mice. On the other hand, serotype Gallinarum harbors a T6SS encoded in SPI-19 (T6SSSPI-19 that is required for colonization of chicks. In this work, we investigated the role of T6SSSPI-6 in infection of chicks by S. Typhimurium. Oral infection of White Leghorn chicks showed that a ΔT6SSSPI-6 mutant had reduced colonization of the gut and internal organs, compared with the wild-type strain. Transfer of the intact T6SSSPI-6 gene cluster into the T6SS mutant restored bacterial colonization. In addition, our results showed that transfer of T6SSSPI-19 from S. Gallinarum to the ΔT6SSSPI-6 mutant of S. Typhimurium not only complemented the colonization defect but also resulted in a transient increase in the colonization of the cecum and ileum of chicks at days 1 and 3 post-infection. Our data indicates that T6SSSPI-6 contributes to chicken colonization and suggests that both T6SSSPI-6 and T6SSSPI-19 perform similar functions in vivo despite belonging to different phylogenetic families.

  6. THE HIGH-ENERGY EMISSION OF THE CRAB NEBULA FROM 20 keV TO 6 MeV WITH INTEGRAL SPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jourdain, E.; Roques, J. P.

    2009-01-01

    The SPI spectrometer aboard the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory mission regularly observes the Crab Nebula since 2003. We report on observations distributed over 5.5 years and investigate the variability of the intensity and spectral shape of this remarkable source in the hard X-rays domain up to a few MeV. While single power-law models give a good description in the X-ray domain (mean photon index ∼ 2.05) and MeV domain (photon index ∼ 2.23), crucial information is contained in the evolution of the slope with energy between these two values. This study has been carried out through individual observations and long duration (∼ 400 ks) averaged spectra. The stability of the emission is remarkable and excludes a single power-law model. The slopes measured below and above 100 keV agree perfectly with the last values reported in the X-ray and MeV regions, respectively, but without indication of a localized break point. This suggests a gradual softening in the emission around 100 keV and thus a continuous evolution rather than an actual change in the mechanism parameters. In the MeV region, no significant deviation from the proposed power-law model is visible up to 5-6 MeV. Finally, we take advantage of the spectroscopic capability of the instrument to seek for previously reported spectral features in the covered energy range with negative results for any significant cyclotron or annihilation emission on 400 ks timescales. Beyond the scientific results, the performance and reliability of the SPI instrument is explicitly demonstrated, with some details about the most appropriate analysis method.

  7. Group A Streptococcus M1T1 Intracellular Infection of Primary Tonsil Epithelial Cells Dampens Levels of Secreted IL-8 Through the Action of SpyCEP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia T. Soderholm

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pyogenes (Group A Streptococcus; GAS commonly causes pharyngitis in children and adults, with severe invasive disease and immune sequelae being an infrequent consequence. The ability of GAS to invade the host and establish infection likely involves subversion of host immune defenses. However, the signaling pathways and innate immune responses of epithelial cells to GAS are not well-understood. In this study, we utilized RNAseq to characterize the inflammatory responses of primary human tonsil epithelial (TEpi cells to infection with the laboratory-adapted M6 strain JRS4 and the M1T1 clinical isolate 5448. Both strains induced the expression of genes encoding a wide range of inflammatory mediators, including IL-8. Pathway analysis revealed differentially expressed genes between mock and JRS4- or 5448-infected TEpi cells were enriched in transcription factor networks that regulate IL-8 expression, such as AP-1, ATF-2, and NFAT. While JRS4 infection resulted in high levels of secreted IL-8, 5448 infection did not, suggesting that 5448 may post-transcriptionally dampen IL-8 production. Infection with 5448ΔcepA, an isogenic mutant lacking the IL-8 protease SpyCEP, resulted in IL-8 secretion levels comparable to JRS4 infection. Complementation of 5448ΔcepA and JRS4 with a plasmid encoding 5448-derived SpyCEP significantly reduced IL-8 secretion by TEpi cells. Our results suggest that intracellular infection with the pathogenic GAS M1T1 clone induces a strong pro-inflammatory response in primary tonsil epithelial cells, but modulates this host response by selectively degrading the neutrophil-recruiting chemokine IL-8 to benefit infection.

  8. Test plan for buried waste containment system materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, J.; Shaw, P.

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of the FY 1997 barrier material work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory are to (1) select a waste barrier material and verify that it is compatible with the Buried Waste Containment System Process, and (2) determine if, and how, the Buried Waste Containment System emplacement process affects the material properties and performance (on proof of principle scale). This test plan describes a set of measurements and procedures used to validate a waste barrier material for the Buried Waste Containment System. A latex modified proprietary cement manufactured by CTS Cement Manufacturing Company will be tested. Emplacement properties required for the Buried Waste Containment System process are: slump between 8 and 10 in., set time between 15 and 30 minutes, compressive strength at set of 20 psi minimum, and set temperature less than 100 degrees C. Durability properties include resistance to degradation from carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates. A set of baseline barrier material properties will be determined to provide a data base for comparison with the barrier materials when tested in the field. The measurements include permeability, petrographic analysis to determine separation and/or segregation of mix components, and a set of mechanical properties. The measurements will be repeated on specimens from the field test material. The data will be used to determine if the Buried Waste Containment System equipment changes the material. The emplacement properties will be determined using standard laboratory procedures and instruments. Durability of the barrier material will be evaluated by determining the effect of carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates on the compressive strength of the barrier material. The baseline properties will be determined using standard ASTM procedures. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  9. Bell Test over Extremely High-Loss Channels: Towards Distributing Entangled Photon Pairs between Earth and the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuan; Li, Yu-Huai; Zou, Wen-Jie; Li, Zheng-Ping; Shen, Qi; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Ren, Ji-Gang; Yin, Juan; Chen, Yu-Ao; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2018-04-01

    Quantum entanglement was termed "spooky action at a distance" in the well-known paper by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen. Entanglement is expected to be distributed over longer and longer distances in both practical applications and fundamental research into the principles of nature. Here, we present a proposal for distributing entangled photon pairs between Earth and the Moon using a Lagrangian point at a distance of 1.28 light seconds. One of the most fascinating features in this long-distance distribution of entanglement is as follows. One can perform the Bell test with human supplying the random measurement settings and recording the results while still maintaining spacelike intervals. To realize a proof-of-principle experiment, we develop an entangled photon source with 1 GHz generation rate, about 2 orders of magnitude higher than previous results. Violation of Bell's inequality was observed under a total simulated loss of 103 dB with measurement settings chosen by two experimenters. This demonstrates the feasibility of such long-distance Bell test over extremely high-loss channels, paving the way for one of the ultimate tests of the foundations of quantum mechanics.

  10. Photon-counting-based diffraction phase microscopy combined with single-pixel imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, Kyuki; Araki, Hiroyuki; Iwata, Tetsuo

    2018-04-01

    We propose a photon-counting (PC)-based quantitative-phase imaging (QPI) method for use in diffraction phase microscopy (DPM) that is combined with a single-pixel imaging (SPI) scheme (PC-SPI-DPM). This combination of DPM with the SPI scheme overcomes a low optical throughput problem that has occasionally prevented us from obtaining quantitative-phase images in DPM through use of a high-sensitivity single-channel photodetector such as a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The introduction of a PMT allowed us to perform PC with ease and thus solved a dynamic range problem that was inherent to SPI. As a proof-of-principle experiment, we performed a comparison study of analogue-based SPI-DPM and PC-SPI-DPM for a 125-nm-thick indium tin oxide (ITO) layer coated on a silica glass substrate. We discuss the basic performance of the method and potential future modifications of the proposed system.

  11. Bubble retention in synthetic sludge: Testing of alternative gas retention apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.

    1995-07-01

    Several of the underground storage tanks currently used to store waste at Hanford have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. The objective of this experimental study is to develop a method to measure gas bubble retention in simulated tank waste and in diluted simulant. The method and apparatus should (1) allow for reasonably rapid experiments, (2) minimize sample disturbance, and (3) provide realistic bubble nucleation and growth. The scope of this experimental study is to build an apparatus for measuring gas retention in simulated waste and to design the apparatus to be compatible with future testing on actual waste. The approach employed for creating bubbles in sludge involves dissolving a soluble gas into the supernatant liquid at an elevated pressure, recirculating the liquid containing the dissolved gas through the sludge, then reducing the pressure to allow bubbles to nucleate and grow. Results have been obtained for ammonia as the soluble gas and SY1-SIM-91A, a chemically representative simulated tank waste. In addition, proof-of-principle experiments were conducted with both ammonia and CO 2 as soluble gases and sludge composed of 90-micron glass beads. Results are described

  12. A spheromak ignition experiment reusing Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1993-01-01

    Based on available experimental results and theory, a scenario is presented to achieve ohmic ignition in a spheromak by slow (∼ 10 sec.) helicity injection using power from the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) substation. Some of the other parts needed (vacuum vessel, coils, power supplies, pumps, shielded building space) might also be obtained from MFTF or other salvage, as well as some components needed for intermediate experiments for additional verification of the concept (especially confinement scaling). The proposed ignition experiment would serve as proof-of-principle for the spheromak DT fusion reactor design published by Hagenson and Krakowski, with a nuclear island cost about ten times less than a tokamak of comparable power. Designs at even higher power density and lower cost might be possible using Christofilos' concept of a liquid lithium blanket. Since all structures would be protected from neutrons by the lithium blanket and the tritium inventory can be reduced by continuous removal from the liquid blanket, environmental and safety characteristics appear to be favorable

  13. How to measure responses of the knee to lateral perturbations during gait? A proof-of-principle for quantification of knee instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Noort, Josien C; Sloot, Lizeth H; Bruijn, Sjoerd M; Harlaar, Jaap

    2017-08-16

    Knee instability is a major problem in patients with anterior cruciate ligament injury or knee osteoarthritis. A valid and clinically meaningful measure for functional knee instability is lacking. The concept of the gait sensitivity norm, the normalized perturbation response of a walking system to external perturbations, could be a sensible way to quantify knee instability. The aim of this study is to explore the feasibility of this concept for measurement of knee responses, using controlled external perturbations during walking in healthy subjects. Nine young healthy participants walked on a treadmill, while three dimensional kinematics were measured. Sudden lateral translations of the treadmill were applied at five different intensities during stance. Right knee kinematic responses and spatio-temporal parameters were tracked for the perturbed stride and following four cycles, to calculate perturbation response and gait sensitivity norm values (i.e. response/perturbation) in various ways. The perturbation response values in terms of knee flexion and abduction increased with perturbation intensity and decreased with an increased number of steps after perturbation. For flexion and ab/adduction during midswing, the gait sensitivity norm values were shown to be constant over perturbation intensities, demonstrating the potential of the gait sensitivity norm as a robust measure of knee responses to perturbations. These results show the feasibility of using the gait sensitivity norm concept for certain gait indicators based on kinematics of the knee, as a measure of responses during perturbed gait. The current findings in healthy subjects could serve as reference-data to quantify pathological knee instability. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of Zoledronic Acid and Denosumab in Patients With Low Back Pain and Modic Change: A Proof-of-Principle Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guoqi; Laslett, Laura L; Aitken, Dawn; Halliday, Andrew; Pan, Feng; Otahal, Petr; Speden, Deborah; Winzenberg, Tania M; Jones, Graeme

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of zoledronic acid (ZA) and denosumab on low back pain (LBP) and Modic change (MC) over 6 months. Adults aged ≥40 years with significant LBP for at least 6 months duration and MC (type 1, 2, or mixed) were randomized to receive ZA (5 mg/100 mL), denosumab (60 mg), or placebo. LBP was measured monthly by visual analogue scale (VAS) and the LBP Rating Scale (RS). MC was measured from MRIs of T 12 -S 1 vertebrae at screening and 6 months. A total of 103 participants with moderate/severe LBP (mean VAS = 57 mm; mean RS = 18) and median total MC area 538 mm 2 were enrolled. Compared to placebo, LBP reduced significantly at 6 months in the ZA group for RS (-3.3; 95% CI, -5.9 to -0.7) but not VAS (-8.2; 95% CI, -18.8 to +2.4) with similar findings for denosumab (RS, -3.0; 95% CI, -5.7 to -0.3; VAS, -10.7; 95% CI, -21.7 to +0.2). There was little change in areal MC size overall and no difference between groups with the exception of denosumab in those with type 1 Modic change (-22.1 mm 2 ; 95% CI, -41.5 to -2.7). In post hoc analyses, both medications significantly reduced VAS LBP in participants with milder disc degeneration and non-neuropathic pain, and denosumab reduced VAS LBP in those with type 1 MC over 6 months, compared to placebo. Adverse events were more frequent in the ZA group. These results suggests a potential therapeutic role for ZA and denosumab in MC-associated LBP. © 2018 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2018 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  15. Sniffer mice discriminate urine odours of patients with bladder cancer: A proof-of-principle study for non-invasive diagnosis of cancer-induced odours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takaaki; Katsuoka, Yoji; Yoneda, Kimihiko; Nonomura, Mitsuo; Uchimoto, Shinya; Kobayakawa, Reiko; Kobayakawa, Ko; Mizutani, Yoichi

    2017-11-07

    Similar to fingerprints, humans have unique, genetically determined body odours. In case of urine, the odour can change due to variations in diet as well as upon infection or tumour formation. We investigated the use of mice in a manner similar to "sniffer dogs" to detect changes in urine odour in patients with bladder cancer. We measured the odour discrimination thresholds of mice in a Y-maze, using urine mixtures from patients with bladder cancer (Stage I) and healthy volunteers (dietary variations) as well as occult blood- or antibiotic drug metabolite-modulated samples. Threshold difference indicated that intensities of urinary olfactory cues increase in the following order: dietary variation < bladder cancer < occult blood < antibiotic drug metabolites. After training with patient urine mixtures, sniffer mice discriminated between urine odours of pre- and post-transurethral resection in individual patients with bladder cancer in an equal-occult blood diluted condition below the detection level of dietary variations, achieving a success rate of 100% (11/11). Furthermore, genetic ablation of all dorsal olfactory receptors elevated the discrimination thresholds of mice by ≥ 10 5 -fold. The marked reduction in discrimination sensitivity indicates an essential role of the dorsal olfactory receptors in the recognition of urinary body odours in mice.

  16. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-01-01

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning

  17. Systemic Endoradiotherapy with Carrier Added 4 [{sup 131I}] Iodo {sup LP}henylalanine: Clinical Proof of principle in Refractory Glioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Richard P.; Schuchardt, Christiane; Senftleben, Stephan; Gildehaus, Franz Josef; Samnick, Samuel [PET Centre, Bad Berka (Germany); Kluge, Andreas; Bronzel, Marcus; Schmidt, Karl [ABX CRO Advanced Pharmaceutical Services, Dresden (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    To explore feasibility, tolerability, dosimetry and probable efficacy of intravenous endoradiotherapy with carrier added 4 [{sup 131I}]iodo {sup Lp}henylalanine (c.a. {sup 131I} IPA) in refractory high grade glioma. Two male patients (45 and 50 years), with long standing, extensively pretreated gliomas and evidence of progression underwent single intravenous injections of 2 and 4 GBq of c.a. {sup 131I} IPA, respectively. Tumor targeting was verified by {sup 131I} IPA single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Metabolic and morphological changes indicative of tumour response were assessed by sequential [{sup 18F}] fluoroethyltyrosine ({sup 18F} FET) positron emission tomography (PET) and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) following therapy. Further monitoring included clinical state, safety laboratory, quality of life and dosimetry. Absorbed mean organ and whole body doses were determined according to the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) scheme using OLINDAEXM based on serial planar scintigraphy. Both patients tolerated the treatment well. No evidence of acute of delayed organ toxicity was observed. {sup 131I} IPA accumulated in the tumour recurrences identified by MRI/{sup 18F} FET. In patient 1, PET showed progressively decreasing maximum standardised uptake values (SUVmax) over 10 months, indicating metabolic response, paralleled by reduced contrast enhancement and tumour volume on MRI. Progression occurred 18 months after therapy. Treatment was repeated using 6.6 GBq of {sup 131I} IPA, to which no response was observed. Patient 2, followed up for 3 months after therapy, showed stable disease on MRI and PET. Mean absorbed whole body doses ranged from 0.13 to 0.17 mSv/MBq, with the highest absorbed organ doses to kidneys, bladder and heart (0.86-1.23; 0.49-0.6 and 0.45-0.56 mSv/MBq). Systemic endoradiotherapy using up to 6.6 GBq of c.a. {sup 131I} IPA is not associated with clinically detectable toxicity. Measurable anti tumour effects in gliomas were observed. {sup 131I} IPA warrants further evaluation as glioma therapy.

  18. A potentiostat featuring an integrator transimpedance amplifier for the measurement of very low currents—Proof-of-principle application in microfluidic separations and voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutilellis, G. D.; Economou, A.; Efstathiou, C. E.

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the design and construction of a novel potentiostat which features an integrator transimpedance amplifier as a current-monitoring unit. The integration approach addresses the limitations of the feedback resistor approach used for current monitoring in conventional potentiostat designs. In the present design, measurement of the current is performed by a precision switched integrator transimpedance amplifier operated in the dual sampling mode which enables sub-pA resolution. The potentiostat is suitable for measuring very low currents (typical dynamic range: 5 pA-4.7 μA) with a 16 bit resolution, and it can support 2-, 3- and 4-electrode cell configurations. Its operation was assessed by using it as a detection module in a home-made capillary electrophoresis system for the separation and amperometric detection of paracetamol and p-aminophenol at a 3-electrode microfluidic chip. The potential and limitations of the proposed potentiostat to implement fast potential-scan voltammetric techniques were demonstrated for the case of cyclic voltammetry.

  19. Targeting FR-expressing cells in ovarian cancer with Fab-functionalized nanoparticles: a full study to provide the proof of principle from in vitro to in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarta, Alessandra; Bernareggi, Davide; Benigni, Fabio; Luison, Elena; Nano, Giuseppe; Nitti, Simone; Cesta, Maria Candida; Di Ciccio, Luciano; Canevari, Silvana; Pellegrino, Teresa; Figini, Mariangela

    2015-02-14

    Efficient targeting in tumor therapies is still an open issue: systemic biodistribution and poor specific accumulation of drugs weaken efficacy of treatments. Engineered nanoparticles are expected to bring benefits by allowing specific delivery of drug to the tumor or acting themselves as localized therapeutic agents. In this study we have targeted epithelial ovarian cancer with inorganic nanoparticles conjugated to a human antibody fragment against the folate receptor over-expressed on cancer cells. The conjugation approach is generally applicable. Indeed several types of nanoparticles (either magnetic or fluorescent) were engineered with the fragment, and their biological activity was preserved as demonstrated by biochemical methods in vitro. In vivo studies with mice bearing orthotopic and subcutaneous tumors were performed. Elemental and histological analyses showed that the conjugated magnetic nanoparticles accumulated specifically and were retained at tumor sites longer than the non-conjugated nanoparticles.

  20. Telotristat ethyl: proof of principle and the first oral agent in the management of well-differentiated metastatic neuroendocrine tumor and carcinoid syndrome diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masab, Muhammad; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2017-12-01

    Metastatic neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are associated with carcinoid syndrome that is typically characterized by diarrhea, cutaneous flushing and bronchospasm. Treatment with somatostatin analogues (SSA) improves the symptom burden but a significant proportion of patients stop responding to SSA therapy eventually. Novel agents with the potential to effectively control the symptoms are urgently needed. This article reviews an in-depth analysis of the phase I-III clinical trials determining the clinical rationale for the use of tryptophan hydroxylase inhibitor, telotristat ethyl in patients with well-differentiated metastatic NETs and uncontrolled carcinoid syndrome. Telotristat ethyl has already been approved for the treatment of inadequately controlled carcinoid syndrome symptoms in metastatic NET patients on SSA therapy. Results from multiple phase I-III clinical studies of telotristat ethyl therapy have reported a significant decrease in the daily bowel movement frequency, increase in quality of life and the subsequent decrease in annual health costs related to carcinoid syndrome symptoms in NET patients. The associated decrease in urinary 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (u5-HIAA) provides evidence that telotristat ethyl effectively decreases serotonin production, and therefore, offers a rationale to investigate this agent to mitigate serotonin-mediated complications in this patient population, especially cardiac valvular disease or mesenteric fibrosis.

  1. Application of the Novel Ventilation Mode FLow-Controlled EXpiration (FLEX): A Crossover Proof-of-Principle Study in Lung-Healthy Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Steffen; Springer, Sebastian; Spaeth, Johannes; Borgmann, Silke; Goebel, Ulrich; Schumann, Stefan

    2017-10-01

    Traditionally, mechanical ventilation is achieved via active lung inflation during inspiration and passive lung emptying during expiration. By contrast, the novel FLEX (FLow-controlled EXpiration) ventilator mode actively decreases the rate of lung emptying. We investigated whether FLEX can be used during intraoperative mechanical ventilation of lung-healthy patients. In 30 adult patients scheduled for neurosurgical procedures, we studied respiratory system mechanics, regional ventilation, oxygenation, and hemodynamics during ventilation with and without FLEX at positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) of 5 and 7 cm H2O. The FLEX system was integrated into the expiratory limb and modified the expiratory flow profile by continuously changing expiratory resistance according to a computer-controlled algorithm. Mean airway pressure increased with PEEP by 1.9 cm H2O and with FLEX by 1 cm H2O (all P ventilated during general anesthesia. FLEX improves the homogeneous distribution of ventilation in the lungs.

  2. Efficacy of Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) to overcome the effect of ovarian ageing (DITTO): A proof of principle double blinded randomized placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkwichean, Amarin; Maalouf, Walid; Baumgarten, Miriam; Polanski, Lukasz; Raine-Fenning, Nick; Campbell, Bruce; Jayaprakasan, Kannamannadiar

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of DHEA supplementation on In-Vitro Fertilisation (IVF) outcome as assessed by ovarian response, oocyte developmental competence and live birth rates in women predicted to have poor ovarian reserve (OR). The feasibility of conducting a large trial is also assessed by evaluating the recruitment rates and compliance of the recruited participants with DHEA/placebo intake and follow-up rates. A single centre, double blinded, placebo controlled, randomized trial was performed over two years with 60 women undergoing in-vitro fertilisation (IVF). Subjects were randomized, based on a computer-generated pseudo-random code to receive either DHEA or placebo with both capsules having similar colour, size and appearance. 60 women with poor OR based on antral follicle count or anti-Mullerian hormone thresholds undergoing IVF were recruited. They were randomised to receive DHEA 75mg/day or placebo for at-least 12 weeks before starting ovarian stimulation. They had long protocol using hMG 300 IU/day. Data analysed by "intention to treat". Ovarian response, live birth rates and molecular markers of oocyte quality were compared between the study and control groups. The recruitment rate was 39% (60/154). A total of 52 participants (27 versus 25 in the study and placebo groups) were included in the final analysis after excluding eight. While the mean (standard deviation) DHEA levels were similar at recruitment (9.4 (5) versus 7.5 (2.4) ng/ml; P=0.1), the DHEA levels at pre-stimulation were higher in the study group than in the controls (16.3 (5.8) versus 11.1 (4.5) ng/ml; Pnumber (median, range) of oocytes retrieved (4, 0-18 versus 4, 0-15 respectively; P=0.54) and live birth rates (7/27, 26% versus 8/25, 32% respectively; RR (95% CI): 0.74 (0.22-2.48) and mRNA expression of developmental biomarkers in granulosa and cumulus cells were similar between the groups. Pre-treatment DHEA supplementation, albeit statistical power in this study is low, did not improve the response to controlled ovarian hyperstimulation or oocyte quality or live birth rates during IVF treatment with long protocol in women predicted to have poor OR. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Energiezuinige teeltsturing bij paprika : proof of principle : testen van dynamische optimalisatie als methode om doelgerichte sturing van de teelt te combineren met energiebesparing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, F.; Zwart, de H.F.; Henten, van E.J.; Gelder, de A.; Hemming, J.; Bontsema, J.; Lagas, P.; Mark, van der C.

    2009-01-01

    De noodzaak om efficiënt met energie om te gaan en de uitstoot van CO2 te beperken, wordt niet alleen door de maatschappij aan de sector opgelegd, maar komt ook voort uit economische noodzaak. In verschillende proeven is aangetoond dat winst valt te behalen door af te wijken van de gangbare

  4. Selective conversion of plasma glucose into CO2 by Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the measurement of C-13 abundance by isotope ratio mass spectrometry : proof of principle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rembacz, Krzysztof P.; Faber, Klaas Nico; Stellaard, Frans

    2007-01-01

    To study carbohydrate digestion and glucose absorption, time-dependent C-13 enrichment in plasma glucose is measured after oral administration of naturally occurring C-13-enriched carbohydrates. The isotope enrichment of the administered carbohydrate is low (APE <0.1%) and plasma C-13 glucose

  5. Deep-sequencing to resolve complex diversity of apicomplexan parasites in platypuses and echidnas: Proof of principle for wildlife disease investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šlapeta, Jan; Saverimuttu, Stefan; Vogelnest, Larry; Sangster, Cheryl; Hulst, Frances; Rose, Karrie; Thompson, Paul; Whittington, Richard

    2017-11-01

    The short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) and the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) are iconic egg-laying monotremes (Mammalia: Monotremata) from Australasia. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the utility of diversity profiles in disease investigations of monotremes. Using small subunit (18S) rDNA amplicon deep-sequencing we demonstrated the presence of apicomplexan parasites and confirmed by direct and cloned amplicon gene sequencing Theileria ornithorhynchi, Theileria tachyglossi, Eimeria echidnae and Cryptosporidium fayeri. Using a combination of samples from healthy and diseased animals, we show a close evolutionary relationship between species of coccidia (Eimeria) and piroplasms (Theileria) from the echidna and platypus. The presence of E. echidnae was demonstrated in faeces and tissues affected by disseminated coccidiosis. Moreover, the presence of E. echidnae DNA in the blood of echidnas was associated with atoxoplasma-like stages in white blood cells, suggesting Hepatozoon tachyglossi blood stages are disseminated E. echidnae stages. These next-generation DNA sequencing technologies are suited to material and organisms that have not been previously characterised and for which the material is scarce. The deep sequencing approach supports traditional diagnostic methods, including microscopy, clinical pathology and histopathology, to better define the status quo. This approach is particularly suitable for wildlife disease investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Synchronized personalized music audio-playlists to improve adherence to physical activity among patients participating in a structured exercise program: a proof-of-principle feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, David A; O'Sullivan, Mary; Oh, Paul I; Redelmeier, Donald A; Marzolini, Susan; Liu, Richard; Forhan, Mary; Silver, Michael; Goodman, Jack M; Bartel, Lee R

    2015-01-01

    Preference-based tempo-pace synchronized music has been shown to reduce perceived physical activity exertion and improve exercise performance. The extent to which such strategies can improve adherence to physical activity remains unknown. The objective of the study is to explore the feasibility and efficacy of tempo-pace synchronized preference-based music audio-playlists on adherence to physical activity among cardiovascular disease patients participating in a cardiac rehabilitation. Thirty-four cardiac rehabilitation patients were randomly allocated to one of two strategies: (1) no music usual-care control and (2) tempo-pace synchronized audio-devices with personalized music playlists + usual-care. All songs uploaded onto audio-playlist devices took into account patient personal music genre and artist preferences. However, actual song selection was restricted to music whose tempos approximated patients' prescribed exercise walking/running pace (steps per minute) to achieve tempo-pace synchrony. Patients allocated to audio-music playlists underwent further randomization in which half of the patients received songs that were sonically enhanced with rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) to accentuate tempo-pace synchrony, whereas the other half did not. RAS was achieved through blinded rhythmic sonic-enhancements undertaken manually to songs within individuals' music playlists. The primary outcome consisted of the weekly volume of physical activity undertaken over 3 months as determined by tri-axial accelerometers. Statistical methods employed an intention to treat and repeated-measures design. Patients randomized to personalized audio-playlists with tempo-pace synchrony achieved higher weekly volumes of physical activity than did their non-music usual-care comparators (475.6 min vs. 370.2 min, P  music usual-care controls, respectively, P  music with RAS utilized their audio-playlist devices more frequently than did non-RAS music counterparts ( P  music usual standard of care. Larger clinical trials are required to validate these findings. ClinicalTrials.gov ID (NCT01752595).

  7. A potentiostat featuring an integrator transimpedance amplifier for the measurement of very low currents--Proof-of-principle application in microfluidic separations and voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutilellis, G D; Economou, A; Efstathiou, C E

    2016-03-01

    This work reports the design and construction of a novel potentiostat which features an integrator transimpedance amplifier as a current-monitoring unit. The integration approach addresses the limitations of the feedback resistor approach used for current monitoring in conventional potentiostat designs. In the present design, measurement of the current is performed by a precision switched integrator transimpedance amplifier operated in the dual sampling mode which enables sub-pA resolution. The potentiostat is suitable for measuring very low currents (typical dynamic range: 5 pA-4.7 μA) with a 16 bit resolution, and it can support 2-, 3- and 4-electrode cell configurations. Its operation was assessed by using it as a detection module in a home-made capillary electrophoresis system for the separation and amperometric detection of paracetamol and p-aminophenol at a 3-electrode microfluidic chip. The potential and limitations of the proposed potentiostat to implement fast potential-scan voltammetric techniques were demonstrated for the case of cyclic voltammetry.

  8. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

  9. Plasma ignition and tuning in different cells of a 1.3 GHz nine-cell superconducting radio frequency cavity: Proof of principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, P. V.; Moss, Andrew; Goudket, Philippe; Pattalwar, Shrikant; Herbert, Joe; Valizadeh, Reza; McIntosh, Peter

    2018-06-01

    Field emission is one of the critical issues in the superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities and can degrade their accelerating gradient during operation. The contamination present at top surface of the SRF cavity is one of the foremost reasons for field emission. Plasma based surface processing can be a viable option to eliminate such surface contaminants and enhance performance of the SRF cavity especially for in-situ applications. These days, 1.3 GHz nine-cell SRF cavity has become baseline standard for many particle accelerators, it is of interest to develop plasma cleaning technique for such SRF cavities. In the development of the plasma processing technique for SRF cavities, the most challenging task is to ignite and tune the plasma in different cells of the SRF cavity. At Daresbury laboratory, UK, we have successfully achieved plasma ignition in different cells of a 1.3 GHz nine-cell SRF cavity. The plasma ignition in different cells of the cavity was accomplished at room temperature towards room temperature plasma cleaning of the SRF cavity surface. Here, we report the successful demonstration of the plasma ignition in different cells of a 1.3 GHz nine-cell SRF cavity.

  10. Integration of different data gap filling techniques to facilitate assessment of polychlorinated biphenyls: A proof of principle case study (ASCCT meeting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Data gap filling techniques are commonly used to predict hazard in the absence of empirical data. The most established techniques are read-across, trend analysis and quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs). Toxic equivalency factors (TEFs) are less frequently used d...

  11. WE-G-BRF-01: Adaptation to Intrafraction Tumor Deformation During Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy: First Proof-Of-Principle Demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ge, Y; OBrien, R; Shieh, C; Booth, J; Keall, P

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Intrafraction tumor deformation limits targeting accuracy in radiotherapy and cannot be adapted to by current motion management techniques. This study simulated intrafractional treatment adaptation to tumor deformations using a dynamic Multi-Leaf Collimator (DMLC) tracking system during Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) treatment for the first time. Methods: The DMLC tracking system was developed to adapt to the intrafraction tumor deformation by warping the planned beam aperture guided by the calculated deformation vector field (DVF) obtained from deformable image registration (DIR) at the time of treatment delivery. Seven single phantom deformation images up to 10.4 mm deformation and eight tumor system phantom deformation images up to 21.5 mm deformation were acquired and used in tracking simulation. The intrafraction adaptation was simulated at the DMLC tracking software platform, which was able to communicate with the image registration software, reshape the instantaneous IMRT field aperture and log the delivered MLC fields.The deformation adaptation accuracy was evaluated by a geometric target coverage metric defined as the sum of the area incorrectly outside and inside the reference aperture. The incremental deformations were arbitrarily determined to take place equally over the delivery interval. The geometric target coverage of delivery with deformation adaptation was compared against the delivery without adaptation. Results: Intrafraction deformation adaptation during dynamic IMRT plan delivery was simulated for single and system deformable phantoms. For the two particular delivery situations, over the treatment course, deformation adaptation improved the target coverage by 89% for single target deformation and 79% for tumor system deformation compared with no-tracking delivery. Conclusion: This work demonstrated the principle of real-time tumor deformation tracking using a DMLC. This is the first step towards the development of an image-guided radiotherapy system to treat deforming tumors in real-time. The authors acknowledge funding support from the Australian NHMRC Australia Fellowship, Cure Cancer Australia Foundation, NHMRC Project Grant APP1042375 and US NIH/NCI R01CA93626

  12. Towards simultaneous individual and tissue identification: A proof-of-principle study on parallel sequencing of STRs, amelogenin, and mRNAs with the Ion Torrent PGM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Zubakov (Dmitry); I. Kokmeijer; A. Ralf (Arwin); N. Rajagopalan; L. Calandro; S. Wootton; R. Langit; C. Chang; R. Lagace; M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAbstract DNA-based individual identification and RNA-based tissue identification represent two commonly-used tools in forensic investigation, aiming to identify crime scene sample donors and helping to provide links between DNA-identified sample donors and criminal acts. Currently

  13. Optimizing treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis—a proof of principle and exploratory trial: is dose tapering practical in good responders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente-Cánovas, Beatriz; Doré, Caroline J; Bosworth, Ailsa; Ma, Margaret H; Galloway, James B; Cope, Andrew P; Pande, Ira; Walker, David; Scott, David L

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives RA patients receiving TNF inhibitors (TNFi) usually maintain their initial doses. The aim of the Optimizing Treatment with Tumour Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis trial was to evaluate whether tapering TNFi doses causes loss of clinical response. Methods We enrolled RA patients receiving etanercept or adalimumab and a DMARD with DAS28 under 3.2 for over 3 months. Initially (months 0–6) patients were randomized to control (constant TNFi) or two experimental groups (tapering TNFi by 33 or 66%). Subsequently (months 6–12) control subjects were randomized to taper TNFi by 33 or 66%. Disease flares (DAS28 increasing ⩾0.6 with at least one additional swollen joint) were the primary outcome. Results Two hundred and forty-four patients were screened, 103 randomized and 97 treated. In months 0–6 there were 8/50 (16%) flares in controls, 3/26 (12%) with 33% tapering and 6/21 (29%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed time to flare was unchanged with 33% tapering but was reduced with 66% tapering compared with controls (adjusted hazard ratio 2.81, 95% CI: 0.99, 7.94; P = 0.051). Analysing all tapered patients after controls were re-randomized (months 6–12) showed differences between groups: there were 6/48 (13%) flares with 33% tapering and 14/39 (36%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed 66% tapering reduced time to flare (adjusted hazard ratio 3.47, 95% CI: 1.26, 9.58; P = 0.016). Conclusion Tapering TNFi by 33% has no impact on disease flares and appears practical in patients in sustained remission and low disease activity states. Trail registration EudraCT, https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, 2010-020738-24; ISRCTN registry, https://www.isrctn.com, 28955701 PMID:28968858

  14. Optimizing treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis—a proof of principle and exploratory trial: is dose tapering practical in good responders?

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Fowzia; Lorente-Cánovas, Beatriz; Doré, Caroline J; Bosworth, Ailsa; Ma, Margaret H; Galloway, James B; Cope, Andrew P; Pande, Ira; Walker, David; Scott, David L

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: RA patients receiving TNF inhibitors (TNFi) usually maintain their initial doses. The aim of the Optimizing Treatment with Tumour Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis trial was to evaluate whether tapering TNFi doses causes loss of clinical response.Methods: We enrolled RA patients receiving etanercept or adalimumab and a DMARD with DAS28 under 3.2 for over 3 months. Initially (months 0-6) patients were randomized to control (constant TNFi) or two experimental groups...

  15. Optimizing treatment with tumour necrosis factor inhibitors in rheumatoid arthritis-a proof of principle and exploratory trial: is dose tapering practical in good responders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fowzia; Lorente-Cánovas, Beatriz; Doré, Caroline J; Bosworth, Ailsa; Ma, Margaret H; Galloway, James B; Cope, Andrew P; Pande, Ira; Walker, David; Scott, David L

    2017-11-01

    RA patients receiving TNF inhibitors (TNFi) usually maintain their initial doses. The aim of the Optimizing Treatment with Tumour Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis trial was to evaluate whether tapering TNFi doses causes loss of clinical response. We enrolled RA patients receiving etanercept or adalimumab and a DMARD with DAS28 under 3.2 for over 3 months. Initially (months 0-6) patients were randomized to control (constant TNFi) or two experimental groups (tapering TNFi by 33 or 66%). Subsequently (months 6-12) control subjects were randomized to taper TNFi by 33 or 66%. Disease flares (DAS28 increasing ⩾0.6 with at least one additional swollen joint) were the primary outcome. Two hundred and forty-four patients were screened, 103 randomized and 97 treated. In months 0-6 there were 8/50 (16%) flares in controls, 3/26 (12%) with 33% tapering and 6/21 (29%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed time to flare was unchanged with 33% tapering but was reduced with 66% tapering compared with controls (adjusted hazard ratio 2.81, 95% CI: 0.99, 7.94; P = 0.051). Analysing all tapered patients after controls were re-randomized (months 6-12) showed differences between groups: there were 6/48 (13%) flares with 33% tapering and 14/39 (36%) with 66% tapering. Multivariate Cox analysis showed 66% tapering reduced time to flare (adjusted hazard ratio 3.47, 95% CI: 1.26, 9.58; P = 0.016). Tapering TNFi by 33% has no impact on disease flares and appears practical in patients in sustained remission and low disease activity states. EudraCT, https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu, 2010-020738-24; ISRCTN registry, https://www.isrctn.com, 28955701. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology.

  16. TU-C-17A-12: Towards a Passively Optimized Phase-Space Monte Carlo (POPMC) Treatment Planning Method: A Proof of Principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Y M; Bednarz, B; Zankowski, C; Svatos, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The advent of on-line/off-line adaptive, and biologically-conformal radiation therapy has led to a need for treatment planning solutions that utilize voxel-specific penalties, requiring optimization over a large solution space that is performed quickly, and the dose in each voxel calculated accurately. This work proposes a “passive” optimization framework, which is executed concurrently during Monte Carlo dose calculation, evaluating the cost/benefit of each history during transport, and creates a passively optimized fluence map. Methods: The Monte Carlo code Geant4 v9.6 was used for this study. The standard voxel geometry implementation was modified to support the passive optimization framework, with voxel-specific optimization parameters. Dose-benefit functions, which will increase a particle history’s weight upon dose deposition, were defined in a central collection of voxels to effectively create target structures. Histories that deposit energy to voxels are reweighted based on a voxel’s dose multiplied by its cost/benefit value. Upon full termination of each history, the dose contributions of that history are reweighted to reflect a contribution proportional to the history’s final weight. A parallel-planar 1.25 MeV photon fluence is transported through the geometry, and re-weighted at each dose deposition step. The resulting weight is tallied with the incident spatial and directional coordinates in a phase-space distribution. Results: A uniform incident fluence was reweighted during MC dose calculations to create an optimized fluence map which would generate dose profiles in target volumes that exhibit the same dose characteristics as the prescribed optimization parameters. An optimized dose profile, calculated concurrently with the phase-space, reflects the resulting dose distribution. Conclusion: This study demonstrated the feasibility of passively optimizing an incident fluence map during Monte Carlo dose calculations. The flexibility of the voxel-specific optimization framework allows a variety and combination of optimization parameters to be calculated for each voxel at every transportation step. This work is partially supported by Varian. This work is partially supported by the NIH

  17. An alternative option for "resect and discard" strategy, using magnifying narrow-band imaging: a prospective "proof-of-principle" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoji; Hanafusa, Masao; Kanzaki, Hiromitsu; Ohta, Takashi; Hanaoka, Noboru; Yamamoto, Sachiko; Higashino, Koji; Tomita, Yasuhiko; Uedo, Noriya; Ishihara, Ryu; Iishi, Hiroyasu

    2015-10-01

    The "resect and discard" strategy is beneficial for cost savings on screening and surveillance colonoscopy, but it has the risk to discard lesions with advanced histology or small invasive cancer (small advanced lesion; SALs). The aim of this study was to prove the principle of new "resect and discard" strategy with consideration for SALs using magnifying narrow-band imaging (M-NBI). Patients undergoing colonoscopy at a tertiary center were involved in this prospective trial. For each detected polyp <10 mm, optical diagnosis (OD) and virtual management ("leave in situ", "discard" or "send for pathology") were independently made using non-magnifying NBI (N-NBI) and M-NBI, and next surveillance interval were predicted. Histological and optical diagnosis results of all polyps were compared. While the management could be decided in 82% of polyps smaller than 10 mm, 24/31 (77%) SALs including two small invasive cancers were not discarded based on OD using M-NBI. The sensitivity [90% confidence interval (CI)] of M-NBI for SALs was 0.77 (0.61-0.89). The risk for discarding SALs using N-NBI was significantly higher than that using M-NBI (53 vs. 23%, p = 0.02). The diagnostic accuracy (95% CI) of M-NBI in distinguishing neoplastic from non-neoplastic lesions [0.88 (0.86-0.90)] was significantly better than that of N-NBI [0.84 (0.82-0.87)] (p = 0.005). The results of our study indicated that our "resect and discard" strategy using M-NBI could work to reduce the risk for discarding SALs including small invasive cancer (UMIN-CTR, UMIN000003740).

  18. Índice estandarizado de precipitación (SPI para la caracterización de sequías meteorológicas en la cuenca del río Dagua-Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loaiza Cerón, Wilmar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI characterizes meteorological droughts of a place, by quantifying the deficit of rainfall in different time periods. Negative SPI values represents drought, while positive values indicate wet periods. The results suggest that negative SPI periods coincide with El Niño years: 82-83, 91-92 and 97-98. The 91-92 event had the largest impact on the region. These results indicate that the most severe droughts in the basin of Dagua, were presented at the quarters of Dec- Jan-Feb, Jan-Feb-Mar, Jun-Jul-Aug and Jul-Aug-Sep. The results have been obtained with geostatistical techniques, and are a basic input to formulate adaptation strategies and ensure food sovereignty of small farmers against drought.El Índice Estandarizado de Precipitación (SPI caracteriza las sequías meteorológicas de un lugar, mediante la cuantificación del déficit de precipitación en diferentes períodos de tiempo. Valores negativos del SPI representan sequías, mientras valores positivos indican periodos húmedos. Los resultados muestran que los períodos SPI negativos, coinciden con años clasificados como El Niño: 82-83, 91-92 y 97-98, de los cuales, el evento 91-92 presentó los mayores impactos en la región. En general, los resultados indican que las sequías más intensas en la cuenca del Dagua, se presentaron en los trimestres de Dic-Ene-Feb, Ene-Feb-Mar, Jun-Jul-Ago y Jul-Ago-Sep; estos resultados se espacializaron con técnicas geoestadísticas, y son insumo básico para formular estrategias de adaptación y garantizar la soberanía alimentaria de los pequeños agricultores frente a las sequías. [fr] L’Indice de précipitations normalisé (SPI caractérise les sécheresses météorologiques d’un lieu, en quantifiant le déficit de précipitations à différentes périodes de temps. Les valeurs négatives de SPI indiquent périodes sécheresse, tandis que les positives indiquent des périodes humides. Les r

  19. Design Modifications, Fabrication and Test of HFDB-03 Racetrack Magnet Wound with Pre-Reacted Nb3Sn Rutherford Cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Barzi, E.; Bhashyam, S.; Carcagno, R.; Feher, S.; Imbasciati, L.; Lamm, M.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Tartaglia, M.; Tompkins, J.; Zlobin, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    A 10 T racetrack magnet (HFDB-03) wound with pre-reacted Nb3Sn Rutherford cable has been fabricated and tested at Fermilab. This magnet is the third one in a proof-of-principle series for the use of the React-and-Wind technology in common-coil dipole magnets for future accelerators. It consists of two flat racetrack coils (28 turns each) separated by 5 mm. The maximum field on the coil, at the short sample limit of 16530 A, is 10 tesla. The cable has 41 strands with 0.7 mm diameter and the minimum bend radius in the magnet ends is 90 mm. The predecessor of this magnet (HFDB-02) reached 78 % of the short sample limit at 7.7 T. The mechanical design was improved and the fabrication procedure was slightly modified in order to address possible causes of limitation. In this paper we present the mechanical design and analysis of HFDB-03, the modifications to the fabrication procedure and the test results

  20. Status of Wrought FeCrAl-UO2 Capsules Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Harp, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Core, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Linton, K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Candidate cladding materials for accident tolerant fuel applications require extensive testing and validation prior to commercial deployment within the nuclear power industry. One class of cladding materials, FeCrAl alloys, is currently undergoing such effort. Within these activities is a series of irradiation programs within the Advanced Test Reactor. These programs are developed to aid in commercial maturation and understand the fundamental mechanisms controlling the cladding performance during normal operation of a typical light water reactor. Three different irradiation programs are on-going; one designed as a simple proof-of-principle concept, the other to evaluate the susceptibility of FeCrAl to fuel-cladding chemical interaction, and the last to fully simulate the conditions of a pressurized water reactor experimentally. To date, nondestructive post-irradiation examination has been completed on the rodlet deemed FCA-L3 from the simple proof-of-concept irradiation program. Initial results show possible breach of the rodlet under irradiation but further studies are needed to conclusively determine whether breach has occurred and the underlying reasons for such a possible failure. Further work includes characterizing additional rodlets following irradiation.

  1. Persvazivní techniky v lifestylových časopisech a jejich vliv na formování životního stylu : obsahová analýza časopisu Spy

    OpenAIRE

    Jeřábek, David

    2010-01-01

    Bachelor thesis "Persuasive techniques in lifestyle magazines and their effect on lifestyle-forming : content analysis of Spy magazines" generally deals with media effects on audiences. It introduces the historic development of perspectives on mass media and mass communication and the effects of media and their research. In particular it focuses on the effects of the so-called lifestyle media on the lifestyle and identity of mainly younger consumers of media products. It specifically evaluate...

  2. An Algorithm of an X-ray Hit Allocation to a Single Pixel in a Cluster and Its Test-Circuit Implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deptuch, G. W. [AGH-UST, Cracow; Fahim, F. [Fermilab; Grybos, P. [AGH-UST, Cracow; Hoff, J. [Fermilab; Maj, P. [AGH-UST, Cracow; Siddons, D. P. [Brookhaven; Kmon, P. [AGH-UST, Cracow; Trimpl, M. [Fermilab; Zimmerman, T. [Fermilab

    2017-05-06

    An on-chip implementable algorithm for allocation of an X-ray photon imprint, called a hit, to a single pixel in the presence of charge sharing in a highly segmented pixel detector is described. Its proof-of-principle implementation is also given supported by the results of tests using a highly collimated X-ray photon beam from a synchrotron source. The algorithm handles asynchronous arrivals of X-ray photons. Activation of groups of pixels, comparisons of peak amplitudes of pulses within an active neighborhood and finally latching of the results of these comparisons constitute the three procedural steps of the algorithm. A grouping of pixels to one virtual pixel that recovers composite signals and event driven strobes to control comparisons of fractional signals between neighboring pixels are the actuators of the algorithm. The circuitry necessary to implement the algorithm requires an extensive inter-pixel connection grid of analog and digital signals that are exchanged between pixels. A test-circuit implementation of the algorithm was achieved with a small array of 32×32 pixels and the device was exposed to an 8 keV highly collimated to a diameter of 3 μm X-ray beam. The results of these tests are given in the paper assessing physical implementation of the algorithm.

  3. Development and in vitro testing of liposomal gadolinium-formulations for neutron capture therapy of glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    For the improvement of current neutron capture therapy, several liposomal formulations of neutron capture agent gadolinium were developed and tested in a glioma cell model. Formulations were analyzed regarding physicochemical and biological parameters, such as size, zeta potential, uptake into cancer cells and performance under neutron irradiation. The neutron and photon dose derived from intracellular as well as extracellular Gd was calculated via Monte Carlo simulations and set in correlation with the reduction of cell survival after irradiation. To investigate the suitability of Gd as a radiosensitizer for photon radiation, cells were also irradiated with synchrotron radiation in addition to clinically used photons generated by linear accelerator. Irradiation with neutrons led to significantly lower survival for Gd-liposome-treated F98 and LN229 cells, compared to irradiated control cells and cells treated with non-liposomal Gd-DTPA. Correlation between Gd-content and -dose and respective cell survival displayed proportional relationship for most of the applied formulations. Photon irradiation experiments showed the proof-of-principle for the radiosensitizer approach, although the photon spectra currently used have to be optimized for higher efficiency of the radiosensitizer. In conclusion, the newly developed Gd-liposomes show great potential for the improvement of radiation treatment options for highly malignant glioblastoma.

  4. Assessment of the Impact of Climate Change on Drought Characteristics in the Hwanghae Plain, North Korea Using Time Series SPI and SPEI: 1981–2100

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Hyun Lee

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available North Korea is a food-deficit nation in which climate change could have a significant impact on drought. We analyzed drought characteristics in the Hwanghae Plain, North Korea using both the multiple timescales of the standardized precipitation index (SPI and the standardized precipitation evapotranspiration index (SPEI from 1981 to 2100. The probability of non-exceedance for a one-month SPEI below −1.0 was only 1.1% in the spring season of 1995 but increased to 24.4% in 2085. The SPEI for a ten-year return period varied from −0.6 to −0.9 in 1995 and decreased to −1.18 in 2025. The results indicate that severe drought is more likely to occur in future as a result of climate change. The seasonal drought conditions were also significantly influenced by climate change. The largest decrease in the SPEI occurred in late spring and early summer, both of which are important for rice growth. Drought characteristics include severity, duration, and intensity. Therefore, we applied the time series of SPIs and SPEIs to the runs theory and found that the drought intensity identified by one-month SPEIs in 1995 was at a level of 1.21, which reached 1.39 in 2085, implying that climate change will intensify drought in the future.

  5. SPI-Based Analyses of Drought Changes over the Past 60 Years in China’s Major Crop-Growing Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang Xia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzes the changes in drought patterns in China’s major crop-growing areas over the past 60 years. The analysis was done using both weather station data and Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI rainfall data to calculate the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI. The results showed that the occurrences of extreme drought were the most serious in recent years in the Southwest China and Sichuan crop-growing areas. The Yangtze River (MLRY and South China crop-growing areas experienced extreme droughts during 1960–1980, whereas the Northeast China and Huang–Huai–Hai crop-growing areas experienced extreme droughts around 2003. The analysis showed that the SPIs calculated by TRMM data at time scales of one, three, and six months were reliable for monitoring drought in the study regions, but for 12 months, the SPIs calculated by gauge and TRMM data showed less consistency. The analysis of the spatial distribution of droughts over the past 15 years using TMI rainfall data revealed that more than 60% of the area experienced extreme drought in 2011 over the MLRY region and in 1998 over the Huang–Huai–Hai region. The frequency of different intensity droughts presented significant spatial heterogeneity in each crop-growing region.

  6. The life and death of massive stars revealed by the observation of nuclear gamma-ray lines with the Integral/SPI spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, P.

    2008-11-01

    The aim of this research thesis is to bring up observational constraints on the mechanisms which govern life and death of massive stars, i.e. stars having an initial mass greater than eight times the Sun's mass, and smaller than 120 to 150 solar masses. Thus, it aims at detecting the vestiges of recent and close supernovae in order to find out the traces of the dynamics of their first instants. The author has explored the radiation of three radio-isotopes accessible to the nuclear gamma astronomy ( 44 Ti, 60 Fe, 26 Al) using observations performed with high resolution gamma spectrometer (SPI) on the INTEGRAL international observatory. After an overview of the present knowledge on the massive star explosion mechanism, the author presents the specificities and potential of the investigated radio-isotopes. He describes the data treatment methods and a population synthesis programme for the prediction of decay gamma streaks, and then reports its work on the inner dynamics of Cassiopeia A explosion, the stellar activity of the galaxy revealed by the radioisotope observation, the nucleo-synthetic activity of the Swan region

  7. Examining the extreme 2017 spring drought event in South Korea using a suite of drought indices (SPI, SC-PDSI, SPEI, EDI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, W. H.; Hayes, M. J.; Svoboda, M. D.; Fuchs, B.; Tadesse, T.; Wilhite, D. A.; Hong, E. M.; Kim, T.

    2017-12-01

    South Korea has experienced extreme droughts in 1994-1995, 2000-2001, 2012, 2015, and 2016-2017. The 2017 spring drought (with especially low winter precipitation recorded in winter 2016) affected a large portion of central and western South Korea, and was one of the most severe droughts in the region since the 2000-2001 drought. The spring drought of 2017 was characterized by exceptionally low precipitation with total precipitation from January to June being 50% lower than the mean normal precipitation record (1981-2010) over most of western South Korea. It was the climatologically driest spring over the 1961-2016 record period. Effective drought monitoring and management depends on which drought indices are selected because each drought index has different drought criteria or levels of drought severity, associated with drought responses. In this study, for the quantitative analysis of the spring 2017 drought event in South Korea, four widely-used drought indices, including the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI), the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI), the Self-Calibrated Palmer Drought Severity Index (SC-PDSI), and the Effective Drought Index (EDI) are compared with observed drought damaged areas in the context of agricultural drought impacts. The South Korean government (Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs (MAFRA) and Korea Rural Community Corporation (KRC)) has been operating a government-level drought monitoring system since 2016. Results from this study can be used to improve the drought monitoring applications, as well as drought planning and preparedness in South Korea.

  8. SMELL-S and SMELL-R: Olfactory tests not influenced by odor-specific insensitivity or prior olfactory experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Julien W; Keller, Andreas; Wong, Michele; Jiang, Rong-San; Vosshall, Leslie B

    2017-10-24

    Smell dysfunction is a common and underdiagnosed medical condition that can have serious consequences. It is also an early biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, where olfactory deficits precede detectable memory loss. Clinical tests that evaluate the sense of smell face two major challenges. First, human sensitivity to individual odorants varies significantly, so test results may be unreliable in people with low sensitivity to a test odorant but an otherwise normal sense of smell. Second, prior familiarity with odor stimuli can bias smell test performance. We have developed nonsemantic tests for olfactory sensitivity (SMELL-S) and olfactory resolution (SMELL-R) that use mixtures of odorants that have unfamiliar smells. The tests can be self-administered by healthy individuals with minimal training and show high test-retest reliability. Because SMELL-S uses odor mixtures rather than a single molecule, odor-specific insensitivity is averaged out, and the test accurately distinguished people with normal and dysfunctional smell. SMELL-R is a discrimination test in which the difference between two stimulus mixtures can be altered stepwise. This is an advance over current discrimination tests, which ask subjects to discriminate monomolecular odorants whose difference in odor cannot be quantified. SMELL-R showed significantly less bias in scores between North American and Taiwanese subjects than conventional semantically based smell tests that need to be adapted to different languages and cultures. Based on these proof-of-principle results in healthy individuals, we predict that SMELL-S and SMELL-R will be broadly effective in diagnosing smell dysfunction. Published under the PNAS license.

  9. Prenatal RhD Testing : A Review of Studies Published from 2006 to 2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Legler, Tobias Joerg; Mueller, Sina Patricia; Haverkamp, Alexander; Grill, Simon; Hahn, Sinuhe

    2009-01-01

    The availability of noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for the fetal RhD status (NIPD RhD) is an obvious benefit for alloimmunized pregnant women. This review gives information about the performance characteristics of current diagnostic technologies and recent promising proof-of-principle studies.

  10. SMELL-S and SMELL-R: Olfactory tests not influenced by odor-specific insensitivity or prior olfactory experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rong-San

    2017-01-01

    Smell dysfunction is a common and underdiagnosed medical condition that can have serious consequences. It is also an early biomarker of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, where olfactory deficits precede detectable memory loss. Clinical tests that evaluate the sense of smell face two major challenges. First, human sensitivity to individual odorants varies significantly, so test results may be unreliable in people with low sensitivity to a test odorant but an otherwise normal sense of smell. Second, prior familiarity with odor stimuli can bias smell test performance. We have developed nonsemantic tests for olfactory sensitivity (SMELL-S) and olfactory resolution (SMELL-R) that use mixtures of odorants that have unfamiliar smells. The tests can be self-administered by healthy individuals with minimal training and show high test–retest reliability. Because SMELL-S uses odor mixtures rather than a single molecule, odor-specific insensitivity is averaged out, and the test accurately distinguished people with normal and dysfunctional smell. SMELL-R is a discrimination test in which the difference between two stimulus mixtures can be altered stepwise. This is an advance over current discrimination tests, which ask subjects to discriminate monomolecular odorants whose difference in odor cannot be quantified. SMELL-R showed significantly less bias in scores between North American and Taiwanese subjects than conventional semantically based smell tests that need to be adapted to different languages and cultures. Based on these proof-of-principle results in healthy individuals, we predict that SMELL-S and SMELL-R will be broadly effective in diagnosing smell dysfunction. PMID:29073044

  11. Architectural Modelling of Alternatives for Verification of New Interventions on the Example of the Romanesque Palace at Spiš Castle in Slovakia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorová, Jana; Kalesný, František; Polomová, Beata; Vojteková, Eva

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the results of the first phase of the research project SK-VEGA 1/0951/16 on using transparent and translucent structures in historical buildings. The team of researchers from the Faculty of Architecture SUT Bratislava introduces possibilities of using lightweight roofs on the model example of a dominant medieval ruin (Romanesque Palace, Spiš Castle, UNESCO site). Architectural 3D-modelling of alternatives gains new methodical importance in conditions, when in real practice only safeguarding conservation approaches are preferred. Research based on design serves as a tool for decision-making on further restoration approaches to a specific cultural heritage object. The selected Romanesque Palace of the Spiš Castle has passed through many structural periods. The interior doesn’t exist and the perimeter walls create a raised landscape landmark. Romanesque, gothic and renaissance periods were identifiable. It would be possible to reconstruct these periods partially hypothetically on the basis of saved archive materials. Inner structures and the roofing of the palace were in individual historical periods changed. Exact frame models of a new roofing were created on the principle of hypothetical reconstruction: from the indication of the medieval form, renaissance form until contemporary new forms respecting the present day horizontal palace’s topping. The aim of the first stage of the research was to present a few architectural alternatives of the roof structure refilling according to the given cultural heritage determinants and structural possibilities. We introduce 12 solutions in graphic and text, which present architectural models of a new roofing, covering the interior by transparent structure based on glass panels and translucent structures based on a textile membrane. We achieve a new space for new functional use of the palace by means of various ways of physical enclosing. On the other side, we work with alternatives of the perimeter wall

  12. The electron antineutrino angular correlation coefficient a in free neutron decay. Testing the standard model with the aSPECT-spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borg, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The β-decay of free neutrons is a strongly over-determined process in the Standard Model (SM) of Particle Physics and is described by a multitude of observables. Some of those observables are sensitive to physics beyond the SM. For example, the correlation coefficients of the involved particles belong to them. The spectrometer aSPECT was designed to measure precisely the shape of the proton energy spectrum and to extract from it the electron anti-neutrino angular correlation coefficient a. A first test period (2005/2006) showed the ''proof-of-principles''. The limiting influence of uncontrollable background conditions in the spectrometer made it impossible to extract a reliable value for the coefficient a (published in 2008). A second measurement cycle (2007/2008) aimed to under-run the relative accuracy of previous experiments (δa)/(a)=5%. I performed the analysis of the data taken there which is the emphasis of this doctoral thesis. A central point are background studies. The systematic impact of background on a was reduced to (δa (syst.) )/(a)=0.61 %. The statistical accuracy of the analyzed measurements is (δa (stat.) )/(a)∼1.4 %. Besides, saturation effects of the detector electronics were investigated which were initially observed. These turned out not to be correctable on a sufficient level. An applicable idea how to avoid the saturation effects is discussed in the last chapter. (orig.)

  13. I spy, I spy with my little eye

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribbers, J.; Keuten, M.G.A.; van Rompay, T.

    2017-01-01

    Aims
    The basis of this study lies in hygiene of swimming pools, where it is argued that taking a pre-swim shower would lead to a decrease in release of pollutants in the swimming pool, which in the end would lead to the decrease of health issues as red eyes and asthma. However, previous research

  14. Quantum Strategies: Proposal to Experimentally Test a Quantum Economics Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-09

    protocols can add security to competitive situations; and analyzing the feasibility of running multi-party quantum games over metro-distance optical... games of complete informa- tion. Physics Letters A, 272:291-303, August 2000. [21] D. A. Meyer. Quantum Communication in Games . In S. M. Barnett, E ...feasibility of quantum games , we proposed to implement a proof-of-principle quantum public goods game , and to experimentally demonstrate that the quantum

  15. Immunolymphoscintigraphy for metastatic sentinel nodes: test of a model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakera, A H; Nielsen, B S; Madsen, J

    2011-01-01

    Aim. To develop a method and obtain proof-of-principle for immunolymphoscintigraphy for identification of metastatic sentinel nodes. Methods. We selected one of four tumour-specific antibodies against human breast cancer and investigated (1), in immune-deficient (nude) mice with xenograft human b...... in healthy rabbits. Results and Conclusion. Our paper suggests the theoretical possibility of a model of dual isotope immuno-lymphoscintigraphy for noninvasive, preoperative, malignant sentinel node imaging....

  16. Testing Testing Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville, Craig; O'Neill, Thomas; Wright, Benjamin D.; Woodcock, Richard W.; Munoz-Sandoval, Ana; Gershon, Richard C.; Bergstrom, Betty

    1998-01-01

    Articles in this special section consider (1) flow in test taking (Craig Deville); (2) testwiseness (Thomas O'Neill); (3) test length (Benjamin Wright); (4) cross-language test equating (Richard W. Woodcock and Ana Munoz-Sandoval); (5) computer-assisted testing and testwiseness (Richard Gershon and Betty Bergstrom); and (6) Web-enhanced testing…

  17. Potential Functional Embedding Theory at the Correlated Wave Function Level. 2. Error Sources and Performance Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jin; Yu, Kuang; Libisch, Florian; Dieterich, Johannes M; Carter, Emily A

    2017-03-14

    Quantum mechanical embedding theories partition a complex system into multiple spatial regions that can use different electronic structure methods within each, to optimize trade-offs between accuracy and cost. The present work incorporates accurate but expensive correlated wave function (CW) methods for a subsystem containing the phenomenon or feature of greatest interest, while self-consistently capturing quantum effects of the surroundings using fast but less accurate density functional theory (DFT) approximations. We recently proposed two embedding methods [for a review, see: Acc. Chem. Res. 2014 , 47 , 2768 ]: density functional embedding theory (DFET) and potential functional embedding theory (PFET). DFET provides a fast but non-self-consistent density-based embedding scheme, whereas PFET offers a more rigorous theoretical framework to perform fully self-consistent, variational CW/DFT calculations [as defined in part 1, CW/DFT means subsystem 1(2) is treated with CW(DFT) methods]. When originally presented, PFET was only tested at the DFT/DFT level of theory as a proof of principle within a planewave (PW) basis. Part 1 of this two-part series demonstrated that PFET can be made to work well with mixed Gaussian type orbital (GTO)/PW bases, as long as optimized GTO bases and consistent electron-ion potentials are employed throughout. Here in part 2 we conduct the first PFET calculations at the CW/DFT level and compare them to DFET and full CW benchmarks. We test the performance of PFET at the CW/DFT level for a variety of types of interactions (hydrogen bonding, metallic, and ionic). By introducing an intermediate CW/DFT embedding scheme denoted DFET/PFET, we show how PFET remedies different types of errors in DFET, serving as a more robust type of embedding theory.

  18. Correlation analysis of Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) for the water debit and level of the Cisadane River during El Niño and La Niña years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoir, A. N.; Rohmah, M.; Nuryadi

    2018-03-01

    Hydrometeorological factor causes most disaster in Indonesia, and two of them are drought and flood. This study aims to correlate Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) 3-monthly to water debit and water level in the Cisadane River. The monthly rainfall data from Serpong and Pasar Baru rain station from 2009 to 2011 when moderate El Niño and moderate La Niña happened. The correlation analysis between debit and water level to SPI 3-monthly used rain post of Serpong to represent the condition of the upstream area and rain post of Pasar Baru to represent the condition of the downstream area. The results showed that during La Niña year, the rainfall on the upstream area of the Cisadane River influenced the increase and the decrease in water debit and water level. Meanwhile, the rainfall on the downstream area of the river has an opposite effect on the increase and the decrease of debit and water level of the Pasar Baru. On the upstream area, the correlation between rainfall and water debit is 0.8, and the correlation between rainfall and water level is also 0.8. During El Niño year, the correlation was less than 0.5.

  19. The man, who wasn't a spy. The life of the communist and scientist Klaus Fuchs; Der Mann, der kein Spion war. Das Leben des Kommunisten und Wissenschaftlers Klaus Fuchs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedmann, R.

    2005-07-01

    In 1949 the Sovjet Union ignited her first atomic bomb, many years earlyer than expected by western secret services. A decisive role played the German physicist Klaus Fuchs. From 1943 to 1946 he cooperated in the US atomic bomb program, called Manhatten Project. All knowledge he yield, all information he got, he passed on secret ways to the Sovjet Union. In 1950 he was exposed and condemned because of spying. This book is worldwide the first comprehensive biography of a man, who had been regarded as the ''most dangerous spy of the 20th century'' in the western world, and his work had been kept a secret in the East lasting for decades. The author evaluated an extensive source material from the USA, Great Britain and the Sovjet Union, released to pubication not till after 1990. Furtheron he could rely on the memory of many actors in the surrounding of Klaus Fuchs, who also found the way to the publicity after the end of the East-West-Conflict. (GL)

  20. Vztah spišských Romů k přírodě ve světle antropologických teorií

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojtěch Pelikán

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with relation between Romanies from Spiš and nature. It discusses its connections with their ethnic identity. It fits the topic in context of anthropological theories, which are completed with knowledge of psychologists and gypsy-focused historians. It argues with a shortcut of harmonious coexistence of Romanies and nature (“Myth of the ecologically noble savage” and also with authors who deny them direct relationship with nature. Study finds theoretical background among five authors dealing with foreign gypsy groups from anthropological perspective. At the end text formulates two hypotheses: Romanies from Spiš have distinctive relationship with nature and their ethnicity can be view as both “non-Gorgio” and “non-natural”.  The non-agrarian relationship to landscape (nature as environment is more specific and is rather evolving contrary to majority; however, landscape in surroundings of settlements has strong spiritual tone and acts as a space of immediate interaction with supernatural. Dichotomy nature-culture (relationship to nature as a principle is quite similar to other ethnic groups and to our non-modern history. Second hypothesis comes from studies upon relevant majority stereotypes of Gypsies. It says major look on Romanies is in many ways similar to our view of nature and also has very analogical evolution.

  1. The effect of soy products in the diet on retention of non-heme iron from radiolabeled test meals fed to marginally iron-deficient young rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Diets based either on casein or soy products and containing about 25 ppm iron were fed to weanling rats for 13 days. Rats were fasted overnight and fed a 59 Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal the morning of day 14. On day 21 less 59 Fe was retained by rats fed various diets based on selected soy products than by rats fed the casein-based diet. A similar adverse effect of diet components on 59 Fe retention from a casein test meal was observed for lactalbumin and for psyllium husk. No adverse effect of diet on 59 Fe retention was observed for the fiber of soy cotyledons or for rapeseed protein concentrate. For a commercial soy protein isolated (SPI) fed throughout the 21-day experiment, the adverse effect of diet on 59 Fe retention was observed to the sum of the effect of dietary SPI previous to the 59 Fe-radiolabeled casein test meal fed on day 14 and the effect of dietary SPI subsequent to the casein test meal. An effect of dietary soy products on 59 Fe retention from a casein test meal was not observed with diets containing higher iron levels (83 ppm) or when diets were fed for a longer period prior to the test meal (56 days). The present work shows that in some circumstances the concept of iron bioavailability must be expanded to include not only the influence of meal composition, but also the influence of diet previous to and subsequent to a meal

  2. Exploring the sensitivity of the zone of inhibition test for leachable biocides from paper and board food contact materials, and improvements thereof.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castle, L; Kelly, J; Jickells, S M; Johns, S M; Mountfort, K A

    2012-01-01

    The zone of inhibition method to test the release of biocides from paper and board food contact materials was evaluated. The method tests the paper by placing a small specimen directly onto culture plates of Bacillus subtilis and Aspergillus niger. The principle is that any extractable biocide will diffuse from the paper into the surrounding nutrient medium and so inhibit growth of the microorganism in the vicinity. The test was found to have insufficient sensitivity for assuring food safety, where detection limits for migration at or below the mg l(-1) (parts per million) level are needed. Also, the test does not mimic the actual or foreseeable conditions of use since most paper/board materials are not intended for direct contact with an aqueous medium for up to 3 days at 30°C (B. subtilis) or 25°C (A. niger), which are the incubation conditions used. The sensitivity of the test was increased approximately 100-fold by preparing a concentrated extract of the paper to be tested and applying this extract to the assay via a blank paper carrier. This was done using methanol as a good solvent for most biocides, as a proof of principle. Other solvents or food simulants could be used to mimic the conditions of use intended for the particular paper/board samples under examination, e.g. contact with dry, fatty, aqueous or acidic foods, hot or cold. Twenty-four plain (unconverted) paper and board samples and 100 food packaging samples were evaluated using the modified procedure. The results revealed that the method has been developed to the stage where background cytotoxic action of normal paper constituents gives a weak response. Unlike the original method, therefore, the modified method with its improved sensitivity and the facility to link with the intended food contact conditions may be considered a suitable bioassay screening test to complement chemical analysis of paper/board for composition and migration.

  3. Rail deployment and storage procedure and test for ITER blanket remote maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakudate, S.; Shibanuma, K.

    2003-01-01

    A concept of rail-mounted vehicle manipulator system has been developed to apply to the maintenance of the ITER blanket composed of ∼400 modules in the vacuum vessel. The most critical issue of the vehicle manipulator system is the feasibility of the deployment and storage of the articulated rail, composed of eight rail links without any driving mechanism in the joints. To solve this issue, a new driving mechanism and procedure for the rail deployment and storage has been proposed, taking account of the repeated operation of the multi-rail links deployed and stored in the same kinematical manner. The new driving mechanism, which is different from those of a usual articulated manipulator or 'articulated boom' equipped with actuators in every joint for movement, is composed of three external mechanisms installed outside the articulated rail, i.e. a vehicle traveling mechanism as main driver and two auxiliary driving mechanisms. A simplified synchronized control of three driving mechanisms has also been proposed, including 'torque-limit control' for suppression of the overload of the mechanisms. These proposals have been tested using a full-scale vehicle manipulator system, in order to demonstrate the proof of principle for rail deployment and storage. As a result, the articulated rail has been successfully deployed and stored within 6 h each, less than the target of 8 h, by means of the three external driving mechanisms and the proposed synchronized control. In addition, the overload caused by an unexpected mismatch of the synchronized control of three driving mechanisms has also been successfully suppressed less than the rated torque by the proposed 'torque-limit control'. It is therefore concluded that the feasibility of the rail deployment and storage of the vehicle manipulator system has been demonstrated

  4. Chlamydia trachomatis Antibody Testing in Vaginal Mucosal Material versus Blood Samples of Women Attending a Fertility Clinic and an STI Clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, I.V.F.; Land, J.A.; van Bergen, J.E.A.M.; Morré, S.A.; van der Sande, M.A.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Chlamydia infections often follow an asymptomatic course but may damage the reproductive tract. Chlamydia antibodies in serum are used as markers for past infections and can relate to tubal pathology and infertility. This "proof of principle" study aimed to assess whether Chlamydia

  5. Same day identification and full panel antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria from positive blood culture bottles made possible by a combined lysis-filtration method with MALDI-TOF VITEK mass spectrometry and the VITEK2 system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Machen

    Full Text Available Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of microorganisms causing bloodstream infections or sepsis have the potential to improve patient care. This proof-of-principle study evaluates the Lysis-Filtration Method for identification as well as antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria directly from positive blood culture bottles in a clinical setting. A total of 100 non-duplicated positive blood cultures were tested and 1012 microorganism-antimicrobial combinations were assessed. An aliquot of non-charcoal blood culture broth was incubated with lysis buffer briefly before being filtered and washed. Microorganisms recovered from the filter membrane were first identified by using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight VITEK® Mass Spectrometry (VITEK MS. After quick identification from VITEK MS, filtered microorganisms were inoculated to VITEK®2 system for full panel antimicrobial susceptibility testing analysis. Of 100 bottles tested, the VITEK MS resulted in 94.0% correct organism identification to the species level. Compared to the conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods, direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing from VITEK®2 resulted in 93.5% (946/1012 category agreement of antimicrobials tested, with 3.6% (36/1012 minor error, 1.7% (7/1012 major error, and 1.3% (13/1012 very major error of antimicrobials. The average time to identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was 11.4 hours by using the Lysis-Filtration method for both VITEK MS and VITEK®2 compared to 56.3 hours by using conventional methods (p<0.00001. Thus, the same-day results of microorganism identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing directly from positive blood culture can be achieved and can be used for appropriate antibiotic therapy and antibiotic stewardship.

  6. Same Day Identification and Full Panel Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Bacteria from Positive Blood Culture Bottles Made Possible by a Combined Lysis-Filtration Method with MALDI-TOF VITEK Mass Spectrometry and the VITEK2 System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machen, Alexandra; Drake, Tim; Wang, Yun F. (Wayne)

    2014-01-01

    Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of microorganisms causing bloodstream infections or sepsis have the potential to improve patient care. This proof-of-principle study evaluates the Lysis-Filtration Method for identification as well as antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria directly from positive blood culture bottles in a clinical setting. A total of 100 non-duplicated positive blood cultures were tested and 1012 microorganism-antimicrobial combinations were assessed. An aliquot of non-charcoal blood culture broth was incubated with lysis buffer briefly before being filtered and washed. Microorganisms recovered from the filter membrane were first identified by using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight VITEK® Mass Spectrometry (VITEK MS). After quick identification from VITEK MS, filtered microorganisms were inoculated to VITEK®2 system for full panel antimicrobial susceptibility testing analysis. Of 100 bottles tested, the VITEK MS resulted in 94.0% correct organism identification to the species level. Compared to the conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods, direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing from VITEK®2 resulted in 93.5% (946/1012) category agreement of antimicrobials tested, with 3.6% (36/1012) minor error, 1.7% (7/1012) major error, and 1.3% (13/1012) very major error of antimicrobials. The average time to identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was 11.4 hours by using the Lysis-Filtration method for both VITEK MS and VITEK®2 compared to 56.3 hours by using conventional methods (p<0.00001). Thus, the same-day results of microorganism identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing directly from positive blood culture can be achieved and can be used for appropriate antibiotic therapy and antibiotic stewardship. PMID:24551067

  7. Investigación y práctica urbanística desde la Escuela de Arquitectura de Madrid : 20 años de actividad del Instituto Juan de Herrera (SPyOT, 1977-1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón López de Lucio

    1997-11-01

    For two decades now, research and urban practice at Escuela Técnica Superior de Arquitectura de Madrid has notably come apart from dominant planning ideology, in which "urban project" has been considered from a quite reductionist approach, so embedded in the paradigmatic tautology of "urban urbanism", as the only way of working and teaching. In 1977 a group of professors of what latter became the Departamento de Urbanística y Ordenación del Territorio de la E.T.S. de Arquitectura de Madrid decided to organize themselves as a working group with the objective of developing research projects and eventually professional work of particular interest in the fields of city and regional planning. Under the name of Seminario de Planeamiento y Ordenación del Territorio (SPyOT this group started a series of research projects focusing initially in Madrid -as central object of study and laboratory of new planning initiatives- and in the comprehensive plans of the main Spanish cities. After 20 years of uninterrupted activity the initial group has grown and consolidated, and its fields of activity have expanded. More than one hundred projects coordinated by two dozens of professors have been completed in which about 200 hundred students have cooperated. A permanent platform for research within the university has developed and an alternative for professional work for full-time professors has been created, following the guidelines of the University Reform Law (LRU. A considerable number of outstanding students have started careers in the planning field, both in the public and private sectors. After 20 years it can be said that the always difficult relationship between academia and the professional world, both for students and professors, has been facilitated by the existence of the SPyOT. Today the SPyOT has become the Sección de Urbanismo del Instituto Juan de Herrera. This publication includes, after some introductory remarks by the Directors of the Planning Department of the

  8. The classification of motor neuron defects in the zebrafish embryo toxicity test (ZFET) as an animal alternative approach to assess developmental neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muth-Köhne, Elke; Wichmann, Arne; Delov, Vera; Fenske, Martina

    2012-07-01

    Rodents are widely used to test the developmental neurotoxicity potential of chemical substances. The regulatory test procedures are elaborate and the requirement of numerous animals is ethically disputable. Therefore, non-animal alternatives are highly desirable, but appropriate test systems that meet regulatory demands are not yet available. Hence, we have developed a new developmental neurotoxicity assay based on specific whole-mount immunostainings of primary and secondary motor neurons (using the monoclonal antibodies znp1 and zn8) in zebrafish embryos. By classifying the motor neuron defects, we evaluated the severity of the neurotoxic damage to individual primary and secondary motor neurons caused by chemical exposure and determined the corresponding effect concentration values (EC₅₀). In a proof-of-principle study, we investigated the effects of three model compounds thiocyclam, cartap and disulfiram, which show some neurotoxicity-indicating effects in vertebrates, and the positive controls ethanol and nicotine and the negative controls 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA) and triclosan. As a quantitative measure of the neurotoxic potential of the test compounds, we calculated the ratios of the EC₅₀ values for motor neuron defects and the cumulative malformations, as determined in a zebrafish embryo toxicity test (zFET). Based on this index, disulfiram was classified as the most potent and thiocyclam as the least potent developmental neurotoxin. The index also confirmed the control compounds as positive and negative neurotoxicants. Our findings demonstrate that this index can be used to reliably distinguish between neurotoxic and non-neurotoxic chemicals and provide a sound estimate for the neurodevelopmental hazard potential of a chemical. The demonstrated method can be a feasible approach to reduce the number of animals used in developmental neurotoxicity evaluation procedures. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The high-density Z-pinch as a pulsed fusion neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Sethian, J.D.; Hagenson, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The dense Z-pinch (DZP) is one of the earliest and simplest plasma heating and confinement schemes. Recent experimental advances based on plasma initiation from hair-like (10s μm in radius) solid hydrogen filaments have so far not encountered the usually devastating MHD instabilities that plagued early DZP experiments. These encouraging results along with debt of a number of proof-of principle, high-current (1--2 MA in 10--100 ns) experiments have prompted consideration of the DZP as a pulsed source of DT fusion neutrons of sufficient strength (/dot S//sub N/ ≥ 10 19 n/s) to provide uncollided neutron fluxes in excess of I/sub ω/ = 5--10 MW/m 2 over test volumes of 10--30 litre or greater. While this neutron source would be pulsed (100s ns pulse widths, 10--100 Hz pulse rate), giving flux time compressions in the range 10 5 --10 6 , its simplicity, near-time feasibility, low cost, high-Q operation, and relevance to fusion systems that may provide a pulsed commercial end-product (e.g., inertial confinement or the DZP itself) together create the impetus for preliminary considerations as a neutron source for fusion nuclear technology and materials testings. The results of a preliminary parametric systems study (focusing primarily on physics issues), conceptual design, and cost versus performance analyses are presented. The DZP promises an expensive and efficient means to provide pulsed DT neutrons at an average rate in excess of 10 19 n/s, with neutron currents I/sub ω/ /approx lt/ 10 MW/m 2 over volumes V/sub exp/ ≥ 30 litre using single-pulse technologies that differ little from those being used in present-day experiments. 34 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs

  10. Same day identification and full panel antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria from positive blood culture bottles made possible by a combined lysis-filtration method with MALDI-TOF VITEK mass spectrometry and the VITEK2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machen, Alexandra; Drake, Tim; Wang, Yun F Wayne

    2014-01-01

    Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of microorganisms causing bloodstream infections or sepsis have the potential to improve patient care. This proof-of-principle study evaluates the Lysis-Filtration Method for identification as well as antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria directly from positive blood culture bottles in a clinical setting. A total of 100 non-duplicated positive blood cultures were tested and 1012 microorganism-antimicrobial combinations were assessed. An aliquot of non-charcoal blood culture broth was incubated with lysis buffer briefly before being filtered and washed. Microorganisms recovered from the filter membrane were first identified by using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight VITEK® Mass Spectrometry (VITEK MS). After quick identification from VITEK MS, filtered microorganisms were inoculated to VITEK®2 system for full panel antimicrobial susceptibility testing analysis. Of 100 bottles tested, the VITEK MS resulted in 94.0% correct organism identification to the species level. Compared to the conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods, direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing from VITEK®2 resulted in 93.5% (946/1012) category agreement of antimicrobials tested, with 3.6% (36/1012) minor error, 1.7% (7/1012) major error, and 1.3% (13/1012) very major error of antimicrobials. The average time to identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was 11.4 hours by using the Lysis-Filtration method for both VITEK MS and VITEK®2 compared to 56.3 hours by using conventional methods (pdirectly from positive blood culture can be achieved and can be used for appropriate antibiotic therapy and antibiotic stewardship.

  11. ClpP deletion causes attenuation of Salmonella Typhimurium virulence through mis-regulation of RpoS and indirect control of CsrA and the SPI genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Olsen, John E.; Aabo, Søren

    2013-01-01

    , suggesting the repression of invasion was directed through RpoS. The expression of the csrA virulence regulator was increased in the ΔclpP mutant and decreased in the rpoS : : amp and ΔclpP/rpoS : : amp mutants, indicating that ClpP affects the csrA expression level as well. Thus, this study suggests...... the proteolytic component ClpP, the stationary phase regulator RpoS and the carbon-storage regulator CsrA. However, the mechanism behind the ClpP regulation is not fully understood. To elucidate this we examined differentially expressed genes in a ΔclpP mutant compared with WT using global transcriptomic analysis...... that ClpP affects SPI1 expression and thereby virulence indirectly through its regulation of both RpoS and CsrA....

  12. In-Tank Elutriation Test Report And Independent Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, H. H.; Adamson, D. J.; Qureshi, Z. H.; Steeper, T. J.

    2011-01-01

    a period of decades. 2. The radionuclides were apparently either in the form of soluble compounds, like cesium, or micrometer sized particles of actinide oxides or hydroxides. 3. After the initial tank retrieval the tank contained cobble which is not conducive to elutriation. Only after the tank contents were treated with thousands of gallons of 50 wt% caustic, were the solids converted to sand which is compatible with elutriation. Discussions between SRNL and PNNL resulted in plans to test elutriation in two phases; in Phase 1 particles would be separated by differences in settling velocity in an existing scaled tank with its associated hardware and in Phase 2 additional hardware, such as a hydrocyclone, would be added downstream to separate slow settling partciels from liquid. Phase 1 of in-tank elutriation was tested for Proof of Principle in theEngineering Development Laboratory of SRNL in a 41' diameter, 87 gallon tank. The tank had been previously used as a 1/22 scale model of Hanford Waste Tank AY-102. The objective of the testing was to determine which tank operating parameters achieved the best separation between fast- and slow-settling particles. For Phase 1 testing a simulated waste tank supernatant, slow-settling particles and fast-settling particles were loaded to the scaled tank. Because this was a Proof of Principle test, readily available solids particles were used that represented fast-settling and slow-settling particles. The tank contents were agitated using rotating mixer jet pumps (MJP) which suspended solids while liquids and solids were drawn out of the tank with a suction tube. The goal was to determine the optimum hydraulic operating conditions to achieve clean separation in which the residual solids in the tank were nearly all fast-settling particles and the solids transferred out of the tank were nearly all slow-settling particles. Tests were conducted at different pump jet velocities, suction tube diameters and suction tube elevations

  13. Pharmacokinetic modeling of an induction regimen for in vivo combined testing of novel drugs against pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Szymanska

    Full Text Available Current regimens for induction therapy of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, or for re-induction post relapse, use a combination of vincristine (VCR, a glucocorticoid, and L-asparaginase (ASP with or without an anthracycline. With cure rates now approximately 80%, robust pre-clinical models are necessary to prioritize active new drugs for clinical trials in relapsed/refractory patients, and the ability of these models to predict synergy/antagonism with established therapy is an essential attribute. In this study, we report optimization of an induction-type regimen by combining VCR, dexamethasone (DEX and ASP (VXL against ALL xenograft models established from patient biopsies in immune-deficient mice. We demonstrate that the VXL combination was synergistic in vitro against leukemia cell lines as well as in vivo against ALL xenografts. In vivo, VXL treatment caused delays in progression of individual xenografts ranging from 22 to >146 days. The median progression delay of xenografts derived from long-term surviving patients was 2-fold greater than that of xenografts derived from patients who died of their disease. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that systemic DEX exposure in mice increased 2-fold when administered in combination with VCR and ASP, consistent with clinical findings, which may contribute to the observed synergy between the 3 drugs. Finally, as proof-of-principle we tested the in vivo efficacy of combining VXL with either the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Bcl-w inhibitor, ABT-737, or arsenic trioxide to provide evidence of a robust in vivo platform to prioritize new drugs for clinical trials in children with relapsed/refractory ALL.

  14. Demonstration of the iodine and NO/sub x/ removal systems in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory integrated equipment test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, B.E.; Jubin, R.T.

    1987-03-01

    This report summarizes the findings from three sets of experiments on iodine and NO/sub x/ removal performance using dual downdraft condensers in the dissolver off-gas line. The initial experiments were conducted in the laboratory using glassware in proof-of-principle tests. Two additional sets of condenser experiments were conducted using equipment prototyical for a 0.5-t/d plant in the Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This report also describes the NO/sub x/ removal performance of a packed scrubber in the IET during the dissolution of depleted uranium oxides. The overall iodine pass-through efficiency of the condensers in the IET was high as desired. Removal efficiencies ranged from only 0.35 to 6.29%, indicating that the bulk of the iodine in the off-gas will be transferred on through the condensers to the iodox process for final disposal rather than recycled to the dissolver. The optimum operating temperature for the first condenser was in the range of 50 to 70 0 C, with the temperature of the second condenser held near 20 0 C. The NO/sub x/ removal performance of the combined dual condensers and packed scrubber resulted in effluent off-gas stream NO/sub x/ compositions of ∼0.4 to 1.0%, which are acceptable levels for the iodox process. The NO/sub x/ removal efficiency of the condensers ranged from ∼5 to 58%, but was generally around 20%. The removal efficiency of the packed tower scrubber was observed to be in the range of 40 to 60%. The NO/sub x/ removal performance of the condensers tended to complement the performance of the scrubber in that the condenser removal afficiency was high when the scrubber efficiency was low and vice versa

  15. LHCb - Measurement of the branching fraction ratio $\\cal{B}$ $(B_{c}^{+} \\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^+)$ / $\\cal{B}$ $(B_{c}^{+} \\to {J}\\psi\\pi^+)$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    An, Liupan

    2016-01-01

    Using the $pp$ collision data collected by LHCb at center-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s} \\, = 7 \\, {\\rm TeV} \\,$ and $8 \\, {\\rm TeV} \\,$, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $3 \\, \\mathrm{fb}^{-1} \\,$, the ratio of the branching fraction of the $B_{c}^{+} \\to \\psi(2S)\\pi^+$ decay relative to that of the $B_{c}^{+} \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+$ decay is measured to be ${0.268 \\pm 0.032\\mathrm{\\,(stat)} \\pm 0.007\\mathrm{\\,(syst)} \\pm 0.006\\,(\\mathrm{BF}) }$. The first uncertainty is statistical, the second is systematic, and the third is due to the uncertainties on the branching fractions of the $J/\\psi \\to \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ and $\\psi(2S) \\to \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ decays. To enhance the signal significance with limited $B_{c}^{+}$ statistics, the boosted decision tree selection is used to separate the signal and background effectively. The systematic uncertainties are discussed extensively. This measurement is consistent with the previous LHCb result, and the statistical uncertainty is halved.

  16. Minimally invasive (13)C-breath test to examine phenylalanine metabolism in children with phenylketonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Abrar; Murthy, Gayathri; Ueda, Keiko; Cheng, Barbara; Giezen, Alette; Stockler-Ipsiroglu, Sylvia; Elango, Rajavel

    2015-01-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of hepatic phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) leading to increased levels of phenylalanine in the plasma. Phenylalanine levels and phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) activity monitoring are currently limited to conventional blood dot testing. 1-(13)C-phenylalanine, a stable isotope can be used to examine phenylalanine metabolism, as the conversion of phenylalanine to tyrosine occurs in vivo via PAH and subsequently releases the carboxyl labeled (13)C as (13)CO2 in breath. Our objective was to examine phenylalanine metabolism in children with PKU using a minimally-invasive 1-(13)C-phenylalanine breath test ((13)C-PBT). Nine children (7 M: 2 F, mean age 12.5 ± 2.87 y) with PKU participated in the study twice: once before and once after sapropterin supplementation. Children were provided 6 mg/kg oral dose of 1-(13)C-phenylalanine and breath samples were collected at 20 min intervals for a period of 2h. Rate of CO2 production was measured at 60 min post-oral dose using indirect calorimetry. The percentage of 1-(13)C-phenylalanine exhaled as (13)CO2 was measured over a 2h period. Prior to studying children with PKU, we tested the study protocol in healthy children (n = 6; 4M: 2F, mean age 10.2 ± 2.48 y) as proof of principle. Production of a peak enrichment (Cmax) of (13)CO2 (% of dose) in all healthy children occurred at 20 min ranging from 17-29% of dose, with a subsequent return to ~5% by the end of 2h. Production of (13)CO2 from 1-(13)C-phenylalanine in all children with PKU prior to sapropterin treatment remained low. Following sapropterin supplementation for a week, production of (13)CO2 significantly increased in five children with a subsequent decline in blood phenylalanine levels, suggesting improved PAH activity. Sapropterin treatment was not effective in three children whose (13)CO2 production remained unchanged, and did not show a reduction in blood phenylalanine levels and improvement

  17. Method-independent, Computationally Frugal Convergence Testing for Sensitivity Analysis Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, J.; Tolson, B.

    2017-12-01

    The increasing complexity and runtime of environmental models lead to the current situation that the calibration of all model parameters or the estimation of all of their uncertainty is often computationally infeasible. Hence, techniques to determine the sensitivity of model parameters are used to identify most important parameters. All subsequent model calibrations or uncertainty estimation procedures focus then only on these subsets of parameters and are hence less computational demanding. While the examination of the convergence of calibration and uncertainty methods is state-of-the-art, the convergence of the sensitivity methods is usually not checked. If any, bootstrapping of the sensitivity results is used to determine the reliability of the estimated indexes. Bootstrapping, however, might as well become computationally expensive in case of large model outputs and a high number of bootstraps. We, therefore, present a Model Variable Augmentation (MVA) approach to check the convergence of sensitivity indexes without performing any additional model run. This technique is method- and model-independent. It can be applied either during the sensitivity analysis (SA) or afterwards. The latter case enables the checking of already processed sensitivity indexes. To demonstrate the method's independency of the convergence testing method, we applied it to two widely used, global SA methods: the screening method known as Morris method or Elementary Effects (Morris 1991) and the variance-based Sobol' method (Solbol' 1993). The new convergence testing method is first scrutinized using 12 analytical benchmark functions (Cuntz & Mai et al. 2015) where the true indexes of aforementioned three methods are known. This proof of principle shows that the method reliably determines the uncertainty of the SA results when different budgets are used for the SA. The results show that the new frugal method is able to test the convergence and therefore the reliability of SA results in an

  18. Patient education with or without manual therapy compared to a control group in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. A proof-of-principle three-arm parallel group randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, E; Hartvigsen, J; Christensen, H W; Roos, E M; Vach, W; Overgaard, S

    2013-10-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a patient education (PE) program with or without the added effect of manual therapy (MT) compared to a minimal control intervention (MCI). In a single-center university hospital setting, a total of 118 patients with clinical and radiographic unilateral hip osteoarthritis (OA) from primary care were randomized into one of three groups: PE, PE plus MT or MCI. The PE was taught by a physiotherapist involving five sessions. The MT was delivered by a chiropractor involving 12 sessions and the MCI included a home stretching program. Primary outcome was self-reported pain severity on an 11-box numeric rating scale (NRS) immediately following a 6-week intervention period. Patients were followed for 1 year. Primary analysis included 111 patients (94%). In the combined group (PE + MT), a clinically relevant reduction in pain severity compared to the MCI of 1.90 points (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.9-2.9) was achieved. Effect size (Cohen's d) for the PE + MT minus the MCI was 0.92 (95% CI 0.41-1.42). Number needed to treat for PE + MT was 3 (95% CI 2-7). No difference was found between the PE and MCI groups, with mean difference 0.0 (95% CI -1.0 to 1.0). At 12 months, not including patients receiving hip surgery the statistically significant difference favoring PE + MT was maintained. For primary care patients with OA of the hip, a combined intervention of MT and PE was more effective than a MCI. PE alone was not superior to the MCI. clinicaltrials.govNCT01039337. Copyright © 2013 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic Beads Enhance Adhesion of NIH 3T3 Fibroblasts: A Proof-of-Principle In Vitro Study for Implant-Mediated Long-Term Drug Delivery to the Inner Ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliuos, Pooyan; Schulze, Jennifer; Schomaker, Markus; Reuter, Günter; Stolle, Stefan R O; Werner, Darja; Ripken, Tammo; Lenarz, Thomas; Warnecke, Athanasia

    2016-01-01

    Long-term drug delivery to the inner ear may be achieved by functionalizing cochlear implant (CI) electrodes with cells providing neuroprotective factors. However, effective strategies in order to coat implant surfaces with cells need to be developed. Our vision is to make benefit of electromagnetic field attracting forces generated by CI electrodes to bind BDNF-secreting cells that are labelled with magnetic beads (MB) onto the electrode surfaces. Thus, the effect of MB-labelling on cell viability and BDNF production were investigated. Murine NIH 3T3 fibroblasts-genetically modified to produce BDNF-were labelled with MB. Atomic force and bright field microscopy illustrated the internalization of MB by fibroblasts after 24 h of cultivation. Labelling cells with MB did not expose cytotoxic effects on fibroblasts and allowed adhesion on magnetic surfaces with sufficient BDNF release. Our data demonstrate a novel approach for mediating enhanced long-term adhesion of BDNF-secreting fibroblasts on model electrode surfaces for cell-based drug delivery applications in vitro and in vivo. This therapeutic strategy, once transferred to cells suitable for clinical application, may allow the biological modifications of CI surfaces with cells releasing neurotrophic or other factors of interest.

  20. Magnetic Beads Enhance Adhesion of NIH 3T3 Fibroblasts: A Proof-of-Principle In Vitro Study for Implant-Mediated Long-Term Drug Delivery to the Inner Ear.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pooyan Aliuos

    Full Text Available Long-term drug delivery to the inner ear may be achieved by functionalizing cochlear implant (CI electrodes with cells providing neuroprotective factors. However, effective strategies in order to coat implant surfaces with cells need to be developed. Our vision is to make benefit of electromagnetic field attracting forces generated by CI electrodes to bind BDNF-secreting cells that are labelled with magnetic beads (MB onto the electrode surfaces. Thus, the effect of MB-labelling on cell viability and BDNF production were investigated.Murine NIH 3T3 fibroblasts-genetically modified to produce BDNF-were labelled with MB.Atomic force and bright field microscopy illustrated the internalization of MB by fibroblasts after 24 h of cultivation. Labelling cells with MB did not expose cytotoxic effects on fibroblasts and allowed adhesion on magnetic surfaces with sufficient BDNF release.Our data demonstrate a novel approach for mediating enhanced long-term adhesion of BDNF-secreting fibroblasts on model electrode surfaces for cell-based drug delivery applications in vitro and in vivo. This therapeutic strategy, once transferred to cells suitable for clinical application, may allow the biological modifications of CI surfaces with cells releasing neurotrophic or other factors of interest.

  1. Patient education with or without manual therapy compared to a control group in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. A proof-of-principle three-arm parallel group randomized clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, E; Hartvigsen, J; Christensen, H W

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of a patient education (PE) program with or without the added effect of manual therapy (MT) compared to a minimal control intervention (MCI).......To investigate the effectiveness of a patient education (PE) program with or without the added effect of manual therapy (MT) compared to a minimal control intervention (MCI)....

  2. Serial isoelectric focusing as an effective and economic way to obtain maximal resolution and high-throughput in 2D-based comparative proteomics of scarce samples: proof-of-principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhoud, Murtada H; Wessels, Hans J C T; Wevers, Ron A; van Engelen, Baziel G; van den Heuvel, Lambert P; Smeitink, Jan A

    2005-01-01

    In 2D-based comparative proteomics of scarce samples, such as limited patient material, established methods for prefractionation and subsequent use of different narrow range IPG strips to increase overall resolution are difficult to apply. Also, a high number of samples, a prerequisite for drawing meaningful conclusions when pathological and control samples are considered, will increase the associated amount of work almost exponentially. Here, we introduce a novel, effective, and economic method designed to obtain maximum 2D resolution while maintaining the high throughput necessary to perform large-scale comparative proteomics studies. The method is based on connecting different IPG strips serially head-to-tail so that a complete line of different IPG strips with sequential pH regions can be focused in the same experiment. We show that when 3 IPG strips (covering together the pH range of 3-11) are connected head-to-tail an optimal resolution is achieved along the whole pH range. Sample consumption, time required, and associated costs are reduced by almost 70%, and the workload is reduced significantly.

  3. Optimal implementation of green infrastructure practices to minimize influences of land use change and climate change on hydrology and water quality: Case study in Spy Run Creek watershed, Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yaoze; Engel, Bernard A; Collingsworth, Paris D; Pijanowski, Bryan C

    2017-12-01

    Nutrient loading from the Maumee River watershed is a significant reason for the harmful algal blooms (HABs) problem in Lake Erie. The nutrient loading from urban areas needs to be reduced with the installation of green infrastructure (GI) practices. The Long-Term Hydrologic Impact Assessment-Low Impact Development 2.1 (L-THIA-LID 2.1) model was used to explore the influences of land use (LU) and climate change on water quantity and quality in Spy Run Creek watershed (SRCW) (part of Maumee River watershed), decide whether and where excess phosphorus loading existed, identify critical areas to understand where the greatest amount of runoff/pollutants originated, and optimally implement GI practices to obtain maximum environmental benefits with the lowest costs. Both LU/climate changes increased runoff/pollutants generated from the watershed. Areas with the highest runoff/pollutant amount per area, or critical areas, differed for various environmental concerns, land uses (LUs), and climates. Compared to optimization considering all areas, optimization conducted only in critical areas can provide similar cost-effective results with decreased computational time for low levels of runoff/pollutant reductions, but critical area optimization results were not as cost-effective for higher levels of runoff/pollutant reductions. Runoff/pollutants for 2011/2050 LUs/climates could be reduced to amounts of 2001 LU/climate by installation of GI practices with annual expenditures of $0.34 to $2.05 million. The optimization scenarios that were able to obtain the 2001 runoff level in 2011/2050, can also reduce all pollutants to 2001 levels in this watershed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Catching the Cyber Spy: ARL's Interrogator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Long, Kerry S

    2004-01-01

    The U.S. Army Research Laboratory has designed a network-based intrusion detection framework, Interrogator, which addresses the constantly changing threat environment that Department of Defense networks...

  5. Spying on the neighbors' pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xantheas, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    The structure and properties of the aqueous proton is of fundamental interest in many areas of chemistry and biology. Acids and bases are molecules that are able to transfer (donate / accept) a proton according to Brønsted and Lowry, a process that was further explained by Lewis in terms of changes in their electronic structure in an attempt to offer a generalization of the Arrhenius theory. Simple proton transfers or the ones coupled to an electron transfer determine speciation, valence and reactivity in aqueous media and explain electrochemical processes, while voltage-gated proton channels have severe implications to the function of a number of tissues and species.

  6. The E166 experiment: Development of an undulator-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A longitudinal polarized positron beam is foreseen for the international linear collider (ILC). A proof-of-principle experiment has been performed in the final focus test beam at SLAC to demonstrate the production of polarized positrons for implementation at the ILC. The E166 experiment uses a 1 m long helical undulator in a ...

  7. Conduction cooled high temperature superconducting dipole magnet for accelerator applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, N.; Nielsen, G.; Hauge, N.

    2012-01-01

    A 3T proof-of-principle dipole magnet for accelerator applications, based on 2nd generation high temperature superconducting tape was designed, built, and tested by a consortium under the lead of Danfysik. The magnet was designed to have a straight, circular bore with a good field region of radius...

  8. Online monitoring of biofouling using coaxial stub resonator technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoog-Antonyuk, N.A.; Mayer, M.J.J.; Miedema, H.; Olthuis, Wouter; Tomaszweska, A.A.; Paulitsch-Fuchs, A.H.; van den Berg, Albert

    Here we demonstrate the proof-of-principle that a coaxial stub resonator can be used to detect early stages of biofilm formation. After promising field tests using a stub resonator with a stainless steel inner conductor as sensitive element, the sensitivity of the system was improved by using a

  9. Feasibility of Exposure Response Prevention to Treat Repetitive Behaviors of Children with Autism and an Intellectual Disability: A Brief Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Brian A.; Woodard, Cooper R.; Bodfish, James W.

    2013-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence-based behavioral therapies or pharmacotherapies to treat repetitive behaviors found in autism. Effective behavioral therapies are needed to counter any negative consequences these behaviors may have on the child's early learning and socialization. The purpose of this proof-of-principle study was to test the feasibility…

  10. New Developments Regarding the KT Event and Other Catastrophes in Earth History

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Papers presented at the conference on New Developments Regarding the KT Event and Other Catastrophes in Earth History are included. Topics covered include: trajectories of ballistic impact ejecta on a rotating earth; axial focusing of impact energy in the earth's interior: proof-of-principle tests of a new hypothesis; in search of Nemesis; impact, extinctions, volcanism, glaciations, and tectonics: matches and mismatches.

  11. Inductive Shimming of Superconductive Undulators - Preparations for a realistic test

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, D; Bernhard,; Burkart, F; Ehlers, S; Gerstl, S; Grau, A; Peiffer, P; Rossmanith, R; Wollmann, D

    2010-01-01

    The monochromaticity and intensity of synchrotron light emitted by undulators strongly depend on the undulator field quality. For the particular case of superconductive undulators it was shown recently that their field quality can be significantly improved by an array of coupled high temperature superconductor loops attached to the surface of the superconductive undulator. Local field errors induce currents in the coupled closed superconducting loops and, as a result, the hereby generated magnetic field minimizes the field errors. In previous papers the concept was described theoretically and a proof-of-principle experiment was reported. This paper reports on a prepatation experiment for the first quantitative measurement of the phase error reduction in a 13-period short model undulator equipped with a full-scale induction shimming system.

  12. Test Architecture, Test Retrofit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Just like buildings, tests are designed and built for specific purposes, people, and uses. However, both buildings and tests grow and change over time as the needs of their users change. Sometimes, they are also both used for purposes other than those intended in the original designs. This paper explores architecture as a metaphor for language…

  13. “I spy, I spy with my little eye”. Perceptions Beyond (or Within Violence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Duschaztky

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay is based upon a reflection on the images and meanings of violence. In the interest of a identifying a set of clichés about the perception of violence, which eradicate all problematization of “the real”, it submits these representations to a critique followed by a proposed analytical shift. In order to do this, the article will examine different situations related to adolescents and school contexts in which particular attention is paid to the indecipherable, to the disturbing and the clash of bodies, obstacles to the construction of “togetherness”. Based in this examination, the proposed analytical shift suggests a moving away from discourses based on the idea of deficit and supported by strong moral referents and toward perspectives that inquire about the potential power of chaos.

  14. Results from the University of Calgary environmental geophysics test range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duckworth, K; Lawton, D.C.; Juigalli, J; Parry, D. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics

    1995-12-31

    The Spy Hill Research Farm, operated by the University of Calgary as a test range site where geophysical equipment and methods related to environmental monitoring can be operated under controlled conditions, was described. The site is used by students in the geophysics courses offered at the University, but it is also intended to be available to other users for equipment tests. The site is underlain by glacial gravels and clays which reach thicknesses in excess of 30 m. Surveys of the site have been completed with the following geophysical systems: Geonics EM-31 and EM-34; Apex Max-Min; Huntec Mk4 IP with Phoenix IP-T1 transmitter; Geometrics Proton Magnetometer; McPhar vertical field Fluxgate magnetometer; Androtex TDR6 IP with Phoenix IP-T1 transmitter; Geometrics 12 channel refraction seismic system; and Pulse Echo Ground Penetrating Radar. The site has proved to be well suited to serve as a test range. The addition of yet more features to the site is being planned.

  15. Testing Significance Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim I. Krueger

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The practice of Significance Testing (ST remains widespread in psychological science despite continual criticism of its flaws and abuses. Using simulation experiments, we address four concerns about ST and for two of these we compare ST’s performance with prominent alternatives. We find the following: First, the 'p' values delivered by ST predict the posterior probability of the tested hypothesis well under many research conditions. Second, low 'p' values support inductive inferences because they are most likely to occur when the tested hypothesis is false. Third, 'p' values track likelihood ratios without raising the uncertainties of relative inference. Fourth, 'p' values predict the replicability of research findings better than confidence intervals do. Given these results, we conclude that 'p' values may be used judiciously as a heuristic tool for inductive inference. Yet, 'p' values cannot bear the full burden of inference. We encourage researchers to be flexible in their selection and use of statistical methods.

  16. Seismic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sollogoub, Pierre

    2001-01-01

    This lecture deals with: qualification methods for seismic testing; objectives of seismic testing; seismic testing standards including examples; main content of standard; testing means; and some important elements of seismic testing

  17. Schirmer test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tear test; Tearing test; Dry eye test; Basal secretion test; Sjögren - Schirmer; Schirmer's test ... used when the eye doctor suspects you have dry eye. Symptoms include dryness of the eyes or excessive ...

  18. Pinworm test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxyuriasis test; Enterobiasis test; Tape test ... diagnose this infection is to do a tape test. The best time to do this is in ... lay their eggs at night. Steps for the test are: Firmly press the sticky side of a ...

  19. Caracterização química e nutricional de plasteína produzida a partir de hidrolisado pancreático de isolado protéico de soja Chemical and nutritional characterization of plastein produced from pancreatic hydrolysate of soy protein isolate (SPI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrian Thereza Serra Martins

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho teve como objetivo realizar a caracterização química e nutricional da plasteína produzida a partir de isolado protéico de soja (IPS. O hidrolisado de IPS foi produzido em sistema descontínuo, 5% de substrato, relação enzima/substrato 1/20, 6 h, 37°C, sob agitação. A plasteína foi produzida com 40% de substrato em solução aquosa, pH 7, 24 h a 37°C, sob repouso. Na caracterização química, foi verificada a distribuição dos pesos moleculares por meio de eletroforese (SDS-PAGE e cromatografia de exclusão molecular (CEM. A SDS-PAGE não permitiu a visualização das bandas tanto no hidrolisado quanto na plasteína. Na CEM o hidrolisado apresentou 5 frações de PM na faixa de 5,4 a 66,2 kDa e a plasteína com 2 frações de PM na faixa de 9,6 e 58,7 kDa. O escore químico de aminoácidos essenciais confirmou a presença dos aminoácidos sulfurados como limitantes, sendo obtidos os valores de 93,2 e 96,4% para o hidrolisado e plasteína, respectivamente. A modificação enzimática através da reação de síntese de plasteína mostrou ser um processo viável na produção de matéria-prima para formulações alimentares de uso em nutrição clínica e em outros sistemas, sendo necessária a suplementação de metionina quando utilizada como fonte exclusiva de proteína.The objective of this research was to characterize chemically the plastein produced from a pancreatic hydrolysate of soy protein isolate (SPI. The SPI hydrolysate was obtained by an enzymatic discontinuous process, with a 5% substrate concentration, an enzyme/substrate ratio of 1/20, 37ºC, 6 hours under constant stirring. The plastein was produced from this hydrolysate with a 40% substrate (w/v, pH 7, 37ºC, for 24 hours without stirring. The protein profile was analyzed by gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE and by molecular exclusion chromatography (MEC. The SDS-PAGE did not permit the bands visualization. The MEC pointed that the SPI hydrolysate

  20. Ultrasonic Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyeong Jun; Kuk, Jeong Han

    2002-02-15

    This book introduces ultrasonic testing, which tells of outline of ultrasonic testing, principle of ultrasonic testing, prosperities of ultrasonic waves, radiographic test and ultrasonic test, basic theory on ultrasonic testing, mode conversion, transmission and diffraction, ultrasonic flaw detection and probe, standard test piece and reference test piece, like KS(JIS) ASME and ASTM, classification and properties of ultrasonic testing, straight beam method, angle beam method, ASME SEC.V.Art.5 ASTMA 388 and KS B 0817 Korean industrial standard.

  1. Trichomonas Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Tests for Targeted Cancer Therapy Glucose Tests Gonorrhea Testing Gram Stain Growth Hormone Haptoglobin hCG Pregnancy ... With some NAATs, samples collected for testing of gonorrhea and chlamydial infections can also be used to ...

  2. Coombs test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direct antiglobulin test; Indirect antiglobulin test; Anemia - hemolytic ... No special preparation is necessary for this test. ... There are 2 types of the Coombs test: Direct Indirect The direct ... that are stuck to the surface of red blood cells. Many diseases ...

  3. Ham test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acid hemolysin test; Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria - Ham test; PNH - Ham test ... BJ. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  4. Magnesium Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PF4 Antibody Hepatitis A Testing Hepatitis B Testing Hepatitis C Testing HER2/neu Herpes Testing High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic HIV Viral Load HLA Testing HLA- ...

  5. Lipase Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PF4 Antibody Hepatitis A Testing Hepatitis B Testing Hepatitis C Testing HER2/neu Herpes Testing High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic HIV Viral Load HLA Testing HLA- ...

  6. Rubella Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PF4 Antibody Hepatitis A Testing Hepatitis B Testing Hepatitis C Testing HER2/neu Herpes Testing High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic HIV Viral Load HLA Testing HLA- ...

  7. Mono Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PF4 Antibody Hepatitis A Testing Hepatitis B Testing Hepatitis C Testing HER2/neu Herpes Testing High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic HIV Viral Load HLA Testing HLA- ...

  8. AMA Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PF4 Antibody Hepatitis A Testing Hepatitis B Testing Hepatitis C Testing HER2/neu Herpes Testing High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV Antiretroviral Drug Resistance Testing, Genotypic HIV Viral Load HLA Testing HLA- ...

  9. Determination of photoionization cross-sections of different organic molecules using gas chromatography coupled to single-photon ionization (SPI) time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) with an electron-beam-pumped rare gas excimer light source (EBEL): influence of molecular structure and analytical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschner, Markus S; Zimmermann, Ralf

    2011-07-01

    This work describes a fast and reliable method for determination of photoionization cross-sections (PICS) by means of gas chromatography (GC) coupled to single-photon ionization mass spectrometry (SPI-MS). Photoionization efficiency (PIE) data for 69 substances was obtained at a photon energy of 9.8 ± 0.4 eV using an innovative electron-beam-pumped rare gas excimer light source (EBEL) filled with argon. The investigated analytes comprise 12 alkylbenzenes as well as 11 other substituted benzenes, 23 n-alkanes, ten polyaromatic hydrocarbons, seven aromatic heterocycles, and six polyaromatic heterocycles. Absolute PICS for each substance at 9.8 eV are calculated from the relative photoionization efficiencies of the compounds with respect to benzene, whose photoionization cross-section data is well known. Furthermore, a direct correlation between the type of benzene substituents and their absolute PICS is presented and discussed in depth. Finally, comparison of previously measured photoionization cross-sections for 20 substances shows good agreement with the data of the present work.

  10. Neuropathy Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LD) Lactoferrin Lactose Tolerance Tests LDL Cholesterol LDL Particle Testing (LDL-P) Lead Legionella Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase ... tests, such as computed tomography (CT) scans or magnetic resonance imaging ... suspected, additional testing may be performed to evaluate heart rate, blood ...

  11. Pharmacogenomic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your family Plan for the future Insurance and financial planning Transition for children Emergency preparedness Testing & Services Testing ... Support Genetic Disease Information Find a Support Group Financial Planning Who Should I Tell? Genetic Testing & Counseling Compensation ...

  12. Predictive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your family Plan for the future Insurance and financial planning Transition for children Emergency preparedness Testing & Services Testing ... Support Genetic Disease Information Find a Support Group Financial Planning Who Should I Tell? Genetic Testing & Counseling Compensation ...

  13. Syphilis Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Tests for Targeted Cancer Therapy Glucose Tests Gonorrhea Testing Gram Stain Growth Hormone Haptoglobin hCG Pregnancy ... treated for another sexually transmitted disease , such as gonorrhea Is pregnant, during the first prenatal visit and ...

  14. Randomization tests

    CERN Document Server

    Edgington, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Tests That Do Not Require Random Sampling Randomization Tests Numerical Examples Randomization Tests and Nonrandom Samples The Prevalence of Nonrandom Samples in Experiments The Irrelevance of Random Samples for the Typical Experiment Generalizing from Nonrandom Samples Intelligibility Respect for the Validity of Randomization Tests Versatility Practicality Precursors of Randomization Tests Other Applications of Permutation Tests Questions and Exercises Notes References Randomized Experiments Unique Benefits of Experiments Experimentation without Mani

  15. Test chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    A test chamber for measuring electromagnetic radiation emitted by an apparatus to be tested or for exposing an apparatus to be tested to an electromagnetic radiation field. The test chamber includes a reverberation chamber made of a conductive tent fabric. To create a statistically uniform field in

  16. Tensile testing

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A complete guide to the uniaxial tensile test, the cornerstone test for determining the mechanical properties of materials: Learn ways to predict material behavior through tensile testing. Learn how to test metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, and plastics to determine strength, ductility and elastic/plastic deformation. A must for laboratory managers, technicians, materials and design engineers, and students involved with uniaxial tensile testing. Tensile Testing , Second Edition begins with an introduction and overview of the test, with clear explanations of how materials properties are determined from test results. Subsequent sections illustrate how knowledge gained through tensile tests, such as tension properties to predict the behavior (including strength, ductility, elastic or plastic deformation, tensile and yield strengths) have resulted in improvements in materals applications. The Second Edition is completely revised and updated. It includes expanded coverage throughout the volume on a variety of ...

  17. Test quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, R.S.; Keller, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    Inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section 11 of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves, respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test's ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing

  18. Test quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartley, R.S.; Keller, A.E.

    1992-01-01

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test's ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing

  19. Randomization tests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Edgington, Eugene S

    1980-01-01

    .... This book provides all the necessary theory and practical guidelines, such as instructions for writing computer programs, to permit experimenters to transform any statistical test into a distribution-free test...

  20. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ... What are lab tests? Laboratory tests are medical devices that are intended for use on samples of blood, urine, or other tissues ...

  1. Triglycerides Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... K. Brunner & Suddarth's Handbook of Laboratory and Diagnostic Tests. 2 nd Ed, Kindle. Philadelphia: Wolters Kluwer Health, Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; c2014. Triglycerides; 491–2 p. Lab Tests ...

  2. Lactate Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plasma Free Metanephrines Platelet Count Platelet Function Tests Pleural Fluid Analysis PML-RARA Porphyrin Tests Potassium Prealbumin ... ency/article/000391.htm . (2002 January, Updated). Lactate (Liquid) Reagent Set. Pointe Scientific, Inc. [On-line Reagent ...

  3. Electrolytes Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plasma Free Metanephrines Platelet Count Platelet Function Tests Pleural Fluid Analysis PML-RARA Porphyrin Tests Potassium Prealbumin ... of potassium is found in the plasma , the liquid portion of the blood. Monitoring potassium is important ...

  4. Ferritin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal" values. By comparing your test results with reference values, you and your healthcare provider can see if ... along with other iron tests , when a routine complete blood count (CBC) shows that a person's hemoglobin and hematocrit ...

  5. Cholesterol Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... artery disease. Other names for a cholesterol test: Lipid profile, Lipid panel What is it used for? If you ... Clinic [Internet]. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research; c1998-2017.Cholesterol Test: Overview; 2016 Jan 12 [ ...

  6. Gonorrhea Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Gonorrhea Testing Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Sources Ask Us Also Known As GC Test Gonorrhea NAAT or NAT Neisseria gonorrhoeae Nucleic Acid Amplification ...

  7. Susceptibility Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marker Bicarbonate (Total CO2) Bilirubin Blood Culture Blood Gases Blood Ketones Blood Smear Blood Typing Blood Urea ... hours depending on the method used. There are commercial tests available that offer rapid susceptibility testing and ...

  8. Nationale test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Professor Sven Erik Nordenbo og centerleder Niels Egelund, begge DPU, i samtale om nationale test.......Professor Sven Erik Nordenbo og centerleder Niels Egelund, begge DPU, i samtale om nationale test....

  9. Nationale Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Hvad er egentlig formålet med de nationale test? Bliver eleverne klogere af at blive testet? Og er der en sammenhæng mellem bandekrig og nationale test? Fysisk medie: dpu.dk/tv......Hvad er egentlig formålet med de nationale test? Bliver eleverne klogere af at blive testet? Og er der en sammenhæng mellem bandekrig og nationale test? Fysisk medie: dpu.dk/tv...

  10. VDRL test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... confirmed with another blood test to make the diagnosis of syphilis. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different ... broken) Alternative Names Venereal disease research ... laboratory test (VDRL) – serum. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. St Louis, MO: Elsevier Saunders; ...

  11. Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... testing, substance abuse testing, toxicology screen, tox screen, sports doping tests What is it used for? Drug screening is used to find out whether or not a person has taken a certain drug or drugs. It ... Sports organizations. Professional and collegiate athletes usually need to ...

  12. HIV Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... All Collapse All Should I get tested for HIV? CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of ...

  13. Nondestructive Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Harold [Argonne National Laboratory

    1969-01-01

    A nondestructive test is an examination of an object in any manner which will not impair the future usefulness of the object. This booklet discusses a few basic methods of nondestructive testing, and some of their characteristics. In addition, it discusses possible future methods for nondestructive testing by taking a quick look at some of the methods now under study.

  14. Nickel-hydrogen battery design for the Transporter Energy Storage Subsystem (TESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapinski, John R.; Bourland, Deborah S.

    1992-01-01

    Information is given in viewgraph form on nickel hydrogen battery design for the transporter energy storage subsystem (TESS). Information is given on use in the Space Station Freedom, the launch configuration, use in the Mobile Servicing Center, battery design requirements, TESS subassembley design, proof of principle testing of a 6-cell battery, possible downsizing of TESS to support the Mobile Rocket Servicer Base System (MBS) redesign, TESS output capacity, and cell testing.

  15. An interventional skin care protocol (InSPiRE) to reduce incontinence-associated dermatitis in critically ill patients in the intensive care unit: A before and after study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyer, Fiona; Gardner, Anne; Doubrovsky, Anna

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed to test the effectiveness of a bundle combining best available evidence to reduce the incidence of incontinence-associated dermatitis occurrences in critically ill patients. The study used a before and after design and was conducted in an adult intensive care unit of an Australian quartenary referral hospital. Data, collected by trained research nurses, included demographic and clinical variables, skin assessment, incontinence-associated dermatitis presence and severity. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Of the 207 patients enrolled, 146 patients were mechanically ventilated and incontinent thus eligible for analysis, 80 with 768days of observation in the after/intervention group and 66 with 733days of observation in the before group. Most patients were men, mean age 53 years. Groups were similar on demographic variables. Incontinence-associated dermatitis incidence was lower in the intervention group (15%; 12/80) compared to the control group (32%; 21/66) (p=0.016). Incontinence-associated dermatitis events developed later in the intensive care unit stay in the intervention group (Logrank=5.2, p=<0.022). This study demonstrated that the use of a bundle combining best available evidence reduced the incidence and delayed the development of incontinence-associated dermatitis occurrences in critically ill patients. Systematic ongoing patient assessments, combined with tailored prevention measures are central to preventing incontinence-associated dermatitis in this vulnerable patient group. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cerebral injury after cardiac surgery: identification of a group at extraordinary risk. Multicenter Study of Perioperative Ischemia Research Group (McSPI) and the Ischemia Research Education Foundation (IREF) Investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolman, R L; Nussmeier, N A; Aggarwal, A; Kanchuger, M S; Roach, G W; Newman, M F; Mangano, C M; Marschall, K E; Ley, C; Boisvert, D M; Ozanne, G M; Herskowitz, A; Graham, S H; Mangano, D T

    1999-03-01

    Cerebral injury after cardiac surgery is now recognized as a serious and costly healthcare problem mandating immediate attention. To effect solution, those subgroups of patients at greatest risk must be identified, thereby allowing efficient implementation of new clinical strategies. No such subgroup has been identified; however, patients undergoing intracardiac surgery are thought to be at high risk, but comprehensive data regarding specific risk, impact on cost, and discharge disposition are not available. We prospectively studied 273 patients enrolled from 24 diverse US medical centers, who were undergoing intracardiac and coronary artery surgery. Patient data were collected using standardized methods and included clinical, historical, specialized testing, neurological outcome and autopsy data, and measures of resource utilization. Adverse outcomes were defined a priori and determined after database closure by a blinded independent panel. Stepwise logistic regression models were developed to estimate the relative risks associated with clinical history and intraoperative and postoperative events. Adverse cerebral outcomes occurred in 16% of patients (43/273), being nearly equally divided between type I outcomes (8.4%; 5 cerebral deaths, 16 nonfatal strokes, and 2 new TIAs) and type II outcomes (7.3%; 17 new intellectual deterioration persisting at hospital discharge and 3 newly diagnosed seizures). Associated resource utilization was significantly increased--prolonging median intensive care unit stay from 3 days (no adverse cerebral outcome) to 8 days (type I; P<0.001) and from 3 to 6 days (type II; P<0.001), and increasing hospitalization by 50% (type II, P=0.04) to 100% (type I, P<0.001). Furthermore, specialized care after hospital discharge was frequently necessary in those with type I outcomes, in that only 31% returned home compared with 85% of patients without cerebral complications (P<0.001). Significant risk factors for type I outcomes related primarily

  17. Intrinsic imperfection of self-differencing single-photon detectors harms the security of high-speed quantum cryptography systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mu-Sheng; Sun, Shi-Hai; Tang, Guang-Zhao; Ma, Xiang-Chun; Li, Chun-Yan; Liang, Lin-Mei

    2013-12-01

    Thanks to the high-speed self-differencing single-photon detector (SD-SPD), the secret key rate of quantum key distribution (QKD), which can, in principle, offer unconditionally secure private communications between two users (Alice and Bob), can exceed 1 Mbit/s. However, the SD-SPD may contain loopholes, which can be exploited by an eavesdropper (Eve) to hack into the unconditional security of the high-speed QKD systems. In this paper, we analyze the fact that the SD-SPD can be remotely controlled by Eve in order to spy on full information without being discovered, then proof-of-principle experiments are demonstrated. Here, we point out that this loophole is introduced directly by the operating principle of the SD-SPD, thus, it cannot be removed, except for the fact that some active countermeasures are applied by the legitimate parties.

  18. Ultrasonic testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Sung Jin [Sungkwunkwan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hyun Jo [Wonkwang Univ., Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    For the proper performance of ultrasonic testing of steel welded joints, and anisotropic material it is necessary to have sound understanding on the underlying physics. To provide such an understanding, it is beneficial to have simulation tools for ultrasonic testing. In order to address such a need, we develop effective approaches to simulate angle beam ultrasonic testing with a personal computer. The simulation is performed using ultrasonic measurement models based on the computationally efficient multi-Gaussian beams. This reach will describe the developed ultrasonic testing models together with the experimental verification of their accuracy.

  19. Troponins Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lab's website in order to provide you with background information about the test(s) you had performed. You will need to return ... C, Banfi G, Guidi GC. Influence of a half-marathon run on NT-proBNP and troponin ... MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia [On-line information]. Available online ...

  20. Insulin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... hours before blood is collected, but occasionally a health practitioner may do testing when fasting is not possible, such as when a glucose tolerance test (see Glucose ) is done. In some cases, the health practitioner may request that a person fast longer ...