WorldWideScience

Sample records for spent aluminium-clad research

  1. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    A large variety of research reactor spent fuel with different fuel meats, different geometries and different enrichments in 235 U are presently stored underwater in basins located around the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminium or aluminium based alloys that are notoriously susceptible to corrosion in water of less than optimum quality. Some fuel is stored in the reactor pools themselves, some in auxiliary pools (or basins) close to the reactor and some stored at away-from-reactor pools. Since the early 1990s, when corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding was observed in many of the pools, corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel stored in light water filled basins has become a major concern, and programmes were implemented at the sites to improve fuel storage conditions. The IAEA has since then established a number of programmatic activities to address corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. Of special relevance was the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase I) initiated in 1996, whose results were published in IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 418. At the end of this CRP it was considered necessary that a continuation of the CRP should concentrate on fuel storage basins that had demonstrated significant corrosion problems and would therefore provide additional insight into the fundamentals of localized corrosion of aluminium. As a consequence, the IAEA started a new CRP entitled Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase II), to carry out more comprehensive research in some specific areas of corrosion of aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. In addition to this CRP, one of the activities under IAEA's Technical Cooperation Regional Project for Latin America Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors (2001-2006) was corrosion monitoring and surveillance of research

  2. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water. Additional information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    A large variety of research reactor spent fuel with different fuel meats, different geometries and different enrichments in 235 U are presently stored underwater in basins located around the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminium or aluminium based alloys that are notoriously susceptible to corrosion in water of less than optimum quality. Some fuel is stored in the reactor pools themselves, some in auxiliary pools (or basins) close to the reactor and some stored at away-from-reactor pools. Since the early 1990s, when corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding was observed in many of the pools, corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel stored in light water filled basins has become a major concern, and programmes were implemented at the sites to improve fuel storage conditions. The IAEA has since then established a number of programmatic activities to address corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. Of special relevance was the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase I) initiated in 1996, whose results were published in IAEA Technical Reports Series No. 418. At the end of this CRP it was considered necessary that a continuation of the CRP should concentrate on fuel storage basins that had demonstrated significant corrosion problems and would therefore provide additional insight into the fundamentals of localized corrosion of aluminium. As a consequence, the IAEA started a new CRP entitled Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water (Phase II), to carry out more comprehensive research in some specific areas of corrosion of aluminium clad spent nuclear fuel in water. In addition to this CRP, one of the activities under IAEA's Technical Cooperation Regional Project for Latin America Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors (2001-2006) was corrosion monitoring and surveillance of research

  3. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This report describes research performed in ten laboratories within the framework of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium Clad Spent Fuel in Water. The project consisted of exposure of standard racks of corrosion coupons in the spent fuel pools of the participating research reactor laboratories and the evaluation of the coupons after predetermined exposure times, along with periodic monitoring of the storage water. A group of experts in the field contributed a state of the art review and provided technical supervision of the project. Localized corrosion mechanisms are notoriously difficult to understand, and it was clear from the outset that obtaining consistency in the results and their interpretation from laboratory to laboratory would depend on the development of an excellent set of experimental protocols. These experimental protocols are described in the report together with guidelines for the maintenance of optimum water chemistry to minimize the corrosion of aluminium clad research reactor fuel in wet storage. A large database on corrosion of aluminium clad materials has been generated from the CRP and the SRS corrosion surveillance programme. An evaluation of these data indicates that the most important factors contributing to the corrosion of the aluminium are: (1) High water conductivity (100-200 μS/cm); (2) Aggressive impurity ion concentrations (Cl - ); (3) Deposition of cathodic particles on aluminium (Fe, etc.); (4) Sludge (containing Fe, Cl - and other ions in concentrations greater than ten times the concentrations in the water); (5) Galvanic couples between dissimilar metals (stainless steel-aluminium, aluminium-uranium, etc); (6) Scratches and imperfections (in protective oxide coating on cladding); (7) Poor water circulation. These factors operating both independently and synergistically may cause corrosion of the aluminium. The single most important key to preventing corrosion is maintaining good

  4. Corrosion of aluminium-clad spent fuel at RA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Maksin, T.; Dobrijevic, R.; Idjakovic, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Almost 95% of all spent fuel elements of the RA research reactor in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro, are stored in 30 aluminium barrels and about 300 stainless steel channel-holders in the temporary spent fuel storage water pool. The first activities of sludge and water samples, taken from the pool, were measured in 1996-1997 and were followed by analysis of chemical composition of samples. Visual inspections of fuel elements in some stainless steel tubes and of the fuel channels stored in the reactor core have shown that some deposits cover aluminium cladding. Stains and surface discoloration are noted on many of the spent fuel elements that were examined visually during the core unloading and inspections carried out in 1979 - 1984. Some of water samples, taken from pool, about a 150 stainless steel tubes and 16 barrels have shown very high 137-Cs activity compared to low activity measured in pool water. It was concluded that aluminium cladding of the fuel elements was penetrated due to corrosion process. Study on influence of water corrosion processes in the RA reactor storage pool was started within the framework of the IAEA CRP 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel in Water' in 2002. The first test rack with various aluminium and stainless steel coupons, supplied by the IAEA, was immersed in the pool already in 1996. New racks were immersed in 2002 and 2003. The rack immersed in 1996 was taken out from the pool in 2002 and the rack immersed in 2002 was taken out in 2003. Results of the examination of these racks, carried out according to the strategy and the protocol, proposed by the IAEA, are described in this paper. (author)

  5. Corrosion of research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendereskaya, O.S.; De, P.K.; Haddad, R.; Howell, J.P.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Laoharojanaphand, S.; Luo, S.; Ramanathan, L.V.; Ritchie, I.; Hussain, N.; Vidowsky, I.; Yakovlev, V.

    2002-01-01

    A significant amount of aluminium-clad spent nuclear fuel from research and test reactors worldwide is currently being stored in water-filled basins while awaiting final disposition. As a result of corrosion issues, which developed from the long-term wet storage of aluminium-clad fuel, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) implemented a Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) in 1996 on the 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel in Water'. The investigations undertaken during the CRP involved ten institutes in nine different countries. The IAEA furnished corrosion surveillance racks with aluminium alloys generally used in the manufacture of the nuclear fuel cladding. The individual countries supplemented these racks with additional racks and coupons specific to materials in their storage basins. The racks were immersed in late 1996 in the storage basins with a wide range of water parameters, and the corrosion was monitored at periodic intervals. Results of these early observations were reported after 18 months at the second research co-ordination meeting (RCM) in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Pitting and crevice corrosion were the main forms of corrosion observed. Corrosion caused by deposition of iron and other particles on the coupon surfaces was also observed. Galvanic corrosion of stainless steel/aluminium coupled coupons and pitting corrosion caused by particle deposition was observed. Additional corrosion racks were provided to the CRP participants at the second RCM and were immersed in the individual basins by mid-1998. As in the first set of tests, water quality proved to be the key factor in controlling corrosion. The results from the second set of tests were presented at the third and final RCM held in Bangkok, Thailand in October 2000. An IAEA document giving details about this CRP and other guidelines for spent fuel storage is in pres. This paper presents some details about the CRP and the basis for its extension. (author)

  6. Lanthanide based conversion coatings for long term wet storage of aluminium-clad spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, S.M.C.; Correa, O.V.; De Souza, J.A.; Ramanathan, L.V.

    2010-01-01

    Spent fuels from research reactors are stored in basins with water of less than desirable quality at many facilities around the world and instances of cladding failure caused by pitting corrosion have been reported. Conversion coatings have been used in many industries to protect different metals, including aluminium alloys. This paper presents the results of an ongoing investigation in which the corrosion resistance of lanthanide (cerium, lanthanum and praseodymium) based conversion coated RR fuel cladding alloys has been studied. Electrochemical tests in the laboratory revealed higher corrosion resistance of CeO 2 , La 2 O 3 and Pr 2 O 3 coated AA 1100 and AA 6061 alloys in NaCl solutions. Uncoated and CeO 2 coated coupons of these alloys exposed for 50 days to the spent fuel basin of the IEA-R1 research reactor in IPEN, Brazil, revealed marked reductions in the extent of pitting corrosion. (author)

  7. Corrosion of aluminium-clad spent fuel in LVR-15 research reactor storage facilities. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Splichal, K.; Berka, J.; Keilova, E.

    2006-03-01

    The corrosion of the research reactor aluminium clad spent fuel in water was investigated in two storage facilities. The standard racks were delivered by the IAEA and consisted of two aluminium alloys AA 6061 and Szav-1 coupons. Bimetallic couples create aluminium alloy and stainless steel 304 coupons. Rolled and extruded AA 6061 material was also tested. Single coupons, bimetallic and crevice couples were exposed in the at-reactor basin (ARB) and the high-level wastage pool (HLW). The water chemistry parameters were monitored and sedimentation of impurities was measured. The content of impurities of mainly Cl and SO 4 was in the range of 2 to 15 μg/l in the HLW pool; it was about one order higher in ARB. The Fe content was below 2 μg/l for both facilities. After two years of exposure the pitting was evaluated as local corrosion damage. The occurrence of pits was evaluated predominantly on the surfaces of single coupons and on the outer and inner surfaces of bimetallic and crevices coupons. No correlation was found between the pitting initiation and the type of aluminium alloys and rolled and extruded materials. In bimetallic couples the presence of stainless coupons did not have any effect on local corrosion. The depth of pits was lower than 50 μm for considerable areas of coupons and should be compared with the results of other participating institutes. (author)

  8. Corrosion of aluminium alloy test coupons in water of spent fuel storage pool at RA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Maksin, T.; Jordanov, G.; Dobrijevic, R.

    2004-12-01

    Study on corrosion of aluminium cladding, of the TVR-S type of enriched uranium spent fuel elements of the research reactor RA in the storage water pool is examined in the framework nr the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) 'Corrosion of Research Reactor Clad-Clad Spent Fuel in Water' since 2002. Standard racks with aluminium coupons are exposed to water in the spent fuel pools of the research reactor RA. After predetermined exposure times along with periodic monitoring of the water parameters, the coupons are examined according to the strategy and the protocol supplied by the IAEA. Description of the standard corrosion racks, experimental protocols, test procedures, water quality monitoring and compilation of results of visual examination of corrosion effects are present in this article. (author)

  9. Development and fabrication of seamless Aluminium finned clad tubes for metallic uranium fuel rods for research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.K.; Hussain, M.M.; Jayachandran, N.K.; Abdulla, K.K.

    2012-01-01

    Natural uranium metal or its alloy is used as fuel in nuclear reactors. Usually fuel is clad with compatible material to prevent its direct contact with coolant which prevents spread of activity. One of the methods of producing fuel for nuclear reactor is by co-drawing finished uranium rods with aluminum clad tube to develop intimate contact for effective heat removal during reactor operation. Presently seam welded Aluminium tubes are used as clad for Research Reactor fuel. The paper will highlight entire fabrication process followed for the fabrication of seamless Aluminium finned tubes along with relevant characterisation results

  10. Protection of spent aluminum-clad research reactor fuels during extended wet storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Stela M.C.; Correa, Olandir V.; Souza, Jose A.; Ramanathan, Lalgudi V.; Antunes, Renato A.

    2013-01-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from research reactors (RR) is stored in light water filled pools or basins worldwide. Many incidences of pitting corrosion of the fuel cladding has been reported and attributed to synergism in the effect of certain water parameters. Protection of spent Al-clad RR fuel with a conversion coating was proposed in 2008. Preliminary results revealed increased pitting corrosion resistance of cerium oxide coated aluminum alloys AA 1050 and AA 6061, used as RR fuel plate cladding. Further development of conversion coatings for Al alloys was carried out and this paper presents: (a) the preparation and characterization of hydrotalcite (HTC) coatings; (b) the results of laboratory tests in which the corrosion behavior of coated Al alloys in NaCl solutions was determined; (c) the results of field tests in which un-coated, boehmite coated, HTC coated and cerium modified boehmite / HTC coated AA 1050 and AA 6061 coupons were exposed to the IEA-R1 reactor spent fuel basin for extended periods. In these field tests the coupons coated with HTC from a high temperature (HT) bath and subsequently modified with Ce were the most resistant to pitting corrosion. In laboratory tests also, HT- hydrotalcite + Ce coated specimens were the most corrosion resistant in 0.01 M NaCl. The role of cerium in increasing the corrosion resistance imparted by the different conversion coatings of spent Al-clad RR fuel elements is presented. (author)

  11. Corrosion and protection of spent Al-clad research reactor fuel during extended wet storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, Lalgudi V.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of spent research reactor fuel elements with different fuel meats, geometries and 235 U enrichments are presently stored under water in basins throughout the world. More than 90% of these fuels are clad in aluminum (Al) or its alloy and are susceptible to corrosion. This paper presents an overview of the influence of Al alloy composition, galvanic effects (Al alloy/stainless steel), crevice effects, water parameters and synergism between these parameters as well as settled solids on the corrosion of typical Al alloys used as fuel element cladding. Pitting is the main form of corrosion and is affected by water conductivity, chloride ion content, formation of galvanic couples with rack supports and settled solid particles. The extent to which these parameters influence Al corrosion varies. This paper also presents potential conversion coatings to protect the spent fuel cladding. (author)

  12. Method of processing spent fuel cladding tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatsuka, Masafumi; Ouchi, Atsuhiro; Imahashi, Hiromichi.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the residual activity of spent fuel cladding tubes in a short period of time and enable safety storage with simple storage equipments. Constitution: Spent fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys discharged from a nuclear fuel reprocessing step are exposed to a grain boundary embrittling atmosphere to cause grain boundary destruction. This causes grain boundary fractures to the zirconium crystal grains as the matrix of nuclear fuels and then precipitation products precipitated to the grain boundary fractures are removed. The zirconium constituting the nuclear fuel cladding tube and other ingredient elements contained in the precipitation products are separated in this removing step and they are separately stored respectively. As a result, zirconium constituting most part of the composition of the spent nuclear fuel cladding tubes can be stored safely at a low activity level. (Takahashi, M.)

  13. Corrosion surveillance programme for Latin American research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, L.V.; Haddad, R.; Ritchie, I.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the IAEA sponsored Regional Technical Co-operation Project for Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Peru) are to provide the basic conditions to define a regional strategy for managing spent fuel and to provide solutions, taking into consideration the economic and technological realities of the countries involved. In particular, to determine the basic conditions for managing research reactor spent fuel during operation and interim storage as well as final disposal, and to establish forms of regional cooperation in the four main areas: spent fuel characterization, safety, regulation and public communication. This paper reports the corrosion surveillance activities of the Regional Project and these are based on the IAEA sponsored co-ordinated research project (CRP) on 'Corrosion of research reactor Al-clad spent fuel in water'. The overall test consists of exposing corrosion coupon racks at different spent fuel basins followed by evaluation. (author)

  14. Good Practices for Water Quality Management in Research Reactors and Spent Fuel Storage Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    Water is the most common fluid used to remove the heat produced in a research reactor (RR). It is also the most common media used to store spent fuel elements after being removed from the reactor core. Spent fuel is stored either in the at-reactor pool or in away-from-reactor wet facilities, where the fuel elements are maintained until submission to final disposal, or until the decay heat is low enough to allow migration to a dry storage facility. Maintaining high quality water is the most important factor in preventing degradation of aluminium clad fuel elements, and other structural components in water cooled research reactors. Excellent water quality in spent fuel wet storage facilities is essential to achieve optimum storage performance. Experience shows the remarkable success of many research reactors where the water chemistry has been well controlled. In these cases, aluminium clad fuel elements and aluminium pool liners show few, if any, signs of either localized or general corrosion, even after more than 30 years of exposure to research reactor water. In contrast, when water quality was allowed to degrade, the fuel clad and the structural parts of the reactor have been seriously corroded. The driving force to prepare this publication was the recognition that, even though a great deal of information on research reactor water quality is available in the open literature, no comprehensive report addressing the rationale of water quality management in research reactors has been published to date. This report is designed to provide a comprehensive catalogue of good practices for the management of water quality in research reactors. It also presents a brief description of the corrosion process that affects the components of a research reactor. Further, the report provides a basic understanding of water chemistry and its influence on the corrosion process; specifies requirements and operational limits for water purification systems of RRs; describes good practices

  15. Corrosion of research reactor aluminium-clad spent fuel in water-chemical and microbiological influenced

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maksin, T.N.; Dobrijevic, R.P.; Idjakovic, Z.E.; Pesic, M.P.

    2002-01-01

    Spent fuel resulting from 25 years of operating research reactor RA at the Vinca Institute is presently all stored in the temporary spent fuel storage pool. It has been left in the ambient temperature and humidity for more then fifteen years so intensive corrosion processes were notice. We have spent fuel pools under control, after first research coordination meeting (RCM), of the first CRP, by monitoring of physical and chemical parameters of water in the pools, including temperature, pH-factor, electrical conductivity, mass concentration of corrosion products in the water and mud, mass concentration of relevant ions etc. The rack of standard corrosion coupons, was given at that time, has been in poor quality water for six years. We pick up rack assembly from basin and analysed. The results of this investigation are present in this article. (author)

  16. US spent fuel research and experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machiels, A [EPRI and USDOE (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The structural performance of high-burnup spent fuel cladding during dry storage and transportation has been the subject of research and evaluation at EPRI for several years. The major issues addressed in this research program have included the following: Characterization and development of predictive models for damage mechanisms perceived to be potentially active during dry storage; Modeling and analysis of deformation processes during long-term dry storage; Development of cladding failure models and failure criteria, considering cladding material and physical conditions during dry storage and transportation; Failure analysis, considering end-of-dry-storage conditions, of spent fuel systems subjected to normal and accident conditions of transport, prescribed in Part 71 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10CFR71) While issues related to dry storage have largely been resolved, transportation issues have not, at least for spent fuel with discharge burnups greater than 45 GWd/MTU. A research program was launched in late 2002 following two NRC-industry meetings held on September 6, 2002 and October 23, 2002. The aim of the research program was to assess the performance of high-burnup spent fuel cladding under normal and accident conditions of transportation, as prescribed by 10CFR71, considering the physical characteristics and mechanical properties of cladding at the end of dry storage. The objective is to present a synthesis of the information that collectively forms a part of a technical basis intended to facilitate resolution of regulatory issues associated with the transportation of spent nuclear fuel characterized by discharge burnups greater than 45 GWd/MTU.

  17. Temperature measurements of the aluminium claddings of fuel elements in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daolong

    1986-01-01

    A method for embedding the sheathed thermocouples in the aluminium claddings of some fuel elements of experimental reactors by ultrasonic welding technique is described. The measurement results of the cladding temperature of fuel elements in reactors are given. By means of this method, the joint between the sheathed thermocouples and the cladding of fuel elements can be made very tight, there are no bulges on the cladding surfaces, and the sheathed thermocouples are embedded strongly and reliably. Therefore an essential means is provided for acquiring the stable and dynamic state data of the cladding temperature of in-core fuel elements

  18. Microbial biofilm growth on irradiated, spent nuclear fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruhn, D.F.; Frank, S.M.; Roberto, F.F.; Pinhero, P.J.; Johnson, S.G.

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental criticism regarding the potential for microbial influenced corrosion in spent nuclear fuel cladding or storage containers concerns whether the required microorganisms can, in fact, survive radiation fields inherent in these materials. This study was performed to unequivocally answer this critique by addressing the potential for biofilm formation, the precursor to microbial-influenced corrosion, in radiation fields representative of spent nuclear fuel storage environments. This study involved the formation of a microbial biofilm on irradiated spent nuclear fuel cladding within a hot cell environment. This was accomplished by introducing 22 species of bacteria, in nutrient-rich media, to test vessels containing irradiated cladding sections and that was then surrounded by radioactive source material. The overall dose rate exceeded 2 Gy/h gamma/beta radiation with the total dose received by some of the bacteria reaching 5 x 10 3 Gy. This study provides evidence for the formation of biofilms on spent-fuel materials, and the implication of microbial influenced corrosion in the storage and permanent deposition of spent nuclear fuel in repository environments

  19. Deep surface rolling for fatigue life enhancement of laser clad aircraft aluminium alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, W., E-mail: wyman.zhuang@dsto.defence.gov.au [Aerospace Division, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, 506 Lorimer Street, Fishermans Bend, Victoria 3207 (Australia); Liu, Q.; Djugum, R.; Sharp, P.K. [Aerospace Division, Defence Science and Technology Organisation, 506 Lorimer Street, Fishermans Bend, Victoria 3207 (Australia); Paradowska, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2232 (Australia)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Deep surface rolling as a post-repair enhancement technology was applied to the laser cladded 7075-T651 aluminium alloy specimens that simulated corrosion damage blend-out repair. • The residual stresses induced by the deep surface rolling process were measured. • The deep surface rolling process can introduce deep and high magnitude compressive residual stresses beyond the laser clad and substrate interface. • Spectrum fatigue test showed the fatigue life was significantly increased by deep surface rolling. - Abstract: Deep surface rolling can introduce deep compressive residual stresses into the surface of aircraft metallic structure to extend its fatigue life. To develop cost-effective aircraft structural repair technologies such as laser cladding, deep surface rolling was considered as an advanced post-repair surface enhancement technology. In this study, aluminium alloy 7075-T651 specimens with a blend-out region were first repaired using laser cladding technology. The surface of the laser cladding region was then treated by deep surface rolling. Fatigue testing was subsequently conducted for the laser clad, deep surface rolled and post-heat treated laser clad specimens. It was found that deep surface rolling can significantly improve the fatigue life in comparison with the laser clad baseline repair. In addition, three dimensional residual stresses were measured using neutron diffraction techniques. The results demonstrate that beneficial compressive residual stresses induced by deep surface rolling can reach considerable depths (more than 1.0 mm) below the laser clad surface.

  20. Deep surface rolling for fatigue life enhancement of laser clad aircraft aluminium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, W.; Liu, Q.; Djugum, R.; Sharp, P.K.; Paradowska, A.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Deep surface rolling as a post-repair enhancement technology was applied to the laser cladded 7075-T651 aluminium alloy specimens that simulated corrosion damage blend-out repair. • The residual stresses induced by the deep surface rolling process were measured. • The deep surface rolling process can introduce deep and high magnitude compressive residual stresses beyond the laser clad and substrate interface. • Spectrum fatigue test showed the fatigue life was significantly increased by deep surface rolling. - Abstract: Deep surface rolling can introduce deep compressive residual stresses into the surface of aircraft metallic structure to extend its fatigue life. To develop cost-effective aircraft structural repair technologies such as laser cladding, deep surface rolling was considered as an advanced post-repair surface enhancement technology. In this study, aluminium alloy 7075-T651 specimens with a blend-out region were first repaired using laser cladding technology. The surface of the laser cladding region was then treated by deep surface rolling. Fatigue testing was subsequently conducted for the laser clad, deep surface rolled and post-heat treated laser clad specimens. It was found that deep surface rolling can significantly improve the fatigue life in comparison with the laser clad baseline repair. In addition, three dimensional residual stresses were measured using neutron diffraction techniques. The results demonstrate that beneficial compressive residual stresses induced by deep surface rolling can reach considerable depths (more than 1.0 mm) below the laser clad surface

  1. Yugoslav spent nuclear fuel management program and international perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Subotic, K.; Sotic, O.; Plecas, I.; Ljubenov, V.; Peric, A.; Milosevic, M.

    2002-01-01

    Spent nuclear fuel stored in the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Yugoslavia, consists of about 2.5 tons of metal uranium (initial enrichment 2%) and about 20 kg uranium dioxide (dispersed in aluminum matrix, initial fuel uranium enrichment 80%). This spent nuclear fuel is generated in operation of the RA heavy water research reactor during 1959-1984 period. Both types of fuel are of ex-USSR origin, have the same shape and dimensions and approximately the same initial mass of 235 nuclide. They are known as the TVR-S type of fuel elements. The total of 8030 spent fuel elements are stored at the RA research reactor premises, almost all in the spent fuel pool filled by ordinary water. The last used 480 high-enriched uranium spent fuel elements are kept in the drained RA reactor core since 1984. Fuel layer of both enrichments is covered with thin aluminium cladding. Due to non-suitable chemical parameters of water in the spent fuel storage pool, the corrosion processes penetrated aluminium cladding and aluminium walls od storage containers during storage period long from 20 to 40 years. Activity of fission products ( 137 Cs) is detected in water samples during water inspection in 1996 and experts of the lAEA Russia and USA were invited to help. By end of 2001, some remediation of the water transparency of the storage pool and inspections of water samples taken from the storage containers with the spent fuel elements were carried out by the Vinca Institute staff and with the help of experts from the Russia and the IAEA. Following new initiatives on international perspective on spent fuel management, a proposal was set by the IAEA, and was supported by the governments of the USA and the Russian Federation to ship the spent fuel elements of the RA research reactor to Mayak spent fuel processing plant in Russia. This paper describes current status of the reactor RA spent fuel elements, initiative for new Yugoslav spent fuel management program speculates on some of the

  2. Corrosion issues in the long term storage of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Sindelar, R.L.; Iyer, N.C.

    1996-01-01

    Approximately 8% of the spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy is clad with aluminum alloys. The spent fuel must be either reprocessed or temporarily stored in wet or dry storage systems until a decision is made on final disposition in a repository. There are corrosion issues associated with the aluminum cladding regardless of the disposition pathway selected. This paper discusses those issues and provides data and analysis to demonstrate that control of corrosion induced degradation in aluminum clad spent fuels can be achieved through relatively simple engineering practices

  3. Characteristics of hydride precipitation and reorientation in spent-fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H. M.; Strain, R. V.; Billone, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    The morphology, number density, orientation, distribution, and crystallographic aspects of Zr hydrides in Zircaloy fuel cladding play important roles in fuel performance during all phases before and after discharge from the reactor, i.e., during normal operation, transient and accident situations in the reactor, temporary storage in a dry cask, and permanent storage in a waste repository. In the past, partly because of experimental difficulties, hydriding behavior in irradiated fuel cladding has been investigated mostly by optical microscopy (OM). In the present study, fundamental metallurgical and crystallographic characteristics of hydride precipitation and reorientation were investigated on the microscopic level by combined techniques of OM and transmission electron and scanning electron microscopy (TEM and SEM) of spent-fuel claddings discharged from several boiling and pressurized water reactors (BWRs and PWRs). Defueled sections of standard and Zr-lined Zircaloy-2 fuel claddings, irradiated to fluences of ∼3.3 x 10 21 n cm -2 and ∼9.2 x 10 21 n cm -2 (E > 1 MeV), respectively, were obtained from spent fuel rods discharged from two BWRs. Sections of standard and low-tin Zircaloy-4 claddings, irradiated to fluences of ∼4.4 x 10 21 n cm -2 , ∼5.9 x 10 21 n cm -2 , and ∼9.6 x 10 21 n cm -2 (E > 1 MeV) in three PWRs, were also obtained. Microstructural characteristics of hydrides were analyzed in as-irradiated condition and after gas-pressurization-burst or expanding-mandrel tests at 292-325 C in Ar for some of the spent-fuel claddings. Analyses were also conducted of hydride habit plane, morphology, and reorientation characteristics on unirradiated Zircaloy-4 cladding that contained dense radial hydrides. Reoriented hydrides in the slowly cooled unirradiated cladding were produced by expanding-mandrel loading

  4. Criteria for Corrosion Protection of Aluminum-Clad Spent Nuclear Fuel in Interim Wet Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Storage of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and other locations in the U. S. and around the world has been a concern over the past decade because of the long time interim storage requirements in water. Pitting corrosion of production aluminum-clad fuel in the early 1990''s at SRS was attributed to less than optimum quality water and corrective action taken has resulted in no new pitting since 1994. The knowledge gained from the corrosion surveillance testing and other investigations at SRS over the past 8 years has provided an insight into factors affecting the corrosion of aluminum in relatively high purity water. This paper reviews some of the early corrosion issues related to aluminum-clad spent fuel at SRS, including fundamentals for corrosion of aluminum alloys. It updates and summarizes the corrosion surveillance activities supporting the future storage of over 15,000 research reactor fuel assemblies from countries over the world during the next 15-20 years. Criteria are presented for providing corrosion protection for aluminum-clad spent fuel in interim storage during the next few decades while plans are developed for a more permanent disposition

  5. Probabilistic assessment of spent-fuel cladding breach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foadian, H.; Rashid, Y.R.; Seager, K.D.

    1991-01-01

    A methodology for determining the probability spent-fuel cladding breach due to normal and accident class B cask transport conditions is introduced. This technique uses deterministic stress analysis results as well as probabilistic cladding material properties, initial flaws, and breach criteria. Best estimates are presented for the probability distributions of irradiated Zircaloy properties such as ductility and fracture toughness, and for fuel rod initial conditions such as manufacturing flaws and PCI part-wall cracks. Example analyses are used to illustrate the implementation of this methodology for a BWR (GE 7 x 7) and a PWR (B ampersand W 15 x 15) assembly. The cladding breach probabilities for each assembly are tabulated for regulatory normal and accident transport conditions including fire

  6. Probabilistic assessment of spent-fuel cladding breach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foadian, H.; Rashid, Y.R.; Seager, K.D.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper a methodology for determining the probability of spent-fuel cladding breach due to normal and accident class B cask transport conditions is introduced. This technique uses deterministic stress analysis results as well as probabilistic cladding material properties, initial flaws, and breach criteria. Best estimates are presented for the probability distributions of irradiated Zircaloy properties such as ductility and fracture toughness, and for fuel rod initial conditions such as manufacturing flaws and PCI part-wall cracks. Example analyses are used to illustrate the implementation of this methodology for a BWR (GE 7 x 7) and a PWR (B and W 15 x 15) assembly. The cladding breach probabilities for each assembly are tabulated for regulatory normal and accident transport conditions including fire

  7. Peak cladding temperature in a spent fuel storage or transportation cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Murakami, H.; Liu, Y.; Gomez, P.E.A.; Gudipati, M.; Greiner, M.

    2007-01-01

    From reactor discharge to eventual disposition, spent nuclear fuel assemblies from a commercial light water reactor are typically exposed to a variety of environments under which the peak cladding temperature (PCT) is an important parameter that can affect the characteristics and behavior of the cladding and, thus, the functions of the spent fuel during storage, transportation, and disposal. Three models have been identified to calculate the peak cladding temperature of spent fuel assemblies in a storage or transportation cask: a coupled effective thermal conductivity and edge conductance model developed by Manteufel and Todreas, an effective thermal conductivity model developed by Bahney and Lotz, and a computational fluid dynamics model. These models were used to estimate the PCT for spent fuel assemblies for light water reactors under helium, nitrogen, and vacuum environments with varying decay heat loads and temperature boundary conditions. The results show that the vacuum environment is more challening than the other gas environments in that the PCT limit is exceeded at a lower boundary temperature for a given decay heat load of the spent fuel assembly. This paper will highlight the PCT calculations, including a comparison of the PCTs obtained by different models.

  8. Phase evolution and dendrite growth in laser cladding of aluminium on zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, T.M.; Xie, H.; Lin, X.; Yang, H.O.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Laser cladding of Al on pure Zr. → A series of phase evolutions occurred across the laser-clad coating. → Epitaxial crystal growth, backward dendrite growth and two-phase eutectic dendritic growth. → Phase and microstructure evolution is discussed. - Abstract: Aluminium was laser clad on a pure zirconium substrate using the blown powder method. The microstructure across the laser-clad coating was studied. Starting from the bottom to the top surface of the coating, a series of phase evolutions had occurred: (Zr) → (Zr) + AlZr 2 + AlZr 3 → Al 4 Zr 5 + Al 3 Zr 2 → Al 3 Zr 2 + AlZr 2 → Al 2 Zr → Al 2 Zr + Al 3 Zr. This resulted in an epitaxial columnar crystal growth at the re-melt substrate boundary, a band of backward growth Al 3 Zr 2 dendrites towards the lower half of the coating, and a two-phase eutectic dendritic growth of Al 2 Zr + Al 3 Zr towards the top of the coating. The evolution of the various phases and microstructures is discussed in conjunction with the Al-Zr phase diagram, the criteria for planar interface instability, and the theory of eutectic growth under rapid solidification conditions (the TMK model).

  9. Influence of the fuel operational parameters on the aluminium cladding quality of discharged fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chwaszczewski, S.; Czajkowski, W.; Borek-Kruszewska, E. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock Swierk (POLAND)

    2002-07-01

    In the last two years, the new MR6 type fuel containing 1550 g of U with 36% enrichment has been loaded into MARIA reactor core. Its aluminium cladding thickness is 0,6 mm and typical burnup -about 4080 MWh (as compared to 2880 MWh for the 80% enriched fuel used). However, increased fission product release from these assemblies was observed near the end of its operational time. The results presented earlier [1] show that the corrosion behaviour of aluminium cladding depends on the conditions of fuel operation in the reactor. The corrosion process in the aluminum of fuel cladding proceeds faster then in the aluminum of constructional elements. This tendency was also observed in MR-6/80% and in WWR- SM fuel assemblies. Therefore the visual tests of discharged MR-6/36% fuel elements were performed. Some change of appearance of aluminum cladding was observed, especially in the regions with large energy generation i.e. in the centre of reactor core and in the strong horizontal gradient of neutron flux. In the present paper, the results of visual investigation of discharged fuel assemblies are presented. The results of the investigation are correlated with the operational parameters. (author)

  10. Spent fuel cladding containment credit test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1983-01-01

    As an initial step in addressing the effectiveness of breached cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release from the repository during the post-containment period, preliminary scoping tests have been initiated which compare radionuclide releases from spent fuel specimens with artificially induced cladding defects of various severities. The artificially induced defects are all more severe than the typical in-reactor type breaches which are expected to be the principal type of breach entering the repository for terminal storage. These preliminary scoping tests being conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Waste Package Development Program in support of the Tuff repository project at the Nevada Test Site are described. Also included in this presentation are selected initial results from these tests. 22 figures

  11. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented

  12. Recent developments in spent fuel management in Norway - 59260

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Peter J.; Oberlaender, Barbara C.

    2012-01-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) in Norway has arisen from irradiation of fuel in the NORA, Jeep I and Jeep II reactors at Kjeller, and in the Heavy Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) in Halden. In total there is some 16 tonnes of SNF, with 12 tons of aluminium-clad fuel, of which 10 tonnes is metallic uranium fuel and the remainder oxide (UO 2 ). The portion of this fuel that is similar to commercial fuel (UO 2 clad in Zircaloy) may be suitable for direct disposal on the Swedish model or in other repository designs. However, metallic uranium and/or fuels clad in aluminium are chemically reactive and there would be risks associated with direct disposal. Two committees were established by the Government of Norway in January 2009 to make recommendations for the interim storage and final disposal of spent fuel in Norway. The Technical Committee on Storage and Disposal of Metallic Uranium Fuel and Al-clad Fuels was formed with the mandate to recommend treatment (i.e. conditioning) options for metallic uranium fuel and aluminium-clad fuel to render them stable for long term storage and disposal. This committee, whose members were drawn from the nuclear industry, reported in January 2010, and recommended commercial reprocessing as the best option for these fuels. The Phase-2 committee, which in part based its work on the work of previous committees and on the report of the Technical Committee, had the mandate to find the most suitable technical solution and localisation for intermediate storage for spent nuclear fuel and long-lived waste. The membership of this committee was chosen to represent a broad cross section of stakeholders. The committee evaluated different solutions and their associated costs, and recommended one of the options. The committee's report published in early 2011. This paper summarises the conclusions of the two committees, and thereby illustrates the steps taken by one country to formulate a strategy for the long-term management of its SNF. (authors)

  13. Radionuclide release from PWR spent fuel specimens with induced cladding defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.; Oversby, V.M.

    1984-03-01

    Radionuclide releases from pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel rod specimens containing various artificially induced cladding defects were compared by leach testing. The study was conducted in support of the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Waste Package Task to evaluate the effectiveness of failed cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release. Test description and results are presented. 6 references, 4 figures

  14. Characteristics of hydride precipitation and reorientation in spent-fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Daum, R.S.; Hiller, J.M.; Billone, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine Zircaloy fuel cladding, either discharged from several PWRs and a BWR after irradiation to fluence levels of 3.3 to 8.6 X 10 21 n cm -2 (E > 1 MeV) or hydrogen-charged and heat-treated under stress to produce radial hydrides; the goal was to determine the microstructural and crystallographic characteristics of hydride precipitation. Morphologies, distributions, and habit planes of various types of hydrides were determined by stereo-TEM. In addition to the normal macroscopic hydrides commonly observed by optical microscopy, small 'microscopic' hydrides are present in spent-fuel cladding in number densities at least a few orders of magnitude greater than that of macroscopic hydrides. The microscopic hydrides, observed to be stable at least up to 333 deg C, precipitate in association with -type dislocations. While the habit plane of macroscopic tangential hydrides in the spent-fuel cladding is essentially the same as that of unirradiated unstressed Zircaloys, i.e., the [107] Zr plane, the habit plane of tangential hydrides that precipitate under high tangential stress is the [104] Zr plane. The habit plane of radial hydrides that precipitate under tangential stress is the [011] Zr pyramidal plane, a naturally preferred plane for a cladding that has 30 basal-pole texture. Effects of texture on the habit plane and the threshold stress for hydride reorientation are also discussed. (authors)

  15. DECONTAMINATION OF ZIRCALOY SPENT FUEL CLADDING HULLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudisill, T; John Mickalonis, J

    2006-01-01

    The reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) generates a Zircaloy cladding hull waste which requires disposal as a high level waste in the geologic repository. The hulls are primarily contaminated with fission products and actinides from the fuel. During fuel irradiation, these contaminants are deposited in a thin layer of zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) which forms on the cladding surface at the elevated temperatures present in a nuclear reactor. Therefore, if the hulls are treated to remove the ZrO 2 layer, a majority of the contamination will be removed and the hulls could potentially meet acceptance criteria for disposal as a low level waste (LLW). Discard of the hulls as a LLW would result in significant savings due to the high costs associated with geologic disposal. To assess the feasibility of decontaminating spent fuel cladding hulls, two treatment processes developed for dissolving fuels containing zirconium (Zr) metal or alloys were evaluated. Small-scale dissolution experiments were performed using the ZIRFLEX process which employs a boiling ammonium fluoride (NH 4 F)/ammonium nitrate (NH 4 NO 3 ) solution to dissolve Zr or Zircaloy cladding and a hydrofluoric acid (HF) process developed for complete dissolution of Zr-containing fuels. The feasibility experiments were performed using Zircaloy-4 metal coupons which were electrochemically oxidized to produce a thin ZrO 2 layer on the surface. Once the oxide layer was in place, the ease of removing the layer using methods based on the two processes was evaluated. The ZIRFLEX and HF dissolution processes were both successful in removing a 0.2 mm (thick) oxide layer from Zircaloy-4 coupons. Although the ZIRFLEX process was effective in removing the oxide layer, two potential shortcomings were identified. The formation of ammonium hexafluorozirconate ((NH 4 ) 2 ZrF 6 ) on the metal surface prior to dissolution in the bulk solution could hinder the decontamination process by obstructing the removal of

  16. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabah, Mahmoud A

    2004-01-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 degrees C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 degrees C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 degrees C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics.

  17. Recovery of aluminium, nickel-copper alloys and salts from spent fluorescent lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabah, Mahmoud A.

    2004-01-01

    This study explores a combined pyro-hydrometallurgical method to recover pure aluminium, nickel-copper alloy(s), and some valuable salts from spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). It also examines the safe recycling of clean glass tubes for the fluorescent lamp industry. Spent lamps were decapped under water containing 35% acetone to achieve safe capture of mercury vapour. Cleaned glass tubes, if broken, were cut using a rotating diamond disc to a standard shorter length. Aluminium and copper-nickel alloys in the separated metallic parts were recovered using suitable flux to decrease metal losses going to slag. Operation variables affecting the quality of the products and the extent of recovery with the suggested method were investigated. Results revealed that total loss in the glass tube recycling operation was 2% of the SFLs. Pure aluminium meeting standard specification DIN 1712 was recovered by melting at 800 deg. C under sodium chloride/carbon flux for 20 min. Standard nickel-copper alloys with less than 0.1% tin were prepared by melting at 1250 deg. C using a sodium borate/carbon flux. De-tinning of the molten nickel-copper alloy was carried out using oxygen gas. Tin in the slag as oxide was recovered by reduction using carbon or hydrogen gas at 650-700 deg. C. Different valuable chloride salts were also obtained in good quality. Further research is recommended on the thermodynamics of nickel-copper recovery, yttrium and europium recovery, and process economics

  18. An allowable cladding peak temperature for spent nuclear fuels in interim dry storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyun-Jin; Jang, Ki-Nam; Kim, Kyu-Tae

    2018-01-01

    Allowable cladding peak temperatures for spent fuel cladding integrity in interim dry storage were investigated, considering hydride reorientation and mechanical property degradation behaviors of unirradiated and neutron irradiated Zr-Nb cladding tubes. Cladding tube specimens were heated up to various temperatures and then cooled down under tensile hoop stresses. Cool-down specimens indicate that higher heat-up temperature and larger tensile hoop stress generated larger radial hydride precipitation and smaller tensile strength and plastic hoop strain. Unirradiated specimens generated relatively larger radial hydride precipitation and plastic strain than did neutron irradiated specimens. Assuming a minimum plastic strain requirement of 5% for cladding integrity maintenance in interim dry storage, it is proposed that a cladding peak temperature during the interim dry storage is to keep below 250 °C if cladding tubes are cooled down to room temperature.

  19. Properties of light water reactor spent fuel cladding. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farwick, D.G.; Moen, R.A.

    1979-08-01

    The Commercial Waste and Spent Fuel Packaging Program will provide containment packages for the safe storage or disposal of spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Maintaining containment of radionuclides during transportation, handling, processing and storage is essential, so the best understanding of the properties of the materials to be stored is necessary. This report provides data collection, assessment and recommendations for spent LWR fuel cladding materials properties. Major emphasis is placed on mechanical properties of the zircaloys and austenitic stainless steels. Limited information on elastic constants, physical properties, and anticipated corrosion behavior is also provided. Work is in progress to revise these evaluations as the program proceeds

  20. Diffusion in cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, M.S.; Pande, B.M.; Agarwala, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Aluminium has been used as a cladding material in most research reactors because its low neutron absorption cross section and ease of fabrication. However, it is not suitable for cladding in power reactors and as such zircaloy-2 is normally used as a clad because it can withstand high temperature. It has low neutron absorption cross section, good oxidation, corrosion, creep properties and possesses good mechanical strength. With the passage of time, further development in this branch of science took place and designers started looking for better neutron economy and less hydrogen pickup in PHW reactors. The motion of fission products in the cladding material could pose a problem after long operation. In order to understand their behaviour under reactor environment, it is essential to study first the diffusion under normal conditions. These studies will throw light on the interaction of defects with impurities which would in turn help in understanding the mechanism of diffusion. In this article, it is intended to discuss the diffusion behaviour of impurities in cladding materials.(i.e. aluminium, zircaloy-2, zirconium-niobium alloy etc.). (author). 94 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Evaluation of Thermal Creep and Hydride Re-orientation Properties of High Burnup Spent Fuel Cladding under Long Term Dry storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamimura, K [JNES (Japan)

    2012-07-01

    In Japan, spent fuels will be reprocessed as recyclable energy source at a reprocessing plant. The first commercial plant is under-constructing and will start operation in 2008. It is necessary that spent fuels should be stored in the independent interim storage facilities (ISF) until reprocessing. Utilities plan the operation of the first ISF in 2010. JNES has a mission to support the safety body by researching the data of technical standard and regulation. Investigating of spent fuel integrity during long term dry storage is one of them. The objectives are: 1) Evaluation of the effects of material design changes on creep properties of high burnup spent fuel cladding; 2) Evaluation of the effects of alloy elements and texture of irradiated Zircaloy on hydride re-orientation properties and the effects of radial hydrides on cladding mechanical properties; 3) Evaluation of the effects of temperature on irradiation hardening recovery.

  2. A deformation and thermodynamic model for hydride precipitation kinetics in spent fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.

    1989-10-01

    Hydrogen is contained in the Zircaloy cladding of spent fuel rods from nuclear reactors. All the spent fuel rods placed in a nuclear waste repository will have a temperature history that decreases toward ambient; and as a result, most all of the hydrogen in the Zircaloy will eventually precipitate as zirconium hydride platelets. A model for the density of hydride platelets is a necessary sub-part for predicting Zircaloy cladding failure rate in a nuclear waste repository. A model is developed to describe statistically the hydride platelet density, and the density function includes the orientation as a physical attribute. The model applies concepts from statistical mechanics to derive probable deformation and thermodynamic functionals for cladding material response that depend explicitly on the hydride platelet density function. From this model, hydride precipitation kinetics depend on a thermodynamic potential for hydride density change and on the inner product of a stress tensor and a tensor measure for the incremental volume change due to hydride platelets. The development of a failure response model for Zircaloy cladding exposed to the expected conditions in a nuclear waste repository is supported by the US DOE Yucca Mountain Project. 19 refs., 3 figs

  3. Protective Coatings for Wet Storage of Aluminium-Clad Spent Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, S.M.C.; Correa, O.V.; Souza, J.A. De; Ramanathan, L.V. [Materials science and Technology Center, Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - IPEN, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Corrosion protection of spent RR fuel for long term wet storage was considered important, primarily from the safety standpoint and the use of conversion coatings was proposed in 2008. This paper presents the results of: (a) on-going field tests in which un-coated and lanthanide-based conversion coated Al alloy coupons were exposed to the IEA-R1 reactor spent fuel basin for durations of up to a year; (b) preparation of cerium modified hydrotalcite coatings and cerium sealed boehmite coatings on AA 6061 alloy; (c) corrosion resistance of coated specimens in NaCl solutions. The field studies indicated that the oxidized and cerium dioxide coated coupons were the most corrosion resistant. The cerium modified hydrotalcite and cerium sealed boehmite coated specimens showed marked increase in pitting corrosion resistance. (author)

  4. Consolidation of cladding hulls from the electrometallurgical treatment of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.

    1998-01-01

    To consolidate metallic waste that is residual from Argonne National Laboratory's electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel, waste ingots are currently being cast using an induction furnace located in a hot cell. These ingots, which have been developed to serve as final waste forms destined for repository disposal, are stainless steel (SS)-Zr alloys (the Zr is very near 15 wt.%). The charge for the alloys consists of stainless steel cladding hulls, Zr from the fuel being treated, noble metal fission products, and minor amounts of actinides that are present with the cladding hulls. The actual in-dated cladding hulls have been characterized before they were melted into ingots, and the final as-cast ingots have been characterized to determine the degree of consolidation of the charge material. It has been found that ingots can be effectively cast from irradiated cladding hulls residual from the electrometallurgical treatment process by employing an induction furnace located in a hot cell

  5. Test plan for spent fuel cladding containment credit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1983-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has chosen Westinghouse Hanford Company as a subcontractor to assist them in determining the requirements for successful disposal of spent fuel rods in the proposed Nevada Test Site repository. An initial scoping test, with the objective of determining whether or not the cladding of a breached fuel rod can be given any credit as an effective barrier to radionuclide release, is described in this test plan. 8 references, 2 figures, 4 tables

  6. Allowable peak heat-up cladding temperature for spent fuel integrity during interim-dry storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Nam Jang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate allowable peak cladding temperature and hoop stress for maintenance of cladding integrity during interim-dry storage and subsequent transport, zirconium alloy cladding tubes were hydrogen-charged to generate 250 ppm and 500 ppm hydrogen contents, simulating spent nuclear fuel degradation. The hydrogen-charged specimens were heated to four peak temperatures of 250°C, 300°C, 350°C, and 400°C, and then cooled to room temperature at cooling rates of 0.3 °C/min under three tensile hoop stresses of 80 MPa, 100 MPa, and 120 MPa. The cool-down specimens showed that high peak heat-up temperature led to lower hydrogen content and that larger tensile hoop stress generated larger radial hydride fraction and consequently lower plastic elongation. Based on these out-of-pile cladding tube test results only, it may be said that peak cladding temperature should be limited to a level < 250°C, regardless of the cladding hoop stress, to ensure cladding integrity during interim-dry storage and subsequent transport.

  7. Transitioning aluminum clad spent fuels from wet to interim dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Iyer, N.C.; Sindelar, R.L.; Peacock, H.B. Jr.

    1994-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns several hundred metric tons of aluminum clad, spent nuclear fuel and target assemblies. The vast majority of these irradiated assemblies are currently stored in water basins that were designed and operated for short term fuel cooling prior to fuel reprocessing. Recent DOE decisions to severely limit the reprocessing option have significantly lengthened the time of storage, thus increasing the tendency for corrosion induced degradation of the fuel cladding and the underlying core material. The portent of continued corrosion, coupled with the age of existing wet storage facilities and the cost of continuing basin operations, including necessary upgrades to meet current facility standards, may force the DOE to transition these wet stored, aluminum clad spent fuels to interim dry storage. The facilities for interim dry storage have not been developed, partially because fuel storage requirements and specifications for acceptable fuel forms are lacking. In spite of the lack of both facilities and specifications, current plans are to dry store fuels for approximately 40 to 60 years or until firm decisions are developed for final fuel disposition. The transition of the aluminum clad fuels from wet to interim dry storage will require a sequence of drying and canning operations which will include selected fuel preparations such as vacuum drying and conditioning of the storage atmosphere. Laboratory experiments and review of the available literature have demonstrated that successful interim dry storage may also require the use of fuel and canister cleaning or rinsing techniques that preclude, or at least minimize, the potential for the accumulation of chloride and other potentially deleterious ions in the dry storage environment. This paper summarizes an evaluation of the impact of fuel transitioning techniques on the potential for corrosion induced degradation of fuel forms during interim dry storage

  8. Oxidation behavior of fuel cladding tube in spent fuel pool accident condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemoto, Yoshiyuki; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Ogawa, Chihiro; Nakashima, Kazuo; Tojo, Masayuki

    2017-01-01

    In spent fuel pool (SFP) under loss-of-cooling or loss-of-coolant severe accident condition, the spent fuels will be exposed to air and heated by their own residual decay heat. Integrity of fuel cladding is crucial for SFP safety therefore study on cladding oxidation in air at high temperature is important. Zircaloy-2 (Zry2) and zircaloy-4 (Zry4) were applied for thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) in different temperatures in air at different flow rates to evaluate oxidation behavior. Oxidation rate increased with testing temperature. In a range of flow rate of air which is predictable in spent fuel lack during a hypothetical SFP accident, influence of flow rate was not clearly observed below 950degC for the Zry2, or below 1050degC for Zry4. In higher temperature, oxidation rate was higher in high rate condition, and this trend was seen clearer when temperature increased. Oxide layers were carefully examined after the TGA analyses and compared with mass gain data to investigate detail of oxidation process in air. It was revealed that the mass gain data in pre-breakaway regime reflects growth of dense oxide film on specimen surface, meanwhile in post-breakaway regime, it reflects growth of porous oxide layer beneath fracture of the dense oxide film. (author)

  9. Radionuclide release from research reactor spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtius, H., E-mail: h.curtius@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Energieforschung, IEF-6 Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik, Geb. 05.3, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Kaiser, G.; Mueller, E.; Bosbach, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Energieforschung, IEF-6 Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik, Geb. 05.3, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-09-01

    Numerous investigations with respect to LWR fuel under non oxidizing repository relevant conditions were performed. The results obtained indicate slow corrosion rates for the UO{sub 2} fuel matrix. Special fuel-types (mostly dispersed fuels, high enriched in {sup 235}U, cladded with aluminium) are used in German research reactors, whereas in German nuclear power plants, UO{sub 2}-fuel (LWR fuel, enrichment in {sup 235}U up to 5%, zircaloy as cladding) is used. Irradiated research reactor fuels contribute less than 1% to the total waste volume. In Germany, the state is responsible for fuel operation and for fuel back-end options. The institute for energy research (IEF-6) at the Research Center Juelich performs investigation with irradiated research reactor spent fuels under repository relevant conditions. In the study, the corrosion of research reactor spent fuel has been investigated in MgCl{sub 2}-rich salt brine and the radionuclide release fractions have been determined. Leaching experiments in brine with two different research reactor fuel-types were performed in a hot cell facility in order to determine the corrosion behaviour and the radionuclide release fractions. The corrosion of two dispersed research reactor fuel-types (UAl{sub x}-Al and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al) was studied in 400 mL MgCl{sub 2}-rich salt brine in the presence of Fe{sup 2+} under static and initially anoxic conditions. Within these experimental parameters, both fuel types corroded in the experimental time period of 3.5 years completely, and secondary alteration phases were formed. After complete corrosion of the used research reactor fuel samples, the inventories of Cs and Sr were quantitatively detected in solution. Solution concentrations of Am and Eu were lower than the solubility of Am(OH){sub 3}(s) and Eu(OH){sub 3}(s) solid phases respectively, and may be controlled by sorption processes. Pu concentrations may be controlled by Pu(IV) polymer species, but the presence of Pu(V) and Pu

  10. Analyses of the transportation of spent research reactor fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, J.W.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    We analyzed the impacts of transportation of research reactor spent fuel from US and foreign reactors for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Defense Programs. Two separate shipment programs were analyzed. The shipment of research reactor spent fuel from Taiwan to the US (Fuel Movement Program), and the return of research reactor spent fuels of US origin from foreign and domestic reactors (Research Reactor Fuel Return Program). To perform these analyses, a comprehensive methodology for analyzing the probabilities and consequences of transportation in coastal waters and port facilities, handling at the port, and shipment by truck to reprocessing facilities was developed. The Taiwanese fuel consists of low-burnup aluminum-clad metallic uranium research reactor spent fuel; the other fuels are primarily aluminum-clad oxide fuels. The Fuel Movement Program is ongoing, while the Fuel Return Program addresses future shipments over a ten-year period. The operational aspects of the Taiwanese shipments have been uniform, but several possible shipping configurations are possible for the Fuel Return Program shipments. The risks of transporting spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive materials by all modes have been analyzed extensively. Comprehensive assessments, which bound the impacts of spent fuel transport, demonstrate that when shipments are made in compliance with applicable regulations, the risks for all such transport are low. For comparison with previously licensed transport activities and to provide continuity with earlier analyses, the results for shipment of 150-day-old commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel are presented as part of this study

  11. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-01

    As storage of spent fuel has become a key technology in spent fuel management, wet and dry storage have become mature technologies and continue to demonstrate good performance. Increased spent fuel storage capacity in combination with longer storage durations will be needed over the foreseeable future as many countries have delayed their decision on spent fuel disposal or reprocessing. Extended spent fuel storage is, and will remain, an important activity for all countries with nuclear power programmes. A number of countries are planning or have already initiated research programmes on spent fuel storage performance, and there is a continuing benefit in exchanging spent fuel storage experience of the Member States in order to build a comprehensive technology knowledge base. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during wet storage are uniform corrosion, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically-influenced corrosion. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during dry storage and subsequent handling and transportation operations are air oxidation, thermal creep, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride re-orientation, hydrogen migration and re-distribution. Investigations carried out so far indicate that from the degradation mechanisms that may affect the integrity of spent fuel assembly/bundle structure during interim storage, hydride re-orientation has the potential to impair the ability of the cladding to effectively withstand potentially adverse mechanical challenges resulting from handling or transportation accidents. Fuel integrity issues are related to the definition and criteria of fuel integrity, failure classification, packaging and retrieval of damaged fuel and transport of damaged fuel assemblies. Various monitoring technologies have been developed and used to confirm the continued spent fuel integrity during storage or to provide an early indication of developing

  12. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project (SPAR-II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    As storage of spent fuel has become a key technology in spent fuel management, wet and dry storage have become mature technologies and continue to demonstrate good performance. Increased spent fuel storage capacity in combination with longer storage durations will be needed over the foreseeable future as many countries have delayed their decision on spent fuel disposal or reprocessing. Extended spent fuel storage is, and will remain, an important activity for all countries with nuclear power programmes. A number of countries are planning or have already initiated research programmes on spent fuel storage performance, and there is a continuing benefit in exchanging spent fuel storage experience of the Member States in order to build a comprehensive technology knowledge base. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during wet storage are uniform corrosion, pitting, galvanic, and microbiologically-influenced corrosion. Potential degradation mechanisms that may affect cladding integrity during dry storage and subsequent handling and transportation operations are air oxidation, thermal creep, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride re-orientation, hydrogen migration and re-distribution. Investigations carried out so far indicate that from the degradation mechanisms that may affect the integrity of spent fuel assembly/bundle structure during interim storage, hydride re-orientation has the potential to impair the ability of the cladding to effectively withstand potentially adverse mechanical challenges resulting from handling or transportation accidents. Fuel integrity issues are related to the definition and criteria of fuel integrity, failure classification, packaging and retrieval of damaged fuel and transport of damaged fuel assemblies. Various monitoring technologies have been developed and used to confirm the continued spent fuel integrity during storage or to provide an early indication of developing

  13. Analyses of the transportation of spent research reactor fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cashwell, J.W.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Transportation Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories has analyzed the impacts of transportation of research reactor spent fuel from US and foreign reactors for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Defense Programs. This effort represents the first comprehensive analytical evaluation of the risks of transporting high-, medium-, and low-enriched uranium spent research reactor fuel by both sea and land. Two separate shipment programs have been analyzed: the shipment of research reactor spent fuel from Taiwan to the US (Fuel Movement Program), and the return of research reactor spent fuels of US origin from foreign and domestic reactors (Research Reactor Fuel Return Program). In order to perform these analyses, a comprehensive methodology for analyzing the probabilities and consequences of transportation in coastal waters and port facilities, handling at the port, and shipment by truck to reprocessing facilities was developed. The Taiwanese fuel consists of low-burnup aluminum-clad metallic uranium research reactor spent fuel; the other fuels are primarily aluminum-clad oxide fuels. The Fuel Movement Program is ongoing, while the Fuel Return Program addresses future shipments over a ten-year period. The operational aspects of the Taiwanese shipments have been uniform, but several possible shipping configurations are possible for the Fuel Return Program shipments. Comprehensive assessments, which bound the impacts of spent fuel transport, demonstrate that when shipments are made in compliance with applicable regulations, the risks for all such transport are low. For comparison with previously licensed transport activities and to provide continuity with earlier analyses, the results for shipment of 150-day-old commercial pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent fuel are presented as part of this study

  14. Review of Current Criteria of Spent Fuel Rod Integrity during Dry Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Sun Ki; Bang, Je Geon; Song, Kun Woo

    2006-01-01

    A PWR spent fuel has been stored in a wet storage pool in Korea. However, the amount of spent fuel is expected to exceed the capacity of a wet storage pool within 10∼15 years. From the early 1970's, a research on the PWR spent fuel dry storage started because the dry storage system has been economical compared with the wet storage system. The dry storage technology for Zircaloy-clad fuel was assessed and licensed in many countries such as USA, Canada, FRG and Switzerland. In the dry storage system, a clad temperature may be higher than in the wet storage system and can reach up to 400 .deg.. A higher clad temperature can cause cladding failures during the period of dry storage, and thus a dry storage related research has essentially dealt with the prevention of clad degradation. It is temperature and rod internal pressure that cause cladding failures through the mechanisms such as clad creep rupture, hydride re-orientation, and stress-corrosion cracking etc.. In this paper, the current licensing criteria are summarized for the PWR spent fuel dry storage system, especially on spent fuel rod integrity. And it is investigated that an application propriety of existing criteria to Korea spent fuel dry storage system

  15. The corrosion of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel in wet basin storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the corrosion of the aluminum-clad spent fuel and the improvements that have been made in the SRS basins since 1993 which have essentially mitigated new corrosion on the fuel. It presents the results of a metallographic examination of two Mk-31A target slugs stored in the L-Reactor basin for about 5 years and a summary of results from the corrosion surveillance programs through 1996

  16. Study of the uniform corrosion of an aluminium alloy used for the fuel cladding of the Jules Horowitz experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintergerst, M.

    2008-01-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material testing reactor, an aluminium base alloy, AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. Taking into account the thermal properties of the alloy and of its oxide, the corrosion of the fuel cans presents many problems. The aim of this thesis is to provide a growing kinetic of the oxide layer at the surface of the AlFeNi fuel can in order to predict the life time of fuel element. Thus the mechanism of degradation of the cladding will be describe in order to integrate the different parameters of the operating reactor. (A.L.B.)

  17. Temperature and humidity effects on the corrosion of aluminium-base reactor fuel cladding materials during dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of temperature and relative humidity on the high temperature (up to 200 deg. C) corrosion of aluminum cladding alloys was investigated for dry storage of spent nuclear fuels. A dependency on alloy type and temperature was determined for saturated water vapor conditions. Models were developed to allow prediction of cladding behaviour of 1100, 5052, and 6061 aluminum alloys for up to 50+ years at 100% relative humidity. Calculations show that for a closed system, corrosion stops after all moisture and oxygen is used up during corrosion reactions with aluminum alloys. (author)

  18. Study on characteristics of spent PWR cladding hull for categorizing into Non-TRU waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, In Ha; Kim, Jong Ho; Park, Jang Jin; Shin, Jin Myeong; Lee, Ho Hee; Yang, Myung Seung

    2005-01-01

    AFCI and GEN-IV programs aim for decreasing the high level radioactive wastes to be disposed. They also try to get valuable materials to recycle as resources such as uranium and plutonium. On the other hand, cladding hull expected to be one-thirds in volume of spent fuel assembly has not studied so much in the point view of recycling to reuse. Since traditional process of reprocessing was wet process, cladding hull generating through the reprocessing process was unavoidably contaminated with TRU by acid solvent during the process. Therefore, cladding hull has been classified into TRU wastes or high level wastes. According to the strategy for TRU high level radioactive wastes of USA as well as Korea, it regulates in two respects. One is activity and the other is heat generation. In respect of activity, TRU waste contains more than 100 nCi/kg of alpha emits with longer half life than 20 years and higher than 92 in atomic number. Also, wastes are categorized into TRU waste when it generates higher than 2kW/m3, in the respect of heat generation. Our results as well as literatures, almost all of TRU nuclides in the cladding hull are responsible for remained uranium and plutonium owing to pellet-cladding interaction. In addition, recoiled fission products on the surface of the cladding hull serve as heat generator. Up to now, decontamination of the cladding hull generating from the reprocessing of wet process is regarded as valueless and un-economic works owing to the amount of second waste produced

  19. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content; Alliages uranium-aluminium a faible teneur en aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabane, G; Englander, M; Lehmann, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1955-07-01

    Uranium, as obtained after spinning in phase {gamma}, presents an heterogeneous structure with large size grains. The anisotropic structure of the metal leads to an important buckling and surface distortion of the fuel slug which is incompatible with its tubular cladding for nuclear fuel uses. Different treatments have been made to obtain an isotropic structure presenting high thermal stability (laminating, hammering and spinning in phase {alpha}) without success. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content present important advantage in respect of non allied uranium. The introduction of aluminium in the form of intermetallic compound (UAl{sub 2}) gives a better resistance to thermal fatigue. Alloys obtained from raw casting present an improved buckling and surface distortion in respect of pure uranium. This improvement is obtained with uranium containing between 0,15 and 0,5 % of aluminium. An even more improvement in thermal stability is obtained by thermal treatments of these alloys. These new characteristics are explained by the fine dispersion of the UAl{sub 2} particles in uranium. The results after treatments obtained from an alloy slug containing 0,4 % of aluminium show no buckling or surface distortion and no elongation. (M.P.)

  20. Computational and experimental analysis of causes for local deformation of research reactor U-Mo fuel pin claddings in case of high burn-ups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popov, V.V.; Khmelevsky, M.Ya.; Lukichev, V.A.; Golosov, O.A.

    2005-01-01

    Post-reactor investigations of (U-Mo) fuel pins irradiated in the IVV-2M reactor have allowed to determine: the change in a fuel pin volume; the dimensions and the kind of the local deformation of fuel pin claddings; the amount of gases released under the cladding from the fuel composition, the thickness and appearance of the interaction layer of between the (U-Mo) particles and aluminium as a matrix material. The computational analysis of the stressed-strained state of fuel pins has shown that the major contribution to the increase of the fuel pin volume is made by the fuel swelling caused by the solid products of fission being formed in the process of operation. The emergence of the (U-Mo) fuel-aluminium matrix interaction layers around the (U-Mo) particles results in formation and evolution of lamination cavities inside the fuel composition under the joint action of the pressure of process gases and gaseous fission products. In case of high burn-up a local bulge of a fuel pin cladding is being formed in the fuel lamination area caused by the pressure of gases in the presence of creep in the fuel pin cladding material. The computational results relating to the local strain in a research reactor (U-Mo) fuel pin are in a good accordance with the results of the post-reactor investigations. (author)

  1. Corrosion surveillance program of aluminum spent fuel elements in wet storage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linardi, E; Haddad, R

    2012-01-01

    Due to different degradation issues observed in aluminum-clad spent fuel during long term storage in water, the IAEA implemented in 1996 a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) and a Regional Project for Latin America, on Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminum Clad Spent Fuel in Water. Argentine has been among the participant countries of these projects, carrying out spent fuel corrosion surveillance activities in its storage facilities. As a result of the research a large database on corrosion of aluminum-clad fuel has been generated. It was determined that the main types of corrosion affecting the spent fuel are pitting and galvanic corrosion due to contact with stainless steel. It was concluded that the quality of the water is the critical factor to control in a spent fuel storage facility. Another phase of the program is being conducted currently, which began in 2011 with the immersion of test racks in the RA1 reactor pool, and in the Research Reactor Spent Fuel Storage Facility (FACIRI), located in Ezeiza Atomic Center. This paper presents the results of the chemical analysis of the water performed so far, and its relationship with the examination of the coupons extracted from the sites (author)

  2. Corrosion of aluminum-clad alloys in wet spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.

    1995-09-01

    Large quantities of Defense related spent nuclear fuels are being stored in water basins around the United States. Under the non-proliferation policy, there has been no processing since the late 1980's and these fuels are caught in the pipeline awaiting processing or other disposition. At the Savannah River Site, over 200 metric tons of aluminum clad fuel are being stored in four water filled basins. Some of this fuel has experienced significant pitting corrosion. An intensive effort is underway at SRS to understand the corrosion problems and to improve the basin storage conditions for extended storage requirements. Significant improvements have been accomplished during 1993-1995, but the ultimate solution is to remove the fuel from the basins and to process it to a more stable form using existing and proven technology. This report presents a discussion of the fundamentals of aluminum alloy corrosion as it pertains to the wet storage of spent nuclear fuel. It examines the effects of variables on corrosion in the storage environment and presents the results of corrosion surveillance testing activities at SRS, as well as other fuel storage basins within the Department of Energy production sites

  3. Ultimate disposition of aluminum clad spent nuclear fuel in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.; Clark, W.D.; Clapper, M.; Mustin, T.P.

    2001-01-01

    Treatment and disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the United States has changed significantly over the last decade due to change in world climate associated with nuclear material. Chemical processing of aluminum based SNF is ending and alternate disposition paths are being developed that will allow for the ultimate disposition of the enriched uranium in this SNF. Existing inventories of aluminum based SNF are currently being stored primarily in water-filled basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) while these alternate disposition paths are being developed and implemented. Nuclear nonproliferation continues to be a worldwide concern and it is causing a significant influence on the development of management alternatives for SNF. SRS recently completed an environmental impact statement for the management of aluminum clad SNF that selects alternatives for all of the fuels in inventory. The U.S. Department of Energy and SRS are now implementing a dual strategy of processing small quantities of 'problematic' SNF while developing an alternative technology to dispose of the remaining aluminum clad SNF in the proposed monitored geologic repository. (author)

  4. CONTAINMENT ANALYSIS METHODOLOGY FOR TRANSPORT OF BREACHED CLAD ALUMINUM SPENT FUEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-07-11

    Aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (Al-SNF) from foreign and domestic research reactors (FRR/DRR) is being shipped to the Savannah River Site and placed in interim storage in a water basin. To enter the United States, a cask with loaded fuel must be certified to comply with the requirements in the Title 10 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The requirements include demonstration of containment of the cask with its contents under normal and accident conditions. Many Al-SNF assemblies have suffered corrosion degradation in storage in poor quality water, and many of the fuel assemblies are 'failed' or have through-clad damage. A methodology was developed to evaluate containment of Al-SNF even with severe cladding breaches for transport in standard casks. The containment analysis methodology for Al-SNF is in accordance with the methodology provided in ANSI N14.5 and adopted by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission in NUREG/CR-6487 to meet the requirements of 10CFR71. The technical bases for the inputs and assumptions are specific to the attributes and characteristics of Al-SNF received from basin and dry storage systems and its subsequent performance under normal and postulated accident shipping conditions. The results of the calculations for a specific case of a cask loaded with breached fuel show that the fuel can be transported in standard shipping casks and maintained within the allowable release rates under normal and accident conditions. A sensitivity analysis has been conducted to evaluate the effects of modifying assumptions and to assess options for fuel at conditions that are not bounded by the present analysis. These options would include one or more of the following: reduce the fuel loading; increase fuel cooling time; reduce the degree of conservatism in the bounding assumptions; or measure the actual leak rate of the cask system. That is, containment analysis for alternative inputs at fuel-specific conditions and

  5. Initial report on stress-corrosion-cracking experiments using Zircaloy-4 spent fuel cladding C-rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.

    1988-09-01

    The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is sponsoring C-ring stress corrosion cracking scoping experiments as a first step in evaluating the potential for stress corrosion cracking of spent fuel cladding in a potential tuff repository environment. The objective is to scope the approximate behavior so that more precise pressurized tube testing can be performed over an appropriate range of stress, without expanding the long-term effort needlessly. The experiment consists of stressing, by compression with a dead weight load, C-rings fabricated from spent fuel cladding exposed to an environment of Well J-13 water held at 90/degree/C. The results indicate that stress corrosion cracking occurs at the high stress levels employed in the experiments. The cladding C-rings, tested at 90% of the stress at which elastic behavior is obtained in these specimens, broke in 25 to 64 d when tested in water. This was about one third of the time required for control tests to break in air. This is apparently the first observation of stress corrosion under the test conditions of relatively low temperature, benign environment but very high stress. The 150 ksi test stress could be applied as a result of the particular specimen geometry. By comparison, the uniaxial tensile yield stress is about 100 to 120 ksi and the ultimate stress is about 150 ksi. When a general model that fits the high stress results is extrapolated to lower stress levels, it indicates that the C-rings in experiments now running at /approximately/80% of the yield strength should take 200 to 225 d to break. 21 refs., 24 figs., 5 tabs

  6. Air Oxidation Behaviors of Zircaloy-4 Cladding During a LOCA In Spent Fuel Pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Je Geon; Chun, Tae Hyun; Kim, Sun Ki; Koo, Yang Hyun

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that air oxidation induces a serious degradation of the Zircaloy cladding material, compared with steam oxidation. From the oxidant point of view, in comparison with steam, chemical heat release during oxidation in air is higher by 80%, which may lead to a more rapid degradation of the Zircaloy cladding, and further evolution of the accident.. Additionally, the oxidation kinetics in air is much faster than in steam due to the formation of non-protective oxide layer. From the safety point of view, the barrier effect of the cladding against release of fission products is lost much earlier in air compared to steam. The objective of this study is to investigate the oxidation behaviors of fuel cladding in two different conditions such as isothermal and transient condition and to generate its kinetic data under an accident condition in the spent fuel pool. In this study, the oxidation behaviors and its kinetics of the Zircaloy-4 were investigated in air environment for various air ingress scenarios in the temperature range 600 .deg. C-1,400 .deg. C by thermo-gravimetric analysis. In this study, the oxidation behaviors of the Zircaloy-4 for both isothermal condition and transient condition were investigated in air environment. In comparison with isothermal condition, the retardation of oxidation rate in transient condition was observed at both 1,200 .deg. C and 1,400 .deg. C. This seems to be ascribed to the effect of thin oxide formed during a heating

  7. Effect of cladding defect size on the oxidation of irradiated spent LWR [light-water reactor] fuel below 3690C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; Strain, R.V.

    1984-01-01

    Tests on spent fuel fragments and rod segments were conducted between 250 and 360 0 C to relate temperature, defect size, and fuel oxidation rate with time-to-cladding-splitting. Defect sizes from 760 μm diameter down to 8 μm, the size of an SCC type breach, were used. Above 283 0 C, the time-to-cladding-splitting was longer for the smaller defects. The enhancement of the incubation time by smaller defects steadily decreased with temperature and was not detected at 250 0 C. 18 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabane, G.; Englander, M.; Lehmann, J.

    1955-01-01

    Uranium, as obtained after spinning in phase γ, presents an heterogeneous structure with large size grains. The anisotropic structure of the metal leads to an important buckling and surface distortion of the fuel slug which is incompatible with its tubular cladding for nuclear fuel uses. Different treatments have been made to obtain an isotropic structure presenting high thermal stability (laminating, hammering and spinning in phase α) without success. Alloys of uranium and aluminium with low aluminium content present important advantage in respect of non allied uranium. The introduction of aluminium in the form of intermetallic compound (UAl 2 ) gives a better resistance to thermal fatigue. Alloys obtained from raw casting present an improved buckling and surface distortion in respect of pure uranium. This improvement is obtained with uranium containing between 0,15 and 0,5 % of aluminium. An even more improvement in thermal stability is obtained by thermal treatments of these alloys. These new characteristics are explained by the fine dispersion of the UAl 2 particles in uranium. The results after treatments obtained from an alloy slug containing 0,4 % of aluminium show no buckling or surface distortion and no elongation. (M.P.)

  9. The corrosion of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel in wet basin storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.; Burke, S.D.

    1996-01-01

    Large quantities of Defense related spent nuclear fuels are being stored in water basins around the United States. Under the non-proliferation policy, there has been no processing since the late 1980's and these fuels are caught in the pipeline awaiting stabilization or other disposition. At the Savannah River Site, over 200 metric tons of aluminum clad fuel are being stored in four water filled basins. Some of this fuel has experienced visible pitting corrosion. An intensive effort is underway at SRS to understand the corrosion problems and to improve the basin storage conditions for extended storage requirements. Significant improvements have been accomplished during 1993-1996. This paper presents a discussion of the fundamentals of aluminum alloy corrosion as it pertains to the wet storage of spent nuclear fuel. It examines the effects of variables on corrosion in the storage environment and presents the results of corrosion surveillance testing activities at SRS, as well as discussions of fuel storage basins at other production sites of the Department of Energy

  10. The corrosion of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel in wet basin storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, J.P.; Burke, S.D.

    1996-02-20

    Large quantities of Defense related spent nuclear fuels are being stored in water basins around the United States. Under the non-proliferation policy, there has been no processing since the late 1980`s and these fuels are caught in the pipeline awaiting stabilization or other disposition. At the Savannah River Site, over 200 metric tons of aluminum clad fuel are being stored in four water filled basins. Some of this fuel has experienced visible pitting corrosion. An intensive effort is underway at SRS to understand the corrosion problems and to improve the basin storage conditions for extended storage requirements. Significant improvements have been accomplished during 1993-1996. This paper presents a discussion of the fundamentals of aluminum alloy corrosion as it pertains to the wet storage of spent nuclear fuel. It examines the effects of variables on corrosion in the storage environment and presents the results of corrosion surveillance testing activities at SRS, as well as discussions of fuel storage basins at other production sites of the Department of Energy.

  11. Impacts of reactor. Induced cladding defects on spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B.

    1978-01-01

    Defects arise in the fuel cladding on a small fraction of fuel rods during irradiation in water-cooled power reactors. Defects from mechanical damage in fuel handling and shipping have been almost negligible. No commercial water reactor fuel has yet been observed to develop defects while stored in spent fuel pools. In some pools, defective fuel is placed in closed canisters as it is removed from the reactor. However, hundreds of defective fuel bundles are stored in numerous pools on the same basis as intact fuel. Radioactive species carried into the pool from the reactor coolant must be dealt with by the pool purification system. However, additional radiation releases from the defective fuel during storage appear tu be minimal, with the possible exception of fuel discharged while the reactor is operating (CANDU fuel). Over approximately two decades, defective commercial fuel has been handled, stored, shipped and reprocessed. (author)

  12. Corrosion surveillance for research reactor spent nuclear fuel in wet basin storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    Foreign and domestic test and research reactor fuel is currently being shipped from locations over the world for storage in water filled basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The fuel was provided to many of the foreign countries as a part of the ''Atoms for Peace'' program in the early 1950's. In support of the wet storage of this fuel at the research reactor sites and at SRS, corrosion surveillance programs have been initiated. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) in 1996 on ''Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminum-Clad Spent Fuel in Water'' and scientists from ten countries worldwide were invited to participate. This paper presents a detailed discussion of the IAEA sponsored CRP and provides the updated results from corrosion surveillance activities at SRS. In May 1998, a number of news articles around the world reported stories that microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) was active on the aluminum-clad spent fuel stored in the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF) at SRS. This assessment was found to be in error with details presented in this paper. A biofilm was found on aluminum coupons, but resulted in no corrosion. Cracks seen on the surface were not caused by corrosion, but by stresses from the volume expansion of the oxide formed during pre-conditioning autoclaving. There has been no pitting caused by MIC or any other corrosion mechanism seen in the RBOF basin since initiation of the SRS Corrosion Surveillance Program in 1993

  13. BWR Spent Nuclear Fuel Integrity Research and Development Survey for UKABWR Spent Fuel Interim Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mertyurek, Ugur [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Scaglione, John M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this report is to identify issues and support documentation and identify and detail existing research on spent fuel dry storage; provide information to support potential R&D for the UKABWR (United Kingdom Advanced Boiling Water Reactor) Spent Fuel Interim Storage (SFIS) Pre-Construction Safety Report; and support development of answers to questions developed by the regulator. Where there are gaps or insufficient data, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has summarized the research planned to provide the necessary data along with the schedule for the research, if known. Spent nuclear fuel (SNF) from nuclear power plants has historically been stored on site (wet) in spent fuel pools pending ultimate disposition. Nuclear power users (countries, utilities, vendors) are developing a suite of options and set of supporting analyses that will enable future informed choices about how best to manage these materials. As part of that effort, they are beginning to lay the groundwork for implementing longer-term interim storage of the SNF and the Greater Than Class C (CTCC) waste (dry). Deploying dry storage will require a number of technical issues to be addressed. For the past 4-5 years, ORNL has been supporting the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in identifying these key technical issues, managing the collection of data to be used in issue resolution, and identifying gaps in the needed data. During this effort, ORNL subject matter experts (SMEs) have become expert in understanding what information is publicly available and what gaps in data remain. To ensure the safety of the spent fuel under normal and frequent conditions of wet and subsequent dry storage, intact fuel must be shown to: 1.Maintain fuel cladding integrity; 2.Maintain its geometry for cooling, shielding, and subcriticality; 3.Maintain retrievability, and damaged fuel with pinhole or hairline cracks must be shown not to degrade further. Where PWR (pressurized water reactor) information is

  14. Extended storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    This document is the final report on the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Programme on the Behaviour of Spent Fuel and Storage Facility Components during Long Term Storage (BEFAST-II, 1986-1991). It contains the results on wet and dry spent fuel storage technologies obtained from 16 organizations representing 13 countries who participated in the co-ordinated research programme. Considerable quantities of spent fuel continue to arise and accumulate. Many countries are investigating the option of extended spent fuel storage prior to reprocessing or fuel disposal. Wet storage continues to predominate as an established technology with the construction of additional away-from-reactor storage pools. However, dry storage is increasingly used with most participants considering dry storage concepts for the longer term. Depending on the cladding type options of dry storage in air or inert gas are proposed. Dry storage is becoming widely used as a supplement to wet storage for zirconium alloy clad oxide fuels. Storage periods as long as under wet conditions appear to be feasible. Dry storage will also continue to be used for Al clad and Magnox type fuel. Enhancement of wet storage capacity will remain an important activity. Rod consolidation to increase wet storage capacity will continue in the UK and is being evaluated for LWR fuel in the USA, and may start in some other countries. High density storage racks have been successfully introduced in many existing pools and are planned for future facilities. For extremely long wet storage (≥50 years), there is a need to continue work on fuel integrity investigations and LWR fuel performance modelling. it might be that pool component performance in some cases could be more limiting than the FA storage performance. It is desirable to make concerted efforts in the field of corrosion monitoring and prediction of fuel cladding and poll component behaviour in order to maintain good experience of wet storage. Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Study of the uniform corrosion of an aluminium alloy used for the fuel cladding of the Jules Horowitz experimental reactor; Etude de la corrosion uniforme d'un alliage d'aluminium utilise comme gainage du combustible nucleaire du reacteur experimental Jules Horowitz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintergerst, M. [CEA Saclay, Dept. des Materiaux pour le Nucleaire (DEN/DANS/DMN/SEMI), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material testing reactor, an aluminium base alloy, AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. Taking into account the thermal properties of the alloy and of its oxide, the corrosion of the fuel cans presents many problems. The aim of this thesis is to provide a growing kinetic of the oxide layer at the surface of the AlFeNi fuel can in order to predict the life time of fuel element. Thus the mechanism of degradation of the cladding will be describe in order to integrate the different parameters of the operating reactor. (A.L.B.)

  16. Experiments for evaluation of corrosion to develop storage criteria for interim dry storage of aluminum-alloy clad spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.B.; Sindelar, R.L.; Lam, P.S.; Murphy, T.H.

    1994-01-01

    The technical bases for specification of limits to environmental exposure conditions to avoid excessive degradation are being developed for storage criteria for dry storage of highly-enriched, aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuels owned by the US Department of Energy. Corrosion of the aluminum cladding is a limiting degradation mechanism (occurs at lowest temperature) for aluminum exposed to an environment containing water vapor. Attendant radiation fields of the fuels can lead to production of nitric acid in the presence of air and water vapor and would exacerbate the corrosion of aluminum by lowering the pH of the water solution. Laboratory-scale specimens are being exposed to various conditions inside an autoclave facility to measure the corrosion of the fuel matrix and cladding materials through weight change measurements and metallurgical analysis. In addition, electrochemical corrosion tests are being performed to supplement the autoclave testing by measuring differences in the general corrosion and pitting corrosion behavior of the aluminum cladding alloys and the aluminum-uranium fuel materials in water solutions

  17. Repository emplacement costs for Al-clad high enriched uranium spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonell, W.R.; Parks, P.B.

    1994-01-01

    A range of strategies for treatment and packaging of Al-clad high-enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuels to prevent or delay the onset of criticality in a geologic repository was evaluated in terms of the number of canisters produced and associated repository costs incurred. The results indicated that strategies in which neutron poisons were added to consolidated forms of the U-Al alloy fuel generally produced the lowest number of canisters and associated repository costs. Chemical processing whereby the HEU was removed from the waste form was also a low cost option. The repository costs generally increased for isotopic dilution strategies, because of the substantial depleted uranium added. Chemical dissolution strategies without HEU removal were also penalized because of the inert constituents in the final waste glass form. Avoiding repository criticality by limiting the fissile mass content of each canister incurred the highest repository costs

  18. Study of the aqueous corrosion mechanisms and kinetics of the AlFeNi aluminium based alloy used for the fuel cladding in the Jules Horowitz research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wintergerst, M.

    2009-05-01

    For the Jules Horowitz new material-testing reactor (JHR), an aluminium base alloy, called AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. This alloy (Al - 1% Fe - 1% Ni - 1 % Mg), which is already used as fuel cladding, was developed for its good corrosion resistance in water at high temperatures. However, few studies dealing with the alteration process in water and the relationships with irradiation effects have been performed on this alloy. The conception of the JHR fuel requires a better knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms. Corrosion tests were performed in autoclaves at 70 C, 165 C and 250 C on AlFeNi plates representative of the fuel cladding. Several techniques were used to characterize the corrosion scale: SEM, TEM, EPMA, XRD, Raman spectroscopy. Our observations show that the corrosion scale is made of two main layers: a dense amorphous scale close to the metal and a porous crystalline scale in contact with the water. More than the morphology, the chemical compositions of both layers are different. This duplex structure results from a mixed growth mechanism: an anionic growth to develop the inner oxide and a cationic diffusion followed by a dissolution-precipitation process to form the outer one. Dynamic experiments at 70 C and corrosion kinetics measurements have demonstrated that the oxide growth process is controlled by a diffusion step associated to a dissolution/precipitation process. A corrosion mechanism of the AlFeNi alloy in aqueous media has been proposed. Then post-irradiation exams performed on irradiated fuel plates were used to investigate the effects of the irradiation on the corrosion behaviour in the reactor core. (author)

  19. Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Norway: Status and Prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, Peter; Larsen, Erlend

    2014-01-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) in Norway has arisen from irradiation of fuel in the JEEP I and JEEP II reactors at Kjeller, and in the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR) in Halden. In total there are some 16 tonnes of SNF, all of which is currently stored on-site, in either wet or dry storage facilities. The greater part of the SNF, 12 tonnes, consists of aluminium-clad fuel, of which 10 tonnes is metallic uranium fuel and the remainder oxide (UO 2 ). Such fuel presents significant challenges with respect to long-term storage and disposal. Current policy is that existing spent fuel will, as far as possible considering its suitability for later direct disposal, be stored until final disposal is possible. Several committees have advised the Government of Norway on, among others, policy issues, storage methods and localisation of a storage facility. Both experts and stakeholders have participated in these committees. This paper presents an overview of the spent fuel in Norway and a description of current storage arrangements. The prospects for long-term storage are then described, including a summary of recommendations made to government, the reactions of various stakeholders to these recommendations, the current status, and the proposed next steps. A recommended policy is to construct a new storage facility for the fuel to be stored for a period of at least 50 years. In the meantime a national final disposal facility should be constructed and taken into operation. It has been recommended that the aluminium-clad fuel be reprocessed in an overseas commercial facility to produce a stable waste form for storage and disposal. This recommendation is controversial, and a decision has not yet been taken on whether to pursue this option. An analysis of available storage concepts for the more modern fuel types resulted in the recommendation to use dual-purpose casks. In addition, it was recommended to construct a future storage facility in a rock hall instead of a free

  20. Long term wet spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    The meeting showed that there is continuing confidence in the use of wet storage for spent nuclear fuel and that long-term wet storage of fuel clad in zirconium alloys can be readily achieved. The importance of maintaining good water chemistry has been identified. The long-term wet storage behaviour of sensitized stainless steel clad fuel involves, as yet, some uncertainties. However, great reliance will be placed on long-term wet storage of spent fuel into the future. The following topics were treated to some extent: Oxidation of the external surface of fuel clad, rod consolidation, radiation protection, optimum methods of treating spent fuel storage water, physical radiation effects, and the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies of long-term wet storage conditions. A number of papers on national experience are included

  1. LASER CLADDING ON ALUMINIUM BASE ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Pilloz , M.; Pelletier , J.; Vannes , A.; Bignonnet , A.

    1991-01-01

    laser cladding is often performed on iron or titanium base alloys. In the present work, this method is employed on aluminum alloys ; nickel or silicon are added by powder injection. Addition of silicon leads to sound surface layers, but with moderated properties, while the presence of nickel induces the formation of hard intermetallic compounds and then to an attractive hardening phenomena ; however a recovery treatment has to be carried out, in order to eliminate porosity in the near surface...

  2. Molybdenum solubility in aluminium nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heres, X.; Sans, D.; Bertrand, M.; Eysseric, C. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DRCP, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Brackx, E.; Domenger, R.; Excoffier, E. [CEA, Centre de Marcoule, Nuclear Energy Division, DTEC, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Valery, J.F. [AREVA-NC, DOR/RDP, Paris - La Defense (France)

    2016-07-01

    For over 60 years, research reactors (RR or RTR for research testing reactors) have been used as neutron sources for research, radioisotope production ({sup 99}Mo/{sup 99m}Tc), nuclear medicine, materials characterization, etc... Currently, over 240 of these reactors are in operation in 56 countries. They are simpler than power reactors and operate at lower temperature (cooled to below 100 C. degrees). The fuel assemblies are typically plates or cylinders of uranium alloy and aluminium (U-Al) coated with pure aluminium. These fuels can be processed in AREVA La Hague plant after batch dissolution in concentrated nitric acid and mixing with UOX fuel streams. The aim of this study is to accurately measure the solubility of molybdenum in nitric acid solution containing high concentrations of aluminium. The higher the molybdenum solubility is, the more flexible reprocessing operations are, especially when the spent fuels contain high amounts of molybdenum. To be most representative of the dissolution process, uranium-molybdenum alloy and molybdenum metal powder were dissolved in solutions of aluminium nitrate at the nominal dissolution temperature. The experiments showed complete dissolution of metallic elements after 30 minutes long stirring, even if molybdenum metal was added in excess. After an induction period, a slow precipitation of molybdic acid occurs for about 15 hours. The data obtained show the molybdenum solubility decreases with increasing aluminium concentration. The solubility law follows an exponential relation around 40 g/L of aluminium with a high determination coefficient. Molybdenum solubility is not impacted by the presence of gadolinium, or by an increasing concentration of uranium. (authors)

  3. Reuse of spent fuel cladding Zr by molten salt toward advanced recycle society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Osamu; Kobayashi, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Kazunori; Yasuike, Y.; Sato, Nobuaki

    2003-01-01

    Cladding tubes of zircaloy 95% generated from reprocessing process for spent nuclear fuels are to be chopped in about 3 cm length, compacted and solidified with cements. This paper reports the summary of investigation of the present possible techniques for zirconium recovery: (1) electrolysis of molten salts (Zr-chlorides and/or fluorides) and (2) separation as volatile zirconium chlorides (ZrCl 4 ) (chloride volatility process) followed by reaction with metallic magnesium at 900degC to produce sponged Zr (Kroll method). The feasibility are discussed from the point of view of reduction of secondary radioactive wastes, accumulation of such nuclides as Co-60 and Ni-63 in electrolytic basin, radioactivity estimation in the products, and also problems of cleaning and reducing chemicals. (S. Ohno)

  4. Examination of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel after extended pool storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradley, E.R.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lowry, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results from metallurgical examinations of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods from two bundles (0551 and 0074) of Shippingport PWR Core 1 blanket fuel after extended water storage. Both bundles were exposed to water in the reactor from late 1957 until discharge. The estimated average burnups were 346 GJ/kgU (4000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0551 and 1550 GJ/kgU (18,000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0074. Fuel rods from bundle 0551 were stored in deionized water for nearly 21 yr prior to examination in 1980, representing the world's oldest pool-stored Zircaloy-clad fuel. Bundle 0074 has been stored in deionized water since reactor discharge in 1964. Data from the current metallurgical examinations enable a direct assessment of extended pool storage effects because the metallurgical condition of similar fuel rods was investigated and documented soon after reactor discharge. Data from current and past examinations were compared, and no significant degradation of the Zircaloy cladding was indicated after almost 21 yr in water storage. The cladding dimensions and mechanical properties, fission gas release, hydrogen contents of the cladding, and external oxide film thicknesses that were measured during the current examinations were all within the range of measurements made on fuel bundles soon after reactor discharge. The appearance of the external surfaces and the microstructures of the fuel and cladding were also similar to those reported previously. In addition, no evidence of accelerated corrosion or hydride redistribution in the cladding was observed

  5. Research Progress on Laser Cladding Amorphous Coatings on Metallic Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Ming-hui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure and property of amorphous alloy as well as the limitations of the traditional manufacturing methods for the bulk amorphous alloy were briefly introduced in this paper.Combined with characteristics of the laser cladding technique,the research status of the laser cladding Fe-based,Zr-based,Ni-based,Cu-based and Al-based amorphous coatings on the metal substrates were mainly summarized.The effects of factors such as laser processing parameter,micro-alloying element type and content and reinforcing phase on the laser cladding amorphous coatings were also involved.Finally,the main problems and the future research directions of the composition design and control of the laser-cladded amorphous coating,the design and optimization of the laser cladding process,and the basic theory of the laser cladding amorphous coatings were also put forward finally.

  6. The maximum allowable temperature of zircaloy-2 fuel cladding under dry storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayuzumi, M.; Yoshiki, S.; Yasuda, T.; Nakatsuka, M.

    1990-09-01

    Japan plans to reprocess and reutilise the spent nuclear fuel from nuclear power generation. However, the temporary storage of spent fuel is assuming increasing importance as a means of ensuring flexibility in the nuclear fuel cycle. Our investigations of various methods of storage have shown that casks are the most suitable means of storing small quantities of spent fuel of around 500 t, and research and development are in progress to establish dry storage technology for such casks. The soundness of fuel cladding is being investigated. The most important factor in evaluating soundness in storage under inert gas as currently envisaged is creep deformation and rupture, and a number of investigations have been made of the creep behaviour of cladding. The present study was conducted on the basis of existing in-house results in collaboration with Nippon Kakunenryo Kaihatsu KK (Nippon Nuclear Fuel Department Co.), which has hot lab facilities. Tests were run on the creep deformation behaviour of irradiated cladding, and the maximum allowable temperature during dry storage was investigated. (author)

  7. Pie technique of LWR fuel cladding fracture toughness test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Endo, Shinya; Usami, Koji; Nakata, Masahito; Fukuda, Takuji; Numata, Masami; Kizaki, Minoru; Nishino, Yasuharu

    2006-01-01

    Remote-handling techniques were developed by cooperative research between the Department of Hot Laboratories in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and the Nuclear Fuel Industries Ltd. (NFI) for evaluating the fracture toughness on irradiated LWR fuel cladding. The developed techniques, sample machining by using the electrical discharge machine (EDM), pre-cracking by fatigue tester, sample assembling to the compact tension (CT) shaped test fixture gave a satisfied result for a fracture toughness test developed by NFL. And post-irradiation examination (PIE) using the remote-handling techniques were carried out to evaluate the fracture toughness on BWR spent fuel cladding in the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF). (author)

  8. Development of comprehensive long-term-dry stored Spent Fuel INtegrity EvaLuator [SFINEL] - I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwon, H. M.; Yang, Y. S.; Kim, Y. S.; You, K. S.; Min, D. K.; No, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    Safe management of spent nuclear fuels is socially, technically, and economically very important in terms of environmental protection and utilization of recyclable resources. One of the most critical parts in the management is to establish the comprehensive monitoring system which can maintain and confirm the integrity of the spent fuels, whenever necessary, until final policy is determined on the their treatment and disposal. Especially in the first stage of maturing up the system, it is essential to secure a computing tool or code which can evaluate the integrity of the fuel cladding based on its power history and cladding degradation mechanisms. SFINEL code, an integrated computer program for predicting the spent fuel rod integrity based on burn-up history and major degradation mechanisms, has been developed in this research. This code can sufficiently simulate the power history of a fuel rod during the reactor operation and estimate the degree of deterioration of spent fuel cladding using the recently-developed models on the degradation mechanisms

  9. Preliminary study on detection technology of the cladding weld of spent fuel storage pool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Pan; Cui, Hongyan; Feng, Meiming; Shao, Wenbin; Liao, Shusheng; Li, Wei

    2018-04-01

    As the first barrier of the Spent fuel storage pool, the steel cladding using different sizes (length×width) of 304L stainless steel with 3˜6mm thickness plate argon arc welded together which is direct contacted with boric acid water. Environmental humidity between the back of steel cladding and concrete, makes phosphate, chloride ion overflowed from the concrete that corroded on the weld zone with different mechanism. Part of the corrosion defects can penetrate leaded to leakage of boric acid water in penetration position accelerated crack propagation. In view of the above situation and combined with the actual needs of the power plant, the development of effective underwater nondestructive testing means of the weld area for periodic inspection and monitoring is necessary. A single method may lead to the missing of defects detection due to weld reinforcement unpolished. In this paper, eddy current array (ARRAY) and Alternating Current Field Measurement (ACFM) are adapted to test the limit sensitivity and resolution through by the specimens with artificial defects which make their detection abilities close to satisfy engineering requirements. The preliminary study found that Φ0.5mm through-wall hole and with 2mm length and 0.3mm width through-wall crack in the weld can be good inspected.

  10. Aluminium toxicity tolerance in crop plants: Present status of research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... tolerance of which genes of the Aluminium-activated malate transporter (ALMT) and multidrug and toxic compound extrusion (MATE) families are prominent. In this review, the progress of research in identifying aluminium toxicity tolerant genes is discussed. Keywords: Aluminium toxicity, soil acidity, hydroponic screening, ...

  11. Laser cladding of quasicrystalline alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audebert, F.; Sirkin, H.; Colaco, R.; Vilar, R.

    1998-01-01

    Quasicrystals are a new class of ordinated structures with metastable characteristics room temperature. Quasicrystalline phases can be obtained by rapid quenching from the melt of some alloys. In general, quasicrystals present properties which make these alloys promising for wear and corrosion resistant coatings applications. During the last years, the development of quasicrystalline coatings by means of thermal spray techniques has been impulsed. However, no references have been found of their application by means of laser techniques. In this work four claddings of quasicrystalline compositions formed over aluminium substrate, produced by a continuous CO 2 laser using simultaneous powders mixture injection are presented. The claddings were characterized by X ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Vickers microhardness. (Author) 18 refs

  12. Thermal model of spent fuel transport cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, E.E.M.; Rahman, F.A.; Sultan, G.F.; Khalil, E.E.

    1996-01-01

    The investigation provides a theoretical model to represent the thermal behaviour of the spent fuel elements when transported in a dry shipping cask under normal transport conditions. The heat transfer process in the spent fuel elements and within the cask are modeled which include the radiant heat transfer within the cask and the heat transfer by thermal conduction within the spent fuel element. The model considers the net radiant method for radiant heat transfer process from the inner most heated element to the surrounding spent elements. The heat conduction through fuel interior, fuel-clad interface and on clad surface are also presented. (author) 6 figs., 9 refs

  13. Control of degradation of spent LWR [light-water reactor] fuel during dry storage in an inert atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, M.E.; Simonen, E.P.; Allemann, R.T.; Levy, I.S.; Hazelton, R.F.

    1987-10-01

    Dry storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gas (referred to as inerted dry storage or IDS) is being developed as an alternative to water pool storage of spent fuel. The objectives of the activities described in this report are to identify potential Zircaloy degradation mechanisms and evaluate their applicability to cladding breach during IDS, develop models of the dominant Zircaloy degradation mechanisms, and recommend cladding temperature limits during IDS to control Zircaloy degradation. The principal potential Zircaloy cladding breach mechanisms during IDS have been identified as creep rupture, stress corrosion cracking (SCC), and delayed hydride cracking (DHC). Creep rupture is concluded to be the primary cladding breach mechanism during IDS. Deformation and fracture maps based on creep rupture were developed for Zircaloy. These maps were then used as the basis for developing spent fuel cladding temperature limits that would prevent cladding breach during a 40-year IDS period. The probability of cladding breach for spent fuel stored at the temperature limit is less than 0.5% per spent fuel rod. 52 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  14. Technical basis for storage of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel in inert gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1983-09-01

    The technical bases to establish safe conditions for dry storage of Zircaloy-clad fuel are summarized. Dry storage of fuel with zirconium alloy cladding has been licensed in Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, and Switzerland. Dry storage demonstrations, hot cell tests, and modeling have been conducted using Zircaloy-clad fuel. The demonstrations have included irradiated boiling water reactor, pressurized heavy-water reactor, and pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies. Irradiated fuel has been emplaced in and retrieved from metal casks, dry wells, silos, and a vault. Dry storage tests and demonstrations have involved about 15,000 fuel rods, and about 5600 rods have been monitored during dry storage in inert gases with maximum cladding temperatures ranging from 50 to 570 0 C. Although some tests and demonstrations are still in progress, there is currently no evidence that any rods exposed to inert gases have failed (one PWR rod exposed to an air cover gas failed at about 270 0 C). Based on this favorable experience, it is concluded that there is sufficient information on fuel rod behavior, storage conditions, and potential cladding failure mechanisms to support licensing of dry storage in the US. This licensing position includes a requirement for inert cover gases and a maximum cladding temperature guideline of 380 0 C for Zircaloy-clad fuel. Using an inert cover gas assures that even if fuel with cladding defects were placed in dry storage, or if defects develop during storage, the defects would not propagate. Tests and demonstrations involving Zircaloy-clad rods and assemblies with maximum cladding temperatures above 400 0 C are in progress. When the results from these tests have been evaluated, the viability of higher temperature limits should be examined. Acceptable conditions for storage in air and dry storage of consolidated fuel are issues yet to be resolved

  15. Dry Storage of Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel - 13321

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, T.M.; Dunsmuir, M.D.; Leduc, D.R.; Severynse, T.F.; Sindelar, R.L. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Moore, E.N. [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Spent fuel from domestic and foreign research reactors is received and stored at the Savannah River Site's L Area Material Storage (L Basin) Facility. This DOE-owned fuel consists primarily of highly enriched uranium in metal, oxide or silicide form with aluminum cladding. Upon receipt, the fuel is unloaded and transferred to basin storage awaiting final disposition. Disposition alternatives include processing via the site's H Canyon facility for uranium recovery, or packaging and shipment of the spent fuel to a waste repository. A program has been developed to provide a phased approach for dry storage of the L Basin fuel. The initial phase of the dry storage program will demonstrate loading, drying, and storage of fuel in twelve instrumented canisters to assess fuel performance. After closure, the loaded canisters are transferred to pad-mounted concrete overpacks, similar to those used for dry storage of commercial fuel. Unlike commercial spent fuel, however, the DOE fuel has high enrichment, very low to high burnup, and low decay heat. The aluminum cladding presents unique challenges due to the presence of an oxide layer that forms on the cladding surface, and corrosion degradation resulting from prolonged wet storage. The removal of free and bound water is essential to the prevention of fuel corrosion and radiolytic generation of hydrogen. The demonstration will validate models predicting pressure, temperature, gas generation, and corrosion performance, provide an engineering scale demonstration of fuel handling, drying, leak testing, and canister backfill operations, and establish 'road-ready' storage of fuel that is suitable for offsite repository shipment or retrievable for onsite processing. Implementation of the Phase I demonstration can be completed within three years. Phases II and III, leading to the de-inventory of L Basin, would require an additional 750 canisters and 6-12 years to complete. Transfer of the fuel from basin storage

  16. Sinter aluminium as cladding material for fuel elements; Aluminium fritte comme materiau de gainage pour les elements combustibles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, K E; Boudouresques, M B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Otto Fuchs, Meinerzhagen, Westfalen (Germany)

    1961-07-01

    1. Survey of the production process of sinter aluminium. 2. Description of the forming processes (extrusion, forging and rolling), whereby the production of tubing for atom piles will be explained in detail. 3. Production of ribbed tubes and tubes with close tolerances of sizes. 4. The different SAP-qualities and their properties under special consideration of the properties at elevated temperatures and the creep properties. 5. Diffusion behaviour of SAP with Be, Mg, Al, U and UO{sub 2}. 6. Corrosion behaviour in CO{sub 2} atmosphere at high temperature and in water. 7. Weldability. 8. Effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties. 9. Superiority of SAP compared with normal wrought alloys of the same composition. (author) [French] 1. Apercu des processus de production de l'aluminium fritte. 2. Expose des operations de transformation (filageries, forgeage et laminage), avec explication detaillee de la fabrication de gaine pour reacteurs. 3. Fabrication de tubes canneles et de tubes avec de faibles tolerances. 4. Diverses proprietes de l'aluminium fritte SAP, notamment proprietes aux temperatures elevees et proprietes de fluage. 5. Diffusion de l'aluminium fritte SAP en presence de Be, Mg, Al, U et UO{sub 2}. 6. Resistance a la corrosion dans une atmosphere de CO{sub 2} a temperature elevee et dans l'eau. 7. Possibilites de soudage. 8. Effet de l'irradiation sur les proprietes mecaniques. 9. Superiorite de l'aluminium fritte SAP sur les alliages forges normaux de meme composition. (auteur)

  17. Prediction of cladding life in waste package environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, J.K.; Doering, T.W.

    1994-01-01

    Fuel cladding can potentially provide longer containment or slower release of radionuclides from spent fuel after geologic disposal. To predict the amount of benefit that cladding can provide, we surveyed degradation modes and developed a model for creep rupture by diffusion-controlled cavity growth, the mechanism that several authors have concluded is the most important. In this mechanism, voids nucleate on the grain boundaries and grow by diffusion of vacancies along the grain boundaries to the voids. When a certain fraction of the grain boundary area is covered with voids, the material fails. An analytic expression for cladding lifetime is developed. Besides materials constants, the predicted lifetime depends on the temperature history, the hoop stress in the cladding, the spacing between void nuclei, and the micro-structure. The inclusion of microstructure is a significant new feature of the model; this feature is used to help avoid excessive conservatism. The model is applied in a sample calculation for disposal of spent fuel, and the practice of using temperature limits to evaluate repository designs is examined

  18. Clad Degradation - FEPs Screening Arguments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    E. Siegmann

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to document the screening of the cladding degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF). This report also addresses the effect of some FEPs on both the cladding and the CSNF, DSNF, and HLW waste forms where it was considered appropriate to address the effects on both materials together. This report summarizes the work of others to screen clad degradation FEPs in a manner consistent with, and used in, the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This document was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for Waste Form Degradation Modeling, Testing, and Analyses in Support of LA'' (BSC 2004a [DIRS 167796])

  19. Calculation of axial hydrogen redistribution on the spent fuels during interim dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasahara, Akihiro; Matsumura, Tetsuo

    2006-01-01

    One of the phenomena that will affect fuel integrity during a spent fuel dry storage is a hydrogen axial migration in cladding. If there is a hydrogen pickup in cladding in reactor operation, hydrogen will move from hotter to colder cladding region in the axial direction under fuel temperature gradient during dry storage. Then hydrogen beyond solubility limit in colder region will be precipitated as hydride, and consequently hydride embrittlement may take place in the cladding. In this study, hydrogen redistribution experiments were carried out to obtain the data related to hydrogen axial migration by using actually twenty years dry (air) stored spent PWR-UO 2 fuel rods of which burn-ups were 31 and 58 MWd/kg HM. From the hydrogen redistribution experiments, the heat of transport of hydrogen of zircaloy-4 cladding from twenty years dry stored spent PWR-UO 2 fuel rods were from 10.1 to 18.6 kcal/mol and they were significantly larger than that of unirradiated zircaloy-4 cladding. This means that hydrogen in irradiated cladding can move easier than that in unirradiated cladding. In the hydrogen redistribution experiments, hydrogen diffusion coefficients and solubility limit were also obtained. There are few differences in the diffusion coefficients and solubility limits between the irradiated cladding and unirradiated cladding. The hydrogen redistribution in the cladding after dry storage for forty years was evaluated by one-dimensional diffusion calculation using the measured values. The maximum values as the heat of transports, diffusion coefficients and solubility limits of the irradiated cladding and various spent fuel temperature profiles reported were used in the calculation. The axial hydrogen migration was not significant after dry storage for forty years in helium atmosphere and the maximum values as the heat of transports, diffusion coefficients and solubility limits of the unirradiated cladding gave conservative evaluation for hydrogen redistribution

  20. Creep Analysis of Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel in Repository Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, C.; Lam, P.S.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1998-07-01

    Aluminum-clad, aluminum-based spent nuclear fuels (Al SNF) from foreign and domestic research reactors are being consolidated at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These fuels are planned to be put into dry storage followed by disposal in the federal repository. Temperature conditions in storage and disposal systems due to nuclear decay heat sources will promote creep information of the fuel elements. Excessive deformation of the Al SNF will cause gross distortion (slump) of the fuels and may cause gross cladding rupture

  1. Chemical dissolution of spent fuel and cladding using complexed fluoride species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rance, P.J.W.; Freeman, G.A.; Mishin, V.; Issoupov, V.

    2001-01-01

    The dissolution of LWR fuel cladding using two fluoride ion donors, HBF 4 and K 2 ZrF 6 , in combination with nitric acid has been investigated as a potential reprocessing head-end process suitable for chemical decladding and fuel dissolution in a single process step. Maximum zirconium concentrations in the order of 0,75 to 1 molar have been achieved and dissolution found to continue to low F:Zr ratios albeit at ever decreasing rates. Dissolution rates of un-oxidised zirconium based fuel claddings are fast, whereas oxidised materials exhibit an induction period prior to dissolution. Data is presented relating to the rates of dissolution of cladding and UO 2 fuels under various conditions. (author)

  2. In-pile test results of HANA claddings in Halden research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jong Hyuk; Choi, Byoung Kwon; Jeong, Yong Hwan; Jung, Yun Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    It is a kind of facing tasks in the nuclear industry to develop advanced claddings for high burn-up fuel which is safer and more economical than the existing conventional ones. Since 1997, taking an initiative in KAERI, the Zr cladding development team has carried out the R and D activities for the development of the advanced claddings to be used in the high burn-up fuel (>70,000 MWD.MTU). The team had produced the advanced claddings (HANA, High-performance Alloy for Nuclear Application) from the patented composition and manufacturing process in the international collaboration with U.S. and Japan. Now, the HANA claddings have being demonstrated their good performances from the out-of-pile tests including the corrosion, creep, burst, tensile, microstructures LOCA, RIA, wear, and so on. In parallel to the out-of-pile performance tests, the HANA claddings are being undertaken to evaluate their in-pile properties in Halden research reactor. In this study, it is included the test overviews, conditions, and results of the HANA claddings in the Halden reactor.

  3. CLAD DEGRADATION - FEPS SCREENING ARGUMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R. Schreiner

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to evaluate and document the screening of the clad degradation features, events, and processes (FEPs) with respect to modeling used to support the Total System Performance Assessment-License Application (TSPA-LA). This report also addresses the effect of certain FEPs on both the cladding and the commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF), DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (DSNF), and defense high-level waste (DHLW) waste forms, as appropriate to address the effects on multiple materials and both components (FEPs 2.1.09.09.0A, 2.1.09.11.0A, 2.1.11.05.0A, 2.1.12.02.0A, and 2.1.12.03.0A). These FEPs are expected to affect the repository performance during the postclosure regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. Table 1-1 provides the list of cladding FEPs, including their screening decisions (include or exclude). The primary purpose of this report is to identify and document the analysis, screening decision, and TSPA-LA disposition (for included FEPs) or screening argument (for excluded FEPs) for these FEPs related to clad degradation. In some cases, where a FEP covers multiple technical areas and is shared with other FEP reports, this report may provide only a partial technical basis for the screening of the FEP. The full technical basis for shared FEPs is addressed collectively by the sharing FEP reports. The screening decisions and associated TSPA-LA dispositions or screening arguments from all of the FEP reports are cataloged in a project-specific FEPs database

  4. Long-term storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempe, T.F.; Martin, A.; Thorne, M.C.

    1980-06-01

    This report presents the results of a study on the storage of spent nuclear fuel, with particular reference to the options which would be available for long-term storage. Two reference programmes of nuclear power generation in the UK are defined and these are used as a basis for the projection of arisings of spent fuel and the storage capacity which might be needed. The characteristics of spent fuel which are relevant to long-term storage include the dimensions, materials and physical construction of the elements, their radioactive inventory and the associated decay heating as a function of time after removal from the reactor. Information on the behaviour of spent fuel in storage ponds is reviewed with particular reference to the corrosion of the cladding. The review indicates that, for long-term storage, both Magnox and AGR fuel would need to be packaged because of the high rate of cladding corrosion and the resulting radiological problems. The position on PWR fuel is less certain. Experience of dry storage is less extensive but it appears that the rate of corrosion of cladding is much lower than in water. Unit costs are discussed. Consideration is given to the radiological impact of fuel storage. (author)

  5. Manufacture of thin-walled clad tubes by pressure welding of roll bonded sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Hans Christian; Grydin, Olexandr; Stolbchenko, Mykhailo; Homberg, Werner; Schaper, Mirko

    2017-10-01

    Clad tubes are commonly manufactured by fusion welding of roll bonded metal sheets or, mechanically, by hydroforming. In this work, a new approach towards the manufacture of thin-walled tubes with an outer diameter to wall thickness ratio of about 12 is investigated, involving the pressure welding of hot roll bonded aluminium-steel strips. By preparing non-welded edges during the roll bonding process, the strips can be zip-folded and (cold) pressure welded together. This process routine could be used to manufacture clad tubes in a continuous process. In order to investigate the process, sample tube sections with a wall thickness of 2.1 mm were manufactured by U-and O-bending from hot roll bonded aluminium-stainless steel strips. The forming and welding were carried out in a temperature range between RT and 400°C. It was found that, with the given geometry, a pressure weld is established at temperatures starting above 100°C. The tensile tests yield a maximum bond strength at 340°C. Micrograph images show a consistent weld of the aluminium layer over the whole tube section.

  6. Tailored Aluminium based Coatings for Optical Appearance and Corrosion Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerbeck, Martin

    potential differences in the microstructure, and protection from the network of the Al3Ti phases precipitated during the heat treatment. Laser surface cladding of aluminium containing up to 20 wt. % Ti6Al4V were studied focusing on the microstructure and the alkaline corrosion properties. Due......The current project investigated the possibility of designing aluminium based coatings focusing on the effect of composition and surface finish on the optical appearance and on the alkaline corrosion properties using titanium as the main alloying element. The main results and discussions...... that the roughness after etching increases with higher amounts of alloying elements (especially iron and silicon). Proper polishing requires some alloy hardness, while alloy purity is required for a glossy appearance after anodisation. Magnetron sputtered aluminium based coatings containing up to 18 wt. % titanium...

  7. CREEP STRAIN CORRELATION FOR IRRADIATED CLADDING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    P. Macheret

    2001-01-01

    In an attempt to predict the creep deformation of spent nuclear fuel cladding under the repository conditions, different correlations have been developed. One of them, which will be referred to as Murty's correlation in the following, and whose expression is given in Henningson (1998), was developed on the basis of experimental points related to unirradiated Zircaloy cladding (Henningson 1998, p. 56). The objective of this calculation is to adapt Murty's correlation to experimental points pertaining to irradiated Zircaloy cladding. The scope of the calculation is provided by the range of experimental parameters characterized by Zircaloy cladding temperature between 292 C and 420 C, hoop stress between 50 and 630 MPa, and test time extending to 8000 h. As for the burnup of the experimental samples, it ranges between 0.478 and 64 MWd/kgU (i.e., megawatt day per kilogram of uranium), but this is not a parameter of the adapted correlation

  8. Zircaloy cladding degradation under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanam, L.; Raghavan, S.; Chin, B.A.

    1990-12-01

    Creep, a potential degradation mechanism of Zircaloy cladding after repository disposal of spent nuclear fuel, has been investigated. The deformation and fracture map methodology has been used to predict maximum allowable initial storage temperatures to achieve a thousand year life without rupture as a function of spent-fuel history. Maximum allowable temperatures are 340 degree C (613 K) for typically stressed rods (70--100 MPa) and 300 degree C (573 K) for highly stressed rods (140--160 MPa). 10 refs., 2 figs

  9. Crack resistance curves determination of tube cladding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, J. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)]. E-mail: johannes.bertsch@psi.ch; Hoffelner, W. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2006-06-30

    Zirconium based alloys have been in use as fuel cladding material in light water reactors since many years. As claddings change their mechanical properties during service, it is essential for the assessment of mechanical integrity to provide parameters for potential rupture behaviour. Usually, fracture mechanics parameters like the fracture toughness K {sub IC} or, for high plastic strains, the J-integral based elastic-plastic fracture toughness J {sub IC} are employed. In claddings with a very small wall thickness the determination of toughness needs the extension of the J-concept beyond limits of standards. In the paper a new method based on the traditional J approach is presented. Crack resistance curves (J-R curves) were created for unirradiated thin walled Zircaloy-4 and aluminium cladding tube pieces at room temperature using the single sample method. The procedure of creating sharp fatigue starter cracks with respect to optical recording was optimized. It is shown that the chosen test method is appropriate for the determination of complete J-R curves including the values J {sub 0.2} (J at 0.2 mm crack length), J {sub m} (J corresponding to the maximum load) and the slope of the curve.

  10. Structural cladding /clad structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beim, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure in the pr......Structural Cladding /Clad Structures: Studies in Tectonic Building Practice A. Beim CINARK – Centre for Industrialized Architecture, Institute of Architectural Technology, The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts School of Architecture, Copenhagen, Denmark ABSTRACT: With point of departure...... to analyze, compare, and discuss how these various construction solutions point out strategies for development based on fundamentally different mindsets. The research questions address the following issues: How to learn from traditional construction principles: When do we see limitations of tectonic maneuver......, to ask for more restrictive building codes. As an example, in Denmark there are series of increasing demands in the current building legislations that are focused at enhancing the energy performance of buildings, which consequently foster rigid insulation standards and ask for improvement of air...

  11. Development of code SFINEL (Spent fuel integrity evaluator)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Soo; Min, Chin Young; Ohk, Young Kil; Yang, Yong Sik; Kim, Dong Ju; Kim, Nam Ku [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-01-01

    SFINEL code, an integrated computer program for predicting the spent fuel rod integrity based on burn-up history and major degradation mechanisms, has been developed through this project. This code can sufficiently simulate the power history of a fuel rod during the reactor operation and estimate the degree of deterioration of spent fuel cladding using the recently-developed models on the degradation mechanisms. SFINEL code has been thoroughly benchmarked against the collected in-pile data and operating experiences: deformation and rupture, and cladding oxidation, rod internal pressure creep, then comprehensive whole degradation process. (author). 75 refs., 51 figs., 5 tabs.

  12. Scientific basis for storage criteria for interim dry storage of aluminum-clad fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, R.L.; Peacock, H.B. Jr.; Lam, P.S.; Iyer, N.C.; Louthan, M.R. Jr.; Murphy, J.R.

    1996-01-01

    An engineered system for dry storage of aluminum-clad foreign and domestic research reactor spent fuel owned by the US Department of Energy is being considered to store the fuel up to a nominal period of 40 years prior to ultimate disposition. Scientifically-based criteria for environmental limits to drying and storing the fuels for this system are being developed to avoid excessive degradation in sealed and non-sealed (open to air) dry storage systems. These limits are based on consideration of degradation modes that can cause loss of net section of the cladding, embrittlement of the cladding, distortion of the fuel, or release of fuel and fission products from the fuel/clad system. Potential degradation mechanisms include corrosion mechanisms from exposure to air and/or sources of humidity, hydrogen blistering of the aluminum cladding, distortion of the fuel due to creep, and interdiffusion of the fuel and fission products with the cladding. The aluminum-clad research reactor fuels are predominantly highly-enriched aluminum uranium alloy fuel which is clad with aluminum alloys similar to 1100, 5052, and 6061 aluminum. In the absence of corrodant species, degradation due to creep and diffusion mechanisms limit the maximum fuel storage temperature to 200 C. The results of laboratory scale corrosion tests indicate that this fuel could be stored under air up to 200 C at low relative humidity levels (< 20%) to limit corrosion of the cladding and fuel (exposed to the storage environment through assumed pre-existing pits in the cladding). Excessive degradation of fuels with uranium metal up to 200 C can be avoided if the fuel is sufficiently dried and contained in a sealed system; open storage can be achieved if the temperature is controlled to avoid excessive corrosion even in dry air

  13. The ballooning of fuel cladding tubes: theory and experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewfelt, R.S.W.

    1988-01-01

    Under some conditions, fuel clad ballooning can result in considerable strain before rupture. If ballooning were to occur during a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA), the resulting substantial blockage of the sub-channel would restrict emergency core cooling. However, circumferential temperature gradients that would occur during a LOCA may significantly limit the average strain at failure. Understandably, the factors that control ballooning and rupture of fuel clad are required for the analysis of a LOCA. Considerable international effort has been spent on studying the deformation of Zircaloy fuel cladding under conditions that would occur during a LOCA. This effort has established a reasonable understanding of the factors that control the ballooning, failure time, and average failure strain of fuel cladding. In this paper, both the experimental and theoretical studies of the fuel clad ballooning are reviewed. (author)

  14. Savannah River Site Spent Nuclear Fuel Management Final Environmental Impact Statement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N/A

    2000-04-14

    The proposed DOE action considered in this environmental impact statement (EIS) is to implement appropriate processes for the safe and efficient management of spent nuclear fuel and targets at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken County, South Carolina, including placing these materials in forms suitable for ultimate disposition. Options to treat, package, and store this material are discussed. The material included in this EIS consists of approximately 68 metric tons heavy metal (MTHM) of spent nuclear fuel 20 MTHM of aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel at SRS, as much as 28 MTHM of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel from foreign and domestic research reactors to be shipped to SRS through 2035, and 20 MTHM of stainless-steel or zirconium-clad spent nuclear fuel and some Americium/Curium Targets stored at SRS. Alternatives considered in this EIS encompass a range of new packaging, new processing, and conventional processing technologies, as well as the No Action Alternative. A preferred alternative is identified in which DOE would prepare about 97% by volume (about 60% by mass) of the aluminum-based fuel for disposition using a melt and dilute treatment process. The remaining 3% by volume (about 40% by mass) would be managed using chemical separation. Impacts are assessed primarily in the areas of water resources, air resources, public and worker health, waste management, socioeconomic, and cumulative impacts.

  15. Initial Cladding Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegmann, E.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis is to describe the condition of commercial Zircaloy clad fuel as it is received at the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) site. Most commercial nuclear fuel is encased in Zircaloy cladding. This analysis is developed to describe cladding degradation from the expected failure modes. This includes reactor operation impacts including incipient failures, potential degradation after reactor operation during spent fuel storage in pool and dry storage and impacts due to transportation. Degradation modes include cladding creep, and delayed hydride cracking during dry storage and transportation. Mechanical stresses from fuel handling and transportation vibrations are also included. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) does not address any potential damage to assemblies that might occur at the YMP surface facilities. Ranges and uncertainties have been defined. This analysis will be the initial boundary condition for the analysis of cladding degradation inside the repository. In accordance with AP-2.13Q, ''Technical Product Development Planning'', a work plan (CRWMS M andO 2000c) was developed, issued, and utilized in the preparation of this document. There are constraints, caveats and limitations to this analysis. This cladding degradation analysis is based on commercial Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel with Zircaloy cladding but is applicable to Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) fuel. Reactor operating experience for both PWRs and BWRs is used to establish fuel reliability from reactor operation. It is limited to fuel exposed to normal operation and anticipated operational occurrences (i.e. events which are anticipated to occur within a reactor lifetime), and not to fuel that has been exposed to severe accidents. Fuel burnup projections have been limited to the current commercial reactor licensing environment with restrictions on fuel enrichment, oxide coating thickness and rod plenum pressures. The information provided in this analysis will be used in

  16. Management of cladding hulls and fuel hardware

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The reprocessing of spent fuel from power reactors based on chop-leach technology produces a solid waste product of cladding hulls and other metallic residues. This report describes the current situation in the management of fuel cladding hulls and hardware. Information is presented on the material composition of such waste together with the heating effects due to neutron-induced activation products and fuel contamination. As no country has established a final disposal route and the corresponding repository, this report also discusses possible disposal routes and various disposal options under consideration at present

  17. Study of corrosion of aluminium alloys of nuclear purity in ordinary water, пart one

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Milan P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of corrosion of aluminum alloys of nuclear purity in ordinary water of the spent fuel storage pool of the RA research reactor at VINČA Institute of Nuclear Sciences has been examined in the frame work of the International Atomic Energy Agency Coordinated Research Project "Corrosion of Research Reactor Aluminum-Clad Spent Fuel in Water" since 2002. The study presented in this paper comprises activities on determination and monitoring of chemical parameters and radio activity of water and sludge in the RA spent fuel storage pool and results of the initial study of corrosion effects obtained by visual examinations of surfaces of various coupons made of aluminum alloys of nuclear purity of the test racks exposed to the pool water for a period from six months to six years.

  18. Fuel-to-cladding heat transfer coefficient into reactor fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lassmann, K.

    1979-01-01

    Models describing the fuel-to-cladding heat transfer coefficient in a reactor fuel element are reviewed critically. A new model is developed with contributions from solid, fluid and radiation heat transfer components. It provides a consistent description of the transition from an open gap to the contact case. Model parameters are easily available and highly independent of different combinations of material surfaces. There are no restrictions for fast transients. The model parameters are fitted to 388 data points under reactor conditions. For model verification another 274 data points of steel-steel and aluminium-aluminium interfaces, respectively, were used. The fluid component takes into account peak-to-peak surface roughnesses and, approximatively, also the wavelengths of surface roughnesses. For minor surface roughnesses normally prevailing in reactor fuel elements the model asymptotically yields Ross' and Stoute's model for the open gap, which is thus confirmed. Experimental contact data can be interpreted in very different ways. The new model differs greatly from Ross' and Stoute's contact term and results in better correlation coefficients. The numerical algorithm provides an adequate representation for calculating the fuel-to-cladding heat transfer coefficient in large fuel element structural analysis computer systems. (orig.) [de

  19. Research on Microstructure and Property of TiC-Co Composite Material Made by Laser Cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei

    The experiment of laser cladding on the surface of 2Cr13 steel was made. Titanium carbide (TiC) powder and Co-base alloy powder were used as cladding material. The microstructure and property of laser cladding layer were tested. The research showed that laser cladding layer had better properties such as minute crystals, deeper layer, higher hardness and good metallurgical bonding with base metal. The structure of cladding was supersaturated solid solution with dispersed titanium carbide. The average hardness of cladding zone was 660HV0.2. 2Cr13 steel was widely used in the field of turbine blades. Using laser cladding, the good wear layer would greatly increase the useful life of turbine blades.

  20. Sinter aluminium as cladding material for fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, K.E.; Boudouresques, M.B.

    1961-01-01

    1. Survey of the production process of sinter aluminium. 2. Description of the forming processes (extrusion, forging and rolling), whereby the production of tubing for atom piles will be explained in detail. 3. Production of ribbed tubes and tubes with close tolerances of sizes. 4. The different SAP-qualities and their properties under special consideration of the properties at elevated temperatures and the creep properties. 5. Diffusion behaviour of SAP with Be, Mg, Al, U and UO 2 . 6. Corrosion behaviour in CO 2 atmosphere at high temperature and in water. 7. Weldability. 8. Effect of irradiation on the mechanical properties. 9. Superiority of SAP compared with normal wrought alloys of the same composition. (author) [fr

  1. Prevention of nuclear fuel cladding materials corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, K.R.; Yang, J.C.; Lee, I.C.; Kang, H.D.; Cho, S.W.; Whang, C.K.

    1983-01-01

    The only way which could be performed by the operator of nuclear power plant to minimizing the degradation of nuclear fuel cladding material is to control the water quality of primary coolant as specified standard conditions which dose not attack the cladding material. If the water quality of reactor coolant does not meet far from the specification, the failure will occure not only cladding material itself but construction material of primary system which contact with the coolant. The corrosion product of system material are circulate through the whole primary system with the coolant and activated by the neutron near the reactor core. The activated corrosion products and fission products which released from fuel rod to the coolant, so called crud, will repeate deposition and redeposition continuously on the fuel rod and construction material surface. As a result we should consider heat transfer problem. In this study following activities were performed; 1. The crud sample was taken from the spent fuel rod surface of Kori unit one and analized for radioactive element and non radioactive chemical species. 2. The failure mode of nuclear fuel cladding material was estimated by the investigation of releasing type of fission products from the fuel rod to the reactor coolant using the iodine isotopes concentration of reactor coolants. 3. A study was carried out on the sipping test results of spent fuel and a discussion was made on the water quality control records through the past three cycle operation period of Kori unit one plant. (Author)

  2. The Canadian research reactor spent fuel situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ernst, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the present research reactor spent fuel situation in Canada. The research reactors currently operating are listed along with the types of fuel that they utilize. Other shut down research reactors contributing to the storage volume are included for completeness. The spent fuel storage facilities associated with these reactors and the methods used to determine criticality safety are described. Finally the current inventory of spent fuel and where it is stored is presented along with concerns for future storage. (author). 3 figs

  3. Zr-rich layers electrodeposited onto stainless steel cladding during the electrorefining of EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Mariani, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory is developing an electrometallurgical treatment for spent nuclear fuels. The initial demonstration of this process is being conducted on U-Zr alloy fuel elements irradiated in the experimental breeder reactor II (EBR-II). We report the first metallographic characterization of cladding hull remains for the electrometallurgical treatment of spent metallic fuel. During the electrorefining process, Zr-rich layers, with some U, deposit on all exposed surfaces of irradiated cladding segments (hulls) that originally contained the fuel alloy that was being treated. In some cases, not only was residual Zr (and U) found inside the cladding hulls, but a Zr-rind was also observed near the interior cladding hull surface. The Zr-rind was originally formed during the fuel casting process on the fuel slug. The observation of Zr deposits on all exposed cladding surfaces is explained with thermodynamic principles, when two conditions are met. These conditions are partial oxidation of Zr and the presence of residual uranium in the hulls when the electrorefining experiment is terminated. Comparisons are made between the structure of the initial irradiated fuel before electrorefining and the morphology of the material remaining in the cladding hulls after electrorefining. (orig.)

  4. Status of research reactor spent fuel world-wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.

    2004-01-01

    Results compiled in the research reactor spent fuel database are used to assess the status of research reactor spent fuel world-wide. Fuel assemblies, their types, enrichment, origin of enrichment and geological distribution among the industrialised and developed countries of the world are discussed. Fuel management practices in wet and dry storage facilities and the concerns of reactor operators about long-term storage of their spent fuel are presented and some of the activities carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency to address the issues associated with research reactor spent fuel are outlined. (author)

  5. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, K.

    2000-01-01

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation

  6. Microstructure Changes in a high burn up Spent Fuel (57,900 MWd/tU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Yang Soon; Kwon, Hyoung Mun; Seo, Hang Seok; Ha, Yeong Keong; Song, Kyuseok

    2009-01-01

    In the nuclear industry, an increase in the burn up and the residence time of fuels is being considered because of the advantages in the fuel cycle cost and the spent fuel management. But, it leads to structural changes in an outer zone (rim) of a UO 2 pellet within a few hundreds of micrometers in thickness. Despite its thin layer, this rim would determine the thermal behavior of a fuel. Therefore, to identify a rim zone effect, the microstructures such as the pores, the grains and the UO 2 lattice size have been investigated by many researchers. In this study, the microstructure changes in the rim of a UO 2 spent fuel, the corrosion layer of a Zry-4 cladding and the interface between a fuel and a cladding were investigated by a micro-XRD and a SEM

  7. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material: ATM-106

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1988-10-01

    The characterization data obtained to date are described for Approved Testing Material (ATM)-106 spent fuel from Assembly BT03 of pressurized-water reactor Calvert Cliffs No. 1. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well- characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCWRM) program. ATM-106 consists of 20 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 3700 GJ/kgM (43 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of /approximately/10%. Characterization data include (1) as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (6) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel rod are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report. 12 refs., 110 figs., 81 tabs

  8. Mobile Melt-Dilute Treatment for Russian Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peacock, H.

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of spent Russian fuel using a Melt-Dilute (MD) process is proposed to consolidate fuel assemblies into a form that is proliferation resistant and provides critically safety under storage and disposal configurations. Russian fuel elements contain a variety of fuel meat and cladding materials. The Melt-Dilute treatment process was initially developed for aluminum-based fuels so additional development is needed for several cladding and fuel meat combinations in the Russian fuel inventory (e.g. zirconium-clad, uranium-zirconium alloy fuel). A Mobile Melt-Dilute facility (MMD) is being proposed for treatment of spent fuels at reactor site storage locations in Russia; thereby, avoiding the costs of building separate treatment facilities at each site and avoiding shipment of enriched fuel assemblies over the road. The MMD facility concept is based on laboratory tests conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), and modular pilot-scale facilities constructed at the Savannah River Site for treatment of US spent fuel. SRTC laboratory tests have shown the feasibility of operating a Melt-Dilute treatment process with either a closed system or a filtered off-gas system. The proposed Mobile Melt-Dilute process is presented in this paper

  9. Radionuclide distribution in LWR [light-water reactor] spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Baldwin, D.L.; Mendel, J.E.

    1990-09-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) provides well-characterized spent fuel from light-water reactors (LWRs) for use in laboratory tests relevant to nuclear waste disposal in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. Interpretation of results from tests on spent fuel oxidation, dissolution, and cladding degradation requires information on the inventory and distribution of radionuclides in the initial test materials. The MCC is obtaining this information from examinations of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs), which include spent fuel with burnups from 17 to 50 MWd/kgM and fission gas releases (FGR) from 0.2 to 18%. The concentration and distribution of activation products and the release of volatile fission products to the pellet-cladding gap and rod plenum are of particular interest because these characteristics are not well understood. This paper summarizes results that help define the 14 C inventory and distribution in cladding, the ''gap and grain boundary'' inventory of radionuclides in fuels with different FGRs, and the structure and radionuclide inventory of the fuel rim region within a few hundred micrometers from the fuel edge. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  10. Method for pre-processing LWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Katsuyuki; Ebihara, Hikoe.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the decladding of spent fuel, cladding tube processing, and waste gas recovery, and to enable the efficient execution of main re-processing process thereafter. Constitution: Spent fuel assemblies are sent to a cutting process where they are cut into chips of easy-to-process size. The chips, in a thermal decladding process, undergo a thermal cycle processing in air with the processing temperatures increased and decreased within the range of from 700 deg C to 1200 deg C, oxidizing zircaloy comprising the cladding tubes into zirconia. The oxidized cladding tubes have a number of fine cracks and become very brittle and easy to loosen off from fuel pellets when even a slight mechanical force is applied thereto, thus changing into a form of powder. Processed products are then separated into zirconia sand and fuel pellets by a gravitational selection method or by a sifting method, the zirconia sand being sent to a waste processing process and the fuel pellets to a melting-refining process. (Yoshino, Y.)

  11. Annex 7 - Task 08/32 final report, Diffusion bond between the fuel and cladding of the RA reactor fuel element; Prilog 7 - Zavrsni izvestaj o podzadatku 08/32, Difuziona veza goriva i kosuljice gorivnog elementa reaktora RA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustudic, D [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1961-12-15

    Based on testing the diffusin bond between the fuel and the aluminium cladding of the RA reactor fuel element it was found that the diffusion bond exists; uranium is protected by a nickel layer to prevent the damaging diffusion between uranium and aluminium; the nickel layer is about 5 microns thick. Under assumption that the diffusion annealing was done after cladding the annealing temperature was about 500 deg C for about 1 hour.

  12. Non-destructive evaluation of the cladding thickness in LEU fuel plates by accurate ultrasonic scanning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borring, J.; Gundtoft, H.E.; Borum, K.K.; Toft, P. [Riso National Lab. (Denmark)

    1997-08-01

    In an effort to improve their ultrasonic scanning technique for accurate determination of the cladding thickness in LEU fuel plates, new equipment and modifications to the existing hardware and software have been tested and evaluated. The authors are now able to measure an aluminium thickness down to 0.25 mm instead of the previous 0.35 mm. Furthermore, they have shown how the measuring sensitivity can be improved from 0.03 mm to 0.01 mm. It has now become possible to check their standard fuel plates for DR3 against the minimum cladding thickness requirements non-destructively. Such measurements open the possibility for the acceptance of a thinner nominal cladding than normally used today.

  13. Non-destructive evaluation of the cladding thickness in LEU fuel plates by accurate ultrasonic scanning technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borring, J.; Gundtoft, H.E.; Borum, K.K.; Toft, P.

    1997-01-01

    In an effort to improve their ultrasonic scanning technique for accurate determination of the cladding thickness in LEU fuel plates, new equipment and modifications to the existing hardware and software have been tested and evaluated. The authors are now able to measure an aluminium thickness down to 0.25 mm instead of the previous 0.35 mm. Furthermore, they have shown how the measuring sensitivity can be improved from 0.03 mm to 0.01 mm. It has now become possible to check their standard fuel plates for DR3 against the minimum cladding thickness requirements non-destructively. Such measurements open the possibility for the acceptance of a thinner nominal cladding than normally used today

  14. Estimation of penetration depth of fission products in cladding Hull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hee Moon; Jung, Yang Hong; Yoo, Byong Ok; Choo, Yong Sun; Hong, Kwon Pyo

    2005-01-01

    A disposal and a reprocessing for spent fuel rod with high burnup need de-cladding procedure. Pellet in this rod has been separated from a cladding hull to reduce a radioactivity of hull by chemical and mechanical methods. But fission products and actinides(U,Pu) still remain inside of cladding hull by chemical bonding and fission spike, which is called as 'contamination'. More specific removal of this contamination would have been considered. In this study, the sorts of fission products and penetration depth in hull were observed by EPMA test. To analyze this behavior, SRIM 2000 code was also used as energies of fission products and an oxide thickness of hull

  15. Spent fuel's behavior under dynamic drip tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Buck, E.C.; Hoh, J.C.; Bates, J.K.

    1995-01-01

    In the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, failure of the waste package container and the cladding of the spent nuclear fuel would expose the fuel to water under oxidizing conditions. To simulate the release behavior of radionuclides from spent fuel, dynamic drip and vapor tests with spent nuclear fuel have been ongoing for 2.5 years. Rapid alteration of the spent fuel has been noted with concurrent release of radionuclides. Colloidal species containing americium and plutonium have been found in the leachate. This observation suggests that colloidal transport of radionuclides should be included in the performance assessment of a potential repository

  16. An experimental study of aluminium electrowinning using a nickel-based hydrogen diffusion anode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Namboothiri, Sankar; Taylor, Mark P.; Chen, John J.J.; Hyland, Margaret M.; Cooksey, Mark A.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Measurable depolarisation of the anode potential and formation of water vapour. → Metallic aluminium was found on the spent cathode. → HF emissions can be minimised by conducting the electrolysis at 750 o C. → The nickel based anode surface corroded during electrolysis. → Its application is constrained by the material limitation of the porous anode. - Abstract: Laboratory scale electrolysis experiments were conducted to investigate the electrowinning of aluminium using hydrogen diffusion anodes. A potassium-based electrolyte (KF-AlF 3 -Al 2 O 3 ), porous nickel alloy anode and molybdenum disk cathode were used in experiments at 750 o C. Hydrogen gas was supplied to the anode/electrolyte interface through the porous anode. Experiments were conducted in potentiostatic, galvanostatic and galvanodynamic modes. There was a measurable depolarisation of the anode potential and also anode reaction of hydrogen and oxygen ions in the bath to form water vapour was confirmed by the water vapour condensate found at the electrolysis exit gas pipe. Metallic aluminium was found on the spent cathode. The experiments conducted in the galvanodynamic mode suggested that the rate limiter for hydrogen oxidation was the availability of surface hydrogen at the anode/electrolyte interface. The anode surface corroded during electrolysis and impurities were found both in the molten bath and on the cathode.

  17. Management and inspection of integrity of spent fuel from IRT MEPhI research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aden, V.G.; Bulkin, S.Y.; Sokolov, A.V.; Bushuev, A.V.; Redkin, A.F.; Portnov, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    The information on wet storage and dry storage of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of the IRT MEPhI reactor and experience from SNF shipment for reprocessing are presented. The procedure and a facility for nondestructive inspection of local power density fields and the burnup of fuel assemblies based on studying the γ-activity of some fission products generated in U 235 and procedure for inspection of the fuel element cladding leak tightness are described. (author)

  18. Effects of an oxidizing atmosphere in a spent fuel packaging facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.

    1991-09-01

    Sufficient oxidation of spent fuel can cause a cladding breach to propagate, resulting in dispersion of fuel particulates and gaseous radionuclides. The literature for spent fuel oxidation in storage and disposal programs was reviewed to evaluate the effect of an oxidizing atmosphere in a preclosure packaging facility on (1) physical condition of the fuel and (2) operations in the facility. Effects such as cladding breach propagation, cladding oxidation, rod dilation, fuel dispersal, 14 C and 85 Kr release, and crud release were evaluated. The impact of these effects, due to oxidation, upon a spent fuel handling facility is generally predicted to be less than the impact of similar effects due to fuel rod breached during handling in an inert-atmosphere facility. Preliminary temperature limits of 240 degree C and 227 degree C for a 2-week or 4-week handling period and 175 degree C for 2-year lag storage would prevent breach propagation and fuel dispersal. Additional data that are needed to support the assumptions in this analysis or complete the database were identified

  19. Modeling of Zircaloy cladding degradation under repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santanam, L.; Raghavan, S.; Chin, B.A.

    1989-07-01

    Two potential degradation mechanisms, creep and stress corrosion cracking, of Zircaloy cladding during repository storage of spent nuclear fuel have been investigated. The deformation and fracture map methodology has been used to predict maximum allowable initial storage temperatures to achieve a thousand year life without rupture as a function of spent-fuel history. A stress analysis of fuel rods has been performed. Stresses in the outer zirconium oxide layer and the inner Zircaloy tube have been predicted for typical internal pressurization, oxide layer thickness, volume expansion from formation of the oxide layer and thermal expansion coefficients of the cladding and oxide. Stress relaxation occurring in-reactor has also been taken into account. The calculations indicate that for the anticipated storage conditions investigated, the outer zirconium oxide layer is in a state of compression thus making it unlikely that stress corrosion cracking of the exterior surface will occur. 20 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs

  20. Research reactor spent fuel in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimenko, A.P.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the research reactors in Ukraine, their spent fuel facilities and spent fuel management problems. Nuclear sciences, technology and industry are highly developed in Ukraine. There are 5 NPPs in the country with 14 operating reactors which have total power capacity of 12,800 MW

  1. Study of the aqueous corrosion mechanisms and kinetics of the AlFeNi aluminium based alloy used for the fuel cladding in the Jules Horowitz research reactor; Etude des mecanismes et des cinetiques de corrosion aqueuse de l'alliage d'aluminium AlFeNi utilise comme gainage du combustible nucleaire de reacteurs experimentaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wintergerst, M.

    2009-05-15

    For the Jules Horowitz new material-testing reactor (JHR), an aluminium base alloy, called AlFeNi, will be used for the cladding of the fuel plates. This alloy (Al - 1% Fe - 1% Ni - 1 % Mg), which is already used as fuel cladding, was developed for its good corrosion resistance in water at high temperatures. However, few studies dealing with the alteration process in water and the relationships with irradiation effects have been performed on this alloy. The conception of the JHR fuel requires a better knowledge of the corrosion mechanisms. Corrosion tests were performed in autoclaves at 70 C, 165 C and 250 C on AlFeNi plates representative of the fuel cladding. Several techniques were used to characterize the corrosion scale: SEM, TEM, EPMA, XRD, Raman spectroscopy. Our observations show that the corrosion scale is made of two main layers: a dense amorphous scale close to the metal and a porous crystalline scale in contact with the water. More than the morphology, the chemical compositions of both layers are different. This duplex structure results from a mixed growth mechanism: an anionic growth to develop the inner oxide and a cationic diffusion followed by a dissolution-precipitation process to form the outer one. Dynamic experiments at 70 C and corrosion kinetics measurements have demonstrated that the oxide growth process is controlled by a diffusion step associated to a dissolution/precipitation process. A corrosion mechanism of the AlFeNi alloy in aqueous media has been proposed. Then post-irradiation exams performed on irradiated fuel plates were used to investigate the effects of the irradiation on the corrosion behaviour in the reactor core. (author)

  2. Growing dimensions. Spent fuel management at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.

    1998-01-01

    More than 550 nuclear research reactors are operating or shout down around the world. At many of these reactors, spent fuel from their operations is stored, pending decisions on its final disposition. In recent years, problems associated with this spent fuel storage have loomed larger in the international nuclear community. In efforts to determine the overall scope of problems and to develop a database on the subject, the IAEA has surveyed research reactor operators in its Member States. Information for the Research Reactor Spent Fuel Database (RRSFDB) so far has been obtained from a limited but representative number of research reactors. It supplements data already on hand in the Agency's more established Research Reactor Database (RRDB). Drawing upon these database resources, this article presents an overall picture of spent fuel management and storage at the world's research reactors, in the context of associated national and international programmes in the field

  3. Research on laser cladding control system based on fuzzy PID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuanwei; Yu, Zhengyang

    2017-12-01

    Laser cladding technology has a high demand for control system, and the domestic laser cladding control system mostly uses the traditional PID control algorithm. Therefore, the laser cladding control system has a lot of room for improvement. This feature is suitable for laser cladding technology, Based on fuzzy PID three closed-loop control system, and compared with the conventional PID; At the same time, the laser cladding experiment and friction and wear experiment were carried out under the premise of ensuring the reasonable control system. Experiments show that compared with the conventional PID algorithm in fuzzy the PID algorithm under the surface of the cladding layer is more smooth, the surface roughness increases, and the wear resistance of the cladding layer is also enhanced.

  4. Characterization of spent fuel approved testing material---ATM-105

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Campbell, T.K.; Jenquin, U.P.; Mendel, J.E.; Thomas, L.E.; Thornhill, C.K.

    1991-12-01

    The characterization data obtained to data are described for Approved Testing Material 105 (ATM-105), which is spent fuel from Bundles CZ346 and CZ348 of the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant, a boiling-water reactor. This report is one in a series being prepared by the Materials Characterization Center at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on spent fuel ATMs. The ATMs are receiving extensive examinations to provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Program. ATM-105 consists of 88 full-length irradiated fuel rods with rod-average burnups of about 2400 GJ/kgM (28 MWd/kgM) and expected fission gas release of about 1%. Characterization data include (1) descriptions of as-fabricated fuel design, irradiation history, and subsequent storage and handling; (2) isotopic gamma scans; (3) fission gas analyses; (4) ceramography of the fuel and metallography of the cladding; (5) special fuel studies involving analytical transmission electron microscopy (AEM); (6) calculated nuclide inventories and radioactivities in the fuel and cladding; and (7) radiochemical analyses of the fuel and cladding. Additional analyses of the fuel are being conducted and will be included in planned revisions of this report.

  5. Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research. Final Report of a Coordinated Research Project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III) 2009–2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-10-01

    At the beginning of 2014, there were 437 nuclear power reactors in operation and 72 reactors under construction. To date, around 370 500 t (HM) (tonnes of heavy metal) of spent fuel have been discharged from reactors, and approximately 253 700 t (HM) are stored at various storage facilities. Although wet storage at reactor sites still dominates, the amount of spent fuel being transferred to dry storage technologies has increased significantly since 2005. For example, around 28% of the total fuel inventory in the United States of America is now in dry storage. Although the licensing for the construction of geological disposal facilities is under way in Finland, France and Sweden, the first facility is not expected to be available until 2025 and for most States with major nuclear programmes not for several decades afterwards. Spent fuel is currently accumulating at around 7000 t (HM) per year worldwide. The net result is that the duration of spent fuel storage has increased beyond what was originally foreseen. In order to demonstrate the safety of both spent fuel and the storage system, a good understanding of the processes that might cause deterioration is required. To address this, the IAEA continued the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR-III) in 2009 to evaluate fuel and materials performance under wet and dry storage and to assess the impact of interim storage on associated spent fuel management activities (such as handling and transport). This has been achieved through: evaluating surveillance and monitoring programmes of spent fuel and storage facilities; collecting and exchanging relevant experience of spent fuel storage and the impact on associated spent fuel management activities; facilitating the transfer of knowledge by documenting the technical basis for spent fuel storage; creating synergy among research projects of the participating Member States; and developing the capability to assess the impact

  6. Microstructural characteristics of PWR [pressurized water reactor] spent fuel relative to its leaching behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural, compositional and thermochemical properties of spent nuclear fuel are discussed relative to its potential performance as a high-level waste form under proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations Project tuff repository conditions. Pressurized water reactor spent fuel specimens with various artificially induced cladding defects were leach tested in deionized water and in a reference tuff groundwater under ambient hot cell air and temperature conditions. Greater fractional actinide release was observed with bare fuel than with clad fuel leached through a cladding defect. Congruent actinide release and preferential release of cesium and technetium were observed in both water types. Selected summary radionuclide release data are presented and correlated to pre- and post-test microstructural characterization data

  7. Electrochemical profiling of multi-clad aluminium sheets used in automotive heat exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Kirill; C. Gudla, Visweswara; Peguet, Lionel

    2018-01-01

    A combination of glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy sputtering and local electrochemical measurements was used to determine electrochemical changes upon brazing in a multi-layered Aluminium sheet (AA4343/AA3xxx/AA4343) with an additional low-Cu (AA3xxx) interlayer. Ecorr values from pot...

  8. Electrochemical profiling of multi-clad aluminium sheets used in automotive heat exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Kirill; Ambat, Rajan; Peguet, Lionel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to understand the mechanisms of corrosion propagation across the multi-clad structure of Al alloys sheets as a function of local alloy composition and microstructure, with and without brazing treatment. Electro-chemical behaviour at different depths was profi...

  9. Corrosion surveillance in spent fuel storage pools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    In mid-1991, corrosion of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel was observed in the light-water filled basins at the Savannah River site. A corrosion surveillance program was initiated in the P, K, L-Reactor basins and in the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels (RBOF). This program verified the aggressive nature of the pitting corrosion and provided recommendations for changes in basin operations to permit extended longer term interim storage. The changes were implemented during 1994--1996 and have resulted in significantly improved basin water quality with conductivity in the 1--3 microS/cm range. Under these improved conditions, no new pitting has been observed over the last three years. This paper describes the corrosion surveillance program at SRS and what has been learned about the corrosion of aluminum-clad in spent fuel storage pools

  10. Electrochemical profiling of multi-clad aluminium sheets used in automotive heat exchangers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bordo, Kirill; Gudla, Visweswara Chakravarthy; Peguet, Lionel

    2018-01-01

    potentiodynamic polarization, galvanic corrosion behaviour by ZRA, microstructure and composition by SEM and TEM were investigated and compared to those obtained for sheet without the interlayer. Inward diffusion of Si from clad, and outward diffusion of Cu from core are found to degrade the corrosion properties...

  11. Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1991-11-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. On such package would store tightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97 degrees C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350 degrees C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97 degrees C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350 degrees C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep- related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 x 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97 degrees C for the full 10000-yr analysis period. For the 4.74-kW load, the peak cladding temperature rises to just below the 350 degrees C limit about 4 years after emplacement. If the packages are stored using the spacing specified in the Site Characterization Plan (15 ft x 126 ft), a maximum of 4.1 kW per container may be stored. If the 0.05-m-thick void between the container and the borehole wall is filled with loosely packed bentonite, the peak cladding temperature rises more than 40 degrees C above the allowed cladding limit. In all cases the dominant heat transfer mode between container components is thermal radiation

  12. Deformation and fracture map methodology for predicting cladding behavior during dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chin, B.A.; Khan, M.A.; Tarn, J.C.L.

    1986-09-01

    The licensing of interim dry storage of light-water reactor spent fuel requires assurance that release limits of radioactive materials are not exceeded. The extent to which Zircaloy cladding can be relied upon as a barrier to prevent release of radioactive spent fuel and fission products depends upon its integrity. The internal pressure from helium and fission gases could become a source of hoop stress for creep rupture if pressures and temperatures were sufficiently high. Consequently, it is of interest to predict the condition of spent fuel cladding during interim storage for periods up to 40 years. To develop this prediction, deformation and fracture theories were used to develop maps. Where available, experimental deformation and fracture data were used to test the validity of the maps. Predictive equations were then developed and cumulative damage methodology was used to take credit for the declining temperature of spent fuel during storage. This methodology was then used to predict storage temperatures below which creep rupture would not be expected to occur except in fuel rods with pre-existing flaws. Predictions were also made and compared with results from tests conducted under abnormal conditions

  13. Method and device for taking out spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Takayuki; Shimamoto, Takijiro; Otsuka, Shiomi.

    1994-01-01

    Both ends of a fuel assembly are cut and removed, and spacers are removed into a single body of a fuel cladding tube. A plurality of the fuel cladding tubes as single bodies are sent into a ring-like electrode. An arc forming electric power source is actuated, to form arcs between the fuel cladding tube and the ring-like electric power source. A magnetic field forming power source is actuated, to form magnetic fields around the ring-like electrode by solenoid coils. The direction of the magnetic fluxes in this magnetic fields intersect the arcs. Then, the arcs are applied with a rotational force by the magnetic fields formed by the solenoid coils and rotate on the surface of the fuel cladding tube and the inner surface of the ring-like electrode. The fuel cladding tube is exhausted circumferentially uniformly by the rotational arcs. Since spent fuels are taken out by melting and scattering the fuel cladding tube by the heat and force of the arcs, the operation is facilitated. (I.N.)

  14. Conditioning of high activity solid waste: fuel claddings and dissolution residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter reports on experimental studies of embedding into matrix material, the melting and conversion of zircaloy, and waste properties and characterization. Methods are developed for embedding the waste scrap into a solid and resistant matrix material in order to confine the radioactivity and to prevent it from dispersion. The matrix materials investigated are lead alloys, ceramics and compacted graphite or aluminium powder. The treatment of fuel hulls by melting or chemical conversion is described. Cemented hulls are characterized and the pyrophoricity of zircaloy fines is investigated. Topics considered include the embedding of hulls into graphite and aluminium, the embedding of hulls and dissolution residues into alumino-ceramics, the solidification of alpha-bearing wastes into a ceramic matrix, and the conditioning of cladding waste by eutectoidic melting and by embedding in glass

  15. Investigation of thermally sensitised stainless steels as analogues for spent AGR fuel cladding to test a corrosion inhibitor for intergranular stress corrosion cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whillock, Guy O. H.; Hands, Brian J.; Majchrowski, Tom P.; Hambley, David I.

    2018-01-01

    A small proportion of irradiated Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel cladding can be susceptible to intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) when stored in pond water containing low chloride concentrations, but corrosion is known to be prevented by an inhibitor at the storage temperatures that have applied so far. It may be necessary in the future to increase the storage temperature by up to ∼20 °C and to demonstrate the impact of higher temperatures for safety case purposes. Accordingly, corrosion testing is needed to establish the effect of temperature increases on the efficacy of the inhibitor. This paper presents the results of studies carried out on thermally sensitised 304 and 20Cr-25Ni-Nb stainless steels, investigating their grain boundary compositions and their IGSCC behaviour over a range of test temperatures (30-60 °C) and chloride concentrations (0.3-10 mg/L). Monitoring of crack initiation and propagation is presented along with preliminary results as to the effect of the corrosion inhibitor. 304 stainless steel aged for 72 h at 600 °C provided a close match to the known pond storage corrosion behaviour of spent AGR fuel cladding.

  16. Zircaloy cladding corrosion degradation in a Tuff repository: initial experimental plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.

    1984-07-01

    The projected environmental history of a Tuff repository sited in an unsaturated hydrologic setting is evaluated to identify the potentially most severe corrosion conditions for Zircaloy spent fuel cladding. Three distinct corrosion periods are identified over the projected history. In two of those, liquid water may be present which is believed to produce the most severe corrosive environment for Zircaloy spent fuel cladding. In the time interval 100 to 1000 years after emplacement in the repository, the most severe condition is exposure to 170 0 C water at about 100 psi in an unbreached canister. This condition will be reproduced experimentally in an autoclave. For times after 1000 years, the most severe condition is exposure to 90 0 C water that is equilibrated with the tuff and invades breached canisters. This condition will be reproduced with a water bath system

  17. Quality of water from the pool, original containers and aluminum drums used for storage of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idjakovic, Z.; Milonjic, S.; Cupic, S.

    2001-01-01

    Results of chemical analyses of water from the pool, including original containers and aluminium drums, for storage of spent nuclear fuel of the research reactor RA at the VINCA Institute and a short survey of the water properties from similar pools of other countries are presented in the paper. (author)

  18. Thermal performance of a buried nuclear waste storage container storing a hybrid mix of PWR and BWR spent fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.

    1988-09-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will design, model, and test nuclear waste packages for use at the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. One such package would store lightly packed spent fuel rods from both pressurized and boiling water reactors. The storage container provides the primary containment of the nuclear waste and the spent fuel rod cladding provides secondary containment. A series of transient conduction and radiation heat transfer analyses was run to determine for the first 1000 yr of storage if the temperature of the tuff at the borehole wall ever falls below 97/degree/C and whether the cladding of the stored spent fuel ever exceeds 350/degree/C. Limiting the borehole to temperatures of 97/degree/C or greater helps minimize corrosion by assuring that no condensed water collects on the container. The 350/degree/C cladding limit minimizes the possibility of creep-related failure in the spent fuel rod cladding. For a series of packages stored in a 8 x 30 m borehole grid where each package contains 10-yr-old spent fuel rods generating 4.74 kW or more, the borehole wall stays above 97/degree/C for the full 1000-yr analysis period

  19. On the importance of fast scattering data for aluminium in the interpretation results from H{sub 2}O moderated lattice experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayers, F J; Terry, M J [General Reactor Physics Division, Atomic Energy Establishment, Winfrith, Dorchester, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    1967-07-15

    Aluminium is often used as a structural material or fuel cladding in lattice experiments with light water moderators. In particular most of the experiments with regular rod lattices of plutonium fuel have contained significant quantities of aluminium. This report examines the importance of scattering data for aluminium in leakage calculations for light water systems. It is shown that some discrepancy exists between calculated plane moments and experimentally measured moments, which may be corrected by an 'ad hoc' adjustment of inelastic scattering data for aluminium. WIMS results are presented for some Battelle plutonium fuelled rod lattices, and it is shown that this adjustment of inelastic data leads to a noticeable correction for the predicted reactivities of these experiments. The influence of scattering data for aluminium on results for some other lattices of interest has been shown to be less important. (author)

  20. Behaviour of Spent WWER fuel under long term storage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadarmetov, I M [A.A.Bochvar All-Russia Research Institute of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1999-07-02

    Results of experimental investigation into thermomechanical properties of pre-irradiated Zr-1%Nb alloy over a range temperatures 500-570 grad C are presented. Safety examination of the Ventilation Storage Casks dry storage system has been carried out. Preliminary safety criteria under dry storage conditions in an environment of inert gas are follows: maximum cladding temperature under normal conditions of dry storage should not exceed 330 grad C after 5-year cooling in water-filled pools; maximum allowable temperature of spent fuel rod cladding under operational mode with infringement of heat removal should not exceed 440 grad C over 8 hours. As each SFA dry storage project comprises its individual technology of spent fuel management, it is necessary to evaluate allowable parameters (terms of storage, maximum temperatures of fuel) for each project respectively. The programme of experimental investigations for the justification of safety criteria for WWER-1000 dry spent fuel storage systems is underway. (author)

  1. Development of high performance cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Yong; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.

    2010-04-01

    The irradiation test for HANA claddings conducted and a series of evaluation for next-HANA claddings as well as their in-pile and out-of pile performances tests were also carried out at Halden research reactor. The 6th irradiation test have been completed successfully in Halden research reactor. As a result, HANA claddings showed high performance, such as corrosion resistance increased by 40% compared to Zircaloy-4. The high performance of HANA claddings in Halden test has enabled lead test rod program as the first step of the commercialization of HANA claddings. DB has been established for thermal and LOCA-related properties. It was confirmed from the thermal shock test that the integrity of HANA claddings was maintained in more expanded region than the criteria regulated by NRC. The manufacturing process of strips was established in order to apply HANA alloys, which were originally developed for the claddings, to the spacer grids. 250 kinds of model alloys for the next-generation claddings were designed and manufactured over 4 times and used to select the preliminary candidate alloys for the next-generation claddings. The selected candidate alloys showed 50% better corrosion resistance and 20% improved high temperature oxidation resistance compared to the foreign advanced claddings. We established the manufacturing condition controlling the performance of the dual-cooled claddings by changing the reduction rate in the cold working steps

  2. Studies of the AA2519 Alloy Hot Rolling Process and Cladding with EN AW-1050A Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Płonka B.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to determine the feasibility of plastic forming by hot rolling of the AA2519 aluminium alloy sheets and cladding these sheets with a layer of the EN AW-1050A alloy. Numerous hot-rolling tests were carried out on the slab ingots to define the parameters of the AA2519 alloy rolling process. It has been established that rolling of the AA2519 alloy should be carried out in the temperature range of 400-440°C. Depending on the required final thickness of the sheet metal, appropriate thickness of the EN AW-1050A alloy sheet, used as a cladding layer, was selected. As a next step, structure and mechanical properties of the resulting AA2519 alloy sheets clad with EN AW-1050A alloy was examined. The thickness of the coating layer was established at 0,3÷0,5mm. Studies covered alloy grain size and the core alloy-cladding material bond strength.

  3. Status of research reactor spent fuel world-wide: Database summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.

    1996-01-01

    Results complied in the research reactor spent fuel database are used to assess the status of research reactor spent fuel world-wide. Fuel assemblies, their types, enrichment, origin of enrichment and geological distribution among the industrialized and developed countries of the world are discussed. Fuel management practices in wet and dry storage facilities and the concerns of reactor operators about long-term storage of their spent fuel are presented and some of the activities carried out by the International Atomic Energy Agency to address the issues associated with research reactor spent fuel are outlined. (author). 4 refs, 17 figs, 4 tabs

  4. A fuel response model for the design of spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malinauskas, A.P.; Duffey, T.A.; Einziger, R.E.; Hobbins, R.R.; Jordon, H.; Rashid, Y.R.; Barrett, P.R.; Sanders, T.L.

    1989-01-01

    The radiological source terms pertinent to spent fuel shipping cask safety assessments are of three distinct origins. One of these concerns residual contamination within the cask due to handling operations and previous shipments. A second is associated with debris (''crud'') that had been deposited on the fuel rods in the course of reactor operation, and a third involves the radioactive material contained within the rods. Although the lattermost source of radiotoxic material overwhelms the others in terms of inventory, its release into the shipping cask, and thence into the biosphere, requires the breach of an additional release barrier, viz., the fuel rod cladding. Hence, except for the special case involving the transport of fuel rods containing previously breached claddings, considerations of the source terms due to material contained in the fuel rods are complicated by the need to address the likelihood of fuel cladding failure during transport. The purpose of this report is to describe a methodology for estimating the shipping cask source terms contribution due to radioactive material contained within the spent fuel rods. Thus, the probability of fuel cladding failure as well as radioactivity release is addressed. 8 refs., 2 tabs

  5. Assessment of nitrogen as an atmosphere for dry storage of spent LWR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.R.; Knox, C.A.; White, G.D.

    1985-09-01

    Interim dry storage of spent light-water reactor (LWR) fuel is being developed as a licensed technology in the United States. Because it is anticipated that license agreements will specify dry storage atmospheres, the behavior of spent LWR fuel in a nitrogen atmosphere during dry storage was investigated. In particular, the thermodynamics of reaction of nitrogen compounds (expected to form in the cover gas during dry storage) and residual impurities (such as moisture and oxygen) with Zircaloy cladding and with spent fuel at sites of cladding breaches were examined. The kinetics of reaction were not considered it was assumed that the 20 to 40 years of interim dry storage would be sufficient for reactions to proceed to completion. The primary thermodynamics reactants were found to be NO 2 , N 2 O, H 2 O 2 , and O 2 . The evaluation revealed that the limited inventories of these reactants produced by the source terms in hermetically sealed dry storage systems would be too low to cause significant spent fuel degradation. Furthermore, the oxidation of spent fuel to degrading O/U ratios is unlikely because the oxidation potential in moist nitrogen limits O/U ratios to values less than UO/sub 2.006/ (the equilibrium stoichiometric form in equilibrium with moist nitrogen). Tests were performed with bare spent UO 2 fuel and nonirradiated UO 2 pellets (with no Zircaloy cladding) in a nitrogen atmosphere containing moisture concentrations greater than encountered under dry storage conditions. These tests were performed for at least 1100 h at temperatures as high as 380 0 C, where oxidation reactions proceed in a matter of minutes. No visible degradation was detected, and weight changes were negligible

  6. ''C-ring'' stress corrosion cracking scoping experiment for Zircaloy spent fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D.

    1986-03-01

    This document describes the purpose and execution of the stress corrosion cracking scoping experiment using ''C-ring'' cladding specimens. The design and operation of the ''C-ring'' stressing apparatus is described and discussed. The experimental procedures and post-experiment sample evaluation are described

  7. Evaluation of limiting mechanisms for long-term spent fuel dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, J.; Machiels, A.

    2001-01-01

    Several failure mechanisms have been postulated that could become limiting for spent fuel in dry storage. These are: stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC), Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) and Creep Rupture (CR). These mechanisms are examined in some detail from two perspectives: their initial environments in which they were developed and applied, and in relation to their applicability to dry storage. Extrapolation techniques are used to transfer the mechanisms from their initial in-reactor and laboratory domains to out-of-reactor spent fuel dry storage environments. This transfer is accomplished both qualitatively where necessary and quantitatively when possible, with fracture toughness used as the transfer function. In this regard, the paper provides useful information on cladding fracture toughness estimates that recognize the specific physical conditions of the cladding, which would not be found elsewhere in the literature. The arguments presented in this paper confirm the general technical consensus that creep is the governing mechanism for spent fuel in long-term dry storage. (author)

  8. Evaluation of limiting mechanisms for long-term spent fuel dry storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, J. [ANATECH Research Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Machiels, A. [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Several failure mechanisms have been postulated that could become limiting for spent fuel in dry storage. These are: stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC), Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) and Creep Rupture (CR). These mechanisms are examined in some detail from two perspectives: their initial environments in which they were developed and applied, and in relation to their applicability to dry storage. Extrapolation techniques are used to transfer the mechanisms from their initial in-reactor and laboratory domains to out-of-reactor spent fuel dry storage environments. This transfer is accomplished both qualitatively where necessary and quantitatively when possible, with fracture toughness used as the transfer function. In this regard, the paper provides useful information on cladding fracture toughness estimates that recognize the specific physical conditions of the cladding, which would not be found elsewhere in the literature. The arguments presented in this paper confirm the general technical consensus that creep is the governing mechanism for spent fuel in long-term dry storage. (author)

  9. Dissolution studies of spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    To obtain quantitative data on the dissolution of high burnup spent nuclear fuel, dissolution study have been carried out at the Department of Chemistry, JAERI, from 1984 under the contract with STA entitled 'Reprocessing Test Study of High Burnup Fuel'. In this study PWR spent fuels of 8,400 to 36,100 MWd/t in averaged burnup were dissolved and the chemical composition and distribution of radioactive nuclides were measured for insoluble residue, cladding material (hull), off-gas and dissolved solution. With these analyses basic data concerning the dissolution and clarification process in the reprocessing plant were accumulated. (author)

  10. Lessons learned from 50 years period the storage of the spent fuel from nuclear research reactor VVR-S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragusin, M.

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear research reactor VVR-S was commissioned in July 1957. This reactor is in permanent shutdown since December 1997 and will be decommissioned. The duration of the decommissioning project is 11 years. The first year of decommissioning project is 2010. The spent nuclear fuels resulting from the 40 years of operating the nuclear research reactor are stored under wet conditions. The chemical and physical water parameters monitored are: transparency, conductibility, pH, chloride content, oxygen content, temperature, dry residual content, Al, Mn, Mg, Fe, Vn, Cr. Residual dry content must be maintained in requested range in order to prevent degradation and corrosion both of the clads, assemblies and linen material of the ponds. Two types of the nuclear fuel assemblies were used: LEU type -EK-10 and HEU type S-36 Russian origin. All spent nuclear fuel assemblies HEU-S-36 type were repatriated in Russian Federation in June 2009 in safety and security conditions without any problems due of the wet storage, after 25 years storage in wet conditions. The spent nuclear fuel assemblies types LEU EK-10 were stored in wet conditions more than 50 years. This paper describes the lessons learned during the 50 years management of the spent nuclear fuel resulted from the operation the research reactor VVR-S. The management was based on the maintenance of water parameters by water filtration, using at all times air HEPA filter incorporated in technological ventilation system and by monitoring the level, temperature, physical and chemical parameters of the water storage from ponds and by controlling ponds linen physical integrity. Also we have used the discs having the same compositions with materials from assemblies stored in the same ponds, in order to verify degradation and corrosion phenomena induced due to the quality of storage water. The paper will described these results obtained by metallographic, visual, XRF analysis onto discs and dry residual samples from storage

  11. Research Into Ni-Cr-Si-B Coating Sprayed Onto Aluminium Substrate Using the Method of Plasma Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Lukauskaitė

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with Ni base coatings deposited on aluminium substrate applying the method of plasma spray. The purpose of the conducted research is to improve the physical and mechanical properties of coatings on the surface of aluminium alloy work pieces. Spraying on aluminium alloys encounters serious problems, and therefore this work analyses the ways to make the situation more favourable. Before spraying, the surfaces of substrates were modified employing chemical and mechanical pre-treatment methods. The aim of pre-treating aluminium alloys was to remove oxide layers from the aluminium surface. Coating microstructures and porosity were characterised applying optical microscopy. Differences in the roughness of pre-treated surfaces have been determined referring to profilometry. The paper investigates the influence of the adhesion of plasma spray coatings on aluminium surface pretreatment. Microhardness technique was applied for measuring the hardness of coatings. The study also describes and compares the mechanical properties of Ni base coatings deposited on different pre-treated aluminium substrates using plasma spray.Article in Lithuanian

  12. Research Into Ni-Cr-Si-B Coating Sprayed Onto Aluminium Substrate Using the Method of Plasma Spray

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimonda Lukauskaitė

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with Ni base coatings deposited on aluminium substrate applying the method of plasma spray. The purpose of the conducted research is to improve the physical and mechanical properties of coatings on the surface of aluminium alloy work pieces. Spraying on aluminium alloys encounters serious problems, and therefore this work analyses the ways to make the situation more favourable. Before spraying, the surfaces of substrates were modified employing chemical and mechanical pre-treatment methods. The aim of pre-treating aluminium alloys was to remove oxide layers from the aluminium surface. Coating microstructures and porosity were characterised applying optical microscopy. Differences in the roughness of pre-treated surfaces have been determined referring to profilometry. The paper investigates the influence of the adhesion of plasma spray coatings on aluminium surface pretreatment. Microhardness technique was applied for measuring the hardness of coatings. The study also describes and compares the mechanical properties of Ni base coatings deposited on different pre-treated aluminium substrates using plasma spray.Article in Lithuanian

  13. Management of waste cladding hulls. Part II. An assessment of zirconium pyrophoricity and recommendations for handling waste hulls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kullen, B.J.; Levitz, N.M.; Steindler, M.J.

    1977-11-01

    This report reviews experience and research related to the pyrophoricity of zirconium and zirconium alloys. The results of recent investigations of the behavior of Zircaloy and some observations of industrial handling and treatment of Zircaloy tubing and scrap are also discussed. A model for the management of waste Zircaloy cladding hulls from light water reactor fuel reprocessing is offered, based on an evaluation of the reviewed information. It is concluded that waste Zircaloy cladding hulls do not constitute a pyrophoric hazard if, following the model flow sheet, finely divided metal is oxidized during the management procedure. Steps alternative to the model are described which yield zirconium in deactivated form and also accomplish varying degrees of transuranic decontamination. Information collected into appendixes is (1) a collation of zirconium pyrophoricity data from the literature, (2) calculated radioactivity contents in Zircaloy cladding hulls from spent LWR fuels, and (3) results of a laboratory study on volatilization of zirconium from Zircaloy using HCl or Cl 2

  14. Theoretical research on the propagation of the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface of the cermet cladding material structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junru, Yang; Chuanjuan, Song; Minglan, Wang; Yeukan, Zhang; Jing, Sun

    2016-01-01

    The interface crack propagation problem in the cermet cladding material structure was studied. A comparative propagation property parameter (CP) suitable to judge the propagation direction of the interface crack in the cermet cladding material structure was proposed. The interface crack propagation criterion was established. Theoretical models of the CPs for the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface deflecting separately into the clad, the interface and the substrate were built, and the relations between the CPs and the load action angle, the clad thickness ratio and the load were investigated with an example. The research results show that, under the research conditions, the interface crack will more easily propagate into the clad layer than into the substrate

  15. Theoretical research on the propagation of the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface of the cermet cladding material structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junru, Yang; Chuanjuan, Song; Minglan, Wang; Yeukan, Zhang; Jing, Sun [College of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Shandong University of Science and Technology, Qingdao (China)

    2016-01-15

    The interface crack propagation problem in the cermet cladding material structure was studied. A comparative propagation property parameter (CP) suitable to judge the propagation direction of the interface crack in the cermet cladding material structure was proposed. The interface crack propagation criterion was established. Theoretical models of the CPs for the crack normal to and dwelling on the interface deflecting separately into the clad, the interface and the substrate were built, and the relations between the CPs and the load action angle, the clad thickness ratio and the load were investigated with an example. The research results show that, under the research conditions, the interface crack will more easily propagate into the clad layer than into the substrate.

  16. Aluminium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, B.; Ayers, J.; Sammer, G.

    2001-01-01

    Aluminium is the most important non-ferrous metal by quantity. Aluminium is produced by electrolysis of aluminium oxide (also known as alumina). Alumina is produced by refining bauxite. The quantity of primary and secondary aluminium production in ECE-countries between 1992 and 1998 is shown. The European aluminium industry employs approximately 200 000 employees. The annual aluminium production in the European Union was 3.58 million tonnes in 1994, of which 44 % was secondary aluminium. In 1996 3.96 million tonnes of aluminium were produced in the EU, of which 44 % was secondary aluminium. (author)

  17. Critical cladding radius for hybrid cladding modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyard, Romain; Leduc, Dominique; Lupi, Cyril; Lecieux, Yann

    2018-05-01

    In this article we explore some properties of the cladding modes guided by a step-index optical fiber. We show that the hybrid modes can be grouped by pairs and that it exists a critical cladding radius for which the modes of a pair share the same electromagnetic structure. We propose a robust method to determine the critical cladding radius and use it to perform a statistical study on the influence of the characteristics of the fiber on the critical cladding radius. Finally we show the importance of the critical cladding radius with respect to the coupling coefficient between the core mode and the cladding modes inside a long period grating.

  18. The study on radioactivity reduction of spent PWR cladding hull

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, I. H.; Kim, J. H.; Park, C. J.; Jung, Y. H.; Song, K. C.; Lee, J. W.; Park, J. J.; Yang, M. S.

    2003-01-01

    Hull arising from the spent PWR fuel elements is classified as a high-level radioactive waste. This report describes the radio-chemical characteristics of the hull-from PWR spent fuel of 32,000MWd/tU burn-up and 15 years cooling, discharged from Gori Unit I cycled 4-7-by examination and literature survey. On the basis of the results, a method of degradation to middle and low-level radioactive waste was proposed by dry process such as laser or plasma technique with removing the nuclides deposited on the surface of the hull

  19. Thermal analysis of a one-element PWR spent fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fields, S.R.

    1979-06-01

    The transient thermal behavior of a typical one-element PWR spent fuel shipping cask, following a hypothetical accident and fire, has been simulated. The objectives of the study were to determine the transient behavior of the cask and its spent fuel primary coolant through the pressure relief system and possible fuel pin clad failure due to overheating following loss of coolant. 15 figures, 7 tables

  20. Spent nuclear fuel storage. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning spent nuclear fuel storage technologies, facilities, sites, and assessment. References review wet and dry storage, spent fuel casks and pools, underground storage, monitored and retrievable storage systems, and aluminum-clad spent fuels. Environmental impact, siting criteria, regulations, and risk assessment are also discussed. Computer codes and models for storage safety are covered. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  1. Fact sheet on spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The IAEA gives high priority to safe and effective spent fuel management. As an example of continuing efforts, the 2003 International Conference on Storage of Spent Fuel from Power Reactors gathered 125 participants from 35 member states to exchange information on this important subject. With its large number of Member States, the IAEA is well-positioned to gather and share information useful in addressing Member State priorities. IAEA activities on this topic include plans to produce technical documents as resources for a range of priority topics: spent fuel performance assessment and research, burnup credit applications, cask maintenance, cask loading optimization, long term storage requirements including records maintenance, economics, spent fuel treatment, remote technology, and influence of fuel design on spent fuel storage. In addition to broader topics, the IAEA supports coordinated research projects and technical cooperation projects focused on specific needs. The proceedings of the 2003 IAEA conference on storage of spent fuel from power reactors has been ranked in the top twenty most accessed IAEA publications. These proceedings are available for free downloads at http://www-pub.iaea.org/MTCD/publications/PubDetails.asp?pubId=6924]. The IAEA organized and held a 2004 meeting focused on long term spent fuel storage provisions in Central and Eastern Europe, using technical cooperation funds to support participation by these Member States. Over ninety percent of the participants in this meeting rated its value as good or excellent, with participants noting that the IAEA is having a positive effect in stimulating communication, cooperation, and information dissemination on this important topic. The IAEA was advised in 2004 that results from a recent coordinated research project (IAEA-TECDOC-1343) were used by one Member State to justify higher clad temperatures for spent fuel in dry storage, leading to more efficient storage and reduced costs. Long term

  2. Volta potential of clad AA2024 aluminium after exposure to CeCl3 solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreatta, F.; Druart, M.-E.; Marin, E.; Cossement, D.; Olivier, M.-G.; Fedrizzi, L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Alkaline etch of clad AA2024 enhances precipitation of Ce compounds. • Exposure to CeCl 3 solution decreases Volta potential of alkaline etched substrate. • Ce compounds reduce the driving force for initiation of localized attack. - Abstract: AA2024 clad with AA1050 was immersed in CeCl 3 solution to promote deposition of cerium species. The deposition occurs on the entire sample surface for the alkaline etched substrate, while it is very limited for the degreased substrate. The surface potential (Volta potential) was investigated by scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy after different immersion times in CeCl 3 solution. The preferential deposition of Ce compounds at Al–Fe intermetallic sites progressively reduces their Volta potential difference relative to the matrix in the alkaline etched substrate. This reduces the susceptibility to localized attack of the intermetallics as proven by potentiodynamic polarization measurements

  3. EBR-II spent fuel treatment demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, R.W.; Henslee, S.P.

    1997-01-01

    For approximately 10 years, Argonne National Laboratory was developed a fast reactor fuel cycle based on dry processing. When the US fast reactor program was canceled in 1994, the fuel processing technology, called the electrometallurgical technique, was adapted for treating unstable spent nuclear fuel for disposal. While this technique, which involves electrorefining fuel in a molten salt bath, is being developed for several different fuel categories, its initial application is for sodium-bonded metallic spent fuel. In June 1996, the Department of Energy (DOE) approved a radiation demonstration program in which 100 spent driver assemblies and 25 spent blanket assemblies from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) will be treated over a three-year period. This demonstrated will provide data that address issues in the National Research Council's evaluation of the technology. The planned operations will neutralize the reactive component (elemental sodium) in the fuel and produce a low enriched uranium product, a ceramic waste and a metal waste. The fission products and transuranium elements, which accumulate in the electrorefining salt, will be stabilized in the glass-bonded ceramic waste form. The stainless steel cladding hulls, noble metal fission products, and insoluble residues from the process will be stabilized in a stainless steel/zirconium alloy. Upon completion of a successful demonstration and additional environmental evaluation, the current plans are to process the remainder of the DOE sodium bonded fuel

  4. Compatibility Behavior of the Ferritic-Martensitic Steel Cladding under the Liquid Sodium Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Baek, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Sung Ho; Lee, Chan Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Fuel cladding is a component which confines uranium fuel to transport energy into the coolant as well as protect radioactive species from releasing outside. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) has been considered as one of the most probable next generation reactors in Korea because it can maximize uranium resource as well as reduce the amount of PWR spent fuel in conjunction with pyroprocessing. Sodium has been selected as the coolant of the SFR because of its superior fast neutron efficiency as well as thermal conductivity, which enables high power core design. However, it is reported that the fuel cladding materials like austenitic and ferritic stainless steel react sodium coolant so that the loss of the thickness, intergranular attack, and carburization or decarburization process may happen to induce the change of the mechanical property of the cladding. This study aimed to evaluate material property of the cladding material under the liquid sodium environment. Ferritic-martensitic steel (FMS) coupon and cladding tube were exposed at the flowing sodium then the microstructural and mechanical property were evaluated. mechanical property of the cladding was evaluated using the ring tension test

  5. Handling of spent fuel from research reactors in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanda, K.

    1997-01-01

    In Japan eleven research reactors are in operation. After the 19th International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research Reactors and Test Reactors (RERTR) on October 6-10, 1996, Seoul, Korea, the Five Agency Committee on Highly Enriched Uranium, which consists of Science and Technology Agency, the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) met on November 7,1996, to discuss the handling of spent fuel from research reactors in Japan. Advantages and disadvantages to return spent fuel to the USA in comparison to Europe were discussed. So far, a number of spent fuel elements in JAERI and KURRI are to be returned to the US. The first shipment to the US is planned for 60 HEU elements from JMTR in 1997. The shipment from KURRI is planned to start in 1999. (author)

  6. Standard guide for characterization of spent nuclear fuel in support of geologic repository disposal

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides guidance for the types and extent of testing that would be involved in characterizing the physical and chemical nature of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in support of its interim storage, transport, and disposal in a geologic repository. This guide applies primarily to commercial light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and spent fuel from weapons production, although the individual tests/analyses may be used as applicable to other spent fuels such as those from research and test reactors. The testing is designed to provide information that supports the design, safety analysis, and performance assessment of a geologic repository for the ultimate disposal of the SNF. 1.2 The testing described includes characterization of such physical attributes as physical appearance, weight, density, shape/geometry, degree, and type of SNF cladding damage. The testing described also includes the measurement/examination of such chemical attributes as radionuclide content, microstructure, and corrosion product c...

  7. Proposed nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel: Appendix B, foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel characteristics and transportation casks. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-03-01

    This is Appendix B of a draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. It discusses relevant characterization and other information of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel that could be managed under the proposed action. It also discusses regulations for the transport of radioactive materials and the design of spent fuel casks

  8. An investigation into the effect of equal channel angular extrusion process on mechanical and microstructural properties of middle layer in copper clad aluminum composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolaminejad, B.; Karimi Taheri, A.; Arabi, H.; Shahmiri, M.

    2009-01-01

    Equal channel angular extrusion is a promising technique for production of ultra fine-grain materials of few hundred nanometers size. In this research, the grain refinement of aluminium strip is accelerated by sandwiching it between two copper strips and then subjecting the three strips to Equal channel angular extrusion process simultaneously. The loosely packed copper-aluminium-copper laminated billet was passed through Equal channel angular extrusion die up to 8 passes using the Bc route. Then, tensile properties and some microstructural characteristics of the aluminium layer were evaluated. The scanning and transmission electron microscopes, and X-ray diffraction were used to characterize the microstructure. The results show that the yield stress of middle layer (Al) is increased significantly by about four times after application of Equal channel angular extrusion throughout the four consecutive passes and then it is slightly decreased when more Equal channel angular extrusion passes are applied. An ultra fine grain within the range of 500 to 600 nm was obtained in the Al layer by increasing the thickness of the copper layers. lt was observed that the reduction of grain size in the aluminium layer is nearly 55% more than that of a equal channel angular-extruded single layer aluminium billet, i.e. extruding a single aluminium strip or a billet without any clad for the same amount of deformation. This behaviour was attributed to the higher rates of dislocations interaction and cell formation and texture development during the Equal channel angular extrusion of the laminated composite compared to those of a single billet.

  9. Radiation heat transfer model in a spent fuel pool by TRACE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez-Saez, F.; Carlos, S.; Villanueva, J.F.; Martorell, S.

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear policies have experienced an important change since Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant accident and the safety of spent fuels has been in the spot issue among all the safety concerns. The work presented consists of the thermohydraulic simulation of spent fuel pool behavior after a loss of coolant throughout transfer channel with loss of cooling transient is produced. The simulation is done with the TRACE code. One of the most important variables that define the behavior of the pool is cladding temperature, which evolution depends on the heat emission. In this work convection and radiation heat transfer is considered. When both heat transfer models are considered, a clear delay in achieving the maximum peak cladding temperature (1477 K) is observed compared with the simulation in which only convection heat transfer is considered. (authors)

  10. Extending dry storage of spent LWR fuel for up to 100 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R.E.; McKinnon, M.A.; Machiels, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    Because of delays in closing the back end of the fuel cycle in the U.S., there is a need to extend dry inert storage of spent fuel beyond its originally anticipated 20-year duration. Many of the methodologies developed to support initial licensing for 20-year storage should be able to support the longer storage periods envisioned. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing information and methodologies to support dry storage up to 100 years. The thrust of the analysis is the potential behavior of the spent fuel. In the USA, the criteria for dry storage of LWR spent fuel are delineated in 10 CFR 72. The criteria fall into four general categories: maintain subcriticality, prevent the release of radioactive material above acceptable limits, ensure that radiation rates and doses do not exceed acceptable levels, and maintain retrievability of the stored radioactive material. These criteria need to be considered for normal, off-normal, and postulated accident conditions. The initial safety analysis report submitted for licensing evaluated the fuel's ability to meet the requirements for 20 years. It is not the intent to repeat these calculations, but to look at expected behavior over the additional 80 years, during which the temperatures and radiation fields are lower. During the first 20 years, the properties of the components may change because of elevated temperatures, presence of moisture, effects of radiation, etc. During normal storage in an inert atmosphere, there is potential for the cladding mechanical properties to change due to annealing or interaction with cask materials. The emissivity of the cladding could also change due to storage conditions. If there is air leakage into the cask, additional degradation could occur through oxidation in breached rods, which could lead to additional fission gas release and enlargement of cladding breaches. Air in-leakage could also affect cover gas conductivity, cladding oxidation, emissivity changes, and excessive

  11. Extending dry storage of spent LWR fuel for up to 100 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einziger, R. E.

    1998-01-01

    Because of delays in closing the back end of the fuel cycle in the U.S., there is a need to extend dry inert storage of spent fuel beyond its originally anticipated 20-year duration. Many of the methodologies developed to support initial licensing for 20-year storage should be able to support the longer storage periods envisioned. This paper evaluates the applicability of existing information and methodologies to support dry storage up to 100 years. The thrust of the analysis is the potential behavior of the spent fuel. In the USA, the criteria for dry storage of LWR spent fuel are delineated in 10 CFR 72 [1]. The criteria fall into four general categories: maintain subcriticality, prevent the release of radioactive material above acceptable limits, ensure that radiation rates and doses do not exceed acceptable levels, and maintain retrievability of the stored radioactive material. These criteria need to be considered for normal, off-normal, and postulated accident conditions. The initial safety analysis report submitted for licensing evaluated the fuel's ability to meet the requirements for 20 years. It is not the intent to repeat these calculations, but to look at expected behavior over the additional 80 years, during which the temperatures and radiation fields are lower. During the first 20 years, the properties of the components may change because of elevated temperatures, presence of moisture, effects of radiation, etc. During normal storage in an inert atmosphere, there is potential for the cladding mechanical properties to change due to annealing or interaction with cask materials. The emissivity of the cladding could also change due to storage conditions. If there is air leakage into the cask, additional degradation could occur through oxidation in breached rods, which could lead to additional fission gas release and enlargement of cladding breaches. Air in-leakage could also affect cover gas conductivity, cladding oxidation, emissivity changes, and

  12. Research reactor spent fuel management in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audero, M.A.; Bevilacqua, A.M.; Mehlich, A.M.; Novara, O.

    2002-01-01

    The research reactor spent fuel (RRSF) management strategy will be presented as well as the interim storage experience. Currently, low-enriched uranium RRSF is in wet interim storage either at reactor site or away from reactor site in a centralized storage facility. High-enriched uranium RRSF from the centralized storage facility has been sent to the USA in the framework of the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The strategy for the management of the RRSF could implement the encapsulation for interim dry storage. As an alternative to encapsulation for dry storage some conditioning processes are being studied which include decladding, isotopic dilution, oxidation and immobilization. The immobilized material will be suitable for final disposal. (author)

  13. Calculation of spent fuel pool severe accident with MELCOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng Jian; Xiang Qing'an; Zhou Kefeng

    2014-01-01

    A calculation model was established for spent fuel pool (SFP) using MELCOR code to study the severe accident phenomena caused by the long term station black-out (SBO), including spent fuel heatup, zirconium cladding oxidation, and the injection into SFP to mitigate the severe accident. The results show that the severe accident progression is slow and relates directly with the initial water level in SFP. It is illustrated that the injection into SFP is one of the best mitigated measures for the SFP severe accident. (authors)

  14. Spent fuel heatup following loss of water during storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, A.S.; McCloskey, D.J.; Powers, D.A.; Dupree, S.A.

    1979-03-01

    An analysis of spent fuel heatup following a hypothetical accident involving drainage of the storage pool is presented. Computations based upon a new computer code called SFUEL have been performed to assess the effect of decay time, fuel element design, storage rack design, packing density, room ventilation, drainage level, and other variables on the heatup characteristics of the spent fuel and to predict the conditions under which clad failure will occur. Possible storage pool design modifications and/or onsite emergency action have also been considered

  15. Electrochemical Studies on Important Elements for Zirconium Recovery Form Irradiated Zircaloy-4 Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.; Sohn, S.; Hwang, I.S.

    2015-01-01

    Since Zircaloy cladding accounts for about 16 wt. % of used nuclear fuel assembly, decontamination process is required to reduce the final waste volume from spent nuclear fuel. To develop Zircaloy-4 electrorefining process as an irradiated Zircaloy cladding decontamination process, electrochemical studies on Sn, Cr, Fe and Co which are major or important elements in the irradiated cladding were conducted based on cyclic voltammetry in LiCl-KCl at 500 deg. C. Cyclic voltammetry for Sn, Fe, Cr and Co elements that should be eliminated was conducted and revealed that redox reactions of these ions are much simpler than Zr and more reductive than Zr. The reliability of cyclic voltammetry was verified by comparing diffusion coefficients and formal reduction potentials of these ions obtained in this study to previous studies. (authors)

  16. Maw and spent HTR Fuel Element Test storage in Boreholes in rock salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnert, E.; Brucher, P.H.; Kroth, K.; Merz, E.; Niephaus, D.

    1986-01-01

    The Budesminister fur Forschung und Technolgie (BMFT, Federal Ministry for Research and Technology) is sponsoring a project at the Kernforschungsanlage Julich (KFA, Juelich Nuclear Research Centre) entitled ''MAW and HTR Fuel Element Test disposal in Boreholes.'' The aim of this project is to develop a technique for the final disposal of (1) dissolver sludge, (2) cladding hulls/structural components and (3) spent HTR fuels elements in salt, and to test this technique in the abandoned Asse salt mine, including safety calculations and safety engineering demonstrations. The project is divided into the sub-projects I ''Disposal/sealing technique'' and II ''Retrievable disposal test.''

  17. Study of laser cladding nuclear valve parts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Shihong; Wang Xinlin; Huang Guodong

    1998-12-01

    The mechanism of laser cladding is discussed by using heat transfer model of laser cladding, heat conduction model of laser cladding and convective transfer mass model of laser melt-pool. Subsequently the laser cladding speed limit and the influence of laser cladding parameters on cladding layer structure is analyzed. A 5 kW with CO 2 transverse flow is used in the research for cladding treatment of sealing surface of stop valve parts of nuclear power stations. The laser cladding layer is found to be 3.0 mm thick. The cladding surface is smooth and has no such defects as crack, gas pore, etc. A series of comparisons with plasma spurt welding and arc bead welding has been performed. The results show that there are higher grain grade and hardness, lower dilution and better performances of resistance to abrasion, wear and of anti-erosion in the laser cladding layer. The new technology of laser cladding can obviously improve the quality of nuclear valve parts. Consequently it is possible to lengthen the service life of nuclear valve and to raise the safety and reliability of the production system

  18. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of spent fuel storage systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rector, D.R.; Wheeler, C.L.; Lombardo, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the COBRA-SFS (Spent Fuel Storage) computer code, which is designed to predict flow and temperature distributions in spent nuclear fuel storage and transportation systems. The decay heat generated by spent fuel in a dry storage cask is removed through a combination of conduction, natural convection, and thermal radiation. One major advantage of COBRA-SFS is that fluid recirculation within the cask is computed directly by solving the mass and momentum conservation equations. In addition, thermal radiation heat transfer is modeled using detailed radiation exchange factors based on quarter-rod segments. The equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation for incompressible flows are presented, and the semi-implicit solution method is described. COBRA-SFS predictions are compared to temperature data from a spent fuel storage cask test and the effect of different fill media on the cladding temperature distribution is discussed. The effect of spent fuel consolidation on cask thermal performance is also investigated. 16 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Examination of stainless steel-clad Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly S004 after storage in borated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langstaff, D.C.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Landow, M.P.; Pasupathi, V.; Klingensmith, R.W.

    1982-09-01

    A Connecticut Yankee fuel assembly (S004) was tested nondestructively and destructively. It was concluded that no obvious degradation of the 304L stainless steel-clad spent fuel from assembly S004 occurred during 5 y of storage in borated water. Furthermore, no obvious degradation due to the pool environment occurred on 304 stainless steel-clad rods in assemblies H07 and G11, which were stored for shorter periods but contained operationally induced cladding defects. The seam welds in the cladding on fuel rods from assembly S004, H07, and G11 were similar in that they showed a wrought microstructure with grains noticeably smaller than those in the cladding base metal. The end cap welds showed a dendritically cored structure, typical of rapidly quenched austenitic weld metal. Some intergranular melting may have occurred in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) in the cladding adjacent to the end cap welds in rods from assemblies S004 and H07. However, the weld areas did not show evidence of corrosion-induced degradation

  20. A Multi-Layered Ceramic Composite for Impermeable Fuel Cladding for COmmercial Wate Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinroth, Herbert

    2008-03-03

    A triplex nuclear fuel cladding is developed to further improve the passive safety of commercial nuclear plants, to increase the burnup and durablity of nuclear fuel, to improve the power density and economics of nuclear power, and to reduce the amount of spent fuel requiring disposal or recycle.

  1. Japanese perspectives and research on packaging, transport and storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, T.; Ito, C.; Yamakawa, H.; Shirai, K.

    2004-01-01

    The Japanese policy on spent fuel is reprocessing. Until, reprocessed, spent fuel shall be stored properly. This paper overviews current status of transport and storage of spent fuel with related research in Japan. The research was partly carried out under a contract of Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of the Japanese government

  2. Numerical/experimental research on welded joints in aluminium truss girders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hove, B.W.E.M.; Soetens, F.; Mazzolani, F.M.; Bellucci, F.; Faggiano, B.; Squillace, A.

    2016-01-01

    Welded joints in a 30 meter span aluminium truss girder were investigated numerically and experimentally. Since aluminium design rules for welded K-and N-joints in CHS truss girders were lacking the joints were checked using steel design rules. Calculations showed that the N-joints were governing

  3. Comparison of structural computer programs used for the analysis of spent fuel shipping casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friley, J.R.

    1984-09-01

    Several structural analysis computer programs were selected and used in analyses relevant to the hypothetical impact requirements for spent fuel shipping cask designs. The objective of the study was to evaluate the computer codes by performing a series of analyses and comparing results. The code evaluation efforts treated end and side impact situations only. As a result, the models were either one or two dimensional. Both clad lead and solid wall construction types were considered. For clad lead models, frictionless sliding between the lead and cladding was assumed. General agreement was achieved between the codes for problems involving non-clad models. For clad models, agreement between the codes was poor. This work was sponsored by the Department of Energy through the Transportation Technology Center at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. 16 references, 18 figures, 9 tables

  4. Physico Chemistry of the Chlorination of Aluminum Claddings in the Framework of HALOX Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Fabiola; De Micco, Georgina; Bohe, Ana; Pasquevich, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The conditioning of spent nuclear fuels from test and research reactors requires a previous physicochemical treatment to stabilize them chemically.A possible way of processing is through what was called in CNEA as Process HALOX (Halogenation and Oxidation).It consists of the selective separation of cladding by halogenation and the subsequent oxidation of the core, previously to insert it into a vitreous matrix.The halogenation aim is to transform the constituents of the 6061aluminum alloy into volatile halides.In this work we present preliminary results of the chlorination of two aluminum alloys: AA 6061 and a type of CuZnAl alloy

  5. Release of segregated nuclides from spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, L.H.; Tait, J.C. [Atomic Energy Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Laboratories

    1997-10-01

    The potential release of fission and activation products from spent nuclear fuel into groundwater after container failure in the Swedish deep repository is discussed. Data from studies of fission gas release from representative Swedish BWR fuel are used to estimate the average fission gas release for the spent fuel population. Information from a variety of leaching studies on LWR and CANDU fuel are then reviewed as a basis for estimating the fraction of the inventory of key radionuclides that could be released preferentially (the Instant Release Fraction of IRF) upon failure of the fuel cladding. The uncertainties associated with these estimates are discussed. 33 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs.

  6. Research progress of aluminium alloy endplates for PEMFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Yu.; Hou, Junbo [Fuel Cell system and Engineering Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Hou, Ming; Yan, Xiqiang; Luo, Xiaokuan; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian [Fuel Cell system and Engineering Laboratory, Dalian Institute of Chemical and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2007-04-15

    The endplate is a crucial component in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack. It can provide the necessary rigidity and strength for the stack. An aluminium alloy is one of the ideal materials for PEMFC endplates because of its low density and high rigidity. But it does not meet the requirements of corrosion resistance and electrical insulation in PEMFC environments. In this work, methods of sealing treatments and the conditions of aluminium alloy anodization were investigated. Corrosion resistances of the samples prepared by different technologies were evaluated in simulated PEMFC environments. The results showed that the corrosion resistance of the samples sealed by epoxy resin was greatly improved compared with those sealed in boiling water, and the samples anodized at a constant current density performed better than those anodized at a constant voltage. By insulation measurements, all of the samples showed good electrical insulation. The aluminium alloy endplate anodized at a constant current density and sealed with thermosetting bisphenol-A epoxy resin exhibited promising potential for practical applications by assembling it in a PEMFC stack and applying a life test. (author)

  7. The Storage of Power Development and Research Reactor Fuel at Sellafield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standring, P.N.; Callaghan, A.H.C.

    2009-01-01

    Sellafield Limited has extensive experience of building and operating spent nuclear fuel storage facilities on the Sellafield site. Since the first operation in 1952, a total of six storage facilities have been built in support of reprocessing spent fuel. Currently, four of these facilities are operational and two are undergoing decommissioning activities. Whilst the routine spent fuel operations are primarily associated with managing Magnox, Advanced Gas Reactor and LWR fuel from power generation reactors, management services to other fuel types are offered. Examples of these services include the storage of British naval training reactor fuel; the reprocessing of two skips of aluminium clad uranium metal fuel from Swedish AB SVAFO and the management of fuel from the UK Power Development Programme. The current paper provides an account of the management of the UK's Power Development Programme fuel stored on the Sellafield site. The fuel has been pond stored for up to 42 years and periodic inspection during this time has revealed no significant deterioration of the fuel, particularly that which has been containerised during its storage period. The paper also outlines some of the issues associated with the recovery and transfer of long stored fuel and assessment of the fuel storage can longevity if the material is not reprocessed. (author)

  8. Arisings of cladding wastes from nuclear fuel in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottone, G.

    1978-01-01

    An inquiry has been made in the member states on composition, activation and amounts of cladding wastes arising in the European Community until 1990 from the following reactor types: BWR, PWR, SGHWR, AGR and FBR. The elaborated results of this inquiry are given in this report. On the basis of forecasted reprocessing capacities the cumulative amount of cladding waste in the Community was estimated to reach in 1985 and 1990, respectively, about 2,100 and 7,300 metric tons. This waste will mainly consist of zircaloy and of smaller amounts of stainless steel and nickel alloy. Assuming that 0.5% of the spent fuel remains with the cladding, the contamination has been estimated for cooling times varying from 1 to 1000 years. In the first centuries activation is prevailing, but contamination determines the long-term radioactivity; consequently better decontamination, removing the alpha-bearing compounds, would be beneficial in reducing the long term hazard

  9. Management and storage of spent fuel from CEA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, F.

    1996-01-01

    CEA research reactors and their interim spent fuel storage facilities are described. Long-term solutions for spent fuel storage problems, involving wet storage at PEGASE or dry storage at CASCAD, are outlined in some detail. (author)

  10. Radioactive Release from Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel in Basin Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1999-10-21

    The report provides an evaluation of: (1) the release rate of radionuclides through minor cladding penetrations (breaches) on aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (AL SNF), and (2) the consequences of direct storage of breached AL SNF relative to the authorization basis for SRS basin operation.

  11. Radioactive Release from Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel in Basin Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    The report provides an evaluation of: (1) the release rate of radionuclides through minor cladding penetrations (breaches) on aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel (AL SNF), and (2) the consequences of direct storage of breached AL SNF relative to the authorization basis for SRS basin operation

  12. Situation of test and research reactors' spent fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Kenichi; Uchiyama, Junzo; Sato, Hiroshi

    1996-01-01

    The U.S. DOE decided a renewal Off-Site Fuel Policy for stopping to spread a highly enriched uranium which was originally enriched at the U.S., the policy declared that to receive all HEU spent fuels from Test and Research reactors in all the world. In Japan, under bilateral agreement of cooperation between the government of the United States and the government of Japan concerning peaceful uses of nuclear energy, the highly enriched uranium of Test and Research Reactors' fuels was purchased from the U.S. and the fuels had been manufactured in Japan, America, Germany and France. On the other hand, a former president of the U.S. J. Carter proposed that to convert the fuels from HEU to LEU concerning a nonproliferation of nuclear materials in 1978, and Japan absolutely supported this policy. Under this condition, the U.S. stopped to receive the spent fuels from the other countries concerning legal action to the Off-Site Fuels Policy. As a result, the spent fuels are increasing, and to cross to each reactor's storage capacity, and if this policy start, a faced crisis of Test and Research Reactors will be avoided. (author)

  13. A Prediction Study of Aluminum Alloy Oxidation of the Fuel Cladding in Jordan Research and Training Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahk, Y. W.; Oh, J. Y.; Lee, B. H.; Seo, C. G.; Chae, H. T.; Yim, J. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel with Al cladding will be used for Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). Aluminum alloy cladding experiences the oxidation layer growth on the surface during the reactor operation. The formation of oxides on the cladding affects fuel performance by increasing fuel temperature. According to the current JRTR fuel management scheme and operation strategy for 5 MW power, a fresh fuel is discharged after 900 effective full power days (EFPD) with 18 cycles of 50 days loading. For the proper prediction of the aluminum oxide thickness of fuel cladding during the long residence time, a reliable model is needed. In this work, several oxide thickness prediction models are compared with the measured data from in-pile test by RERTR program. Moreover, specific parametric studies and a preliminary prediction of the aluminum alloy oxidation using the latest model are performed for JRTR fuel

  14. The role of engineered barriers in spent fuel disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vokal, A.

    1997-01-01

    Engineered, i.e. man-made, barriers in underground spent fuel disposal include the waste form itself, the fuel cladding, the storage container, and the isolating system made of buffering, filling, and sealing materials. The parameters of and requirements for each of the components are highlighted, and the methodology of materials selection is discussed. (P.A.)

  15. The risks of the Taiwan research reactor spent fuel project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-06-01

    The proposed action is to transport up to 118 spent fuel rods, to include canned spent fuel rod particulates immobilized on filters, from a research reactor in Taiwan by sea to Hampton Roads, Virginia, and then overland by truck to the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuels at the Savannah River Site (SRS). At SRS, the spent fuel will be reprocessed to recover uranium and plutonium. 55 refs., 8 tabs

  16. Aluminium cables in automotive applications : Prestudy of aluminium cable uses in Scania products&Failure analysis and evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Man, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand of light constructed vehicles as well as soaring price of copper metal owing to limited nature resources have been promoting the use of aluminium metal as an alternative conductor of automotive cables. This thesis work is to lay theoretical foundations for further research and development regarding the introduction of new automotive cables i.e. aluminium cables. Current application of automotive aluminium cables in automotive industry as well as failure analysis and eval...

  17. Status of the DOE's foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacey, K.; Saris, E.C.

    1997-01-01

    In May 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the U.S. Department of State (DOS), adopted a policy to accept and manage in the United States ∼20 tonnes of spent nuclear fuel from research reactors in up to 41 countries. This spent fuel is being accepted under the nuclear weapons non-proliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. Only spent fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States is covered under this policy. Implementing this policy is a top priority of the DOE. The purpose of this paper is to provide the current status of the foreign research reactor acceptance program, including achievements to date and future challenges

  18. Aluminium bridges, aluminium bridge decks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetens, F.; Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2003-01-01

    Applications of aluminium have grown considerably in building and civil engineering the last decade. In building and civil engineering the increase of aluminium applications is due to various aspects like light weight, durability and maintenance, use of extrusions, and esthetics. The paper starts

  19. Experimental research on the ultimate strength of hard aluminium alloy 2017 subjected to short-time radioactive heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dafang, Wu; Yuewu, Wang; Bing, Pan; Meng, Mu; Lin, Zhu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ultimate strength at transient heating is critical to security design of missiles. ► We measure the ultimate strength of alloy 2017 subjected to transient heating. ► Experimental results at transient heating are lacking in strength design handbook. ► Ultimate strength of alloy 2017 experimented is much higher than handbook value. ► The results provide a new method for optimal design of high-speed flight vehicles. -- Abstract: Alloy 2017 (Al–Cu–Mg) is a hard aluminium alloy strengthened by heat treatment. Because of its higher strength, finer weldability and ductility, hard aluminium alloy 2017 has been widely used in the field of aeronautics and astronautics. However, the ultimate strength and other characteristic mechanical parameters of aluminium alloy 2017 in a transient heating environment are still unclear, as these key mechanical parameters are lacking in the existing strength design handbook. The experimental characterisation of these critical parameters of aluminium alloy 2017 is undoubtedly meaningful for reliably estimating life span of and improving safety in designing high-speed flight vehicles. In this paper, the high-temperature ultimate strength, loading time and other mechanical properties of hard aluminium alloy 2017 under different transient heating temperatures and loading conditions are investigated by combining a transient aerodynamic heating simulation system and a material testing machine. The experimental results reveal that the ultimate strength and loading capability of aluminium alloy 2017 subjected to transient thermal heating are much higher than those tested in a long-time stable high-temperature environment. The research of this work not only provides a substantial basis for the loading capability improvement and optimal design of aerospace materials and structures subject to transient heating but also presents a new research direction with a practical application value.

  20. 78 FR 20625 - Spent Nuclear Fuel Management at the Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Engineering Laboratory Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Programs Final Environmental Impact... generated at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and approximately 1,000 bundles of aluminum-clad SNF... processing is a chemical separations process that involves dissolving spent fuel in nitric acid and...

  1. Assessment of conditions of the spent nuclear fuel stored in the stainless steel channel-holders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.; Sotic, O.; Cupac, S.; Maksin, T.; Dasic, N.

    2003-01-01

    The IAEA technical co-operation project 'Safe Removal of Spent Fuel of the Vinca RA Research Reactor' is carried out at the Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro, since January 2003. Present activities will provide up-to-date information on the conditions of the spent nuclear fuel, stored in the stainless steel channel-holders ('chekhols') and on the water quality in the storage basins. Water samples taken out from the chekhols and the basins are measured to determine their activity and chemical parameters. Until September 2003, about 1/3 of the chekhols containing spent fuel elements with initial enrichment of 2% and 80% of uranium were inspected. High activity of Cs-137 was found in several water samples taken out from chekhols. All water samples show very high electrical conductivity, while those taken from the basins show the presence of chlorides and aluminium ions, too. Information on established procedures and measuring results are given in this paper. The obtained results, so far, show that the spent nuclear fuel elements are leaking in about 10% of chekhols. (author)

  2. Behavior of high-density spent-fuel storage racks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1986-08-01

    Included in this report is a summary of information on neutron-absorbing materials such as B 4 C in an aluminum matrix or organic binder material, stainless steel-boron and aluminum-boron alloys, and stainless steetl-clad cadmium that are used in high-density spent fuel storage racks. A list of the types of neutron-absorbing materials being used in spent fuel storage racks at domestic commercial plants is provided. Recent cases at several domestic plants where swelling of rack side plates (where the B 4 C in an aluminum matrix and B 4 C in an organic binder material were located) occurred are reviewed

  3. Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Kanter, J.L.C.G.

    2006-01-01

    Summary accompanying the thesis: Energy Absorption of Monolithic and Fibre Reinforced Aluminium Cylinders by Jens de Kanter This thesis presents the investigation of the crush behaviour of both monolithic aluminium cylinders and externally fibre reinforced aluminium cylinders. The research is based

  4. Burn-up credit in criticality safety of PWR spent fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Rowayda F., E-mail: Rowayda_mahmoud@yahoo.com [Metallurgy Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); Shaat, Mohamed K. [Nuclear Engineering, Reactors Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt); Nagy, M.E.; Agamy, S.A. [Professor of Nuclear Engineering, Nuclear and Radiation Department, Alexandria University (Egypt); Abdelrahman, Adel A. [Metallurgy Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority (Egypt)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Designing spent fuel wet storage using WIMS-5D and MCNP-5 code. • Studying fresh and burned fuel with/out absorber like “B{sub 4}C and Ag–In–Cd” in racks. • Sub-criticality was confirmed for fresh and burned fuel under specific cases. • Studies for BU credit recommend increasing fuel burn-up to 60.0 GWD/MTU. • Those studies require new core structure materials, fuel composition and cladding. - Abstract: The criticality safety calculations were performed for a proposed design of a wet spent fuel storage pool. This pool will be used for the storage of spent fuel discharged from a typical pressurized water reactor (PWR). The mathematical model based on the international validated codes, WIMS-5 and MCNP-5 were used for calculating the effective multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, for the spent fuel stored in the pool. The data library for the multi-group neutron microscopic cross-sections was used for the cell calculations. The k{sub eff} was calculated for several changes in water density, water level, assembly pitch and burn-up with different initial fuel enrichment and new types and amounts of fixed absorbers. Also, k{sub eff} was calculated for the conservative fresh fuel case. The results of the calculations confirmed that the effective multiplication factor for the spent fuel storage is sub-critical for all normal and abnormal states. The future strategy for the burn-up credit recommends increasing the fuel burn-up to a value >60.0 GWD/MTU, which requires new fuel composition and new fuel cladding material with the assessment of the effects of negative reactivity build up.

  5. The impact of interface bonding efficiency on high-burnup spent nuclear fuel dynamic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Hao, E-mail: jiangh@ornl.gov; Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • To investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on its dynamic performance. • Flexural rigidity, EI = M/κ, estimated from FEA results were benchmarked with SNF dynamic experimental results, and used to evaluate interface bonding efficiency. • Interface bonding efficiency can significantly dictate the SNF system rigidity and the associated dynamic performance. • With consideration of interface bonding efficiency and fuel cracking, HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with SNF static and dynamic experimental data. - Abstract: Finite element analysis (FEA) was used to investigate the impact of interfacial bonding efficiency at pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces of high-burnup (HBU) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) on system dynamic performance. Bending moments M were applied to FEA model to evaluate the system responses. From bending curvature, κ, flexural rigidity EI can be estimated as EI = M/κ. The FEA simulation results were benchmarked with experimental results from cyclic integrated reversal bending fatigue test (CIRFT) of HBR fuel rods. The consequence of interface debonding between fuel pellets and cladding is a redistribution of the loads carried by the fuel pellets to the clad, which results in a reduction in composite rod system flexural rigidity. Therefore, the interface bonding efficiency at the pellet-pellet and pellet-clad interfaces can significantly dictate the SNF system dynamic performance. With the consideration of interface bonding efficiency, the HBU SNF fuel property was estimated with CIRFT test data.

  6. Spent fuel waste form characteristics: Grain and fragment size statistical dependence for dissolution response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stout, R.B.; Leider, H.; Weed, H.; Nguyen, S.; McKenzie, W.; Prussin, S.; Wilson, C.N.; Gray, W.J.

    1991-04-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project of the US Department of Energy is investigating the suitability of the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, NV, for a high-level nuclear waste repository. All of the nuclear waste will be enclosed in a container package. Most of the nuclear waste will be in the form of fractured UO 2 spent fuel pellets in Zircaloy-clad rods from electric power reactors. If failure of both the container and its enclosed clad rods occurs, then the fragments of the fractured UO 2 spent fuel will be exposed to their surroundings. Even though the surroundings are an unsaturated zone, a possibility of water transport exists, and consequently, UO 2 spent fuel dissolution may occur. A repository requirement imposes a limit on the nuclide release per year during a 10,000 year period; thus the short term dissolution response from fragmented fuel pellet surfaces in any given year must be understood. This requirement necessitates that both experimental and analytical activities be directed toward predicting the relatively short term dissolution response of UO 2 spent fuel. The short term dissolution response involves gap nuclides, grain boundary nuclides, and grain volume nuclides. Analytical expressions are developed that describe the combined geometrical influences of grain boundary nuclides and grain volume nuclides on the dissolution rate of spent fuel. 7 refs., 1 fig

  7. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.; Croson, M.L.

    1994-01-01

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented

  8. Determining Bond Sodium Remaining in Plenum Region of Spent Nuclear Driver Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaden, D.; Li, S.X.

    2008-01-01

    The Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) treats spent nuclear fuel using an electro-chemical process that separates the uranium from the fission products, sodium thermal bond, and cladding materials (REF 1). Upon immersion into the ER electrolyte, the sodium used to thermally bond the fuel to the clad jacket chemically reacts with the UCl3 in the electrolyte producing NaCl and uranium metal. The uranium in the spent fuel is separated from the cladding and fission products by taking advantage of the electro-chemical potential differences between uranium and the other fuel components. Assuming all the sodium in the thermal bond is converted to NaCl in the ER, the difference between the cumulative bond sodium mass in the fuel elements and the cumulative sodium mass found in the driver ER electrolyte inventory provides an upper mass limit for the sodium that migrated to the upper gas region, or plenum section, of the fuel element during irradiation in the reactor. The plenums are to be processed as metal waste via melting and metal consolidation operations. However, depending on the amount of sodium in the plenums, additional processing may be required to remove the sodium before metal waste processing

  9. A simplified computational scheme for thermal analysis of LWR spent fuel dry storage and transportation casks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Hyun

    1997-02-01

    A simplified computational scheme for thermal analysis of the LWR spent fuel dry storage and transportation casks has been developed using two-step thermal analysis method incorporating effective thermal conductivity model for the homogenized spent fuel assembly. Although a lot of computer codes and analytical models have been developed for application to the fields of thermal analysis of dry storage and/or transportation casks, some difficulties in its analysis arise from the complexity of the geometry including the rod bundles of spent fuel and the heat transfer phenomena in the cavity of cask. Particularly, if the disk-type structures such as fuel baskets and aluminium heat transfer fins are included, the thermal analysis problems in the cavity are very complex. To overcome these difficulties, cylindrical coordinate system is adopted to calculate the temperature profile of a cylindrical cask body using the multiple cylinder model as the step-1 analysis of the present study. In the step-2 analysis, Cartesian coordinate system is adopted to calculate the temperature distributions of the disk-type structures such as fuel basket and aluminium heat transfer fin using three- dimensional conduction analysis model. The effective thermal conductivity for homogenized spent fuel assembly based on Manteufel and Todreas model is incorporated in step-2 analysis to predict the maximum fuel temperature. The presented two-step computational scheme has been performed using an existing HEATING 7.2 code and the effective thermal conductivity for the homogenized spent fuel assembly has been calculated by additional numerical analyses. Sample analyses of five cases are performed for NAC-STC including normal transportation condition to examine the applicability of the presented simplified computational scheme for thermal analysis of the large LWR spent fuel dry storage and transportation casks and heat transfer characteristics in the cavity of the cask with the disk-type structures

  10. Initial results for electrochemical dissolution of spent EBR-II fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, S. X.

    1998-01-01

    Initial results are reported for the anode behavior of spent metallic nuclear fuel in an electrorefining process. The anode behavior has been characterized in terms of the initial spent fuel composition and the final composition of the residual cladding hulls. A variety of results have been obtained depending on the experimental conditions. Some of the process variables considered are average and maximum cell voltage, average and maximum anode voltage, amount of electrical charge passed (coulombs or amp-hours) during the experiment, and cell resistance. The main goal of the experiments has been the nearly complete dissolution of uranium with the retention of zirconium and noble metal fission products in the cladding hulls. Analysis has shown that the most indicative parameters for determining an endpoint to the process, recognizing the stated goal, are the maximum anode voltage and the amount of electrical charge passed. For the initial experiments reported here, the best result obtained is greater than 98% uranium dissolution with approximately 50% zirconium retention. Noble metal fission product retention appears to be correlated with zirconium retention

  11. Transportation of failed or damaged foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, C.E.; Mustin, T.P.; Massey, C.D.

    1998-01-01

    Since resuming the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance Program in 1996, the Program has had to deal with difficult issues associated with the transportation of failed or damaged spent fuel. In several instances, problems with failed or damaged fuel have prevented the acceptance of the fuel at considerable cost to both the Department of Energy (DOE) and research reactor operators. In response to the problems faced by the Acceptance Program, DOE has undertaken significant steps to better define the spent fuel acceptance criteria. DOE has worked closely with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address failed or damaged research reactor spent fuel and to identify cask certificate issues which must be resolved by cask owners and foreign regulatory authorities. The specific issues associated with the transport of Materials Testing Reactor (MTR)-type FRR SNF will be discussed. The information presented will include U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory issues, cask certificate issues, technical constraints, and lessons learned. Specific information will also be provided on the latest efforts to revise DOE's Appendix B, Transport Package (Cask) Acceptance Criteria. The information presented in this paper will be important to foreign research reactor operators, shippers, and cask vendors, so that appropriate amendments to the Certificate of Compliance for spent fuel casks can be submitted in a timely manner to facilitate the safe and scheduled transport of FRR SNF

  12. Feasibility of long-life and corrosion-resistant canister with titanium cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Masahiro; Tokiwai, Moriyasu; Saegusa, Toshiari

    2008-01-01

    In order to store nuclear spent fuels for a long term, we propose the concept of stainless steel canister with titanium cladding. The stainless canister is first brazed to titanium plates, and then the brazed joints are covered with other titanium plates. A MIG brazing for titanium and stainless steel was demonstrated with a brazing metal of Cu-1Mn-3Si alloy (MG960). JIS G 0601 shear strength, tensile shear stress and peel strength tests are conducted for the optimized MIG brazing conditions. These results showed the MIG brazing specimens possess adequate structural strength. After the salt spray test on the basis of JIS Z 2371, there were no pitting and general corrosions on a TIG welding specimen between titanium plates. The corrosion resistance is therefore, sufficiently high. Manufacturing cost estimation suggests that the titanium cladding concept is feasible thereby using 1-mm-thick titanium plates to reduce the material cost. In addition to this concept, we propose another concept of the canister by using titanium-stainless steel cladding plates to reduce a number of brazing joints. (author)

  13. Modelling spent fuel and HLW behaviour in repository conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esparza, A. M.; Esteban, J. A.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this report is to give the reader an overall insight of the different models, which are used to predict the long-term behaviour of the spent fuels and HLW disposed in a repository. The models must be established on basic data and robust kinetics describing the mechanisms controlling spent fuel alteration/dissolution in a repository. The UO2 matrix, or source term, contains embedded in it the , majority of radionuclides of the spent fuel (some are in the gap cladding). For this reason the SF radionuclides release models play a significant role in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The differences existing between models published in the literature are due to the conceptual understanding of the processes and the degree of the conservatism used with the parameter values, and the boundary conditions. They mainly differ in their level of simplification and their final objective. Sometimes are focused the show compliance with regulatory requirements, other to support decision making, to increase the level of confidence of public and scientific community, could be empirical, semi-empirical or analytical. The models take into account the experimental results from radionuclides releases and their extrapolation to the very long term. Its necessary a great statistics for have a representative dissolution rate, due at the number of experimental results is not very high and many of them show a great scatter, independently of theirs different compositions by axial and radial variations, due to linear power or local burnup. On the other hand, it is difficult to predict the spent fuel behaviour over the long term, based in short term experiments. In this report is given a little description of the radionuclides distribution in the spent fuel and also in the cladding/pellet gap, grain boundary, cracks and rim zones (the matrix rim zone can be considered with an especial characteristics very different to the rest of the spent fuel), and structural

  14. Modelling spent fuel and HLW behaviour in repository conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esparza, A M; Esteban, J A

    2003-07-01

    The aim of this report is to give the reader an overall insight of the different models, which are used to predict the long-term behaviour of the spent fuels and HLW disposed in a repository. The models must be established on basic data and robust kinetics describing the mechanisms controlling spent fuel alteration/dissolution in a repository. The UO2 matrix, or source term, contains embedded in it the , majority of radionuclides of the spent fuel (some are in the gap cladding). For this reason the SF radionuclides release models play a significant role in the performance assessment of radioactive waste disposal. The differences existing between models published in the literature are due to the conceptual understanding of the processes and the degree of the conservatism used with the parameter values, and the boundary conditions. They mainly differ in their level of simplification and their final objective. Sometimes are focused the show compliance with regulatory requirements, other to support decision making, to increase the level of confidence of public and scientific community, could be empirical, semi-empirical or analytical. The models take into account the experimental results from radionuclides releases and their extrapolation to the very long term. Its necessary a great statistics for have a representative dissolution rate, due at the number of experimental results is not very high and many of them show a great scatter, independently of theirs different compositions by axial and radial variations, due to linear power or local burnup. On the other hand, it is difficult to predict the spent fuel behaviour over the long term, based in short term experiments. In this report is given a little description of the radionuclides distribution in the spent fuel and also in the cladding/pellet gap, grain boundary, cracks and rim zones (the matrix rim zone can be considered with an especial characteristics very different to the rest of the spent fuel), and structural

  15. Electrically heated ex-reactor pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) simulations utilizing irradiated Zircaloy cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barner, J.O.; Fitzsimmons, D.E.

    1985-02-01

    In a program sponsored by the Fuel Systems Research Branch of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, a series of six electrically heated fuel rod simulation tests were conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The primary objective of these tests was to determine the susceptibility of irradiated pressurized-water reactor (PWR) Zircaloy-4 cladding to failures caused by pellet-cladding mechanical interaction (PCMI). A secondary objective was to acquire kinetic data (e.g., ridge growth or relaxation rates) that might be helpful in the interpretation of in-reactor performance results and/or the modeling of PCMI. No cladding failures attributable to PCMI occurred during the six tests. This report describes the testing methods, testing apparatus, fuel rod diametral strain-measuring device, and test matrix. Test results are presented and discussed

  16. Oxidation of aluminum alloy cladding for research and test reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Hofman, G. L.; Robinson, A. B.; Snelgrove, J. L.; Hanan, N.

    2008-08-01

    The oxide thicknesses on aluminum alloy cladding were measured for the test plates from irradiation tests RERTR-6 and 7A in the ATR (advanced test reactor). The measured thicknesses were substantially lower than those of test plates with similar power from other reactors available in the literature. The main reason is believed to be due to the lower pH (pH 5.1-5.3) of the primary coolant water in the ATR than in the other reactors (pH 5.9-6.5) for which we have data. An empirical model for oxide film thickness predictions on aluminum alloy used as fuel cladding in the test reactors was developed as a function of irradiation time, temperature, surface heat flux, pH, and coolant flow rate. The applicable ranges of pH and coolant flow rates cover most research and test reactors. The predictions by the new model are in good agreement with the in-pile test data available in the literature as well as with the RERTR test data measured in the ATR.

  17. Oxidation of aluminum alloy cladding for research and test reactor fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeon Soo [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: yskim@anl.gov; Hofman, G.L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Robinson, A.B. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-6188 (United States); Snelgrove, J.L.; Hanan, N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Nuclear Engineering, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2008-08-31

    The oxide thicknesses on aluminum alloy cladding were measured for the test plates from irradiation tests RERTR-6 and 7A in the ATR (advanced test reactor). The measured thicknesses were substantially lower than those of test plates with similar power from other reactors available in the literature. The main reason is believed to be due to the lower pH (pH 5.1-5.3) of the primary coolant water in the ATR than in the other reactors (pH 5.9-6.5) for which we have data. An empirical model for oxide film thickness predictions on aluminum alloy used as fuel cladding in the test reactors was developed as a function of irradiation time, temperature, surface heat flux, pH, and coolant flow rate. The applicable ranges of pH and coolant flow rates cover most research and test reactors. The predictions by the new model are in good agreement with the in-pile test data available in the literature as well as with the RERTR test data measured in the ATR.

  18. Non-destructive control of cladding thickness of fuel elements for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlov, Y.; Zhukov, Y.; Chashchin, S

    1997-07-01

    The control method of fuel elements for research reactors by means of measuring beta particles back scattering made it possible to perform complete automatic non-destructive control of internal and external claddings at our plant. This control gives high guarantees of the fuel element correspondence to the requirements. The method can be used to control the three-layer items of different geometry, including plates. (author)

  19. Net shape powder processing of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaffer, G.B.

    2000-01-01

    The increasing interest in light weight materials coupled to the need for cost-effective processing have combined to create a significant opportunity for aluminium powder metallurgy. Net shape processing of aluminium using the classical press-and-sinter powder metallurgy technique is a unique and important metal-forming method which is cost effective in producing complex parts at, or very close to, final dimensions. This paper provides an overview of the net shape powder processing of aluminium. Current research is critically reviewed and the future potential is briefly considered

  20. Development of advanced zirconium fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Young Hwan; Park, S. Y.; Lee, M. H.

    2007-04-01

    This report includes the manufacturing technology developed for HANA TM claddings, a series of their characterization results as well as the results of their in-pile and out-of pile performances tests which were carried out to develop some fuel claddings for a high burn-up (70,000MWd/mtU) which are competitive in the world market. Some of the HANA TM claddings, which had been manufactured based on the results from the 1st and 2nd phases of the project, have been tested in a research reactor in Halden of Norway for an in-pile performance qualification. The results of the in-pile test showed that the performance of the HANA TM claddings for corrosion and creep was better than 50% compared to that of Zircaloy-4 or A cladding. It was also found that the out-of pile performance of the HANA TM claddings for such as LOCA and RIA in some accident conditions corrosion creep, tensile, burst and fatigue was superior or equivalent to that of the Zircaloy-4 or A cladding. The project also produced the other many data which were required to get a license for an in-pile test of HANA TM claddings in a commercial reactor. The data for the qualification or characterization were provided for KNFC to assist their activities to get the license for the in-pile test of HANA TM Lead Test Rods(LTR) in a commercial reactor

  1. Actions for continued safe wet storage of spent nuclear fuel at VVR-S reactor in Bucharest-Magurele

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isbasescu, M.; Zorliu, A.; Silviu-laurentiu, B.; Stefan, V. . E-mail address of corresponding author: mirifa@ifin.nipne.ro; Isbasescu, M.)

    2005-01-01

    The Romanian VVR-S research reactor is located 8 kilometers from Bucharest in the town of Magurele and was operated by the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH). The reactor first reached criticality in July 1957 and operated until December 1997 when it was permanently shutdown. The VVR - S reactor of IFIN has two repositories for spent fuel elements: (1) Cooling pool located in the reactor room; (2) Long-term repositories located outside the reactor building - SNFW (spent nuclear fuel warehouse). The major factors believed to influence the pitting of aluminium alloys are conductivity, pH, and bicarbonate, chloride, sulphate and oxygen content. Some of these parameters have been analyzed at SNFW-IFIN-HH. (author)

  2. The Analytical Repository Source-Term (AREST) model: Analysis of spent fuel as a nuclear waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apted, M.J.; Liebetrau, A.M.; Engel, D.W.

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to assess the performance of spent fuel as a final waste form. The release of radionuclides from spent nuclear fuel has been simulated for the three repository sites that were nominated for site characterization in accordance with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. The simulation is based on waste package designs that were presented in the environmental assessments prepared for each site. Five distinct distributions for containment failure have been considered, and the release for nuclides from the UO 2 matrix, gap (including grain boundary), crud/surface layer, and cladding has been calculated with the Analytic Repository Source-Term (AREST) code. Separate scenarios involving incongruent and congruent release from the UO 2 matrix have also been examined using the AREST code. Congruent release is defined here as the condition in which the relative mass release rates of a given nuclide and uranium from the UO 2 matrix are equal to their mass ratios in the matrix. Incongruent release refers to release of a given nuclide from the UO 2 matrix controlled by its own solubility-limiting solid phase. Release of nuclides from other sources within the spent fuel (e.g., cladding, fuel/cladding gap) is evaluated separately from either incongruent or congruent matrix release. 51 refs., 200 figs., 9 tabs

  3. Engineered zircaloy cladding modifications for improved accident tolerance of LWR fuel: US DOE NEUP Integrated Research Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heuser, Brent

    2013-01-01

    An integrated research project (IRP) to fabricate and evaluate modified zircaloy LWR cladding under normal BWR/PWR operation and off-normal events has been funded by the US DOE. The IRP involves three US academic institutions, a US national laboratory, an intermediate stock industrial cladding supplier, and an international academic institution. A combination of computational and experimental protocols will be employed to design and test modified zircaloy cladding with respect to corrosion and accelerated oxide growth, the former associated with normal operation, the latter associated with steam exposure during loss of coolant accidents (LOCAs) and low-pressure core re-floods. Efforts will be made to go beyond design-base accident (DBA) scenarios (cladding temperature equal to or less than 1204 deg. C) during the experimental phase of modified zircaloy performance characterisation. The project anticipates the use of the facilities at ORNL to achieve steam exposure beyond DBA scenarios. In addition, irradiation of down-selected modified cladding candidates in the ATR may be performed. Cladding performance evaluation will be incorporated into a reactor system modelling effort of fuel performance, neutronics, and thermal hydraulics, thereby providing a holistic approach to accident-tolerant nuclear fuel. The proposed IRP brings together personnel, facilities, and capabilities across a wide range of technical areas relevant to the study of modified nuclear fuel and LWR performance during normal operation and off-normal scenarios. Two pathways towards accident-tolerant LWR fuel are envisioned, both based on the modification of existing zircaloy cladding. The first is the modification of the cladding surface by the application of a coating layer designed to shift the M + O→MO reaction away from oxide growth during steam exposure at elevated temperatures. This pathway is referred to as the 'surface coating' solution. The second is the modification of the bulk

  4. Rows of Dislocation Loops in Aluminium Irradiated by Aluminium Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, L.; Johansen, A.; Koch, J.

    1967-01-01

    Single-crystal aluminium specimens, irradiated with 50-keV aluminium ions, contain dislocation loops that are arranged in regular rows along <110 > directions. ©1967 The American Institute of Physics......Single-crystal aluminium specimens, irradiated with 50-keV aluminium ions, contain dislocation loops that are arranged in regular rows along directions. ©1967 The American Institute of Physics...

  5. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassayre, L., E-mail: cassayre@chimie.ups-tlse.fr [Laboratoire de Genie Chimique (LGC), Departement Procedes Electrochimiques, CNRS-UMR 5503, Universite de Toulouse III - Paul Sabatier, 31062 Toulouse (France); Soucek, P.; Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Nourry, C.; Eloirdi, R.; Glatz, J.-P. [European Commission, JRC, Institute for Transuranium Elements, Postfach 2340, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Pyrochemical processes in molten LiCl-KCl are being developed in ITU for recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The fuel is anodically dissolved to the molten salt electrolyte and actinides are electrochemically reduced on solid aluminium cathodes forming solid actinide-aluminium alloys. A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from the alloys. This route consists in three steps: Vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorination of the actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorine gas and sublimation of the formed AlCl{sub 3}. A thermochemical study showed thermodynamic feasibility of all three steps. On the basis of the conditions identified by the calculations, experiments using pure UAl{sub 3} alloy were carried out to evaluate and optimise the chlorination step. The work was focused on determination of the optimal temperature and Cl{sub 2}/UAl{sub 3} molar ratio, providing complete chlorination of the alloy without formation of volatile UCl{sub 5} and UCl{sub 6}. The results showed high efficient chlorination at a temperature of 150 deg. C.

  6. Recovery of actinides from actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorination: Part I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassayre, L.; Soucek, P.; Mendes, E.; Malmbeck, R.; Nourry, C.; Eloirdi, R.; Glatz, J.-P.

    2011-01-01

    Pyrochemical processes in molten LiCl-KCl are being developed in ITU for recovery of actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The fuel is anodically dissolved to the molten salt electrolyte and actinides are electrochemically reduced on solid aluminium cathodes forming solid actinide-aluminium alloys. A chlorination route is being investigated for recovery of actinides from the alloys. This route consists in three steps: Vacuum distillation for removal of the salt adhered on the electrode, chlorination of the actinide-aluminium alloys by chlorine gas and sublimation of the formed AlCl 3 . A thermochemical study showed thermodynamic feasibility of all three steps. On the basis of the conditions identified by the calculations, experiments using pure UAl 3 alloy were carried out to evaluate and optimise the chlorination step. The work was focused on determination of the optimal temperature and Cl 2 /UAl 3 molar ratio, providing complete chlorination of the alloy without formation of volatile UCl 5 and UCl 6 . The results showed high efficient chlorination at a temperature of 150 deg. C.

  7. Monitoring the oxidation of nuclear fuel cladding using Raman spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mi, Hongyi; Mikael, Solomon; Allen, Todd; Sridharan, Kumar; Butt, Darryl; Blanchard, James P.; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to observe Zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) cladding oxidation within a spent fuel canister, cladding oxidized in air at 500 °C was investigated by micro-Raman spectroscopy to measure the oxide layer thickness. Systematic Raman scans were performed to study the relationship between typical Raman spectra and various oxide layer thicknesses. The thicknesses of the oxide layers developed for various exposure times were measured by cross-sectional Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results of this work reveal that each oxide layer thickness has a corresponding typical Raman spectrum. Detailed analysis suggests that the Raman scattering peaks around wave numbers of 180 cm −1 and 630 cm −1 are the best choices for accurately determining the oxide layer thickness. After Gaussian–Lorentzian deconvolution, these two peaks can be quantitatively represented by four peaks. The intensities of the deconvoluted peaks increase consistently as the oxide layer becomes thicker and sufficiently strong signals are produced, allowing one to distinguish the bare and oxidized cladding samples, as well as samples with different oxide layer thicknesses. Hence, a process that converts sample oxide layer thickness to optical signals can be achieved

  8. Multiply-negatively charged aluminium clusters and fullerenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Noelle

    2008-07-15

    Multiply negatively charged aluminium clusters and fullerenes were generated in a Penning trap using the 'electron-bath' technique. Aluminium monoanions were generated using a laser vaporisation source. After this, two-, three- and four-times negatively charged aluminium clusters were generated for the first time. This research marks the first observation of tetra-anionic metal clusters in the gas phase. Additionally, doubly-negatively charged fullerenes were generated. The smallest fullerene dianion observed contained 70 atoms. (orig.)

  9. Swedish research on aluminium reactor technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsen, Bjoern

    1960-02-15

    A historical survey of the work done in Sweden this subject is given in the first part of the paper. The second part is elevated to a brief outline of the authors view of the present status of corrosion theories for aluminium in high temperature water. A theory where the crystallization of boehemite from the barrier layer is considered as an important control of the corrosion reaction is presented.

  10. Swedish research on aluminium reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsen, Bjoern

    1960-02-01

    A historical survey of the work done in Sweden this subject is given in the first part of the paper. The second part is elevated to a brief outline of the authors view of the present status of corrosion theories for aluminium in high temperature water. A theory where the crystallization of boehemite from the barrier layer is considered as an important control of the corrosion reaction is presented

  11. The aluminium content of infant formulas remains too high.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuchu, Nancy; Patel, Bhavini; Sebastian, Blaise; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-08

    Recent research published in this journal highlighted the issue of the high content of aluminium in infant formulas. The expectation was that the findings would serve as a catalyst for manufacturers to address a significant problem of these, often necessary, components of infant nutrition. It is critically important that parents and other users have confidence in the safety of infant formulas and that they have reliable information to use in choosing a product with a lower content of aluminium. Herein, we have significantly extended the scope of the previous research and the aluminium content of 30 of the most widely available and often used infant formulas has been measured. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were subjected to microwave digestion in the presence of 15.8 M HNO3 and 30% w/v H2O2 and the aluminium content of the digests was measured by TH GFAAS. Both ready-to-drink milks and milk powders were contaminated with aluminium. The concentration of aluminium across all milk products ranged from ca 100 to 430 μg/L. The concentration of aluminium in two soya-based milk products was 656 and 756 μg/L. The intake of aluminium from non-soya-based infant formulas varied from ca 100 to 300 μg per day. For soya-based milks it could be as high as 700 μg per day. All 30 infant formulas were contaminated with aluminium. There was no clear evidence that subsequent to the problem of aluminium being highlighted in a previous publication in this journal that contamination had been addressed and reduced. It is the opinion of the authors that regulatory and other non-voluntary methods are now required to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas and thereby protect infants from chronic exposure to dietary aluminium.

  12. Spent fuels conditioning and irradiated nuclear fuel elements examination: the STAR facility and its abilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boussard, F.; Huillery, R. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. d`Etudes des Combustibles; Averseng, J.L.; Serpantie, J.P. [Novatome Industries, 92 - Le Plessis-Robinson (France)

    1994-12-31

    This paper is a presentation of the STAR facility, a high activity laboratory located in Cadarache Nuclear Research Center (France). The purpose of the STAR facility and of the associated processes, is the treatment, cleaning and conditioning of spent fuels from Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) and in particular of about 2300 spent GCR fuel cartridges irradiated more than 20 years ago in Electricite de France (EDF) or CEA Uranium Graphite GCR. The processes are: to separate the nuclear fuel from the clad remains, to chemically stabilize the nuclear material and to condition it in sealed canisters. An additional objective of STAR consists in non-destructive or destructive examinations and tests on PWR rods or FBR pins in the frame of fuel development programs. The paper describes the STAR facility conceptual design (safety design rules, hot cells..) and the different options corresponding to the GCR reconditioning process and to further research and development works on various fuel types. (J.S.). 3 figs.

  13. Spent fuels conditioning and irradiated nuclear fuel elements examination: the STAR facility and its abilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boussard, F.; Huillery, R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is a presentation of the STAR facility, a high activity laboratory located in Cadarache Nuclear Research Center (France). The purpose of the STAR facility and of the associated processes, is the treatment, cleaning and conditioning of spent fuels from Gas Cooled Reactors (GCR) and in particular of about 2300 spent GCR fuel cartridges irradiated more than 20 years ago in Electricite de France (EDF) or CEA Uranium Graphite GCR. The processes are: to separate the nuclear fuel from the clad remains, to chemically stabilize the nuclear material and to condition it in sealed canisters. An additional objective of STAR consists in non-destructive or destructive examinations and tests on PWR rods or FBR pins in the frame of fuel development programs. The paper describes the STAR facility conceptual design (safety design rules, hot cells..) and the different options corresponding to the GCR reconditioning process and to further research and development works on various fuel types. (J.S.). 3 figs

  14. FRAPCON analysis of cladding performance during dry storage operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, David J.; Geelhood, Kenneth J.

    2018-03-01

    There is an increasing need in the U.S. and around the world to move used nuclear fuel from wet storage in fuel pools to dry storage in casks stored at independent spent fuel storage installations (ISFSI) or interim storage sites. The NRC limits cladding temperature to 400°C while maintaining cladding hoop stress below 90 MPa in an effort to avoid radial hydride reorientation. An analysis was conducted with FRAPCON-4.0 on three modern fuel designs with three representative used nuclear fuel storage temperature profiles that peaked at 400 °C. Results were representative of the majority of U.S. LWR fuel. They conservatively showed that hoop stress remains below 90 MPa at the licensing temperature limit. Results also show that the limiting case for hoop stress may not be at the highest rod internal pressure in all cases but will be related to the axial temperature and oxidation profiles of the rods at the end of life and in storage.

  15. Development of U-frame bending system for studying the vibration integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Jy-An John; Tan, Ting; Jiang, Hao; Cox, Thomas S.; Howard, Rob L.; Bevard, Bruce B.; Flanagan, Michelle

    2013-09-01

    A bending fatigue system developed to evaluate the response of spent nuclear fuel rods to vibration loads is presented. A U-frame testing setup is used for imposing bending loads on the fuel rod specimen. The U-frame setup consists of two rigid arms, side connecting plates to the rigid arms, and linkages to a universal testing machine. The test specimen's curvature is obtained through a three-point deflection measurement method. The tests using surrogate specimens with stainless steel cladding revealed increased flexural rigidity under unidirectional cyclic bending, significant effect of cladding-pellets bonding on the response of surrogate rods, and substantial cyclic softening in reverse bending mode. These phenomena may cast light on the expected response of a spent nuclear fuel rod. The developed U-frame system is thus verified and demonstrated to be ready for further pursuit in hot-cell tests.

  16. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradbury, M.H.; Pickering, S.; Whitlow, W.H.

    1977-01-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  17. Some proposed mechanisms for internal cladding corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradbury, M H; Pickering, S; Whitlow, W H [EURATOM (United Kingdom)

    1977-04-01

    In spite of extensive research during recent years, a comprehensive model for internal cladding corrosion in fast reactor oxide fuel pins has not yet been established. In this paper, a model is proposed which accounts for many of the features normally associated with this type of corrosion. The model is composed of a number of parts which describe the chronological sequence of events at the fuel/cladding interface. The corrosion reaction is visualised as being primarily chemical in character, involving the cladding steel, the fuel and the more aggressive fission products, notably caesium in the presence of oxygen. The model attempts to explain how corrosion starts, how it depends on the oxygen potential, why it occurs non-uniformly; also covered are phase changes within the cladding steel and morphological features such as the intergranular form of attack and the distribution of corrosion products in the fuel/cladding gap. (author)

  18. Investigation and recovery of unrecovered fuel pellets and cladding tube pieces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Keiji

    1980-01-01

    The total weight of the fuel pellets lost due to break was about 1206 g, and cladding tube pieces were about 217 g. Among these, the pellets of about 527 g and the cladding tube pieces of about 152 g were recovered when broken fuel rods were discovered. It is not desirable to leave these broken pieces as unrecovered in view of safety and the management of nuclear fuel materials. Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., investigated the position and the amount of these pellets and cladding tube pieces for about a year, and recovered a part of them. The results were written in two reports. The objects of the investigation and recovery, and the method of recovery are explained. The UO 2 and zirconium recovered were 58.52 g and 369.58 g, respectively. The solid pellets were recovered from the reactor, fuel assemblies, a spent fuel pit and canals, and the content in sludge was recovered from other installations. The amounts of unrecovered pellets and cladding tube pieces in primary cooling water, coolant filters, sealing water filters, primary cooling pipes, waste resins and fuel assemblies were estimated. The problems concerning the recovery and estimation are pointed out. The results of estimating the amount of uranium in coolant filters and sealing water filters are useful to know the time of the occurrence of accident. (Kako, I.)

  19. A method for determining the spent-fuel contribution to transport cask containment requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, T.L.; Seager, K.D.; Rashid, Y.R.; Barrett, P.R.; Malinauskas, A.P.; Einziger, R.E.; Jordan, H.; Reardon, P.C.

    1992-11-01

    This report examines containment requirements for spent-fuel transport containers that are transported under normal and hypothetical accident conditions. A methodology is described that estimates the probability of rod failure and the quantity of radioactive material released from breached rods. This methodology characterizes the dynamic environment of the cask and its contents and deterministically models the peak stresses that are induced in spent-fuel cladding by the mechanical and thermal dynamic environments. The peak stresses are evaluated in relation to probabilistic failure criteria for generated or preexisting ductile tearing and material fractures at cracks partially through the wall in fuel rods. Activity concentrations in the cask cavity are predicted from estimates of the fraction of gases, volatiles, and fuel fines that are released when the rod cladding is breached. Containment requirements based on the source term are calculated in terms of maximum permissible volumetric leak rates from the cask. Calculations are included for representative cask designs

  20. Quantity and management of spent fuel from prototype and research reactors in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorr, Sabine; Bollingerfehr, Wilhelm; Filbert, Wolfgang; Tholen, Marion

    2013-01-01

    Within the scope of an R and D project (project identification number FKZ 02 S 8679) sponsored by BMBF (Federal Ministry of Education and Research), the current state of storage and management of fuel elements from prototype and research reactors was established, and an approach for their future storage/management was developed. The spent fuels from prototype and research reactors in Germany that require disposal were specified and were described in regard to their repository-relevant characteristics. As there are currently no casks licensed for disposal in Germany, descriptions of casks that were considered to be suitable were provided. Based on the information provided on the spent fuel from prototype and research reactors and the potential casks, a technical disposal concept was developed. In this context, concepts to integrate the spent fuel from prototype and research reactors into existing disposal concepts for spent fuel from German nuclear power plants and for waste from reprocessing were developed for salt and clay formations. (authors)

  1. Investigation of aluminium-rich alloy system of aluminium-strontium-silicium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganiev, I.N.; Vakhobov, A.B.; Dzhuraev, T.D.; Alidzhanov, F.N.

    1976-01-01

    An area of the solid solution based on aluminium was studied, and the surface was plotted of the liquidus adjoining the apex of the aluminium corner of the strontium-aluminium-silicon system. The investigation was carried out by microstructure and differential thermal analyses and by the measurement of the microhardness of the component phases. A combined solubility of silicon and strontium in aluminium was studied along three radial sections at Sr-to-Si ratios of 1/2, 1/1 and 2/1. The relationships of ''composition vs. Microhardness'', obtained in these sections, made it possible to define the boundaries of the phase regions in the aluminium corner of the strontium-aluminium-silicon system at 500 deg C. The greatest solubility is that along the Al-SrAl 2 Si 2 section at a Sr/Si ratio of 1/2. A further increase in the content of strontium brings about a drop in the solubility of silicon in solid aluminium. The projection of the liquidus surface of the strontium-aluminium-silicon system, rich in aluminium, includes four surfaces of primary crystallization: α-Al, SrAl 4 , SrAl 2 Si 2 and Si. The system comprises a section of Al-SrAl 2 Si 2 representing a quasibinary system of an eutectic type. The eutectic reaction takes place at a temperature of 640 deg C. The quasibinary Al-SrAl 2 Si 2 section divides the aluminium corner of the Sr-Al-Si system into two independent systems Al-SrAl 4 -SrAl 2 Si 2 and Al-Si-SrAl 2 Si 2 of an eutectic type

  2. Development of high performance cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, Kiyoshi

    2003-01-01

    The developments of superior next-generation light water reactor are requested on the basis of general view points, such as improvement of safety, economics, reduction of radiation waste and effective utilization of plutonium, until 2030 year in which conventional reactor plants should be renovate. Improvements of stainless steel cladding for conventional high burn-up reactor to more than 100 GWd/t, developments of manufacturing technology for reduced moderation-light water reactor (RMWR) of breeding ratio beyond 1.0 and researches of water-materials interaction on super critical pressure-water cooled reactor are carried out in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Stable austenite stainless steel has been selected for fuel element cladding of advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR). The austenite stain less has the superiority for anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength. A hard spectrum of neutron energy up above 0.1 MeV takes place in core of the reduced moderation-light water reactor, as liquid metal-fast breeding reactor (LMFBR). High performance cladding for the RMWR fuel elements is required to get anti-irradiation properties, corrosion resistance and mechanical strength also. Slow strain rate test (SSRT) of SUS 304 and SUS 316 are carried out for studying stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Irradiation tests in LMFBR are intended to obtain irradiation data for damaged quantity of the cladding materials. (M. Suetake)

  3. What is the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2014-06-01

    Aluminium is neurotoxic. Its free ion, Al(3+) (aq), is highly biologically reactive and uniquely equipped to do damage to essential cellular (neuronal) biochemistry. This unequivocal fact must be the starting point in examining the risk posed by aluminium as a neurotoxin in humans. Aluminium is present in the human brain and it accumulates with age. The most recent research demonstrates that a significant proportion of individuals older than 70 years of age have a potentially pathological accumulation of aluminium somewhere in their brain. What are the symptoms of chronic aluminium intoxication in humans? What if neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease are the manifestation of the risk of aluminium as a neurotoxin? How might such an (outrageous) hypothesis be tested?

  4. Detection of fission products release in the research reactor 'RA' spent fuel storage pool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matausek, M.V.; Vukadin, Z.; Pavlovic, S.; Maksin, T.; Idakovic, Z.; Marinkovic, N.

    1997-05-01

    Spent fuel resulting from 25 years of operating the 6.5/10 MW thermal heavy water moderated and cooled research reactor RA at the VINCA Institute is presently all stored in the temporary spent fuel storage pool in the basement of the reactor building. In 1984, the reactor was shut down for refurbishment, which for a number of reasons has not yet been completed. Recent investigations show that independent of the future status of the research reactor, safe disposal of the so far irradiated fuel must be the subject of primary concern. The present status of the research reactor RA spent fuel storage pool at the VINCA Institute presents a serious safety problem. Action is therefore initiated in two directions. First, safety of the existing spent fuel storage should be improved. Second, transferring spent fuel into another, presumably dry storage space should be considered. By storing the previously irradiated fuel of the research reactor RA in a newly built storage space, sufficient free space will be provided in the existing spent fuel storage pool for the newly irradiated fuel when the reactor starts operation again. In the case that it would be decided to decommission the research reactor RA, the newly built storage space would provide safe disposal for the fuel irradiated so far

  5. CFD Simulation of Heat and Fluid Flow for Spent Fuel in a Dry Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Wangkee; Kwack, Youngkyun; Kook, Donghak; Koo, Yanghyun

    2014-01-01

    A dry storage system is used for the interim storage of spent fuel prior to permanent depository and/or recycling. The spent fuel is initially stored in a water pool for more than 5 years at least after dispatch from the reactor core and is transported to dry storage. The dry cask contains a multiple number of spent fuel assemblies, which are cooled down in the spent fuel pool. The dry cask is usually filled up with helium gas for increasing the heat transfer to the environment outside the cask. The dry storage system has been used for more than a decade in United States of America (USA) and the European Union (EU). Korea is also developing a dry storage system since its spent fuel pool is anticipated to be full within 10 years. The spent fuel will be stored in a dry cask for more than 40 years. The integrity and safety of spent fuel are important for long-term dry storage. The long-term storage will experience the degradation of spent fuel such as the embrittlement of fuel cladding, thermal creep and hydride reorientation. High burn-up fuel may expedite the material degradation. It is known that the cladding temperature has a strong influence on the material degradation. Hence, it is necessary to accurately predict the local distribution of the cladding temperature using the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approach. The objective of this study is to apply the CFD method for predicting the three-dimensional distribution of fuel temperature in a dry cask. This CFD study simulated the dry cask for containing the 21 fuel assemblies under development in Korea. This paper presents the fluid velocity and temperature distribution as well as the fuel temperature. A two-step CFD approach was applied to simulate the heat and fluid flow in a dry storage of 21 spent fuel assemblies. The first CFD analysis predicted the helium flow and temperature in a dry cask by a assuming porous body of the spent fuel. The second CFD analysis was to simulate a spent fuel assembly in the

  6. Effect of laser power on clad metal in laser-TIG combined metal cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Akihiro; Hino, Takanori; Matsuda, Jun; Tasoda, Takashi; Yoneda, Masafumi; Katsumura, Munehide; Yano, Tetsuo; Araki, Takao

    2003-03-01

    TIG arc welding has been used to date as a method for clad welding of white metal as bearing material. We propose a new clad welding process that combines a CO2 laser and a TIG arc, as a method for cladding at high speed. We hypothesized that this method would permit appropriate control of the melted quantity of base metal by varying the laser power. We carried out cladding while varying the laser power, and investigated the structure near the boundary between the clad layer and the base metal. Using the laser-TIG combined cladding, we found we were able to control appropriately the degree of dilution with the base metal. By applying this result to subsequent cladding, we were able to obtain a clad layer of high quality, which was slightly diluted with the base metal.

  7. Recent experience in planning, packaging and preparing non-commercial spent fuel for shipment within the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, P.E.; Shappert, L.B.; Turner, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    US DOE orders dictate that the aluminium clad fuels now stored at ORNL will be shipped to the Savannah River Site. A number of activities had to be carried out in order to ready the fuel for shipping, including choosing a cask capable of transporting the fuel, repackaging the fuel, developing a transportation plan, identifying the appropriate routes, and carrying out a readiness self assessment. These tasks have been successfully completed and are discussed herein

  8. Toxicity of dissolved and precipitated aluminium to marine diatoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Megan L; Golding, Lisa A; Angel, Brad M; Adams, Merrin S; Jolley, Dianne F

    2016-05-01

    Localised aluminium contamination can lead to high concentrations in coastal waters, which have the potential for adverse effects on aquatic organisms. This research investigated the toxicity of 72-h exposures of aluminium to three marine diatoms (Ceratoneis closterium (formerly Nitzschia closterium), Minutocellus polymorphus and Phaeodactylum tricornutum) by measuring population growth rate inhibition and cell membrane damage (SYTOX Green) as endpoints. Toxicity was correlated to the time-averaged concentrations of different aluminium size-fractions, operationally defined as aluminium exposure varied between diatom species. C. closterium was the most sensitive species (10% inhibition of growth rate (72-h IC10) of 80 (55-100)μg Al/L (95% confidence limits)) while M. polymorphus (540 (460-600)μg Al/L) and P. tricornutum (2100 (2000-2200)μg Al/L) were less sensitive (based on measured total aluminium). Dissolved aluminium was the primary contributor to toxicity in C. closterium, while a combination of dissolved and precipitated aluminium forms contributed to toxicity in M. polymorphus. In contrast, aluminium toxicity to the most tolerant diatom P. tricornutum was due predominantly to precipitated aluminium. Preliminary investigations revealed the sensitivity of C. closterium and M. polymorphus to aluminium was influenced by initial cell density with aluminium toxicity significantly (paluminium toxicity to diatoms do not involve compromising the plasma membrane. These results indicate that marine diatoms have a broad range in sensitivity to aluminium with toxic mechanisms related to both dissolved and precipitated aluminium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Aluminium in human sweat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. A Brief Research Review for Improvement Methods the Wettability between Ceramic Reinforcement Particulate and Aluminium Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razzaq, Alaa Mohammed; Majid, Dayang Laila Abang Abdul; Ishak, M. R.; B, Uday M.

    2017-05-01

    The development of new methods for addition fine ceramic powders to Al aluminium alloy melts, which would lead to more uniform distribution and effective incorporation of the reinforcement particles into the aluminium matrix alloy. Recently the materials engineering research has moved to composite materials from monolithic, adapting to the global need for lightweight, low cost, quality, and high performance advanced materials. Among the different methods, stir casting is one of the simplest ways of making aluminium matrix composites. However, it suffers from poor distribution and combination of the reinforcement ceramic particles in the metal matrix. These problems become significantly effect to reduce reinforcement size, more agglomeration and tendency with less wettability for the ceramic particles in the melt process. Many researchers have carried out different studies on the wettability between the metal matrix and dispersion phase, which includes added wettability agents, fluxes, preheating the reinforcement particles, coating the reinforcement particles, and use composting techniques. The enhancement of wettability of ceramic particles by the molten matrix alloy and the reinforcement particles distribution improvement in the solidified matrix is the main objective for many studies that will be discussed in this paper.

  11. Test plan for Series 2 spent fuel cladding containment credit tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1984-10-01

    This test plan describes a second series of tests to be conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to evaluate the effectiveness of breached cladding as a barrier to radionuclide release in the NNWSI-proposed geologic repository. These tests will be conducted at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL). A first series of tests, initiated at HEDL during FY 1983, demonstrated specimen preparation and feasibility of the testing concept. The second series tests will be similar to the Series 1 tests with the following exceptions: NNWSI reference groundwater obtained from well J-13 will be used as the leachant instead of deionized water; fuel from a second source will be used; and certain refinements will be made in specimen preparation, sampling, and analytical procedures. 12 references, 5 figures, 5 tables

  12. Development of U-frame bending system for studying the vibration integrity of spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Jy-An John; Tan, Ting; Jiang, Hao; Cox, Thomas S.; Howard, Rob L.; Bevard, Bruce B.; Flanagan, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    A bending fatigue system developed to evaluate the response of spent nuclear fuel rods to vibration loads is presented. A U-frame testing setup is used for imposing bending loads on the fuel rod specimen. The U-frame setup consists of two rigid arms, side connecting plates to the rigid arms, and linkages to a universal testing machine. The test specimen’s curvature is obtained through a three-point deflection measurement method. The tests using surrogate specimens with stainless steel cladding revealed increased flexural rigidity under unidirectional cyclic bending, significant effect of cladding-pellets bonding on the response of surrogate rods, and substantial cyclic softening in reverse bending mode. These phenomena may cast light on the expected response of a spent nuclear fuel rod. The developed U-frame system is thus verified and demonstrated to be ready for further pursuit in hot-cell tests

  13. Plans and status for accepting spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeitoun, Abe; Williams, John; Brown, Keith; Chacey, Kenneth

    1996-01-01

    In May 1996, the Department of Energy, acting with the cooperation of the Department of State, announced adoption of a policy that will have a significant influence on international efforts to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons. This policy is concerned with the management of spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors. Spent nuclear fuel, unirradiated fuel, and target material accepted under the policy must contain uranium enriched in the U.S. Although such spent fuel will comprise a relatively small part of the Department of Energy's (the Department's) overall inventory of spent nuclear fuel, the policy invokes actions that provide a cornerstone of U.S. nonproliferation activities. Implementation of this policy is now underway. This paper describes the Department's implementation strategy with the emphasis on those actions that will affect foreign research reactor operators. (author)

  14. Building on success. The foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David G.; Mustin, Tracy P.; Saris, Elizabeth C.; Massey, Charles D.

    1998-01-01

    The second year of implementation of the research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program was marked by significant challenges and achievements. In July 1998, the Department of Energy completed by significant challenges and achievements. In July 1998, the Department of Energy completed its first shipment of spent fuel from Asia via the Concord Naval Weapons Station in California to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental (INEEL). This shipment, which consisted of three casks of spent nuclear fuel from two research reactors in the Republic of Korea, presented significant technical, legal, and political challenges in the United States and abroad. Lessons learned will be used in the planning and execution of our next significant milestone, a shipment of TRIGA spent fuel from research reactors in Europe to INEEL, scheduled for the summer of 1999. This shipment will include transit across the United States for over 2,000 miles. Other challenges and advances include: clarification of the fee policy to address changes in the economic status of countries during the life of the program; resolution of issues associated with cask certification and the specific types and conditions of spent fuel proposed for transport; revisions to standard contract language in order to more clearly address unique shipping situations; and priorization and scheduling of shipments to most effectively implement the program. As of this meeting, eight shipments, consisting of nearly 2,000 spent fuel assemblies from fifteen countries, have been successfully completed. With the continued cooperation of the international research reactor community, we are committed to building on this success in the remaining years of the program. (author)

  15. Effect of known clad and pellet reactions on the GEC ESL design of dry vault store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, D.

    1984-01-01

    The more important clad and pellet reactions and their temperature dependence are briefly reviewed, followed by an outline of the economical GEC ESL interim spent fuel storage concept that highlights: The ability of the concept to reduce the temperature of the fuel to values where the clad and pellet reactions are minimal. The containment philosophy that enables any consequences of the reactions to be safely retained to ALARA principles. The maintenance of an air storage environment that can never be lost. The utilisation of passive, naturally induced cooling regimes. The ability to continuously monitor for long-term degradation, together with ease of inspection at any time during storage

  16. Use of a commercial heat transfer code to predict horizontally oriented spent fuel rod temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Koski, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive spent fuel assemblies are a source of hazardous waste that will have to be dealt with in the near future. It is anticipated that the spent fuel assemblies will be transported to disposal sites in spent fuel transportation casks. In order to design a reliable and safe transportation cask, the maximum cladding temperature of the spent fuel rod arrays must be calculated. The maximum rod temperature is a limiting factor in the amount of spent fuel that can be loaded in a transportation cask. The scope of this work is to demonstrate that reasonable and conservative spent fuel rod temperature predictions can be made using commercially available thermal analysis codes. The demonstration is accomplished by a comparison between numerical temperature predictions, with a commercially available thermal analysis code, and experimental temperature data for electrical rod heaters simulating a horizontally oriented spent fuel rod bundle

  17. Available Reprocessing and Recycling Services for Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    The high enriched uranium (HEU) take back programmes will soon have achieved their goals. When there are no longer HEU inventories at research reactors and no commerce in HEU for research reactors, the primary driver for the take back programmes will cease. However, research reactors will continue to operate in order to meet their various mission objectives. As a result, inventories of low enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel will continue to be created during the research reactors' lifetime and, therefore, there is a need to develop national final disposition routes. This publication is designed to address the issues of available reprocessing and recycling services for research reactor spent fuel and discusses the various back end management aspects of the research reactor fuel cycle.

  18. Safe transport of spent fuels after long-term storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aritomi, M.; Takeda, T.; Ozaki, S.

    2004-01-01

    Considering the scarcity of energy resources in Japan, a nuclear energy policy pertaining to the spent fuel storage has been adopted. The nuclear energy policy sets the rules that spent fuels generated from LWRs shall be reprocessed and that plutonium and unburnt uranium shall be recovered and reused. For this purpose, a reprocessing plant, which has a reprocessing capability of 800 ton/yr, is under construction at Rokkasho Village. However, it is anticipated that the start of its operation will be delayed. In addition, the amount of spent fuels generated from nuclear power plants exceeds its reprocessing capability. Therefore, the establishment of storage technology for spent fuels becomes an urgent problem in Japan in order to continue smoothly the LWR operations. In this paper, the background of nuclear power generation in Japan is introduced at first. Next, the policy of spent fuel storage in Japan and circumstances surrounding the spent fuels in Japan are mentioned. Furthermore, the major subjects for discussions to settle and improve 'Standard for Safety Design and Inspection of Metal Casks for Spent Fuel Interim Storage Facility' in Atomic Energy Society of Japan are discussed, such as the integrity of fuel cladding, basket, shielding material and metal gasket for the long term storage for achieving safe transport of spent fuels after the storage. Finally, solutions to the unsolved subject in establishing the spent fuel interim storage technologies ase introduced accordingly

  19. Assessment of spent WWER-440 fuel performance under long-term storage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupca, L [VUJE Inc. (Slovakia)

    2012-07-01

    In the Slovak Republic are under operation 6 units (4 in the Jaslovske Bohunice site, and 2 in the Mochovce), 2 units are under construction in Mochovce site. All units are WWER-440 type. The fresh fuel is imported from the Russian Federation. The spent fuel assemblies are stored in wet conditions in Bohunice Interim Storage Spent Fuel Facility (SFIS). By 15 July 2008, there were 8413 assemblies in SFIS. The objectives are: 1) Wet AR storage of spent fuel from the NPP Bohunice and Mochovce: Surveillance of conditions for spent fuel storage in the at-reactor (AR) storage pools of both NPP's (characteristics of pool water, corrosion product data); Visual control of storage pool components; Evaluation of storage conditions with respect to long-term stability (corrosion of fuel cladding, structural materials); 2) Wet SFIS storage at Bohunice: Measurement of spent fuel conditions during the long-term wet storage, activity data in the storage casks and amount of crud; Surveillance program for SFIS structural materials.

  20. Status of the US foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacey, K.A.; Zeitoun, A.; Saris, E.C.

    1997-01-01

    A significant step was made in 1996 with the establishment of a new nuclear weapons nonproliferation policy concerning foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel. Specifically the United States will accept over a 13-year period up to 20 tonnes of spent nuclear fuel from 41 countries. Only spent fuel containing uranium enriched in the United States is covered under this policy. Since the acceptance policy took effect on 13 May 1996, the Department of Energy has undertaken a number of steps to effectively implement the policy. An implementation strategy plan, mitigation action plan, and detailed transportation plans have been developed. Other activities include foreign research reactor assessments, and the determination of shipment priorities and schedules. The first shipment under the acceptance policy was received into the United States in September 1996. A second shipment was received from Canada in December 1996. The next shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel is expected from Europe in early March 1997. The primary challenge for DOE is to continue to transport this material in a consistent, cost-effective manner over the 13-year duration of the program. This article covers the following topics: background; acceptance policy; implementation of the acceptance policy; next steps/closing. 6 figs

  1. IAEA activities related to research reactor fuel conversion and spent fuel return programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldman, Ira N.; Adelfang, Pablo; Ritchie, Iain G.

    2005-01-01

    The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly associated efforts to return research reactor fuel to the country where it was originally enriched. IAEA efforts have included the development and maintenance of several data bases with information related to research reactors and research reactor spent fuel inventories that have been essential in planning and managing both RERTR and spent fuel return programmes. Other IAEA regular budget programs have supported research reactor fuel conversion from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU), and in addressing issues common to many member states with spent fuel management problems and concerns. The paper briefly describes IAEA involvement since the early 1980's in these areas, including regular budget and Technical Co-operation programme activities, and focuses on efforts in the past five years to continue to support and accelerate U.S. and Russian research reactor spent fuel return programmes. (author)

  2. Spent fuel performance assessment and research. Final report of a co-ordinated research project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR) 1997-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The report provides an overview of technical issues related to spent fuel wet and dry storage and summarizes the objectives and major findings of research, carried out within the framework of the Coordinated Research Program. Included are the fuel integrity aspects, fuel degradation mechanisms in dry and wet storage, behaviour of storage facility components (metallic components, reinforced concrete). Also included are issues related to long-term storage and monitoring technologies and techniques. Country reports on research projects within the SPAR Coordinated Research Program is presented. A brief history is given on the history of the BEFAST and SPAR Coordinated Research Projects

  3. Spent fuel performance assessment and research. Final report of a co-ordinated research project on Spent Fuel Performance Assessment and Research (SPAR) 1997-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The report provides an overview of technical issues related to spent fuel wet and dry storage and summarizes the objectives and major findings of research, carried out within the framework of the Coordinated Research Program. Included are the fuel integrity aspects, fuel degradation mechanisms in dry and wet storage, behaviour of storage facility components (metallic components, reinforced concrete). Also included are issues related to long-term storage and monitoring technologies and techniques. Country reports on research projects within the SPAR Coordinated Research Program is presented. A brief history is given on the history of the BEFAST and SPAR Coordinated Research Projects.

  4. Development of a transport cask for spent fuel elements of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quintana, F.; Saliba, R.O.; Furnari, J.C.; Mourao, R.P; Leite da Silva, L.; Novara, O.; Alexandre Miranda, C.; Mattar Neto, M.

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the development of a research reactor spent fuel transport cask. Through a project funded by the IAEA, Argentina, Brazil and Chile have collaborated to enhance regional capacity in the management of spent fuel elements from research reactors operated in the region. A packaging for the transport of research reactors spent fuel was developed. It was designed by a team of researchers from the countries mentioned and a 1:2 scale model for MTR type fuel was constructed in Argentina and subsequently tested in CDTN facilities in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. There were three test sequences to test the cask for normal transport and hypothetical accident conditions. It has successfully passed the tests and the overall performance was considered satisfactory. As part of the licensing process, a test sequence with the presence of regulatory authorities is scheduled for December, 2012 (author)

  5. New developments in dry spent fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnet, C.; Chevalier, Ph.

    2001-01-01

    As shown in various new examples, HABOG facility (Netherlands), CERNAVODA (Candu - Romania), KOZLODUY (WWER - Bulgaria), CHERNOBYL ( RMBK - Ukraine), MAYAK (Spent Fuel from submarine and Icebreakers - Russia), recent studies allow to confirm the flexibility and performances of the CASCAD system proposed by SGN, both in safety and operability, for the dry storage of main kinds of spent fuel. The main features are: A multiple containment barrier system: as required by international regulation, 2 independent barriers are provided (tight canister and storage pit); Passive cooling, while the Fuel Assemblies are stored in an inert atmosphere and under conditions of temperature preventing from degradation of rod cladding; Sub-criticality controlled by adequate arrangements in any conditions; Safe facility meeting ICPR 60 Requirements as well as all applicable regulations (including severe weather conditions and earthquake); Safe handling operations; Retrievability of the spent fuel either during storage period or at the end of planned storage period (100 years); Future Decommissioning of the facility facilitated through design optimisation; Construction and operating cost-effectiveness. (author)

  6. Conditioning and storage of spent fuel cladding hulls by rolling and embedding in concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spenk, G.; Frotscher, H.; Graebner, H.; Kapulla, H.

    1981-01-01

    Under a contract with the European Atomic Energy Community the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe, KfK, developed a conditioning process for LWR cladding waste. After compaction of the hulls by rolling they are embedded in a concrete matrix. In addition to basic data of the cladding waste, the compaction process, consisting of a dosage system and a rolling mill, is described. Several embedding techniques are possible, but a final selection has still to be made. Best results will probably be achieved by a vacuum technique. To characterize the waste product, leach tests have been started. The compression strength of compacted hulls embedded in concrete was determined to 2300 N.cm -2 . Hydrogen release due to radiolyses lies around 3 μl.g -1 sub(concrete).Mrad -1 which corresponds to the values expected on account of the water content of the samples. Less hydrogen was determined in samples with Zircaloy added. The tritium release of tritiated Zircaloy hulls embedded in concrete is greatly dependent on temperature and irradiation. At 100 0 C and with γ-irradiation the tritium release is about two orders of magnitude higher compared with experiments without irradiation. The thermal conductivity of samples of Zircaloy hulls embedded in concrete was determined to be 1.4W.m -1 .K -1 . (author)

  7. A Prediction Study on Oxidation of Aluminum Alloy Cladding of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al Fuel Plate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahk, Y.W.; Lee, B.H.; Oh, J.Y.; Park, J.H.; Yim, J.S. [Research Reactor Design and Engineering Div., Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-07-01

    U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel with aluminum alloy cladding will be used for the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). Aluminum alloy cladding undergoes corrosion at slow rates under operational status. This causes thinning of the cladding walls and impairs heat transfer to the coolant. Predictions of the aluminum oxide thickness of the fuel cladding and the maximum temperature difference across the oxide film are needed for reliability evaluation based on the design criteria and limits which prohibit spallation of oxide film. In this work, several oxide thickness prediction models were compared with the measured data of in-pile test results from RERTR program. Moreover, specific parametric studies and a preliminary prediction of the aluminum alloy oxidation using the latest model were performed for JRTR fuel. According to the current JRTR fuel management scheme and operation strategy for 5 MW power, fresh fuel is discharged after 900 effective full power days (EFPD), which is too long a span to predict oxidation properly without an elaborate model. The latest model developed by Kim et al. is in good agreement with the recent in-pile test data as well as with the out-of-pile test data available in the literature, and is one of the best predictors for the oxidation of aluminum alloy cladding in various operating condition. Accordingly, this model was chosen for estimating the oxide film thickness. Through the preliminarily evaluation, water pH level is to be controlled lower than 6.2 for the conservativeness in the case of including the effect of anticipated operational occurrences and the spent fuel residence time in the storage rack after discharging. (author)

  8. Shipment of Taiwanese research reactor spent nuclear fuel (Phase 2): Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    The proposed action is to transport approximately 1100 spent fuel rods from a foreign research reactor in Taiwan by sea to Hampton Roads, Virginia, and then overland by truck to the receiving basin for offsite fuels at the Savannah River Plant (SRP) for reprocessing to recover uranium and plutonium. The analysis of the impacts of the proposed action have been evaluated and shown to have negligible impact on the local environments. The calculations have been completed using the RADTRAN III code. PWR spent fuel was analyzed as a benchmark to link the calculations in this analysis to those in earlier environmental documentation. Cumulative total, maximum annual, and per shipment risks were calculated. The results indicate that the PWR spent fuel shipment risks are somewhat lower than those previously estimated. The cumulative and maximum annual normal, or incident-free, risks associated with the shipment of Taiwanese research reactor spent fuel is a factor of 10 lower than that for PWR fuel, and the cumulative and maximum annual accident radiological risks are a factor of about 2.2 lower than that for PWR spent fuel. As a result, the port risks are about a factor of 10 larger than the risk of overland transport. All of the risks calculated are small. The PWR risk values are similar to those judged by the NRC to be small enough not to warrant increased stringency in regulations. The Taiwanese research reactor spent fuel shipment risk values are smaller yet. 51 refs., 22 tabs

  9. Ontario Hydro Research Division's program for treatment of spent ion-exchange resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nott, B.R.; Dodd, D.J.R.

    1981-09-01

    A brief review of the evolution of work programmes for chemical treatment of spent ion-exchange resins in Ontario Hydro's Research Division is presented. Attention has been focussed on pre-treatment processes for the treatment of the spent resins prior to encapsulation of the products in solid matrices. Spent Resin Regeneration and Acid Stripping processes were considered in some detail. Particular attention was paid to carbon-14 on spent resins, its determination in and removal from the spent resins (with the acid stripping technique). The use of separate cation and anion resin beds instead of mixed bed resins was examined with a view to reducing the volume of resin usage and consequently the volume of waste radioactive ion-exchange resin generated. (author)

  10. Transportation of failed or damaged foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, Charles E.; Mustin, Tracy P.; Massey, Charles D.

    1999-01-01

    Since initiating the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance Program in 1996, the Program has had to deal with difficult issues associated with the transportation of failed or damaged spent fuel. In several instances, problems with failed or damaged fuel have prevented the acceptance of the fuel at considerable cost to both the Department of Energy and research reactor operators. In response to the problems faced by the Acceptance Program, DOE has undertaken significant steps to better define the spent fuel acceptance criteria. DOE has worked closely with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to address failed or damaged research reactor spent fuel causing a degradation of the fuel assembly exposing fuel meat and to identify cask certificate issues which must be resolved by cask owners and foreign regulatory authorities. The specific issues and implementation challenges associated with the transport of MTR type FRR SNF will be discussed. The information presented will include U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulatory issues, cask certificate issues, technical constraints, implementation status, and lessons learned. Specific information will also be provided on the latest efforts to revise DOE's Appendix B, Transport Package (Cask) Acceptance Criteria. The information presented in this paper will be of interest to foreign research reactor operators, shippers, and cask vendors in evaluating the condition of their fuel to ensure it can be transported in accordance with appropriate cask certificate requirements. (author)

  11. Development of concrete cask storage technology for spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saegusa, Toshiari; Shirai, Koji; Takeda, Hirofumi

    2010-01-01

    Need of spent fuel storage in Japan is estimated as 10,000 to 25,000 t by 2050 depending on reprocessing. Concrete cask storage is expected due to its economy and risk hedge for procurement. The CRIEPI executed verification tests using full-scale concrete casks. Heat removal performances in normal and accidental conditions were verified and analytical method for the normal condition was established. Shielding performance focus on radiation streaming through the air outlet was tested and confirmed to meet the design requirements. Structural integrity was verified in terms of fracture toughness of stainless steel canister for the cask of accidental drop tests. Cracking of cylindrical concrete container due to thermal stress was confirmed to maintain its integrity. Seismic tests of concrete cask without tie-down using scale and full-scale model casks were carried out to confirm that the casks do not tip-over and the spent fuel assembly keeps its integrity under severe earthquake conditions. Long-term integrity of concrete cask for 40 to 60 years is required. It was confirmed using a real concrete cask storing real spent fuel for 15 years. Stress corrosion cracking is serious issue for concrete cask storage in the salty air environment. The material factor was improved by using highly corrosion resistant stainless steel. The environmental factor was mitigated by the development of salt reduction technology. Estimate of surface salt concentration as a function of time became possible. Monitoring technology to detect accidental loss of containment of the canister by the stress corrosion cracking was developed. Spent fuel integrity during storage was evaluated in terms of hydrogen movement using spent fuel claddings stored for 20 years. The effect of hydrogen on the integrity of the cladding was found negligible. With these results, information necessary for real service of concrete cask was almost prepared. Remaining subject is to develop more economical and rational

  12. Research on microstructure properties of the TiC/Ni-Fe-Al coating prepared by laser cladding technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Junke; Xu, Zifa; Zan, Shaoping; Zhang, Wenwu; Sheng, Liyuan

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the laser cladding method was used to preparation the TiC reinforced Ni-Fe-Al coating on the Ni base superalloy. The Ti/Ni-Fe-Al powder was preset on the Ni base superalloy and the powder layer thickness is 0.5mm. A fiber laser was used the melting Ti/Ni-Fe-Al powder in an inert gas environment. The shape of the cladding layer was tested using laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) under different cladding parameters such as the laser power, the melting velocity and the defocused amount. The microstructure, the micro-hardness was tested by LSCM, SEM, Vickers hardness tester. The test result showed that the TiC particles was distributed uniformly in the cladding layer and hardness of the cladding layer was improved from 180HV to 320HV compared with the Ni-Fe-Al cladding layer without TiC powder reinforced, and a metallurgical bonding was produced between the cladding layer and the base metal. The TiC powder could make the Ni-Fe-Al cladding layer grain refining, and the more TiC powder added in the Ni-Fe-Al powder, the smaller grain size was in the cladding layer.

  13. Corrosion of aluminium in copper-aluminium couples under a marine environment: Influence of polyaniline deposited onto copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vera, Rosa; Verdugo, Patricia; Orellana, Marco; Munoz, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The presence of Polyaniline in the Al-Cu system produces a decrease in the oxygen reduction reaction. → In the marine enviroment, aluminium in Al-Cu couples, suffers pitting and exfoliation. → The aluminium deterioration increases with chloride and enviromental sulphur dioxide presence, mainly when it is united to bare copper. - Abstract: In this study, we examined how aluminium corrosion in Al-Cu/PANI galvanic couples in a marine environment is influenced by deposition of polyaniline (PANI) on copper. Polarization curves and immersion assays in 0.1 M NaCl were performed. The morphologies of etched Al and corrosion products were observed by SEM, and the Al ions in solution were quantified by atomic absorption spectroscopy. A reduction in aluminium damage due to galvanic corrosion was observed as a result of decreased effective area for the oxygen reduction reaction on Cu/PANI electrode. Furthermore, an electrochemical reduction of PANI from leucoemeraldine to emeraldine base is proposed.

  14. Laser cladding of turbine blades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepeleva, L.; Medres, B.; Kaplan, W.D.; Bamberger, M.

    2000-01-01

    A comparative study of two different techniques for the application of wear-resistant coatings for contact surfaces of shroud shelves of gas turbine engine blades (GTE) has been conducted. Wear-resistant coatings were applied on In713 by laser cladding with direct injection of the cladding powder into the melt pool. Laser cladding was conducted with a TRUMPF-2500, CW-CO 2 laser. The laser cladding was compared with commercially available plasma cladding with wire. Both plasma and laser cladded zones were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the laser cladded zone has a higher microhardness value (650-820 HV) compared with that of the plasma treated material (420-440 HV). This is a result of the significant reduction in grain size in the case of laser cladding. Unlike the plasma cladded zones, the laser treated material is free of micropores and microcracks. (orig.)

  15. Human exposure to aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  16. MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH AND TEST REACTOR ALUMINUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL - A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-07-11

    The Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program is responsible for the receipt and storage of aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel or used fuel until ultimate disposition. Aluminum research reactor used fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the U.S. and stored at DOE-EM storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper assesses the technologies and the options for safe transportation/receipt and interim storage of aluminum research reactor spent fuel and reviews the comprehensive strategy for its management. The U.S. Department of Energy uses the Appendix A, Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Criteria, to identify the physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of spent nuclear fuel to be returned to the United States under the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The fuel is further evaluated for acceptance through assessments of the fuel at the foreign sites that include corrosion damage and handleability. Transport involves use of commercial shipping casks with defined leakage rates that can provide containment of the fuel, some of which are breached. Options for safe storage include wet storage and dry storage. Both options must fully address potential degradation of the aluminum during the storage period. This paper focuses on the various options for safe transport and storage with respect to technology maturity and application.

  17. Process evaluation for treatment of aluminium bearing declad waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, D.; Rao, Manjula A.; Srinivas, C.; Wattal, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Declad waste generated by the process of chemical decladding of Al-cladded uranium metal fuel is characterized by highly alkaline, high Al bearing intermediate level waste. It was found that the process developed and adopted in India for plant scale treatment of alkaline intermediate level waste (ILW) is unsuitable for treatment of declad waste. This is mainly due to its exotic characteristics, notably substantial amounts of aluminium in the declad waste. As part of development of treatment scheme for this waste, 137 Cs removal by RFPR has been demonstrated earlier and the present paper reports the results of further processing of the Cs-lean effluent. The waste simulated with respect to the major chemical constituents of stored Al-bearing alkaline ILW after 137 Cs and 90 Sr removal by ion exchange, is used in this study

  18. Determination of Aluminium Content in Aluminium Hydroxide Formulation by FT-NIR Transmittance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lai, Xuxin; Zheng, Yiwu; Søndergaard, Ib

    2007-01-01

    A method for determining the aluminium content of an aluminium hydroxide suspension using near infrared (NIR) transmittance spectroscopy has been developed. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) was used as reference method. The factors influencing the NIR analysis...... aluminium content in aluminium hydroxide suspension. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  19. Review and perspective: Sapphire optical fiber cladding development for harsh environment sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Buric, Michael; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Nakano, Jinichiro; Liu, Bo; Chorpening, Benjamin T.

    2018-03-01

    The potential to use single-crystal sapphire optical fiber as an alternative to silica optical fibers for sensing in high-temperature, high-pressure, and chemically aggressive harsh environments has been recognized for several decades. A key technological barrier to the widespread deployment of harsh environment sensors constructed with sapphire optical fibers has been the lack of an optical cladding that is durable under these conditions. However, researchers have not yet succeeded in incorporating a high-temperature cladding process into the typical fabrication process for single-crystal sapphire fibers, which generally involves seed-initiated fiber growth from the molten oxide state. While a number of advances in fabrication of a cladding after fiber-growth have been made over the last four decades, none have successfully transitioned to a commercial manufacturing process. This paper reviews the various strategies and techniques for fabricating an optically clad sapphire fiber which have been proposed and explored in published research. The limitations of current approaches and future prospects for sapphire fiber cladding are discussed, including fabrication methods and materials. The aim is to provide an understanding of the past research into optical cladding of sapphire fibers and to assess possible material systems for future research on this challenging problem for harsh environment sensors.

  20. Explosive Cladding of Titanium and Aluminium Alloys on the Example of Ti6Al4V-AA2519 Joints / Wybuchowe Platerowanie Stopów Tytanu I Aluminium Na Przykładzie Połączenia Ti6Al4V-AA2519

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gałka A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Explosive cladding is currently one of the basic technologies of joining metals and their alloys. It enables manufacturing of the widest range of joints and in many cases there is no alternative solution. An example of such materials are clads that include light metals such as titanium and aluminum. ach new material combination requires an appropriate adaptation of the technology by choosing adequate explosives and tuning other cladding parameters. Technology enabling explosive cladding of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy and aluminum AA2519 was developed. The clads were tested by means of destructive and nondestructive testing, analyzing integrity, strength and quality of the obtained joint.

  1. Storage method for spent fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajiri, Hiroshi.

    1992-01-01

    In the present invention, spent fuel assemblies are arranged at a dense pitch in a storage rack by suppressing the reactivity of the assemblies, to increase storage capacity for the spent fuel assemblies. That is, neutron absorbers are filled in the cladding tube of an absorbing rod, and the diameter thereof is substantially equal with that of a fuel rod. A great amount of the absorbing rods are arranged at the outer circumference of the fuel assembly. Then, they are fixed integrally to the fuel assembly and stored in a storage rack. In this case, the storage rack may be constituted only with angle materials which are inexpensive and installed simply. With such a constitution, in the fuel assembly having absorbing rods wound therearound, neutrons are absorbed by absorbing rods and the reactivity is lowered. Accordingly, the assembly arrangement pitch in the storage rack can be made dense. As a result, the storage capacity for the assemblies is increased. (I.S.)

  2. Experimental assessment of fuel-cladding interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Elizabeth Sooby [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-29

    A range of fuel concepts designed to better tolerate accident scenarios and reactor transients are currently undergoing fundamental development at national laboratories as well as university and industrial partners. Pellet-clad mechanical and chemical interaction can be expected to affect fuel failure rates experienced during steady state operation, as well as dramatically impact the response of the fuel form under loss of coolant and other accident scenarios. The importance of this aspect of fuel design prompted research initiated by AFC in FY14 to begin exploratory efforts to characterize this phenomenon for candidate fuelcladding systems of immediate interest. Continued efforts in FY15 and FY17 aimed to better understand and simulate initial pellet-clad interaction with little-to-no pressure on the pellet-clad interface. Reported here are the results from 1000 h heat treatments at 400, 500, and 600°C of diffusion couples pairing UN with a FeCrAl alloy, SiC, and Zr-based cladding candidate sealed in evacuated quartz ampoules. No gross reactions were observed, though trace elemental contaminants were identified.

  3. Treatment of cladding hulls by the HIPOW process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larker, H.T.; Tegman, R.

    1981-01-01

    The conditions for densifying and bonding Zircaloy cladding hulls from spent LWR fuel to blocks by the HIPOW (hot isostatic pressing of waste) process have been studied. Fully dense and mechanically strong blocks of Zircaloy can be made without additives at temperatures around 1000 0 C. A volume reduction of about seven times and surface area reduction of more than 300 times, compared to typical loose-filled cladding hulls remaining after the chop-leach operations in a reprocessing plant, can be obtained. A study of a possible process for industrial scale has been made. Handling under water can prevent any fire hazard in the preparation sequence. The use of a special hermetically sealed double-wall metal container encasing the hulls during the densification in the hot isostatic press virtually eliminates the problem of lasting contamination of this equipment, thus greatly simplifying service and maintenance. One hot isostatic press can serve a reprocessing line with an LWR fuel capacity of 800 tons/year. Fines (residues) from fuel dissolution and alpha-contaminated ashes from incinerated organic materials in the plant may also be incorporated in the Zircaloy blocks. Tritium can quantitatively be contained in these blocks

  4. Iron and aluminium oxides containing industrial wastes as adsorbents of heavy metals: Application possibilities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacukowicz-Sobala, Irena; Ociński, Daniel; Kociołek-Balawejder, Elżbieta

    2015-07-01

    Industrial wastes with a high iron or aluminium oxide content are produced in huge quantities as by-products of water treatment (water treatment residuals), bauxite processing (red mud) and hard and brown coal burning in power plants (fly ash). Although they vary in their composition, the wastes have one thing in common--a high content of amorphous iron and/or aluminium oxides with a large specific surface area, whereby this group of wastes shows very good adsorbability towards heavy metals, arsenates, selenates, etc. But their physical form makes their utilisation quite difficult, since it is not easy to separate the spent sorbent from the solution and high bed hydraulic resistances occur in dynamic regime processes. Nevertheless, because of the potential benefits of utilising the wastes in industrial effluent treatment, this issue attracts much attention today. This study describes in detail the waste generation processes, the chemical structure of the wastes, their physicochemical properties, and the mechanisms of fixing heavy metals and semimetals on the surface of iron and aluminium oxides. Typical compositions of wastes generated in selected industrial plants are given. A detailed survey of the literature on the adsorption applications of the wastes, including methods of their thermal and chemical activation, as well as regeneration of the spent sorbents, is presented. The existing and potential ways of modifying the physical form of the discussed group of wastes, making it possible to overcome the basic limitation on their practical use, are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. Reducing the radiotoxicity of PWR cladding hulls by cold-crucible melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berthier, P.; Boen, R.; Piccinato, R.; Ladirat, C.

    1994-12-31

    PWR cladding wastes from spent fuel reprocessing plants are highly radiotoxic due to the presence of long-lived alpha-emitting nuclides and certain beta-gamma emitters. Various options are now under consideration for disposal of such wastes. The ``Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique`` is now developing a melting process at Marcoule that promises to diminish their radiotoxicity. Work has focused on two complementary research areas: obtaining a high quality metallic containment matrix and achieving maximum decontamination by concentrating the plutonium and minor actinides together with cesium and strontium in the slag. Vitrification represents a short-term solution for the slag; from a longer-term perspective, this waste form is ideally suited for the SPIN programme. This is an indispensable step toward the possible implementation of an advanced waste management strategy involving actinide separation and transmutation to reduce the long-term nuclear waste disposal hazard. (author). 1 ref., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  6. Effect of Bio char on Plant Growth and Aluminium Form of Soil under Aluminium Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Lianwen; Li, Qingbiao; Sun, Jingwei; Feng, Ying

    2018-01-01

    Aluminium-enriched acid red soils in South China easily cause aluminium toxicity to plants, but biochip can improve soils and eliminate soil contaminations. In this project, biochip was used in potted plant control test to study the effect of biochip on plant growth in soil under acid aluminium stress and the migration and conversion of aluminium in plant-soil system. The fin dings show that the application of biochip increases the pH value of soil under aluminium stress significantly, changes the existing form of aluminium ion in soil, reduces the plants’ absorption of aluminium, and alleviates the aluminium toxicity to plants, but too much biochip may inhibit the growth of plants. In this case, further study should be carried out as regards the volume and way of biochip input in practical applications as well as the timeliness of aluminium toxicity removal.

  7. Validation concerns for dry storage of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trumble, E.F.

    1994-01-01

    Recent decisions by the Department of Energy have accelerated the need for storage options to support the return of foreign research reactor (FRR) fuel to the United States. Many of these returns consist of fuel types which contain highly enriched uranium and are aluminum clad. These attributes present many challenges not experienced in the fuel storage designs for commercial nuclear fuels where the fuels have lower enrichment and the cladding is more robust. Historically, returned FRR fuel has been stored for short periods in basins where it is cooled and then sent to be reprocessed. However, a severe lack of basin space and questionable availability of reprocessing facilities necessitates the development of other proposals. One proposed option is to store the FRR fuel in a dry state, thus reducing the corrosion problems associated with aluminum cladding. A drawback to this type of storage, however, is the lack of experimental data for this type of fuel under dry storage conditions. This lack of data has led to recent discussions over the accuracy of some of the current multigroup cross section libraries when applied to dry, fast systems of uranium and aluminum. This concern is evaluated for the specific case of Material Test Reactor (MTR) fuel (MTR is >60% of FRR fuel), a review of applicable experiments is presented and a new experiment is proposed

  8. Spent fuel and materials performance in wet and dry storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuloaga, P [ENRESA (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    According to the 6th General Radioactive Waste Plan, spent fuel in Spain shall have to be gathered in a Centralised Temporary Storage (CTS) during some decades in order to have time for a decision concerning its final fate: direct disposal at a geological repository or partitioning and transmutation if technology opens this possibility when the decision will be taken, expected in 2050. The CTS technology has already been chosen as a vault type building based in spent fuel dry storage. To support the use of this technology, a number of programmes have been completed or are still in progress, mostly concerned about high burnup fuel issues and new cladding materials. These programmes are directly managed by ENRESA alone or in joint venture with other parties, at a national and international level. Apart from that, there are contacts with other countries organisms who share similar interests with Spanish ones. The objectives are: Review of spent fuel data relevant for future storage in Spain; Perform destructive and non-destructive examinations on irradiated and non-irradiated fuel rods relevant to Spanish spent fuel management.

  9. Confined recrystallization of high-purity aluminium during accumulative roll bonding of aluminium laminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekhonin, Paul; Beausir, Benoît; Scharnweber, Juliane; Oertel, Carl-Georg; Hausöl, Tina; Höppel, Heinz Werner; Brokmeier, Heinz-Günter; Skrotzki, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Aluminium laminates consisting of high-purity aluminium and commercially pure aluminium have been produced by accumulative roll bonding (ARB) at ambient temperature for up to 10 cycles. To study the microstructure and texture development of the high-purity aluminium layers with regard to the shrinking layer thickness during ARB, microstructure and texture investigations were carried out by electron backscatter diffraction and neutron and X-ray diffraction, respectively. While the commercially pure aluminium layers develop an ultrafine-grained microstructure, partial discontinuous recrystallization occurs in the high-purity layers. The texture of the high-purity layers mainly consists of Cube and “Tilted Cube” (tilted with respect to the transverse direction) components. The experimental results are discussed with respect to confined recrystallization in the ARB aluminium laminates.

  10. Spent nuclear fuel structural response when subject to an end impact accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, D.T.; Guttmann, J. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD (United States)]|[United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Koeppel, B.J.; Adkins, H.E.

    2004-07-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) is responsible for licensing spent fuel storage and transportation systems. A subset of this responsibility is to investigate and understand the structural performance of these systems. Studies have shown that the fuel rods of intact spent fuel assemblies with burn-ups up to 45 gigawatt days per metric ton of uranium (Gwd/MTU) are capable of resisting the normally expected impact loads subjected during drop accident conditions. However, effective cladding thickness for intact spent fuel assemblies with burn ups greater than 45 Gwd/MTU can be reduced due to corrosion. The capability of the fuel rod to withstand the expected loads encountered under normal and accident conditions may also be reduced, given degradation of the material properties under extended use, such as decrease in ductility. The USNRC and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNNL) performed computational studies to predict the structural response of spent nuclear fuel in a transport system that is subjected to a hypothetical regulatory impact accident, as defined in 10 CFR71.73. This study performs a structural analysis of a typical high burn up Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel assembly using the ANSYS {sup registered} ANSYS {sup registered} /LS- DYNA {sup registered} finite element analysis (FEA) code. The material properties used in the analyses were based on expert judgment and included uncertainties. Ongoing experimental programs will reduce the uncertainties. The current evaluations include the pins, spacer grids, and tie plates to assess possible cladding failure/rupture under hypothetical impact accident loading. This paper describes the USNRC and PNNL staff's analytical approach, provides details on the single pin model developed for this assessment, and presents the results.

  11. AE Monitoring of Diamond Turned Rapidly Soldified Aluminium 443

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onwuka, G; Abou-El-Hossein, K; Mkoko, Z

    2017-01-01

    The fast replacement of conventional aluminium with rapidly solidified aluminium alloys has become a noticeable trend in the current manufacturing industries involved in the production of optics and optical molding inserts. This is as a result of the improved performance and durability of rapidly solidified aluminium alloys when compared to conventional aluminium. Melt spinning process is vital for manufacturing rapidly solidified aluminium alloys like RSA 905, RSA 6061 and RSA 443 which are common in the industries today. RSA 443 is a newly developed alloy with few research findings and huge research potential. There is no available literature focused on monitoring the machining of RSA 443 alloys. In this research, Acoustic Emission sensing technique was applied to monitor the single point diamond turning of RSA 443 on an ultrahigh precision lathe machine. The machining process was carried out after careful selection of feed, speed and depths of cut. The monitoring process was achieved with a high sampling data acquisition system using different tools while concurrent measurement of the surface roughness and tool wear were initiated after covering a total feed distance of 13km. An increasing trend of raw AE spikes and peak to peak signal were observed with an increase in the surface roughness and tool wear values. Hence, acoustic emission sensing technique proves to be an effective monitoring method for the machining of RSA 443 alloy. (paper)

  12. IAEA activities related to research reactor fuel conversion and spent fuel return programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, I.G.; Adelfang, P.; Goldman, I.N.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA has been involved for more than twenty years in supporting international nuclear non-proliferation efforts associated with reducing the amount of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in international commerce. IAEA projects and activities have directly supported the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) programme, as well as directly associated efforts to return research reactor fuel to the country of origin where it was originally enriched. IAEA efforts have included the development and maintenance of several data bases with information related to research reactors and research reactor spent fuel inventories that have been essential in planning and managing both RERTR and spent fuel return programmes. Other IAEA regular budget programmes have supported research reactor fuel conversion from HEU to low enriched uranium, and in addressing issues common to many member states with spent fuel management problems and concerns. The paper briefly describes IAEA involvement since the early 1980's in these areas, including regular budget and Technical Co-operation programme activities, and focuses on efforts in the past five years to continue to support and accelerate U.S. and Russian research reactor spent fuel return programmes. It is hoped that an announcement of the extension of the U.S. Acceptance Programme, which is expected in the very near future, will facilitate the life extensions of many productive TRIGA reactors around the world. (author)

  13. Fire exposed aluminium structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.; Fellinger, J.E.J.; Soetens, F.

    2005-01-01

    Material properties and mechanical response models for fire design of steel structures are based on extensive research and experience. Contrarily, the behaviour of aluminium load bearing structures exposed to fire is relatively unexplored. This article gives an overview of physical and mechanical

  14. Phase transformation of aluminium hydroxide to aα- alumina prepared from different aluminium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masliana Muslimin; Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2006-01-01

    The study intends to look at the most suitable aluminium salt to produce a single-phase a-alumina by the hydrothermal method. In the process to produce alumina from the calcination of aluminium hydroxide (Al(OH) 3 ), three different aluminium salts namely aluminium sulfate (Al 2 (SO 4) 2), aluminium nitrate (A(NO 3 ) 3 ) and aluminium chloride (AlCl 3 ) were tried. The process involved the used of NH 4 OH as the precipitating medium. Aluminium hydroxide produced from each of these salts were characterised by x-ray diffraction (XRD) technique to identity the crystalline phase. Aluminium hydroxide produced by all the different aluminium salts is present as boehmite or pseudo-boehmite phase. Aluminium hydroxide produced from Al 2 (SO) 2 , Al(NO) 3 and AlCl 3 shows the transformation of the boehmite phase to a α-alumina phase at 500 0 C. On further heating, the α-alumina continuously formed at 800 o C followed soon at 1000 o C. But for the Al(NO3) 3 salts a different phase transitions occurs on heating especially at 1000 o C. Here it was observed not a single alumina phase is presence but the presence of both α and γ--alumina phases. At 1300 o C, the single α-alumina phase was formed. The study concluded that aluminium sulphate is recommended in order to obtain a single-phase α-alumina with the required characteristics. (Author)

  15. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site

  16. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  17. Pyrochemical head-end treatment for spent nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowersox, D.F.

    1977-01-01

    A program based upon thermodynamic values and scouting experiments at Argonne National Laboratory is proposed for development of a pyrochemical head-end treatment of spent nuclear fuels to replace the proposed chopping and leaching operation in the Purex process. The treatment consists of separation of the cladding from the oxide fuel by dissolution into liquid zinc; oxide reduction of uranium and plutonium and dissolution into a zinc--magnesium alloy; separation of alkali, alkaline earth, and rare earth fission products into a molten salt; and, finally, separation and recovery of the plutonium and uranium in the alloy. Uranium and plutonium would be separated from the fuel cladding and selected fission products in a form readily dissolvable in nitric acid. The head-end process could be developed eventually into an optimum method for recovering uranium, plutonium, and selected fission products and for minimizing wastes as compact, stable solids. Developmental expenses are not known clearly, but the potential advantages of the process are impressive

  18. Research reactors spent fuel management in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rychecky, J.

    2001-01-01

    In Czech Republic 3 research and testing nuclear reactors are operated at present time, with the biggest one being the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) reactor LVR-15, operated with maximum power 10 MW. This reactor serves as a radiation source for material testing, producing of ionizing radiation sources, theoretical studies, and, most recently, for boron neutron capture therapy. Another NRI reactor LR-0 is a reactor of zero power used mainly for the studies of WWER 1000 spent fuel criticality. For training of students the reactor called VRABEC (VR-1), operated also with very low power, serves since 1990 at the Faculty of Nuclear Engineering, of Czech Technical University. The similar testing type reactor (SR-0), already decommissioned, was also used since 1974 to 1989 in Skoda, Nuclear Machinery, Plzen. This contribution summarizes the present state of the spent fuel (SF) management of these nuclear reactors. As the SF management is different for very low or zero power reactors and power reactors, the first type will be only briefly discussed, and then the main attention will be devoted to SF management of the NRI experimental reactor LVR-15

  19. Research reactors spent fuel management in the Nuclear Research Institute Rez

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rychecky, J. [Nuclear Research Institute, 25068 Rez (Czech Republic)

    2001-07-01

    In Czech Republic 3 research and testing nuclear reactors are operated at present time, with the biggest one being the Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) reactor LVR-15, operated with maximum power 10 MW. This reactor serves as a radiation source for material testing, producing of ionizing radiation sources, theoretical studies, and, most recently, for boron neutron capture therapy. Another NRI reactor LR-0 is a reactor of zero power used mainly for the studies of WWER 1000 spent fuel criticality. For training of students the reactor called VRABEC (VR-1), operated also with very low power, serves since 1990 at the Faculty of Nuclear Engineering, of Czech Technical University. The similar testing type reactor (SR-0), already decommissioned, was also used since 1974 to 1989 in Skoda, Nuclear Machinery, Plzen. This contribution summarizes the present state of the spent fuel (SF) management of these nuclear reactors. As the SF management is different for very low or zero power reactors and power reactors, the first type will be only briefly discussed, and then the main attention will be devoted to SF management of the NRI experimental reactor LVR-15.

  20. Comparison of corrosion behavior between fusion cladded and explosive cladded Inconel 625/plain carbon steel bimetal plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zareie Rajani, H.R.; Akbari Mousavi, S.A.A.; Madani Sani, F.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Both explosive and fusion cladding aggravate the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625. ► Fusion cladding is more detrimental to nonuniform corrosion resistance. ► Single-layered fusion coat does not show any repassivation ability. ► Adding more layers enhance the corrosion resistance of fusion cladding Inconel 625. ► High impact energy spoils the corrosion resistance of explosive cladding Inconel 625. -- Abstract: One of the main concerns in cladding Inconel 625 superalloy on desired substrates is deterioration of corrosion resistance due to cladding process. The present study aims to compare the effect of fusion cladding and explosive cladding procedures on corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 cladding on plain carbon steel as substrate. Also, an attempt has been made to investigate the role of load ratio and numbers of fusion layers in corrosion behavior of explosive and fusion cladding Inconel 625 respectively. In all cases, the cyclic polarization as an electrochemical method has been applied to assess the corrosion behavior. According to the obtained results, both cladding methods aggravate the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625. However, the fusion cladding process is more detrimental to nonuniform corrosion resistance, where the chemical nonuniformity of fusion cladding superalloy issuing from microsegregation, development of secondary phases and contamination of clad through dilution hinders formation of a stable passive layer. Moreover, it is observed that adding more fusion layers can enhance the nonuniform corrosion resistance of fusion cladding Inconel 625, though this resistance still remains weaker than explosive cladding superalloy. Also, the results indicate that raising the impact energy in explosive cladding procedure drops the corrosion resistance of Inconel 625.

  1. Investigation of water-logged spent fuel rods under dry storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohli, R.; Pasupathi, V.

    1986-09-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the amount of moisture contained in breached, water-logged spent fuel rods and the rate of release. Two well-characterized BWR fuel rods with reactor-induced breaches were tested in a hot cell. These rods contained approximately 6 to 10 g of moisture, most of which was released during heating tests simulating normal cask drying operations. Additional testing with two intentionally defected fuel rods (BWR and PWR) was performed to evaluate the effect of the cladding breach on migration of moisture along the length of the fuel rod. The results showed that the moisture released from reactor-breached spent fuel rods was insufficient to cause degradation of fuel or dry storage system components

  2. Coprecipitation of yttrium and aluminium hydroxide for preparation of yttrium aluminium garnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrolijk, J.W.G.A.; Willems, J.W.M.M.; Metselaar, R.

    1990-01-01

    Coprecipitation of yttrium and aluminium hydroxide for the preparation of pure yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) powder with small grain size is the subject of this study. Starting materials are sulphates and chlorides of yttrium and aluminium. To obtain pure YAG (Y3Al5O12), the pH during flocculation

  3. Optical Cladding Waveguides in Dielectric Crystals Produced by Femtosecond Laser Inscription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Feng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the recent progress of our research on optical cladding waveguides in dielectric crystals produced by femtosecond laser inscription has been overviewed. With different scales at cross sections, the cladding waveguides support guidance from single mode to highly multi-modes, and work for wavelength till mid-infrared regimes. Applications of the fabricated cladding structures as new integrated light sources are introduced.

  4. Effects of Aluminium Sulfate on Cadmium Accumulation in Rice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khamvarn, Vararas; Boontanon, Narin; Prapagdee, Benjaphorn; Kumsopa, Acharaporn; Boonsirichai, Kanokporn

    2011-06-01

    Full text: Cadmium accumulation in Pathum Thani 1 and Suphan Buri 60 rice cultivars was investigated upon treatment with aluminium sulfate as a precipitant. Rice was grown hydroponically in a medium containing 4 ppm cadmium nitrate with or without 4 ppm aluminium sulfate. Root, stem with leaves and grain samples were collected and analyzed for cadmium content using atomic absorption spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Without the addition of aluminium sulfate, Pathum Thani 1 and Suphan Buri 60 accumulated 24.71∫ 3.14 ppm and 34.43 ∫ 4.51 ppm (dry weight of whole plant) of cadmium, respectively. With aluminium sulfate, cadmium accumulation increased to 40.66 ∫ 2.47 ppm and 62.94 ∫ 10.69 ppm, respectively. The addition of aluminium sulfate to the planting medium did not reduce cadmium accumulation but caused the rice to accumulate more cadmium especially in the shoots and grains. This observation might serve as the basis for future research on the management of agricultural areas that are contaminated with cadmium and aluminium

  5. WWER water chemistry related to fuel cladding behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kysela, J; Zmitko, M [Nuclear Research Inst. plc., Rez (Czech Republic); Vrtilkova, V [Nuclear Fuel Inst., Prague (Czech Republic)

    1997-02-01

    Operational experience in WWER primary water chemistry and corrosion related to the fuel cladding is reviewed. Insignificant corrosion of fuel cladding was found which is caused by good corrosion resistance of Zr1Nb material and relatively low coolant temperature at WWER-440 reactor units. The differences in water chemistry control is outlined and an attention to the question of compatibility of Zircaloys with WWER water chemistry is given. Some results of research and development in field of zirconium alloy corrosion behaviour are discussed. Experimental facility for in-pile and out-of-pile cladding material corrosion testing is shown. (author). 14 refs, 5 figs, 3 tabs.

  6. Corrosion characteristics of K-claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J. Y.; Choi, B. K.; Jung, Y. H.; Jung, Y. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Improvement of the corrosion resistance of nuclear fuel claddings is the critical issue for the successful development of the high burn-up fuel. KAERI have developed the K-claddings having a superior corrosion resistance by controlling the alloying element addition and optimizing the manufacturing process. The comparative evaluation of the corrosion resistance for K-claddings and the foreign claddings was performed and the effect of the heat treatment on the corrosion behavior of K-claddings was also examined. Corrosion tests were carried out in the conditions of 360 .deg. C pure water, PWR-simulating loop and 400 .deg. C steam, From the results of the corrosion tests, it was found that the corrosion resistance of K-claddings is superior to those of Zry4 and A claddings and K6 showed a better corrosion resistance than K3. The corrosion behavior of K-cladding was strongly influenced by the final annealing rather than the intermediate annealing, and the corrosion resistance increased with decreasing the final annealing temperature

  7. The Effect of Peak Temperatures and Hoop Stresses on Hydride Reorientations of Zirconium Alloy Cladding Tubes under Interim Dry Storage Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Hyun Jin; Jang, Ki Nam; Kim, Kyu Tae

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of peak temperatures and hoop tensile stresses on hydride reorientation in cladding was investigated. It was shown that the 250ppm-H specimens generated larger radial hydride fractions and longer radial hydrides than the 500ppm-H ones. The precipitated hydride in radial direction severely degrades mechanical properties of spent fuel rod. Hydride reorientation is related to cladding material, cladding temperature, hydrogen contents, thermal cycling, hoop stress and cooling rate. US NRC established the regulation on cladding temperature during the dry storage, which is the maximum fuel cladding temperature should not exceed 400 .deg. C for all fuel burnups under normal conditions of storage. However, if it is proved that the best estimate cladding hoop stress is equal to or less than 90MPa for the temperature limit proposed, a higher short-term temperature limit is allowed for low burnup fuel. In this study, 250ppm and 500ppm hydrogen-charged Zr-Nb alloy cladding tubes were selected to evaluate the effect of peak temperatures and hoop tensile stresses on the hydride reorientation during the dry storage. In order to evaluate threshold stresses in relation to various peak temperatures, four peak temperatures of 250, 300, 350, and 400 .deg. C and three tensile hoop stresses of 80, 100, 120MPa were selected.

  8. CASTI handbook of cladding technology. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.; Celant, M.

    2000-01-01

    This updated (2000) CASTI handbook covers all aspects of clad products - the different means of manufacture, properties and applications in various industries. Topics include: an introduction to cladding technology, clad plate, clad pipes, bends, clad fittings, specification requirements of clad products, welding clad products, clad product application and case histories from around the world. Unique to this book is the documentation of case histories of major cladding projects from around the world and how the technology of that day has withstood the demands of time. Filled with over 100 photos and graphics illustrating the various cladding technology examples and products, this book truly documents the most recent technologies in the field of cladding technology used worldwide

  9. Thermal-hydraulic analyses of the TN-24P cask loaded with consolidated and unconsolidated spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michener, T.E.; McKinnon, M.A.; Rector, D.R.; Creer, J.M.

    1989-06-01

    This paper presents the results of comparisons of COBRA-SFS (spent fuel storage) temperature predictions with experimental data from the TN-24P (Transnuclear) spent fuel storage cask loaded with unconsolidated and consolidated spent PWR fuel. Peak cladding temperature predictions using the COBRA-SFS code are compared with test data and predicted axial and radial temperature distributions are compared with measured temperature profiles. The pre-test accuracy of the COBRA-SFS code in predicting temperature distributions is discussed, along with the effect of post-test model improvements on temperature predictions. This paper also briefly describes the COBRA-SFS code, which is designed to accurately predict flow and temperature distributions in spent nuclear fuel storage and transportation systems. 6 refs., 14 figs

  10. Loss of cooling accident simulation of nuclear power station spent-fuel pool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M.; Liang, K-S., E-mail: mlee@ess.nthu.edu.tw, E-mail: ksliang_1@hotmail.com [National Tsing Hua Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Lin, K-Y., E-mail: syrup760914@gmail.com [Taiwan Power Company, Taiwan (China)

    2014-07-01

    The core melt down accident of Fukushima Nuclear Power Station on March 11th, 2011 alerted nuclear industry that the long term loss of cooling of spent fuel pool may need some attention. The target plant analyzed is the Chinshan Nuclear Power Station of Taiwan Power Company. The 3-Dimensional RELAP5 input deck of the spent fuel pool of the station is built. The results indicate that spent fuel of Chinshan Nuclear Power Station is uncovered at 6.75 days after an accident of loss cooling takes place and cladding temperature rises above 2,200{sup o}F around 8 days. The time is about 13 hours earlier than the results predicted using simple energy balance method. The results also show that the impact of Counter Current Flow Limitation (CCFL) and radiation heat transfer model is marginal. (author)

  11. There is (still too much aluminium in infant formulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burrell Shelle-Ann M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infant formulas are sophisticated milk-based feeds for infants which are used as a substitute for breast milk. Historically they are known to be contaminated by aluminium and in the past this has raised health concerns for exposed infants. We have measured the aluminium content of a number of widely used infant formulas to determine if their contamination by aluminium and consequent issues of child health persists. Methods Samples of ready-made milks and powders used to make milks were prepared by microwave digestion of acid/peroxide mixtures and their aluminium content determined by THGA. Results The concentration of aluminium in ready-made milks varied from ca 176 to 700 μg/L. The latter concentration was for a milk for preterm infants. The aluminium content of powders used to make milks varied from ca 2.4 to 4.3 μg/g. The latter content was for a soya-based formula and equated to a ready-to-drink milk concentration of 629 μg/L. Using the manufacturer's own guidelines of formula consumption the average daily ingestion of aluminium from infant formulas for a child of 6 months varied from ca 200 to 600 μg of aluminium. Generally ingestion was higher from powdered as compared to ready-made formulas. Conclusions The aluminium content of a range of well known brands of infant formulas remains high and particularly so for a product designed for preterm infants and a soya-based product designed for infants with cow's milk intolerances and allergies. Recent research demonstrating the vulnerability of infants to early exposure to aluminium serves to highlight an urgent need to reduce the aluminium content of infant formulas to as low a level as is practically possible.

  12. Public sector's research programme on spent fuel management in Finland supporting the authorities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuori, S.; Rasilainen, K.

    2000-01-01

    A multiphase research program launched in 1989 to support Finnish authorities in their activities concerning spent fuel management is reviewed. The Finnish program for spent fuel management has so far managed to keep its original time schedule at least partly due to clearly defined responsibilities between the nuclear energy producing industry and the authorities. It appears that the public sector's research programme has been successful in its supporting role, because authorities have had good possibilities to adjust the emphasis and volume of the research programme from the very beginning. (author)

  13. Insights from a comprehensive evaluation of risk at spent fuel pools at decommissioning nuclear power plants in the U.S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, G.; Palla, R.; Cheok, M.; Parry, G.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) undertook the first comprehensive safety assessment (the study) of spent fuel pools at decommissioning nuclear power plants in the United States. Previous NRC studies of spent fuel pools applied only to commercial nuclear operating reactors. The NRC staff made site visits to four decommissioning sites, and determined that the configurations at the decommissioning plants were very different from that assumed in operating reactor spent fuel pool safety assessments previously performed. The safety assessment will help determine the technical basis for rule making for emergency preparedness, security, and indemnification for decommissioning reactors. The scenario investigated by the safety assessment is one where the pool inventory is lost, spent fuel is uncovered, the fuel heats up, rapid oxidation of the zirconium fuel cladding occurs, and a fuel clad zirconium fire commences, which results in significant off-site doses to the public. The assessment investigated a wide range of internal and external initiating events such as loss of pool cooling, seismic, fire, loss-of-offsite-power, heavy load drop, tornado missile, aircraft impact, and loss of inventory events. The assessment developed conditional recovery probabilities for extended recovery periods. Comparison to the U.S. NRC Safety Goals is made. (author)

  14. Toxicity of aluminium on five aquatic invertebrates; Aluminiums toksisitet paa 5 akvatiske invertebrater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, J [Oslo Univ. (Norway)

    1996-01-01

    The conference paper deals with the experiments done by investigating the effects from the toxicity of aluminium on aquatic invertebrates. The aim of the experiments was to compare the toxicity of unstable aluminium compounds with stable forms of aluminium. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Results from Cycles 1 and 2 of NNWSI Series 2 spent fuel dissolution tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1987-05-01

    PWR spent fuel rod segments from the H.B. Robinson Unit 2 and Turkey Point Unit 3 reactors were leach tested in Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) reference J-13 water under ambient hot cell conditions. The test matrix included bare fuel plus the cladding, rod segments with artificially induced cladding defects, and undefected rod segments. Radionuclide release results are presented and discussed. The actinides Pu, Am, Cm and Np appear to have been released congruently as the UO 2 oxide fuel matrix dissolved. Preferential U release measured in certain tests may be related to dissolution of oxidized UO/sub 2+x/ from the fuel surface, and/or greater solubility (and mobility) of U relative to the other actinides within defected cladding specimens. Uranium solubility measured in the J-13 water was much greater then that measured in deionized water in previous tests. All of the principal fission products analyzed ( 137 Cs, 129 I, 99 Tc and 90 Sr) were released preferentially relative to the actinides. Preferential release of activation product 14 C was also measured, with a portion of the 14 C release appearing to originate from the cladding exterior surface. Much greater fractional fuel dissolution appeared to have occurred with bare fuel particles than from fuel contained in defected cladding. Actinide release from test specimens containing small (∼200 μm) laser-drilled holes through the cladding was not significantly greater than from undefected specimens

  16. Inspection and Characterization of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Wet Basin Storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.; Sindelar, R.L.

    1998-01-01

    About 200 metric tons of aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel and targets have been stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the L, K-Reactor basins, and the Receiving Basin for Off-Site Fuels (RBOF) since 1988. Processing ceased at SRS in the early 90's for facility improvements. This was followed by a re-evaluation of the Department of Energy's processing policies in light of the end of the cold war

  17. Effect of Sintering Temperature on the Properties of Aluminium-Aluminium Oxide Composite Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewan Muhammad Nuruzzaman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, aluminium-aluminium oxide (Al-Al2O3 metal matrix composites of different weight percentage reinforcements of aluminium oxide were processed at different sintering temperatures. In order to prepare these composite specimens, conventional powder metallurgy (PM method was used. Three types specimens of different compositions such as 95%Al+5%Al2O3, 90%Al+10%Al2O3 and 85%Al+15%Al2O3 were prepared under 20 Ton compaction load. Then, all the specimens were sintered in a furnace at two different temperatures 550oC and 580oC. In each sintering process, two different heating cycles were used. After the sintering process, it was observed that undistorted flat specimens were successfully prepared for all the compositions. The effects of sintering temperature and weight fraction of aluminium oxide particulates on the density, hardness and microstructure of Al-Al2O3 composites were observed. It was found that density and hardness of the composite specimens were significantly influenced by sintering temperature and percentage aluminium oxide reinforcement. Furthermore, optical microscopy revealed that almost uniform distribution of aluminium oxide reinforcement within the aluminium matrix was achieved.

  18. Evaluation of cover gas impurities and their effects on the dry storage of LWR [light-water reactor] spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoll, R.W.; Gilbert, E.R.

    1987-11-01

    The purposes of this report are to (1) identify the sources of impurity gases in spent fuel storage casks; (2) identify the expected concentrations and types of reactive impurity gases from these sources over an operating lifetime of 40 years; and (3) determine whether these impurities could significantly degrade cladding or exposed fuel during this period. Four potential sources of impurity gases in the helium cover gas in operating casks were identified and evaluated. Several different bounding cases have been considered, where the reactive gas inventory is either assumed to be completely gettered by the cladding or where all oxygen is assumed to react completely with the exposed fuel. It is concluded that the reactive gas inventory will have no significant effect on the cladding unless all available oxygen reacts with the UO 2 fuel to produce U 3 O 8 at one or two cladding breaches. Based on Zircaloy oxidation data, the oxygen inventory in a fully loaded pressurized water reactor cask such as the Castor-V/21 will be gettered by the Zircaloy cladding in about 1 year if the peak cladding temperature within the task is ≥300 0 C. Only a negligible decrease in the thickness of the cladding would result. 24 refs., 4 tabs

  19. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feinroth, H.

    2000-01-01

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  20. Cladding creepdown model for FRAPCON-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Tolli, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    This report presents a cladding deformation model developed to analyze cladding creepdown during steady state operation in both a pressurized water reactor (PWR) and a boiling water reactor (BWR). This model accounts for variations in zircaloy cladding heat treatment; cold worked and stress relieved material, typically used in a PWR, and fully recrystallized material, typically used in a BWR. The model calculates cladding creepdown as a function of hoop stress, fast neutron flux, exposure time, and temperature. This report also presents a comparison between cladding creep calculations by this model and corresponding measurements from the KWU/CE program, ORNL HOBBIE experiments, and EPRI/Westinghouse Engineering cooperative project. The comparisons show that the model calculates cladding creep strains well. The analyses of non-fueled rods by FRAPCON-2 show that the cladding creepdown model was correctly incorporated. Also, analysis of a PWR rod test case shows that the FRAPCON-2 code can analyze pellet-cladding mechanical interaction caused by cladding creepdown and fuel swelling

  1. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Laser Clad and Post-cladding Tempered AISI H13 Tool Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telasang, Gururaj; Dutta Majumdar, Jyotsna; Wasekar, Nitin; Padmanabham, G.; Manna, Indranil

    2015-05-01

    This study reports a detailed investigation of the microstructure and mechanical properties (wear resistance and tensile strength) of hardened and tempered AISI H13 tool steel substrate following laser cladding with AISI H13 tool steel powder in as-clad and after post-cladding conventional bulk isothermal tempering [at 823 K (550 °C) for 2 hours] heat treatment. Laser cladding was carried out on AISI H13 tool steel substrate using a 6 kW continuous wave diode laser coupled with fiber delivering an energy density of 133 J/mm2 and equipped with a co-axial powder feeding nozzle capable of feeding powder at the rate of 13.3 × 10-3 g/mm2. Laser clad zone comprises martensite, retained austenite, and carbides, and measures an average hardness of 600 to 650 VHN. Subsequent isothermal tempering converted the microstructure into one with tempered martensite and uniform dispersion of carbides with a hardness of 550 to 650 VHN. Interestingly, laser cladding introduced residual compressive stress of 670 ± 15 MPa, which reduces to 580 ± 20 MPa following isothermal tempering. Micro-tensile testing with specimens machined from the clad zone across or transverse to cladding direction showed high strength but failure in brittle mode. On the other hand, similar testing with samples sectioned from the clad zone parallel or longitudinal to the direction of laser cladding prior to and after post-cladding tempering recorded lower strength but ductile failure with 4.7 and 8 pct elongation, respectively. Wear resistance of the laser surface clad and post-cladding tempered samples (evaluated by fretting wear testing) registered superior performance as compared to that of conventional hardened and tempered AISI H13 tool steel.

  2. Dispersion strengthening of aluminium-aluminium-oxide products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Niels

    1970-01-01

    The true stress-true strain curves at room temperature and at 400°C were determined for various types of aluminium-aluminium-oxide products containing from 0.2 to 4.7 weight per cent of aluminium oxide. The effect of particles on the initial flow stress and the flow stress for 0.2% offset at room...... temperature and at 400°C is in agreement with Orowan's theory. The increase in flow stress at room temperature for strain values below 3 per cent was related to the plastic strain by the equation σ-σoy=k1ε 1/2, where σoy is the initial flow stress and where k1 increases for increasing volume fraction...... and decreasing particle size of the dispersed particles. A general expression for k1 was derived for the relationship between the dislocation density and the strain in dispersion-strengthened products...

  3. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented

  4. The French program on the spent nuclear fuel long term evolution: Major results, uncertainties and new requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferry, Cecile; Poinssot, Christophe; Gras, Jean-Marie

    2006-01-01

    The 1991 Radioactive Waste Management Act established a framework in France for research activities on nuclear waste. Within this context, the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique initiated a research program in 1999 to investigate the long-term behaviour of commercial spent nuclear fuel under the PRECCI project (from the French acronym for Research Project on Long-Term Evolution of Spent Fuel Packages), supported by the French electrical utility EDF and partially by FRAMATOME ANP. The scientific and technical studies performed within the project aim to address the operational issues of the spent fuel end-of-life. Within the context of the law which ends in 2006, the major part of the studies focused on the behaviour of the spent fuel (SF) in interim long-term dry storage and deep geological disposal. The operational questions initially identified concern (i) the retrievability of spent fuel assemblies at the end of the interim period of storage, (ii) the feasibility of treatment after the period of storage, (iii) the radionuclide source terms for SF in storage and geological disposal and (iv) the compatibility between storage and a subsequent geological disposal. Therefore the long-term evolution of the irradiated fuel is studied under the various boundary conditions encountered during storage and geological disposal: - in a closed system; this condition corresponds to the nominal scenario during storage and to the first confinement phase in disposal conditions (with a duration of 10,000 years in the reference scenario); - it consists in assessing the effects of the residual temperature and high radioactivity on the chemical and physical properties of the spent fuel pellets; - some of the studies are also dedicated to the mechanical behaviour of the cladding and structural materials of the assemblies; - in air, it refers to an incidental loss of confinement during storage or to a breaching of the canister before the site re-saturation in geological disposal

  5. The prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lione, A

    1983-02-01

    The use of modern analytical methods has demonstrated that aluminium salts can be absorbed from the gut and concentrated in various human tissues, including bone, the parathyroids and brain. The neurotoxicity of aluminium has been extensively characterized in rabbits and cats, and high concentrations of aluminium have been detected in the brain tissue of patients with Alzheimer's disease. Various reports have suggested that high aluminium intakes may be harmful to some patients with bone disease or renal impairment. Fatal aluminium-induced neuropathies have been reported in patients on renal dialysis. Since there are no demonstrable consequences of aluminium deprivation, the prophylactic reduction of aluminium intake by many patients would appear prudent. In this report, the major sources of aluminium in foods and non-prescription drugs are summarized and alternative products are described. The most common foods that contain substantial amounts of aluminium-containing additives include some processed cheeses, baking powders, cake mixes, frozen doughs, pancake mixes, self-raising flours and pickled vegetables. The aluminium-containing non-prescription drugs include some antacids, buffered aspirins, antidiarrhoeal products, douches and haemorrhoidal medications. The advisability of recommending a low aluminium diet for geriatric patients is discussed in detail.

  6. A New Material Constitutive Model for Predicting Cladding Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Joe; Dunham, Robert [ANATECH Corp., San Diego, CA (United States); Rashid, Mark [University of California Davis, Davis, CA (United States); Machiels, Albert [EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2009-06-15

    An important issue in fuel performance and safety evaluations is the characterization of the effects of hydrides on cladding mechanical response and failure behavior. The hydride structure formed during power operation transforms the cladding into a complex multi-material composite, with through-thickness concentration profile that causes cladding ductility to vary by more than an order of magnitude between ID and OD. However, current practice of mechanical property testing treats the cladding as a homogeneous material characterized by a single stress-strain curve, regardless of its hydride morphology. Consequently, as irradiation conditions and hydrides evolution change, new material property testing is required, which results in a state of continuous need for valid material property data. A recently developed constitutive model, treats the cladding as a multi-material composite in which the metal and the hydride platelets are treated as separate material phases with their own elastic-plastic and fracture properties and interacting at their interfaces with appropriate constraint conditions between them to ensure strain and stress compatibility. An essential feature of the model is a multi-phase damage formulation that models the complex interaction between the hydride phases and the metal matrix and the coupled effect of radial and circumferential hydrides on cladding stress-strain response. This gives the model the capability of directly predicting cladding failure progression during the loading event and, as such, provides a unique tool for constructing failure criteria analytically where none could be developed by conventional material testing. Implementation of the model in a fuel behavior code provides the capability to predict in-reactor operational failures due to PCI or missing pellet surfaces (MPS) without having to rely on failure criteria. Even, a stronger motivation for use of the model is in the transportation accidents analysis of spent fuel

  7. Electrical connection for aluminium conductors in automotive applications : Prestudy of available solutions for electrical connection methods of aluminium cables

    OpenAIRE

    Hamedi, Emilia

    2017-01-01

    Due to increasing weight of electrical component and wiring harnesses in a vehicle contrary to the demand of light constructed vehicles as well as the constantly increasing and fluctuating price of copper compared to aluminium’s stable and far lower price, the use of aluminium conductors as an alternative have been promoted.  This thesis work lay theoretical research of the available methods used for electrical connection of aluminium conductors in order to increase the knowledge about the av...

  8. Numerical modelling of closed-cell aluminium foam under dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazell, Paul; Kader, M. A.; Islam, M. A.; Escobedo, J. P.; Saadatfar, M.

    2015-06-01

    Closed-cell aluminium foams are extensively used in aerospace and automobile industries. The understanding of their behaviour under impact loading conditions is extremely important since impact problems are directly related to design of these engineering structures. This research investigates the response of a closed-cell aluminium foam (CYMAT) subjected to dynamic loading using the finite element software ABAQUS/explicit. The aim of this research is to numerically investigate the material and structural properties of closed-cell aluminium foam under impact loading conditions with interest in shock propagation and its effects on cell wall deformation. A μ-CT based 3D foam geometry is developed to simulate the local cell collapse behaviours. A number of numerical techniques are applied for modelling the crush behaviour of aluminium foam to obtain the more accurate results. The simulation results are compared with experimental data. Comparison of the results shows a good correlation between the experimental results and numerical predictions.

  9. Zirconium-barrier cladding attributes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbaum, H.S.; Rand, R.A.; Tucker, R.P.; Cheng, B.; Adamson, R.B.; Davies, J.H.; Armijo, J.S.; Wisner, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    This metallurgical study of Zr-barrier fuel cladding evaluates the importance of three salient attributes: (1) metallurgical bond between the zirconium liner and the Zircaloy substrate, (2) liner thickness (roughly 10% of the total cladding wall), and (3) softness (purity). The effect that each of these attributes has on the pellet-cladding interaction (PCI) resistance of the Zr-barrier fuel was studied by a combination of analytical model calculations and laboratory experiments using an expanding mandrel technique. Each of the attributes is shown to contribute to PCI resistance. The effect of the zirconium liner on fuel behavior during off-normal events in which steam comes in contact with the zirconium surface was studied experimentally. Simulations of loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) showed that the behavior of Zr-barrier cladding is virtually indistinguishable from that of conventional Zircaloy cladding. If steam contacts the zirconium liner surface through a cladding perforation and the fuel rod is operated under normal power conditions, the zirconium liner is oxidized more rapidly than is Zircaloy, but the oxidation rate returns to the rate of Zircaloy oxidation when the oxide phase reaches the zirconium-Zircaloy metallurgical bond

  10. Spent fuel management options for research reactors in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-06-01

    Research reactors (RRs) have been operated in Latin America since the late 1950s, and a total of 23 RRs have been built in the region. At the time of writing (November 2005), 18 RRs are in operation, 4 have been shut down and 1 has been decommissioned. The number of operating RRs in Latin America represents around 6% of the existing operational RRs worldwide and around 21% of the RRs operating in developing countries. Common to all RRs in the region is a consistent record of safe and successful operation. With the purpose of carrying out a collaborative study of different aspects of the management of spent fuel from RRs, some countries from the region proposed to the IAEA in 2000 the organization of a Regional Project. The project (IAEA TC Regional Project RLA/4/018) that was approved for the biennium 2001-2002 and extended for 2003-2004 included the participation of Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Mexico and Peru. The main objectives of this project were: (a) to define the basic conditions for a regional strategy for managing spent fuel that will provide solutions compatible with the economic and technological realities of the countries involved; and (b) to determine what is needed for the temporary wet and dry storage of spent fuel from the research reactors in the countries of the Latin American region that participated in the project. This TECDOC is based on the results of TC Regional Project RLA/4/018. This project was successful in identifying and assessing a number of viable alternatives for RRSF management in the Latin American region. Options for operational and interim storage, spent fuel conditioning and final disposal have been carefully considered. This report presents the views of Latin American experts on RR spent fuel management and will be useful as reference material for the Latin American RR community, decision making authorities in the region and the public in general

  11. Aluminium hydroxide-induced granulomas in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valtulini, S; Macchi, C; Ballanti, P

    2005-01-01

    The effect of intramuscular injection of 40 mg/2 ml aluminium hydroxide in the neck of pigs was examined in a number of ways. The investigation followed repeated slaughterhouse reports, according to which 64.8% of pigs from one particular farm were found at slaughter to have one or more nodules...... in the muscles of the neck (group slaughtered). The pigs had been injected with a vaccine containing 40 mg/2 ml dose of aluminium hydroxide as adjuvant. Research consisted of two phases: first, an epidemiological study was carried out, aimed at determining the risk factors for the granulomas. The results...... and adjuvant) to pigs inoculated twice with apyrogenic bi-distilled water (group water) and to pigs inoculated once with the adjuvant and once with apyrogenic bi-distilled water (group adjuvant/water). Both studies agreed in their conclusions, which indicate that the high amount of aluminium hydroxide...

  12. Thermal test and analysis of a spent fuel storage cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, H.; Gomi, Y.; Ozaki, S.; Kosaki, A.

    1993-01-01

    A thermal test simulated with full-scale cask model for the normal storage was performed to verify the storage skill of the spent fuels of the cask. The maximum temperature at each point in the test was lower than the allowable temperature. The integrity of the cask was maintained. It was observed that the safety of containment system was also kept according to the check of the seal before and after the thermal test. Therefore it was shown that using the present skill, it is possible to store spent fuels in the dry-type cask safely. Moreover, because of the good agreement between analysis and experimental results, it was shown that the analysis model was successfully established to estimate the temperature distribution of the fuel cladding and the seal portion. (J.P.N.)

  13. Fabrication and testing of U–7Mo monolithic plate fuel with Zircaloy cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasqualini, E.E. [Laboratorio de Nanotecnología Nuclear, Centro Atómico Constituyentes, Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica, Av. General Paz 1499, B1650KNA, San Martín, Prov. Buenos Aires (Argentina); Robinson, A.B. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Porter, D.L., E-mail: Douglas.Porter@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Wachs, D.M. [Idaho National Laboratory, P. O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID, 83415-6188 (United States); Finlay, M.R. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, PMB 1, Menai, NSW, 2234 (Australia)

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear fuel designs are being developed to replace highly enriched fuel used in research and test reactors with fuels of low enrichment. In the most challenging cases, U–(7–10 wt%)Mo monolithic plate fuels are proposed. One of the considered designs includes aluminum-alloy cladding, which provides some challenges in fabrication and fuel/cladding interaction during service. Zircaloy cladding, specifically Zry–4, was investigated as an alternative cladding, and development of a fabrication method was performed by researchers with the Comisión Nacionalde Energia Atómica (CNEA) in Argentina, resulting in test fuel plates (Zry–4 clad U–7Mo) which were subsequently tested in the Advanced Test Reactor in Idaho. Because Zry–4 and U–(7–10)Mo have similar high-temperature mechanical properties, fabrication was simplified in that the fuel foil and cladding could be co-rolled and bonded. The challenge was to prevent a thermal-expansion mismatch, which could destroy the fuel/cladding bond before complete bonding was achieved; the solution was to prevent the composites from cooling significantly during or between roll passes. The final product performed very well in-reactor, showing good bonding, very little fuel/cladding interaction—either from fabrication or in-reactor testing—and little swelling, especially no detectable heterogeneous bubble formation at the fuel/cladding interface tested to a fission density of up to 2.7E+21 (average) fissions/cm{sup 3}, 3.8E+21 (peak).

  14. Progress of the United States foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel acceptance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, D.G.; Clapper, M.; Thrower, A.W.

    2002-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), in consultation with the Department of State (DOS), adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. To date, the Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Acceptance Program has completed 23 shipments. Almost 5000 spent fuel assemblies from eligible research reactors throughout the world have been accepted into the United States under this program. Over the past year, another cross-country shipment of fuel was accomplished, as well as two additional shipments in the fourth quarter of calendar year 2001. These shipments attracted considerable safeguards oversight since they occurred post September 11. Recent guidance from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) pertaining to security and safeguards issues deals directly with the transport of nuclear material. Since the Acceptance Program has consistently applied above regulatory safety enhancements in transport of spent nuclear fuel, this guidance did not adversely effect the Program. As the Program draws closer to its termination date, an increased number of requests for program extension are received. Currently, there are no plans to extend the policy beyond its current expiration date; therefore, eligible reactor operators interested in participating in this program are strongly encouraged to evaluate their inventory and plan for future shipments as soon as possible. (author)

  15. Development of the down-ender and the spent fuel rod cutting device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Yoon, Ji Sup; Kim, Young Hwan; Hoo, Jung Jae; Hong, Dong Hee; Kim, Do Woo

    2000-07-01

    It is necessary to disassemble the spent fuel assembly for the recycling of the PWR spent fuels. The spent fuel disassembling process includes transportation and handling of the spent fuel assembly, extraction and cutting of the spent fuel rods, and extraction of the spent fuel pellets(decladding). In this study, the downender of the spent fuel assembly and the spent fuel rod cutting device have been developed. The downender is used to change the posture of the spent fuel assembly from the vertical to the horizontal directions, prior to extracting the fuel rods. The concepts of the remote operation and maintenance has been introduced in the design of the downender. Also, the several design consideration has been given such as the reliable adaptation of the vertically accessing the assembly to the device, the minimization of the shock force when settling down the assembly, and the interface with the rod extraction device without intermittent operation. The spent fuel rod cutting device using a tube cutter is developed for cutting the fuel rods to the suitable size. In designing this device, the mechanical property of the spent fuel rod is examined such as the strength of the clad material and the optimal size of the rod for the extracting process. Also, several cutting methods, which are commercially available, are investigated and tested in terms of the durability, the deformation on the cutting surface of the rods, and the amount of the generated debris, and the fire risk. As like the downender, the design of this device accommodates the concepts of the remote operation and maintenance

  16. Investigation of the aluminium-aluminium oxide reversible transformation as observed by hot stage electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, C. A.; Judd, G.; Ansell, G. S.

    1972-01-01

    Thin foils of high purity aluminium and an Al-Al2O3 SAP type of alloy were oxidised in a specially designed hot stage specimen chamber in an electron microscope. Below 450 C, amorphous aluminium oxide formed on the foil surface and was first detectable at foil edges, holes, and pits. Islands of aluminium then nucleated in this amorphous oxide. The aluminium islands displayed either a lateral growth with eventual coalescence with other islands, or a reoxidation process which caused the islands to disappear. The aluminium island formation was determined to be related to the presence of the electron beam. A mechanism based upon electron charging due to the electron beam was proposed to explain the nucleation, growth, coalescence, disappearance, and geometry of the aluminium islands.

  17. TEM investigation of aluminium containing precipitates in high aluminium doped silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong-Leung, J.; FitzGerald, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Silicon carbide is a promising semiconductor material for applications in high temperature and high power devices. The successful growth of good quality epilayers in this material has enhanced its potential for device applications. As a novel semiconductor material, there is a need for studying its basic physical properties and the role of dopants in this material. In this study, silicon carbide epilayers were grown on 4H-SiC wafers of (0001) orientation with a miscut angle of 8 deg at a temperature of 1550 deg C. The epilayers contained regions of high aluminium doping well above the solubility of aluminium in silicon carbide. High temperature annealing of this material resulted in the precipitation of aluminium in the wafers. The samples were analysed by secondary ion mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. Selected area diffraction studies show the presence of aluminium carbide and aluminium silicon carbide phases. Copyright (2002) Australian Society for Electron Microscopy Inc

  18. The characteristics of anodic coating of Al-alloy claddings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yong; Zou Benhui; Guo Hong; Du Yanhua; Bai Zhiyong; Cai Zhenfang

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum alloy claddings of research reactor fuel elements should be corroded by sodium hydroxide solution and anodized in sulfuric acid solution, but there are often some uneven color phenomena on surfaces, and sometimes regions of 'black and white stripes' appear. In order to study the relationship of colorful stripes on coatings and the surface morphology of aluminum alloy claddings corroded by sodium hydroxide solution, surface microstructures and second phase particles of the aluminum alloy claddings, which were corroded by sodium hydroxide solution, are investigated metallographically and via SEM analysis; Meanwhile, thickness, microstructure, chemical composition and construction of anodic oxidation coatings on aluminum coatings are analyzed. It is shown that: 1) the darker the surface color of corroded aluminum alloy claddings is, the darker of anodic oxidation coating; 2) there are many micro-pores on anodized oxidation coatings, which is much similar to that of corroded aluminum alloy claddings according to the morphology and distribution. So, it can be deduced that the surface morphology of anodic coatings is inherited from the corroded surfaces. (authors)

  19. Development of Diffusion barrier coatings and Deposition Technologies for Mitigating Fuel Cladding Chemical Interactions (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Allen, Todd; Cole, James

    2013-02-27

    The goal of this project is to develop diffusion barrier coatings on the inner cladding surface to mitigate fuel-cladding chemical interaction (FCCI). FCCI occurs due to thermal and radiation enhanced inter-diffusion between the cladding and fuel materials, and can have the detrimental effects of reducing the effective cladding wall thickness and lowering the melting points of the fuel and cladding. The research is aimed at the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), a sodium-cooled fast reactor, in which higher burn-ups will exacerbate the FCCI problem. This project will study both diffusion barrier coating materials and deposition technologies. Researchers will investigate pure vanadium, zirconium, and titanium metals, along with their respective oxides, on substrates of HT-9, T91, and oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steels; these materials are leading candidates for ABR fuel cladding. To test the efficacy of the coating materials, the research team will perform high-temperature diffusion couple studies using both a prototypic metallic uranium fuel and a surrogate the rare-earth element lanthanum. Ion irradiation experiments will test the stability of the coating and the coating-cladding interface. A critical technological challenge is the ability to deposit uniform coatings on the inner surface of cladding. The team will develop a promising non-line-of-sight approach that uses nanofluids . Recent research has shown the feasibility of this simple yet novel approach to deposit coatings on test flats and inside small sections of claddings. Two approaches will be investigated: 1) modified electrophoretic deposition (MEPD) and 2) boiling nanofluids. The coatings will be evaluated in the as-deposited condition and after sintering.

  20. Aluminium supplier selection for the automotive parts manufacturer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cieśla

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology for selection of the optimal sources of supply, which is also known as the problem of supplier selection. Theoretical considerations are expanded with research related to aluminium supplier selection for a hypothetical manufacturer of aluminium parts for transportation equipment located in Poland. Evaluation of five suppliers of aluminium from Poland, Germany and Slovenia has been conducted using a weighted scoring method, a strengths and weaknesses method and a graphical method. Choosing the best offer and prioritizing suppliers allows not only the most rational decision in the field of supply logistics to be taken but also the quality of service in the metallurgical industry to be improved.

  1. Assessment of spent WWER-440 fuel performance under long-term storage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takats, F [TS Enercon Kft. (Hungary)

    2012-07-01

    Paks Nuclear Power Plant is the only NPP in Hungary. It has four WWER-440 type reactor units. The fresh fuel is imported from Russia so far. The spent fuel assemblies were shipped back to Russia until 1997 after about 6 years cooling at the plant. A dry storage facility (MVDS type) has been constructed and is operational since then. By 1 January 2008, there were 5107 assemblies in dry storage. The objectives are: 1) Wet AR storage of spent fuel from the NPP Paks: Measurements of conditions for spent fuel storage in the at-reactor (AR) storage pools of Paks NPP (physical and chemical characteristics of pool water, corrosion product data); Measurements and visual control of storage pool component characteristics; Evaluation of storage characteristics and conditions with respect to long-term stability (corrosion of fuel cladding, construction materials); 2) Dry AFR storage at Paks NPP: Calculation and measurement of spent fuel conditions during the transfer from the storage pool to the modular vault dry storage (MVDS) on the site; Calculation and measurement of spent fuel conditions during the preparation of fuel for dry storage (drying process), such as crud release, activity build-up; Measurement of spent fuel conditions during the long-term dry storage, activity data in the storage tubes and amount of crud.

  2. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, S.; Griffith, G.

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R and D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental enhancements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and fuel/cladding interaction to allow improved fuel economy via power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an 'accident tolerant' fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. In a staged development approach, the LWRS program will engage stakeholders throughout the development process to ensure commercial viability of the investigated technologies. Applying minimum performance criteria, several of the top-ranked materials and fabrication concepts will undergo a rigorous series of mechanical, thermal and chemical characterization tests to better define their properties and operating potential in a relatively low-cost, nonnuclear test series. A reduced number of options will be recommended for test rodlet fabrication and in-pile nuclear testing under steady-state, transient and accident conditions. (author)

  3. BWR fuel clad behaviour following LOCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, S.M.; Vyas, K.N.; Dinesh Babu, R.

    1996-01-01

    Flow and pressure through the fuel coolant channel reduce rapidly following a loss of coolant accident. Due to stored energy and decay heat, fuel and cladding temperatures rise rapidly. Increase in clad temperature causes deterioration of mechanical properties of clad material. This coupled with increase of pressure inside the cladding due to accumulation of fission gases and de-pressurization of coolant causes the cladding to balloon. This phenomenon is important as it can reduce or completely block the flow passages in a fuel assembly causing reduction of emergency coolant flow. Behaviour of a BWR clad is analyzed in a design basis LOCA. Fuel and clad temperatures following a LOCA are calculated. Fission gas release and pressure is estimated using well established models. An elasto-plastic analysis of clad tube is carried out to determine plastic strains and corresponding deformations using finite-element technique. Analysis of neighbouring pins gives an estimate of flow areas available for emergency coolant flow. (author). 7 refs, 6 figs, 3 tabs

  4. Cladding Alloys for Fluoride Salt Compatibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Santella, Michael L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-06-01

    This report provides an overview of several candidate technologies for cladding nickel-based corrosion protection layers onto high-temperature structural alloys. The report also provides a brief overview of the welding and weld performance issues associated with joining nickel-clad nickel-based alloys. From the available techniques, two cladding technologies were selected for initial evaluation. The first technique is a line-of-sight method that would be useful for cladding large structures such as vessel interiors or large piping. The line-of-sight method is a laser-based surface cladding technique in which a high-purity nickel powder mixed into a polymer binder is first sprayed onto the surface, baked, and then rapidly melted using a high-power laser. The second technique is a vapor phase technique based on the nickel-carbonyl process that is suitable for cladding inaccessible surfaces such as the interior surfaces of heat exchangers. An initial evaluation for performed on the quality of nickel claddings processed using the two selected cladding techniques.

  5. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus

    2006-06-01

    Based on this study, the following conclusions and recommendations can be made: Due to significant differences in the thermal and mechanical properties between the austenitic cladding and the ferritic base metal, residual stresses are induced in the cladding and the underlying base metal. These stresses are left in clad components even after Post-Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT). The different restraint conditions of the clad component have a minor influence on the magnitude of the cladding residual stresses in the cladding layer. The thickness of the clad object is the main impacting geometrical dimension in developing cladding residual stresses. A clad object having a base material thickness exceeding 10 times the cladding thickness would be practically sufficient to introduce cladding residual stresses of a thick reactor pressure vessel. For a clad component that received PWHT, the peak tensile stress is in the cladding layer, and the residual stresses in the underlying base material are negligible. However, for clad components not receiving PWHT, for instance the repair welding of the cladding, the cladding residual stresses of tensile type exist even in the base material. This implies a higher risk for underclad cracking for clad repairs that received no PWHT. For certain clad geometries, like nozzles, the profile of the cladding residual stresses depends on the clad thickness and position, and significant tensile stresses can also exist in the base material. Based on different measurements reported in the literature, a value of 150 GPa can be used as Young's Modulus of the austenitic cladding material at room temperature. The control measurements of small samples from the irradiated reactor pressure vessel head did not reveal a significant difference of Young's Modulus between the irradiated and the unirradiated cladding material condition. No significant differences between the axial and tangential cladding residual stresses are reported in the measurement of

  6. Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

    1996-05-01

    As part of the Department of Energy's spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report

  7. U.S. Department of Energy operational experience with shipments of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messick, Charles E.; Massey, Charles D.; Mustin, Tracy P.

    1998-01-01

    On May 13, 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Record of Decision on a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel. The goal of the long-term policy is to recover enriched uranium exported from the United States, while giving foreign research reactor operators sufficient time to develop their own long-term solutions for storage and disposal of spent fuel. The spent fuel accepted by the U.S. DOE under the policy must be out of the research reactors by May 12, 2006 and returned to the United States by May 12, 2009. (author)

  8. Electra-Clad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-05-04

    The study relates to the use of building-integrated photovoltaics. The Electra-Clad project sought to use steel-based cladding as a substrate for direct fabrication of a fully integrated solar panel of a design similar to the ICP standard glass-based panel. The five interrelated phases of the project are described. The study successfully demonstrated that the principles of the panel design are achievable and sound. But, despite intensive trials, a commercially realistic solar performance has not been achieved: the main failing was the poor solar conversion efficiency as the active area of the panel was increased in size. The problem lies with the coating used on the steel cladding substrates and it was concluded that a new type of coating will be required. ICP Solar Technologies UK carried out the work under contract to the DTI.

  9. Modeling of dimensional changes of spent WWER fuel rods during dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, T.; Evdokimov, I.; Likhanskii, V.; Sorokin, A.; Kolesnik, M.; Kozhakin, A.; Zborovskii, V.; Zvir, E.; Ilyin, P.

    2015-01-01

    The engineering model of anisotropic creep is developed to predict the behavior of WWER fuel rods in dry storage of spent fuel. The model considers several deformation mechanisms, the main one being the dislocation creep. The effects of radiation defects accumulation and its partial annealing during storage, as well as work hardening are taken into account. Based on the available experimental data preliminary verification of the developed model is performed. The model adequately describes the data set used. Conditions of experiments conducted up to date are more severe in temperature and stresses than ones in dry storage. It is shown that in dry storage additional deformation mechanisms play an important role. One such mechanism is the creep induced by temperature cycling that occurs during the experiments. Thermal cycles produce internal stresses caused by thermal expansion anisotropy in α-Zr crystallites. This mechanism makes a significant contribution to the experimentally measured strain at stresses characteristic for spent fuel claddings. Additional experimental research is planned to expand the range of Verification Matrix to the prototype conditions for dry storage and to improve prediction accuracy of the model. (author)

  10. Experimental Setup with Transient Behavior of Fuel Cladding of SFR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Hun; Kim, Jun Hwan; Kim, June-Hyung; Ryu, Woo Seog; Park, Sang Gyu; Kim, Sung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    Nowadays, in Korea, advanced cladding such as FC92 is developed and its transient behaviors are required for the safety analysis of SFR. Design and safety analyses of sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) require understanding fuel pin responses to a wide range of off-normal events. In a loss-of-flow (LOF) or transient over-power (TOP), the temperature of the cladding is rapidly increased above its steady-state service temperature. Transient tests have been performed in sections of fuel pin cladding and a large data base has been established for austenitic stainless steel such as 20% cold-worked 316 SS and ferritic/martensitic steels such as HT9. This paper summarizes the technical status of transient testing facilities and their results. Previous researches showed the transient behaviors of HT9 cladding. For the safety analyses in SFR in Korea, simulated transient tests with newly developed FC92 as well as HT9 cladding are being carried out.

  11. High performance fuel technology development : Development of high performance cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeongyong; Jeong, Y. H.; Park, S. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The superior in-pile performance of the HANA claddings have been verified by the successful irradiation test and in the Halden research reactor up to the high burn-up of 67GWD/MTU. The in-pile corrosion and creep resistances of HANA claddings were improved by 40% and 50%, respectively, over Zircaloy-4. HANA claddings have been also irradiated in the commercial reactor up to 2 reactor cycles, showing the corrosion resistance 40% better than that of ZIRLO in the same fuel assembly. Long-term out-of-pile performance tests for the candidates of the next generation cladding materials have produced the highly reliable test results. The final candidate alloys were selected and they showed the corrosion resistance 50% better than the foreign advanced claddings, which is beyond the original target. The LOCA-related properties were also improved by 20% over the foreign advanced claddings. In order to establish the optimal manufacturing process for the inner and outer claddings of the dual-cooled fuel, 18 different kinds of specimens were fabricated with various cold working and annealing conditions. Based on the performance tests and various out-of-pile test results obtained from the specimens, the optimal manufacturing process was established for the inner and outer cladding tubes of the dual-cooled fuel

  12. Analysis of aluminium in rat following administration of allergen immunotherapy using either aluminium or microcrystalline-tyrosine-based adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougall, Stuart A; Heath, Matthew D; Kramer, Matthias F; Skinner, Murray A

    2016-03-01

    Investigation into the absorption, distribution and elimination of aluminium in rat after subcutaneous aluminium adjuvant formulation administration using ICP-MS is described. Assays were verified under the principles of a tiered approach. There was no evidence of systemic exposure of aluminium, in brain or in kidney. Extensive and persistent retention of aluminium at the dose site was observed for at least 180 days after administration. This is the first published work that has quantified aluminium adjuvant retention based on the quantity of aluminium delivered in a typical allergy immunotherapy course. The results indicate that the repeated administration of aluminium-containing adjuvants will likely contribute directly and significantly to an individual's body burden of aluminium.

  13. Spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity. Annual report, FY 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bailey, W.J.; Schreiber, R.E.; Kustas, F.M.

    1980-05-01

    International meetings under the BEFAST program and under INFCE Working Group No. 6 during 1978 and 1979 continue to indicate that no cases of fuel cladding degradation have developed on pool-stored fuel from water reactors. A section from a spent fuel rack stand, exposed for 1.5 y in the Yankee Rowe (PWR) pool had 0.001- to 0.003-in.-deep (25- to 75-μm) intergranular corrosion in weld heat-affected zones but no evidence of stress corrosion cracking. A section of a 304 stainless steel spent fuel storage rack exposed 6.67 y in the Point Beach reactor (PWR) spent fuel pool showed no significant corrosion. A section of 304 stainless steel 8-in.-dia pipe from the Three Mile Island No. 1 (PWR) spent fuel pool heat exchanger plumbing developed a through-wall crack. The crack was intergranular, initiating from the inside surface in a weld heat-affected zone. The zone where the crack occurred was severely sensitized during field welding. The Kraftwerk Union (Erlangen, GFR) disassembled a stainless-steel fuel-handling machine that operated for 12 y in a PWR (boric acid) spent fuel pool. There was no evidence of deterioration, and the fuel-handling machine was reassembled for further use. A spent fuel pool at a Swedish PWR was decontaminated. The procedure is outlined in this report

  14. Spent fuel disposal problem in Bulgaria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milanov, M; Stefanova, I [Bylgarska Akademiya na Naukite, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. za Yadrena Izsledvaniya i Yadrena Energetika

    1994-12-31

    The internationally agreed basic safety principles and criteria for spent fuel (SF) and high level waste (HLW) disposal are outlined. In the framework of these principles the specific problems of Bulgaria described in the `National Concept for Radioactive Waste Management and Disposal in Republic of Bulgaria` are discussed. The possible alternatives for spent fuel management are: (1) sending the spent fuel for disposal in other country; (2) once-through cycle and (3) closed fuel cycle. A mixed solution of the problem is implemented in Bulgaria. According to the agreement between Bulgaria and former Soviet Union a part of the spent fuel has been returned to Russia. The once-through and closed-fuel cycle are also considered. The projected cumulated amount of spent fuel is estimated for two cases: (1) the six units of Kozloduy NPP are in operation till the end of their lifetime (3300 tHM) and (2) low estimate (2700 tHM) - only units 5 and 6 are operated till the end of their lifetime. The reprocessing of the total amount of 3300 tHM will lead to the production of about 370 m{sup 3} vitrified high level wastes. Together with the HLW about 1850 m{sup 3} cladding hulls and 7800 m{sup 3} intermediate-level wastes will be generated, which should be disposed off in deep geological repository. The total production of radioactive waste in once-through cycle is 181 000 m{sup 3}, and in closed cycle - 190 000 m{sup 3}. Geological investigations are performed resulting in categorization of the territory of the country based on geological, geotechnical and hydrogeological conditions. This will facilitate the choice of the most suitable location for deep geological repository. 7 figs., 11 refs.

  15. TITANIUM CARBON ALUMINIUM : A NOVEL GRAIN REFINER FOR ALUMINIUM-LITHIUM ALLOYS

    OpenAIRE

    Birch , M.; Cowell , A.

    1987-01-01

    This work explores the possibility of achieving grain size control in aluminium-lithium alloys with the titanium carbon aluminium (TiCAl) master alloys invented at the Technical University of Berlin and developed by London and Scandinavian Metallurgical Co Ltd (LSM). Grain refining tests were conducted on a single batch of 8090 alloy using addition rates of 0.2wt% and 0.4wt% of TiCAl and 3/1 titanium boron aluminium (TiBAl). Other tests using 0.4wt% of binary TiAl gave poor results, showing t...

  16. Unirradiated cladding rip-propagation tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, W.L.; Hunter, C.W.

    1981-04-01

    The size of cladding rips which develop when a fuel pin fails can affect the subassembly cooling and determine how rapidly fuel escapes from the pin. The object of the Cladding Rip Propagation Test (CRPT) was to quantify the failure development of cladding so that a more realistic fuel pin failure modeling may be performed. The test results for unirradiated 20% CS 316 stainless steel cladding show significantly different rip propagation behavior at different temperatures. At room temperature, the rip growth is stable as the rip extension increases monotonically with the applied deformation. At 500 0 C, the rip propagation becomes unstable after a short period of stable rip propagation. The rapid propagation rate is approximately 200 m/s, and the critical rip length is 9 mm. At test temperatures above 850 0 C, the cladding exhibits very high failure resistances, and failure occurs by multiple cracking at high cladding deformation. 13 figures

  17. Cladding Effects on Structural Integrity of Nuclear Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sattari-Far, Iradi; Andersson, Magnus [lnspecta Technology AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-06-15

    Based on this study, the following conclusions and recommendations can be made: Due to significant differences in the thermal and mechanical properties between the austenitic cladding and the ferritic base metal, residual stresses are induced in the cladding and the underlying base metal. These stresses are left in clad components even after Post-Weld Heat Treatment (PWHT). The different restraint conditions of the clad component have a minor influence on the magnitude of the cladding residual stresses in the cladding layer. The thickness of the clad object is the main impacting geometrical dimension in developing cladding residual stresses. A clad object having a base material thickness exceeding 10 times the cladding thickness would be practically sufficient to introduce cladding residual stresses of a thick reactor pressure vessel. For a clad component that received PWHT, the peak tensile stress is in the cladding layer, and the residual stresses in the underlying base material are negligible. However, for clad components not receiving PWHT, for instance the repair welding of the cladding, the cladding residual stresses of tensile type exist even in the base material. This implies a higher risk for underclad cracking for clad repairs that received no PWHT. For certain clad geometries, like nozzles, the profile of the cladding residual stresses depends on the clad thickness and position, and significant tensile stresses can also exist in the base material. Based on different measurements reported in the literature, a value of 150 GPa can be used as Young's Modulus of the austenitic cladding material at room temperature. The control measurements of small samples from the irradiated reactor pressure vessel head did not reveal a significant difference of Young's Modulus between the irradiated and the unirradiated cladding material condition. No significant differences between the axial and tangential cladding residual stresses are reported in the

  18. Fuel Assemblies Thermal Analysis in the New Spent Fuel Storage Facility at Inshass Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, M.; Mariy, Ahmed

    1999-01-01

    New Wet Storage Facility (NSF) is constructed at Inshass site to solve the problem of spent fuel storage capacity of ETRR-1 reactor . The Engineering Safety Heat Transfer Features t hat characterize the new facility are presented. Thermal analysis including different scenarios of pool heat load and safety limits are discussed . Cladding temperature limit during handling and storage process are specified for safe transfer of fuel

  19. Corrosion behavior of duplex and reference cladding in NPP Grohnde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besch, O.A.; Yagnik, S.K.; Eucken, C.M.; Bradley, E.R.

    1996-01-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Industry Research (NFIR) Group undertook a lead test assembly (LTA) program in NPP Grohnde PWR in Germany to assess the corrosion performance of duplex and reference cladding. Two identical 16 by 16 LTAs, each containing 32 peripheral test rods, completed four reactor cycles, reaching a peak rod burnup of 46 MWd/kgU. The results from poolside examinations performed at the end of each cycle, together with power histories and coolant chemistry, are reported. Five different cladding materials were characterized during fabrication. The corrosion performance of the cladding materials was tracked in long-term tests in high-pressure, high-temperature autoclaves. The relative ranking of corrosion behavior in such tests corresponded well with the in-reactor corrosion performance. The extent and distribution of hydriding in duplex and reference specimens during the autoclave testing has been characterized. The in-reactor corrosion data indicate that the low-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R2, had an improved corrosion resistance compared to high-tin Zircaloy-4 reference cladding, R1. Two types of duplex cladding, D1 (Zr-2.5% Nb) and D2 (Zr-0.4% Fe-0.5% Sn), showed an even further improvement in corrosion resistance compared to R2 cladding. The third duplex cladding, D3 (Zr-4 + 1.0% Nb), had significantly less corrosion resistance, which was inferior to R1. The in-reactor and out-reactor corrosion performances have been ranked

  20. Criticality and Its Uncertainty Analysis of Spent Fuel Storage Rack for Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Tae Young; Park, Chang Je; Lee, Byung Chul

    2011-01-01

    For evaluating the criticality safety of spent fuel storage rack in an open pool type research reactor, a permissible upper limit of criticality should be determined. It can be estimated from the criticality upper limit presented by the regulatory guide and an uncertainty of criticality calculation. In this paper, criticalities for spent fuel storage rack are carried out at various conditions. The calculation uncertainty of MCNP system is evaluated from the calculation results for the benchmark experiments. Then, the upper limit of criticality is determined from the uncertainties and the calculated criticality of the spent fuel storage rack is evaluated

  1. Capturing reflected cladding modes from a fiber Bragg grating with a double-clad fiber coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baiad, Mohamad Diaa; Gagné, Mathieu; Lemire-Renaud, Simon; De Montigny, Etienne; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Godbout, Nicolas; Boudoux, Caroline; Kashyap, Raman

    2013-03-25

    We present a novel measurement scheme using a double-clad fiber coupler (DCFC) and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) to resolve cladding modes. Direct measurement of the optical spectra and power in the cladding modes is obtained through the use of a specially designed DCFC spliced to a highly reflective FBG written into slightly etched standard photosensitive single mode fiber to match the inner cladding diameter of the DCFC. The DCFC is made by tapering and fusing two double-clad fibers (DCF) together. The device is capable of capturing backward propagating low and high order cladding modes simply and efficiently. Also, we demonstrate the capability of such a device to measure the surrounding refractive index (SRI) with an extremely high sensitivity of 69.769 ± 0.035 μW/RIU and a resolution of 1.433 × 10(-5) ± 8 × 10(-9) RIU between 1.37 and 1.45 RIU. The device provides a large SRI operating range from 1.30 to 1.45 RIU with sufficient discrimination for all individual captured cladding modes. The proposed scheme can be adapted to many different types of bend, temperature, refractive index and other evanescent wave based sensors.

  2. Categorization of failed and damaged spent LWR [light-water reactor] fuel currently in storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1987-11-01

    The results of a study that was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute are described in this report. The purpose of the study was to (1) estimate the number of failed fuel assemblies and damaged fuel assemblies (i.e., ones that have sustained mechanical or chemical damage but with fuel rod cladding that is not breached) in storage, (2) categorize those fuel assemblies, and (3) prepare this report as an authoritative, illustrated source of information on such fuel. Among the more than 45,975 spent light-water reactor fuel assemblies currently in storage in the United States, it appears that there are nearly 5000 failed or damaged fuel assemblies. 78 refs., 23 figs., 19 tabs

  3. Aluminium in Infrastructures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maljaars, J.

    2016-01-01

    Aluminium alloys are used in infrastructures such as pedestrian bridges or parts of it such as handrail. This paper demonstrates that aluminium alloys are in principle also suited for heavy loaded structures, such as decks of traffic bridges and helicopter landing platforms. Recent developments in

  4. Influence of Alkali Treatment on the Surface Area of Aluminium Dross

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Ahmad Zauzi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium dross is an industrial waste from aluminium refining industry and classified as toxic substances. However, the disposal of dross as a waste is a burden to aluminium manufacturer industries due to its negative effects to the ecosystem, surface, and ground water. Therefore the purpose of this study is to evaluate the influence of sodium hydroxide (NaOH on the surface area and pore size of aluminium dross. There were 3 stages in the treatment activities, which were leaching, precipitation, and calcination process. The optimum result from this study was the surface area of aluminium dross increases from 10.1 m2/g up to 80.0 m2/g at 40°C, 1% NaOH, and 15-minute reaction time. Thus, aluminium dross has a potential to be converted into other useful material such as catalyst and absorbent. The benefit of this research is that the hazardous industrial waste can be turned into wealth to be used in other applications such as in catalytic activities and absorber in waste water treatment. Further investigation on the physicochemical of aluminium dross with different acid or alkali should be conducted to get deeper understanding on the aluminium dross as a catalyst-type material.

  5. Formation of aluminium nitride and segregation of Cu impurity atoms in aluminium implanted by high dose nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Chenglu; Hemment, P.L.F.; Li Jinhua; Zou Shichang

    1994-01-01

    Aluminium films with a thickness of 7000 A (containing 0.85% copper) were deposited on silicon substrates. 400 keV N 2 + or 350 keV N + ions were implanted into the aluminium films or at the interface between the aluminium and silicon, respectively. Automatic spreading resistance (ASR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Rutherford backscattering (RBS) and channelling were used to characterize the formation of aluminium nitride and the depth distribution of the Cu impurity in the aluminium films after ion implantation and post-annealing. The formation of a stoichiometric AlN layer with high resistance was evident from ASR, RBS analysis and FTIR measurements by the presence of the absorption band at 650 cm -1 . When the implanted nitrogen is near the interface between the aluminium and silicon, a multilayer structure can be obtained, which consists of aluminium, aluminium nitride and the silicon substrate. Cu, which is a background impurity in the deposited aluminium films, segregated into the synthesised aluminium nitride during high dose nitrogen ion implantation. This is due to irradiation-induced segregation during ion implantation. (orig.)

  6. Ion nitriding of aluminium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitz, T.

    2002-09-01

    The present study is devoted to the investigation of the mechanism of aluminium nitriding by a technique that employs implantation of low-energy nitrogen ions and diffusional transport of atoms. The nitriding of aluminium is investigated, because this is a method for surface modification of aluminium and has a potential for application in a broad spectrum of fields such as automobile, marine, aviation, space technologies, etc. However, at present nitriding of aluminium does not find any large scale industrial application, due to problems in the formation of stoichiometric aluminium nitride layers with a sufficient thickness and good quality. For the purposes of this study, ion nitriding is chosen, as an ion beam method with the advantage of good and independent control over the process parameters, which thus can be related uniquely to the physical properties of the resulting layers. Moreover, ion nitriding has a close similarity to plasma nitriding and plasma immersion ion implantation, which are methods with a potential for industrial application. (orig.)

  7. Studies on the fission products behavior during dissolution process of BWR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, K.; Nakai, E.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1987-01-01

    In order to obtain basic data on fission products behavior in connection with the head end process of fuel reprocessing, especially to obtain better understanding on undissolved residues, small scale dissolution studies were performed by using BWR spent fuel rods which were irradiated as monitoring fuel rods under the monitoring program for LWR fuel assembly performance entitled PROVING TEST ON RELIABILITY OF FUEL ASSEMBLY . The Zircaloy-2 claddings and the fuel pellets were subjected individually to the following studies on 1) release of fission products during dissolution process, 2) characterization of undissolved residues, and 3) analysis of the claddings. This paper presents comprehensive descriptions of the fission products behavior during dissolution process, based on detailed and through PIE conducted by JNFS under the sponsorship of MITI (Ministry of International Trade and Industry)

  8. Fission Product Release from Spent Nuclear Fuel During Melting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.; Zino, J.F.

    1998-09-01

    The Melt-Dilute process consolidates aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel by melting the fuel assemblies and diluting the 235U content with depleted uranium to lower the enrichment. During the process, radioactive fission products whose boiling points are near the proposed 850 degrees C melting temperature can be released. This paper presents a review of fission product release data from uranium-aluminum alloy fuel developed from Severe Accident studies. In addition, scoping calculations using the ORIGEN-S computer code were made to estimate the radioactive inventories in typical research reactor fuel as a function of burnup, initial enrichment, and reactor operating history and shutdown time.Ten elements were identified from the inventory with boiling points below or near the 850 degrees C reference melting temperature. The isotopes 137Cs and 85Kr were considered most important. This review serves as basic data to the design and development of a furnace off-gas system for containment of the volatile species

  9. A top priority problem of national radiation protection - proper disposal of research reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, N.; Matausek, M.V.; Jovic, V.

    1997-01-01

    The paper presents basic facts about RA research reactor at the Vinca Institute. The present state of the RA reactor spent fuel storage pool appears to be a serious safety and radiological problem, which must be solved urgently, independent of the decision about the future status of the reactor itself. The following paragraphs describe current activities on improving storage conditions of the research reactor RA spent fuel. Activities performed so far, concerning identification and improvement of the spent fuel storage conditions are presented. These are verification of radiation protection measures, radiological and chemical analyses, visual inspection and photographing, safety analyses and nuclear criticality studies.A project for long-term solution of the research reactor spent fuel storage is proposed. In order to minimise further corrosion and establish strict control of all the relevant technological parameters of the utility, improvement of conditions for disposal of the fuel in the existing storage, is foreseen in the first phase. New dry storage for long-term storing of the spent fuel should be built during the second phase of the project. Particular attention is paid to the activities related to radiation protection and waste treatment, starting from standard monitoring and control, radiological analyses, regulations and legislation, to complicated handling of high level radioactive waste. (authors)

  10. Report on Reactor Physics Assessment of Candidate Accident Tolerant Fuel Cladding Materials in LWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); George, Nathan [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Maldonado, G. Ivan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-08-28

    This work focuses on ATF concepts being researched at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), expanding on previous studies of using alternate cladding materials in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The neutronic performance of two leading alternate cladding materials were assessed in boiling water reactors (BWRs): iron-chromium-aluminum (FeCrAl) cladding, and silicon carbide (SiC)-based composite cladding. This report fulfills ORNL Milestone M3FT-15OR0202332 within the fiscal year 2015 (FY15)

  11. Treatment of spent fuels from research reactors and reactor development programs in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closs, K.D.

    1999-01-01

    Quite a great number of different types of spent fuel from research reactors and development programs exists in Germany. The general policy is to send back to the USA as long as possible fuel from MTRs and TRIGAs of USA origin. An option is reprocessing in Great Britain or France. This option is pursued as long as reprocessing and reuse of the recovered material is economically justifiable. For those fuels which cannot be returned to the USA or which will not be reprocessed, a domestic back-up solution of spent fuel management has been developed in Germany, compatible with the management of spent fuel from power reactors. It consists in dry storage in special casks and, later on, direct disposal. Preliminary results from experimental R and D investigations with research reactor fuel and experience from LWR fuel lead to the conclusion that the direct disposal option even for research reactor fuel or exotic fuel does not impose major technical difficulties for the German waste management and disposal concept. (author)

  12. Radiation exposures associated with shipments of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, C.D.; Messick, C.E.; Mustin, T.

    1999-01-01

    In accordance with the Record of Decision on a Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (ROD) (DOE, 1996a), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is implementing a 13-year program under which DOE accepts foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States. The ROD required that DOE take several steps to ensure low environmental and health impacts resulting from the implementation of the program. These efforts mainly focus on transportation related activities that the analysis of potential environmental impacts in the Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (EIS) (DOE, 1996b) identified as having the potential for exceeding current radiation protection guidelines. Consequently, DOE issued a Mitigation Action Plan to reduce the likelihood of potential adverse environmental impacts associated with the policy established in the ROD. As shown in the EIS, incident-free radiation exposures to members of the ship's crew, port workers, and ground transportation personnel due to shipments of spent nuclear fuel from foreign research reactors are expected to be below the radiation exposure limit of 100 mrem (1 mSv) per year established to protect the general public. However, the analysis in the EIS demonstrated that port and transportation workers could conceivably receive a cumulative radiation dose above the limit established for the general public if, for example, they are involved in multiple shipments within one year or if the radiation levels outside the casks are at the maximum allowable regulatory limit (10 mrem/hr [0.1 mSv/h] at 2 meters from the surface of the cask). With the program successfully underway, DOE has collected information from the shipments in accordance with the Mitigation Action Plan. The information to date has demonstrated that the analysis in

  13. Delayed hydride cracking of Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pizarro, Luis M.; Fernandez, Silvia; Lafont, Claudio; Mizrahi, Rafael; Haddad, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Crack propagation rates, grown by the delayed hydride cracking mechanism, were measured in Zircaloy-4 fuel cladding, according to a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). During the first stage of the program a Round Robin Testing was performed on fuel cladding samples provided by Studsvik (Sweden), of the type used in PWR reactors. Crack growth in the axial direction is obtained through the specially developed 'pin load testing' (PLT) device. In these tests, crack propagation rates were determined at 250 C degrees on several samples of the material described above, obtaining a mean value of about 2.5 x 10 -8 m s -1 . The results were analyzed and compared satisfactorily with those obtained by the other laboratories participating in the CRP. At the present moment, similar tests on CANDU and Atucha I type fuel cladding are being performed. It is thought that the obtained results will give valuable information concerning the analysis of possible failures affecting fuel cladding under reactor operation. (author) [es

  14. Test plan for reactions between spent fuel and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Hoh, J.C.; Emery, J.W.; Hafenrichter, L.D.; Bates, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is evaluating the long-term performance of a high-level nuclear waste form, spent fuel from commercial reactors. Permanent disposal of the spent fuel is possible in a potential repository to be located in the volcanic tuff beds near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. During the post-containment period the spent fuel could be exposed to water condensation since of the cladding is assumed to fail during this time. Spent fuel leach (SFL) tests are designed to simulate and monitor the release of radionuclides from the spent fuel under this condition. This Test Plan addresses the anticipated conditions whereby spent fuel is contacted by small amounts of water that trickle through the spent fuel container. Two complentary test plans are presented, one to examine the reaction of spent fuel and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions and the second to examine the reaction of unirradiated UO 2 pellets and J-13 well water under unsaturated conditions. The former test plan examines the importance of the water content, the oxygen content as affected by radiolysis, the fuel burnup, fuel surface area, and temperature. The latter test plant examines the effect of the non-presence of Teflon in the test vessel

  15. Experience of shipping Russian-origin research reactor spent fuel to the Russian Federation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The primary goal of the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) programme is to advance nuclear non-proliferation objectives by eliminating stockpiles of Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU). The RRRFR programme was first conceived during trilateral discussions among the USA, the Russian Federation and the IAEA, initiated in 1999, when participants identified more than 20 research reactors in 17 countries having Russian/Soviet supplied fuel. In 2000, the Director General of the IAEA sent a letter to 15 countries asking for their willingness to return HEU spent fuel to the Russian Federation. Fourteen countries responded positively to the Director General's letter. In 2004, the Russian Federation and the USA signed a Government-to-Government Agreement concerning cooperation to return the Russian produced research reactor nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation. This agreement established the legal framework necessary for the cooperation between the Russian Federation and the USA for the return of Russian supplied research reactor fuel from eligible countries. Under the Bratislava agreements concluded by Presidents George W. Bush and Vladimir Putin in February 2005, both countries committed to completing all shipments of Russian-origin HEU spent fuel currently stored outside research reactors by the end of 2010. Up to the time of writing (May 2009) the programme has completed 19 shipments totalling over 838 kg of Russian-origin HEU spent and fresh fuel which has been returned from Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Kazakhstan, Latvia, the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Poland, Romania, Serbia, Uzbekistan and Vietnam. During this time, the programme successfully removed all HEU from two countries, Latvia and Bulgaria. HEU spent fuel shipments have been the most complex shipments under the RRRFR programme, which will be the focus of this publication. The first shipment of HEU spent fuel from Uzbekistan was completed in January 2006, followed by HEU spent fuel

  16. Instant release fraction corrosion studies of commercial UO2 BWR spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Torrents, Albert; Serrano-Purroy, Daniel; Sureda, Rosa; Casas, Ignasi; de Pablo, Joan

    2017-05-01

    The instant release fraction of a spent nuclear fuel is a matter of concern in the performance assessment of a deep geological repository since it increases the radiological risk. Corrosion studies of two different spent nuclear fuels were performed using bicarbonate water under oxidizing conditions to study their instant release fraction. From each fuel, cladded segments and powder samples obtained at different radial positions were used. The results were normalised using the specific surface area to permit a comparison between fuels and samples. Different radionuclide dissolution patterns were studied in terms of water contact availability and radial distribution in the spent nuclear fuel. The relationship between the results of this work and morphological parameters like the grain size or irradiation parameters such as the burn-up or the linear power density was studied in order to increase the understanding of the instant release fraction formation.

  17. Variation in aluminium patch test reactivity over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemund, Ingrid; Mowitz, Martin; Zimerson, Erik; Bruze, Magnus; Hindsén, Monica

    2017-11-01

    Contact allergy to aluminium has been reported more frequently in recent years. It has been pointed out that positive patch test reactions to aluminium may not be reproducible on retesting. To investigate possible variations in patch test reactivity to aluminium over time. Twenty-one adults, who had previously reacted positively to aluminium, were patch tested with equimolar dilution series in pet. of aluminium chloride hexahydrate and aluminium lactate, four times over a period of 8 months. Thirty-six of 84 (43%) serial dilution tests with aluminium chloride hexahydrate and 49 of 84 (58%) serial dilution tests with aluminium lactate gave negative results. The range of reactivity varied between a negative reaction to aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 10% and/or to aluminium lactate at 12%, and a positive reaction to aluminium chloride hexahydrate at 0.1% and/or to aluminium lactate at 0.12%. The highest individual difference in test reactivity noticed was 320-fold when the two most divergent minimal eliciting concentrations were compared. The patch test reactivity to aluminium varies over time. Aluminium-allergic individuals may have false-negative reactions. Therefore, retesting with aluminium should be considered when there is a strong suspicion of aluminium contact allergy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Dry reloading and packaging of spent fuel at TRIGA MARK I reactor of Medical University Hanover (MHH), Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haferkamp, D.

    2008-01-01

    Between 1994 and 1998 the equipment for dry reloading of a research reactor was developed by Noell, which was funded by the German Federal Government and State of Saxonia. The task of this development programme was the design and delivery of an equipment able to load the spent fuel into the shipping casks in a dry mode for research reactors, where wet loading inside the storage pool is impossible. ALARA and infrastructure conditions had to be taken into consideration. Most of the research reactors of TRIGA MARK I type or WWR-SM have operating modes for handling of spent fuel inside the pond or for transfer of spent fuel from pond to dry/wet storage pools. On the other hand, most of them cannot handle heavy weighted shipping casks inside the reactor building because of the crane capacity, or inside water pool because of dimensions and weight of shipping casks. A typical licensed normal operating procedure for spent fuel in research reactors (TRIGA MARK I) is shown. Dry unloading procedure is described. Additionally to the normal operating procedures at the MHH research reactor the following steps were necessary: - dry packaging of spent fuel elements into the loading units (six packs) in order to minimise the transfer and loading steps between the pool and shipping cask; - transfer of spent fuel loading units from dry storage pool to the shipping cask (outside the reactor building) in a shielded transfer cask; - dry reloading of loading units, into the shipping casks outside the reactor building. The Dry Reloading Equipment implies the following 5 items: 1. loading units (six packs), which includes: - capacity up to six spent fuel elements; - criticality safe placement of spent fuel elements; - handling of several spent fuel elements in an aluminium loading unit. 2. Special Transfer Cask, which includes: - shielded housing with locks; - gripper inside housing; - hoist outside housing; - computer aided operation mode for loading and unloading. 3. Transfer Vehicle

  19. Manufacturing and Machining Challenges of Hybrid Aluminium Metal Matix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburaja, Kammuluri; Sainadh Teja, S.; Karthik Sri, D.; Kuldeep, J.; Gowtham, V.

    2017-08-01

    Manufacturing which involves material removal processes or material addition processes or material transformation processes. One or all the processes to obtain the final desired properties for a material with desired shape which meets the required precision and accuracy values for the expected service life of a material in working conditions. Researchers found the utility of aluminium to be the second largest after steel. Aluminium and its metal matrix composite possess wide applications in various applications in aerospace industry, automobile industry, Constructions and even in kitchen utensils. Hybrid Al-MMCconsist of two different materials, and one will be from organic origin along with the base material. In this paper an attempt is made to bring out the importance of utilization of aluminium and the challenges concerned in manufacturing and machining of hybrid aluminium MMC.

  20. UKAEA fast reactor project research and development programme on fuel element cladding and sub-assembly wrapper materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harries, D.R.

    1977-01-01

    Research and development work on fuel element component (cladding, subassembly wrappers, etc.) materials for the U.K. sodium cooled fast reactor programme has been conducted at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) establishments at Dounreay, Harwell, Risley, and Springfields during the past fifteen years or so. This work has formed an integral part of, and has been co-ordinated by, the UKAEA Fast Reactor Project and has involved close liaison with the Nuclear Power Company (NPC) and the Central Electricity Generating Board (CEGB). The research and development were initially related to the Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) but the scope has now been extended to cover the first Civil Fast Reactor (CFR1), which has recently been re-designated the Civil Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR). The paper outlines the present status of the development of sodium cooled fast reactors in the U.K. and proceeds to summarize the principal PFR and CDFR core and fuel element parameters which have determined the planning and direction of the fuel element materials programme. The current position on the fuel element cladding and wrapper research and development programme is reviewed, and the facilities and future irradiation programme to be carried out in PFR are described

  1. Recovery in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlach, Carsten

    2006-01-01

    In the present thesis the development of a unique experimental method for volume characterisation of individual embedded crystallites down to a radius of 150 nm is presented. This method is applied to in-situ studies of recovery in aluminium. The method is an extension of 3DXRD microscopy, an X...... are represented as strings. To identify the strings a combination of a 5D connected component type algorithm and multi-peak fitting was found to be superior. The first use of the method was a study of recovery of a deformed aluminium alloy (AA1050). The aluminium alloy was deformed by cold rolling to a thickness...

  2. Anticipating Potential Waste Acceptance Criteria for Defense Spent Nuclear Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rechard, R.P.; Lord, M.E.; Stockman, C.T.; McCurley, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    The Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and disposal of DOE owned defense spent nuclear fuel and high level waste (DSNF/DHLW). A desirable option, direct disposal of the waste in the potential repository at Yucca Mountain, depends on the final waste acceptance criteria, which will be set by DOE's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). However, evolving regulations make it difficult to determine what the final acceptance criteria will be. A method of anticipating waste acceptance criteria is to gain an understanding of the DOE owned waste types and their behavior in a disposal system through a performance assessment and contrast such behavior with characteristics of commercial spent fuel. Preliminary results from such an analysis indicate that releases of 99Tc and 237Np from commercial spent fuel exceed those of the DSNF/DHLW; thus, if commercial spent fuel can meet the waste acceptance criteria, then DSNF can also meet the criteria. In large part, these results are caused by the small percentage of total activity of the DSNF in the repository (1.5%) and regulatory mass (4%), and also because commercial fuel cladding was assumed to provide no protection

  3. Phosphate-core silica-clad Er/Yb-doped optical fiber and cladding pumped laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, O N; Semjonov, S L; Velmiskin, V V; Yatsenko, Yu P; Sverchkov, S E; Galagan, B I; Denker, B I; Dianov, E M

    2014-04-07

    We present a composite optical fiber with a Er/Yb co-doped phosphate-glass core in a silica glass cladding as well as cladding pumped laser. The fabrication process, optical properties, and lasing parameters are described. The slope efficiency under 980 nm cladding pumping reached 39% with respect to the absorbed pump power and 28% with respect to the coupled pump power. Due to high doping level of the phosphate core optimal length was several times shorter than that of silica core fibers.

  4. A Probabilistic Analysis Methodology and Its Application to A Spent Fuel Pool System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyowon; Jae, Moosung [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Ho G. [Daedeok R and D Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    There was a similar accident occurring at the 2{sup nd} unit of PAKS nuclear power station in Hungary on the 10{sup th} April 2003. Insufficient cooling of spent fuel caused the spent fuel burn up or partly melting. There were many previous studies performed for analyzing and measuring the risk of spent fuel damage. In the 1980s, there are changes in conditions such as development of high density storage racks and new information concerning the possibility of cladding fires in the drained spent fuel pools. The US NRC assessed the spent fuel pool risk under the Generic Issue 82. In the 1990s, under the US NRC sponsorship, the risk assessment about the spent fuel pool at Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES) has been performed and Analysis Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) has been organized for accumulating the reliability data. A methodology for assessing the risk associated with the spent fuel pool facility has been developed and is applied to the reference plant. It is shown that the methodology developed in this study might contribute to assessing these kinds of the SFP facilities. In this probabilistic risk analysis, the LINV Initial event results in the high frequent occurrence. The most dominant cut-sets include the human errors. The result of this analysis might contribute to identifying the weakness of the preventive and mitigating system in the SFP facility.

  5. Experimental verification of methods for gamma dose rate calculations in the vicinity of containers with the RA reactor spent fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.; Cupac, S.; Pesic, M.

    2005-01-01

    The methodology for equivalent gamma dose rate determination on the outer surface of existing containers with the spent fuel elements of the RA reactor is briefly summarised, and experimental verification of this methodology in the field of gamma rays near the aluminium channel with spent fuel elements lifted from the stainless steel containers no. 275 in the RA reactor hall is presented. The proposed methodology is founded on: the existing fuel burnup data base; methods and models for the photon source determination in the RA reactor spent fuel elements developed in the Vinca Institute, and validated Monte Carlo codes for the equivalent gamma dose rate calculations. (author) [sr

  6. Surface roughness when diamond turning RSA 905 optical aluminium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, T.; Abou-El-Hossein, K.; Hsu, W. Y.; Cheng, Y. C.; Mkoko, Z.

    2015-08-01

    Ultra-high precision machining is used intensively in the photonics industry for the production of various optical components. Aluminium alloys have proven to be advantageous and are most commonly used over other materials to make various optical components. Recently, the increasing demand from optical systems for optical aluminium with consistent material properties has led to the development of newly modified grades of aluminium alloys produced by rapid solidification in the foundry process. These new aluminium grades are characterised by their finer microstructures and refined mechanical and physical properties. However the machining database of these new optical aluminium grades is limited and more research is still required to investigate their machinability performance when they are diamond turned in ultrahigh precision manufacturing environment. This work investigates the machinability of rapidly solidified aluminium RSA 905 by varying a number of diamond-turning cutting parameters and measuring the surface roughness over a cutting distance of 4 km. The machining parameters varied in this study were the cutting speed, feed rate and depth of cut. The results showed a common trend of decrease in surface roughness with increasing cutting distance. The lowest surface roughness Ra result obtained after 4 km in this study was 3.2 nm. This roughness values was achieved using a cutting speed of 1750 rpm, feed rate of 5 mm/min and depth of cut equal to 25 μm.

  7. Internal friction in iron-aluminium alloys having a high aluminium content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillairet, J.; Delaplace, J.; Silvent, A.

    1966-01-01

    By using a torsion pendulum to measure the internal friction of iron-aluminium alloys containing between 25 and 50 atom per cent of aluminium, it has been possible to show the existence of three damping peaks due to interstitial carbon. Their evolution is followed as a function of the carbon content, of the thermal treatment and of the aluminium content. A model based on the preferential occupation of tetrahedral sites is proposed as an interpretation of the results. A study of the Zener peak in these substitution alloys shows also that a part of the short distance disorder existing at high temperatures can be preserved by quenching. (author) [fr

  8. Cladding creepdown under compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, D.O.

    1977-01-01

    Light-water power reactors use Zircaloy tubing as cladding to contain the UO 2 fuel pellets. In-service operating conditions impose an external hydrostatic force on the cladding, causing it to creep down into eventual contact with the fuel. Knowledge of the rate of such creepdown is of great importance to modelers of fuel element performance. An experimental system was devised for studying creepdown that meets several severe requirements by providing (1) correct stress state, (2) multiple positions for measuring radial displacement of the cladding surface, (3) high-precision data, and (4) an experimental configuration compact enough to fit in-reactor. A microcomputer-controlled, eddy-current monitoring system was developed for this study and has proven highly successful in measuring cladding deformation with time at temperatures of 371 0 C (700 0 F) and higher, and at pressures as high as 21 MPa

  9. Eddy current examination of the nuclear fuel elements with aluminum 1100-F cladding of IPR-R1 research reactor: An initial study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Roger F. da; Silva Júnior, Silvério F. da; Frade, Rangel T.; Rodrigues, Juliano S.

    2017-01-01

    Tubes of aluminum 1100-F as well as tubes of AISI 304 stainless steel are used as cladding of the fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 nuclear research reactor. Usually, these tubes are inspected by means of visual test and sipping test. The visual test allows the detection of changes occurred at the external fuel elements surface, such as those promoted by corrosion processes. However, this test method cannot be used for detection of internal discontinuities at the tube walls. Sipping test allows the detection of fuel elements whose cladding has failed, but it is not able to determine the place where the discontinuity is located. On the other hand, eddy current testing, an electromagnetic nondestructive test method, allows the detection of discontinuities and monitoring their growth. In previous works, the application of eddy current testing to evaluate the AISI 304 cladding fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 was studied. In this paper, it is proposed an initial study about the use of eddy current testing for detection and characterization of discontinuities in the aluminum 1100-F fuel elements cladding. The study includes the development of probes and the design and manufacture of reference standards. (author)

  10. Eddy current examination of the nuclear fuel elements with aluminum 1100-F cladding of IPR-R1 research reactor: An initial study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Roger F. da; Silva Júnior, Silvério F. da; Frade, Rangel T. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nucelar (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Rodrigues, Juliano S., E-mail: rfs@cdtn.br, E-mail: silvasf@cdtn.br, E-mail: rtf@cdtn.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Tubes of aluminum 1100-F as well as tubes of AISI 304 stainless steel are used as cladding of the fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 nuclear research reactor. Usually, these tubes are inspected by means of visual test and sipping test. The visual test allows the detection of changes occurred at the external fuel elements surface, such as those promoted by corrosion processes. However, this test method cannot be used for detection of internal discontinuities at the tube walls. Sipping test allows the detection of fuel elements whose cladding has failed, but it is not able to determine the place where the discontinuity is located. On the other hand, eddy current testing, an electromagnetic nondestructive test method, allows the detection of discontinuities and monitoring their growth. In previous works, the application of eddy current testing to evaluate the AISI 304 cladding fuel elements of TRIGA IPR-R1 was studied. In this paper, it is proposed an initial study about the use of eddy current testing for detection and characterization of discontinuities in the aluminum 1100-F fuel elements cladding. The study includes the development of probes and the design and manufacture of reference standards. (author)

  11. Oxidation resistant chromium coating on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Eui-Jung; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    The attributes of such a fuel are approved reaction kinetics with steam, a slower hydrogen generation rate, and good cladding thermo-mechanical properties. Many researchers have tried to modify zirconium alloys to improve their oxidation resistance in the early stages of the ATF development. Corrosion resistant coating on cladding is one of the candidate technologies to improve the oxidation resistance of zirconium cladding. By applying coating technology to zirconium cladding, it is easy to obtain corrosion resistance without a change in the base materials. Among the surface coating methods, arc ion plating (AIP) is a coating technology to improve the adhesion owing to good throwing power, and a dense deposit (Fig. 1). Owing to these advantages, AIP has been widely used to efficiently form protective coatings on cutting tools, dies, bearings, etc. In this study, The AIP technique for the protection of zirconium claddings from the oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment was studied. The homogeneous Cr film with a high adhesive ability to the cladding was deposited by AIP and acted as a protection layer to enhance the corrosion resistance of the zirconium cladding. It was concluded that the AIP technology is effective for coating a protective layer on claddings

  12. Oxidation resistant chromium coating on Zircaloy-4 for accident tolerant fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung-Hwan; Kim, Eui-Jung; Jung, Yang-Il; Park, Dong-Jun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The attributes of such a fuel are approved reaction kinetics with steam, a slower hydrogen generation rate, and good cladding thermo-mechanical properties. Many researchers have tried to modify zirconium alloys to improve their oxidation resistance in the early stages of the ATF development. Corrosion resistant coating on cladding is one of the candidate technologies to improve the oxidation resistance of zirconium cladding. By applying coating technology to zirconium cladding, it is easy to obtain corrosion resistance without a change in the base materials. Among the surface coating methods, arc ion plating (AIP) is a coating technology to improve the adhesion owing to good throwing power, and a dense deposit (Fig. 1). Owing to these advantages, AIP has been widely used to efficiently form protective coatings on cutting tools, dies, bearings, etc. In this study, The AIP technique for the protection of zirconium claddings from the oxidation in a high-temperature steam environment was studied. The homogeneous Cr film with a high adhesive ability to the cladding was deposited by AIP and acted as a protection layer to enhance the corrosion resistance of the zirconium cladding. It was concluded that the AIP technology is effective for coating a protective layer on claddings.

  13. Management of spent fuel from research and prototype power reactors and residues from post-irradiation examination of fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    The safe and economic management of spent fuel is important for all countries which have nuclear research or power reactors. It involves all aspects of the handling, transportation, storage, conditioning and reprocessing or final disposal of the spent fuel. In the case of spent fuel management from power reactors the shortage of available reprocessing capacity and the rising economic interest in the direct disposal of spent fuel have led to an increasing interest in the long term storage and management of spent fuel. The IAEA has played a major role in coordinating the national activities of the Member States in this area. It was against this background that the Technical Committee Meeting on ''Safe Management of Spent Fuel From Research Reactors, Prototype Power Reactors and Fuel From Commercial Power Reactors That Has Been Subjected to PIE (Post Irradiated Examination)'' (28th November - 1st December 1988) was organised. The aims of the current meeting have been to: 1. Review the state-of-the-art in the field of management of spent fuel from research and prototype power reactors, as well as the residues from post irradiation examination of commercial power reactor fuel. The emphasis was to be on the safe handling, conditioning, transportation, storage and/or disposal of the spent fuel during operation and final decommissioning of the reactors. Information was sought on design details, including shielding, criticality and radionuclide release prevention, heat removal, automation and remote control, planning and staff training; licensing and operational practices during each of the phases of spent fuel management. 2. Identify areas where additional research and development are needed. 3. Recommend areas for future international cooperation in this field. Refs, figs and tabs

  14. Experimental program to determine maximum temperatures for dry storage of spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knox, C.A.; Gilbert, E.R.; White, G.D.

    1985-02-01

    Although air is used as a cover gas in some dry storage facilities, other facilities use inert cover gases which must be monitored to assure inertness of the atmosphere. Thus qualifying air as a cover gas is attractive for the dry storage of spent fuels. At sufficiently high temperatures, air can react with spent fuel (UO 2 ) at the site of cladding breaches that formed during reactor irradiation or during dry storage. The reaction rate is temperature dependent; hence the rates can be maintained at acceptable levels if temperatures are low. Tests with spent fuel are being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine the allowable temperatures for storage of spent fuel in air. Tests performed with nonirradiated UO 2 pellets indicated that moisture, surface condition, gamma radiation, gadolinia content of the fuel pellet, and temperature are important variables. Tests were then initiated on spent fuel to develop design data under simulated dry storage conditions. Tests have been conducted at 200 and 230 0 C on spent fuel in air and 275 0 C in moist nitrogen. The results for nonirradiated UO 2 and published data for irradiated fuel indicate that above 230 0 C, oxidation rates are unacceptably high for extended storage in air. The tests with spent fuel will be continued for approximately three years to enable reliable extrapolations to be made for extended storage in air and inert gases with oxidizing constituents. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Aluminium alloys in municipal solid waste incineration bottom ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanjun; Rem, Peter

    2009-05-01

    With the increasing growth of incineration of household waste, more and more aluminium is retained in municipal solid waste incinerator bottom ash. Therefore recycling of aluminium from bottom ash becomes increasingly important. Previous research suggests that aluminium from different sources is found in different size fractions resulting in different recycling rates. The purpose of this study was to develop analytical and sampling techniques to measure the particle size distribution of individual alloys in bottom ash. In particular, cast aluminium alloys were investigated. Based on the particle size distribution it was computed how well these alloys were recovered in a typical state-of-the-art treatment plant. Assessment of the cast alloy distribution was carried out by wet physical separation processes, as well as chemical methods, X-ray fluorescence analysis and electron microprobe analysis. The results from laboratory analyses showed that cast alloys tend to concentrate in the coarser fractions and therefore are better recovered in bottom ash treatment plants.

  16. Investigation of fission products release and structural changes of WWER spent fuel in inert and oxidizing environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kungurtsev, I.A.; Smirnov, V.P.; Kuzmin, I.V.; Lebeduk, I.V.; Pimonov, Y.I.; Sohcilin, G.I.; Stupina, L.N.; Chesanov, V.V.; Shtuckert, Y.A.; Zvir, E.A.

    1996-01-01

    At the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors in-cell experiments were carried out which were aimed at investigation of WWER spent fuel behaviour under accident conditions. Gaseous and volatile fission products release and the influence of gaseous swelling, fuel interaction with the cladding and oxidation on it have been investigated. At the present time, series of experiments in inert and air environments have been finished and the tests in steam environment have been carrying out. In all series the samples in the form of fuel pellets fragments and fuel elements pieces were used. This report presents some results of annealing tests and investigations of the sample microstructure after annealing. (author). 4 refs, 15 figs, 2 tabs

  17. Methods and codes for neutronic calculations of the MARIA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.; Bretscher, M.M.; Hanan, N.A.; Matos, J.E.

    1998-01-01

    The core of the MARIA high flux multipurpose research reactor is highly heterogeneous. It consists of beryllium blocks arranged in 6x8 matrix, tubular fuel assemblies, control rods and irradiation channels. The reflector is also heterogeneous and consists of graphite blocks clad with aluminium. Its structure is perturbed by the experimental beam tubes. This paper presents methods and codes used to calculate the MARIA reactor neutronics characteristics and experience gained thus far at IAE and ANL. At ANL the methods of MARIA calculations were developed in connection with RERTR program. At IAE the package of programs was developed to help its operator in optimization of fuel utilization. (author)

  18. Consideration of BORAX-type reactivity accidents applied to research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couturier, Jean; Meignen, Renaud; Bourgois, Thierry; Biaut, Guillaume; Mireau, Jean-Pierre; Natta, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Most of the research reactors discussed in this document are pool-type reactors in which the reactor vessel and some of the reactor coolant systems are located in a pool of water. These reactors generally use fuel in plate assemblies formed by a compact layer of uranium (or U 3 Si 2 ) and aluminium particles, sandwiched between two thin layers of aluminium serving as cladding. The fuel melting process begins at 660 deg. C when the aluminium melts, while the uranium (or U 3 Si 2 ) particles may remain solid. The accident that occurred in the American SL-1 reactor in 1961, together with tests carried out in the United States as of 1954 in the BORAX-1 reactor and then, in 1962, in the SPERT-1 reactor, showed that a sudden substantial addition of reactivity in this type of reactor could lead to explosive mechanisms caused by degradation, or even fast meltdown, of part of the reactor core. This is what is known as a 'BORAX-type' accident. The aim of this document is first to briefly recall the circumstances of the SL-1 reactor accident, the lessons learned, how this operational feedback has been factored into the design of various research reactors around the world and, second, to describe the approach taken by France with regard to this type of accident and how, led by IRSN, this approach has evolved in the last decade. (authors)

  19. Chemical compatibility between cladding alloys and advanced fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fee, D.C.; Johnson, C.E.

    1975-05-01

    The National Advanced Fuels Program requires chemical, mechanical, and thermophysical properties data for cladding alloys. The compatibility behavior of cladding alloys with advanced fuels is critically reviewed. in carbide fuel pins, the principal compatibility problem is cladding carburization, diffusion of carbon into the cladding matrix accompanied by carbide precipitation. Carburization changes the mechanical properties of the cladding alloy. The extent of carburization increases in sodium (versus gas) bonded fuels. The depth of carburization increases with increasing sesquicarbide (M 2 C 3 ) content of the fuel. In nitride fuel pins, the principal compatibility problem is cladding nitriding, diffusion of nitrogen into the cladding matrix accompanied by nitride precipitation. Nitriding changes the mechanical properties of the cladding alloy. In both carbide and nitride fuel pins, fission products do not migrate appreciably to the cladding and do not appear to contribute to cladding attack. 77 references. (U.S.)

  20. The determination of trace oxygen in aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloy by helium-3 activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vandecasteele, C.; Goethals, P.; Kieffer, R.; Hoste, J.

    1975-01-01

    The determination of oxygen in aluminium and aluminium-silicon alloy by helium-3 activation is studied. The 18 F formed from oxygen is separated by distillation followed by precipitation of leadfluorochloride. The chemical yield is determined by activation in an isotopic neutron source. Concentrations of resp. 27 and 64 ng.g -1 with a precision for a single determination of resp. 30 and 13% are found in 99.5% aluminium and in aluminium-silicon (3%) alloy. (author)

  1. Cna 1 spent fuel element interim dry storage system thermal analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilal, R. E; Garcia, J. C; Delmastro, D. F

    2006-01-01

    At the moment, the Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant (Cnea-I) located in the city of Lima, has enough room to store its spent fuel (Sf) in their two pools spent fuel until about 2015.In case of life extension a spend fuel element interim dry storage system is needed.Nucleolectrica Argentina S.A. (N A-S A) and the Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica (Cnea), have proposed different interim dry storage systems.These systems have to be evaluated in order to choose one of them.The present work's objective is the thermal analysis of one dry storage alternative for the Sf element of Cna 1.In this work a simple model was developed and used to perform the thermal calculations corresponding to the system proposed by Cnea.This system considers the store of sealed containers with 37 spent fuels in concrete modules.Each one of the containers is filled in the pool houses and transported to the module in a transference cask with lead walls.Fulfill the maximum cladding temperature requirement ( [es

  2. Moving into the 21st century - The United States' Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huizenga, David G.; Mustin, Tracy P.; Saris, Elizabeth C.; Reilly, Jill E.

    1999-01-01

    Since 1996, when the United States Department of Energy and the Department of State jointly adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel, twelve shipments totaling 2,985 MTR and TRIGA spent nuclear fuel assemblies from research reactors around the world have been accepted into the United States. These shipments have contained approximately 1.7 metric tons of HEU and 0.6 metric tons of LEU. Foreign research reactor operators played a significant role in this success. A new milestone in the acceptance program occurred during the summer of 1999 with the arrival of TRIGA spent nuclear fuel from Europe through the Charleston Naval Weapons Station via the Savannah River Site to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This shipment consisted of five casks of TRIGA spent nuclear fuel from research reactors in Germany, Italy, Slovenia, and Romania. These casks were transported by truck approximately 2,400 miles across the United States (one cask packaged in an ISO container per truck). Drawing upon lessons learned in previous shipments, significant technical, legal, and political challenges were addressed to complete this cross-country shipment. Other program activities since the last RERTR meeting have included: formulation of a methodology to determine the quantity of spent nuclear fuel in a damaged condition that may be transported in a particular cask (containment analysis for transportation casks); publication of clarification of the fee policy; and continued planning for the outyears of the acceptance policy including review of reactors and eligible material quantities. The United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program continues to demonstrate success due to the continuing commitment between the United States and the research reactor community to make this program work. We strongly encourage all eligible research reactors to decide as soon as possible to

  3. Roll bonding of strained aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun, Jakob M.

    2003-01-01

    This report investigates roll bonding of pre-strained (å ~ 4) aluminium sheets to produce high strain material from high purity aluminium (99.996%) and commercial pure aluminium (99.6%). The degree of bonding is investigated by optical microscopy and ultrasonic scanning. Under the right...... of the cross rolled volume fraction is found. To further asses this effect, and the anisotropy, it is necessary to acquire knowledge about both texture and microstructure, e.g. by TEM. Roll bonding of pre-strained aluminium is found to be a possible alternative to ARB in the quest for ultra-fine grained...

  4. Fission product release in conditions of a spent fuel pool severe accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohai, Dumitru

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Depending on the residence time, fuel burnup, and fuel rack configuration, there may be sufficient decay heat for the fuel clad to heat up, swell, and burst in case of a loss of pool water. Initiating event categories can be: loss of offsite power from events initiated by severe weather, internal fire, loss of pool cooling, loss of coolant inventory, seismic event, aircraft impact, tornado, missile attack. The breach in the clad releases the radioactive gases present in the gap between the fuel and clad, what is called 'gap release'. If the fuel continues to heat up, the zirconium clad will reach the point of rapid oxidation in air. This reaction of zirconium and air, or zirconium and steam is exothermic. The energy released from the reaction, combined with the fuel's decay energy, can cause the reaction to become self-sustaining and ignite the zirconium. The increase in heat from the oxidation reaction can also raise the temperature in adjacent fuel assemblies and propagate the oxidation reaction. Simultaneously, the sintered UO 2 pellets resulting from pins destroying are oxidized. Due to the self-disintegration of pellets by oxidation, fission gases and low volatile fission products are released. The release rate, the chemical nature and the amount of fission products depend on powder granulation distribution and environmental conditions. The zirconium burning and pellets self-disintegration will result in a significant release of spent fuel fission products that will be dispersed from the reactor site. (author)

  5. Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Cladding System Development Trade-Off Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristine Barrett; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Light Water Reactor (LWR) Nuclear Fuel Development Research and Development (R&D) Pathway encompasses strategic research focused on improving reactor core economics and safety margins through the development of an advanced fuel cladding system. To achieve significant operating improvements while remaining within safety boundaries, significant steps beyond incremental improvements in the current generation of nuclear fuel are required. Fundamental improvements are required in the areas of nuclear fuel composition, cladding integrity, and the fuel/cladding interaction to allow power uprates and increased fuel burn-up allowance while potentially improving safety margin through the adoption of an “accident tolerant” fuel system that would offer improved coping time under accident scenarios. With a development time of about 20 – 25 years, advanced fuel designs must be started today and proven in current reactors if future reactor designs are to be able to use them with confidence.

  6. Review and evaluation of cladding attack of LMFBR fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, M.; Nagai, S.; Furuya, H.; Muto, T.

    1977-01-01

    The behavior of cladding inner wall corrosion during irradiation was evaluated in terms of fuel density, fuel form, O/M ratio, plutonium concentration, cladding composition, cladding pretreatment, cladding inner diameter, burnup and cladding inner wall temperature. Factors which influence the corrosion are O/M ratio (oxygen to metal ratio), burn up, cladding inner diameter and cladding inner wall temperature. Maximum cladding inner wall corrosion depth was formulated as a function of O/M ratio, burn up and cladding inner wall temperature

  7. Ceramic Coatings for Clad (The C3 Project): Advanced Accident-Tolerant Ceramic Coatings for Zr-Alloy Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sickafus, Kurt E. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Miller, Larry [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Weber, Bill [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhang, Yanwen [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Patel, Maulik [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Motta, Arthur [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Wolfe, Doug [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Fratoni, Max [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Raj, Rishi [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Plunkett, Kenneth [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hollis, Kendall [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nelson, Andy [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stanek, Chris [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Comstock, Robert [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Partezana, Jonna [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Whittle, Karl [Univ. of Sheffield (United Kingdom); Preuss, Michael [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Withers, Philip [Univ. of Manchester (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Angus [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Donnelly, Stephen [Univ. of Huddersfield (United Kingdom); Riley, Daniel [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Syndney (Australia)

    2017-02-14

    The goal of this NEUP-IRP project is to develop a fuel concept based on an advanced ceramic coating for Zr-alloy cladding. The coated cladding must exhibit demonstrably improved performance compared to conventional Zr-alloy clad in the following respects: During normal service, the ceramic coating should decrease cladding oxidation and hydrogen pickup (the latter leads to hydriding and embrittlement). During a reactor transient (e.g., a loss of coolant accident), the ceramic coating must minimize or at least significantly delay oxidation of the Zr-alloy cladding, thus reducing the amount of hydrogen generated and the oxygen ingress into the cladding. The specific objectives of this project are as follows: To produce durable ceramic coatings on Zr-alloy clad using two possible routes: (i) MAX phase ceramic coatings or similar nitride or carbide coatings; and (ii) graded interface architecture (multilayer) ceramic coatings, using, for instance, an oxide such as yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the outer protective layer. To characterize the structural and physical properties of the coated clad samples produced in 1. above, especially the corrosion properties under simulated normal and transient reactor operating conditions. To perform computational analyses to assess the effects of such coatings on fuel performance and reactor neutronics, and to perform fuel cycle analyses to assess the economic viability of modifying conventional Zr-alloy cladding with ceramic coatings. This project meets a number of the goals outlined in the NEUP-IRP call for proposals, including: Improve the fuel/cladding system through innovative designs (e.g. coatings/liners for zirconium-based cladding) Reduce or eliminate hydrogen generation Increase resistance to bulk steam oxidation Achievement of our goals and objectives, as defined above, will lead to safer light-water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel assemblies, due to improved cladding properties and built-in accident resistance, as well as

  8. Instant release fraction corrosion studies of commercial UO{sub 2} BWR spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martínez-Torrents, Albert, E-mail: albert.martinez@ctm.com.es [Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Plaça de la Ciència 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Serrano-Purroy, Daniel [European Commission, DG Joint Research Centre - JRC, Directorate G - Nuclear Safety & Security, Department G.III, P.O. Box 2340, D-76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); Sureda, Rosa [Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Plaça de la Ciència 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Casas, Ignasi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya – Barcelona Tech, Eduard Maristany 14, 08019 Barcelona (Spain); Pablo, Joan de [Fundació CTM Centre Tecnològic, Plaça de la Ciència 2, 08243 Manresa (Spain); Department of Chemical Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya – Barcelona Tech, Eduard Maristany 14, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2017-05-15

    The instant release fraction of a spent nuclear fuel is a matter of concern in the performance assessment of a deep geological repository since it increases the radiological risk. Corrosion studies of two different spent nuclear fuels were performed using bicarbonate water under oxidizing conditions to study their instant release fraction. From each fuel, cladded segments and powder samples obtained at different radial positions were used. The results were normalised using the specific surface area to permit a comparison between fuels and samples. Different radionuclide dissolution patterns were studied in terms of water contact availability and radial distribution in the spent nuclear fuel. The relationship between the results of this work and morphological parameters like the grain size or irradiation parameters such as the burn-up or the linear power density was studied in order to increase the understanding of the instant release fraction formation.

  9. Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorhem, L; Haegglund, G

    1992-01-01

    The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.

  10. Clad Treatment in KARMA Code and Library

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong-yeup; Lee, Hae-chan; Woo, Hae-seuk [KEPCO Nuclear Fuel Co., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Zirconium is the main components in clad materials. The subgroup parameters of zirconium were generated with effective cross section which obtained by using flux distribution in clad region. It decreases absorption reaction rate differences with reference MCNP results. Use of composite nuclide is acceptable to increase efficiency but should be limited to specific target composition. Therefore, the use of the composite nuclide of Zircaloy-2 should be limited when HANA clad material is used for clad. Either using explicit components or generating composite nuclide for HANA is suggested. This paper investigates the clad analysis model for KARMA whether current method is applicable to HANA clad material.

  11. Constructions of aluminium electrolytic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galushkin, N.V.

    1995-01-01

    This chapter of monograph is devoted to constructions of aluminium electrolytic cells. Therefore, the general characteristic and classification of aluminium electrolytic cells was considered. The anode and cathode structure was studied. The lining of cathode casing, the process of collection of anode gases, electrolytic cell cover, and electrical insulation was studied as well. The installation and dismantling of aluminium electrolytic cells was described.

  12. Integrity assessment of research reactor fuel cladding and material testing using eddy current inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alencar, Donizete Anderson de

    2004-01-01

    A methodology to perform the integrity assessment of research reactors nuclear fuels cladding, such as those installed in IPR-Rl (TRIGA) and IEA-R1 (MTR), using nondestructive electromagnetic inspection (eddy current) is presented. This methodology is constituted by: the development of calibration reference standards, specific for each type of fuel; the development of special test probes; the recommendations for the inspection equipment calibration; the construction of voltage based evaluation curves and the inspection procedures developed for the characterization of detected flaws. The test probes development, specially those designed for the inspection of MTR fuels cladding, which present access difficulties due to the narrow gap between fuel plates (2,89 mm for IEAR-R1), constituted a challenge that demanded the introduction of unusual materials and constructive techniques. The operational performance of the developed resources, as well as the special operative characteristics of the test probes, such as their immunity to adjacent fuel plates interference and electrical resistivity changes of the fuels meat are experimentally demonstrated. The practical applicability of the developed methodology is verified in non radioactive environment, using a dummy MTR fuel element model, similar to an IEA-R1 reactor fuel element, produced and installed in IPEN, Sao Paulo. The efficacy of the proposed methodology was verified by the achieved results. (author)

  13. Design of Matched Cladding Fiber with UV-sensitive Cladding for Minimization of Claddingmode Losses in Fiber Bragg Gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Lønstrup; Berendt, Martin Ole; Bjarklev, Anders Overgaard

    2000-01-01

    The effect on the Bragg-grating-induced cladding-mode coupling of varying the extent of the photosensitive region in a step-index fiber is analyzed. We introduce a figure of merit for the suppression of cladding-mode loss and compare different matched cladding fiber designs. It is found to be adv......The effect on the Bragg-grating-induced cladding-mode coupling of varying the extent of the photosensitive region in a step-index fiber is analyzed. We introduce a figure of merit for the suppression of cladding-mode loss and compare different matched cladding fiber designs. It is found...... to be advantageous to increase the extent of the photosensitive region. However, no significant improvement is obtained by extending the photosensitive region more than approximately 10 mu m into the cladding. This result is not in agreement with a simple analysis that neglects UV absorption, which suggests...... that the radius of the photosensitive region should be close to twice as large. (C) 2000 Academic Press....

  14. Nuclear-powered pacemaker fuel cladding study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoup, R.L.

    1976-07-01

    The fabrication of fuel capsules with refractory metal and alloy clads used in nuclear-powered cardiac pacemakers precludes the expedient dissolution of the clad in inorganic acid solutions. An experiment to measure penetration rates of acids on commonly used fuel pellet clads indicated that it is not impossible, but that it would be very difficult to dissolve the multiple cladding. This work was performed because of a suggestion that a 238 PuO 2 -powered pacemaker could be transformed into a terrorism weapon

  15. Study of the electronic structure of pure aluminium, aluminium oxide and nitride by spectroscopy of electrons excited under electronic and photonic bombardment (X and UV)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautier-Soyer, Martine

    1985-01-01

    This research thesis reports the use of electron spectroscopy with electrons excited under electronic or photonic (X or UV) bombardment for the study of electronic state density of aluminium, aluminium oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) and aluminium nitride (AlN). The objective is to get an insight into phenomena related to technological problems of adherence, wear, lubrication, corrosion or breakdown met in metals, insulators and semiconductors. The author highlighted the presence of occupied surface states on Al(111) and Al(100), and electronic levels localised in the forbidden band of Al 2 O 3 and AlN, induced by structural defects which promote surface reactivity [fr

  16. Microstructure and properties of aluminium-aluminium oxide graded composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaruzaman, F. F.; Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Ismail, N. M.; Hamedon, Z.; Iqbal, A. K. M. A.; Azhari, A.

    2018-03-01

    In this research works, four-layered aluminium-aluminium oxide (Al-Al2O3) graded composite materials were fabricated using powder metallurgy (PM) method. In processing, metal-ceramic graded composite materials of 0%, 10%, 20% and 30% weight percentage of ceramic concentration were prepared under 30 ton compaction load using a cylindrical die-punch set made of steel. After that, two-step pressureless sintering was carried out at sintering temperature and time 600°C and 3 hours respectively. It was observed that the sintered cylindrical specimens of 30 mm diameter were prepared successfully. The graded composite specimens were analysed and the properties such as density, microstructure and hardness were measured. It was found that after sintering process, the diameter of the graded cylindrical structure was decreased. Using both Archimedes method and rule of mixture (ROM), he density of structure was measured. The obtained results revealed that the microvickers hardness was increased as the ceramic component increases in the graded layer. Moreover, it was observed that the interface of the graded structure is clearly distinguished within the multilayer stack and the ceramic particles are almost uniformly distributed in the Al matrix.

  17. In-pile cladding tests at NRI Rez and PIE capabilities and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zmitko, M.

    2002-01-01

    In-pile cladding corrosion test facilities and relevant post-irradiation capabilities at NRI Rez plc are overviewed. Basic information about the research rector LVR-15 and in-pile water loops is given. An experience in the field of Zr-alloy cladding corrosion testing and investigation of cladding corrosion behaviour is demonstrated for two experimental programmes conducted at NRI Rez in the past period. The first example describes results obtained at studying of corrosion behaviour of advanced Zr-alloys under PWR conditions with a special concern to a high lithium content and subcooled surface boiling. The second example informs about completion of the experimental programme supported by the IAEA which is focused on investigation of Zircaloy-4 cladding behaviour under VVER water chemistry, thermal-hydraulic and irradiation conditions with the main to obtain experimental data for an assessment of the Zircaloy-4 cladding compatibility with VVER conditions. (author)

  18. Analysis of corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Kim, Ki Hang; Seo, Keum Seok; Chung, Jin Gon

    1994-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding was analyzed using the oxide measurement data of KOFA fuel irradiated up to the fuel rod burnup of 35,000 MWD/MTU for two cycles in Kori-2. Even though KOFA cladding is a standard Zircaloy-4 manufactured by Westinghouse according to the Siemens/KWU's HCW (Highly Cold Worked) standard Zircaloy-4 specification, it was expected that in-pile corrosion behavior of KOFA cladding would not be equivalent to that of Siemens/KWU's cladding due to the differences in such manufacturing processes as cold work and heat treatment. The analysis of measured KOFA cladding oxidation showed that oxidation of KOFA cladding is at least 19 % lower than the design analysis based upon Siemens/KWU's HCW standard Zircaloy-4 cladding. Lower corrosion of KOFA cladding seems to result from the differences in the manufacturing processes and chemical composition although the burnup and oxide layer thickness of the measured fuel rods is relatively low and the amount of the oxidation data base is small

  19. Determination of aluminium in groundwater samples by GF-AAS, ICP-AES, ICP-MS and modelling of inorganic aluminium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankowski, Marcin; Zioła-Frankowska, Anetta; Kurzyca, Iwona; Novotný, Karel; Vaculovič, Tomas; Kanický, Viktor; Siepak, Marcin; Siepak, Jerzy

    2011-11-01

    The paper presents the results of aluminium determinations in ground water samples of the Miocene aquifer from the area of the city of Poznań (Poland). The determined aluminium content amounted from aluminium determinations were performed using three analytical techniques: graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GF-AAS), inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The results of aluminium determinations in groundwater samples for particular analytical techniques were compared. The results were used to identify the ascent of ground water from the Mesozoic aquifer to the Miocene aquifer in the area of the fault graben. Using the Mineql+ program, the modelling of the occurrence of aluminium and the following aluminium complexes: hydroxy, with fluorides and sulphates was performed. The paper presents the results of aluminium determinations in ground water using different analytical techniques as well as the chemical modelling in the Mineql+ program, which was performed for the first time and which enabled the identification of aluminium complexes in the investigated samples. The study confirms the occurrence of aluminium hydroxy complexes and aluminium fluoride complexes in the analysed groundwater samples. Despite the dominance of sulphates and organic matter in the sample, major participation of the complexes with these ligands was not stated based on the modelling.

  20. [Association between serum aluminium level and methylation of amyloid precursor protein gene in workers engaged in aluminium electrolysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X J; Yuan, Y Z; Niu, Q

    2016-04-20

    To investigate the association between serum aluminium level and methylation of the promoter region of amyloid precursor protein (APP)gene in workers engaged in aluminium electrolysis. In 2012, 366 electrolysis workers in an aluminium factory were enrolled as exposure group (working years >10 and age >40 years)and divided into low-exposure group and high-exposure group based on the median serum aluminium level. Meanwhile, 102 workers in a cement plant not exposed to aluminium were enrolled as control group. Graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure serum aluminium level, methylation specific PCR was used to measure the methylation rate of the promoter region of APP gene, and ELI-SA was used to measure the protein expression of APP in lymphocytes in peripheral blood. The exposure group had a significantly higher serum aluminium level than the control group (45.07 μg/L vs 30.51 μg/L, P0.05). The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that with reference to the control group, low aluminium exposure (OR=1.86, 95% CI 1.67~3.52)and high aluminium exposure (OR=2.98, 95% CI 1.97~4.15)were risk factors for a reduced methylation rate of the promoter region of APP gene. Reduced methylation of the promoter region of APP gene may be associated with increased serum aluminium level, and downregulated methylation of the promoter region of APP gene may accelerate APP gene transcription.

  1. Development of Cr Electroplated Cladding Tube for preventing Fuel-Cladding Chemical Interaction (FCCI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jun Hwan; Woo, Je Woong; Kim, Sung Ho; Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Byung Oon; Lee, Chan Bock [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Metal fuel has been selected as a candidate fuel in the SFR because of its superior thermal conductivity as well as enhanced proliferation resistance in connection with the pyroprocessing. However, metal fuel suffers eutectic reaction (Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction, FCCI) with the fuel cladding made of stainless steel at reactor operating temperature so that cladding thickness gradually reduces to endanger reactor safety. In order to mitigate FCCI, barrier concept has been proposed between the fuel and the cladding in designing fuel rod. Regarding this, KAERI has initiated barrier cladding development to prevent interdiffusion process as well as enhance the SFR fuel performance. Previous study revealed that Cr electroplating has been selected as one of the most promising options because of its technical and economic viability. This paper describes the development status of the Cr electroplating technology for the usage of fuel rod in SFR. This paper summarizes the status of Cr electroplating technology to prevent FCCI in metal fuel rod. It has been selected for the ease of practical application at the tube inner surface. Technical scoping, performance evaluation and optimization have been carried out. Application to the tube inner surface and in-pile test were conducted which revealed as effective.

  2. Laser surface cladding:a literature survey

    OpenAIRE

    Gedda, Hans

    2000-01-01

    This work consists of a literature survey of a laser surface cladding in order to investigate techniques to improve the cladding rate for the process. The high local heat input caused by the high power density of the laser generates stresses and the process is consider as slow when large areas are processed. To avoid these disadvantages the laser cladding process velocity can be increased three or four times by use of preheated wire instead of the powder delivery system. If laser cladding is ...

  3. Innovative coating of nanostructured vanadium carbide on the F/M cladding tube inner surface for mitigating the fuel cladding chemical interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Phillpot, Simon [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2017-11-29

    Fuel cladding chemical interactions (FCCI) have been acknowledged as a critical issue in a metallic fuel/steel cladding system due to the formation of low melting intermetallic eutectic compounds between the fuel and cladding steel, resulting in reduction in cladding wall thickness as well as a formation of eutectic compounds that can initiate melting in the fuel at lower temperature. In order to mitigate FCCI, diffusion barrier coatings on the cladding inner surface have been considered. In order to generate the required coating techniques, pack cementation, electroplating, and electrophoretic deposition have been investigated. However, these methods require a high processing temperature of above 700 oC, resulting in decarburization and decomposition of the martensites in a ferritic/martensitic (F/M) cladding steel. Alternatively, organometallic chemical vapor deposition (OMCVD) can be a promising process due to its low processing temperature of below 600 oC. The aim of the project is to conduct applied and fundamental research towards the development of diffusion barrier coatings on the inner surface of F/M fuel cladding tubes. Advanced cladding steels such as T91, HT9 and NF616 have been developed and extensively studied as advanced cladding materials due to their excellent irradiation and corrosion resistance. However, the FCCI accelerated by the elevated temperature and high neutron exposure anticipated in fast reactors, can have severe detrimental effects on the cladding steels through the diffusion of Fe into fuel and lanthanides towards into the claddings. To test the functionality of developed coating layer, the diffusion couple experiments were focused on using T91 as cladding and Ce as a surrogate lanthanum fission product. By using the customized OMCVD coating equipment, thin and compact layers with a few micron between 1.5 µm and 8 µm thick and average grain size of 200 nm and 5 µm were successfully obtained at the specimen coated between 300oC and

  4. Computer modelling of age hardening for cast aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Linda; Ferguson, W George

    2009-01-01

    Age hardening, or precipitation hardening, is one of the most widely adopted techniques for strengthening of aluminium alloys. Although various age hardening models have been developed for aluminium alloys, from the large volume of literature reviewed, it appears that the bulk of the research has been concentrated on wrought aluminium alloys, only a few of the established precipitation models have been applied to the casting aluminium alloys. In the present work, there are two modelling methods that have been developed and applied to the casting aluminium alloys A356 and A357. One is based on the Shercliff-Ashby methodology to produce a process model, by which we mean a mathematical relationship between process variables (alloy composition, ageing temperature and time) and material properties (yield strength or hardness) through microstructure evolution (precipitate radius, volume fraction). The other method is based on the Kampmann and Wagner Numerical (KWN) model which deals with concomitant nucleation, growth and coarsening and is thus capable of predicting the full evolution of the particle size distribution and then a strength model is used to evaluate the resulting change in hardness or yield strength at room temperature by taking into account contributions from lattice resistance, solid solution hardening and precipitation hardening.

  5. Encapsulation technology of MR6 spent fuel and quality analysis of the EK-10 and WWR-SM spent fuel stored more than 30 years in wet conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borek-Kruszewska, E.; Bykowski, W.; Chwaszczewski, S.; Czajkowski, W.; Madry, M. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock -Swierk (Poland)

    2002-07-01

    The research reactor MARIA has been in operation for more than twenty years and all the spent fuel assemblies used since the first commissioning of the reactor are stored in wet facility on site. The present paper deals with the spent fuel MR-6 encapsulation technology in MARIA reactor. The encapsulated spent MR-6 fuel will be stored under water in the same pool unless some other solution is available. The capsules made of stainless steel are capable to accommodate one MR-6 fuel assembly. The encapsulation process is performed in the hot cell by the MARIA reactor. The spent fuel having its leg cut off is loaded to the transport cylinder manually and next transferred to a trolley. The trolley is moving to a position directly below the entrance to the hot cell and the spent fuel is entering the hot cell. The spent fuel assembly is then put into the drying cell. Dried out spent fuel is moved into the capsule mounted on the grip of the machine. Next, the capsule lid is pressed in and welded. After the leak test and filling up with helium the capsule returns from the hot cell to the pool. The hermetic capsule is sunk back into the water and positioned in the separator . The results presented earlier show, that the limiting time of WWR-SM and Ek-10 type spent fuel residence in wet storage is about 40-45 years. Therefore, the systematic quality investigation of all Ek-10 fuel elements and WWR-SM fuel assemblies discharged from EWA reactor in the period of 1959-1969 was performed. Altogether, about 2500 Ek-10 fuel elements and 47 WWR-SM fuel assemblies were investigated. The results of these investigations are presented in the present work. The sipping test, visual investigation and ultrasonic techniques were used for that purpose. The radioactive isotope Cs-137 was used as the indicator of fission product release from the fuel assembly. Taking into account the value of Cs-137 release from damaged WWR-SM fuel assembly the criteria of damaged fuel assembly were proposed. It

  6. Castor-V/21 PWR spent fuel storage cask performance test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creer, J.M.; Schoonen, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Performance testing of a CASTOR-V/21 PWR spent fuel storage cask manufactured by Gesellschaft fur Nuklear Service (GNS) was performed as part of a cooperative program between Virginia Power and the US Department of Energy. The performance test consisted of obtaining cask handling experience and heat transfer, shielding, and limited fuel integrity data. Five heat transfer test runs were performed with 21 Surry reactor spent fuel assemblies generating approximately 28 kW. Test runs were performed vacuum, nitrogen, and helium backfill environments with the cask in both vertical and horizontal orientations. Cask exterior surface gamma and neutron dose rates were measured with the cask fully loaded. Gas samples were obtained at the beginning and end of each run with nitrogen or helium environments to verify fuel integrity. The heat transfer performance of the CASTOR-V/21 cask was exceptionally good. Peak clad temperatures with helium and nitrogen environments with the cask in a vertical orientation and with helium with the cask in a horizontal orientation were less than 380 0 C. Vertical vacuum and horizontal nitrogen test runs resulted in peak clad temperatures over 380 0 , but the temperatures were not excessively high ( 0 C). The shielding performance of the cask met the design goal of less than 200 mrem/hr. Cask surface dose rates of <75 mrem/hr can easily be established with minor gamma shielding design refinements if desired. Gas samples obtained during testing indicated no leaking fuel rods were present in the cask. It was concluded that the cask performed satisfactorily from heat transfer and shielding perspectives

  7. CASTOR-V/21 PWR spent fuel storage cask performance test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Creer, J.M.; Schoonen, D.H.

    1986-01-01

    Performance testing of a CASTOR-V/21 PWR spent fuel storage cask manufactured by Gesellschaft fur Nuklear Service (GNS) was performed as part of a cooperative program between Virginia Power and the US Department of Energy. The performance test consisted of obtaining cask handling experience and heat transfer, shielding, and limited fuel integrity data. Five heat transfer test runs were performed with 21 Surry reactor spent fuel assemblies generating approximately 28 kW. Test runs were performed with vacuum, nitrogen, and helium backfills in both vertical and horizontal orientations. Cask exterior surface gamma and neutron dose rates were measured with the cask fully loaded. Gas samples were obtained at the beginning and end of each run with nitrogen or helium backfills to verify fuel integrity. The heat transfer performance of the CASTOR-V/21 cask was exceptionally good. Peak clad temperatures with helium and nitrogen backfills in a vertical orientation and with helium in a horizontal orientation were less than 380 0 C. Vertical vacuum and horizontal nitrogen runs resulted in peak clad temperatures over 380 0 , but the temperatures were not excessively high ( 0 C). The shielding performance of the cask met the design expectation of less than 200 mrem/h. Cask surface dose rates of <75 mrem/h can easily be established with minor gamma shielding design refinements if desired. Gas samples obtained during testing indicated no leaking fuel rods were present in the cask. It was concluded that the cask performed satisfactorily from heat transfer and shielding perspectives

  8. Characterization of Zircaloy-4 tubing procured for fuel cladding research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    A quantity of Zircaloy-4 tubing [10.92 mm outside diameter by 0.635 mm wall thickness] was purchased specifically for use in a number of related fuel cladding research programs sponsored by the Division of Reactor Safety Research, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC/RSR). Identical tubing (produced simultaneously and from the same ingot) was purchased concurrently by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for use in similar research programs sponsored by that organization. In this way, source variability and prior fabrication history were eliminated as parameters, thus permitting direct comparison (as far as as-received material properties are concerned) of experimental results from the different programs. The tubing is representative of current reactor technology. Consecutive serial numbers assigned to each tube identify the sequence of the individual tubes through the final tube wall reduction operation. The report presented documents the procurement activities, provides a convenient reference source of manufacturer's data and tubing distribution to the various users, and presents some preliminary characterization data. The latter have been obtained routinely in various research programs and are not complete. Although the number of analyses, tests, and/or examinations performed to date are insufficient to draw statistically valid conclusions with regard to material characterization, the data are expected to be representative of the as-received tubing. It is anticipated that additional characterizations will be performed and reported routinely by the various research programs that use the tubing

  9. All fiber cladding mode stripper with uniform heat distribution and high cladding light loss manufactured by CO2 laser ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jebali, M. A.; Basso, E. T.

    2018-02-01

    Cladding mode strippers are primarily used at the end of a fiber laser cavity to remove high-power excess cladding light without inducing core loss and beam quality degradation. Conventional manufacturing methods of cladding mode strippers include acid etching, abrasive blasting or laser ablation. Manufacturing of cladding mode strippers using laser ablation consist of removing parts of the cladding by fused silica ablation with a controlled penetration and shape. We present and characterize an optimized cladding mode stripper design that increases the cladding light loss with a minimal device length and manufacturing time. This design reduces the localized heat generation by improving the heat distribution along the device. We demonstrate a cladding mode stripper written on a 400um fiber with cladding light loss of 20dB, with less than 0.02dB loss in the core and minimal heating of the fiber and coating. The manufacturing process of the designed component is fully automated and takes less than 3 minutes with a very high throughput yield.

  10. Bumblebee pupae contain high levels of aluminium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exley, Christopher; Rotheray, Ellen; Goulson, David

    2015-01-01

    The causes of declines in bees and other pollinators remains an on-going debate. While recent attention has focussed upon pesticides, other environmental pollutants have largely been ignored. Aluminium is the most significant environmental contaminant of recent times and we speculated that it could be a factor in pollinator decline. Herein we have measured the content of aluminium in bumblebee pupae taken from naturally foraging colonies in the UK. Individual pupae were acid-digested in a microwave oven and their aluminium content determined using transversely heated graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. Pupae were heavily contaminated with aluminium giving values between 13.4 and 193.4 μg/g dry wt. and a mean (SD) value of 51.0 (33.0) μg/g dry wt. for the 72 pupae tested. Mean aluminium content was shown to be a significant negative predictor of average pupal weight in colonies. While no other statistically significant relationships were found relating aluminium to bee or colony health, the actual content of aluminium in pupae are extremely high and demonstrate significant exposure to aluminium. Bees rely heavily on cognitive function and aluminium is a known neurotoxin with links, for example, to Alzheimer's disease in humans. The significant contamination of bumblebee pupae by aluminium raises the intriguing spectre of cognitive dysfunction playing a role in their population decline.

  11. Production and quality control of fuel cladding tubes for LWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Katsuhiko; Hagi, Shigeki; Anada, Hiroyuki; Abe, Hideaki; Hyodo, Shigetoshi

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent fabrication technology and corrosion resistance study of fuel cladding tubes for LWRs conducted by Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd. started the research on zircaloy in 1957. In 1980, the factory exclusively for the production of cladding tubes was founded, and the mass production system on full scale was established. Thereafter, the various improvement of the production technology, the development of new products, and the heightening of the performance mainly on the corrosion resistance have been tested and studied. Recently, the works in the production processes were almost automated, and the installation of the production lines advanced, and the stabilization of product quality and the rationalization of costs are promoted. Moreover, the development of the zircaloy cladding tubes having high corrosion resistance has been advanced to cope with the long term cycle operation of LWRs hereafter. The features of zircaloy cladding tubes, the manufacturing processes, the improvement of the manufacturing technology, the improvement of the corrosion resistance and so on are reported. (K.I.)

  12. A continuing success - The United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mustin, Tracy P.; Clapper, Maureen; Reilly, Jill E.

    2000-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy, in consultation with the Department of State, adopted the Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel in May 1996. To date, the Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Acceptance Program, established under this policy, has completed 16 spent fuel shipments. 2,651 material test reactor (MTR) assemblies, one Slowpoke core containing less than 1 kilogram of U.S.-origin enriched uranium, 824 Training, Research, Isotope, General Atomic (TRIGA) rods, and 267 TRIGA pins from research reactors around the world have been shipped to the United States so far under this program. As the FRR SNF Acceptance Program progresses into the fifth year of implementation, a second U.S. cross country shipment has been completed, as well as a second overland truck shipment from Canada. Both the cross country shipment and the Canadian shipment were safely and successfully completed, increasing our knowledge and experience in these types of shipments. In addition, two other shipments were completed since last year's RERTR meeting. Other program activities since the last meeting included: taking pre-emptive steps to avoid license amendment pitfalls/showstoppers for spent fuel casks, publication of a revision to the Record of Decision allowing up to 16 casks per ocean going vessel, and the issuance of a cable to 16 of the 41 eligible countries reminding their governments and the reactor operators that the U.S.-origin uranium in their research reactors may be eligible for return to the United States under the Acceptance Program and urging them to begin discussions on shipping schedules. The FRR SNF program has also supported the Department's implementation of the competitive pricing policy for uranium and resumption of shipments of fresh uranium for fabrication into assemblies for research reactors. The United States Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program continues

  13. Modelling cladding response to changing conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tulkki, Ville; Ikonen, Timo [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland ltd (Finland)

    2016-11-15

    The cladding of the nuclear fuel is subjected to varying conditions during fuel reactor life. Load drops and reversals can be modelled by taking cladding viscoelastic behaviour into account. Viscoelastic contribution to the deformation of metals is usually considered small enough to be ignored, and in many applications it merely contributes to the primary part of the creep curve. With nuclear fuel cladding the high temperature and irradiation as well as the need to analyse the variable load all emphasise the need to also inspect the viscoelasticity of the cladding.

  14. Long-term effects of aluminium dust inhalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Susan; Reid, Alison; Fritschi, Lin; de Klerk, Nicholas; Musk, A W Bill

    2013-12-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, aluminium dust inhalation was used as a potential prophylaxis against silicosis in underground miners, including in Australia. We investigated the association between aluminium dust inhalation and cardiovascular, cerebrovascular and Alzheimer's diseases in a cohort of Australian male underground gold miners. We additionally looked at pneumoconiosis mortality to estimate the effect of the aluminium therapy. SMRs and 95% CI were calculated to compare mortality of the cohort members with that of the Western Australian male population (1961-2009). Internal comparisons on duration of aluminium dust inhalation were examined using Cox regression. Aluminium dust inhalation was reported for 647 out of 1894 underground gold miners. During 42 780 person-years of follow-up, 1577 deaths were observed. An indication of increased mortality of Alzheimer's disease among miners ever exposed to aluminium dust was found (SMR=1.38), although it was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.69 to 2.75). Rates for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular death were above population levels, but were similar for subjects with or without a history of aluminium dust inhalation. HRs suggested an increasing risk of cardiovascular disease with duration of aluminium dust inhalation (HR=1.02, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.04, per year of exposure). No difference in the association between duration of work underground and pneumoconiosis was observed between the groups with or without aluminium dust exposure. No protective effect against silicosis was observed from aluminium dust inhalation. Conversely, exposure to aluminium dust may possibly increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and dementia of the Alzheimer's type.

  15. Management of spent fuel from research reactors - Brazilian progress report (within the framework of Regional Project IAEA-RLA-4/018)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, A.J.; Silva, J.E.R.

    2005-01-01

    There are four research reactors in Brazil. For three of them, because of the low reactor power and low burn-up of the fuel, except for the concern about ageing, spent fuel storage is not a problem. However for one of the reactors, more specifically IEA-R1 research reactor, the storage of spent fuel is a major concern, because, according to the proposed operation schedule for the reactor, unless an action is taken, by the year 2009 there will be no more racks available to store its spent fuel. This paper gives a brief description of the type and amount of fuel elements utilized in each one of the Brazilian research reactors, with a short discussion about the storage capacity at each installation. It also gives a description of the activities developed by Brazilian engineers and researchers during the period between 2001 and 2004, within the framework of regional project 'RLA-4/018-Management of Spent Fuel from Research Reactors'. As a conclusion, we can say that the advances of the project, and the integration promoted among the engineers and researchers of the participant countries were of fundamental importance for Brazilian researchers and engineers to understand the problems related to the storage of spent fuel, and to make a clear definition about the most suitable alternatives for interim storage of the spent fuel from IEAR1 research reactor. (author)

  16. Long-term strength of claddings made of E110 in the temperature range of 400-570 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobylyansky, G.; Shamardin, V.; Eremin, S.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the data on the initial stage of the in-sight into the mechanism of long-term strength of spent fuel rod claddings in the temperature range 400-570 0 C and also their comparison with corresponding mechanism of irradiated in the inert environment specimens and unirradiated ones. A set of test results in the temperature range 400-570 0 C of non-irradiated and irradiated in BOR-60 specimens and also of the WWER-1000 fuel element claddings irradiated up to a burnup of 29-47 MWd/kgU is approximated by Larson-Miller parametric dependence in the first approximation that allows the long-term strength data to be extrapolated and interpolated onto the unknown value regions of stress, temperature and time. The time before damage of the fuel element claddings irradiated up to ∼ 29MWd/kgU in the temperature range 540-570 0 C is higher than that of non-irradiated tubular specimens and irradiated ones up to fast neutron fluence (1-2)x10 22 cm -2 (E >0.1 MeV). With temperature decreasing to 673 K, the long-term strength of the claddings irradiated up to ∼ 47 MWd/kgU is lower than it can be expected from the extrapolation of high-temperature data obtained with the irradiated specimens. Now, the bulk of experimental data on the long-term strength of the claddings made of E110 alloy makes it possible to provide only preliminary estimation for the validation of parameters typical of the deviation from the normal operation conditions; emergencies and accidental situations; dry and wet storage and also transportation. The experiments should be continued to accumulate missing data, in particular, tests of fuel element claddings irradiated up to high burnup at temperatures ranging 300-400 0 C and stresses, which are significantly lower than the yield stress

  17. Possible effects of UO2 oxidation on light water reactor spent fuel performance in long-term geologic disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almassy, M.Y.; Woodley, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    Disposal of spent nuclear fuel in a conventionally mined geologic formation is the nearest-term option for permanently isolating radionuclides from the biosphere. Because irradiated uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) fuel pellets retain 95 to 99% of the radionuclides generated during normal light water reactor operation, they may represent a significant barrier to radionuclide release. This document presents a technical assessment of published literature representing the current level of understanding of spent fuel characteristics and conditions that may degrade pellet integrity during a geologic disposal sequence. A significant deterioration mechanism is spent UO 2 oxidation with possible consequences identified as fission gas release, rod diameter increases, cladding breach extension, and release of solid fuel particles containing radionuclides. Areas requiring further study to support development of a comprehensive spent fuel performance prediction model are highlighted. A program and preliminary schedule to obtain the information needed to develop model correlations are also presented

  18. Laser cladding with powder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schneider, M.F.; Schneider, Marcel Fredrik

    1998-01-01

    This thesis is directed to laser cladding with powder and a CO2 laser as heat source. The laser beam intensity profile turned out to be an important pa6 Summary rameter in laser cladding. A numerical model was developed that allows the prediction of the surface temperature distribution that is

  19. Radiochemical analyses of several spent fuel Approved Testing Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Wildung, N.J.

    1994-09-01

    Radiochemical characterization data are described for UO 2 and UO 2 plus 3 wt% Gd 2 O 3 commercial spent nuclear fuel taken from a series of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs). These full-length nuclear fuel rods include MLA091 of ATM-103, MKP070 of ATM-104, NBD095 and NBD131 of ATM-106, and ADN0206 of ATM-108. ATMs 103, 104, and 106 were all irradiated in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Reactor No.1), a pressurized-water reactor that used fuel fabricated by Combustion Engineering. ATM-108 was part of the same fuel bundle designed as ATM-105 and came from boiling-water reactor fuel fabricated by General Electric and irradiated in the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant. Rod average burnups and expected fission gas releases ranged from 2,400 to 3,700 GJ/kgM. (25 to 40 Mwd/kgM) and from less than 1% to greater than 10%, respectively, depending on the specific ATM. The radiochemical analyses included uranium and plutonium isotopes in the fuel, selected fission products in the fuel, fuel burnup, cesium and iodine on the inner surfaces of the cladding, 14 C in the fuel and cladding, and analyses of the gases released to the rod plenum. Supporting examinations such as fuel rod design and material descriptions, power histories, and gamma scans used for sectioning diagrams are also included. These ATMs were examined as part of the Materials Characterization Center Program conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program

  20. Manufacturing and Construction of Spent Fuel Storage Rack for Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangjin; Jung, Kwangsub; Oh, Jinho; Lee, Jongmin [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The spent fuel storage rack consists of spent fuel storage racks and support frame. The spent fuel storage racks are installed in the support frame. A spent fuel storage rack consists of frame weldment and storage cell pipe assembly. Storage cell pipe assembly is mounted on the base plate of the frame weldment. The spent fuel storage rack is designed to withstand seismic load and other loads during earthquake. The structural integrity of the spent fuel storage rack is evaluated in accordance with ASME Section III, Subsection NF. Computer Code used for this analysis is ANSYS version 14.0.0. Dead load and seismic load is considered in load condition and hydrodynamic mass is included in the analysis. Design, manufacturing, and construction of the spent fuel storage rack are introduced. The spent fuel storage rack is for storage of spent fuel assemblies. The spent fuel storage rack should be designed, manufactured, and installed with consideration of predicted number of spent fuel assemblies, structural integrity, resistivity to corrosion and radiation, cleaning, and workability.

  1. Design and analysis of aluminium brdiges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soetens, F.; Straalen, IJ.J. van

    2004-01-01

    Applications of aluminium have grown considerably in building and civil engineering the last decade, which is due to various aspects: light weight, durability and maintenance, use of extrusions. The paper starts with a short history of aluminium bridges and then focuses on aluminium bridges in the

  2. Diagnostics of ytterbium/aluminium laser plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, J.; Lee, R.W.; Landen, O.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Lewis, C.L.; Busquet, M.

    1986-11-01

    Microdot spectroscopy was used to study the x-ray emission from laser-produced plasmas consisting of 10% ytterbium, 90% aluminium. Spectra were recorded with a space-resolving flat crystal (PET) mini-spectrometer in the 4.0-8.0 A range. The Janus research laser at LLNL irradiated the targets with green (0.53 μm) light in a 1 nsec pulse. The power density was varied between 4x10 13 and 3x10 14 W/cm 2 . The plasma electron density and temperature were determined from the aluminium XI, XII and XIII line emission. By examining correlations between changes in the plasma conditions with changes in the ytterbium spectra, we will determine the potential for using ytterbium line emission as a plasma diagnostic

  3. Friction Surface Cladding of AA1050 on AA2024-T351; influence of clad layer thickness and tool rotation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Shaojie; Bor, Teunis Cornelis; Geijselaers, Hubertus J.M.; Akkerman, Remko

    2015-01-01

    Friction Surfacing Cladding (FSC) is a recently developed solid state process to deposit thin metallic clad layers on a substrate. The process employs a rotating tool with a central opening to supply clad material and support the distribution and bonding of the clad material to the substrate. The

  4. Separate-effect tests on zirconium cladding degradation in air ingress situations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duriez, C. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, Direction de Prevention des Accidents Majeurs, Centre de Cadarache, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France)], E-mail: christian.duriez@irsn.fr; Steinbrueck, M. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe, FZK, Institut fuer Materialforschung, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Ohai, D.; Meleg, T. [Institute for Nuclear Research, INR, Nuclear Material and Corrosion Department, Pitesti, 115400 Mioveni Arges (Romania); Birchley, J.; Haste, T. [Paul Scherrer Institute, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2009-02-15

    In the event of air ingress during a reactor or spent fuel pond low probability accident, the fuel rods will be exposed to air-containing atmospheres at high temperatures. In comparison with steam, the presence of air is expected to result in a more rapid escalation of the accident. A state-of-the-art review performed before SARNET started showed that the existing data on zirconium alloy oxidation in air were scarce. Moreover, the exact role of zirconium nitride on the cladding degradation process was poorly understood. Regarding the cladding behaviour in air + steam or nitrogen-enriched atmospheres (encountered in oxygen-starved conditions), almost no data were available. New experimental programmes comprising small-scale tests have therefore been launched at FZK, IRSN (MOZART programme in the frame of the International Source Term Program-ISTP) and INR. Zircaloy-4 cladding in PWR (FZK, IRSN) and in CANDU (INR) geometry are investigated. On-line kinetic data are obtained on centimetre size tube segments, by thermogravimetry (FZK, IRSN and INR) or by mass spectrometry (FZK). Plugged tubes 15 cm long (FZK) are also investigated. The samples are air-oxidised either in the 'as-received' state, or after pre-oxidation in steam. 'Analytical' tests at constant temperature and gas composition provide basic kinetic data, while more prototypical temperature transients and sequential gas compositions are also investigated. The temperature domains extend from 600 deg. C up to 1500 deg. C. Systematic post-test metallographic inspections are performed. The paper gives a synthesis of the results obtained, comparing them in terms of kinetics and oxide scale structure and composition. A comparative analysis is performed with results of the QUENCH-10 (Q-10) bundle test, which included an air ingress phase. It is shown how the data contribute to a better understanding of the cladding degradation process, especially regarding the role of nitrogen. For modelling of

  5. Separate-effect tests on zirconium cladding degradation in air ingress situations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duriez, C.; Steinbrueck, M.; Ohai, D.; Meleg, T.; Birchley, J.; Haste, T.

    2009-01-01

    In the event of air ingress during a reactor or spent fuel pond low probability accident, the fuel rods will be exposed to air-containing atmospheres at high temperatures. In comparison with steam, the presence of air is expected to result in a more rapid escalation of the accident. A state-of-the-art review performed before SARNET started showed that the existing data on zirconium alloy oxidation in air were scarce. Moreover, the exact role of zirconium nitride on the cladding degradation process was poorly understood. Regarding the cladding behaviour in air + steam or nitrogen-enriched atmospheres (encountered in oxygen-starved conditions), almost no data were available. New experimental programmes comprising small-scale tests have therefore been launched at FZK, IRSN (MOZART programme in the frame of the International Source Term Program-ISTP) and INR. Zircaloy-4 cladding in PWR (FZK, IRSN) and in CANDU (INR) geometry are investigated. On-line kinetic data are obtained on centimetre size tube segments, by thermogravimetry (FZK, IRSN and INR) or by mass spectrometry (FZK). Plugged tubes 15 cm long (FZK) are also investigated. The samples are air-oxidised either in the 'as-received' state, or after pre-oxidation in steam. 'Analytical' tests at constant temperature and gas composition provide basic kinetic data, while more prototypical temperature transients and sequential gas compositions are also investigated. The temperature domains extend from 600 deg. C up to 1500 deg. C. Systematic post-test metallographic inspections are performed. The paper gives a synthesis of the results obtained, comparing them in terms of kinetics and oxide scale structure and composition. A comparative analysis is performed with results of the QUENCH-10 (Q-10) bundle test, which included an air ingress phase. It is shown how the data contribute to a better understanding of the cladding degradation process, especially regarding the role of nitrogen. For modelling of the oxide scale

  6. Different Approach to the Aluminium Oxide Topography Characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poljacek, Sanja Mahovic; Gojo, Miroslav; Raos, Pero; Stoic, Antun

    2007-01-01

    Different surface topographic techniques are being widely used for quantitative measurements of typical industrial aluminium oxide surfaces. In this research, specific surface of aluminium oxide layer on the offset printing plate has been investigated by using measuring methods which have previously not been used for characterisation of such surfaces. By using two contact instruments and non-contact laser profilometer (LPM) 2D and 3D roughness parameters have been defined. SEM micrographs of the samples were made. Results have shown that aluminium oxide surfaces with the same average roughness value (Ra) and mean roughness depth (Rz) typically used in the printing plate surface characterisation, have dramatically different surface topographies. According to the type of instrument specific roughness parameters should be used for defining the printing plate surfaces. New surface roughness parameters were defined in order to insure detailed characterisation of the printing plates in graphic reproduction process

  7. Mechanical behaviour of aluminium-lithium alloys

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aluminium-lithium alloys hold promise of providing a breakthrough response to the crying need for lightweight alloys for use as structurals in aerospace applications. Considerable worldwide research has gone into developing a range of these alloys over the last three decades. As a result, substantial understanding has ...

  8. The quest for safe and reliable fuel cladding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pino, Eddy S.; Abe, Alfredo Y., E-mail: eddypino132@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Giovedi, Claudia, E-mail: claudia.giovedi@labrisco.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (POLI/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Analise, Avaliacao e Gerenciamento de Risco

    2015-07-01

    The tragic Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident of March, 2011, has brought great unrest and challenge to the nuclear industry, which, in collaboration with universities and nuclear research institutes, is making great efforts to improve the safety in nuclear reactors developing accident tolerant fuels (ATF). This involves the study of different materials to be applied as cladding and, also, the improvement in the fuel properties in order to enhance the fuel performance and safety, specifically under accident conditions. Related to the cladding, iron based alloys and silicon carbide (SiC) materials have been studied as a good alternative. In the case of austenitic stainless steel, there is the advantage that the austenitic stainless steel 304 was used as cladding material in the first PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) registering a good performance. Then, alternated cladding materials such as iron based alloys (304, 310, 316, 347) should be used to replace the zirconium-based alloys in order to improve safety. In this paper, these cladding materials are evaluated in terms of their physical and chemical properties; among them, strength and creep resistance, thermal conductivity, thermal stability and corrosion resistance. Additionally, these properties are compared with those of conventional zirconium-based alloys, the most used material in actual PWR, to assess the advantages and disadvantages of each material concerning to fuel performance and safety contribution. (author)

  9. The quest for safe and reliable fuel cladding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pino, Eddy S.; Abe, Alfredo Y.; Giovedi, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The tragic Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident of March, 2011, has brought great unrest and challenge to the nuclear industry, which, in collaboration with universities and nuclear research institutes, is making great efforts to improve the safety in nuclear reactors developing accident tolerant fuels (ATF). This involves the study of different materials to be applied as cladding and, also, the improvement in the fuel properties in order to enhance the fuel performance and safety, specifically under accident conditions. Related to the cladding, iron based alloys and silicon carbide (SiC) materials have been studied as a good alternative. In the case of austenitic stainless steel, there is the advantage that the austenitic stainless steel 304 was used as cladding material in the first PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) registering a good performance. Then, alternated cladding materials such as iron based alloys (304, 310, 316, 347) should be used to replace the zirconium-based alloys in order to improve safety. In this paper, these cladding materials are evaluated in terms of their physical and chemical properties; among them, strength and creep resistance, thermal conductivity, thermal stability and corrosion resistance. Additionally, these properties are compared with those of conventional zirconium-based alloys, the most used material in actual PWR, to assess the advantages and disadvantages of each material concerning to fuel performance and safety contribution. (author)

  10. Recycling of aluminium swarf by direct incorporation in aluminium melts

    OpenAIRE

    Puga, Hélder; Barbosa, J.; Soares, Delfim; Silva, Filipe Samuel; Ribeiro, Carlos Silva

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to recover a standard AlSi12Cu1 alloy from machining chips inside the foundry plant, by using an environmentally friend technique to produce cast ingots with characteristics similar to those of the commercially available 2nd melt raw material. The recyclability of aluminium swarf using different melting techniques and the influence of chips preparation in the aluminium alloy recovery rate and dross production was experimentally studied and evaluated...

  11. Irradiation damage in aluminium single crystals produced by 50-keV aluminium and copper ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, L.; Johansen, A.; Koch, J.

    1968-01-01

    Aluminium single crystals, thin enough to be examined by electron microscopy, have been irradiated with 50-keV aluminium and copper ions. The irradiation fluxes were in the range 1011–1014 cm−2 s−1 and the doses were from 6 × 1012 to 6 × 1014 cm−2. Irradiation along either a or a direction produces...... rows of dislocation loops all lying parallel to one particular direction. If the aluminium target is quenched from 600 °C and annealed at room temperature prior to irradiation with aluminium ions, the rows of loops are suppressed. The amount of damage observed is considerably less than would...

  12. TRIGA 14 MW spent fuel shipment to USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toma, C.; Barbos, D.; Preda, M.; Covaci, St.; Ciocanescu, M.

    2008-01-01

    Romania has begun to convert Pitesti TRIGA 14 MW reactor having HEU fuel in its first loading and has agreed to complete conversion of the reactor to LEU fuel by May 12, 2006. Thus it became possible to benefit of US policy as set forth in the Record of Decision (ROD) issued by the Department of Energy (DOE ) on May 13 , 1996 directed for acceptance, management and disposition of the Authorized Material which has been discharged from the foreign research reactors. Consequently, United States, DOE Idaho Operations Office and Institute for Nuclear Research at Pitesti, Romania have mutually agreed the terms and conditions set forth in a contract applicable to the receipt of the Authorized Material. Irradiated and spent nuclear fuel rods from TRIGA reactor containing uranium enriched in the United States that have met the requirements set forth in the Environmental Impact Statement and the ROD have been designated as 'Authorized Material' and transferred to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)- USA during the summer of 1999 in a joint shipment. 267 TRIGA spent fuel rods loaded in a Legal Weight Truck Shipping Cask belonging to the NAC International have been transported through an overland truck route from Pitesti, Romania to Koper, Slovenia and from there it was shipped to USA. The paper has the following contents: 1.Introduction; 2.Fuel rods selection; 3.Fuel rods characterization; 4.Evaluation of TRIGA fuel in wet storage; 5.Fuel rods transfer from TRIGA pool to the transport cask; 6.Supporting documentation for transfer approval; 7. Conclusions. In conclusion one is stressed that, on site fuel evaluation process evidenced the existence of very good running and storage conditions in reactor pool during reactor operation and fuel storage. Only one fuel rod had to be packaged prior to placement in the shipping cask because of damaged cladding during negligent handling

  13. Bioaccumulation of Aluminium in Hydromacrophytes in Polish Coastal Lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senze Magdalena

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The research on aluminium content was conducted in water and on aquatic flora of Polish lakes in the central part of the coast. The study included the lakes Sarbsko, Choczewskie, Bia.e, K.odno, D.brze and Salino investigated in the summer of 2013. The examined lakes belong mainly to the direct basin of the Baltic Sea. Samples of aquatic plants and lake waters were collected. In the water samples pH and electrolytic conductivity were measured. The aluminium content was determined both in water and aquatic plants. Submerged hydromacrophyte studies included Myriophyllum alterniflorum L., Potamogeton perfoliatus L. and Ceratophyllum demersum L. Emergent hydromacrophyte studies included Phragmites australis (Cav. Trin. ex Steud., Juncus bulbosus L., Iris pseudacorus L., Eleocharis palustris (L. Roem. % Schult., Phalaris arundinacea L., Carex riparia Curt., Mentha aquatic L., Stratiotes aloides L., Alisma plantago-aquatica L., Glyceria maxima (Hartman Holmb., Sagittaria sagittifolia L., Scirpus lacustris L. and Typha angustifolia L. The purpose of this investigation was the determination of the aluminium content in submerged and emergent hydromacrophytes and also the definition of their bioaccumulative abilities. The average concentration of aluminium in water was 2.68 fęg Al dm.3. The average content of aluminium in plants was 2.8015 mg Al kg.1. The bioaccumulation factor ranged from BCF=19.74 to BCF=16619. On the basis of the analysis of the aluminium content in water and aquatic plants results show that both water and plants were characterized by a moderate level of aluminium. The recorded concentrations indicate a mid-range value and are much lower than those which are quoted for a variety of surface waters in various parts of the world.

  14. Modelling of pellet-clad interaction during power ramps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, G.; Lindback, J.E.; Schutte, H.C.; Jernkvist, L.O.; Massih, A.R.; Massih, A.R.

    2005-01-01

    A computational method to describe the pellet-clad interaction phenomenon is presented. The method accounts for the mechanical contact between fragmented pellets and the zircaloy clad, as well as for chemical reaction of fission products with zircaloy during power ramps. Possible pellet-clad contact states, soft, hard and friction, are taken into account in the computational algorithm. The clad is treated as an elastic-plastic-viscoplastic material with irradiation hardening. Iodine-induced stress corrosion cracking is described by using a fracture mechanics-based model for crack propagation. This integrated approach is used to evaluate two power ramp experiments made on boiling water reactor fuel rods in test reactors. The influence of the pellet-clad coefficient of friction on clad deformation is evaluated and discussed. Also, clad deformations, pellet-clad gap size and fission product gas release for one of the ramped rods are calculated and compared with measured data. (authors)

  15. The aluminium content of breast tissue taken from women with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Emily; Polwart, Anthony; Darbre, Philippa; Barr, Lester; Metaxas, George; Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    The aetiology of breast cancer is multifactorial. While there are known genetic predispositions to the disease it is probable that environmental factors are also involved. Recent research has demonstrated a regionally specific distribution of aluminium in breast tissue mastectomies while other work has suggested mechanisms whereby breast tissue aluminium might contribute towards the aetiology of breast cancer. We have looked to develop microwave digestion combined with a new form of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry as a precise, accurate and reproducible method for the measurement of aluminium in breast tissue biopsies. We have used this method to test the thesis that there is a regional distribution of aluminium across the breast in women with breast cancer. Microwave digestion of whole breast tissue samples resulted in clear homogenous digests perfectly suitable for the determination of aluminium by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The instrument detection limit for the method was 0.48 μg/L. Method blanks were used to estimate background levels of contamination of 14.80 μg/L. The mean concentration of aluminium across all tissues was 0.39 μg Al/g tissue dry wt. There were no statistically significant regionally specific differences in the content of aluminium. We have developed a robust method for the precise and accurate measurement of aluminium in human breast tissue. There are very few such data currently available in the scientific literature and they will add substantially to our understanding of any putative role of aluminium in breast cancer. While we did not observe any statistically significant differences in aluminium content across the breast it has to be emphasised that herein we measured whole breast tissue and not defatted tissue where such a distribution was previously noted. We are very confident that the method developed herein could now be used to provide accurate and reproducible data on the aluminium content

  16. Oxidation Behavior of FeCrAl -coated Zirconium Cladding prepared by Laser Coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Il-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-Gil; Choi, Byung-Kwan; Park, Jeong-Yong; Koo, Yang-Hyun; Kim, Jin-Seon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    From the recent research trends, the ATF cladding concepts for enhanced accident tolerance are divided as follows: Mo-Zr cladding to increase the high temperature strength, cladding coating to increase the high temperature oxidation resistance, FeCrAl alloy and SiC/SiCf material to increase the oxidation resistance and strength at high temperature. To commercialize the ATF cladding concepts, various factors are considered, such as safety under normal and accident conditions, economy for the fuel cycle, and developing development challenges, and schedule. From the proposed concepts, it is known that the cladding coating, FeCrAl alloy, and Zr-Mo claddings are considered as a near/mid-term application, whereas the SiC material is considered as a long-term application. Among them, the benefit of cladding coating on Zr-based alloys is the fuel cycle economy regarding the manufacturing, neutron cross section, and high tritium permeation characteristics. However, the challenge of cladding coating on Zr-based alloys is the lower oxidation resistance and mechanical strength at high-temperature than other concepts. Another important point is the adhesion property between the Zr-based alloy and coating materials. A laser coating method supplied with FeCrAl powders was developed to decrease the high-temperature oxidation rate in a steam environment through a systematic study for various coating parameters, and a FeCrAl-coated Zircaloy-4 cladding tube of 100 mm in length to the axial direction can be successfully manufactured.

  17. Finite Element Analysis of Laser Engineered Net Shape (LENS™) Tungsten Clad Squeeze Pins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhuja, Amit; Brevick, Jerald R.

    2004-06-01

    In the aluminum high-pressure die-casting and indirect squeeze casting processes, local "squeeze" pins are often used to minimize internal solidification shrinkage in heavy casting sections. Squeeze pins frequently fail in service due to molten aluminum adhering to the H13 tool steel pins ("soldering"). A wide variety of coating materials and methods have been developed to minimize soldering on H13. However, these coatings are typically very thin, and experience has shown their performance on squeeze pins is highly variable. The LENS™ process was employed in this research to deposit a relatively thick tungsten cladding on squeeze pins. An advantage of this process was that the process parameters could be precisely controlled in order to produce a satisfactory cladding. Two fixtures were designed and constructed to enable the end and outer diameter (OD) of the squeeze pins to be clad. Analyses were performed on the clad pins to evaluate the microstructure and chemical composition of the tungsten cladding and the cladding-H13 substrate interface. A thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to assess the stress distribution as a function of cladding thickness on the pins during a typical casting thermal cycle. FEA results were validated via a physical test, where the clad squeeze pins were immersed into molten aluminum. Pins subjected to the test were evaluated for thermally induced cracking and resistance to soldering of the tungsten cladding.

  18. Finite element analysis of laser engineered net shape (LENSTM) tungsten clad squeeze pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakhuja, Amit; Brevick, Jerald R.

    2004-01-01

    In the aluminum high-pressure die-casting and indirect squeeze casting processes, local 'squeeze' pins are often used to minimize internal solidification shrinkage in heavy casting sections. Squeeze pins frequently fail in service due to molten aluminum adhering to the H13 tool steel pins ('soldering'). A wide variety of coating materials and methods have been developed to minimize soldering on H13. However, these coatings are typically very thin, and experience has shown their performance on squeeze pins is highly variable. The LENS TM process was employed in this research to deposit a relatively thick tungsten cladding on squeeze pins. An advantage of this process was that the process parameters could be precisely controlled in order to produce a satisfactory cladding. Two fixtures were designed and constructed to enable the end and outer diameter (OD) of the squeeze pins to be clad. Analyses were performed on the clad pins to evaluate the microstructure and chemical composition of the tungsten cladding and the cladding-H13 substrate interface. A thermo-mechanical finite element analysis (FEA) was performed to assess the stress distribution as a function of cladding thickness on the pins during a typical casting thermal cycle. FEA results were validated via a physical test, where the clad squeeze pins were immersed into molten aluminum. Pins subjected to the test were evaluated for thermally induced cracking and resistance to soldering of the tungsten cladding

  19. Report of the advanced neutron source (ANS) aluminum cladding corrosion workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.H.; Gibson, G.W.; Griess, J.C.; Pawel, R.E.; Pace, N.E.; Ryskamp, J.M.

    1989-02-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) Corrosion Workshop on aluminum cladding corrosion in reactor environments is summarized. The Workshop was held to examine the aluminum cladding oxidation studies being conducted in support of the ANS design. This report was written principally to provide a record of the ideas and judgments expressed by the workshop attendees. The ANS operating heat flux is significantly higher than that in existing reactors, and early experiments indicate that there may be an aluminum cladding oxidation problem unique to higher heat fluxes or associated cladding temperatures that, if not solved, may limit the operation of the ANS to unacceptably low power levels. A brief description of the information presented by each speaker is included along with a compilation of the most significant ideas and recommended research areas. The appendixes contain a copy of the workshop agenda and a list of attendees

  20. Laser welding of aluminium alloys

    OpenAIRE

    Forsman, Tomas

    2000-01-01

    This thesis treats laser welding of aluminium alloys from a practical perspective with elements of mathematical analysis. The theoretical work has in all cases been verified experimentally. The aluminium alloys studied are from the 5xxx and 6xxx groups which are common for example in the automotive industry. Aluminium has many unique physical properties. The properties which more than others have been shown to influence the welding process is its high reflection, high thermal conductivity, lo...

  1. Development of Silicide Coating on Molybdenum Alloy Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Woojin; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    The molybdenum alloy is considered as one of the accident tolerant fuel (ATF) cladding materials due to its high temperature mechanical properties. However, molybdenum has a weak oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. To modify the oxidation resistance of molybdenum cladding, silicide coating on the cladding is considered. Molybdenum silicide layers are oxidized to SiO 2 in an oxidation atmosphere. The SiO 2 protective layer isolates the substrate from the oxidizing atmosphere. Pack cementation deposition technique is widely adopted for silicide coating for molybdenum alloys due to its simple procedure, homogeneous coating quality and chemical compatibility. In this study, the pack cementation method was conducted to develop molybdenum silicide layers on molybdenum alloys. It was found that the Mo 3 Si layer was deposited on substrate instead of MoSi 2 because of short holding time. It means that through the extension of holding time, MoSi 2 layer can be formed on molybdenum substrate to enhance the oxidation resistance of molybdenum. The accident tolerant fuel (ATF) concept is to delay the process following an accident by reducing the oxidation rate at high temperatures and to delay swelling and rupture of fuel claddings. The current research for Atf can be categorized into three groups: First, modification of existing zirconium-based alloy cladding by improving the high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Second, replacing Zirconium based alloys with alternative metallic materials such as refractory elements with high temperature oxidation resistance and strength. Third, designing alternative fuel structures using ceramic and composite systems

  2. Investigation on structural analysis computer program of spent nuclear fuel shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagawa, Ganki; Ikushima, Takeshi.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes the results done by the Sub-Committee of Research Cooperation Committee (RC-62) of the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers under the trust of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The principal fulfilments and accomplishments are summarized as follows: (1) Regarding the survey of structural analysis methods of spent fuel shipping cask, several documents, which explain the features and applications of the exclusive computer programs for impact analysis on the basis of 2 or 3 dimensional finite element or difference methods such as HONDO, STEALTH and DYNA-3D, were reviewed. (2) In comparative evaluation of the existing computer programs, the common benchmark test problems for 9 m vertical drop impact of the axisymmetric lead cylinder with and without stainless steel clads were adopted where the calculational evaluations for taking into account the strain rate effect were carried out. (3) Evaluation of impact analysis algorithm of computer programs were conducted and the requirements for computer programs to be developed in future and an index for further studies have been clarified. (author)

  3. Constant structure creep experiments on aluminium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Milička, Karel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 5 (2011), s. 307-318 ISSN 0023-432X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2041203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : mechanical properties * high temperature deformation * creep * aluminium Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.451, year: 2011

  4. Progress and Challenges of Ultrasonic Testing for Stress in Remanufacturing Laser Cladding Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ling Yan

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Stress in laser cladding coating is an important factor affecting the safe operation of remanufacturing components. Ultrasonic testing has become a popular approach in the nondestructive evaluation of stress, because it has the advantages of safety, nondestructiveness, and online detection. This paper provides a review of ultrasonic testing for stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating. It summarizes the recent research outcomes on ultrasonic testing for stress, and analyzes the mechanism of ultrasonic testing for stress. Remanufacturing laser cladding coating shows typical anisotropic behaviors. The ultrasonic testing signal in laser cladding coating is influenced by many complex factors, such as microstructure, defect, temperature, and surface roughness, among others. At present, ultrasonic testing for stress in laser cladding coating can only be done roughly. This paper discusses the active mechanism of micro/macro factors in the reliability of stress measurement, as well as the impact of stress measurement on the quality and safety of remanufacturing components. Based on the discussion, this paper proposes strategies to nondestructively, rapidly, and accurately measure stress in remanufacturing laser cladding coating.

  5. Development of the transverse tensile and fracture toughness test techniques for spent fuel cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S. B.; Hong, K. P.; Jung, Y. H.; Seo, H. S.; Oh, W. H.; Yoo, B. O.; Kim, D. S.; Seo, K. S

    2001-12-01

    To define the cause of cladding damage which can take place during the operation of nuclear power plant and the storage through the degradation aspect of mechanical characteristics, the transverse tensile an fracture toughness test were developed in hot cell at IMEF(Irradiated Material Experiment Facility). The following hot cell techniques were developed. 1. The development of a jig and a specimen for transverse tensile test 2. The acquisition of a manufacturing technique for the transverse tensile specimen at hot cell 3. The acquisition of testing procedures and an analysis technque for the transverse tensile 4. The dimensional determination of an optimized fracture toughness specimen 5. The acquisition of manufacturing technique for the fracture toughness test specimen at the hot cell 6. The acquisition of testing procedures and analysis technique for the fracture toughness test (Multiple specimen method, DCPD method, Load ratio method)

  6. Determination of aluminium content in foodstuffs by neutron activation analysis utilizing PCF of Dhruva research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanda, B.B.; Biswal, R.R.; Acharya, R.; Pujari, P.K.; Shinde, A.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium is one of the toxic elements in food and food products are the main sources of aluminium entering the human body. In the present study, Aluminium (Al) content of 25 samples (from market) including rice, rice products, wheat, spices, tea, tea products, and lentils were determined using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). The concentrations of Al were in the range of 25-500 mg kg -1 in general except for tea and one spice sample. Samples were neutron irradiated using PCF of Dhruva reactor and 1779 keV γ-ray of 28 Al was analyzed using HPGe detector based γ-ray spectrometry. Three RMs was analyzed for method validation. The results obtained by INAA are discussed in this paper. (author)

  7. Developments in the US aluminium recycling industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolling, R N

    1983-06-01

    In the USA scrap recovery of aluminium has gained in importance since the war. Today its amounts to about 32% of total supply. On the other hand primary production in the US seems to have hardly any expansion possibilities. The development of the aluminium beverage can is the clearest example for recycling growth. The increased use of aluminium in passenger cars has led to very close technical and local relations of aluminium foundries and secondary smelters. The changing nature of the aluminium business caused by the growth of recycling should be recognized and made use of.

  8. Process for the manufacture of plates containing neutron poison from aluminium and aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, G.; Pollmann, E.; Srostlik, P.

    1985-01-01

    A process for guaranteeing sub-critical arrangements of nuclear fuel in tranport and/or storage containers is described, in which a homogeneous distribution of neutron poison in the aluminium matrix is guaranteed. A homogeneous mixture of aluminium powder and neutron poison powder is produced, this is pressed into plates in several stages, dried and made into hollow aluminium profiles of rectangular cross-section. The open ends of the hollow profile are then closed and this is rolled to the required dimension at 470-500 0 C. (orig./HP) [de

  9. Chapter 1. Economic aspects of aluminium production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanko, E.A.; Kabirov, Sh.O.; Safiev, Kh.; Azizov, B.S.; Mirpochaev, Kh.A.

    2011-01-01

    This article is devoted to economic aspects of aluminium production. Therefore, the perspectives of development of aluminium production, the base components of aluminium cost and economic security of enterprise are considered in this chapter.

  10. Aluminium and nickel in human albumin solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gammelgaard, Bente; Sandberg, E

    1989-01-01

    Five different brands of commercially available human albumin solutions for infusion were analysed for their aluminium and nickel contents by atomic absorption spectrometry. The aluminium concentrations ranged from 12 micrograms/l to 1109 micrograms/l and the nickel concentrations ranged from 17...... micrograms/l to 77 micrograms/l. Examination of the aluminium and nickel contents of the constituents for the production of one brand showed too low levels to explain the final contamination of the product. By following the aluminium and nickel concentrations of the same brand during the production...... of a batch of albumin solution, filtration was shown to contribute to contamination, although the largest increase in aluminium as well as nickel concentrations appeared during the bulk concentrating process. To avoid health risks to certain patients, regulations should be established requiring aluminium...

  11. Spent fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The production of nuclear electricity results in the generation of spent fuel that requires safe, secure and efficient management. Appropriate management of the resulting spent fuel is a key issue for the steady and sustainable growth of nuclear energy. Currently about 10,000 tonnes heavy metal (HM) of spent fuel are unloaded every year from nuclear power reactors worldwide, of which 8,500 t HM need to be stored (after accounting for reprocessed fuel). This is the largest continuous source of civil radioactive material generated, and needs to be managed appropriately. Member States have referred to storage periods of 100 years and even beyond, and as storage quantities and durations extend, new challenges arise in the institutional as well as in the technical area. The IAEA gives high priority to safe and effective spent fuel management. As an example of continuing efforts, the 2003 International Conference on Storage of Spent Fuel from Power Reactors gathered 125 participants from 35 member states to exchange information on this important subject. With its large number of Member States, the IAEA is well-positioned to gather and share information useful in addressing Member State priorities. IAEA activities on this topic include plans to produce technical documents as resources for a range of priority topics: spent fuel performance assessment and research, burnup credit applications, cask maintenance, cask loading optimization, long term storage requirements including records maintenance, economics, spent fuel treatment, remote technology, and influence of fuel design on spent fuel storage. In addition to broader topics, the IAEA supports coordinated research projects and technical cooperation projects focused on specific needs

  12. Analyses on Silicide Coating for LOCA Resistant Cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweidan, Faris B.; Lee, You Ho; Ryu, Ho Jin [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    A particular focus of accident-tolerant fuel has been cladding due to the rapid high-temperature oxidation of zirconium-based cladding with the evolution of H2 when steam is a reactant. Some key features of the coated cladding include high-temperature resistance to oxidation, lower processing temperatures, and a high melting point of the coating. Zirconium alloys exhibit a reasonably high melting temperature, so a coating for the cladding is appealing if the coating increases the high-temperature resistance to oxidation. In this case, the cladding is protected from complete oxidation. The cladding coating involves the application of zirconium silicide onto Zr-based cladding. Zirconium silicide coating is expected to produce a glassy layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature. For this reason, silicide coatings on cladding offer the potential for improved reliability at normal operating temperatures and at the higher transient temperatures encountered during accidents. Although ceramic coatings are brittle and may have weak points to be used as coating materials, several ceramic coatings were successful and showed adherent behavior and high resistance to oxidation. In this study, the oxidation behavior of zirconium silicide and its oxidation kinetics are analyzed. Zirconium silicide is a new suggested material to be used as coatings on existing Zr-based cladding alloys, the aim of this study is to evaluate if zirconium silicide is applicable to be used, so they can be more rapidly developed using existing cladding technology with some modifications. These silicide coatings are an attractive alternative to the use of coatings on zirconium claddings or to the lengthy development of monolithic ceramic or ceramic composite claddings and coatings.

  13. Analyses on Silicide Coating for LOCA Resistant Cladding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweidan, Faris B.; Lee, You Ho; Ryu, Ho Jin

    2015-01-01

    A particular focus of accident-tolerant fuel has been cladding due to the rapid high-temperature oxidation of zirconium-based cladding with the evolution of H2 when steam is a reactant. Some key features of the coated cladding include high-temperature resistance to oxidation, lower processing temperatures, and a high melting point of the coating. Zirconium alloys exhibit a reasonably high melting temperature, so a coating for the cladding is appealing if the coating increases the high-temperature resistance to oxidation. In this case, the cladding is protected from complete oxidation. The cladding coating involves the application of zirconium silicide onto Zr-based cladding. Zirconium silicide coating is expected to produce a glassy layer that becomes more protective at elevated temperature. For this reason, silicide coatings on cladding offer the potential for improved reliability at normal operating temperatures and at the higher transient temperatures encountered during accidents. Although ceramic coatings are brittle and may have weak points to be used as coating materials, several ceramic coatings were successful and showed adherent behavior and high resistance to oxidation. In this study, the oxidation behavior of zirconium silicide and its oxidation kinetics are analyzed. Zirconium silicide is a new suggested material to be used as coatings on existing Zr-based cladding alloys, the aim of this study is to evaluate if zirconium silicide is applicable to be used, so they can be more rapidly developed using existing cladding technology with some modifications. These silicide coatings are an attractive alternative to the use of coatings on zirconium claddings or to the lengthy development of monolithic ceramic or ceramic composite claddings and coatings

  14. Inspection and Analysis of Aluminum Storage Racks in Spent Fuel Storage Basins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, J.P.; Nelson, D.Z.

    1998-07-01

    Aluminum-clad spent nuclear fuel is stored in water filled basins at the Savannah River Site awaiting processing or other disposition. After more than 35 years of service underwater, the aluminum storage racks that position the fuel bundles in the basin were replaced. During the removal of the racks from the basin, a failure occurred in one of the racks and the Savannah River Technology Center was asked to investigate. This paper presents results of the failure analysis and provides a discussion of the effects of corrosion on the structural integrity of the storage racks

  15. Aluminium beverage can recycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewinski, A von

    1985-08-01

    Canned beverages have become a controversial issue in this era of ecological sensitivity. METALL has already discussed the problem of can recycling. The present article discusses the technical aspects of aluminium can recycling. Two further articles will follow on aluminium can recycling in North America and on the results of European pilot projects.

  16. Interaction between thorium and potential clad materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kale, G.B.; Gawde, P.S.; Sengupta, Pranesh

    2005-01-01

    Thorium based fuels are being used for nuclear reactors. The structural stability of fuel-clad assemblies in reactor systems depend upon the nature of interdiffusion reaction between fuel-cladding materials. Interdiffusion reaction thorium and various cladding materials is presented in this paper. (author)

  17. Photochemical preparation of aluminium oxide layers via vacuum ultraviolet irradiation of a polymeric hexanoato aluminium complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wennrich, L.; Khalil, H.; Bundesmann, C.; Decker, U.; Gerlach, J.W.; Helmstedt, U.; Manova, D.; Naumov, S.; Prager, L.

    2013-01-01

    By means of photochemical conversion of thin layers of a polymeric hexanoato aluminium complex as the precursor, thin aluminium oxide layers were prepared onto silicon wafers. The precursor compound was synthesized and characterized by several analytical techniques like NMR, FTIR, XPS, ICP, and found to be a polymeric aluminium-containing coordination compound which has been proposed to be a hydroxo-bridged aluminium chain with pendant hexanoyl side-chains ascertained as catena-poly[{di(κ-O,O-hexanoato)aluminium}(μ-hydroxo)] (PHAH). Thin layers deposited from a solution of PHAH in toluene onto silicon wafers were irradiated using VUV radiation from a xenon excimer lamp. The layers were characterized by XPS, XRD, XRR, and spectroscopic ellipsometry. VUV radiation with a radiant exposure of E = 36 J cm −2 led to almost carbon-free amorphous layers with a composition close to that of alumina having a density of about 2.1 g cm −3 . Thus, using the example of a polymeric aluminium complex, the potential of the photochemical conversion of metal complexes into oxides could be shown as an alternative method, in addition to sol–gel techniques, for the generation of thin plane metal-oxide layers at normal temperature and pressure. Highlights: ► A polymeric aluminium complex was synthesized and characterized by NMR, FTIR, XPS and ICP. ► Thin layers of the compound were irradiated using vacuum-UV radiation and converted to AlO x . ► Quantum-chemical calculations explain the conversion mechanism.

  18. Aluminium-27 n.m.r. studies of aluminium fluoro complexes in dichloromethane solution: evidence for tetrafluoroaluminate anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, R.; Eller, P.G.

    1989-01-01

    Mixed aluminium chloro/fluoro anions are formed in dichloromethane solution by the interaction of AlCl 3 and [Ph 3 PhCH 2 P] [H 2 F 3 ]. Aluminium-27 n.m.r. studies are restricted to the stoichiometric ranges F/Al from 1:1 to 3:1 and F/Al>8:1. Between these limits rapid precipitation reactions occur. In the fluoride-rich stoichiometric range there is rapid exchange on the n.m.r. time scale between the aluminium fluoro anion and free fluoride,