WorldWideScience

Sample records for spectroscopy diffractive production

  1. Precision Meson Spectroscopy: Diffractive Production at COMPASS and Development of a GEM-based TPC for PANDA

    Weitzel, Q

    Meson spectroscopy is a unique way to access Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) and learn about its properties. Due to the non-Abelian structure, QCD predicts new states of matter with gluonic degrees of freedom. In particular q ¯ qg hybrids, which can have spin-exotic quantum numbers forbidden for conventional q ¯ q mesons, are expected to exist. Such states were searched for in the past, mostly in the light-quark sector. However, the experimental situation is still ambiguous and needs to be clarified. Further insights will certainly also come from the heavy-quark spectroscopy. Several new charmonium-like resonances were for example discovered during the last years, which have to be studied in more detail by future experiments to reveal their nature. Diffractive dissociation reactions at COMPASS provide clean access to meson resonances with masses below 2.5 GeV/c2. During a pilot run in 2004 using pion beams on lead targets, a competitive number of −−+ final state events were recorded within a few days of d...

  2. Precision meson spectroscopy. Diffractive production at COMPASS and development of a GEM-based TPC for PANDA

    Weitzel, Quirin

    2008-01-01

    Meson spectroscopy is a unique way to access Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) and learn about its properties. Due to the non-Abelian structure, QCD predicts new states of matter with gluonic degrees of freedom. In particular q anti qg hybrids, which can have spin-exotic quantum numbers forbidden for conventional q anti q mesons, are expected to exist. Such states were searched for in the past, mostly in the light-quark sector. However, the experimental situation is still ambiguous and needs to be clarified. Further insights will certainly also come from the heavy-quark spectroscopy. Several new charmonium-like resonances were for example discovered during the last years, which have to be studied in more detail by future experiments to reveal their nature. Diffractive dissociation reactions at COMPASS provide clean access to meson resonances with masses below 2.5 GeV/c 2 . During a pilot run in 2004 using pion beams on lead targets, a competitive number of π - π - π + final state events were recorded within a few days of data taking. A full partial wave analysis (PWA) of these data has been performed for this dissertation, concentrating on the kinematic domain of large momentum transfer (t' element of [0.1, 1.0] GeV 2 /c 2 ). While well-known mesons are resolved with high quality, also a strong signal consistent with the much disputed hybrid candidate π 1 (1600) is observed in the spin-exotic J PC = 1 -+ partial wave. A Breit-Wigner parameterization yields a mass and width of 1.660 +0.010 -0.074 and 0.269 +0.063 -0.085 GeV/c 2 , respectively. In addition, a first PWA of events with small momentum transfer (t' element of [10 -3 ,10 -2 ] GeV 2 /c 2 ) has been carried out, yielding several high-mass radial-excitation states. In the future, the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility will perform highprecision spectroscopy in the charm-sector employing anti pp annihilations. Due to its excellent tracking capabilities for charged particles, a time projection chamber (TPC

  3. Precision meson spectroscopy. Diffractive production at COMPASS and development of a GEM-based TPC for PANDA

    Weitzel, Quirin

    2008-09-24

    Meson spectroscopy is a unique way to access Quantum Chromo Dynamics (QCD) and learn about its properties. Due to the non-Abelian structure, QCD predicts new states of matter with gluonic degrees of freedom. In particular q anti qg hybrids, which can have spin-exotic quantum numbers forbidden for conventional q anti q mesons, are expected to exist. Such states were searched for in the past, mostly in the light-quark sector. However, the experimental situation is still ambiguous and needs to be clarified. Further insights will certainly also come from the heavy-quark spectroscopy. Several new charmonium-like resonances were for example discovered during the last years, which have to be studied in more detail by future experiments to reveal their nature. Diffractive dissociation reactions at COMPASS provide clean access to meson resonances with masses below 2.5 GeV/c{sup 2}. During a pilot run in 2004 using pion beams on lead targets, a competitive number of {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} final state events were recorded within a few days of data taking. A full partial wave analysis (PWA) of these data has been performed for this dissertation, concentrating on the kinematic domain of large momentum transfer (t' element of [0.1, 1.0] GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}). While well-known mesons are resolved with high quality, also a strong signal consistent with the much disputed hybrid candidate {pi}{sub 1}(1600) is observed in the spin-exotic J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} partial wave. A Breit-Wigner parameterization yields a mass and width of 1.660{sup +0.010}{sub -0.074} and 0.269{sup +0.063}{sub -0.085} GeV/c{sup 2}, respectively. In addition, a first PWA of events with small momentum transfer (t' element of [10{sup -3},10{sup -2}] GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}) has been carried out, yielding several high-mass radial-excitation states. In the future, the PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility will perform highprecision spectroscopy in the charm-sector employing anti pp annihilations

  4. Diffractive production and hadron structure

    Nussinov, S.; Szwed, J.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of diffractive production on nuclei implied cross sections of the diffractively produced system on nucleons which are smaller than the corresponding projectile nucleon cross sections. A natural explanation for this feature is provided in the Good-Walker coherent production formalism. A specific realization of the Good-Walker formalism stated in terms of quarks and connecting electric flux tubes and some ensuing consequences are also discussed briefly. (Auth.)

  5. Diffractive dijet and W production in CDF

    Goulianos, K.

    1998-01-01

    Results on diffractive dijet and W-boson production from CDF are reviewed and compared with predictions based on factorization of the diffractive structure function of the proton measured in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

  6. Imaging spectroscopy using embedded diffractive optical arrays

    Hinnrichs, Michele; Hinnrichs, Bradford

    2017-09-01

    Pacific Advanced Technology (PAT) has developed an infrared hyperspectral camera based on diffractive optic arrays. This approach to hyperspectral imaging has been demonstrated in all three infrared bands SWIR, MWIR and LWIR. The hyperspectral optical system has been integrated into the cold-shield of the sensor enabling the small size and weight of this infrared hyperspectral sensor. This new and innovative approach to an infrared hyperspectral imaging spectrometer uses micro-optics that are made up of an area array of diffractive optical elements where each element is tuned to image a different spectral region on a common focal plane array. The lenslet array is embedded in the cold-shield of the sensor and actuated with a miniature piezo-electric motor. This approach enables rapid infrared spectral imaging with multiple spectral images collected and processed simultaneously each frame of the camera. This paper will present our optical mechanical design approach which results in an infrared hyper-spectral imaging system that is small enough for a payload on a small satellite, mini-UAV, commercial quadcopter or man portable. Also, an application of how this spectral imaging technology can easily be used to quantify the mass and volume flow rates of hydrocarbon gases. The diffractive optical elements used in the lenslet array are blazed gratings where each lenslet is tuned for a different spectral bandpass. The lenslets are configured in an area array placed a few millimeters above the focal plane and embedded in the cold-shield to reduce the background signal normally associated with the optics. The detector array is divided into sub-images covered by each lenslet. We have developed various systems using a different number of lenslets in the area array. Depending on the size of the focal plane and the diameter of the lenslet array will determine the number of simultaneous different spectral images collected each frame of the camera. A 2 x 2 lenslet array will image

  7. HIFI - a dedicated HIgh-FIeld diffraction and spectroscopy instrument

    Steffens, P.; Enderle, M.; Boehm, M.; Roux, S.

    2011-01-01

    The outstanding scientific impact of single-crystal neutron diffraction and spectroscopy in steady state vertical magnetic fields up to 15 T (17 T without dilution fringe) is reflected in numerous high-profile publications. Magnetic fields 30 T - 35 T in vertical geometry allow to address enigmatic questions without equivalence at lower fields. The constraints implied by such magnetic fields demand a specially designed dedicated instrument. Since the vertical field geometry is crucial for single-crystal diffraction as well as spectroscopy, the solid angle of scattered neutrons is restricted, and a high-flux reactor is best suited to host a corresponding instrument. We propose a world-wide unique versatile instrument for diffraction and spectroscopy in vertical steady fields of 30 T. (authors)

  8. Diffractive charm and jet production at HERA

    Savin, Alexander A.

    2003-01-01

    A new high precision inclusive measurement of the diffractive production of D* ± (2010) mesons in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) in the kinematic region Q 2 >1.5 GeV 2 , 0.02 IP 2 2 , 165 2 , χ IP < 0.03 are presented. Diffractive parton densities extracted using a NLO DGLAP QCD fit are used for comparisons with diffractive DIS and PHP dijet and open charm cross sections at HERA and the Tevatron, thus testing the factorization properties of hard diffraction

  9. Physics and chemistry of materials from neutron diffraction and spectroscopy

    Dahlborg, U.; Lovesey, S.W.; Uppsala Univ.

    1990-11-01

    A short introduction to the powerful techniques of neutron diffraction and spectroscopy is illustrated largely with achievements by Swedish researchers in the past few years. Background material on sources and instrumentation is included, together with a directory of facilities routinely available to the Swedish scientific community. (author)

  10. Diffractive beauty production at the LHC

    Eggert, K.; Morsch, A.

    1994-01-01

    Using the framework of Pomeron exchange to describe diffractive pp collisions at the LHC we discuss beauty production in those events. The cross sections for beauty production at different diffractive masses and the topology for the beauty particles and the underlying event are given. When triggering on large diffractive masses, the beauty system is boosted into the Pomeron hemisphere opposite the underlying event, which tends to follow the excited proton direction. This may offer some advantages for the acceptance of beauty and its reconstruction in forward spectrometers. For the identification of diffractive events at the LHC collider, we present a scheme to measure the momentum loss of forward protons in the range 2x10 -3 < Δp/p <0.1. This momentum loss can be determined with a precision of about 10%. ((orig.))

  11. Selected-area diffraction and spectroscopy in LEEM and PEEM

    Tromp, R.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the effects of spherical and chromatic aberration of the objective lens, as well as chromatic dispersion of magnetic prism arrays, on the ability to perform selected area Low Energy Electron Diffraction, as well as (Angle Resolved) Photo Electron Spectroscopy experiments in today's advanced cathode lens microscopy instruments. -- Highlights: ► Aberrations of the cathode lens affect SA diffraction and spectroscopy experiments in LEEM/PEEM. ► In LEEM the problem can be overcome by inserting the SA aperture in the illuminating path. ► In PEEM for selected areas smaller than 2–4 μm aberration correction becomes a necessity. ► Chromatic dispersion in the magnetic prism array commonly can be neglected in most cases.

  12. Diffractive production off nuclei-shadow of hadronic bremsstrahlung

    Bialas, A.; Czyz, W.

    1974-01-01

    Diffractive production on nuclei is calculated using as an input a specific model for diffractive production on nucleons. In this model diffractive production is described as a shadow of non-diffractive multiple production of particles. The mechanism for non-diffractive production is taken to be hadronic bremsstrahlung of independently produced clusters. It is shown that such a model naturally explains the strikingly simple pattern of absorption observed in coherent production on nuclei. Possible generalizations of these results are indicated. (author)

  13. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on celestite

    Chen Yenhua; Yu Shucheng; Huang, Eugene; Lee, P.-L.

    2010-01-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of celestite (SrSO 4 ) were carried out in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. Variation in the Raman vibrational frequency and change of lattice parameters with pressure indicate that a transformation occurs in celestite. This transformation caused an adjustment in the Sr-O polyhedra that affected the stretching-force constant of SO 4 . Moreover, compressibilities along the crystallographic axes decreased in the order a to c to b. From the compression data, the bulk modulus of the celestite was 87 GPa. Both X-ray and Raman data show that the transition in celestite is reversible.

  14. ATLAS results on diffraction and exclusive production

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00224260; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Various aspects of forward physics have been studied by the ATLAS collaboration using data from Run I at the LHC. In this text, main results of three published analyses are summarized, based on data from proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 7$ or 8 TeV collected between 2010 and 2012. One analysis deals with diffractive signature with at least two jets in the final state, the other two study exclusive production of a pair of leptons or W bosons.

  15. [Diffraction gratings used in x-ray spectroscopy]: Final report

    Smith, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    This subcontract was initiated in order to facilitate the development at MIT of technologies for fabricating the very fine diffraction grating required in x-ray spectroscopy at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). These gratings are generally gold transmission gratings with spatial periods of 200 nm or less. The major focus of our efforts was to develop a means of fabricating gratings of 100 nm period. We explored two approaches: e-beam fabrication of x-ray lithography masks, and achromatic holographic lithography. This work was pursued by Erik Anderson as a major component of his Ph.D. thesis. Erik was successful in both the e-beam and holographic approaches. However, the e-beam method proved to be highly impractical: exposure times of about 115 days would be required to cover an area of 1 cm 2 . The achromatic holography, on the other hand, should be capable of exposing areas well in excess of 1 cm 2 in times under 1 hour. Moreover, 100 nm-period gratings produced by achromatic holography are coherent over their entire area whereas gratings produced by e-beam lithography are coherent only over areas /approximately/100 μm. The remainder of this report consists of portions excerpted from Erik Anderson's thesis. These contain all the details of our work on 100 nm period gratings. 26 refs., 17 figs

  16. Nanostructure Diffraction Gratings for Integrated Spectroscopy and Sensing

    Guo, Junpeng (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present disclosure pertains to metal or dielectric nanostructures of the subwavelength scale within the grating lines of optical diffraction gratings. The nanostructures have surface plasmon resonances or non-plasmon optical resonances. A linear photodetector array is used to capture the resonance spectra from one of the diffraction orders. The combined nanostructure super-grating and photodetector array eliminates the use of external optical spectrometers for measuring surface plasmon or optical resonance frequency shift caused by the presence of chemical and biological agents. The nanostructure super-gratings can be used for building integrated surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectrometers. The nanostructures within the diffraction grating lines enhance Raman scattering signal light while the diffraction grating pattern of the nanostructures diffracts Raman scattering light to different directions of propagation according to their wavelengths. Therefore, the nanostructure super-gratings allows for the use of a photodetector array to capture the surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra.

  17. Diffraction peaks in x-ray spectroscopy: Friend or foe?

    Tissot, R.G.; Goehner, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Diffraction peaks can occur as unidentifiable peaks in the energy spectrum of an x-ray spectrometric analysis. Recently, there has been increased interest in oriented polycrystalline films and epitaxial films on single crystal substrates for electronic applications. Since these materials diffract x-rays more efficiently than randomly oriented polycrystalline materials, diffraction peaks are being observed more frequently in x-ray fluorescent spectra. In addition, micro x-ray spectrometric analysis utilizes a small, intense, collimated x-ray beam that can yield well defined diffraction peaks. In some cases these diffraction peaks can occur at the same position as elemental peaks. These diffraction peaks, although a possible problem in qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis, can give very useful information about the crystallographic structure and orientation of the material being analyzed. The observed diffraction peaks are dependent on the geometry of the x-ray spectrometer, the degree of collimation and the distribution of wavelengths (energies) originating from the x-ray tube and striking the sample

  18. Remarks on diffractive production of the Higgs boson

    Peschanski, R. [CEA Saclay, Service de Physique Theorique, URA 2306, Unite de Recherche Associee au CNRS, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2005-07-01

    Central diffractive production of the Higgs boson has recently received much attention as a potentially interesting production mode at the LHC (large hadron collider). While the standard production of Higgs boson via gluon-gluon fusion can reach high cross-sections, the study of the Higgs boson will be uneasy due to accompanying particles and background. The original guiding line for central diffractive production is to compensate the weak cross-sections by a cleaner signal, and precise production kinematics thanks to the tagging of diffracted protons. We shall review some of the wishes and realities encountered in this field. Theoretical open problems of diffractive dynamics are involved in making accurate predictions for the LHC, among which the most crucial is understanding factorization breaking in hard diffraction.

  19. Heavy quark production and spectroscopy

    Appel, J.A.

    1993-11-01

    This review covers many new experimental results on heavy flavor production and spectroscopy. It also shows some of the increasingly improved theoretical understanding of results in light of basic perturbative QCD and heavy quark symmetry. At the same time, there are some remaining discrepancies among experiments as well as significant missing information on some of the anticipated lowest lying heavy quark states. Most interesting, perhaps, are some clearly measured production effects awaiting full explanation

  20. FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction characterization of microcrystalline cellulose obtained from alfa fibers

    Trache D.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Many cereal straws have been used as raw materials for the preparation of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC. These raw materials were gradually replaced with wood products; nevertheless about 10% of the world overall pulp production is obtained from non-wood raw material. The main interest in pulp made from straw is that it provides excellent fibres for different industries with special properties, and that it is the major available source of fibrous raw material in some geographical areas. The aim of the present work was to characterize microcrystalline cellulose prepared from alfa fibers using the hydrolysis process. The products obtained are characterized with FTIR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. As a result, FTIR spectroscopy is an appropriate technique for studying changes occurred by any chemical treatment. The spectrum of alfa grass stems shows the presence of lignin and hemicelluloses. However, the cellulose spectrum indicates that the extraction of lignin and hemicellulose was effective. The X-ray analysis indicates that the microcrystalline cellulose is more crystalline than the source material.

  1. X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy and thermal characterization of partially hydrolyzed guar gum.

    Mudgil, Deepak; Barak, Sheweta; Khatkar, B S

    2012-05-01

    Guar gum was hydrolyzed using cellulase from Aspergillus niger at 5.6 pH and 50°C temperature. Hydrolyzed guar gum sample was characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, X-ray diffraction, dilute solution viscometry and rotational viscometry. Viscometry analysis of native guar gum showed a molecular weight of 889742.06, whereas, after enzymatic hydrolysis, the resultant product had a molecular weight of 7936.5. IR spectral analysis suggests that after enzymatic hydrolysis of guar gum there was no major transformation of functional group. Thermal analysis revealed no major change in thermal behavior of hydrolyzed guar gum. It was shown that partial hydrolysis of guar gum could be achieved by inexpensive and food grade cellulase (Aspergillus niger) having commercial importance and utilization as a functional soluble dietary fiber for food industry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Characterization of Maghsail meteorite from Oman by Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and petrographic microscopy

    Al-Rawas, A. D.; Gismelseed, A. M.; Al-Kathiri, A. F.; Elzain, M. E.; Yousif, A. A.; Al-Kathiri, S. B.; Widatallah, H. M.; Abdalla, S. B.

    2008-01-01

    The meteorite found at Maghsail (16 55 70 N-53 46 69 E) west of Salalah Oman, has been studied by 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-diffractometry and petrographic microscopy. In the polished section the meteorite exhibits a porphyritic texture consisting of pyroxene and olivine phenocrysts in a fine to medium grained ground mass in addition to minor phases possibly skeletal chromite, troilite and minute amount of iron oxides. X-ray diffraction supports the existence of these compounds. The Moessbauer spectra of powdered material from the core of the rock at 298 K and 78 K exhibit a mixture of magnetic and paramagnetic components. The paramagnetic components are assigned to the silicate minerals olivine and pyroxene. On the other hand, the magnetic spectra reveal the presence of troilite and iron oxides. The petrographic analyses indicate that the iron oxides are terrestrial alteration products.

  3. A credit card verifier structure using diffraction and spectroscopy concepts

    Sumriddetchkajorn, Sarun; Intaravanne, Yuttana

    2008-04-01

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate an angle-multiplexing based optical structure for verifying a credit card. Our key idea comes from the fact that the fine detail of the embossed hologram stamped on the credit card is hard to duplicate and therefore its key color features can be used for distinguishing between the real and counterfeit ones. As the embossed hologram is a diffractive optical element, we choose to shine one at a time a number of broadband lightsources, each at different incident angle, on the embossed hologram of the credit card in such a way that different color spectra per incident angle beam is diffracted and separated in space. In this way, the number of pixels of each color plane is investigated. Then we apply a feed forward back propagation neural network configuration to separate the counterfeit credit card from the real one. Our experimental demonstration using two off-the-shelf broadband white light emitting diodes, one digital camera, a 3-layer neural network, and a notebook computer can identify all 69 counterfeit credit cards from eight real credit cards.

  4. Probing diffractive production of gauge bosons at forward rapidities

    Basso, Eduardo; Rangel, Murilo S. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica, Caixa Postal 68528, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Goncalves, Victor P. [Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Instituto de Fisica e Matematica, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)

    2016-12-15

    Gauge boson production at forward rapidities in single diffractive events at the LHC is investigated considering pp collisions at √(s) = 8 and 13 TeV. The impact of gap survival effects is analysed using two different models for the soft rescattering contributions. We demonstrate that using the forward shower counter Project at LHCb-HERSCHEL, together with the Vertex Locator-VELO, it is possible to discriminate diffractive production of the gauge bosons W and Z from the non-diffractive processes and studies of the Pomeron structure and diffraction phenomenology are feasible. Moreover, we show that the analysis of this process can be useful to constrain the modelling of the gap survival effects. (orig.)

  5. Quark-antiquark production in DIS diffractive dissociation

    Bartels, J.; Lotter, H.; Wuesthoff, M.

    1996-02-01

    We calculate the cross section for the production of two jets with large transverse momenta k 2 in DIS diffractive dissociation for both transverse and longitudinally polarized photons. The scale which defines the hardness of the Pomeron is found to be k 2 (Q 2 +M 2 )/M 2 . We present analytic expressions and discuss numerical results relevant for the diffractive dissociation at HERA. (orig.)

  6. Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and infrared studies of prehistoric materials from Minas Gerais

    Jesus Filho, M.F. de; Costa, G.M. da; Prous, A.

    1988-01-01

    Eight samples of pigmented materials from an archaelogical site in Santana do Riacho (Minas Gerais, Brazil) were studied by X-ray diffraction, infrared and Moessbauer spectroscopy. These three techniques and the results of chemical analysis allowed the approximated composition of each sample to be proposed. No trace of organic material was found in any sample. (author)

  7. System and technique for characterizing fluids using ultrasonic diffraction grating spectroscopy

    Greenwood, Margaret S [Richland, WA

    2008-07-08

    A system for determining property of multiphase fluids based on ultrasonic diffraction grating spectroscopy includes a diffraction grating on a solid in contact with the fluid. An interrogation device delivers ultrasound through the solid and a captures a reflection spectrum from the diffraction grating. The reflection spectrum exhibits peaks whose relative size depends on the properties of the various phases of the multiphase fluid. For example, for particles in a liquid, the peaks exhibit dependence on the particle size and the particle volume fraction. Where the exact relationship is know know a priori, data from different peaks of the same reflection spectrum or data from the peaks of different spectra obtained from different diffraction gratings can be used to resolve the size and volume fraction.

  8. Exclusive Double Diffractive Higgs Boson Production at LHC

    Petrov, V; 10.1140/epjc/s2004-01972-4

    2004-01-01

    Exclusive double diffractive (EDD) Higgs boson production is analyzed in the framework of the Regge-eikonal approach. Total and differential cross-sections for the process $p+p\\to p+H+p$ are calculated. Experimental possibilities to find Higgs boson at LHC are discussed.

  9. Double Regge model for non diffractive A1 production

    Anjos, J.C.; Endler, A.; Santoro, A.; Simao, F.R.A.

    1977-07-01

    A Reggeized double-nucleon-exchange model is shown to be able to to reproduce qualitatively the non-diffractive A 1 production recently observed in the reaction K - p → Σ - π + π - π + at 4.15 GeV/c

  10. Diffractive production of charmed strange mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos

    Asratyan, A. E.; Aderholz, M.; Ammosov, V. V.; Burkot, W.; Clayton, E. F.; Coghen, T.; Erriquez, O.; Gapienko, G. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Guy, J.; Hantke, D.; Jones, G. T.; Kaftanov, V. S.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Korotkov, V. A.; Krutchinin, S. P.; Kubantsev, M. A.; Marage, P.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Neveu, M.; Sacton, J.; Schmitz, N.; Varvell, K.; Venus, W.; Wittek, W.; Zaetz, V. G.

    1993-03-01

    The diffractive production of charmed strange D {s/*} and possibly D s mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos on nucleons in hydrogen, deuterium and neon targets is observed. The slope parameter of the t distribution is 3.3±0.8 (GeV)-2. The production rate per charged current neutrino interaction with an isoscalar target times the D{s/+}→φτ+ branching fraction is (1.03±0.27)×10-4.

  11. Diffractive production of charmed strange mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos

    Asratyan, A.E.; Kaftanov, V.S.; Krutchinin, S.P.; Kubantsev, M.A.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Katz, U.F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Ammosov, V.V.; Gapienko, G.S.; Gapienko, V.A.; Korotkov, V.A.; Zaetz, V.G.; Burkot, W.; Coghen, T.; Clayton, E.F.; Miller, D.B.; Mobayyen, M.M.; Erriquez, O.; Guy, J.; Venus, W.; Jones, G.T.; Varvell, K.; Marage, P.; Sacton, J.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Neveu, M.

    1993-01-01

    The diffractive production of charmed strange D s * and possibly D s mesons by neutrinos and antineutrinos on nucleons in hydrogen, deuterium and neon targets is observed. The slope parameter of the t distribution is 3.3±0.8 (GeV) -2 . The production rate per charged current neutrino interaction with an isoscalar target times the D s + →φπ + branching fraction is (1.03±0.27)x10 -4 . (orig.)

  12. Dijet production in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2007-08-01

    The production of dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 61 pb -1 . The dijet cross section has been measured for virtualities of the exchanged virtual photon, 5 2 2 , and γ * p centre-of-mass energies, 100 T algorithm in the γ * p frame, were required to have a transverse energy E * T,jet >4 GeV and the jet with the highest transverse energy was required to have E * T,jet >5 GeV. All jets were required to be in the pseudorapidity range -3.5 * jet <0. The differential cross sections are compared to leading-order predictions and next-to-leading- order QCD calculations based on recent diffractive parton densities extracted from inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering data. (orig.)

  13. Atomic-layer-resolved analysis of surface magnetism by diffraction spectroscopy

    Matsui, Fumihiko; Matsushita, Tomohiro; Daimon, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) measurements by Auger-electron-yield detection are powerful analysis tools for the electronic and magnetic structures of surfaces, but all the information from atoms within the electron mean-free-path range is summed into the obtained spectrum. In order to investigate the electronic and magnetic structures of each atomic layer at subsurface, we have proposed a new method, diffraction spectroscopy, which is the combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and Auger electron diffraction (AED). From a series of measured thickness dependent AED patterns, we deduced a set of atomic-layer-specific AED patterns arithmetically. Based on these AED patterns, we succeeded in disentangling obtained XANES and XMCD spectra into those from different atomic layers.

  14. Mineral and Geochemical Classification From Spectroscopy/Diffraction Through Neural Networks

    Ferralis, N.; Grossman, J.; Summons, R. E.

    2017-12-01

    Spectroscopy and diffraction techniques are essential for understanding structural, chemical and functional properties of geological materials for Earth and Planetary Sciences. Beyond data collection, quantitative insight relies on experimentally assembled, or computationally derived spectra. Inference on the geochemical or geophysical properties (such as crystallographic order, chemical functionality, elemental composition, etc.) of a particular geological material (mineral, organic matter, etc.) is based on fitting unknown spectra and comparing the fit with consolidated databases. The complexity of fitting highly convoluted spectra, often limits the ability to infer geochemical characteristics, and limits the throughput for extensive datasets. With the emergence of heuristic approaches to pattern recognitions though machine learning, in this work we investigate the possibility and potential of using supervised neural networks trained on available public spectroscopic database to directly infer geochemical parameters from unknown spectra. Using Raman, infrared spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction from the publicly available RRUFF database, we train neural network models to classify mineral and organic compounds (pure or mixtures) based on crystallographic structure from diffraction, chemical functionality, elemental composition and bonding from spectroscopy. As expected, the accuracy of the inference is strongly dependent on the quality and extent of the training data. We will identify a series of requirements and guidelines for the training dataset needed to achieve consistent high accuracy inference, along with methods to compensate for limited of data.

  15. Diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering at ZEUS

    Bonato, A.

    2008-03-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of dijet production of diffractive deep inelastic scattering ep collisions. This type of process is specially relevant for the experimental validity of the perturbative QCD approach to diffractive physics. The measurement was based on an integrated luminosity of 61 pb -1 collected at the HERA collider with the ZEUS experiment. The events were selected for virtualities of the photon, γ*, 5 2 2 , and energies of the γ*p centre-of-mass, 100 T algorithm in the γ*p frame. The jets were required to have a transverse energy in the γ*p frame E T jet *>4 GeV. The jet with the highest transverse energy was required to have E T jet *>5 GeV. All jets were required to be in the pseudorapidity range -3.5 jet * P , was required to be x P TOT D (ep→ep jet 1 jet 2 X')=9.15±1.2 (stat.) 5.4 3.3 (syst.) -5.3 +6.4 (corr.)pb. Single and double differential cross sections were extracted and compared to leading-order predictions and next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The latter used several diffractive parton densities extracted from inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering data. The agreement with the leading and next-to-leading order predictions is good and no hints of factorisation breaking are observed. The double differential measurement can be a previous input for the extraction of more accurate diffractive parton densities. (orig.)

  16. Diffractive production in deep inelastic scattering and hadronic interactions

    Kaidalow, A.

    1996-01-01

    Diffractive processes in hadronic interactions are considered and important role of multi-Pomeron exchanges is emphasized. It is argued that in deep inelastic scattering these contributions are much less important and energy behavior of structure functions at Q 2 ≥ 1 GeV 2 is determined mostly by bare Pomeron intercept. It is shown that the model based on these ideas is in a perfect agreement with recent results from HERA. Diffractive production in DIS is discussed and theoretical predictions for the structure function of the Pomeron are compared with experimental observations. It is emphasized that both quarks and gluons in the Pomeron have hard distributions. Shadowing corrections to structure function of a nucleon are calculated and found to small in the region of x > 10 -4 . A good agreement with experimental data on the shadowing of structure functions of nuclei is obtained. Energy dependence for the cross sections of the diffractive production of vector mesons by real and virtual photons is calculated in the same approach and is found to be in an excellent agreement with experiment. (author)

  17. Diffractive D{sup *}-mesons production in DIS at HERA

    Vinokurova, Svetlana

    2010-05-15

    This thesis presents a measurement of the cross sections for the production of the charmed mesons in diffractive deep inelastic positron-proton scattering (DIS) interactions of the type ep{yields}eXY, where the system X is separated from a low-mass system Y, by a large rapidity gap where no particles are observed. These diffractive processes can be explained as a result of the exchange of a strongly interacting colour singlet object between the final state particles. In this measurement data taken with the H1 detector in the years 1999-2000, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L{sub int}=46.7 pb{sup -1} are used. Inclusive DIS events are selected in the kinematic range with the momentum transfer Q{sup 2} element of [2;100] GeV and inelasticity y{sub bj} element of [0.05;07]. The charm quark is tagged by requiring a D{sup *} meson decaying into the channel D{sup *}{yields}D{sup 0}{pi}{sub slow}{yields}K{pi}{pi}{sub slow} inside the central tracking system with transverse momenta p{sub t}(D{sup *})>2 GeV. The forward components of the H1 detector are used to select genuine diffractive events on the basis of the forward sub-detectors activity and of the presence a large rapidity gap in the final state hadrons. The visible charm production cross sections are measured in the diffractive kinematic range M{sub Y} < 1.6 GeV, vertical stroke t vertical stroke < 1 GeV{sup 2} and x{sub P} < 0.04 to be {sigma}(ep{yields}e{sup '}(D{sup *}X)Y)=249{+-}31(stat.){+-}30(sys) pb, where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic. The shape of the differential distributions for diffractive D{sup *} production are well described by the collinear factorisation model which is implemented in the Monte Carlo simulation RAPGAP. (orig.)

  18. Innovative diffraction gratings for high-resolution resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering spectroscopy

    Voronov, D.L.; Warwick, T.; Gullikson, E. M.; Salmassi, F.; Padmore, H. A.

    2016-01-01

    High-resolution Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) requires diffraction gratings with very exacting characteristics. The gratings should provide both very high dispersion and high efficiency which are conflicting requirements and extremely challenging to satisfy in the soft x-ray region for a traditional grazing incidence geometry. To achieve high dispersion one should increase the groove density of a grating; this however results in a diffraction angle beyond the critical angle range and results in drastic efficiency loss. The problem can be solved by use of multilayer coated blazed gratings (MBG). In this work we have investigated the diffraction characteristics of MBGs via numerical simulations and have developed a procedure for optimization of grating design for a multiplexed high resolution imaging spectrometer for RIXS spectroscopy to be built in sector 6 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). We found that highest diffraction efficiency can be achieved for gratings optimized for 4"t"h or 5"t"h order operation. Fabrication of such gratings is an extremely challenging technological problem. We present a first experimental prototype of these gratings and report its performance. High order and high line density gratings have the potential to be a revolutionary new optical element that should have great impact in the area of soft x-ray RIXS.

  19. Characterization of Metalloproteins and Biomaterials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl

    This thesis presents thework on combining complementary X-rays techniques for studying the structures of proteins and other biomaterials, and consists of three different projects: (i) Characterization of protein powders with X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). (ii) The combination of X-ray...... crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) applied to studying different hexameric insulin conformations. (iii) The structures of polymorphs of strontium ranelate and the distribution of strontium in bone tissue. A procedure for fast identification and verification of protein powders using XRPD...... was correction for disordered bulk-solvent, but also correction for background and optimization of unit cell parameters have to be taken into account. A sample holder was designed for collecting powder diffraction data on a standard laboratory X-ray powder diffractometer. The background was reduced by use...

  20. Diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering at ZEUS

    Bonato, A.

    2008-03-15

    This thesis presents a measurement of dijet production of diffractive deep inelastic scattering ep collisions. This type of process is specially relevant for the experimental validity of the perturbative QCD approach to diffractive physics. The measurement was based on an integrated luminosity of 61 pb{sup -1} collected at the HERA collider with the ZEUS experiment. The events were selected for virtualities of the photon, {gamma}*, 54 GeV. The jet with the highest transverse energy was required to have E{sub T} {sub jet}*>5 GeV. All jets were required to be in the pseudorapidity range -3.5<{eta}{sub jet}*<0 as measured in the {gamma}*p frame. The selection of diffractive events was carried out by requiring a large rapidity gap in the direction of the scattered proton. The value of the fraction of initial proton momentum entering in the hard process, x{sub P}, was required to be x{sub P}<0.03. The total cross section for the process was measured to be {sigma}{sub TOT}{sup D}(ep{yields}ep jet{sub 1}jet{sub 2} X')=9.15{+-}1.2 (stat.){sub 5.4}{sup 3.3} (syst.){sub -5.3}{sup +6.4} (corr.)pb. Single and double differential cross sections were extracted and compared to leading-order predictions and next-to-leading-order QCD calculations. The latter used several diffractive parton densities extracted from inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering data. The agreement with the leading and next-to-leading order predictions is good and no hints of factorisation breaking are observed. The double differential measurement can be a previous input for the extraction of more accurate diffractive parton densities. (orig.)

  1. Dijet production in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2007-08-15

    The production of dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 61 pb{sup -1}. The dijet cross section has been measured for virtualities of the exchanged virtual photon, 54 GeV and the jet with the highest transverse energy was required to have E{sup *}{sub T,jet}>5 GeV. All jets were required to be in the pseudorapidity range -3.5<{eta}{sup *}{sub jet}<0. The differential cross sections are compared to leading-order predictions and next-to-leading- order QCD calculations based on recent diffractive parton densities extracted from inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering data. (orig.)

  2. Hard single diffractive jet production at D0

    Abachi, S.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.

    1996-08-01

    Preliminary results from the D null experiment on jet production with forward rapidity gaps in p anti p collisions are presented. A class of dijet events with a forward rapidity gap is observed at center-of-mass energies √s = 1800 GeV and 630 GeV. The number of events with rapidity gaps at both center-of-mass energies is significantly greater than the expectation from multiplicity fluctuations and is consistent with a hard single diffractive process. A small class of events with two forward gaps and central dijets is also observed at 1800 GeV. This topology is consistent with hard double pomeron exchange

  3. Characterization of the Roraima savanna across of X-ray diffraction, thermomagnetic analysis and Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Silva, Gilmar A.; Araujo, R.C.; Sergio, C.S. [Universidade Federal de Roraima (UFRR), Boa Vista, RR (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The technique of X-ray diffraction has great resolving power to determine the phases present in crystalline material, thereby enabling it to determine the elements present in the materials as well as changes in structure that they can suffer when subjected to various physical processes and/or chemical means. The research had as objective to characterize the mineralogy of iron oxides, silicon, aluminum and other minerals in the soil of five points of the Roraima savannah. The points where samples were collected are five municipalities in the state of Roraima. The area of sampling is part of the savanna in Roraima. The samples were collected. We analyzed samples from five points from the collection of natural soil in the locations listed. The samples were placed in a mill to a uniform grain size. After the milling process, the magnetic material was separated using a permanent magnet. Then the samples were analyzed by x-ray diffraction, thermomagnetic analysis and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Preliminary results of XRD showed the occurrence of phases of oxides of iron, silicon, aluminum and other phases less. Thermomagnetic analysis show that the magnetic phases are magnetite and hematite. The results of the Moessbauer spectroscopy indicates the reliability in the two prior art and confirmed the presence of the phases of oxides of iron present in the soil analyzed. (author)

  4. Mineral identification in Colombian coals using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Fajardo, M.; Mojica, J.; Barraza, J.; Perez Alcazar, G.A.; Tabares, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Minerals were identified in three Colombian coal samples from the Southwest of the country using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Original and sink separated coal fractions of specific gravity 1.40 and 1.60 with particle size less than 600 μm were used in the study. Using Moessbauer spectroscopy, the minerals identified in the original coal samples were pyrite jarosite, ankerite, illite and ferrous sulfate, whereas by means of X-ray diffraction, minerals identified were kaolinite, quartz, pyrite, and jarosite. Differences in mineral composition were found in the original and sink separated fractions using both techniques. Moessbauer spectra show that the mineral phases in low concentrations such as illite, ankerite and ferrous sulfate do not always appear in the spectra of sink coals, despite of those minerals occurring in the original coal, due to the fact that they are associated with the organic matter and not liberated in the grinding process. X-ray results show that the peak intensity grows as the specific gravity is increased indicating that the density separation method could be an effective process to clean coal

  5. Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction study of 304 L stainless steel thin films

    Boubeker, B.; Eymery, J.P.; Goudeau, P.; Sayouty, E.H.

    1994-01-01

    304 L stainless steel films (SS) were elaborated using an ion-beam sputtering technique. The target material was a sheet of commercial grade 304 L SS. The starting material was first analysed by both conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS) and X-ray diffraction. The nonmagnetic state and f.c.c. structure of this material were confirmed. The films were deposited on various substrates with thicknesses in the 175-800 nm range. The films are found to have both b.c.c. structure and ferromagnetic character. X-ray diffraction technique was also used in order to determine the residual stresses developed during the deposition process. The second stage of the work is devoted to the evolution of the film structure as a function of annealing treatments. So isochronal and isothermal kinetics at temperatures higher than 913 K have allowed to follow the alpha --> gamma phase transformation using X-ray diffraction and CEMS technique.The X-ray diffractograms reveal the existence of both b.c.c. and f.c.c. phases. Similar results can be deduced from Moessbauer spectra due to the single line coming from the non-magnetic phase and the sextet coming from the ferromagnetic phase. In addition the CEMS spectra reveal that the ferromagnetic component is split into two parts which indicates the existence of two iron sites. 1 fig., 4 refs.(author)

  6. Heavy flavour production and spectroscopy at LHCb

    Manca, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present recent results in heavy flavour production and spectroscopy from the LHCb experiment, obtained using a data-set corresponding to up to 1 fb -1 of pp collisions at √(s)=7 TeV. We will discuss the studies of production of B mesons and quarkonium states, and the first observation of excited Λ* b states, as well as the production of double charm and χ c states. (author)

  7. Simultaneous Femtosecond X-ray Spectroscopy and Diffraction of Photosystem II at Room Temperature

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Gildea, Richard J.; Echols, Nathaniel; Glöckner, Carina; Hellmich, Julia; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond G.; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Koroidov, Sergey; Lampe, Alyssa; Han, Guangye; Gul, Sheraz; DiFiore, Dörte; Milathianaki, Despina; Fry, Alan R.; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Seibert, M. Marvin; Koglin, Jason E.; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sellberg, Jonas; Latimer, Matthew J.; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Glatzel, Pieter; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Williams, Garth J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messinger, Johannes; Zouni, Athina; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Intense femtosecond X-ray pulses produced at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) were used for simultaneous X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of microcrystals of Photosystem II (PS II) at room temperature. This method probes the overall protein structure and the electronic structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the oxygen-evolving complex of PS II. XRD data are presented from both the dark state (S1) and the first illuminated state (S2) of PS II. Our simultaneous XRD/XES study shows that the PS II crystals are intact during our measurements at the LCLS, not only with respect to the structure of PS II, but also with regard to the electronic structure of the highly radiation sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster, opening new directions for future dynamics studies. PMID:23413188

  8. [Desmoid fibromatosis in absorption infrared spectroscopy, emission spectral analysis and roentgen diffraction recording].

    Zejkan, A; Bejcek, Z; Horejs, J; Vrbová, H; Bakosová, M; Macholda, F; Rykl, D

    1989-10-01

    The authors present results of serial quality and quantity microanalyses of bone patterns and dental tissue patterns in patient with desmoid fibromatosis. Methods of absorption spectroscopy, emission spectral analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis with follow-up to x-ray examination are tested. The above mentioned methods function in a on-line system by means of specially adjusted monitor unit which is controlled centrally by the computer processor system. The whole process of measurement is fully automated and the data obtained are recorded processed in the unit data structure classified into index sequence blocks of data. Serial microanalyses offer exact data for the study of structural changes of dental and bone tissues which manifest themselves in order of crystal grid shifts. They prove the fact that microanalyses give new possibilities in detection and interpretation of chemical and structural changes of apatite cell.

  9. Exclusive central diffractive production of scalar, pseudoscalar and vector mesons

    Lebiedowicz P.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss exclusive central diffractive production of scalar (ƒ0(980, ƒ0(1370, ƒ0(1500, pseudoscalar (η, η′(958, and vector (ρ0 mesons in proton-proton collisions. The amplitudes are formulated in terms of effective vertices required to respect standard rules of Quantum Field Theory and propagators for the exchanged pomeron and reggeons. Different pomeron-pomeron-meson tensorial (vectorial coupling structures are possible in general. In most cases two lowest orbital angular momentum - spin couplings are necessary to describe experimental differential distributions. For the ƒ0(980 and η production the reggeon-pomeron, pomeron-reggeon, and reggeon-reggeon exchanges are included in addition, which seems to be necessary at relatively low energies. The theoretical results are compared with the WA102 experimental data, in order to determine the model parameters. For the ρ0 production the photon-pomeron and pomeron-photon exchanges are considered. The coupling parameters of tensor pomeron and/or reggeon are fixed from the H1 and ZEUS experimental data of the γp → ρ0 p reaction. We present first predictions of this mechanism for pp → ppπ+π− reaction being studied at COMPASS, RHIC, Tevatron, and LHC. Correlation in azimuthal angle between outgoing protons and distribution in pion rapidities at √s = 7 TeV are presented. We show that high-energy central production of mesons could provide crucial information on the spin structure of the soft pomeron.

  10. DEVELOPMENT OF NEXT-GENERATION DETECTORS AND INSTRUMENTATION FOR PHOTOELECTRON SPECTROSCOPY, DIFFRACTION AND HOLOGRAPHY

    Charles S. Fadley, Principal Investigator

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a new multichannel detector for use in photoelectron spectroscopy (as well as other types of high-count-rate spectroscopy) that will operate at rates of up to 1 GHz. Such detectors are crucial to the full utilization of the high-brightness radiation generated by third-generation synchrotron radiation sources. In addition, new software and hardware has been developed to permit rapidly and accurately scanning photoelectron spectra that will be accumulated in as little as a 200 micros. A versatile next-generation sample goniometer permitting equally rapid scanning of specimen angles or photon energies for angle-resolved photoemission studies, photoelectron diffraction, and photoelectron holography measurements, and cooling to below 10K has also been designed and constructed. These capabilities have been incorporated into a unique photoelectron spectrometer/diffractometer at the Advanced Light Source of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; this experimental system includes ultrahigh energy resolution, in situ rotation, variable polarization, and optional spin detection. This overall system is now being used in studies of a variety of problems including magnetic metals and oxides; metal/metal, metal/metal oxide, and metal-oxide/metal-oxide multilayers; and systems exhibiting giant and colossal magnetoresistance

  11. Thermal dehydration of potash alum studied by Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis

    Kishimura, Hiroaki, E-mail: kisimura@nda.ac.jp; Imasu, Yuhta; Matsumoto, Hitoshi

    2015-01-15

    The thermal dehydrations of potash alum caused by heating at various temperatures for at least 2 h were investigated by ex situ Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses in air. With increasing the heating temperature, all Raman peaks were observed to broaden, while an additional broad peak appeared at approximately 1030 cm{sup −1} and shifted toward higher wavenumbers. In addition, the Raman band assigned to the O–H stretching mode weakened. The orientational disorder (OD) of the sulfate ions, as indicated by the intensity ratio of doublet peaks at 989 and 974 cm{sup −1}, was found to increase with increasing the heating temperature. The XRD patterns demonstrated that a structural phase transition from crystalline KAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}⋅12H{sub 2}O to amorphous phases began at around 75 °C, while broadening of the Raman peaks and an increase in OD also suggested the onset of an amorphous phase. Raman peaks corresponding to anhydrous KAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} appeared at approximately 180 °C. It was concluded that the elimination of water molecules was responsible for increase in the extent of OD, and this in turn induced the observed phase transitions. The formation of the amorphous phases observed in this work was similar to the pressure-induced amorphization of KAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}⋅12H{sub 2}O. - Highlights: • The thermal dehydration of potash alum proceeds through several steps. • Raman spectra and X-ray diffraction reveal the amorphization of the heated samples. • A transition from the amorphous phase to the KAl(SO{sub 4}){sub 2} crystal phase is observed in the sample heated at 180 °C.

  12. Diffractive production of charm quark/antiquark pairs at RHIC and LHC

    Luszczak, Marta; Szczurek, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    We have discussed single and central diffractive production of c(bar sign)c pairs in the Ingelman-Schlein model. In these calculations we have included diffractive parton distributions obtained by the H1 collaboration at HERA and absorption effects neglected in some early calculations in the literature. The absorption effects which are responsible for the naive Regge factorization breaking cause that the cross section for diffractive processes is much smaller than that for the fully inclusive case, but could be measured at RHIC and LHC by imposing special condition on rapidity gaps. We discuss also different approaches to diffractive production of heavy quark/antiquark [1, 2, 3]. The particular mechanism is similar to the diffractive dissociation of virtual photons into quarks, which drives diffractive deep inelastic production of charm in the low-mass diffraction, or large β-region.

  13. Diffractive production of charm quark/antiquark pairs at RHIC and LHC

    Luszczak, Marta [University of Rzeszow, PL-35-959 Rzeszow (Poland); Szczurek, Antoni [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, PL-31-342 Cracow and University of Rzeszow, PL-35-959 Rzeszow (Poland)

    2013-04-15

    We have discussed single and central diffractive production of c(bar sign)c pairs in the Ingelman-Schlein model. In these calculations we have included diffractive parton distributions obtained by the H1 collaboration at HERA and absorption effects neglected in some early calculations in the literature. The absorption effects which are responsible for the naive Regge factorization breaking cause that the cross section for diffractive processes is much smaller than that for the fully inclusive case, but could be measured at RHIC and LHC by imposing special condition on rapidity gaps. We discuss also different approaches to diffractive production of heavy quark/antiquark [1, 2, 3]. The particular mechanism is similar to the diffractive dissociation of virtual photons into quarks, which drives diffractive deep inelastic production of charm in the low-mass diffraction, or large {beta}-region.

  14. The Moessbauer spectroscopy in the characterization of atmospheric corrosion products

    Hernandez Torres, D.; Leiva Ronda, P.; Gomez, J.; Ronda, M.

    1996-01-01

    A study of corrosion products on mild steel formed after 1 and 5 years exposure in two industrial coastal weathering stations in the Bay from Matanzas City, Cuba, has been carried out. Structural analysis was conducted using mainly transmission Moessbauer Spectroscopy and the X-ray diffraction as complementary technique. The main phases found in the specimen exposed to high chloride containing environment were: lepidocrocite (γ- FeOOH), goethite (α- FeOOH) and magnetite concentration was the lowest, the phases found were γ- FeOOH and α- FeOOH, and the phase transformation proposed was γ- FeOOh -> α- Fe-OOH. In this station were found also amorphous corrosion products. There amorphous phases could be responsible for the lowest levels of corrosion on steel in this station

  15. Heavy flavour production and spectroscopy at LHCb

    INSPIRE-00258787

    2012-01-01

    At the Moriond QCD conference LHCb has presented results on heavy flavour production and spectroscopy. Here the latest results are discussed, which include the first observation and measurement of the branching fraction of the hadronic decay $B^+_e \\to J/\\psi\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+$, the mass measurement of the excited B mesons and the mass measurement of the $\\Xi_b$ and $\\Omega_b$ baryons.

  16. Diffractive heavy quark production in AA collisions at the LHC at NLO

    Machado, M. M.; Ducati, M. B. Gay; Machado, M. V. T.

    2011-07-01

    The single and double diffractive cross sections for heavy quarks production are evaluated at NLO accuracy for hadronic and heavy ion collisions at the LHC. Diffractive charm and bottom production is the main subject of this work, providing predictions for CaCa, PbPb and pPb collisions. The hard diffraction formalism is considered using the Ingelman-Schlein model where a recent parametrization for the Pomeron structure function (DPDF) is applied. Absorptive corrections are taken into account as well. The diffractive ratios are estimated and theoretical uncertainties are discussed. Comparison with competing production channels is also presented.

  17. Diffractive heavy flavor production-including W/sup +-/ and Z/sup 0/

    White, A.R.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that when the Pomeron has the semiperturbative origin in QCD, diffractive heavy quark production is independent from, and not suppressed relative to, the perturbative gluon fusion process. It is emphasized that anomalously large diffractive heavy flavor cross-sections could anticipate correspondingly large cross-sections for the diffractive production of W/sup +-/ and Z 0 -providing distinctive evidence for the dynamical nature of the electroweak Higgs sector

  18. Structural studies of WO3-TeO2 glasses by high-Q-neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    Khanna, A.; Kaur, A.; Krishna, P.S.R.; Shinde, A.B.

    2013-01-01

    Glasses from the system: xWO 3 -(100-x)TeO 2 (x=15, 20 and 25 mol %) were prepared by melt quenching technique and characterized by density, UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Raman spectroscopy and high-Q neutron diffraction measurements. Glass density and glass transition temperature increased with increase in WO 3 concentration, Raman spectroscopy indicated the conversion of TeO 4 units into TeO 3 units with increase in WO 3 content. The increase in glass transition temperature with the incorporation of WO 3 was attributed to the increase in average bond strength of the glass network since the bond dissociation energy of W-O bonds (672 kJ/mol) is significantly higher than that of Te-O bonds (376 kJ/mol). UV-visible studies found a very strong optical absorption band due to W 6+ ions, just below the absorption edge. High-Q neutron diffraction measurements were performed on glasses and radial distribution function analyses revealed changes in W-O and Te-O correlations in the glass network. The findings about changes in glass structure from neutron diffraction studies were consistent with structural information obtained from Raman spectroscopy and structure-property correlations were made. (author)

  19. Raman spectroscopy in pharmaceutical product design

    Paudel, Amrit; Raijada, Dhara; Rantanen, Jukka

    2015-01-01

    Almost 100 years after the discovery of the Raman scattering phenomenon, related analytical techniques have emerged as important tools in biomedical sciences. Raman spectroscopy and microscopy are frontier, non-invasive analytical techniques amenable for diverse biomedical areas, ranging from...... molecular-based drug discovery, design of innovative drug delivery systems and quality control of finished products. This review presents concise accounts of various conventional and emerging Raman instrumentations including associated hyphenated tools of pharmaceutical interest. Moreover, relevant...... application cases of Raman spectroscopy in early and late phase pharmaceutical development, process analysis and micro-structural analysis of drug delivery systems are introduced. Finally, potential areas of future advancement and application of Raman spectroscopic techniques are discussed....

  20. Study of archaeological iron objects by PGAA, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Wagner, F. E., E-mail: fwagner@tum.de [Technische Universität München, Physik- Department E15 (Germany); Gebhard, R. [Archäologische Staatssammlung München (Germany); Häusler, W.; Wagner, U. [Technische Universität München, Physik- Department E15 (Germany); Albert, P.; Hess, H. [Archäologische Staatssammlung München (Germany); Révay, Z.; Kudejová, P.; Kleszcz, K. [Technische Universität München, Forschungsneutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II) (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Archaeological iron objects often corrode rapidly after their excavation, even though they have survived long times of burial in the ground. Chlorine that accumulates during burial is thought to play a major role in this destructive post-excavation corrosion. It is therefore important for the conservation of such objects to determine the chlorine content in a non-destructive manner and, if necessary, to remove the chlorine from the artefacts by appropriate methods. Such methods are leaching in alkaline solutions or heating in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures up to 800 {sup ∘}C. We have studied the efficiency of the heating method using prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) for monitoring the Cl content and Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature (RT) and 4.2 K as well as X-ray diffraction to study the mineralogical transformations of the rust layers. The heat treatments were performed a N{sub 2}/H{sub 2} (90/10) mixture at temperatures up to 750 {sup ∘}C. As test specimens sections of iron rods from the Celtic oppidum of Manching (Bavaria) were used. The initial Cl contents of the pieces varied in the range of several hundred ppm, referring to the iron mass. Annealing for 24 h at 350, 550 and 750 {sup ∘}C was found to reduce the Cl contents of the specimens, to about 70, 30 and 15 % of the original values, respectively. The rust consists mainly of goethite with admixtures of magnetite, lepidocrocite and akaganeite, which is thought to be a major carrier of chlorine, probably together with iron chlorides. Much of the goethite is so fine-grained that it does not split magnetically at RT. Annealing converts the rust mainly to maghemite at 350 {sup ∘}C, to magnetite at 550 {sup ∘}C and to wüstite plus magnetite and metallic iron at 750 {sup ∘}C. Pure akaganeite behaves in nearly the same manner.

  1. Study of archaeological iron objects by PGAA, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Wagner, F. E.; Gebhard, R.; Häusler, W.; Wagner, U.; Albert, P.; Hess, H.; Révay, Z.; Kudejová, P.; Kleszcz, K.

    2016-01-01

    Archaeological iron objects often corrode rapidly after their excavation, even though they have survived long times of burial in the ground. Chlorine that accumulates during burial is thought to play a major role in this destructive post-excavation corrosion. It is therefore important for the conservation of such objects to determine the chlorine content in a non-destructive manner and, if necessary, to remove the chlorine from the artefacts by appropriate methods. Such methods are leaching in alkaline solutions or heating in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures up to 800 "∘C. We have studied the efficiency of the heating method using prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) for monitoring the Cl content and Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature (RT) and 4.2 K as well as X-ray diffraction to study the mineralogical transformations of the rust layers. The heat treatments were performed a N_2/H_2 (90/10) mixture at temperatures up to 750 "∘C. As test specimens sections of iron rods from the Celtic oppidum of Manching (Bavaria) were used. The initial Cl contents of the pieces varied in the range of several hundred ppm, referring to the iron mass. Annealing for 24 h at 350, 550 and 750 "∘C was found to reduce the Cl contents of the specimens, to about 70, 30 and 15 % of the original values, respectively. The rust consists mainly of goethite with admixtures of magnetite, lepidocrocite and akaganeite, which is thought to be a major carrier of chlorine, probably together with iron chlorides. Much of the goethite is so fine-grained that it does not split magnetically at RT. Annealing converts the rust mainly to maghemite at 350 "∘C, to magnetite at 550 "∘C and to wüstite plus magnetite and metallic iron at 750 "∘C. Pure akaganeite behaves in nearly the same manner.

  2. Study of archaeological iron objects by PGAA, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Wagner, F. E.; Gebhard, R.; Häusler, W.; Wagner, U.; Albert, P.; Hess, H.; Révay, Z.; Kudejová, P.; Kleszcz, K.

    2016-12-01

    Archaeological iron objects often corrode rapidly after their excavation, even though they have survived long times of burial in the ground. Chlorine that accumulates during burial is thought to play a major role in this destructive post-excavation corrosion. It is therefore important for the conservation of such objects to determine the chlorine content in a non-destructive manner and, if necessary, to remove the chlorine from the artefacts by appropriate methods. Such methods are leaching in alkaline solutions or heating in a reducing atmosphere at temperatures up to 800 ∘C. We have studied the efficiency of the heating method using prompt gamma activation analysis (PGAA) for monitoring the Cl content and Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature (RT) and 4.2 K as well as X-ray diffraction to study the mineralogical transformations of the rust layers. The heat treatments were performed a N2/H2 (90/10) mixture at temperatures up to 750 ∘C. As test specimens sections of iron rods from the Celtic oppidum of Manching (Bavaria) were used. The initial Cl contents of the pieces varied in the range of several hundred ppm, referring to the iron mass. Annealing for 24 h at 350, 550 and 750 ∘C was found to reduce the Cl contents of the specimens, to about 70, 30 and 15 % of the original values, respectively. The rust consists mainly of goethite with admixtures of magnetite, lepidocrocite and akaganeite, which is thought to be a major carrier of chlorine, probably together with iron chlorides. Much of the goethite is so fine-grained that it does not split magnetically at RT. Annealing converts the rust mainly to maghemite at 350 ∘C, to magnetite at 550 ∘C and to wüstite plus magnetite and metallic iron at 750 ∘C. Pure akaganeite behaves in nearly the same manner.

  3. Statistical description of multipion production in diffractive hadronic reactions

    Gagnon, R.

    1980-01-01

    A statistical model in which higher-multiplicity enhancements are generated from lower ones in a completely determined fashion is presented. Full account is taken of isospin and G-parity conservation as well as the finite width of the produced resonances. It is applied to diffractive dissociation on nucleon and deuteron targets, for which multipion mass distributions and relative cross sections are calculated. Agreement with available experimental data is seen to be excellent

  4. NMR spectroscopy of coal pyrolysis products

    Polonov, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Shevchenko, G.G.

    1985-12-01

    The authors consider the scope for using H 1 and C 13 NMR spectroscopy to describe the products from coal pyrolysis and hydrogenization. The accuracy of the structural information provided by the best NMR methods is also considered. The stuctural parameters derived from H 1 and C 13 NMR spectra are presented. Results demonstrate the high accuracy and sensitivity of the structural information provided by H 1 AND C 13 NMR spectra for coal products. There are substantial structural differences between the soluble products from medium-temperature coking of Cheremkhov coal and high-speed pyrolysis of Kan-Acha coal, and also differences in behavior during hydrogenation. These differences are related to the structure of the organic matter in the initial coal and to differences in the pyrolysis mechanisms.

  5. Nanocomposites of polypropylene and organophilic clay: X ray diffraction, absorption infrared spectroscopy with fourier transform and water vapor permeation

    Morelli, Fernanda C.; Ruvolo Filho, Adhemar

    2010-01-01

    In this work nano composites were prepared from polypropylene, graft polypropylene with maleic anhydride as compatibilizer and organophilic montmorillonite Cloisite 20A with concentrations of 1.5, 2.5, 5.0 and 7.5% clay. The mixture was made in the melt state using a twin screw extruder. The materials were characterized by X ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transform and analysis of water vapor permeation. The results of X ray diffraction and absorption infrared spectroscopy indicates the formation of nano composites with structures probably exfoliate and or intercalated for concentrations of 1.5 and 2.5% clay, and provided a marked decrease in the water permeability, corroborating with other analyses. (author)

  6. Nanocomposites of polypropylene and organophilic montmorillonite clay: X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transform and water permeation

    Morelli, Fernanda C.; Ruvolo Filho, Adhemar

    2009-01-01

    In this work were prepared nanocomposites of polypropylene and organophilic montmorillonite Cloisite 20A with concentrations of 1.5%, 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% clay and graft polypropylene with maleic anhydride as compatibilizer. The mixture was made in the melt state using a twin screw extruder. The materials were characterized by x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transform and analysis of water vapor permeation. The results of x-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy indicates the formation of nanocomposites with structures probably exfoliate and / or intercalated for concentrations of 1.5% and 2.5% clay, and provided a marked decrease in the water permeability, corroborating with other analysis. (author)

  7. Diffractive vector meson production in deep inelastic scattering

    Kamps, M. de.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis seeks to bring comfort to those who are appalled by the usual high level of violence in high energy physics. Although also here we engage in the customary vandalistic smashing together of two particles, the reaction we will study has a happy end in store for both of them. The subject of this thesis will be the reaction: e + p→e + pV where V is one of the vector mesons ρ, ω, φ, J/ψ. We will investigate the situation where the final state positron enters the ZEUS main detector, which indicates that a violent reaction has taken place between the initial state particles, but nevertheless the proton does not break up. The violence with which the positron is scattered characterises the reaction as a Deep Inelastic Scattering (DIS), the fact that the proton does not break up characterises the reaction as diffractive which explains the title of the thesis. Both DIS and diffractive physics will be defined and discussed in the context of this thesis. (orig./WL)

  8. Diffractive open charm production at DESY HERA. Experiment versus two-gluon exchange model

    Baranov, S.P. [P.N. Lebedev Inst. of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-03-15

    Diffractive production of D{sup *} mesons at HERA conditions is considered in the framework of collinear two-gluon exchange model. Theoretical results are compared with recent experimental data. (orig.)

  9. Diffractive jet production in a simple model with applications to DESY HERA

    Berera, A.; Soper, D.E.

    1994-01-01

    In diffractive jet production, two high energy hardons A and B collide and produce high transverse momentum jets, while hadron A is diffractively scattered. Ingelman and Schlein predicted this phenomenon. In their model, part of the longitudinal momentum transferred from hadron A is delivered to the jet system, part is lost. Lossless diffractive jet production, in which all of this longitudinal momentum is delivered to the jet system, has been discussed by Collins, Frankfurt, and Strikman. We study the structure of lossless diffractive jet production in a simple model. The model suggests that the phenomenon can be probed experimentally at DESY HERA, with A being a proton and B being a bremsstrahlung photon with virtuality Q 2 . Lossless events should be present for small Q 2 , but not for Q 2 larger than 1/R P 2 , where R P is a characteristic size of the Pomeron

  10. Pressure-induced crystallization and phase transformation of amorphous selenium: Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction studies

    Yang Kaifeng; Cui Qiliang; Hou Yuanyuan; Liu Bingbing; Zhou Qiang; Hu Jingzhu; Mao, H-K; Zou Guangtian

    2007-01-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy studies have been carried out on amorphous Se (a-Se) at room temperature in a diamond anvil cell with an 830 nm exciting line. Raman evidence for the pressure-induced crystallization of a-Se and the coexistence of the unknown high-pressure phase with the hexagonal phase is presented for the first time. Further experimental proof of high-pressure angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction studies for a-Se indicates that the unknown high-pressure phase is also a mixture phase of the tetragonal I4 1 /acd and Se IV structure. Our Raman and x-ray diffraction results suggest that hexagonal Se I undergoes a direct transition to triclinic Se III at about 19 GPa, which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction

  11. The stoichiometry of synthetic alunite as a function of hydrothermal aging investigated by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy

    Grube, Elisabeth; Nielsen, Ulla Gro

    2015-01-01

    The stoichiometry of a series of synthetic alunite (nominally KAl3(SO4)2(OH)6) samples prepared by hydrothermal methods as a function of reaction time (1 – 31 days) has been investigated by powder X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy as well as solid-state 1H and 27Al magic...... of potassium defects present, from 17.261(1) to 17.324(5) Å. Solid-state 27Al MAS NMR revealed a decrease in the defect concentration as a function of time and showed the presence of 7-10 % impurities in the samples....

  12. Production application of injection-molded diffractive elements

    Clark, Peter P.; Chao, Yvonne Y.; Hines, Kevin P.

    1995-12-01

    We demonstrate that transmission kinoforms for visible light applications can be injection molded in acrylic in production volumes. A camera is described that employs molded Fresnel lenses to change the convergence of a projection ranging system. Kinoform surfaces are used in the projection system to achromatize the Fresnel lenses.

  13. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction ...

    the crystalline quality through full-width at half-maximum values. .... angular divergence of ∆α = 12 arc sec. X-rays generated from the monochromator were diffracted from (0 0 6) LiNbO3 atomic planes with the (+, −, −, +, +) geometry. [8].

  14. Evidence for factorization breaking in diffractive low-Q2 dijet production

    Klasen, Michael; Kramer, Gustav

    2004-01-01

    We calculate diffractive dijet production in deep-inelastic scattering at next-to-leading order of perturbative QCD, including contributions from direct and resolved photons, and compare our predictions to preliminary data from the H1 Collaboration at DESY HERA. In contrast to recent experimental claims, evidence for factorization breaking is found only for resolved, and not direct, photon contributions. No evidence is found for large normalization uncertainties in diffractive parton densities. The results confirm theoretical expectations for the (non)cancellation of soft singularities in diffractive scattering as well as previous results for (almost) real photoproduction

  15. Imaging the proton via hard exclusive production in diffractive pp scattering

    Charles Hyde; Leonid Frankfurt; Mark Strikman; Christian Weiss

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the prospects for probing Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) via exclusive production of a high-mass system (H = heavy quarkonium, di-photon, di-jet, Higgs boson) in diffractive pp scattering, pp -> p + H + p. In such processes the interplay of hard and soft interactions gives rise to a diffraction pattern in the final-state proton transverse momenta, which is sensitive to the transverse spatial distribution of partons in the colliding protons. We comment on the plans for diffractive pp measurements at RHIC and LHC. Such studies could complement future measurements of GPDs in hard exclusive ep scattering (JLab, COMPASS, EIC)

  16. Single-diffractive Drell-Yan pair production at the LHC

    Ceccopieri, Federico Alberto [Universita degli Studi di Perugia, Dipartimento di Fisica e Geologia, Perugia (Italy); Universite de Liege, IFPA, Liege (Belgium); INFN, Sezione di Perugia (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    We present predictions for single-diffractive low-mass Drell-Yan pair production in pp collisions at the LHC at √(s) = 13 TeV. Predictions are obtained adopting a factorised form for the relevant cross sections and are based on a new set of diffractive parton distributions resulting from the QCD analysis of combined HERA leading proton data. We discuss a number of observables useful to characterise the expected factorisation breaking effects. (orig.)

  17. Impact factor for high-energy two and three jets diffractive production

    Boussarie, R.; Grabovsky, A.V.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the γ (∗) →qq-barg transition within Balitsky’s high energy operator expansion. We also rederive the impact factor for the γ (∗) →qq-bar transition within the same framework. These results provide the necessary building blocks for further phenomenological studies of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering, as well as, for two and three jets diffractive production, which go beyond approximations discussed in the literature.

  18. Impact factor for high-energy two and three jets diffractive production

    Boussarie, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Bât. 210, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS,91405 Orsay (France); Grabovsky, A.V. [Physics Department, Novosibirsk State University,2 Pirogova street, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Theory division, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics,11 Lavrenteva avenue, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Szymanowski, L. [Theoretical Physics Division, National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ),Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Wallon, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, Bât. 210, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS,91405 Orsay (France); UPMC Université Paris 06, Faculté de Physique,4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2014-09-02

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the γ{sup (∗)}→qq-barg transition within Balitsky’s high energy operator expansion. We also rederive the impact factor for the γ{sup (∗)}→qq-bar transition within the same framework. These results provide the necessary building blocks for further phenomenological studies of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering, as well as, for two and three jets diffractive production, which go beyond approximations discussed in the literature.

  19. Impact factor for high-energy two and three jets diffractive production

    Boussarie, R.; Grabovsky, A.V.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the photon to quark, antiquark and gluon transition within Balitsky’s shock-wave formalism. We also rederive the impact factor for photon to quark and antiquark transition. These results provide the necessary building blocks for further phenomenological studies of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering as well as for two and three jets diffractive production which go beyond approximations discussed in the literature

  20. Impact factor for high-energy two and three jets diffractive production

    Boussarie, R. [LPT, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS, 91405, Orsay (France); Grabovsky, A.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics and Novosibirsk State University, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Szymanowski, L. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ), Warsaw (Poland); Wallon, S. [UPMC Univ. Paris 06, Faculté de Physique, 4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); LPT, Université Paris-Sud, CNRS, 91405, Orsay (France)

    2015-04-10

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the photon to quark, antiquark and gluon transition within Balitsky’s shock-wave formalism. We also rederive the impact factor for photon to quark and antiquark transition. These results provide the necessary building blocks for further phenomenological studies of inclusive diffractive deep inelastic scattering as well as for two and three jets diffractive production which go beyond approximations discussed in the literature.

  1. Anomalous compression behaviour in Nd2O3 studied by x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    Sheng Jiang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural stability of hexagonal Nd2O3 under pressure has been investigated by in situ synchrotron angle dispersive x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy up to 53.1 GPa and 37.0 GPa, respectively. Rietveld analysis of the x-ray diffraction data indicate that the hexagonal Nd2O3 undergoes an isostructural phase transition in the pressure range from 10.2 to 20.3 GPa, accompanied by anomalous lattice compressibility and pressure-volume curve. A third-order Birch-Murnaghan fit based on the observed Pressure-Volume data yields zero pressure bulk moduli (B0 of 142(4 and 183(6 GPa for the low and high pressure hexagonal phases, respectively. Raman spectroscopy confirms this isostructural transition, the pressure dependence of the Raman modes display noticeable breaks in the pressure range of 9.7-20.9 GPa, which is consistent with the change of Nd-O bond length. The pressure coefficients of Raman peaks and the mode Grüneisen parameters of different Raman modes were also determined.

  2. Diffractive production of ρ-mesons and of ρπ-systems by neutrinos and antineutrinos on protons

    Jones, G. T.; Jones, R. W. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; Morrison, D. R. O.; Miller, D. B.; Mobayyen, M. M.; Wainstein, S.; Aderholz, M.; Hantke, D.; Katz, U. F.; Kern, J.; Schmitz, N.; Wittek, W.; Borner, H. P.; Myatt, G.; Bullock, F. W.; Burke, S.

    1993-09-01

    Evidence is presented for diffractive production of ρ-mesons and of ρπ-systems in vp andbar ν p chargedcurrent interactions. In the (anti-)neutrino energy range 10 GeV< E v <60 GeV the cross sections for diffractive ρ and diffractive ρπ production are found to be (0.64±0.14 (stat.)±0.08 (syst.))% and (0.28±0.08 (stat.)±0.04 (syst.))% of the charged-current cross section. The diffractive ρπ signal is consistent with being entirely due to diffractive a 1 production. However, the data cannot distinguish between diffractive a 1 and diffractive nonresonant ρπ production. The experimental distributions of W, Q 2, x Bj and y Bj for diffractive ρ and ρπ events are consistent with model predictions.

  3. Design of high-efficiency diffractive optical elements towards ultrafast mid-infrared time-stretched imaging and spectroscopy

    Xie, Hongbo; Ren, Delun; Wang, Chao; Mao, Chensheng; Yang, Lei

    2018-02-01

    Ultrafast time stretch imaging offers unprecedented imaging speed and enables new discoveries in scientific research and engineering. One challenge in exploiting time stretch imaging in mid-infrared is the lack of high-quality diffractive optical elements (DOEs), which encode the image information into mid-infrared optical spectrum. This work reports the design and optimization of mid-infrared DOE with high diffraction-efficiency, broad bandwidth and large field of view. Using various typical materials with their refractive indices ranging from 1.32 to 4.06 in ? mid-infrared band, diffraction efficiencies of single-layer and double-layer DOEs have been studied in different wavelength bands with different field of views. More importantly, by replacing the air gap of double-layer DOE with carefully selected optical materials, one optimized ? triple-layer DOE, with efficiency higher than 95% in the whole ? mid-infrared window and field of view greater than ?, is designed and analyzed. This new DOE device holds great potential in ultrafast mid-infrared time stretch imaging and spectroscopy.

  4. Kinetic studies of methane-ethane mixed gas hydrates by neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Murshed, M Mangir; Kuhs, Werner F

    2009-04-16

    In situ formations of CH(4)-C(2)H(6) mixed gas hydrates were made using high flux neutron diffraction at 270 K and 5 MPa. For this purpose, a feed gas composition of CH(4) and C(2)H(6) (95 mol% CH(4)) was employed. The rates of transformation of spherical grains of deuterated ice Ih into hydrates were measured by time-resolved neutron powder diffraction on D20 at ILL, Grenoble. Phase fractions of the crystalline constituents were obtained from Rietveld refinements. A concomitant formation of structure type I (sI) and structure type II (sII) hydrates were observed soon after the gas pressure was applied. The initial fast formation of sII hydrate reached its maximum volume and started declining very slowly. The formation of sI hydrate followed a sigmoid growth kinetics that slowed down due to diffusion limitation. This observation has been interpreted in terms of a kinetically favored nucleation of the sII hydrate along with a slow transformation into sI. Both powder diffraction and Raman spectroscopic results suggest that a C(2)H(6)-rich sII hydrate was formed at the early part of the clathration, which slowly decreased to approximately 3% after a reaction of 158 days as confirmed by synchrotron XRD. The final persistence of a small portion of sII hydrate points to a miscibility gap between CH(4)-rich sI and C(2)H(6)-rich sII hydrates.

  5. Single- and central-diffractive production of open charm and bottom mesons at the LHC

    Łuszczak, Marta; Szczurek, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    We discuss diffractive production of open charm and bottom mesons at the LHC. The differential cross sections for single- and central-diffractive mechanisms for $c\\bar c$ and $b\\bar b$ pair production are calculated in the framework of the Ingelman-Schlein model corrected for absorption effects. The LO gluon-gluon fusion and quark-antiquark anihilation partonic subprocesses are taken into consideration, which are calculated within standard collinear approximation. The extra corrections from reggeon exchanges are taken into account. The hadronization of charm and bottom quarks is taken into account by means of fragmentation functions. Predictions for single- and central-diffractive production in the case of $D$ and $B$ mesons, as well as $D\\bar D$ pairs are presented, including detector acceptance of the ATLAS, CMS and LHCb Collaborations.

  6. High pressure sample container for thermal neutron spectroscopy and diffraction on strongly scattering fluids

    Verkerk, P.; Pruisken, A.M.M.

    1979-01-01

    A description is presented of the construction and performance of a container for thermal neutron scattering on a fluid sample with about 1.5 cm -1 macroscopic cross section (neglecting absorption). The maximum pressure is about 900 bar. The container is made of 5052 aluminium capillary with inner diameter 0.75 mm and wall thickness 0.25 mm; it covers a neutron beam with a cross section of 9 X 2.5 cm 2 . The container has been successfully used in neutron diffraction and time-of-flight experiments on argon-36 at 120 K and several pressures up to 850 bar. It is shown that during these measurements the temperature gradient over the sample as well as the error in the absolute temperature were both less than 0.05 K. Subtraction of the Bragg peaks due to container scattering in diffraction experiments may be dfficult, but seems feasible because of the small amount of aluminium in the neutron beam. Correction for container scattering and multiple scattering in time-of-flight experiments may be difficult only in the case of coherently scattering samples and small scattering angles. (Auth.)

  7. Diffractive Production of Jets and Weak Bosons, and Tests of Hard-Scattering Factorization

    Alvero, L; Terrón, J; Whitmore, J; Alvero, Lyndon; Collins, John C.; Terron, Juan; Whitmore, Jim

    1999-01-01

    We extract diffractive parton densities from diffractive, deep inelastic (DIS) ep data from the ZEUS experiment. Then we use these fits to predict the diffractive production of jets and of W's and Z's in p\\bar p collisions at the Tevatron. Although the DIS data require a hard quark density in the pomeron, we find fairly low rates for the Tevatron processes (a few percent of the inclusive cross section). This results from the combined effects of Q^{2} evolution and of a normalization of the parton densities to the data. The calculated rates for W production are generally consistent with the preliminary data from the Tevatron. However, the jet data from CDF with a ``Roman pot'' trigger are substantially lower than the results of our calculations; if confirmed, this would signal a breakdown of hard-scattering factorization.

  8. Weathering of ordinary chondrites from the Atacama Desert, Chile, by Mössbauer spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction

    Munayco, Pablo; Munayco, Jimmy; Avillez, Roberto R.; Valenzuela, Millarca; Rochette, Pierre; Gattacceca, JéRôMe; Scorzelli, Rosa B.

    2013-03-01

    Some terrestrial areas have climatic and geomorphologic features that favor the preservation, and therefore, accumulation of meteorites. The Atacama Desert in Chile is among the most important of such areas, known as DCA. This desert is the driest on Earth, one of the most arid, uninhabitable localities with semiarid, arid, and hyper-arid conditions. The meteorites studied here were collected from within the DCA of San Juan and Pampa de Mejillones, located, respectively, in the Central Depression and the Coastal Range of the Atacama Desert. 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy was used for quantitative analysis of the degree of weathering of the meteorites, through the determination of the proportions of the various Fe-bearing phases and in particular the amount of oxidized iron in terrestrial alteration products. The abundance of ferric ions in weathered chondrites can be related to specific precursor compositions and to the level of terrestrial weathering. The aim of the study was the identification, quantification, and differentiation of the weathering products in the ordinary chondrites found in the San Juan and the Pampa de Mejillones areas of the Atacama Desert. The 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy study was complemented by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction and magnetic susceptibility measurements. The results allow a clear differentiation of the rate of weathering in meteorite samples collected from the San Juan versus the Pampa de Mejillones areas of the Atacama Desert.

  9. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Kazimirov, Alexander; Gillilan, Richard; Cornaby, Sterling; Woll, Arthur; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Huang Rong

    2007-01-01

    A number of synchrotron x-ray applications such as powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc. can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the flux per square micron on a sample. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus at a 25 to 50 mm distance beyond the capillary tip. For modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000. We show some of the results obtained at CHESS and Hasylab with capillaries focusing 5 to 40 keV radiation, their properties, and how even better the experimental results could be if more ideal capillaries were fabricated in the future

  10. Sample-angle feedback for diffraction anomalous fine-structure spectroscopy

    Cross, J.O.; Elam, W.T.; Harris, V.G.; Kirkland, J.P.; Bouldin, C.E.; Sorensen, L.B.

    1998-01-01

    Diffraction anomalous fine-structure (DAFS) experiments measure Bragg peak intensities as continuous functions of photon energy near a core-level excitation. Measuring the integrated intensity at each energy makes the experiments prohibitively slow; however, in many cases DAFS can be collected quickly by measuring only the peak intensity at the center of the rocking curve. A piezoelectric-actuator-driven stage has been designed and tested as part of a sample-angle feedback circuit for locking onto the maximum of the rocking curve while the energy is scanned. Although software peak-tracking requires only a simple calculation of diffractometer angles, it is found that the additional hardware feedback dramatically improves the reproducibility of the data

  11. Internal dynamics in helical molecules studied by X-ray diffraction, NMR spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    Dračínský, Martin; Storch, Jan; Církva, Vladimír; Císařová, I.; Sýkora, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 4 (2017), s. 2900-2907 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-11223S; GA ČR GA15-12719S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:67985858 Keywords : helicene * NMR spectroscopy * DFT calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry; Physical chemistry (UCHP-M) Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2013/cp/c6cp07552e

  12. Diffractive open charm production in deep-inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    Aktas, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Anthonis, T. [Inter-Univ. Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Brussels (Belgium)]|[Antwerp Univ. (BE)] (and others)

    2006-10-15

    Measurements are presented of diffractive open charm production at HERA. The event topology is given by ep{yields}eXY where the system X contains at least one charmed hadron and is well separated by a large rapidity gap from a leading low-mass proton remnant system Y. Two analysis techniques are used for the cross section measurements. In the first, the charm quark is tagged by the reconstruction of a D{sup *{+-}}(2010) meson. This technique is used in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) and photoproduction ({gamma}p). In the second, a method based on the displacement of tracks from the primary vertex is used to measure the open charm contribution to the inclusive diffractive cross section in DIS. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton density functions previously obtained from a QCD analysis of the inclusive diffractive cross section at H1. A good agreement is observed in the full kinematic regime, which supports the validity of QCD factorization for open charm production in diffractive DIS and {gamma}p. (orig.)

  13. Diffractive open charm production in deep-inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, C.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-03-01

    Measurements are presented of diffractive open charm production at HERA. The event topology is given by ep→eXY where the system X contains at least one charmed hadron and is well separated by a large rapidity gap from a leading low-mass proton remnant system Y. Two analysis techniques are used for the cross section measurements. In the first, the charm quark is tagged by the reconstruction of a D*±(2010) meson. This technique is used in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) and photoproduction (γp). In the second, a method based on the displacement of tracks from the primary vertex is used to measure the open charm contribution to the inclusive diffractive cross section in DIS. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton density functions previously obtained from a QCD analysis of the inclusive diffractive cross section at H1. A good agreement is observed in the full kinematic regime, which supports the validity of QCD factorization for open charm production in diffractive DIS and γp.

  14. Adsorption of thiophene on a Si(0 0 1)-2 x 1 surface studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction

    Shimomura, M. [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)]. E-mail: romshimo@rie.shizuoka.ac.jp; Ikejima, Y. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yajima, K. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yagi, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Goto, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Gunnella, R. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); UdR INFM, Department of Physics, University of Camerino, Camerino 62032 (Italy); Abukawa, T. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Fukuda, Y. [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, Johoku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Kono, S. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2004-10-15

    Chemisorption of thiophene on a Si(0 0 1) surface has been studied by synchrotron radiation induced photoelectron spectroscopy (SRPES). Two adsorption-related components in Si 2p and S 2p spectra are observed after exposure of thiophene. It is suggested that the two components of Si 2p are ascribed to silicon bonded to hydrocarbon and sulfur. The core-level shift resolved photoelectron diffraction (PED) result indicates that the low-kinetic-energy component of S 2p can be ascribed to 2,5-dihydrothiophehe (DHT)-like species. Another S 2p component could be assigned to dissociated sulfur based on the results of PED and time evolution of the spectrum under irradiation. These assignments are consistent with the core-level shift of S 2p.

  15. Use of neutron diffraction and laser-induced plasma spectroscopy in integrated authentication methodologies of copper alloy artefacts

    Siano, S.; Bartol, L.; Mencaglia, A.A.; Agresti, J.; Miccio, M.

    2009-01-01

    The present study approaches the general problem of the authentication of copper alloy artefacts of art and historical interest using non-invasive analytical techniques. It aims to demonstrate that a suitable combination of time-of-flight neutron diffraction and laser-induced plasma spectroscopy in integrated multidisciplinary authentication methodologies can provide crucial data for discriminating between genuine archaeological objects and modern counterfeits. After introducing the methodology, which is dedicated in particular to copper alloy figurines of ancient style, two representative authentication case studies are discussed. The results of the work provide evidence that the combination of multiphase analysis using TOF-N D and elemental depth profiles provided by Lips makes it possible to solve most of the present authentication problems.

  16. Adsorption of thiophene on a Si(0 0 1)-2 x 1 surface studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction

    Shimomura, M.; Ikejima, Y.; Yajima, K.; Yagi, T.; Goto, T.; Gunnella, R.; Abukawa, T.; Fukuda, Y.; Kono, S.

    2004-01-01

    Chemisorption of thiophene on a Si(0 0 1) surface has been studied by synchrotron radiation induced photoelectron spectroscopy (SRPES). Two adsorption-related components in Si 2p and S 2p spectra are observed after exposure of thiophene. It is suggested that the two components of Si 2p are ascribed to silicon bonded to hydrocarbon and sulfur. The core-level shift resolved photoelectron diffraction (PED) result indicates that the low-kinetic-energy component of S 2p can be ascribed to 2,5-dihydrothiophehe (DHT)-like species. Another S 2p component could be assigned to dissociated sulfur based on the results of PED and time evolution of the spectrum under irradiation. These assignments are consistent with the core-level shift of S 2p

  17. On the Habitability of Desert Varnish: A Combined Study by Micro-Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Methylated Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Malherbe, C; Hutchinson, I B; Ingley, R; Boom, A; Carr, A S; Edwards, H; Vertruyen, B; Gilbert, B; Eppe, G

    2017-11-01

    In 2020, the ESA ExoMars and NASA Mars 2020 missions will be launched to Mars to search for evidence of past and present life. In preparation for these missions, terrestrial analog samples of rock formations on Mars are studied in detail in order to optimize the scientific information that the analytical instrumentation will return. Desert varnishes are thin mineral coatings found on rocks in arid and semi-arid environments on Earth that are recognized as analog samples. During the formation of desert varnishes (which takes many hundreds of years), organic matter is incorporated, and microorganisms may also play an active role in the formation process. During this study, four complementary analytical techniques proposed for Mars missions (X-ray diffraction [XRD], Raman spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry [Py-GC-MS]) were used to interrogate samples of desert varnish and describe their capacity to sustain life under extreme scenarios. For the first time, both the geochemistry and the organic compounds associated with desert varnish are described with the use of identical sets of samples. XRD and Raman spectroscopy measurements were used to nondestructively interrogate the mineralogy of the samples. In addition, the use of Raman spectroscopy instruments enabled the detection of β-carotene, a highly Raman-active biomarker. The content and the nature of the organic material in the samples were further investigated with elemental analysis and methylated Py-GC-MS, and a bacterial origin was determined to be likely. In the context of planetary exploration, we describe the habitable nature of desert varnish based on the biogeochemical composition of the samples. Possible interference of the geological substrate on the detectability of pyrolysis products is also suggested. Key Words: Desert varnish-Habitability-Raman spectroscopy-Py-GC-MS-XRD-ExoMars-Planetary science. Astrobiology 17, 1123-1137.

  18. Study of the diffractive production of baryon states and search for cryptoexotic baryons with hidden strangeness

    Balatz, M.Ya.; Belyaev, I.M.; Dorofeev, V.A.; Dzyubenko, G.B.; Filimonov, I.M.; Frolov, S.V.; Golovkin, S.V.; Grishkin, Yu.L.; Gritzuk, M.V.; Jilin, A.V.; Kamenskii, A.D.; Kliger, G.K.; Kolganov, V.Z.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Korchagin, Yu.V.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.; Kubarovskii, V.P.; Kulman, N.Yu.; Kulyavtsev, A.I.; Kurshetsov, V.F.; Kushnirenko, A.E.; Lakaev, V.S.; Landsberg, L.G.; Lebedev, A.A.; Lomkatzi, G.S.; Molchanov, V.V.; Mukhin, V.A.; Nilov, A.F.; Novoghilov, Yu.B.; Prutskoi, V.A.; Sitnikov, A.I.; Smolyankin, V.T.; Solyanik, V.I.; Vavilov, D.V.; Victorov, V.A.; Vishnyakov, V.E. (Inst. for High Energy Physics, Protvino (Russian Federation) Inst. of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation) Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)); SPHINX Collaboration

    1994-02-01

    The reactions of baryon diffractive production p + N [yields] (pK[sup +] K[sup -]) + N, p + N [yields] (p[Phi]) + N, p + N [yields] [Lambda](1520) K[sup +] + N and p + N [yields] [Sigma](1385) K[sup +] + N in the 70 GeV proton beam were studied. Very sensitive upper limits for the production cross sections of heavy narrow cryptoexotic baryon resonances with hidden strangeness were obtained. (orig.)

  19. Study of the diffractive production of baryon states and search for cryptoexotic baryons with hidden strangeness

    Balatz, M.Ya.; Belyaev, I.M.; Dorofeev, V.A.

    1993-01-01

    The reactions of baryon diffractive production p + N → (pK + K - ) + N, p + N → (pφ) + N, p + N → [Λ(1520)K + ] + N and p + N → [Σ(1385) 0 K + ] + N in the 70 GeV proton beam were studied. Very sensitive upper limits for the production cross sections of heavy narrow cryptoexotic baryon resonances with hidden strangeness were obtained

  20. Instrumental development of a quasi-relativistic ultrashort electron beam source for electron diffractions and spectroscopies.

    Shin, Young-Min; Figora, Michael

    2017-10-01

    A stable femtosecond electron beam system has been configured for time-resolved pump-probe experiments. The ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) system is designed with a sub-MeV photoelectron beam source pulsed by a femtosecond UV laser and nondispersive beamline components, including a bunch compressor-a pulsed S-band klystron is installed and fully commissioned with 5.5 MW peak power in a 2.5 μs pulse length. A single-cell RF photo-gun is designed to produce 1.6-16 pC electron bunches in a photoemission mode with 150 fs pulse duration at 0.5-1 MeV. The measured RF system jitters are within 1% in magnitude and 0.2° in phase, which would induce 3.4 keV and 0.25 keV of ΔE, corresponding to 80 fs and 5 fs of Δt, respectively. Our particle-in-cell simulations indicate that the designed bunch compressor reduces the time-of-arrival jitter by about an order of magnitude. The transport and focusing optics of the designed beamline with the bunch compressor enables an energy spread within 10 -4 and a bunch length (electron probe) within quasi-relativistic UED system.

  1. Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses of clayey samples used as ceramic sourcing materials, in Peru

    Quille, Ruben, E-mail: quilleruben@gmail.com; Bustamante, Angel [San Marcos National University, Laboratory of Ceramics and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Physical Sciences (Peru); Palomino, Ybar [National University of San Cristobal de Huamanga, Experimental Center of Ceramics (Peru)

    2011-11-15

    The ceramic industry is an important area of economic activity in the Ayacucho Region, in particular in the District of Quinua. As a consequence, there is a huge demand for clay to produce ceramic pastes in that region. This paper reports on results concerning the mineralogical characterization of four clayey samples, which were collected MAA and SPQA from the area Pampa de La Quinua with geographic coordinates 13 Degree-Sign 02 Prime 49 Double-Prime S 74 Degree-Sign 08 Prime 03 Double-Prime W, CE1M and CE2M from the Quinua locality 13 Degree-Sign 03 Prime 07 Double-Prime S 74 Degree-Sign 08 Prime 31 Double-Prime W, both in the District of Quinua, Province of Huamanga, Ayacucho, Peru. The chemical and mineralogical characterization of these samples was carried out with powder X-ray diffraction detecting quartz, albite, montmorillonite, kaolinite and glauconite mineral phases, Moessbauer spectroscopy detected iron in kaolinite, glauconite and montmorillonite minerals. Chemical analysis was performed through scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Data obtained from the combination of these techniques provided relevant information about the morphology, chemical composition, and the mineralogy of samples.

  2. Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses of clayey samples used as ceramic sourcing materials, in Peru

    Quille, Rubén; Bustamante, Ángel; Palomino, Ybar

    2011-11-01

    The ceramic industry is an important area of economic activity in the Ayacucho Region, in particular in the District of Quinua. As a consequence, there is a huge demand for clay to produce ceramic pastes in that region. This paper reports on results concerning the mineralogical characterization of four clayey samples, which were collected MAA and SPQA from the area Pampa de La Quinua with geographic coordinates 13° 02' 49″ S 74° 08' 03″ W, CE1M and CE2M from the Quinua locality 13° 03' 07″ S 74° 08' 31″ W, both in the District of Quinua, Province of Huamanga, Ayacucho, Peru. The chemical and mineralogical characterization of these samples was carried out with powder X-ray diffraction detecting quartz, albite, montmorillonite, kaolinite and glauconite mineral phases, Mössbauer spectroscopy detected iron in kaolinite, glauconite and montmorillonite minerals. Chemical analysis was performed through scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Data obtained from the combination of these techniques provided relevant information about the morphology, chemical composition, and the mineralogy of samples.

  3. Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analyses of clayey samples used as ceramic sourcing materials, in Peru

    Quille, Rubén; Bustamante, Ángel; Palomino, Ybar

    2011-01-01

    The ceramic industry is an important area of economic activity in the Ayacucho Region, in particular in the District of Quinua. As a consequence, there is a huge demand for clay to produce ceramic pastes in that region. This paper reports on results concerning the mineralogical characterization of four clayey samples, which were collected MAA and SPQA from the area Pampa de La Quinua with geographic coordinates 13° 02′ 49″ S 74° 08′ 03″ W, CE1M and CE2M from the Quinua locality 13° 03′ 07″ S 74° 08′ 31″ W, both in the District of Quinua, Province of Huamanga, Ayacucho, Peru. The chemical and mineralogical characterization of these samples was carried out with powder X-ray diffraction detecting quartz, albite, montmorillonite, kaolinite and glauconite mineral phases, Mössbauer spectroscopy detected iron in kaolinite, glauconite and montmorillonite minerals. Chemical analysis was performed through scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Data obtained from the combination of these techniques provided relevant information about the morphology, chemical composition, and the mineralogy of samples.

  4. Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.

    2015-05-01

    Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic e ± p scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector at HERA using an integrated luminosity of 372 pb -1 . The measurement was performed for γ * -p centre-of-mass energies in the range 9025 GeV 2 . Energy and transverse-energy flows around the jet axis are presented. The cross section is presented as a function of β and φ, where β=x/x P , x is the Bjorken variable and x P is the proton fractional longitudinal momentum loss. The angle φ is defined by the γ * -dijet plane and the γ * -e ± plane in the rest frame of the diffractive final state. The φ cross section is measured in bins of β. The results are compared to predictions from models based on different assumptions about the nature of the diffractive exchange.

  5. Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Abramowicz, H.; Gueta, O.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Stern, A.; Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Schmidke, W.B.; Verbytskyi, A.; Adamczyk, L.; Gach, G.; Guzik, M.; Kisielewska, D.; Przybycien, M.; Adamus, M.; Tymieniecka, T.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Iudin, A.; Kadenko, I.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Trofymov, A.; Viazlo, O.; Zakharchuk, N.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Dolinska, G.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Hain, W.; Januschek, F.; Klein, U.; Korol, I.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Libov, V.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loehr, B.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Myronenko, V.; Notz, D.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Stefaniuk, N.; Szuba, J.; Turkot, O.; Wichmann, K.; Wolf, G.; Zenaiev, O.; Bertolin, A.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E.G.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Zhautykov, B.O.; Brock, I.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Paul, E.; Brook, N.H.; Wing, M.; Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S.; Bruni, A.; Corradi, M.; Bussey, P.J.; Saxon, D.H.; Skillicorn, I.O.; Capua, M.; Schioppa, M.; Tassi, E.; Catterall, C.D.; Chwastowski, J.; Figiel, J.; Krupa, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L.; Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R.J.; Perlanski, W.; Tomaszewska, J.; Zarnecki, A.F.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Devenish, R.C.E.; Walczak, R.; Corriveau, F.; Dementiev, R.K.; Gladilin, L.K.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Levchenko, B.B.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Zotkin, D.S.; Foster, B.; Gallo, E.; Klanner, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Turcato, M.; Hochman, D.; Karshon, U.; Hori, R.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Jomhari, N.Z.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Wan Abdullah, W.A.T.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Kuze, M.; Nobe, T.; Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I.; Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W.; Ruspa, M.; Shyrma, Yu.; Zhmak, N.; Solano, A.; Tsurugai, T.

    2016-01-01

    Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic e ± p scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector atHERAusing an integrated luminosity of 372 pb -1 . The measurement was performed for γ* - p centre-of-mass energies in the range 90 < W < 250 GeV and for photon virtualities Q 2 > 25 GeV 2 . Energy flows around the jet axis are presented. The cross section is presented as a function of β and φ, where β = x/x P , x is the Bjorken variable and x P is the proton fractional longitudinal momentum loss. The angle φ is defined by the γ*-dijet plane and the γ*-e ± plane in the rest frame of the diffractive final state. The φ cross section is measured in bins of β. The results are compared to predictions from models based on different assumptions about the nature of the diffractive exchange. (orig.)

  6. The New Peruvian Meteorite Carancas: Mössbauer Spectroscopy and X-Ray Diffraction Studies

    Munayco, P.; Munayco, J.; Varela, M. E.; Scorzelli, R. B.

    2013-02-01

    The Carancas meteorite fell on 15 September 2007 approximately 10 km south of Desaguadero, near Lake Titicaca, Peru, producing bright lights, clouds of dust in the sky and intense detonations. The Carancas meteorite is classified as a H4-5 ordinary chondrite with shock stage S3 and a degree of weathering W0. The Carancas meteorite is characterized by well defined chondrules composed either of olivine or pyroxene. The Mössbauer spectra show an overlapping of paramagnetic and magnetic phases. The spectra show two quadrupole doublets associated to olivine and pyroxene; and two magnetic sextets, associated with the primary phases kamacite/taenite and Troilite (Fe2+). Metal particles were extracted from the bulk powdered samples exhibit only kamacite and small amounts of the intergrowth tetrataenite/antitaenite. X-Ray diffractogram shows the primary phases olivine, pyroxene, troilite, kamacite, diopside and albite. Iron oxides has not been detected by Mössbauer spectroscopy or XRD as can be expected for a meteorite immediately recovered after its fall.

  7. Double Diffractive Process Factorization from ηc and γ Associated Production at Tevatron and LHC

    YANZhan-Yuan; LIZhi-Wen; DUANChun-Gui

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of associated ηc and γ double diffractive production in pp- collision based on Ingelman-Schlein model, and the framework of non-relativistic QOD factorization formalism for quarkonia production. The prediction of ηc and γ is more reliable than J/ψ production, because the associated ηc and γ production is a pure color-octet process, and the dominant contribution comes from color octet 1S0(8) subprocess, which is related to the color octet matrix element of 1S0(8) of J/ψ by the heavy quark spin symmetry and the large PT J/ψ production data. We find that the ratio of diffractive to inclusive cross sections is independent of the values of color octet matrix elements, but is sensitive to the gluon factor of the Pomeron and renormalized Pomeron flux factors. So experimental measurement of this ratio can give us more information of the nature of Pomeron and test the assumption of hard diffractive factorization in hadron-hadron collisions.

  8. Double Diffractive Process Factorization from ηc and γ Associated Production at Tevatron and LHC

    YAN Zhan-Yuan; LI Zhi-Wen; DUAN Chun-Gui

    2004-01-01

    We present a study of associated ηc and γ double diffractive production in p-p collision based on Ingelman-Schlein model, and the framework of non-relativistic QCD factorization formalism for quarkonia production. The predic-tion of ηc and γ is more reliable than J/ψ production, because the associated ηc and γ production is a pure color-octetprocess, and the dominant contribution comes from color octet 1So(8) subprocess, which is related to the color octet matrixelement of 1So(8) of J/ψ by the heavy quark spin symmetry and the large PT J/ψ production data. We find that the ratioof diffractive to inclusive cross sections is independent of the values of color octet matrix elements, but is sensitive to thegluon factor of the Pomeron and renormalized Pomeron flux factors. So experimental measurement of this ratio can giveus more information of the nature of Pomeron and test the assumption of hard diffractive factorization in hadron-hadron collisions.

  9. Diffractive production of p-mesons and of pπ-systems by neutrinos and antineutrinos on protons

    Jones, G.T.; Jones, R.W.L.; Kennedy, B.W.; Morrison, D.R.O.; Borner, H.P.; Myatt, G.; Bullock, F.W.; Burke, S.

    1993-01-01

    Evidence is presented for diffractive production of ρ-mesons and of ρπ-systems in νp and anti νp charged-current interactions. In the (anti-)neutrino energy range 10 GeV ν 1 production. However, the data cannot distinguish between diffractive a 1 and diffractive nonresonant ρπ production. The experimental distributions of W, Q 2 , x Bj and y Bj for diffractive ρ and ρπ events are consistent with model predictions. (orig.)

  10. Measurement of D* production in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baghdasaryan, A.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Yerevan (Armenia); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T. [Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bolz, A.; Huber, F.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A. [Universitaet Heidelberg, Physikalisches Institut, Heidelberg (Germany); Boudry, V.; Specka, A. [LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS/IN2P3, Palaiseau (France); Brandt, G. [Universitaet Goettingen, II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen (Germany); Brisson, V.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [LAL, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, Orsay (France); Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Haidt, D.; Jung, A.; Jung, H.; Katzy, J.; Kleinwort, C.; Kruecker, D.; Krueger, K.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Olsson, J.E.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Buniatyan, A.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [University of Birmingham, School of Physics and Astronomy, Birmingham (United Kingdom); Bylinkin, A. [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Avila, K.B.C.; Contreras, J.G. [CINVESTAV, Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Cerny, K.; Jansova, M.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Zlebcik, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Chekelian, V.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Lobodzinski, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Cvach, J.; Hladky, J.; Reimer, P. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Institute of Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D. [University of Liverpool, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Daum, K.; Meyer, H. [Fachbereich C, Universitaet Wuppertal, Wuppertal (Germany); Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Vallee, C. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille (France); Dobre, M.; Rotaru, M. [Horia Hulubei National Institute for R and D in Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH), Bucharest (Romania); Egli, S.; Horisberger, R.; Ozerov, D. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Roosen, R.; Mechelen, P. van [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); Feltesse, J.; Schoeffel, L. [Irfu/SPP, CE Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ferencei, J. [Nuclear Physics Institute of the CAS, Rez (Czech Republic); Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Krakow (Poland); Gouzevitch, M.; Petrukhin, A. [IPNL, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Villeurbanne (France); Grab, C. [Institut fuer Teilchenphysik, ETH, Zurich (Switzerland); Henderson, R.C.W. [University of Lancaster, Department of Physics, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Kapichine, M.; Morozov, A.; Spaskov, V. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Kogler, R. [Universitaet Hamburg, Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Hamburg (Germany); Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D. [University of London, School of Physics and Astronomy, London (United Kingdom); Lange, W.; Naumann, T. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Martyn, H.U. [I. Physikalisches Institut der RWTH, Aachen (Germany); Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P. [Physik-Institut der Universitaet Zuerich, Zurich (Switzerland); Perez, E. [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland); Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [University of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (Montenegro); Polifka, R. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); University of Toronto, Department of Physics, Toronto, ON (Canada); Radescu, V. [Oxford University, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Rostovtsev, A. [Institute for Information Transmission Problems RAS, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sankey, D.P.C. [STFC, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Sauvan, E. [Aix Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, CPPM UMR 7346, Marseille (France); Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, LAPP, Annecy-le-Vieux (France); Shushkevich, S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Stella, B. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universita di Roma Tre (Italy); INFN Roma 3, Rome (Italy); Sykora, T. [Brussels and Universiteit Antwerpen, Inter-University Institute for High Energies ULB-VUB, Antwerp (Belgium); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic); Tsakov, I. [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Sofia (Bulgaria); Tseepeldorj, B. [Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Ulaanbaatar University, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Wegener, D. [Institut fuer Physik, TU Dortmund, Dortmund (Germany)

    2017-05-15

    Measurements of D*(2010) meson production in diffractive deep inelastic scattering (5 < Q{sup 2} < 100 GeV{sup 2}) are presented which are based on HERA data recorded at a centre-of-mass energy √(s) = 319 GeV with an integrated luminosity of 287 pb{sup -1}. The reaction ep → eXY is studied, where the system X, containing at least one D*(2010) meson, is separated from a leading low-mass proton dissociative system Y by a large rapidity gap. The kinematics of D* candidates are reconstructed in the D* → Kππ decay channel. The measured cross sections compare favourably with next-to-leading order QCD predictions, where charm quarks are produced via boson-gluon fusion. The charm quarks are then independently fragmented to the D* mesons. The calculations rely on the collinear factorisation theorem and are based on diffractive parton densities previously obtained by H1 from fits to inclusive diffractive cross sections. The data are further used to determine the diffractive to inclusive D* production ratio in deep inelastic scattering. (orig.)

  11. Diffractive Open Charm Production in Deep-Inelastic Scattering and Photoproduction at HERA

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Gwilliam, C.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marshall, R.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, T.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truoel, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, C.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements are presented of diffractive open charm production at HERA. The event topology is given by ep -> eX Y where the system X contains at least one charmed hadron and is well separated by a large rapidity gap from a leading low-mass proton remnant system Y. Two analysis techniques are used for the cross section measurements. In the first, the charm quark is tagged by the reconstruction of a D*(2010) meson. This technique is used in deep-inelastic scattering (DIS) and photoproduction. In the second, a method based on the displacement of tracks from the primary vertex is used to measure the open charm contribution to the inclusive diffractive cross section in DIS. The measurements are compared with next-to-leading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton density functions previously obtained from a QCD analysis of the inclusive diffractive cross section at H1. A good agreement is observed in the full kinematic regime, which supports the validity of QCD factorization for open charm production in...

  12. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    Blagoev, K.; Grozeva, M.; Malcheva, G.; Neykova, S.

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893–972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts. - Highlights: ► LIBS, XRF and XRD analyses of medieval white-clay ceramic tiles fragments are done. ► Different elements and phases, presented in the ceramics fragments were determined. ► Differences in the tiles' raw material mineral composition are found. ► Information of the tiles' production process and the raw clay deposits is obtained

  13. Investigation by laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence and X-ray powder diffraction of the chemical composition of white clay ceramic tiles from Veliki Preslav

    Blagoev, K., E-mail: kblagoev@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Grozeva, M., E-mail: margo@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Malcheva, G., E-mail: bobcheva@issp.bas.bg [Institute of Solid State Physics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Neykova, S., E-mail: sevdalinaneikova@abv.bg [National Institute of Archaeology with Museum, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 2 Saborna, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2013-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the application of laser induced breakdown spectroscopy, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and X-ray powder diffraction in assessing the chemical and phase composition of white clay decorative ceramic tiles from the medieval archaeological site of Veliki Preslav, a Bulgarian capital in the period 893–972 AC, well-known for its original ceramic production. Numerous white clay ceramic tiles with highly varied decoration, produced for wall decoration of city's churches and palaces, were found during the archaeological excavations in the old capital. The examination of fourteen ceramic tiles discovered in one of the city's monasteries is aimed at characterization of the chemical profile of the white-clay decorative ceramics produced in Veliki Preslav. Combining different methods and comparing the obtained results provides complementary information regarding the white-clay ceramic production in Veliki Preslav and complete chemical characterization of the examined artefacts. - Highlights: ► LIBS, XRF and XRD analyses of medieval white-clay ceramic tiles fragments are done. ► Different elements and phases, presented in the ceramics fragments were determined. ► Differences in the tiles' raw material mineral composition are found. ► Information of the tiles' production process and the raw clay deposits is obtained.

  14. X-ray diffraction study of slags forming during corrosion resistant steel production

    Slavov, V.I.; Zadorozhnaya, V.N.; Shurygina, A.V.

    1990-01-01

    Using X-ray diffraction analysis slags, forming during corrosion-resistant 12Kh18N10T grade steel production by two flowsheets, are studied. Standard two-slag technology of steel production does not provide efficient disintegration of chromospinelides in slags, gives high steel contamination with respect to nonmetallic impurities, coarse structure and, as a consequence, presence of macrodefects on rolled products surface. One-slag steel melting technology with titanium alloying of the steel at vacuum causes fast removal of chromospinelides at the beginning of reduction period, promotes titanium absorption by the steel, refines nonmetallic inclusions, provides more fine structure and steel plasticity, removes surface defects

  15. On the Habitability of Desert Varnish: A Combined Study by Micro-Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Methylated Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Malherbe, C.; Hutchinson, I. B.; Ingley, R.; Boom, A.; Carr, A. S.; Edwards, H.; Vertruyen, B.; Gilbert, B.; Eppe, G.

    2017-11-01

    In 2020, the ESA ExoMars and NASA Mars 2020 missions will be launched to Mars to search for evidence of past and present life. In preparation for these missions, terrestrial analog samples of rock formations on Mars are studied in detail in order to optimize the scientific information that the analytical instrumentation will return. Desert varnishes are thin mineral coatings found on rocks in arid and semi-arid environments on Earth that are recognized as analog samples. During the formation of desert varnishes (which takes many hundreds of years), organic matter is incorporated, and microorganisms may also play an active role in the formation process. During this study, four complementary analytical techniques proposed for Mars missions (X-ray diffraction [XRD], Raman spectroscopy, elemental analysis, and pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry [Py-GC-MS]) were used to interrogate samples of desert varnish and describe their capacity to sustain life under extreme scenarios. For the first time, both the geochemistry and the organic compounds associated with desert varnish are described with the use of identical sets of samples. XRD and Raman spectroscopy measurements were used to nondestructively interrogate the mineralogy of the samples. In addition, the use of Raman spectroscopy instruments enabled the detection of β-carotene, a highly Raman-active biomarker. The content and the nature of the organic material in the samples were further investigated with elemental analysis and methylated Py-GC-MS, and a bacterial origin was determined to be likely. In the context of planetary exploration, we describe the habitable nature of desert varnish based on the biogeochemical composition of the samples. Possible interference of the geological substrate on the detectability of pyrolysis products is also suggested.

  16. Diffraction production of tagged Bdo Beams to search for mixing and rare decay modes

    Cline, D. B.

    1986-01-01

    The expected large cross section for (Σ b antiB d o ) diffractive production can be used to obtain an intense beam of pure B d o mesons. We review the search for mixing in the B s o system from the UA1 experiment and comment on the need for B d o beams to search for mixing in this system as well. 6 refs

  17. Measurement of D* production in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.; Cvach, Jaroslav; Ferencei, Jozef; Hladký, Jan; Reimer, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 5 (2017), s. 1-14, č. článku 340. ISSN 1434-6044 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LG14033 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389005 Keywords : diffractive deep inelastic scattering * charm meson production * boson-gluon fusion * next-to- leading order QCD Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics OBOR OECD: Particles and field physics Impact factor: 5.331, year: 2016

  18. Structural and Electronic Properties Study of Colombian Aurifer Soils by Moessbauer Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    Bustos Rodriguez, H., E-mail: hbustos@ut.edu.co; Rojas Martinez, Y.; Oyola Lozano, D. [Universidad del Tolima, Departamento de Fisica (Colombia); Perez Alcazar, G. A.; Fajardo, M. [Universidad del Valle, Departamento de Fisica (Colombia); Mojica, J. [Ingeominas Valle, Departamento de Geologia (Colombia); Molano, Y. J. C. [Universidad Nacional, Departamento de Geologia (Colombia)

    2005-02-15

    In this work a study on gold mineral samples is reported, using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS). The auriferous samples are from the El Diamante mine, located in Guachavez-Narino (Colombia) and were prepared by means of polished thin sections. The petrography analysis registered the presence, in different percentages that depend on the sample, of pyrite, quartz, arsenopyirite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite and galena. The XRD analysis confirmed these findings through the calculated cell parameters. One typical Rietveld analysis showed the following weight percent of phases: 85.0% quartz, 14.5% pyrite and 0.5% sphalerite. In this sample, MS demonstrated the presence of two types of pyrite whose hyperfine parameters are {delta}{sub 1} = 0.280 {+-} 0.002 mm/s and {Delta}{sub 1} = 0.642 {+-} 0.002 mm/s, {delta}{sub 2} = 0.379 {+-} 0.002 mm/s and {Delta}{sub 2} = 0.613 {+-} 0.002 mm/s.

  19. Study by X-ray diffraction and Infrared spectroscopy of human bones of the pre hispanic and colonial epoch

    Canto, A.B.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado G, J.; Tiesler, V.; Diaz F, L.L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the structure of bony remains obtained from different Pre hispanic and colonial Mayan burial contexts and sites. This study was conducted using X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy in order to identify the phases and impurities present in the archaeological bones and to measure the degree of hydroxyapatite crystallinity. With it, we aim at examining the potential structural influence that different burial spaces (chamber as opposed to filled burial space), and soil properties (karstic soil, marshland and cenote) had on the bone samples. The sites were chosen from two different time periods: Pre hispanic (before 1519 d.C.) and Colonial (after 1519 d.C.). Some samples were collected from Siho, Mayapan y Oxkintok in the Puuc area. Other come from Calakmul, in Campeche's southeast, from Xcambo on the north coast of the Peninsula, and from the city of Campeche. Additional remains were recovered from the site of Palenque, Chiapas, where the soil contains higher contents of clay mineral than the karstic substrates that characterize the Peninsula of Yucatan. (Author) 40 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs

  20. Fundamental aspects of Am and Cm in zirconia-based materials. Investigations using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    Raison, P.E.; Haire, R.G.; Assefa, Z.

    2002-01-01

    We have investigated incorporation of americium and curium in selected zirconia-based materials. Fundamental aspects were explored via X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. First explored was the pseudo ternary system, AmO 2 -ZrO 2 -Y 2 O 3 . It was found that stable, cubic solid solutions (Am x Zr 1-x Y y )O 2-2/y can be obtained for selected compositions. The cell parameters of the cubic phases were established as being linear with the AmO 2 content. For the Cm 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 system, it was determined that diphasic materials are produced, except for two compositions: 25 mol% and 50 mol% of CmO 1.5 . For these compositions a single-phase cubic fluorite type solid solution (a=5.21A±0.01) and a pyrochlore oxide Cm 2 Zr 2 O 7 (a=10.63A±0.02) are formed, respectively. The stability of pyrochlore oxides is also being investigated as a function of self-irradiation, using shorter-lived isotopes, one being the californium pyrochlore 249 Cf 2 Zr 2 O 7 . We obtained evidence that after six months of storage the pyrochlore oxide is undergoing structural change. Additional studies are in progress. (author)

  1. Structural and Electronic Properties Study of Colombian Aurifer Soils by Moessbauer Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    Bustos Rodriguez, H.; Rojas Martinez, Y.; Oyola Lozano, D.; Perez Alcazar, G. A.; Fajardo, M.; Mojica, J.; Molano, Y. J. C.

    2005-01-01

    In this work a study on gold mineral samples is reported, using optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS). The auriferous samples are from the El Diamante mine, located in Guachavez-Narino (Colombia) and were prepared by means of polished thin sections. The petrography analysis registered the presence, in different percentages that depend on the sample, of pyrite, quartz, arsenopyirite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite and galena. The XRD analysis confirmed these findings through the calculated cell parameters. One typical Rietveld analysis showed the following weight percent of phases: 85.0% quartz, 14.5% pyrite and 0.5% sphalerite. In this sample, MS demonstrated the presence of two types of pyrite whose hyperfine parameters are δ 1 = 0.280 ± 0.002 mm/s and Δ 1 = 0.642 ± 0.002 mm/s, δ 2 = 0.379 ± 0.002 mm/s and Δ 2 = 0.613 ± 0.002 mm/s.

  2. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of white decorations on tricolored ceramics from Northwestern Argentina

    Freire, E.; Acevedo, V.; Halac, E. B.; Polla, G.; López, M.; Reinoso, M.

    2016-03-01

    White virgules, commas, and dot designs on tricolored ceramics are sporadically found in different archaeological sites located in Northwestern Argentina area, as Puna and Quebrada de Humahuaca. This decorating style has been reported in several articles, but few previous archaeometric studies have been carried out on the pigment composition. Fragments from Puna and Quebrada archaeological sites, belonging to Regional Development Period (900-1430 AD), were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in order to characterize the pigments employed. Red and black pigments are based on iron and manganese oxides, as it has been extensively reported for the NW Argentina area. White pigments from white virgules, comma, and dot designs have shown different composition. Hydroxyapatite was found in samples from Doncellas site (North Puna region), and calcium and calcium-magnesium containing compounds, as vaterite and dolomite, along with titanium containing compounds were detected on samples from Abralaite (Central Puna region) and Gasoducto (Quebrada de Humahuaca region). It has been concluded that pigment composition is not characteristic of a unique region.

  3. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy study of white decorations on tricolored ceramics from Northwestern Argentina.

    Freire, E; Acevedo, V; Halac, E B; Polla, G; López, M; Reinoso, M

    2016-03-15

    White virgules, commas, and dot designs on tricolored ceramics are sporadically found in different archaeological sites located in Northwestern Argentina area, as Puna and Quebrada de Humahuaca. This decorating style has been reported in several articles, but few previous archaeometric studies have been carried out on the pigment composition. Fragments from Puna and Quebrada archaeological sites, belonging to Regional Development Period (900-1430 AD), were analyzed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy in order to characterize the pigments employed. Red and black pigments are based on iron and manganese oxides, as it has been extensively reported for the NW Argentina area. White pigments from white virgules, comma, and dot designs have shown different composition. Hydroxyapatite was found in samples from Doncellas site (North Puna region), and calcium and calcium-magnesium containing compounds, as vaterite and dolomite, along with titanium containing compounds were detected on samples from Abralaite (Central Puna region) and Gasoducto (Quebrada de Humahuaca region). It has been concluded that pigment composition is not characteristic of a unique region. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterization of mineral phases of agricultural soil samples of Colombian coffee using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Rodriguez, Humberto Bustos, E-mail: hbustos@ut.edu.co; Lozano, Dagoberto Oyola; Martinez, Yebrayl Antonio Rojas; Pinilla, Marlene Rivera [Universidad del Tolima, Grupo Ciencia de Materiales y Tecnologia en Plasma (Colombia); Alcazar, German Antonio Perez [Universidad del Valle, Grupo Metalurgia Fisica y Teoria de las Transiciones de Fase (Colombia)

    2012-03-15

    Soil chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Moessbauer spectrometry (MS) of {sup 57}Fe were used to characterize mineral phases of samples taken from the productive layer (horizon A) of agricultural coffee soil from Tolima (Colombia). Chemical analysis shows the chemical and textural parameters of samples from two different regions of Tolima, i.e., Ibague and Santa Isabel. By XRD phases like illite (I), andesine (A) and quartz (Q) in both samples were identified. The quantity of these phases is different for the two samples. The MS spectra taken at room temperature were adjusted by using five doublets, three of them associated to Fe{sup + 3} type sites and the other two to Fe{sup + 2} type sites. According to their isomer shift and quadrupole splitting the presence of phases like illite (detected by DRX), nontronite and biotite (not detected by XRD) can be postulated.

  5. Use of absorption spectroscopy for refined petroleum product discrimination

    Short, Michael

    1991-07-01

    On-line discrimination between arbitrary petroleum products is necessary for optimal control of petroleum refinery and pipeline operation and process control involving petroleum distillates. There are a number of techniques by which petroleum products can be distinguished from one another. Among these, optical measurements offer fast, non-intrusive, real-time characterization. The application examined here involves optically monitoring the interface between dissimilar batches of fluids in a gasoline pipeline. After examination of near- infrared and mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform mid-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was chosen as the best candidate for implementation. On- line FTIR data is presented, verifying the applicability of the technique for batch interface detection.

  6. Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    Abramowicz, H.; Gueta, O.; Kananov, S.; Levy, A.; Stern, A. [Tel Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, School of Physics, Tel Aviv (Israel); Abt, I.; Caldwell, A.; Schmidke, W.B.; Verbytskyi, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Munich (Germany); Adamczyk, L.; Gach, G.; Guzik, M.; Kisielewska, D.; Przybycien, M. [AGH-University of Science and Technology, Faculty of Physics and Applied Computer Science, Krakow (Poland); Adamus, M.; Tymieniecka, T. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Warsaw (Poland); Antonelli, S. [University, Bologna (Italy); INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Aushev, V. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (Ukraine); National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Department of Nuclear Physics, Kiev (Ukraine); Aushev, Y.; Iudin, A.; Kadenko, I.; Kondrashova, N.; Kononenko, O.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Trofymov, A.; Viazlo, O.; Zakharchuk, N. [National Taras Shevchenko University of Kyiv, Department of Nuclear Physics, Kiev (Ukraine); Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Ciesielski, R.; Dolinska, G.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Grebenyuk, J.; Gregor, I.; Hain, W.; Januschek, F.; Klein, U.; Korol, I.; Koetz, U.; Kowalski, H.; Kuprash, O.; Libov, V.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loehr, B.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Myronenko, V.; Notz, D.; Roloff, P.; Rubinsky, I.; Schneekloth, U.; Schoerner-Sadenius, T.; Stefaniuk, N.; Szuba, J.; Turkot, O.; Wichmann, K.; Wolf, G.; Zenaiev, O. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Bertolin, A.; Dusini, S.; Longhin, A.; Stanco, L. [INFN Padova, Padua (Italy); Bloch, I. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Boos, E.G.; Pokrovskiy, N.S.; Zhautykov, B.O. [Institute of Physics and Technology of Ministry of Education and Science of Kazakhstan, Almaty (Kazakhstan); Brock, I.; Mergelmeyer, S.; Paul, E. [Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Brook, N.H.; Wing, M. [University College London, Physics and Astronomy Department, London (United Kingdom); Brugnera, R.; Garfagnini, A.; Limentani, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Univ., Padua (Italy); INFN, Padua (Italy); Bruni, A.; Corradi, M. [INFN Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Bussey, P.J.; Saxon, D.H.; Skillicorn, I.O. [University of Glasgow, School of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Capua, M.; Schioppa, M.; Tassi, E. [Calabria University, Physics Department, Cosenza (Italy); INFN, Cosenza (Italy); Catterall, C.D. [York University, Department of Physics, Ontario (Canada); Chwastowski, J.; Figiel, J.; Krupa, B.; Stopa, P.; Zawiejski, L. [Polish Academy of Sciences, The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Krakow (Poland); Ciborowski, J.; Grzelak, G.; Nowak, R.J.; Perlanski, W.; Tomaszewska, J.; Zarnecki, A.F. [University of Warsaw, Faculty of Physics, Warsaw (Poland); Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Devenish, R.C.E.; Walczak, R. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Corriveau, F. [McGill University, Department of Physics, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Dementiev, R.K.; Gladilin, L.K.; Golubkov, Yu.A.; Korzhavina, I.A.; Levchenko, B.B.; Lukina, O.Yu.; Shcheglova, L.M.; Zotkin, D.S. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Foster, B.; Gallo, E.; Klanner, R.; Kovalchuk, N.; Lohrmann, E.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Szuba, D.; Turcato, M. [Hamburg University, Institute of Experimental Physics, Hamburg (Germany); Hochman, D.; Karshon, U. [Weizmann Institute, Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Rehovot (Israel); Hori, R.; Nagano, K.; Tokushuku, K.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y. [Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Ibrahim, Z.A.; Jomhari, N.Z.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Wan Abdullah, W.A.T. [Universiti Malaya, National Centre for Particle Physics, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Iga, Y. [Polytechnic University, Tokyo (Japan); Ishitsuka, M.; Kuze, M.; Nobe, T. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Department of Physics, Tokyo (JP); Kaur, M.; Kaur, P.; Singh, I. [Panjab University, Department of Physics, Chandigarh (IN); Kotanski, A.; Slominski, W. [Jagellonian University, Department of Physics, Krakow (PL); Ruspa, M. [Universita del Piemonte Orientale, Novara (IT); INFN, Turin (IT); Shyrma, Yu.; Zhmak, N. [National Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research, Kiev (UA); Solano, A. [Universita di Torino (IT); INFN, Turin (IT); Tsurugai, T. [Meiji Gakuin University, Faculty of General Education, Yokohama (JP); Collaboration: ZEUS Collaboration

    2016-01-15

    Production of exclusive dijets in diffractive deep inelastic e{sup ±}p scattering has been measured with the ZEUS detector atHERAusing an integrated luminosity of 372 pb{sup -1}. The measurement was performed for γ* - p centre-of-mass energies in the range 90 < W < 250 GeV and for photon virtualities Q{sup 2} > 25 GeV{sup 2}. Energy flows around the jet axis are presented. The cross section is presented as a function of β and φ, where β = x/x{sub P}, x is the Bjorken variable and x{sub P} is the proton fractional longitudinal momentum loss. The angle φ is defined by the γ*-dijet plane and the γ*-e{sup ±} plane in the rest frame of the diffractive final state. The φ cross section is measured in bins of β. The results are compared to predictions from models based on different assumptions about the nature of the diffractive exchange. (orig.)

  7. D* Meson Production in Deep-Inelastic Diffractive Interactions at HERA

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Becker, J.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, C.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boehme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Tchernyshov, V.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Urban, Marcel; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, M.; Werner, N.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.E.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement is presented of the cross section for D* meson production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering for the first time at HERA. The cross section is given for the process ep -> eXY, where the system X contains at least one D* meson and is separated by a large rapidity gap from a low mass proton remnant system Y. The cross section is presented in the diffractive deep-inelastic region defined by 2 2 GeV and |\\eta_D* | < 1.5. The cross section is found to be 246+-54+-56 pb and forms about 6% of the corresponding inclusive D* cross section. The cross section is presented as a function of various kinematic variables, including z_pom^obs which is an estimate of the fraction of the momentum of the diffractive exchange carried by the parton entering the hard-subprocess. The data show a large component of the cross section at low z_pom^obs where the contribution of the Boson-Gluon-Fusion process is expected to dominate. The data are compared with several QCD--based calculations.

  8. Curcumin-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex: stability, solubility, characterisation by FT-IR, FT-Raman, X-ray diffraction and photoacoustic spectroscopy, and food application.

    Mangolim, Camila Sampaio; Moriwaki, Cristiane; Nogueira, Ana Claudia; Sato, Francielle; Baesso, Mauro Luciano; Neto, Antônio Medina; Matioli, Graciette

    2014-06-15

    Curcumin was complexed with β-CD using co-precipitation, freeze-drying and solvent evaporation methods. Co-precipitation enabled complex formation, as indicated by the FT-IR and FT-Raman techniques via the shifts in the peaks that were assigned to the aromatic rings of curcumin. In addition, photoacoustic spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, with the disappearance of the band related to aromatic rings, by Gaussian fitting, and modifications in the spectral lines, respectively, also suggested complex formation. The possible complexation had an efficiency of 74% and increased the solubility of the pure colourant 31-fold. Curcumin-β-CD complex exhibited a sunlight stability 18% higher than the pure colourant. This material was stable to pH variations and storage at -15 and 4°C. With an isothermal heating at 100 and 150°C for 2h, the material exhibited a colour retention of approximately 99%. The application of curcumin-β-CD complex in vanilla ice creams intensified the colour of the products and produced a great sensorial acceptance. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface analysis using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction of UO2 fuel pellets oxidised in air at 2300C and 2700C

    Tempest, P.A.; Tyler, J.W.

    1987-08-01

    Factors which affect the UO 2 → U 3 O 8 transformation have been investigated by sequentially oxidising UO 2 fuel pellets in air at 230 0 C and 270 0 C and monitoring the growth of U 3 O 7 and U 3 O 8 using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Initially oxidation proceeded at a linear rate by the inward diffusion of oxygen to form a complete layer of sub-stoichiometric U 3 O 7 . This phase was tetragonal with a c/a ratio of 1.015, significantly less than the value of 1.03 measured on UO 2 powder when oxidised under identical conditions. This difference and the preferred orientation exhibited by surface grains were caused by growth stresses induced in the pellet surface. Both intergranular and transgranular cracking occurred and became nucleation sites for the growth of U 3 O 8 . The linear oxidation period associated with U 3 O 7 growth was much shorter at 270 0 C than 230 0 C and U 3 O 8 nucleated earlier. Spallation and the production of particulate were only observed during the formation of U 3 O 8 when a 30% increase in volume arose from the U 3 O 7 → U 3 O 8 phase change. (author)

  10. Oxygen adsorption on Cu-9 at. %Al(111) studied by low energy electron diffraction and Auger electron spectroscopy

    Yoshitake, Michiko; Bera, Santanu; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Song, Weijie

    2003-07-01

    Cu-based alloys have been used for electric cables for long time. In the field of microelectronics, Al had been used for electrical wiring. However, it became clear that electromigration occurs in Al that causes breaking of wires in minute wirings. Due to this problem, Cu wiring is used in most advanced microprocessors. Cu metal is more corrosive than Al and Cu-based alloys with a small amount of Al is expected to solve problems both on electromigration and corrosion. The initial stage of corrosion is oxygen adsorption. We studied surface segregation of Al on Cu-9% Al(111) and oxygen adsorption on the surface with/without Al segregation in ultrahigh vacuum by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy. It was found that Al segregates on the surface to form (√3×√3)R30° structure and the structure vanishes above 595 K to give (1×1) structure while Al still segregates. The specimen was exposed to oxygen at different temperatures. The amount of oxygen uptake was not structure dependent but temperature dependent. Below 595 K, only a small amount of oxygen adsorbed. Between 595 and 870 K, oxygen adsorbed surface showed amorphous LEED pattern. The specimen was annealed at 1070 K after oxygen exposure. When the specimen was exposed oxygen below 870 K, the oxygen Auger intensity decreased significantly by annealing and the annealed surface showed (√3×√3)R30° structure at room temperature. When the specimen was exposed to oxygen at 870 K, diffused spots developed newly in LEED pattern but the pattern disappeared after 1070 K annealing while oxygen Auger intensity remained almost constant. Exposing the specimen to oxygen at 995 K resulted in clear spots in the LEED pattern, which were attributed to the (7/√3×7√3)R30° structure.

  11. Evolution of local structure in Ag2O-TeO2 glasses with addition of Ag2O analyzed by pulsed neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    Iwadate, Yasuhiko; Suzuki, Mineta; Hattori, Takeo; Fukushima, Kazuko; Nishiyama, Shin; Misawa, Masakatsu; Fukunaga, Toshiharu; Itoh, Keiji

    2005-01-01

    The local structure of Ag 2 O-TeO 2 glasses was studied by time-of-flight pulsed neutron diffraction (TOF-PND) and Raman spectroscopy. The results of Raman spectroscopy indicated that TeO 4 trigonal bipyramidal units (tbp) were converted to TeO 3 trigonal pyramidal units (tp) by addition of Ag 2 O to TeO 2 . Furthermore in PND, the structural parameters for each atomic pair were optimized in the Q-space, and the distances of the near neighbor Te-O correlations forming tbp units and tp units in the network were estimated with some accuracy

  12. Use of X-ray diffraction, molecular simulations, and spectroscopy to determine the molecular packing in a polymer-fullerene bimolecular crystal

    Miller, Nichole Cates

    2012-09-05

    The molecular packing in a polymer: fullerene bimolecular crystal is determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, 2D solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and IR absorption spectroscopy. The conformation of the electron-donating polymer is significantly disrupted by the incorporation of the electron-accepting fullerene molecules, which introduce twists and bends along the polymer backbone and 1D electron-conducting fullerene channels. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Use of X-ray diffraction, molecular simulations, and spectroscopy to determine the molecular packing in a polymer-fullerene bimolecular crystal

    Miller, Nichole Cates; Cho, Eunkyung; Junk, Matthias J N; Gysel, Roman; Risko, Chad; Kim, Dongwook; Sweetnam, Sean; Miller, Chad E.; Richter, Lee J.; Kline, Regis Joseph; Heeney, Martin J.; McCulloch, Iain A.; Amassian, Aram; Acevedo-Feliz, Daniel; Knox, Christopher; Hansen, Michael Ryan; Dudenko, Dmytro V.; Chmelka, Bradley F.; Toney, Michael F.; Bré das, Jean Luc; McGehee, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The molecular packing in a polymer: fullerene bimolecular crystal is determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, 2D solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and IR absorption spectroscopy. The conformation of the electron-donating polymer is significantly disrupted by the incorporation of the electron-accepting fullerene molecules, which introduce twists and bends along the polymer backbone and 1D electron-conducting fullerene channels. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Magnetic properties of the ternary carbide DyCoC2 studied by magnetization measurements, neutron diffraction and 161Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Amanai, H.; Onodera, H.; Ohashi, M.; Matsuo, S.; Yamauchi, H.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic properties of DyCoC 2 have been investigated by means of magnetization measurements, powder neutron diffraction and 161 Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy. The magnetization versus temperature curves of a single-crystalline sample reveal that the magnetic structure of DyCoC 2 is a simple collinear ferromagnetic one below T C =10.0 K. At 4.2 K, the magnitude of the Dy moment is 8.7(1)μ B , whose direction is defined by an angle of 38.0(5) from the a-axis toward the c-axis. The magnetic structure and the magnitude of the moment are also confirmed by the results of powder neutron diffraction experiments and 161 Dy Moessbauer spectroscopy, respectively. ((orig.))

  15. A comparative study of the use of powder X-ray diffraction, Raman and near infrared spectroscopy for quantification of binary polymorphic mixtures of piracetam.

    Croker, Denise M; Hennigan, Michelle C; Maher, Anthony; Hu, Yun; Ryder, Alan G; Hodnett, Benjamin K

    2012-04-07

    Diffraction and spectroscopic methods were evaluated for quantitative analysis of binary powder mixtures of FII(6.403) and FIII(6.525) piracetam. The two polymorphs of piracetam could be distinguished using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Raman and near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. The results demonstrated that Raman and NIR spectroscopy are most suitable for quantitative analysis of this polymorphic mixture. When the spectra are treated with the combination of multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) and second derivative data pretreatments, the partial least squared (PLS) regression model gave a root mean square error of calibration (RMSEC) of 0.94 and 0.99%, respectively. FIII(6.525) demonstrated some preferred orientation in PXRD analysis, making PXRD the least preferred method of quantification. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The Composition of Intermediate Products of the Thermal Decomposition of (NH4)2ZrF6 to ZrO2 from Vibrational-Spectroscopy Data

    Voit, E. I.; Didenko, N. A.; Gaivoronskaya, K. A.

    2018-03-01

    Thermal decomposition of (NH4)2ZrF6 resulting in ZrO2 formation within the temperature range of 20°-750°C has been investigated by means of thermal and X-ray diffraction analysis and IR and Raman spectroscopy. It has been established that thermolysis proceeds in six stages. The vibrational-spectroscopy data for the intermediate products of thermal decomposition have been obtained, systematized, and summarized.

  17. Scattering, diffraction and multiparticle production on hadron and nuclei at high energy

    Ter-Martirosyan, K.A.; Zoller, V.R.

    1988-01-01

    The cross sections for different types of interactions of hadronic with hadrons and nuclei at high energy are obtained in the simple form in the supercritical pomeron theory. Diffraction desintegration (DD) of hadrons both in the intermediate states, between rescatterings on pomerons, and in the final states is taken into account. With the same accuracy the cross sections δ n for production of n pomeron jets on hadrons and nuclei are also obtained. They determine the whole dynamics of the multiple particle productions, i.e. the spectra and multiplicities of produced particles, the cross sections for DD of colliding hadrons and nucleons inside the target nuclei. The numerical results for δ tot , δ el and for dδ el /dp tr 2 with the set of the pomeron and f, ω-reggeons pole parameters obtained early are presented. 19 refs.; 6 figs

  18. An X-ray diffraction study of corrosion products from low carbon steel

    Morales, A. L.

    2003-01-01

    It was found in earlier work a decrease in the corrosion rate from low carbon steel when it was subjected to the action of a combined pollutant concentration (SO 4 ''2-=10''-4 M+Cl=1.5x 10''-3 M). It was also found that large magnetic content of the rust was related to higher corrosion rates. In the present study corrosion products are further analyzed by means of X-ray diffraction to account for composition changes during the corrosion process. it is found that lepidocrocite and goethite are the dominant components for the short-term corrosion in all batches considered while for log-term corrosion lepidocrite and goethite dominates if the corrosion rates is low and magnetite dominates if the corrosion rate is high. The mechanism for decreasing the corrosion rate is related to the inhibition of magnetite production at this particular concentration. (Author) 15 refs

  19. Diffraction based overlay and image based overlay on production flow for advanced technology node

    Blancquaert, Yoann; Dezauzier, Christophe

    2013-04-01

    One of the main challenges for lithography step is the overlay control. For the advanced technology node like 28nm and 14nm, the overlay budget becomes very tight. Two overlay techniques compete in our advanced semiconductor manufacturing: the Diffraction based Overlay (DBO) with the YieldStar S200 (ASML) and the Image Based Overlay (IBO) with ARCHER (KLA). In this paper we will compare these two methods through 3 critical production layers: Poly Gate, Contact and first metal layer. We will show the overlay results of the 2 techniques, explore the accuracy and compare the total measurement uncertainty (TMU) for the standard overlay targets of both techniques. We will see also the response and impact for the Image Based Overlay and Diffraction Based Overlay techniques through a process change like an additional Hardmask TEOS layer on the front-end stack. The importance of the target design is approached; we will propose more adapted design for image based targets. Finally we will present embedded targets in the 14 FDSOI with first results.

  20. Corrosion products study of alcohol by Mossbauer spectroscopy

    Velazquez, R.; Gil de Larre, M.

    1995-01-01

    Simulated corrosion essays in alcohol is presented and corrosion products of storage tanks (CAPASA) were analyzed. The analysis by Mossbauer absortion and transmission spectroscopy shows the formation of hematite substratum in the rust of the storage tanks of carburetant and burning alcohol. In the sample of corrosion with strong rum shows the formation of lepidocrocite and with destilled water besides of lepidocrocite, magnetite (Fe3 O4) is detected

  1. Electrochemical and Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Detection of SF₆ Decomposition Products.

    Dong, Ming; Zhang, Chongxing; Ren, Ming; Albarracín, Ricardo; Ye, Rixin

    2017-11-15

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF₆) gas-insulated electrical equipment is widely used in high-voltage (HV) and extra-high-voltage (EHV) power systems. Partial discharge (PD) and local heating can occur in the electrical equipment because of insulation faults, which results in SF₆ decomposition and ultimately generates several types of decomposition products. These SF₆ decomposition products can be qualitatively and quantitatively detected with relevant detection methods, and such detection contributes to diagnosing the internal faults and evaluating the security risks of the equipment. At present, multiple detection methods exist for analyzing the SF₆ decomposition products, and electrochemical sensing (ES) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are well suited for application in online detection. In this study, the combination of ES with IR spectroscopy is used to detect SF₆ gas decomposition. First, the characteristics of these two detection methods are studied, and the data analysis matrix is established. Then, a qualitative and quantitative analysis ES-IR model is established by adopting a two-step approach. A SF₆ decomposition detector is designed and manufactured by combining an electrochemical sensor and IR spectroscopy technology. The detector is used to detect SF₆ gas decomposition and is verified to reliably and accurately detect the gas components and concentrations.

  2. Diffractive baryon production and the relation between reggeon and photon couplings

    Collins, P.D.B.; Gault, F.D.

    1976-01-01

    The authors illustrate how one can employ the γ-analogy hypothesis, introduced in a previous paper, which relates the couplings of the leading natural-parity reggeon exchanges, P, f and ω, to those of the isoscalar part of the photon. It enables the prediction of the differential cross sections for the diffractive processes pp→pN*(5/2 + ,1688), N*(3/2 - ,1520), and N*(7/2 - ,2190) starting from Regge fits to pp elastic scattering, with just a single free parameter in each case. This success stems from an intimate relation between electromagnetic and hadronic couplings demanded by duality, scaling and vector dominance. Dips due to pole-cut interference in the N* production differential cross sections are not expected because of their more complicated helicity structure. (Auth.)

  3. Examining the ground layer of St. Anthony from Padua 19th century oil painting by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Vančo, Ľubomír; Kadlečíková, Magdaléna; Breza, Juraj; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Gregor, Miloš

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Raman spectroscopic examination of uncovered and covered paint layers of a real painting. ► Deconvolution of Raman peaks of lead white. ► Comparison of results with energy-dispersive analysis and X-ray diffraction. - Abstract: In this paper we studied the material composition of the ground layer of a neoclassical painting. We used Raman spectroscopy (RS) as a prime method. Thereafter scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM–EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were employed as complementary techniques. The painting inspected was of the side altar in King St. Stephen's Church in Galanta (Slovakia), signed and dated by Jos. Chr. Mayer 1870. Analysis was carried out on both covered and uncovered ground layers. Four principal compounds (barite, lead white, calcite, dolomite) and two minor compounds (sphalerite, quartz) were identified. This ground composition is consistent with the 19th century painting technique used in Central Europe consisting of white pigments and white fillers. Transformation of lead white occurred under laser irradiation. Subdominant Raman peaks of the components were measured. The observed results elucidate useful partnership of RS and SEM–EDS measurements supported by X-ray powder diffraction as well as possibilities and limitations of non-destructive analysis of covered lower layers by RS.

  4. Residual stress determination in oxide layers at different length scales combining Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction: Application to chromia-forming metallic alloys

    Guerain, Mathieu; Grosseau-Poussard, Jean-Luc; Geandier, Guillaume; Panicaud, Benoit; Tamura, Nobumichi; Kunz, Martin; Dejoie, Catherine; Micha, Jean-Sebastien; Thiaudière, Dominique; Goudeau, Philippe

    2017-11-01

    In oxidizing environments, the protection of metals and alloys against further oxidation at high temperature is provided by the oxide film itself. This protection is efficient only if the formed film adheres well to the metal (substrate), i.e., without microcracks and spalls induced by thermomechanical stresses. In this study, the residual stresses at both macroscopic and microscopic scales in the oxide film adhering to the substrate and over the damaged areas have been rigorously determined on the same samples for both techniques. Ni-30Cr and Fe-47Cr alloys have been oxidized together at 900 and 1000 °C, respectively, to create films with a thickness of a few microns. A multi-scale approach was adopted: macroscopic stress was determined by conventional X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, while microscopic residual stress mappings were performed over different types of bucklings using Raman micro-spectroscopy and synchrotron micro-diffraction. A very good agreement is found at macro- and microscales between the residual stress values obtained with both techniques, giving confidence on the reliability of the measurements. In addition, relevant structural information at the interface between the metallic substrate and the oxide layer was collected by micro-diffraction, a non-destructive technique that allows mapping through the oxide layer, and both the grain size and the crystallographic orientation of the supporting polycrystalline metal located either under a buckling or not were measured.

  5. Abiotic versus biotic iron mineral transformation studied by a miniaturized backscattering Mössbauer spectrometer (MIMOS II), X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    Markovski, C.; Byrne, J. M.; Lalla, E.; Lozano-Gorrín, A. D.; Klingelhöfer, G.; Rull, F.; Kappler, A.; Hoffmann, T.; Schröder, C.

    2017-11-01

    Searching for biomarkers or signatures of microbial transformations of minerals is a critical aspect for determining how life evolved on Earth, and whether or not life may have existed in other planets, including Mars. In order to solve such questions, several missions to Mars have sought to determine the geochemistry and mineralogy on the Martian surface. This research includes the two miniaturized Mössbauer spectrometers (MIMOS II) on board the Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity, which have detected a variety of iron minerals on Mars, including magnetite (Fe2+Fe3+2O4) and goethite (α-FeO(OH)). On Earth, both minerals can derive from microbiological activity (e.g. through dissimilatory iron reduction of ferrihydrite by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria). Here we used a lab based MIMOS II to characterize the mineral products of biogenic transformations of ferrihydrite to magnetite by the Fe(III)-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens. In combination with Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD), we observed the formation of magnetite, goethite and siderite. We compared the material produced by biogenic transformations to abiotic samples in order to distinguish abiotic and biotic iron minerals by techniques that are or will be available onboard Martian based laboratories. The results showed the possibility to distinguish the abiotic and biotic origin of the minerals. Mossbauer was able to distinguish the biotic/abiotic magnetite with the interpretation of the geological context (Fe content mineral assemblages and accompanying minerals) and the estimation of the particle size in a non-destructive way. The Raman was able to confirm the biotic/abiotic principal peaks of the magnetite, as well as the organic principal vibration bands attributed to the bacteria. Finally, the XRD confirmed the particle size and mineralogy.

  6. Tests of QCD factorisation in the diffractive production of dijets in deep-inelastic scattering and photoproduction at HERA

    Aktas, A.; Andreev, V.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J. C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Cantun Avila, K. B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J. G.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B. R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, L.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S. J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Mozer, M. U.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, T.; Newman, P. R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, T.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Plačakytė, R.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A. J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schätzel, S.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R. N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, I.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T. N.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, C.; Wolf, R.; Wünsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y. C.; Zimmermann, J.; Zimmermann, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-08-01

    Measurements are presented of differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction (Q2<0.01 GeV2) and deep-inelastic scattering processes (DIS, 4diffractive parton densities previously obtained from a QCD analysis of inclusive diffractive DIS cross sections by H1. In DIS, the dijet data are well described, supporting the validity of QCD factorisation. The diffractive DIS dijet data are more sensitive to the diffractive gluon density at high fractional parton momentum than the measurements of inclusive diffractive DIS. In photoproduction, the predicted dijet cross section has to be multiplied by a factor of approximately 0.5 for both direct and resolved photon interactions to describe the measurements. The ratio of measured dijet cross section to NLO prediction in photoproduction is a factor 0.5±0.1 smaller than the same ratio in DIS. This suppression is the first clear observation of QCD hard scattering factorisation breaking at HERA. The measurements are also compared to the two soft colour neutralisation models SCI and GAL. The SCI model describes diffractive dijet production in DIS but not in photoproduction. The GAL model fails in both kinematic regions.

  7. Single-diffractive production of charmed mesons at the LHC within the k{sub t}-factorization approach

    Łuszczak, Marta [University of Rzeszów,PL-35-959 Rzeszów (Poland); Maciuła, Rafał; Szczurek, Antoni; Trzebiński, Maciej [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN,PL-31-342 Cracow (Poland)

    2017-02-16

    We discuss the single-diffractive production of cc̄ pairs and charmed mesons at the LHC. For a first time we propose a k{sub t}-factorization approach to the diffractive processes. The transverse momentum dependent diffractive parton distributions are obtained from standard (collinear) diffractive parton distributions used in the literature. In this calculation the transverse momentum of the pomeron is neglected with respect to transverse momentum of partons entering the hard process. We also perform a first evaluation of the cross sections at the LHC using the diffractive transverse momentum dependent parton distributions. The results of the new approach are compared with those of the standard collinear one. Significantly larger cross sections are obtained in the k{sub t}-factorization approach in which some parts of higher-order effects is effectively included. The differences between corresponding differential distributions are discussed. Finally, we present a feasibility study of the process at the LHC using proton tagging technique. The analysis suggests that the measurement of single-diffractive charm production is possible using ATLAS and CMS/TOTEM detectors.

  8. Dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering in next-to-next-to-leading order QCD arXiv

    Britzger, D.; Gehrmann, T.; Huss, A.; Niehues, J.; Žlebčík, R.

    Hard processes in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering can be described by a factorisation into parton-level subprocesses and diffractive parton distributions. In this framework, cross sections for inclusive dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic electron-proton scattering (DIS) are computed to next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) QCD accuracy and compared to a comprehensive selection of data. Predictions for the total cross sections, 39 single-differential and four double-differential distributions for six measurements at HERA by the H1 and ZEUS collaborations are calculated. In the studied kinematical range, the NNLO corrections are found to be sizeable and positive. The NNLO predictions typically exceed the data, while the kinematical shape of the data is described better at NNLO than at next-to-leading order (NLO). A significant reduction of the scale uncertainty is achieved in comparison to NLO predictions. Our results use the currently available NLO diffractive parton distributions, and the dis...

  9. X-rays diffraction characterization of corrosion products transported by secondary side of a CANDU NPP

    Dinu, A.; Tunaru, M.; Velciu, L.

    2016-01-01

    To verify the chemistry of secondary side of CANDU steam generators, Millipore filters are used to sampling from condensing extraction pump, from feed water header and blow down of steam generator. These filters retain the corrosion products as very fine particles and are used as samples in chemistry water control. X-Ray diffraction technique is the able to distinguish the different crystallographic compounds present in oxide films deposited on the Millipore filters and gives information referring to the nature of corrosion products transported in secondary side. The XRD analysis has identified the following substance in deposited layer: magnetite (Fe_3O_4), hematite (Fe_2O_3), and iron oxide hydroxide (FeOOH). By optical microscopy it was observed a brown-reddish background specific to hematite and iron oxide hydroxide, especially for filters extracted from condensing extraction pump. The black colour of crud present on filters extracted from feed water header and blow down of steam generator shows the presence of magnetite. (authors)

  10. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    Gazder, Azdiar A; Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th; Mitchell, David R G; Pereloma, Elena V

    2014-12-01

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Study on mineral components of rat calvaria by means of X-ray powder diffraction analysis and Raman microprobe spectroscopy

    Tamura, Norihiro [Meikai Univ., Sakado, Saitama (Japan). School of Dentistry

    2000-07-01

    The present study was designed to examine the occurrence of the precursor minerals of hydroxyapatite (HA) during the process of HA formation in the rat calvaria. Dried and powdered rat calvaria and synthetic samples, such as HA, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), octacalcium phosphate (OCP), ({beta}-calcium pyrophosphate) and ({beta}-tricalcium phosphate), were used. Determinations were carried out by X-ray powder diffraction and Raman microprobe spectrometry. In general, significant widening of the diffraction peaks was shown to occur after the plasma ashing was performed for the X-ray diffraction. As a result, two adjacent peaks seen normally in the diffraction angles (2 {theta}) 30-35 deg, which is a characteristic feature of HA, were found to fuse with each other, forming a widened single peak. Also, there was a tendency for the intensity of the diffraction peaks to increase with age. With regard to the effect of plasma ashing on the crystallograms of synthetic specimens, all specimens manifested sharp peak patterns except DCPD and OCP. In contrast, a widening of diffraction peaks was observed in the DCPD and OCP samples, indicating that crystallinity had changed during the pretreatment. Results obtained from both vital and synthetic samples after heat treatment at 1000 deg C were as follow: Clearcut diffraction patterns, characteristics of HA, were obtained in all of the calvaria samples. Further, {beta}-TCP was produced by heat treatment of OCP, and its pattern was detected in the samples from rats younger than 6 days of age. Amounts of {beta}-TCP in percentage were disclosed to be 40.2% in embryonal samples, 28.4% in newborn samples, and 18.6% in 6-day-old samples. But no {beta}-TCP could be detected in the 12-week-old samples, indicating that the amount of {beta}-TCP in calvaria decreased with age. We also found that ashing pretreatment did not cause any changes in the samples of HA, {beta}-CPP, and {beta}-TCP. Further, DCPD and {beta}-CPP samples shared

  12. Study on mineral components of rat calvaria by means of X-ray powder diffraction analysis and Raman microprobe spectroscopy

    Tamura, Norihiro

    2000-01-01

    The present study was designed to examine the occurrence of the precursor minerals of hydroxyapatite (HA) during the process of HA formation in the rat calvaria. Dried and powdered rat calvaria and synthetic samples, such as HA, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD), octacalcium phosphate (OCP), (β-calcium pyrophosphate) and (β-tricalcium phosphate), were used. Determinations were carried out by X-ray powder diffraction and Raman microprobe spectrometry. In general, significant widening of the diffraction peaks was shown to occur after the plasma ashing was performed for the X-ray diffraction. As a result, two adjacent peaks seen normally in the diffraction angles (2 θ) 30-35 deg, which is a characteristic feature of HA, were found to fuse with each other, forming a widened single peak. Also, there was a tendency for the intensity of the diffraction peaks to increase with age. With regard to the effect of plasma ashing on the crystallograms of synthetic specimens, all specimens manifested sharp peak patterns except DCPD and OCP. In contrast, a widening of diffraction peaks was observed in the DCPD and OCP samples, indicating that crystallinity had changed during the pretreatment. Results obtained from both vital and synthetic samples after heat treatment at 1000 deg C were as follow: Clearcut diffraction patterns, characteristics of HA, were obtained in all of the calvaria samples. Further, β-TCP was produced by heat treatment of OCP, and its pattern was detected in the samples from rats younger than 6 days of age. Amounts of β-TCP in percentage were disclosed to be 40.2% in embryonal samples, 28.4% in newborn samples, and 18.6% in 6-day-old samples. But no β-TCP could be detected in the 12-week-old samples, indicating that the amount of β-TCP in calvaria decreased with age. We also found that ashing pretreatment did not cause any changes in the samples of HA, β-CPP, and β-TCP. Further, DCPD and β-CPP samples shared the same diffraction pattern, and OCP

  13. Possibility of gravitational wave detector production on the base of light diffraction

    Segizboev, T.I.

    1989-01-01

    Gravitational wave detector based on the light diffraction is proposed. Under the gravitation wave incidence on an elastic rod standing acoustic oscillations are excited in it, which are then used as a diffraction grating for the light scattering. A detailed mathematical analysis of this detector is given. 1 ref

  14. Crystallography of waxes - an electron diffraction study of refined and natural products

    Dorset, Douglas L.

    1997-02-01

    The crystal structure of four waxes has been investigated by electron crystallography. Two of these waxes, including a refined petroleum product (Gulfwax) and a material from lignite (montan wax), form well ordered crystals and their structure could be solved quantitatively from the observed 0022-3727/30/3/018/img1 diffraction patterns. As also found previously for simpler binary n-paraffin solid solutions, the average structure resembles that of a pure paraffin (e.g. n-0022-3727/30/3/018/img2) but with a Gaussian distribution of atomic occupancies near the chain ends to account for the statistical distribution of chain lengths within a lamella. Two other waxes from living organisms, South African bee honeycomb and the leaves of the Brazilian carnauba palm, are much less ordered, even though they share the same methylene subcell packing of the most crystalline parts of the previous materials. It appears that these waxes cannot fully separate into distinct lamellae, perhaps due to the presence of very long `tie' molecules, and are therefore `frustrated' crystal structures.

  15. High-pressure behavior of α-boron studied on single crystals by X-ray diffraction, Raman and IR spectroscopy

    Chuvashova, Irina, E-mail: irina.chuvashova@gmail.com [Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Bykova, Elena; Bykov, Maxim [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Svitlyk, Volodymyr [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Gasharova, Biliana [Institute for Photon Science and Synchrotron Radiation, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); IBPT, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mathis, Yves-Laurent [ANKA Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); IBPT, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Caracas, Razvan [CNRS, Laboratoire de Géologie de Lyon, ENS de Lyon, UCBL Lyon 1, Université de Lyon (France); Dubrovinsky, Leonid [Bayerisches Geoinstitut, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Dubrovinskaia, Natalia [Material Physics and Technology at Extreme Conditions, Laboratory of Crystallography, University of Bayreuth, D-95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    In the present study single crystals of rhombohedral α-B were investigated under pressure to 60 GPa by means of single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The bulk modulus of α-B was found to be K=224(7) GPa (K′=3.0(3)). Measurements of interatomic distances as a function of pressure revealed that the intericosahedral two-center two-electron (2c–2e) bonds are almost as stiff as some of intraicosahedral ones. The three-center two-electron (3c–2e) intericosahedral bonds show much higher compliance compared to other bonds in α-B. The vibrational properties of α-B under pressure were investigated by Raman spectroscopy at pressures up to 160 GPa and IR spectroscopy at pressures up to 53 GPa. - Graphical abstract: The rhombohedral α-B is highly incompressible and extremely stable: it maintains its crystal structure up to 160 GPa and its intericosahedral 2e2c bonds are almost as stiff as some of intraicosahedral ones. - Highlights: • Structural stability of α-B has been investigated up to 160 GPa on single crystals. • Single-crystal x-ray diffraction reveals that α-B is highly incompressible. • Compressibility of B{sub 12} icosahedra is considerably lower than that of the bulk material. • Intericosahedral 2e2c bonds are almost as stiff as some of intraicosahedral ones.

  16. Examining the ground layer of St. Anthony from Padua 19th century oil painting by Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Vančo, Ľubomír; Kadlečíková, Magdaléna; Breza, Juraj; Čaplovič, Ľubomír; Gregor, Miloš

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we studied the material composition of the ground layer of a neoclassical painting. We used Raman spectroscopy (RS) as a prime method. Thereafter scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) were employed as complementary techniques. The painting inspected was of the side altar in King St. Stephen's Church in Galanta (Slovakia), signed and dated by Jos. Chr. Mayer 1870. Analysis was carried out on both covered and uncovered ground layers. Four principal compounds (barite, lead white, calcite, dolomite) and two minor compounds (sphalerite, quartz) were identified. This ground composition is consistent with the 19th century painting technique used in Central Europe consisting of white pigments and white fillers. Transformation of lead white occurred under laser irradiation. Subdominant Raman peaks of the components were measured. The observed results elucidate useful partnership of RS and SEM-EDS measurements supported by X-ray powder diffraction as well as possibilities and limitations of non-destructive analysis of covered lower layers by RS.

  17. Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of Fe-Ni order-disorder processes in a 35% Ni meteorite (Santa Catharina)

    Scorzelli, R.B.; Danon, J.

    1985-01-01

    The composition and structure of iron-nickel alloys in the Santa Catharina iron meteorite were investigated by metallographic techniques, electron microprobe analysis, Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. The occurence of an ordered Fe-Ni phase with non-cubic symmetry is demonstrated. This phase is present in large proportions in the Santa Catharina meteorite, and has been identified by its asymmetric Moessbauer spectrum, arising from the presence of a quadrupolar splitting superposed on the magnetic hyperfine splitting. The other major Fe-Ni phase in Santa Catharina gives rise to a single line Moessbauer spectrum with no hyperfine components. X-ray diffraction confirms the presence of the Fe-Ni Llo superstructure in this meteorite. Lattice parameter variations with temperature were found to be identical for the meteorite and for electron irradiated Fe-Ni alloys of the sample composition. Detailed Moessbauer spectroscopy studies from room temperature to liquid helium, and in the presence of external magnetic field show the presence of a smaller amount of another ferromagnetic Fe-Ni phase, probably with disordered structure. The destruction of the superstructure in the Santa Catharina meteorite was investigated after heating the samples. Partial ordering seems to coexist with the disordered phase at intermediate annealing temperatures. At higher temperatures the samples are homogeneous and similar to laboratory produced Fe-Ni alloys with 35% Ni. Order-disorder transformations produced by shock waves and by mechanical treatment are also described. (orig.)

  18. Continuous Monitoring of Photolysis Products by Thz Spectroscopy

    Omar, Abdelaziz; Cuisset, Arnaud; Mouret, Gaël; Hindle, Francis; Eliet, Sophie; Bocquet, Robin

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate the potential of THz spectroscopy to monitor the real time evolution of the gas phase concentration of photolysis products and determine the kinetic reaction rate constant. In the primary work, we have chosen to examine the photolysis of formaldehyde (H_2CO). Exposure of H_2CO to a UVB light (250 to 360 nm) in a single pass of 135 cm length cell leads to decomposition via two mechanisms: the radical channel with production of HCO and the molecular channel with production of CO. A commercial THz source (frequency multiplication chain) operating in the range 600-900 GHz was used to detect and quantify the various chemical species as a function of time. Monitoring the concentrations of CO and H_2CO via rotational transitions, allowed the kinetic rate of H_2CO consummation to be obtained, and an estimation of the rate constants for both the molecular and radical photolysis mechanisms. We have modified our experimental setup to increase the sensitivity of the spectrometer and changed sample preparation protocol specifically to quantify the HCO concentration. Acetaldehyde was used as the precursor for photolysis by UVC resulting in the decompositon mechanism can be described by: CH_3CHO+hν→ CH_3 + HCO → CH_4 + CO Frequency modulation of the source and Zeeman modulation is used to achieve the high sensitivity required. Particular attention has been paid to the mercury photosensitization effect that allowed us to increase the HCO production enabling quantification of the monitored radical. We quantify the HCO radical and start a spectroscopic study of the line positions. H. M. Pickett and T. L. Boyd, Chem. Phys. Lett, Vol 58, 446-449, (1978) S. Eliet, A. Cuisset, M Guinet, F. Hindle, G. Mouret, R. Bocquet, and J. Demaison, Journal of Molecular Spectroscopy, Vol 279, 12-15 (2012). G. Mouret, M. Guinet, A. Cuisset, L. Croizé, S. Eliet, R. Bocquet and F. Hindle, Sensors Journal. IEEE, Vol 13, 133 - 138, (2013)

  19. 15x optical zoom and extreme optical image stabilisation: diffraction limited integral field spectroscopy with the Oxford SWIFT spectrograph

    Tecza, Matthias; Thatte, Niranjan; Clarke, Fraser; Lynn, James; Freeman, David; Roberts, Jennifer; Dekany, Richard

    2012-09-01

    When commissioned in November 2008 at the Palomar 200 inch Hale Telescope, the Oxford SWIFT I and z band integral field spectrograph, fed by the adaptive optics system PALAO, provided a wide (3×) range of spatial resolutions: three plate scales of 235 mas, 160 mas, and 80 mas per spaxel over a contiguous field-of-view of 89×44 pixels. Depending on observing conditions and guide star brightness we can choose a seeing limited scale of 235 mas per spaxel, or 160 mas and 80 mas per spaxel for very bright guide star AO with substantial increase of enclosed energy. Over the last two years PALAO was upgraded to PALM-3000: an extreme, high-order adaptive optics system with two deformable mirrors with more than 3000 actuators, promising diffraction limited performance in SWIFT's wavelength range. In order to take advantage of this increased spatial resolution we upgraded SWIFT with new pre-optics allowing us to spatially Nyquist sample the diffraction limited PALM-3000 point spread function with 16 mas resolution, reducing the spaxel scale by another factor of 5×. We designed, manufactured, integrated and tested the new pre-optics in the first half of 2011 and commissioned it in December 2011. Here we present the opto-mechanical design and assembly of the new scale changing optics, as well as laboratory and on-sky commissioning results. In optimal observing conditions we achieve substantial Strehl ratios, delivering the near diffraction limited spatial resolution in the I and z bands.

  20. Diffraction dissociation

    Abarbanel, H.

    1972-01-01

    An attempt is made to analyse the present theoretical situation in the field of diffraction scattering. Two not yet fully answered questions related with a typical diffraction process AB→CD, namely: what is the structure of the transition matrix elements, and what is the structure of the exchange mechanism responsible for the scattering, are formulated and various proposals for answers are reviewed. Interesting general statement that the products (-1)sup(J)P, where J and P are respectively spin and parity, is conserved at each vertex has been discussed. The exchange mechanism in diffractive scattering has been considered using the language of the complex J-plane as the most appropriate. The known facts about the exchange mechanism are recalled and several routs to way out are proposed. The idea to consider the moving pole and associated branch points as like a particle and the associated two and many particle unitarity cuts is described in more details. (S.B.)

  1. Electrochemical stability of organic electrolytes in supercapacitors: Spectroscopy and gas analysis of decomposition products

    Kurzweil, P.; Chwistek, M. [University of Applied Sciences, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Ring 23, D-92224 Amberg (Germany)

    2008-02-01

    The fundamental aging mechanisms in double-layer capacitors based on alkylammonium electrolytes in acetonitrile were clarified for the first time. After abusive testing at cell voltages above 4 V, ultracapacitors cast out a crystalline mass of residual electrolyte, organic acids, acetamide, aromatics, and polymer compounds. The mixture could be reproduced by electrolysis. The decomposition products of active carbon electrodes and electrolyte solution after a heat treatment at 70 C were identified by infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy, liquid and headspace GC-MS, thermogravimetric analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The alkylammonium cation is destroyed by the elimination of ethene. The fluoroborate anion works as source of fluoride and hydrogenfluoride, and boric acid derivates. Acetonitrile forms acetamide, acetic and fluoroacetic acid, and derivates thereof. Due to the catalytic activity of the electrode, heterocyclic compounds are generated in the liquid phase. The etched aluminium support under the active carbon layer is locally destroyed by fluorination. Exploring novel electrolytes, ionic liquids were characterized by impedance spectroscopy. (author)

  2. Powder diffraction

    Hart, M.

    1995-12-31

    the importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940`s, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments.

  3. Powder diffraction

    Hart, M.

    1995-01-01

    The importance of x-ray powder diffraction as an analytical tool for phase identification of materials was first pointed out by Debye and Scherrer in Germany and, quite independently, by Hull in the US. Three distinct periods of evolution lead to ubiquitous application in many fields of science and technology. In the first period, until the mid-1940's, applications were and developed covering broad categories of materials including inorganic materials, minerals, ceramics, metals, alloys, organic materials and polymers. During this formative period, the concept of quantitative phase analysis was demonstrated. In the second period there followed the blossoming of technology and commercial instruments became widely used. The history is well summarized by Parrish and by Langford and Loueer. By 1980 there were probably 10,000 powder diffractometers in routine use, making it the most widely used of all x-ray crystallographic instruments. In the third, present, period data bases became firmly established and sophisticated pattern fitting and recognition software made many aspects of powder diffraction analysis routine. High resolution, tunable powder diffractometers were developed at sources of synchrotron radiation. The tunability of the spectrum made it possible to exploit all the subtleties of x-ray spectroscopy in diffraction experiments

  4. Temperature-dependent surface structure, composition, and electronic properties of the clean SrTiO3(111) crystal face: Low-energy-electron diffraction, Auger-electron spectroscopy, electron energy loss, and ultraviolet-photoelectron spectroscopy studies

    Lo, W.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Low-energy-electron diffraction, Auger-electron spectroscopy, electron-energy-loss, and ultraviolet-photoelectron spectroscopies were used to study the structure, composition, and electron energy distribution of a clean single-crystal (111) face of strontium titanate (perovskite). The dependence of the surface chemical composition on the temperature has been observed along with corresponding changes in the surface electronic properties. High-temperature Ar-ion bombardment causes an irreversible change in the surface structure, stoichiometry, and electron energy distribution. In contrast to the TiO 2 surface, there are always significant concentrations of Ti 3+ in an annealed ordered SrTiO 3 (111) surface. This stable active Ti 3+ monolayer on top of a substrate with large surface dipole potential makes SrTiO 3 superior to TiO 2 when used as a photoanode in the photoelectrochemical cell

  5. X-ray absorption spectroscopy and neutron diffraction study of the perovskite-type rare-earth cobaltites

    Sikolenko, V.; Efimova, E.; Franz, A.; Ritter, C.; Troyanchuk, I. O.; Karpinsky, D.; Zubavichus, Y.; Veligzhanin, A.; Tiutiunnikov, S. I.; Sazonov, A.; Efimov, V.

    2018-05-01

    Correlations between local and long-range structure distortions in the perovskite-type RE1-xSrxCoO3-δ (RE = La, Pr, Nd; x = 0.0 and 0.5) compounds have been studied at room temperature by extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the Co K-edge and high-resolution neutron powder diffraction (NPD). The use of two complementary experimental techniques allowed us to explore the influence of the type of rare-earth element and strontium substitution on unusual behavior of static and dynamic features of both the Co-O bond lengths.

  6. Survival probability for diffractive dijet production in p anti p collisions from next-to-leading order calculations

    Klasen, M.; Kramer, G.

    2009-08-01

    We perform next-to-leading order calculations of the single-diffractive and non-diffractive cross sections for dijet production in proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron. By comparing their ratio to the data published by the CDF collaboration for two different center-of-mass energies, we deduce the rapidity-gap survival probability as a function of the momentum fraction of the parton in the antiproton. Assuming Regge factorization, this probability can be interpreted as a suppression factor for the diffractive structure function measured in deep-inelastic scattering at HERA. In contrast to the observations for photoproduction, the suppression factor in protonantiproton collisions depends on the momentum fraction of the parton in the Pomeron even at next-to-leading order. (orig.)

  7. Application of Moessbauer spectroscopy on corrosion products of NPP

    Dekan, J., E-mail: julius.dekan@stuba.sk; Lipka, J.; Slugen, V. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology, SUT (Slovakia)

    2013-04-15

    Steam generator (SG) is generally one of the most important components at all nuclear power plants (NPP) with close impact to safe and long-term operation. Material degradation and corrosion/erosion processes are serious risks for long-term reliable operation. Steam generators of four VVER-440 units at nuclear power plants V-1 and V-2 in Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia) were gradually changed by new original 'Bohunice' design in period 1994-1998, in order to improve corrosion resistance of SGs. Corrosion processes before and after these design and material changes in Bohunice secondary circuit were studied using Moessbauer spectroscopy during last 25 years. Innovations in the feed water pipeline design as well as material composition improvements were evaluated positively. Moessbauer spectroscopy studies of phase composition of corrosion products were performed on real specimens scrapped from water pipelines or in form of filters deposits. Newest results in our long-term corrosion study confirm good operational experiences and suitable chemical regimes (reduction environment) which results mostly in creation of magnetite (on the level 70 % or higher) and small portions of hematite, goethite or hydrooxides. Regular observation of corrosion/erosion processes is essential for keeping NPP operation on high safety level. The output from performed material analyses influences the optimisation of operating chemical regimes and it can be used in optimisation of regimes at decontamination and passivation of pipelines or secondary circuit components. It can be concluded that a longer passivation time leads more to magnetite fraction in the corrosion products composition.

  8. High-pressure optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on synthetic cobalt aluminum silicate garnet

    N. Taran, Michail; Nestola, Fabrizio; Ohashi, Haruo

    2007-01-01

    The pressure-induced behavior of spin-allowed dd-bands of VIIICo2+ in the absorption spectra of synthetic Co3Al2Si3O12 garnet was studied from 10-4 to 13 GPa. The plots of the peak energy vs. pressure for the three sharpest well resolved bands at ca. 5160, 17 680, and 18 740 cm-1 display small...... but discernible breaks in linear relations between 4 and 5 GPa. Datafromsingle-crystalX-raydiffractionData from single-crystal X-ray diffraction likewise show discontinuities in trends of CoO8 polyhedral volume and distortion, and Co-O and Si-O bond distances over this pressure range. These effects are related...... to a pressure-induced phase transition from the ß- to a-isostructural polymorph of Co3Al2Si3O12....

  9. Characterization of cubic ceria?zirconia powders by X-ray diffraction and vibrational and electronic spectroscopy

    Sánchez Escribano, Vicente; Fernández López, Enrique; Panizza, Marta; Resini, Carlo; Gallardo Amores, José Manuel; Busca, Guido

    2003-10-01

    The X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns and the Infrared, Raman and UV-visible spectra of CeO 2ZrO 2 powders prepared by co-precipitation are presented. Raman spectra provide evidence for the largely predominant cubic structure of the powders with CeO 2 molar composition higher than 25%. Also skeletal IR spectra allow to distinguish cubic from tetragonal phases which are instead not easily distinguished on the basis of the XRD patterns. All mixed oxides including pure ceria are strong UV absorbers although also absorb in the violet visible region. By carefully selecting their composition and treatment temperature, the onset of the radiation that they cut off can be chosen in the 425-475 nm interval. Although they are likely metastable, the cubic phases are still pure even after heating at 1173 K for 4 h.

  10. Diffractive Dijet Production with a Leading Proton in ep Collisions at HERA

    Andreev, V.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Belov, P.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Dossanov, A.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Herbst, M.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krüger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Müller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rusakov, S.; Šálek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wünsch, E.; Žáček, J.; Zhang, Z.; Žlebčík, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2015-05-11

    The cross section of the diffractive process e^+p -> e^+Xp is measured at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton p is detected in the H1 Very Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed in photoproduction with photon virtualities Q^2 <2 GeV^2 and in deep-inelastic scattering with 4 GeV^2diffractive parton distribution functions as extracted from measurements of inclusive cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering.

  11. Measurement of Dijet Production in Diffractive Deep-Inelastic Scattering with a Leading Proton at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.

    2012-04-18

    The cross section of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering ep \\rightarrow eXp is measured, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton is detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed for fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss xIP < 0.1 and covers the range 0.1 < |t| < 0.7 GeV2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4 < Q2 < 110 GeV2 in photon virtuality. The differential cross sections extrapolated to |t| < 1 GeV2 are in agreement with next-toleading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton distribution functions extracted from measurements of inclusive and dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The data are also compared with leading order Monte Carlo models.

  12. Measurement of dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G.; Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y.; Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kraemer, M.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E.; Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F.; Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D.; Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Chekelian, V.; Dossanov, A.; Grindhammer, G.; Kiesling, C.; Bystritskaya, L.; Fedotov, A.; Lubimov, V.; Ozerov, D.; Rostovtsev, A.; Zhokin, A.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Contreras, J.G.; Ruiz Tabasco, J.E.; Ceccopieri, F.; Delvax, J.; Wolf, E.A. de; Favart, L.; Hreus, T.; Janssen, X.; Marage, P.; Roosen, R.; Staykova, Z.; Mechelen, P. van; Cerny, K.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Salek, D.; Valkarova, A.; Zacek, J.; Coughlan, J.A.; Morris, J.V.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Cvach, J.; Reimer, P.; Zalesak, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Gabathuler, E.; Greenshaw, T.; Klein, M.; Kluge, T.; Kretzschmar, J.; Laycock, P.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Patel, G.D.; Daum, K.; Meyer, H.; Diaconu, C.; Hoffmann, D.; Sauvan, E.; Vallee, C.; Dobre, M.; Placakyte, R.; Dodonov, V.; Povh, B.; Egli, S.; Hildebrandt, M.; Horisberger, R.; Feltesse, J.; Perez, E.; Schoeffel, L.; Goerlich, L.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Nowak, G.; Sopicki, P.; Turnau, J.; Grab, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Sloan, T.; Hennekemper, E.; Herbst, M.; Krueger, K.; Lendermann, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Henschel, H.; Hiller, K.H.; Kostka, P.; Lange, W.; Naumann, T.; Herrera, G.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Huber, F.; Pirumov, H.; Radescu, V.; Sauter, M.; Schoening, A.; Joensson, L.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Makankine, A.; Morozov, A.; Nikitin, D.; Palichik, V.; Spaskov, V.; Landon, M.P.J.; Rizvi, E.; Traynor, D.; Martyn, H.U.; Mueller, K.; Robmann, P.; Straumann, U.; Truoel, P.; Stella, B.; Sykora, T.; Tsakov, I.; Wegener, D.

    2012-01-01

    The cross section of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering ep→eXp is measured, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton is detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed for fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss x P 2 in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4 2 2 in photon virtuality. The differential cross sections extrapolated to vertical stroke t vertical stroke 2 are in agreement with next-to-leading order QCD predictions based on diffractive parton distribution functions extracted from measurements of inclusive and dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The data are also compared with leading order Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  13. Diffractive dijet production with a leading proton in ep collisions at HERA

    Andreev, V.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Begzsuren, K.

    2014-12-01

    The cross section of the diffractive process e + p→e + Xp is measured at a centre-of-mass energy of 318 GeV, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton p is detected in the H1 Very Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed in photoproduction with photon virtualities Q 2 <2 GeV 2 and in deep-inelastic scattering with 4 GeV 2 diffractive parton distribution functions as extracted from measurements of inclusive cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering.

  14. Measurement of dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    Aaron, F.D.; Alexa, C.; Rotaru, M.; Stoicea, G. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V.; Belousov, A.; Eliseev, A.; Fomenko, A.; Gogitidze, N.; Lebedev, A.; Malinovski, E.; Rusakov, S.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Soloviev, Y.; Vazdik, Y. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (Russian Federation); Backovic, S.; Dubak, A.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Picuric, I.; Raicevic, N. [Univ. of Montenegro, Faculty of Science, Podgorica (ME); Baghdasaryan, A.; Baghdasaryan, S.; Zohrabyan, H. [Yerevan Physics Inst., Yerevan (Armenia); Barrelet, E. [CNRS/IN2P3, LPNHE, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie Paris 6, Univ. Denis Diderot Paris 7, Paris (France); Bartel, W.; Belov, P.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Britzger, D.; Campbell, A.J.; Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Felst, R.; Fischer, D.J.; Fleischer, M.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grebenyuk, A.; Grell, B.R.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Helebrant, C.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kraemer, M.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, J.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, K.; Olsson, J.E.; Pahl, P.; Panagoulias, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Petrukhin, A.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Schmitt, S.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; South, D.; Steder, M.; Wuensch, E. [DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Begzsuren, K.; Ravdandorj, T.; Tseepeldorj, B. [Inst. of Physics and Technology of the Mongolian Academy of Sciences, Ulaanbaatar (Mongolia); Bizot, J.C.; Brisson, V.; Delcourt, B.; Jacquet, M.; Pascaud, C.; Tran, T.H.; Zhang, Z.; Zomer, F. [CNRS/IN2P3, LAL, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay (France); Boudry, V.; Moreau, F.; Specka, A. [CNRS/IN2P3, LLR, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Mudrinic, M.; Pandurovic, M.; Smiljanic, I. [Univ. of Belgrade, Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (RS); Bracinik, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Newman, P.R.; Thompson, P.D. [Univ. of Birmingham (United Kingdom); Bruncko, D.; Cerny, V.; Ferencei, J. [Slovak Academy of Sciences, Kosice (Slovakia)] [and others

    2012-04-15

    The cross section of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering ep{yields}eXp is measured, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton is detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed for fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss x{sub P}<0.1 and covers the range 0.1< vertical stroke t vertical stroke <0.7 GeV{sup 2} in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4diffractive parton distribution functions extracted from measurements of inclusive and dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The data are also compared with leading order Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  15. Diffractive dijet production with a leading proton in ep collisions at HERA

    Zlebcik, Radek

    2016-03-01

    The cross section of the diffractive process e + p → e + Xp is measured at a centre-of mass energies of 319 GeV, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton p is detected in the H1 Very Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed in photoproduction defined by photon virtualities Q 2 < 2 GeV 2 and in deep-inelastic scattering with 4 GeV 2 < Q 2 < 80 GeV 2 . The results are compared to next-to-leading order QCD calculations based on diffractive parton distribution functions as extracted from measurements of inclusive cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. A collinear QCD factorization theorem is tested against the measured cross sections and their ratios.

  16. On the authenticity of eight Reales 1730 Mexican silver coins by X-ray diffraction and by energy dispersion spectroscopy techniques

    Rojas-Rodriguez, I.; Herrera, A.; Vazquez-Lopez, C.; Apolo, R.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, J.; Hernandez-Landaverde, M.A.; Rodriguez, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Ancient silver Mexican coins made during the years 1730-1734, were analyzed non-destructively by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and by optical microscopy. Nine coins of denomination eight Reales were studied. These coins belong to the numismatic private collection in Mexico. Six elements (copper, aluminum, magnesium, silicon, chromium and silver) were determined quantitatively. The coins reveal a uniform Ag concentration. Some of the items are covered with patina. A strong positive correlation between Al and Cu content and also a strong negative correlation between S and Ag were determined. The weight of the coins varied between 26.1344 and 26.9913 g, which is a good indicator of the authenticity of the items. The purpose of this work is to investigate by precise means if some of the coins were falsified or if really all of them are authentic

  17. Radial composition of single InGaN nanowires: a combined study by EDX, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction

    Gomez-Gomez, M.; Garro, N.; Cantarero, A. [Institut de Ciencia dels Materials, Universitat de Valencia, Paterna (Spain); Segura-Ruiz, J.; Martinez-Criado, G.; Chu, M.H. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Experiments Division, Grenoble (France); Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A. [IV. Physikalisches Institut, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    The radial alloy distribution of In{sub x} Ga{sub 1-x}N nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated by three different techniques with nanometric spatial resolution and capability to study single nanowires. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy radial line-scans revealed a gradient in the alloy composition of individual nanowires. Resonant Raman scattering and spatially resolved X-ray diffraction showed the existence of three distinctive regions with different alloy composition. The combination of the three techniques provides robust evidence of the spontaneous formation of a core-shell structure with a thin Ga-richer shell wrapping an In-rich core at the bottom part of the nanowires. This composition-modulated nanostructure offers an attractive way to explore new device concepts in fully epitaxial nanowire-based solar cells. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Radial composition of single InGaN nanowires: a combined study by EDX, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction

    Gomez-Gomez, M.; Garro, N.; Cantarero, A.; Segura-Ruiz, J.; Martinez-Criado, G.; Chu, M.H.; Denker, C.; Malindretos, J.; Rizzi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The radial alloy distribution of In x Ga 1-x N nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy has been investigated by three different techniques with nanometric spatial resolution and capability to study single nanowires. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy radial line-scans revealed a gradient in the alloy composition of individual nanowires. Resonant Raman scattering and spatially resolved X-ray diffraction showed the existence of three distinctive regions with different alloy composition. The combination of the three techniques provides robust evidence of the spontaneous formation of a core-shell structure with a thin Ga-richer shell wrapping an In-rich core at the bottom part of the nanowires. This composition-modulated nanostructure offers an attractive way to explore new device concepts in fully epitaxial nanowire-based solar cells. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Short chain lead (II) alkanoates as ionic liquids and glass formers: A d.s.c., X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy study

    Martinez Casado, F.J.; Sanchez Arenas, A.; Garcia Perez, M.V.; Redondo Yelamos, M.I.; Lopez de Andres, S.; Cheda, J.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    Three members of the lead (II) n-alkanoates (from etanoate to n-butanoate) have been synthesized, purified and studied by d.s.c., X-ray diffraction, and FTIR spectroscopy. Lead (II) acetate, propanoate, and butanoate present only a melting transition at T = (452.6, 398.2, and 346.5) K, with Δ f H = (16.0, 13.1, and 15.6) kJ . mol -1 , and Δ f S (35.3, 32.8, and 45.1) J . mol -1 . K -1 , respectively. These temperature data correct to a great extent the historical values reported in the literature. These three members readily quench into a glass state. Their corresponding T g values are (314.4, 289.0, and 274.9) K, respectively, measured by d.s.c. at a heating rate of 5 K . min -1

  20. Characterization of sintered samples of La/Sr/Cu/O by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

    Gonzalez, C.O. de; Polla, Griselda; Manghi, Estela

    1987-01-01

    Samples of La/Sr/Cu/O were sinterized by solid state reaction starting from a nominal composition of La 1 .8, Sr 0 .2, CuO 4 . They presented superconductive properties with T c = 40.9 K (onset) and δ T c = 17 K. Two phases were observed by X-ray diffraction and the more abundant was the tetragonal phase. The mean grain size was 1-5 μm. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements were carried out using Mg kα (1486.6 eV) as incident radiation. Sample temperature was varied between -180 deg C and 420 deg C, approximately. The temperature variation produces a change in the atomic concentration of the surface components. Deconvolutions of the O 1s peaks show three components with binding energies (B.E.). The decomposition of Cu 2p 3 /2 peaks presents two components corresponding to Cu + and Cu 2+ . (Author) [es

  1. C-Ni-Pd and CNT-Ni-Pd film's molecular and crystalline structure investigations by FTIR spectroscopy and XRD diffraction

    Stepińska, Izabela; Czerwosz, ElŻbieta; Diduszko, Ryszard; Kozłowski, Mirosław; Wronka, Halina

    2017-08-01

    In this work molecular and crystalline structure of new type of nanocomposite films were investigated. These films compose of CNT decorated with palladium nanograins. They were prepared on a base of C-Ni films modified in CVD process. C-Ni nanocomposite films were obtained by PVD process and their modification by CVD leads to a growth of CNT film. CNTs-Ni or C-Ni films were treated with additional PVD process with palladium. Nickel and palladium acetate and fulleren C60 are precursors of films in PVD process. FTIR spectroscopy was used to studied the molecular structure of film in every stage of preparation . The crystalline structure of these films was studied by X-ray diffraction. SEM (scanning electron microscopy) was applied to investigate film's surface topography.

  2. Analysis of structure and vibrational dynamics of the BeTe(001) surface using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and density functional theory

    Kumpf, C.; Müller, A.; Weigand, W.

    2003-01-01

    The atomic structure and lattice dynamics of epitaxial BeTe(001) thin films are derived from surface x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. On the Te-rich BeTe(001) surface [1 (1) over bar0]-oriented Te dimers are identified. They cause a (2 X 1) superstructure and induce a pronounced buckling...... in the underlying Te layer. The Be-rich surface exhibits a (4 X 1) periodicity with alternating Te dimers and Te-Be-Te trimers. A vibration eigenfrequency of 165 cm(-1) is observed for the Te-rich surface, while eigenmodes at 157 and 188 cm(-1) are found for the Be-rich surface. The experimentally derived atomic...... geometry and the vibration modes are in very good agreement with the results of density functional theory calculations....

  3. Measurement of Dijet Production in Diffractive Deep-Inelastic ep Scattering at HERA

    Andreev, V.; Begzsuren, K.; Belousov, A.; Boudry, V.; Brandt, G.; Brisson, V.; Britzger, D.; Buniatyan, A.; Bylinkin, A.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Ceccopieri, F.; Cerny, K.; Chekelian, V.; Contreras, J.G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; Diaconu, C.; Dobre, M.; Dodonov, V.; Eckerlin, G.; Egli, S.; Elsen, E.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Fleischer, M.; Fomenko, A.; Gabathuler, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, S.; Glazov, A.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Grebenyuk, A.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Haidt, D.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Herbst, M.; Hladky, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hreus, T.; Huber, F.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Kiesling, C.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kogler, R.; Kostka, P.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Levonian, S.; Lipka, K.; List, B.; List, J.; Lobodzinski, B.; Malinovski, E.; Martyn, H.U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Mikocki, S.; Morozov, A.; Muller, K.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P.R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nowak, G.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Pahl, P.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Pirumov, H.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Pokorny, B.; Polifka, R.; Radescu, V.; Raicevic, N.; Ravdandorj, T.; Reimer, P.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rotaru, M.; Rusakov, S.; Salek, D.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Sefkow, F.; Shushkevich, S.; Soloviev, Y.; Sopicki, P.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Straumann, U.; Sykora, T.; Thompson, P.D.; Traynor, D.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tseepeldorj, B.; Turnau, J.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vazdik, Y.; Wegener, D.; Wunsch, E.; Zacek, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zlebcik, R.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2015-03-18

    A measurement is presented of single- and double-differential dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic $ep$ scattering at HERA using data collected by the H1 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 290 pb^{-1}. The investigated phase space is spanned by the photon virtuality in the range of 4diffractive parton distribution functions and the value of the strong coupling constant is extracted.

  4. Spectroscopy

    Hellman, Hal

    1968-01-01

    This booklet discusses spectroscopy, the study of absorption of radiation by matter, including X-ray, gamma-ray, microwave, mass spectroscopy, as well as others. Spectroscopy has produced more fundamental information to the study of the detailed structure of matter than any other tools.

  5. Molecular structure of hybrid imino-chalcone in the solid state: X-ray diffraction, spectroscopy study and third-order nonlinear optical properties

    Custodio, J. M. F.; Santos, F. G.; Vaz, W. F.; Cunha, C. E. P.; Silveira, R. G.; Anjos, M. M.; Campos, C. E. M.; Oliveira, G. R.; Martins, F. T.; da Silva, C. C.; Valverde, C.; Baseia, B.; Napolitano, H. B.

    2018-04-01

    A comprehensive structural study of the compound (2E)-1-((E)-4-(4-methoxybenzylideneamino)phenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one was carried out in this work. Single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD), X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), NMR, Raman and Infrared spectroscopies, and DFT calculations were performed for characterization of this iminochalcone hybrid. Intermolecular interactions were described by Hirshfeld surface analysis derived from crystal structure. Reactivity and intramolecular charge transfer were investigated using the frontier molecular orbitals and molecular electrostatic potential. In addition, we have calculated the Nonlinear Optical Properties at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311+g(d) level of theory in the presence of different solvents (gas-phase, acetone, chloroform, dichloromethane, dimethyl sulfoxide, ethanol, methanol, and water), being found meaningful NLO parameters for our compound. At last, there is a good agreement between calculated and experimental IR spectrum, allowing the assignment of some of normal vibrational modes of the iminochalcone hybrid.

  6. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    Sun, Cheng-Jun; Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Zhang, Bangmin; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M.; Venkatesan, T.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr 0.67 Sr 0.33 MnO 3 film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam

  7. Combined operando X-ray diffraction-electrochemical impedance spectroscopy detecting solid solution reactions of LiFePO4 in batteries.

    Hess, Michael; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Villevieille, Claire; Novák, Petr

    2015-09-08

    Lithium-ion batteries are widely used for portable applications today; however, often suffer from limited recharge rates. One reason for such limitation can be a reduced active surface area during phase separation. Here we report a technique combining high-resolution operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy to directly track non-equilibrium intermediate phases in lithium-ion battery materials. LiFePO4, for example, is known to undergo phase separation when cycled under low-current-density conditions. However, operando X-ray diffraction under ultra-high-rate alternating current and direct current excitation reveal a continuous but current-dependent, solid solution reaction between LiFePO4 and FePO4 which is consistent with previous experiments and calculations. In addition, the formation of a preferred phase with a composition similar to the eutectoid composition, Li0.625FePO4, is evident. Even at a low rate of 0.1C, ∼20% of the X-ray diffractogram can be attributed to non-equilibrium phases, which changes our understanding of the intercalation dynamics in LiFePO4.

  8. Analysis of bakery products by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Bilge, Gonca; Boyacı, İsmail Hakkı; Eseller, Kemal Efe; Tamer, Uğur; Çakır, Serhat

    2015-08-15

    In this study, we focused on the detection of Na in bakery products by using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) as a quick and simple method. LIBS experiments were performed to examine the Na at 589 nm to quantify NaCl. A series of standard bread sample pellets containing various concentrations of NaCl (0.025-3.5%) were used to construct the calibration curves and to determine the detection limits of the measurements. Calibration graphs were drawn to indicate functions of NaCl and Na concentrations, which showed good linearity in the range of 0.025-3.5% NaCl and 0.01-1.4% Na concentrations with correlation coefficients (R(2)) values greater than 0.98 and 0.96. The obtained detection limits for NaCl and Na were 175 and 69 ppm, respectively. Performed experimental studies showed that LIBS is a convenient method for commercial bakery products to quantify NaCl concentrations as a rapid and in situ technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Kinetics of methane-ethane gas replacement in clathrate-hydrates studied by time-resolved neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Murshed, M Mangir; Schmidt, Burkhard C; Kuhs, Werner F

    2010-01-14

    The kinetics of CH(4)-C(2)H(6) replacement in gas hydrates has been studied by in situ neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Deuterated ethane structure type I (C(2)H(6) sI) hydrates were transformed in a closed volume into methane-ethane mixed structure type II (CH(4)-C(2)H(6) sII) hydrates at 5 MPa and various temperatures in the vicinity of 0 degrees C while followed by time-resolved neutron powder diffraction on D20 at ILL, Grenoble. The role of available surface area of the sI starting material on the formation kinetics of sII hydrates was studied. Ex situ Raman spectroscopic investigations were carried out to crosscheck the gas composition and the distribution of the gas species over the cages as a function of structure type and compared to the in situ neutron results. Raman micromapping on single hydrate grains showed compositional and structural gradients between the surface and core of the transformed hydrates. Moreover, the observed methane-ethane ratio is very far from the one expected for a formation from a constantly equilibrated gas phase. The results also prove that gas replacement in CH(4)-C(2)H(6) hydrates is a regrowth process involving the nucleation of new crystallites commencing at the surface of the parent C(2)H(6) sI hydrate with a progressively shrinking core of unreacted material. The time-resolved neutron diffraction results clearly indicate an increasing diffusion limitation of the exchange process. This diffusion limitation leads to a progressive slowing down of the exchange reaction and is likely to be responsible for the incomplete exchange of the gases.

  10. Spectroscopy

    Walker, S

    1976-01-01

    The three volumes of Spectroscopy constitute the one comprehensive text available on the principles, practice and applications of spectroscopy. By giving full accounts of those spectroscopic techniques only recently introduced into student courses - such as Mössbauer spectroscopy and photoelectron spectroscopy - in addition to those techniques long recognised as being essential in chemistry teaching - sucha as e.s.r. and infrared spectroscopy - the book caters for the complete requirements of undergraduate students and at the same time provides a sound introduction to special topics for graduate students.

  11. Single meson production in proton diffraction at 190 GeV/c at COMPASS

    Weisrock, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    The quark model successfully describes all ground state baryons as members of SU(N) flavour multiplets. For excited baryon states the situation is totally different. There are much less states found in the experiment than predicted in most theoretical calculations. This fact has been known for a long time as the 'missing resonance problem'. In addition, many states found in experiments are only poorly measured up to now. Therefore, further experimental efforts are needed to clarify the situation. At COMPASS, reactions of a 190 GeV/c hadron beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target are investigated. The hadron beam contains different species of particles (π,K,p). To distinguish these particles, two Cherenkov detectors are used. In this thesis, a new method for the identification of particles from the detector information is developed. This method is based on statistical approaches and allows a better kaon identification efficiency with a similar purity compared to the method, which was used before. The reaction pp→ppX with X=(π 0 ,η,ω,φ) is used to study different production mechanisms. A previous analysis of ω and φ mesons is extended to pseudoscalar mesons. As the resonance contributions in pη are smaller than in pπ 0 a different behaviour of these two final states is expected as a function of kinematic variables. The investigation of these differences allows to study different production mechanisms and to estimate the size of the resonant contribution in the different channels. In addition, the channel pp→ppX allows to study baryon resonances in the pX system. In the COMPASS energy regime, the reaction is dominated by Pomeron exchange. As a Pomeron carries vacuum quantum numbers, no isospin is transferred between the target proton and the beam proton. Therefore, the pX final state has isospin (1)/(2) and all baryon resonances in this channel are N* baryons. This offers the opportunity to do spectroscopy without taking Δ resonances into

  12. Diffractive Jet Production in Deep-Inelastic $e^{+}p$ Collisions at HERA

    Adloff, C.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Arkadov, V.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Ayyaz, I.; Babaev, A.; Bahr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Bate, P.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Beier, C.; Belousov, A.; Benisch, T.; Berger, Christoph; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J.C.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Broker, H.B.; Brown, D.P.; Bruckner, W.; Bruel, P.; Bruncko, D.; Burger, J.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burkhardt, H.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Campbell, A.J.; Cao, Jun; Carli, T.; Caron, S.; Chabert, E.; Clarke, D.; Clerbaux, B.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J.G.; Coppens, Y.R.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cousinou, M.C.; Cox, B.E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Dau, W.D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J.D.; Droutskoi, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleming, Y.H.; Flugge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formanek, J.; Foster, J.M.; Franke, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, Joerg; Gerhards, R.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Goldberg, M.; Goodwin, C.; Grab, C.; Grassler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, Guenter; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haynes, W.J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hladky, J.; Hoting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Issever, C .; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Jansen, D.M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jones, M.A.S.; Jung, H.; Kastli, H.K.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kermiche, S.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S.D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S.K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Krasny, M.W.; Krehbiel, H.; Kroseberg, J.; Kruger, K.; Kupper, A.; Kuhr, T.; Kurca, T.; Lahmann, R.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leissner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindstroem, M.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Luders, S.; Luke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Magnussen, N.; Mahlke-Kruger, H.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Malinovski, I.; Maracek, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Merkel, P.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, P.O.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mkrtchyan, T.; Mohr, R.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M.N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, T.; Nellen, G.; Newman, Paul R.; Nicholls, T.C.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Olsson, J.E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Perez, E.; Phillips, J.P.; Pitzl, D.; Poschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rabbertz, K.; Radel, G.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Reyna, D.; Riess, S.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Royon, C.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmitt, S.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schorner, T.; Schroder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlak, K.; Sefkow, F.; Chekelian, V.I.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sievers, P.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Solochenko, V.; Solovev, Y.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Steinhart, J.; Stella, B.; Stellberger, A.; Stiewe, J.; Straumann, U.; Struczinski, W.; Swart, M.; Tasevsky, M.; Chernyshov, V.; Chetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, Graham; Thompson, P.D.; Tobien, N.; Traynor, D.; Truoel, Peter; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J.E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Udluft, S.; Usik, A.; Valkar, S.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wallny, R.; Walter, T.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Weber, M.; Wegener, D.; Werner, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.G.; Wissing, C.; Wobisch, M.; Wollatz, H.; Wunsch, E.; Wyatt, A.C.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zsembery, J.; zur Nedden, M.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement is presented of dijet and 3-jet cross sections in low-|t| diffractive deep-inelastic scattering interactions of the type ep -> eXY, where the system X is separated by a large rapidity gap from a low-mass baryonic system Y. Data taken with the H1 detector at HERA, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.0 pb^(-1), are used to measure hadron level single and double differential cross sections for 44 GeV. The energy flow not attributed to jets is also investigated. The measurements are consistent with a factorising diffractive exchange with trajectory intercept close to 1.2 and tightly constrain the dominating diffractive gluon distribution. Viewed in terms of the diffractive scattering of partonic fluctuations of the photon, the data require the dominance of qqbarg over qqbar states. Soft colour neutralisation models in their present form cannot simultaneously reproduce the shapes and the normalisations of the differential cross sections. Models based on 2-gluon exchange are able to reprod...

  13. Diffractive jet production in deep-inelastic e+p collisions at HERA

    Adloff, C.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.

    2001-01-01

    A measurement is presented of dijet and 3-jet cross sections in low- vertical stroke t vertical stroke diffractive deep-inelastic scattering interactions of the type ep →eXY, where the system X is separated by a large rapidity gap from a low-mass baryonic system Y. Data taken with the H1 detector at HERA, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.0 pb -1 , are used to measure hadron level single and double differential cross sections for 4 2 2 , x P T,jet >4 GeV. The energy flow not attributed to jets is also investigated. The measurements are consistent with a factorising diffractive exchange with trajectory intercept close to 1.2 and tightly constrain the dominating diffractive gluon distribution. Viewed in terms of the diffractive scattering of partonic fluctuations of the photon, the data require the dominance of qqg over qq states. Soft colour neutralisation models in their present form cannot simultaneously reproduce the shapes and the normalisations of the differential cross sections. Models based on 2-gluon exchange are able to reproduce the shapes of the cross sections at low x P values. (orig.)

  14. Diffractive {rho} production with an AdS/QCD holographic wavefunction for the {rho} meson

    Forshaw, Jeff [University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Sandapen, Ruben [Universite de Moncton, Moncton, N-B, E1A 3E9 (Canada) and Mount Allison University, Sackville, N-B, E46 1E6 (Canada)

    2013-04-15

    We report on the results of our recent research published in [1] that shows that AdS/QCD generates predictions for the rate of diffractive {rho}-meson electroproduction that are in agreement with data collected at the HERA electron-proton collider [2, 3]. Preliminary results of this research were presented in [4].

  15. Diffractive ρ production with an AdS/QCD holographic wavefunction for the ρ meson

    Forshaw, Jeff; Sandapen, Ruben

    2013-01-01

    We report on the results of our recent research published in [1] that shows that AdS/QCD generates predictions for the rate of diffractive ρ-meson electroproduction that are in agreement with data collected at the HERA electron-proton collider [2, 3]. Preliminary results of this research were presented in [4].

  16. Investigation of the role of stereoelectronic effects in the conformation of piperidones by NMR spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Cesar Garcias-Morales

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the synthesis of a series of piperidones 1–8 by the Mannich reaction and analysis of their structures and conformations in solution by NMR and mass spectrometry. The six-membered rings in 2,4,6,8-tetraphenyl-3,7-diazabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9-ones, compounds 1 and 2, adopt a chair–boat conformation, while those in 2,4-diphenyl-3-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-9-ones, compounds 3–8, adopt a chair–chair conformation because of stereoelectronic effects. These stereoelectronic effects were analyzed by the 1JC–H coupling constants, which were measured in the 13C satellites of the 1H NMR spectra obtained with the hetero-dqf pulse sequence. In the solid state, these stereoelectronic effects were investigated by measurement of X-ray diffraction data, the molecular geometry (torsional bond angles and bond distances, and inter- and intramolecular interactions, and by natural bond orbital analysis, which was performed using density functional theory at the ωB97XD/6311++G(d,p level. We found that one of the main factors influencing the conformational stability of 3–8 is the interaction between the lone-pair electrons of nitrogen and the antibonding sigma orbital of C(7–Heq (nN→σ*C–H(7eq, a type of hyperconjugative interaction.

  17. Production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the allergen Can f 2 from Canis familiaris

    Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Nilsson, Ola B.; Jönsson, Klas; Grönlund, Hans; Achour, Adnane

    2009-01-01

    The recombinant form of the allergen Can f 2 from C. familiaris was produced, isolated and crystallized in two different forms. Preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses are reported for the two crystal forms of Can f 2. The allergen Can f 2 from dog (Canis familiaris) present in saliva, dander and fur is an important cause of allergic sensitization worldwide. Here, the production, isolation, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of two crystal forms of recombinant Can f 2 are reported. The first crystal form belonged to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 68.7, b = 77.3, c = 65.1 Å, and diffracted to 1.55 Å resolution, while the second crystal form belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 75.7, b = 48.3, c = 68.7 Å, β = 126.5°, and diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution. Preliminary data analysis indicated the presence of a single molecule in the asymmetric unit for both crystal forms

  18. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy studies of solid-vacuum, solid-air and solid-liquid interfaces

    Hoffer, Saskia [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Electron based surface probing techniques can provide detailed information about surface structure or chemical composition in vacuum environments. The development of new surface techniques has made possible in situ molecular level studies of solid-gas interfaces and more recently, solid-liquid interfaces. The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, by using novel sample preparation, Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) and other traditional ultra high vacuum (UHV) techniques are shown to provide new information on the insulator/vacuum interface. The surface structure of the classic insulator NaCl has been determined using these methods. Second, using sum frequency generation (SFG) surface specific vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed on both the biopolymer/air and electrode/electrolyte interfaces. The surface structure and composition of polyetherurethane-silicone copolymers were determined in air using SFG, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). SFG studies of the electrode (platinum, gold and copper)/electrolyte interface were performed as a function of applied potential in an electrochemical cell.

  19. Grazing incidence synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy analyses of plasma nitrided ASTM F138 stainless steel

    Souza, Danilo Olzon Dionysio de; Ardisson, Jose Domingos, E-mail: dolzon@gmail.com [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Silva, Edilaine Honorio [Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie (Belgium); Olzon-Dionysio, Maristela; Souza, Sylvio Dionysio de; Fabris, Jose Domingos [Universidade Federal dos Vales do Jequitinhonha e Mucuri (UFVJM), Diamantina, MG (Brazil); Martinez, L.G. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: systematic investigation of samples of plasma-nitriding austenitic stainless steels ASTM F138 and AISI 316L is reported. The surface treatment of the steels through plasma-nitriding was used to improve further the hardness, wear and corrosion resistance of these stainless steels. The resulting layered crystallographic structure actually corresponds to several phases with close cell parameters, making their identification and quantification a real experimental challenge. The ASTM F138 and AISI 316L stainless steel disks were plasma nitrided for 4 h at 400 deg C in a 80% H{sub 2} -20% N2 atmosphere at 6 torr, using plasma current frequencies between 6 and 100 kHz. Data of Moessbauer (CEMS and CXMS) and grazing incidence synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD-SR) were systematically collected. The nitrided layer thickness were not in general influenced by the plasma frequency, except at 12 kHz, which produced a layer thickness of approximately 8.0 mm, being in average 40% thicker than for the other samples. CXMS and CEMS Moessbauer spectra for this 12 kHz-sample show a much more pronounced magnetic resonance lines than for the other samples. The Fe{sub 4}N phase presents a single magnetic hyperfine interaction; the other two (Fe{sub 2-3}N and the expanded austenite) present both paramagnetic and magnetic components, even though their hyperfine parameters may not be safely separated. We also present the results of XRD-SR that were probed at several depths. The data from these techniques may be consistently correlated and this leads to an improved model to explain the structure of the nitrided layers. (author)

  20. Measurement of dijet production in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering with a leading proton at HERA

    Aaron, F.D. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Bucharest Univ. (Romania). Faculty of Physics; Alexa, C. [National Inst. for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Andreev, V. [Lebedev Physical Inst., Moscow (RU)] (and others)

    2011-09-15

    The cross section of diffractive deep-inelastic scattering ep{yields}eXp is measured, where the system X contains at least two jets and the leading final state proton is detected in the H1 Forward Proton Spectrometer. The measurement is performed for fractional proton longitudinal momentum loss x{sub P}<0.1 and covers the range 0.1< vertical stroke t vertical stroke <0.7 GeV{sup 2} in squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex and 4diffractive parton distribution functions extracted from measurements of inclusive and dijet cross sections in diffractive deep-inelastic scattering. The data are also compared with leading order Monte Carlo models. (orig.)

  1. Diffractive Dijet Production in $\\bar{p}p$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96$ TeV

    Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Albrow, M.; /Fermilab; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Oviedo U. /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, D.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U. /Fermilab; Annovi, A.; /Frascati; Antos, J.; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Appel, J.A.; /Fermilab; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2012-06-01

    We report on a study of diffractive dijet production in {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron {bar p}p collider. A data sample from 310 pb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected by triggering on a high transverse energy jet, E{sub T}{sup jet}, in coincidence with a recoil antiproton detected in a Roman pot spectrometer is used to measure the ratio of single-diffractive to inclusive-dijet event rates as a function of x{sup {bar p}} of the interacting parton in the antiproton, the Bjorken-x, x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}}, and a Q{sup 2} {approx} (E{sub T}{sup jet}){sup 2} in the ranges 10{sup -3} < x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} < 10{sup -1} and 10{sup 2} < Q{sup 2} < 10{sup 4} GeV{sup 2}, respectively. Results are presented for the region of {bar p}-momentum-loss fraction 0.03 < {zeta}{sub {bar p}} < 0.09 and a four-momentum transfer squared t{sub {bar p}} > -4 GeV{sup 2}. The t{sub {bar p}} dependence is measured as a function of Q{sup 2} and x{sub Bj}{sup {bar p}} and compared with that of inclusive single diffraction dissociation. We find weak x{sub Bj}{sup bar p}} and Q{sup 2} dependencies in the ratio of single diffractive to inclusive event rates, and no significant Q{sup 2} dependence in the diffractive t{sub {bar p}} distributions.

  2. Reaction Kinetics of Acetone Peroxide Formation and Structure Investigations Using Raman Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    Jensen, Lars; Mortensen, Peter Mølgaard; Trane, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    functional theory (DFT)/Hartree-Fock approach. It was not possible from this to assess with certainty which intermediate products formed most extensively in an acetone/hydrogen peroxide mixture. However, it was concluded that the most likely reaction mixture is a mixture of the different intermediate...

  3. Coherent and noncoherent double diffractive production of QQ-bar pairs in heavy-ion collisions at high energies

    Agababyan, N.M.; Chatrchyan, S.A.; Galoyan, A.S.; Malakhov, A.I.; Melkumov, G.L.; Zarubin, P.I.; Jenkovszky, L.L.

    1999-01-01

    The coherent and noncoherent double diffractive production of heavy quark-antiquark pairs in ion scattering at the LHC energies has been considered. The total and differential cross sections for such processes featuring the production of cc-bar and bb-bar quark pairs in pp, CaCa, and PbPb collisions have been estimated. It has been shown that the fraction of heavy quark-antiquark pairs produced in double diffractive scattering amounts to a few percent of the number of QQ-bar pairs produced in hard QCD scattering; therefore, it is necessary to take into account such processes in detecting heavy quarks, in seeking Higgs bosons of intermediate mass, in investigating the suppression of heavy quarkonia in quark-gluon plasma, and so on. It has been demonstrated that the cross section for coherent scattering is so large that this process can be used to study collective effects in nuclei at high energies. Large values of the quark-antiquark invariant mass, M QQ-bar > or approx. 100 GeV, in association with a large rapidity gap between diffractive jets, Δη>5, exemplify manifestations of such nuclear interactions

  4. X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy analyses on the crystallinity of engineered biological hydroxyapatite for medical application

    Poralan, G. M., Jr.; Gambe, J. E.; Alcantara, E. M.; Vequizo, R. M.

    2015-06-01

    Biological hydroxyapatite (BHAp) derived from thermally-treated fish bones was successfully produced. However, the obtained biological HAp was amorphous and thus making it unfavorable for medical application. Consequently, this research exploits and engineers the crystallinity of BHAp powders by addition of CaCO3 and investigates its degree of crystallinity using XRD and IR spectroscopy. On XRD, the HAp powders with [Ca]/[P] ratios 1.42, 1.46, 1.61 and 1.93 have degree of crystallinity equal to 58.08, 72.13, 85.79, 75.85% and crystal size equal to 0.67, 0.74, 0.75, 0.72 nm, respectively. The degree of crystallinity and crystal size of the obtained calcium deficient biological HAp powders increase as their [Ca]/[P] ratio approaches the stoichiometric ratio by addition of CaCO3 as source of Ca2+ ions. These results show the possibility of engineering the crystallinity and crystal size of biological HAp by addition of CaCO3. Moreover, the splitting factor of PO4 vibration matches the result with % crystallinity on XRD. Also, the area of phosphate-substitution site of PO4 vibration shows linear relationship (R2 = 0.994) with crystal size calculated from XRD. It is worth noting that the crystallinity of the biological HAp with [Ca]/[P] ratios 1.42 and 1.48 fall near the range 60-70% for highly resorbable HAp used in the medical application.

  5. Identification and characterization of historical pigments with x-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), x-ray fluorescence analysis (XRA) and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)

    Hochleitner, B.

    2002-11-01

    This thesis presents a systematic characterization of historical inorganic pigments with respect to their crystallographic structure, main components, and trade elements, utilizing three complementary methods. The results are compiled in a computer-database containing the experimentally obtained information. The specimens examined in this study originate from a collection of 19th and 20th century pigments, dyes and binders with a wide variety of colors and materials at the Institute of Natural Sciences and Technologies in Art of the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Approximately 400 different inorganic pigments were analysed for this first study of its kind by combining the experimental techniques explained in the next paragraph. For analyzing the inorganic pigments three different methods were applied: x-ray diffraction (XRD), x-ray fluorescence (XRF) and fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) proved to be suitable techniques to identify and characterize the composition of the materials. The experimental work was focused on x-ray diffraction to detect the main components and to perform phase analysis for the identification of the crystallographic structure. To facilitate the analysis of the diffractograms and investigate differences in the elemental composition, XRF-measurements were carried out and complemented by FTIR-spectroscopy. The latter technique supports the identification of organic components of the samples and both ease phase analysis. In some cases, the obtained results show remarkable differences in composition for pigments having the same trade name. These differences consist either with respect to the identified elements or added components, such as pure white pigments. However, in most cases the chemical structure of the phase determining the color of the relevant pigment group was similar. Knowledge of the composition of the originally used pigments is of great importance for the restoration and conservation of art objects. In order to

  6. Determination of electronic and atomic properties of surface, bulk and buried interfaces: Simultaneous combination of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Rubio-Zuazo, J., E-mail: rubio@esrf.fr [SpLine, Spanish CRG BM25 Beamline at the ESRF, ESRF, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Castro, G.R. [SpLine, Spanish CRG BM25 Beamline at the ESRF, ESRF, B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, ICMM, CSIC, Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •We have developed a novel and exceptional tool for non-destructive characterization of bulk and buried interfaces that combine XRD and HAXPES. •We studied the correlation between the atomic, electronic and transport properties of oxygen deficient manganite thin films. •The diffraction data showed a cooperative tilt of the MnO{sub 6} block along the out-of-plane direction. •We shown the absence of the conventional basal plane rotation for the oxygen deficient samples. -- Abstract: Hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) is a powerful novel emerging technique for bulk compositional, chemical and electronic properties determination in a non-destructive way. It benefits from the exceptionally large escape depth of high kinetic energy photoelectrons enabling the study of bulk and buried interfaces up to several tens of nanometres depth. Its advantage over conventional XPS is based on the long mean free path of high kinetic energetic photoelectrons. Using the advantage of tuneable X-ray radiation provided by synchrotron sources the photoelectron kinetic energy, i.e. the information depth can be changed and consequently electronic and compositional depth profiles can be obtained. The combination of HAXPES with an atomic structure sensitive technique, as X-ray diffraction, opens a new research field with great potential for many systems in which their electronic properties are intimately linked to their crystallographic structure. At SpLine, the Spanish CRG Beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) we have developed a novel and exceptional set-up that combine grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) and HAXPES. Both techniques can be operated simultaneously on the same sample and using the same excitation source. The set-up includes a heavy 2S+3D diffractometer and UHV chamber equipped with an electrostatic analyzer. The UHV chamber has also MBE evaporation sources, an ion gun, a LEED optic, a sample heating and cooling

  7. Spectroscopy

    Berg, Rolf W.

    This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules.......This introductory booklet covers the basics of molecular spectroscopy, infrared and Raman methods, instrumental considerations, symmetry analysis of molecules, group theory and selection rules, as well as assignments of fundamental vibrational modes in molecules....

  8. Search for exotic baryons with hidden strangeness in proton diffractive production at the energy of 70 GeV

    Antipov, Yu.M.; Artamonov, A.V.; Batarin, V.A.; Golovkin, S.V.; Gorin, Yu.P.; Kolganov, V.Z.; Lomkatsi, G.S.; Nilov, A.F.

    2001-01-01

    Using data obtained by upgraded SPHINX spectrometer at IHEP accelerator the preliminary results on the reaction p + N → (Σ 0 K + ) + N at the energy of 70 GeV are presented. The existence of state X(2000) observed in our previous data is confirmed with the increased statistic for this state by a factor of approx 5. We also observed radiative decay of Λ (1520) → Λ + γ. The significant increase of statistics for many diffractive production reactions will allow to study them in great detail

  9. Search for exotic baryons with hidden strangeness in proton diffractive production at the energy of 70 GeV

    Antipov, Y M; Batarin, V A

    2002-01-01

    First preliminary results from upgraded SPHINX spectrometer, working in the proton beam with the energy of 70 GeV of IHEP accelerator, are presented. The data for the reaction p + N -> [SIGMA sup 0 K sup +] + N based on a new statistics are in a good agreement with our previous data and strongly support the existence of X(2000) state (with the increase of statistics for this state by a factor of approx 5). Radiative decay of LAMBDA(1520) -> LAMBDA subgamma was also observed. The significant increase of statistics for many diffractive-production reactions will allow to study them in great detail

  10. A correlative approach to segmenting phases and ferrite morphologies in transformation-induced plasticity steel using electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy

    Gazder, Azdiar A., E-mail: azdiar@uow.edu.au [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Al-Harbi, Fayez; Spanke, Hendrik Th. [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Mitchell, David R.G. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V. [Electron Microscopy Centre, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Using a combination of electron back-scattering diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy data, a segmentation procedure was developed to comprehensively distinguish austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite, ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths in a thermo-mechanically processed low-Si, high-Al transformation-induced plasticity steel. The efficacy of the ferrite morphologies segmentation procedure was verified by transmission electron microscopy. The variation in carbon content between the ferrite in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite laths was explained on the basis of carbon partitioning during their growth. - Highlights: • Multi-condition segmentation of austenite, martensite, polygonal ferrite and ferrite in bainite. • Ferrites in granular bainite and bainitic ferrite segmented by variation in relative carbon counts. • Carbon partitioning during growth explains variation in carbon content of ferrites in bainites. • Developed EBSD image processing tools can be applied to the microstructures of a variety of alloys. • EBSD-based segmentation procedure verified by correlative TEM results.

  11. Comparative investigation of Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the determination of cotton fiber crystallinity.

    Liu, Yongliang; Thibodeaux, Devron; Gamble, Gary; Bauer, Philip; VanDerveer, Don

    2012-08-01

    Despite considerable efforts in developing curve-fitting protocols to evaluate the crystallinity index (CI) from X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, in its present state XRD can only provide a qualitative or semi-quantitative assessment of the amounts of crystalline or amorphous fraction in a sample. The greatest barrier to establishing quantitative XRD is the lack of appropriate cellulose standards, which are needed to calibrate the XRD measurements. In practice, samples with known CI are very difficult to prepare or determine. In a previous study, we reported the development of a simple algorithm for determining fiber crystallinity information from Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Hence, in this study we not only compared the fiber crystallinity information between FT-IR and XRD measurements, by developing a simple XRD algorithm in place of a time-consuming and subjective curve-fitting process, but we also suggested a direct way of determining cotton cellulose CI by calibrating XRD with the use of CI(IR) as references.

  12. Quantifying low amorphous or crystalline amounts of alpha-lactose-monohydrate using X-ray powder diffraction, near-infrared spectroscopy, and differential scanning calorimetry.

    Fix, I; Steffens, K J

    2004-05-01

    Efficient and accurate quantification of low amorphous and crystalline contents within pharmaceutical materials still remains a challenging task in the pharmaceutical industry. Since X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) equipment has improved in recent years, our aim was 1) to investigate the possibility of substantially lowering the detection limits of amorphous or crystalline material to about 1% or 0.5% w/w respectively by applying conventional Bragg Brentano optics, combined with a fast and simple evaluation technique; 2) to perform these measurements within a short time to make it suitable for routine analysis; and 3) to subject the same data sets to a partial least squares regression (PLSR) in order to investigate whether it is possible to improve accuracy and precision compared to the standard integration method. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) were chosen as reference method. As model substance, alpha lactose monohydrate was chosen to create calibration curves based on predetermined mixtures of highly crystalline and amorphous substance. In contrast to DSC, XRPD and NIRS revealed an excellent linearity, precision, and accuracy with the percent of crystalline amount and a detectability down to about 0.5% w/w. Chemometric evaluation (partial least squares regression) applied to the XRPD data further improved the quality of our calibration.

  13. Short chain lead (II) alkanoates as ionic liquids and glass formers: A d.s.c., X-ray diffraction and FTIR spectroscopy study

    Martinez Casado, F.J. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sanchez Arenas, A. [Seccion Departamental de Fisica Aplicada I, Facultad de Veterinaria (Spain); Garcia Perez, M.V. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Redondo Yelamos, M.I. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Lopez de Andres, S. [Departamento de Cristalografia, Facultad de Ciencias Geologicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Cheda, J.A.R. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: cheda@quim.ucm.es

    2007-03-15

    Three members of the lead (II) n-alkanoates (from etanoate to n-butanoate) have been synthesized, purified and studied by d.s.c., X-ray diffraction, and FTIR spectroscopy. Lead (II) acetate, propanoate, and butanoate present only a melting transition at T = (452.6, 398.2, and 346.5) K, with {delta}{sub f} H = (16.0, 13.1, and 15.6) kJ . mol{sup -1}, and {delta}{sub f} S (35.3, 32.8, and 45.1) J . mol{sup -1} . K{sup -1}, respectively. These temperature data correct to a great extent the historical values reported in the literature. These three members readily quench into a glass state. Their corresponding T {sub g} values are (314.4, 289.0, and 274.9) K, respectively, measured by d.s.c. at a heating rate of 5 K . min{sup -1}.

  14. Nanoporous active carbons at ambient conditions: a comparative study using X-ray scattering and diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and N2 adsorption

    Shiryaev, A. A.; Voloshchuk, A. M.; Volkov, V. V.; Averin, A. A.; Artamonova, S. D.

    2017-05-01

    Furfural-derived sorbents and activated carbonaceous fibers were studied using Small- and Wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS), X-ray diffraction and multiwavelength Raman spectroscopy after storage at ambient conditions. Correlations between structural features with degree of activation and with sorption parameters are observed for samples obtained from a common precursor and differing in duration of activation. However, the correlations are not necessarily applicable to the carbons obtained from different precursors. Using two independent approaches we show that treatment of SWAXS results should be performed with careful analysis of applicability of the Porod law to the sample under study. In general case of a pore with rough/corrugated surface deviations from the Porod law may became significant and reflect structure of the pore-carbon interface. Ignorance of these features may invalidate extraction of closed porosity values. In most cases the pore-matrix interface in the studied samples is not atomically sharp, but is characterized by 1D or 2D fluctuations of electronic density responsible for deviations from the Porod law. Intensity of the pores-related small-angle scattering correlates positively with SBET values obtained from N2 adsorption.

  15. Nanoporous active carbons at ambient conditions: a comparative study using X-ray scattering and diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and N2 adsorption

    Shiryaev, A A; Voloshchuk, A M; Averin, A A; Artamonova, S D.; Volkov, V V

    2017-01-01

    Furfural-derived sorbents and activated carbonaceous fibers were studied using Small- and Wide-angle X-ray scattering (SWAXS), X-ray diffraction and multiwavelength Raman spectroscopy after storage at ambient conditions. Correlations between structural features with degree of activation and with sorption parameters are observed for samples obtained from a common precursor and differing in duration of activation. However, the correlations are not necessarily applicable to the carbons obtained from different precursors. Using two independent approaches we show that treatment of SWAXS results should be performed with careful analysis of applicability of the Porod law to the sample under study. In general case of a pore with rough/corrugated surface deviations from the Porod law may became significant and reflect structure of the pore-carbon interface. Ignorance of these features may invalidate extraction of closed porosity values. In most cases the pore-matrix interface in the studied samples is not atomically sharp, but is characterized by 1D or 2D fluctuations of electronic density responsible for deviations from the Porod law. Intensity of the pores-related small-angle scattering correlates positively with S BET values obtained from N 2 adsorption. (paper)

  16. Probing the thermal stability and the decomposition mechanism of a magnesium-fullerene polymer via X-ray Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Aramini, Matteo; Niskanen, Johannes; Cavallari, Chiara; Pontiroli, Daniele; Musazay, Abdurrahman; Krisch, Michael; Hakala, Mikko; Huotari, Simo

    2016-02-21

    We report the microscopic view of the thermal structural stability of the magnesium intercalated fullerene polymer Mg2C60. With the application of X-ray Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, we study in detail the decomposition pathways of the polymer system upon annealing at temperatures between 300 and 700 °C. We show that there are at least two energy scales involved in the decomposition reaction. Intermolecular carbon bonds, which are responsible for the formation of a 2D fullerene polymer, are broken with a relatively modest thermal energy, while the long-range order of the original polymer remains intact. With an increased thermal energy, the crystal structure in turn is found to undergo a transition to a novel intercalated cubic phase that is stable up to the highest temperature studied here. The local structure surrounding magnesium ions gets severely modified close to, possibly at, the phase transition. We used density functional theory based calculations to study the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the collapse of the fullerene network, and to explain the intermediate steps as well as the reaction pathways in the break-up of this peculiar C60 intermolecular bonding architecture.

  17. In situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy/synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction-A powerful new technique for the characterization of electrochemical surfaces and interfaces

    De Marco, Roland [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)]. E-mail: r.demarco@exchange.curtin.edu.au; Jiang, Z.-T. [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Martizano, Jay [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Lowe, Alex [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Pejcic, Bobby [Nanochemistry Research Institute, Department of Applied Chemistry, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Riessen, Arie van [Materials Research Group, Department of Applied Physics, Curtin University of Technology, GPO Box U 1987, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)

    2006-08-15

    A marriage of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and in situ synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (SR-GIXRD) has provided a powerful new technique for the elucidation of the mechanistic chemistry of electrochemical systems. In this study, EIS/SR-GIXRD has been used to investigate the influence of metal ion buffer calibration ligands, along with natural organic ligands in seawater, on the behaviour of the iron chalcogenide glass ion-selective electrode (ISE). The SR-GIXRD data demonstrated that citrate - a previously reported poor iron calibration ligand for the analysis of seawater - induced an instantaneous and total dissolution of crystalline GeSe and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} in the modified surface layer (MSL) of the ISE, while natural organic ligands in seawater and a mixture of ligands in a mimetic seawater ligand system protected the MSL's crystalline inclusions of GeSe and Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} from oxidative attack. Expectedly, the EIS data showed that citrate induced a loss in the medium frequency time constant for the MSL of the ISE, while seawater's natural organic ligands and the mimetic ligand system preserved the medium frequency EIS response characteristics of the ISE's MSL. The new EIS/SR-GIXRD technique has provided insights into the suitability of iron calibration ligands for the analysis of iron in seawater.

  18. Revealing Lattice Expansion of Small-Pore Zeolite Catalysts during the Methanol-to-Olefins Process Using Combined Operando X-ray Diffraction and UV-vis Spectroscopy.

    Goetze, Joris; Yarulina, Irina; Gascon, Jorge; Kapteijn, Freek; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2018-03-02

    In small-pore zeolite catalysts, where the size of the pores is limited by eight-ring windows, aromatic hydrocarbon pool molecules that are formed inside the zeolite during the Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO) process cannot exit the pores and are retained inside the catalyst. Hydrocarbon species whose size is comparable to the size of the zeolite cage can cause the zeolite lattice to expand during the MTO process. In this work, the formation of retained hydrocarbon pool species during MTO at a reaction temperature of 400 °C was followed using operando UV-vis spectroscopy. During the same experiment, using operando X-ray Diffraction (XRD), the expansion of the zeolite framework was assessed, and the activity of the catalyst was measured using online gas chromatography (GC). Three different small-pore zeolite frameworks, i.e., CHA, DDR, and LEV, were compared. It was shown using operando XRD that the formation of retained aromatic species causes the zeolite lattice of all three frameworks to expand. Because of the differences in the zeolite framework dimensions, the nature of the retained hydrocarbons as measured by operando UV-vis spectroscopy is different for each of the three zeolite frameworks. Consequently, the magnitude and direction of the zeolite lattice expansion as measured by operando XRD also depends on the specific combination of the hydrocarbon species and the zeolite framework. The catalyst with the CHA framework, i.e., H-SSZ-13, showed the biggest expansion: 0.9% in the direction along the c -axis of the zeolite lattice. For all three zeolite frameworks, based on the combination of operando XRD and operando UV-vis spectroscopy, the hydrocarbon species that are likely to cause the expansion of the zeolite cages are presented; methylated naphthalene and pyrene in CHA, 1-methylnaphthalene and phenalene in DDR, and methylated benzene and naphthalene in LEV. Filling of the zeolite cages and, as a consequence, the zeolite lattice expansion causes the

  19. Revealing Lattice Expansion of Small-Pore Zeolite Catalysts during the Methanol-to-Olefins Process Using Combined Operando X-ray Diffraction and UV–vis Spectroscopy

    2018-01-01

    In small-pore zeolite catalysts, where the size of the pores is limited by eight-ring windows, aromatic hydrocarbon pool molecules that are formed inside the zeolite during the Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO) process cannot exit the pores and are retained inside the catalyst. Hydrocarbon species whose size is comparable to the size of the zeolite cage can cause the zeolite lattice to expand during the MTO process. In this work, the formation of retained hydrocarbon pool species during MTO at a reaction temperature of 400 °C was followed using operando UV–vis spectroscopy. During the same experiment, using operando X-ray Diffraction (XRD), the expansion of the zeolite framework was assessed, and the activity of the catalyst was measured using online gas chromatography (GC). Three different small-pore zeolite frameworks, i.e., CHA, DDR, and LEV, were compared. It was shown using operando XRD that the formation of retained aromatic species causes the zeolite lattice of all three frameworks to expand. Because of the differences in the zeolite framework dimensions, the nature of the retained hydrocarbons as measured by operando UV–vis spectroscopy is different for each of the three zeolite frameworks. Consequently, the magnitude and direction of the zeolite lattice expansion as measured by operando XRD also depends on the specific combination of the hydrocarbon species and the zeolite framework. The catalyst with the CHA framework, i.e., H-SSZ-13, showed the biggest expansion: 0.9% in the direction along the c-axis of the zeolite lattice. For all three zeolite frameworks, based on the combination of operando XRD and operando UV–vis spectroscopy, the hydrocarbon species that are likely to cause the expansion of the zeolite cages are presented; methylated naphthalene and pyrene in CHA, 1-methylnaphthalene and phenalene in DDR, and methylated benzene and naphthalene in LEV. Filling of the zeolite cages and, as a consequence, the zeolite lattice expansion causes the

  20. Revealing Lattice Expansion of Small-Pore Zeolite Catalysts during the Methanol-to-Olefins Process Using Combined Operando X-ray Diffraction and UV–vis Spectroscopy

    Goetze, Joris

    2018-02-06

    In small-pore zeolite catalysts, where the size of the pores is limited by eight-ring windows, aromatic hydrocarbon pool molecules that are formed inside the zeolite during the Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO) process cannot exit the pores and are retained inside the catalyst. Hydrocarbon species whose size is comparable to the size of the zeolite cage can cause the zeolite lattice to expand during the MTO process. In this work, the formation of retained hydrocarbon pool species during MTO at a reaction temperature of 400 °C was followed using operando UV–vis spectroscopy. During the same experiment, using operando X-ray Diffraction (XRD), the expansion of the zeolite framework was assessed, and the activity of the catalyst was measured using online gas chromatography (GC). Three different small-pore zeolite frameworks, i.e., CHA, DDR, and LEV, were compared. It was shown using operando XRD that the formation of retained aromatic species causes the zeolite lattice of all three frameworks to expand. Because of the differences in the zeolite framework dimensions, the nature of the retained hydrocarbons as measured by operando UV–vis spectroscopy is different for each of the three zeolite frameworks. Consequently, the magnitude and direction of the zeolite lattice expansion as measured by operando XRD also depends on the specific combination of the hydrocarbon species and the zeolite framework. The catalyst with the CHA framework, i.e., H-SSZ-13, showed the biggest expansion: 0.9% in the direction along the c-axis of the zeolite lattice. For all three zeolite frameworks, based on the combination of operando XRD and operando UV–vis spectroscopy, the hydrocarbon species that are likely to cause the expansion of the zeolite cages are presented; methylated naphthalene and pyrene in CHA, 1-methylnaphthalene and phenalene in DDR, and methylated benzene and naphthalene in LEV. Filling of the zeolite cages and, as a consequence, the zeolite lattice expansion causes the

  1. CEBAF at higher energies: Working group report on hadron spectroscopy and production

    Barnes, T. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)]| [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States); Napolitano, J. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01

    This report summarizes topics in hadron spectroscopy and production which could be addressed at CEBAF with an energy upgrade to E{sub {gamma}} = 8 GeV and beyond. The topics discussed include conventional meson and baryon spectrocopy, spectroscopy of exotica (especially molecules and hybrids), CP and CPT tests using {phi} mesons, and new detector and accelerator options.

  2. Production of muscovite-feldspathic glass composite: scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis

    Costa, F.P.F.; Ogasawara, T.; Santos, S.F.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to find the sintering conditions for the feldspathic glass + muscovite mixture to produce a dense composite block for manufacturing dental prosthesis by using CAD-CAM. Each 20g of the glass-frit had : 15.55g of Armil-feldspar; 0.53g of Al 2 O 3 ; 1.56g of Na 2 CO 3 ; 0.5g of borax; 1.74g of K 2 CO 3 ; 0.13g of CeO 2 . Frit's powder finer than 350 Tyler mesh was mixed with 0 wt%, 10 wt%, 20 wt% and 100 wt% of muscovite pressed cylinders (5600 pounds force) 16mm in diameter and sintered under vacuum Vacumat (VITA) furnace at 850 deg C, 900 deg C, 950 deg C, 1000 deg C, 1050 deg C, 1100 deg C and 1150 deg C. X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy were carried out. The necessary temperature for high densification depended on the composition of the mixture: 850 deg C (for pure frit); 1050 deg C (for 10 wt% mica) and 1150 deg C (for 20 wt% mica); pure mica degraded during sintering. (author)

  3. Characterization of mineral phases of agricultural soil samples of Colombian coffee using Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Rodríguez, Humberto Bustos; Lozano, Dagoberto Oyola; Martínez, Yebrayl Antonio Rojas; Pinilla, Marlene Rivera; Alcázar, German Antonio Pérez

    2012-03-01

    Soil chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectrometry (MS) of 57Fe were used to characterize mineral phases of samples taken from the productive layer (horizon A) of agricultural coffee soil from Tolima (Colombia). Chemical analysis shows the chemical and textural parameters of samples from two different regions of Tolima, i.e., Ibagué and Santa Isabel. By XRD phases like illite (I), andesine (A) and quartz (Q) in both samples were identified. The quantity of these phases is different for the two samples. The MS spectra taken at room temperature were adjusted by using five doublets, three of them associated to Fe + 3 type sites and the other two to Fe + 2 type sites. According to their isomer shift and quadrupole splitting the presence of phases like illite (detected by DRX), nontronite and biotite (not detected by XRD) can be postulated.

  4. Characterization of mineral phases of agricultural soil samples of Colombian coffee using Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Rodríguez, Humberto Bustos; Lozano, Dagoberto Oyola; Martínez, Yebrayl Antonio Rojas; Pinilla, Marlene Rivera; Alcázar, German Antonio Pérez

    2012-01-01

    Soil chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectrometry (MS) of 57 Fe were used to characterize mineral phases of samples taken from the productive layer (horizon A) of agricultural coffee soil from Tolima (Colombia). Chemical analysis shows the chemical and textural parameters of samples from two different regions of Tolima, i.e., Ibagué and Santa Isabel. By XRD phases like illite (I), andesine (A) and quartz (Q) in both samples were identified. The quantity of these phases is different for the two samples. The MS spectra taken at room temperature were adjusted by using five doublets, three of them associated to Fe  + 3 type sites and the other two to Fe  + 2 type sites. According to their isomer shift and quadrupole splitting the presence of phases like illite (detected by DRX), nontronite and biotite (not detected by XRD) can be postulated.

  5. The competitive growth of cubic domains in Ti(1-x)AlxN films studied by diffraction anomalous near-edge structure spectroscopy.

    Pinot, Y; Tuilier, M-H; Pac, M-J; Rousselot, C; Thiaudière, D

    2015-11-01

    Titanium and aluminium nitride films deposited by magnetron sputtering generally grow as columnar domains made of oriented nanocrystallites with cubic or hexagonal symmetry depending on Al content, which are embedded in more disordered grain boundaries. The substitution of Al atoms for Ti in the cubic lattice of the films improves their resistance to wear and oxidation, allowing their use as protective coatings. Ti K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, which probes both crystallized and more disordered grain boundaries, and X-ray diffraction anomalous fine structure, which is sensitive to short- and long-range order within a given crystallized domain, are carried out on a set of Ti(1-x)AlxN films deposited by magnetron sputtering on Si substrates. Attention is paid to the shape of the pre-edge region, which is sensitive to the symmetry of the site occupied by Ti atoms, either octahedral in face-centred-cubic Ti-rich (TiN, Ti0.54Al0.46N) samples or tetrahedral in hexagonal-close-packed Al-rich (Ti0.32Al0.68N) films. In order to obain information on the titanium environment in the well crystallized areas, subtraction of the smooth part of the energy-dependent structure factor for the Bragg reflections is applied to the pre-edge region of the diffraction anomalous data in order to restore their spectroscopic appearance. A flat pre-edge is related to the typical octahedral environment of Ti atoms for cubic reflections. The difference observed between pre-edge spectra associated with face-centred-cubic 200 and 111 Bragg reflections of Ti0.54Al0.46N is assigned to Ti enrichment of 111 large well ordered domains compared with the more disordered 200 ones. The sharp peak observed in the spectrum recorded from the hexagonal 002 peak of Ti0.32Al0.68N can be regarded as a standard for the pure tetrahedral Ti environment in hexagonal-close-packed nitride.

  6. spectroscopy

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-14

    Oct 14, 2015 ... characterized by using phenotypic, API and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy methods. One hundred and fifty-seven (157) strains were isolated from 13 cheese samples, and identification test was performed for 83 strains. At the end of the study, a total of 22 Lactococcus sp., 36 Enterecoccus ...

  7. Diffractive interactions

    Del Duca, V.; Marage, P.

    1996-08-01

    The general framework of diffractive deep inelastic scattering is introduced and reports given in the session on diffractive interactions at the international workshop on deep-inelastic scattering and related phenomena, Rome, April 1996, are presented. (orig.)

  8. Analysis of an industrial production suspension of Bacillus lentus subtilisin crystals by powder diffraction: a powerful quality-control tool.

    Frankaer, Christian G; Moroz, Olga V; Turkenburg, Johan P; Aspmo, Stein I; Thymark, Majbritt; Friis, Esben P; Stahl, Kenny; Nielsen, Jens E; Wilson, Keith S; Harris, Pernille

    2014-04-01

    A microcrystalline suspension of Bacillus lentus subtilisin (Savinase) produced during industrial large-scale production was analysed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and X-ray single-crystal diffraction (MX). XRPD established that the bulk microcrystal sample representative of the entire production suspension corresponded to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.65, b = 62.43, c = 75.74 Å, equivalent to those for a known orthorhombic crystal form (PDB entry 1ndq). MX using synchrotron beamlines at the Diamond Light Source with beam dimensions of 20 × 20 µm was subsequently used to study the largest crystals present in the suspension, with diffraction data being collected from two single crystals (∼20 × 20 × 60 µm) to resolutions of 1.40 and 1.57 Å, respectively. Both structures also belonged to space group P2(1)2(1)2(1), but were quite distinct from the dominant form identified by XRPD, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.04, b = 57.55, c = 71.37 Å and a = 52.72, b = 57.13, c = 65.86 Å, respectively, and refined to R = 10.8% and Rfree = 15.5% and to R = 14.1% and Rfree = 18.0%, respectively. They are also different from any of the forms previously reported in the PDB. A controlled crystallization experiment with a highly purified Savinase sample allowed the growth of single crystals of the form identified by XRPD; their structure was solved and refined to a resolution of 1.17 Å with an R of 9.2% and an Rfree of 11.8%. Thus, there are at least three polymorphs present in the production suspension, albeit with the 1ndq-like microcrystals predominating. It is shown how the two techniques can provide invaluable and complementary information for such a production suspension and it is proposed that XRPD provides an excellent quality-control tool for such suspensions.

  9. Diffraction theory

    Bouwkamp, C.J.

    1954-01-01

    A critical review is presented of recent progress in classical diffraction theory. Both scalar and electromagnetic problems are discussed. The report may serve as an introduction to general diffraction theory although the main emphasis is on diffraction by plane obstacles. Various modifications of

  10. Verification of Ganoderma (lingzhi) commercial products by Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and two-dimensional IR correlation spectroscopy

    Choong, Yew-Keong; Sun, Su-Qin; Zhou, Qun; Lan, Jin; Lee, Han-Lim; Chen, Xiang-Dong

    2014-07-01

    Ganoderma commercial products are typically based on two sources, raw material (powder form and/or spores) and extract (water and/or solvent). This study compared three types of Ganoderma commercial products using 1 Dimensional Fourier Transform infrared and second derivative spectroscopy. The analyzed spectra of Ganoderma raw material products were compared with spectra of cultivated Ganoderma raw material powder from different mushroom farms in Malaysia. The Ganoderma extract product was also compared with three types of cultivated Ganoderma extracts. Other medicinal Ganoderma contents in commercial extract product that included glucan and triterpenoid were analyzed by using FTIR and 2DIR. The results showed that water extract of cultivated Ganoderma possessed comparable spectra with that of Ganoderma product water extract. By comparing the content of Ganoderma commercial products using FTIR and 2DIR, product content profiles could be detected. In addition, the geographical origin of the Ganoderma products could be verified by comparing their spectra with Ganoderma products from known areas. This study demonstrated the possibility of developing verification tool to validate the purity of commercial medicinal herbal and mushroom products.

  11. Corrosion product characterisation by fibre optic raman spectroscopy

    Guzonas, D.A.; Rochefort, P.A.; Turner, C.W.

    1998-01-01

    Fibre optic Raman spectroscopy has been used to characterise secondary-side deposits removed from CANDU steam generators. The deposits examined were in the form of powders, millimetre-sized flakes, and deposits on the surfaces of pulled steam generator tubes. The compositions of the deposits obtained using Raman spectroscopy are similar to the compositions obtained using other ex-situ analytical techniques. A semi-quantitative estimate of amounts of the major components can be obtained from the spectra. It was noted that the signal-to-noise ratio of the Raman spectra decreased as the amount of magnetite in the deposit increased, as a result of absorption of the laser light by the magnetite. The conversion of magnetite to hematite by the laser beam was observed when high laser powers were used. The Raman spectra of larger flake samples clearly illustrate the inhomogeneous nature of the deposits. (author)

  12. Combining selective sequential extractions, X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and X-Ray Powder Diffraction for Cu (II speciation in soil and mineral phases

    Tatiana Minkina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Interaction of Cu (II ions with the matrix of soil and mineral phases of layered silicates was assessed by the Miller method of selective sequential fractionation and a set of synchrotron X-ray methods, including X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES. It was shown that the input of Cu into Calcic Chernozem in the form of monoxide (CuO and salt (Cu(NO32 affected the transformation of Cu compounds and their affinity for metal-bearing phases. It was found that the contamination of soil with a soluble Cu(II salt increased the bioavailability of the metal and the role of organic matter and Fe oxides in the fixation and retention of Cu. During the incubation of soil with Cu monoxide, the content of the metal in the residual fractions increased, which was related to the possible entry of Cu in the form of isomorphic impurities into silicates, as well as to the incomplete dissolution of exogenic compounds at the high level of their input into the soil. A mechanism for the structural transformation of minerals was revealed, which showed that ion exchange processes result in the sorption of Cu (II ions from the saturated solution by active sites on the internal surface of the lattice of dioctahedral aluminosilicates. Surface hydroxyls at the octahedral aluminum atom play the main role. X-ray diagnostics revealed that excess Cu(II ions are removed from the system due to the formation and precipitation of coarsely crystalline Cu(NO3(OH3.

  13. Effect of resonance production and diffraction on the inclusive spectra of pions and protons in 19 GeV/c pn interactions

    Baken, V.; Breivik, F.O.; Jacobsen, T. (Oslo Univ. (Norway). Fysisk Inst.)

    1984-01-01

    Bubble chamber data on pn interactions at 19 GeV/c are used to investigate the effects of nucleon diffraction and resonance production on the inclusive x- and psub(T)/sup 2/-distributions of protons and pions. We determine the differential distributions of p, ..pi../sup -/ and ..pi../sup +/ due to neutron and proton diffraction and similarly the distributions from the decay of the strong resonances ..delta../sup + +/(1232) and ..delta../sup -/(1232) and from rho/sup 0/(770). The x-distributions of the protons in the two c.m. hemispheres become quite similar when the effect of diffraction and ..delta../sup + +/ is subtracted. The psub(T)/sup 2/-distributions can then be described by a single exponential in the whole kinematic region. The net effect on the shapes of the x-distributions of the pions due to diffraction, ..delta../sup + +//..delta../sup -/ and rho/sup 0/ production is rather small. The separate effects of these processes on the particle ratio ..pi../sup -//..pi../sup +/ is investigated. By excluding the diffraction and ..delta../sup + +//..delta../sup -/ production, the strength of the low-psub(T)/sup 2/ component of the psub(T)/sup 2/-distributions of the pions is reduced, but it seems that diffraction and resonance production cannot account for all of this low-psub(T)/sup 2/ enhancement.

  14. Observation of a diffractive contribution to dijet production in proton-proton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Aguilo, Ernest; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Knünz, Valentin; Krammer, Manfred; Krätschmer, Ilse; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Christine; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Cornelis, Tom; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Staykova, Zlatka; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Van Spilbeeck, Alex; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hreus, Tomas; Léonard, Alexandre; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Reis, Thomas; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Wang, Jian; Adler, Volker; Beernaert, Kelly; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Garcia, Guillaume; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Strobbe, Nadja; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Yazgan, Efe; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Castello, Roberto; Ceard, Ludivine; Delaere, Christophe; Du Pree, Tristan; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Alves, Gilvan; Correa Martins Junior, Marcos; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Martins, Thiago; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Custódio, Analu; Melo Da Costa, Eliza; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Soares Jorge, Luana; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Asawatangtrakuldee, Chayanit; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Liu, Shuai; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Wang, Dayong; Zhang, Linlin; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Avila, Carlos; Gomez, Juan Pablo; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Elgammal, Sherif; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Peltola, Timo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Millischer, Laurent; Nayak, Aruna; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Daci, Nadir; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Naranjo, Ivo Nicolas; Nguyen, Matthew; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Juillot, Pierre; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Tsamalaidze, Zviad; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Caudron, Julien; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Duchardt, Deborah; Erdmann, Martin; Fischer, Robert; Güth, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Olschewski, Mark; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Weber, Martin; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Geisler, Matthias; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behr, Joerg; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Burgmeier, Armin; Cakir, Altan; Calligaris, Luigi; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Costanza, Francesco; Dammann, Dirk; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Glushkov, Ivan; Gunnellini, Paolo; Habib, Shiraz; Hauk, Johannes; Hellwig, Gregor; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marfin, Ihar; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Olzem, Jan; Perrey, Hanno; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Ribeiro Cipriano, Pedro M; Riedl, Caroline; Ron, Elias; Rosin, Michele; Salfeld-Nebgen, Jakob; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Erfle, Joachim; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Höing, Rebekka Sophie; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Nowak, Friederike; Peiffer, Thomas; Pietsch, Niklas; Rathjens, Denis; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schmidt, Alexander; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Seidel, Markus; Sola, Valentina; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Vanelderen, Lukas; Barth, Christian; Berger, Joram; Böser, Christian; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Descroix, Alexis; Dierlamm, Alexander; Feindt, Michael; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Hauth, Thomas; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Nürnberg, Andreas; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Röcker, Steffen; Scheurer, Armin; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Ulrich, Ralf; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Wayand, Stefan; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Bencze, Gyorgy; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Sikler, Ferenc; Veszpremi, Viktor; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Czellar, Sandor; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Bansal, Monika; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Kaur, Manjit; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Jasbir; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Ahuja, Sudha; Bhardwaj, Ashutosh; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Sharma, Varun; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Sharan, Manoj; Abdulsalam, Abdulla; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mehta, Pourus; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Ganguly, Sanmay; Guchait, Monoranjan; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Chhibra, Simranjit Singh; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Singh, Gurpreet; Venditti, Rosamaria; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Grandi, Claudio; Guiducci, Luigi; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gian Piero; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Tosi, Silvano; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Fiorendi, Sara; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Manzoni, Riccardo Andrea; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Meola, Sabino; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gozzelino, Andrea; Kanishchev, Konstantin; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Pazzini, Jacopo; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Triossi, Andrea; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Gabusi, Michele; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Saha, Anirban; Santocchia, Attilio; Spiezia, Aniello; Taroni, Silvia; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Rizzi, Andrea; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Squillacioti, Paola; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Diemoz, Marcella; Fanelli, Cristiano; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Micheli, Francesco; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Soffi, Livia; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Candelise, Vieri; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Schizzi, Andrea; Heo, Seong Gu; Kim, Tae Yeon; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Choi, Minkyoo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Kwon, Eunhyang; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Juodagalvis, Andrius; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Bell, Alan James; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Reucroft, Steve; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ansari, Muhammad Hamid; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Bialkowska, Helena; Boimska, Bozena; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Brona, Grzegorz; Bunkowski, Karol; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Vischia, Pietro; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Gorbunov, Ilya; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Malakhov, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Evstyukhin, Sergey; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Tlisov, Danila; Toropin, Alexander; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kossov, Mikhail; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Khein, Lev; Klyukhin, Vyacheslav; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Popov, Andrey; Proskuryakov, Alexander; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Quintario Olmeda, Adrián; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Senghi Soares, Mara; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Brun, Hugues; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Graziano, Alberto; Jorda, Clara; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Benitez, Jose F; Bernet, Colin; Bianchi, Giovanni; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bonato, Alessio; Botta, Cristina; Breuker, Horst; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; D'Enterria, David; Dabrowski, Anne; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dobson, Marc; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Georgiou, Georgios; Giffels, Manuel; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Giunta, Marina; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Hansen, Magnus; Harris, Philip; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegner, Benedikt; Hinzmann, Andreas; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Kousouris, Konstantinos; Lecoq, Paul; Lee, Yen-Jie; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Musella, Pasquale; Nesvold, Erik; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Perrozzi, Luca; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Santanastasio, Francesco; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sekmen, Sezen; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Tsirou, Andromachi; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vlimant, Jean-Roch; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Buchmann, Marco-Andrea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Deisher, Amanda; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Donegà, Mauro; Dünser, Marc; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hits, Dmitry; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marini, Andrea Carlo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Mohr, Niklas; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pandolfi, Francesco; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Peruzzi, Marco; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Hannsjoerg Artur; Wehrli, Lukas; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Snoek, Hella; Tupputi, Salvatore; Verzetti, Mauro; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Singh, Anil; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Majumder, Devdatta; Petrakou, Eleni; Shi, Xin; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Gurpinar, Emine; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Karaman, Turker; Karapinar, Guler; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Cankocak, Kerem; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Flacher, Henning; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Williams, Thomas; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Dauncey, Paul; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pela, Joao; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; Sparrow, Alex; Stoye, Markus; Tapper, Alexander; Vazquez Acosta, Monica; Virdee, Tejinder; Wakefield, Stuart; Wardle, Nicholas; Whyntie, Tom; Chadwick, Matthew; Cole, Joanne; Hobson, Peter R; Khan, Akram; Kyberd, Paul; Leggat, Duncan; Leslie, Dawn; Martin, William; Reid, Ivan; Symonds, Philip; Teodorescu, Liliana; Turner, Mark; Hatakeyama, Kenichi; Liu, Hongxuan; Scarborough, Tara; Charaf, Otman; Henderson, Conor; Rumerio, Paolo; Avetisyan, Aram; Bose, Tulika; Fantasia, Cory; Heister, Arno; St John, Jason; Lawson, Philip; Lazic, Dragoslav; Rohlf, James; Sperka, David; Sulak, Lawrence; Alimena, Juliette; Bhattacharya, Saptaparna; Cutts, David; Ferapontov, Alexey; Heintz, Ulrich; Jabeen, Shabnam; Kukartsev, Gennadiy; Laird, Edward; Landsberg, Greg; Luk, Michael; Narain, Meenakshi; Nguyen, Duong; Segala, Michael; Sinthuprasith, Tutanon; Speer, Thomas; Tsang, Ka Vang; Breedon, Richard; Breto, Guillermo; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, Manuel; Chauhan, Sushil; Chertok, Maxwell; Conway, John; Conway, Rylan; Cox, Peter Timothy; Dolen, James; Erbacher, Robin; Gardner, Michael; Houtz, Rachel; Ko, Winston; Kopecky, Alexandra; Lander, Richard; Miceli, Tia; Pellett, Dave; Ricci-tam, Francesca; Rutherford, Britney; Searle, Matthew; Smith, John; Squires, Michael; Tripathi, Mani; Vasquez Sierra, Ricardo; Andreev, Valeri; Cline, David; Cousins, Robert; Duris, Joseph; Erhan, Samim; Everaerts, Pieter; Farrell, Chris; Hauser, Jay; Ignatenko, Mikhail; Jarvis, Chad; Plager, Charles; Rakness, Gregory; Schlein, Peter; Traczyk, Piotr; Valuev, Vyacheslav; Weber, Matthias; Babb, John; Clare, Robert; Dinardo, Mauro Emanuele; Ellison, John Anthony; Gary, J William; Giordano, Ferdinando; Hanson, Gail; Jeng, Geng-Yuan; Liu, Hongliang; Long, Owen Rosser; Luthra, Arun; Nguyen, Harold; Paramesvaran, Sudarshan; Sturdy, Jared; Sumowidagdo, Suharyo; Wilken, Rachel; Wimpenny, Stephen; Andrews, Warren; Branson, James G; Cerati, Giuseppe Benedetto; Cittolin, Sergio; Evans, David; Golf, Frank; Holzner, André; Kelley, Ryan; Lebourgeois, Matthew; Letts, James; Macneill, Ian; Mangano, Boris; Padhi, Sanjay; Palmer, Christopher; Petrucciani, Giovanni; Pieri, Marco; Sani, Matteo; Sharma, Vivek; Simon, Sean; Sudano, Elizabeth; Tadel, Matevz; Tu, Yanjun; Vartak, Adish; Wasserbaech, Steven; Würthwein, Frank; Yagil, Avraham; Yoo, Jaehyeok; Barge, Derek; Bellan, Riccardo; Campagnari, Claudio; D'Alfonso, Mariarosaria; Danielson, Thomas; Flowers, Kristen; Geffert, Paul; Incandela, Joe; Justus, Christopher; Kalavase, Puneeth; Koay, Sue Ann; Kovalskyi, Dmytro; Krutelyov, Vyacheslav; Lowette, Steven; Mccoll, Nickolas; Pavlunin, Viktor; Rebassoo, Finn; Ribnik, Jacob; Richman, Jeffrey; Rossin, Roberto; Stuart, David; To, Wing; West, Christopher; Apresyan, Artur; Bornheim, Adolf; Chen, Yi; Di Marco, Emanuele; Duarte, Javier; Gataullin, Marat; Ma, Yousi; Mott, Alexander; Newman, Harvey B; Rogan, Christopher; Spiropulu, Maria; Timciuc, Vladlen; Veverka, Jan; Wilkinson, Richard; Yang, Yong; Zhu, Ren-Yuan; Akgun, Bora; Azzolini, Virginia; Carroll, Ryan; Ferguson, Thomas; Iiyama, Yutaro; Jang, Dong Wook; Liu, Yueh-Feng; Paulini, Manfred; Vogel, Helmut; Vorobiev, Igor; Cumalat, John Perry; Drell, Brian Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Ford, William T; Gaz, Alessandro; Heyburn, Bernadette; Luiggi Lopez, Eduardo; Smith, James; Stenson, Kevin; Ulmer, Keith; Wagner, Stephen Robert; Alexander, James; Chatterjee, Avishek; Eggert, Nicholas; Gibbons, Lawrence Kent; Heltsley, Brian; Khukhunaishvili, Aleko; Kreis, Benjamin; Mirman, Nathan; Nicolas Kaufman, Gala; Patterson, Juliet Ritchie; Ryd, Anders; Salvati, Emmanuele; Sun, Werner; Teo, Wee Don; Thom, Julia; Thompson, Joshua; Tucker, Jordan; Vaughan, Jennifer; Weng, Yao; Winstrom, Lucas; Wittich, Peter; Winn, Dave; Abdullin, Salavat; Albrow, Michael; Anderson, Jacob; Bauerdick, Lothar AT; Beretvas, Andrew; Berryhill, Jeffrey; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bloch, Ingo; Burkett, Kevin; Butler, Joel Nathan; Chetluru, Vasundhara; Cheung, Harry; Chlebana, Frank; Elvira, Victor Daniel; Fisk, Ian; Freeman, Jim; Gao, Yanyan; Green, Dan; Gutsche, Oliver; Hanlon, Jim; Harris, Robert M; Hirschauer, James; Hooberman, Benjamin; Jindariani, Sergo; Johnson, Marvin; Joshi, Umesh; Kilminster, Benjamin; Klima, Boaz; Kunori, Shuichi; Kwan, Simon; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Linacre, Jacob; Lincoln, Don; Lipton, Ron; Lykken, Joseph; Maeshima, Kaori; Marraffino, John Michael; Maruyama, Sho; Mason, David; McBride, Patricia; Mishra, Kalanand; Mrenna, Stephen; Musienko, Yuri; Newman-Holmes, Catherine; O'Dell, Vivian; Prokofyev, Oleg; Sexton-Kennedy, Elizabeth; Sharma, Seema; Spalding, William J; Spiegel, Leonard; Tan, Ping; Taylor, Lucas; Tkaczyk, Slawek; Tran, Nhan Viet; Uplegger, Lorenzo; Vaandering, Eric Wayne; Vidal, Richard; Whitmore, Juliana; Wu, Weimin; Yang, Fan; Yumiceva, Francisco; Yun, Jae Chul; Acosta, Darin; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Chen, Mingshui; Cheng, Tongguang; Das, Souvik; De Gruttola, Michele; Di Giovanni, Gian Piero; Dobur, Didar; Drozdetskiy, Alexey; Field, Richard D; Fisher, Matthew; Fu, Yu; Furic, Ivan-Kresimir; Gartner, Joseph; Hugon, Justin; Kim, Bockjoo; Konigsberg, Jacobo; Korytov, Andrey; Kropivnitskaya, Anna; Kypreos, Theodore; Low, Jia Fu; Matchev, Konstantin; Milenovic, Predrag; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Muniz, Lana; Remington, Ronald; Rinkevicius, Aurelijus; Sellers, Paul; Skhirtladze, Nikoloz; Snowball, Matthew; Yelton, John; Zakaria, Mohammed; Gaultney, Vanessa; Hewamanage, Samantha; Lebolo, Luis Miguel; Linn, Stephan; Markowitz, Pete; Martinez, German; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Adams, Todd; Askew, Andrew; Bochenek, Joseph; Chen, Jie; Diamond, Brendan; Gleyzer, Sergei V; Haas, Jeff; Hagopian, Sharon; Hagopian, Vasken; Jenkins, Merrill; Johnson, Kurtis F; Prosper, Harrison; Veeraraghavan, Venkatesh; Weinberg, Marc; Baarmand, Marc M; Dorney, Brian; Hohlmann, Marcus; Kalakhety, Himali; Vodopiyanov, Igor; Adams, Mark Raymond; Anghel, Ioana Maria; Apanasevich, Leonard; Bai, Yuting; Bazterra, Victor Eduardo; Betts, Russell Richard; Bucinskaite, Inga; Callner, Jeremy; Cavanaugh, Richard; Dragoiu, Cosmin; Evdokimov, Olga; Gauthier, Lucie; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Hofman, David Jonathan; Khalatyan, Samvel; Lacroix, Florent; Malek, Magdalena; O'Brien, Christine; Silkworth, Christopher; Strom, Derek; Varelas, Nikos; Akgun, Ugur; Albayrak, Elif Asli; Bilki, Burak; Clarida, Warren; Duru, Firdevs; Griffiths, Scott; Merlo, Jean-Pierre; Mermerkaya, Hamit; Mestvirishvili, Alexi; Moeller, Anthony; Nachtman, Jane; Newsom, Charles Ray; Norbeck, Edwin; Onel, Yasar; Ozok, Ferhat; Sen, Sercan; Tiras, Emrah; Wetzel, James; Yetkin, Taylan; Yi, Kai; Barnett, Bruce Arnold; Blumenfeld, Barry; Bolognesi, Sara; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Tinti, Gemma; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Calvert, Brian; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Kolberg, Ted; Lu, Ying; Marionneau, Matthieu; Mignerey, Alice; Pedro, Kevin; Peterman, Alison; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Apyan, Aram; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; Butz, Erik; Cali, Ivan Amos; Chan, Matthew; Dutta, Valentina; Gomez Ceballos, Guillelmo; Goncharov, Maxim; Hahn, Kristan Allan; Kim, Yongsun; Klute, Markus; Krajczar, Krisztian; Li, Wei; Luckey, Paul David; Ma, Teng; Nahn, Steve; Paus, Christoph; Ralph, Duncan; Roland, Christof; Roland, Gunther; Rudolph, Matthew; Stephans, George; Stöckli, Fabian; Sumorok, Konstanty; Sung, Kevin; Velicanu, Dragos; Wenger, Edward Allen; Wolf, Roger; Wyslouch, Bolek; Xie, Si; Yang, Mingming; Yilmaz, Yetkin; Yoon, Sungho; Zanetti, Marco; Cooper, Seth; Dahmes, Bryan; De Benedetti, Abraham; Franzoni, Giovanni; Gude, Alexander; Kao, Shih-Chuan; Klapoetke, Kevin; Kubota, Yuichi; Mans, Jeremy; Pastika, Nathaniel; Rusack, Roger; Sasseville, Michael; Singovsky, Alexander; Tambe, Norbert; Turkewitz, Jared; Cremaldi, Lucien Marcus; Kroeger, Rob; Perera, Lalith; Rahmat, Rahmat; Sanders, David A; Avdeeva, Ekaterina; Bloom, Kenneth; Bose, Suvadeep; Butt, Jamila; Claes, Daniel R; Dominguez, Aaron; Eads, Michael; Keller, Jason; Kravchenko, Ilya; Lazo-Flores, Jose; Malbouisson, Helena; Malik, Sudhir; Snow, Gregory R; Baur, Ulrich; Godshalk, Andrew; Iashvili, Ia; Jain, Supriya; Kharchilava, Avto; Kumar, Ashish; Shipkowski, Simon Peter; Smith, Kenneth; Alverson, George; Barberis, Emanuela; Baumgartel, Darin; Chasco, Matthew; Haley, Joseph; Nash, David; Trocino, Daniele; Wood, Darien; Zhang, Jinzhong; Anastassov, Anton; Kubik, Andrew; Mucia, Nicholas; Odell, Nathaniel; Ofierzynski, Radoslaw Adrian; Pollack, Brian; Pozdnyakov, Andrey; Schmitt, Michael Henry; Stoynev, Stoyan; Velasco, Mayda; Won, Steven; Antonelli, Louis; Berry, Douglas; Brinkerhoff, Andrew; Hildreth, Michael; Jessop, Colin; Karmgard, Daniel John; Kolb, Jeff; Lannon, Kevin; Luo, Wuming; Lynch, Sean; Marinelli, Nancy; Morse, David Michael; Pearson, Tessa; Ruchti, Randy; Slaunwhite, Jason; Valls, Nil; Wayne, Mitchell; Wolf, Matthias; Bylsma, Ben; Durkin, Lloyd Stanley; Hill, Christopher; Hughes, Richard; Kotov, Khristian; Ling, Ta-Yung; Puigh, Darren; Rodenburg, Marissa; Vuosalo, Carl; Williams, Grayson; Winer, Brian L; Adam, Nadia; Berry, Edmund; Elmer, Peter; Gerbaudo, Davide; Halyo, Valerie; Hebda, Philip; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hunt, Adam; Jindal, Pratima; Lopes Pegna, David; Lujan, Paul; Marlow, Daniel; Medvedeva, Tatiana; Mooney, Michael; Olsen, James; Piroué, Pierre; Quan, Xiaohang; Raval, Amita; Safdi, Ben; Saka, Halil; Stickland, David; Tully, Christopher; Werner, Jeremy Scott; Zuranski, Andrzej; Acosta, Jhon Gabriel; Brownson, Eric; Huang, Xing Tao; Lopez, Angel; Mendez, Hector; Oliveros, Sandra; Ramirez Vargas, Juan Eduardo; Zatserklyaniy, Andriy; Alagoz, Enver; Barnes, Virgil E; Benedetti, Daniele; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; De Mattia, Marco; Everett, Adam; Hu, Zhen; Jones, Matthew; Koybasi, Ozhan; Kress, Matthew; Laasanen, Alvin T; Leonardo, Nuno; Maroussov, Vassili; Merkel, Petra; Miller, David Harry; Neumeister, Norbert; Shipsey, Ian; Silvers, David; Svyatkovskiy, Alexey; Vidal Marono, Miguel; Yoo, Hwi Dong; Zablocki, Jakub; Zheng, Yu; Guragain, Samir; Parashar, Neeti; Adair, Antony; Boulahouache, Chaouki; Ecklund, Karl Matthew; Geurts, Frank JM; Padley, Brian Paul; Redjimi, Radia; Roberts, Jay; Zabel, James; Betchart, Burton; Bodek, Arie; Chung, Yeon Sei; Covarelli, Roberto; de Barbaro, Pawel; Demina, Regina; Eshaq, Yossof; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Goldenzweig, Pablo; Han, Jiyeon; Harel, Amnon; Miner, Daniel Carl; Vishnevskiy, Dmitry; Zielinski, Marek; Bhatti, Anwar; Ciesielski, Robert; Demortier, Luc; Goulianos, Konstantin; Lungu, Gheorghe; Malik, Sarah; Mesropian, Christina; Arora, Sanjay; Barker, Anthony; Chou, John Paul; Contreras-Campana, Christian; Contreras-Campana, Emmanuel; Duggan, Daniel; Ferencek, Dinko; Gershtein, Yuri; Gray, Richard; Halkiadakis, Eva; Hidas, Dean; Lath, Amitabh; Panwalkar, Shruti; Park, Michael; Patel, Rishi; Rekovic, Vladimir; Robles, Jorge; Rose, Keith; Salur, Sevil; Schnetzer, Steve; Seitz, Claudia; Somalwar, Sunil; Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sakuma, Tai; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Roh, Youn; Volobouev, Igor; Appelt, Eric; Delannoy, Andrés G; Florez, Carlos; Greene, Senta; Gurrola, Alfredo; Johns, Willard; Johnston, Cody; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sharma, Monika; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Borrello, Laura; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Palmonari, Francesco; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua

    2013-01-08

    The cross section for dijet production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV is presented as a function of xi, a variable that approximates the fractional momentum loss of the scattered proton in single-diffractive events. The analysis is based on an integrated luminosity of 2.7 inverse nanobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC at low instantaneous luminosities, and uses events with jet transverse momentum of at least 20 GeV. The dijet cross section results are compared to the predictions of diffractive and non-diffractive models. The low-xi data show a significant contribution from diffractive dijet production, observed for the first time at the LHC. The associated rapidity gap survival probability is estimated.

  15. IR spectroscopy together with multivariate data analysis as a process analytical tool for in-line monitoring of crystallization process and solid-state analysis of crystalline product

    Pöllänen, Kati; Häkkinen, Antti; Reinikainen, Satu-Pia

    2005-01-01

    -ray powder diffraction (XRPD) as a reference technique. In order to fully utilize DRIFT, the application of multivariate techniques are needed, e.g., multivariate statistical process control (MSPC), principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS). The results demonstrate that multivariate...... Fourier transform infra red (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy provides valuable information on process, which can be utilized for more controlled crystallization processes. Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infra red (DRIFT-IR) is applied for polymorphic characterization of crystalline product using X......Crystalline product should exist in optimal polymorphic form. Robust and reliable method for polymorph characterization is of great importance. In this work, infra red (IR) spectroscopy is applied for monitoring of crystallization process in situ. The results show that attenuated total reflection...

  16. Diffractive J/Psi Production; Produção Difrativa de $J/psi$ no Experimento DØ

    dos Santos Assis Jesus, Ana Carolina [Federal Univ., Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2007-07-01

    This work presents measurements of two diffractive production ratio for heavy flavour physics with the use of a reconstructed J/Ψ → μ+μ- sample in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using the D0 detector at Fermilab Tevatron. These events were selected using the Luminosity Monitor detectors, the calorimeter system and the muon system in a pseudo-rapidity region with range 2.7 ≤ |η| ≤ 4.4. The measured ratio were estimated to be N$J/Ψ\\atop{diff}$/N$J/Ψ\\atop{total}$ = (1.74 ± 0.16(stat) {+-} 0.13(syst))% e N$b\\atop{diff}$/N$b\\atop{total}$ = (0.79 ± 0.11(stat) ± 0.23(syst))%.

  17. High-Density Diffraction Imaging and Non-Imaging Grating Elements for EUV and X-ray Spectroscopy Fabricated by DUV Reduction Photolithography, Phase II

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Diffraction gratings are powerful tools for the spectral analysis of electromagnetic radiation. Properties of gratings are determined by available fabrication means...

  18. Semiquantitative analysis of corrosion products in iron channel by the X-ray diffraction technique

    Bueno, C.R.E.; Varela, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    The corrosion in the us very important in the slag line region, but in others regions over and above this line there is a corrosion process still important. We have made a detailed mapping of phases present in seven different regions in the iron channel in three distinct positions. After the phases identifications, it was made a deconvolution of the diffractograms using Gaussian functions. The analysis of the relative intensity of each phase gave an idea for a semi-quantitative analysis and we have proposed a mechanism of the refractory corrosion. It was observed that the calcium oxide migrates by diffusion to different regions originating low melting point products like pseudo-wolastonite, anorthite and guelenite. (author)

  19. X-ray diffraction phase analysis of crystalline copper corrosion products after treatment in different chloride solutions

    Chmielova, M.; Seidlerova, J.; Weiss, Z.

    2003-01-01

    The corrosion products Cu 2 (OH) 3 Cl, Cu 2 O, and CuCl 2 were identified on the surface of copper plates after their four days treating in three different sodium chloride, sodium/magnesium, and sodium/calcium chloride solutions using X-ray diffraction powder analysis. However, the quantitative proportions of individual corrosion products differ and depend on the type of chloride solution used. Treating of copper plates only in the sodium chloride solution produced the mixture of corrosion products where Cu 2 O is prevailing over the Cu 2 (OH) 3 Cl and CuCl 2 was not identified. The sample developed after treating of the cooper surface in the sodium/magnesium chloride solution contains Cu 2 (OH) 3 Cl and CuCl 2 prevailing over the Cu 2 O, while the sample developed after treatment of copper in sodium/calcium chloride solution contains Cu 2 (OH) 3 Cl prevailing over CuCl 2 and Cu 2 O was not identified

  20. NIR spectroscopy for determining soy contents in processed meat products

    Soy products such as soy concentrate, soy protein and soy grits are used as a meat extender in processed meat products to improve meat texture. However, soy allergies are one of the common food allergies, especially in infants and young children, and can be mild to life-threatening. The United State...

  1. Recombinant Kinase Production and Fragment Screening by NMR Spectroscopy.

    Han, Byeonggu; Ahn, Hee-Chul

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has rapidly evolved and several drugs or drug candidates developed by FBDD approach are clinically in use or in clinical trials. For example, vemurafenib, a V600E mutated BRAF inhibitor, was developed by utilizing FBDD approach and approved by FDA in 2011. In FBDD, screening of fragments is the starting step for identification of hits and lead generation. Fragment screening usually relies on biophysical techniques by which the protein-bound small molecules can be detected. NMR spectroscopy has been extensively used to study the molecular interaction between the protein and the ligand, and has many advantages in fragment screening over other biophysical techniques. This chapter describes the practical aspects of fragment screening by saturation transfer difference NMR.

  2. Diffractive production of two ρ0L mesons in e+e- collisions

    Segond, M.; Wallon, S.; Szymanowski, L.

    2007-01-01

    We present an estimate of the cross-section for the exclusive production of a ρ L 0 -meson pair in e + e - scattering, which will be studied in the future high-energy International Linear Collider. For this aim, we complete calculations of the Born order approximation of the amplitudes γ * L,T (Q 1 2 )γ * L,T (Q 2 2 )→ρ L 0 ρ L 0 , for arbitrary polarization of virtual photons and longitudinally polarized mesons, in the kinematical region s>>-t,Q 1 2 ,Q 2 2 . These processes are completely calculable in the hard region Q 1 2 ,Q 2 2 >>Λ 2 QCD , and we perform most of the calculations in an analytical way. The resulting cross-section turns out to be large enough for this process to be measurable with foreseen luminosity and energy, for Q 1 2 and Q 2 2 in the range of a few GeV 2 . (orig.)

  3. Cooperative photo-induced effects: from photo-magnetism under continuous irradiation to ultra-fast phenomena - study through optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Glijer, D.

    2006-12-01

    The control with ultra-short laser pulses of the collective and concerted transformation of molecules driving a macroscopic state switching on an ultra-fast time scale in solid state opens new prospects in materials science. The goal is to realize at the material level what happens at the molecular level in femto-chemistry. These processes are highly cooperative and highly non-linear, leading to self-amplification and self-organization within the material, a so-called photo-induced phase transition with a new long range order (structural, magnetic, ferroelectric,...). Two families of molecular compounds have been studied here: first of all, spin transition materials changing from a diamagnetic state over to a paramagnetic state under the effect of temperature or under continuous laser excitation. It concerns photo-active molecular bi-stability prototype materials in solid state, whose switching has been studied during X-ray diffraction, optical reflectivity and magnetism experiments. Then we have studied charge-transfer molecular systems, prototype compounds for ultrafast photo-induced phase transitions: insulator-metal, neutral-ionic....As well as ultrafast optical experiments, time-resolved X ray crystallography is a key technique in order to follow at the atomic level the different steps of the photo-induced transformation and thus to observe the involved mechanisms. We have underlined a process of photo-formation of one-dimensional nano-domains of lattice-relaxed charge-transfer excitations, governing the photo-induced phase transition of the molecular charge-transfer complex TTF-CA by the first time-resolved diffuse scattering measurements. Moreover, a new femtosecond laser-plasma source and a optical pump-probe spectroscopy set-up with a highly sensitive detecting system have been developed in this work. The results presented here will be an illustration of the present scientific challenges existing on the one hand with the development of projects of major

  4. Probing the role of ceramide hydroxylation in skin barrier lipid models by 2H solid-state NMR spectroscopy and X-ray powder diffraction.

    Kováčik, Andrej; Vogel, Alexander; Adler, Juliane; Pullmannová, Petra; Vávrová, Kateřina; Huster, Daniel

    2018-05-01

    In this work, we studied model stratum corneum lipid mixtures composed of the hydroxylated skin ceramides N-lignoceroyl 6-hydroxysphingosine (Cer[NH]) and α-hydroxylignoceroyl phytosphingosine (Cer[AP]). Two model skin lipid mixtures of the composition Cer[NH] or Cer[AP], N-lignoceroyl sphingosine (Cer[NS]), lignoceric acid (C24:0) and cholesterol in a 0.5:0.5:1:1 molar ratio were compared. Model membranes were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and 2 H solid-state NMR spectroscopy at temperatures from 25 °C to 80 °C. Each component of the model mixture was specifically deuterated for selective detection by 2 H NMR. Thus, the exact phase composition of the mixture at varying temperatures could be quantified. Moreover, using X-ray powder diffraction we investigated the lamellar phase formation. From the solid-state NMR and DSC studies, we found that both hydroxylated Cer[NH] and Cer[AP] exhibit a similar phase behavior. At physiological skin temperature of 32 °C, the lipids form a crystalline (orthorhombic) phase. With increasing temperature, most of the lipids become fluid and form a liquid-crystalline phase, which converts to the isotropic phase at higher temperatures (65-80 °C). Interestingly, lignoceric acid in the Cer[NH]-containing mixture has a tendency to form two types of fluid phases at 65 °C. This tendency was also observed in Cer[AP]-containing membranes at 80 °C. While Cer[AP]-containing lipid models formed a short periodicity phase featuring a repeat spacing of d = 5.4 nm, in the Cer[NH]-based model skin lipid membranes, the formation of unusual long periodicity phase with a repeat spacing of d = 10.7 nm was observed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Applications of Moessbauer spectroscopy to the structural characterization of minerals and products of the country 's mining - metallurgical industry

    Herrera Palma, Victoria; Cruz Inclan, Carlos Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Since the seventies of the past century Moessbauer Spectroscopy (MS) has been systematically and successfully applied at CEADEN in the study and characterization of lateritic and other iron-rich ores, and different products of their industrial processing as well. Due to their high iron and chrome content these materials seemed to be attractive as raw material for the production of several enriched fractions in metallurgical applications. Such studies showed that the systematic application of MS combined with X- Ray Diffraction and other techniques like neutron Diffraction, Thermal and Calorimetric analysis and Optical and Electron Microscopies, has allowed a higher level of accuracy in the crystallographic characterization, and the phase composition and other specific properties assessment. As examples in this direction, in the present paper results of the study on two different iron-bearing materials are reported: a) magnetite of Mina Grande (in Santiago de Cuba), and b) Monitoring of a proposed process using concentration tables for chrome enrichment from tailings of the nickel plant 'Hector Ramos Latour' at Holguin, both areas located in the east of Cuba. It is evidenced that a right combination of 57 Fe Moessbauer Spectroscopy with other mentioned methods is nowadays the wisest and most efficient way for a thorough identification and characterization of iron-bearing mineral ores and products in mining and metallurgical industry. (Author)

  6. Production and spectroscopy of quarkonia states at the ATLAS experiment

    Price, D; The ATLAS collaboration

    2014-01-01

    This presentation will cover ATLAS results in the domain of charmonium production, including J/psi, psi(2s) and chi_c states. The analyses discussed include double-differential production cross-section measurements of the J/psi, psi(2S) and P-wave charmonium states chi_cJ, extending upon previous measurements in precision and kinematic reach. Prompt and non-prompt modes are distinguished, as well as J/psi vs psi(2s) and the contribution to J/psi production from chi_c feed-down. Alongside the latter analysis, a competitive measurement of the branching fraction B± --> chi_c1 + K± was also performed. Results of the measurements are compared with the latest theoretical predictions from a variety of theoretical approaches.

  7. Nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy: 3. International workshop on nuclear fission and fission-product spectroscopy

    Goutte, Heloise; Fioni, Gabriele; Faust, Herbert; Goutte, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    The present book contains the proceedings of the third workshop in a series of workshops previously held in Seyssins in 1994 and 1998. The meeting was jointly organized by different divisions of CEA and two major international laboratories. In the opening address, Prof. B. Bigot, the French High Commissioner for Atomic Energy, outlined France's energy policy for the next few decades. He emphasized the continuing progress of nuclear fission in both technical and economic terms, allowing it to contribute to the energy needs of the planet even more in the future than it does today. Such progress implies a very strong link between fundamental and applied research based on experimental and theoretical approaches. The workshop gathered the different nuclear communities studying the fission process, including topics as the following: - nuclear fission experiments, - spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei, - fission data evaluation, - theoretical aspects of nuclear fission, - and innovative nuclear systems and new facilities. The scientific program was suggested by an International Advisory Committee. About 100 scientists from 13 different countries attended the conference in the friendly working atmosphere of the Castle of Cadarache in the heart of the Provence. The proceedings of the workshop were divided into 11 sections addressing the following subject matters: 1. Cross sections and resonances (5 papers); 2. Fission at higher energies - I (5 papers); 3. Fission: mass and charge yields (4 papers); 4. Light particles and cluster emission (4 papers); 5. Spectroscopy of neutron rich nuclei (5 papers); 6. Resonances, barriers, and fission times (5 papers); 7. Fragment excitation and neutron emission (4 papers); 8. Mass and energy distributions (4 papers); 9. Needs for nuclear data and new facilities - I (4 papers); 10. Angular momenta and fission at higher Energies - II (3 papers); 11. New facilities - II (2 papers). A poster session of 8 presentations completed the workshop

  8. Analysis of 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate in sunscreen products by HPLC and Raman spectroscopy.

    Cheng, J; Li, Y S; L Roberts, R; Walker, G

    1997-10-01

    The analyses of 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate (EHMC) using HPLC and Raman spectroscopy have been undertaken and compared. EHMC, which is one of the most widely used sunscreen agents in suncare products in the US, exhibits a strong Raman signal. This signal clearly appears in both ethanol solutions of EHMC as well as in commercial sunscreen lotions containing this sun screen agent. A method for the direct detection and analysis of EHMC has been developed using Raman spectroscopy. This was accomplished by correlating the Raman intensities with the HPLC assays for a series of prototype suncare formulations. Based upon this information, it would be possible to employ Raman spectroscopy as an in-process control method in the commercial production of suncare products containing EHMC. The possibility of applying surface-enhanced Raman scattering for trace analysis was discussed.

  9. The effect of resonance production and diffraction on the inclusive spectra of pions and protons in 19 GeV/c pn interactions

    Bakken, V.; Breivik, F.O.; Jacobsen, T.

    1984-01-01

    Bubble chamber data on pn interactions at 19 GeV/c are used to investigate the effects of nucleon diffraction and resonance production on the inclusive x- and psub(T)sup(2)-distributions of protons and pions. The differential distributions of p, π - and distributions from the decay of the strong resonances Δsup(++)(1232) and Δ - (1232) and from rho 0 (770) are determined. The x-distributions of the protons in the two c.m. hemispheres become quite similar when the effect of diffraction and Δsup(++) is subtracted. The psub(T)sup(2)-distributions can then be described by a single exponential in the whole kinematic region. The net effect on the shape of the x-distributions of the pions due to diffraction, effect of these processes on the particle ratio π - /π + is investigated. By excluding the diffraction and Δsup(++)/Δ - production, the strength of the low-psub(T)sup(2) component of the psub(T)sup(2)-distributions of the pions is reduced, but it seems that diffraction and resonance production cannot account for all oft his low-psub(T)sup(2) enhancement

  10. The utility of N-15 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the study of natural products

    Randall, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    The utility of 15 N NMR spectroscopy for the study of natural products and the difficulties which must be overcome arte discussed. The widespread use of pulse Fourier techniques, decouplings, larger magnetic fields and large tube sizes allows a large number of 15 N studies of natural products, the more recent and important of these being peptides, nucleosides and nucleotides. Sites of protonation, tautomerism, sites of nitrosation and proton exchange behaviour for some of these natrual products have been studied. (A.G.)

  11. Production and spectroscopy of ultracold YbRb{sup *} molecules

    Nemitz, Nils

    2008-11-15

    This thesis describes the formation of electronically excited but translationally cold molecules formed from rubidium atoms and two isotopes of ytterbium ({sup 176}Yb and {sup 174}Yb) by means of photoassociation. The experiments were performed in a combined MOT with 10{sup 9} rubidium atoms and 2.10{sup 6} ytterbium atoms at temperatures of less than 1 mK. Photoassociation lines were found by trap loss spectroscopy throughout a wavelength range of 2 nm near the 795 nm D1 transition in rubidium. The majority of lines belong to two vibrational series in the excited YbRb{sup *} molecule, converging on a system of a ground state ytterbium atom and an excited rubidium atom. The strong variation of line strength between different vibrational lines is explained through the Franck-Condon principle. An improved version of the Leroy-Bernstein equation was used to extract the leading dispersion coefficient of the potential from the vibrational progression. Most of the observed lines show a resolved rotational structure as expected from a basic quantum mechanical model. The series terminates with the third or forth rotational component due to the ground state centrifugal barrier.The measured rotational constants agree very well with calculations based on the C{sub 6} coefficient. The discovery of a splitting of the rotational components into subcomponents indicates an uncommon angular momentum coupling described by Hund's case. Variations in the depth of the subcomponents indicates a similar splitting in the ground state, with the energies of the substates based on the alignment of the rubidium atom's magnetic dipole moment relative to the angular momentum carried by an approaching ytterbium atom. This creates an additional ground state barrier, partially suppressing some of the subcomponents. Using a rate equation model developed for this purpose, a maximum formation rate of 2.5.10{sup 6} molecules per second was calculated over the volume of the entire trap. The

  12. Production and spectroscopy of ultracold YbRb* molecules

    Nemitz, Nils

    2008-11-01

    This thesis describes the formation of electronically excited but translationally cold molecules formed from rubidium atoms and two isotopes of ytterbium ( 176 Yb and 174 Yb) by means of photoassociation. The experiments were performed in a combined MOT with 10 9 rubidium atoms and 2.10 6 ytterbium atoms at temperatures of less than 1 mK. Photoassociation lines were found by trap loss spectroscopy throughout a wavelength range of 2 nm near the 795 nm D1 transition in rubidium. The majority of lines belong to two vibrational series in the excited YbRb * molecule, converging on a system of a ground state ytterbium atom and an excited rubidium atom. The strong variation of line strength between different vibrational lines is explained through the Franck-Condon principle. An improved version of the Leroy-Bernstein equation was used to extract the leading dispersion coefficient of the potential from the vibrational progression. Most of the observed lines show a resolved rotational structure as expected from a basic quantum mechanical model. The series terminates with the third or forth rotational component due to the ground state centrifugal barrier.The measured rotational constants agree very well with calculations based on the C 6 coefficient. The discovery of a splitting of the rotational components into subcomponents indicates an uncommon angular momentum coupling described by Hund's case. Variations in the depth of the subcomponents indicates a similar splitting in the ground state, with the energies of the substates based on the alignment of the rubidium atom's magnetic dipole moment relative to the angular momentum carried by an approaching ytterbium atom. This creates an additional ground state barrier, partially suppressing some of the subcomponents. Using a rate equation model developed for this purpose, a maximum formation rate of 2.5.10 6 molecules per second was calculated over the volume of the entire trap. The work presented here is an important step on

  13. Thermal analysis, X-ray powder diffraction and electron microscopy data related with the production of 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric Acid cocrystals

    Íris Duarte

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the production of 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric Acid cocrystals as part of the research article entitled “Green production of cocrystals using a new solvent-free approach by spray congealing” (Duarte et al., 2016 [1]. More specifically, here we present the thermal analysis and the X-ray powder diffraction data for pure Glutaric Acid, used as a raw material in [1]. We also include the X-ray powder diffraction and electron microscopy data obtained for the 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric Acid cocrystal (form II produced using the cooling crystallization method reported in “Operating Regions in Cooling Cocrystallization of Caffeine and Glutaric Acid in Acetonitrile” (Yu et al., 2010 [2]. Lastly, we show the X-ray powder diffraction data obtained for assessing the purity of the 1:1 Caffeine:Glutaric cocrystals produced in [1].

  14. Thermal expansion of mullite-type Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9}: A study by X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy and density functional theory

    Mangir Murshed, M., E-mail: murshed@uni-bremen.de [Chemische Kristallographie fester Stoffe, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Universität Bremens, Leobener Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Mendive, Cecilia B.; Curti, Mariano [Departamento de Química, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Dean Funes 3350, B7600AYL Mar del Plata (Argentina); Šehović, Malik [Chemische Kristallographie fester Stoffe, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Universität Bremens, Leobener Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Friedrich, Alexandra [Institut für Geowissenschaften, Abteilung Kristallographie, Goethe-Universität Frankfurt, Altenhöferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Fischer, Michael [Kristallographie, FB Geowissenschaften, Universität Bremen, Klagenfurter Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany); Gesing, Thorsten M. [Chemische Kristallographie fester Stoffe, Institut für Anorganische Chemie, Universität Bremens, Leobener Straße, D-28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    Polycrystalline Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9} powder samples were synthesized using the glycerine method. Single crystals were produced from the powder product in a Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} melt. The lattice thermal expansion of the mullite-type compound was studied using X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT). The metric parameters were modeled using Grüneisen approximation for the zero pressure equation of state, where the temperature-dependent vibrational internal energy was calculated from the Debye characteristic frequency. Both the first-order and second-order Grüneisen approximations were applied for modeling the volumetric expansion, and the second-order approach provided physically meaningful axial parameters. The phonon density of states as well as phonon dispersion guided to set the characteristic frequency for simulation. The experimental infrared and Raman phonon bands were compared with those calculate from the DFT calculations. Selective Raman modes were analyzed for the thermal anharmonic behaviors using simplified Klemens model. The respective mode Grüneisen parameters were calculated from the pressure-dependent Raman spectra. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure of mullite-type Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9} showing the edge-sharing AlO{sub 6} octahedra running parallel to the c-axis. - Highlights: • Thermal expansion of Bi{sub 2}Al{sub 4}O{sub 9} was studied using XRD, FTIR, Raman and DFT. • Metric parameters were modeled using Grüneisen approximation. • Phonon DOS and phonon dispersion helped to set the Debye frequency. • Mode Grüneisen parameters were calculated from the pressure-dependent Raman spectra. • Anharmonicity was analyzed for some selective Raman modes.

  15. Laser Spectroscopy on Ozone Destruction by SF6 Decomposed Products

    北嶋, 巌; 村上, 和幸; 田中, 淳一; 岡井, 善四郎

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports on the identification of the SF6 decomposed products and the possibility of the ozone destruction by it. SF6 gas absorbs very strongly the 10.6μm P branch of C02 laser beam,so that the trace detection under ppb will be easily performed by the laser photo-acoustic method. We observed a new absorption spectra within the 9.6μm P branch resulted from the decomposed molecules after 2 hours 1 Hz-pulsed discharge of SF6 gas. As a resu1t ofthe gas chromatograph, it will be assumed ...

  16. Meson Spectroscopy in Photo-production at CLAS

    Nozar, Mina

    2003-01-01

    Photo-production of excited mesons in the 1-2 GeV mass range decaying via multi-pion or multi-kaon emission has been investigated at the TJNAF\\thanks{This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and The U.S. National Science Foundation.} experiment E01-017 (g6c) in the $4.8-5.4$ GeV photon beam energy range. The main objective of the experiment is to extract resonance parameters of the produced states by way of a Partial Wave Analysis (PWA) technique. In this paper, we will focus ...

  17. Application of NMR Spectroscopy in the Analysis of Petroleum Derivatives and Products

    Parlov Vuković, J.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Complex chemical composition and physical properties of oil and fuel make their complete cha racterization very difficult. Components present in oil and oil products differ in structure, size, po larity and functionality. The presence and structure of specific hydrocarbons in final products depend on the processing procedure and type of the fuel. In order to predict or improve fuel pro perties it is necessary to determine its composition. Thus, new and more sophisticated analytical methods and procedures are constantly being developed. NMR spectroscopy plays a significant role in analysis and identification of complex hydrocarbon mixtures of petroleum and petroleum products. In this review, we describe the application of NMR spectroscopy for analyzing gasoline and diesel fuels. Hence, by using NMR spectroscopy it is possible to determine gasoline composition and presence of benzene and oxygenates, as well as some important physical characteristics of gasoli ne such as the research octane number. An application of different NMR techniques made it pos sible to characterize diesel fuels and middle oil distillates from various refineries. Data so obtained can be used in combination with statistical methods to predict fuel properties and to monitor pro- duction processes in the petroleum industry. NMR spectroscopy has proven useful in analysis of FAME which has recently been used as an ecologically acceptable alternative fuel. Furthermore, techniques such as CP/MAS for characterization of solid state oil-geochemical samples are inclu- ded. Also, possibilities of using NMR spectroscopy in the analysis of polymeric additives are di- scussed.

  18. Study of diffractive production processes in proton-nucleon and proton-nucleus interactions and search for exotic baryons

    1996-01-01

    Coherent diffractive production reactions p+C→[Σ(1385)0K+]+C and p+C→[Σ0K+]+C on carbon nuclei were investigated in experiments at the SPHINX facility in a 70-GeV proton beam from the IHEP accelerator. A large body of evidence for new baryon states was obtained in the study of hyperon-kaon effective-mass spectra in these two reactions: X(2050) with mass M=2052±6 MeV and width Γ=35+22-35 MeV in M[Σ(1385)0K+] and X(2000) with M=1999±6 MeV and Γ=91±17 MeV in M[Σ0K+]. The unusual features of these massive states (comparatively small decay widths and anomalously large branching ratios for decays with strange-particle emission) make them very serious candidates for cryptoexotic pentaquark baryons with hidden strangeness. Preliminary data on the reactions p+N→[pη]+N and p+N→[pη']+N, as well as first results for M[Σ0K+], M(pη'), and M(pη') effective mass spectra in nonperipheral region (with p2T(greater-or-similar sign)0.3 GeV2), are presented

  19. The production of sulfur targets for gamma-ray spectroscopy

    Greene, J P

    2002-01-01

    The production of thin sulfur targets for nuclear physics, either in elemental or in compound form, is problematic, due to low melting points, high vapor pressures and high dissociation rates. Many sulfur compounds have been tried in the past without great success. In this paper, we report the use of spray coating molybdenum disulfide onto a thin carbon backing. The targets were of thickness 750 mu g/cm sup 2 (approx 300 mu g/cm sup 2 of sulfur) on 15 mu g/cm sup 2 carbon backings, and withstood 4 pnA (approx 10 mW/cm sup 2) of deposited beam power for several days without apparent loss of sulfur content.

  20. Classification and Processing Optimization of Barley Milk Production Using NIR Spectroscopy, Particle Size, and Total Dissolved Solids Analysis

    Jasenka Gajdoš Kljusurić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Barley is a grain whose consumption has a significant nutritional benefit for human health as a very good source of dietary fibre, minerals, vitamins, and phenolic and phytic acids. Nowadays, it is more and more often used in the production of plant milk, which is used to replace cow milk in the diet by an increasing number of consumers. The aim of the study was to classify barley milk and determine the optimal processing conditions in barley milk production based on NIR spectra, particle size, and total dissolved solids analysis. Standard recipe for barley milk was used without added additives. Barley grain was ground and mixed in a blender for 15, 30, 45, and 60 seconds. The samples were filtered and particle size of the grains was determined by laser diffraction particle sizing. The plant milk was also analysed using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS, in the range from 904 to 1699 nm. Furthermore, conductivity of each sample was determined and microphotographs were taken in order to identify the structure of fat globules and particles in the barley milk. NIR spectra, particle size distribution, and conductivity results all point to 45 seconds as the optimal blending time, since further blending results in the saturation of the samples.

  1. Diffractive production of {pi}{sup -}f{sub 1} in {pi}{sup -}p interactions at COMPASS(CERN)

    Yang, Hao

    2012-11-06

    Diffractive dissociation of a {pi}{sup -} beam(190 GeV/c) on a proton target was measured at the COMPASS spectrometer. During a run in 2008, a large number of events with {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta} in the final state was recorded. Partial wave analyses(PWA) of these data are being performed, concentrating on the kinematic domain of momentum transfer t' from 0.1 to 1.0 GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2}. Subject of this thesis is the diffractive production of X from {pi}{sup -}p{yields}Xp with the subsequent decays X{yields}{pi}{sup -}f{sub 1} and f{sub 1}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{eta}. Two different decays of the {eta} were selected: {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}({gamma}{gamma}) and {eta}{yields}{gamma}{gamma}. A kinematic fitting routine was used to improve the data selection. In order to do the PWA, a Monte Carlo(MC) simulation is needed to account for the detector acceptance. In the mass-independent PWA the angular distributions of the real events are compared with the event distributions imposed on Monte Carlo(MC) events in order to determine the production amplitudes of different assumed partial waves in mass bins of 50 MeV/c{sup 2} of the invariant mass m{sub X} of X in the range 1.3 < m{sub X} < 3.0 GeV/c{sup 2}, by means of a maximum-likelihood-fit. Then a simplified mass-dependent fit of Breit-Wigner amplitudes has been applied to the distributions of production intensities as a function of m{sub X} in order to determine the contributions of known or presumed resonances. In the {pi}{sup -}f{sub 1} channel, we focus on the S, P and D wave i.e. orbital angular momentum L=0, 1, 2 between {pi}{sup -} and f{sub 1}. Significant intensity and phase motion are observed for the following J{sup PC}M{sup {epsilon}} combinations, where J, P, C, M and {epsilon} stand for the total angular momentum, parity and charge conjugation, total spin projection and reflectivity: 1{sup -+}1{sup +} (S wave), 1{sup ++}0{sup +} (P wave), 2{sup -+}0{sup +} (D

  2. Experimental review of light quark spectroscopy from e+e- production and γγ collisions

    Toki, W.H.

    1987-07-01

    This is an experimental review of light quark spectroscopy from e + e - production and γγ collision results presented at the 2nd International Conference on Hadron Spectroscopy at KEK, Japan. The recent results in γγ production have evidence for the J/sup PC/ = 1 ++ , E/f 1 (1420) and D/f 1 (1285), mesons from the TPC and Mark II collaborations and upper limits for pseudoscalar resonances from the Crystal Ball collaboration. The results in J/psi reactions include D/f 1 (1285) meson production in radiative decays and a complete measurement of the hadronic decays into pseudoscalar-vector pairs from the DM2 collaboration and evidence for phi phi production in radiative decays and a study of the iota line shape from the Mark III collaboration. A short review of simple theoretical ideas is presented

  3. CMS results on hard diffraction

    INSPIRE-00107098

    2013-01-01

    In these proceedings we present CMS results on hard diffraction. Diffractive dijet production in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$=7 TeV is discussed. The cross section for dijet production is presented as a function of $\\tilde{\\xi}$, representing the fractional momentum loss of the scattered proton in single-diffractive events. The observation of W and Z boson production in events with a large pseudo-rapidity gap is also presented.

  4. Diffractive DIS: Where are we?

    Nikolaev, N.N.

    2001-01-01

    A brief review of the modern QCD theory of diffractive DIS is given. The recent progress has been remarkably rapid, all the principal predictions from the color dipole approach to diffraction - the (Q 2 + m V 2 ) scaling, the pattern of SCHNC, shrinkage of the diffraction cone in hard diffractive DIS, the strong impact of longitudinal gluons in inclusive J/Ψ production at Tevatron - have been confirmed experimentally

  5. Comparison of macromolecular interactions in the cell walls of hardwood, softwood and maize by fluorescence and FTIR spectroscopy, differential polarization laser scanning microscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Djikanović, D.; Devecerski, A.; Steinbach, Gabor; Simonović, J.; Matović, B.; Garab, G.; Kalauzi, A.; Radotić, K.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 3 (2016), s. 547-566 ISSN 0043-7719 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : IR SPECTROSCOPY * CROSS-LINKING * CELLULOSE Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 1.509, year: 2016

  6. Tests of QCD Factorisation in the Diffractive Production of Dijets in Deep-Inelastic Scattering and Photoproduction at HERA

    Aktas, A.; Anthonis, T.; Antunovic, B.; Aplin, S.; Asmone, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Backovic, S.; Baghdasaryan, A.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baudrand, S.; Beckingham, M.; Begzsuren, K.; Behnke, O.; Behrendt, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, N.; Bizot, J.C.; Boenig, M.-O.; Boudry, V.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, G.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Bruncko, D.; Busser, F.W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A.J.; Cantun Avila, K.B.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Cerny, K.; Cerny, V.; Chekelian, V.; Cholewa, A.; Contreras, J.G.; Coughlan, J.A.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J.B.; Daum, K.; de Boer, Y.; Delcourt, B.; Del Degan, M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Diaconu, C.; Dodonov, V.; Dubak, A.; Eckerlin, Guenter; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eliseev, A.; Elsen, E.; Essenov, S.; Falkewicz, A.; Faulkner, P.J.W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Feltesse, J.; Ferencei, J.; Finke, L.; Fleischer, M.; Flucke, G.; Fomenko, A.; Franke, G.; Frisson, T.; Gabathuler, E.; Garutti, E.; Gayler, J.; Ghazaryan, Samvel; Ginzburgskaya, S.; Glazov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Goerlich, L.; Goettlich, M.; Gogitidze, N.; Gorbounov, S.; Gouzevitch, M.; Grab, C.; Greenshaw, T.; Gregori, M.; Grell, B.R.; Grindhammer, G.; Habib, S.; Haidt, D.; Hansson, M.; Heinzelmann, G.; Helebrant, C.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henschel, H.; Herrera, G.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hiller, K.H.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hreus, T.; Hussain, S.; Jacquet, M.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jonsson, L.; Johnson, D.P.; Jung, Andreas Werner; Jung, H.; Kapichine, M.; Katzy, J.; Kenyon, I.R.; Kiesling, Christian M.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Klimkovich, T.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Knutsson, A.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kraemer, M.; Krastev, K.; Kretzschmar, J.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kruger, K.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lange, W.; Lastovicka-Medin, G.; Laycock, P.; Lebedev, A.; Leibenguth, G.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; Lindfeld, L.; Lipka, K.; Liptaj, A.; List, B.; List, J.; Loktionova, N.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Lubimov, V.; Lucaci-Timoce, A.-I.; Lueders, H.; Lytkin, L.; Makankine, A.; Malinovski, E.; Marage, P.; Marti, Ll.; Martisikova, M.; Martyn, H.-U.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A.B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michels, V.; Mikocki, S.; Milcewicz-Mika, I.; Mladenov, D.; Mohamed, A.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J.V.; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Muller, K.; Murin, P.; Nankov, K.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, Paul R.; Niebuhr, C.; Nikiforov, A.; Nowak, G.; Nowak, K.; Nozicka, M.; Oganezov, R.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J.E.; Osman, S.; Ozerov, D.; Palichik, V.; Panagoulias, I.; Pandurovic, M.; Papadopoulou, Th.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G.D.; Peng, H.; Perez, E.; Perez-Astudillo, D.; Perieanu, A.; Petrukhin, A.; Picuric, I.; Piec, S.; Pitzl, D.; Placakyte, R.; Povh, B.; Prideaux, P.; Rahmat, A.J.; Raicevic, N.; Reimer, P.; Rimmer, A.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roland, B.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakov, S.; Salvaire, F.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sauter, M.; Sauvan, E.; Schatzel, S.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, C.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoning, A.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Sefkow, F.; Shaw-West, R.N.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L.N.; Sloan, T.; Smiljanic, Ivan; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, Arnd E.; Steder, M.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Stoilov, A.; Straumann, U.; Sunar, D.; Sykora, T.; Tchoulakov, V.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P.D.; Toll, T.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Trinh, T.N.; Truol, P.; Tsakov, I.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Urban, K.; Usik, A.; Utkin, D.; Valkarova, A.; Vallee, C.; Van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vazdik, Y.; Vinokurova, S.; Volchinski, V.; Wacker, K.; Weber, G.; Weber, R.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Wessels, M.; Wissing, Ch.; Wolf, R.; Wunsch, E.; Xella, S.; Yan, W.; Yeganov, V.; Zacek, J.; Zalesak, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokin, A.; Zhu, Y.C.; Zimmerman, J.; Zimmerman, T.; Zohrabyan, H.; Zomer, F.

    2007-01-01

    Measurements are presented of differential dijet cross sections in diffractive photoproduction (Q^2 e X Y, in which the system X, containing at least two jets, is separated from a leading low-mass proton remnant system Y by a large rapidity gap. The dijet cross sections are compared with NLO QCD predictions based on diffractive parton densities previously obtained from a QCD analysis of inclusive diffractive DIS cross sections by H1. In DIS, the dijet data are well described, supporting the validity of QCD factorisation. The diffractive DIS dijet data are more sensitive to the diffractive gluon density at high fractional parton momentum than the measurements of inclusive diffractive DIS. In photoproduction, the predicted dijet cross section has to be multiplied by a factor of approximately 0.5 for both direct and resolved photon interactions to describe the measurements. The ratio of measured dijet cross section to NLO prediction in photoproduction is a factor 0.5+-0.1 smaller than the same ratio in DIS. This...

  7. Semiexclusive production of J/ψ mesons in proton–proton collisions with electromagnetic and diffractive dissociation of one of the protons

    Anna Cisek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We calculate the cross sections for both electromagnetic and diffractive dissociation of protons for the semiexclusive production of J/ψ mesons in proton–proton collisions at the LHC. Several differential distributions in missing mass (MX, or single-particle variables related exclusively to the J/ψ meson are calculated for s=7and13 TeV. The cross sections and distributions are compared to the cross section of the purely exclusive reaction pp→ppJ/ψ. We show the corresponding ratio as a function of J/ψ meson rapidity. We compare the distributions for purely electromagnetic and purely diffractive proton excitations/dissociation. We predict cross sections for electromagnetic and diffractive excitations of similar order of magnitude.

  8. X-ray Excited Optical Fluorescence and Diffraction Imaging of Reactivity and Crystallinity in a Zeolite Crystal : Crystallography and Molecular Spectroscopy in One

    Ristanovic, Zoran; Hofmann, Jan P; Richard, Marie-Ingrid; Jiang, Tao; Chahine, Gilbert A; Schülli, Tobias U; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-01-01

    Structure-activity relationships in heterogeneous catalysis are challenging to be measured on a single-particle level. For the first time, one X-ray beam is used to determine the crystallographic structure and reactivity of a single zeolite crystal. The method generates μm-resolved X-ray diffraction

  9. Diffraction attraction

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'

  10. Diffractive scattering

    De Wolf, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken-x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wusthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed.

  11. Diffractive Scattering

    Wolf, E.A. de

    2002-01-01

    We discuss basic concepts and properties of diffractive phenomena in soft hadron collisions and in deep-inelastic scattering at low Bjorken - x. The paper is not a review of the rapidly developing field but presents an attempt to show in simple terms the close inter-relationship between the dynamics of high-energy hadronic and deep-inelastic diffraction. Using the saturation model of Golec-Biernat and Wuesthoff as an example, a simple explanation of geometrical scaling is presented. The relation between the QCD anomalous multiplicity dimension and the Pomeron intercept is discussed. (author)

  12. Diffraction attraction

    Anon.

    1986-03-15

    Elastic scattering – when colliding particles 'bounce' off each other like billiard balls – has always had a special interest for high energy physicists. While its simplicity makes for deep analogies with classical ideas like diffraction, its jbtle details also test our understanding of the intricate inner mechanisms which drive particle interactions. With a new stock of elastic scattering data now available thanks to experiments at the CERN proton-antiproton Collider, and with studies at higher energies imminent or planned, some seventy physicists gathered in the magnificent chateau at Blois, France, for a 'Workshop on Elastic and Diffractive Scattering at the Collider and Beyond'.

  13. Synthesis and characterization by diffraction of X-Ray and impedance spectroscopy the ferroelectric ceramic Ti0.4Fe0.3Nb0.3O2 (TFNO) with additions of Bi2O3

    Sousa, D.G.; Sales, A.J.M.; Carneiro, J.C.S.; Sancho, E.O.; Sombra, A.S.B.; Sales, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    The ceramic Ti 0.4F e 0.3 Nb 0. 3O 2 (TFNO), was synthesized through of the solid-state reaction technique. The oxides were mixed for 7h and calcined at 1075 deg C for 4h. Phase TFNO was confirmed via X-ray diffraction technique (XRD) and Rietveld refinement. Were made additions of 6% and 8% of Bi 2 O 3 to the calcined powder, that after the pressing and sintering at 1125 deg C, were submitted to analysis by XRD and impedance spectroscopy study. The X-ray diffraction technique confirm a rutile-type structure [TiO2 (tP6) ] to calcined powder and to presence of two phases, Ti0.4Fe0.3Nb0.3O2 (TFNO tetragonal-rutile P 42/m n m(136)) and Bi1.721Fe1.056Nb1.134O7 (BFNO cubic F d -3 m Z(227)), for samples sintered. The impedance spectroscopy reveal in 240°C, to TFNO with addition of 8% at 100 KHz, the following results: σ' = 0,0452(Ω.m) -1 ; ε r ' = 9613 e tgδ = 0,83556. (author)

  14. Spin transitions in La{sub 0.7} Ba{sub 0.3}CoO{sub 3} thin films revealed by combining Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Othmen, Zied; Oueslati, Meherzi [Unité Nanomatériaux et Photonique, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, Tunis El-Manar University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Copie, Olivier; Gemeiner, Pascale; Dkhil, Brahim [Laboratoire Structures, Propriétés et Modélisation des Solides, Centrale Supélec, CNRS-UMR 8580, Université Paris-Saclay (France); Daoudi, Kais [Unité Nanomatériaux et Photonique, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, Tunis El-Manar University, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Department of Applied Physics and Astronomy, College of Sciences, University of Sharjah, P.O. Box 27272, Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Boudard, Michel [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2016-07-07

    In cobaltite, the spin states transitions of Co{sup 3+/4+} ions govern the magnetic and electronic conduction properties. These transitions are strain-sensitive and can be varied using external parameters, including temperature, hydrostatic pressure, or chemical stresses through ionic substitutions. In this work, using temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction, the epitaxial strain effects on both structural and vibrational properties of La{sub 0.7} Ba{sub 0.3} CoO{sub 3} (LBCO) cobaltite thin films are investigated. All Raman active phonon modes as well as the structure are found to be strongly affected. Both Raman modes and lattice parameter evolutions show temperature changes correlated with magnetic and electronic transitions properties. Combining Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction appears as a powerful approach to probe the spin transition in thin film cobaltite. Our results provide insight into strong spin-charge-phonon coupling in LBCO thin film. This coupling manifests as vibrational transition with temperature in the Raman spectra near the ferromagnetic spin ordered transition at 220 K.

  15. The Moessbauer spectroscopy in the characterization of atmospheric corrosion products; La espectroscopia Moessbauer en la caracterizacion de productos de corrosion atmosferica

    Hernandez Torres, D; Leiva Ronda, P [Centro de Estudios Aplicados al Desarrollo Nuclear (CEADEN), La Habana (Cuba); Gomez, J; Ronda, M [Centro de Investigaciones del Petroleo, La Habana (Cuba)

    1996-07-01

    A study of corrosion products on mild steel formed after 1 and 5 years exposure in two industrial coastal weathering stations in the Bay from Matanzas City, Cuba, has been carried out. Structural analysis was conducted using mainly transmission Moessbauer Spectroscopy and the X-ray diffraction as complementary technique. The main phases found in the specimen exposed to high chloride containing environment were: lepidocrocite ({gamma}- FeOOH), goethite ({alpha}- FeOOH) and magnetite concentration was the lowest, the phases found were {gamma}- FeOOH and {alpha}- FeOOH, and the phase transformation proposed was {gamma}- FeOOh -> {alpha}- Fe-OOH. In this station were found also amorphous corrosion products. There amorphous phases could be responsible for the lowest levels of corrosion on steel in this station.

  16. Evaluating Lignocellulosic Biomass, Its Derivatives, and Downstream Products with Raman Spectroscopy

    Lupoi, Jason S.; Gjersing, Erica; Davis, Mark F.

    2015-01-01

    The creation of fuels, chemicals, and materials from plants can aid in replacing products fabricated from non-renewable energy sources. Before using biomass in downstream applications, it must be characterized to assess chemical traits, such as cellulose, lignin, or lignin monomer content, or the sugars released following an acid or enzymatic hydrolysis. The measurement of these traits allows researchers to gage the recalcitrance of the plants and develop efficient deconstruction strategies to maximize yields. Standard methods for assessing biomass phenotypes often have experimental protocols that limit their use for screening sizeable numbers of plant species. Raman spectroscopy, a non-destructive, non-invasive vibrational spectroscopy technique, is capable of providing qualitative, structural information and quantitative measurements. Applications of Raman spectroscopy have aided in alleviating the constraints of standard methods by coupling spectral data with multivariate analysis to construct models capable of predicting analytes. Hydrolysis and fermentation products, such as glucose and ethanol, can be quantified off-, at-, or on-line. Raman imaging has enabled researchers to develop a visual understanding of reactions, such as different pretreatment strategies, in real-time, while also providing integral chemical information. This review provides an overview of what Raman spectroscopy is, and how it has been applied to the analysis of whole lignocellulosic biomass, its derivatives, and downstream process monitoring. PMID:25941674

  17. In vivo Microscopic Photoacoustic Spectroscopy for Non-Invasive Glucose Monitoring Invulnerable to Skin Secretion Products.

    Sim, Joo Yong; Ahn, Chang-Geun; Jeong, Eun-Ju; Kim, Bong Kyu

    2018-01-18

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy has been shown to be a promising tool for non-invasive blood glucose monitoring. However, the repeatability of such a method is susceptible to changes in skin condition, which is dependent on hand washing and drying due to the high absorption of infrared excitation light to the skin secretion products or water. In this paper, we present a method to meet the challenges of mid-infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy for non-invasive glucose monitoring. By obtaining the microscopic spatial information of skin during the spectroscopy measurement, the skin region where the infrared spectra is insensitive to skin condition can be locally selected, which enables reliable prediction of the blood glucose level from the photoacoustic spectroscopy signals. Our raster-scan imaging showed that the skin condition for in vivo spectroscopic glucose monitoring had significant inhomogeneities and large variability in the probing area where the signal was acquired. However, the selective localization of the probing led to a reduction in the effects of variability due to the skin secretion product. Looking forward, this technology has broader applications not only in continuous glucose monitoring for diabetic patient care, but in forensic science, the diagnosis of malfunctioning sweat pores, and the discrimination of tumors extracted via biopsy.

  18. Raman and Infrared spectroscopies and X-ray diffraction data on bupivacaine and ropivacaine complexed with 2-hydroxypropyl−β−cyclodextrin

    Longo Martins, Murillo; Eckert, Juergen; Jacobsen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Probing the dynamics of complexed local anesthetics via neutron scattering spectroscopy and DFT calculations (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2017.03.051)” (Martins et al., 2017) [1]. This work shows the molecular...

  19. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of SDF2-like protein from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Radzimanowski, Jens; Ravaud, Stephanie; Schott, Andrea; Strahl, Sabine; Sinning, Irmgard

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of the stromal-cell-derived factor 2-like protein of Arabidopsis thaliana are reported. The crystals belonged to the space group P6 1 and diffracted to 1.95 Å resolution. The stromal-cell-derived factor 2-like protein of Arabidopsis thaliana (AtSDL) has been shown to be highly up-regulated in response to unfolded protein response (UPR) inducing reagents, suggesting that it plays a crucial role in the plant UPR pathway. AtSDL has been cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized using the vapour-diffusion method. Two crystal forms have been obtained under very similar conditions. The needle-shaped crystals did not diffract X-rays, while the other form diffracted to 1.95 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source and belonged to the hexagonal space group P6 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 96.1, c = 69.3 Å

  20. Cooperative photo-induced effects: from photo-magnetism under continuous irradiation to ultra-fast phenomena - study through optical spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction; Effets photo-induits cooperatifs: du photomagnetisme sous irradiation continue aux phenomenes ultrarapides - etude par spectroscopie optique et diffraction X

    Glijer, D

    2006-12-15

    The control with ultra-short laser pulses of the collective and concerted transformation of molecules driving a macroscopic state switching on an ultra-fast time scale in solid state opens new prospects in materials science. The goal is to realize at the material level what happens at the molecular level in femto-chemistry. These processes are highly cooperative and highly non-linear, leading to self-amplification and self-organization within the material, a so-called photo-induced phase transition with a new long range order (structural, magnetic, ferroelectric,...). Two families of molecular compounds have been studied here: first of all, spin transition materials changing from a diamagnetic state over to a paramagnetic state under the effect of temperature or under continuous laser excitation. It concerns photo-active molecular bi-stability prototype materials in solid state, whose switching has been studied during X-ray diffraction, optical reflectivity and magnetism experiments. Then we have studied charge-transfer molecular systems, prototype compounds for ultrafast photo-induced phase transitions: insulator-metal, neutral-ionic....As well as ultrafast optical experiments, time-resolved X ray crystallography is a key technique in order to follow at the atomic level the different steps of the photo-induced transformation and thus to observe the involved mechanisms. We have underlined a process of photo-formation of one-dimensional nano-domains of lattice-relaxed charge-transfer excitations, governing the photo-induced phase transition of the molecular charge-transfer complex TTF-CA by the first time-resolved diffuse scattering measurements. Moreover, a new femtosecond laser-plasma source and a optical pump-probe spectroscopy set-up with a highly sensitive detecting system have been developed in this work. The results presented here will be an illustration of the present scientific challenges existing on the one hand with the development of projects of major

  1. High mass exclusive diffractive dijet production in ppˉ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Kupčo, Alexander; Lokajíček, Miloš

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 705, č. 3 (2011), s. 193-199 ISSN 0370-2693 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA08047 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : pair production * diffraction * Batavia TEVATRON Coll * anti-p p: exclusive reaction * mass spectrum: (2jet) * DZERO * experimental results Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 3.955, year: 2011 http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1009.2444

  2. Electrochemical and Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Detection of SF6 Decomposition Products

    Ming Dong

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6 gas-insulated electrical equipment is widely used in high-voltage (HV and extra-high-voltage (EHV power systems. Partial discharge (PD and local heating can occur in the electrical equipment because of insulation faults, which results in SF6 decomposition and ultimately generates several types of decomposition products. These SF6 decomposition products can be qualitatively and quantitatively detected with relevant detection methods, and such detection contributes to diagnosing the internal faults and evaluating the security risks of the equipment. At present, multiple detection methods exist for analyzing the SF6 decomposition products, and electrochemical sensing (ES and infrared (IR spectroscopy are well suited for application in online detection. In this study, the combination of ES with IR spectroscopy is used to detect SF6 gas decomposition. First, the characteristics of these two detection methods are studied, and the data analysis matrix is established. Then, a qualitative and quantitative analysis ES-IR model is established by adopting a two-step approach. A SF6 decomposition detector is designed and manufactured by combining an electrochemical sensor and IR spectroscopy technology. The detector is used to detect SF6 gas decomposition and is verified to reliably and accurately detect the gas components and concentrations.

  3. Electrochemical and Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Detection of SF6 Decomposition Products

    Dong, Ming; Ren, Ming; Ye, Rixin

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas-insulated electrical equipment is widely used in high-voltage (HV) and extra-high-voltage (EHV) power systems. Partial discharge (PD) and local heating can occur in the electrical equipment because of insulation faults, which results in SF6 decomposition and ultimately generates several types of decomposition products. These SF6 decomposition products can be qualitatively and quantitatively detected with relevant detection methods, and such detection contributes to diagnosing the internal faults and evaluating the security risks of the equipment. At present, multiple detection methods exist for analyzing the SF6 decomposition products, and electrochemical sensing (ES) and infrared (IR) spectroscopy are well suited for application in online detection. In this study, the combination of ES with IR spectroscopy is used to detect SF6 gas decomposition. First, the characteristics of these two detection methods are studied, and the data analysis matrix is established. Then, a qualitative and quantitative analysis ES-IR model is established by adopting a two-step approach. A SF6 decomposition detector is designed and manufactured by combining an electrochemical sensor and IR spectroscopy technology. The detector is used to detect SF6 gas decomposition and is verified to reliably and accurately detect the gas components and concentrations. PMID:29140268

  4. Monte Carlo study of particle production in diffractive proton-proton collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV with the very forward detector combined with central information

    Zhou, Qi-Dong [Nagoya University, Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya (Japan); Itow, Yoshitaka; Sako, Takashi [Nagoya University, Institute for Space-Earth Environmental Research, Nagoya (Japan); Nagoya University, Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute, Nagoya (Japan); Menjo, Hiroaki [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Very forward (VF) detectors in hadron colliders, having unique sensitivity to diffractive processes, can be a powerful tool for studying diffractive dissociation by combining them with central detectors. Several Monte Carlo simulation samples in p-p collisions at √(s) = 13 TeV were analyzed, and different nondiffractive and diffractive contributions were clarified through differential cross sections of forward neutral particles. Diffraction selection criteria in the VF-triggered-event samples were determined by using the central track information. The corresponding selection applicable in real experiments has ∼ 100% purity and 30-70% efficiency. Consequently, the central information enables classification of the forward productions into diffraction and nondiffraction categories; in particular, most of the surviving events from the selection belong to low-mass diffraction events at log{sub 10}(ξ{sub x}) < -5.5. Therefore, the combined method can uniquely access the low-mass diffraction regime experimentally. (orig.)

  5. Analysis of the corrosion products on galvanized steels by FTIR spectroscopy

    Kasperek, J.

    1998-01-01

    FTIR reflectance spectroscopy has been used for the characterization of products formed by an accelerated wet ageing test on industrial hot-dip galvanized steel. Several aluminium contents are selected. Various products have been detected in this study. The kind and amount vary with the substrate, the type of ageing test used, the relative humidity level and the temperature. The galvanized coatings studied show a mixed zinc-aluminium compound, Zn 6 Al 2 (OH) 16 CO 3 .4H 2O. This phase is observed from the first exposure time on all coatings regardless of the amount of aluminium. Contrary to zinc, no basic aluminium compound has been detected. (orig.)

  6. Moessbauer Spectroscopy in the Characterization of waste product used like fertilizer in soil. Some Applications

    Furet, N. R.; Orihuela, D. L.; Hernandez

    2007-01-01

    At the present time, the use of industrial solid wastes is an important task, because a great effort that have been carried out to preserve the environmental and to obtain the high technologies. In this work, a characterization of a industrial waste product, on base of the monohydrous iron sulphate (FeSO 4 .1H 2 O) with a 15% approximately of free sulphuric acid, used like improvement of soil was carried out by Mossabuer spectroscopy. This waste product was used in a series of the experiences in parcels (where peaches, (Prunus persica), strawberries are cultivated) in the zone of Cartaya (Huelva, Spain). The characterisation of soil from the parcel before application of this product was carried out in order to analyse and compare with the final results by using the methods of the Moessbauer spectroscopy. High contents of Fe, S, and Zn at the studied product are observed . This elements are very important for plants. The pH in soil and Fe, Mn, and Zn contents in soil and leaf were determined. The knowledge of the main chemical-structural properties of this product, used like improvement of soil, will permit the study of the influence to) on the soil properly, b) on the peach leaves and c) on the foodstuff fruit. (Author)

  7. Diffractive dijet production in p-bar p collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    Aaltonen, T.; Albrow, M.; Gonzalez, B.A.; Lysák, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 3 (2012), "032009-1"-"032009-21" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC527 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100502 Keywords : Batavia TEVATRON * diffraction * jet * high transverse energy * CDF * dijet hadronproduction Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.691, year: 2012 http://arxiv.org/abs/arXiv:1206.3955

  8. New results from HERA on photoproduction and diffraction, the proton structure function, deep inelastic scattering at low x, heavy flavour production, jets and searches for leptoquarks

    Barreiro, F.; Bhadra, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lim, J.N.; Soeldner-Rembold, S.; Straub, B.

    1994-11-01

    This report contains some of the papers presented by the ZEUS Collaboration at the 27th international conference on high energy physics in Glasgow (20-27 July 1994). These concern deep inelastic ep scattering at low x, photoproduction and diffraction in ep scattering, a measurement of the proton structure function and determination of the low-x gluon distribution, D * and J/Ψ production in ep scattering, multi-jet production and determination of α s in ep scattering, and the search for leptoquarks in ep collisions. (HSI)

  9. Production, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of the nucleoside diphosphate kinase b from Leishmania major

    Tonoli, Celisa Caldana Costa; Vieira, Plinio Salmazo; Ward, Richard John; Arni, Raghuvir Krishnaswamy; Oliveira, Arthur Henrique Cavalcante de; Murakami, Mario Tyago

    2009-01-01

    Overexpression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the nucleoside diphosphate kinase b from Leishmania major are reported. The crystals belonged to the trigonal space group P3 2 21 and diffracted to 2.18 Å resolution. Nucleoside diphosphate kinases (NDKs; EC 2.7.4.6) play an essential role in the synthesis of nucleotides from intermediates in the salvage pathway in all parasitic trypanosomatids and their structural studies will be instrumental in shedding light on the biochemical machinery involved in the parasite life cycle and host–parasite interactions. In this work, NDKb from Leishmania major was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The NDK crystal diffracted to 2.2 Å resolution and belonged to the trigonal crystal system, with unit-cell parameters a = 114.2, c = 93.9 Å. Translation-function calculations yielded an unambiguous solution in the enantiomorphic space group P3 2 21

  10. Determination of trace amounts of chemical warfare agent degradation products in decontamination solutions with NMR spectroscopy.

    Koskela, Harri; Rapinoja, Marja-Leena; Kuitunen, Marja-Leena; Vanninen, Paula

    2007-12-01

    Decontamination solutions are used for an efficient detoxification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). As these solutions can be composed of strong alkaline chemicals with hydrolyzing and oxidizing properties, the analysis of CWA degradation products in trace levels from these solutions imposes a challenge for any analytical technique. Here, we present results of application of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for analysis of trace amounts of CWA degradation products in several untreated decontamination solutions. Degradation products of the nerve agents sarin, soman, and VX were selectively monitored with substantially reduced interference of background signals by 1D 1H-31P heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) spectrometry. The detection limit of the chemicals was at the low part-per-million level (2-10 microg/mL) in all studied solutions. In addition, the concentration of the degradation products was obtained with sufficient confidence with external standards.

  11. A QCD analysis of ZEUS diffractive data

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (US)] (and others)

    2009-11-15

    ZEUS inclusive diffractive cross-section measurements have been used in a DGLAP next-to-leading-order QCD analysis to extract the diffractive parton distribution functions. Data on diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering have also been included to constrain the gluon density. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive charm and dijet photoproduction data. (orig.)

  12. A QCD analysis of ZEUS diffractive data

    Chekanov, S.; Derrick, M.; Magill, S.

    2009-11-01

    ZEUS inclusive diffractive cross-section measurements have been used in a DGLAP next-to-leading-order QCD analysis to extract the diffractive parton distribution functions. Data on diffractive dijet production in deep inelastic scattering have also been included to constrain the gluon density. Predictions based on the extracted parton densities are compared to diffractive charm and dijet photoproduction data. (orig.)

  13. X-ray diffraction, dielectric, and Raman spectroscopy studies of BaSrTiO{sub 3}-NaNbO{sub 3} ceramic

    Abdessalem, L. Ben; Aydi, S.; Aydi, A.; Maalej, A.; Khemakhem, H. [Universite de Sfax, Laboratoire des Materiaux Multifonctionnels et Applications (LaMMA), Faculte des Sciences de Sfax (FSS), Sfax (Tunisia); Sassi, Z. [Laboratoire de Genie Electrique et Ferroelectricite (LGEF) de L' INSA de Lyon, Villeurbanne (France)

    2017-05-15

    Ba{sub 0.837}Sr{sub 0.093}Na{sub 0.07}Ti{sub 0.93}Nb{sub 0.07}O{sub 3} (BSNTN) ceramic was synthesized by the solid-state reaction at 1350 C for 3 h. The crystal structure, investigated by X-ray diffraction at room temperature, revealed a single-phase perovskite crystallizing with tetragonal P4mm group space. Dielectric properties were investigated as a function of applied frequency. The ferroelectric behavior has been confirmed by hysteresis investigation. The evolution of the Raman spectra was used to study the variations of the basic phase transition of BaTiO{sub 3}, at room temperature. It shows the introduction of a disorder in this composition, thus favoring a ferroelectric relaxor behavior. (orig.)

  14. Inclusive distributions of diffractively produced neutral kaons, lambdas, and antilambdas, and upper limits on Λ/sub c/+ production in high energy γ p interactions

    Bhadra, S.

    1985-01-01

    The author has used a large acceptance spectrometer in a tagged photon beam to study the interactions of real photons with protons in a hydrogen target. In particular, this thesis presents distributions of neutral kaons, lambdas, and antilambdas from diffractive dissociation where the kinematic regions of the target and projectile fragments are clearly distinguished by using events with clean recoiling protons. This data extends the neutral strange particle production rate measurements to higher overall centre-of-mass energies than previous photoproduction experiments. Comparison to pion-induced reactions supports the hypothesis that the photon behaves primarily as a hardon. Finally, upper limits have been set on the Λ/sub c/ + cross section times the branching ratio for decay modes leading to neutral strange particles for a diffractive dissociation process

  15. Determination of Free Fatty Acid by FT-NIR Spectroscopy in Esterification Reaction for Biodiesel Production

    Djéssica Tatiana Raspe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the use of FT-NIR spectroscopy coupled with multivariate calibration to determine the percentage of free fatty acids (FFA in samples obtained by the esterification of FFA in vegetable oils. The analytical method used as calibration matrix samples of the reaction medium of esterification of oleic acid in soybean oil in proportions of 0.3 to 40 wt% (by weight of oleic acid obtained under different experimental conditions and utilized the partial least squares (PLS regression. The efficiency of the method was tested to predict the content of FFA in reactions of esterification of oleic acid in soybean oil catalysed by KSF clay and Amberlyst 15 commercial resin, both in a batch mode. Good Correlations were observed between the FT-NIR/PLS method and the reference method (AOCS. The results confirm that FT-NIR spectroscopy, in combination with multivariate calibration, is a promising technique for monitoring esterification reaction for biodiesel production.

  16. Diffraction gauging

    Wilkens, P.H.

    1978-01-01

    This system of gauging is now being designed to fit on an Excello NC lathe to measure the form, accuracy, and size of external contoured surfaces as they approach the finish machined size. A template profile of the finished workpiece, but 0.003 in. bigger on radius, will be aligned with the workpiece using a reference diameter and face on the machining fixture to leave a gap between the profile of the template and workpiece. A helium--neon laser beam will be projected through this gap using a rotating retroreflector and a fixed laser. The resulting diffraction pattern produced by the laser beam passing through the template to workpiece gap will be reflected and focused on a fixed diode array via a second retroreflector which moves and remains in optical alignment with the first. These retroreflectors will be rotated about a center that will enable the laser beam, which is shaped in a long slit, to scan the template workpiece gap from the pole to the equator of the workpiece. The characteristic diffraction pattern will be detected by the fixed diode array, and the signal levels from this array will be processed in a mini-computer programmed to produce a best fit through the two minima of the diode signals. The separation of the two minima will yield the size of the workpiece to template gap and this information will be presented to the machine tool operator

  17. Proton diffraction

    Den Besten, J.L.; Jamieson, D.N.; Allen, L.J.

    1998-01-01

    The Lindhard theory on ion channeling in crystals has been widely accepted throughout ion beam analysis for use in simulating such experiments. The simulations use a Monte Carlo method developed by Barret, which utilises the classical 'billiard ball' theory of ions 'bouncing' between planes or tubes of atoms in the crystal. This theory is not valid for 'thin' crystals where the planes or strings of atoms can no longer be assumed to be of infinite proportions. We propose that a theory similar to that used for high energy electron diffraction can be applied to MeV ions, especially protons, in thin crystals to simulate the intensities of transmission channeling and of RBS spectra. The diffraction theory is based on a Bloch wave solution of the Schroedinger equation for an ion passing through the periodic crystal potential. The widely used universal potential for proton-nucleus scattering is used to construct the crystal potential. Absorption due to thermal diffuse scattering is included. Experimental parameters such as convergence angle, beam tilt and scanning directions are considered in our calculations. Comparison between theory and experiment is encouraging and suggests that further work is justified. (authors)

  18. Effect of Pressure on Valence and Structural Properties of YbFe2Ge2 Heavy Fermion Compound A Combined Inelastic X-ray Spectroscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Theoretical Investigation

    Kumar, Ravhi S.; Svane, Axel; Vaitheeswaran; #8741; , Ganapathy; Kanchana, Venkatakrishnan; Antonio, Daniel; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Bauer, Eric D.; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul (Aarhus); (CIW); (Hyderabad - India); (IIT-India); (LANL); (UNLV)

    2016-06-03

    The crystal structure and the Yb valence of the YbFe2Ge2 heavy fermion compound was measured at room temperature and under high pressures using high-pressure powder X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy via both partial fluorescence yield and resonant inelastic X-ray emission techniques. Furthermore, the measurements are complemented by first-principles density functional theoretical calculations using the self-interaction corrected local spin density approximation investigating in particular the magnetic structure and the Yb valence. While the ThCr2Si2-type tetragonal (I4/mmm) structure is stable up to 53 GPa, the X-ray emission results show an increase of the Yb valence from v = 2.72(2) at ambient pressure to v = 2.93(3) at ~9 GPa, where at low temperature a pressure-induced quantum critical state was reported.

  19. In situ observation of Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticle formation by X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy: Influence of Cu/Ni ratio

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Chiarello, Gian Luca

    2014-01-01

    Silica-supported, bimetallic Cu-Ni nanomaterials were prepared with different ratios of Cu to Ni by incipient wetness impregnation without a specific calcination step before reduction. Different in situ characterization techniques, in particular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray...... diffraction (XRD), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), were applied to follow the reduction and alloying process of Cu-Ni nanoparticles on silica. In situ reduction of Cu-Ni samples with structural characterization by combined synchrotron XRD and XAS reveals a strong interaction between Cu and Ni species......, which results in improved reducibility of the Ni species compared with monometallic Ni. At high Ni concentrations silica-supported Cu-Ni alloys form a homogeneous solid solution of Cu and Ni, whereas at lower Ni contents Cu and Ni are partly segregated and form metallic Cu and Cu-Ni alloy phases. Under...

  20. Copper doped TiO2 nanoparticles characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy, total scattering, and powder diffraction--a benchmark structure-property study.

    Lock, Nina; Jensen, Ellen M L; Mi, Jianli; Mamakhel, Aref; Norén, Katarina; Qingbo, Meng; Iversen, Bo B

    2013-07-14

    Metal functionalized nanoparticles potentially have improved properties e.g. in catalytic applications, but their precise structures are often very challenging to determine. Here we report a structural benchmark study based on tetragonal anatase TiO2 nanoparticles containing 0-2 wt% copper. The particles were synthesized by continuous flow synthesis under supercritical water-isopropanol conditions. Size determination using synchrotron PXRD, TEM, and X-ray total scattering reveals 5-7 nm monodisperse particles. The precise dopant structure and thermal stability of the highly crystalline powders were characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and multi-temperature synchrotron PXRD (300-1000 K). The combined evidence reveals that copper is present as a dopant on the particle surfaces, most likely in an amorphous oxide or hydroxide shell. UV-VIS spectroscopy shows that copper presence at concentrations higher than 0.3 wt% lowers the band gap energy. The particles are unaffected by heating to 600 K, while growth and partial transformation to rutile TiO2 occur at higher temperatures. Anisotropic unit cell behavior of anatase is observed as a consequence of the particle growth (a decreases and c increases).

  1. Characterization of Synthesized and Commercial Forms of Magnesium Stearate Using Differential Scanning Calorimetry, Thermogravimetric Analysis, Powder X-Ray Diffraction, and Solid-State NMR Spectroscopy.

    Delaney, Sean P; Nethercott, Matthew J; Mays, Christopher J; Winquist, Nickolas T; Arthur, Donia; Calahan, Julie L; Sethi, Manish; Pardue, Daniel S; Kim, Junghyun; Amidon, Gregory; Munson, Eric J

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium stearate is the salt of a complex mixture of fatty acids, with the majority being stearate and palmitate. It has multiple crystalline forms and, potentially, an amorphous form. Magnesium stearate is used in the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry as a powder lubricant, and typically is added at low levels (∼1%) during the manufacturing process and blended for a relatively short time (∼5 min). Proper levels and mixing times are needed, as too short a mixing time or too small a quantity will result in improper lubrication, and too much can negatively impact dissolution rates. The complex mixture of multiple fatty acids and crystalline forms in magnesium stearate leads to variability between commercial sources, and switching between sources can impact both the amount of lubricant and mixing time needed for proper lubrication. In order to better understand the complex nature of magnesium stearate, a variety of analytical techniques were used to characterize both synthesized and commercial magnesium stearate samples. The results show that correlation among differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and other techniques provides a unique insight into the forms of magnesium stearate. Finally, the ability to monitor form changes of magnesium stearate in an intact tablet using solid-state NMR spectroscopy is shown. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Cation distribution in Ni-substituted Mn{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles: A Raman, Mössbauer, X-ray diffraction and electron spectroscopy study

    Thota, Suneetha [Microwave Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Kashyap, Subhash C., E-mail: skashyap@physics.iitd.ac.in [Microwave Laboratory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India); Sharma, Shiv K. [Hawaii Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, University of Hawaii (UH), Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Reddy, V.R. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India)

    2016-04-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Synthesized Mn{sub 0.5−x}Ni{sub x}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}, nanoparticles (0.05 ≤ x ≤ 0.45) at low temperature. • Raman studies established that Fe and Zn ions occupy A site in equal fraction. • {sup 57}Fe Mossbauer study revealed that Ni and Mn ions occupy nearly 25% of B sites. • Electron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that nearly 25% Fe{sup 3+} dwells at A sites. • Diffraction peak intensity (X-ray) quantified cations distribution at A- and B-sites. - Abstract: In this paper we report the structural, vibration, and electronic-structure parameters (bonding and valence of cations) of single phase cubic mixed spinel nanoparticles of (Zn{sub δ}Mn{sub γ}Fe{sub 1−(γ+δ)})[Ni{sub x}Zn{sub 0.5−δ}Mn{sub 0.5−γ−x}Fe{sub 1+(γ+δ)}]O{sub 4} where x = 0.05–0.45 with an aim to determine cation-distribution i.e. δ and γ in these samples. The Raman spectroscopy has established that only Fe and Zn cations occupy tetrahedral interstitial sites in a FCC anion lattice in nearly equal fraction, and Mössbauer spectra have shown that Fe{sup 3+} cations are present at both, tetrahedral and octahedral interstitial sites and Ni{sup 2+} cations are situated at the octahedral sites in all the substituted samples. The photoelectron spectra also revealed the presence of Fe{sup 3+} cations at both the interstitial sites. The best possible cationic distribution in Ni substituted Mn–Zn ferrites has been estimated by reiteratively calculating the intensity ratios of various pairs of X-ray diffraction peaks and matching with the observed intensity ratios.

  3. Domain sizing diffraction and deformation degree of Zr-2.5%Nb pressure pipes of national production

    Banchik, A D; Buoli, D C; Flores, A; Vizcaino, P

    2012-01-01

    The Life Extension Program for the PHWR Embalse power reactor requires the replacement of the original Zr-2, 5% Nb pressure tubes by a new set of Zr-2,5%Nb pressure tubes. It was also decided to make the new set de pressure tubes locally from imported extruded tubes. As the mechanical properties of pressure tubes in operation depends on the microstructural deformation it is necessary to add to the normal macroscopic quality control same microstructural studies, specially .during the development stage. In the present work x-ray diffraction techniques are applied to determine the magnitude of the micro-structural deformation of three pressure tubes obtained Zr-2,5% Nb extruded tubes that were processes following designer specifications. The pressure tubes were obtained by two step of plastic deformation in a HPTR 60-120 tube rolling machine without intermediate annealing and a final thermal treatment. The line width at half height (FWHM) diffraction lines diagrams are drawn in a Williamson - Hall plot to determine the size of the coherent diffraction domains and estimate the degree of micro-structural deformation. To evaluate the possible effects of texture and/or anisotropy the X-ray measurement were made at the three principal directions of the processed tubes. In summary, the three pressure tubes obtained follow the same average Williamson-Hall line and similar dispersion with respect to that line. That result implies an acceptable homogeneity between the micro-deformation of these pressure tubes. As then have been chosen at random from a lot of preceded pressure tubes, it is possible to predict similar conclusions for the entire batch (author)

  4. Characterization of an Yb:LuVO{sub 4} single crystal using X-ray topography, high-resolution X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Paszkowicz, W., E-mail: paszk@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotnikow 32/46, PL-02668 Warsaw (Poland); Romanowski, P.; Bak-Misiuk, J. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotnikow 32/46, PL-02668 Warsaw (Poland); Wierzchowski, W. [Institute of Electronic Materials Technology, Wolczynska 133, PL-01919 Warsaw (Poland); Wieteska, K. [Institute of Atomic Energy POLATOM, PL-05400 Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Graeff, W. [HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestr. 85, D-22603 Hamburg (Germany); Iwanowski, R.J. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotnikow 32/46, PL-02668 Warsaw (Poland); Heinonen, M.H. [Laboratory of Materials Science, Department of Physics, University of Turku, Vesilinnantie 5, FI-20014, Turku (Finland); Ermakova, O. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotnikow 32/46, PL-02668 Warsaw (Poland); Dabkowska, H. [Department of Physics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada)

    2011-10-15

    Knowledge on the defect and electronic structure allows for improved modeling of material properties. A short literature review has shown that the information on defect structure of rare earth orthovanadate single crystals is limited. In this paper, defect and electronic structure of a needle-shaped Yb:LuVO{sub 4} single crystal grown by the slow cooling method have been studied by means of X-ray diffraction topography employing white synchrotron beam, high-resolution diffraction (HRD) and photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. Topographic investigations show that the crystal is composed of two blocks disoriented by about 1.5{sup o} and separated by a narrow deformed region. Some contrasts observed within the crystal volume may be attributed to glide bands and sector boundaries. The contrasts appearing in the vicinity of the surface may be interpreted as due to the presence of small inclusions. The HRD study indicates, in particular, that among point defects, the vacancy type defects dominate and that the density of other defects is small in comparison. The XPS measurements enabled, despite highly insulating properties of the studied crystal, an analysis of its bulk electronic structure, including the main core-levels (O 1s, V 2p, Lu 4f) as well as the valence band range.

  5. Selective Dissolution Techniques, X-Ray Diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy Studies of Forms of Fe in Particle-Size Fractions of an Entic Haplustoll

    Acebal, S. G.; Aguirre, M. E.; Santamaria, R. M.; Mijovilovich, A.; Petrick, S.; Saragovi, C.

    2003-01-01

    Particle-size fractions (o = mean diameter, 5-2 μm, 2-1 μm, and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS). Quartz, feldspar, smectite, illite and interstratified illite-smectite are the dominant minerals whereas Fe oxides and oxy-hydroxides are present in low concentration but increase as particle size decreases. Poorly crystallized oxides (highly Al-substituted hematite and goethite) amounts are lower, comparable to or slightly higher than the hematite amounts in the o 5-2 μm, 2-1 μm and 3+ and Fe 2+ are associated to the clay minerals and/or hydroxyl-interlayered 2:1 type material present; part of this Fe 3+ is located in the hydroxy-interlayers its amount being higher in the smallest fraction. Any possible changes after the PY and NaOH treatments were not detected by MS.

  6. Raman and Infrared spectroscopies and X-ray diffraction data on bupivacaine and ropivacaine complexed with 2-hydroxypropyl−β−cyclodextrin

    Murillo L. Martins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the research article entitled “Probing the dynamics of complexed local anesthetics via neutron scattering spectroscopy and DFT calculations (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpharm.2017.03.051” (Martins et al., 2017 [1]. This work shows the molecular and structural behavior of the local anesthetics (LAs bupivacaine (BVC, C18H28N2O and ropivacaine (RVC, C17H26N2O before and after complexation with the water-soluble oligosaccharide 2-hydroxypropyl−β−cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD.

  7. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy of CaFe2O4-type β-CaCr2O4

    Zhai, Shuangmeng; Yin, Yuan; Shieh, Sean R.; Shan, Shuangming; Xue, Weihong; Wang, Ching-Pao; Yang, Ke; Higo, Yuji

    2016-04-01

    In situ high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopic studies of orthorhombic CaFe2O4-type β-CaCr2O4 chromite were carried out up to 16.2 and 32.0 GPa at room temperature using multi-anvil apparatus and diamond anvil cell, respectively. No phase transition was observed in this study. Fitting a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state to the P-V data yields a zero-pressure volume of V 0 = 286.8(1) Å3, an isothermal bulk modulus of K 0 = 183(5) GPa and the first pressure derivative of isothermal bulk modulus K 0' = 4.1(8). Analyses of axial compressibilities show anisotropic elasticity for β-CaCr2O4 since the a-axis is more compressible than the b- and c-axis. Based on the obtained and previous results, the compressibility of several CaFe2O4-type phases was compared. The high-pressure Raman spectra of β-CaCr2O4 were analyzed to determine the pressure dependences and mode Grüneisen parameters of Raman-active bands. The thermal Grüneisen parameter of β-CaCr2O4 is determined to be 0.93(2), which is smaller than those of CaFe2O4-type CaAl2O4 and MgAl2O4.

  8. Stress analysis of local blisters coupling Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Correlation between experimental results and continuous damage modelling for buckling in an iron oxide/phosphated iron system

    Panicaud, B., E-mail: benoit.panicaud@utt.fr [Universite de Technologie de Troyes (UTT), CNRS UMR 6279, 12 rue Marie Curie, 10010 Troyes (France); Grosseau-Poussard, J.L. [LEMMA, Pole Sciences et Technologie, Universite de La Rochelle, Av. M. Crepeau, 17042 La Rochelle Cedex (France)

    2010-12-01

    In this present work, local stress development in the iron oxide layers growing on phosphated {alpha}-Fe at 400 deg. C in ambient air is investigated by Raman spectroscopy. Coupled with X-ray diffraction it enables to obtain directly local stresses' maps in the oxide layers. Use of Raman spectroscopy allows obtaining better accuracy on mechanical behaviour at local scale. This characterisation technique is very useful to study systems developing mechanical heterogeneities on surface, especially in case of buckling phenomenon. Investigations on particular local blisters have been done to measure some characteristic lengths at local scale. From local measurements, we are able to evaluate general effect of buckling from simplified scale transition. So, a macroscopic approach has been performed to calculate global stress evolution of the oxide layer, based on continuous damage mechanics. Consequently, it leads to good comparison between modelling and experimental values (global stresses versus oxidation time) in {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide.

  9. Average and local atomic-scale structure in BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0. 10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics by high-energy x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Buscaglia, Vincenzo; Tripathi, Saurabh; Petkov, Valeri; Dapiaggi, Monica; Deluca, Marco; Gajović, Andreja; Ren, Yang

    2014-02-12

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and total scattering XRD coupled to atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis studies of the atomic-scale structure of archetypal BaZrxTi(1-x)O3 (x = 0.10, 0.20, 0.40) ceramics are presented over a wide temperature range (100-450 K). For x = 0.1 and 0.2 the results reveal, well above the Curie temperature, the presence of Ti-rich polar clusters which are precursors of a long-range ferroelectric order observed below TC. Polar nanoregions (PNRs) and relaxor behaviour are observed over the whole temperature range for x = 0.4. Irrespective of ceramic composition, the polar clusters are due to locally correlated off-centre displacement of Zr/Ti cations compatible with local rhombohedral symmetry. Formation of Zr-rich clusters is indicated by Raman spectroscopy for all compositions. Considering the isovalent substitution of Ti with Zr in BaZrxTi1-xO3, the mechanism of formation and growth of the PNRs is not due to charge ordering and random fields, but rather to a reduction of the local strain promoted by the large difference in ion size between Zr(4+) and Ti(4+). As a result, non-polar or weakly polar Zr-rich clusters and polar Ti-rich clusters are randomly distributed in a paraelectric lattice and the long-range ferroelectric order is disrupted with increasing Zr concentration.

  10. On the Sr1−xBaxFeO2F Oxyfluoride Perovskites: Structure and Magnetism from Neutron Diffraction and Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    García-Ramos, Crisanto A.; Retuerto, María; Alonso, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Four oxyfluorides of the title series (x = 0.00, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75) have been stabilized by topotactic treatment of perovskite precursors Sr1−xBaxFeO3−δ prepared by soft-chemistry procedures, yielding reactive materials that can easily incorporate a substantial amount of F atoms at moderate temperatures, thus avoiding the stabilization of competitive SrF2 and BaF2 parasitic phases. XRD and Neutron Powder Diffraction (NPD) measurements assess the phase purity and yield distinct features concerning the unit cell parameters’ variation, the Sr and Ba distribution, the stoichiometry of the anionic sublattice and the anisotropic displacement factors for O and F atoms. The four oxyfluorides are confirmed to be cubic in all of the compositional range, the unit cell parameters displaying Vergard’s law. All of the samples are magnetically ordered above room temperature; the magnetic structure is always G-type antiferromagnetic, as shown from NPD data. The ordered magnetic moments are substantially high, around 3.5 μB, even at room temperature (RT). Temperature-dependent Mössbauer data allow identifying Fe3+ in all of the samples, thus confirming the Sr1−xBaxFeO2F stoichiometry. The fit of the magnetic hyperfine field vs. temperature curve yields magnetic ordering TN temperatures between 740 K (x = 0.00) and 683 K (x = 0.75). These temperatures are substantially higher than those reported before for some of the samples, assessing for stronger Fe-Fe superexchange interactions for these specimens prepared by fluorination of citrate precursors in mild conditions. PMID:28774089

  11. On the Sr1−xBaxFeO2F Oxyfluoride Perovskites: Structure and Magnetism from Neutron Diffraction and Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    Crisanto A. García-Ramos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Four oxyfluorides of the title series (x = 0.00, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75 have been stabilized by topotactic treatment of perovskite precursors Sr1−xBaxFeO3−δ prepared by soft-chemistry procedures, yielding reactive materials that can easily incorporate a substantial amount of F atoms at moderate temperatures, thus avoiding the stabilization of competitive SrF2 and BaF2 parasitic phases. XRD and Neutron Powder Diffraction (NPD measurements assess the phase purity and yield distinct features concerning the unit cell parameters’ variation, the Sr and Ba distribution, the stoichiometry of the anionic sublattice and the anisotropic displacement factors for O and F atoms. The four oxyfluorides are confirmed to be cubic in all of the compositional range, the unit cell parameters displaying Vergard’s law. All of the samples are magnetically ordered above room temperature; the magnetic structure is always G-type antiferromagnetic, as shown from NPD data. The ordered magnetic moments are substantially high, around 3.5 μB, even at room temperature (RT. Temperature-dependent Mössbauer data allow identifying Fe3+ in all of the samples, thus confirming the Sr1−xBaxFeO2F stoichiometry. The fit of the magnetic hyperfine field vs. temperature curve yields magnetic ordering TN temperatures between 740 K (x = 0.00 and 683 K (x = 0.75. These temperatures are substantially higher than those reported before for some of the samples, assessing for stronger Fe-Fe superexchange interactions for these specimens prepared by fluorination of citrate precursors in mild conditions.

  12. Anisotropic lattice thermal expansion of PbFeBO4: A study by X-ray and neutron diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and DFT calculations

    Murshed, M. Mangir; Mendive, Cecilia B.; Curti, Mariano; Nénert, Gwilherm; Kalita, Patricia E.; Lipinska, Kris; Cornelius, Andrew L.; Huq, Ashfia; Gesing, Thorsten M.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Mullite-type PbFeBO 4 shows uni-axial negative coefficient of thermal expansion. • Anisotropic thermal expansion of the metric parameters was modeled using modified Grüneisen approximation. • The model includes harmonic, quasi-harmonic and intrinsic anharmonic contributions to the internal energy. • DFT calculation, temperature- and pressure-dependent Raman spectra help understand the phonon decay and associated anharmonicity. - Abstract: The lattice thermal expansion of mullite-type PbFeBO 4 is presented in this study. The thermal expansion coefficients of the metric parameters were obtained from composite data collected from temperature-dependent neutron and X-ray powder diffraction between 10 K and 700 K. The volume thermal expansion was modeled using extended Grüneisen first-order approximation to the zero-pressure equation of state. The additive frame of the model includes harmonic, quasi-harmonic and intrinsic anharmonic potentials to describe the change of the internal energy as a function of temperature. The unit-cell volume at zero-pressure and 0 K was optimized during the DFT simulations. Harmonic frequencies of the optical Raman modes at the Γ-point of the Brillouin zone at 0 K were also calculated by DFT, which help to assign and crosscheck the experimental frequencies. The low-temperature Raman spectra showed significant anomaly in the antiferromagnetic regions, leading to softening or hardening of some phonons. Selected modes were analyzed using a modified Klemens model. The shift of the frequencies and the broadening of the line-widths helped to understand the anharmonic vibrational behaviors of the PbO 4 , FeO 6 and BO 3 polyhedra as a function of temperature

  13. The structures of T6, T3R3 and R6 bovine insulin: combining X-ray diffraction and absorption spectroscopy

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Knudsen, Marianne Vad; Noren, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structures of three conformations, T6, T3R3 and R6, of bovine insulin were solved at 1.40, 1.30 and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. All conformations crystallized in space group R3. In contrast to the T6 and T3R3 structures, different conformations of the N-terminal B-chain residue Phe......B1 were observed in the R6 insulin structure, resulting in an eightfold doubling of the unit-cell volume upon cooling. The zinc coordination in each conformation was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), including both EXAFS and XANES. Zinc adopts a tetrahedral coordination in all R3 sites...... molecules, as well as in other high-resolution insulin structures. As the radiation dose for XRD experiments is two orders of magnitude higher compared with that of XAS experiments, the single crystals were exposed to a higher degree of radiation damage that affected the zinc coordination in the T3 sites...

  14. Profile characterization of soil developed on pelitic rocks from the Bambui Group through chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and Moessbaur spectroscopy

    Almeida Barbosa, L.C. de.

    1986-07-01

    Five sample from a Red-yellow latosol developed on pelitic rocks from the Bambui Group, located close to Paraopeba, state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, were collected and studied. The sample with color patterns varying from yellowish (sample SL11; 0.3m depth), in superficial horizons, to reddish (SL12; 1.0m) in intermediate profile positions, and various shades (SL14A and SL14V; 3.0m), in deeper horizons, were studied through Moessbauer spectroscopy in order to characterize, in detail, the ferruginous species present. The total iron content within the soil is practically constant in relation to the depth. Yet, the hematite/goethite content ratio varies within the expected sequence according to the color. A linear relationship was observed between the reddish intensity and the hematite content of the argillaceous fraction. The hematite contents are proportionally less in the SL14A sample, apparently due to deficient drainage in the past, and in the SL11 sample, due to organic matter effects. This latter sample is also characterized by at least two goethite populations: one with 20% mol replacing aluminum and another with certainly more than 30% mol. In to explan this difference, three hypothesis were elaborated. The most suitable one suggests that the goethite is destroyed and formed again through the soil column, in response to pedo environmental changes closer to the surface. (D.J.M.) [pt

  15. Rapid detection of chlorpyrifos pesticide residue concentration in agro-product using Raman spectroscopy

    Dhakal, Sagar; Peng, Yankun; Li, Yongyu; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Zhang, Leilei; Xu, Tianfeng

    2014-05-01

    Different chemicals are sprayed in fruits and vegetables before and after harvest for better yield and longer shelf-life of crops. Cases of pesticide poisoning to human health are regularly reported due to excessive application of such chemicals for greater economic benefit. Different analytical technologies exist to detect trace amount of pesticides in fruits and vegetables, but are expensive, sample destructive, and require longer processing time. This study explores the application of Raman spectroscopy for rapid and non-destructive detection of pesticide residue in agricultural products. Raman spectroscopy with laser module of 785 nm was used to collect Raman spectral information from the surface of Gala apples contaminated with different concentrations of commercially available organophosphorous (48% chlorpyrifos) pesticide. Apples within 15 days of harvest from same orchard were used in this study. The Raman spectral signal was processed by Savitzky-Golay (SG) filter for noise removal, Multiplicative Scatter Correction (MSC) for drift removal and finally polynomial fitting was used to eliminate the fluorescence background. The Raman spectral peak at 677 cm-1 was recognized as Raman fingerprint of chlorpyrifos. Presence of Raman peak at 677 cm-1 after fluorescence background removal was used to develop classification model (presence and absence of pesticide). The peak intensity was correlated with actual pesticide concentration obtained using Gas Chromatography and MLR prediction model was developed with correlation coefficient of calibration and validation of 0.86 and 0.81 respectively. Result shows that Raman spectroscopy is a promising tool for rapid, real-time and non-destructive detection of pesticide residue in agro-products.

  16. Study of coherent diffractive production reactions of p + C --> [Y$^{0}$K$^{+}$] + C type and observation of the new baryonic states X(2050) --> $\\Sigma$(1385)$^{0}$K$^{+}$ and X(2000) --> $\\Sigma^{0}$K$^{+}$

    Golovkin, S V; Kozhevnikov, A A; Kubarovskii, V P; Kulyavtsev, A I; Kurshetsov, V F; Kushnirenko, A Yu; Landsberg, G L; Molchanov, V V; Mukkin, V A; Solyanik, V I; Vavilov, D V; Victorov, V A; Balats, M Ya; Dzubenko, G B; Kamenskii, A D; Kliger, G K; Kolganov, V Z; Lakaev, V S; Lomkatsi, G S; Nilov, A P; Smolyankin, V T; Vishniakov, V V

    1994-01-01

    Study of coherent diffractive production reactions of p + C --> [Y$^{0}$K$^{+}$] + C type and observation of the new baryonic states X(2050) --> $\\Sigma$(1385)$^{0}$K$^{+}$ and X(2000) --> $\\Sigma^{0}$K$^{+}$

  17. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase from Clostridium perfringens

    Ficko-Blean, Elizabeth; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2005-01-01

    Crystallization of a family 84 glycoside hydrolase, a putative virulence factor, secreted by C. perfringens is reported. Clostridium perfringens is a ubiquitous environmental organism that is capable of causing a variety of diseases in mammals, including gas gangrene and necrotic enteritis in humans. The activity of a secreted hyaluronidase, attributed to the NagH protein, contributes to the pathogenicity of this organism. The family 84 catalytic module of one of the three homologues of NagH found in C. perfringens (ATCC 13124) has been cloned. The 69 kDa catalytic module of NagJ, here called GH84C, was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified by immobilized metal-affinity chromatography (IMAC). Crystals belonging to space group I222 or I2 1 2 1 2 1 with unit-cell parameters a = 130.39, b = 150.05, c = 155.43 Å were obtained that diffracted to 2.1 Å. Selenomethionyl crystals have also been produced, leading to the possibility of solving the phase problem by MAD using synchrotron radiation

  18. Cloning, recombinant production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a family 101 glycoside hydrolase from Streptococcus pneumoniae

    Gregg, Katie J.; Boraston, Alisdair B.

    2009-01-01

    The catalytic module of a family 101 glycoside hydrolase from S. pneumoniae was cloned, recombinantly produced and crystallized. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a serious human pathogen that is responsible for a wide range of diseases including pneumonia, meningitis, septicaemia and otitis media. The full virulence of this bacterium is reliant on carbohydrate processing and metabolism, as revealed by biochemical and genetic studies. One carbohydrate-processing enzyme is a family 101 glycoside hydrolase (SpGH101) that is responsible for catalyzing the liberation of galactosyl β1,3-N-acetyl-d-galactosamine (Galβ1,3GalNAc) α-linked to serine or threonine residues of mucin-type glycoproteins. The 124 kDa catalytic module of this enzyme (SpGH101CM) was cloned and overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. Crystals were obtained in space group P2 1 and diffracted to 2.0 Å resolution, with unit-cell parameters a = 81.86, b = 88.91, c = 88.77 Å, β = 112.46°. SpGH101CM also qualitatively displayed good activity towards the synthetic substrate p-nitrophenyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-3-O-(β-d-galactopyranosyl) -α-d-galactopyranoside, which is consistent with the classification of this enzyme as an endo-α-N-acetylgalactosaminidase

  19. Chemometric methods and near-infrared spectroscopy applied to bioenergy production

    Liebmann, B.

    2010-01-01

    The present work examines bioenergy production from different viewpoints. The three main objectives are: (1) to reveal the relation of technology, sustainability and economy in bioenergy processes; (2) to investigate spectroscopic methods as a tool for analytical monitoring of bioenergy processes; and (3) to develop new chemometric methods for advanced analysis of spectroscopic data. At the first stage, this thesis investigates the technological, ecological, and economic features of renewable-resource-based and de-centralized bioenergy production systems. In different scenarios, small-scale bioethanol production is combined with other technologies that provide renewable energy from residuals of the bioethanol process. The general aim is to substitute fossil energy conventionally used within the bioethanol process. The investigated technologies are biogas production and straw incineration. Agricultural aspects are introduced by sustainable crop rotation concepts that reconcile food, feed, and biofuel production. The sustainability of small-scale bioethanol production in the different scenarios is quantified by an ecological footprint method, the sustainable process index, SPI, and compared to conventional fuels. The main findings are: (i) small-scaled bioethanol production can be operated with 100 % renewable energy supply, (ii) the SPI of bioethanol can be reduced up to 92 % compared to conventional fuels, (iii) a complex trade-off between ecology-of-scale and economy-of-scale is necessary. At the second stage, this thesis approaches bioenergy production processes from an analytical perspective, and presents near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR) as promising method for fast process monitoring of bioethanol production and biomass characterization. In addition, new analytical methods are presented for a fast determination of the heating value of solid biomass fuel, based on IR and NIR spectroscopy. The main findings are that NIR spectroscopy and appropriate chemometric

  20. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy for Gaseous Fission Products Trace Measurements in Sodium Fast Reactors

    Jacquet, P.; Pailloux, A.; Doizi, D.; Aoust, G.; Jeannot, J.-P.

    2013-06-01

    Safety and availability are key issues of the generation IV reactors. Hence, the three radionuclide confinement barriers, including fuel cladding, must stay tight during the reactor operation. During the primary gaseous failure, fission products xenon and krypton are released. Their fast and sensitive detection guarantees the first confinement barrier tightness. In the frame of the French ASTRID project, an optical spectroscopy technique - Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) - is investigated for the gaseous fission products measurement. A dedicated CRDS set-up is needed to detect the rare gases with a commercial laser. Indeed, the CRDS is coupled to a glow discharge plasma, which generates a population of metastable atoms. The xenon plasma conditions are optimized to 110 Pa and 1.3 W (3 mA). The production efficiency of metastable Xe is then 0.8 %, stable within 0.5% during hours. The metastable number density is proportional to the xenon over argon molar fraction. The spectroscopic parameters of the strong 823.16 nm xenon transition are calculated and/or measured in order to optimize the fit of the experimental spectra and make a quantitative measurement of the metastable xenon. The CRDS is coupled to the discharge cell. The laser intensity inside the cavity is limited by the optical saturation process, resulting from the strong optical pumping of the metastable state. The resulting weak CRDS signal requires a fast and very sensitive photodetector. A 600 ppt xenon molar fraction was measured by CRDS. With the present set-up, the detection limits are estimated from the baseline noise to approximately 20 ppt for each even isotope, 60 ppt for the 131 Xe and 55 ppt for the 129 Xe. This sensitivity matches the specifications required for gaseous leak measurement; approximately 100 ppt for 133 Xe (4 GBq/m 3 ) and 10 ppb for stable isotopes. The odd isotopes are selectively measured, whereas the even isotopes overlap, a spectroscopic feature that applies for stable or

  1. Process optimization of large-scale production of recombinant adeno-associated vectors using dielectric spectroscopy.

    Negrete, Alejandro; Esteban, Geoffrey; Kotin, Robert M

    2007-09-01

    A well-characterized manufacturing process for the large-scale production of recombinant adeno-associated vectors (rAAV) for gene therapy applications is required to meet current and future demands for pre-clinical and clinical studies and potential commercialization. Economic considerations argue in favor of suspension culture-based production. Currently, the only feasible method for large-scale rAAV production utilizes baculovirus expression vectors and insect cells in suspension cultures. To maximize yields and achieve reproducibility between batches, online monitoring of various metabolic and physical parameters is useful for characterizing early stages of baculovirus-infected insect cells. In this study, rAAVs were produced at 40-l scale yielding ~1 x 10(15) particles. During the process, dielectric spectroscopy was performed by real time scanning in radio frequencies between 300 kHz and 10 MHz. The corresponding permittivity values were correlated with the rAAV production. Both infected and uninfected reached a maximum value; however, only infected cell cultures permittivity profile reached a second maximum value. This effect was correlated with the optimal harvest time for rAAV production. Analysis of rAAV indicated the harvesting time around 48 h post-infection (hpi), and 72 hpi produced similar quantities of biologically active rAAV. Thus, if operated continuously, the 24-h reduction in the production process of rAAV gives sufficient time for additional 18 runs a year corresponding to an extra production of ~2 x 10(16) particles. As part of large-scale optimization studies, this new finding will facilitate the bioprocessing scale-up of rAAV and other bioproducts.

  2. Baryon spectroscopy in COMPASS

    Austregesilo, Alexander; Chung, Suh-Urk; Ketzer, Bernhard; Neubert, Sebastian; Paul, Stephan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E18, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at CERN SPS which investigates the structure and spectroscopy of hadrons. During in total 9 weeks in 2008 and 2009, a 190 GeV/c proton beam impinging on a liquid hydrogen target has been used primarily to study the production of exotic mesons and glueball candidates at central rapidities. As no bias on the rapidity was introduced by the trigger system, the data also yield the unique possibility to study diffractive dissociation of the beam proton while an inert target is assumed. To this end exclusive events with three charged particles including one proton in the final state have been extracted. We report on the status of the event selection studies and discuss the prospect of using partial wave analysis techniques, which have been successfully applied for diffractive dissociation reactions of pions in COMPASS.

  3. High titer oncolytic measles virus production process by integration of dielectric spectroscopy as online monitoring system.

    Grein, Tanja A; Loewe, Daniel; Dieken, Hauke; Salzig, Denise; Weidner, Tobias; Czermak, Peter

    2018-05-01

    Oncolytic viruses offer new hope to millions of patients with incurable cancer. One promising class of oncolytic viruses is Measles virus, but its broad administration to cancer patients is currently hampered by the inability to produce the large amounts of virus needed for treatment (10 10 -10 12 virus particles per dose). Measles virus is unstable, leading to very low virus titers during production. The time of infection and time of harvest are therefore critical parameters in a Measles virus production process, and their optimization requires an accurate online monitoring system. We integrated a probe based on dielectric spectroscopy (DS) into a stirred tank reactor to characterize the Measles virus production process in adherent growing Vero cells. We found that DS could be used to monitor cell adhesion on the microcarrier and that the optimal virus harvest time correlated with the global maximum permittivity signal. In 16 independent bioreactor runs, the maximum Measles virus titer was achieved approximately 40 hr after the permittivity maximum. Compared to an uncontrolled Measles virus production process, the integration of DS increased the maximum virus concentration by more than three orders of magnitude. This was sufficient to achieve an active Measles virus concentration of > 10 10 TCID 50 ml -1 . © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. High-precision gamma-ray spectroscopy for enhancing production and application of medical isotopes

    McCutchan, E. A.; Sonzogni, A. A.; Smith, S. V.; Muench, L.; Nino, M.; Greene, J. P.; Carpenter, M. P.; Zhu, S.; Chillery, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Harding, R.; Lister, C. J.

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear medicine is a field which requires precise decay data for use in planning radionuclide production and in imaging and therapeutic applications. To address deficiencies in decay data, sources of medical isotopes were produced and purified at the Brookhaven Linear Isotope Producer (BLIP) then shipped to Argonne National Laboratory where high-precision, gamma-ray measurements were performed using Gammasphere. New decay schemes for a number of PET isotopes and the impact on dose calculations will be presented. To investigate the production of next-generation theranostic or radiotherapeutic isotopes, cross section measurements with high energy protons have also been explored at BLIP. The 100-200 MeV proton energy regime is relatively unexplored for isotope production, thus offering high discovery potential but at the same time a challenging analysis due to the large number of open channels at these energies. Results of cross sections deduced from Compton-suppressed, coincidence gamma-ray spectroscopy performed at Lowell will be presented, focusing on the production of platinum isotopes by irradiating natural platinum foils with 100 to 200 MeV protons. DOE Isotope Program is acknowledged for funding ST5001030. Work supported by the US DOE under Grant DE-FG02-94ER40848 and Contracts DE-AC02-98CH10946 and DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  5. Conservation of Moroccan manuscript papers aged 150, 200 and 800 years. Analysis by infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS).

    Hajji, Latifa; Boukir, Abdellatif; Assouik, Jamal; Lakhiari, Hamid; Kerbal, Abdelali; Doumenq, Pierre; Mille, Gilbert; De Carvalho, Maria Luisa

    2015-02-05

    The preservation of manuscripts and archive materials is a serious problem for librarians and restorers. Paper manuscript is subjected to numerous degradation factors affecting their conservation state. This research represents an attempt to evaluate the conservation restoration process applied in Moroccan libraries, especially the alkaline treatment for strengthening weakened paper. In this study, we focused on six samples of degraded and restored paper taken from three different Moroccan manuscripts aged 150, 200 and 800 years. In addition, the Japanese paper used in restoration has been characterized. A modern paper was also analyzed as reference. A three-step analytical methodology based on infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy coupled to energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS) analysis was developed before and after restoration in order to determine the effect of the consolidation treatment on the paper structure. The results obtained by XRD and ATR-FTIR disclosed the presence of barium sulfate (BaSO4) in all restored paper manuscripts. The presence of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in all considered samples was confirmed by FTIR spectroscopy. The application of de-acidification treatment causes significant changes connected with the increase of intensity mostly in the region 1426 cm(-1), assigned to the asymmetric and symmetric CO stretching mode of calcite, indicating the effectiveness of de-acidification procedure proved by the rise of the alkaline reserve content allowing the long term preservation of paper. Observations performed by SEM magnify the typical paper morphology and the structure of fibbers, highlighting the effect of the restoration process, manifested by the reduction of impurities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Analysis of an industrial production suspension of Bacillus lentus subtilisin crystals by powder diffraction: a powerful quality-control tool

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl; Moroz, Olga V.; Turkenburg, Johan P.

    2014-01-01

    . A controlled crystallization experiment with a highly purified Savinase sample allowed the growth of single crystals of the form identified by XRPD; their structure was solved and refined to a resolution of 1.17 Å with an R of 9.2% and an Rfree of 11.8%. Thus, there are at least three polymorphs present...... in the production suspension, albeit with the 1ndq -like microcrystals predominating. It is shown how the two techniques can provide invaluable and complementary information for such a production suspension and it is proposed that XRPD provides an excellent quality-control tool for such suspensions....

  7. Coherent and non-coherent double diffractive production of QQ-bar-pairs in collisions of heavy ions at high energies

    Agababyan, N.M.; Galoyan, A.S.; Enkovskij, L.L.; Zarubin, P.I.; Malakhov, A.I.; Melkumov, G.L.; Chatrchyan, S.A.

    1999-01-01

    The double coherent and non-coherent diffractive production of heavy quark-antiquark pairs (QQ-bar) in heavy ion scattering at high energies (LHC) is considered. The total and differential cross sections of these processes with the formation of cc-bar and bb-bar pairs in pp, CaCa and PbPb collisions are evaluated. The contribution of the considered mechanisms is a few per cent of the number of heavy quark-antiquark pairs obtained in the processes of hard (QCD) scattering, and it will be taken into account in the registration of c, b quarks or, for instance, in the study of the heavy quarkonia suppression effect in Quark-Gluon Plasma, in the search got intermediate mass Higgs bosons and so on. It is shown that the cross section of the coherently scattering process is great enough. This makes it suitable for studying collective effects in nuclear interactions at high energies. An example of such effects is given: large values of the invariant mass of a QQ-bar pair, M QQ-bar ≥ 100 GeV, in association with a large rapidity gap between diffractive jets Δη >5 [ru

  8. Coherent and non-coherent double diffractive production of QQ-bar - pairs in collisions of heavy ions at high energies

    Agababyan, N.M.; Chatrchyan, S.A.; Galoyan, A.S.; Malakhov, A.I.; Melkumov, G.L.; Zarubin, P.I.; Jenkovszky, L.L.

    1998-01-01

    The double coherent and non-coherent diffractive production of heavy quark-antiquark pair (QQ-bar) in heavy ion scattering at high energies (LHC) is considered. The total and differential cross sections of these processes with the formation of cc bar and bb bar pairs in pp, CaCa and PbPb collisions are evaluated. The contribution of the considered mechanisms is a few per cent of the number of heavy quark-antiquark pairs obtained in the processes of hard (QCD) scattering, and it will be taken into account in the registration of c, b quarks or, for instance, in the study of the heavy quarkonia suppression effects in quark-gluon plasma, in the search for intermediate mass Higgs bosons and so on. It is shown that the cross section of the coherent scattering process is great enough. This makes it suitable for studying collective effects in nuclear interactions at high energies. An example of such effects is given: large values of the invariant mass of a QQ- bar pair, M QQb ar ≥ 100 GeV, in association with a large rapidity gap between diffractive jets Δη>5

  9. Using infrared spectroscopy and satellite data to accurately monitor remote volcanoes and map their eruptive products

    Ramsey, M. S.

    2011-12-01

    The ability to detect the onset of new activity at a remote volcano commonly relies on high temporal resolution thermal infrared (TIR) satellite-based observations. These observations from sensors such as AVHRR and MODIS are being used in innovative ways to produce trends of activity, which are critical for hazard response planning and scientific modeling. Such data are excellent for detection of new thermal features, volcanic plumes, and tracking changes over the hour time scale, for example. For some remote volcanoes, the lack of ground-based monitoring typically means that these sensors provide the first and only confirmation of renewed activity. However, what is lacking is the context of the higher spatial scale, which provides the volcanologist with meter-scale information on specific temperatures and changes in the composition and texture of the eruptive products. For the past eleven years, the joint US-Japanese ASTER instrument has been acquiring image-based data of volcanic eruptions around the world, including in the remote northern Pacific region. There have been more ASTER observations of Kamchatka volcanoes than any other location on the globe due mainly to an operational program put into place in 2004. Automated hot spot alarms from AVHRR data trigger ASTER acquisitions using the instrument's "rapid response" mode. Specifically for Kamchatka, this program has resulted in more than 700 additional ASTER images of the most thermally-active volcanoes (e.g., Shiveluch, Kliuchevskoi, Karymsky, Bezymianny). The scientific results from this program at these volcanoes will be highlighted. These results were strengthened by several field seasons used to map new products, collect samples for laboratory-based spectroscopy, and acquire TIR camera data. The fusion of ground, laboratory and space-based spectroscopy provided the most accurate interpretation of the eruptions and laid the ground work for future VSWIR/TIR sensors such as HyspIRI, which are a critically

  10. Low temperature fluorination of Sr3Fe2O7−x with polyvinylidine fluoride: An X-ray powder diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy study

    Hancock, Cathryn A.; Herranz, Tirma; Marco, Jose F.; Berry, Frank J.; Slater, Peter R.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorination of the Ruddlesden Popper phase, Sr 3 Fe 2 O 7−x by heat treatment with polyvinylidine fluoride (PVDF) gives a range of novel oxide fluoride compounds. Fluorination with 1 mol equivalent PVDF leads to a filling of the normal Ruddlesden Popper structure anion sites and a material of composition Sr 3 Fe 2 O 5+x F 2−x (x≈0.28(4)) which contains both Fe 4+ and Fe 3+ . Increasing the amount of PVDF to 2 mol equivalent leads to an increase in anion content due to filling of half the interstitial sites within the structure, with iron being completely reduced to Fe 3+ leading to a composition Sr 3 Fe 2 O 4 F 4 . An increase in the amount of PVDF to ≈3 mol equivalent leads to a further increase in unit cell volume, attributed to complete filling of the interstitial sites and a composition Sr 3 Fe 2 O 3 F 6 . 57 Fe Mössbauer spectra in the temperature range 10–300 K demonstrated the complexity of the magnetic interactions in each of the three phases which reflect different local compositions of oxygen and fluorine around the iron ions thus influencing the superexchange pathways. - Graphical abstract: Low temperature (375 °C) fluorination of Sr 3 Fe 2 O 7−x with poly(vinylidene fluoride) leads to the production of three new Ruddlesden Popper oxide fluorides with progressive filling of the anion sites within the structure. Highlights: ► The fluorination of Sr 3 Fe 2 O 7−x using PVDF. ► The control of the fluorine content with amount of PVDF used. ► The synthesis of three new Fe based oxide fluorides. ► The identification of the structures of these oxide fluorides.

  11. Gamma-ray spectroscopy of neutron-rich products of heavy-ion collisions

    Carpenter, M.P.; Janssens, R.V.F.; Ahmad, I. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Thick-target {gamma}{gamma} coincidence techniques are being used to explore the spectroscopy of otherwise hard-to-reach neutron-rich products of deep-inelastic heavy ion reactions. Extensive {gamma}{gamma} coincidence measurements were performed at ATLAS using pulsed beams of {sup 80}Se, {sup 136}Xe, and {sup 238}U on lead-backed {sup 122,124}Sn targets with energies 10-15% above the Coulomb barrier. Gamma-ray coincidence intensities were used to map out yield distributions with A and Z for even-even product nuclei around the target and around the projectile. The main features of the yield patterns are understandable in terms of N/Z equilibration. We had the most success in studying the decays of yrast isomers. Thus far, more than thirty new {mu}s isomers in the Z = 50 region were found and characterized. Making isotopic assignments for previously unknown {gamma}-ray cascades proves to be one of the biggest problems. Our assignments were based (a) on rare overlaps with radioactivity data, (b) on the relative yields with different beams, and (c) on observed cross-coincidences between {gamma} rays from light and heavy reaction partners. However, the primary products of deep inelastic collisions often are sufficiently excited for subsequent neutron evaporation, so {gamma}{gamma} cross-coincidence results require careful interpretation.

  12. Assessment of the optimum degree of Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}MoO{sub 9} electron-doping through oxygen removal: An X-ray powder diffraction and {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy study

    Lopez, Carlos A.; Viola, Maria del C. [Area de Quimica General e Inorganica, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700 San Luis (Argentina); Pedregosa, Jose C., E-mail: jpedreg@unsl.edu.ar [Area de Quimica General e Inorganica, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Quimica, Bioquimica y Farmacia, Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Chacabuco y Pedernera, 5700 San Luis (Argentina); Mercader, Roberto C., E-mail: mercader@fisica.unlp.edu.ar [Departamento de Fisica, IFLP-CONICET, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, C.C. 67, 1900 La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-10-15

    We describe the preparation and structural characterization by X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) and Moessbauer spectroscopy of three electron-doped perovskites Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}MoO{sub 9-{delta}} with Fe/Mo = 2 obtained from Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}MoO{sub 9}. The compounds were synthesized by topotactic reduction with H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} (5/95) at 600, 700 and 800 {sup o}C. Above 800 {sup o}C the Fe/Mo ratio changes from Fe/Mo = 2-1 < Fe/Mo < 2. The structural refinements of the XRPD data for the reduced perovskites were carried out by the Rietveld profile analysis method. The crystal structure of these phases is cubic, space group Fm3-bar m, with cationic disorder at the two different B sites that can be populated in variable proportions by the Fe atoms. The Moessbauer spectra allowed determining the evolution of the different species formed after the treatments at different temperatures and confirm that Fe ions in the samples reduced at 600, 700 and 800 {sup o}C are only in the high-spin Fe{sup 3+} electronic state.

  13. Stabilization of high-temperature antimony oxide with molybdenum incorporation. Structure of Mo-doped Sb2O4 by powder neutron diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    Teller, R.G.; Antonio, M.R.; Brazdil, J.F.; Mehicic, M.; Grasselli, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    It has been discovered that the presence of MoO 3 lowers the α-β transition in Sb 2 O 4 from 935 to 850 0 C with concurrent dissolution of Mo in the high-temperature (β) form. The structure of Mo-doped β-Sb 2 O 4 has been investigated by powder neutron diffraction, extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and Raman spectroscopies, and scanning-electron microscopy (SEM). Cell parameters: a = 12.0571 (12) A, b = 4.8335 (1) A, c = 5.3838 (6) A, β = 105.579 (5) 0 , monoclinic, space group C2/c, Z = 4. Combining the results of these techniques leads to the hypothesis that Mo is located interstitially within channels of electron density in the Sb 2 O 4 structure with concurrent vacancy of two Sb/sup III/ atoms. There is no apparent oxygen deficiency in the resulting structure. 25 references, 6 figures, 3 tables

  14. Thermally-induced crystallization behaviour of 80GeSe2–20Ga2Se3 glass as probed by combined X-ray diffraction and PAL spectroscopy

    Shpotyuk, O.; Calvez, L.; Petracovschi, E.; Klym, H.; Ingram, A.; Demchenko, P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Chalcogenide Ge–Ga–Se glasses were annealed at 380 °C for 10, 25 and 50 h. • Crystallization of glasses during annealing indicates formation of crystals. • Structural changes are described by two-state positron trapping model. • Modification leading to nucleation and fragmentation of free volume of glasses. • The Ge–Ga–Se systems cannot be classified as typical pseudo-binary system. -- Abstract: Crystallization behaviour of 80GeSe 2 –20Ga 2 Se 3 glass caused by thermal annealing at 380 °C for 10, 25 and 50 h are studied using X-ray diffraction and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. It is shown that the structural changes caused by crystallization can be adequately described by positron trapping modes determined within two-state model. The observed changes in defect-related component in the fit of experimental positron lifetime spectra for annealed glasses testifies in a favour of structural fragmentation of larger free volume entities into smaller ones with preceding nucleation in the initial stage of thermal annealing. Because of strong deviation in defect-free bulk positron lifetime from corresponding additive values proper to boundary constituents, the studied glasses cannot be considered as typical representatives of pseudo-binary cut-section

  15. Thermally-induced crystallization behaviour of 80GeSe{sub 2}–20Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glass as probed by combined X-ray diffraction and PAL spectroscopy

    Shpotyuk, O., E-mail: shpotyuk@novas.lviv.ua [Scientific Research Company “Carat”, 202, Stryjska str., Lviv 79031 (Ukraine); Institute of Physics of Jan Dlugosz University, 13/15, al. Armii Krajowej, Czestochowa 42201 (Poland); Calvez, L.; Petracovschi, E. [Equipe Verres et Céramiques, UMR-CNRS 6226, Institute des Sciences chimiques de Rennes, Université de Rennes 1, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Klym, H. [Lviv polytechnic National University, 12 Bandera str., Lviv 79013 (Ukraine); Ingram, A. [Physics Faculty of Opole University of Technology, 75, Ozimska str., Opole 45370 (Poland); Demchenko, P. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, 6, Kyryla and Mefodiya Str., Lviv 79005 (Ukraine)

    2014-01-05

    Highlights: • Chalcogenide Ge–Ga–Se glasses were annealed at 380 °C for 10, 25 and 50 h. • Crystallization of glasses during annealing indicates formation of crystals. • Structural changes are described by two-state positron trapping model. • Modification leading to nucleation and fragmentation of free volume of glasses. • The Ge–Ga–Se systems cannot be classified as typical pseudo-binary system. -- Abstract: Crystallization behaviour of 80GeSe{sub 2}–20Ga{sub 2}Se{sub 3} glass caused by thermal annealing at 380 °C for 10, 25 and 50 h are studied using X-ray diffraction and positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy. It is shown that the structural changes caused by crystallization can be adequately described by positron trapping modes determined within two-state model. The observed changes in defect-related component in the fit of experimental positron lifetime spectra for annealed glasses testifies in a favour of structural fragmentation of larger free volume entities into smaller ones with preceding nucleation in the initial stage of thermal annealing. Because of strong deviation in defect-free bulk positron lifetime from corresponding additive values proper to boundary constituents, the studied glasses cannot be considered as typical representatives of pseudo-binary cut-section.

  16. Study by X-ray diffraction and Infrared spectroscopy of human bones of the pre hispanic and colonial epoch; Estudio por Difraccion de rayos X y Espectroscopia infrarroja de huesos humanos de la epoca prehispanica y colonial

    Canto, A.B.; Quintana, P.; Alvarado G, J. [Cinvestav-Unidad Merida, Carretera Antigua a Progreso km. 6, Apdo. Postal 73 Cordemex, 97310 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Tiesler, V. [Facultad de Ciencias Antropologicas, UADY, 97000 Merida, Yucatan (Mexico); Diaz F, L.L. [Cinvestav-Unidad Queretaro, Libramiento Norponiente No. 2000, Fracc. Real de Juriquilla, 76230 Queretaro (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    This paper explores the structure of bony remains obtained from different Pre hispanic and colonial Mayan burial contexts and sites. This study was conducted using X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy in order to identify the phases and impurities present in the archaeological bones and to measure the degree of hydroxyapatite crystallinity. With it, we aim at examining the potential structural influence that different burial spaces (chamber as opposed to filled burial space), and soil properties (karstic soil, marshland and cenote) had on the bone samples. The sites were chosen from two different time periods: Pre hispanic (before 1519 d.C.) and Colonial (after 1519 d.C.). Some samples were collected from Siho, Mayapan y Oxkintok in the Puuc area. Other come from Calakmul, in Campeche's southeast, from Xcambo on the north coast of the Peninsula, and from the city of Campeche. Additional remains were recovered from the site of Palenque, Chiapas, where the soil contains higher contents of clay mineral than the karstic substrates that characterize the Peninsula of Yucatan. (Author) 40 refs., 4 tabs., 6 figs.

  17. Evidence for the presence of U-Mo-Al ternary compounds in the U-Mo/Al interaction layer grown by thermal annealing: a coupled micro X-ray diffraction and micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    Palancher, H.; Martin, P.; Nassif, V.

    2007-01-01

    The systematic presence of the ternary phases U 6 Mo 4 Al 43 and UMo 2 Al 20 is reported in a U-Mo/Al interaction layer grown by thermal annealing. This work shows, therefore, the low Mo solubility in UAl 3 and UAl 4 binary phases; it contradicts the hypothesis of the formation of (U,Mo)Al 3 and (U,Mo)Al 4 solid solutions often admitted in the literature. Using μ-XAS (micro X-ray absorption spectroscopy) at the Mo K edge and μ-XRD (micro X-ray diffraction), the heterogeneity of the interaction layer obtained on a γ-U 0.85 Mo 0.15 /Al diffusion couple has been precisely investigated. The UMo 2 Al 20 phase has been identified at the closest location from the Al side. Moreover, μ-XRD mapping performed on an annealed fuel plate enabled the characterization of the four phases resulting from the γ-U 0.85 Mo 0.15 /Al and (U 2 Mo+α-U)/Al interactions. A strong correlation between the concentrations of UAl 4 and UMo 2 Al 20 and those of UAl 3 and U 6 Mo 4 Al 43 has been shown. (orig.)

  18. Rapid determination of sugar level in snack products using infrared spectroscopy.

    Wang, Ting; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E

    2012-08-01

    Real-time spectroscopic methods can provide a valuable window into food manufacturing to permit optimization of production rate, quality and safety. There is a need for cutting edge sensor technology directed at improving efficiency, throughput and reliability of critical processes. The aim of the research was to evaluate the feasibility of infrared systems combined with chemometric analysis to develop rapid methods for determination of sugars in cereal products. Samples were ground and spectra were collected using a mid-infrared (MIR) spectrometer equipped with a triple-bounce ZnSe MIRacle attenuated total reflectance accessory or Fourier transform near infrared (NIR) system equipped with a diffuse reflection-integrating sphere. Sugar contents were determined using a reference HPLC method. Partial least squares regression (PLSR) was used to create cross-validated calibration models. The predictability of the models was evaluated on an independent set of samples and compared with reference techniques. MIR and NIR spectra showed characteristic absorption bands for sugars, and generated excellent PLSR models (sucrose: SEP 0.96). Multivariate models accurately and precisely predicted sugar level in snacks allowing for rapid analysis. This simple technique allows for reliable prediction of quality parameters, and automation enabling food manufacturers for early corrective actions that will ultimately save time and money while establishing a uniform quality. The U.S. snack food industry generates billions of dollars in revenue each year and vibrational spectroscopic methods combined with pattern recognition analysis could permit optimization of production rate, quality, and safety of many food products. This research showed that infrared spectroscopy is a powerful technique for near real-time (approximately 1 min) assessment of sugar content in various cereal products. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  19. Study of correlation of production and decay planes in π → 3π diffractive dissociation process on nuclei

    Efremov, A.V.; Ivan'shin, Yu.I.; Tkachev, L.G.; Zul'karneev, R.Ya.

    1998-01-01

    A large correlation of production and decay planes of (π - π + π - )-system in dissociation of π - -beam 40 GeV/c on nuclear targets was observed. The dependences of the correlation on atomic number, Feynman variable and transverse momentum as well as on invariant mass of the pion triple and neutral pion pair were investigated. It was shown that the phenomenon has a clear dynamic origin and resembles the single spin asymmetry behaviour

  20. Basic Principles of Spectroscopy

    Penner, Michael H.

    Spectroscopy deals with the production, measurement, and interpretation of spectra arising from the interaction of electromagnetic radiation with matter. There are many different spectroscopic methods available for solving a wide range of analytical problems. The methods differ with respect to the species to be analyzed (such as molecular or atomic spectroscopy), the type of radiation-matter interaction to be monitored (such as absorption, emission, or diffraction), and the region of the electromagnetic spectrum used in the analysis. Spectroscopic methods are very informative and widely used for both quantitative and qualitative analyses. Spectroscopic methods based on the absorption or emission of radiation in the ultraviolet (UV), visible (Vis), infrared (IR), and radio (nuclear magnetic resonance, NMR) frequency ranges are most commonly encountered in traditional food analysis laboratories. Each of these methods is distinct in that it monitors different types of molecular or atomic transitions. The basis of these transitions is explained in the following sections.

  1. On the one loop γ{sup (∗)}→qq̄ impact factor and the exclusive diffractive cross sections for the production of two or three jets

    Boussarie, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, UMR 8627, CNRS, University Paris-Sud, CNRS,Université Paris-Saclay,91405, Orsay (France); Grabovsky, A.V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics,11, Lavrenteva avenue, 630090, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University,630090, 2, Pirogova street, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Department of Physics, University of Minnesota,Duluth, Minnesota, 55812 (United States); Szymanowski, L. [National Centre for Nuclear Research (NCBJ),Warsaw (Poland); Wallon, S. [Laboratoire de Physique Théorique, UMR 8627, CNRS, University Paris-Sud, CNRS,Université Paris-Saclay,91405, Orsay (France); UPMC University Paris 06, faculté de physique,4 place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

    2016-11-24

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the γ{sup (∗)}→qq̄ transition with one loop accuracy in arbitrary kinematics. The calculation was done within Balitsky’s high energy operator expansion. Together with our previous result for the γ{sup (∗)}→qq̄g Born impact factor it allows one to derive cross sections for 2- (one loop) and 3-jet (Born) difractive electroproduction. We write such cross sections for the 2 and 3 jet exclusive diffractive electroproduction off a proton in terms of hadronic matrix elements of Wilson lines. For the 2-jet cross section we demonstrate the cancellation of infrared, collinear and rapidity singularities. Our result can be directly exploited to describe the recently analyzed data on exclusive dijet production at HERA and used for the study of jet photoproduction in ultraperipheral proton or nuclear scattering.

  2. On the one loop γ(∗)→qq̄ impact factor and the exclusive diffractive cross sections for the production of two or three jets

    Boussarie, R.; Grabovsky, A.V.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2016-01-01

    We present the calculation of the impact factor for the γ (∗) →qq̄ transition with one loop accuracy in arbitrary kinematics. The calculation was done within Balitsky’s high energy operator expansion. Together with our previous result for the γ (∗) →qq̄g Born impact factor it allows one to derive cross sections for 2- (one loop) and 3-jet (Born) difractive electroproduction. We write such cross sections for the 2 and 3 jet exclusive diffractive electroproduction off a proton in terms of hadronic matrix elements of Wilson lines. For the 2-jet cross section we demonstrate the cancellation of infrared, collinear and rapidity singularities. Our result can be directly exploited to describe the recently analyzed data on exclusive dijet production at HERA and used for the study of jet photoproduction in ultraperipheral proton or nuclear scattering.

  3. Hard scattering and a diffractive trigger

    Berger, E.L.; Collins, J.C.; Soper, D.E.; Sterman, G.

    1986-02-01

    Conclusions concerning the properties of hard scattering in diffractively produced systems are summarized. One motivation for studying diffractive hard scattering is to investigate the interface between Regge theory and perturbative QCD. Another is to see whether diffractive triggering can result in an improvement in the signal-to-background ratio of measurements of production of very heavy quarks. 5 refs

  4. Analysis of silver nanoparticles in antimicrobial products using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS).

    Guo, Huiyuan; Zhang, Zhiyun; Xing, Baoshan; Mukherjee, Arnab; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; He, Lili

    2015-04-07

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are the most commonly used nanoparticles in consumer products. Concerns over human exposure to and risk from these particles have resulted in increased interest in novel strategies to detect AgNPs. This study investigated the feasibility of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) as a method for the detection and quantification of AgNPs in antimicrobial products. By using ferbam (ferric dimethyl-dithiocarbamate) as an indicator molecule that binds strongly onto the nanoparticles, AgNPs detection and discrimination were achieved based on the signature SERS response of AgNPs-ferbam complexes. SERS response with ferbam was distinct for silver ions, silver chloride, silver bulk particles, and AgNPs. Two types of AgNPs with different coatings, citrate and polyvinylpirrolidone (PVP), both showed strong interactions with ferbam and induced strong SERS signals. SERS was effectively applicable for detecting Ag particles ranging from 20 to 200 nm, with the highest signal intensity in the 60-100 nm range. A linear relationship (R(2) = 0.9804) between Raman intensity and citrate-AgNPs concentrations (60 nm; 0-20 mg/L) indicates the potential for particle quantification. We also evaluated SERS detection of AgNPs in four commercially available antimicrobial products. Combined with ICP-MS and TEM data, the results indicated that the SERS response is primarily dependent on size, but also affected by AgNPs concentration. The findings demonstrate that SERS is a promising analytical platform for studying environmentally relevant levels of AgNPs in consumer products and related matrices.

  5. Determination of hazardous ingredients in personal care products using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Abrar, M.; Iqbal, T.; Fahad, M.; Andleeb, M.; Farooq, Z.; Afsheen, S.

    2018-05-01

    In the present work, the laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy technique is applied to explore the concentration of toxic elements present in cosmetic materials. The elemental analysis of chromium (Cr), magnesium (Mg), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) are selected as major elements and manganese (Mn), sodium (Na), potassium (P), sulfur (S), silicon (Si) and titanium (Ti) as minor elements in cosmetic products. In this technique, a plasma plume is generated by using an Nd:YAG Laser of 532 nm wavelength and spectral lines for the respective samples are observed. Four different samples of cosmetic products are selected, i.e. two samples for lipstick and two for eyeshadow. The observed spectral lines of all major and minor elements are used to calculate their concentration in all samples through the intensity ratio method. Among selected lipstick and eyeshadow samples, one sample is branded, and one is collected from the local market. It is observed that chromium, magnesium and lead have strong spectral lines and consequently show high concentration. The calculated concentrations are then compared to permissible limits set by the Food and Drug Administration with regard to the cosmetics industry. The concentration of these toxic elements in selected local cosmetic samples exceeds the safe permissible limit for human use and could lead to serious health problems.

  6. Detection of boron in simulated corrosion products by using a laser induced breakdown spectroscopy

    Song, K.; Yeon, J-W.; Jung, S-H.; Hwang, J.; Jung, E-C.

    2010-01-01

    In nuclear power plants, many methods for detection of coolant leakage have been developed and employed for the safe operation. However, these methods have many limitations for analyzing and dealing with the corrosion products due to the high radioactivity. LIBS (Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy) offer a remote and on-site elemental analysis including the boron in the corrosion products with no sample preparation. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of detecting boron and analyzing an elemental composition of boron-containing iron oxides with the LIBS, in order to develop a coolant leakage detection system. First, we prepared five different boron-containing iron oxides and the element ratios were determined by using ICP-AES (inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer). After this, the laser induced emission spectra of these iron oxides were obtained by using a 266 nm Nd:YAG laser. The B/Fe ratios of the oxides were determined by comparing the intensities of the B emission peak at 249.844 nm with those of the Fe peak at 250.217 nm as an internal reference. It was confirmed that the B contents in the oxides could be analyzed over 0.1 wt% by the laser induced breakdown spectroscopic technique. (author)

  7. Fed-Batch Production of Bacterial Ghosts Using Dielectric Spectroscopy for Dynamic Process Control

    Andrea Meitz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Bacterial Ghost (BG platform technology evolved from a microbiological expression system incorporating the ϕX174 lysis gene E. E-lysis generates empty but structurally intact cell envelopes (BGs from Gram-negative bacteria which have been suggested as candidate vaccines, immunotherapeutic agents or drug delivery vehicles. E-lysis is a highly dynamic and complex biological process that puts exceptional demands towards process understanding and control. The development of a both economic and robust fed-batch production process for BGs required a toolset capable of dealing with rapidly changing concentrations of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. This challenge was addressed using a transfer function combining dielectric spectroscopy and soft-sensor based biomass estimation for monitoring the rapid decline of viable biomass during the E-lysis phase. The transfer function was implemented to a feed-controller, which followed the permittivity signal closely and was capable of maintaining a constant specific substrate uptake rate during lysis phase. With the described toolset, we were able to increase the yield of BG production processes by a factor of 8–10 when compared to currently used batch procedures reaching lysis efficiencies >98%. This provides elevated potentials for commercial application of the Bacterial Ghost platform technology.

  8. Diffractive production of two {rho}{sup 0} {sub L} mesons in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions

    Segond, M.; Wallon, S. [Universite Paris-Sud - CNRS, LPT, Orsay (France); Szymanowski, L. [Universite Paris-Sud - CNRS, LPT, Orsay (France); Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Warsaw (Poland); Universite de Liege, Liege (Belgium); Ecole Polytechnique - CNRS, CPHT, Palaiseau (France)

    2007-09-15

    We present an estimate of the cross-section for the exclusive production of a {rho}{sub L}{sup 0}-meson pair in e{sup +}e{sup -} scattering, which will be studied in the future high-energy International Linear Collider. For this aim, we complete calculations of the Born order approximation of the amplitudes {gamma}{sup *}{sub L,T}(Q{sub 1}{sup 2}){gamma}{sup *}{sub L,T}(Q{sub 2}{sup 2}){yields}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}{rho}{sub L}{sup 0}, for arbitrary polarization of virtual photons and longitudinally polarized mesons, in the kinematical region s>>-t,Q{sub 1} {sup 2},Q{sub 2} {sup 2}. These processes are completely calculable in the hard region Q{sub 1}{sup 2},Q{sub 2}{sup 2}>>{lambda}{sup 2}{sub QCD}, and we perform most of the calculations in an analytical way. The resulting cross-section turns out to be large enough for this process to be measurable with foreseen luminosity and energy, for Q{sub 1}{sup 2} and Q{sub 2}{sup 2} in the range of a few GeV{sup 2}. (orig.)

  9. Copper Vapor Laser with One-Beam Radiation of Diffraction Quality and Its Capabilities for Microprocessing of Materials for Electronic Engineering Products

    N. A. Lyabin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure, spatial, time and energy characteristics of copper vapor laser radiation (CVL with optical resonators possessing high spatial selectivity have been investigated: with an unstable resonator (UR with two convex mirrors and telescopic UR, and the conditions to form one-beam radiation with diffraction divergence and high stability of directivity pattern axis have been defined.The most weighty and prospective application of CVL with UR with two convex mirrors is to use it as a driving oscillator (DO in a copper vapor laser system (CVLS of the type: driving oscillator – power amplifier (DO – PA when diffraction beam radiating power and power density in a focused spot of 10-20 µm in diameter increases by 1-2 orders. Using industrial sealed-off active elements (AE of “Kulon” series with an average radiation power of 15-25 W as PAs the peak power density increases up to 1011 W/cm 2 while an application of AE “Crystal” with 30- 50 W power gives up to 1012 W/cm 2 , which is sufficient for efficient and qualitative microprocessing of materials up to 1…2 mm thick. Such a CVLS has become the basis for creating up-to-date automated laser technological installations (ALTI of “Karavella-1” and “Karavella-1M” types to manufacture precision parts of electronic engineering products (EEP of metal up to 0.5 mm thick and of non-metal up to 1.5…1.8 mm thick.CVL with a telescopic UR with an average power of 5-6 W diffraction radiation beam has become the basis for creating industrial ALTI “Karavella-2” and “Karavella-2M” to manufacture precision parts of electronic engineering products (EEP of metal up to 0.3 mm thick and of non-metal up to 0.5 – 0.7 mm thick.Practical work on all types of ALTI “Karavella” has shown a set of significant advantages of a laser way of pulsed microprocessing over the traditional ones, including electro-erosion machining: a wide range of structural metal and non-metal materials to be

  10. Highly constrained ferroelectric [BaTiO3](1−x)Λ/[BaZrO3]xΛ superlattices: X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy

    Belhadi, J.; El Marssi, M.; Gagou, Y.; El Mendili, Y.; Bouyanfif, H.; Yuzyuk, Yu. I.; Raevski, I. P.; Wolfman, J.

    2014-01-01

    We report an x-ray diffraction (XRD) and a Raman-scattering investigation of ferroelectric/paraelectric superlattices [BaTiO 3 ] (1−x)Λ /[BaZrO 3 ] xΛ for which the composition varied, 0.15 ≤ x ≤ 0.85, while the superlattice (SL) modulation period Λ was kept constant at about 100 Å. The samples were epitaxially grown by pulsed laser deposition on MgO substrates buffered with La 0.5 Sr 0.5 CoO 3 . Based on the XRD analysis and on polarized Raman spectra, we have showed that the large strain in SLs induced ferroelectricity in BaZrO 3 (BZ) for all SLs, a material that is paraelectric in the bulk form at any temperature and in the single film. The induced polar axis in BZ layers is perpendicular to the plane of substrate while BaTiO 3 (BT) layers exhibit in-plane polar orientation. Raman spectroscopy revealed a lattice ordering in SLs due to the misfit strain generated by the large lattice mismatch between the alternating BZ and BT layers. This strain induced a huge upward frequency of the lowest E(1TO) soft mode from 60 cm −1 in the BT single film to 215 cm −1 in the SL with x = 0.85. These results show that in spite of relatively large periodicity of SLs, they are highly constrained and the variation of BZ ratio allowed modifying strains between layers. The temperature dependence of the Raman spectra for BT 0.3Λ /BZ 0.7Λ and BT 0.7Λ /BZ 0.3Λ samples revealed giant shift of the ferroelectric phase transition. The phase transition temperature was found to be upshifted by about 300 °C with respect to BT single crystal.

  11. Impact of the long chain omega-acylceramides on the stratum corneum lipid nanostructure. Part 1: Thermotropic phase behaviour of CER[EOS] and CER[EOP] studied using X-ray powder diffraction and FT-Raman spectroscopy.

    Kessner, Doreen; Brezesinski, Gerald; Funari, Sergio S; Dobner, Bodo; Neubert, Reinhard H H

    2010-01-01

    The stratum corneum (SC), the outermost layer of the mammalian skin, is the main skin barrier. Ceramides (CERs) as the major constituent of the SC lipid matrix are of particular interest. At the moment, 11 classes of CERs are identified, but the effect of each single ceramide species is still not known. Therefore in this article, the thermotropic behaviour of the long chain omega-acylceramides CER[EOS] and CER[EOP] was studied using X-ray powder diffraction and FT-Raman spectroscopy. It was found that the omega-acylceramides CER[EOS] and CER[EOP] do not show a pronounced polymorphism which is observed for shorter chain ceramides as a significant feature. The phase behaviour of both ceramides is strongly influenced by the extremely long acyl-chain residue. The latter has a much stronger influence compared with the structure of the polar head group, which is discussed as extremely important for the appearance of a rich polymorphism. Despite the strong influence of the long chain, the additional OH-group of the phyto-sphingosine type CER[EOP] influences the lamellar repeat distance and the chain packing. The less polar sphingosine type CER[EOS] is stronger influenced by the long acyl-chain residue. Hydration is necessary for the formation of an extended hydrogen-bonding network between the polar head groups leading to the appearance of a long-periodicity phase (LPP). In contrast, the more polar CER[EOP] forms the LPP with densely packed alkyl chains already in the dry state.

  12. Structural characterization of ammonium uranate by infrared spectroscopy

    Rodriguez S, A.

    1994-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopy have been used to investigate the chemical composition of some ammonium uranates. In this study, I have attempted to establish the interrelationship between the structure of the products, the character of their infrared spectra and x-ray diffraction data capable of consistent interpretation in terms of defining the compounds. (Author)

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in the structure elucidation and biosynthesis of natural products

    Meksuriyen, D.

    1988-01-01

    Examination of a chloroform extract of Dracaena loureiri Gagnep (Agavaceae), a Thia medicinal plant possessing antibacterial activity, has led to the isolation of fifteen flavenoids. The biogenic relationships among these flavenoids isolated were briefly discussed. Definition of the skeleton and the unambiguous assignment of all of the protons of the isolates was achieved through extensive 2D-homonuclear chemical shift correlation, nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) difference spectroscopy and 2D-NOE experiments. The 1 H and 13 C NMR spectra of staurosporine, a potent biologically active agent from Streptomyces staurosporeus, were unambiguously assigned by using 2D homonuclear chemical shift correlation, NOE, 1 H-detected heteronuclear multiple-quantum coherence via direct coupling and via multiple-bond coupling for resonance assignments of protonated and nonprotonated carbons, respectively. S. Staurosporeus was found to utilize endogenous and exogenous D- and L-isomers of trytophan in the production of staurosporine. The biosynthesis of staurosporine was examined by employing carbon-14, tritium, and carbon-13 labeled precursors

  14. Nanocomposites of polypropylene and organophilic montmorillonite clay: X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transform and water permeation;Nanocomposito de prolipropileno e argila montmorilonita organifilica: difracao de raios-X, espectroscopia na regiao do infravermelho e permeacao ao vapor de agua

    Morelli, Fernanda C; Ruvolo Filho, Adhemar, E-mail: fer_morelli@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: adhemar@power.ufscar.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    In this work were prepared nanocomposites of polypropylene and organophilic montmorillonite Cloisite 20A with concentrations of 1.5%, 2.5%, 5.0% and 7.5% clay and graft polypropylene with maleic anhydride as compatibilizer. The mixture was made in the melt state using a twin screw extruder. The materials were characterized by x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transform and analysis of water vapor permeation. The results of x-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy indicates the formation of nanocomposites with structures probably exfoliate and / or intercalated for concentrations of 1.5% and 2.5% clay, and provided a marked decrease in the water permeability, corroborating with other analysis. (author)

  15. [Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS): a novel approach to reconstructing historical changes of primary productivity in Antarctic lake].

    Chen, Qian-Qian; Liu, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Wen-Qi; Jiang, Shan

    2011-10-01

    Compared with traditional chemical analysis methods, reflectance spectroscopy has the advantages of speed, minimal or no sample preparation, non-destruction, and low cost. In order to explore the potential application of spectroscopy technology in the paleolimnological study on Antarctic lakes, we took a lake sediment core in Mochou Lake at Zhongshan Station of Antarctic, and analyzed the near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) data in the sedimentary samples. The results showed that the factor loadings of principal component analysis (PCA) displayed very similar depth-profile change pattern with the S2 index, a reliable proxy for the change in historical lake primary productivity. The correlation analysis showed that the values of PCA factor loading and S2 were correlated significantly, suggesting that it is feasible to infer paleoproductivity changes recorded in Antarctic lakes using NIRS technology. Compared to the traditional method of the trough area between 650 and 700 nm, the authors found that the PCA statistical approach was more accurate for reconstructing the change in historical lake primary productivity. The results reported here demonstrate that reflectance spectroscopy can provide a rapid method for the reconstruction of lake palaeoenviro nmental change in the remote Antarctic regions.

  16. X-ray diffraction studies of chitosan acetate-based polymer electrolytes

    Osman, Z.; Ibrahim, Z.A.; Abdul Kariem Arof

    2002-01-01

    Chitosan is the product when partially deacetylated chitin dissolves in dilute acetic acid. This paper presents the x-ray diffraction patterns of chitosan acetate, plasticised chitosan acetate and plasticised-salted chitosan acetate films. The results show that the chitosan acetate based polymer electrolyte films are not completely amorphous but it is partially crystalline. X-ray diffraction study also confirms the occurrence of the complexation between chitosan and the salt and the interaction between salt and plasticizer. The salt-chitosan interaction is clearly justified by infrared spectroscopy. (Author)

  17. Characterization of combustion chamber products by core-level photoabsorption spectroscopy

    Kellar, S.A.; Huff, W.R.A.; Moler, E.J.

    1997-01-01

    The lubricating performance of motor oil is adversely affected by the carbon soot contamination that is a natural by-product of the combustion process. Particularly in diesel engines, open-quote blow-by close-quote is a problem that greatly decreases the longevity of the engine-lubricating oil. Motor oil manufacturers spend considerable resources developing new oil formulations that counteract the adverse affects of this combustion soot. At present, the only effective way to test new formulations is in a working engine. This process is obviously expensive and not especially efficient. In this ongoing work in collaboration with Chevron Research and Technology, the authors goal is to find a form of carbon that chemically resembles the soot created by the open-quote blow-by close-quote in a diesel engine. The chemically correct soot substitute can be used in bench tests to replace the expensive full motor testing for new formulations. The final testing would still be done in the test motors but only with promising candidates. To these ends, Near Edge X-ray Adsorption spectroscopy Extended Fine Structure (NEXAFS) is an attractive technique in that it has chemical specificity through the core-level binding energy and because it probes the chemically important unoccupied molecular orbitals of the material. Core-level photoabsorption has been used to characterize the empty electronic states of a wide variety of materials. Specifically, the near-edge region of the photoabsorption process has been used to determine the relative quantity of sp 2 and sp 3 bonding in carbon films. The samples were fine grained powders pressed into pellets. The C(1s) absorption spectra were collected from each sample by measuring the total electron yield from the sample as a function of photon energy. The absorption intensity was normalized to the incoming photon flux by measuring the photoyield from a fine gold mesh

  18. Diffraction coherence in optics

    Françon, M; Green, L L

    2013-01-01

    Diffraction: Coherence in Optics presents a detailed account of the course on Fraunhofer diffraction phenomena, studied at the Faculty of Science in Paris. The publication first elaborates on Huygens' principle and diffraction phenomena for a monochromatic point source and diffraction by an aperture of simple form. Discussions focus on diffraction at infinity and at a finite distance, simplified expressions for the field, calculation of the path difference, diffraction by a rectangular aperture, narrow slit, and circular aperture, and distribution of luminous flux in the airy spot. The book th

  19. Hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    Brandt, A.

    1995-09-01

    The field of hard diffraction, which studies events with a rapidity gap and a hard scattering, has expanded dramatically recently. A review of new results from CDF, D OE, H1 and ZEUS will be given. These results include diffractive jet production, deep-inelastic scattering in large rapidity gap events, rapidity gaps between high transverse energy jets, and a search for diffractive W-boson production. The combination of these results gives new insight into the exchanged object, believed to be the pomeron. The results axe consistent with factorization and with a hard pomeron that contains both quarks and gluons. There is also evidence for the exchange of a strongly interacting color singlet in high momentum transfer (36 2 ) events

  20. Study of quark line selection rule (OZI rule) in the hadron processes. 3. Study of the OZI rule in production of φ and ω mesons in diffractive p N interactions at the energy of 70 GeV

    Balats, M.Ya.; Vavilov, D.V.; Viktorov, V.A.

    1996-01-01

    Ratio of cross sections for pφ- and pω-production in diffractive p N-interactions was measured with the Sphinx facility at the energy of E p = 70 GeV. Results of this work demonstrate significant OZI rule violation in proton-induced reactions. 12 refs., 8 figs

  1. Investigation of the OZI selection rule for connected quark diagrams in hadronic processes: 3. Diffractive φ and ω production in pN collisions at 70 GeV

    1996-01-01

    The ratio between the cross sections for the diffractive production of pφ and pω systems in pN collisions at Ep=70 GeV is determined by using data from the SPHINX detector. A significant violation of the OZI rule in proton-induced transitions is observed

  2. Equation of state and hyperfine parameters of high-spin bridgmanite in the Earth’s lower mantle by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Mao, Zhu; Wang, Fan; Lin, Jung-Fu; Fu, Suyu; Yang, Jing; Wu, Xiang; Okuchi, Takuo; Tomioka, Naotaka; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we performed synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS) measurements on two single-crystal bridgmanite samples [ Embedded Image and Embedded Image ] to investigate the combined effect of Fe and Al on the hyperfine parameters, lattice parameters, and equation of state (EoS) of bridgmanite up to 130 GPa. Our SMS results show that Fe2+ and Fe3+ in Bm6 and Al-Bm11 are predominantly located in the large pseudo-dodecahedral sites (A-site) at lower-mantle pressures. The observed drastic increase in the hyperfine quadrupole splitting (QS) between 13 and 32 GPa can be associated with an enhanced local distortion of the A-site Fe2+ in Bm6. In contrast to Bm6, the enhanced lattice distortion and the presence of extremely high QS values of Fe2+ are not observed in Al-Bm11 at high pressures. Our results here support the notion that the occurrence of the extremely high QS component of approximately 4 mm/s in bridgmanite is due to the lattice distortion in the high-spin (HS) A-site Fe2+, instead of the occurrence of the intermediate-spin state. Both A-site Fe2+ and Fe3+ in Bm6 and Al-Bm11 remain in the HS state at lower-mantle pressures. Together with XRD results, we present the first experimental evidence that the enhanced lattice distortion of A-site Fe2+ does not cause any detectable variation in the EoS parameters, but is associated with anomalous variations in the bond length, tilting angle, and shear strain in the octahedra of Bm6. Analysis of the obtained EoS parameters of bridgmanite at lower-mantle pressures indicates that the substitution of Fe in bridgmanite will cause an enhanced density and a reduced bulk sound velocity (VΦ), whereas the Al and Fe substitution has a reduced effect on density and a negligible effect on VΦ. These experimental results provide new insight into the correlation between lattice, hyperfine, and EoS parameters of bridgmanite in the Earth’s lower mantle.

  3. A comprehensive physicochemical, thermal, and spectroscopic characterization of zinc (II) chloride using X-ray diffraction, particle size distribution, differential scanning calorimetry, thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermogravimetric analysis, ultraviolet-visible, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy.

    Trivedi, Mahendra Kumar; Sethi, Kalyan Kumar; Panda, Parthasarathi; Jana, Snehasis

    2017-01-01

    Zinc chloride is an important inorganic compound used as a source of zinc and has other numerous industrial applications. Unfortunately, it lacks reliable and accurate physicochemical, thermal, and spectral characterization information altogether. Hence, the authors tried to explore in-depth characterization of zinc chloride using the modern analytical technique. The analysis of zinc chloride was performed using powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), particle size distribution, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermogravimetric analysis (TGA/DTG), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), and Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) analytical techniques. The PXRD patterns showed well-defined, narrow, sharp, and the significant peaks. The crystallite size was found in the range of 14.70-55.40 nm and showed average crystallite size of 41.34 nm. The average particle size was found to be of 1.123 ( d 10 ), 3.025 ( d 50 ), and 6.712 ( d 90 ) μm and average surface area of 2.71 m 2 /g. The span and relative span values were 5.849 μm and 1.93, respectively. The DSC thermogram showed a small endothermic inflation at 308.10°C with the latent heat (ΔH) of fusion 28.52 J/g. An exothermic reaction was observed at 449.32°C with the ΔH of decomposition 66.10 J/g. The TGA revealed two steps of the thermal degradation and lost 8.207 and 89.72% of weight in the first and second step of degradation, respectively. Similarly, the DTG analysis disclosed T max at 508.21°C. The UV-vis spectrum showed absorbance maxima at 197.60 nm (λ max ), and FT-IR spectrum showed a peak at 511/cm might be due to the Zn-Cl stretching. These in-depth, comprehensive data would be very much useful in all stages of nutraceuticals/pharmaceuticals formulation research and development and other industrial applications.

  4. Phase behavior in diffraction

    Checon, A.

    1983-01-01

    Theoretical formulation of a straight edge diffraction shows a phase difference of π/2 between the incoming and diffracted waves. Experiments using two straight edges do not confirm the π/2 difference but suggest that the incoming wave is in phase with the wave diffracted into the shadowed region of the edge and out of phase by a factor of π with the wave diffracted into the illuminated region. (Author) [pt

  5. New diffractive results from the Tevatron

    Gallinaro, Michele; /Rockefeller U.

    2005-05-01

    Experimental results in diffractive processes are summarized and a few notable characteristics described in terms of Quantum Chromodynamics. Exclusive dijet production is used to establish a benchmark for future experiments in the quest for diffractive Higgs production at the Large Hadron Collider. Using new data from the Tevatron and dedicated diffractive triggers, no excess over a smooth falling distribution for exclusive dijet events could be found. Stringent upper limits on the exclusive dijet production cross section are presented. The quark/gluon composition of dijet final states is used to provide additional hints on exclusive dijet production.

  6. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    Del Duca, V.

    1995-06-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). (orig.)

  7. Theory of hard diffraction and rapidity gaps

    Del Duca, V.

    1996-01-01

    In this talk we review the models describing the hard diffractive production of jets or more generally high-mass states in presence of rapidity gaps in hadron-hadron and lepton-hadron collisions. By rapidity gaps we mean regions on the lego plot in (pseudo)-rapidity and azimuthal angle where no hadrons are produced, between the jet(s) and an elastically scattered hadron (single hard diffraction) or between two jets (double hard diffraction). copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  8. Comprehensive Chiroptical Spectroscopy, Applications in Stereochemical Analysis of Synthetic Compounds, Natural Products, and Biomolecules

    Berova, Nina; Nakanishi, Koji; Woody, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the important methods of chiroptical spectroscopy in general, and circular dichroism (CD) in particular, which are increasingly important in all areas of chemistry, biochemistry, and structural biology. The book can be used as a text for undergraduate and graduate students and as a reference for researchers in academia and industry. Experimental methods and instrumentation are described with topics ranging from the most widely used methods (electronic and vibrational CD) to frontier areas such as nonlinear spectroscopy and photoelectron CD,

  9. Production of high temperature superconductors and characteristics by infrared and Raman spectroscopy

    Thomsen, C.

    1991-01-01

    This final report, which is partly kept short, is concerned with electron/phonon interaction and the determination of the band gap in high temperature superconductors (YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 ). The final report is divided into four parts, which reflect the individual working groups: 1. Raman spectroscopy, 2. IR spectroscopy (reflection measurements, isotope effect, superconducting energy gap, behaviour of infrared active phonons), 3. Magnetic field measurements, and 4. Theory (initial calculation of the metal/isolator transfer in BaBiO 3 ). (MM) [de

  10. Nuclear Bragg diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    Rueffer, R.; Gerdau, E.; Grote, M.; Hollatz, R.; Roehlsberger, R.; Rueter, H.D.; Sturhahn, W.

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Bragg diffraction with synchrotron radiation as source will become a powerful new X-ray source in the A-region. This source exceeds by now the brilliance of conventional Moessbauer sources giving hyperfine spectroscopy further momentum. As examples applications to yttrium iron garnet (YIG) and iron borate will be discussed. (author)

  11. High-energy particle diffraction

    Barone, V.; Predazzi, E.

    2002-01-01

    This monograph gives a comprehensive and up-to-date overview of soft and hard diffraction processes in strong interaction physics. The first part covers the general formalism (the optical analogy, the eikonal picture, high-energy kinematics, S-matrix theory) and soft hadron-hadron scattering (including the Regge theory) in a complete and mature presentation. It can be used as a textbook in particle physics classes. The remainder of the book is devoted to the 'new diffraction': the pomeron in QCD, low-x physics, diffractive deep inelastic scattering and related processes, jet production etc. It presents recent results and experimental findings and their phenomenological interpretations. This part addresses graduate students as well as researchers. (orig.)

  12. Colorimetry and photoacoustic spectroscopy as suitable tools for direct determination of cocoa powder in confectionary products

    Doka, O.; Pragai, E.; Bicanic, D.D.; Kulcsar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) and colorimetry have been used to rapidly and accurately determine the content of fat-free cocoa solids in dark chocolates. Both techniques are inexpensive and require only a one-time calibration step versus a method capable of absolute concentration

  13. Physico-chemical characterization of products from vacuum oil under delayed coking process by infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics methods

    Meléndez, L V; Cabanzo, R; Mejía-Ospino, E; Guzmán, A

    2016-01-01

    Eight vacuum residues and their delayed coking liquids products from Colombian crude were study by infrared spectroscopy with attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and principal component analysis (PCA). For the samples the structural parameters of aromaticity factor (fa), alifaticity (A2500-3100cm -1 ), aromatic condensation degree (GCA), length of aliphatic chains (LCA) and aliphatic chain length associated with aromatic (LACAR) were determined through the development of a methodology, which includes the previous processing of spectroscopy data, identifying the regions in the IR spectra of greatest variance using PCA and molecules patterns. The parameters were compared with the results obtained from proton magnetic resonance ( 1 H-NMR) and 13 C-NMR. The results showed the influence and correlation of structural parameters with some physicochemical properties such as API gravity, weight percent sulphur (% S) and Conradson carbon content (% CCR) (paper)

  14. A phytochemical comparison of saw palmetto products using gas chromatography and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolomic profiling

    Booker, Anthony; Suter, Andy; Krnjic, Ana; Strassel, Brigitte; Zloh, Mire; Said, Mazlina; Heinrich, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Preparations containing saw palmetto berries are used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). There are many products on the market, and relatively little is known about their chemical variability and specifically the composition and quality of different saw palmetto products notwithstanding that in 2000, an international consultation paper from the major urological associations from the five continents on treatments for BPH demanded further research on this topic. Here, we compare two analytical approaches and characterise 57 different saw palmetto products. Methods An established method – gas chromatography – was used for the quantification of nine fatty acids, while a novel approach of metabolomic profiling using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used as a fingerprinting tool to assess the overall composition of the extracts. Key findings The phytochemical analysis determining the fatty acids showed a high level of heterogeneity of the different products in the total amount and of nine single fatty acids. A robust and reproducible 1H NMR spectroscopy method was established, and the results showed that it was possible to statistically differentiate between saw palmetto products that had been extracted under different conditions but not between products that used a similar extraction method. Principal component analysis was able to determine those products that had significantly different metabolites. Conclusions The metabolomic approach developed offers novel opportunities for quality control along the value chain of saw palmetto and needs to be followed further, as with this method, the complexity of a herbal extract can be better assessed than with the analysis of a single group of constituents. PMID:24417505

  15. A phytochemical comparison of saw palmetto products using gas chromatography and (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolomic profiling.

    Booker, Anthony; Suter, Andy; Krnjic, Ana; Strassel, Brigitte; Zloh, Mire; Said, Mazlina; Heinrich, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Preparations containing saw palmetto berries are used in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). There are many products on the market, and relatively little is known about their chemical variability and specifically the composition and quality of different saw palmetto products notwithstanding that in 2000, an international consultation paper from the major urological associations from the five continents on treatments for BPH demanded further research on this topic. Here, we compare two analytical approaches and characterise 57 different saw palmetto products. An established method - gas chromatography - was used for the quantification of nine fatty acids, while a novel approach of metabolomic profiling using (1) H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used as a fingerprinting tool to assess the overall composition of the extracts. The phytochemical analysis determining the fatty acids showed a high level of heterogeneity of the different products in the total amount and of nine single fatty acids. A robust and reproducible (1) H NMR spectroscopy method was established, and the results showed that it was possible to statistically differentiate between saw palmetto products that had been extracted under different conditions but not between products that used a similar extraction method. Principal component analysis was able to determine those products that had significantly different metabolites. The metabolomic approach developed offers novel opportunities for quality control along the value chain of saw palmetto and needs to be followed further, as with this method, the complexity of a herbal extract can be better assessed than with the analysis of a single group of constituents. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Production of photofission fragments and study of their nuclear structure by laser spectroscopy

    Gangrskij, Yu.P.; Zemlyanoj, S.G.; Karaivanov, D.V.; Marinova, K.P.; Markov, B.N.; Mel'nikova, L.M.; Myshinskij, G.V.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.Eh.; Zhemenik, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    The prospective nuclear structure investigations of the fission fragments by resonance laser spectroscopy methods are discussed. Research in this field is currently being carried out as part of the DRIBs project, which is under development at the Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions, JINR. The fission fragments under study are mainly very neutron-rich nuclei near the proton (Z=50) and neutron (N=50 and 82) closed shells, nuclei in the region of strong deformation (N>60 and N>90) and nuclei with high-spin isomeric states. Resonance laser spectroscopy is used successfully in the study of the structure of such nuclei. It allows one to determine a number of nuclear parameters (mean-square charge radius, magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments) and to make conclusions about the collective and single particle properties of the nuclei

  17. Photodissociation of acrylonitrile at 193 nm: A photofragment translational spectroscopy study using synchrotron radiation for product photoionization

    Blank, D.A.; Suits, A.G.; Lee, Y.T.; North, S.W.; Hall, G.E.

    1998-01-01

    We have investigated the photodissociation of acrylonitrile (H 2 CCHCN) at 193 nm using the technique of photofragment translational spectroscopy. The experiments were performed at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline at the Advanced Light Source and used tunable vacuum ultraviolet synchrotron radiation for product photoionization. We have identified four primary dissociation channels including atomic and molecular hydrogen elimination, HCN elimination, and CN elimination. There is significant evidence that all of the dissociation channels occur on the ground electronic surface following internal conversion from the initially optically prepared state. The product translational energy distributions reflect near statistical simple bond rupture for the radical dissociation channels, while substantial recombination barriers mediate the translational energy release for the two molecular elimination channels. Photoionization onsets have provided additional insight into the chemical identities of the products and their internal energy content. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  18. Determination of aromatic fragment content in phenol-containing fractions of solid fuel conversion products using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Kanitskaya, L.V.; Kushnarev, D.F.; Polonov, V.M.; Kalabin, G.A.

    1986-03-01

    Optimum conditions are determined for obtaining quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance /sup 13/C spectra of fragments in phenol-containing fraction of coal products. Causes are analyzed of residual signals in spectra of un-protonized carbon atoms. The tests were carried out on: low-temperature carbonization tar and phenol fraction obtained during medium-temperature coking of Cherenkhovskii coal (which contains 84.13% C; 9.68% H; 1.23% S; 4.96% O); products of tar hydrogenation with various phenol content; standard phenol mixture. It was found that quantitative determination of aromatic fraction content in coal conversion products and other phenol- and amine-containing complex mixtures, using NMR spectroscopy requires the addition of dimethylsulfide or acetone in order to suppress specific interactions of phenols (amines) with relaxants and obtain quantitative subspectra of Tertiary and Quaternary aromatic carbon atoms. 16 references.

  19. Fission 2009 4. International Workshop on Nuclear Fission and Fission Product Spectroscopy - Compilation of slides

    2009-01-01

    This conference is dedicated to the last achievements in experimental and theoretical aspects of the nuclear fission process. The topics include: mass, charge and energy distribution, dynamical aspect of the fission process, nuclear data evaluation, quasi-fission and fission lifetime in super heavy elements, fission fragment spectroscopy, cross-section and fission barrier, and neutron and gamma emission. This document gathers the program of the conference and the slides of the presentations

  20. Morphological and Production Changes in Stressed Red Yeasts Monitored Using SEM and Raman Spectroscopy

    Hrubanová, Kamila; Samek, Ota; Haroniková, A.; Bernatová, Silvie; Zemánek, Pavel; Márová, I.; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, S3 (2016), s. 1146-1147 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20012S; GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20645S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : SEM * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  1. Diffraction at TOTEM

    Giani, S; Niewiadomski, H; Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Avati, V; Bagliesi, M G; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Besta, M; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the TOTEM experiment at the LHC is the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the study of elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. In addition TOTEM also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage...

  2. Diffraction at TOTEM

    Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Avati, V.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Catastini, P.L.; Cecchi, R.

    2008-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC measures the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. It also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral...

  3. Structural Characterization of Amadori Rearrangement Product of Glucosylated Nα-Acetyl-Lysine by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Chuanjiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maillard reaction is a nonenzymatic reaction between reducing sugars and free amino acid moieties, which is known as one of the most important modifications in food science. It is essential to characterize the structure of Amadori rearrangement products (ARPs formed in the early stage of Maillard reaction. In the present study, the Nα-acetyl-lysine-glucose model had been successfully set up to produce ARP, Nα-acetyl-lysine-glucose. After HPLC purification, ARP had been identified by ESI-MS with intense [M+H]+ ion at 351 m/z and the purity of ARP was confirmed to be over 90% by the relative intensity of [M+H]+ ion. Further structural characterization of the ARP was accomplished by using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy, including 1D 1H NMR and 13C NMR, the distortionless enhancement by polarization transfer (DEPT-135 and 2D 1H-1H and 13C-1H correlation spectroscopy (COSY and 2D nuclear overhauser enhancement spectroscopy (NOESY. The complexity of 1D 1H NMR and 13C NMR was observed due to the presence of isomers in glucose moiety of ARP. However, DEPT-135 and 2D NMR techniques provided more structural information to assign the 1H and 13C resonances of ARP. 2D NOESY had successfully confirmed the glycosylated site between 10-N in Nα-acetyl-lysine and 7′-C in glucose.

  4. Rapid estimation of sugar release from winter wheat straw during bioethanol production using FTIR-photoacoustic spectroscopy

    Bekiaris, Georgios; Lindedam, Jane; Peltre, Clément

    2015-01-01

    Complexity and high cost are the main limitations for high-throughput screening methods for the estimation of the sugar release from plant materials during bioethanol production. In addition, it is important that we improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which different chemical components...... are affecting the degradability of plant material. In this study, Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) was combined with advanced chemometrics to develop calibration models predicting the amount of sugars released after pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of wheat straw during...

  5. Morphological and Production Changes in Planktonic and Biofilm Cells Monitored Using SEM and Raman Spectroscopy

    Hrubanová, Kamila; Krzyžánek, Vladislav; Samek, Ota; Skoupý, Radim; Šiler, Martin; Ježek, Jan; Obruča, S.; Zemánek, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, S1 (2017), s. 1158-1159 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20645S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-12477S; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-15451S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : biofilm cells * SEM * Raman spectroscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  6. Observables of QCD diffraction

    Mieskolainen, Mikael; Orava, Risto

    2017-03-01

    A new combinatorial vector space measurement model is introduced for soft QCD diffraction. The model independent mathematical construction resolves experimental complications; the theoretical framework of the approach includes the Good-Walker view of diffraction, Regge phenomenology together with AGK cutting rules and random fluctuations.

  7. Digital diffractive optics: Have diffractive optics entered mainstream industry yet?

    Kress, Bernard; Hejmadi, Vic

    2010-05-01

    When a new technology is integrated into industry commodity products and consumer electronic devices, and sold worldwide in retail stores, it is usually understood that this technology has then entered the realm of mainstream technology and therefore mainstream industry. Such a leap however does not come cheap, as it has a double edge sword effect: first it becomes democratized and thus massively developed by numerous companies for various applications, but also it becomes a commodity, and thus gets under tremendous pressure to cut down its production and integration costs while not sacrificing to performance. We will show, based on numerous examples extracted from recent industry history, that the field of Diffractive Optics is about to undergo such a major transformation. Such a move has many impacts on all facets of digital diffractive optics technology, from the optical design houses to the micro-optics foundries (for both mastering and volume replication), to the final product integrators or contract manufacturers. The main causes of such a transformation are, as they have been for many other technologies in industry, successive technological bubbles which have carried and lifted up diffractive optics technology within the last decades. These various technological bubbles have been triggered either by real industry needs or by virtual investment hype. Both of these causes will be discussed in the paper. The adjective ""digital"" in "digital diffractive optics" does not refer only, as it is done in digital electronics, to the digital functionality of the element (digital signal processing), but rather to the digital way they are designed (by a digital computer) and fabricated (as wafer level optics using digital masking techniques). However, we can still trace a very strong similarity between the emergence of micro-electronics from analog electronics half a century ago, and the emergence of digital optics from conventional optics today.

  8. Determination of the products from the oxidation of aqueous hydrogen sulfide by sulfur K-edge XANES spectroscopy

    Vairavamurthy, A.; Manowitz, B.; Jeon, Yongseog; Zhou, Weiqing.

    1993-01-01

    The application of synchrotron radiation based XANES spectroscopy is described for determining the products formed from oxidation of aqueous sulfide.This technique allows simultaneous characterization of all the different forms of sulfur both qualitatively and quantitatively. Thus, it is superior to other commonly used techniques, such as chromatography, which are usually targeted at specific compounds. Since the use of XANES-based technique is relatively new in geochemistry, we present here an overview of the principles of the technique as well as the approach used for quantitative analysis. We studied the sulfide oxidation under conditions of high sulfide to oxygen ratio using 0.1 M sulfide solutions and the catalytic effects of sea sand, Fe 2+ , and Ni 2+ , were also examined. Significant results obtained from this study are presented to illustrate the value of the XANES technique for the determination of the products formed from the oxidation of sulfide at high concentrations

  9. Perspectives on Heavy Flavour Production and Spectroscopy Studies at the LHC

    Kraan, A C

    2008-01-01

    In this note we discuss prospects of analyses at the ATLAS and CMS experiments that are related to the production of heavy flavour quarks. Trigger strategies are summarized and a selection of studies is presented. These include quarkonium production studies such as the differential transverse momentum cross section measurement and polarization studies, as well as reconstruction of excited quarkonium states. Furthermore inclusive b-quark production is discussed.

  10. Using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy on vacuum alloys-production process for elements concentration analysis

    Zhao, Tianzhuo; Fan, Zhongwei; Lian, Fuqiang; Liu, Yang; Lin, Weiran; Mo, Zeqiang; Nie, Shuzhen; Wang, Pu; Xiao, Hong; Li, Xin; Zhong, Qixiu; Zhang, Hongbo

    2017-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) utilizing an echelle spectrograph-ICCD system is employed for on-line analysis of elements concentration in a vacuum induction melting workshop. Active temperature stabilization of echelle spectrometer is implemented specially for industrial environment applications. The measurement precision is further improved by monitoring laser parameters, such as pulse energy, spatial and temporal profiles, in real time, and post-selecting laser pulses with specific pulse energies. Experimental results show that major components of nickel-based alloys are stable, and can be well detected. By using internal standard method, calibration curves for chromium and aluminum are obtained for quantitative determination, with determination coefficient (relative standard deviation) to be 0.9559 (< 2.2%) and 0.9723 (< 2.8%), respectively.

  11. Borehole radar diffraction tomography

    Cho, Seong Jun; Kim, Jung Ho; Yi, Myeong Jong; Chung, Seung Hwan; Lee, Hee Il [Korea Institute of Geology Mining and Materials, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Tomography is widely used as imaging method for determining subsurface structure. Among the reconstruction algorithms for tomographic imaging, travel time tomography is almost applied to imaging subsurface. But isolated small body comparable with the wavelength could not be well recognized by travel time tomography. Other tomographic method are need to improve the imaging process. In the study of this year, diffraction tomography was investigated. The theory for diffraction tomography is based on the 1st-order Born approximation. Multisource holography, which is similar to Kirchihoff migration, is compared with diffraction tomography. To improve 1st-order Born diffraction tomography, two kinds of filter designed from multisource holography and 2-D green function, respectively, applied on the reconstructed image. The algorithm was tested for the numerical modeling data of which algorithm consists of the analytic computation of radar signal in transmitter and receiver regions and 2-D FDM scheme for the propagation of electromagnetic waves in media. The air-filled cavity model to show a typical diffraction pattern was applied to diffraction tomography imaging, and the result shows accurate location and area of cavity. But the calculated object function is not well matched the real object function, because the air-filled cavity model is not satisfied week scattered inhomogeneity for 1st born approximation, and the error term is included in estimating source wavelet from received signals. In spite of the object function error, the diffraction tomography assist for interpretation of subsurface as if conducted with travel time tomography. And the fracture model was tested, 1st born diffraction tomographic image is poor because of limited view angle coverage and violation of week scatter assumption, but the filtered image resolve the fracture somewhat better. The tested diffraction tomography image confirms effectiveness of filter for enhancing resolution. (author). 14

  12. Diffraction. Powder, amorphous, liquid

    Sosnowska, I.M.

    1999-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction is a unique tool to observe all possible diffraction effects appearing in crystal. High-resolution neutron diffractometers have to be used in this study. Analysis of the magnetic structure of polycrystalline materials requires the use of high-resolution neutron diffraction in the range of large interplanar distances. As distinguished from the double axis diffractometers (DAS), which show high resolution only at small interplanar distances, TOF (time-of-flight) diffractometry offers the best resolution at large interplanar distances. (K.A.)

  13. Non-diffractive waves

    Hernandez-Figueroa, Hugo E; Recami, Erasmo

    2013-01-01

    This continuation and extension of the successful book ""Localized Waves"" by the same editors brings together leading researchers in non-diffractive waves to cover the most important results in their field and as such is the first to present the current state.The well-balanced presentation of theory and experiments guides readers through the background of different types of non-diffractive waves, their generation, propagation, and possible applications. The authors include a historical account of the development of the field, and cover different types of non-diffractive waves, including Airy

  14. Bragg diffraction of fermions at optical potentials

    Deh, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes the Bragg diffraction of ultracold fermions at an optical potential. A moving optical lattice was created, by overlaying two slightly detuned lasers. Atoms can be diffracted at this lattice if the detuning fulfills the Bragg condition for resting atoms. This Bragg diffraction is analyzed systematically in this thesis. To this end Rabi oscillations between the diffraction states were driven, as well in the weakly interacting Bragg regime, as in the strongly interacting Kapitza-Dirac regime. Simulations, based on a driven two-, respectively multilevel-system describe the observed effects rather well. Furthermore, the temporal evolution of the diffracted states in the magnetic trapping potential was studied. The anharmonicity of the trap in use and the scattering cross section for p-wave collisions in a 6 Li system was determined from the movement of these states. Moreover the momentum distribution of the fermions was measured with Bragg spectroscopy and first signs of Fermi degeneracy were found. Finally an interferometer with fermions was build, exhibiting a coherence time of more than 100 μs. With this, the possibility for measurement and manipulation of ultracold fermions with Bragg diffraction could bee shown. (orig.)

  15. Monitoring of substrate and product concentrations in acetic fermentation processes for onion vinegar production by NIR spectroscopy: value addition to worthless onions.

    González-Sáiz, J M; Esteban-Díez, I; Sánchez-Gallardo, C; Pizarro, C

    2008-08-01

    Wastes and by-products of the onion-processing industry pose an increasing disposal and environmental problem and represent a loss of valuable sources of nutrients. The present study focused on the production of vinegar from worthless onions as a potential valorisation route which could provide a viable solution to multiple disposal and environmental problems, simultaneously offering the possibility of converting waste materials into a useful food-grade product and of exploiting the unique properties and health benefits of onions. This study deals specifically with the second and definitive step of the onion vinegar production process: the efficient production of vinegar from onion waste by transforming onion ethanol, previously produced by alcoholic fermentation, into acetic acid via acetic fermentation. Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), coupled with multivariate calibration methods, has been used to monitor the concentrations of both substrates and products in acetic fermentation. Separate partial least squares (PLS) regression models, correlating NIR spectral data of fermentation samples with each kinetic parameter studied, were developed. Wavelength selection was also performed applying the iterative predictor weighting-PLS (IPW-PLS) method in order to only consider significant spectral features in each model development to improve the quality of the final models constructed. Biomass, substrate (ethanol) and product (acetic acid) concentration were predicted in the acetic fermentation of onion alcohol with high accuracy using IPW-PLS models with a root-mean-square error of the residuals in external prediction (RMSEP) lower than 2.5% for both ethanol and acetic acid, and an RMSEP of 6.1% for total biomass concentration (a very satisfactory result considering the relatively low precision and accuracy associated with the reference method used for determining the latter). Thus, the simple and reliable calibration models proposed in this study suggest that they

  16. The use of laser-induced shock wave plasma spectroscopy (LISPS) for examining physical characteristics of pharmaceutical products

    Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur, E-mail: syahrun-madjid@yahoo.com; Lahna, Kurnia, E-mail: kurnialahna@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, Aceh (Indonesia); Desiyana, Lydia Septa, E-mail: lydia-septa@yahoo.com [Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh 23111, Aceh (Indonesia)

    2016-03-11

    An experimental study has been performed to examine the physical characteristics of pharmaceutical products, such as tablet, by employing an emission plasma induced by Nd-YAG laser at a low pressure of Helium gas. The hardness of tablet is one of the parameters that examined during the production process for standard quality of pharmaceutical products. In the Laser-Induced Shock Wave Plasma Spectroscopy (LISPS), the shock wave has a significant role in inducing atomic excitation. It was known that, the speed of the shock wavefront depends on the hardness of the sample, and it correlates with the ionization rate of the ablated atoms. The hardness of the tablet is examined using the intensity ratio between the ion of Mg (II) 275.2 nm and the neutral of Mg (I) 285.2 nm emission lines detected from the laser-induced plasma. It was observed that the ratio changes with respect to the change in the tablet hardness, namely the ratio is higher for the hard tablet. Besides the ratio measurements, we also measured the depth profile of a tablet by focusing 60 shots of irradiation of laser light at a fixed position on the surface of the tablet. It was found that the depth profile varies differently with the hardness of the tablet. These experiment results show that the technique of LISPS can be applied to examine the quality of pharmaceutical products.

  17. The use of laser-induced shock wave plasma spectroscopy (LISPS) for examining physical characteristics of pharmaceutical products

    Abdulmadjid, Syahrun Nur; Lahna, Kurnia; Desiyana, Lydia Septa

    2016-01-01

    An experimental study has been performed to examine the physical characteristics of pharmaceutical products, such as tablet, by employing an emission plasma induced by Nd-YAG laser at a low pressure of Helium gas. The hardness of tablet is one of the parameters that examined during the production process for standard quality of pharmaceutical products. In the Laser-Induced Shock Wave Plasma Spectroscopy (LISPS), the shock wave has a significant role in inducing atomic excitation. It was known that, the speed of the shock wavefront depends on the hardness of the sample, and it correlates with the ionization rate of the ablated atoms. The hardness of the tablet is examined using the intensity ratio between the ion of Mg (II) 275.2 nm and the neutral of Mg (I) 285.2 nm emission lines detected from the laser-induced plasma. It was observed that the ratio changes with respect to the change in the tablet hardness, namely the ratio is higher for the hard tablet. Besides the ratio measurements, we also measured the depth profile of a tablet by focusing 60 shots of irradiation of laser light at a fixed position on the surface of the tablet. It was found that the depth profile varies differently with the hardness of the tablet. These experiment results show that the technique of LISPS can be applied to examine the quality of pharmaceutical products.

  18. Non-Invasive Assessment of Dairy Products Using SpatiallyResolved Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Abildgaard, Otto Højager Attermann; Kamran, Faisal; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm

    2015-01-01

    of commercially available milk and yogurt products with three different levels of fat content are measured. These constitute a relevant range of products at a dairy plant. The measured reduced scattering properties of the samples are presented and show a clear discrimination between levels of fat contents as well...... as fermentation. The presented measurement technique and method of analysis is thus suitable for a rapid, noncontact, and non-invasive inspection that can deduce physically interpretable properties....

  19. Electrochemical and Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Detection of SF6 Decomposition Products

    Dong, Ming; Zhang, Chongxing; Ren, Ming; Albarracín, Ricardo; Ye, Rixin

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas-insulated electrical equipment is widely used in high-voltage (HV) and extra-high-voltage (EHV) power systems. Partial discharge (PD) and local heating can occur in the electrical equipment because of insulation faults, which results in SF6 decomposition and ultimately generates several types of decomposition products. These SF6 decomposition products can be qualitatively and quantitatively detected with relevant detection methods, and such detection contributes ...

  20. High energy diffraction

    Berger, C.

    1995-11-01

    Recent experiments on total hadronic cross sections are reviewed together with results on photo- and electroproduction of vector mesons. New data on diffractive deep inelastic scattering shed light on the nature of the pomeron. (orig.)

  1. Diffraction at TOTEM

    Antchev, G.; Avati, V.; Bagliesi, M.G.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Brucken, E.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F.; Calicchio, M.; Catanesi, M.G.; Catastini, P.L.; Cecchi, R.; Ciocci, M.A.; Deile, M.; Dimovasili, E.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Garcia, F.; Giani, S.; Greco, V.; Heino, J.; Hilden, T.; Kaspar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrat, V.; Kurvinen, K.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Lippmaa, E.; Lokajicek, M.; Lo Vetere, M.; Lucas Rodriguez, F.; Macri, M.; Magazzu, G.; Meucci, M.; Minutoli, S.; Niewiadomski, H.; Noschis, E.; Notarnicola, G.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Orava, R.; Oriunno, M.; Osterberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Pedreschi, E.; Petajajarvi, J.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Rella, G.; Robutti, E.; Ropelewski, L.; Ruggiero, G.; Rummel, A.; Saarikko, H.; Sanguinetti, G.; Santroni, A.; Scribano, A.; Sette, G.; Snoeys, W.; Spinella, F.; Squillacioti, P.; Ster, A.; Taylor, C.; Trummal, A.; Turini, N.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, J.

    2009-01-01

    The TOTEM experiment at the LHC measures the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. It also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral particle detection and the large variety of trigger possibilities even at large luminosities. TOTEM will take data under all LHC beam conditions including standard high luminosity runs to maximize its physics reach. This contribution describes the main features of the TOTEM physics programme including measurements to be made in the early LHC runs. In addition, a novel scheme to extend the diffractive proton acceptance for high luminosity runs by installing proton detectors at IP3 is described.

  2. Diffraction at TOTEM

    Giani, S; Antchev, G; Aspell, P; Avati, V; Bagliesi, M G; Berardi, V; Berretti, M; Besta, M; Bozzo, M; Brücken, E; Buzzo, A; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Catanesi, M G; Cecchi, R; Ciocci, M A; Dadel, P; Deile, M; Dimovasili, E; Eggert, K; Eremin, V; Ferro, F; Fiergolski, A; García, F; Greco, V; Grzanka, L; Heino, J; Hildén, T; Kaspar, J; Kopal, J; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Lami, S; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Leszko, R; Lippmaa, E; Lokajícek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodriguez, F; Macrí, M; Magazzù, G; Meucci, M; Minutoli, S; Notarnicola, G; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Österberg, K; Pedreschi, E; Petäjäjärvi, J; Prochazka, J; Quinto, M; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Ravotti, F; Rella, G; Robutti, E; Ropelewski, L; Rostkowski, M; Ruggiero, G; Rummel, A; Saarikko, H; Sanguinetti, G; Santroni, A; Scribano, A; Sette, G; Snoeys, W; Spinella, F; Ster, A; Taylor, C; Trummal, A; Turini, N; Whitmore, J; Wu, J; Zalewski, M

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of the TOTEM experiment at the LHC is the measurement of the total proton-proton cross section with the luminosity-independent method and the study of elastic proton-proton cross-section over a wide |t|-range. In addition TOTEM also performs a comprehensive study of diffraction, spanning from cross-section measurements of individual diffractive processes to the analysis of their event topologies. Hard diffraction will be studied in collaboration with CMS taking advantage of the large common rapidity coverage for charged and neutral particle detection and the large variety of trigger possibilities even at large luminosities. TOTEM will take data under all LHC beam conditions including standard high luminosity runs to maximise its physics reach. This contribution describes the main features of the TOTEM diffractive physics programme including measurements to be made in the early LHC runs.

  3. Duality in diffraction dissociations

    Santoro, Alberto.

    1977-01-01

    Diffractive dissociations (aN→a*πN) are naturally explained and a model that accounts for the three-variable correlation (mass-transfer-Jackson angle correlation) is presented. This model takes into account the three possible exchanges: t (pion), u(a*) and s(a) channel exchanger. The physical consequences of the model are: a strong mass-slope correlation due to the zeros of the amplitude, a factorization of diffractive dissociations (factorization of the Pomeron), the possibility of extending this model to double diffractive dissociation and diffraction by nuclei. This model was applied to the NN→NπN reaction. Using the usual parameters of the Deck model, a comparison is made with experiments for all available distributions. the strong slope of the peak at 1400 MeV is naturally explained [fr

  4. DIFFRACTION SYNCHRONIZATION OF LASERS,

    semiconductor lasers while suppressing parasitic generation in the plane of the mirror. The diffraction coupling coefficient of open resonators is calculated, and the stability conditions of the synchronized system is determined.

  5. X-ray diffraction 2 - diffraction principles

    O'Connor, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The computation of powder diffraction intensities is based on the principle that the powder pattern comprises the summation of the intensity contributions from each of the crystallites (or single crystals) in the material. Therefore, it is of value for powder diffractionists to appreciate the form of the expression for calculating single crystal diffraction pattern intensities. This knowledge is especially important for Rietveld analysis practitioners in terms of the (i) mathematics of the method and (ii) retrieving single crystal structure data from the literature. We consider the integrated intensity from a small single crystal being rotated at velocity ω through the Bragg angle θ for reflection (hkl).... I(hkl) = [l o /ω]. [e 4 /m 2 c 4 ]. [λ 3 δV F(hkl) 2 /υ 2 ].[(1+cos 2 2θ)/2sin2θ] where e, m and c are the usual fundamental constants; λ is the x-ray wavelength, δV is the crystallite volume; F(hkl) is the structure factor; υ is the unit cell volume; and (1+cos 2 θ)/2sin2θ] is the Lorentz-polarisation factor for an unpolarised incident beam. The expression does not include a contribution for extinction. The influence of factors λ, δV, F(hkl) and υ on the intensities should be appreciated by powder diffractionists, especially the structure factor, F(hkl), which is responsible for the fingerprint nature of diffraction patterns, such as the rise and fall of intensity from peak to peak. The structure factor expression represents the summation of the scattered waves from each of the j scattering centres (i e atoms) in the unit cell: F(hkl) Σ f j exp[2πi (h.x j +k.y i +l. z i )] T j . Symbol f is the scattering factor (representing the atom-type scattering efficiency); (x, y, z) are the fractional position coordinates of atom j within the unit cell; and T is the thermal vibration factor for the atom given by: T j = 8π 2 2 > sin 2 θ/λ 2 with 2 > being the mean-square vibration amplitude of the atom (assumed to be isotropic). The

  6. Optical spectroscopy of radiotherapy and photodynamic therapy responses in normal rat skin shows vascular breakdown products

    Teles de Andrade, Cintia; Nogueira, Marcelo S.; Kanick, Stephen C.; Marra, Kayla; Gunn, Jason; Andreozzi, Jacqueline; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Kurachi, Cristina; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) and radiotherapy are non-systemic cancer treatment options with different mechanisms of damage. So combining these techniques has been shown to have some synergy, and can mitigate their limitations such as low PDT light penetration or radiotherapy side effects. The present study monitored the induced tissue changes after PDT, radiotherapy, and a combination protocol in normal rat skin, using an optical spectroscopy system to track the observed biophysical changes. The Wistar rats were treated with one of the protocols: PDT followed by radiotherapy, PDT, radiotherapy and radiotherapy followed by PDT. Reflectance spectra were collected in order to observe the effects of these combined therapies, especially targeting vascular response. From the reflectance, information about oxygen saturation, met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentration, blood volume fraction (BVF) and vessel radius were extracted from model fitting of the spectra. The rats were monitored for 24 hours after treatment. Results showed that there was no significant variation in the vessel size or BVF after the treatments. However, the PDT caused a significant increase in the met-hemoglobin and bilirubin concentrations, indicating an important blood breakdown. These results may provide an important clue on how the damage establishment takes place, helping to understand the effect of the combination of those techniques in order to verify the existence of a known synergistic effect.

  7. Production, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the HIV-2-neutralizing V3 loop-specific Fab fragment 7C8

    Uchtenhagen, Hannes; Sourial, Samer; Friemann, Rosmarie; Ehnlund, Mariethe; Spetz, Anna-Lena; Harris, Robert A.; Madhurantakam, Chaithanya; Achour, Adnane

    2009-01-01

    Neutralizing Fab fragments of the HIV-2-binding murine antibody 7C8 were generated after purification from hybridoma cell-culture supernatant. Crystallization conditions were determined and diffraction data were collected to 2.7 Å resolution. 7C8 is a mouse monoclonal antibody that is specific for the third hypervariable loop (V3 loop) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) associated protein gp125. Fab fragments of 7C8 effectively neutralize HIV-2. 7C8 was expressed and purified from a hybridoma cell line in order to establish the molecular basis underlying the specificity of the 7C8 antibody for the V3 loop as well as the specific role of the elongated third complementarity-determining region of the heavy chain (CDRH3). The antibody was digested with papain and Fab fragments were purified using size-exclusion chromatography. Hanging-drop vapour-diffusion crystallization techniques were employed and the protein was crystallized in 50 mM ammonium sulfate, 100 mM Tris–HCl pH 8.5, 25%(w/v) PEG 8000 and 2.5%(w/v) PEG 400 at 275 K. The analysed crystals belonged to the rhombohedral space group P3 2 21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 100.1, c = 196.8 Å, and diffracted to 2.7 Å resolution

  8. Exploiting hydrophobicity for efficient production of transmembrane helices for structure determination by NMR spectroscopy

    Bugge, Katrine Østergaard; Steinocher, Helena; Brooks, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    -labeled protein. In this work, we have exploited the hydrophobic nature of membrane proteins to develop a simple and efficient production scheme for isotope-labeled single-pass transmembrane domains (TMDs) with or without intrinsically disordered regions. We have evaluated the applicability and limitations...... of the strategy using seven membrane protein variants that differ in their overall hydrophobicity and length and show a recovery for suitable variants of >70%. The developed production scheme is cost-efficient and easy to implement and has the potential to facilitate an increase in the number of structures...

  9. Contributions to advances in blend pellet products (BPP) research on molecular structure and molecular nutrition interaction by advanced synchrotron and globar molecular (Micro)spectroscopy.

    Guevara-Oquendo, Víctor H; Zhang, Huihua; Yu, Peiqiang

    2018-04-13

    To date, advanced synchrotron-based and globar-sourced techniques are almost unknown to food and feed scientists. There has been little application of these advanced techniques to study blend pellet products at a molecular level. This article aims to provide recent research on advanced synchrotron and globar vibrational molecular spectroscopy contributions to advances in blend pellet products research on molecular structure and molecular nutrition interaction. How processing induced molecular structure changes in relation to nutrient availability and utilization of the blend pellet products. The study reviews Utilization of co-product components for blend pellet product in North America; Utilization and benefits of inclusion of pulse screenings; Utilization of additives in blend pellet products; Application of pellet processing in blend pellet products; Conventional evaluation techniques and methods for blend pellet products. The study focus on recent applications of cutting-edge vibrational molecular spectroscopy for molecular structure and molecular structure association with nutrient utilization in blend pellet products. The information described in this article gives better insight on how advanced molecular (micro)spectroscopy contributions to advances in blend pellet products research on molecular structure and molecular nutrition interaction.

  10. Spectroscopy of few-particle nuclei around magic 132Sn from fission product γ-ray studies

    Zhang, C. T.

    1998-01-01

    We are studying the yrast structure of very neutron-rich nuclei around doubly magic 132 Sn by analyzing fission product γ-ray data from a 248 Cm source at Eurogam II. Yrast cascades in several few-valence-particle nuclei have been identified through γγ cross coincidences with their complementary fission partners. Results for two-valence-particle nuclei 132 Sb, 134 Te, 134 Sb and 134 Sn provide empirical nucleon-nucleon interactions which, combined with single-particle energies already known in the one-particle nuclei, are essential for shell-model analysis in this region. Findings for the N = 82 nuclei 134 Te and 135 I have now been extended to the four-proton nucleus 136 Xe. Results for the two-neutron nucleus 134 Sn and the N = 83 isotones 134 Sb, 135 Te and 135 I open up the spectroscopy of nuclei in the northeast quadrant above 132 Sn

  11. Phase analysis of the system La1-xBaxFeO3-y (0≤x≤0.70) by means of X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Li, J.; Jing, J.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray diffraction and Moessbauer measurements were performed on novelly synthesized La 1-x Ba x FeO 3-y (0≤x≤0.70). Two phases were found in the system. La 1-x Ba x FeO 3-y for 0≤x≤0.10 is an orthorhombic perovskite. La 1-x Ba x FeO 3-y for 0.54≤x≤0.70 is a cubic perovskite. La 1-x Ba x FeO 3-y for 0.10≤x≤0.54 consists of these two phases. (orig.)

  12. Carotenoid stability during production and storage of tomato juice made from tomatoes with diverse pigment profiles measured by infrared spectroscopy.

    Rubio-Diaz, Daniel E; Santos, Alejandra; Francis, David M; Rodriguez-Saona, Luis E

    2010-08-11

    Chemical changes in carotenoids and lipids were studied during production and storage of canned tomato juice using ATR infrared spectroscopy and HPLC. Samples from 10 groups of tomatoes with different carotenoid profiles were analyzed fresh, after hot-break and screening, after canning, and at five different time points during 1 year of storage. An apparent increase of carotenoids was observed after hot-break due to improved extraction efficiency. This increase was accompanied by some degree of lipid oxidation and carotenoid isomerization. Canning produced the most intense changes in the lipid profile with breakdown of triglycerides ( approximately 1743 cm(-1)), formation of fatty acids ( approximately 1712 cm(-1)), and degradation and isomerization of trans-carotenoids ( approximately 960 and approximately 3006 cm(-1)). Isomerization was corroborated by the relative increase of HPLC areas corresponding to carotenoid cis isomers. Canning reduced trans-lycopene, trans-delta-carotene, trans-beta-carotene, and trans-lutein by 30, 34, 43, and 67%, respectively. HPLC data indicate that canning causes a drastic reduction of tetra-cis-lycopene and promotes its isomerization to other geometric forms, including all-trans-lycopene. Infrared spectra of tomato juice lipid fractions correlated well with the number of days in storage (SECV 0.99), demonstrating continuous degradation of lipids. Results demonstrated that individual carotenoids and their isomeric forms behave differently during production and storage of canned tomato juice. Information collected by infrared spectroscopy complemented well that of HPLC, providing marker bands to further the understanding of chemical changes taking place during processing and storage of tomato juice.

  13. Fission products detection in irradiated TRIGA fuel by means of gamma spectroscopy and MCNP calculation.

    Cagnazzo, M; Borio di Tigliole, A; Böck, H; Villa, M

    2018-05-01

    Aim of this work was the detection of fission products activity distribution along the axial dimension of irradiated fuel elements (FEs) at the TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the Technische Universität (TU) Wien. The activity distribution was measured by means of a customized fuel gamma scanning device, which includes a vertical lifting system to move the fuel rod along its vertical axis. For each investigated FE, a gamma spectrum measurement was performed along the vertical axis, with steps of 1 cm, in order to determine the axial distribution of the fission products. After the fuel elements underwent a relatively short cooling down period, different fission products were detected. The activity concentration was determined by calibrating the gamma detector with a standard calibration source of known activity and by MCNP6 simulations for the evaluation of self-absorption and geometric effects. Given the specific TRIGA fuel composition, a correction procedure is developed and used in this work for the measurement of the fission product Zr 95 . This measurement campaign is part of a more extended project aiming at the modelling of the TU Wien TRIGA reactor by means of different calculation codes (MCNP6, Serpent): the experimental results presented in this paper will be subsequently used for the benchmark of the models developed with the calculation codes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sorting in-shell walnuts using near infrared spectroscopy for improved drying efficiency and product quality

    In the current walnut drying practice, dryers comingle nuts with varying moisture contents (MC) which results in over drying of nuts with low MC and thereby decrease product quality. The objectives of this research were to investigate correlations among near infrared (NIR) spectral data and MC of fr...

  15. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy - useful tools in the analysis of pharmaceutical products

    Sarecka-Hujar, Beata; Balwierz, Radoslaw; Ostrozka-Cieslik, Aneta; Dyja, Renata; Lukowiec, Dariusz; Jankowski, Andrzej

    2017-11-01

    The quality of the drug, its purity and identification of degradation products provide the highest quality of pharmaceutical products. The energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) method analyses the percentage of each element form as well as their distribution, and morphological characteristics of the drug form. We analysed the usefulness of EDS method in testing orally disintegrating tablets (ODT) with trimetazidine hydrochloride with high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM, SUPRA25 Carl Zeiss company) with spectrophotometer equipped with an X-ray energy dispersion (EDAX Company). The samples of the analysed tablets were imaged after applying conductive layers of gold on their surface. In the EDS analysis the compositions of each sample of the obtained tablets were observed to be virtually identical. The differences in the content of carbon and oxygen came from differences in the composition of particular tablets. The presence of gold in the composition resulted from the sputtering the surface of tablets with gold during the analysis. Knowing the composition of the tablet, SEM-EDS method helps to locate and identify the impurities and degradation products of the compounds, leading to a better understanding of the mechanisms of their formation.

  16. Hard diffraction at HERA and Tevatron

    Kaidalov, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    A relation between hard diffraction at HERA and Tevatron is discussed. A model, which takes into account unitarity effects is developed for interaction of high-energy virtual photons with nucleons. It is shown that this model gives a good description of HERA data on both total γ* p total cross section and diffractive dissociation of virtual photons in a broad region of Q 2 . It is shown how to describe the CDF data on diffractive jet production at Tevatron using an information on distribution of partons in the Pomeron from HERA experiments

  17. Crystal structures, thermal behaviors, and C-H...O=C hydrogen bondings of poly(3-hydroxyvalerate) and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) studied by infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    Sato, H.; Ando, Y.; Dybal, Jiří; Iwata, T.; Noda, I.; Ozaki, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 12 (2008), s. 4305-4312 ISSN 0024-9297 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0425 Grant - others:Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology(JP) MEXT Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : poly(3-hydroxyvalerate) * poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) * infrared spectroscopy Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 4.407, year: 2008

  18. Strategies for multivariate modeling of moisture content in freeze-dried mannitol-containing products by near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Yip, Wai Lam; Gausemel, Ingvil; Sande, Sverre Arne; Dyrstad, Knut

    2012-11-01

    Accurate determination of residual moisture content of a freeze-dried (FD) pharmaceutical product is critical for prediction of its quality. Near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy is a fast and non-invasive method routinely used for quantification of moisture. However, several physicochemical properties of the FD product may interfere with absorption bands related to the water content. A commonly used stabilizer and bulking agent in FD known for variation in physicochemical properties, is mannitol. To minimize this physicochemical interference, different approaches for multivariate correlation between NIR spectra of a FD product containing mannitol and the corresponding moisture content measured by Karl Fischer (KF) titration have been investigated. A novel method, MIPCR (Main and Interactions of Individual Principal Components Regression), was found to have significantly increased predictive ability of moisture content compared to a traditional PLS approach. The philosophy behind the MIPCR is that the interference from a variety of particle and morphology attributes has interactive effects on the water related absorption bands. The transformation of original wavelength variables to orthogonal scores gives a new set of variables (scores) without covariance structure, and the possibility of inclusion of interaction terms in the further modeling. The residual moisture content of the FD product investigated is in the range from 0.7% to 2.6%. The mean errors of cross validated prediction of models developed in the investigated NIR regions were reduced from a range of 24.1-27.6% for traditional PLS method to 15.7-20.5% for the MIPCR method. Improved model quality by application of MIPCR, without the need for inclusion of a large number of calibration samples, might increase the use of NIR in early phase product development, where availability of calibration samples is often limited. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Multi-parameter spectroscopy of fission fragments and related emission products

    Ruben, A.; Jahnke, U.

    1993-01-01

    An exclusive measurement of the 252 C f(sf) fragment distribution in mass and energy in coincidence with the related emission products by combining a twin ionization chamber with a 4π-neutron tank, a n-γ-detector, and a solid-state detector telescope is presented. The experimental set-up, data handling and acquisition is described followed by a discussion of the raw data evaluation. (orig.)

  20. Spectral characterisation of dairy products using photon time-of-flight spectroscopy

    Nielsen, Otto Højager Attermann; Subash, Arman Ahamed; Nielsen, Frederik Donbæk

    2013-01-01

    in the sample provides important information on the chemical composition and micro-structural properties, which are not available with the traditional techniques used in dairy production. The instrument operates in the spectral range from 500 nm to 1030 nm. The reduced scattering coefficient varies from 5 cm(-1...... distinguishes milk and yoghurt with the same fat content and can offer a reliable way of monitoring structural formation during milk fermentation....

  1. Studies of natural radioactivity in cement products using gamma ray spectroscopy

    Ibrahim, N.; Periasamy, V.

    2000-01-01

    Evidence from our earlier study on several types of building materials has shown that cement contains a substantial amount of natural occurring radioactive materials. There are many brands of cement products available in Malaysia. Although the basic ingredients of cement are similar across brand, their proportion varies. In this study we have selected twelve brands of cement products which are analysed for natural radioactivity (U,Th,K) using gamma ray spectrometry. The gamma energies of interest are 583.1 keV, 609.3 keV and 1460 keV for nuclides 208 Tl, 214 Bi and 40 K respectively. Our findings show a relatively high activity of 40 K for all cement brands, ranging from 33 Bq/kg to as high as 3010 Bq/kg. Uranium activity ranges from 9Bq/kg to 672 Bq/kg while thorium activity was found range from 6Bq/kg to 94 Bq/kg. The radium equivalent activity is calculated for all brands and the values obtained range between 24 Bq/kg to 879 Bq/kg. Eight out of twelve products possess radium equivalent greater than 370 Bq/kg, a threshold limit for radiation dose equivalent to 1.5 mSv per annum. (author)

  2. Diffractive pion dissociation into 5 pion final states at COMPASS

    Neubert, Sebastian; Friedrich, Jan; Grabmueller, Stefanie; Haas, Florian; Ketzer, Bernhard; Paul, Stephan; Weitzel, Quirin [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E18, 85748 Garching (Germany); Chung, Suh-Urk [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E18, 85748 Garching (Germany); Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Ryabchikov, Dimitry [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik Department E18, 85748 Garching (Germany); Institute for High Ernergy Physics, 142284 Protvino (Russian Federation)

    2009-07-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS, which investigates the structure and spectroscopy of hadrons. In 2004, a first run with a 190 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} beam took place using nuclear targets. Diffractive dissociation reactions observed in this run provide clean access to meson resonances with masses up to 3 GeV/c{sup 2}. Exclusive final states with 5 charged pions have been extracted. The covered range in momentum transfer extends from threshold to a few GeV{sup 2}/c{sup 2} allowing to study resonance production in different regimes. We report on the status of the analysis of this unique data set.

  3. Diffraction. Single crystal, magnetic

    Heger, G.

    1999-01-01

    The analysis of crystal structure and magnetic ordering is usually based on diffraction phenomena caused by the interaction of matter with X-rays, neutrons, or electrons. Complementary information is achieved due to the different character of X-rays, neutrons and electrons, and hence their different interactions with matter and further practical aspects. X-ray diffraction using conventional laboratory equipment and/or synchrotron installations is the most important method for structure analyses. The purpose of this paper is to discuss special cases, for which, in addition to this indispensable part, neutrons are required to solve structural problems. Even though the huge intensity of modern synchrotron sources allows in principle the study of magnetic X-ray scattering the investigation of magnetic structures is still one of the most important applications of neutron diffraction. (K.A.)

  4. Raman Spectroscopy of Serpentine and Reaction Products at High Pressure Using a Diamond Anvil Cell

    Burgess, K.; Zinin, P.; Odake, S.; Fryer, P.; Hellebrand, E.

    2012-12-01

    Serpentine is one of the most abundant hydrous phases in the altered subducting plate, and contributes a large portion of the water flux in subduction zones. Measuring and understanding the structural changes in serpentine with pressure aids our understanding of the processes ongoing in oceanic crust and subduction zones. We have conducted high-pressure/high-temperature experiments on serpentine and its dehydration reaction products using a diamond anvil cell. We used the multifunctional in-situ measurement system equipped with a Raman device and laser heating system at the University of Hawaii. Well-characterized natural serpentinite was used in the study. Pressure was determined using the shift of the fluorescence line of a ruby placed next to the sample. Raman spectra of serpentine were obtained at higher pressures than previously published, up to 15 GPa; the peak shift with pressure fits the model determined by Auzende et al. [2004] at lower pressures. Heating was done at several different pressures up to 20 GPa, and reaction products were identified using Raman. Micro-Raman techniques allow us to determine reaction progress and heterogeneity within natural samples containing olivine and serpentine. Auzende, A-L., I. Daniel, B. Reynard, C. Lemaire, F. Guyot (2004). High-pressure behavior of serpentine minerals: a Raman spectroscopic study. Phys. Chem. Minerals 31 269-277.

  5. Raman spectroscopy analysis of dental enamel treated with whitening product - Influence of saliva in the remineralization

    Silveira, J.; Coutinho, S.; Marques, D.; Castro, J.; Mata, A.; Carvalho, M. L.; Pessanha, S.

    2018-06-01

    In this work we present the analysis of dental enamel treated with an over-the-counter whitening product, bought in e-commerce at a very low cost, used without medical supervision in an abusive manner, in order to evaluate its demineralization action. Moreover, we studied the influence of renewal or non-renewal of saliva solution in which the specimens were stored throughout the study. The Degree of Demineralization was determined through the evaluation of the PO43- symmetric stretching band ( 959 cm-1) in Raman spectra of the specimens in different days during the course of the study. Results showed that a maximum of demineralization occurred between days 27 and 34 of application. Titration of the whitening product revealed a content of hydrogen peroxide 170-fold higher than what is allowed in Europe, according with legislation. Despite this extreme concentration of hydrogen peroxide, the demineralization was not as great as could be expected suggesting an important role of the pH of the solution in this demineralization mechanism.

  6. Diffraction in nuclear scattering

    Wojciechowski, H.

    1986-01-01

    The elastic scattering amplitudes for charged and neutral particles have been decomposed into diffractive and refractive parts by splitting the nuclear elastic scattering matrix elements into components responsible for these effects. It has been shown that the pure geometrical diffractive effect which carries no information about the nuclear interaction is always predominant at forward angle of elastic angular distributions. This fact suggests that for strongly absorbed particles only elastic cross section at backward angles, i.e. the refractive cross section, can give us basic information about the central nuclear potential. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab. (author)

  7. Dynamics from diffraction

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Cope, Elizabeth R.; Dove, Martin T.; Keen, David A.

    2006-01-01

    We explore the possibility that detailed dynamical information might be extracted from powder diffraction data. Our focus is a recently reported technique that employs statistical analysis of atomistic configurations to calculate dynamical properties from neutron total scattering data. We show that it is possible to access the phonon dispersion of low-frequency modes using such an approach, without constraining the results in terms of some pre-defined dynamical model. The high-frequency regions of the phonon spectrum are found to be less well preserved in the diffraction data

  8. Determination And Characteristic Oil Biomarker Of Illegal Crude Oil Production Using Mass Spectroscopy in Musi Banyuasin District

    Edhi suryanto

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available South Sumatra is one of the largest petroleum producing provinces in Indonesia, especially in the region of Musi Banyuasin Petroleum resources other than legally cultivated by Pertamina as government representatives, but on the other hand the community also participate through Illegal Drilling activities. This study aims to determine the hydrocarbon content and characterization of petroleum produced illegally by communities in the Sangadesa, Babattoman and Keluang districts through the biomarker analysis of the distribution of n-Alkane C10-C34 (m/z: 57, pristane, phytane, sterane C27-C29 (m/z: 217,218,259 and specific biomarker using Gas Chromatography Mass Spectroscopy agilent GCMSD 6890/5973i with data analysis using MSD Chemstation F.01.01.2317 and Library Database NIST14. Petroleum samples taken from 10 illegal wells with a depth range of 80-250 meters and production period of 3 months until 3 years. Oil is produced through The illegal drilling is not the main oil source rock but the result of migration. Biomarkers Hydrocarbon analysis is one of the most widely used devices for exploration geochemistry, exploitation, production and forensic environment in the assessment and determination of sources of pollution related to petroleum material and derivatives very well.

  9. A study of the reactivity of elemental Cr/Se/Te thin multilayers using X-ray reflectometry, in situ X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Behrens, Malte; Tomforde, Jan; May, Enno; Kiebach, Ragnar; Bensch, Wolfgang; Haeussler, Dietrich; Jaeger, Wolfgang

    2006-01-01

    The reactivity of [Cr/Se/Te] multilayers under annealing was investigated using X-ray reflectometry, in situ X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements and transmission electron microscopy. For all samples, interdiffusion was complete at temperatures between 100 and 300 deg. C, depending on the repeating tri-layer thickness. A crystalline phase nucleated approximately 20 deg. C above the temperature where interdiffusion was finished. The first crystalline phase in a binary Cr/Te sample was layered CrTe 3 nucleating at 230 deg. C. In ternary samples (Se:Te=0.6-1.2), the low-temperature nucleation of such a layered CrQ 3 (Q=Se, Te) phase is suppressed and instead the phase Cr 2 Q 3 nucleates first. Interestingly, this phase decomposes around 500 deg. C into layered CrQ 3 . In contrast, binary Cr/Se samples form stable amorphous alloys after interdiffusion and Cr 3 Se 4 nucleates around 500 deg. C as the only crystalline phase. Evaluation of the XAFS data of annealed samples yield Se-Cr distances of 2.568(1) and 2.552(1) A for Cr 2 Q 3 and CrQ 3 , respectively. In the latter sample, higher coordination shells around Se are seen accounting for the Se-Te contacts in the structure. - Graphical abstract: The first step of the reaction of elemental Cr/Te/Se-multilayers is the interdiffusion of the elements as evidenced by the decay of the modulation peaks in the low-angle region of the X-ray diffraction patterns. The subsequent growth of Bragg peaks at higher scattering angles indicates crystallization of chromium chalcogenide Cr 2 Te 3- x Se x

  10. Nuclear structure and shapes from prompt gamma ray spectroscopy of fission products

    Ahmad, I.; Morss, L.R.; Durell, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    Many nuclear shape phenomena are predicted to occur in neutron-rich nuclei. The best source for the production of these nuclides is the spontaneous fission which produces practically hundreds of nuclides with yields of greater than 0.1 % per decay. Measurements of coincident gamma rays with large Ge arrays have recently been made to obtain information on nuclear structures and shapes of these neutron- rich nuclei. Among the important results that have been obtained from such measurements are octupole correlations in Ba isotopes, triaxial shapes in Ru nuclei, two-phonon vibrations in 106 Mo and level lifetimes and quadrupole moments in Nd isotopes and A=100 nuclei. These data have been used to test theoretical models

  11. Diffraction at collider energies

    Frankfurt, L.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lessons with ''soft'' hadron physics to explain (a) feasibility to observe and to investigate color transparency, color opacity effects at colliders; (b) significant probability and specific features of hard diffractive processes; (c) feasibility to investigate components of parton wave functions of hadrons with minimal number of constituents. This new physics would be more important with increase of collision energy

  12. Diffraction through partial identity

    Blum, W.

    1981-06-01

    A model of diffraction dissociation is proposed in which the quantum-mechanical interference between the incoming and the outgoing wave determines the cross-section. This interference occurs due to the finite life-time of the excited state. (orig.)

  13. Diffractive optics for industrial and commercial applications

    Turunen, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland); Wyrowski, F. [eds.] [Jena Univ. (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    The following topics were dealt with: diffractive optics, diffraction gratings, optical system design with diffractive optics, continuous-relief diffractive lenses and microlens arrays, diffractive bifocal intraocular lenses, diffractive laser resonators, diffractive optics for semiconductor lasers, diffractive elements for optical image processing, photorefractive crystals in optical measurement systems, subwavelenth-structured elements, security applications, diffractive optics for solar cells, holographic microlithography. 999 refs.

  14. Production, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of the Gαs α-helical domain in complex with a nanobody.

    Triest, Sarah; Wohlkönig, Alexandre; Pardon, Els; Steyaert, Jan

    2014-11-01

    GPCR-G-protein complexes are one of the most important components of cell-signalling cascades. Extracellular signals are sensed by membrane-associated G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and transduced via G proteins towards intracellular effector molecules. Structural studies of these transient complexes are crucial to understand the molecular details of these interactions. Although a nucleotide-free GPCR-G-protein complex is stable, it is not an ideal sample for crystallization owing to the intrinsic mobility of the Gαs α-helical domain (AHD). To stabilize GPCR-G-protein complexes in a nucleotide-free form, nanobodies were selected that target the flexible GαsAHD. One of these nanobodies, CA9177, was co-crystallized with the GαsAHD. Initial crystals were obtained using the sitting-drop method in a sparse-matrix screen and further optimized. The crystals diffracted to 1.59 Å resolution and belonged to the monoclinic space group P2₁, with unit-cell parameters a=44.07, b=52.55, c=52.66 Å, α=90.00, β=107.89, γ=90.00°. The structure of this specific nanobody reveals its binding epitope on GαsAHD and will help to determine whether this nanobody could be used as crystallization chaperone for GPCR-G-protein complexes.

  15. Quantification of liquid products from the electroreduction of CO2 and CO using static headspace-gas chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Bertheussen, Erlend; Abghoui, Younes; Jovanov, Zarko P.

    2017-01-01

    Static headspace-gas chromatography (HS-GC) useful for ex-situ liquid product analysis. Could complement high-performance liquid chromatography and NMR spectroscopy. Particularly high sensitivity towards compounds with high vapor pressure. Detection limits below 0.5μM were shown for acetaldehyde...

  16. Dehydration of Methylcyclohexanol Isomers in the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory and Product Analysis by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (GC-MS)

    Clennan, Malgorzata M.; Clennan, Edward L.

    2011-01-01

    Dehydrations of "cis"- and "trans"-2-methylcyclohexanol mixtures were carried out with 60% sulfuric acid at 78-80 [degrees]C as a function of time and the products were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) analysis. The compounds identified in the reaction mixtures include alkenes, 1-, 3-, and 4-methylcyclohexenes and…

  17. NMR spectroscopy: structure elucidation of cycloelatanene A: a natural product case study.

    Urban, Sylvia; Dias, Daniel Anthony

    2013-01-01

    The structure elucidation of new secondary metabolites derived from marine and terrestrial sources is frequently a challenging task. The hurdles include the ability to isolate stable secondary metabolites of sufficient purity that are often present in products that the compound may rapidly degrade during and/or after the isolation, due to sensitivity to light, air oxidation, and/or temperature. In this way, precautions need to be taken, as much as possible to avoid any such chemical inter-conversions and/or degradations. Immediately after purification, the next step is to rapidly acquire all analytical spectroscopic data in order to complete the characterization of the isolated secondary metabolite(s), prior to any possible decomposition. The final hurdle in this multiple step process, especially in the acquisition of the NMR spectroscopic and other analytical data (mass spectra, infrared and ultra-violet spectra, optical rotation, etc.), is to assemble the structural moieties/units in an effort to complete the structure elucidation. Often ambiguity with the elucidation of the final structure remains when structural fragments identified are difficult to piece together on the basis of the HMBC NMR correlations or when the relative configuration cannot be unequivocally identified on the basis of NOE NMR enhancements observed. Herein, we describe the methodology used to carry out the structure elucidation of a new C16 chamigrene, cycloelatanene A (5) which was isolated from the southern Australian marine alga Laurencia elata (Rhodomelaceae). The general approach and principles used in the structure determination of this compound can be applied to the structure elucidation of other small molecular weight compounds derived from either natural or synthetic sources.

  18. Diffraction analysis of customized illumination technique

    Lim, Chang-Moon; Kim, Seo-Min; Eom, Tae-Seung; Moon, Seung Chan; Shin, Ki S.

    2004-05-01

    Various enhancement techniques such as alternating PSM, chrome-less phase lithography, double exposure, etc. have been considered as driving forces to lead the production k1 factor towards below 0.35. Among them, a layer specific optimization of illumination mode, so-called customized illumination technique receives deep attentions from lithographers recently. A new approach for illumination customization based on diffraction spectrum analysis is suggested in this paper. Illumination pupil is divided into various diffraction domains by comparing the similarity of the confined diffraction spectrum. Singular imaging property of individual diffraction domain makes it easier to build and understand the customized illumination shape. By comparing the goodness of image in each domain, it was possible to achieve the customized shape of illumination. With the help from this technique, it was found that the layout change would not gives the change in the shape of customized illumination mode.

  19. Source Determination of Red Gel Pen Inks using Raman Spectroscopy and Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy combined with Pearson's Product Moment Correlation Coefficients and Principal Component Analysis.

    Mohamad Asri, Muhammad Naeim; Mat Desa, Wan Nur Syuhaila; Ismail, Dzulkiflee

    2018-01-01

    The potential combination of two nondestructive techniques, that is, Raman spectroscopy (RS) and attenuated total reflectance-fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy with Pearson's product moment correlation (PPMC) coefficient (r) and principal component analysis (PCA) to determine the actual source of red gel pen ink used to write a simulated threatening note, was examined. Eighteen (18) red gel pens purchased from Japan and Malaysia from November to December 2014 where one of the pens was used to write a simulated threatening note were analyzed using RS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, respectively. The spectra of all the red gel pen inks including the ink deposited on the simulated threatening note gathered from the RS and ATR-FTIR analyses were subjected to PPMC coefficient (r) calculation and principal component analysis (PCA). The coefficients r = 0.9985 and r = 0.9912 for pairwise combination of RS and ATR-FTIR spectra respectively and similarities in terms of PC1 and PC2 scores of one of the inks to the ink deposited on the simulated threatening note substantiated the feasibility of combining RS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with PPMC coefficient (r) and PCA for successful source determination of red gel pen inks. The development of pigment spectral library had allowed the ink deposited on the threatening note to be identified as XSL Poppy Red (CI Pigment Red 112). © 2017 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Contribution to diffraction theory

    Chako, N.

    1966-11-01

    In a first part, we have given a general and detailed treatment of the modern theory of diffraction. The rigorous theory is formulated as a boundary value problem of the wave equation or Maxwell equations. However, up to the present time, such a program of treating diffraction by optical systems, even for simple optical instruments, has not been realized due to the complicated character of the boundary conditions. The recent developments show clearly the nature of the approximation of the classical theories originally due to Fresnel and Young, later formulated in a rigorous manner by Kirchhoff and Rubinowicz, respectively and, at the same time the insufficiency of these theories in explaining a number of diffraction phenomena. Furthermore, we have made a study of the limitations of the approximate theories and the recent attempts to improve these. The second part is devoted to a general mathematical treatment of the theory of diffraction of optical systems including aberrations. After a general and specific analysis of geometrical and wave aberrations along classical and modern (Nijboer) lines, we have been able to evaluate the diffraction integrals representing the image field at any point in image space explicitly, when the aberrations are small. Our formulas are the generalisations of all anterior results obtained by previous investigators. Moreover, we have discussed the Zernike-Nijboer theory of aberration and generalised it not only for rotational systems, but also for non-symmetric systems as well, including the case of non circular apertures. The extension to non-circular apertures is done by introducing orthogonal functions or polynomials over such aperture shapes. So far the results are valid for small aberrations, that is to say, where the deformation of the real wave front emerging from the optical system is less than a wave length of light or of the electromagnetic wave from the ideal wave front. If the aberrations are large, then one must employ the

  1. The COMPASS Hadron Spectroscopy Programme

    Austregesilo, A

    2011-01-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS for the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of hadrons. The experimental setup features a large acceptance and high momentum resolution spectrometer including particle identification and calorimetry and is therefore ideal to access a broad range of different final states. Following the promising observation of a spin-exotic resonance during an earlier pilot run, COMPASS focused on light-quark hadron spectroscopy during the years 2008 and 2009. A data set, world leading in terms of statistics and resolution, has been collected with a 190GeV/c hadron beam impinging on either liquid hydrogen or nuclear targets. Spin-exotic meson and glueball candidates formed in both diffractive dissociation and central production are presently studied. Since the beam composition includes protons, the excited baryon spectrum is also accessible. Furthermore, Primakoff reactions have the potential to determine radiative widths of the resonances and to probe chiral pe...

  2. Development of nondestructive detection method for adulterated powder products using Raman spectroscopy and partial least squares regression

    Lee, Sang Dae; Lohumi, Santosh; Cho, Byoung Kwan [Dept. of Biosystems Machinery Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moon Sung [United States Department of Agriculture Agricultural Research Service, Washington (United States); Lee, Soo Hee [Life and Technology Co.,Ltd., Hwasung (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    This study was conducted to develop a non-destructive detection method for adulterated powder products using Raman spectroscopy and partial least squares regression(PLSR). Garlic and ginger powder, which are used as natural seasoning and in health supplement foods, were selected for this experiment. Samples were adulterated with corn starch in concentrations of 5-35%. PLSR models for adulterated garlic and ginger powders were developed and their performances evaluated using cross validation. The R{sup 2}{sub c} and SEC of an optimal PLSR model were 0.99 and 2.16 for the garlic powder samples, and 0.99 and 0.84 for the ginger samples, respectively. The variable importance in projection (VIP) score is a useful and simple tool for the evaluation of the importance of each variable in a PLSR model. After the VIP scores were taken pre-selection, the Raman spectrum data was reduced by one third. New PLSR models, based on a reduced number of wavelengths selected by the VIP scores technique, gave good predictions for the adulterated garlic and ginger powder samples.

  3. Development of nondestructive detection method for adulterated powder products using Raman spectroscopy and partial least squares regression

    Lee, Sang Dae; Lohumi, Santosh; Cho, Byoung Kwan; Kim, Moon Sung; Lee, Soo Hee

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to develop a non-destructive detection method for adulterated powder products using Raman spectroscopy and partial least squares regression(PLSR). Garlic and ginger powder, which are used as natural seasoning and in health supplement foods, were selected for this experiment. Samples were adulterated with corn starch in concentrations of 5-35%. PLSR models for adulterated garlic and ginger powders were developed and their performances evaluated using cross validation. The R 2 c and SEC of an optimal PLSR model were 0.99 and 2.16 for the garlic powder samples, and 0.99 and 0.84 for the ginger samples, respectively. The variable importance in projection (VIP) score is a useful and simple tool for the evaluation of the importance of each variable in a PLSR model. After the VIP scores were taken pre-selection, the Raman spectrum data was reduced by one third. New PLSR models, based on a reduced number of wavelengths selected by the VIP scores technique, gave good predictions for the adulterated garlic and ginger powder samples.

  4. X-ray diffraction

    Einstein, J.R.; Wei, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  5. Monitoring the process of purification of crude glycerol derived from biodiesel production: a method based on fluorescence spectroscopy

    Magalhaes, Keurison F.; Caires, Anderson R.L. [Universidade Federal da Grande Dourados, MS (Brazil). Grupo de Optica Aplicada; Oliveira, Samuel L. [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), MS (Brazil). Grupo de Optica e Fotonica

    2011-07-01

    Full text. The use of biodiesel has increased worldwide. The biodiesel production on an industrial scale has been based on the transesterification of vegetable oils and fats with methanol in the presence of an alkaline catalyst. During the transesterification, one molecule of triglyceride reacts with three molecules of alcohol to produce glycerol and molecules of alkyl esters (biodiesel). As a result, an increase in biodiesel production also enhances the availability of glycerol on the market. However, crude glycerin has about 30% of impurities which are inherent to biodiesel production such as catalyst, alcohol and fatty acids. The present study evaluated the usefulness of the fluorescence spectroscopy as a tool to monitor the glycerol purification process. Glycerol samples were obtained from transesterification of soybean, canola, and sunflower oils in the presence of NaOH. After stirring time, the solutions were let to stand in separating funnels, then two phases were observed: one containing mainly biodiesel and other consisting of glycol. Then, the respective glycerol samples were collected, henceforth called G1. After that, it was added H2SO4 (20%) in the crude glycerol samples to reduce their pH to 4 in order to remove fatty acids. The solutions were stored for 24 hours in separating funnels. The glycerol (heavy phase), hereafter named G2, was then separated and filtered. To remove other impurities from G2 samples by means of ionic exchange columns, the samples were neutralized and diluted using Milli-Q water (G3 samples). Aliquots of 20 mL were then passed through cationic and anionic resins (G4 and G5 samples, respectively). Emission and excitation spectra of the G1-G5 samples as well as of the glycerol PA-ACS (reference) were recorded at room temperature using a spectrofluorimeter. The emission spectra were obtained setting the excitation at 325nm and monitoring the emission in the 330-800nm range. Fluorimetric maps were also achieved by pumping the

  6. Crystal structure and magnetic properties of Bi0.8A0.2FeO3 (A = La, Ca, Sr, Ba multiferroics using neutron diffraction and Mossbauer spectroscopy

    Manisha Rangi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bi0.8A0.2FeO3 (A = La, Ca, Sr, Ba multiferroics were studied using x-ray, neutron diffraction and magnetization techniques. All the samples crystallized in rhombohedral structure with space group R3c. The compounds exhibit antiferromagnetic (AFM ordering at 300 K and no evidence of further structural or magnetic transition was observed on lowering of temperature below it. The magnetic structure of these substituted compounds are found to be collinear G-type AFM structure as against the non collinear incommensurate magnetic structure reported in the case of parent compound. The moments on Fe at 6 K are aligned along the a-axis in the case of Ca-doped sample. With increase in the ionic radii of dopant, the moments are found to be aligned in the ac plane and the angle of tilt away from the a-axis increases. The observed change in the magnetic structure with substitution is attributed to the intrinsic structural distortion as evidenced by the change in the bond angle (Fe-O-Fe and bond distances (Bi-O, Fe-O. It has been found that heterovalent substitution A2+ results in the formation of oxygen vacancies in the parent lattices as the possibility of Fe4+ ruled out by Mössbauer spectra recorded at room temperature. Higher value of remnant magnetization (0.4187 emu/g and coercivity (4.7554kOe is observed in Bi0.8Ba0.2FeO3 sample in comparison to other substituted samples revealing a strong correlation between ionic radii and magnetization.

  7. Structural characterization of chemical warfare agent degradation products in decontamination solutions with proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy.

    Koskela, Harri; Hakala, Ullastiina; Vanninen, Paula

    2010-06-15

    Decontamination solutions, which are usually composed of strong alkaline chemicals, are used for efficient detoxification of chemical warfare agents (CWAs). The analysis of CWA degradation products directly in decontamination solutions is challenging due to the nature of the matrix. Furthermore, occasionally an unforeseen degradation pathway can result in degradation products which could be eluded to in standard analyses. Here, we present the results of the application of proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy, i.e., band-selective 1D (1)H-(31)P heteronuclear single quantum coherence (HSQC) and band-selective 2D (1)H-(31)P HSQC-total correlation spectroscopy (TOCSY), for ester side chain characterization of organophosphorus nerve agent degradation products in decontamination solutions. The viability of the approach is demonstrated with a test mixture of typical degradation products of nerve agents sarin, soman, and VX. The proton band-selective (1)H-(31)P NMR spectroscopy is also applied in characterization of unusual degradation products of VX in GDS 2000 solution.

  8. Study of coherent diffractive production reactions of p+C→[Y0Κ+]+C type and observation of narrow structures in Σ(1385)0Κ+ and Σ0Κ+ effective mass spectra

    Golovkin, S.V.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.; Kubarovsky, V.P.

    1995-01-01

    In the experiments at the SPHINX facility in 70 GeV proton beam of the IHEP accelerator the coherent diffractive production reactions on carbon nuclei p + C → [Σ(1385) 0 K + ] + C and p + C → [Σ 0 K + ] + C were investigated. The evidences for new baryon states were obtained in the study of hyperon-kaon effective mass spectra in these two reactions: X(2050) with mass M = (2052 ± 6) MeV and width Γ = (35 +22 -35 ) MeV in M[Σ(1385) 0 K + ] and X(2000) with M = 1999 ± 6 MeV and Γ = 91 ± 17 MeV in M[Σ 0 K + ]. The unusual features of these massive states (small enough decay widths, anomalously large branching ratios for decays with strange particles emission) make them very serious candidates for cryptoexotic pentaquark baryons with hidden strangeness. (orig.)

  9. Study of coherent diffractive production reactions of ρ + C → [Y0 K+] + C type and observation of the new baryonic states X(2050) → Σ(1385)0 K+ and X(2000) → Σ0 K+

    Golovkin, S.V.; Konychev, A.P.; Kozhevnikov, A.P.

    1994-01-01

    In the experiments at the SPHINX facility in 70 GeV proton beam of the IHEP accelerator the coherent diffractive production reactions on carbon nuclei ρ + C → [Σ(1385) 0 K + ] + C and ρ + C → [Σ 0 K + ] + C were studied. In the effective mass spectrum M(Y K) of the first reaction X(2050) peak with mass M = (2052 ± 6) MeV and width Γ = (35 -35 +22 ) was observed (with C.L. > 6/8 standard deviations) and in the second reaction X(2000) state with M = 1999 ± 7 MeV and Γ = 91 ± 17 MeV (C.L. > 10 s.d.) was clearly seen. The unusual features of these massive states (small enough decay widths, anomalously large branching ratios for decays with strange particles emission) make them very serious candidates for cryptoexotic pentaquark baryons with hidden strangeness. 18 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  10. Diffraction by disordered polycrystalline fibers

    Stroud, W.J.; Millane, R.P.

    1995-01-01

    X-ray diffraction patterns from some polycrystalline fibers show that the constituent microcrystallites are disordered. The relationship between the crystal structure and the diffracted intensities is then quite complicated and depends on the precise kind and degree of disorder present. The effects of disorder on diffracted intensities must be included in structure determinations using diffraction data from such specimens. Theory and algorithms are developed here that allow the full diffraction pattern to be calculated for a disordered polycrystalline fiber made up of helical molecules. The model accommodates various kinds of disorder and includes the effects of finite crystallite size and cylindrical averaging of the diffracted intensities from a fiber. Simulations using these methods show how different kinds, or components, of disorder produce particular diffraction effects. General properties of disordered arrays of helical molecules and their effects on diffraction patterns are described. Implications for structure determination are discussed. (orig.)

  11. Electron spectroscopy

    Hegde, M.S.

    1979-01-01

    An introduction to the various techniques in electron spectroscopy is presented. These techniques include: (1) UV Photoelectron spectroscopy, (2) X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy, (3) Auger electron spectroscopy, (4) Electron energy loss spectroscopy, (5) Penning ionization spectroscopy and (6) Ion neutralization spectroscopy. The radiations used in each technique, the basis of the technique and the special information obtained in structure determination in atoms and molecules by each technique are summarised. (A.K.)

  12. X-ray diffraction

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  13. Developments in diffraction databases

    Jenkins, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: There are a number of databases available to the diffraction community. Two of the more important of these are the Powder Diffraction File (PDF) maintained by the International Centre for Diffraction Data (ICDD), and the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD) maintained by Fachsinformationzentrum (FIZ, Karlsruhe). In application, the PDF has been used as an indispensable tool in phase identification and identification of unknowns. The ICSD database has extensive and explicit reference to the structures of compounds: atomic coordinates, space group and even thermal vibration parameters. A similar database, but for organic compounds, is maintained by the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre. These databases are often used as independent sources of information. However, little thought has been given on how to exploit the combined properties of structural database tools. A recently completed agreement between ICDD and FIZ, plus ICDD and Cambridge, provides a first step in complementary use of the PDF and the ICSD databases. The focus of this paper (as indicated below) is to examine ways of exploiting the combined properties of both databases. In 1996, there were approximately 76,000 entries in the PDF and approximately 43,000 entries in the ICSD database. The ICSD database has now been used to calculate entries in the PDF. Thus, to derive d-spacing and peak intensity data requires the synthesis of full diffraction patterns, i.e., we use the structural data in the ICSD database and then add instrumental resolution information. The combined data from PDF and ICSD can be effectively used in many ways. For example, we can calculate PDF data for an ideally random crystal distribution and also in the absence of preferred orientation. Again, we can use systematic studies of intermediate members in solid solutions series to help produce reliable quantitative phase analyses. In some cases, we can study how solid solution properties vary with composition and

  14. Chemical durability and Structural approach of the glass series (40-y) Na2O-yFe2O3-5Al2O3-55P2O5-by IR, X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer Spectroscopy

    Aqdim, S; Sayouty, El H; Elouad, B; Greneche, J M

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the composition and structure for the glasses of general composition (40-y)Na 2 O-yFe 2 O 3 -5Al 2 O 3 -55P 2 O 5 (5≤y≤20), has been studied. The chemical durability and density of these glasses increase with increasing Fe 2 O 3 content. The dissolution rate (D R ), calculated from the weight loss in distilled water at 90°C for up to 20 days was ≈ 3.10 −9 g/cm 2 /mn which is 30 times lower than that of window glass. The structure and valence states of the iron ions in the glasses were investigated using, X-ray diffraction, 57Fe Mössbauer spectrometry, potentiometric analysis, and infrared spectroscopy. Both Mössbauer spectrometry and potentiometric analysis allow to estimate both Fe 2+ and Fe 3+ contents in all these glasses. X-ray diffraction indicates that the local structure of iron phosphate glasses is related to the short range structures of NaFeP 2 O 7 . Infrared spectra indicate the formation of P–O–Fe bonds in the pyrophosphate glasses that replace P–O–Na bonds. The presence of a small content of Al 2 O 3 in the glass seems to play a role as a network modifier. The addition of Fe 2 O 3 to Al 2 O 3 in phosphate glasses favours the enhancement of the formation of pyrophosphate units because iron ions have stronger effect on the depolymerization of metaphosphate chains than the aluminium ions. Finally, the I.R spectra indicate that the presence of P-O-Fe bands of these glasses containing more than 15 mol%Fe 2 O 3 is consistent with their good chemical durability.

  15. Factorization and non-factorization in diffractive hard scattering

    Berera, Arjun

    1997-01-01

    Factorization, in the sense defined for inclusive hard scattering, is discussed for diffractive hard scattering. A factorization theorem similar to its inclusive counterpart is presented for diffractive DIS. For hadron-hadron diffractive hard scattering, in contrast to its inclusive counterpart, the expected breakdown of factorization is discussed. Cross section estimates are given from a simple field theory model for non-factorizing double-pomeron-exchange (DPE) dijet production with and without account for Sudakov suppression

  16. Nontargeted, Rapid Screening of Extra Virgin Olive Oil Products for Authenticity Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Combination with Conformity Index and Multivariate Statistical Analyses.

    Karunathilaka, Sanjeewa R; Kia, Ali-Reza Fardin; Srigley, Cynthia; Chung, Jin Kyu; Mossoba, Magdi M

    2016-10-01

    A rapid tool for evaluating authenticity was developed and applied to the screening of extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) retail products by using Fourier-transform near infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy in combination with univariate and multivariate data analysis methods. Using disposable glass tubes, spectra for 62 reference EVOO, 10 edible oil adulterants, 20 blends consisting of EVOO spiked with adulterants, 88 retail EVOO products and other test samples were rapidly measured in the transmission mode without any sample preparation. The univariate conformity index (CI) and the multivariate supervised soft independent modeling of class analogy (SIMCA) classification tool were used to analyze the various olive oil products which were tested for authenticity against a library of reference EVOO. Better discrimination between the authentic EVOO and some commercial EVOO products was observed with SIMCA than with CI analysis. Approximately 61% of all EVOO commercial products were flagged by SIMCA analysis, suggesting that further analysis be performed to identify quality issues and/or potential adulterants. Due to its simplicity and speed, FT-NIR spectroscopy in combination with multivariate data analysis can be used as a complementary tool to conventional official methods of analysis to rapidly flag EVOO products that may not belong to the class of authentic EVOO. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Moessbauer Spectroscopy study of Quimsachata Volcano materials

    Dominguez, A.G.B.

    1988-01-01

    It has been studied volcanic lava from Quimsachata Volcano in Pem. Moessbauer Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, electronic and optical microscopy allowed the identification of different mineralogical phases. (A.C.AS.) [pt

  18. Gamma Spectroscopy

    Niemantsverdriet, J.W.; Butz, Tilman; Ertl, G.; Knözinger, H.; Schüth, F.

    2008-01-01

    No abstract. The sections in this article are 1 Introduction 2 Mössbauer Spectroscopy 3 Time-Differential Perturbed Angular Correlations (TDPAC) 4 Conclusions and Outlook Keywords: Mössbauer spectroscopy; gamma spectroscopy; perturbed angular correlation; TDPAC

  19. Birefringent coherent diffraction imaging

    Karpov, Dmitry; dos Santos Rolo, Tomy; Rich, Hannah; Kryuchkov, Yuriy; Kiefer, Boris; Fohtung, E.

    2016-10-01

    Directional dependence of the index of refraction contains a wealth of information about anisotropic optical properties in semiconducting and insulating materials. Here we present a novel high-resolution lens-less technique that uses birefringence as a contrast mechanism to map the index of refraction and dielectric permittivity in optically anisotropic materials. We applied this approach successfully to a liquid crystal polymer film using polarized light from helium neon laser. This approach is scalable to imaging with diffraction-limited resolution, a prospect rapidly becoming a reality in view of emergent brilliant X-ray sources. Applications of this novel imaging technique are in disruptive technologies, including novel electronic devices, in which both charge and spin carry information as in multiferroic materials and photonic materials such as light modulators and optical storage.

  20. Diffraction and Unitarity

    Dremin, I. M.

    I begin with a tribute to V.N. Gribov and then come to a particular problem which would be of interest for him. His first paper on reggeology was devoted to elastic scatterings of hadrons. Here, using the unitarity relation in combination with experimental data about the elastic scattering in the diffraction cone, I show how the shape and the darkness of the interaction region of colliding protons change with the increase of their energies. In particular, the collisions become fully absorptive at small impact parameters at LHC energies that results in some special features of inelastic processes as well. The possible evolution with increasing energy of the shape from the dark core at the LHC to the fully transparent one at higher energies is discussed. It implies that the terminology of the black disk would be replaced by the black torus.

  1. Boundary diffraction wave integrals for diffraction modeling of external occulters

    Cady, E.

    2012-01-01

    An occulter is a large diffracting screen which may be flown in conjunction with a telescope to image extrasolar planets. The edge is shaped to minimize the diffracted light in a region beyond the occulter, and a telescope may be placed in this dark shadow to view an extrasolar system with the starlight removed. Errors in position, orientation, and shape of the occulter will diffract additional light into this region, and a challenge of modeling an occulter system is to accurately and quickly...

  2. Prospects for Diffractive and Forward Physics at the LHC

    Albrow, M; Arneodo, M; Avati, V; Bartalini, P; Berardi, V; Bottigli, U; Bozzo, M; Brucken, E; Burtovoy, V; Buzzo, A; Calicchio, M; Capurro, F; Catanesi, M G; Catastini, P; Ciocci, M A; Croft, R; Datsko, K; Deile, M; De Favereau De Jeneret, J; De Jesus Damiao, D; Robutti, E; de Roeck, A; D'Enterria, D G; De Wolf, E A; Eggert, K; Engel, R; Erhan, S; Ferro, F; García-Fuertes, W; Geist, W; Grothe, M; Guillaud, J P; Heino, J; Hees, A; Hilden, T; Kalliopuska, J; Kaspar, J; Katsas, P; Kim, V; Klyukhin, V; Kundrát, V; Kurvinen, K; Kuznetsov, A; Lami, S; Lamsa, J; Latino, G; Lauhakanga, R; Lippmaa, E; Lippmaa, J; Liu, Y; Loginov, A; Lokajícek, M; Lo Vetere, M; Lucas Rodriguez, F; Macri, M; Mäki, T; Meucci, M; Minutoli, S; Mnich, J; Moussienko, I; Murray, M; Niewiadomski, H; Noschis, E; Notarnicola, G; Ochesanu, S; Österberg, K; Oliveri, E; Oljemark, F; Orava, R; Oriunno, M; Ottela, M; Ovyn, S; Palazzi, P; Panagiotou, A D; Paoletti, R; Popov, V; Petrov, V; Pierzchala, T; Piotrzkowski, K; Radermacher, E; Radicioni, E; Rella, G; Reucroft, S; Ropelewski, Leszek; Rouby, X; Ruggiero, G; Rummel, A; Ruspa, M; Ryutin, R; Saarikko, H; Sanguinetti, G; Santoro, A F S; Santroni, A; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E; Sarycheva, L; Schilling, F P; Schlein, P E; Scribano Memoria, A; Sette, G; Snoeys, W; Snow, G R; Sobol, A; Solano, A; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Swain, J; Sznajder, A; Tasevsky, M; Taylor, C C; Torp, F; Trummal, A; Turini, N; Van Der Donckt, M; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Vilela-Pereira, A; Whitmore, J; Zaborov, D

    2006-01-01

    The CMS and TOTEM experiments intend to carry out a joint diffractive/forward physics program with an unprecedented rapidity coverage. The present document outlines some aspects of such a physics program, which spans from the investigation of the low-x structure of the proton to the diffractive production of a SM or MSSM Higgs boson.

  3. Inclusive measurements on diffractive processes in ep collisions

    Janssen, Xavier

    2007-01-01

    Measurements from the H1 and ZEUS collaborations of the diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process, ep → eXY, where Y is a proton or a low mass proton excitation, are presented for photon virtualities in the range 2.2 2 2 and squared four-momentum transfer at the proton vertex satisfying | t | 2 . Diffractive parton distribution functions and their uncertainties are determined from a next-to-leading order DGLAP QCD analysis. Combining measurements of the inclusive diffractive deep-inelastic scattering process with an analysis of diffractive di jet production allows a very sensitive determination of both quark and gluon distributions. (author)

  4. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results.

  5. Diffraction radiation from relativistic particles

    Potylitsyn, Alexander Petrovich; Ryazanov, Mikhail Ivanovich; Strikhanov, Mikhail Nikolaevich; Tishchenko, Alexey Alexandrovich

    2010-01-01

    This book deals with diffraction radiation, which implies the boundary problems of electromagnetic radiation theory. Diffraction radiation is generated when a charged particle moves in a vacuum near a target edge. Diffraction radiation of non-relativistic particles is widely used to design intense emitters in the cm wavelength range. Diffraction radiation from relativistic charged particles is important for noninvasive beam diagnostics and design of free electron lasers based on Smith-Purcell radiation which is diffraction radiation from periodic structures. Different analytical models of diffraction radiation and results of recent experimental studies are presented in this book. The book may also serve as guide to classical electrodynamics applications in beam physics and electrodynamics. It can be of great use for young researchers to develop skills and for experienced scientists to obtain new results. (orig.)

  6. Study of the local structure of binary surfaces by electron diffraction (XPS, LEED)

    Gereová, Katarína

    2006-01-01

    Study of local structure of binary surface with usage of ultra-thin film of cerium deposited on a Pd (111) single-crystal surface is presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and diffraction (XPS, XPD), angle resolved UV photoemission spectroscopy (ARUPS) and low energy electron diffraction (LEED) was used for our investigations. LEED and X-ray excited photoemission intensities results represent a surface-geometrical structure. As well, mapping of ultra-violet photoelectron intensities as a...

  7. Causal aspects of diffraction

    Crawford, G.N.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis is directed at a causal description of photon diffraction, which is explained in terms of a wave exerting real forces and providing actual guidance to each quantum of energy. An undulatory PSI wave is associated with each photon, and this wave is assumed to imply more than an informative probability function, so that it actually carries real energy, in much the same way as does an electro-magnetic wave. Whether or not it may be in some way related to the electromagnetic wave is left as a matter of on-going concern. A novel application of the concept of a minimum energy configuration is utilized; that is, a system of energy quanta seeks out relative positions and orientations of least mutual energy, much as an electron seeks its Bohr radius as a position of least mutual energy. Thus the concept implies more a guiding interaction of the PSI waves than an interfering cancellation of these waves. Similar concepts have been suggested by L. de Broglie and D. Bohm

  8. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar; Allam, Srinivasa Rao; Satyanarayana, S. V. M.; Sharan, Alok

    2014-01-01

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known

  9. Gluon radiation in diffractive electroproduction

    Buchmueller, W.; McDermott, M.F.; Hebecker, A.

    1996-07-01

    Order α s -correlations to the diffractive structure functions F L D and F 2 D at large Q 2 and small x are evaluated in the semiclassical approach, where the initial proton is treated as a classical colour field. The diffractive final state contains a fast gluon in addition to a quark-antiquark pair. Two of these partons may have large transverse momentum. Our calculations lead to an intuitive picture of deep-inelastic diffractive processes which is very similar to Bjorken's aligned-jet model. Both diffractive structure functions contain leading twist contributions from high-p perpendicular to jets. (orig.)

  10. Study of optical Laue diffraction

    Chakravarthy, Giridhar, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Allam, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Satyanarayana, S. V. M., E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com; Sharan, Alok, E-mail: cgiridhar84@gmail.com, E-mail: aloksharan@email.com [Department of Physics, Pondicherry University, Puducherry-605014 (India)

    2014-10-15

    We present the study of the optical diffraction pattern of one and two-dimensional gratings with defects, designed using desktop pc and printed on OHP sheet using laser printer. Gratings so prepared, using novel low cost technique provides good visual aid in teaching. Diffraction pattern of the monochromatic light (632.8nm) from the grating so designed is similar to that of x-ray diffraction pattern of crystal lattice with point defects in one and two-dimensions. Here both optical and x-ray diffractions are Fraunhofer. The information about the crystalline lattice structure and the defect size can be known.

  11. Diffractive optics and nanophotonics resolution below the diffraction limit

    Minin, Igor

    2016-01-01

    In this book the authors present several examples of techniques used to overcome the Abby diffraction limit using flat and 3D diffractive optical elements, photonic crystal lenses, photonic jets, and surface plasmon diffractive optics. The structures discussed can be used in the microwave and THz range and also as scaled models for optical frequencies. Such nano-optical microlenses can be integrated, for example, into existing semiconductor heterostructure platforms for next-generation optoelectronic applications. Chapter 1 considers flat diffractive lenses and innovative 3D radiating structures including a conical millimeter-wave Fresnel zone plate (FZP) lens proposed for subwavelength focusing. In chapter 2 the subwavelength focusing properties of diffractive photonic crystal lenses are considered and it is shown that at least three different types of photonic crystal lens are possible.  With the aim of achieving subwavelength focusing, in chapter 3 an alternative mechanism to produce photonic jets at Tera...

  12. Electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes

    Qin, L-C

    2006-01-01

    The properties of a carbon nanotube are dependent on its atomic structure. The atomic structure of a carbon nanotube can be defined by specifying its chiral indices (u, v), that specify its perimeter vector (chiral vector), with which the diameter and helicity are also determined. The fine electron beam available in a modern transmission electron microscope (TEM) offers a unique probe to reveal the atomic structure of individual nanotubes. This review covers two aspects related to the use of the electron probe in the TEM for the study of carbon nanotubes: (a) to understand the electron diffraction phenomena for inter-pretation of the electron diffraction patterns of carbon nanotubes and (b) to obtain the chiral indices (u, v), of the carbon nanotubes from the electron diffraction patterns. For a nanotube of a given structure, the electron scattering amplitude from the carbon nanotube is first described analytically in closed form using the helical diffraction theory. From a known structure as given by the chiral indices (u, v), its electron diffraction pattern can be calculated and understood. The reverse problem, i.e. assignment of the chiral indices from an electron diffraction pattern of a carbon nanotube, is approached from the relationship between the electron scattering intensity distribution and the chiral indices (u, v). We show that electron diffraction patterns can provide an accurate and unambiguous assignment of the chiral indices of carbon nanotubes. The chiral indices (u, v) can be read indiscriminately with a high accuracy from the intensity distribution on the principal layer lines in an electron diffraction pattern. The symmetry properties of electron diffraction from carbon nanotubes and the electron diffraction from deformed carbon nanotubes are also discussed in detail. It is shown that 2mm symmetry is always preserved for single-walled carbon nanotubes, but it can break down for multiwalled carbon nanotubes under some special circumstances

  13. Tolerance analysis on diffraction efficiency and polychromatic integral diffraction efficiency for harmonic diffractive optics

    Shan, Mao

    2016-10-01

    In this dissertation, the mathematical model of effect of manufacturing errors including microstructure relative height error and relative width error on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements (HDEs) is set up. According to the expression of the phase delay and diffraction efficiency of the HDEs, the expression of diffraction efficiency of refraction and diffractive optical element with the microstructure height and periodic width errors in fabrication process is presented in this paper. Furthermore, the effect of manufacturing errors on diffraction efficiency for the harmonic diffractive optical elements is studied, and diffraction efficiency change is analyzed as the relative microstructure height-error in the same and in the opposite sign as well as relative width-error in the same and in the opposite sign. Example including infrared wavelength with materials GE has been discussed in this paper. Two kinds of manufacturing errors applied in 3.7 4.3um middle infrared and 8.7-11.5um far infrared optical system which results in diffraction efficiency and PIDE of HDEs are studied. The analysis results can be used for manufacturing error control in micro-structure height and periodic width. Results can be used for HDEs processing.

  14. Computer Simulation of Diffraction Patterns.

    Dodd, N. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an Apple computer program (listing available from author) which simulates Fraunhofer and Fresnel diffraction using vector addition techniques (vector chaining) and allows user to experiment with different shaped multiple apertures. Graphics output include vector resultants, phase difference, diffraction patterns, and the Cornu spiral…

  15. Identification of Diethyl 2,5-Dioxahexane Dicarboxylate and Polyethylene Carbonate as Decomposition Products of Ethylene Carbonate Based Electrolytes by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Shi, Feifei; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Gao; Ross, Philip N.; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Komvopoulos, Kyriakos

    2014-01-01

    The formation of passive films on electrodes due to electrolyte decomposition significantly affects the reversibility of Li-ion batteries (LIBs); however, understanding of the electrolyte decomposition process is still lacking. The decomposition products of ethylene carbonate (EC)-based electrolytes on Sn and Ni electrodes are investigated in this study by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The reference compounds, diethyl 2,5-dioxahexane dicarboxylate (DEDOHC) and polyethylene carbonate (poly-EC), were synthesized, and their chemical structures were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Assignment of the vibration frequencies of these compounds was assisted by quantum chemical (Hartree-Fock) calculations. The effect of Li-ion solvation on the FTIR spectra was studied by introducing the synthesized reference compounds into the electrolyte. EC decomposition products formed on Sn and Ni electrodes were identified as DEDOHC and poly-EC by matching the features of surface species formed on the electrodes with reference spectra. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of accounting for the solvation effect in FTIR analysis of the decomposition products forming on LIB electrodes. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  16. Identification of Diethyl 2,5-Dioxahexane Dicarboxylate and Polyethylene Carbonate as Decomposition Products of Ethylene Carbonate Based Electrolytes by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy

    Shi, Feifei

    2014-07-10

    The formation of passive films on electrodes due to electrolyte decomposition significantly affects the reversibility of Li-ion batteries (LIBs); however, understanding of the electrolyte decomposition process is still lacking. The decomposition products of ethylene carbonate (EC)-based electrolytes on Sn and Ni electrodes are investigated in this study by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The reference compounds, diethyl 2,5-dioxahexane dicarboxylate (DEDOHC) and polyethylene carbonate (poly-EC), were synthesized, and their chemical structures were characterized by FTIR spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Assignment of the vibration frequencies of these compounds was assisted by quantum chemical (Hartree-Fock) calculations. The effect of Li-ion solvation on the FTIR spectra was studied by introducing the synthesized reference compounds into the electrolyte. EC decomposition products formed on Sn and Ni electrodes were identified as DEDOHC and poly-EC by matching the features of surface species formed on the electrodes with reference spectra. The results of this study demonstrate the importance of accounting for the solvation effect in FTIR analysis of the decomposition products forming on LIB electrodes. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  17. QCD and hard diffraction at the LHC

    Albrow, Michael G.; Fermilab

    2005-01-01

    As an introduction to QCD at the LHC I given an overview of QCD at the Tevatron, emphasizing the high Q 2 frontier which will be taken over by the LHC. After describing briefly the LHC detectors I discuss high mass diffraction, in particular central exclusive production of Higgs and vector boson pairs. I introduce the FP420 project to measure the scattered protons 420 m downstream of ATLAS and CMS

  18. Central Diffraction in ALICE

    Schicker, R

    2012-01-01

    The ALICE experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN consists of a central barrel, a muon spectrometer and of additional detectors for trigger and event classification purposes. The low transverse momentum threshold of the central barrel gives ALICE a unique opportunity to study the low mass sector of central production at the LHC. I will report on first analysis results of meson production in double gap events in minimum-bias proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 7 TeV, and will describe a dedicated double gap trigger for future data taking.

  19. Hard diffraction and small-x

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    In the United States, phrases such as ''small-x evolution'', ''the BFKL Pomeron'', ''deep-inelastic rapiditygap events'' and ''hard-diffraction'' do not generate the same intensity of discussion amongst high-energy physicists that they do in Europe. However, for three days in the fall such discussion filled the air at Fermilab. The ''2nd Workshop on Small-x and Diffractive Physics at the Tevatron'' was a review of the rapid theoretical and experimental progress taking place in this field. Although Quantum Chromo-dynamics (QCD) has been established as the theory of strong interactions for twenty years, as yet neither perturbative high-energy calculations nor low-energy non-perturbative techniques have been successfully extended to the mixture of high energy and low transverse momenta which characterize traditional ''soft'' diffractive processes. The simplest soft diffractive process is elastic scattering. In this case it is easiest to accept that there is an exchanged ''pomeron'', which can be pictured as a virtual entity with no electric charge or strong charge (colour), perhaps like an excitation of the vacuum. The same pomeron is expected to appear in all diffractive processes. Understanding the pomeron in QCD is a fundamental theoretical and experimental challenge. In the last two or three years the ''frontier'' in this challenging area of QCD has been pushed back significantly in both theory and experiment. Progress has been achieved by studying the evolution of hard collisions to relatively smaller constituent momenta (small x) and by studying ''hard'' diffractive collisions containing simultaneous signatures of diffraction and hard perturbative processes. The hard processes have included high transverse momentum jet production, deep inelastic lepton scattering, and (most recently) W-production

  20. Near edge x-ray spectroscopy theory

    1994-01-01

    We propose to develop a quantitative theory of x-ray spectroscopies in the near edge region, within about 100 eV of threshold. These spectroscopies include XAFS (X-ray absorption fine structure), photoelectron diffraction (PD), and diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS), all of which are important tools for structural studies using synchrotron radiation x-ray sources. Of primary importance in these studies are many-body effects, such as the photoelectron self-energy, and inelastic losses. A better understanding of these quantities is needed to obtain theories without adjustable parameters. We propose both analytical and numerical calculations, the latter based on our x-ray spectroscopy codes FEFF

  1. Moessbauer spectroscopy

    Zemcik, T.

    1984-01-01

    The emission and absorption of photons taking place without changes in the frequency spectrum of the crystal lattice are known as the Moessbauer effect. It takes place in the low energy levels of heavy nuclei in solid lattices at low temperatures. On the basis of the hyperfine structure of Moessbauer spectra the notions are explained of isomer shift, quadrupole splitting and magnetic splitting. The principle and function are explained of Moessbauer spectrometers and the methods of graphical processing of spectra, also the use of the least square fit. Moessbauer spectroscopy is nondestructive, highly sensitive and selective and makes structural resolution possible. It is used for quantitative and qualitative analysis of compounds. Examples are given of the use of this method for mineralogical and crystallo-chemical analysis of lunar minerals and rocks, for analysis of corrosion products of iron and for phase analysis of alloys. (M.D.)

  2. Raman spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction of sp3CaCO3 at lower mantle pressures

    Lobanov, Sergey S.; Dong, Xiao; Martirosyan, Naira S.; Samtsevich, Artem I.; Stevanovic, Vladan; Gavryushkin, Pavel N.; Litasov, Konstantin D.; Greenberg, Eran; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Oganov, Artem R.; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2017-09-01

    The exceptional ability of carbon to form sp 2 and sp 3 bonding states leads to a great structural and chemical diversity of carbon-bearing phases at nonambient conditions. Here we use laser-heated diamond-anvil cells combined with synchrotron x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and first-principles calculations to explore phase transitions in CaC O 3 at P > 40 GPa . We find that postaragonite CaC O 3 transforms to the previously predicted P 2 1 / c CaC O 3 with sp 3 -hybridized carbon at 105 GPa ( ~ 30 GPa higher than the theoretically predicted crossover pressure). The lowest-enthalpy transition path to P2 1 / c CaC O 3 includes reoccurring sp 2 and sp 3 CaC O 3 intermediate phases and transition states, as revealed by our variable-cell nudged-elastic-band simulation. Raman spectra of P 2 1 / c CaC O 3 show an intense band at 1025 c m -1 , which we assign to the symmetric C-O stretching vibration based on empirical and first-principles calculations. This Raman band has a frequency that is ~ 20 % low-ymmetric C-O stretching in sp 2 CaC O 3 due to the C-O bond length increase across the sp 2 ~ sp 3 transition and can be used as a fingerprint of tetrahedrally coordinated carbon in other carbonates.

  3. Assessing the impact of lyophilization process in production of implants based on the bacterial cellulose using Raman spectroscopy method

    Timchenko, E V; Timchenko, P E; Pisareva, E V; Vlasov, M Yu; Revin, V V; Klenova, N A; Asadova, A A

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present the research results of lyophilization process influence on the composition of hybrid materials based on the bacterial cellulose (BC) using Raman spectroscopy method. As an object of research was used BC, as well as hybrids based on it, comprising the various combinations of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and collagen. Our studies showed that during the lyophilization process changes the ratio of the individual components. It was found that for samples hybrid based on BC with addition of HAP occurs increase of PO 4 3- peak intensity in the region 956 cm -1 with decreasing width, which indicates a change in the degree of HAP crystallinity. (paper)

  4. Assessing the impact of lyophilization process in production of implants based on the bacterial cellulose using Raman spectroscopy method

    Timchenko, E. V.; Timchenko, P. E.; Pisareva, E. V.; Vlasov, M. Yu; Revin, V. V.; Klenova, N. A.; Asadova, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present the research results of lyophilization process influence on the composition of hybrid materials based on the bacterial cellulose (BC) using Raman spectroscopy method. As an object of research was used BC, as well as hybrids based on it, comprising the various combinations of hydroxyapatite (HAP) and collagen. Our studies showed that during the lyophilization process changes the ratio of the individual components. It was found that for samples hybrid based on BC with addition of HAP occurs increase of PO4 3- peak intensity in the region 956 cm-1 with decreasing width, which indicates a change in the degree of HAP crystallinity.

  5. Grazing incidence diffraction : A review

    Gilles, B [LTPCM, ENSEEG. St. Martin d` Heres. (France)

    1996-09-01

    Different Grazing Incidence Diffraction (GID) methods for the analysis of thin films and multilayer structures are reviewed in three sections: the reflectivity is developed in the first one, which includes the non-specular diffuse scattering. The second one is devoted to the extremely asymmetric Bragg diffraction and the third one to the in-plane Bragg diffraction. Analytical formulations of the scattered intensities are developed for each geometry, in the framework of the kinetical analysis as well as the dynamical theory. Experimental examples are given to illustrate the quantitative possibility of the GID techniques.

  6. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    Jenkovszky, Laszlo [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680, Ukraine and Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences 1525 Budapest, POB 49 (Hungary); Orava, Risto [Institute of Physics, Division of Elementary Particle Physics, P.O. Box 64 (Gustaf Haellstroeminkatu 2a), FI-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland and CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Salii, Andrii [Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP), Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences 14-b, Metrolohichna str., Kiev, 03680 (Ukraine)

    2013-04-15

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  7. Diffraction dissociation at the LHC

    Jenkovszky, László; Orava, Risto; Salii, Andrii

    2013-01-01

    We report on recent calculations of low missing mass single (SD) and double (DD) diffractive dissociation at LHC energies. The calculations are based on a dual-Regge model, dominated by a single Pomeron exchange. The diffractively excited states lie on the nucleon trajectory N*, appended by the isolated Roper resonance. Detailed predictions for the squared momentum transfer and missing mass dependence of the differential and integrated single-and double diffraction dissociation in the kinematical range of present and future LHC measurements are given.

  8. The diffractive achromat full spectrum computational imaging with diffractive optics

    Peng, Yifan

    2016-07-11

    Diffractive optical elements (DOEs) have recently drawn great attention in computational imaging because they can drastically reduce the size and weight of imaging devices compared to their refractive counterparts. However, the inherent strong dispersion is a tremendous obstacle that limits the use of DOEs in full spectrum imaging, causing unacceptable loss of color fidelity in the images. In particular, metamerism introduces a data dependency in the image blur, which has been neglected in computational imaging methods so far. We introduce both a diffractive achromat based on computational optimization, as well as a corresponding algorithm for correction of residual aberrations. Using this approach, we demonstrate high fidelity color diffractive-only imaging over the full visible spectrum. In the optical design, the height profile of a diffractive lens is optimized to balance the focusing contributions of different wavelengths for a specific focal length. The spectral point spread functions (PSFs) become nearly identical to each other, creating approximately spectrally invariant blur kernels. This property guarantees good color preservation in the captured image and facilitates the correction of residual aberrations in our fast two-step deconvolution without additional color priors. We demonstrate our design of diffractive achromat on a 0.5mm ultrathin substrate by photolithography techniques. Experimental results show that our achromatic diffractive lens produces high color fidelity and better image quality in the full visible spectrum. © 2016 ACM.

  9. Diffractive interference optical analyzer (DiOPTER)

    Sasikumar, Harish; Prasad, Vishnu; Pal, Parama; Varma, Manoj M.

    2016-03-01

    This report demonstrates a method for high-resolution refractometric measurements using, what we have termed as, a Diffractive Interference Optical Analyzer (DiOpter). The setup consists of a laser, polarizer, a transparent diffraction grating and Si-photodetectors. The sensor is based on the differential response of diffracted orders to bulk refractive index changes. In these setups, the differential read-out of the diffracted orders suppresses signal drifts and enables time-resolved determination of refractive index changes in the sample cell. A remarkable feature of this device is that under appropriate conditions, the measurement sensitivity of the sensor can be enhanced by more than two orders of magnitude due to interference between multiply reflected diffracted orders. A noise-equivalent limit of detection (LoD) of 6x10-7 RIU was achieved in glass. This work focuses on devices with integrated sample well, made on low-cost PDMS. As the detection methodology is experimentally straightforward, it can be used across a wide array of applications, ranging from detecting changes in surface adsorbates via binding reactions to estimating refractive index (and hence concentration) variations in bulk samples. An exciting prospect of this technique is the potential integration of this device to smartphones using a simple interface based on transmission mode configuration. In a transmission configuration, we were able to achieve an LoD of 4x10-4 RIU which is sufficient to explore several applications in food quality testing and related fields. We are envisioning the future of this platform as a personal handheld optical analyzer for applications ranging from environmental sensing to healthcare and quality testing of food products.

  10. Investigation of diffractive pion dissociation at COMPASS

    Weitzel, Quirin; Austregesilo, Alexander; Dinkelbach, Anna-Maria; Friedrich, Jan; Gerassimov, Sergei; Grabmueller, Stefanie; Haas, Florian; Hoeppner, Christian; Ketzer, Bernhard; Konorov, Igor; Kraemer, Markus; Kuhn, Roland; Mann, Alexander; Nagel, Thiemo; Neubert, Sebastian; Paul, Stephan [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department E18, 85748 Garching (Germany); Chung, Suh-Urk [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Physik-Department E18, 85748 Garching (Germany)]|[Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Ryabchikov, Dmitri [Institute for High Energy Physics, 142284 Protvino (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    COMPASS is a fixed-target experiment at the CERN SPS, which investigates the structure and spectroscopy of hadrons. In 2004, a first run with a 190 GeV/c {pi}{sup -} beam took place, using nuclear targets. Diffractive reactions in COMPASS provide clean access to meson resonances with masses below 2.5 GeV/c{sup 2}, where candidates for spin-exotic states (e. g. 1{sup -+}) have been reported in the past. Within a few days of data taking, a competitive number of events on lead with {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} final states were recorded. In this talk we report on the results of a first partial wave analysis of this data set.

  11. Molecular spectroscopy

    Kokh, Eh.; Zonntag, B.

    1981-01-01

    The latest investigation results on molecular spectroscopy with application of synchrotron radiation in the region of vacuum ultraviolet are generalized. Some results on investigation of excited, superexcited and ionized molecule states with the use of adsorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, by fluorescent and mass-spectrometric methods are considered [ru

  12. Atom spectroscopy

    Kodling, K.

    1981-01-01

    Experiments on atom photoabsorption spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation in the 10-1000 eV range are reviewed. Properties of the necessary synchrotron radiation and the experiment on absorption spectroscopy are briefly described. Comparison with other spectroscopy methods is conducted. Some data on measuring photoabsorption, photoelectron emission and atom mass spectra are presented [ru

  13. Vibrational spectroscopy

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Rajai Atalla

    2010-01-01

    Vibrational spectroscopy is an important tool in modern chemistry. In the past two decades, thanks to significant improvements in instrumentation and the development of new interpretive tools, it has become increasingly important for studies of lignin. This chapter presents the three important instrumental methods-Raman spectroscopy, infrared (IR) spectroscopy, and...

  14. Hydrothermal liquefaction oil and hydrotreated product from pine feedstock characterized by heteronuclear two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and FT-ICR mass spectrometry

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

  15. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the uranium/oxygen system

    Allen, G.C.; Holmes, N.R.

    1986-10-01

    Other authors have presented evidence to show that the oxidised surface layer which forms on UO 2 at 25 0 C is amorphous UO 3 . In the present study X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction have been used to characterise the higher oxides α-UO 3 , β-UO 3 , γ-UO 3 and δ-UO 3 . While the infra-red and X-ray diffraction results may be used to characterise each oxide the X-ray photoelectron spectra for each phase are very similar. During reduction of the oxide surface in the spectrometer changes in the spectra were observed which were shown to be associated with particular oxidation states of the metal rather than different uranium atom coordination sites within the oxide. A close structural relationship is demonstrated between these oxides and the product at the surface of air-oxidised UO 2 fuel. (author)

  16. Neutron diffraction studies of glasses

    Wright, A.C.

    1987-01-01

    A survey is given of the application of neutron diffraction to structural studies of oxide and halide glasses. As with crystalline materials, neutron and X-ray diffraction are the major structural probes for glasses and other amorphous solids, particularly in respect of intermediate range order. The glasses discussed mostly have structures which are dominated by a network in which the bonding is predominantly covalent. The examples discussed demonstrate the power of the neutron diffraction technique in the investigation of the structures of inorganic glasses. The best modern diffraction experiments are capable of providing accurate data with high real space resolution, which if used correctly, are an extremely fine filter for the various structural models proposed in the literature. 42 refs

  17. Diffraction at a Straight Edge

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 5. Diffraction at a Straight Edge: A Gem from Sommerfeld's Work in Classical Physics. Rajaram Nityananda. General Article Volume 20 Issue 5 May 2015 pp 389-400 ...

  18. Neutron Powder Diffraction in Sweden

    Tellgren, R.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction in Sweden has developed around the research reactor R2 in Studsvik. The article describes this facility and presents a historical review of research results obtained. It also gives some ideas of plans for future development

  19. Tomography with energy dispersive diffraction

    Stock, S. R.; Okasinski, J. S.; Woods, R.; Baldwin, J.; Madden, T.; Quaranta, O.; Rumaiz, A.; Kuczewski, T.; Mead, J.; Krings, T.; Siddons, P.; Miceli, A.; Almer, J. D.

    2017-09-01

    X-ray diffraction can be used as the signal for tomographic reconstruction and provides a cross-sectional map of the crystallographic phases and related quantities. Diffraction tomography has been developed over the last decade using monochromatic x-radiation and an area detector. This paper reports tomographic reconstruction with polychromatic radiation and an energy sensitive detector array. The energy dispersive diffraction (EDD) geometry, the instrumentation and the reconstruction process are described and related to the expected resolution. Results of EDD tomography are presented for two samples containing hydroxyapatite (hAp). The first is a 3D-printed sample with an elliptical crosssection and contains synthetic hAp. The second is a human second metacarpal bone from the Roman-era cemetery at Ancaster, UK and contains bio-hAp which may have been altered by diagenesis. Reconstructions with different diffraction peaks are compared. Prospects for future EDD tomography are also discussed.

  20. Diffraction at a Straight Edge

    IAS Admin

    teaching and understanding physics. ... and mathematical footing, using electromagnetic theory and the proper ... this article, we will use the word diffraction to cover all experiments ..... PES Institute of Technology. Campus ... communication!)