WorldWideScience

Sample records for space science reviews

  1. A Review of Infrared Readout Electronics for Space Science Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Bedabrata; Fossum, Eric R.

    1993-01-01

    A review of infrared readout electornics for space science sensors is presented. General requirements for scientific IR FPA readout are discussed. Specific approaches to the unit cell electronics are described with respect to operation, complexity, noise and other operating parameters. Recent achievements in IR FPA readout electronics are reviewed. Implementation technologies for realization of IR FPA readout electronics are discussed. Future directions for addressing NASA and other scientific users' needs are suggested.

  2. Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory 2002 Science Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curreri, P. A. (Editor); Robinson, M. B. (Editor); Murphy, K. L. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    With the International Space Station Program approaching core complete, our NASA Headquarters sponsor, the new Code U Enterprise, Biological and Physical Research, is shifting its research emphasis from purely fundamental microgravity and biological sciences to strategic research aimed at enabling human missions beyond Earth orbit. Although we anticipate supporting microgravity research on the ISS for some time to come, our laboratory has been vigorously engaged in developing these new strategic research areas.This Technical Memorandum documents the internal science research at our laboratory as presented in a review to Dr. Ann Whitaker, MSFC Science Director, in July 2002. These presentations have been revised and updated as appropriate for this report. It provides a snapshot of the internal science capability of our laboratory as an aid to other NASA organizations and the external scientific community.

  3. Research review, 1 January - 31 December 1972. [in space sciences and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    Space science projects are reported individually for the period January 1, 1972 through December 31, 1972. The articles, representing both theoretical and experimental study approaches, present highlights of the research, along with graphical diagrams of important results. Subjects range from laboratory astrophysics to balloon-borne infrared astronomy, from lunar studies to stellar evolution, and from planetary atmospheric investigations to climatology. Applications of research for the same period are also reviewed, along with their attendant results.

  4. Learning in Earth and space science: a review of conceptual change instructional approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Reece; Tomas, Louisa; Lewthwaite, Brian

    2016-03-01

    In response to calls for research into effective instruction in the Earth and space sciences, and to identify directions for future research, this systematic review of the literature explores research into instructional approaches designed to facilitate conceptual change. In total, 52 studies were identified and analyzed. Analysis focused on the general characteristics of the research, the conceptual change instructional approaches that were used, and the methods employed to evaluate the effectiveness of these approaches. The findings of this review support four assertions about the existing research: (1) astronomical phenomena have received greater attention than geological phenomena; (2) most studies have viewed conceptual change from a cognitive perspective only; (3) data about conceptual change were generated pre- and post-intervention only; and (4) the interventions reviewed presented limited opportunities to involve students in the construction and manipulation of multiple representations of the phenomenon being investigated. Based upon these assertions, the authors recommend that new research in the Earth and space science disciplines challenges traditional notions of conceptual change by exploring the role of affective variables on learning, focuses on the learning of geological phenomena through the construction of multiple representations, and employs qualitative data collection throughout the implementation of an instructional approach.

  5. Space Sciences Focus Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-10

    To advance our understanding of the space environment (from the Sun to the Earth and beyond) and to advance our ability to operate systems in space that protect life and society. Space Science is distinct from other field, such as astrophysics or cosmology, in that Space Science utilizes in-situ measurements from high altitude rockets, balloons and spacecraft or ground-based measurements of objects and conditions in space.

  6. The Proposal Auto-Categorizer and Manager for Time Allocation Review at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strolger, Louis-Gregory; Porter, Sophia; Lagerstrom, Jill; Weissman, Sarah; Reid, I. Neill; Garcia, Michael

    2017-04-01

    The Proposal Auto-Categorizer and Manager (PACMan) tool was written to respond to concerns about subjective flaws and potential biases in some aspects of the proposal review process for time allocation for the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), and to partially alleviate some of the anticipated additional workload from the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) proposal review. PACMan is essentially a mixed-method Naive Bayesian spam filtering routine, with multiple pools representing scientific categories, that utilizes the Robinson method for combining token (or word) probabilities. PACMan was trained to make similar programmatic decisions in science category sorting, panelist selection, and proposal-to-panelists assignments to those made by individuals and committees in the Science Policies Group (SPG) at the Space Telescope Science Institute. Based on training from the previous cycle’s proposals, at an average of 87%, PACMan made the same science category assignments for proposals in Cycle 24 as the SPG. Tests for similar science categorizations, based on training using proposals from additional cycles, show that this accuracy can be further improved, to the > 95 % level. This tool will be used to augment or replace key functions in the Time Allocation Committee review processes in future HST and JWST cycles.

  7. Experiences in Space Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    This publication contains descriptions of space science activities that can be conducted with simple equipment. There are activities suitable for both elementary and secondary school children. Activities are placed under the headings: Astronomy, Atmosphere, Universal Gravitation, Aerodynamics, Guidance and Propulsion, Tracking and Communications,…

  8. Earth and space science information systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zygielbaum, A. (ed.) (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States))

    1993-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the Earth and Space Science Information Systems (ESSIS) Conference. The attendees included scientists and engineers across many disciplines. New trends in information organizations were reviewed. One hundred and twenty eight papers are included in this volume, out of these two have been abstracted for the Energy Science and Technology database. The topics covered in the papers range from Earth science and technology to astronomy and space, planetary science and education. (AIP)

  9. Space Science in Action: Space Exploration [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the human quest to discover what is out in space. Students see the challenges and benefits of space exploration including the development of rocket science, a look back at the space race, and a history of manned space travel. A special section on the Saturn V rocket gives students insight into the…

  10. CERN and space science

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    The connection between CERN and space is tangible this week, as former CERN Fellow and ESA astronaut Christer Fuglesang begins the second week of his mission on space shuttle flight STS-128. I had the pleasure to meet Christer back in October 2008 at an IEEE symposium in Dresden, and he asked me whether we could give him something related to CERN for his official flight kit. We thought of caps and tee-shirts, but in the end decided to give him a neutralino as a symbol of the link between particle physics and the science of the Universe. Neutralinos are theoretical particles that the LHC will be looking for, and if they exist, they’re strong candidates for the Universe’s dark matter. Christer’s neutralino is just a model, of course, escaped from the particle zoo, but what better symbol of the connectedness of science? Christer Fuglesang is not the only link CERN has with the space shuttle programme. We’ve recently learned that...

  11. Space Sciences and Idealism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, M.

    Erwin Schrodinger suggested that " Scientific knowledge forms part of the idealistic background of human life", which exalted man from a nude and savage state to true humanity [Science and Humanism, Cambridge, 1961, p9]. Modern space sciences an space exploration are a brilliant demonstration of the validity of Schrodinger's thesis on Idealism. Moreover, Schrodingers thesis could be considered also as a basic principle for the New Educational Space Philosophical Project "TIMAEUS"."TIMAEUS" is not only an attempt to to start a new dialogue between Science, the Humanities and Religion; but also it is an origin of the cultural innovations of our so strange of globilisation. TIMAEUS, thus, can reveal Idealism as something more fundamental , more refined, more developed than is now accepted by the scientific community and the piblic. TIMAEUS has a significant cultural agenda, connected with the high orbital performance of the synthetic arts, combining a knowledge of the truly spiritual as well as the universal. In particular, classical ballet as a synthetic art can be a new and powerful perfector and re-creator of the real human, real idealistic, real complex culture in orbit. As is well known, Carlo Blasis, the most important dance theorist of the 19t h .century, made probably the first attempts to use the scientific ideas of Leonardo da Vinci and Isaac Newton for the understanding of the gravitational nature of balance and allegro in ballet. In particular Blasis's idea of the limited use of the legs in classical dance realised by the gifted pupils of Enrico Cecchetti - M.Fokine, A.Pavlova and V.Nijinsky, with thinkable purity and elegance of style. V.Nijinsky in his remarkable animation of the dance of two dimensional creatures of a Euclidean flat world (L'Apres Midi d'un Faune,1912) discovered that true classical dance has some gravitational limits. For example, Nijinsky's Faunes and Nymphs mut use running on the heels (In accordance with "Partitura" 1916); they

  12. USSR space life sciences digest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, C.S.; Donnelly, K.L.

    1980-01-01

    Research in exobiology, life sciences technology, space biology, and space medicine and physiology, primarily using data gathered on the Salyut 6 orbital space station, is reported. Methods for predicting, diagnosing, and preventing the effects of weightlessness are discussed. Psychological factors are discussed. The effects of space flight on plants and animals are reported. Bioinstrumentation advances are noted.

  13. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, C. S. (Editor); Donnelly, K. L. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    Research in exobiology, life sciences technology, space biology, and space medicine and physiology, primarily using data gathered on the Salyut 6 orbital space station, is reported. Methods for predicting, diagnosing, and preventing the effects of weightlessness are discussed. Psychological factors are discussed. The effects of space flight on plants and animals are reported. Bioinstrumentation advances are noted.

  14. Lightning detection from Space Science and Applications Team review. [optical and radio frequency sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few, A. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The various needs for lightning data that exist among potential users of satellite lightning data were identified and systems were defined which utilize the optical and radio frequency radiations from lightning to serve as the satellite based lightning mapper. Three teams worked interactively with NASA to develop a system concept. An assessment of the results may be summarized as follows: (1) a small sensor system can be easily designed to operate on a geostationary satellite that can provide the bulk of the real time user requirements; (2) radio frequency systems in space may be feasible but would be much larger and more costly; RF technology for this problem lags the optical technology by years; and (3) a hybrid approach (optical in space and RF on the ground) would provide the most complete information but is probably unreasonably complex and costly at this time.

  15. National Space Science Data Center Master Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The National Space Science Data Center serves as the permanent archive for NASA space science mission data. 'Space science' means astronomy and astrophysics, solar...

  16. Space Telescope Science Institute Symposium

    CERN Document Server

    Unsolved Problems in Stellar Evolution

    2000-01-01

    This timely volume reviews recent progress in our understanding of all aspects of stellar structure and evolution, with special emphasis on currently unsolved problems. It covers every stage in the life of a star, from birth to death, as well as the fundamental processes that affect stellar evolution. Each chapter is written by a leading world expert, based on presentations at an international conference held at the Space Telescope Science Institute. A complete understanding of stellar evolution is important in its own right, constituting a vital piece in the more general puzzle of understanding how galaxies form and evolve. This volume presents the most comprehensive and up-to-date survey available of this crucial topic in astrophysics.

  17. Astronomy, space science and geopolitics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courvoisier, Thierry J.-L.

    2011-06-01

    Astronomy has played a major part in the development of civilisations, not only through conceptual developments, but most importantly through the very practical gains obtained through the observation of Sun, Moon planets and stars. Space sciences, including astronomy, have also played a major rôle in the development of modern societies, as an engine for most subsequent space technology developments. Present trends tend to decrease the rôle of science in space development. This trend should be reversed to give modern ``societies'' their independence in space-related matters that permeate the lives of all inhabitants of the Earth.

  18. Knowledge Transfer in Space Science

    OpenAIRE

    Yuen, P C

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge Transfer (KT) is a major part of technical aspect in space science. By involving the research council funded Knowledge Transfer Account (KTA) programme and the university industrial and commercial partners, these strengthen the future research collaboration amongst the university, industrial, commercial, scientific and engineering communities. Since the space science research and development is a multi-billion pounds sterling industry, it is often referred as the most advanced resea...

  19. Materials science experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelles, S. H.; Giessen, B. C.; Glicksman, M. E.; Margrave, J. L.; Markovitz, H.; Nowick, A. S.; Verhoeven, J. D.; Witt, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    The criteria for the selection of the experimental areas and individual experiments were that the experiment or area must make a meaningful contribution to the field of material science and that the space environment was either an absolute requirement for the successful execution of the experiment or that the experiment can be more economically or more conveniently performed in space. A number of experimental areas and individual experiments were recommended for further consideration as space experiments. Areas not considered to be fruitful and others needing additional analysis in order to determine their suitability for conduct in space are also listed. Recommendations were made concerning the manner in which these materials science experiments are carried out and the related studies that should be pursued.

  20. Social Sciences and Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between technology and society is a subject of continuing interest, because technological change and its effects confront and challenge society. College students are especially interested in technological change, knowing that they must cope with the pervasive and escalating effect of wide-ranging technological change. The space shuttle represents a technological change. The book's role is to serve as a resource for college faculty and students who are or will be interested in the social science implications of space technology. The book is designed to provide introductory material on a variety of space social topics to help faculty and students pursue teaching, learning, and research. Space technologies, perspectives on individual disciplines (economics, history, international law, philosophy, political science, psychology, and sociology) and interdiscipline approaches are presented.

  1. Space Science and Interdisciplinary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, B. H.

    The contribution of space science to an education cursus can be conceived as a series of educational modules (each including text books for teacher and pupil, exercises, CD-roms, observations or study projects, kits for hands-on projects, and Internet products from space agencies) covering different age groups (elementary 7-10, middle 10-14, high school 15-17). These modules should not be limited to the science teacher area, but must pervade in all topics of education the same way as space is part of everyday life. Space agencies can contribute to this by supporting a pilot group of teachers on sabbatical residence to develop these modules. These teachers should cover different European languages (e.g. English, French, German, other languages), different educational systems experience, and different backgrounds (Language/arts, science, history, technology). These modules could be developed in one year, in partnership with education ministers, publishers, for validation and production. They should be distributed and inserted in curricula via education authorities and networks of teachers. We list some examples of space (science) modules to be developed, in different teachers courses for a total of about 20 hours courses/yr, with basic modules for age group (7-10 yr) and Advanced Modules for (10-15 yr).

  2. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (Editor); Radtke, Mike (Editor); Radtke, Mike (Editor); Radtke, Mike (Editor); Radtke, Mike (Editor); Radtke, Mike (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    This is the eleventh issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 54 papers recently published in Russian language periodicals and bound collections and of four new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated. Additional features include the translation of a paper presented in Russian to the United Nations, a review of a book on space ecology, and report of a conference on evaluating human functional capacities and predicting health. Current Soviet Life Sciences titles available in English are cited. The materials included in this issue have been identified as relevant to 30 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology. These areas are: adaptation, aviation physiology, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cosmonaut training, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, equipment and instrumentation, gastrointestinal systems, group dynamics, genetics, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, and radiobiology.

  3. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, L. R. (Editor); Radtke, M. (Editor); Garshnek, V. (Editor); Rowe, J. E. (Editor); Teeter, R. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    This is the third issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. Abstracts are included for 46 Soviet periodical articles in 20 areas of aerospace medicine and space biology and published in Russian during the second third of 1985. Selected articles are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. In addition, translated introductions and tables of contents for seven Russian books on six topics related to NASA's life science concerns are presented. Areas covered are adaptation, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, endocrinology, exobiology, gravitational biology, habitability and environmental effects, health and medical treatment, immunology, life support systems, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system; neurophysiology, nutrition, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, and space physiology. Two book reviews translated from the Russian are included and lists of additional relevant titles available in English with pertinent ordering information are given.

  4. Achievements and Challenges in the Science of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, Hannu E. J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Balogh, André; Gombosi, Tamas; Veronig, Astrid; von Steiger, Rudolf

    2017-11-01

    In June 2016 a group of 40 space weather scientists attended the workshop on Scientific Foundations of Space Weather at the International Space Science Institute in Bern. In this lead article to the volume based on the talks and discussions during the workshop we review some of main past achievements in the field and outline some of the challenges that the science of space weather is facing today and in the future.

  5. USSR Space Life Sciences Digest, issue 19

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooke, Lydia Razran (Editor); Donaldson, P. Lynn (Editor); Teeter, Ronald (Editor); Garshnek, Victoria (Editor); Rowe, Joseph (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    This is the 19th issue of NASA's USSR Space Life Sciences Digest. It contains abstracts of 47 papers published in Russian language periodicals or presented at conferences and of 5 new Soviet monographs. Selected abstracts are illustrated with figures and tables from the original. Reports on two conferences, one on adaptation to high altitudes, and one on space and ecology are presented. A book review of a recent work on high altitude physiology is also included. The abstracts in this issue have been identified as relevant to 33 areas of space biology and medicine. These areas are: adaptation, biological rhythms, biospherics, body fluids, botany, cardiovascular and respiratory systems, cytology, developmental biology, endocrinology, enzymology, biology, group dynamics, habitability and environmental effects, hematology, human performance, immunology, life support systems, man-machine systems, mathematical modeling, metabolism, microbiology, musculoskeletal system, neurophysiology, nutrition, operational medicine, perception, personnel selection, psychology, radiobiology, and space biology and medicine.

  6. Science & technology review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This document is the August, 1995 issue of the Science and Technology review, a Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory publication. It contains two major articles, one on Scanning Tunneling Microscopy - as applied to materials engineering studies, and one on risk assessment, in this case looking primarily at a health care problem. Separate articles will be indexed from this journal to the energy database.

  7. Gravitational wave science from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jonathan R.

    2016-05-01

    The rich millihertz gravitational wave band can only be accessed with a space- based detector. The technology for such a detector will be demonstrated by the LISA Pathfinder satellite that is due to launch this year and ESA has selected gravitational wave detection from space as the science theme to be addressed by the L3 large mission to be launched around 2034. In this article we will discuss the sources that such an instrument will observe, and how the numbers of events and precision of parameter determination are affected by modifications to the, as yet not finalised, mission design. We will also describe some of the exciting scientific applications of these observations, to astrophysics, fundamental physics and cosmology.

  8. Space Research, Education, and Related Activities In the Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, David

    2002-01-01

    The mission of this activity, known as the Cooperative Program in Space Sciences (CPSS), is to conduct space science research and leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, enable research by the space sciences communities, and to expedite the effective dissemination of space science research, technology, data, and information to the educational community and the general public. To fulfill this mission, the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) recruits and maintains a staff of scientific researchers, operates a series of guest investigator facilities, organizes scientific meetings and workshops, and encourages various interactions with students and university faculty members. This paper is the final report from this now completed Cooperative Agreement.

  9. Science and Exploration Deep Space Gateway Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, James F.

    2017-01-01

    We propose a workshop whose outcome is a publically disseminated product that articulates SMD investigations and HEOMD Life Science research, including international collaborations, that are made possible by the new opportunities in space that result from the Deep Space Gateway.

  10. Space Life Sciences Research and Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, Alfred C.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1969, the Universities Space Research Association (USRA), a private, nonprofit corporation, has worked closely with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to advance space science and technology and to promote education in those areas. USRA's Division of Space Life Sciences (DSLS) has been NASA's life sciences research partner for the past 18 years. For the last six years, our Cooperative Agreement NCC9-41 for the 'Space Life Sciences Research and Education Program' has stimulated and assisted life sciences research and education at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) - both at the Center and in collaboration with outside academic institutions. To accomplish our objectives, the DSLS has facilitated extramural research, developed and managed educational programs, recruited and employed visiting and staff scientists, and managed scientific meetings.

  11. The Information Science Experiment System - The computer for science experiments in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foudriat, Edwin C.; Husson, Charles

    1989-01-01

    The concept of the Information Science Experiment System (ISES), potential experiments, and system requirements are reviewed. The ISES is conceived as a computer resource in space whose aim is to assist computer, earth, and space science experiments, to develop and demonstrate new information processing concepts, and to provide an experiment base for developing new information technology for use in space systems. The discussion covers system hardware and architecture, operating system software, the user interface, and the ground communication link.

  12. WOMEN POWER IN SPACE SCIENCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    TSC

    Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) is the research and development wing of. Department of Space (DOS), institutionalized in. 1969, responsible for the execution of the national space programme. Support universities and other academic institutions in the country ...

  13. The Space Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thronson, Harley; Lester, Dan; Hatfield, Skip

    2011-01-01

    Human space flight in the US and other space-faring countries is faced with a twin challenge that is likely to persist for many years: flat or declining budgets along with an expectation of continuing, significant achievements. A partial solution may involve increased participation by multiple commercial competitors with the promise - albeit yet to be fully demonstrated - of much-reduced costs. That said, most commercial goals are concentrated on low-Earth orbit (LEO) for the time being, leaving human trips beyond Earth orbit (BED) as governmental initiatives. The past decade, beginning with the 1999/2000 Decadal Planning Team (DPT)/NASA Exploration Team (NExT) human space flight studies for the White House Office of Management and Budget (http://history.nasa.gov/DPT/DPT.htm), can arguably be described as a Golden Age of engineering design, strategic planning, technology capability prioritization, and development programs on the International Space Station (ISS). However, cynics have criticized the same period as little more than PowerPoint presentations, and unfocused technology investments with only limited progress toward a goal of human space flight beyond the immediate vicinity of the Earth. We disagree with the cynics. Experience with the ISS on increasingly sophisticated capabilities have prepared international partners to deploy a major "stepping stone" for human space flight: a habitation system in free space beyond low-Earth orbit. Such an achievement would be a major milestone in human space flight and, very likely, an essential demonstration site for subsequent, very ambitious exploration missions such as to Mars. Developing critical capabilities for human voyages beyond LEO, such as Earth-Moon libration points, offers, as just one example, easy return to Earth within days (see, e.g., Farquhar 1971 (Aeronautics & Astronautics, July, p. 59ff), Thronson, Lester, and Talay 2011 (http://www.thespacereview.com/article/1756/1), and Lester 2012 (http

  14. Space science education in the african continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseno, J. O.

    Through measurement and interpretation of the spectral, spatial and temporal variations in electromagnetic emissions and reflections from the Earth's surface, important information related to natural resources can be acquired. Furthermore, satellite technology has greatly improved the communication and positioning techniques world-wide. Consequently, space science now provides valuable and timely information about natural resources, which has become a major factor in sustainable development. The realization of the full potential of space science in the context of development in Africa requires adequate education and training in order to facilitate project formulation, planning, management and implementation. This, in turn, would lead to the formulation and adoption of national space science policies based on user needs and addressing both the short and long-term needs of a particular country. Space science education in Africa needs to address issues like (i) provision of programme, (ii) integration of the proposed techniques within the existing infrastructure, and (iii) training in Remote Sensing, Global Positioning System, Geographic Information System and other space science techniques, in order to ensure the successful implementation of space science projects within the continent. In this context, African universities ought to play a major role in space science training, research, consultancy and publication. Through international co-operation, it is possible to develop and support national, regional and international training programmes and international scientific exchange in Africa.

  15. Website for the Space Science Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, James; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Space Science Division at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to research in astrophysics, exobiology, advanced life support technologies, and planetary science. These research programs are structured around Astrobiology (the study of life in the universe and the chemical and physical forces and adaptions that influence life's origin, evolution, and destiny), and address some of the most fundamental questions pursued by science. These questions examine the origin of life and our place in the universe. Ames is recognized as a world leader in Astrobiology. In pursuing our mission in Astrobiology, Space Science Division scientists perform pioneering basic research and technology development.

  16. International Space Station External Contamination Environment for Space Science Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Steagall, Courtney A.; Huang, Alvin Y.; Koontz, Steven; Worthy, Erica

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the largest and most complex on-orbit platform for space science utilization in low Earth orbit. Multiple sites for external payloads, with exposure to the associated natural and induced environments, are available to support a variety of space science utilization objectives. Contamination is one of the induced environments that can impact performance, mission success and science utilization on the vehicle. The ISS has been designed, built and integrated with strict contamination requirements to provide low levels of induced contamination on external payload assets. This paper addresses the ISS induced contamination environment at attached payload sites, both at the requirements level as well as measurements made on returned hardware, and contamination forecasting maps being generated to support external payload topology studies and science utilization.

  17. Conveying International Space Station Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goza, Sharon P.

    2017-01-01

    Over 1,000 experiments have been completed, and others are being conducted and planed on the International Space Station (ISS). In order to make the information on these experiments accessible, the IGOAL develops mobile applications to easily access this content and video products to convey high level concepts. This presentation will feature the Space Station Research Explorer as well as several publicly available video examples.

  18. Philosophical Aspects of Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poghosyan, Gevorg

    2015-07-01

    The modern astronomy and physics are closely related to the philosophy. If in the past philosophy was largely confined to interpretations of the results obtained by the natural sciences, in the present times it becomes a full member of the scientific research process. Philosophy is currently involved not only in the methodological problems of the natural sciences and formulation process of the general conclusions. In most cases, the philosophical considerations are allowed to make a choice between the different physical hypotheses and assumptions. A unified approach to solving the problems of philosophy and natural sciences becomes more important as the physical and philosophical aspects are often intertwined, forming a mold that defines our knowledge of today's leading edge.

  19. Space Life Sciences Social Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llewellyn, Alicia

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews some of the problems in the world, that NASA is working to solve. It reviews some of the problems that NASA has solved in the past, and is working to solve now. Particularly of interest are some of the problems related to medical delivery in rural and remote areas.

  20. Space Science at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karl

    2017-09-01

    The Space Science and Applications group (ISR-1) in the Intelligence and Space Research (ISR) division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory lead a number of space science missions for civilian and defense-related programs. In support of these missions the group develops sensors capable of detecting nuclear emissions and measuring radiations in space including γ-ray, X-ray, charged-particle, and neutron detection. The group is involved in a number of stages of the lifetime of these sensors including mission concept and design, simulation and modeling, calibration, and data analysis. These missions support monitoring of the atmosphere and near-Earth space environment for nuclear detonations as well as monitoring of the local space environment including space-weather type events. Expertise in this area has been established over a long history of involvement with cutting-edge projects continuing back to the first space based monitoring mission Project Vela. The group's interests cut across a large range of topics including non-proliferation, space situational awareness, nuclear physics, material science, space physics, astrophysics, and planetary physics.

  1. Space and Earth Science Data Compression Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilton, James C. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The workshop explored opportunities for data compression to enhance the collection and analysis of space and Earth science data. The focus was on scientists' data requirements, as well as constraints imposed by the data collection, transmission, distribution, and archival systems. The workshop consisted of several invited papers; two described information systems for space and Earth science data, four depicted analysis scenarios for extracting information of scientific interest from data collected by Earth orbiting and deep space platforms, and a final one was a general tutorial on image data compression.

  2. (abstract) Space Science with Commercial Funding

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The world-wide recession, and other factors, have led to reduced or flat budgets in real terms for space agencies around the world. Consequently space science projects and proposals have been under pressure and seemingly will continue to be pressured for some years into the future. A new concept for space science funding is underway at JPL. A partnership has been arranged with a commercial, for-profit, company that proposes to implement a (bandwidth-on-demand) information and telephone system through a network of low earth orbiting satellites (LEO). This network will consist of almost 1000 satellites operating in polar orbit at Ka-band. JPL has negotiated an agreement with this company that each satellite will also carry one or more science instruments for astrophysics, astronomy, and for earth observations. This paper discussed the details of the arrangement and the financial arrangements. It describes the technical parameters, such as the 60 GHz wideband inter-satellite links and the frequency, time, and position control, on which the science is based, and it also discusses the complementarity of this commercially funded space science with conventional space science.

  3. Space development and space science together, an historic opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, P. T.

    2016-11-01

    The national space programs have an historic opportunity to help solve the global-scale economic and environmental problems of Earth while becoming more effective at science through the use of space resources. Space programs will be more cost-effective when they work to establish a supply chain in space, mining and manufacturing then replicating the assets of the supply chain so it grows to larger capacity. This has become achievable because of advances in robotics and artificial intelligence. It is roughly estimated that developing a lunar outpost that relies upon and also develops the supply chain will cost about 1/3 or less of the existing annual budgets of the national space programs. It will require a sustained commitment of several decades to complete, during which time science and exploration become increasingly effective. At the end, this space industry will capable of addressing global-scale challenges including limited resources, clean energy, economic development, and preservation of the environment. Other potential solutions, including nuclear fusion and terrestrial renewable energy sources, do not address the root problem of our limited globe and there are real questions whether they will be inadequate or too late. While industry in space likewise cannot provide perfect assurance, it is uniquely able to solve the root problem, and it gives us an important chance that we should grasp. What makes this such an historic opportunity is that the space-based solution is obtainable as a side-benefit of doing space science and exploration within their existing budgets. Thinking pragmatically, it may take some time for policymakers to agree that setting up a complete supply chain is an achievable goal, so this paper describes a strategy of incremental progress. The most crucial part of this strategy is establishing a water economy by mining on the Moon and asteroids to manufacture rocket propellant. Technologies that support a water economy will play an

  4. The United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubold, Hans; Balogh, Werner

    2014-05-01

    The basic space science initiative was a long-term effort for the development of astronomy and space science through regional and international cooperation in this field on a worldwide basis, particularly in developing nations. Basic space science workshops were co-sponsored and co-organized by ESA, JAXA, and NASA. A series of workshops on basic space science was held from 1991 to 2004 (India 1991, Costa Rica and Colombia 1992, Nigeria 1993, Egypt 1994, Sri Lanka 1995, Germany 1996, Honduras 1997, Jordan 1999, France 2000, Mauritius 2001, Argentina 2002, and China 2004; http://neutrino.aquaphoenix.com/un-esa/) and addressed the status of astronomy in Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and Western Asia. Through the lead of the National Astronomical Observatory Japan, astronomical telescope facilities were inaugurated in seven developing nations and planetariums were established in twenty developing nations based on the donation of respective equipment by Japan.Pursuant to resolutions of the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space of the United Nations (COPUOS) and its Scientific and Technical Subcommittee, since 2005, these workshops focused on the preparations for and the follow-ups to the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (UAE 2005, India 2006, Japan 2007, Bulgaria 2008, South Korea 2009; www.unoosa.org/oosa/SAP/bss/ihy2007/index.html). IHY's legacy is the current operation of 16 worldwide instrument arrays with more than 1000 instruments recording data on solar-terrestrial interaction from coronal mass ejections to variations of the total electron content in the ionosphere (http://iswisecretariat.org/). Instruments are provided to hosting institutions by entities of Armenia, Brazil, France, Israel, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States. Starting in 2010, the workshops focused on the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) as mandated in a three-year-work plan as part of the deliberations of COPUOS. Workshops on ISWI

  5. Science & Technology Review September 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duoss, Eric B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, Paul R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-16

    This is the September 2017 edition of the LLNL, Science and Technology Review. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  6. Life sciences space missions. Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzman, F. M.

    1996-01-01

    It has been known for many years that weightlessness induces changes in numerous physiological systems: the cardiovascular system declines in both aerobic capacity and orthostatic tolerance; there is a reduction in fluid and electrolyte balance, hematocrit, and certain immune parameters; bone and muscle mass and strength are reduced; various neurological responses include space motion sickness and posture and gate alterations. These responses are caused by the hypokinesia of weightlessness, the cephalic fluid shift, the unloading of the vestibular system, stress, and the altered temporal environment.

  7. NASA Space Sciences Symposium-1977

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The primary objective of the symposium was to motivate American Indians and other minority youths and women to select science and engineering as viable career choices, thereby making them available to the technical work force. Other objectives were: (1) to determine how aerospace technology careers and aerospace activities can be made more relevant to minorities and women; (2) to provide an opportunity for key NASA officials to interact with teachers and counselors of the participating schools; (3) to stimulate a greater interest among American Indian organizations and students in NASA's research and development programs; (4) to help NASA's efforts in the recruiting of minorities and women into its work force; and (5) to provide opportunities for minority aerospace scientists and engineers to interact with the minority community, particularly with youths at the junior high school and high school levels.

  8. European Space Science Scales New Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-01

    been approved by all ESA's Member States. Outside Europe, the stability and solidity of Horizon 2000 have made ESA an extremely credible and reliable partner, arousing ever greater interest in international - including transatlantic - co-operation. Given that the first results look positive, it makes sense to think about continuing the work done to date. Which is why this year, half-way through Horizon 2000, it is time to look ahead to the next twenty-year period and embark on the follow-up programme which will lead to further missions being carried out between 2006 and 2016. At ESA Council meeting to be held in October in Toulouse, European ministers responsible for space will therefore have to take a decision on a "Horizon 2000 PLUS " programme designed to ensure successful European space science over a further ten-year period. The proposal being put forward by ESA's directorate of scientific programmes involves setting up three large-scale missions: * a mission to explore Mercury, the least known of the inner solar planets, 60iln of whose surface has yet to be mapped * an interferometry observatory designed to map the sky a hundred times more accurately than the Hipparcos satellite * a gravitational observatory able to pick up the space time waves emitted by the universe at the precise moment of the Big Bang. In parallel four medium-size missions - their content still to be defined - would be carried out. As with its forerunner, Horizon 2000 PLUS has been defined on the basis of proposals submitted by the scientific community following open competition. In all, I10 mission concepts were proposed by a total of 2500 scientists. These were then examined by peer-review groups, involving 75 scientists in all who announced their final choice on I October 1994. The agency is proposing to start preparing for Horizon 2000 PLUS on the basis of level funding up to the year 2000. This means that ESA would undertake to conduct preliminary Horizon 2000 PLUS technological studies

  9. A Science Strategy for Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This report by the Committee on Solar and Space Physics and the Committee on Solar-Terrestrial Research recommends the major directions for scientific research in space physics for the coming decade. As a field of science, space physics has passed through the stage of simply looking to see what is out beyond Earth's atmosphere. It has become a 'hard' science, focusing on understanding the fundamental interactions between charged particles, electromagnetic fields, and gases in the natural laboratory consisting of the galaxy, the Sun, the heliosphere, and planetary magnetospheres, ionospheres, and upper atmospheres. The motivation for space physics research goes far beyond basic physics and intellectual curiosity, however, because long-term variations in the brightness of the Sun virtually affect the habitability of the Earth, while sudden rearrangements of magnetic fields above the solar surface can have profound effects on the delicate balance of the forces that shape our environment in space and on the human technology that is sensitive to that balance. The several subfields of space physics share the following objectives: to understand the fundamental laws or processes of nature as they apply to space plasmas and rarefied gases both on the microscale and in the larger complex systems that constitute the domain of space physics; to understand the links between changes in the Sun and the resulting effects at the Earth, with the eventual goal of predicting the significant effects on the terrestrial environment; and to continue the exploration and description of the plasmas and rarefied gases in the solar system.

  10. CubeSat Capabilities for Space Science Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CubeSat Capabilities for Space Science Missions combines science and engineering talent at Goddard Space Flight Center and the Wallops Flight Facility to...

  11. Peer review in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballantyne, Kaye N; Edmond, Gary; Found, Bryan

    2017-08-01

    Peer review features prominently in the forensic sciences. Drawing on recent research and studies, this article examines different types of peer review, specifically: editorial peer review; peer review by the scientific community; technical and administrative review; and verification (and replication). The article reviews the different meanings of these quite disparate activities and their utility in relation to enhancing performance and reducing error. It explains how forensic practitioners should approach and use peer review, as well as how it should be described in expert reports and oral testimony. While peer review has considerable potential, and is a key component of modern quality management systems, its actual value in most forensic science settings has yet to be determined. In consequence, forensic practitioners should reflect on why they use specific review procedures and endeavour to make their actual practices and their potential value transparent to consumers; whether investigators, lawyers, jurors or judges. Claims that review increases the validity of a scientific technique or accuracy of opinions within a particular case should be avoided until empirical evidence is available to support such assertions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Space Science is Alive with Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Sarah Jane; Vermeulen, Angelo

    2013-02-01

    The history of human space flight and analogue and ground-based space science is alive with art. Artists, scientists and engineers working together build upon diverse frameworks of understanding, but also share tools and processes of investigation. By jointly stepping into new worlds and territories - with common purpose and mutual respect for curiosity - there emerge opportunities for encounters that offer an alternative viewpoint on things. Artists can introduce a meta perspective (taking a step back and inquiring into the practice of research), a historical, conceptual or aesthetic view, all of which can invite those who are researchers, engineers and inventors toward new insight and discovery. Scientist’s methods of inquiry and their particular ways of dealing with natural phenomena and technology can also be a great source of inspiration for artists. Often with technical curiosity, artists can also contribute to concrete R&D just as science can directly impact art and inform aesthetics. So combined, the different philosophies, the experiments and the field work can lead to collaborative outcomes that are positively contributing to research, exploration and advancement. Artist and biologist Angelo Vermeulen has been working together with the European Space Agency (ESA) MELiSSA research program since 2009. In response to the ESA invitation to reflect on the development of future space habitats, Vermeulen set up SEAD (Space Ecologies Art & Design), a platform for artistic research on the transfer of terrestrial ecosystems to space to facilitate space settlement. Artist and diver Sarah Jane Pell has been working with the underwater technology and biotechnology community since 2003. She joined NASA’s Luna Gaia team and the League of New World Explorers analogue space subsea habitat exploration mission Atlantica in 2006. Current and future work by these, and similar partnerships, illustrates a dynamic culture of fieldwork, lab protocols/studio practice, research

  13. The Space Science Enterprise Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    It is a pleasure to present our new Space Science Strategic Plan. It represents contributions by hundreds of members of the space science community, including researchers, technologists, and educators, working with staff at NASA, over a period of nearly two years. Our time is an exciting one for space science. Dramatic advances in cosmology, planetary research, and solar-terrestrial science form a backdrop for this ambitious plan. Our program boldly addresses the most fundamental questions that science can ask: (1) how the universe began and is changing, (2) what are the past and future of humanity, and (3) whether we are alone. In taking up these questions, researchers and the general public--for we are all seekers in this quest--will draw upon all areas of science and the technical arts. Our Plan outlines how we will communicate our findings to interested young people and adults. The program that you will read about in this Plan includes forefront research and technology development on the ground as well as development and operation of the most complex spacecraft conceived. The proposed flight program is a balanced portfolio of small missions and larger spacecraft. Our goal is to obtain the best science at the lowest cost, taking advantage of the most advanced technology that can meet our standards for expected mission success. In driving hard to achieve this goal, we experienced some very disappointing failures in 1999. But NASA, as a research and development agency, makes progress by learning also from mistakes, and we have learned from these.

  14. European Space Science gets new Programme Director

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    Prof. Southwood, born on 30 June 1945, holds a BA in Mathematics and a Ph.D in Physics from Imperial College, London. He has spent most of his career at Imperial College, apart from two periods at UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles), as Postdoctoral Fellow and later as Visiting Professor. In 1997 he joined ESA as Earth Observation Future Programme Strategy Manager. He is currently Imperial College Pro Rector responsible for external academic affairs. Prof. Southwood has received five awards/honours and held many chairmanships, including those of the Science Programme Committee and Space Science Advisory Committee at ESA. His role as Principal Investigator for the Cassini Saturn Orbiter Magnetometer is his most recent project. He has been active over the years, both in Europe and in the United States, in public outreach on space science. He has around 200 publications and 100 invited papers to his name. "David Southwood ranks among the most prominent space science experts in Europe", said ESA's Director General, Antonio Rodotà, welcoming Prof. Southwood's appointment, "and I am sure that he, like his predecessor, Prof. Bonnet, will do a first-rate job for the excellent scientific community in our member states".

  15. Improving science literacy and education through space life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeish, M. Y.; Moreno, N. P.; Tharp, B. Z.; Denton, J. J.; Jessup, G.; Clipper, M. C.

    2001-01-01

    The National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) encourages open involvement by scientists and the public at large in the Institute's activities. Through its Education and Public Outreach Program, the Institute is supporting national efforts to improve Kindergarten through grade twelve (K-12) and undergraduate education and to communicate knowledge generated by space life science research to lay audiences. Three academic institution Baylor College of Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine and Texas A&M University are designing, producing, field-testing, and disseminating a comprehensive array of programs and products to achieve this goal. The objectives of the NSBRI Education and Public Outreach program are to: promote systemic change in elementary and secondary science education; attract undergraduate students--especially those from underrepresented groups--to careers in space life sciences, engineering and technology-based fields; increase scientific literacy; and to develop public and private sector partnerships that enhance and expand NSBRI efforts to reach students and families. c 2001. Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Science & Technology Review March 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, V E

    2005-01-25

    This issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) Enhanced National Security through International Research Collaborations--Commentary by Stephen G. Cochran; (2) Building Networks of Trust through Collaborative Science--Livermore scientists are leading collaborative science and technology projects with colleagues from Central and South Asia and the Middle East; (3) Tracing the Steps in Nuclear Material Trafficking--The Laboratory.s nuclear science expertise is helping to thwart the illicit trafficking of nuclear material; (4) Looking at Earth in Action--Geophysicists at Livermore are using laboratory experiments to examine such issues as how best to store nuclear wastes and how to mitigate the effects of greenhouse gases; and (5) Gamma-Ray Bursts Shower the Universe with Metals--Computer models indicate that gamma-ray bursts from dying stars may be important sources of elements such as iron, zinc, titanium, and copper.

  17. EarthSpace: The Higher Education Clearinghouse for Earth and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, H.; Cobabe-Ammann, E. A.; Shipp, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    EarthSpace is a searchable database of undergraduate classroom materials designed specifically for faculty teaching planetary sciences, Earth sciences, astrophysics, and solar and space physics at the introductory and upper division levels. Modeled after the highly successful SERC clearinghouse for geosciences assets, EarthSpace was designed for easy submission of classroom assets, from homework and computer interactives to laboratory exercises, lectures, and demonstrations. The site capabilities are being expanded to allow assignment of a unique Digital Object Identifier (DOI) to submitted materials, which will provide material developers a way to identify their submitted materials as publications on their CVs. EarthSpace materials are automatically cross-posted to other digital libraries (e.g., ComPADRE) and virtual higher education communities (e.g., Connexions), providing a wider distribution of the resources. In addition to classroom materials, EarthSpace provides the latest news and information about educational research and best practices, funding opportunities, and ongoing efforts and collaborations for undergraduate education. This information is emailed monthly in a newsletter to faculty members via the community mailing list, HENews. HENews is a place for the higher education community to share and receive news and information about higher education, teaching, and Earth and space science. EarthSpace also has an RSS feed to notify members when items are added. EarthSpace is a community-driven effort; higher education faculty members contribute and review materials and thus influence the content provided on the site. All materials are peer-reviewed before posting, and authors adhere to the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY 3.0). You are invited to visit EarthSpace to search for teaching resources, submit your materials, or volunteer to review submitted resources in your discipline with a frequency designed to fit your schedule.

  18. Why do science in space? Researchers' Night at CERN 2017

    CERN Multimedia

    Nellist, Clara

    2017-01-01

    Space topic and debate "Why do science in space?" With the special presence of Matthias Maurer, European Space Agency astronaut, and Mercedes Paniccia, PhD, Senior Research Associate for space experiment AMS.

  19. Fuel Cells for Space Science Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kenneth A.

    2003-01-01

    Fuel cell technology has been receiving more attention recently as a possible alternative to the internal combustion engine for our automobile. Improvements in fuel cell designs as well as improvements in lightweight high-pressure gas storage tank technology make fuel cell technology worth a look to see if fuel cells can play a more expanded role in space missions. This study looks at the specific weight density and specific volume density of potential fuel cell systems as an alternative to primary and secondary batteries that have traditionally been used for space missions. This preliminary study indicates that fuel cell systems have the potential for energy densities of greater than 500 W-hr/kg, greater than 500W/kg and greater than 400 W-hr/liter, greater than 200 W/liter. This level of performance makes fuel cells attractive as high-power density, high-energy density sources for space science probes, planetary rovers and other payloads. The power requirements for these space missions are, in general, much lower than the power levels where fuel cells have been used in the past. Adaptation of fuel cells for space science missions will require down-sizing the fuel cell stack and making the fuel cell operate without significant amounts of ancillary equipment.

  20. Federated Space-Time Query for Earth Science Data Using OpenSearch Conventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynnes, Chris; Beaumont, Bruce; Duerr, Ruth; Hua, Hook

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a Space-time query system that has been developed to assist the user in finding Earth science data that fulfills the researchers needs. It reviews the reasons why finding Earth science data can be so difficult, and explains the workings of the Space-Time Query with OpenSearch and how this system can assist researchers in finding the required data, It also reviews the developments with client server systems.

  1. Science opportunities through nuclear power in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Henry M.

    1995-01-01

    With the downsizing or outright elimination of nuclear power capability in space in progress, it is important to understand what this means to science in therms of capability cost. This paper is a survey of the scientific possibilities inherent in the potential availability of between 15 to 30 kW through electrical nuclear power in space. The approach taken has been to interview scientists involved in space-research, especially those whose results are dependent or proportional to power availability and to survey previous work in high-power spacecraft and space-based science instruments. In addition high level studies were done to gather metrics about what kind and quantity of science could be achieved throughout the entire solar system assuming the availability in the power amounts quoted above. It is concluded that: (1) Sustained high power using a 10-30 kW reactor would allow the capture of an unprecedented amount of data on planetary objects through the entire solar system. (2) High power science means high qualtiy data through higher resolution of radars, optics and the sensitivity of many types of instruments. (3) In general, high power in the range of 10-30 kW provides for an order-of-magnitude increase of resolution of synthetic aperture radars over other planetary radars. (4) High power makes possible the use of particle accelerators to probe the atomic structure of planetary surface, particularly in the dim, outer regions of the solar system. (5) High power means active cooling is possible for devices that must operate at low temperature under adverse conditions. (6) High power with electric propulsion provides the mission flexibility to vary observational viewpoints and select targets of opportunity.

  2. Science & Technology Review June 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, Paul [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-06-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  3. Science & Technology Review June 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2007-04-30

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. At Livermore, we focus science and technology on ensuring our nation's security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published 10 times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory's scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication's goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  4. Review Essay: Zur Relevanz des ethnografischen Blicks bei der sozial- und kulturwissenschaftlichen Erforschung von Orten und Räumen [Researching Place and Space in the Social Sciences and Cultural Studies: The Relevance of the Ethnographic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Siebeck

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the so-called "spatial turn" in the social sciences and cultural studies, social geographers have rightfully been cautioning against positivist notions of space and place: We cannot simply deduce the social from spatial reality—on the contrary, this reality is in every respect itself socially constituted and mediated. In her highly recommended study on the esthetical and socio-political reshaping of Alexanderplatz in Berlin after 1990, Gisa WESZKALNYS has shown how a radical constructivist concept of place and space can be transformed into practical research. This review essay argues that an ethnographic research perspective is of particular relevance both epistemologically as well as methodologically if the aim is to reconstruct places and spaces beyond their perceived "actuality" in terms of a fundamentally contingent social and essentially political practice. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1103203

  5. Sign Language in Astronomy and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cova, J.; Movilio, V.; Gómez, Y.; Gutiérrez, F.; García, R.; Moreno, H.; González, F.; Díaz, J.; Villarroel, C.; Abreu, E.; Aparicio, D.; Cárdenas, J.; Casneiro, L.; Castillo, N.; Contreras, D.; La Verde, N.; Maita, M.; Martínez, A.; Villahermosa, J.; Quintero, A.

    2009-05-01

    Teaching science to school children with hearing deficiency and impairment can be a rewarding and valuable experience for both teacher and student, and necessary to society as a whole in order to reduce the discriminative policies in the formal educational system. The one most important obstacle to the teaching of science to students with hearing deficiency and impairments is the lack of vocabulary in sign language to express the precise concepts encountered in scientific endeavor. In a collaborative project between Centro de Investigaciones de Astronomía ``Francisco J. Duarte'' (CIDA), Universidad Pedagógica Experimental Libertador-Instituto Pedagógico de Maturín (UPEL-IPM) and Unidad Educativa Especial Bolivariana de Maturín (UEEBM) initiated in 2006, we have attempted to fill this gap by developing signs for astronomy and space sciences terminology. During two three-day workshops carried out at CIDA in Mérida in July 2006 and UPEL-IPM in Maturín in March 2007 a total of 112 concepts of astronomy and space sciences were coined in sign language using an interactive method which we describe in the text. The immediate goal of the project is to incorporate these terms into Venezuelan Sign Language (LSV).

  6. Life sciences research in space: The requirement for animal models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, C. A.; Philips, R. W.; Ballard, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Use of animals in NASA space programs is reviewed. Animals are needed because life science experimentation frequently requires long-term controlled exposure to environments, statistical validation, invasive instrumentation or biological tissue sampling, tissue destruction, exposure to dangerous or unknown agents, or sacrifice of the subject. The availability and use of human subjects inflight is complicated by the multiple needs and demands upon crew time. Because only living organisms can sense, integrate and respond to the environment around them, the sole use of tissue culture and computer models is insufficient for understanding the influence of the space environment on intact organisms. Equipment for spaceborne experiments with animals is described.

  7. eScience and archiving for space science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy E Eastman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A confluence of technologies is leading towards revolutionary new interactions between robust data sets, state-of-the-art models and simulations, high-data-rate sensors, and high-performance computing. Data and data systems are central to these new developments in various forms of eScience or grid systems. Space science missions are developing multi-spacecraft, distributed, communications- and computation-intensive, adaptive mission architectures that will further add to the data avalanche. Fortunately, Knowledge Discovery in Database (KDD tools are rapidly expanding to meet the need for more efficient information extraction and knowledge generation in this data-intensive environment. Concurrently, scientific data management is being augmented by content-based metadata and semantic services. Archiving, eScience and KDD all require a solid foundation in interoperability and systems architecture. These concepts are illustrated through examples of space science data preservation, archiving, and access, including application of the ISO-standard Open Archive Information System (OAIS architecture.

  8. Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Contact. Journal Home > About the Journal > Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Contact. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Archives: Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 34 of 34 ... Archives: Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review. Journal Home > Archives: Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  10. Science & Technology Review: September 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This is the September issue of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Science & Technology Review, which communicates, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. This month, there are features on "Laboratory Investments Drive Computational Advances" and "Laying the Groundwork for Extreme-Scale Computing." Research highlights include "Nuclear Data Moves into the 21st Century", "Peering into the Future of Lick Observatory", and "Facility Drives Hydrogen Vehicle Innovations."

  11. Impact of International Cooperation for Sustaining Space-Science Programs

    CERN Document Server

    Jani, Karan

    2016-01-01

    Space-science programs provide a wide range of application to a nation's key sectors of development: science-technology infrastructure, education, economy and national security. However, the cost of sustaining a space-science program has discouraged developing nations from participating in space activities, while developed nations have steadily cut down their space-science budget in past decade. In this study I investigate the role of international cooperation in building ambitious space-science programs, particularly in the context of developing nations. I devise a framework to quantify the impact of international collaborations in achieving the space-science goals as well as in enhancing the key sectors of development of a nation. I apply this framework on two case studies, (i) Indian Space Research Organization - a case of space-science program from a developing nation that has historically engaged in international collaborations, and (ii) International Space Station - a case for a long term collaboration ...

  12. Physical sciences research plans for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.

    2003-01-01

    The restructuring of the research capabilities of the International Space Station has forced a reassessment of the Physical Sciences research plans and a re-targeting of the major scientific thrusts. The combination of already selected peer-reviewed flight investigations with the initiation of new research and technology programs will allow the maximization of the ISS scientific and technological potential. Fundamental and applied research will use a combination of ISS-based facilities, ground-based activities, and other experimental platforms to address issues impacting fundamental knowledge, industrial and medical applications on Earth, and the technology required for human space exploration. The current flight investigation research plan shows a large number of principal investigators selected to use the remaining planned research facilities. c2003 American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Experiences of the GDR in space sciences and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, H.; Knuth, R.; Bormann, P.

    Following a historical review of the first activities of GDR scientists in the fields of space research, especially on astronomical and geodetical satellite-observations and in atmospheric and magnetospheric research, the growing scientific and increasingly efficient technological and economic benefits of the cooperation of the Academy of sciences and other scientific and technological institutions of the GDR within the Intercosmos-programme are described. Especially, the experiences in connection with remote sensing, of the cooperation with countries as Cuba and the Peoples Republic of Vietnam and of the common USSR - GDR manned spaceflight are discussed under the viewpoint of the mutual interests of developing and developed countries in the fields of space science and technology.

  14. Mathematical Model of the Public Understanding of Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisniakov, V.; Prisniakova, L.

    science. The boundary sectioning area of effective and unefficient modes of training and education of the population of country in space spirit is determined. The mathematical model of quality of process of education concern to an outer space exploration is reviewed separately. The coefficient of quality of education in an estimation of space event is submitted as relation Δ I' to mismatch of the universal standard of behavior with the information, which is going to the external spectator, about the applicable reacting of the considered individual Δ I''. The obtained outcomes allow to control a learning process and education of the society spirit of adherence to space ideals of mankind.

  15. Space Science for the 21st Century: The Space Science Enterprise Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    Throughout its history, the U.S. Space Science technologies program has been enormously productive. Its accomplishments have rewritten the textbooks. But now, the economic environment has changed dramatically. The Nation's scientific and technological goals are being reexamined and redefined.And the social contract between the scientific community and the Federal Government is being rewritten. There is an expectation that the American public should receive more direct benefits from its investment in science and technology. This Strategic Plan reflects this new paradigm. It presents a carefully selected set of new scientific initiatives that build on past accomplishments to continue NASA's excellence in Space Science. At the same time, it responds to fiscal constraints by defining a new approach to planning, developing, and operating Space Science missions. In particular, investments in new technologies will permit major scientific advances to be made with smaller, more focused, and less costly missions. With the introduction of advanced technologies, smaller does not have to mean less capable. The focus on new technologies also provides and opportunity for the Space Science program to enhance its direct contribution to the country's economic base. At the same time, the program can build on public interest to strengthen its contributions to education and scientific literacy. With this plan we are taking the first steps toward shaping the Space Science program of the 21st century. In doing so, we face major challenges. It will be a very different program than might have been envisioned even a few years ago. But it will be a program that remains at the forefront of science, technology, and education. We intend to continue rewriting the textbooks.

  16. Edible Earth and Space Science Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, D.; Shupla, C.

    2014-07-01

    In this workshop we describe using Earth and Space Science demonstrations with edible ingredients to increase student interest. We show how to use chocolate, candy, cookies, popcorn, bagels, pastries, Pringles, marshmallows, whipped cream, and Starburst candy for activities such as: plate tectonics, the interior structure of the Earth and Mars, radioactivity/radioactive dating of rocks and stars, formation of the planets, lunar phases, convection, comets, black holes, curvature of space, dark energy, and the expansion of the Universe. In addition to creating an experience that will help students remember specific concepts, edible activities can be used as a formative assessment, providing students with the opportunity to create something that demonstrates their understanding of the model. The students often eat the demonstrations. These demonstrations are an effective teaching tool for all ages, and can be adapted for cultural, culinary, and ethnic differences among the students.

  17. CSIR ScienceScope: Space science & technology in CSIR

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available TO BE R 20 08 CONTENTS SCIENCESCOPE | OCTOBER 2008 CONTEXTUAL OVERVIEW 2 On the brink of space – a new era 2 CEOS: Present and future opportunities 4 Earth observation for earth system science 6 SAEOS – deriving value for SA from earth... climate change,” Bernard notes. “The ocean is a difficult and expensive place to make measurements in – with satellites we can see how both the physical forces that control the system, such as wind, are changing, and how these changes affect ocean...

  18. Science& Technology Review November 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D

    2003-11-01

    This issue of Science & Technology Review covers the following topics: (1) We Will Always Need Basic Science--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) When Semiconductors Go Nano--experiments and computer simulations reveal some surprising behavior of semiconductors at the nanoscale; (3) Retinal Prosthesis Provides Hope for Restoring Sight--A microelectrode array is being developed for a retinal prosthesis; (4) Maglev on the Development Track for Urban Transportation--Inductrack, a Livermore concept to levitate train cars using permanent magnets, will be demonstrated on a 120-meter-long test track; and (5) Power Plant on a Chip Moves Closer to Reality--Laboratory-designed fuel processor gives power boost to dime-size fuel cell.

  19. Science & Technology Review October 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2007-08-21

    Livermore researchers won five R&D 100 awards in R&D Magazine's annual competition for the top 100 industrial innovations worldwide. This issue of Science & Technology Review highlights the award-winning technologies: noninvasive pneumothorax detector, microelectromechanical system-based adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope, large-area imager, hyper library of linear solvers, and continuous-phase-plate optics system manufactured using magnetorheological finishing. Since 1978, Laboratory researchers have received 118 R&D 100 awards. The R&D 100 logo (on the cover and p 1) is reprinted courtesy of R&D Magazine.

  20. Devices development and techniques research for space life sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, A.; Liu, B.; Zheng, C.

    The development process and the status quo of the devices and techniques for space life science in China and the main research results in this field achieved by Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics SITP CAS are reviewed concisely in this paper On the base of analyzing the requirements of devices and techniques for supporting space life science experiments and researches one designment idea of developing different intelligent modules with professional function standard interface and easy to be integrated into system is put forward and the realization method of the experiment system with intelligent distributed control based on the field bus are discussed in three hierarchies Typical sensing or control function cells with certain self-determination control data management and communication abilities are designed and developed which are called Intelligent Agents Digital hardware network system which are consisted of the distributed Agents as the intelligent node is constructed with the normative opening field bus technology The multitask and real-time control application softwares are developed in the embedded RTOS circumstance which is implanted into the system hardware and space life science experiment system platform with characteristic of multitasks multi-courses professional and instant integration will be constructed

  1. Science & Technology Review April 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2007-02-27

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Shaking the Foundations of Solar-System Science--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Stardust Results Challenge Astronomical Convention--The first samples retrieved from a comet are a treasure trove of surprises to Laboratory researchers; (3) Fire in the Hole--Underground coal gasification may help to meet future energy supply challenges with a production process from the past; (4) Big Physics in Small Spaces--A newly developed computer model successfully simulates particle-laden fluids flowing through complex microfluidic systems; (5) A New Block on the Periodic Table--Livermore and Russian scientists add a new block to the periodic table with the creation of element 118; and (6) A Search for Patterns and Connections--Throughout his career, Edward Teller searched for mathematical solutions to explain the physical world.

  2. Current Developments in Basic Space Science in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okeke, P. N.

    Astronomy is important to developing African countries. In this paper, a brief review of the situation of astronomical research in Africa before 1991 is given. During that period only South Africa and Egypt were carrying out observational research in astronomy. In other African countries astronomy research was in its infancy, except the University of Nigeria Space Research Centre (UNNSRC) in theoretical areas. A summary of the important recommendations for Africa at the United Nations/ European Space Agency (UN/ESA) series of workshops on basic space science were itemized to help identify those which have now been accomplished. Additionally, UNNSRC has now embarked on further observational programmes through the establishment of strong collaborative ventures with two observatories in South Africa, the Hartesbeesthoek Radio Astronomical Observatory (Hart RAO) and the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO). UNNSRC has also made permanent arrangements with HartRAO, SAAO, and the Jodrell Bank for collaborations in data analysis. A new interest in astronomy appears to have awakened in Nigeria with three more universities joining this area of basic space science. It is recommended that the time has come for all African countries to contribute towards a common facility such as the Southern African Large Telescope (SALT). The efforts of UN/ESA which resulted in tremendous achievements are commended.

  3. NASA Space Science Day Events-Engaging Students in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxworth, S.; Mosie, A.; Allen, J.; Kent, J.; Green, A.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Space Science Day Event follows the same format of planning and execution at all host universities and colleges. These institutions realized the importance of such an event and sought funding to continue hosting NSSD events. In 2014, NASA Johnson Space Center ARES team has supported the following universities and colleges that have hosted a NSSD event; the University of Texas at Brownsville, San Jacinto College, Georgia Tech University and Huston-Tillotson University. Other universities and colleges are continuing to conduct their own NSSD events. NASA Space Science Day Events are supported through continued funding through NASA Discovery Program. Community Night begins with a NASA speaker and Astromaterials display. The entire community surrounding the host university or college is invited to the Community Night. This year at the Huston-Tillotson (HTU) NSSD, we had Dr. Laurie Carrillo, a NASA Engineer, speak to the public and students. She answered questions, shared her experiences and career path. The speaker sets a tone of adventure and discovery for the NSSD event. After the speaker, the public is able to view Lunar and Meteorite samples and ask questions from the ARES team. The students and teachers from nearby schools attended the NSSD Event the following day. Students are able to see the university or college campus and the university or college mentors are available for questions. Students rotate through hour long Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) sessions and a display area. These activities are from the Discovery Program activities that tie in directly with k- 12 instruction. The sessions highlight the STEM in exploration and discovery. The Lunar and Meteorite display is again available for students to view and ask questions. In the display area, there are also other interactive displays. Angela Green, from San Jacinto College, brought the Starlab for students to watch a planetarium exhibit for the NSSD at Huston

  4. Space exhibitions: the science encounters the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coliolo, F.; Menendez, M.

    The widespread dissemination of science has always been one pillar of the development of human knowledge. There are several methods to structure interaction with the public: media, conferences, various written genres, and exhibitions. But: how to attract the public? How to arouse interest among future generation, insatiable for knowledge? In this paper we focus on space exhibitions, whose content combines mystery, discovery and science. The preparation of an exhibition is based on guidelines discussed between an interdisciplinary team and the exhibition project manager, the purpose of which is to find a coherent "strategy" to select information and to choose a concise, efficient, smart and original way to "visualize" the messages. Exhibition visitors are "privileged" because the interactivity is first emotive, then mental and cultural; the audience is universal. The goal of an exhibition is not to explain the content, but to stimulate the audience's curiosity in an attractive environment. We show some photos of ESA exhibitions, and try to understand if the visual impact is the first step towards a "multi-sensory" approach to communication. "A good exhibition can never be replaced by a book, a film or a lecture. A good exhibition creates a thirst for books, film, lectures. A good exhibition changes the visitors"(J. Wagensberg, Modern scientific museology")

  5. Science & Technology Review November 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K

    2002-09-25

    This months issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) High-Tech Help for Fighting Wildfires--Commentary by Leland W. Younker; (2) This Model Can Take the Heat--A physics-based simulation program to combat wildfires combines the capabilities and resources of Lawrence Livermore and Los Alamos national laboratories. (3) The Best and the Brightest Come to Livermore--The Lawrence Fellowship Program attracts the most sought-after postdoctoral researchers to the Laboratory. (4) A view to Kill--Livermore sensors are aimed at the ''kill'' vehicle when it intercepts an incoming ballistic missile. (5) 50th Anniversary Highlight--Biological Research Evolves at Livermore--Livermore's biological research program keeps pace with emerging national issues, from studying the effects of ionizing radiation to detecting agents of biological warfare.

  6. Science& Technology Review October 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K S

    2002-10-01

    The October 2002 issue of Science and Technology Review has the following articles: (1) Applied Science Is a Hallmark of This Laboratory--Commentary by Hal Graboske. (2) Sending Up Signals for Genetic Variation--In situ rolling circle amplification promises to advance the detection and treatment of cancer and other diseases. (3) SiMM Is Anything But Simple--Modules of silicon microchannels and microlenses result in the smallest, most powerful, and least expensive laser diode pumps ever. (4) World's Most Powerful Solid-State Laser--A new design allows tremendous scaling up of solid-state laser power. (5) Stepping Up to Extreme Lithography--The next generation of computer chips can now be produced on a commercial scale. (6) Relief for Acute and Chronic Pain--New technology turns an ancient pain management method into a modern medical tool. (7)50th Anniversary Highlight--14 Energy and Environment: Understanding Our World--The Laboratory's energy and environmental research is an important adjunct to its core national security mission.

  7. Science& Technology Review May 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2003-05-01

    This May 2003 issue of ''Science and Technology Review'' covers the following articles: (1) ''Another Weapon in the Battle against Proliferation''; (2) ''Chemical Weapons Can't Evade This Lab'', Livermore's Forensic Science Center is certified to analyze samples collected during inspections conducted to monitor the Chemical Weapons Convention. (3) ''Bird's-Eye View Clarifies Research on the Ground'' Geobotanical remote sensing has applications in homeland security and energy resource development and provides new insights into complex ecologic systems. (4) ''Age Does Make a Difference'' Age-dating techniques and ultrasensitive technologies provide a comprehensive map of California's groundwater and indicate where it is most vulnerable to contaminants. (5) ''Reducing Aerodynamic Drag'' Simulations and experiments reveal ways to make heavy trucks more aerodynamic and fuel efficient.

  8. Developing Basic Space Science World-Wide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsteker, W.; Albrecht, Rudolf; Haubold, Hans J.

    2004-03-01

    When the first United Nations/European Space Agency Workshop for Basic Space Science was planned to be held in Bangalore, India (1991) on the invitation of ISRO, few of those involved could expect that a unique forum was going to be created for scientific dialogue between scientists from developing and industrialized nations. As the format of the first workshop was on purpose left free with time for presentations, working sessions, and plenary discussions, the workshop was left to find its own dynamics. After a decade of UN/ESA Workshops, this book brings together the historical activities, the plans which have been developed over the past decade in the different nations, and the results which have materialized during this time in different developing nations. It aims to achieve for development agencies to be assisted in ways to find more effective tools for the application of development aid. The last section of the book contains a guide for teachers to introduce astrophysics into university physics courses. This will be of use to teachers in many nations. Everything described in this book is the result of a truly collective effort from all involved in all UN/ESA workshops. The mutual support from the participants has helped significantly to implement some of the accomplishments described in the book. Rather than organizing this book in a subject driven way, it is essentially organized according to the common economic regions of the world, as defined by the United Nations (Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, Western Asia). This allows better recognition of the importance of a regional (and at times) global approach to basic space science for the developing nation's world wide. It highlights very specific scientific investigations which have been completed successfully in the various developing nations. The book supplements the published ten volumes of workshop proceedings containing scientific papers presented in the workshops

  9. Earth & Space Science in the Next Generation Science Standards: Promise, Challenge, and Future Actions. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, E. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are a step forward in ensuring that future generations of students become scientifically literate. The NGSS document builds from the National Science Education Standards (1996) and the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) science framework of 2005. Design teams for the Curriculum Framework for K-12 Science Education were to outline the essential content necessary for students' science literacy, considering the foundational knowledge and the structure of each discipline in the context of learning progressions. Once draft standards were developed, two issues emerged from their review: (a) the continual need to prune 'cherished ideas' within the content, such that only essential ideas were represented, and (b) the potential for prior conceptions of Science & Engineering Practices (SEP) and cross-cutting concepts (CCC) to limit overly constrain performance expectations. With the release of the NGSS, several challenges are emerging for geoscience education. First, the traditional emphasis of Earth science in middle school has been augmented by new standards for high school that require major syntheses of concepts. Second, the integration of SEPs into performance expectations places an increased burden on teachers and curriculum developers to organize instruction around the nature of inquiry in the geosciences. Third, work is needed to define CCCs in Earth contexts, such that the unique structure of the geosciences is best represented. To ensure that the Earth & Space Science standards are implemented through grade 12, two supporting structures must be developed. In the past, many curricular materials claimed that they adhered to the NSES, but in some cases this match was a simple word match or checklist that bore only superficial resemblance to the standards. The structure of the performance expectations is of sufficient sophistication to ensure that adherence to the standards more than a casual exercise. Claims

  10. EDITORIAL: From reciprocal space to real space in surface science From reciprocal space to real space in surface science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Ludwig; Ernst, Karl-Heinz

    2012-09-01

    This issue is dedicated to Karl-Heinz Rieder on the occasion of his 70th birthday. It contains contributions written by his former students and colleagues from all over the world. Experimental techniques based on free electrons, such as photoelectron spectroscopy, electron microscopy and low energy electron diffraction (LEED), were foundational to surface science. While the first revealed the band structures of materials, the second provided nanometer scale imagery and the latter elucidated the atomic scale periodicity of surfaces. All required an (ultra-)high vacuum, and LEED illustrated impressively that adsorbates, such as carbon monoxide, hydrogen or oxygen, can markedly and periodically restructure surfaces from their bulk termination, even at pressures ten orders of magnitude or more below atmospheric. Yet these techniques were not generally able to reveal atomic scale surface defects, nor could they faithfully show adsorption of light atoms such as hydrogen. Although a complete atom, helium can also be regarded as a wave with a de Broglie wavelength that allows the study of surface atomic periodicities at a delicateness and sensitivity exceeding that of electrons-based techniques. In combination, these and other techniques generated insight into the periodicity of surfaces and their vibrational properties, yet were limited to simple and periodic surface setups. All that changed with the advent of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) roughly 30 years ago, allowing real space access to surface defects and individual adsorbates. Applied at low temperatures, not only can STM establish a height profile of surfaces, but can also perform spectroscopy and serve as an actuator capable of rearranging individual species at atomic scale resolution. The direct and intuitive manner in which STM provided access as a spectator and as an actor to the atomic scale was foundational to today's surface science and to the development of the concepts of nanoscience in general. The

  11. Quantum Opportunities and Challenges for Fundamental Sciences in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Nan

    2012-01-01

    Space platforms offer unique environment for and measurements of quantum world and fundamental physics. Quantum technology and measurements enhance measurement capabilities in space and result in greater science returns.

  12. 2015 Space Radiation Standing Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2015-01-01

    big data” study must be used with caution. The general scientific issues of reproducibility, details of experimental methods and data analysis from preclinical and basic research laboratories have been raised broadly over the last few years (not specific to this work) and indicate that caution must be applied in the ways these data are used. This pertains to preclinical data and also to phase 3 clinical trials in radiation oncology and medical oncology. Of course, appropriate use and analysis of these “big-data” sets also offer the potential of pinpointing limitations and extracting remaining useful information. Emphasis should be placed on the latter possibility. A key target is risk reduction from radiation exposure. Progress of the entire space program, now moving towards the Mars mission, requires timely answers to key components of human risk, which are known to be complex. Periodic review of progress should be conducted with additional resources directed into achieving critical milestones. Turning the long red bars to yellow and green (or for some risks such as CNS possibly to grey) must be high priority. That such progress will require new science and not engineering means that it should be viewed in a knowledge-based light. The technology-based aspects of engineering issues are certainly as important, however, science and knowledge-based problems are solved in a different way than engineering. Timelines for engineering are more predictable, while for science, progress can be methodical with occasional major incremental findings that can rapidly change the rate of progress. As opportunities for rapid incremental changes arise, periodic enhancement of investment is strongly recommended to enable such new knowledge to be quickly and efficiently exploited. Collaborations and linkages with National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) and the Department of Defense (DoD) are in place

  13. Space science Education:Challenges and Prospects in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latinwo, O.

    Space Science is a multidisciplinary subject the study of which is crucial to the survival and well being of humans In view of the significance of space science and its contribution to the present day global development this paper outlines many of the challenges of space science education in developing countries of Africa with a reference to Nigeria The way space science is typically being introduced and taught in pre-collegiate level is reconsidered if we are to provide those students who have chosen to study this science with a rich and rewarding experience Moreover one of the highlighted practical initiatives i e well planned and appropriate educational program to correct misconceptions stimulate interest and foster understanding among pre-collegiate students Reference is moreover made to the Basic Space Science outreach which commenced in 1995 in central Nigeria as one of the first pilot projects launched

  14. Errors in science: the role of reviewers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szekely, T.; Kruger, O.; Krause, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Reviewers play a key role in science, although studies suggest the current peer-reviewing system has faults. We propose to introduce a quality control system to evaluate each journal’s review process, and produce a Review Quality Index. We propose four schemes that have the potential to reduce

  15. Science and Technology Review June 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K.

    2002-06-01

    This Science and Technology Review has the following stories: (1) Fighting Bioterrorism, Fighting Cancer; (2) A Two-Pronged Attack on Bioterrorism--synthetic two-legged molecules will be excellent detectors of biowarfare agents and cancer cells; (3) Adaptive Optics Sharpen the View from Earth--astronomers are obtaining images with unprecedented resolution, thanks to telescopes equipped with adaptive optics developed at Livermore; (4) Experiments Re-create X Rays from Comets--Experiments using the Laboratory's electron beam ion trap and an x-ray spectrometer designed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration are shedding light on how comets emit x rays as they pass the Sun; (5) Chemistry--50 Years of exploring the Material World--from isotopic analysis to atomic-level simulations of material behavior, Livermore's chemists and materials scientists apply their expertise to fulfill the Laboratory's mission.

  16. Space Science Projects. LC Science Tracer Bullet No. TB-89-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Constance, Comp.

    This publication aims to assist elementary and secondary school students and teachers in planning, preparing and executing projects in the space sciences. Sources in other areas of science and on science fairs themselves are listed in "Science Fair Projects" (LC Science Tracer Bullet 88-4). This compilation is not intended to be a comprehensive…

  17. Mozambique Science, Technology and Innovation Review | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project aims to strengthen the capacity of the Mozambique Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) to govern the country's science, technology and innovation (STI) system, and of researchers and policymakers to conduct systematic reviews of STI policy implementation. It will do so by supporting a review of the ...

  18. Mozambique Science, Technology and Innovation Review | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project aims to strengthen the capacity of the Mozambique Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) to govern the country's science, technology and innovation (STI) system, and of researchers and policymakers to conduct systematic reviews of STI policy implementation. It will do so by supporting a review of the ...

  19. Seafloor Observatory Science: a Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Beranzoli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The ocean exerts a pervasive influence on Earth’s environment. It is therefore important that we learn how this system operates (NRC, 1998b; 1999. For example, the ocean is an important regulator of climate change (e.g., IPCC, 1995. Understanding the link between natural and anthropogenic climate change and ocean circulation is essential for predicting the magnitude and impact of future changes in Earth’s climate. Understanding the ocean, and the complex physical, biological, chemical, and geological systems operating within it, should be an important goal for the opening decades of the 21st century. Another fundamental reason for increasing our understanding of ocean systems is that the global economy is highly dependent on the ocean (e.g., for tourism, fisheries, hydrocarbons, and mineral resources (Summerhayes, 1996. The establishment of a global network of seafloor observatories will help to provide the means to accomplish this goal. These observatories will have power and communication capabilities and will provide support for spatially distributed sensing systems and mobile platforms. Sensors and instruments will potentially collect data from above the air-sea interface to below the seafloor. Seafloor observatories will also be a powerful complement to satellite measurement systems by providing the ability to collect vertically distributed measurements within the water column for use with the spatial measurements acquired by satellites while also providing the capability to calibrate remotely sensed satellite measurements (NRC, 2000. Ocean observatory science has already had major successes. For example the TAO array has enabled the detection, understanding and prediction of El Niño events (e.g., Fujimoto et al., 2003. This paper is a world-wide review of the new emerging “Seafloor Observatory Science”, and describes both the scientific motivations for seafloor observatories and the technical solutions applied to their architecture. A

  20. The James Webb Space Telescope: Extending the Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.; JWST Science Working Group

    2013-01-01

    The science objectives of the James Webb Space Telescope fall into four themes. The End of the Dark Ages: First Light and Reionization theme seeks to identify the first luminous sources to form and to determine the ionization history of the universe. The Assembly of Galaxies theme seeks to determine how galaxies and the dark matter, gas, stars, metals, morphological structures, and black holes within them evolved from the epoch of reionization to the present. The Birth of Stars and Protoplanetary Systems theme seeks to unravel the birth and early evolution of stars, from infall onto dust-enshrouded protostars, to the genesis of planetary systems. The Planetary Systems and the Origins of Life theme seeks to determine the physical and chemical properties of planetary systems around nearby stars and of our own, and to investigate the potential for life in those systems. These four science themes were used to establish the design requirements for the observatory and instrumentation. Since Webb’s capabilities are unique, those science themes will remain relevant through launch and operations and goals contained within these themes will continue to guide the design and implementation choices for the mission. More recently, it has also become clear that Webb will make major contributions to other areas of research, including dark energy, dark matter, exoplanet characterization and Solar System objects. In this poster, I review the original four science themes and discuss how the scientific output of Webb will extend to these new areas of research.

  1. Science& Technology Review October 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2003-10-01

    The October 2003 issue of Science & Technology Review consists of the following articles: (1) Award-Winning Technologies from Collaborative Efforts--Commentary by Hal Graboske; (2) BASIS Counters Airborne Bioterrorism--The Biological Aerosol Sentry and Information System is the first integrated biodefense system; (3) In the Chips for the Coming Decade--A new system is the first full-field lithography tool for use at extreme ultraviolet wavelengths; (4) Smoothing the Way to Print the Next Generation of Computer Chips--With ion-beam thin-film planarization, the reticles and projection optics made for extreme ultraviolet lithography are nearly defect-free; (5) Eyes Can See Clearly Now--The MEMS-based adaptive optics phoropter improves the process of measuring and correcting eyesight aberrations; (6) This Switch Takes the Heat--A thermally compensated Q-switch reduces the light leakage on high-average-power lasers; (7) Laser Process Forms Thick, Curved Metal Parts--A new process shapes parts to exact specifications, improving their resistance to fatigue and corrosion cracking; and (8) Characterizing Tiny Objects without Damaging Them--Livermore researchers are developing nondestructive techniques to probe the Lilliputian world of mesoscale objects.

  2. Science& Technology Review September 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D

    2003-09-01

    This September 2003 issue of ''Science and Technology Review'' covers the following articles: (1) ''The National Ignition Facility Is Born''; (2) ''The National Ignition Facility Comes to Life'' Over the last 15 years, thousands of Livermore engineers, scientists, and technicians as well as hundreds of industrial partners have worked to bring the National Ignition Facility into being. (3) ''Tracking the Activity of Bacteria Underground'' Using real-time polymerase chain reaction and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry, researchers at Livermore are gaining knowledge on how bacteria work underground to break down compounds of environmental concern. (4) ''When Every Second Counts--Pathogen Identification in Less Than a Minute'' Livermore has developed a system that can quickly identify airborne pathogens such as anthrax. (5) ''Portable Radiation Detector Provides Laboratory-Scale Precision in the Field'' A team of Livermore physicists and engineers has developed a handheld, mechanically cooled germanium detector designed to identify radioisotopes.

  3. Exploring the Dialogic Space of Public Participation in Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kristian Hvidtfelt

    in public misconceptions of science. This paper uses the dialogic space proposed by Callon et al. to explore relationships between public and science. The dialogic space spans collective versus scientific dimensions. The collective (or public) is constituted by aggregation (opinion polls) or by composition...

  4. Science of floorball: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Tervo T; Nordström A

    2014-01-01

    Taru Tervo,1 Anna Nordström2 1Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine, Floorball Research and Development Center, Umeå School of Sport Sciences, 2Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine, Umeå School of Sport Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden Background: The purpose of this study was to comprehensively review the scientific research on floorball at the competitive and recreational leve...

  5. The prospects of enhanced space science training in kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aseno, J. O.; Obel, J. D.

    To a limited extent, space exploration has been conducted in Kenya for almost the last two decades through a joint project (San Marco Project) between the Government of Kenya and the Government of Italy. Other space science activities in the country include remote sensing, space communications, meteorology and the use o f navigation and positioning satellite systems. To sustain space science activities in Kenya will require specialized training in the various disciplines of space sciences. Currently, there are no well coordinated training programmes in the country. Consequently, there is an urgent need for a well planned and a well coordinated space science training programme. This could be achieved through international co-operation and joint ventures between Kenya and space science institutions/organizations worldwide. The paper justifies the need for training in space science in Kenya and discusses socio-economic as well as environmental gains which would be realized due to increased space science activities arising from such training. Some of these gains would include participation in the launching and tracking, and control of satellite, managing and running a space centre or satellite launching and tracking station, decoding and synthesizing data from satellites and disseminating such data for public and scientific uses. The paper further offers suggestions on how the training requirements cited above could be achieved. It also highlights the level of expertise in space science disciplines and provides specific recommendations on the types of personnel that need to be trained. In addition, various forms and levels of training required to strengthen the role of space science in socio-economic development in Kenya, are discussed.

  6. Space Science Reference Guide, 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Renee (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    This Edition contains the following reports: GRACE: Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment; Impact Craters in the Solar System; 1997 Apparition of Comet Hale-Bopp Historical Comet Observations; Baby Stars in Orion Solve Solar System Mystery; The Center of the Galaxy; The First Rock in the Solar System; Fun Times with Cosmic Rays; The Gamma-Ray Burst Next Door; The Genesis Mission: An Overview; The Genesis Solar Wind Sample Return Mission; How to Build a Supermassive Black Hole; Journey to the Center of a Neutron Star; Kepler's Laws of Planetary Motion; The Kuiper Belt and Oort Cloud ; Mapping the Baby Universe; More Hidden Black Hole Dangers; A Polarized Universe; Presolar Grains of Star Dust: Astronomy Studied with Microscopes; Ring Around the Black Hole; Searching Antarctic Ice for Meteorites; The Sun; Astrobiology: The Search for Life in the Universe; Europa and Titan: Oceans in the Outer Solar System?; Rules for Identifying Ancient Life; Inspire ; Remote Sensing; What is the Electromagnetic Spectrum? What is Infrared? How was the Infrared Discovered?; Brief History of Gyroscopes ; Genesis Discovery Mission: Science Canister Processing at JSC; Genesis Solar-Wind Sample Return Mission: The Materials ; ICESat: Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite ICESat: Ice, Cloud, and Land; Elevation Satellite ICESat: Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite ICESat: Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite ICESat: Ice, Cloud, and Land Elevation Satellite Measuring Temperature Reading; The Optical Telescope ; Space Instruments General Considerations; Damage by Impact: The Case at Meteor Crater, Arizona; Mercury Unveiled; New Data, New Ideas, and Lively Debate about Mercury; Origin of the Earth and Moon; Space Weather: The Invisible Foe; Uranus, Neptune, and the Mountains of the Moon; Dirty Ice on Mars; For a Cup of Water on Mars; Life on Mars?; The Martian Interior; Meteorites from Mars, Rocks from Canada; Organic Compounds in Martian Meteorites May be Terrestrial

  7. Evaluation of an international doctoral educational program in space life sciences: The Helmholtz Space Life Sciences Research School (SpaceLife) in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Spitta, L. F.; Kopp, K.; Schmitz, C.; Reitz, G.; Gerzer, R.

    2016-01-01

    Training young researchers in the field of space life sciences is essential to vitalize the future of spaceflight. In 2009, the DLR Institute of Aerospace Medicine established the Helmholtz Space Life Sciences Research School (SpaceLife) in cooperation with several universities, starting with 22 doctoral candidates. SpaceLife offered an intensive three-year training program for early-stage researchers from different fields (biology, biomedicine, biomedical engineering, physics, sports, nutrition, plant and space sciences). The candidates passed a multistep selection procedure with a written application, a self-presentation to a selection committee, and an interview with the prospective supervisors. The selected candidates from Germany as well as from abroad attended a curriculum taught in English. An overview of space life sciences was given in a workshop with introductory lectures on space radiation biology and dosimetry, space physiology, gravitational biology and astrobiology. The yearly Doctoral Students' Workshops were also interdisciplinary. During the first Doctoral Students' Workshop, every candidate presented his/her research topic including hypothesis and methods to be applied. The progress report was due after ∼1.5 years and a final report after ∼3 years. The candidates specialized in their subfield in advanced lectures, Journal Clubs, practical trainings, lab exchanges and elective courses. The students attended at least one transferable skills course per year, starting with a Research Skills Development course in the first year, a presentation and writing skills course in the second year, and a career and leadership course in the third year. The whole program encompassed 303 h and was complemented by active conference participation. In this paper, the six years' experience with this program is summarized in order to guide other institutions in establishment of structured Ph.D. programs in this field. The curriculum including elective courses is

  8. Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), Space Science's Past, Present and Future Aboard the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Reggie; Spearing, Scott; Jordan, Lee

    2012-01-01

    The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) is a double rack facility aboard the International Space Station (ISS), which accommodates science and technology investigations in a "workbench' type environment. The MSG has been operating on the ISS since July 2002 and is currently located in the US Laboratory Module. In fact, the MSG has been used for over 10,000 hours of scientific payload operations and plans to continue for the life of ISS. The facility has an enclosed working volume that is held at a negative pressure with respect to the crew living area. This allows the facility to provide two levels of containment for small parts, particulates, fluids, and gases. This containment approach protects the crew from possible hazardous operations that take place inside the MSG work volume and allows researchers a controlled pristine environment for their needs. Research investigations operating inside the MSG are provided a large 255 liter enclosed work space, 1000 watts of dc power via a versatile supply interface (120, 28, + 12, and 5 Vdc), 1000 watts of cooling capability, video and data recording and real time downlink, ground commanding capabilities, access to ISS Vacuum Exhaust and Vacuum Resource Systems, and gaseous nitrogen supply. These capabilities make the MSG one of the most utilized facilities on ISS. MSG investigations have involved research in cryogenic fluid management, fluid physics, spacecraft fire safety, materials science, combustion, and plant growth technologies. Modifications to the MSG facility are currently under way to expand the capabilities and provide for investigations involving Life Science and Biological research. In addition, the MSG video system is being replaced with a state-of-the-art, digital video system with high definition/high speed capabilities, and with near real-time downlink capabilities. This paper will provide an overview of the MSG facility, a synopsis of the research that has already been accomplished in the MSG, and an

  9. Gravitational biology and space life sciences: Current status and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gravitational and space biology organizations and journals. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics ... importance of International Space Station for life sciences. http://asgsb.org/index.php. Astrobiology Magazine. ... Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). The site provides information about activities, ...

  10. Newspaper space for science (Portuguese original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta M. Kanashiro

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, courses, events and incentive programs for scientific journalism and the divulgation of science have proliferated in Brazil. Part of this context is “Sunday is science day, history of a supplement from the post-war years”, a book published this year that is based on the Master’s degree research of Bernardo Esteves, a journalist specialized in science.

  11. A Review of Forensic Science Management Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, M M; McAndrew, W P; Porter, M; Davies, B

    2015-01-01

    The science in forensic science has received increased scrutiny in recent years, but interest in how forensic science is managed is a relatively new line of research. This paper summarizes the literature in forensic science management generally from 2009 to 2013, with some recent additions, to provide an overview of the growth of topics, results, and improvements in the management of forensic services in the public and private sectors. This review covers only the last three years or so and a version of this paper was originally produced for the 2013 Interpol Forensic Science Managers Symposium and is available at interpol.int. Copyright © 2015 Central Police University.

  12. Precipitation from Space: Advancing Earth System Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Paul A.; Ebert, Elizabeth E.; Turk, F. Joseph; Levizzani, Vicenzo; Kirschbaum, Dalia; Tapiador, Francisco J.; Loew, Alexander; Borsche, M.

    2012-01-01

    Of the three primary sources of spatially contiguous precipitation observations (surface networks, ground-based radar, and satellite-based radar/radiometers), only the last is a viable source over ocean and much of the Earth's land. As recently as 15 years ago, users needing quantitative detail of precipitation on anything under a monthly time scale relied upon products derived from geostationary satellite thermal infrared (IR) indices. The Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSMI) passive microwave (PMW) imagers originated in 1987 and continue today with the SSMI sounder (SSMIS) sensor. The fortunate longevity of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is providing the environmental science community a nearly unbroken data record (as of April 2012, over 14 years) of tropical and sub-tropical precipitation processes. TRMM was originally conceived in the mid-1980s as a climate mission with relatively modest goals, including monthly averaged precipitation. TRMM data were quickly exploited for model data assimilation and, beginning in 1999 with the availability of near real time data, for tropical cyclone warnings. To overcome the intermittently spaced revisit from these and other low Earth-orbiting satellites, many methods to merge PMW-based precipitation data and geostationary satellite observations have been developed, such as the TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Product and the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) morphing method (CMORPH. The purpose of this article is not to provide a survey or assessment of these and other satellite-based precipitation datasets, which are well summarized in several recent articles. Rather, the intent is to demonstrate how the availability and continuity of satellite-based precipitation data records is transforming the ways that scientific and societal issues related to precipitation are addressed, in ways that would not be

  13. Game Changing: NASA's Space Launch System and Science Mission Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is directing efforts to build the Space Launch System (SLS), a heavy-lift rocket that will carry the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) and other important payloads far beyond Earth orbit (BEO). Its evolvable architecture will allow NASA to begin with Moon fly-bys and then go on to transport humans or robots to distant places such as asteroids and Mars. Designed to simplify spacecraft complexity, the SLS rocket will provide improved mass margins and radiation mitigation, and reduced mission durations. These capabilities offer attractive advantages for ambitious missions such as a Mars sample return, by reducing infrastructure requirements, cost, and schedule. For example, if an evolved expendable launch vehicle (EELV) were used for a proposed mission to investigate the Saturn system, a complicated trajectory would be required - with several gravity-assist planetary fly-bys - to achieve the necessary outbound velocity. The SLS rocket, using significantly higher C3 energies, can more quickly and effectively take the mission directly to its destination, reducing trip time and cost. As this paper will report, the SLS rocket will launch payloads of unprecedented mass and volume, such as "monolithic" telescopes and in-space infrastructure. Thanks to its ability to co-manifest large payloads, it also can accomplish complex missions in fewer launches. Future analyses will include reviews of alternate mission concepts and detailed evaluations of SLS figures of merit, helping the new rocket revolutionize science mission planning and design for years to come.

  14. Capacity Building Partnership for Research and Education in Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebede, A.; Danagoulian, S.; James, F.; Craft, B.

    2005-05-01

    The goals of the Capacity Building Partnership for Research and Education in Space Science (CB-PRESS) project include 1) establish a viable partnership to develop model education, research outreach programs in space science 2) to enhance existing STEM curricula using space science content 3) to develop a BS/MS space science track or full programs 4) to promote the value of space science within the "underserved" communities 5) to increase STEM majors 6) to develop adequate infrastructure for outreach and observation 7) to conduct ABET accreditation of the Engineering Physics Program. We report the following (1) Courses and programs: We are developing courses in astrophysics, Earth and Space Science, Solar Physics, and Space Radiation. We will begin offering these courses beginning Spring or Fall 2005. The BS/MS space science tracks will be offered beginning Fall 2005 pending approval. (2) Student training: Two students participated directly in NASA related research at Goddard Space Flight Center, and The National Radio Astronomy Observatory. (3) Public and K12 Outreach: We participated in one Teacher's workshop, and we made several trips to several elementary schools with our shows "Colors are Everywhere" We conducted outreach on "Venus Transit" for the public and NASA Sharp students. (4) Infrastructure: We are developing a robotic telescope for public outreach, and astronomy laboratory which non-existent at this time. We are also building the first robotic telescope on campus. (5) The draft proposal for the ABET accreditation of the Engineering Physics program is being studied. This work is supported by Minority University and College Education and Research Partnership Initiative (MUCERPI) in Space Science (NRA 03-OSS-03)

  15. ISS External Contamination Environment for Space Science Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos; Mikatarian, Ron; Steagall, Courtney; Huang, Alvin; Koontz, Steven; Worthy, Erica

    2014-01-01

    (1) The International Space Station is the largest and most complex on-orbit platform for space science utilization in low Earth orbit, (2) Multiple sites for external payloads, with exposure to the associated natural and induced environments, are available to support a variety of space science utilization objectives, (3) Contamination is one of the induced environments that can impact performance, mission success and science utilization on the vehicle, and (4)The ISS has been designed, built and integrated with strict contamination requirements to provide low levels of induced contamination on external payload assets.

  16. Book review of "Encyclopedia of soil science"

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book review describes "Encyclopedia of soil science" edited by Chesworth et al. (2008), an update of the 1979 version of "The encyclopedia of soil science" edited by Fairbridge and Finkl. It is compared with Hillel et al. (2004) second edition of "Encyclopedia of soils in the environment" and w...

  17. PREFACE: International Symposium on Physical Sciences in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Andreas; Egry, Ivan

    2011-12-01

    ISPS is the major international scientific forum for researchers in physics utilizing the space environment, in particular microgravity. It is intended to inspire and encourage cross-cutting discussions between different scientific communities working in the same environment. Contributions discussing results of experiments carried out on drop towers, parabolic aircraft flights, sounding rockets, unmanned recoverable capsules and, last but not least, the International Space Station ISS, are the backbone of this conference series, complemented by preparatory ground-based work, both experimentally and theoretically. The first International Symposium on Physical Sciences in Space (ISPS) sponsored by the International Microgravity Strategic Planning Group (IMSPG) took place in 2000 in Sorrento, Italy. IMSPG seeks to coordinate the planning of space for research in physical sciences by space agencies worldwide. AEB (Brazil), ASI (Italy), CNES (France), CSA (Canada), DLR (Germany), ESA (Europe), JAXA (Japan), NASA (USA), NSAU (Ukraine) and RSA (Russia) are members, and CNSA (China) and ISRO (India) are also invited to join IMSPG meetings. ISPS-4 was the fourth symposium in that series, following ISPS-2 organized by CSA in 2004 in Toronto, Canada, and ISPS-3 organized in 2007 by JAXA in Nara, Japan. ISPS-4 was jointly organized by ESA and DLR on behalf of the IMSPG and was held in Bonn from 11-15 July 2011. 230 participants from 17 different countries attended ISPS-4. Recent microgravity experiments were presented, analysed, and set in context to results from Earth bound experiments in 16 plenary and 68 topical talks. Lively discussions continued during two dedicated poster sessions and at the exhibition booths of space industry and research centers with new flight hardware on display. The oral presentations at ISPS4 were selected exclusively on the basis of scientific merit, as evidenced through the submitted abstracts. The selection was performed by the International

  18. An Open and Holistic Approach for Geo and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, Bernd; Seelus, Christoph; Neher, Günther; Toshihiko, Iyemori; Yatagai, Akiyo; Koyama, Yukinobu; Murayama, Yasuhiro; King, Todd; Hughes, Steve; Fung, Shing; Galkin, Ivan; Hapgood, Mike; Belehaki, Anna

    2016-04-01

    references in preparation of the publishing process. In addition, references to well documented earth and space science data are available via an increasing amount of data publications. This approach serves both, the institutional geo and space data centers which increase their awareness and importance, but also the scientists, which will find the right and already DOI-referenced data in the appropriate data journals. The Open Data and Open Archive approach finally merges in the concept of Open Science. Open Science emphasizes an open sharing of knowledge of all kind, based on a transparent multi-disciplinary and cross-domain scientific work. But Open Science is not just an idea, it also stands for a variety of projects which following the rules of Open Science, such as open methodology, open source, open data, open access, open peer review and open educational resources. Open Science also demands a new culture of scientific collaboration based on social media, and the use of shared cloud technology for data storage and computing. But, we should not forget, the WWW is not a one way road. As more data, methods and software for science research become freely available at the Internet, as more chances for a commercial or even destructive use of scientific data are opened. Already now, the giant search engine provider, such as Google or Microsoft and others are collecting, storing and analyzing all data which is available at the net. The usage of Deep Learning for the detection of semantical coherence of data for e.g. the creation of personalized on time and on location predictions using neuronal networks and artificial intelligence methods should not be reserved for them but also used within Open Science for the creation of new scientific knowledge. Open Science does not mean just to dump our scientific data, information and knowledge into the Web. Far from it, we are still responsible for a sustainable handling of our data for the benefit of humankind. The usage of the

  19. Materials science and engineering in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, L. K.

    1980-01-01

    The influences of gravitational forces on processes used in the preparation of materials employed in earth-based applications are addressed and the benefits which may be derived from the microgravity environment of space in improving on such constraints are considered. Attention is given to the fact that Materials Processing in Space is directed toward the utilization of the unique space environment as a tool to establish a scientific characterization of materials processes for technological exploitation in the public benefit. In the context of enhancement to earth-based technology or implementation of space-based processes for specialized, low volume, high value materials, the thrust of the Materials Processing in Space program is surveyed.

  20. Space Science Investigation: NASA ISS Stowage Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Gary

    2017-01-01

    During this internship the opportunity was granted to work with the Integrated, Graphics, Operations and Analysis Laboratory (IGOAL) team. The main assignment was to create 12 achievement patches for the Space Station training simulator called the "NASA ISS Stowage Training Game." This project was built using previous IGOAL developed software. To accomplish this task, Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Illustrator were used to craft the badges and other elements required. Blender, a 3D modeling software, was used to make the required 3D elements. Blender was a useful tool to make things such as a CTB bag for the "No More Bob" patch which shows a gentleman kicking a CTB bag into the distance. It was also used to pose characters to the positions that was optimal for their patches as in the "Station Sanitation" patch which portrays and astronaut waving on a U.S module on a truck. Adobe Illustrator was the main piece of software for this task. It was used to craft the badges and upload them when they were completed. The style of the badges were flat, meaning that they shouldn't look three dimensional in any way, shape or form. Adobe Photoshop was used when any pictures need brightening and was where the texture for the CTB bag was made. In order for the patches to be ready for the game's next major release, they have to go under some critical reviewing, revising and re-editing to make sure the other artists and the rest of the staff are satisfied with the final products. Many patches were created and revamped to meet the flat setting and incorporate suggestions from the IGOAL team. After the three processes were completed, the badges were implemented into the game (reference fig1 for badges). After a month of designing badges, the finished products were placed into the final game build via the programmers. The art was the final piece in showcasing the latest build to the public for testing. Comments from the testers were often exceptional and the feedback on the badges were

  1. Pushing the boundaries of cultural congruence pedagogy in science education towards a third space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Cassie

    2011-09-01

    This review explores Meyers and Crawford's "Teaching science as a cultural way of knowing: Merging authentic inquiry, nature of science, and multicultural strategies" by examining how they combine the use of inquiry-based science instruction with multicultural strategies. In this conversation, I point to the need of specific discourse strategies to help teachers and students create hybrid spaces to push the boundaries of cultural congruence as described in this article. These strategies include a reflective component to the explicit instruction that encourages an integration of home and science discourses. My response to this work expands on their use of multicultural strategies to push toward a congruent Third space that asks not only what happens to the students who do not participate in science, but also what happens to science when a diverse group of people does not participate?

  2. Sscience & technology review; Science Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments, particularly in the Laboratory`s core mission areas - global security, energy and the environment, and bioscience and biotechnology. This review for the month of July 1996 discusses: Frontiers of research in advanced computations, The multibeam Fabry-Perot velocimeter: Efficient measurement of high velocities, High-tech tools for the American textile industry, and Rock mechanics: can the Tuff take the stress.

  3. Enabling Science and Deep Space Exploration through Space Launch System (LSL) Secondary Payload Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jody; Pelfrey, Joseph; Norris, George

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in almost 40 years, a NASA human-rated launch vehicle has completed its Critical Design Review (CDR). By reaching this milestone, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft are on the path to launch a new era of deep space exploration. NASA is making investments to expand science and exploration capability of the SLS by developing the capability to deploy small satellites during the trans-lunar phase of the mission trajectory. Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1), currently planned for launch no earlier than July 2018, will be the first mission to carry such payloads on the SLS. The EM-1 launch will include thirteen 6U Cubesat small satellites that will be deployed beyond low earth orbit. By providing an earth-escape trajectory, opportunities are created for advancement of small satellite subsystems, including deep space communications and in-space propulsion. This SLS capability also creates low-cost options for addressing existing Agency strategic knowledge gaps and affordable science missions. A new approach to payload integration and mission assurance is needed to ensure safety of the vehicle, while also maintaining reasonable costs for the small payload developer teams. SLS EM-1 will provide the framework and serve as a test flight, not only for vehicle systems, but also payload accommodations, ground processing, and on-orbit operations. Through developing the requirements and integration processes for EM-1, NASA is outlining the framework for the evolved configuration of secondary payloads on SLS Block upgrades. The lessons learned from the EM-1 mission will be applied to processes and products developed for future block upgrades. In the heavy-lift configuration of SLS, payload accommodations will increase for secondary opportunities including small satellites larger than the traditional Cubesat class payload. The payload mission concept of operations, proposed payload capacity of SLS, and the payload requirements for launch and

  4. Distribution of Cost Growth in Robotic Space Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Christopher

    2007-01-01

    Cost growth characterization is a critical factor for effective cost risk analysis and project planning. This study analyzed low level budget changes in Jet Propulsion Laboratory-managed space science missions, which occurred during the development of the project. The data was then curve fit, according to cost distribution categories, to provide a reference set of distribution parameters with sufficient granularity to effectively model cost growth in robotic space science missions.

  5. NASA Ames and Future of Space Exploration, Science, and Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Pushing the frontiers of aeronautics and space exploration presents multiple challenges. NASA Ames Research Center is at the forefront of tackling these issues, conducting cutting edge research in the fields of air traffic management, entry systems, advanced information technology, intelligent human and robotic systems, astrobiology, aeronautics, space, earth and life sciences and small satellites. Knowledge gained from this research helps ensure the success of NASA's missions, leading us closer to a world that was only imagined as science fiction just decades ago.

  6. The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA);Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. This photo shows the completed center with the additional arnex (right of building) that added an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to the already existent NSSTC, nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At

  7. Faculty Institutes for NASA Earth and Space Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, S. S.; Slater, S. J.; Slater, T. F.

    2009-12-01

    Surveys and focus groups suggest that science education faculty and other science faculty who help prepare future teachers can benefit greatly from each other through professional development incorporating educationally-researched pedagogical techniques, the latest Earth and space science discoveries, materials, and new activities. In response, a team of scientists and science educators has delivered four such 2-day faculty institutes, through our Faculty Institute for NASA Earth and Space Science Education (FINESSE). One challenge to inquiry is the time spent obtaining true data, and yet the majority of astronomers and planetary scientists are using existing data acquired by robotic missions, telescopes, and orbiters. Through these workshops, participating College of Science and College of Education faculty have co-developed mechanisms for working inquiry into a deeper understanding of science by using existing on-line data to develop and research Earth and space science topics, progressing from creating a valid and easily testable question, to simple data analysis, arriving at a conclusion, and finally presenting and supporting that conclusion in the classroom. This framework is the foundation of the FINESSE institutes, which also incorporate discussions on the nature of inquiry, assessment, presentations by Earth and space science researchers, and opportunities for the participants to design implementation plans of their own. This project was developed to help faculty overcome several roadblocks, including: many education faculty surveyed stated that they desired, but lacked, access to professional development experiences; education faculty responsible for training pre-service education students varied greatly in their own science experiences and level of expertise, with a majority having a science background in biology but little or no experience in Earth or space science; the modeling of best science education practices (e.g., building understanding through

  8. U.K. radio science reviews available

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coincident with its triennial general assemblies, the International Union of Radio Science (URSI) publishes an international review of the most significant scientific developments over the previous 3 years in the nine subject areas covered by URSI's commissions. To produce this review, international editors distill reviews from each member country of national scientific developments. For those scientists who wish to know more details about the significant scientific developments in radio science in the United Kingdom from 1981 to 1984, the British National Committee for Radio Science has made its reviews available.Unless otherwise noted, the following surveys are available from the Royal Society, 6 Carlton House Terrace, London SW1Y 5AG, Attention: C.R. Argent.

  9. A Science Information Infrastructure for Access to Earth and Space Science Data through the Nation's Science Museums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S.

    1999-01-01

    In this project, we worked with the University of California at Berkeley/Center for Extreme Ultraviolet Astrophysics and five science museums (the National Air and Space Museum, the Science Museum of Virginia, the Lawrence Hall of Science, the Exploratorium., and the New York Hall of Science) to formulate plans for computer-based laboratories located at these museums. These Science Learning Laboratories would be networked and provided with real Earth and space science observations, as well as appropriate lesson plans, that would allow the general public to directly access and manipulate the actual remote sensing data, much as a scientist would.

  10. Measuring the Value of AI in Space Science and Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, B.; Parr, J.; Diamond, B.; Pittman, B.; Rasky, D.

    2017-10-01

    FDL is tackling knowledge gaps useful to the space program by forming small teams of industrial partners, cutting-edge AI researchers and space science domain experts, and tasking them to solve problems that are important to NASA as well as humanity's future.

  11. Global Cooperation in the Science of Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Nat

    2011-01-01

    The international space science community had recognized the importance of space weather more than a decade ago, which resulted in a number of international collaborative activities such as the Climate and Weather of the Sun Earth System (CAWSES) by SCOSTEP and the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI). The ISWI program is a continuation of the successful International Heliophysical Year (IHY) program. These programs have brought scientists together to tackle the scientific issues behind space weather. In addition to the vast array of space instruments, ground based instruments have been deployed, which not only filled voids in data coverage, but also inducted young scientists from developing countries into the scientific community. This paper presents a summary of CAWSES and ISWI activities that promote space weather science via complementary approaches in international scientific collaborations. capacity building. and public outreach.

  12. Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. 1. Manuscript Size The EASSRR publishes articles, book reviews and short communications. The maximum length of manuscripts to be submitted to the journal is twenty-five pages (double-spaced) for articles, and ten pages for book reviews. In exceptional cases, longer manuscripts may be considered ...

  13. 2017 International Conference on Space Science and Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Table of Content Preface 2017 International Conference on Space Science and Communication “Space Science for Sustainability” The present volume of the Journal of Physics: Conference Series represents contributions from participants of the 2017 International Conference on Space Science and Communication (IconSpace2017) held in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia from May 3-5, 2017. The conference was organized by Space Science Centre (ANGKASA), Institute of Climate Change, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) with a theme on “Space Science for Sustainability”. IconSpace2017 is the fifth series of conferences devoted to bringing researchers from around the world together to present and discuss their recent research results related to space science and communication, and also to provide an international platform for future research collaborations. This biennial international conference is an open forum where members in the field and others can meet in one place to discuss their current research findings. The technical program of this conference includes four keynote speakers, invited speakers, and the presentation of papers and poster. The track of the session includes Astrophysics and Astronomy, Atmospheric and Magnetospheric Sciences, Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Satellite and Communication Technology, and Interdisciplinary Space Science. Apart from the main conference, there will be a special talk on “Space Exploration & Updates” on 5 May 2017. More than 100 scientists and engineers from various academic, government, and industrial institutions in Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, and the Americas attended the conference. The papers for this conference were selected after a rigorous review process. The papers were all evaluated by international and local reviewers and at least two reviewers were required to evaluate each paper. We should like to offer our thanks for the professionalism of the organizing committee, authors, reviewers, and volunteers deserve much

  14. Space Science in Action: Astronomy [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This videotape recording teaches students about constellations, star movement, and how scientists have studied celestial bodies throughout history from Ptolemy to Copernicus to the work of the Hubble Space Telescope. An interview with Kathy Thornton, one of the astronauts who repaired the Hubble while in orbit, is featured. A hands-on activity…

  15. The NASA Space Life Sciences Training Program: Accomplishments Since 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Jon; Gibbs, Kristina; Ray, Hami; Bridges, Desireemoi; Bailey, Brad; Smith, Jeff; Sato, Kevin; Taylor, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    The NASA Space Life Sciences Training Program (SLSTP) provides undergraduate students entering their junior or senior years with professional experience in space life science disciplines. This challenging ten-week summer program is held at NASA Ames Research Center. The primary goal of the program is to train the next generation of scientists and engineers, enabling NASA to meet future research and development challenges in the space life sciences. Students work closely with NASA scientists and engineers on cutting-edge research and technology development. In addition to conducting hands-on research and presenting their findings, SLSTP students attend technical lectures given by experts on a wide range of topics, tour NASA research facilities, participate in leadership and team building exercises, and complete a group project. For this presentation, we will highlight program processes, accomplishments, goals, and feedback from alumni and mentors since 2013. To date, 49 students from 41 different academic institutions, 9 staffers, and 21 mentors have participated in the program. The SLSTP is funded by Space Biology, which is part of the Space Life and Physical Sciences Research and Application division of NASA's Human Exploration and Operations Mission Directorate. The SLSTP is managed by the Space Biology Project within the Science Directorate at Ames Research Center.

  16. In-Space Internet-Based Communications for Space Science Platforms Using Commercial Satellite Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Fabian, Theodore P.; Griner, James H.; Kachmar, Brian A.; Richard, Alan M.

    1999-01-01

    The continuing technological advances in satellite communications and global networking have resulted in commercial systems that now can potentially provide capabilities for communications with space-based science platforms. This reduces the need for expensive government owned communications infrastructures to support space science missions while simultaneously making available better service to the end users. An interactive, high data rate Internet type connection through commercial space communications networks would enable authorized researchers anywhere to control space-based experiments in near real time and obtain experimental results immediately. A space based communications network architecture consisting of satellite constellations connecting orbiting space science platforms to ground users can be developed to provide this service. The unresolved technical issues presented by this scenario are the subject of research at NASA's Glenn Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. Assessment of network architectures, identification of required new or improved technologies, and investigation of data communications protocols are being performed through testbed and satellite experiments and laboratory simulations.

  17. Space, relations, and the learning of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael; Hsu, Pei-Ling

    2014-03-01

    In the literature on the situated and distributed nature of cognition, the coordination of spatial organization and the structure of human practices and relations is accepted as a fact. To date, science educators have yet to build on such research. Drawing on an ethnographic study of high school students during an internship in a scientific research laboratory, which we understand as a "perspicuous setting" and a "smart setting," in which otherwise invisible dimensions of human practices become evident, we analyze the relationship between spatial configurations of the setting and the nature and temporal organization of knowing and learning in science. Our analyses show that spatial aspects of the laboratory projectively organize how participants act and can serve as resources to help the novices to participate in difficult and unfamiliar tasks. First, existing spatial relations projectively organize the language involving interns and lab members. In particular, spatial relations projectively organize where and when pedagogical language should happen; and there are specific discursive mechanisms that produce cohesion in language across different places in the laboratory. Second, the spatial arrangements projectively organize the temporal dimensions of action. These findings allow science educators to think explicitly about organizing "smart contexts" that help learners participate in and learn complex scientific laboratory practices.

  18. Space and Time in Life and Science

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    commerce led to arithmetic. parcelof land, and m ade this his source of revenue, ap- pointing the paym ent of a yearly tax. A nd any m an w ho w as robbed by the river of a part of his land w ould com e to Sesostris and declare w hat had befallen him ; then the. K ing would send m en to look into it and m easure the space by ...

  19. An open science peer review oath

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aleksic, Jelena; Adrian Alexa, Adrian Alexa; Attwood, Teresa K.

    2015-01-01

    : specifically, we introduce a peer-review oath and accompanying manifesto. These have been designed to offer guidelines to enable reviewers (with the minimum friction or bias) to follow and apply open science principles, and support the ideas of transparency, reproducibility and ultimately greater societal...... impact. Introducing the oath and manifesto at the stage of peer review will help to check that the research being published includes everything that other researchers would need to successfully repeat the work. Peer review is the lynchpin of the publishing system: encouraging the community to consciously...

  20. Science of floorball: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tervo T

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Taru Tervo,1 Anna Nordström2 1Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine, Floorball Research and Development Center, Umeå School of Sport Sciences, 2Department of Surgical and Perioperative Sciences, Sports Medicine, Umeå School of Sport Sciences, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden Background: The purpose of this study was to comprehensively review the scientific research on floorball at the competitive and recreational levels according to field of study. Methods: Full articles containing original data on floorball that had been published in English in peer-reviewed journals were considered for inclusion. Results: Of 75 articles screened, 19 were included in this systematic review. One article each was identified in the fields of sports management and sports psychology, and the remaining 17 articles were in the field of sports medicine. Injury epidemiology in floorball players was the most thoroughly examined topic of research. To date, no research has been performed on the incidence of floorball-related injury, or any aspect of the sport, in children and adolescents. Conclusion: Collaborative research among sports science disciplines is needed to identify strategies to reduce the incidence of injury and enhance the performance of licensed floorball players. Despite the increasing popularity of floorball in recent years, surprisingly little research has examined this sport. Keywords: floorball, unihockey, review

  1. Science & Technology Review March 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-01-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Seismic Science and Nonproliferation--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Sleuthing Seismic Signals--Supercomputer simulations improve the accuracy of models used to distinguish nuclear explosions from earthquakes and pinpoint their location; (3) Wind and the Grid--The Laboratory lends technical expertise to government and industry to more effectively integrate wind energy into the nation's electrical infrastructure; (4) Searching for Tiny Signals from Dark Matter--Powerful amplifiers may for the first time allow researchers to detect axions, hypothesized particles that may constitute 'dark matter', and (5) A Better Method for Self-Decontamination--A prototype decontamination system could one day allow military personnel and civilians to better treat themselves for exposure to toxic chemicals.

  2. Science & Technology Review September 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-07-24

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Remembering the Laboratory's First Director - Commentary by Harold Brown; (2) Herbert F. York (1921-2009): A Life of Firsts, an Ambassador for Peace - The Laboratory's first director, who died on May 19, 2009, used his expertise in science and technology to advance arms control and prevent nuclear war; (3) Searching for Life in Extreme Environments - DNA will help researchers discover new marine species and prepare to search for life on other planets; (4) Energy Goes with the Flow - Lawrence Livermore is one of the few organizations that distills the big picture about energy resources and use into a concise diagram; and (5) The Radiant Side of Sound - An experimental method that converts sound waves into light may lead to new technologies for scientific and industrial applications.

  3. Science & Technology Review May 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide III, M B

    2006-04-03

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Science and Technology Help the Nation Counter Terrorism--Commentary by Raymond J. Juzaitis; (2) Imagers Provide Eyes to See Gamma Rays--Gamma-ray imagers provide increased radiation detection capabilities and enhance the nation's arsenal for homeland security; (3) Protecting the Nation's Livestock--Foot-and-mouth disease could devastate America's livestock; a new assay provides a rapid means to detect it; (4) Measures for Measures--Laboratory physicists combine emissivity and reflectivity to achieve highly accurate temperature measurements of metal foils; and (5) Looping through the Lamb Shift--Livermore scientists measured a small perturbation in the spectra of highly ionized uranium--the first measurement of the two-loop Lamb shift in a bound state.

  4. Science & Technology Review June 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-06-05

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A Safer and Even More Effective TATB - Commentary by Bruce T. Goodwin; (2) Dissolving Molecules to Improve Their Performance - Computer scientists and chemists have teamed to develop a green method for recycling a valuable high explosive that is no longer manufactured; (3) Exceptional People Producing Great Science - Postdoctoral researchers lend their expertise to projects that support the Laboratory's missions; (4) Revealing the Identities and Functions of Microbes - A new imaging technique illuminates bacterial metabolic pathways and complex relationships; and (5) A Laser Look inside Planets - Laser-driven ramp compression may one day reveal the interior structure of Earth-like planets in other solar systems.

  5. Science & Technology Review September 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K

    2002-09-01

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Livermore--Poised for the Future, Commentary by Michael R. Anastasio; (2) A Hitchhiker's Guide to Early Earth--Experiments examine the possibility that the building blocks of life arrived on Earth as hitchhikers on comets; (3) A New World of Maps--More than pretty pictures, maps prepared with the tools of geographic information sciences allow researchers to find new relationships among spatial information; (4) Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells Stack Up to Efficient, Clean Power--The goal of Livermore's research in solid-oxide fuel cells is electric power generated cleanly and efficiently at an affordable cost; and (5) Empowering Light, Historic Accomplishments in Laser Research--During the past 40 plus years, the laser program at Livermore has played a seminal role in taking high-energy lasers from concept to reality.

  6. Science & Technology Review June 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blobaum, K J

    2010-04-28

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) A Leader in High-Pressure Science--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Diamonds Put the Pressure on Materials--New experimental capabilities are helping Livermore scientists better understand how extreme pressure affects a material's structure; (3) Exploring the Unusual Behavior of Granular Materials--Livermore scientists are developing new techniques for predicting the response of granular materials under pressure; (4) A 1-Ton Device in a Briefcase--A new briefcase-sized tool for nuclear magnetic resonance is designed for onsite analysis of suspected chemical weapons; and (5) Targets Designed for Ignition--A series of experiments at the National Ignition Facility is helping scientists finalize the ignition target design.

  7. Science & Technology Review November 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H

    2006-09-29

    This months issue has the following articles: (1) Expanded Supercomputing Maximizes Scientific Discovery--Commentary by Dona Crawford; (2) Thunder's Power Delivers Breakthrough Science--Livermore's Thunder supercomputer allows researchers to model systems at scales never before possible. (3) Extracting Key Content from Images--A new system called the Image Content Engine is helping analysts find significant but hard-to-recognize details in overhead images. (4) Got Oxygen?--Oxygen, especially oxygen metabolism, was key to evolution, and a Livermore project helps find out why. (5) A Shocking New Form of Laserlike Light--According to research at Livermore, smashing a crystal with a shock wave can result in coherent light.

  8. Space science experiments aboard ATS-F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, R.; King, W.

    1972-01-01

    The Environmental Measurements Experiment (EME) package is mounted on the ATS-F spacecraft to a structure that is located on top of the 30-foot parabolic reflector hub. The eight experiments of the EME package are designed to study the environment in space at synchronous altitude and to obtain information on electromagnetic-ionospheric interactions. Six of these experiments will obtain data on charged particles of several different types. A seventh experiment is to provide magnetic field data. The eighth experiment is concerned with solar cell degradation studies.

  9. Science & Technology Review April 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henson, V E

    2005-03-04

    This months issue has the following articles: (1) Addressing National Security Needs Benefits Energy and Environment--Commentary by Jane C. S. Long; (2) Monitoring Earth's Subsurface from Space--Livermore scientists are using radar images and simulations Livermore scientists are using radar images and simulations to detect subsurface changes on Earth of less than 1 centimeter; (3) Faculty on Sabbatical Find a Good Home at Livermore--Since 2000, more than 20 faculty members from around the world have come to the Laboratory as sabbatical scholars; (4) Finding Genes by Leaps and Bounds--Livermore biologists use computational analysis and laboratory frogs to identify functional elements of the human genome; and (5) Into the Wide Blue Yonder with BlueGene/L--BlueGene/L is the world's fastest supercomputer, and it embodies an entirely new class of highly scalable platform.

  10. Human Research Program Space Radiation Standing Review Panel (SRP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woloschak, Gayle; Steinberg-Wright, S.; Coleman, Norman; Grdina, David; Hill, Colin; Iliakis, George; Metting, Noelle; Meyers, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The Space Radiation Standing Review Panel (SRP) met at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) on December 9-11, 2009 to discuss the areas of current and future research targeted by the Space Radiation Program Element (SRPE) of the Human Research Program (HRP). Using evidence-based knowledge as a background for identified risks to astronaut health and performance, NASA had identified gaps in knowledge to address those risks. Ongoing and proposed tasks were presented to address the gaps. The charge to the Space Radiation SRP was to review the gaps, evaluate whether the tasks addressed these gaps and to make recommendations to NASA s HRP Science Management Office regarding the SRP's review. The SRP was requested to evaluate the practicality of the proposed efforts in light of the demands placed on the HRP. Several presentations were made to the SRP during the site visit and the SRP spent sufficient time to address the SRP charge. The SRP made a final debriefing to the HRP Program Scientist, Dr. John B. Charles, on December 11, 2009. The SRP noted that current SRPE strategy is properly science-based and views this as the best assurance of the likelihood that answers to the questions posed as gaps in knowledge can be found, that the uncertainty in risk estimates can be reduced, and that a solid, cost-effective approach to risk reduction solutions is being developed. The current approach of the SRPE, based on the use of carefully focused research solicitations, requiring thorough peer-review and approaches demonstrated to be on the path to answering the NASA strategic questions, addressed to a broad extramural community of qualified scientists, optimally positioned to take advantage of serendipitous discoveries and to leverage scientific advances made elsewhere, is sound and appropriate. The SRP viewed with concern statements by HRP implying that the only science legitimately deserving support should be "applied" or, in some instances that the very term "research" might be

  11. Visualization Techniques in Space and Atmospheric Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szuszczewicz, E. P. (Editor); Bredekamp, Joseph H. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Unprecedented volumes of data will be generated by research programs that investigate the Earth as a system and the origin of the universe, which will in turn require analysis and interpretation that will lead to meaningful scientific insight. Providing a widely distributed research community with the ability to access, manipulate, analyze, and visualize these complex, multidimensional data sets depends on a wide range of computer science and technology topics. Data storage and compression, data base management, computational methods and algorithms, artificial intelligence, telecommunications, and high-resolution display are just a few of the topics addressed. A unifying theme throughout the papers with regards to advanced data handling and visualization is the need for interactivity, speed, user-friendliness, and extensibility.

  12. Science & Technology Review March 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2007-02-05

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Partnering to Enhance Americans Health--Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) Advancing the Frontiers in Cancer Research--Researchers at the University of California Davis Cancer Center and Lawrence Livermore are teaming up to fight cancer; (3) On the Leading Edge of Atmospheric Predictions--Continual research and development at the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center help mitigate the consequences of toxic airborne hazards; (4) Climate and Agriculture: Change Begets Change--A Livermore researcher is using computer models to explore how a warmer climate may affect crop yields in California; (5) New Routes to High Temperatures and Pressures--With functionally graded density impactors composed of thin metal and polyethylene films, researchers can explore new areas of experimental physics; and (6) From Sound Waves to Stars: Teller's Contributions to Shock Physics--Edward Teller's interest in shock physics led to significant developments in both basic and applied science.

  13. Science & Technology Review October 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide III, M B

    2005-08-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Important Missions, Great Science, and Innovative Technology--Commentary by Cherry A. Murray; (2) NanoFoil{reg_sign} Solders with Less Heat--Soldering and brazing to join an array of materials are now Soldering and brazing to join an array of materials are now possible without furnaces, torches, or lead; (3) Detecting Radiation on the Move--An award-winning technology can detect even small amounts An award-winning technology can detect even small amounts of radioactive material in transit; (4) Identifying Airborne Pathogens in Time to Respond--A mass spectrometer identifies airborne spores in less than A mass spectrometer identifies airborne spores in less than a minute with no false positives; (5) Picture Perfect with VisIt--The Livermore-developed software tool VisIt helps scientists The Livermore-developed software tool VisIt helps scientists visualize and analyze large data sets; (6) Revealing the Mysteries of Water--Scientists are using Livermore's Thunder supercomputer and new algorithms to understand the phases of water; and (7) Lightweight Target Generates Bright, Energetic X Rays--Livermore scientists are producing aerogel targets for use in inertial Livermore scientists are producing aerogel targets for use in inertial confinement fusion experiments and radiation-effects testing.

  14. United Nations/European Space Agency Workshops on Basic Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haubold, H. J.; Ocampo, A.; Torres, S.; Wamsteker, W.

    1995-02-01

    In 1958, the United Nations (UN) formally recognized a new potential for international cooperation by establishing an ad hoc Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (COPUOS). A year later the Committee became a permanent body, and by 1983 membership had expanded to 53 states, with more than half of the members coming from the developing world. In 1970, COPUOS established the UN Program on Space Applications in order to strengthen cooperation in space science and technology between non-industrialized and industrialized countries. In the last few years, the UN and its COPUOS have paid increasing attention to education and research in space science and technology, including basic space science. In 1991 the UN, in cooperation with ESA, initiated the organization of annual Workshops in Basic Space Science for developing countries. These Workshops are designed to be held in one of the following major regions: Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, Western Asia, and Europe. Accordingly, Basic Space Science Workshops have already been held in India (1991), Costa Rica and Colombia (1992), and Nigeria (1993). The fourth Workshop was held from 27 June to 1 July 1994 at the Cairo University, in Egypt, for Western Asia.

  15. Innovative Space Sciences Education Programs for Young People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inbar, T.

    2002-01-01

    The future of the world is greatly depends on space. Through space sciences education programs with the main focus is on young people, the society, as a whole will gain in the years to come. The Weizmann Institute of Science is the leading scientific research center in Israel. After the need for science education programs for young students was recognized, the institute established its Youth Activities Section, which serves as the institute's outreach for the general population of school children nation-wide. The youth activities section holds courses, seminars, science camps etc. for almost 40 years. As an instructor in the youth activities section since 1990, my focus is space sciences programs, such as rocketry courses, planetarium demonstrations, astronomical observations and special events - all in the creed of bringing the space science to everyone, in a enjoyable, innovative and creative way. Two of the courses conducted combines' scientific knowledge, hands-on experience and a glimpse into the work of space programs: the rocketry courses offered a unique chance of design, build and fly actual rockets, to height of about 800 meters. The students conduct research on the rockets, such as aerial photography, environmental measurements and aerodynamic research - using student built wind tunnel. The space engineering course extend the high frontier of the students into space: the objective of a two year course is to design, build an launch an experiments package to space, using one of NASA's GAS programs. These courses, combined with special guest lectures by Weizmann institute's senior researchers, tours to facilities like satellite control center, clean rooms, the aeronautical industry, give the students a chance to meet with "the real world" of space sciences applications and industry, and this - in turn - will have payback effect on the society as a whole in years to come. The activities of space sciences education include two portable planetariums, 4

  16. Progress report on nuclear propulsion for space exploration and science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Gary L.; Miller, Thomas J.

    1993-01-01

    NASA is continuing its work in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) on nuclear propulsion - both nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and nuclear electric propulsion (NEP). The focus of the NTP studies remains on piloted and cargo missions to Mars (with precursor missions to the moon) although studies are under way to examine the potential uses of NTP for science missions. The focus of the NEP studies has shifted to space science missions with consideration of combining a science mission with an earlier demonstration of NEP using the SP-100 space nuclear reactor power system. Both NTP and NEP efforts are continuing in 1993 to provide a good foundation for science and exploration planners. Both NTP and NEP provide a very important transportation resource and in a number of cases enable missions that could not otherwise be accomplished.

  17. Dielectrophoresis for Biomedical Sciences Applications: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Rahman, Nurhaslina; Ibrahim, Fatimah; Yafouz, Bashar

    2017-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) is a label-free, accurate, fast, low-cost diagnostic technique that uses the principles of polarization and the motion of bioparticles in applied electric fields. This technique has been proven to be beneficial in various fields, including environmental research, polymer research, biosensors, microfluidics, medicine and diagnostics. Biomedical science research is one of the major research areas that could potentially benefit from DEP technology for diverse applications. Nevertheless, many medical science research investigations have yet to benefit from the possibilities offered by DEP. This paper critically reviews the fundamentals, recent progress, current challenges, future directions and potential applications of research investigations in the medical sciences utilizing DEP technique. This review will also act as a guide and reference for medical researchers and scientists to explore and utilize the DEP technique in their research fields. PMID:28245552

  18. Science and Technology Review December 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Pruneda, J.H.

    2000-12-01

    This issue contains the following articles: (1) ''Computational Know-How Advances Materials Science''. (2) ''Following Materials over Time and Space'' Large-scale simulations, performed over an enormous range of length and time scales, enable researchers to advance their understanding of material behavior. (3) ''The Art of Systems Science'' Systems scientists practice the multidisciplinary art of gathering information and constructing the systems models needed for informed decision making. (4) ''A Solution for Carbon Dioxide Overload''. (5) ''Preparing for Strong Earthquakes''.

  19. IVth Azores International Advanced School in Space Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, Nuno; Monteiro, Mário

    2018-01-01

    This book presents the proceedings of the IVth Azores International Advanced School in Space Sciences entitled "Asteroseismology and Exoplanets: Listening to the Stars and Searching for New Worlds". The school addressed the topics at the forefront of scientific research being conducted in the fields of asteroseismology and exoplanetary science, two fields of modern astrophysics that share many synergies and resources. These proceedings comprise the contributions from 18 invited lecturers, including both monographic presentations and a number of hands-on tutorials.

  20. What can Space Resources do for Astronomy and Planetary Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvis, Martin

    2016-11-01

    The rapid cost growth of flagship space missions has created a crisis for astronomy and planetary science. We have hit the funding wall. For the past 3 decades scientists have not had to think much about how space technology would change within their planning horizon. However, this time around enormous improvements in space infrastructure capabilities and, especially, costs are likely on the 20-year gestation periods for large space telescopes. Commercial space will lower launch and spacecraft costs substantially, enable cost-effective on-orbit servicing, cheap lunar landers and interplanetary cubesats by the early 2020s. A doubling of flagship launch rates is not implausible. On a longer timescale it will enable large structures to be assembled and constructed in space. These developments will change how we plan and design missions.

  1. Space Manifold Dynamics Novel Spaceways for Science and Exploration

    CERN Document Server

    Perozzi, Ettore

    2010-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the outcomes resulting from applying the dynamical systems approach to space mission design, a topic referred to as "Space Manifold Dynamics" (SMD). It is a natural follow-on to the international workshop "Novel Spaceways for Scientific and Exploration Missions," which was held in October 2007 at the Telespazio Fucino Space Centre (Italy) under the auspices of the Space OPS Academy. The benefits and drawbacks of using the Lagrangian points and the associated trajectories for present and future space missions are discussed. The related methods and algorithms are also described in detail. Each topic is presented in articles that were written as far as possible to be self consistent; the use of introductory sections and of extended explanations is included in order to address the different communities potentially interested in SMD: space science, the aerospace industry, manned and unmanned exploration, celestial mechanics, and flight dynamics.

  2. Science and Exploration Workshop: A Forum to Articulate Science Enabled by Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, J. F.; Niles, P. B.; Weber, R. C.; Needham, D. H.

    2017-02-01

    This talk outlines a plan to coordinate existing efforts that leverage human exploration and robotic investigations in a crucial step towards improving crew safety and enhancing science returns during upcoming space exploration operations.

  3. Science & Technology Review July/August 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, Ramona L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, Caryn N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chinn, Ken B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-07-18

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for the months of July and August 2016, there are two features: one on Science and Technology in Support of Nuclear Nonproliferation, and another on Seeking Out Hidden Radioactive Materials. Then there are highlights are three research projects--on optics, plasma science, and the nature of neutrinos--along with a news section and patents and awards.

  4. Secondary Payload Opportunities on NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Enable Science and Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jody; Pelfrey, Joseph; Norris, George

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in almost 40 years, a NASA human-rated launch vehicle has completed its Critical Design Review (CDR). With this milestone, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft are on the path to launch a new era of deep space exploration. This first launch of SLS and the Orion Spacecraft is planned no later than November 2018 and will fly along a trans-lunar trajectory, testing the performance of the SLS and Orion systems for future missions. NASA is making investments to expand the science and exploration capability of the SLS by developing the capability to deploy small satellites during the trans-lunar phase of the mission trajectory. Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) will include thirteen 6U Cubesat small satellites to be deployed beyond low earth orbit. By providing an earth-escape trajectory, opportunities are created for the advancement of small satellite subsystems, including deep space communications and in-space propulsion. This SLS capability also creates low-cost options for addressing existing Agency strategic knowledge gaps and affordable science missions. A new approach to payload integration and mission assurance is needed to ensure safety of the vehicle, while also maintaining reasonable costs for the small payload developer teams. SLS EM-1 will provide the framework and serve as a test flight, not only for vehicle systems, but also payload accommodations, ground processing, and on-orbit operations. Through developing the requirements and integration processes for EM-1, NASA is outlining the framework for the evolved configuration of secondary payloads on SLS Block upgrades. The lessons learned from the EM-1 mission will be applied to processes and products developed for future block upgrades. In the heavy-lift configuration of SLS, payload accommodations will increase for secondary opportunities including small satellites larger than the traditional Cubesat class payload. The payload mission concept of operations, proposed payload

  5. U.S. Materials Science on the International Space Station: Status and Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Kelton, Kenneth F.; Matson, Douglas M.; Poirier, David R.; Trivedi, Rohit K.; Su, Ching-Hua; Volz, Martin P.; Voorhees, Peter W.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the current status and NASA plans for materials science on the International Space Station. The contents include: 1) Investigations Launched in 2009; 2) DECLIC in an EXPRESS rack; 3) Dynamical Selection of Three-Dimensional Interface Patterns in Directional Solidification (DSIP); 4) Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR); 5) Materials Science Laboratory; 6) Comparison of Structure and Segregation in Alloys Directionally Solidified in Terrestrial and Microgravity Environments (MICAST/CETSOL); 7) Coarsening in Solid Liquid Mixtures 2 Reflight (CSLM 2R); 8) Crystal Growth Investigations; 9) Levitator Investigations; 10) Quasi Crystalline Undercooled Alloys for Space Investigation (QUASI); 11) The Role of Convection and Growth Competition in Phase Selection in Microgravity (LODESTARS); 12) Planned Additional Investigations; 13) SETA; 14) METCOMP; and 15) Materials Science NRA.

  6. The Space Science Suitcase—Instruments for Exploring Near-Earth Space from the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsson, Kjartan; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Tanskanen, Eija

    2009-04-01

    The aurora and other phenomena in near Earth space are becoming a considerable part of the science curriculum in upper secondary school (high school) in Norway. Introducing scientific methods to the young students is an important objective of the education, but experimental experience is mainly restricted to simple laboratory exercises under controlled conditions; observations of uncontrollable natural phenomena are generally left to academic scientists and researchers. The Space Physics Group and The Science Education and Outreach Group at The Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, are constructing a Space Science Suitcase with a set of simple versions of instruments for monitoring solar and geophysical activity in near Earth space. The instruments will be lent to physics classes in upper secondary schools.

  7. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vos, Winnok H.; Beghuin, Didier; Schwarz, Christian J.; Jones, David B.; van Loon, Jack J. W. A.; Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen; Stelzer, Ernst H. K.

    2014-10-01

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  8. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vos, Winnok H., E-mail: winnok.devos@uantwerpen.be [Laboratory of Cell Biology and Histology, Department of Veterinary Sciences, University of Antwerp, Antwerp (Belgium); Cell Systems and Imaging Research Group, Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Ghent University, Ghent (Belgium); Beghuin, Didier [Lambda-X, Nivelles (Belgium); Schwarz, Christian J. [European Space Agency (ESA), ESTEC, TEC-MMG, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Jones, David B. [Institute for Experimental Orthopaedics and Biomechanics, Philipps University, Marburg (Germany); Loon, Jack J. W. A. van [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery/Oral Pathology, VU University Medical Center and Department of Oral Cell Biology, Academic Centre for Dentistry Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bereiter-Hahn, Juergen; Stelzer, Ernst H. K. [Physical Biology, BMLS (FB15, IZN), Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as ionizing radiation and microgravity at the cellular and tissue level demands adequate visualization technology. Advanced light microscopy (ALM) is the leading tool for non-destructive structural and functional investigation of static as well as dynamic biological systems. In recent years, technological developments and advances in photochemistry and genetic engineering have boosted all aspects of resolution, readout and throughput, rendering ALM ideally suited for biological space research. While various microscopy-based studies have addressed cellular response to space-related environmental stressors, biological endpoints have typically been determined only after the mission, leaving an experimental gap that is prone to bias results. An on-board, real-time microscopical monitoring device can bridge this gap. Breadboards and even fully operational microscope setups have been conceived, but they need to be rendered more compact and versatile. Most importantly, they must allow addressing the impact of gravity, or the lack thereof, on physiologically relevant biological systems in space and in ground-based simulations. In order to delineate the essential functionalities for such a system, we have reviewed the pending questions in space science, the relevant biological model systems, and the state-of-the art in ALM. Based on a rigorous trade-off, in which we recognize the relevance of multi-cellular systems and the cellular microenvironment, we propose a compact, but flexible concept for space-related cell biological research that is based on light sheet microscopy.

  9. Artistic Research on Freedom in Space and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.; Schelfhout, Ronald; Gelfand, Dmitry; Van der Heide, Edwin; Preusterink, Jolanda; Domnitch, Evelina

    ArtScience ESTEC: Space science in the arts. Since the earliest scientific preparations for extra-terrestrial travel at the beginning of the 20th century, the exploration of outer space has become a quintessential framework of the human condition and its creative manifestations. Although the artistic pursuit of space science is still in its infancy, an accelerated evolution is currently underway. Perspective: With the current state of the planet and the development of technology, humankind has the ability to look from a greater distance to the damage that has been done. This offers potential in the form of early detection and prevention of disasters. Meanwhile our aim seems to be directed away from the earth into the universe. In the Space science in the arts project I tried to encapsulate these two viewpoints that tend to avoid each other. We are still earthbound and that is our basis. A tree cannot grow tall without strong roots. Space, a promise of freedom. Line of thought: Space sounds like freedom but to actually send people out there they have to be strapped tightly on top of a giant missile to reach a habitat of interconnecting tubes with very little space. It is impossible to escape protocol with- out risking your life and the lives of astronauts have been fixed years in advance. This is the human predicament which does not apply to the telescopes and other devices used to reach far into the universe. Providing information instantly the various forms of light allow us to travel without moving. Description of the installation: The research on freedom in space and science led to the development of an installation that reflects the dualistic aspect which clings to the exploration of the universe. The installation is a model on multiple scales. You can look at the material or the feeling it evokes as well as at the constantly changing projections. The image is light. Inside this glass circle there is a broken dome placed over a dark and reflective surface on

  10. The Spectrum of Citizen Science Projects in Astronomy and Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, B. J. H.; Day, B.; Gay, P. L.; Jacoby, S. H.; Raddick, M. J.; Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2010-08-01

    Citizen science projects are gaining in popularity and are seen by some as a paradigm shift that will benefit participants, extend scientific research, and improve public understanding of how science is done. All projects engage nonspecialists in observations, measurements, or classifications that further some aspect of scientific activity. In astronomy and space science, there is a range of involvement from passive to active, and differences in how necessary the citizen scientists are to the scientific goals of the project. Some projects are dealing with scientific questions that could not be investigated effectively and efficiently without the aid of large numbers of human volunteers. We will conduct a panel discussion of the lessons learned from several current citizen science projects in astronomy and space science. We will also engage session participants in round table discussions of future citizen science projects, especially in light of the large data sets becoming available online and access to educational telescopes.

  11. Lessons from Communicating Space Science Over the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooling, David, Jr.; Triese, D.

    2000-01-01

    The Science Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center uses the web in an aggressive manner to expand communications beyond the traditional "public affairs" or "media relations" routines. The key to success has been developing a balanced process that A) involves laboratory personnel and the NASA center community through a weekly Science Communications Roundtable, B) vests ownership and development of the product (i.e., the story) in the scientist a writer resident in the laboratory, and C) seeks taps the talents of the outside communications community through the Research/Roadmap Communications activity. The process is flexible and responsive, allowing Science@NASA to provide daily coverage for events, such as two materials science missions managed by NASA/Marshall. In addition to developing materials for the web, Science@NASA has conducted extensive research to determine what subjects people seek on the web, and the best methods to position stories so they will be found and read.

  12. Research and Development of Electrostatic Accelerometers for Space Science Missions at HUST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanzheng; Li, Zhuxi; Hu, Ming; Liu, Li; Qu, Shaobo; Tan, Dingyin; Tu, Haibo; Wu, Shuchao; Yin, Hang; Li, Hongyin; Zhou, Zebing

    2017-08-23

    High-precision electrostatic accelerometers have achieved remarkable success in satellite Earth gravity field recovery missions. Ultralow-noise inertial sensors play important roles in space gravitational wave detection missions such as the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission, and key technologies have been verified in the LISA Pathfinder mission. Meanwhile, at Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST, China), a space accelerometer and inertial sensor based on capacitive sensors and the electrostatic control technique have also been studied and developed independently for more than 16 years. In this paper, we review the operational principle, application, and requirements of the electrostatic accelerometer and inertial sensor in different space missions. The development and progress of a space electrostatic accelerometer at HUST, including ground investigation and space verification are presented.

  13. Space science in the twenty-first century: imperatives for the decades 1995 to 2015 : life sciences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1988-01-01

    Early in 1984, NASA asked the Space Science Board to undertake a study to determine the principal scientific issues that the disciplines of space science would face during the period from about 1995 to 2015...

  14. Space Culture: Innovative Cultural Approaches To Public Engagement With Astronomy, Space Science And Astronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Roger F.

    2012-01-01

    In recent years a number of cultural organizations have established ongoing programs of public engagement with astronomy, space science and astronautics. Many involve elements of citizen science initiatives, artists’ residencies in scientific laboratories and agencies, art and science festivals, and social network projects as well as more traditional exhibition venues. Recognizing these programs several agencies and organizations have established mechanisms for facilitating public engagement with astronomy and space science through cultural activities. The International Astronautics Federation has established an Technical Activities Committee for the Cultural Utilization of Space. Over the past year the NSF and NEA have organized disciplinary workshops to develop recommendations relating to art-science interaction and community building efforts. Rationales for encouraging public engagement via cultural projects range from theory of creativity, innovation and invention to cultural appropriation in the context of `socially robust science’ as advocated by Helga Nowotny of the European Research Council. Public engagement with science, as opposed to science education and outreach initiatives, require different approaches. Just as organizations have employed education professionals to lead education activities, so they must employ cultural professionals if they wish to develop public engagement projects via arts and culture. One outcome of the NSF and NEA workshops has been development of a rationale for converting STEM to STEAM by including the arts in STEM methodologies, particularly for K-12 where students can access science via arts and cultural contexts. Often these require new kinds of informal education approaches that exploit locative media, gaming platforms, artists projects and citizen science. Incorporating astronomy and space science content in art and cultural projects requires new skills in `cultural translation’ and `trans-mediation’ and new kinds

  15. Science & Technology Review January/February 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-12

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  16. Nuclear computational science a century in review

    CERN Document Server

    Azmy, Yousry

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear engineering has undergone extensive progress over the years. In the past century, colossal developments have been made and with specific reference to the mathematical theory and computational science underlying this discipline, advances in areas such as high-order discretization methods, Krylov Methods and Iteration Acceleration have steadily grown. Nuclear Computational Science: A Century in Review addresses these topics and many more; topics which hold special ties to the first half of the century, and topics focused around the unique combination of nuclear engineering, computational

  17. Science & Technology Review January/February 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-18

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  18. Science & Technology Review October/November 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orme, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-11-05

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world.

  19. Relevance and challenges of space science education in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasturirangan, K.

    Development in space research activities during the past decades has been responsible to bring about revolutionary concepts and advances in long distance reliable communications, remote sensing of earth's resources and environment, planetary science, astronomy and cosmology. The ever-unfolding future prospects and potentials of the field, which are to be exploited for the well-being of the human race, pose many challenges including educating the masses. The configuration and content of imparting such education at different academic levels vary with the overall promotion of space research activities of a country. It is recognised that no single system of space science education can perhaps be applied uniformly to all countries as local variables are to be considered based on interest, infrastructure, practical experience and availability of trained manpower. The prevailing situation of science education in general and space science education in particular with reference to developing countries is discussed along with suggestions on the necessary means to improve the education programme in this frontier area of great intellectual possibilities.

  20. The state of space science in Africa | Mhlahlo | Africa Insight

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been an increase in the number of space science activities and facilities in Africa in the last 15 years. This increase, however, is not proportionate to the indigenous user community for these activities and facilities. In this paper, I discuss these activities and their benefits for the African region, and point out some of ...

  1. Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: About this journal. Journal Home > Eastern Africa Social Science Research Review: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Social Justice and Out-of-School Science Learning: Exploring Equity in Science Television, Science Clubs and Maker Spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Emily

    2017-01-01

    This article outlines how social justice theories, in combination with the concepts of infrastructure access, literacies and community acceptance, can be used to think about equity in out-of-school science learning. The author applies these ideas to out-of-school learning via television, science clubs, and maker spaces, looking at research as well…

  4. A New Center for Science Education at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, I.

    1998-01-01

    The Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley has established a new Center for Science Education through the Laboratory's Senior Fellow program. The Center has a two-fold mission: (1) science education research through collaborations with UCB Graduate School of Education faculty, and (2) education and outreach projects that bring NASA research to the K-14 and general public communities. The Center is the host of two major education and outreach programs funded by NASA - The Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum (SECEF) and the Science Education Gateway (SEGway) Project. The SECEF - a collaborative between UC Berkeley and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center - is one of four Forums that have been funded through the Office of Space Science as part of their Education Ecosystem. SEGway is a partnership between science research centers, science museums, and teachers, for the purpose of developing Internet-based, inquiry activities for the K-12 classroom that tap NASA remote sensing data. We will describe the Center for Science Education's history and vision, as well as summarize our core programs.

  5. Heliophysics Science and the Moon: Potential Solar and Space Physics Science for Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    This report addresses both these features new science enabled by NASAs exploration initiative and enabling science that is critical to ensuring a safe return to the Moon and onward to Mars. The areas of interest are structured into four main themes: Theme 1: Heliophysics Science of the Moon Studies of the Moons unique magnetodynamic plasma environment. Theme 2: Space Weather, Safeguarding the Journey Studies aimed at developing a predictive capability for space weather hazards. Theme 3: The Moon as a Historical Record Studies of the variation of the lunar regolith to uncover the history of the Sun, solar system, local interstellar medium, galaxy, and universe. Theme 4: The Moon as a Heliophysics Science Platform Using the unique environment of the lunar surface as a platform to provide observations beneficial to advancing heliophysics science.

  6. Status of space science and technology - An Australian perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carver, J. H.

    The ``Tyranny of Distance'' has had a profound influence on Australian history and reaction to it has been an important factor in determining national scientific and technological goals. Because of its size and geographical remoteness, Australia is one of the countries to have gained substantially from the applications of space technology particularly in the fields of communications, meteorology and remote sensing. Australia is the fifth largest investor in INTELSAT which carries a major fraction of the nation's overseas telecommunications. A domestic satellite system, AUSSAT, is being acquired to improve telecommunications within the country. Australia is heavily dependent on satellite data for routine meteorological forecasting. Data from the Australian Landsat Station are in strong demand, particularly for mineral exploration. In the field of space science, Australia is collaborating with Canada and the United States in feasibility studies for STARLAB, a free-flying UV-optical one metre telescope proposed for launch by the US Space Shuttle beginning in 1989. These scientific and technological programs in which Australia is participating are all dependent upon the space programs of other nations and in describing the status of space science and technology from an Australian perspective some comments will be made on particular aspects of the space programs of the United States and Japan.

  7. Enhanced science capability on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felice, Ronald R.; Kienlen, Mike

    2002-12-01

    It is inevitable that the International Space Station (ISS) will play a significant role in the conduct of science in space. However, in order to provide this service to a wide and broad community and to perform it cost effectively, alternative concepts must be considered to complement NASA"s Institutional capability. Currently science payload forward and return data services must compete for higher priority ISS infrastructure support requirements. Furthermore, initial astronaut crews will be limited to a single shift. Much of their time and activities will be required to meet their physical needs (exercise, recreation, etc.), station maintenance, and station operations, leaving precious little time to actively conduct science payload operations. ISS construction plans include the provisioning of several truss mounted, space-hardened pallets, both zenith and nadir facing. The ISS pallets will provide a platform to conduct both earth and space sciences. Additionally, the same pallets can be used for life and material sciences, as astronauts could place and retrieve sealed canisters for long-term micro-gravity exposure. Thus the pallets provide great potential for enhancing ISS science return. This significant addition to ISS payload capacity has the potential to exacerbate priorities and service contention factors within the exiting institution. In order to have it all, i.e., more science and less contention, the pallets must be data smart and operate autonomously so that NASA institutional services are not additionally taxed. Specifically, the "Enhanced Science Capability on the International Space Station" concept involves placing data handling and spread spectrum X-band communications capabilities directly on ISS pallets. Spread spectrum techniques are considered as a means of discriminating between different pallets as well as to eliminate RFI. The data and RF systems, similar to that of "free flyers", include a fully functional command and data handling system

  8. Project LAUNCH: Bringing Space into Math and Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauerbach, M.; Henry, D. P.; Schmidt, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    Project LAUNCH is a K-12 teacher professional development program, which has been created in collaboration between the Whitaker Center for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education at Florida Gulf Coast University (FGCU), and the Florida Space Research Institute (FSRI). Utilizing Space as the overarching theme it is designed to improve mathematics and science teaching, using inquiry based, hands-on teaching practices, which are aligned with Florida s Sunshine State Standards. Many students are excited about space exploration and it provides a great venue to get them involved in science and mathematics. The scope of Project LAUNCH however goes beyond just providing competency in the subject area, as pedagogy is also an intricate part of the project. Participants were introduced to the Conceptual Change Model (CCM) [1] as a framework to model good teaching practices. As the CCM closely follows what scientists call the scientific process, this teaching method is also useful to actively engage institute participants ,as well as their students, in real science. Project LAUNCH specifically targets teachers in low performing, high socioeconomic schools, where the need for skilled teachers is most critical.

  9. Hungarian space research 1981-1985: Lectures and review articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benko, G. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    This monograph presents an overview of Hungarian space research from 1981 to 1985. Topics discussed in the original report include the development of space research centers, the flight of the first Hungarian astronaut, Hungarian participation in international space programs such as the Vega/Halley's Comet mission and the BEALUCA materials science experiment, advances in astronomical research, and activities of the Cosmic Geodetic Observatory. Other topics discussed incude space biomedical studies, meteorological applications of space research, satellite communications, and satellite power supply systems.

  10. Laboratory science with space data accessing and using space-experiment data

    CERN Document Server

    van Loon, Jack J W A; Zell, Martin; Beysens, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    For decades experiments conducted on space stations like MIR and the ISS have been gathering data in many fields of research in the natural sciences, medicine and engineering. The European Union-sponsored ULISSE project focused on exploring the wealth of unique experimental data provided by revealing raw and metadata from these studies via an Internet Portal. This book complements the portal. It serves as a handbook of space experiments and describes the various types of experimental infrastructure areas of research in the life and physical sciences and technology space missions that hosted scientific experiments the types and structures of the data produced and how one can access the data through ULISSE for further research. The book provides an overview of the wealth of space experiment data that can be used for additional research and will inspire academics (e.g. those looking for topics for their PhD thesis) and research departments in companies for their continued development.

  11. Implications of the Next Generation Science Standards for Earth and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysession, M. E.; Colson, M.; Duschl, R. A.; Huff, K.; Lopez, R. E.; Messina, P.; Speranza, P.; Matthews, T.; Childress, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), due to be released in 2013, set a new direction for K-12 science education in America. These standards will put forth significant changes for Earth and space sciences. The NGSS are based upon the recommendations of the National Research Council's 2011 report "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Cross-Cutting Concepts, and Core Ideas." The standards are being written by a large group of authors who represent many different constituencies, including 26 participating states, in a process led by Achieve, Inc. The standards encourage innovative ways to teach science at the K-12 level, including enhanced integration between the content, practices, and crosscutting ideas of science and greater assimilation among the sciences and engineering, and among the sciences, mathematics, and English language arts. The NGSS presents a greater emphasis on Earth and space sciences than in previous standards, recommending a year at both the middle and high school levels. The new standards also present a greater emphasis on areas of direct impact between humans and the Earth system, including climate change, natural hazards, resource management, and sustainability.

  12. Miniature Photonic Spectrometers and Filters for Astrophysics and Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veilleux, Sylvain

    ratio of the waveguide cross-section and overall design of the Braggs and arrayed waveguide gratings to make them polarization-independent, and (4) increase the overall throughput of these gratings to >70% at 1 - 1.7 microns by changing the deposition method of the cladding material (silica) and reducing the scattering losses with the use of a newly commissioned electron beam writer that delivers higher resolution (down to a few nm instead of 8 nm). Two graduate students, already trained in the techniques relevant to this project, will lead the optimization, fabrication, and testing of these optoelectronic components. Up to three undergraduate students will also be involved with the research. A wide swath of astrophysical research, from spectroscopic studies of the distant universe to searches for biosignatures in the atmospheres of exoplanets, stands to benefit from these miniature spectrometers and filters on board future NASA balloon, CubeSat, Explorer, Probe-, Flagship-, and Surveyor class missions. The technical by-products of this effort will also offer benefits in fields far beyond astronomy, such as medicine, human science, petrochemistry, space geo-science, and quantum computing and communication. The names and contact information of five experts qualified to review this proposal were emailed directly to the two relevant Program Officers.

  13. NASA's astrophysics archives at the National Space Science Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vansteenberg, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    NASA maintains an archive facility for Astronomical Science data collected from NASA's missions at the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) at Goddard Space Flight Center. This archive was created to insure the science data collected by NASA would be preserved and useable in the future by the science community. Through 25 years of operation there are many lessons learned, from data collection procedures, archive preservation methods, and distribution to the community. This document presents some of these more important lessons, for example: KISS (Keep It Simple, Stupid) in system development. Also addressed are some of the myths of archiving, such as 'scientists always know everything about everything', or 'it cannot possibly be that hard, after all simple data tech's do it'. There are indeed good reasons that a proper archive capability is needed by the astronomical community, the important question is how to use the existing expertise as well as the new innovative ideas to do the best job archiving this valuable science data.

  14. Space Weather Research at the National Science Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, T.

    2015-12-01

    There is growing recognition that the space environment can have substantial, deleterious, impacts on society. Consequently, research enabling specification and forecasting of hazardous space effects has become of great importance and urgency. This research requires studying the entire Sun-Earth system to understand the coupling of regions all the way from the source of disturbances in the solar atmosphere to the Earth's upper atmosphere. The traditional, region-based structure of research programs in Solar and Space physics is ill suited to fully support the change in research directions that the problem of space weather dictates. On the observational side, dense, distributed networks of observations are required to capture the full large-scale dynamics of the space environment. However, the cost of implementing these is typically prohibitive, especially for measurements in space. Thus, by necessity, the implementation of such new capabilities needs to build on creative and unconventional solutions. A particularly powerful idea is the utilization of new developments in data engineering and informatics research (big data). These new technologies make it possible to build systems that can collect and process huge amounts of noisy and inaccurate data and extract from them useful information. The shift in emphasis towards system level science for geospace also necessitates the development of large-scale and multi-scale models. The development of large-scale models capable of capturing the global dynamics of the Earth's space environment requires investment in research team efforts that go beyond what can typically be funded under the traditional grants programs. This calls for effective interdisciplinary collaboration and efficient leveraging of resources both nationally and internationally. This presentation will provide an overview of current and planned initiatives, programs, and activities at the National Science Foundation pertaining to space weathe research.

  15. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Science and Engineering Apprentice Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Science and Engineering Apprentice Program for high school students is one of NASA's many efforts toward a goal of scientific literacy. It embraces science, mathematics, and technology as keys to purposeful and sustained progress and security for our nation and its people. It serves as a model for helping reform education by striving to address mechanisms to influence the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of our students. It focuses on what to do today to meet the challenges of tomorrow.

  16. Solar and Space Physics: A Science for a Technological Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    From the interior of the Sun, to the upper atmosphere and near-space environment of Earth, and outward to a region far beyond Pluto where the Sun's influence wanes, advances during the past decade in space physics and solar physics the disciplines NASA refers to as heliophysics have yielded spectacular insights into the phenomena that affect our home in space. This report, from the National Research Council's (NRC's) Committee for a Decadal Strategy in Solar and Space Physics, is the second NRC decadal survey in heliophysics. Building on the research accomplishments realized over the past decade, the report presents a program of basic and applied research for the period 2013-2022 that will improve scientific understanding of the mechanisms that drive the Sun's activity and the fundamental physical processes underlying near-Earth plasma dynamics, determine the physical interactions of Earth's atmospheric layers in the context of the connected Sun-Earth system, and enhance greatly the capability to provide realistic and specific forecasts of Earth's space environment that will better serve the needs of society. Although the recommended program is directed primarily to NASA (Science Mission Directorate -- Heliophysics Division) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) (Directorate for Geosciences -- Atmospheric and Geospace Sciences) for action, the report also recommends actions by other federal agencies, especially the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) those parts of NOAA charged with the day-to-day (operational) forecast of space weather. In addition to the recommendations included in this summary, related recommendations are presented in the main text of the report.

  17. Low Gravity Materials Science Research for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Semmes, Edmund B.; Schlagheck, Ronald A.; Bassler, Julie A.; Cook, Mary Beth; Wargo, Michael J.; Sanders, Gerald B.; Marzwell, Neville I.

    2004-01-01

    On January 14, 2004, the President of the United States announced a new vision for the United States civil space program. The Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has the responsibility to implement this new vision. The President also created a Presidential Commission 'to obtain recommendations concerning implementation of the new vision for space exploration.' The President's Commission recognized that achieving the exploration objectives would require significant technical innovation, research, and development in focal areas defined as 'enabling technologies.' Among the 17 enabling technologies identified for initial focus were advanced structures; advanced power and propulsion; closed-loop life support and habitability; extravehicular activity system; autonomous systems and robotics; scientific data collection and analysis; biomedical risk mitigation; and planetary in situ resource utilization. The Commission also recommended realignment of NASA Headquarters organizations to support the vision for space exploration. NASA has aggressively responded in its planning to support the vision for space exploration and with the current considerations of the findings and recommendations from the Presidential Commission. This presentation will examine the transformation and realignment activities to support the vision for space exploration that are underway in the microgravity materials science program. The heritage of the microgravity materials science program, in the context of residence within the organizational structure of the Office of Biological and Physical Research, and thematic and sub-discipline based research content areas, will be briefly examined as the starting point for the ongoing transformation. Overviews of future research directions will be presented and the status of organizational restructuring at NASA Headquarters, with respect to influences on the microgravity materials science program, will be discussed

  18. Between inner space and outer space. Essays on science, art, and philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, J. D.

    In this fascinating and entertaining collection of essays, the author addresses the many question that we ponder in our quest to discover the universe. Key topics are: the popularity of Big Science, and physics and cosmology in particular; life on other planets; issues of time and space and quantum reality; the ancient foundations of science, mathematics, and their most modern expression - complexity theory; and how science relates to religion and aesthetics. Taken as a whole, these thought-provoking essays provide a rich introduction to contemporary scientific debate.

  19. ESSC-ESF Position Paper: Science-Driven Scenario for Space Exploration: Report from the European Space Sciences Committee (ESSC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worms, Jean-Claude; Lammer, Helmut; Barucci, Antonella

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In 2005 the then ESA Directorate for Human Spaceflight, Microgravity and Exploration (D-HME) commissioned a study from the European Science Foundation's (ESF) European Space Sciences Committee (ESSC) to examine the science aspects of the Aurora Programme in preparation for the December...... in NASA's budget that was taking place at that time; e.g., the postponement sine die of the Mars Sample Return mission. At the time of this study, ESSC made it clear to ESA that the timeline imposed prior to the Berlin Conference had not allowed for a proper consultation of the relevant science community......'s exploration programme, dubbed "Emergence and co-evolution of life with its planetary environments," focusing on those targets that can ultimately be reached by humans, i.e., Mars, the Moon, and Near Earth Objects. Mars was further recognized as the focus of that programme, with Mars sample return...

  20. Life sciences biomedical research planning for Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primeaux, Gary R.; Michaud, Roger; Miller, Ladonna; Searcy, Jim; Dickey, Bernistine

    1987-01-01

    The Biomedical Research Project (BmRP), a major component of the NASA Life Sciences Space Station Program, incorporates a laboratory for the study of the effects of microgravity on the human body, and the development of techniques capable of modifying or counteracting these effects. Attention is presently given to a representative scenario of BmRP investigations and associated engineering analyses, together with an account of the evolutionary process by which the scenarios and the Space Station design requirements they entail are identified. Attention is given to a tether-implemented 'variable gravity centrifuge'.

  1. Conceptual planning for Space Station life sciences human research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primeaux, Gary R.; Miller, Ladonna J.; Michaud, Roger B.

    1986-01-01

    The Life Sciences Research Facility dedicated laboratory is currently undergoing system definition within the NASA Space Station program. Attention is presently given to the Humam Research Project portion of the Facility, in view of representative experimentation requirement scenarios and with the intention of accommodating the Facility within the Initial Operational Capability configuration of the Space Station. Such basic engineering questions as orbital and ground logistics operations and hardware maintenance/servicing requirements are addressed. Biospherics, calcium homeostasis, endocrinology, exercise physiology, hematology, immunology, muscle physiology, neurosciences, radiation effects, and reproduction and development, are among the fields of inquiry encompassed by the Facility.

  2. The Space Science Lab: High School Student Solar Research Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelaz, Michael W.; Whitworth, C.; Harris, B.; David, C.

    2007-12-01

    Native American, Hispanic, African American, and other underrepresented high school students in rural Western North Carolina have the unprecedented opportunity as researchers in the Space Science Lab to conduct visible and radio observations of the Sun. The program involves 90 students over a three year period. The primary goal is to reach students who otherwise would not have this opportunity, and motivate them to develop the critical thinking skills necessary for objective scientific inquiry. Students develop skills in electronics, computer sciences, astronomy, physics and earth sciences. Equally important is the hope that the students will become interested in pursuing careers in research or other science-related areas. We expect their enthusiasm for science will increase by experiencing research investigations that are fun and relevant to their understanding of the world around them. The students conduct their own research, and also interact with scientists around the world. A total of 54 students have spent a week at the Space Science Lab located on the campus of the Pisgah Astronomical Research Institute (PARI) during the Summers of 2006 and 2007. Students construct their own JOVE radio telescopes that they bring home to continue their observations during the academic year. They share their results during four follow-up sessions throughout the school year. The students also have Internet access to radio telescopes and solar monitoring equipment at PARI. We report on results from student evaluations from the first year in 2006 and current session student experiences. We gratefully acknowledge support from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund - Student Science Enrichment Program

  3. The Space Science Suitcase - Instruments for Exploring Space Weather From the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olafsson, K.; Ostgaard, N.

    2008-12-01

    The aurora and other phenomena in near Earth space are becoming a considerable part of the science curriculum in upper secondary school (high school - age 16 to 19) in Norway. Introducing scientific methods to the young students is an important task of the education, but experimental science experience is to a great extent restricted to simple laboratory exercises under controlled conditions; observations of uncontrollable natural phenomena are generally left to academic scientists and researchers. The Space Physics Group and The Science Education and Outreach Group at The Department of Physics and Technology, University of Bergen, have constructed a "Space Science Suitcase" with a set of simple versions of instruments for monitoring solar and geophysical activity in near Earth space. The contents of the suitcase are: Two solar telescopes, commercial SLR digital camera with a fisheye lens for photographing the aurora, tri-axial magnetometer, Geiger counter, two spectroscopes, GPS-receiver, a laptop for collecting the pictures and measurements, and a manual with suggestions for some relevant experiments. The suitcase is lent to physics classes in upper secondary schools for 3-4 weeks at each school, allowing the students to do their own quantitative observations of sunspots, magnetic disturbances, optical aurora, background radiation etc. Comparison of these observations with online observations from ground based observatories and satellites is an integrated part of the project. The purpose of the experiment is to promote scientific literacy, bring excitement about space phenomena into the classroom, and, finally, to recruit enthusiastic students to university studies in physic and geophysics in general, and space science in particular.

  4. The contributions of occupational science to the readiness of long duration deep space exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Janis; Burr, Macy; Absi, Maria; Telles, Rochelle; Koh, Howard

    2017-01-01

    This study introduces the contributions of occupational science (OS) to the preparation and support of astronauts during long duration space exploration. Given the hostile environment of space, it is not surprising that there is grave deterioration of both physical and mental health when off Earth. However, OS, through occupational therapy (OT), can identify strategies that maintain health and minimize disruptions in task performance for mission success. To determine the gaps in NASA's preparation of astronauts for long duration space exploration and the viable contributions of OT. Because occupational therapists are trained to address deficits and modify environments to support meaningful engagement in occupations, the OT practitioner is well suited to address the disabling conditions astronauts experience in space. A literature review revealing the challenges of deep space travel on humans was completed. A survey was also sent to (N = 170) occupational therapists worldwide to identify opinions about the profession's involvement in deep space exploration. Ninety-seven percent (N = 163) of the participants believed that OS can inform long duration space travel. Approximately ninety-eight percent (N = 166) of respondents believed that OT interventions can be used on space travelers during long duration space flights. OT interventions can be implemented in any phase of space flight to increase the likelihood of mission success and astronaut safety and well-being.

  5. Exploring the Functioning of Decision Space: A Review of the Available Health Systems Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Tamlyn Eslie; Cleary, Susan; McIntyre, Diane

    2017-01-01

    Background: The concept of decision space holds appeal as an approach to disaggregating the elements that may influence decision-making in decentralized systems. This narrative review aims to explore the functioning of decision space and the factors that influence decision space. Methods: A narrative review of the literature was conducted with searches of online databases and academic journals including PubMed Central, Emerald, Wiley, Science Direct, JSTOR, and Sage. The articles were included in the review based on the criteria that they provided insight into the functioning of decision space either through the explicit application of or reference to decision space, or implicitly through discussion of decision-making related to organizational capacity or accountability mechanisms. Results: The articles included in the review encompass literature related to decentralisation, management and decision space. The majority of the studies utilise qualitative methodologies to assess accountability mechanisms, organisational capacities such as finance, human resources and management, and the extent of decision space. Of the 138 articles retrieved, 76 articles were included in the final review. Conclusion: The literature supports Bossert’s conceptualization of decision space as being related to organizational capacities and accountability mechanisms. These functions influence the decision space available within decentralized systems. The exact relationship between decision space and financial and human resource capacities needs to be explored in greater detail to determine the potential influence on system functioning. PMID:28812832

  6. Exploring the Functioning of Decision Space: A Review of the Available Health Systems Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamlyn Eslie Roman

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The concept of decision space holds appeal as an approach to disaggregating the elements that may influence decision-making in decentralized systems. This narrative review aims to explore the functioning of decision space and the factors that influence decision space. Methods A narrative review of the literature was conducted with searches of online databases and academic journals including PubMed Central, Emerald, Wiley, Science Direct, JSTOR, and Sage. The articles were included in the review based on the criteria that they provided insight into the functioning of decision space either through the explicit application of or reference to decision space, or implicitly through discussion of decision-making related to organizational capacity or accountability mechanisms. Results The articles included in the review encompass literature related to decentralisation, management and decision space. The majority of the studies utilise qualitative methodologies to assess accountability mechanisms, organisational capacities such as finance, human resources and management, and the extent of decision space. Of the 138 articles retrieved, 76 articles were included in the final review. Conclusion The literature supports Bossert’s conceptualization of decision space as being related to organizational capacities and accountability mechanisms. These functions influence the decision space available within decentralized systems. The exact relationship between decision space and financial and human resource capacities needs to be explored in greater detail to determine the potential influence on system functioning.

  7. Exploring the Functioning of Decision Space: A Review of the Available Health Systems Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Tamlyn Eslie; Cleary, Susan; McIntyre, Diane

    2017-02-27

    The concept of decision space holds appeal as an approach to disaggregating the elements that may influence decision-making in decentralized systems. This narrative review aims to explore the functioning of decision space and the factors that influence decision space. A narrative review of the literature was conducted with searches of online databases and academic journals including PubMed Central, Emerald, Wiley, Science Direct, JSTOR, and Sage. The articles were included in the review based on the criteria that they provided insight into the functioning of decision space either through the explicit application of or reference to decision space, or implicitly through discussion of decision-making related to organizational capacity or accountability mechanisms. The articles included in the review encompass literature related to decentralisation, management and decision space. The majority of the studies utilise qualitative methodologies to assess accountability mechanisms, organisational capacities such as finance, human resources and management, and the extent of decision space. Of the 138 articles retrieved, 76 articles were included in the final review. The literature supports Bossert's conceptualization of decision space as being related to organizational capacities and accountability mechanisms. These functions influence the decision space available within decentralized systems. The exact relationship between decision space and financial and human resource capacities needs to be explored in greater detail to determine the potential influence on system functioning.

  8. A new chapter in doctoral candidate training: The Helmholtz Space Life Sciences Research School (SpaceLife)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellweg, C. E.; Gerzer, R.; Reitz, G.

    2011-05-01

    In the field of space life sciences, the demand of an interdisciplinary and specific training of young researchers is high due to the complex interaction of medical, biological, physical, technical and other questions. The Helmholtz Space Life Sciences Research School (SpaceLife) offers an excellent interdisciplinary training for doctoral students from different fields (biology, biochemistry, biotechnology, physics, psychology, nutrition or sports sciences and related fields) and any country. SpaceLife is coordinated by the Institute of Aerospace Medicine at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Cologne. The German Universities in Kiel, Bonn, Aachen, Regensburg, Magdeburg and Berlin, and the German Sports University (DSHS) in Cologne are members of SpaceLife. The Universities of Erlangen-Nürnberg, Frankfurt, Hohenheim, and the Beihang University in Beijing are associated partners. In each generation, up to 25 students can participate in the three-year program. Students learn to develop integrated concepts to solve health issues in human spaceflight and in related disease patterns on Earth, and to further explore the requirements for life in extreme environments, enabling a better understanding of the ecosystem Earth and the search for life on other planets in unmanned and manned missions. The doctoral candidates are coached by two specialist supervisors from DLR and the partner university, and a mentor. All students attend lectures in different subfields of space life sciences to attain an overview of the field: radiation and gravitational biology, astrobiology and space physiology, including psychological aspects of short and long term space missions. Seminars, advanced lectures, laboratory courses and stays at labs at the partner institutions or abroad are offered as elective course and will provide in-depth knowledge of the chosen subfield or allow to appropriate innovative methods. In Journal Clubs of the participating working groups, doctoral students learn

  9. Astronauts in Outer Space Teaching Students Science: Comparing Chinese and American Implementations of Space-to-Earth Virtual Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Song A.; Zhang, Meilan; Tillman, Daniel A.; Robertson, William; Siemssen, Annette; Paez, Carlos R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate differences between science lessons taught by Chinese astronauts in a space shuttle and those taught by American astronauts in a space shuttle, both of whom conducted experiments and demonstrations of science activities in a microgravity space environment. The study examined the instructional structure…

  10. Developing Nontraditional Partnerships to Disseminate the Space Science Story (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, C.; Allen, J. S.; Garcia, J.; Martinez, D.

    2010-12-01

    NASA Space Science Days (NSSD) was established in 2004 to bring the story of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) to a community far removed from areas NASA traditionally served. The original NSSD invited 400 5th and 8th graders from the Texas Rio Grande Valley area to the University of Texas Brownsville (UTB) campus to participate in a one day Saturday event filled with information about MER with related hands on activities. Currently the yearly NSSD at UTB has grown to over 700 5th and 8th grade participants who are mentored by NASA trained university students. The NSSD program has expanded to other universities and community colleges and will soon include universities from throughout the U.S. A collaboration between three major institutions: 1) NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate (ARES); 2) The Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers/Advancing Hispanic Excellence in Technology Engineering, Math, and Science, (SHPE/AHETEMS); and 3) The University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) has been established to enable the dissemination of NASA Space Science related education materials throughout the U.S. Already in its 8th year, UTB developed and tested a NSSD model that has successfully engaged students throughout South Texas Rio Grande Valley in space science activities. With this newly formed collaboration of NASA JSC, SHPE/AHETEMS, and UTB the expansion of the NSSD model will allow trained SHPE students and professionals to conduct events throughout SHPE’s established nation-wide delivery systems. Each year a new NSSD site will be established through an application process solicited from SHPE student and professional chapters. Once a chapter is awarded to conduct a NSSD, upper-level high school and university students will travel to NASA-JSC for a two day workshop where students learn about the current year’s science theme and are trained to present hands-on activities related to the theme. In each NSSD

  11. Trends in Gender Bias Across Earth and Space Science Scholarly Publishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerback, J. C.; Hanson, B.

    2016-12-01

    It has been challenging to assess gender bias across scholarly publishing in part because data on both gender and age are needed, as the proportion of women varies with age across most disciplines. To address this, we matched the member database of the American Geophysical Union (AGU), where age and gender are self-reported, with the AGU editorial database. The proportion of women members increased since 2013 across all disciplines from 24.6 to 26.9%. The proportion of women publishing as first authors increased across most disciplines and overall from 24.8 to 25.9%; however, it decreased in atmospheric science, global change, and planetary science. Overall, women had a higher acceptance rate than men across all in aggregate, 60.4 vs. 56.4% and equal or higher in all disciplines. Co-author behavior did not vary greatly across disciplines; most female first authors had 20% female co-authors, whereas male first authors have 15% female co-authors. Women were used less often as reviewers (17.9% of the time) than expected based on their membership in the society and their rate as accepted first authors (26.7% female) and all accepted authors (23.3%). Furthermore, the proportion of reviews done by women did not increase in several disciplines from 2012-2015, including atmospheric science, geology and geophysics, mathematical geophysics, and planetary science. The bias is a result of fewer suggestions of women reviewers by male authors and editors, and also a higher decline rate by women within each age cohort when asked to review. Invitations to women to review increased from 16.7% in 2012 to 18.5% in 2015 overall, but not in geology and geophysics, planetary sciences, and space sciences. Participating as a reviewer can have important career benefits; thus, addressing this bias is important for addressing pipeline issues and improving retention of women in the field.

  12. The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI): Science Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Niu, A; Haubold, H J; Doi, T

    2012-01-01

    The United Nations Human Space Technology Initiative (HSTI) aims at promoting international cooperation in human spaceflight and space exploration-related activities; creating awareness among countries on the benefits of utilizing human space technology and its applications; and building capacity in microgravity education and research. HSTI has been conducting various scientific activities to promote microgravity education and research. The primary science activity is called 'Zero-gravity Instrument Distribution Project', in which one-axis clinostats will be distributed worldwide. The distribution project will provide unique opportunities for students and researchers to observe the growth of indigenous plants in their countries in a simulated microgravity condition and is expected to create a huge dataset of plant species with their responses to gravity.

  13. Great Explorations in Math and Science[R] (GEMS[R]) Space Science. What Works Clearinghouse Intervention Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    What Works Clearinghouse, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Great Explorations in Math and Science[R] (GEMS[R]) Space Science" is an instructional sequence for grades 3-5 that covers fundamental concepts, including planetary sizes and distance, the Earth's shape and movement, gravity, and moon phases and eclipses. Part of the "GEMS"[R] core curriculum, "GEMS[R] Space Science"…

  14. International Space Station-Based Electromagnetic Launcher for Space Science Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    A method was developed of lowering the cost of planetary exploration missions by using an electromagnetic propulsion/launcher, rather than a chemical-fueled rocket for propulsion. An electromagnetic launcher (EML) based at the International Space Station (ISS) would be used to launch small science payloads to the Moon and near Earth asteroids (NEAs) for the science and exploration missions. An ISS-based electromagnetic launcher could also inject science payloads into orbits around the Earth and perhaps to Mars. The EML would replace rocket technology for certain missions. The EML is a high-energy system that uses electricity rather than propellant to accelerate payloads to high velocities. The most common type of EML is the rail gun. Other types are possible, e.g., a coil gun, also known as a Gauss gun or mass driver. The EML could also "drop" science payloads into the Earth's upper

  15. The Office of Space Science and Applications strategic plan, 1990: A strategy for leadership in space through excellence in space science and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    A strategic plan for the U.S. space science and applications program during the next 5 to 10 years was developed and published in 1988. Based on the strategies developed by the advisory committees of both the National Academy of Science and NASA, the plan balances major, moderate, and small mission initiatives, the utilization of the Space Station Freedom, and the requirements for a vital research base. The Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) strategic plan is constructed around five actions: establish a set of programmatic themes; establish a set of decision rules; establish a set of priorities for missions and programs within each theme; demonstrate that the strategy will yield a viable program; and check the strategy for consistency within resource constraints. The OSSA plan is revised annually. This OSSA 1990 Strategic Plan refines the 1989 Plan and represents OSSA's initial plan for fulfilling its responsibilities in two major national initiatives. The Plan is now built on interrelated, complementary strategies for the core space science and applications program, for the U.S. Global Change Research Program, and for the Space Exploration Initiative. The challenge is to make sure that the current level of activity is sustained through the end of this century and into the next. The 1990 Plan presents OSSA's strategy to do this.

  16. An open science peer review oath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksic, Jelena; Alexa, Adrian; Attwood, Teresa K; Chue Hong, Neil; Dahlö, Martin; Davey, Robert; Dinkel, Holger; Förstner, Konrad U; Grigorov, Ivo; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Lahti, Leo; MacLean, Dan; Markie, Michael L; Molloy, Jenny; Schneider, Maria Victoria; Scott, Camille; Smith-Unna, Richard; Vieira, Bruno Miguel

    2014-01-01

    One of the foundations of the scientific method is to be able to reproduce experiments and corroborate the results of research that has been done before. However, with the increasing complexities of new technologies and techniques, coupled with the specialisation of experiments, reproducing research findings has become a growing challenge. Clearly, scientific methods must be conveyed succinctly, and with clarity and rigour, in order for research to be reproducible. Here, we propose steps to help increase the transparency of the scientific method and the reproducibility of research results: specifically, we introduce a peer-review oath and accompanying manifesto. These have been designed to offer guidelines to enable reviewers (with the minimum friction or bias) to follow and apply open science principles, and support the ideas of transparency, reproducibility and ultimately greater societal impact. Introducing the oath and manifesto at the stage of peer review will help to check that the research being published includes everything that other researchers would need to successfully repeat the work. Peer review is the lynchpin of the publishing system: encouraging the community to consciously (and conscientiously) uphold these principles should help to improve published papers, increase confidence in the reproducibility of the work and, ultimately, provide strategic benefits to authors and their institutions.

  17. Critical Review of the Navy Space Cadre

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    DOD Department of Defense DON Department of the Navy DS4 director of space forces EAS executive agent for space ELINT electronic intelligence ESG ...on CSG, CPR, or expeditionary strike group ( ESG ) staffs that are not coded as sea-based billets. Overall, the ZBR report and recommended billet...48 billet, and one communications billet.192 CSG-8 has two space billets, one each for IW and mine warfare. All three active ESGs have space-coded

  18. Proposed School of Earth And Space Sciences, Hyderabad, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aswathanarayana, U.

    2004-05-01

    The hallmarks of the proposed school in the University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad,India, would be synergy, inclusivity and globalism. The School will use the synergy between the earth (including oceanic and atmospheric realms), space and information sciences to bridge the digital divide, and promote knowledge-driven and job-led economic development of the country. It will endeavour to (i) provide the basic science underpinnings for Space and Information Technologies, (ii) develop new methodologies for the utilization of natural resources (water, soils, sediments, minerals, biota, etc.)in ecologically-sustainable, employment-generating and economically-viable ways, (iii) mitigate the adverse consequences of natural hazards through preparedness systems,etc. The School will undertake research in the inter-disciplinary areas of earth and space sciences (e.g. climate predictability, satellite remote sensing of soil moisture) and linking integrative science with the needs of the decision makers. It will offer a two-year M.Tech. (four semesters, devoted to Theory, Tools, Applications and Dissertation, respectively ) course in Earth and Space Sciences. The Applications will initially cover eight course clusters devoted to Water Resources Management, Agriculture, Ocean studies, Energy Resources, Urban studies, Environment, Natural Hazards and Mineral Resources Management. The School will also offer a number of highly focused short-term refresher courses / supplementary courses to enable cadres to update their knowledge and skills. The graduates of the School would be able to find employment in macro-projects, such as inter-basin water transfers, and Operational crop condition assessment over large areas, etc. as well as in micro-projects, such as rainwater harvesting, and marketing of remote sensing products to stake-holders (e.g. precision agricultural advice to the farmers, using the large bandwidth of thousands of kilometres of unlit optical fibres). As the School is highly

  19. Developing a STEM Education Pipeline Using Astronomy and Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The Capitol College Center for Space Science Education and Public Outreach is in its second year of operation working to address the clearly articulated national need of providing an educated workforce in the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. Working with the K-12, community college and college students, the Center is actively engaged in providing learning opportunities for future leaders in STEM. This goal is accomplished through the following methods: 1. Increase student awareness of selected astronomy/space science career fields that require a college education, including necessary academic preparation related to STEM courses in high school. 2. Increase the number of community college students, specifically within the traditionally under-represented populations, advance to the bachelor's level degree within the STEM fields and then secure jobs within the field. 3. Increase STEM participation/majors in general (both in community colleges and four-year colleges), and especially NASA-related disciplines. This presentation provides an update regarding the Center's activities, reports on the year-one results working with middle schools and high schools in the state of Maryland and the Prince George's Community College, and highlights plans for the future.

  20. What Makes Earth and Space Science Sexy? A Model for Developing Systemic Change in Earth and Space Systems Science Curriculum and Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slutskin, R. L.

    2001-12-01

    Earth and Space Science may be the neglected child in the family of high school sciences. In this session, we examine the strategies that Anne Arundel County Public Schools and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center used to develop a dynamic and highly engaging program which follows the vision of the National Science Education Standards, is grounded in key concepts of NASA's Earth Science Directorate, and allows students to examine and apply the current research of NASA scientists. Find out why Earth/Space Systems Science seems to have usurped biology and has made students, principals, and teachers clamor for similar instructional practices in what is traditionally thought of as the "glamorous" course.

  1. Bringing Space Science to the Undergraduate Classroom: NASA's USIP Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassiliadis, D.; Christian, J. A.; Keesee, A. M.; Spencer, E. A.; Gross, J.; Lusk, G. D.

    2015-12-01

    As part of its participation in NASA's Undergraduate Student Instrument Project (USIP), a team of engineering and physics students at West Virginia University (WVU) built a series of sounding rocket and balloon missions. The first rocket and balloon missions were flown near-simultaneously in a campaign on June 26, 2014 (image). The second sounding rocket mission is scheduled for October 5, 2015. Students took a course on space science in spring 2014, and followup courses in physics and aerospace engineering departments have been developed since then. Guest payloads were flown from students affiliated with WV Wesleyan College, NASA's IV&V Facility, and the University of South Alabama. Students specialized in electrical and aerospace engineering, and space physics topics. They interacted regularly with NASA engineers, presented at telecons, and prepared reports. A number of students decided to pursue internships and/or jobs related to space science and technology. Outreach to the campus and broader community included demos and flight projects. The physics payload includes plasma density and temperature measurements using a Langmuir and a triple probe; plasma frequency measurements using a radio sounder (WVU) and an impedance probe (U.S.A); and a magnetometer (WVWC). The aerospace payload includes an IMU swarm, a GPS experiment (with TEC capability); a cubesat communications module (NASA IV&V), and basic flight dynamics. Acknowledgments: staff members at NASA Wallops Flight Facility, and at the Orbital-ATK Rocket Center, WV.

  2. Life Science Research In Space: The Spacelab Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, R. M.; Cramer, D. B.; Reid, D. H.

    1982-02-01

    This manuscript summarizes the events leading to the first Spacelab mission dedicated exclusively to life sciences experimentation. This mission is currently planned for a Space Shuttle flight in the 1984-1985 time frame. Following publication of a NASA Announce ment of Opportunity in 1978, approximately 400 proposals were received from researchers in universities, government laboratories, and industrial firms both in the U. S. and abroad. In 1979, 87 candidate experiments were selected for definition studies to identify the detailed resources which would need to be accommodated by the Spacelab. These proposals addressed problems encountered in man's previous space flight experience, such as space motion sickness, cardiovascular deconditioning, muscle wasting, calcium loss and a reduction in red cell mass. Additionally, experiments were selected in areas of bioengineering, behavior and performance, Plant physiology, and cell biology. Animal species (rodents and small primates) to be investigated will be housed in a specially-developed animal holding facility which will provide all life support requirements for the animals. Human subjects will consist of a Mission Specialist Astronaut and up to four Payload Specialists. Plant species will be housed in Plant Growth Units. A general purpose work station and biological containment facility will provide the working area for much of the in-space experimentation. A comprehensive array of flight qualified laboratory equipment will be made available by NASA to Principal Investigators for in-flight use by the Payload Specialists. This equipment includes microscopes, biotelemetry systems, cameras, centrifuges, refrigerators, and similar equipment. All of this equipment has been designed for use in weightlessness. The process to develop a primary payload of about 20 experiments is now underway for Spacelab mission number four, the first dedicated life sciences flight. Under the overall guidance of NASA Headquarters

  3. SpacePy - a Python-based library of tools for the space sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morley, Steven K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Welling, Daniel T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Koller, Josef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Larsen, Brian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Henderson, Michael G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Space science deals with the bodies within the solar system and the interplanetary medium; the primary focus is on atmospheres and above - at Earth the short timescale variation in the the geomagnetic field, the Van Allen radiation belts and the deposition of energy into the upper atmosphere are key areas of investigation. SpacePy is a package for Python, targeted at the space sciences, that aims to make basic data analysis, modeling and visualization easier. It builds on the capabilities of the well-known NumPy and MatPlotLib packages. Publication quality output direct from analyses is emphasized. The SpacePy project seeks to promote accurate and open research standards by providing an open environment for code development. In the space physics community there has long been a significant reliance on proprietary languages that restrict free transfer of data and reproducibility of results. By providing a comprehensive, open-source library of widely used analysis and visualization tools in a free, modern and intuitive language, we hope that this reliance will be diminished. SpacePy includes implementations of widely used empirical models, statistical techniques used frequently in space science (e.g. superposed epoch analysis), and interfaces to advanced tools such as electron drift shell calculations for radiation belt studies. SpacePy also provides analysis and visualization tools for components of the Space Weather Modeling Framework - currently this only includes the BATS-R-US 3-D magnetohydrodynamic model and the RAM ring current model - including streamline tracing in vector fields. Further development is currently underway. External libraries, which include well-known magnetic field models, high-precision time conversions and coordinate transformations are wrapped for access from Python using SWIG and f2py. The rest of the tools have been implemented directly in Python. The provision of open-source tools to perform common tasks will provide openness in the

  4. The influence of television and film on interest in space and science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Katrina Marie

    Entertainment media has the great potential to inspire interest in the topics it presents. The purpose of this study is to better understand how entertainment media contributes to people's interests in space and science. There is a huge variety of science communication topics in previous literature, some of which deals with television and film, but very little that specifically study how television and film can inspire interest. A historical review of pioneers in the space industry shows that many were inspired by entertainment media, which at the time consisted of science fiction novels and magazines. In order to explore the possible relationships among influences for scientists and non-scientists and to determine specific questions for future research, I created and distributed an anonymous, online survey. The survey is suggestive, exploratory research using a convenience sampling method and is not meant to provide scientifically accurate statistics. 251 participants completed the survey; 196 were scientists and 55 were non-scientists. The survey showed that the participants did identify entertainment media as a major influencing factor, on a comparable level as factors such as classes or family members. Participants in space-related fields were influenced by entertainment media more than the participants in other fields were. I identified several questions for future research, such as: Are people in space-related fields inspired by entertainment media more than other scientists are? Are non-space-related scientists often inspired by space-related media? Do people who regularly watch science fiction tend to be more scientifically literate than average?

  5. Challenges of space medical operations and life sciences management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, S. G.

    1992-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has been the premier launch and landing site for America's space program since the early 1960s. Visitors are cognizant of space vehicles, processing facilities and launch pads which are treasured national resources. However, most are unaware of the unique organization which supports launch and landing activities and manages the center's occupational medicine, environmental health, ecological and environmental monitoring functions, as well as human and plant research programs. Management of this multifaceted organization can be complex because funding its different functions comes from a number of sources. Additionally the diverse disciplines of personnel present a special challenge in maintaining professional competencies while assuring efficiency in cyclical operations. This article explains the organization's structure and reviews some of its accomplishments.

  6. Science on the Moon: The Wailing Wall of Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas

    Science on and from the Moon has important implications for expanding human knowledge and understanding, a prospect for the 21st Century that has been under discussion for at least the past 25 years [1-3]. That having been said, however, there remain many issues of international versus national priorities, strategy, economy, and politics that come into play. The result is a very complex form of human behavior where science and exploration take center stage, but many other important human options are sacrificed. To renew this dialogue about the Moon, it seems we are already rushing pell-mell into it as has been done in the past. The U.S., Japan, China, India, and Russia either have sent or plan to send satellites and robotic landers there at this time. What does a return to the Moon mean, why are we doing this now, who should pay for it, and how? The only semblance of such a human enterprise seems to be the LHC currently coming online at CERN. Can it be used as a model of international collaboration rather than a sports or military event focused on national competition? Who decides and what is the human sacrifice? There are compelling arguments for establishing science on the Moon as one of the primary goals for returning to the Moon and venturing beyond. A number of science endeavors will be summarized, beyond lunar and planetary science per se. These include fundamental physics experiments that are background-limited by the Earth's magnetic dipole moment and noise produced by its atmosphere and seismic interior. The Moon is an excellent platform for some forms of astronomy. Other candidate Moon-based experiments vary from neutrino and gravitational wave astronomy, particle astrophysics, and cosmic-ray calorimeters, to space physics and fundamental physics such as proton decay. The list goes on and includes placing humans in a hostile environment to study the long-term effects of space weather. The list is long, and even newer ideas will come from this COSPAR

  7. Nuclear electric propulsion for future NASA space science missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, Chen-wan L.

    1993-07-20

    This study has been made to assess the needs, potential benefits and the applicability of early (circa year 2000) Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technology in conducting NASA science missions. The study goals are: to obtain the performance characteristics of near term NEP technologies; to measure the performance potential of NEP for important OSSA missions; to compare NEP performance with that of conventional chemical propulsion; to identify key NEP system requirements; to clarify and depict the degree of importance NEP might have in advancing NASA space science goals; and to disseminate the results in a format useful to both NEP users and technology developers. This is a mission performance study and precludes investigations of multitudes of new mission operation and systems design issues attendant in a NEP flight.

  8. Increasing student learning through space life sciences education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Nancy P.; Kyle Roberts, J.; Tharp, Barbara Z.; Denk, James P.; Cutler, Paula H.; Thomson, William A.

    2005-05-01

    Scientists and educators at Baylor College of Medicine are using space life sciences research areas as themes for middle school science and health instructional materials. This paper discusses study findings of the most recent unit, Food and Fitness, which teaches concepts related to energy and nutrition through guided inquiry. Results of a field test involving more than 750 students are reported. Use of the teaching materials resulted in significant knowledge gains by students as measured on a pre/post assessment administered by teachers. In addition, an analysis of the time spent by each teacher on each activity suggested that it is preferable to conduct all of the activities in the unit with students rather than allocating the same total amount of time on just a subset of the activities.

  9. Space science public outreach at Louisiana State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzik, T.; Babin, E.; Cooney, W.; Giammanco, J.; Hartman, D.; McNeil, R.; Slovak, M.; Stacy, J.

    Over the last seven years the Astronomy / Astrophysics group in the Department of Physics and Astronomy of Louisiana State University has developed an exten- sive Space Science education and public outreach program. This program includes the local park district (the Recreation and Park Commission for the Parish of East Baton Rouge, BREC), the local amateur astronomer group (the Baton Rouge As- tronomical Society, BRAS), the Louisiana Arts and Science Museum (LASM), and Southern University (SU, part of the largest HBCU system in the nation). Our effort has directly led to the development of the Highland Road Park Observatory (HRPO, http://www.bro.lsu.edu/hrpo) that supports student astronomy training at LSU and SU, amateur observations and a public program for adults and children, establishment of a series of teacher professional development workshops in astronomy and physics, and the "Robots for Internet Experiences (ROBIE)" project (http://www.bro.lsu.edu/) where we have several instruments (e.g. HAM radio, radio telescope, optical tele- scopes) that can be controlled over the internet by students and teachers in the class- room along with associated lessons developed by a teacher group. In addition, this year the LASM, will be opening a new planetarium / space theater in downtown Baton Rouge, Louisiana. We are currently working to bring live views of the heavens from the HRPO telescope to audiences attending planetarium shows and will be working closely with planetarium staff to develop shows that highlight LSU astronomy / space science research. During the presentation we will provide some details about our in- dividual projects, the overall structure of our program, establishing community links and some of the lessons we learned along the way. Finally, we would like to acknowl- edge NASA, Louisiana State University, the Louisiana Systemic Initiatives Program and the Louisiana Technology Innovation Fund for their support.

  10. Science of floorball: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervo, Taru; Nordström, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to comprehensively review the scientific research on floorball at the competitive and recreational levels according to field of study. Methods Full articles containing original data on floorball that had been published in English in peer-reviewed journals were considered for inclusion. Results Of 75 articles screened, 19 were included in this systematic review. One article each was identified in the fields of sports management and sports psychology, and the remaining 17 articles were in the field of sports medicine. Injury epidemiology in floorball players was the most thoroughly examined topic of research. To date, no research has been performed on the incidence of floorball-related injury, or any aspect of the sport, in children and adolescents. Conclusion Collaborative research among sports science disciplines is needed to identify strategies to reduce the incidence of injury and enhance the performance of licensed floorball players. Despite the increasing popularity of floorball in recent years, surprisingly little research has examined this sport. PMID:25349484

  11. Without Gravity: Designing Science Equipment for the International Space Station and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kevin Y.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation discusses space biology research, the space flight factors needed to design hardware to conduct biological science in microgravity, and examples of NASA and commercial hardware that enable space biology study.

  12. My Space- a collaboration between Arts & Science to create a suite of informal interactive public engagement initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Niamh, , Dr.; McSweeney, Clair; Smith, Niall, , Dr.; O'Neill, Stephanie; Foley, Cathy; Crawley, Joanna; Phelan, Ronan; Colley, Dan; Henderson, Clare; Conroy, Lorraine

    2015-04-01

    A suite of informal interactive public engagement initiatives, entitled 'MySpace' was created, to promote the importance of Earth science and Space exploration, to ignite curiosity and discover new and engaging platforms for science in the Arts & in STEM Education, and to increase awareness of careers in Ireland's Space and Earth Science industries. Site visits to research centres in Ireland & abroad, interviews with scientists, engineers, and former astronauts were conducted over a 6 month period. A suite of performance pieces emerged from this development phase, based on Dr. Shaw's personal documented journey and the dissemination of her research. These included: 1. 'To Space'- A live multimedia theatre performance aimed at the general public & young adult. Initially presented as a 'Work In Progress' event at The Festival of Curiosity, the full theatre show 'To Space' premiered at Science Gallery, Dublin as part of Tiger Dublin Fringe Arts Festival. Response to the piece was very strong, indicated by audience response, box office sales and theatre reviews in national press and online. A national and international tour is in place for 2015. To Space was performed a total of 10 times and was seen by 680 audiences. 2. An adapted piece for 13-17 year old students -'ToSpace for Secondary Schools'- to increase awareness of Ireland's involvement in Space Exploration & to encourage school leavers to dream big. This show toured nationally as part of World Space week and Science week events in conjunction with ESERO Ireland, CIT Blackrock Castle Observatory, Cork, Armagh Planetarium & Dunsink Observatory. It was performed 12 times and was seen by 570 students. 3. 'My Place in Space', created for families from the very old (60 +) to the very young (3yrs +), this highly interactive workshop highlighted the appeal of science through the wonders of our planet and its place in Space. Presented at Festival of Curiosity, the Mallow Science Fair and at Science week 2014, this

  13. The Science of Gravitational Waves with Space Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2013-01-01

    After decades of effort, direct detection of gravitational waves from astrophysical sources is on the horizon. Aside from teaching us about gravity itself, gravitational waves hold immense promise as a tool for general astrophysics. In this talk I will provide an overview of the science enabled by a space-based gravitational wave observatory sensitive in the milli-Hertz frequency band including the nature and evolution of massive black holes and their host galaxies, the demographics of stellar remnant compact objects in the Milky Way, and the behavior of gravity in the strong-field regime. I will also summarize the current status of efforts in the US and Europe to implement a space-based gravitational wave observatory.

  14. Educational Spaces: A Pictorial Review of Significant Spaces. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    A pictorial review presents educational facility designs from around the world as examples of contemporary and inspirational trends in school architecture. Photos showcase exterior and interior design features from primary and secondary, and adult educational facilities. Biographies of some of the architectural firms involved are provided. (GR)

  15. Book Review: Physics of the Space Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Gordon D.

    1998-01-01

    Space physics, narrowly defined as the study of Earth's plasma environment, has had an identity crisis throughout its relatively brief existence as a discipline. - The limited and often serendipitous nature of the data requires the research style of an astrophysicist. However, the in situ observations and instrumentation that are central to the field are quite different from the remote observations and instrumentation of astronomy. Compared to neutral gases, the wealth of additional phenomena and the complexity associated with magnetized plasmas and their interaction leaves little in common with the atmospheric scientist. Although the phenomena studied in space physics are ultimately important to astrophysics, the intimate measurements of plasma properties provide a greater commonality with the plasma physicist. Space physics has experienced something of a renaissance in the past few years. The interdisciplinary umbrella "Solar-Terrestrial Physics" or "Sun-Earth Connection" has stimulated an increasing interaction of space physicists, solar physicists and atmospheric scientists. Spectacular images of the Sun from Yohkoh and SOHO and solar-activity-related damage to communications satellites have increased the public's awareness of and interest in "space weather". The dangers of energetic particles and currents in space to technological systems and to future space exploration have elevated space physics observations from interesting scientific measurements that can be included on a space probe to critically important measurements that must be made.

  16. Science on the Moon: The Wailing Wall of Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Science on and from the Moon has important implications for expanding human knowledge and understanding, a prospect for the 21st Century that has been under discussion for at least the past 25 years. That having been said, however, there remain many issues of international versus national priorities, strategy, economy, and politics that come into play. The result is a very complex form of human behavior where science and exploration take center stage, but many other important human options are sacrificed. To renew this dialogue about the Moon, it seems we are already rushing pell-mell into it as has been done in the past. The U.S., Japan, China, India, and Russia either have sent or plan to send satellites and robotic landers there at this time. What does a return to the Moon mean, why are we doing this now, who should pay for it, and how? The only semblance of such a human enterprise seems to be the LHC currently coming online at CERN. Can it be used as a model of international collaboration rather than a sports or military event focused on national competition? Who decides and what is the human sacrifice? There are compelling arguments for establishing science on the Moon as one of the primary goals for returning to the Moon and venturing beyond. A number of science endeavors will be summarized, beyond lunar and planetary science per se. These include fundamental physics experiments that are background-limited by the Earth's magnetic dipole moment and noise produced by its atmosphere and seismic interior. The Moon is an excellent platform for some forms of astronomy. Other candidate Moon-based experiments vary from neutrino and gravitational wave astronomy, particle astrophysics, and cosmic-ray calorimeters, to space physics and fundamental physics such as proton decay. The list goes on and includes placing humans in a hostile environment to study the long-term effects of space weather. The list is long, and even newer ideas will come from this COSPAR conference

  17. Evaluating Educational Resources for Inclusion in the Dig Texas Instructional Blueprints for Earth & Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, B. E.; Bohls-Graham, E.; Martinez, A. O.; Ellins, K. K.; Riggs, E. M.; Serpa, L. F.; Stocks, E.; Fox, S.; Kent, M.

    2014-12-01

    Today's instruction in Earth's systems requires thoughtful selection of curricula, and in turn, high quality learning activities that address modern Earth science. The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), which are intended to guide K-12 science instruction, further demand a discriminating selection process. The DIG (Diversity & Innovation in Geoscience) Texas Instructional Blueprints attempt to fulfill this practice by compiling vetted educational resources freely available online into units that are the building blocks of the blueprints. Each blueprint is composed of 9 three-week teaching units and serves as a scope and sequence for teaching a one-year Earth science course. In the earliest stages of the project, teams explored the Internet for classroom-worthy resources, including laboratory investigations, videos, visualizations, and readings, and submitted the educational resources deemed suitable for the project into the project's online review tool. Each team member evaluated the educational resources chosen by fellow team members according to a set of predetermined criteria that had been incorporated into the review tool. Resources rated as very good or excellent by all team members were submitted to the project PIs for approval. At this stage, approved resources became candidates for inclusion in the blueprint units. Team members tagged approved resources with descriptors for the type of resource and instructional strategy, and aligned these to the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Earth and Space Science and the Earth Science Literacy Principles. Each team then assembled and sequenced resources according to content strand, balancing the types of learning experiences within each unit. Once units were packaged, teams then considered how they addressed the NGSS and identified the relevant disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts, and science and engineering practices. In addition to providing a brief overview of the project, this

  18. Reviews of accelerator science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Chou, Weiren

    2008-01-01

    Particle accelerators are a major invention of the 20th century. In the last eight decades, they have evolved enormously and have fundamentally changed the way we live, think and work. Accelerators are the most powerful microscopes for viewing the tiniest inner structure of cells, genes, molecules, atoms and their constituents such as protons, neutrons, electrons, neutrinos and quarks. This opens up a whole new world for materials science, chemistry and molecular biology.Accelerators with megawatt beam power may ultimately solve a critical problem faced by our society, namely, the treatment of nuclear waste and the supply of an alternative type of energy. There are also tens of thousands of small accelerators all over the world. They are used every day for medical imaging, cancer therapy, radioisotope production, high-density chip-making, mass spectrometry, cargo x-ray/gamma-ray imaging, detection of explosives and illicit drugs, and weapons. This volume provides a comprehensive review of this driving and fas...

  19. Science & Technology Review October/November 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, R. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meissner, C. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kotta, P. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-11-11

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. The Laboratory is operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNS is a partnership involving Bechtel National, University of California, Babcock & Wilcox, Washington Division of URS Corporation, and Battelle in affiliation with Texas A&M University. More information about LLNS is available online at www.llnsllc.com. Please address any correspondence (including name and address changes) to S&TR, Mail Stop L-664, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551, or telephone (925) 423-3893. Our e-mail address is str-mail@llnl.gov. S&TR is available on the Web at str.llnl.gov.

  20. Multimedia, spatial visualization, and the Earth and Space Science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavich, Carrie

    It is important that Earth and Space science educators understand how their students develop the ability to visualize three-dimensional (3D) concepts. The purpose of this study is to provide Earth and Space Science instructors with information on what spatial skills that are needed in the classroom can be integrated from outside sources. Two specific questions guided the research: (1) Do spatial skills developed in one academic subject transfer to another academic subject? (2) Do spatial skills developed outside of the classroom via 3D multimedia have a significant impact on performance on academic tasks? Fifty-three students at the University of Texas at Dallas were tested on three types of spatial tasks: spatial rotation ability, geo-spatial penetrative ability, and geometry of the Earth-Moon-Sun system. Demographic data collected included academic major, previous coursework in geology and astronomy, and computer usage habits. The computer usage data was divided into three- dimensional multimedia use, and other types of computer use such as word processing and Internet browsing. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  1. The NASA Sounding Rocket Program and space sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkin, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    High altitude suborbital rockets (sounding rockets) have been extensively used for space science research in the post-World War II period; the NASA Sounding Rocket Program has been on-going since the inception of the Agency and supports all space science disciplines. In recent years, sounding rockets have been utilized to provide a low gravity environment for materials processing research, particularly in the commercial sector. Sounding rockets offer unique features as a low gravity flight platform. Quick response and low cost combine to provide more frequent spaceflight opportunities. Suborbital spacecraft design practice has achieved a high level of sophistication which optimizes the limited available flight times. High data-rate telemetry, real-time ground up-link command and down-link video data are routinely used in sounding rocket payloads. Standard, off-the-shelf, active control systems are available which limit payload body rates such that the gravitational environment remains less than 10(-4) g during the control period. Operational launch vehicles are available which can provide up to 7 minutes of experiment time for experiment weights up to 270 kg. Standard payload recovery systems allow soft impact retrieval of payloads. When launched from White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, payloads can be retrieved and returned to the launch site within hours.

  2. Developing Nontraditional Partnerships to Disseminate the Space Science Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo, Charles; Allen, Jaclyn; Garcia, Javier; Martinez, Debra

    2010-01-01

    NASA Space Science Days (NSSD) was established in 2004 to bring the story of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) to a community far removed from areas NASA traditionally serves. The original NSSD invited 400 5th and 8th graders from the Texas Rio Grande Valley area to the University of Texas Brownsville campus to participate in a one day Saturday event filled with information about MER with related hands on activities. Currently the program has grown to over 700 5th and 8th grade participants who are mentored by trained university students from several Texas universities and community colleges and growing to include universities from throughout the U.S. A collaboration between three major institutions: The NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate (ARES), the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers/Advancing Hispanic Excellence in Technology Engineering, Math, and Science, (SHPE/AHETEMS), and the University of Texas at Brownsville (UTB) has been established to enable the dissemination of Solar System related educational materials throughout the U.S. Already in its 8th year, UTB has developed and tested a NSSD model that has successfully disseminated space science materials to students throughout South Texas Rio Grande Valley. With this newly formed collaboration this model s expansion will allow trained SHPE students and professionals to conduct events throughout its established nation-wide delivery systems. Each year a new NSSD site will be established through an application process solicited from SHPE student and professional chapters. Once a chapter is awarded, upper-level high school and university students will travel to NASA- JSC for a two day workshop where students learn about the current year s theme and are trained to present hands-on activities related to the theme. Additional training by ARES and UTB occurs one month before the new event in their own communities. Both local middle school teachers and

  3. Titan Science with the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Conor A.; Achterberg, Richard K.; Adamkovics, Mate; Bezard, Bruno; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Comet, Thomas; Hayes, Alaxander G.; Lellouch, Emmanuel; Lemmon, Mark T.; Lopez-Puertas, Manuel; hide

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), scheduled for launch in 2018, is the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) but with a signicantly larger aperture (6.5 m) and advanced instrumentation focusing on infrared science (0.6-28.0 microns). In this paper, we examine the potential for scientic investigation of Titan using JWST, primarily with three of the four instruments: NIRSpec, NIRCam, and MIRI, noting that science with NIRISS will be complementary. Five core scientic themes are identied: (1) surface (2) tropospheric clouds (3) tropospheric gases (4) stratospheric composition, and (5) stratospheric hazes. We discuss each theme in depth, including the scientic purpose, capabilities, and limitations of the instrument suite and suggested observing schemes. We pay particular attention to saturation, which is a problem for all three instruments, but may be alleviated for NIRCam through use of selecting small sub-arrays of the detectorssufcient to encompass Titan, but with signicantly faster readout times. We nd that JWST has very signicant potential for advancing Titan science, with a spectral resolution exceeding the Cassini instrument suite at near-infrared wavelengths and a spatial resolution exceeding HST at the same wavelengths. In particular, JWST will be valuable for time-domain monitoring of Titan, given a ve- to ten-year expected lifetime for the observatory, for example, monitoring the seasonal appearance of clouds. JWST observations in the post-Cassini period will complement those of other large facilities such as HST, ALMA, SOFIA, and next-generation ground-based telescopes (TMT, GMT, EELT).

  4. Materials Science Research Rack Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, S. E.; Lehman, J. R.; Frazier, N. C.

    2016-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) is a research facility developed under a cooperative research agreement between NASA and ESA for materials science investigations on the International Space Station (ISS). MSRR was launched on STS-128 in August 2009 and currently resides in the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. Since that time, MSRR has logged more than 1400 hours of operating time. The MSRR accommodates advanced investigations in the microgravity environment on the ISS for basic materials science research in areas such as solidification of metals and alloys. The purpose is to advance the scientific understanding of materials processing as affected by microgravity and to gain insight into the physical behavior of materials processing. MSRR allows for the study of a variety of materials, including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses. Materials science research benefits from the microgravity environment of space, where the researcher can better isolate chemical and thermal properties of materials from the effects of gravity. With this knowledge, reliable predictions can be made about the conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials. MSRR is a highly automated facility with a modular design capable of supporting multiple types of investigations. The NASA-provided Rack Support Subsystem provides services (power, thermal control, vacuum access, and command and data handling) to the ESA-developed Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) that accommodates interchangeable Furnace Inserts (FI). Two ESA-developed FIs are presently available on the ISS: the Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) and the Solidification and Quenching Furnace (SQF). Sample Cartridge Assemblies (SCAs), each containing one or more material samples, are installed in the FI by the crew and can be processed at temperatures up to 1400degC. ESA continues to develop samples with 14 planned for launch and processing in the near future. Additionally NASA has begun developing SCAs to

  5. Earth and Space Science PhDs: Class of 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesler, J.

    2001-12-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU) and the American Geological Institute (AGI) have been collecting data on recent PhDs in the geosciences for 5 years (1996-2000). Over these years continual improvement has been recorded in the job market through indicators such as time to find employment and starting salaries. As these indicators continue to improve, so too does the perception of the job market in general. There are several characteristics that are unique to PhDs in the geosciences. Unlike physical science graduates, there is a significant number who have been working full-time at least one year prior to earning their PhD. Recent graduates employed prior to graduation are heavily concentrated in Solid Earth Geology (41%) followed by Atmospheric Sciences (19%) and Oceanography (12%). A second distinguishable feature of Earth & space science PhDs is their age. Each year there is a higher percentage of recent graduates over the age of 40: 16% in 1998, 20% in 1999, and 23% in 2000. In 2000, the average time between earning a B.S. and starting a graduate program was 4.6 years. Both 1999 and 2000 show a drop in the overall numbers of postdoctoral appointments. This suggests that greater than 50% of the recent graduates are finding full-time permanent employment. Of the geoscience subfields, oceanography has greatest number of people obtaining employment outside the field.

  6. Strategic plan, 1991: A strategy for leadership in space through excellence in space science and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    In 1988, the Office of Space Science and Applications (OSSA) developed and published a Strategic Plan for the United States' space science and applications program during the next 5 to 10 years. The Plan presented the proposed OSSA program for the next fiscal year and defined a flexible process that provides the basis for near-term decisions on the allocation of resources and the planning of future efforts. Based on the strategies that have been developed by the advisory committees both of the National Academy of Sciences and of NASA, the Plan balances major, moderate, and small mission initiatives, the utilization of Space Station Freedom, and the requirements for a vital research base. The Plan can be adjusted to accommodate varying budget levels, both those levels that provide opportunities for an expanded science and applications program, and those that constrain growth. SSA's strategic planning is constructed around five actions: establish a set of programmatic themes; establish a set of decision rules; establish a set of priorities for missions and programs within each theme; demonstrate that the strategy can yield a viable program; and check the strategy for consistency with resource constraints. The outcome of this process is a clear, coherent strategy that meets both NASA's and OSSA's goals, that assures realism in long-range planning and advanced technology development, and that provides sufficient resiliency to respond and adapt to both known and unexpected internal and external realities. The OSSA Strategic Plan is revised annually to reflect the approval of new programs, improved understanding of requirements and issues, and any major changes in the circumstances, both within NASA and external to NASA, in which OSSA initiatives are considered.

  7. South Dakota Space Grant Consortium: Balancing Indigenous Earth System and Space Science with Western/Contemporary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J.; Nall, J.

    2005-05-01

    The South Dakota Space Grant Consortium (SDSGC) was established March 1, 1991 by a NASA Capability Enhancement Grant. Since that time SDSGC has worked to provide earth system and space science education, outreach and services to all students across South Dakota. South Dakota has nine tribes and five Tribal Colleges. This has presented a tremendous opportunity to develop sustainable equitable partnerships and collaborations. SDSGC believes strongly in developing programs and activities that highlight and reinforce the balance of Indigenous science and ways of knowing with current findings in Western/Contemporary Science. This blending of science and culture creates a learning community where individuals especially students, can gain confidence and pride in their unique skills and abilities. Universities are also witnessing the accomplishments and achievements of students who are able to experience a tribal environment and then carry that experience to a college/university/workplace and significantly increase the learning achievement of all. The presentation will highlight current Tribal College and Tribal Community partnerships with the Rosebud Sioux Reservation (Sinte Gleska University), Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (Oglala Lakota College), Standing Rock Sioux Reservation (Sitting Bull College) and Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation (Si Tanka) amongst others. Programs and activities to be explained during the presentation include but not limited to: NASA Workforce Native Connections, Scientific Knowledge for Indian Learning and Leadership (SKILL), NSF "Bridges to Success" Summer Research Program, NSF "Fire Ecology" Summer Research Experience, as well as geospatial and space science programs for students and general community members. The presentation will also cover the current initiatives underway through NASA Workforce Development. These include: partnering with the Annual He Sapa Wacipi (Black Hills Pow Wow - attendance of 14,000 Natives) to host Native Space

  8. Visual Analytics for Integrated Data Analysis in Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Reinaldo; Sawant, Hanumant; Sych, Robert; Fernandes, Francisco

    Analysis of information from multiple data sources obtained through high resolution instrumental measurements has become a fundamental task in all scientific areas. The development of expert methods able to treat such multi- source data systems, with both large variability and measurement extension, is a key for studying complex scientific phenomena, especially those related to systemic analysis in space and environmental sciences. In this talk, we present a time series generalization introducing the concept of generalized numerical lattice, which represents a discrete sequence of temporal measures for a given variable. In this novel representation approach each generalized numerical lattice brings post-analytical data information. We define a generalized numerical lattice £ as a set of three parameters representing the following data properties: dimensionality, size and post-analytical measure. From this generalization, any multi-source database can be reduced to a closed set of classified time series in spatio-temporal generalized dimensions. As a case study, we show a preliminary application in space science data, highlighting the possibility of a real time analysis expert system. In this particular application, we have selected and analyzed, applying detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA), decimetric solar bursts associated to X flare-classes. The association with geomagnetic activity is also reported. DFA method is performed in the framework of a radio burst automatic monitoring system. Our results may characterize the variability pattern evolution, computing the DFA scaling exponent, scanning the time series by a short windowing before the extreme event. For the first time, the application of systematic fluctuation analysis for space weather purposes is presented.

  9. Fundamental Space Biology-1: HHR and Incubator for ISS Space Life Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirven-Brooks, M.; Fahlen, T.; Sato, K.; Reiss-Bubenheim, D.

    The Space Station Biological Research Project (SSBRP) is developing an Incubator and a Habitat Holding Rack (HHR) to support life science experiments aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The HHR provides for cooling and power needs, and supports data transfer (including telemetry, commanding, video processing, Ethernet), video compression, and data and command storage). The Incubator is a habitat that provides for controlled temperature between +4 C and +45 C and air circulation. It has a set of connector ports for power, analog and digital sensors, and video pass-through to support experiment-unique hardware within the Incubator specimen chamber. The Incubator exchanges air with the ISS cabin. The Fundamental Space Biology-1 (FSB-1) Project will be delivering, the HHR and two Incubators to ISS. The two inaugural experiments to be conducted on ISS using this hardware will investigate the biological effects of the space environment on two model organisms, Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae; yeast) and Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans; nematode). The {M}odel {Y}east {C}ultures {o}n {S}tation (MYCOS) experiment will support examination of the effect of microgravity and cosmic radiation on yeast biology. In the second series of experiments during the same increment, the effects of microgravity and space environment radiation on C. elegans will be examined. The {F}undamental Space Biology {I}ncubator {E}xperiment {R}esearch using {C}. {e}legans (FIERCE) study is designed to support a long duration, multi-generational study of nematodes. FIERCE on-orbit science operations will include video monitoring, sub-culturing and periodic fixation and freezing of samples. For both experiments, investigators will be solicited via an International Space Life Sciences Research Announcement. In the near future, the Centrifuge Accommodation Module will be delivered to ISS, which will house the SSBRP 2.5 m Centrifuge Rotor. The Incubator can be placed onto the Centrifuge

  10. Use of social media and online tools for participative space education and citizen science in India: Perspectives of future space leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Aafaque; Sridhar, Apoorva

    2012-07-01

    review with various examples of present existing projects such as Open NASA, Zooniverse, SETI, Google Earth etc. Support these perspectives. Further, the authors put light on how developing countries can benefit from Space outreach and citizen science through Social Media to connect with the society. The paper concludes with various innovative ideas that are derived from the survey and discussions with these prospective space leaders, along with the insights of the authors on future strategies for such approaches in India and other developing nations. Demographically, youth provides the largest user-base to the Social Media and these young future space leaders are expert at using Social Media in their daily life. Thus, it is important that their collective and shared opinion is presented to the present policymakers and leaders of space agencies and industry.

  11. Investigation of Electrostatic Accelerometer in HUST for Space Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yanzheng; Hu, Ming; Li, Gui; Liu, Li; Qu, Shaobo; Wu, Shuchao; Zhou, Zebing

    2014-05-01

    High-precision electrostatic accelerometers are significant payload in CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE gravity missions to measure the non-gravitational forces. In our group, space electrostatic accelerometer and inertial sensor based on the capacitive sensors and electrostatic control technique has been investigated for space science research in China such as testing of equivalence principle (TEPO), searching non-Newtonian force in micrometer range, satellite Earth's field recovery and so on. In our group, a capacitive position sensor with a resolution of 10-7pF/Hz1/2 and the μV/Hz1/2 level electrostatic actuator are developed. The fiber torsion pendulum facility is adopt to measure the parameters of the electrostatic controlled inertial sensor such as the resolution, and the electrostatic stiffness, the cross couple between different DOFs. Meanwhile, high voltage suspension and free fall methods are applied to verify the function of electrostatic accelerometer. Last, the engineering model of electrostatic accelerometer has been developed and tested successfully in space and preliminary results are present.

  12. Postcolonial foldings of space and identity in science education: limits, transformations, prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembylas, Michalinos; Avraamidou, Lucy

    2008-12-01

    The four essays reviewed here constitute a worthwhile attempt to discuss various aspects of postcolonial theory, and offer constructive ideas to ongoing academic as well as public conversations with respect to whether science education can meet the challenges of educating an increasingly diverse population in the 21st century. These essays are grounded in the assumption that it is difficult to make meaningful and transformative changes in science education so that educators' efforts take into consideration the dramatic changes (i.e., diverse culture and racial origins, language, economic status etc.) of `an era of globalization' in order to meet the demands of today's schools. Each of these four essays problematizes various aspects of the social and cultural conditions of science education nowadays using different `postcolonial' ideas to interpret the implications for science learning and teaching. Although the term `postcolonial' has certainly multiple meanings in the literature, we use this term here to describe the philosophical position of these essays to challenge long-standing and hegemonic practices and taken-for-granted assumptions in science education. Through critical analysis of these essays, we engage in a dialogue with the authors, focusing on two of what seem crucial issues in understanding the potential contributions as well as the risks of postcolonial concepts in science education; these issues are space and identity. We choose these issues because they permeate all four essays in interesting and often provocative ways.

  13. Growing Minority Student Interest in Earth and Space Science with Suborbital and Space-related Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    This presentation describes the transformative impact of student involvement in suborbital and Cubesat investigations under the MECSAT program umbrella at Medgar Evers College (MEC). The programs evolved from MUSPIN, a NASA program serving minority institutions. The MUSPIN program supported student internships for the MESSENGER and New Horizons missions at the Applied Physics Lab at John Hopkins University. The success of this program motivated the formation of smaller-scale programs at MEC to engage a wider group of minority students using an institutional context. The programs include an student-instrument BalloonSAT project, ozone investigations using sounding vehicles and a recently initiated Cubesat program involving other colleges in the City University of New York (CUNY). The science objectives range from investigations of atmospheric profiles, e.g. temperature, humidity, pressure, and CO2 to ozone profiles in rural and urban areas including comparisons with Aura instrument retrievals to ionospheric scintillation experiments for the Cubesat project. Through workshops and faculty collaborations, the evolving programs have mushroomed to include the development of parallel programs with faculty and students at other minority institutions both within and external to CUNY. The interdisciplinary context of these programs has stimulated student interest in Earth and Space Science and includes the use of best practices in retention and pipelining of underrepresented minority students in STEM disciplines. Through curriculum integration initiatives, secondary impacts are also observed supported by student blogs, social networking sites, etc.. The program continues to evolve including related student internships at Goddard Space Flight Center and the development of a CUNY-wide interdisciplinary team of faculty targeting research opportunities for undergraduate and graduate students in Atmospheric Science, Space Weather, Remote Sensing and Astrobiology primarily for

  14. 18 years of science with the Hubble Space Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J

    2009-01-01

    After several decades of planning, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was launched in 1990 as the first of NASA's Great Observatories. After a rocky start arising from an error in the fabrication of its main mirror, it went on to change forever many fields of astronomy, and to capture the public's imagination with its images. An ongoing programme of servicing missions has kept the telescope on the cutting edge of astronomical research. Here I review the advances made possible by the HST over the past 18 years.

  15. Survival of microorganisms in space: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, G

    1981-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis were exposed to selected factors of space (vacuum, solar UV radiation, heavy ions of cosmic radiation), and their response was studied after recovery. These investigations were supplemented by ground-based studies under simulated space conditions. The vacuum of space did not inactivate the spores. However, vacuum-induced structural changes in the DNA, and probably in the proteins, caused a supersensitivity to solar UV radiation. This phenomenon is caused by the production of specific photoproducts in DNA and protein, which cannot be removed by normal cellular repair processes. In vegetative bacterial cells, exposed to vacuum, cell dehydration led to damage of the cell membrane, which could be partly repaired during subsequent incubation. The high local effectiveness of the cosmic heavy ions further decreases the chance that spores can survive for any length of time in space. Nonetheless, a spore travelling through space and protected from ultraviolet radiation could possibly survive an interplanetary journey. Such a situation favors panspermia as a possible explanation for the origin of life.

  16. Survival of microorganisms in space: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horneck, G.

    1981-01-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis were exposed to selected factors of space (vacuum, solar uv radiation, heavy cosmic ray ions), and their response was studied after recovery. These investigations were supplemented by ground-based studies under a simulated space conditions. The vacuum of space did not inactivate the spores. However, vacuum-induced structural changes in the DNA, and probably in the proteins, caused a supersensitivity to solar uv radiation. This phenomenon is caused by the production of specific photoproducts in DNA and protein, which cannot be removed by normal cellular repair processes. In vegetative bacterial cells exposed to vacuum, cell dehydration led to damage of the cell membrane, which could be partly repaired during subsequent incubation. The high local effectiveness of the heavy cosmic ray ions further decreases the chance that spores can survive for any length of time in space. Nonetheless, a spore travelling through space and protected from ultraviolet radiation could possibly survive an interplanetary journey. Such a situation favors panspermia as a possible explanation for the origin of life.

  17. Science is Cool with NASA's "Space School Musical"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, S.

    2011-12-01

    To help young learners understand basic solar system science concepts and retain what they learn, NASA's Discovery Program collaborated with KidTribe to create "Space School Musical," an innovative approach to teaching about the solar system that combines science content with music, fun lyrics, and choreography. It's an educational "hip-hopera" that moves and grooves its way into the minds and memories of students and educators alike. Kids can watch the videos, learn the songs, do the cross-curricular activities, and perform the show themselves. "Space School Musical" captures students attention as it brings the solar system to life, introducing the planets, moons, asteroids and more. The musical uses many different learning styles, helping to assure retention. Offering students an engaging, creative, and interdisciplinary learning opportunity helps them remember the content and may lead them to wonder about the universe around them and even inspire children to want to learn more, to dare to consider they can be the scientists, technologists, engineers or mathematicians of tomorrow. The unique Activity Guide created that accompanies "Space School Musical" includes 36 academic, fitness, art, and life skills lessons, all based on the content in the songs. The activities are designed to be highly engaging while helping students interact with the information. Whether students absorb information best with their eyes, ears, or body, each lesson allows for their learning preferences and encourages them to interact with both the content and each other. A guide on How to Perform the Play helps instructors lead students in performing their own version of the musical. The guide has suggestions to help with casting, auditions, rehearsing, creating the set and costumes, and performing. The musical is totally flexible - the entire play can be performed or just a few selected numbers; students can sing to the karaoke versions or lip-sync to the original cast. After learning about

  18. Calling Taikong a strategy report and study of China's future space science missions

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Ji

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the status quo of space science in China, details the scientific questions to be addressed by the Chinese space science community in 2016-2030, and proposes key strategic goals, space science programs and missions, the roadmap and implementation approaches. Further, it explores the supporting technologies needed and provides an outlook of space science beyond the year 2030. “Taikong” means “outer space” in Chinese, and space science is one of the most important areas China plans to develop in the near future. This book is authored by Ji Wu, a leader of China's space science program, together with National Space Science Center, Chinese Academy of Sciences, a leading institute responsible for planning and managing most of China’s space science missions. It also embodies the viewpoints shared by many space scientists and experts on future space science development. Through this book, general readers and researchers alike will gain essential insights into the current developments an...

  19. Review of Psychotherapy as a human science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Robert

    2008-12-01

    Reviews the book, Psychotherapy as a human science by Daniel Burston and Roger Frie (see record 2006-12980-000). In this book, the authors show how philosophical assumptions pervade therapeutic praxis. "In our view, philosophy is inherent to the very practice of psychotherapy" (p. 2). There is a "common ground that unites the therapists of today with the philosophers of the past" (p. 17). Their effort succeeds brilliantly in reconnecting psychology and philosophy and, by that homecoming, to ground psychotherapy (including contemporary psychoanalysis) as a "human science." The book begins by sketching ideas about truth we inherit from the Greeks, then shows how Descartes and Pascal helped launch the Enlightenment with their thinking about truth and the limits of reason. Kant, Hegel, and Marx broaden the scope to include reason, the unconscious, and the course of history. Kierkegaard and Nietzsche interject angst and authenticity. Dilthey proposes a human science neither scientistic nor irrational. Husserl launches phenomenology as the proper study of experience; Scheler, Jaspers and Heidegger react in their particular ways. Freud and Jung come to loggerheads over the unconscious. Buber, Binswanger, and Boss further develop existential-phenomenological perspectives in terms of human interrelatedness. Confrontation with the other and the limits of reciprocity engage Sartre, Lacan, and Laing. Psychoanalysis grows intersubjectively through the work of Sullivan, Fromm, Merleau-Ponty, Benjamin, and Stolorow. Postmodernism's excess, Frie and Burston conclude, requires acknowledgment of an authentic self answerable for choices in life: '...[W]e are both determined by, and exercise our agency in determining, the communicative contexts in which we exist" (p. 262). Psychotherapy from this existential-phenomenological perspective becomes "a rigorous exploration of our ways of making meaning--both consciously and unconsciously" (p. 263). The book ends, then, with an affirmation

  20. An updated review of nanotechnologies for the space elevator tether

    OpenAIRE

    Brambilla, G.

    2010-01-01

    The space elevator tether requires an extraordinary specific ultimate strength (ratio between ultimate strength and density) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been identified as the ideal candidate because of their astonishing strength. This paper reviews CNT manufacture and measured strengths.

  1. Editorial: Thanking the JGR Space Physics reviewers of 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, Michael W.; Wang, Yuming; Rodger, Alan; Kepko, Larry; Balikhin, Michael

    2017-05-01

    The Journal of Geophysical Research Space Physics Editors wish to whole-heartedly thank the 1602 scientists that invested their time, expertise, and effort in service to the journal and the research community by conducting 3997 reviews in 2016.

  2. Creating new opportunities for communicating about space science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treise, Debbie

    1996-01-01

    With the political and economic atmosphere changing so drastically, NASA has found it necessary to change its mission from one of exploration to that of accountability and application. These changes have made it difficult for NASA to access how its roles and constituency groups have changed in response. Specifically, at the MSFC Space Sciences Lab, management must now decide the most appropriate communication objectives, strategies and target market to direct messages reflecting these changes. Complicating the issue is that MSFC, must walk a fine line between looking as though it is spending too much money and 'marketing' themselves, which it is strictly prohibited from doing, and imparting the information in an exciting enough form to be picked up by the media.

  3. OSS-1 - A pathfinder mission for space science on Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neupert, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    On the third Shuttle flight (STS-3), the Orbiter carried a payload of nine scientific instruments. The payload was designated OSS-1 because the program was originaly managed by the Office of Space Science. The OSS-1 objectives are discussed, taking into account the Plasma Diagnostics Package, a study concerned with vehicle charging and potential, the Thermal Canister Experiment, the Solar Flare X-ray Polarimeter, the Solar Ultraviolet Spectral Irradiance Monitor, the study of the influence of weightlessness on lignification in developing plant seedlings, the Microabrasion Foil Experiment, the Contamination Monitor Package, and a study of the characteristics of the Shuttle/Spacelab induced atmosphere. The OSS-1 payload was launched on STS-3 on March 22, 1982.

  4. Meaningful experiences in science education: Engaging the space researcher in a cultural transformation to greater science literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, Cherilynn A.

    1993-01-01

    The visceral appeal of space science and exploration is a very powerful emotional connection to a very large and diverse collection of people, most of whom have little or no perspective about what it means to do science and engineering. Therein lies the potential of space for a substantially enhanced positive impact on culture through education. This essay suggests that through engaging more of the space research and development community in enabling unique and 'meaningful educational experiences' for educators and students at the pre-collegiate levels, space science and exploration can amplify its positive feedback on society and act as an important medium for cultural transformation to greater science literacy. I discuss the impact of space achievements on people and define what is meant by a 'meaningful educational experience,' all of which points to the need for educators and students to be closer to the practice of real science. I offer descriptions of two nascent science education programs associated with NASA which have the needed characteristics for providing meaningful experiences that can cultivate greater science literacy. Expansion of these efforts and others like it will be needed to have the desired impact on culture, but I suggest that the potential for the needed resources is there in the scientific research communities. A society in which more people appreciate and understand science and science methods would be especially conducive to human progress in space and on Earth.

  5. RoMPS concept review automatic control of space robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The Robot operated Material Processing in Space (RoMPS) experiment is being performed to explore the marriage of two emerging space commercialization technologies: materials processing in microgravity and robotics. This concept review presents engineering drawings and limited technical descriptions of the RoMPS programs' electrical and software systems.

  6. VLF Science at Indian Centre for Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Indian Centre for Space Physics has been monitoring VLF signals from stations around the world at its laboratories at Kolkata and Sitapur (Ionospheric and Earthquake Research Centre) as well as at several places throughout India when in a campaign mode. We have been interested to study high energy events from space, such as solar flares and gamma ray bursts. We have made studies during multiple solar eclipses and most importantly made substantial progress in the problem of lithosphere-ionosphere coupling while understanding various types of anomalies prior to major earthquakes. Other effects such as AGWs and LEPs are being studied. We have experience of two antarctic expedition and obtained VLF data from both Maitri and Bharati stations of India, which revealed, among other things, how the signal attenuation can indicate the extent of ice mass in Antarctica. We have been able to reproduce various VLF perturbation events using Atmospheric Chemical evolution model coupled with LWPC code. For instance we have reproduced solar flare induced VLF amplitude perturbation pattern by completely ab initio calculation. We also targeted the inverse problem, namely, deduction of the injected radiation spectra from space from the VLF signal alone, thereby establishing that the Earth can be used as a gigantic detector. These interesting results would be presented in my review talk.

  7. United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative (UNBSSI) 1991-2012 and Beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Mathai, A M; Balogh, W R

    2015-01-01

    This paper contains an overview and summary on the achievements of the United Nations basic space science initiative in terms of donated and provided planetariums, astronomical telescopes, and space weather instruments, particularly operating in developing nations. This scientific equipment has been made available to respective host countries, particularly developing nations, through the series of twenty basic space science workshops, organized through the United Nations Programme on Space Applications since 1991. Organized by the United Nations, the European Space Agency (ESA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States of America, and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), the basic space science workshops were organized as a series of workshops that focused on basic space science (1991-2004), the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (2005-2009), and the International Space Weather Initiative (2010-2012) proposed by the Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Spac...

  8. Urban green spaces and cancer: a protocol for a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porcherie, Marion; Lejeune, Mathilde; Gaudel, Marion; Pommier, Jeanine; Faure, Emmanuelle; Heritage, Zoé; Rican, Stéphane; Simos, Jean; Cantoreggi, Nicola Luca; Roué Le Gall, Anne; Cambon, Linda; Regnaux, Jean-Philippe

    2018-02-16

    Green space in the built environment is an important topic on the health agenda today. Studies have shown that access to green spaces is associated with better mental and physical health, yet green spaces can also be detrimental to health if they are not managed appropriately. Despite the increasing interest in urban green spaces, little research has so far been conducted into the links between green spaces and cancer. The purpose of this scoping review is therefore to map the literature available on the types of relationship between urban green spaces and cancer. We followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols 2015 guideline to report the protocol. To conduct this scoping review, we will use a structured search strategy based on controlled vocabulary and relevant key terms related to green space, urban space and cancer. We will search MEDLINE (PubMed), GreenFILE (EBSCOhost), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (EBSCOhost) and ScienceDirect as electronic database as well as hand-search publications for grey literature. This review will therefore provide evidence on this current topic, one which could have practical implications for policy-makers involved in choices which are more conducive to healthy living. No primary data will be collected since all data that will be presented in this review are based on published articles and publicly available documents, and therefore ethics committee approval is not a requirement. The findings of this review will be presented at workshops and conferences, and will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. NASA space and Earth science data on CD-ROM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towheed, Syed S.

    1993-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) is very interested in facilitating the widest possible use of the scientific data acquired through NASA spaceflight missions. Therefore, NSSDC has participated with projects and data management elements throughout the NASA science environment in the creation, archiving, and dissemination of data using Compact Disk-Read Only Memory (CD-ROM). This CD-ROM technology has the potential to enable the dissemination of very large data volumes at very low prices to a great many researchers, students and their teachers, and others. This catalog identifies and describes the scientific CD-ROM's now available from NSSDC including the following data sets: Einstein Observatory CD-ROM, Galileo Cruise Imaging on CD-ROM, International Halley Watch, IRAS Sky Survey Atlas, Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM), Magellan (MIDR), Magellan (ARCDR's), Magellan (GxDR's), Mars Digital Image Map (MDIM), Outer Planets Fields & Particles Data, Pre-Magellan, Selected Astronomical Catalogs, TOMS Gridded Ozone Data, TOMS Ozone Image Data, TOMS Update, Viking Orbiter Images of Mars, and Voyager Image.

  10. Hypertelescopes: potential science gains, current testing and prospects in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labeyrie, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the way of giant dilute telescopes, the hypertelescope is a many-aperture interferometer, which provides direct high resolution images with efficient light concentration. Pending future versions in space, a prototype terrestrial hypertelescope is under test in a high valley of the southern Alps. A moving focal gondola, suspended 101 m above small static mirrors, is driven under computer control with millimeter accuracy. The coude focus at ground level has been qualified by observing a Vega image focused by one of the mirrors and transmitted through the gondola. Upgrades under way for multi-beam interference include full autoguiding, the installation of several cameras on the gondola and adaptive optics for cophasing. Science observing is expected to begin in a few years, and other potential sites are considered for a larger meta-aperture, in the kilometer range. Future space versions, utilizing a 10-1000 km flotilla of small mirrors, are also considered and proposed to NASA and ESA, but require different technical developments.

  11. The Earth and Space Sciences: A Statistical Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czujko, R.

    2002-12-01

    This talk provides a statistical overview of supply and demand trends in the U.S. in Earth and space sciences. Data will be presented on the changes over time both in the number of degrees awarded and in the demographic profile of bachelors, masters and PhD awarded in the U.S. While the number of women earning geoscience degrees has increased over the past decade, the representation of minorities remains far lower in the geosciences than in related disciplines. The talk will include statistical indicators on the demand for Earth and space scientists such as starting salaries and will describe the qualitative aspects of the initial employment of recent PhDs. Currently, there are more geoscience faculty over age 55 than under age 40. The talk will provide data on how the age structure among faculty has changed over the last decade and will describe possible implications for future retirement rates among academics. The talk will conclude with a discussion of whether supply is likely to match the future demand for geoscientists.

  12. Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science Teacher, 1989

    1989-01-01

    Reviews a software planetarium package called "Sky Travel." Includes two audiovisuals: "Conquest of Space" and "Windows on Science: Earth Science"; and four books: "Small Energy Sources: Choices that Work,""Stonehenge Complete,""Uneasy Careers and Intimate Lives: Women in Science…

  13. Interferometric Astrometry with Hubble Space Telescope - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, G. F.; McArthur, B. E.; Franz, O. G.; Wasserman, L. H.; Henry, T. J.; Takato, T.; Strateva, I.

    2000-05-01

    We review recent results from fringe tracking (POS) and fringe scanning (TRANS) mode astrometry using Fine Guidance Sensor 3 aboard Hubble Space Telescope. The relatively large field of regard, faint limiting magnitude, and raw resolution of FGS 3 have allowed us to obtain sub-millisecond of arc precision parallaxes for several Cataclysmic Variables ( RW Tri & TV Col), a fundamental distance scale calibrator (RR Lyr), a Planetary Nebula central star (NGC 6853), and a hot White Dwarf binary (Feige 24). We have determined parallaxes, orbital parameters, and masses for low-mass binaries critical to the lower main sequence Mass-Luminosity Relationship (Gl 791.2, Wolf 1062, Gl 623). The Astrometry Science Team presently consists of W. H. Jefferys, P.I., G. F. Benedict, Deputy P.I., B. McArthur, O.G. Franz, L. H. Wasserman, L. W. Fredrick, W. van Altena, E. Nelan, R. Duncombe, P. J. Shelus, and P. D. Hemenway. This research had the support of NASA Grants NAS5-1603 (GSFC), and GO-06036.01-94A, GO-07491.01-97A (STScI).

  14. EMERGING SCIENCE: EPA'S ORD SUPPORTS REGIONAL HAZE PROGRAM; POSTERS FROM BOSC REVIEW AND SCIENCE FORUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of presentations from EPA's Board of Science Councilors review in April 2005 and the Science Forum in May 2005 are being made available to the Regional Planning Organization conference on June 9-10, 2005. Attendees will be able to review the materials during the confere...

  15. Science of rugby league football: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive review of the science of rugby league football at all levels of competition (i.e. junior, amateur, semi-professional, professional), with special reference to all discipline-specific scientific research performed in rugby league (i.e. physiological, psychological, injury epidemiology, strength and conditioning, performance analysis). Rugby league football is played at junior and senior levels in several countries worldwide. A rugby league team consists of 13 players (6 forwards and 7 backs). The game is played over two 30 - 40 min halves (depending on the standard of competition) separated by a 10 min rest interval. Several studies have documented the physiological capacities and injury rates of rugby league players. More recently, studies have investigated the physiological demands of competition. Interestingly, the physiological capacities of players, the incidence of injury and the physiological demands of competition all increase as the playing standard is increased. Mean blood lactate concentrations of 5.2, 7.2 and 9.1 mmol . l(-1) have been reported during competition for amateur, semi-professional and professional rugby league players respectively. Mean heart rates of 152 beats . min(-1) (78% of maximal heart rate), 166 beats . min(-1) (84% of maximal heart rate) and 172 beats . min(-1) (93% of maximal heart rate) have been recorded for amateur, semi-professional and junior elite rugby league players respectively. Skill-based conditioning games have been used to develop the skill and fitness of rugby league players, with mean heart rate and blood lactate responses during these activities almost identical to those obtained during competition. In addition, recent studies have shown that most training injuries are sustained in traditional conditioning activities that involve no skill component (i.e. running without the ball), whereas the incidence of injuries while participating in skill-based conditioning

  16. Mission and Instrument Design Trades for a Space-based Gravitational Wave Observatory to Maximize Science Return

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livas, Jeffrey; Baker, John; Stebbins, Robin; Thorpe, James; Larson, Shane; Sesana, Alberto

    2016-03-01

    A space-based gravitational wave observatory is required to access the rich array of astrophysical sources expected at frequencies between 0.0001 and 0.1 Hz. The European Space Agency (ESA) chose the Gravitational Universe as the science theme of its L3 launch opportunity. A call for mission proposals will be released soon after the completion of the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission. LPF is scheduled to start science operations in March 2016, and finish by the end of the year, so an optimized mission concept is needed now. There are a number of possible design choices for both the instrument and the mission. One of the goals for a good mission design is to maximize the science return while minimizing risk and keeping costs low. This presentation will review some of the main design choices for a LISA-like laser interferometry mission and the impact of these choices on cost, risk, and science return.

  17. Space shuttle SRM field joint: Review paper

    OpenAIRE

    S. Mohammad Gharouni; Hamid M. Panahiha; Jafar Eskandari Jam

    2014-01-01

    Due to Challenger space shuttle accident in 1986, significant research has been done concerning structural behavior of field joints in solid rocket boosters (SRB). The structural deformations between the clevis inner leg and the tang (male-to-female parts of joint), the sealing of the O-ring to prevent the hot gas in joints, has been neglected causing the failure of the vehicle. Redesigning the field joint in SRB engine by accurate analysis of dynamic and thermal loads and by design of insula...

  18. NRT Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on International Space Station (ISS) Science Data Vb0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NRT Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on International Space Station (ISS) Science Data were collected by the LIS instrument on the ISS used to detect the...

  19. United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative: 2010 Status Report on the International Space Weather Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadimova, S.; Haubold, H. J.; Danov, D.; Georgieva, K.; Maeda, G.; Yumoto, K.; Davila, J. M.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2011-11-01

    The UNBSSI is a long-term effort for the development of astronomy and space science through regional and international cooperation in this field on a worldwide basis. A series of workshops on BSS was held from 1991 to 2004 (India 1991, Costa Rica and Colombia 1992, Nigeria 1993, Egypt 1994, Sri Lanka 1995, Germany 1996, Honduras 1997, Jordan 1999, France 2000, Mauritius 2001, Argentina 2002, and China 2004) Pursuant to resolutions of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space (UNCOPUOS) and its Scientific and Technical Subcommittee, since 2005, these workshops focused on the International Heliophysical Year 2007 (UAE 2005, India 2006, Japan 2007, Bulgaria 2008, Ro Korea 2009) Starting in 2010, the workshops focus on the International Space Weather Initiative (ISWI) as recommended in a three-year-work plan as part of the deliberations of UNCOPUOS (www.iswi-secretariat.org/). Workshops on the ISWI have been scheduled to be hosted by Egypt in 2010 for Western Asia, Nigeria in 2011 for Africa, and Ecuador in 2012 for Latin America and the Caribbean. Currently, fourteen IHY/ISWI instrument arrays with more than five hundred instruments are operational in ninety countries.

  20. Towards science educational spaces as dynamic and coauthored communities of practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhingra, Koshi

    2008-04-01

    In this essay review, four studies around the themes of identity and globalization are summarized and analyzed. The researchers' perspectives are generally grounded in Brown and Campione's ideas on situated knowledge ( Classroom lessons: Integrating cognitive theory and classroom practice (pp. 229-270). Cambridge: The MIT Press/Bradford Books, 1994) and Lave and Wenger's definition of learning as an activity fostered through participation in communities of practice ( Situated learning. Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge: University of Cambridge Press, 1991). Questions about the goals of science education spaces, the nature of globalization in relation to practices in schools, the role of identities-in-practice in relation to participation in communities of practice such as classrooms are explored. Recommendations for key design features in effective science educational spaces, based upon the findings presented in the collection of four studies, are offered. School, it is suggested here, functions best as a clearing house for the myriad science-related stories student participants generate in their various communities of practice (e.g., within popular culture, family, community, informal educational sites). In this way, school has the potential to construct bridges between multiple student experiences and identities-in-practice.

  1. Petroleum Science and Technology Institute with the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, H. C.; Olson, J. E.; Bryant, S. L.; Lake, L. W.; Bommer, P.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Jablonowski, C.; Willis, M.

    2009-12-01

    The TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, a professional development program for 8th- thru 12th-grade Earth Science teachers, presented a one-week Petroleum Science and Technology Institute at The University of Texas at Austin campus. The summer program was a joint effort between the Jackson School of Geosciences and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering. The goal of the institute was to focus on the STEM components involved in the petroleum industry and to introduce teachers to the larger energy resources theme. The institute kicked off with a welcoming event and tour of a green, energy-efficient home (LEED Platinum certified) owned by one of the petroleum engineering faculty. Tours of the home included an introduction to rainwater harvesting, solar energy, sustainable building materials and other topics on energy efficiency. Classroom topics included drilling technology (including a simulator lab and an overview of the history of the technology), energy use and petroleum geology, well-logging technology and interpretation, reservoir engineering and volumetrics (including numerous labs combining chemistry and physics), risk assessment and economics, carbon capture and storage (CO2 sequestration technology) and hydraulic fracturing. A mid-week field trip included visiting the Ocean Star offshore platform in Galveston, the Weiss Energy Hall at the Houston Museum of Science and Schlumberger (to view 3-D visualization technology) in Houston. Teachers remarked that they really appreciated the focused nature of the institute and especially found the increased use of mathematics both a tool for professional growth, as well as a challenge for them to use more math in their science classes. STEM integration was an important feature of the summer institute, and teachers found the integration of science (earth sciences, geophysics), technology, engineering (petroleum, chemical and reservoir) and mathematics particularly valuable. Pre

  2. BOOK REVIEW: OPENING SCIENCE, THE EVOLVING GUIDE ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The way we get our funding, collaborate, do our research, and get the word out has evolved over hundreds of years but we can imagine a more open science world, largely facilitated by the internet. The movement towards this more open way of doing and presenting science is coming, and it is not taking hundreds of years. If you are interested in these trends, and would like to find out more about where this is all headed and what it means to you, consider downloding Opening Science, edited by Sönke Bartling and Sascha Friesike, subtitled The Evolving Guide on How the Internet is Changing Research, Collaboration, and Scholarly Publishing. In 26 chapters by various authors from a range of disciplines the book explores the developing world of open science, starting from the first scientific revolution and bringing us to the next scientific revolution, sometimes referred to as “Science 2.0”. Some of the articles deal with the impact of the changing landscape of how science is done, looking at the impact of open science on Academia, or journal publishing, or medical research. Many of the articles look at the uses, pitfalls, and impact of specific tools, like microblogging (think Twitter), social networking, and reference management. There is lots of discussion and definition of terms you might use or misuse like “altmetrics” and “impact factor”. Science will probably never be completely open, and Twitter will probably never replace the journal article,

  3. A systematic review of US rangeland science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangeland science aims to create knowledge to sustain rangeland social-ecological systems over the long term. Range science has made substantial progress on understanding ecological dynamics of rangeland systems and the management practices that sustain them, and these findings have been systematica...

  4. Space syntax in healthcare facilities research: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haq, Saif; Luo, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Space Syntax is a theory and method that has been developing for the last 40 years. Originally conceived as a theory of "society and space," it has expanded to other areas. An important aspect of this is technical; it allows the quantification of layouts, and unit spaces within a layout, so that the environment itself can produce independent variables in quantitative research. Increasingly, it is being used to study healthcare facilities. Space Syntax has thereby become relevant to healthcare facilities researchers and designers. This paper attempts to explain Space Syntax to a new audience of healthcare designers, administrators, and researchers; it provides a literature review on the use of Space Syntax in healthcare facility research and suggests some possibilities for future application.

  5. The Science and Technology of Future Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonati, A.; Fusi, R.; Longoni, F.

    1999-12-01

    The future space missions span over a wide range of scientific objectives. After different successful scientific missions, other international cornerstone experiments are planned to study of the evolution of the universe and of the primordial stellar systems, and our solar system. Space missions for the survey of the microwave cosmic background radiation, deep-field search in the near and mid-infrared region and planetary exploration will be carried out. Several fields are open for research and development in the space business. Three major categories can be found: detector technology in different areas, electronics, and software. At LABEN, a Finmeccanica Company, we are focusing the technologies to respond to this challenging scientific demands. Particle trackers based on silicon micro-strips supported by lightweight structures (CFRP) are studied. In the X-ray field, CCD's are investigated with pixels of very small size so as to increase the spatial resolution of the focal plane detectors. High-efficiency and higly miniaturized high-voltage power supplies are developed for detectors with an increasingly large number of phototubes. Material research is underway to study material properties at extreme temperatures. Low-temperature mechanical structures are designed for cryogenic ( 20 K) detectors in order to maintain the high precision in pointing the instrument. Miniaturization of front end electronics with low power consumption and high number of signal processing channels is investigated; silicon-based microchips (ASIC's) are designed and developed using state-of-the-art technology. Miniaturized instruments to investigate the planets surface using X-Ray and Gamma-Ray scattering techniques are developed. The data obtained from the detectors have to be processed, compressed, formatted and stored before their transmission to ground. These tasks open up additional strategic areas of development such as microprocessor-based electronics for high-speed and parallel data

  6. Space shuttle SRM field joint: Review paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mohammad Gharouni

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to Challenger space shuttle accident in 1986, significant research has been done concerning structural behavior of field joints in solid rocket boosters (SRB. The structural deformations between the clevis inner leg and the tang (male-to-female parts of joint, the sealing of the O-ring to prevent the hot gas in joints, has been neglected causing the failure of the vehicle. Redesigning the field joint in SRB engine by accurate analysis of dynamic and thermal loads and by design of insulator and good O-ring, the leakiness of combustion hot gases was eliminated. Some parts of field joint such as capture feature (CF and its third O-ring, J-leg insulator and shim were added to redesigned field joint. Also, some adjustments in sealing system and pins were done to promote the efficiency of the field joint. Due to different experimental analysis on assembled field joints with default imperfections, redesigned joints operated well. These redesigned field joints are commonly used in aerospace and mechanical structures. This paper investigates the original and the redesigned field joints with additional explanations of different parts of the redesigned joints.

  7. Postdoctoral Mentoring at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Molly

    2018-01-01

    The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) has, on average, about 30 postdoctoral researchers. This groups is funded primarily by individual grants but includes independent Fellows (Giacconi, Lasker, and Hubble Fellows) and postdocs based at neighboring Johns Hopkins University but with supervisors based at STScI. Our mentoring program aims to support the intellectual and career development of this entire group, outside of the scientific and career mentoring they receive from their direct supervisors or fellowship sponsors. Our mentoring program consists of two parts. First and foremost, each postdoc has a mentor (someone on the research staff) with whom they meet regularly. Ideally, the mentor is not someone with whom the postdoc collaborates scientifically and can therefore provide an outside, independent, fresh perspective. As different postdocs require different kinds of mentoring, we try to best pair postdocs and mentors according to the postdocs’ needs and the mentors’ backgrounds, skills, and mentoring styles. Second, we conduct several career guidance seminars and related events throughout the year. These have included proposal writing workshops, formalized practice talks, academic job application seminars, and discussion sessions on career paths outside of academia (featuring colleagues who are no longer in academia). These workshops have the added benefit of providing the postdocs with a wider support network of staff members. Finally, we have begun to conduct an annual survey of the postdocs to gauge their experience and integration at STScI, the efficacy of the mentoring program, and to collect feedback on how to improve postdoctoral life at the Institute.

  8. The Next Generation Science Standards: An Historic Opportunity for K-12 Earth and Space Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. M.; Passow, M. J.; Holzer, M. A.; Moore, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) provide an historic opportunity to significantly improve Earth and space science (ESS) education nationally at the K-12 level. The increased emphasis on ESS related topics in the NGSS relative to previous standards provides a real opportunity for ensuring all K-12 students in adopting states learn about the ESS - allowing us to reach many more students than are currently are exposed to our discipline. The new standards are also exciting in that they explicitly couple science and engineering practice, cross-cutting concepts, and disciplinary core ideas in such a way that student must actively demonstrate their understanding through actions rather than through mere regurgitation of memorized responses. Achieving mastery of NGSS Performance Expectations will require practice with higher-order learning skills - with students engaging in the practices of scientists and engineers. Preparing students for this mastery will be a challenging task for teachers, since in many states professional development support is limited at best for the current curriculum - let alone the curricula that will be developed to address the NGSS. As adoption of the NGSS expands across the country, states will be at various levels of implementation of the new standards over the next several years - and there is real concern that teachers must have sufficient professional development to be able to be successful in preparing their students - particularly in view of likely coupled assessments and teacher evaluations. NESTA strongly supports implementation of the NGSS, and the rigorous and compelling ESS education it will engender, when coupled with a strong emphasis nationwide on teacher professional development. For the past two years, the National Earth Science Teachers Association (NESTA) has continued our leadership in K-12 ESS education through workshops, web seminars, events and publications that emphasize implementation of the NGSS in ESS

  9. United Nations Basic Space Science Initiative: 2011 Status Report on the International Space Weather Initiative

    CERN Document Server

    Gadimova, S; Danov, D; Georgieva, K; Maeda, G; Yumoto, K; Davila, J M; Gopalswami, N

    2011-01-01

    The UNBSSI is a long-term effort for the development of astronomy and space science through regional and international cooperation in this field on a worldwide basis. A series of workshops on BSS was held from 1991 to 2004 (India 1991, Costa Rica and Colombia 1992, Nigeria 1993, Egypt 1994, Sri Lanka 1995, Germany 1996, Honduras 1997, Jordan 1999, France 2000, Mauritius 2001, Argentina 2002, and China 2004; http://www.seas.columbia.edu/~ah297/un-esa/) and addressed the status of astronomy in Asia and the Pacific, Latin America and the Caribbean, Africa, and Western Asia. One major recommendation that emanated from these workshops was the establishment of astronomical facilities in developing nations for research and education programmes at the university level. Such workshops on BSS emphasized the particular importance of astrophysical data systems and the virtual observatory concept for the development of astronomy on a worldwide basis. Pursuant to resolutions of the United Nations Committee on the Peaceful ...

  10. ED20. Crisis or Opportunity? Earth and Space Science Education at the State and National Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brett, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Scientists and researchers, those often in oversight positions and often control of the purse strings, have historically not been kind to the Earth Systems Science (ESS) discipline. This is puzzling to those of us who are ESS educators because we know that to appreciate how our planet works it is necessary to integrate and apply all the disciplines of science. With our amazing technologies and the increasing demands of a growing population we are dramatically changing our home planet. Perhaps a crisis? As the last century ended we found ESS in the same minor league position it was in when the 20th Century started. During the review period of what was to become the National Science Education Standards (NSES) draft after draft, no matter what color the cover was, seemed to ignore, omit, or severely limit ESS topics in meteorology and oceanography. Once published the NSES became the basis for the science standards in many states with what many said were critical gaps. In the years following 1996 different groups have worked to correct the omissions they found by developing guides...Ocean Literacy: Essential Principles of Ocean Science K-12 and Climate Literacy: The Essential Principals of Climate Science. An observer on the side might have considered each effort one of lobbying to get attention, funding and materials. Each effort was clearly interested in making an impact where it mattered...in the classroom. Now our Opportunity! The NAS process for developing "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" presented ESS educators with a real opportunity and we can proudly say we made our voices heard. And while there is great enthusiasm for the framework and the Chapter 7 Earth and Space we face critically important work to bring real Earth Space Science Education into the K-12 classroom. The possibility of the standards to be developed from the Framework becoming Common Core for the majority of states following the course of ELA and mathematics requires that those who

  11. IRIS Toxicological Review for Acrylamide (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review for Acrylamide, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS Assessment Development Process<...

  12. Space data management at the NSSDC (National Space Sciences Data Center): Applications for data compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James L.

    1989-01-01

    The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC), established in 1966, is the largest archive for processed data from NASA's space and Earth science missions. The NSSDC manages over 120,000 data tapes with over 4,000 data sets. The size of the digital archive is approximately 6,000 gigabytes with all of this data in its original uncompressed form. By 1995 the NSSDC digital archive is expected to more than quadruple in size reaching over 28,000 gigabytes. The NSSDC digital archive is expected to more than quadruple in size reaching over 28,000 gigabytes. The NSSDC is beginning several thrusts allowing it to better serve the scientific community and keep up with managing the ever increasing volumes of data. These thrusts involve managing larger and larger amounts of information and data online, employing mass storage techniques, and the use of low rate communications networks to move requested data to remote sites in the United States, Europe and Canada. The success of these thrusts, combined with the tremendous volume of data expected to be archived at the NSSDC, clearly indicates that innovative storage and data management solutions must be sought and implemented. Although not presently used, data compression techniques may be a very important tool for managing a large fraction or all of the NSSDC archive in the future. Some future applications would consist of compressing online data in order to have more data readily available, compress requested data that must be moved over low rate ground networks, and compress all the digital data in the NSSDC archive for a cost effective backup that would be used only in the event of a disaster.

  13. Achievements and challenges of Space Station Freedom's safety review process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, David W.

    1993-01-01

    The most complex space vehicle in history, Space Station Freedom, is well underway to completion, and System Safety is a vital part of the program. The purpose is to summarize and illustrate the progress that over one-hundred System Safety engineers have made in identifying, documenting, and controlling the hazards inherent in the space station. To date, Space Station Freedom has been reviewed by NASA's safety panels through the first six assembly flights, when Freedom achieves a configuration known as Man Tended Capability. During the eight weeks of safety reviews spread out over a year and a half, over 200 preliminary hazard reports were presented. Along the way NASA and its contractors faced many challenges, made much progress, and even learned a few lessons.

  14. Fire science at LLNL: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, H.K. (ed.)

    1990-03-01

    This fire sciences report from LLNL includes topics on: fire spread in trailer complexes, properties of welding blankets, validation of sprinkler systems, fire and smoke detectors, fire modeling, and other fire engineering and safety issues. (JEF)

  15. Internet-based Science Learning: A review of journal publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen-Yu Lee, Silvia; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Wu, Ying-Tien; Tsai, Meng-Jung; Liu, Tzu-Chien; Hwang, Fu-Kwun; Lai, Chih-Hung; Liang, Jyh-Chong; Wu, Huang-Ching; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2011-09-01

    Internet-based science learning has been advocated by many science educators for more than a decade. This review examines relevant research on this topic. Sixty-five papers are included in the review. The review consists of the following two major categories: (1) the role of demographics and learners' characteristics in Internet-based science learning, such as demographic background, prior knowledge, and self-efficacy; and (2) the learning outcomes derived from Internet-based science learning, such as attitude, motivation, conceptual understanding, and conceptual change. Some important conclusions are drawn from the review. For example, Internet-based science learning is equally favorable, or in some cases more so, to learning for female students compared to male students. The learner's control is essential for enhancing students' attitudes and motivation toward learning in Internet-based science learning environments. Nevertheless, appropriate guidance from teachers, moderators, or the Internet-based learning environment itself is still quite crucial in Internet-based science learning. Recommendations for future research related to the effects of Internet-based science learning on students' metacognitive reflections, epistemological development, and worldviews are suggested.

  16. A methodological review of computer science education research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Randolph, Justus; Sutinen, Erkki; Julnes, George; Lehman, Steve

    2008-01-01

    ..., Guzdial, & Petre, 2005). (In this methodological review, we use the term behavioral research as a synonym for what Guzdzial, in Almstrum et al. (2005, p. 192), calls "education, cognitive science, and learning sciences research.") Addressing this lack of connection with behavioral research, Guzdial, in Almstrum and colleagues (2005) wrote, The real challeng...

  17. Expanding Earth and Space Science through the Initiating New Science Partnerships In Rural Education (INSPIRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radencic, S.; McNeal, K. S.; Pierce, D.; Hare, D.

    2010-12-01

    The INSPIRE program at Mississippi State University (MSU), funded by the NSF Graduate STEM Fellows in K-12 Education (GK12) program, focuses on Earth and Space science education and has partnered ten graduate students from MSU with five teachers from local, rural school districts. For the next five years the project will serve to increase inquiry and technology experiences in science and math while enhancing graduate student’s communication skills. Graduate students, from the disciplines of Geosciences, Physics, and Engineering are partnered with Chemistry, Physical Science, Physics, Geometry and Middle school science classrooms and will create engaging inquiry activities that incorporate elements of their research, and integrate various forms of technology. The generated lesson plans that are implemented in the classroom are published on the INSPIRE home page (www.gk12.msstate.edu) so that other classroom instructors can utilize this free resource. Local 7th -12th grade students will attend GIS day later this fall at MSU to increase their understanding and interest in Earth and Space sciences. Selected graduate students and teachers will visit one of four international university partners located in Poland, Australia, England, or The Bahamas to engage research abroad. Upon return they will incorporate their global experiences into their local classrooms. Planning for the project included many factors important to the success of the partnerships. The need for the program was evident in Mississippi K-12 schools based on low performance on high stakes assessments and lack of curriculum in the Earth and Space sciences. Meeting with administrators to determine what needs they would like addressed by the project and recognizing the individual differences among the schools were integral components to tailoring project goals and to meet the unique needs of each school partner. Time for training and team building of INSPIRE teachers and graduate students before the

  18. A Review on Carbon-rich Molecules in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Franco; García-Hernández, D. Aníbal; Manchado, Arturo

    2015-03-01

    We present and discuss carbon-rich compounds of astrochemical interest such as polyynes, acetylenic carbon chains and the related derivative known as monocyanopolyynes and dicyanopolyynes. Fullerenes are now known to be abundant in space, while fulleranes - the hydrogenated fullerenes - and other carbon-rich compounds such as very large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy petroleum fractions are suspected to be present in space. We review the synthesis, the infrared spectra as well as the electronic absorption spectra of these four classes of carbon-rich molecules. The existence or possible existence in space of the latter molecules is reported and discussed.

  19. Quadrilateral space syndrome: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chautems, R C; Glauser, T; Waeber-Fey, M C; Rostan, O; Barraud, G E

    2000-11-01

    The quadrilateral space syndrome is defined as tenderness over the quadrilateral space and shoulder pain radiating to the arm, secondary to compression of the axillary nerve and posterior circumflex humeral artery in the quadrilateral space. The symptoms are aggravated by forced abduction and extrenal rotation of the arm. The diagnosis is clinical and is documented by arteriography or angio-MR imaging with dynamic maneuvers. A 30-year-old woman presenting with this syndrome is described here, the differential diagnosis discussed, and the literature reviewed.

  20. Life sciences flight hardware development for the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, V. D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Bowman, R. N.; Donovan, F. M.; Elland, C.; Fahlen, T. F.; Girten, B.; Kirven-Brooks, M.; Lagel, K.; Meeker, G. B.; Santos, O.

    During the construction phase of the International Space Station (ISS), early flight opportunities have been identified (including designated Utilization Flights, UF) on which early science experiments may be performed. The focus of NASA's and other agencies' biological studies on the early flight opportunities is cell and molecular biology; with UF-1 scheduled to fly in fall 2001, followed by flights 8A and UF-3. Specific hardware is being developed to verify design concepts, e.g., the Avian Development Facility for incubation of small eggs and the Biomass Production System for plant cultivation. Other hardware concepts will utilize those early research opportunities onboard the ISS, e.g., an Incubator for sample cultivation, the European Modular Cultivation System for research with small plant systems, an Insect Habitat for support of insect species. Following the first Utilization Flights, additional equipment will be transported to the ISS to expand research opportunities and capabilities, e.g., a Cell Culture Unit, the Advanced Animal Habitat for rodents, an Aquatic Facility to support small fish and aquatic specimens, a Plant Research Unit for plant cultivation, and a specialized Egg Incubator for developmental biology studies. Host systems (Figure 1A, B), e.g., a 2.5 m Centrifuge Rotor (g-levels from 0.01-g to 2-g) for direct comparisons between μg and selectable g levels, the Life Sciences Glove☐ for contained manipulations, and Habitat Holding Racks (Figure 1B) will provide electrical power, communication links, and cooling to the habitats. Habitats will provide food, water, light, air and waste management as well as humidity and temperature control for a variety of research organisms. Operators on Earth and the crew on the ISS will be able to send commands to the laboratory equipment to monitor and control the environmental and experimental parameters inside specific habitats. Common laboratory equipment such as microscopes, cryo freezers, radiation

  1. The new space and earth science information systems at NASA's archive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.L. (NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The on-line interactive systems of the National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) are examined. The worldwide computer network connections that allow access to NSSDC users are outlined. The services offered by the NSSDC new technology on-line systems are presented, including the IUE request system, ozone TOMS data, and data sets on astrophysics, atmospheric science, land sciences, and space plasma physics. Plans for future increases in the NSSDC data holdings are considered. 8 refs.

  2. Science Students Creating Hybrid Spaces When Engaging in an Expo Investigation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramnarain, Umesh; de Beer, Josef

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we report on the experiences of three 9th-grade South African students (13-14 years) in doing open science investigation projects for a science expo. A particular focus of this study was the manner in which these students merge the world of school science with their social world to create a hybrid space by appropriating knowledge…

  3. Emerging Geospatial Sharing Technologies in Earth and Space Science Informatics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2013-12-01

    Emerging Geospatial Sharing Technologies in Earth and Space Science Informatics The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) mission is to serve as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The OGC coordinates with over 400 institutions in the development of geospatial standards. In the last years two main trends are making disruptions in geospatial applications: mobile and context sharing. People now have more and more mobile devices to support their work and personal life. Mobile devices are intermittently connected to the internet and have smaller computing capacity than a desktop computer. Based on this trend a new OGC file format standard called GeoPackage will enable greater geospatial data sharing on mobile devices. GeoPackage is perhaps best understood as the natural evolution of Shapefiles, which have been the predominant lightweight geodata sharing format for two decades. However the format is extremely limited. Four major shortcomings are that only vector points, lines, and polygons are supported; property names are constrained by the dBASE format; multiple files are required to encode a single data set; and multiple Shapefiles are required to encode multiple data sets. A more modern lingua franca for geospatial data is long overdue. GeoPackage fills this need with support for vector data, image tile matrices, and raster data. And it builds upon a database container - SQLite - that's self-contained, single-file, cross-platform, serverless, transactional, and open source. A GeoPackage, in essence, is a set of SQLite database tables whose content and layout is described in the candidate GeoPackage Implementation Specification available at https://portal.opengeospatial.org/files/?artifact_id=54838&version=1. The second trend is sharing client 'contexts'. When a user is looking into an article or a product on the web

  4. JPRS report: Science and technology. Central Eurasia: Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    Translated articles cover the following topics: influence of aerosol atmosphere on colorimetric characteristics of water surfaces in space observation; allowance for influence of waves and cloud cover in measurements of ocean surface temperature from artificial earth satellites by microwave-spectrometer method; Almaz 1 Spacecraft - 'Okean-I' Program: preliminary results of high-resolution radar observation of oceanic processes, internal waves; Russia's space plans to end of decade; views of value of space program, future of Buran; accomplishments of space program lauded; superiority of reusable aerospace systems; pros and cons of cooperation on Alpha Space Station Project; and nuclear power sources for space, cooperation with U.S.

  5. Climate Change Adaptation Science Activities at NASA Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, William L.; Lulla, Kamlesh

    2012-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC), located in the southeast metropolitan region of Houston, TX is the prime NASA center for human spaceflight operations and astronaut training, but it also houses the unique collection of returned extraterrestrial samples, including lunar samples from the Apollo missions. The Center's location adjacent to Clear Lake and the Clear Creek watershed, an estuary of Galveston Bay, puts it at direct annual risk from hurricanes, but also from a number of other climate-related hazards including drought, floods, sea level rise, heat waves, and high wind events all assigned Threat Levels of 2 or 3 in the most recent NASA Center Disaster/Risk Matrix produced by the Climate Adaptation Science Investigator Working Group. Based on prior CASI workshops at other NASA centers, it is recognized that JSC is highly vulnerable to climate-change related hazards and has a need for adaptation strategies. We will present an overview of prior CASI-related work at JSC, including publication of a climate change and adaptation informational data brochure, and a Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Risks Workshop that was held at JSC in early March 2012. Major outcomes of that workshop that form a basis for work going forward are 1) a realization that JSC is embedded in a regional environmental and social context, and that potential climate change effects and adaptation strategies will not, and should not, be constrained by the Center fence line; 2) a desire to coordinate data collection and adaptation planning activities with interested stakeholders to form a regional climate change adaptation center that could facilitate interaction with CASI; 3) recognition that there is a wide array of basic data (remotely sensed, in situ, GIS/mapping, and historical) available through JSC and other stakeholders, but this data is not yet centrally accessible for planning purposes.

  6. "Family Guides" to Timely Topics in Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, C.; McLain, B.; Wilkerson, A.; Garvin-Doxas, K.; Dyches, P.

    We have undertaken the development, field testing, and dissemination of a new series of ``Family Guides'' on timely topics of notable interest in space science and astronomy. Each Guide includes an innovative collection of puzzles, pictures, poetry, and projects, all designed to stimulate enjoyable co-learning, inquiry-based experiences between kids aged 6-12 and the caring adults in their lives. The Guides are primarily intended for use in informal educational settings, including at home, with after-school programs, in youth groups, and in programs for children, school-groups, or families that are conducted in museums, planetariums, and nature centers. We are learning that classroom teachers also express interest in the Guide's activities as a means to engage students attention toward more formal lessons. The Guides endeavor to be accessible to those who are not familiar with astronomy. They provide background on questions commonly asked by children. The interactive activities challenge common misconceptions. The Guides' also coach adults how to lead inquiry with kids instead of telling or prescribing answers. The Guides' resource sections provide leads to more information and additional products related to family learning. We released the field test version of the Family Guide to the Sun in late summer 2003. In January 2004 we released the field test version of the Family Guide to Mars in time for use with educational programs associated with the Mars Exploration Rover landings. We are in the planning stages for a Family Guide to Saturn and for a Family Guide to the Search for Life Elsewhere. These later Guides will build on the base of understanding we construct from the field testing of the earlier Guides. This paper will provide details of the Guides' contents as well as results from field testing in various educational settings. We are proposing for funds to translate the Family Guide to Mars and the Family Guide the Sun into both French and Spanish.

  7. A Methodological Review of Computer Science Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Justus; Julnes, George; Sutinen, Erkki; Lehman, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Methodological reviews have been used successfully to identify research trends and improve research practice in a variety of academic fields. Although there have been three methodological reviews of the emerging field of computer science education research, they lacked reliability or generalizability. Therefore, because of the capacity for a…

  8. Legislator voting and behavioral science theory: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Gregory J; Vernick, Jon S; Reiney, Erin V; Gielen, Andrea C

    2012-11-01

    To examine the application of behavioral science theories to explain the voting behavior of legislators for public health policies. We conducted a systematic review to identify studies that examined factors associated with legislator support, intention to vote, or actual votes on public health policies, emphasizing those grounded in behavior science theory. Twenty-one papers met our inclusion criteria, and 6 were explicitly grounded in a behavioral science theory. Behavioral science theories, and the theory of planned behavior in particular, provide a framework for understanding legislator voting behavior and can be used by advocates to advance pro-health policies.

  9. Editor's Introduction and Review: Coordination and Context in Cognitive Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kello, Christopher T

    2017-11-08

    The role of coordination in cognitive science has been on the rise in recent years, in terms of coordination among neurons, coordination among sensory and motor systems, and coordination among individuals. Research has shown that coordination patterns corresponding to cognitive activities depend on the various contexts in which the underlying interactions are situated. The present issue of Topics in Cognitive Science centers on studies of coordination that address the role of context in shaping or interpreting dynamical patterns of human behavior. This introductory article reviews some of the prior literature leading up to current and future research on coordination and context in cognitive science. Copyright © 2017 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  10. An Inquiry-Based Approach to Teaching Space Weather to Undergraduate Non-Science Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cade, W. B., III

    2016-12-01

    Undergraduate Space Weather education is an important component of creating a society that is knowledgeable about space weather and its societal impacts. The space physics community has made great strides in providing academic education for students, typically physics and engineering majors, who are interested in pursuing a career in the space sciences or space weather. What is rarely addressed, however, is providing a broader space weather education to undergraduate students as a whole. To help address this gap, I have created an introductory space weather course for non-science majors, with the idea of expanding exposure to space weather beyond the typical physics and engineering students. The philosophy and methodologies used in this course will be presented, as well as the results of the first attempts to teach it. Using an approach more tailored to the non-scientist, courses such as this can be an effective means of broadening space weather education and outreach.

  11. Individualized Instruction in Science, Earth Space Project, Learning Activities Package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczma, R. M.

    Learning Activity Packages (LAP) relating to the earth and space are presented for use in sampling a new type of learning for a whole year. Eighteen topics are incorporated into five units: (1) introduction to individualized learning, (2) observation versus interpretation, (3) chemistry in the space age, (4) the space age interdisciplines, and (5)…

  12. Towards a cooperation between the arts, space science research and the European Space Agency - Preliminary findings of the ESA Topical Team Arts and Sciences (ETTAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Sarah Jane; Imhof, Anna Barbara; Waldvogel, Christian; Kotler, J. Michelle; Peljhan, Marko

    2014-12-01

    The arts offer alternative insights into reality, which are explored by science in general, and broadened by the activities conducted by the European Space Agency [4] and other space agencies. Similar to the way the members of ESA are ambassadors for spaceflight and science, artists and cultural professionals are ambassadors for human expression, experimentation, and exploration. In June 2011, the ESA Topical Team Arts and Sciences (ETTAS) held a three-day workshop at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany. During this workshop, topics and ideas were discussed to develop initiatives between the arts, sciences and ESA. The aim was to foster and expand the human and cultural aspects of space exploration, and at the same time offer a means of communication that aims to reach audiences beyond the scope of traditional space-related channels. The consensus of the team was that establishing and sustaining a transdisciplinary professional community consisting of ESA representatives, scientists and artists would fuel knowledge transfer, and mutual inspiration. Potential ways to provide a sustainable cooperation within and between the various groups were discussed. We present the preliminary findings including a number of measures and mechanisms to initiate and conduct such an initiative. Plausible organisational measures, procedures and consequences, as well as a proposition on how to proceed are also discussed. Overall, the involvement and cooperation between the arts, space science research and ESA will enhance in the citizens of the ESA member states the sense of public ownership of ESA results, and participation in ESA's research.

  13. 2014 Space Human Factors Engineering Standing Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) participated in a WebEx/teleconference with members of the Space Human Factors and Habitability (SHFH) Element, representatives from the Human Research Program (HRP), the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI), and NASA Headquarters on November 17, 2014 (list of participants is in Section XI of this report). The SRP reviewed the updated research plans for the Risk of Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design (HAB Risk) and the Risk of Performance Errors Due to Training Deficiencies (Train Risk). The SRP also received a status update on the Risk of Inadequate Critical Task Design (Task Risk), the Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI Risk), and the Risk of Inadequate Human-Computer Interaction (HCI Risk).

  14. The Texas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution: A Model for the Delivery of Earth Science Professional Development to Minority-Serving Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Snow, E.; Olson, H. C.; Stocks, E.; Willis, M.; Olson, J.; Odell, M. R.

    2013-01-01

    The Texas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution was a 5-y teacher professional development project that aimed to increase teachers' content knowledge in Earth science and preparing them to teach a 12th-grade capstone Earth and Space Science course, which is new to the Texas curriculum. The National Science Foundation-supported project was…

  15. A review of research on formal reasoning and science teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Anton E.

    A central purpose of education is to improve students' reasoning abilities. The present review examines research in developmental psychology and science education that has attempted to assess the validity of Piaget's theory of formal thought and its relation to educational practice. Should a central objective of schools be to help students become formal thinkers? To answer this question research has focused on the following subordinate questions: (1) What role does biological maturation play in the development of formal reasoning? (2) Are Piaget's formal tasks reliable and valid? (3) Does formal reasoning constitute a unified and general mode of intellectual functioning? (4) How does the presence or absence of formal reasoning affect school achievement? (5) Can formal reasoning be taught? (6) What is the structural or functional nature of advanced reasoning? The general conclusion drawn is that although Piaget's work and that which has sprung from it leaves a number of unresolved theoretical and methodological problems, it provides an important background from which to make substantial progress toward a most significant educational objective.All our dignity lies in thought. By thought we must elevate ourselves, not by space and time which we can not fill. Let us endeavor then to think well; therein lies the principle of morality. Blaise Pascal 1623-1662.

  16. Materials Science Experiments Under Microgravity - A Review of History, Facilities, and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenzel, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Materials science experiments have been a key issue already since the early days of research under microgravity conditions. A microgravity environment facilitates processing of metallic and semiconductor melts without buoyancy driven convection and sedimentation. Hence, crystal growth of semiconductors, solidification of metallic alloys, and the measurement of thermo-physical parameters are the major applications in the field of materials science making use of these dedicated conditions in space. In the last three decades a large number of successful experiments have been performed, mainly in international collaborations. In parallel, the development of high-performance research facilities and the technological upgrade of diagnostic and stimuli elements have also contributed to providing optimum conditions to perform such experiments. A review of the history of materials science experiments in space focussing on the development of research facilities is given. Furthermore, current opportunities to perform such experiments onboard ISS are described and potential future options are outlined.

  17. Science & Technology Review March/April 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chinn, D J

    2008-01-22

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Science and Security in Sharp Focus--Commentary by William H. Goldstein; (2) Extending the Search for Extrasolar Planets--The Gemini Planet Imager will delve deep into the universe to identify planets that cannot be detected with current instrumentation; (3) Standardizing the Art of Electron-Beam Welding--The Laboratory's EBeam Profiler makes electron-beam welds consistent and improves quality control; (4) Molecular Building Blocks Made of Diamonds--Livermore physicists are exploring the electrical properties of diamondoids, tiny molecules of diamond; and (5) Animation Brings Science to Life--Animation helps scientists and engineers effectively communicate their ideas and research in a visually compelling way.

  18. Science and technology review, October 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhye, R.

    1997-10-01

    This month`s issue contains articles entitled Livermore Science and Technology Garner Seven 1997 R&D 100 Awards; New Interferometer Measures to Atomic Dimensions; Compact More Powerful Chips from Virtually Defect-free Thin Film Systems, A New Precision Cutting Tool; The Femtosecond Laser; MELD: A CAD Tool for Photonoics Systems, The Tiltmeter: Tilting at Great Depths to Find Oil; Smaller Insulators Handle Higher Voltage; and Compact Storage Management Software: The Next Generation.

  19. INTEGRATION PROCESS IN MANAGEMENT SCIENCE - THEORETICAL REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOAN CONSTANTIN DIMA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Complexity of phenomena found in the social, economic and environmental sphere of modern economic systems constitute one of factors in favor of attempts to apply examination approaches based on the analysis of the management integration phenomena in modern theoretical and practical studies concerning management. The aim to this paper is to present chosen approaches to integration process in theory of management science mainly strategic management and system approach.

  20. From the Moon: Bringing Space Science to Diverse Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, C. J.; Hall, C.; Joyner, E.; Meyer, H. M.; M3 Science; E/PO Team

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Apollo missions held a place in the mindset of many Americans - we dared to go someplace where humans had never set foot, a place unknown and beyond our imaginations. These early NASA missions and discoveries resulted in an enhanced public understanding of the Moon. Now, with the human element so far removed from space exploration, students must rely on textbooks, TV's, and computers to build their understanding of our Moon. However, NASA educational materials about the Moon are stale and out-of-date. In addition, they do not effectively address 21st Century Skills, an essential for today's classrooms. Here, we present a three-part model for developing opportunities in lunar science education professional development that is replicable and sustainable and integrates NASA mission-derived data (e.g., Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3)/Chandrayaan-1). I) With the return of high resolution/high spatial data from M3/Chandrayaan-1, we can now better explore and understand the compositional variations on the lunar surface. Data and analysis techniques from the imaging spectrometer are incorporated into the M3 Educator's Guide: Seeing the Moon in a New Light. The guide includes an array of activities and lessons to help educators and students understand how NASA is currently exploring the Moon. The guide integrates NASA maps and data into the interactive lessons, bringing the excitement of scientific exploration and discovery into the classroom. II) Utilizing the M3 Educator's Guide as well as educational activities from more current NASA lunar missions, we offer two sustained professional development opportunities for educators to explore the Moon through interactive and creative strategies. 1) Geology of the Moon, an online course offered through Montana State University's National Teacher Enhancement Network, is a 3-credit graduate course. 2) Fly Me to the Moon, offered through the College of Charleston's Office of Professional Development in Education, is a two

  1. Science & Technology Review January/February 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radousky, H B

    2006-12-01

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Another Step for High-Energy-Density Science and Teller's Legacy--Commentary by George H. Miller. (2) Titan Leads the Way in Laser-Matter Science--Livermore's Titan laser combines long- and short-pulse lasers to explore high-energy-density science. (3) Identifying the Source of Stolen Nuclear Materials--Nuclear forensic scientists are using advanced techniques to discover the exact nature of interdicted radiological and nuclear materials, their age and origin, and where legitimate control was lost. (4) Tiny Tubes Make the Flow Go--Membranes made up of billions of tiny carbon tubes 50,000 times slimmer than a human hair allow liquids and gases to flow through at astonishingly fast speeds. (5) Acidic Microbe Community Fosters the Unique--In an abandoned mine, where the pH can be even lower than zero, communities of acidophilic microbes produce hundreds of unusual proteins.

  2. Operational Concept of the NEXTSat-1 for Science Mission and Space Core Technology Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Goo-Hwan; Chae, Jang-Soo; Lee, Sang-Hyun; Min, Kyung-Wook; Sohn, Jong-Dae; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Moon, Bong-Gon

    2014-03-01

    The next generation small satellite-1 (NEXTSat-1) program has been kicked off in 2012, and it will be launched in 2016 for the science missions and the verification of space core technologies. The payloads for these science missions are the Instrument for the Study of Space Storms (ISSS) and NIR Imaging Spectrometer for Star formation history (NISS). The ISSS and the NISS have been developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) and Korea Astronomy and Space science Institute (KASI) respectively. The ISSS detects plasma densities and particle fluxes of 10 MeV energy range near the Earth and the NISS uses spectrometer. In order to verify the spacecraft core technologies in the space, the total of 7 space core technologies (SCT) will be applied to the NEXTSat-1 for space verification and those are under development. Thus, the operation modes for the ISSS and the NISS for space science missions and 7 SCTs for technology missions are analyzed for the required operation time during the NEXTSat-1¡¯s mission life time of 2 years. In this paper, the operational concept of the NEXTSat-1¡¯s science missions as well as the verification of space core technologies are presented considering constraints of volume, mass, and power after launch.

  3. Operational Concept of the NEXTSat-1 for Science Mission and Space Core Technology Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goo-Hwan Shin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The next generation small satellite-1 (NEXTSat-1 program has been kicked off in 2012, and it will be launched in 2016 for the science missions and the verification of space core technologies. The payloads for these science missions are the Instrument for the Study of Space Storms (ISSS and NIR Imaging Spectrometer for Star formation history (NISS. The ISSS and the NISS have been developed by Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST and Korea Astronomy and Space science Institute (KASI respectively. The ISSS detects plasma densities and particle fluxes of 10 MeV energy range near the Earth and the NISS uses spectrometer. In order to verify the spacecraft core technologies in the space, the total of 7 space core technologies (SCT will be applied to the NEXTSat-1 for space verification and those are under development. Thus, the operation modes for the ISSS and the NISS for space science missions and 7 SCTs for technology missions are analyzed for the required operation time during the NEXTSat-1’s mission life time of 2 years. In this paper, the operational concept of the NEXTSat-1’s science missions as well as the verification of space core technologies are presented considering constraints of volume, mass, and power after launch.

  4. The art and science of chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, J J; Wall, T C; Spettell, C M; Calhoun, J; Fargason, C A; Kobylinski, R W; Farmer, R; Kiefe, C

    2000-03-01

    Explicit chart review was an integral part of an ongoing national cooperative project, "Using Achievable Benchmarks of Care to Improve Quality of Care for Outpatients with Depression," conducted by a large managed care organization (MCO) and an academic medical center. Many investigators overlook the complexities involved in obtaining high-quality data. Given a scarcity of advice in the quality improvement (QI) literature on how to conduct chart review, the process of chart review was examined and specific techniques for improving data quality were proposed. The abstraction tool was developed and tested in a prepilot phase; perhaps the greatest problem detected was abstractor assumption and interpretation. The need for a clear distinction between symptoms of depression or anxiety and physician diagnosis of major depression or anxiety disorder also became apparent. In designing the variables for the chart review module, four key aspects were considered: classification, format, definition, and presentation. For example, issues in format include use of free-text versus numeric variables, categoric variables, and medication variables (which can be especially challenging for abstraction projects). Quantitative measures of reliability and validity were used to improve and maintain the quality of chart review data. Measuring reliability and validity offers assistance with development of the chart review tool, continuous maintenance of data quality throughout the production phase of chart review, and final documentation of data quality. For projects that require ongoing abstraction of large numbers of clinical records, data quality may be monitored with control charts and the principles of statistical process control. The chart review module, which contained 140 variables, was built using MedQuest software, a suite of tools designed for customized data collection. The overall interrater reliability increased from 80% in the prepilot phase to greater than 96% in the final

  5. A study of the compatibility of science instruments with the solar electric propulsion space vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, R. H.; Ajello, J. M.; Bratenahl, A.; Clay, D. R.; Tsurutani, B.

    1973-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference and field-of-view constraints are identified as the areas of most concern to science on solar electric propulsion space vehicles. Several areas are indicated which more detailed data on the space vehicle environment are needed. In addition, possible means to attain or demonstrate science/space vehicle compatibility are recommended for further iteration between space vehicle design and science payload considerations. The space vehicle design developed by the solar electric propulsion system integration technology effort is used. Two payload sets for comet Encke missions (a slow flyby and a rendezvous), as well as several instruments which are not included in the two payload sets, are analyzed to determine requirements on the space vehicle imposed by the instruments in order to meet their objectives. Environmental requirements for the sets of instruments are developed and compared to both the SEPSIT design criteria and the environment as it is presently understood.

  6. Appreciation of the 2015 JGR Space Physics Peer Reviewers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liemohn, Michael W.; Balikhin, Michael; Kepko, Larry; Rodger, Alan; Wang, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    The Editors of the Journal of Geophysical Research Space Physics are deeply indebted to the many people among the research community that serve this journal through peer review. The journal could not exist without the time and effort invested by the community through this voluntary activity, providing expert evaluations and thoughtful assessments of the work of others. In 2015, the journal had 1506 scientists contribute to the process with at least one peer review, for a total of 3575 reviews completed, including additional reviews of resubmitted manuscripts. There were 277 reviewers that contributed four or more reports in 2015. The average number of reviews per referee in 2015 was, therefore, 2.4. Note that the total number of manuscript final decisions (i.e., accept or reject) for Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR) Space Physics was 1147 in 2015. Of this, 774 were accepted and 373 were declined, for an acceptance rate of 67% last year. If the 1334 "revision" decisions are included in the tally, then the total number of decisions made in 2015 was 2481. Working out the arithmetic, it means that on average, a manuscript gets about 1.2 revision decisions before a final accept-or-reject decision. This explains the 3.1 average number of reviews per manuscript throughout each paper's lifetime in the submission-revision editorial process. We are pleased and happy that the research community is willing and able to devote their resources toward this service endeavor. We appreciate each and every one of you that helped maintain the high quality of papers in JGR Space Physics last year. We look forward to another excellent year working with all of you through the year ahead.

  7. Pushing the Boundaries of Cultural Congruence Pedagogy in Science Education towards a Third Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Cassie

    2011-01-01

    This review explores Meyers and Crawford's "Teaching science as a cultural way of knowing: Merging authentic inquiry, nature of science, and multicultural strategies" by examining how they combine the use of inquiry-based science instruction with multicultural strategies. In this conversation, I point to the need of specific discourse strategies…

  8. Research Methods for Comprehensive Science Literature Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Barry N.

    2009-01-01

    Finding some information on most topics is easy. There are abundant sources of information readily available. However, completing a comprehensive literature review on a particular topic is often difficult, laborious, and time intensive; the project requires organization, persistence, and an understanding of the scholarly communication and…

  9. Review of software for space-time disease surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Colin; Nelson, Trisalyn A

    2010-03-12

    Disease surveillance makes use of information technology at almost every stage of the process, from data collection and collation, through to analysis and dissemination. Automated data collection systems enable near-real time analysis of incoming data. This context places a heavy burden on software used for space-time surveillance. In this paper, we review software programs capable of space-time disease surveillance analysis, and outline some of their salient features, shortcomings, and usability. Programs with space-time methods were selected for inclusion, limiting our review to ClusterSeer, SaTScan, GeoSurveillance and the Surveillance package for R. We structure the review around stages of analysis: preprocessing, analysis, technical issues, and output. Simulated data were used to review each of the software packages. SaTScan was found to be the best equipped package for use in an automated surveillance system. ClusterSeer is more suited to data exploration, and learning about the different methods of statistical surveillance.

  10. Science and Technology Review March 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Pruneda, J H

    2000-03-01

    The contents of this Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory newsletter include the following: (1) The Laboratory in the News; (2) Commentary by George Miller--Reaping Unexpected Benefits from the Petawatt Laser Breakthrough; (3) The Amazing Power of the Petawatt--For three years, the Petawatt laser was the most powerful laser in the world, pushing electrons toward the speed of light and accomplishing some remarkable science in the process; (4) Building a Virtual Time Machine--A powerful new computer code simulates geologic changes eons into the future at Yucca Mountain, a potential underground nuclear waste repository; (5) Research Highlight: Dead Sea Explosions Trigger International Cooperation; and (6) Patents and Awards; (7) Abstracts.

  11. Science & Technology Review July/August 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2008-05-27

    This months issue has the following articles: (1) Science Translated for the Greater Good--Commentary by Steven D. Liedle; (2) The New Face of Industrial Partnerships--An entrepreneurial spirit is blossoming at Lawrence Livermore; (3) Monitoring a Nuclear Weapon from the Inside--Livermore researchers are developing tiny sensors to warn of detrimental chemical and physical changes inside nuclear warheads; (4) Simulating the Biomolecular Structure of Nanometer-Size Particles--Grand Challenge simulations reveal the size and structure of nanolipoprotein particles used to study membrane proteins; and (5) Antineutrino Detectors Improve Reactor Safeguards--Antineutrino detectors track the consumption and production of fissile materials inside nuclear reactors.

  12. Science and technology review: June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S. [eds.

    1996-06-01

    The first feature article is a survey of four research projects showing how theory and modeling efforts by scientist in the Chemistry and Materials Science Directorate at LLNL are advancing the understanding of the property of materials with consideration of underlying structures. The second feature article discusses Livermore and DOE`s Oakland Operations Office teaming up to decontaminate, decommission, and close out--on time and under budget--the Ann Arbor Inertial Confinement Fusion Facility in Michigan. Two research highlights on Mammoth Mountain CO{sub 2} mystery and osteoporosis are also included.

  13. A Review of Tribomaterial Technology for Space Nuclear Power Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanford, Malcolm K.

    2007-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has recently proposed a nuclear closed-cycle electric power conversion system for generation of 100-kW of electrical power for space exploration missions. A critical issue is the tribological performance of sliding components within the power conversion unit that will be exposed to neutron radiation. This paper presents a review of the main considerations that have been made in the selection of solid lubricants for similar applications in the past as well as a recommendations for continuing development of the technology.

  14. Review article: Wave analysis methods for space plasma experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Yasuhito

    2017-05-01

    A review of analysis methods is given on quasi-monochromatic waves, turbulent fluctuations, and wave-wave and wave-particle interactions for single-spacecraft data in situ in near-Earth space and interplanetary space, in particular using magnetic field and electric field data. Energy spectra for different components of the fluctuating fields, minimum variance analysis, propagation and polarization properties of electromagnetic waves, wave distribution function, helicity quantities, higher-order statistics, and detection methods for wave-particle interactions are explained.

  15. Gravitational biology and space life sciences: Current status and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    India is one of the 14-nation International Space Exploration Coordination Group (2007) that hopes that someday humans may live and work on other planets within the Solar System. The vision statement of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) includes planetary exploration and human spaceflight. While a ...

  16. Space Station life science research facility - The vivarium/laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilchey, J. D.; Arno, R. D.

    1985-01-01

    Research opportunities possible with the Space Station are discussed. The objective of the research program will be study gravity relationships for animal and plant species. The equipment necessary for space experiments including vivarium facilities are described. The cost of the development of research facilities such as the vivarium/laboratory and a bioresearch centrifuge is examined.

  17. Optical Communication on SmallSats - Enabling the Next Era in Space Science (a Keck Institute for Space Studies Workshop)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grefenstette, Brian

    2017-08-01

    Small satellites (communications are poised to increase telemetry bandwidth to a gigabit per second (Gb/s) or more. This enhancement can allow real-time, global science measurements and/or ultra-high fidelity (resolution, cadence, etc.) observations from tens or hundreds of Earth-orbiting satellites, or permit high-bandwidth, direct-to-earth communications for (inter)planetary missions. Here we present the results of a recent Keck Institue for Space Science workshop that brought together scientists and engineers from academia and industry to showcase the breakthrough science enabled by optical communications on small satellites for future missions.

  18. Science and Technology Review, August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Stull, S.; Wheatcraft, D. [eds.

    1996-08-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments, particularly in the Laboratory`s core mission areas - global security, energy and the environment, and bioscience and biotechnology. Topics discussed in this August 1996 issue are: Keeping the nuclear stockpile safe, secure, and reliable; Molten salt takes the bang out of high explosives; Security clearances meet the electronic age; and Exploring oil fields with crosshole electromagnetic induction.

  19. Science and Technology Review April 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, D H

    2004-02-24

    This months issue has the following articles: (1)''Computing Science: One Arrow in the Quiver for Homeland Security''--Commentary by Wayne Shotts; (2) ''On the Front Lines of Biodefense''--The Laboratory's pathogen bioinformatics group is developing ways to rapidly identify microbes that could pose a threat to the nation's citizens, livestock, and crops. (3) ''Defending against Corrosion''--Livermore researchers are designing a rugged system to prevent nuclear wastes from seeping into the environment at the proposed underground repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. (4) ''Engine Shows Diesel Efficiency without the Emissions''--Computer models are helping Laboratory engineers better understand the homogeneous compression charge ignition engine, a fuel-efficient engine with reduced emissions.

  20. Science and Technology Review September 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quong, A.A.

    2001-09-01

    This issue contains the following articles: (1) ''Technology Transfer Takes a Team''. (2) ''Zeroing In on Genes'' With Gene Recovery Microdissection, sequencing an entire genome to find its genes will no longer be necessary. (3) ''Big Glass for a Big Laser'' Together, Livermore and two leading laser glass producers have developed a revolutionary new method for making big pieces of high-quality laser glass. (4) ''Lasershot Makes Its Mark'' The Lasershot Marking System creates permanent, high-resolution identification marks on safety-critical metal parts, without weakening the part. (5) ''Tracking the Global Spread of Advanced Technology'' The Center for Global Security Research takes on the challenge of analyzing and raising awareness of the potential national security threats posed by advances in science and technology.

  1. Integrated Science Assessment (ISA) of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Second External Review Draft, Sep 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has released the Integrated Science Assessment of Ozone and Related Photochemical Oxidants (Second External Review Draft) for independent peer review and public review. This draft document represents a concise synthesis and evaluation of the most policy-relevant scienc...

  2. Astrobiology in an Urban New York City High School: John Dewey High School's Space Science Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, B.; Dash, H. B.

    2010-04-01

    John Dewey High School's participation in NASA's MESDT and DLN projects and other partnerships provide opportunities for our diverse population, focusing particular attention to under-represented and under-served groups in the field of Space Science.

  3. Advanced Hybrid On-Board Science Data Processor - SpaceCube 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatley, Tom

    2010-01-01

    Topics include an overview of On-board science data processing, software upset mitigation, on-board data reduction, on-board products, HyspIRI demonstration testbed, SpaceCube 2.0 block diagram, and processor comparison.

  4. Astronomy Village: A Multimedia Educational Interface for Communicating New Results in Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croft, S. K.; McGee, S. M.; Hornyak, J.; Coffield, J.; Stoffel, D.

    1999-03-01

    Astronomy Village is a multimedia educational interface for presenting new scientific results in a problemsolving format. Two content packages exist, one highlighting research problems and data in Earth and space science, and one in stellar and galactic astronomy.

  5. Opportunities for Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Support Through NASA's Office of Space Science (OSS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, L.; Rosendhal, J.

    2001-11-01

    NASA's Office of Space Science has made strong commitment to education, with an increased emphasis in recent years that is keyed around the participation of the space science research community in K-14 education and public outreach activities. The strategy includes funding of E/PO activities embedded into each mission, as well as opportunities for direct funding and participation for space scientists awarded research grants through OSS and for special independent E/PO program opportunities. This paper will emphasize the funding and participation opportunities available to the individual research scientist, outside of flight project missions. Recognition has recently been given to the need for space scientists to have a variety of ways to participate in E/PO activities, both in the depth (level of involvement) and the type of activity (review of material, museum exhibit development, classroom visits, etc.). This paper focuses on the specific NASA OSS opportunities for funding as well as volunteer activities for the individual space science researcher or a group of researchers at a single institution. In particular, we will discuss the NASA IDEAS program (Initiative to Develop Education Through Astronomy and Space Science) and the recently revised NASA OSS NRA E/PO funding process and the associated menu of participation opportunities. Our emphasis here will be on immediate ways to participate and propose for funding for these programs. We will present guidelines for the types of programs generally supported through these funding sources, summarize the administrative requirements for proposing and participating (including deadlines), and introduce a menu of opportunities for researchers who wish to participate through existing E/PO programs.

  6. Review of Nuclear Physics Experiments for Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W.; Miller, Jack; Adamczyk, Anne M.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan B.; Guetersloh, Stephen B.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2011-01-01

    Human space flight requires protecting astronauts from the harmful effects of space radiation. The availability of measured nuclear cross section data needed for these studies is reviewed in the present paper. The energy range of interest for radiation protection is approximately 100 MeV/n to 10 GeV/n. The majority of data are for projectile fragmentation partial and total cross sections, including both charge changing and isotopic cross sections. The cross section data are organized into categories which include charge changing, elemental, isotopic for total, single and double differential with respect to momentum, energy and angle. Gaps in the data relevant to space radiation protection are discussed and recommendations for future experiments are made.

  7. Review of nuclear physics experimental data for space radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norbury, John W; Miller, Jack

    2012-11-01

    The available nuclear fragmentation data relevant to space radiation studies are reviewed. It is found that there are serious gaps in the data. Helium data are missing in the intervals 280 MeV n-3 GeV n and >15 GeV n. Carbon data are missing >15 GeV n. Iron projectile data are missing at all energies except in the interval 280 MeV n-3 GeV n.

  8. Science & Technology Review July/August 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aufderheide, M B

    2005-06-14

    This journal contains the following articles (1) The Grand Challenge of Thermonuclear Ignition--Commentary by Edward I. Moses; (2) Orchestrating the World's Most Powerful Laser--The computer control system for the National Ignition Facility will soon have about 1.4-million lines of code running on more than 750 computers; (3) A Randon Walk through Time and Space--Albert einstein's 1905 papers on Brownian motion, random fluctuations, and statistical mechanics are fundamental to many Livermore research projects; (4) The Search for Methane in Earth's Mantle--Scientists are discovering that Earth's mantle may have untapped reserves of methane; and (5) Testing the Physics of Nuclear Isomers--Results from a tri-laboratory project contradict claims of accelerated release of energy from the nuclear isomer hafnium-178.

  9. Science and Technology Review April 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quong, A.A.

    2001-04-01

    This issue contains the following articles: (1) ''Computer Modeling Advances Bioscience''. (2) ''A New Kind of Biological Research'' Researchers are using advanced computer simulations to reveal the mechanisms of a host of biological phenomena. (3) ''The World's Most Accurate Lathe'' Used to make large mirrors for the National Aeronautical and Space Administration and the Department of Defense, Livermore's Large Optics Diamond Turning Machine is over 1,000 times more accurate than a conventional machine tool. (4) ''Leading the Attack on Cancer'' Scientists from Lawrence Livermore and the University of California at Davis Cancer Center are collaborating on research to find better ways to prevent, detect, diagnose, and treat cancer. (5) ''Electronic Memory Goes High Rise '' Stackable magnetic random access memory may improve computer performance.

  10. NIST in Space: Better Remote Sensors for Better Science Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This NASA Innovative Research Grant activity conducts engineering analysis to demonstrate the feasibility and advantages of applyi?ng a breakthrough remote sensor...

  11. CONCEPT OF CULTURAL AND EDUCATIONAL SPACE IN MODERN PEDAGOGICAL SCIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олеся Смолінська

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the content of the concept of cultural and educational space from pedagogical theory positions. A classification of the studies of cultural and educational space has been made in this research. Author’s criteria for grouping definitions of cultural and educational space and other notions used in a synonymic sense have been outlined. The following definitions of this subject by scientists have been presented: as a physical factor of spatial organization, organizational and managerial category, factor of pedagogical influence, the coordinate system for society ethnic values, space of social and psychological communications, the object of philosophical and educational discourse, factors of the appearance of a person’s subjectness, the circumstance of metaphor formation of speech assimilation of reality.

  12. Using NASA's Space Launch System to Enable Game Changing Science Mission Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is directing efforts to build the Space Launch System (SLS), a heavy-lift rocket that will help restore U.S. leadership in space by carrying the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle and other important payloads far beyond Earth orbit. Its evolvable architecture will allow NASA to begin with Moon fly-bys and then go on to transport humans or robots to distant places such as asteroids, Mars, and the outer solar system. Designed to simplify spacecraft complexity, the SLS rocket will provide improved mass margins and radiation mitigation, and reduced mission durations. These capabilities offer attractive advantages for ambitious missions such as a Mars sample return, by reducing infrastructure requirements, cost, and schedule. For example, if an evolved expendable launch vehicle (EELV) were used for a proposed mission to investigate the Saturn system, a complicated trajectory would be required with several gravity-assist planetary fly-bys to achieve the necessary outbound velocity. The SLS rocket, using significantly higher C3 energies, can more quickly and effectively take the mission directly to its destination, reducing trip times and cost. As this paper will report, the SLS rocket will launch payloads of unprecedented mass and volume, such as monolithic telescopes and in-space infrastructure. Thanks to its ability to co-manifest large payloads, it also can accomplish complex missions in fewer launches. Future analyses will include reviews of alternate mission concepts and detailed evaluations of SLS figures of merit, helping the new rocket revolutionize science mission planning and design for years to come.

  13. BOOK REVIEW: Science Fair Projects: Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Helen

    2000-11-01

    I have often thought that the notion of a Science Fair is intrinsically a good one but have never set one up. With this book such an undertaking is possible, with 47 projects from which you can choose. Each project has a clearly stated purpose with an overview that contains the physics you need to get started. A hypothesis, or sometimes two, and a procedure detailing what the student should do follow this. The materials to be used are those you should be able to find at home, and safety guidelines as well as places the student needs adult help are clearly marked. Every project asks the student to write down the results of their experiment and decide whether or not their hypothesis was correct. There are also suggestions for taking each project further. Some of these projects are standard experiments that you may already do with students in class, for example, making plasticine boats, string telephones and levers. Most are interesting twists on standard experiments such as using a wedge as a simple machine, home-made spinning toys and the experiments with light bulbs. The latter are the only real cause for concern if students were to do these things at home as adult supervision would be essential. This is obviously an American book, though. Teachers in British classrooms would need to work out how to deal with the references to temperature in Fahrenheit and mass in ounces. Length is usually given in centimetres as well as inches. Translations of soda bottles and bobby pins would also be needed. This book is designed to be full of ideas and to give structure to projects students can do at home, not to provide ideas that you can transport into the classroom. It does this very well and I would recommend it to anyone thinking of starting up a Science Fair. Alternatively, this is an excellent resource for more interesting homework assignments that would put more responsibility on the student and give them something fun to do.

  14. Soil Science in Space: Thinking Way Outside the Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.

    2016-01-01

    Mars is a perfect laboratory to reconsider the future of pedology across the universe. By investigating the soils and geology through our Curiosity and further endeavors, we find ourselves able to learn about the past, present, and possibly the future. Imagine what we could learn about the early Earth if we could have explored it without vegetation and clouds in the way. The tools and techniques that are used to probe the Martian soil can teach us about exploring the soils on Earth. Although many may feel that soil science has learned all that it can about the soils on Earth, we know differently. Deciding what the most important things to know about Martian soils can help us focus on the fundamentals of soil science on Earth. Our soil science knowledge and experience on Earth can help us learn more about the angry red planet. Why is it so angry with so many fascinating secrets it can tell?

  15. Salary, Space, and Satisfaction: An Examination of Gender Differences in the Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Marjorie; Hougland, James; Prince, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    How can universities be more successful in recruiting and promoting the professional success of women in their science-related departments? This study examines selected pieces of the puzzle by examining actual salary and space allocations to 282 faculty members in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) and the social and…

  16. Science and Technology Review, September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Failor, B.; Upadhye, R.; Wheatcraft, D. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This review is published ten times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The feature articles are `Taking Lasers beyond the National Ignition Facility` and `Jumpin` Jupiter! Metallic Hydrogen`. The first article describes the ultimate goal of laser fusion as the production of electricity by inertial confinement fusion. Advances in diode-laser technology promise to take another step closer to that goal. The latter article discusses a Laboratory team`s efforts to provide evidence for the metallization of hydrogen based on the team`s expertise in shock compression. A commentary on `The Next Frontiers of Advanced Lasers Research is provided, and a research highlight is given on `Modeling Human Joints and Prosthetic Implants.

  17. A REVIEW ON TEXTILES IN SPACE PROTECTION EQUIPMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUNTER EROGLU Nilsen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Astronauts need the lander for decelerate and bridle the speed when they land on the space surface slowly. This lander could be controlled velocity magnitude in any direction or orientation and provide protection. The landers consist of airbags and parachutes. The airbag is a type of vehicle safety device, have a soft cushioning and is an occupant restraint system. The parachute provides to slow the motion of an object through an atmosphere by the hauling. Space protection equipments must have some properties because of astronaut’s entry, descend and landing in safely. Textiles in airbags provide these properties especially which are light weight, low gas permeability, high strength, low cost, low temperature flexibility and low coefficient of friction. For textiles in parachutes must have properties such as smooth, porosity, air permeability, high strength, cost-effective, stability light weight and good in drag and lift. Airbags and parachutes in space protection equipment’s are improved in systems provide easy stability. Recently, inflatable technologies for space protection equipments plays a fundamental role in building re-entry capsule. It can be performed a variety of pre-flight analyses to ensure the success of the tests of protection systems from day to day. In this review, space protection systems, their textile materials and properties, their advantages and disadvantages are presented.

  18. Multiverse: Increasing Diversity in Earth and Space Science Through Multicultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peticolas, L. M.; Raftery, C. L.; Mendez, B.; Paglierani, R.; Ali, N. A.; Zevin, D.; Frappier, R.; Hauck, K.; Shackelford, R. L., III; Yan, D.; Thrall, L.

    2015-12-01

    Multiverse at the University of California, Berkeley Space Sciences Laboratory provides earth and space science educational opportunities and resources for a variety of audiences, especially for those who are underrepresented in the sciences. By way of carefully crafted space and earth science educational opportunities and resources, we seek to connect with people's sense of wonder and facilitate making personal ties to science and the learning process in order to, ultimately, bring the richness of diversity to science and make science discovery accessible for all. Our audiences include teachers, students, education and outreach professionals, and the public. We partner with NASA, the National Science Foundation, scientists, teachers, science center and museum educators, park interpreters, and others with expertise in reaching particular audiences. With these partners, we develop resources and communities of practice, offer educator workshops, and run events for the public. We will will present on our pedagogical techniques, our metrics for success, and our evaluation findings of our education and outreach projects that help us towards reaching our vision: We envision a world filled with science literate societies capable of thriving with today's technology, while maintaining a sustainable balance with the natural world; a world where people develop and sustain the ability to think critically using observation and evidence and participate authentically in scientific endeavors; a world where people see themselves and their culture within the scientific enterprise, and understand science within the context that we are all under one sky and on one Earth. Photo Caption: Multiverse Team Members at our Space Sciences Laboratory from left to right: Leitha Thrall, Daniel Zevin, Bryan Mendez, Nancy Ali, Igor Ruderman, Laura Peticolas, Ruth Paglierani, Renee Frappier, Rikki Shackelford, Claire Raftery, Karin Hauck, and Darlene Yan.

  19. The Use of Mobile Learning in Science: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Helen; Burke, Diane; Gregory, Kristen H.; Gräbe, Catharina

    2016-01-01

    The use of mobile learning in education is growing at an exponential rate. To best understand how mobile learning is being used, it is crucial to gain a collective understanding of the research that has taken place. This systematic review reveals the trends in mobile learning in science with a comprehensive analysis and synthesis of studies from…

  20. A Review of Microbiology: An Evolving Science, Second Edition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara May

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Review of: Microbiology: An Evolving Science, 2nd ed.; Joan L Slonczweski and John W. Foster; (2011. W.W. Norton & Company, New York NY. 1096 pages. ISBN: 978-0-393-93447-2. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  1. Discussing legal scholarship from political science perspectives : Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Edwards, P.; Giessen, L.

    2014-01-01

    Scholarship in international law aims at addressing global forest governance comprehensively. This article reviews the recent contribution Global Forest Governance — Legal Concepts and Policy Trends by Rowena Maguire and puts it into the perspective of recent political and policy science research on

  2. Doing Phenomenology in Science Education: A Research Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    OStergaard, Edvin; Dahlin, Bo; Hugo, Aksel

    2008-01-01

    This article is a review of applications of phenomenology, as a philosophy of knowledge and qualitative research approach, to the field of science education (SE). The purpose is to give an overview of work that has been done as well as to assess it and discuss its possibilities of future development. We ask: what attempts for connecting…

  3. Space for Women: Perspectives on Careers in Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, Julie

    The Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) is a joint collaboration between the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and the Harvard College Observatory. The CfA's research mission is the study of the origin, evolution, and ultimate fate of the universe. This 16-page booklet profiles women in the physical sciences or related fields; it…

  4. The "Next Generation Science Standards" and the Earth and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysession, Michael E.

    2013-01-01

    The "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS"), due to be released this spring, represents a revolutionary step toward establishing modern, national K-12 science education standards. Based on the recommendations of the National Research Council's "A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting…

  5. Income Elasticity Literature Review | Science Inventory | US ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following advice from the SAB Council, when estimating the economic value of reductions in air pollution-related mortality and morbidity risk, EPA accounts for the effect of personal income on the willingness to pay to reduce the risk of adverse health outcomes. These income growth adjustment factors are calculated using a combination of income elasticity estimates and income growth projections, both of which have remained essentially unchanged since 1999. These income elasticity estimates vary according to the severity of illness. EPA recently received advice from the SAB regarding the range of income elasticities to apply as well as the research standards to use when selecting income elasticity estimates. Following this advice, EPA consulted with a contractor to update its income elasticity and income growth projections, and generate new income growth adjustment factors. The SAB would evaluate the income elasticity estimates identified in the EPA-provided literature review, determining the extent to which these estimates are appropriate to use in human health benefits assessments.

  6. A Progress Report on the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Snow, E.; Olson, H. C.; Odell, M. R.; Stocks, E.

    2009-12-01

    The TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution is a five-year, NSF-sponsored professional development program for minority-serving 8th grade and high science school teachers who are preparing to teach a new senior capstone course in Earth and Space Science that is an option for the four years of science required for high school graduation in Texas. In this presentation (1) we will describe the sequence and content of the professional development academies and the summer institutes; (2) report on our effort to reach minority students; (3) review the preliminary results of the project evaluation on the effectiveness of the TXESS Revolution professional development program; and (4) describe enrichment opportunities for TXESS Revolution participants in connection with other projects, professional organizations and consortia (e.g., UNAVCO, IRIS, and the Consortium for Ocean Leadership). The program consists of eight professional development academies, each with a different contemporary content theme, during which teachers engage in rigorous, data-driven learning activities. Field trips, guest lectures, and other special programs are integrated into the professional development. Summer institutes are offered each year. The number of teachers participating in Cohorts A (spring 2008- summer 2009), B (fall 2008 - summer 2010) and C (fall 2009 - summer 2011) is 160. Cohort A and B teachers have directly impacted 9,494 K-12 students of which 67% are Hispanic, African American, Asian American or Native American, and 35% are Caucasian. Thirty-five Cohort A teachers have turned the training around and offered project-related professional development to 1,356 other teachers. The content of the TXESS Revolution worklshops is rigorous. Evaluation results reveal that many teachers felt overwhelmed at the start of the project. However, they soon became accustomed to the level of information presented and felt increased confidence in the core content. Participants appreciate how

  7. Research synthesis in veterinary science: Narrative reviews, systematic reviews and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Annette; Sargeant, Jan

    2015-12-01

    Reviews of the scientific literature are critically important for synthesizing the state of knowledge and are used extensively in teaching, clinical practice and public policy. Despite the importance of literature reviews, in veterinary science little attention has been paid to the science of research synthesis. In the same manner that diverse study designs address diverse research questions, different approaches to combining scientific literature serve different and valid purposes. However, and again reflective of the underlying primary research, the potential for bias in a review should also be considered when interpreting the results. This article introduces some basic concepts in research synthesis and discusses some of the basic forms of reviews including narrative reviews, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. Also discussed are potential sources of bias and design features that can be incorporated into reviews to either reduce, or at least acknowledge, the potential for bias. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Research in space science and technology. [including X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckley, L. E.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in various space flight research programs is reported. Emphasis is placed on X-ray astronomy and interplanetary plasma physics. Topics covered include: infrared astronomy, long base line interferometry, geological spectroscopy, space life science experiments, atmospheric physics, and space based materials and structures research. Analysis of galactic and extra-galactic X-ray data from the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-3) and HEAO-A and interplanetary plasma data for Mariner 10, Explorers 47 and 50, and Solrad is discussed.

  9. Activity of Science and Operational Research of NICT Space Weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Mamoru; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Watari, Shinichi; Shinagawa, Hiroyuki; Tsugawa, Takuya; Kubo, Yuki

    Operational space weather forecast is for contribution to social infrastructure than for academic interests. These user need will determine the target of research, e.g., the precision level, spatial and temporal resolution and/or required lead time. We, NICT, aim two target in the present mid-term strategic plan, which are (1) forecast of ionospheric disturbance influencing to satellite positioning, and (2) forecast of disturbance in radiation belt influencing to satellite operation. We have our own observation network and develop empirical and numerical models for achieving each target. However in actual situation, it is much difficult to know the user needs quantitatively. Most of space weather phenomena makes the performance of social infrastructure poor, for example disconnect of HF communication, increase of GNSS error. Most of organizations related to these operation are negative to open these information. We have personal interviews to solve this issue. In this interview, we try to collect incident information related to space weather in each field, and to retrieve which space weather information is necessary for users. In this presentation we will introduce our research and corresponding new service, in addition to our recent scientific results.

  10. New science from the phase space of old stellar systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varri, Anna Lisa; Breen, Philip G.; Heggie, Douglas C.; Tiongco, Maria; Vesperini, Enrico

    2017-06-01

    Our traditional interpretative picture of the internal dynamics of globular clusters has been recently revolutionized by a series of discoveries about their chemical, structural, and kinematic properties. The empirical evidence that their velocity space is much more complex than usually expected encourages us to use them as refreshingly novel phase space laboratories for some long-forgotten aspects of collisional gravitational dynamics. Such a realization, coupled with the discovery that the stars in clusters were not all born at once in a single population, makes them new, challenging chemodynamical puzzles.Thanks to the proper motions of thousands of stars that will be available from the Gaia mission, we are about to enter a new ''golden age'' for the study of the dynamics of this class of stellar systems, as the full phase space of several Galactic globular clusters will be soon unlocked for the first time. In this context, I will present the highlights of a more realistic dynamical paradigm for these intriguing stellar systems, with emphasis on the role of angular momentum, velocity anisotropy and external tidal field. Such a fundamental understanding of the emerging phase space complexity of globulars will allow us to address many open questions about their rich dynamical evolution, their elusive stellar populations and putative black holes, and their role within the history of our Galaxy.

  11. LIDAR and atmosphere remote sensing [DST Space Science Initiatives

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Venkataraman, S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available the Earth and Moon, up to a level of 3 mm. There are only 3 other international stations that have this capability. SA is developing a new concept Lunar Laser Ranger, at The Space Geodesy Programme of HartRAO (NRF Facility) The National Laser Centre...

  12. Life science research objectives and representative experiments for the space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Catherine C. (Editor); Arno, Roger D. (Editor); Mains, Richard (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    A workshop was convened to develop hypothetical experiments to be used as a baseline for space station designer and equipment specifiers to ensure responsiveness to the users, the life science community. Sixty-five intra- and extramural scientists were asked to describe scientific rationales, science objectives, and give brief representative experiment descriptions compatible with expected space station accommodations, capabilities, and performance envelopes. Experiment descriptions include hypothesis, subject types, approach, equipment requirements, and space station support requirements. The 171 experiments are divided into 14 disciplines.

  13. Calibrated peer review assignments for the earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, J.A.; Wang, V.Z.; Cervato, C.; Ridky, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Calibrated Peer Review ??? (CPR), a web-based instructional tool developed as part of the National Science Foundation reform initiatives in undergraduate science education, allows instructors to incorporate multiple writing assignments in large courses without overwhelming the instructor. This study reports successful implementation of CPR in a large, introductory geology course and student learning of geoscience content. For each CPR assignment in this study, students studied web-based and paper resources, wrote an essay, and reviewed seven essays (three from the instructor, three from peers, and their own) on the topic. Although many students expressed negative attitudes and concerns, particularly about the peer review process of this innovative instructional approach, they also recognized the learning potential of completing CPR assignments. Comparing instruction on earthquakes and plate boundaries using a CPR assignment vs. an instructional video lecture and homework essay with extensive instructor feedback, students mastered more content via CPR instruction.

  14. LEMDist: e-learning and e-science work space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz Gurman, J.; Hernandez Duarte, M.; Garza Rivera, J.; Arjona Raoman, J. L.

    2007-07-01

    LEMDist is an implementation for remote access to laboratory equipment in a grid environment. The actual functionality for these applications includes the remote data acquisition from real laboratory equipment in the grid environment. The access has been implemented for instruments with standard serial or USB interface. Experiments for Basic Chemistry and Food Engineering will be presented. The instruments are reached via authentication and authorization grid services and a interface grid device commands. Other services had been implemented for Food Engineering; they include a modeling process for freezing times of meat calculation and texture analysis from frozen meat images. Taking advantage of Grid infrastructure and experimental laboratory equipment the design model based on a categorical approach had been driven to build a technological platform to support different pedagogical approach in natural science teaching and e-science applications, implementing other services. (Author)

  15. Possibility of using sources of vacuum ultraviolet irradiation to solve problems of space material science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhoutseva, E. T.; Yaremenko, E. I.

    1974-01-01

    An urgent problem in space materials science is simulating the interaction of vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) of solar emission with solids in space conditions, that is, producing a light source with a distribution that approximates the distribution of solar energy. Information is presented on the distribution of the energy flux of VUV of solar radiation. Requirements that must be satisfied by the VUV source used for space materials science are formulated, and a critical evaluation is given of the possibilities of using existing sources for space materials science. From this evaluation it was established that none of the sources of VUV satisfies the specific requirements imposed on the simulator of solar radiation. A solution to the problem was found to be in the development of a new type of source based on exciting a supersonic gas jet flowing into vacuum with a sense electron beam. A description of this gas-jet source, along with its spectral and operation characteristics, is presented.

  16. THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE IN THE INTERACTIVE SPACE OF CBME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.F.B Ovigli

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering that since the 1980’s it has a paradigm change, strengtheningthe perception of Science as a human construction and not as "natural truth", newapproaches of teaching emphasizes the importance of the History of Science inthe educational process, also recommended by the Brazilian PCNs. In thiscontext, it is presented the conclusion of the elaboration and evaluation of anillustrated historical panel that is in permanent exposition in the Interactive Spaceof Biotechnology of the CBME. It presents 25 pictures, inserted in a timeline thatselects important events related to cell biology, microbiology and immunology. Thetimeline is initiated in century XVI, with the microbial theory of the illnesses;spontaneous generation and the experiments of Needham and Spallanzani alsoare commented, as well as the production of the first vaccine. Koch, in centuryXIX, is remembered with its postulates and the discovery of some illnessescausative agents. Brazilians’ researchers - Adolfo Lutz, Oswaldo Cruz, Vital Braziland Carlos Chagas – and institutes are presented too. The panel revealed itself asan important source of information, awakening the interest of the visitors for thesubject. The idea was based on presenting Science as a human knowledgeadventure, emphasizing the scientific process in the construction of theknowledge, based on procedures, needs and different interests and values.

  17. Maximizing students' retention via spaced review: practical guidance from computational models of memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajah, Mohammad M; Lindsey, Robert V; Mozer, Michael C

    2014-01-01

    During each school semester, students face an onslaught of material to be learned. Students work hard to achieve initial mastery of the material, but when they move on, the newly learned facts, concepts, and skills degrade in memory. Although both students and educators appreciate that review can help stabilize learning, time constraints result in a trade-off between acquiring new knowledge and preserving old knowledge. To use time efficiently, when should review take place? Experimental studies have shown benefits to long-term retention with spaced study, but little practical advice is available to students and educators about the optimal spacing of study. The dearth of advice is due to the challenge of conducting experimental studies of learning in educational settings, especially where material is introduced in blocks over the time frame of a semester. In this study, we turn to two established models of memory-ACT-R and MCM-to conduct simulation studies exploring the impact of study schedule on long-term retention. Based on the premise of a fixed time each week to review, converging evidence from the two models suggests that an optimal review schedule obtains significant benefits over haphazard (suboptimal) review schedules. Furthermore, we identify two scheduling heuristics that obtain near optimal review performance: (a) review the material from μ-weeks back, and (b) review material whose predicted memory strength is closest to a particular threshold. The former has implications for classroom instruction and the latter for the design of digital tutors. Copyright © 2013 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  18. Report of the Space Shuttle Management Independent Review Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    At the request of the NASA Administrator a team was formed to review the Space Shuttle Program and propose a new management system that could significantly reduce operating costs. Composed of a group of people with broad and extensive experience in spaceflight and related areas, the team received briefings from the NASA organizations and most of the supporting contractors involved in the Shuttle Program. In addition, a number of chief executives from the supporting contractors provided advice and suggestions. The team found that the present management system has functioned reasonably well despite its diffuse structure. The team also determined that the shuttle has become a mature and reliable system, and--in terms of a manned rocket-propelled space launch system--is about as safe as today's technology will provide. In addition, NASA has reduced shuttle operating costs by about 25 percent over the past 3 years. The program, however, remains in a quasi-development mode and yearly costs remain higher than required. Given the current NASA-contractor structure and incentives, it is difficult to establish cost reduction as a primary goal and implement changes to achieve efficiencies. As a result, the team sought to create a management structure and associated environment that enables and motivates the Program to further reduce operational costs. Accordingly, the review team concluded that the NASA Space Shuttle Program should (1) establish a clear set of program goals, placing a greater emphasis on cost-efficient operations and user-friendly payload integration; (2) redefine the management structure, separating development and operations and disengaging NASA from the daily operation of the space shuttle; and (3) provide the necessary environment and conditions within the program to pursue these goals.

  19. Science and Technology Review October/November 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, Rebecca J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2011-08-25

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we focus on science and technology research to ensure our nation’s security. We also apply that expertise to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight times a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory’s scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication’s goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. This is the October/November 2011 issue, with the cover story being "Proton Therapy Advances Cancer Treatment."

  20. UNIESPAÇO A Space Technology and Science Program for Brazillian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Gurgel, Carlos

    This work describes the activioties of The UNIESPAÇO Program of the Brazillian Space Agency AEB. This program was stablished in 1997, just three years after the official announcement of the Brazillian Space Agency. Its objective is to integrate the university sector to the goals of the Brazillian National Space Activities Program - PNAE in order to attend the requirements of the Brazillian space sector by developing processes, products, analysis and studies relevants to PNAE development. Its main goal is to form a solid base for space research and development composed by specialized groups capable to execute projects for the space sector. In summary the main tasks for the UNIESPAÇO program are: - Stimulate and amplify the participation of universities and others related research institutionsd in the PNAE. - To promote research projects on selected topics to generate products, processes, analysis and studies that can be applied on the brazillian space program with emphasis on possible prototype instruments development as a result of the research projects. - To improve research and development groups on space science and technology in order to give and increase capacities to execute projects with higher complexity. The guidelines of the UNIESPAÇO program are determined by represetants from AEB, Brazillian Universities, Brazillian Academy of Sciences (ABC), INPE (Brazillian Space Institute) and IAE(Institute of Space and Aeronautics from DCTA).

  1. Distributing learning over time: the spacing effect in children's acquisition and generalization of science concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlach, Haley A; Sandhofer, Catherine M

    2012-01-01

    The spacing effect describes the robust finding that long-term learning is promoted when learning events are spaced out in time rather than presented in immediate succession. Studies of the spacing effect have focused on memory processes rather than for other types of learning, such as the acquisition and generalization of new concepts. In this study, early elementary school children (5- to 7-year-olds; N = 36) were presented with science lessons on 1 of 3 schedules: massed, clumped, and spaced. The results revealed that spacing lessons out in time resulted in higher generalization performance for both simple and complex concepts. Spaced learning schedules promote several types of learning, strengthening the implications of the spacing effect for educational practices and curriculum. © 2012 The Authors. Child Development © 2012 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  2. Space Science &Technology in Mauritius: Current Status and Future Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rughooputh, S. D. D. V.; Beeharry, G. K.; Golap, K.; Issur, N. H.; Somanah, R.; Rughooputh, H. C. S.; Udayashankar, N.; Mueller, K.

    Space research (with either direct or indirect spin-offs) has been instrumental in leading to accomplishments that are meant to improve our quality of life in its broadest perspective. But are we all acquainted of the now proven-use of these findings and their capabilities? What do these mean to a remote small insular developing state like Mauritius? This paper explores the recent developments in this field in Mauritius and how we intend to optimize the use of the emerging technologies. Initiatives of the University of Mauritius are highlighted.

  3. James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module Thermal Vacuum Thermal Balance Test Campaign at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Stuart; Comber, Brian (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope is a large infrared telescope with a 6.5-meter primary mirror, designed as a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope when launched in 2018. Three of the four science instruments contained within the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) are passively cooled to their operational temperature range of 36K to 40K with radiators, and the fourth instrument is actively cooled to its operational temperature of approximately 6K. Thermal-vacuum testing of the flight science instruments at the ISIM element level has taken place in three separate highly challenging and extremely complex thermal tests within a gaseous helium-cooled shroud inside Goddard Space Flight Centers Space Environment Simulator. Special data acquisition software was developed for these tests to monitor over 1700 flight and test sensor measurements, track over 50 gradients, component rates, and temperature limits in real time against defined constraints and limitations, and guide the complex transition from ambient to final cryogenic temperatures and back. This extremely flexible system has proven highly successful in safeguarding the nearly $2B science payload during the 3.5-month-long thermal tests. Heat flow measurement instrumentation, or Q-meters, were also specially developed for these tests. These devices provide thermal boundaries o the flight hardware while measuring instrument heat loads up to 600 mW with an estimated uncertainty of 2 mW in test, enabling accurate thermal model correlation, hardware design validation, and workmanship verification. The high accuracy heat load measurements provided first evidence of a potentially serious hardware design issue that was subsequently corrected. This paper provides an overview of the ISIM-level thermal-vacuum tests and thermal objectives; explains the thermal test configuration and thermal balances; describes special measurement instrumentation and monitoring and control software; presents key test thermal results

  4. Questioning the Fidelity of the "Next Generation Science Standards" for Astronomy and Space Sciences Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Stephanie J.; Slater, Timothy F.

    2015-01-01

    Although the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are not federally mandated national standards or performance expectations for K-12 schools in the United States, they stand poised to become a de facto national science and education policy, as state governments, publishers of curriculum materials, and assessment providers across the country…

  5. Electro-Optical Payloads and CubeSat Missions for Earth and Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, C.; Marchant, A.

    2015-12-01

    Small, low-power electro-optical scientific payloads are required if small satellites and CubeSats are to become significant enablers of new science. Although these are just one class of scientific instrumentation they have often played a key role in many scientific discoveries. The most significant advances in Earth and space science, over the next decade are most likely to derive from new observational techniques. The connection between advances in scientific understanding and technology has historically been demonstrated across many disciplines and time. In this paper we present a review of three such sensors and the associated CubeSat missions and scientific investigation enabled. Each mission involves a relatively recently developed small electro-optical sensor which is tightly integrated with the small satellite bus in to a "Science Craft". The first is the NSF funded OPAL mission which makes use of a high-sensitivity, hyper-spectral limb imager to observe the daytime O2 A-band (near 762nm) emission. These observations allow the temperature of the lower thermosphere to be determined and address questions on the energy budget and response of the thermosphere to geomagnetic storms. The second is the MeNISCuS mission Methane Nadir Imaging Spatial-heterodyne CubeSat Spectrometer which is a demonstration of the volume holographic grating (VHG) spatial heterodyne spectrometer developed under a NASA-sponsored STTR contract. Methane (CH4) is the second most important greenhouse gas and although burning methane produces less CO2 than oil or coal, methane's global warming potential is about ~30 times higher. As a result, if methane leak rates are greater than 3-5%, the warming potential will outweigh the benefit of reduced CO2. The sources of such leaks can be discovered using missions like MeNISCuS. The third instrument and mission is SEDI a CubeSat scaled Fabry-Perot spectrometer focused on a narrow band around the OI(630) red line for observing winds in the

  6. Big Science, Small-Budget Space Experiment Package Aka MISSE-5: A Hardware And Software Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowski, Michael; Greer, Lawrence; Flatico, Joseph; Jenkins, Phillip; Spina, Dan

    2007-01-01

    Conducting space experiments with small budgets is a fact of life for many design groups with low-visibility science programs. One major consequence is that specialized space grade electronic components are often too costly to incorporate into the design. Radiation mitigation now becomes more complex as a result of being restricted to the use of commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) parts. Unique hardware and software design techniques are required to succeed in producing a viable instrument suited for use in space. This paper highlights some of the design challenges and associated solutions encountered in the production of a highly capable, low cost space experiment package.

  7. Project SMART at the University of New Hampshire: Integrating Space and Environmental Sciences Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, V.; Rock, B.; Farrugia, C.; Smith, C.; Kucharek, H.; Puhl-Quinn, P.; Vasquez, B.; Raeder, J.; Dorelli, J.

    2004-12-01

    We present an overview of the Science and Mathematics Achievement through Research Training (SMART) program at the University of New Hampshire. This academic program, designed for high school sophomores and juniors, emphasizes multidisciplinary development through active involvement in scientific research. Students with diverse backgrounds meet over a four week period in the summer at research centers across the University, and are given the opportunity to explore in depth fields of science that are not generally offered in high school curricula. Fields of study include Space Science, Biotechnology, Environmental Sciences, and Chemistry. The program includes interdisciplinary lectures, demonstrations, field trips, and "hands on" research experience. Our statistics from previous years of Project SMART indicate that typically more than 50% of the enrollees are women. Student research in Space Science this summer has involved several NASA flight missions (Wind, ACE, Cluster) and computer simulations. Environmental Science research topics focused on aquatic and terrestrial studies, many involving remote sensing analysis and image processing methods. The knowledge students gained was tied together in the form of research posters they presented on the last day of the program and defended in a public viewing to other researchers, friends, and families. We present examples of cross-disciplinary studies integrating concepts from both Space and Environmental Sciences and of student-generated research.

  8. [Earth and Space Sciences Project Services for NASA HPCC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkey, Phillip

    2002-01-01

    This grant supported the effort to characterize the problem domain of the Earth Science Technology Office's Computational Technologies Project, to engage the Beowulf Cluster Computing Community as well as the High Performance Computing Research Community so that we can predict the applicability of said technologies to the scientific community represented by the CT project and formulate long term strategies to provide the computational resources necessary to attain the anticipated scientific objectives of the CT project. Specifically, the goal of the evaluation effort is to use the information gathered over the course of the Round-3 investigations to quantify the trends in scientific expectations, the algorithmic requirements and capabilities of high-performance computers to satisfy this anticipated need.

  9. Scientific racism: reflections on peer review, science and ideology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, C

    1990-01-01

    The scholars who use Social Science & Medicine in their research and teaching, who publish their work in it, participate in its peer review of manuscripts, and attend its conferences belong to various nationalities, disciplines, and cultural traditions. Our common enterprise originated in and depends upon liberal democratic social institutions, and assumes their values. With all our differences and disagreements, we are committed to scientific research in a common effort to improve human health and welfare. Our professional careers are a large part of our personal lives, so that our science, our lives, and our values are a single fabric. The present lecture is a meditation on this situation based upon my own heritage, personal experience, and career in anthropology, and on the recent publication in Social Science & Medicine of an essay that attributed the epidemiology of AIDS to racial variation.

  10. Advancing Space Sciences through Undergraduate Research Experiences at UC Berkeley's Space Sciences Laboratory - a novel approach to undergraduate internships for first generation community college students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, C. L.; Davis, H. B.; Peticolas, L. M.; Paglierani, R.

    2015-12-01

    The Space Sciences Laboratory at UC Berkeley launched an NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program in the summer of 2015. The "Advancing Space Sciences through Undergraduate Research Experiences" (ASSURE) program recruited heavily from local community colleges and universities, and provided a multi-tiered mentorship program for students in the fields of space science and engineering. The program was focussed on providing a supportive environment for 2nd and 3rd year undergraduates, many of whom were first generation and underrepresented students. This model provides three levels of mentorship support for the participating interns: 1) the primary research advisor provides academic and professional support. 2) The program coordinator, who meets with the interns multiple times per week, provides personal support and helps the interns to assimilate into the highly competitive environment of the research laboratory. 3) Returning undergraduate interns provided peer support and guidance to the new cohort of students. The impacts of this program on the first generation students and the research mentors, as well as the lessons learned will be discussed.

  11. A review of instruments and methods for dosimetry in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.; Hamby, D. M.

    2011-02-01

    Instruments and methods recently used for space radiation dosimetry are reviewed for the purposes of comparison and reference. Passive detection methods mentioned include track-etch, luminescent, nuclear emulsion, and metal foil detectors. These can provide a reliable source of data for all types of radiation, but often require processing that cannot occur in space. Experimental methods of LET determination using TLDs, such as the high temperature peak ratio (HTR) method, are also discussed. Portable readout passive detectors including Pille, MOSFET, and bubble detector systems provide a novel alternative to traditional passive detectors, but research is more limited and their widespread use has yet to be established. Active detectors including DOSTEL, CPDS, RRMD-III, TEPC, R-16, BBND, and the Liulin series are examined for technical details. These instruments allow the determination of dose in real-time, and some can determine LET of incident particles by measuring energy deposition over a known path-length, but size and power consumption limit their practical use for dosimetry. Improved neutron dosimetry and development of a small active or portable readout personnel dosimeter capable of accurate LET determination are important steps for managing the effects of long-term exposure to the space radiation environment.

  12. Forensic science in the context of Islamic law: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkahtani, Theeb; Aljerian, Khaldoon; Golding, Bartholomew; Alqahtani, Sakher

    2015-08-01

    Even though it is still in its nascent phase, forensic science has already encountered strong resistance in Saudi Arabia due to its incompatibility with their present legal system. What follow is a review on the status of forensic medicine and its future in terms of acceptance and use in legal action. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  13. Life Science on the International Space Station Using the Next Generation of Cargo Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. A.; Phillion, J. P.; Hart, A. T.; Comella, J.; Edeen, M.; Ruttley, T. M.

    2011-01-01

    With the retirement of the Space Shuttle and the transition of the International Space Station (ISS) from assembly to full laboratory capabilities, the opportunity to perform life science research in space has increased dramatically, while the operational considerations associated with transportation of the experiments has changed dramatically. US researchers have allocations on the European Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV) and Japanese H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV). In addition, the International Space Station (ISS) Cargo Resupply Services (CRS) contract will provide consumables and payloads to and from the ISS via the unmanned SpaceX (offers launch and return capabilities) and Orbital (offers only launch capabilities) resupply vehicles. Early requirements drove the capabilities of the vehicle providers; however, many other engineering considerations affect the actual design and operations plans. To better enable the use of the International Space Station as a National Laboratory, ground and on-orbit facility development can augment the vehicle capabilities to better support needs for cell biology, animal research, and conditioned sample return. NASA Life scientists with experience launching research on the space shuttle can find the trades between the capabilities of the many different vehicles to be confusing. In this presentation we will summarize vehicle and associated ground processing capabilities as well as key concepts of operations for different types of life sciences research being launched in the cargo vehicles. We will provide the latest status of vehicle capabilities and support hardware and facilities development being made to enable the broadest implementation of life sciences research on the ISS.

  14. Making a Place for Space: Spatial Thinking in Social Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, John R.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies and multilevel data sets that include geographic identifiers have heightened sociologists’ interest in spatial analysis. I review several of the key concepts, measures, and methods that are brought into play in this work, and offer examples of their application in a variety of substantive fields. I argue that the most effective use of the new tools requires greater emphasis on spatial thinking. A device as simple as an illustrative map requires some understanding of how people respond to visual cues; models as complex as HLM with spatial lags require thoughtful measurement decisions and raise questions about what a spatial effect represents. PMID:24273374

  15. Deep neck space infections: a retrospective review of 173 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakir, Salih; Tanriverdi, M Halis; Gün, Ramazan; Yorgancilar, A Ediz; Yildirim, Müzeyyen; Tekbaş, Güven; Palanci, Yılmaz; Meriç, Kaan; Topçu, Ismail

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to review our recent experience with deep neck infections and emphasize the importance of radiologic evaluation and appropriate treatment selection in those patients. The records of 173 patients treated for deep neck infection at the Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery of Dicle University Hospital during the period from 2003 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Their demography, symptoms, etiology, seasonal distribution, bacteriology, radiology, site of deep neck infection, durations of the hospital admission and hospital stay, treatment, complications, and outcomes were evaluated. The findings were compared to those in the available literature. Dental infection was the most common cause of deep neck infection (48.6%). Peritonsillar infections (19.7%) and tuberculosis (6.9%) were the other most common cause. Pain, odynophagia, dysphagia, and fever were the most common presenting symptoms. Radiologic evaluation was performed on almost all of the patients (98.3%) to identify the location, extent, and character (cellulitis or abscesses) of the infections. Computed tomography was performed in 85.3% of patients. The most common involved site was the submandibular space (26.1%). In 29.5% of cases, the infection involved more than one space. All the patients were taken to intravenous antibiotic therapy. Surgical intervention was required in 95 patients (59.5%), whereas 78 patients (40.5%) were treated with intravenous antibiotic therapy alone. Life-threatening complications were developed in 13.8% of cases; 170 patients (98.3%) were discharged in stable condition. Despite the wide use of antibiotics, deep neck space infections are commonly seen. Today, complications of deep neck infections are often life threatening. Although surgical drainage remains the main method of treating deep neck abscesses, conservative medical treatment are effective in selective cases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Book Review: Space Research at the Technical University of Moldova.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaina, Alex

    Recently the historian of the Technical University of Moldova Aurel Marinchuk (Marinciuc) in a collaboration with the editorial team from the same University has published a Jubiliary Album "50 Years of the Technical University of Moldova". The Album is published at the Technical University in Chisinau (The Republic of Moldova). Two chapters of this album present major interest: 1) Space research at the Technical University of Moldova 2) The Foucault Pendulum manufactured at the same University under the supervision of the Rector of University, Dr. Hab. of Technical Sciences and Member of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Moldova Ion Bostan. The parameters of the Pendulums are: m=102 kg L=17,24 m T=8.35 sec. >From the first chapter We learn that 3 astronauts: Frank Lee Culbertson, Vladimir Dezhurov and Dumitru Dorin Prunariu are Doctors Honoris Causa of this University. As well we can found in the album informations about the Microsatellit "Republic of Moldova" built also by a team from the same University. It is ready to fly, but many depends on the funds for launch the Satellite. The Foucault Pendulum presents also interest in view of its possible applications to detect the influence of the relative position of the Sun and the Moon on Earthquakes. As is well known the tidal gravitational Force varies, depending on the relative position of the Sun and the Moon.

  17. Carbon nanotubes applications in separation science: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera-Herrera, Antonio V.; Gonzalez-Curbelo, Miguel Angel [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Avenida Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Hernandez-Borges, Javier, E-mail: jhborges@ull.es [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Avenida Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain); Rodriguez-Delgado, Miguel Angel [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Avenida Astrofisico Francisco Sanchez s/n, 38206 La Laguna (Tenerife) (Spain)

    2012-07-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The use of CNTs in Separation Science in the period 2009-2011 is reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNTs as stationary phases in LC, CE and GC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNTs as pseudostationary phases in EKC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CNTs as sorbents in SPE and SPME. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other uses of CNTs in separation science, as LDI substrates or in membranes. - Abstract: Due to the intensive and multidisciplinary research carried out during the last two decades on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), the scientific community understands nowadays much better the chemistry, structure and properties of these interesting materials. In fact, they have found their particular place in a wide number of application fields (nanotechnology, electronics, optics, medicine, etc.) among which Analytical Chemistry is becoming more and more important. The aim of this review is to provide an updated report of the most recent manuscripts (years 2009-2011) regarding the use of CNTs in Separation Science. In particular, the use of CNTs as solid-phase extraction and microextraction sorbents, as part of membranes as well as their use in chromatography and electrophoresis will be discussed and commented. Besides, although not as fully related to Separation Science as the previous techniques, the use of CNTs as laser desorption/ionization substrates has also been considered because of its importance in the field.

  18. Big data science: A literature review of nursing research exemplars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Bonnie L; Sylvia, Martha; Weinfurter, Elizabeth F; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Park, Jung In; Dodd, Dianna; Keenan, Gail M; Senk, Patricia; Richesson, Rachel L; Baukner, Vicki; Cruz, Christopher; Gao, Grace; Whittenburg, Luann; Delaney, Connie W

    Big data and cutting-edge analytic methods in nursing research challenge nurse scientists to extend the data sources and analytic methods used for discovering and translating knowledge. The purpose of this study was to identify, analyze, and synthesize exemplars of big data nursing research applied to practice and disseminated in key nursing informatics, general biomedical informatics, and nursing research journals. A literature review of studies published between 2009 and 2015. There were 650 journal articles identified in 17 key nursing informatics, general biomedical informatics, and nursing research journals in the Web of Science database. After screening for inclusion and exclusion criteria, 17 studies published in 18 articles were identified as big data nursing research applied to practice. Nurses clearly are beginning to conduct big data research applied to practice. These studies represent multiple data sources and settings. Although numerous analytic methods were used, the fundamental issue remains to define the types of analyses consistent with big data analytic methods. There are needs to increase the visibility of big data and data science research conducted by nurse scientists, further examine the use of state of the science in data analytics, and continue to expand the availability and use of a variety of scientific, governmental, and industry data resources. A major implication of this literature review is whether nursing faculty and preparation of future scientists (PhD programs) are prepared for big data and data science. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Starguides plus a world-wide directory of organizations in astronomy and related space sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Heck, André

    2004-01-01

    StarGuides Plus represents the most comprehensive and accurately validated collection of practical data on organizations involved in astronomy, related space sciences and other related fields This invaluable reference source (and its companion volume, StarBriefs Plus) should be on the reference shelf of every library, organization or individual with any interest in these areas The coverage includes relevant universities, scientific committees, institutions, associations, societies, agencies, companies, bibliographic services, data centers, museums, dealers, distributors, funding organizations, journals, manufacturers, meteorological services, national norms & standard institutes, parent associations & societies, publishers, software producers & distributors, and so on Besides astronomy and associated space sciences, related fields such as aeronautics, aeronomy, astronautics, atmospheric sciences, chemistry, communications, computer sciences, data processing, education, electronics, engineering, en...

  20. Gnoseological and epistemological aspects of the Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasyan, Alexandr

    2015-07-01

    In a formula "If knowledge is true, it is true objectively" widely spread in philosophical literature is reflected the perception of traditional gnoseology about relations of truth and inter-scientific characteristics of knowledge. In a monograph "Methodological principles of scientific knowledge and problem of unity of science" (Yerevan, 2002, in Russian) we have tried to justify the thesis according to which objectivity may be concluded from truth as a final product of scientific cognition, is not appropriate to a real process of scientific cognition. We contapose to it another formula: "the train of cognition for reaching to the station of truth passes through station of objectivity". The grand debates of history of cosmology have rich material that overcoming of subjective component of knowledge is a way to reach merit of objectivity. This is the way through which the cognition progresses to truth. In this sense, "Ptolemy-Copernicus" and "Einstein-Lorenz" debates are of special interest. The role of inter-scientific regulators of causality, simplicity, invariance and the role of other regulators of objectivity ensure objectivity of knowledge. Furthermore, proposed approach allows demarcating gnoseology and epistemology as disciplines about process of cognition.

  1. LISA: Science and Prospects for Gravitational Wave Detection in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Shane L.

    2017-01-01

    Spaceborne gravitational wave observatories with million kilometer armlengths will probe gravitational waves with kilosecond periods. This part of the spectrum is populated by a diverse menagerie of high energy astrophysical systems that will give new insights into stellar evolution, the formation and evolution of super-massive black holes, and the growth of structure in the Universe. LISA is a laser interferometric observatory that will be sensitive to gravitational wave frequencies from about 10 microHertz to about 1 Hertz, providing gravitational wave observations of these phenomena that will enable population studies, detailed characterization of the structure and bulk motion of matter in these systems, as well as enabling new, detailed tests of physics in strong gravitational fields. The core LISA measurement has been demonstrated by the successful flight of LISA Pathfinder, paving the way for the start of LISA mission design and planning. In this talk, we will discuss the science that low-frequency gravitational wave observations will reveal and enable, as well as the current technology status and progress forward toward an eventual LISA flight.

  2. An overview of the United States government's space and science policy-making process

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    A brief overview of the basic elements of the US space and science policy-making apparatus will be presented, focussing on insights into the interactions among the principal organizations, policy-making bodies and individual participants and their respective impact on policy outcomes. Several specific examples will be provided to illustrate the points made, and in the conclusion there will be some observations on current events in the US that may shape the outcome for the near-term future of US space and science policy in several areas.

  3. Cryo-Vacuum Testing of the Integrated Science Instrument Module for the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Davila, P. S.; Drury, M. P.; Glazer, S. D.; Krom, J. R.; Lundquist, R. A.; Mann, S. D.; McGuffey, D. B.; Perry, R. L.; Ramey, D. D.

    2011-01-01

    With delivery of the science instruments for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) expected in 2012, current plans call for the first cryo-vacuum test of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to be carried out at GSFC in early 2013. Plans are well underway for conducting this ambitious test, which will perform critical verifications of a number of optical, thermal, and operational requirements of the IS 1M hardware, at its deep cryogenic operating temperature. We describe here the facilities, goals, methods, and timeline for this important Integration & Test milestone in the JWST program.

  4. Issues and recommendations associated with distributed computation and data management systems for the space sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The primary purpose of the report is to explore management approaches and technology developments for computation and data management systems designed to meet future needs in the space sciences.The report builds on work presented in previous reports on solar-terrestrial and planetary reports, broadening the outlook to all of the space sciences, and considering policy issues aspects related to coordiantion between data centers, missions, and ongoing research activities, because it is perceived that the rapid growth of data and the wide geographic distribution of relevant facilities will present especially troublesome problems for data archiving, distribution, and analysis.

  5. Life Sciences Research Facility automation requirements and concepts for the Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Daryl N.

    1986-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the methods and preliminary results of a study on prospects for the automation of the NASA Space Station's Life Sciences Research Facility. In order to remain within current Space Station resource allocations, approximately 85 percent of planned life science experiment tasks must be automated; these tasks encompass specimen care and feeding, cage and instrument cleaning, data acquisition and control, sample analysis, waste management, instrument calibration, materials inventory and management, and janitorial work. Task automation will free crews for specimen manipulation, tissue sampling, data interpretation and communication with ground controllers, and experiment management.

  6. Professionality of Junior High School (SMP) Science Teacher in Preparing Instructional Design of Earth and Space Sciences (IPBA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlina, L.; Liliasari; Tjasyono, B.; Hendayana, S.

    2017-02-01

    The teacher is one important factor in the provision of education in schools. Therefore, improving the quality of education means we need to enhance the quality and the professionalism of teachers. We offer a solution through education and training of junior high school science teachers in developing the instructional design of Earth and Space Sciences (IPBA). IPBA is part of the science subjects which is given to students from elementary school to college. This research is a preliminary study of junior high school science teacher professionalism in creating instructional design IPBA. Mixed method design is used to design the research. Preliminary studies conducted on junior high school science teacher in one MGMPs in South Sumatera, and the respondent are 18 teachers from 13 schools. The educational background of science teachers who teach IPBA not only from physical education but also biology and agriculture. The result of preliminary study showed that the ratio of teachers who teach IPBA are 56% from physic education, 39% from biology, and 5% from agriculture. The subjects of IPBA that considered difficult by teachers are the distribution of sun, moon, and satellite motion; specific processes in lithosphere and atmosphere; and the correlation between lithosphere and atmosphere with the environment. The teachers also face difficulty in preparing media, choosing the right methods in teaching IPBA.

  7. Advances in the archiving and distribution facilities at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, Robert J.; Postman, Marc; Pollizzi, Joseph; Richon, J.

    1998-07-01

    The Hubble Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute contains over 4.3 TB of data, primarily for the Hubble Space Telescope, but also from complementary space- based and ground-based facilities. We are in the process of upgrading and generalizing many of the HDA's component system, developing tools to provide more integrated access to the HDA holdings, and working with other major data providing organizations to implement global data location services for astronomy and other space science disciplines. This paper describes the key elements of our archiving and data distribution systems, including a planned transition to DVD media, data compression, data segregation, on-the-fly calibration, an engineering data warehouse, and distributed search and retrieval facilities.

  8. Research on Life Science and Life Support Engineering Problems of Manned Deep Space Exploration Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Bin; Guo, Linli; Zhang, Zhixian

    2016-07-01

    Space life science and life support engineering are prominent problems in manned deep space exploration mission. Some typical problems are discussed in this paper, including long-term life support problem, physiological effect and defense of varying extraterrestrial environment. The causes of these problems are developed for these problems. To solve these problems, research on space life science and space medical-engineering should be conducted. In the aspect of space life science, the study of space gravity biology should focus on character of physiological effect in long term zero gravity, co-regulation of physiological systems, impact on stem cells in space, etc. The study of space radiation biology should focus on target effect and non-target effect of radiation, carcinogenicity of radiation, spread of radiation damage in life system, etc. The study of basic biology of space life support system should focus on theoretical basis and simulating mode of constructing the life support system, filtration and combination of species, regulation and optimization method of life support system, etc. In the aspect of space medical-engineering, the study of bio-regenerative life support technology should focus on plants cultivation technology, animal-protein production technology, waste treatment technology, etc. The study of varying gravity defense technology should focus on biological and medical measures to defend varying gravity effect, generation and evaluation of artificial gravity, etc. The study of extraterrestrial environment defense technology should focus on risk evaluation of radiation, monitoring and defending of radiation, compound prevention and removal technology of dust, etc. At last, a case of manned lunar base is analyzed, in which the effective schemes of life support system, defense of varying gravity, defense of extraterrestrial environment are advanced respectively. The points in this paper can be used as references for intensive study on key

  9. Proceedings of The Twentieth International Symposium on Space Technology and Science. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-31

    The 20th international symposium on space technology and science was held in Nagaragawa city, Gifu prefecture on May 19-25, 1996, and 401 papers were made public. Out of those, 112 papers were summed up as Volume 2 following the previous Volume 1. As to space transportation, the paper included reports titled as follows: Conceptual study of H-IIA rocket (upgraded H-II rocket); Test flight of the launch vehicle; International cooperation in space transportation; etc. Concerning microgravity science, Recent advances in microgravity research; Use of microgravity environment to investigate the effect of magnetic field on flame shape; etc. Relating to satellite communications and broadcasting, `Project GENESYS`: CRL`s R and D project for realizing high data rate satellite communications networks; The Astrolink {sup TM/SM} system; etc. Besides, the paper contained reports on the following fields: lunar and planetary missions and utilization, space science and balloons, earth observations, life science and human presence, international cooperation and space environment, etc

  10. A New Direction for the NASA Materials Science Research Using the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagheck, Ronald A.; Stinson, Thomas N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 NASA created a fifth Strategic Enterprise, the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR), to bring together physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering to foster interdisciplinary research. The Materials Science Program is one of five Microgravity Research disciplines within this new Enterprise's Division of Physical Sciences Research. The Materials Science Program will participate within this new enterprise structure in order to facilitate effective use of ISS facilities, target scientific and technology questions and transfer results for Earth benefits. The Materials Science research will use a low gravity environment for flight and ground-based research in crystallization, fundamental processing, properties characterization, and biomaterials in order to obtain fundamental understanding of various phenomena effects and relationships to the structures, processing, and properties of materials. Completion of the International Space Station's (ISS) first major assembly, during the past year, provides new opportunities for on-orbit research and scientific utilization. The Enterprise has recently completed an assessment of the science prioritization from which the future materials science ISS type payloads will be implemented. Science accommodations will support a variety of Materials Science payload hardware both in the US and international partner modules with emphasis on early use of Express Rack and Glovebox facilities. This paper addresses the current scope of the flight and ground investigator program. These investigators will use the various capabilities of the ISS lab facilities to achieve their research objectives. The type of research and classification of materials being studied will be addressed. This includes the recent emphasis being placed on radiation shielding, nanomaterials, propulsion materials, and biomaterials type research. The Materials Science Program will pursue a new, interdisciplinary approach, which contributes, to Human

  11. Organizing space: Dutch space science between astronomy, industry and the government

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baneke, D.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/272602302

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyzes how scientists, private companies and the government in the Netherlands cooperated in the creation of the new field of space research. It examines especially the role of Philips Electronics and Fokker Aircraft, and the consequences of their different structure and corporate

  12. Science on Spacelab. [astronomy, high energy astrophysics, life sciences, and solar, atmospheric and space physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerling, E. R.

    1977-01-01

    Spacelab was developed by the European Space Agency for the conduction of scientific and technological experiments in space. Spacelab can be taken into earth orbit by the Space Shuttle and returned to earth after a period of 1-3 weeks. The Spacelab modular system of pallets, pressurized modules, and racks can contain large payloads with high power and telemetry requirements. A working group has defined the 'Atmospheres, Magnetospheres, and Plasmas-in-Space' project. The project objectives include the absolute measurement of solar flux in a number of carefully selected bands at the same time at which atmospheric measurements are made. NASA is committed to the concept that the scientist is to play a key role in its scientific programs.

  13. [A NASA / University Joint Venture in Space Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wold, Donald C.

    1996-01-01

    MILAGRO is a water-Cherenkov detector for observing cosmic gamma rays over a broad energy range of 100 GeV to 100 TeV. MILAGRO will be the first detector that has sensitivity overlapping both air-Cherenkov and air-shower detectors. With this detector scientists in the collaboration will study previously observed celestial sources at their known emission energies, extend these observations into a new energy regime, and search for new sources at unexplored energies. The diffuse gamma-radiation component in our galaxy, which originates from interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar gas and photons, provides important information about the density, distribution, and spectrum of the cosmic rays that pervade the interstellar medium. Events in the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) are being observed up to about 30 GeV, differing by slightly more than order of magnitude from the low energy threshold of MILAGRO. By looking in coincidence at sources, correlated observations will greatly extend the astrophysics potential of MILAGRO and NASA's GRO. A survey of cosmic-ray observatories is being prepared for scientists and others to provide a resource and reference which describes high energy cosmic-ray research activities around the world. This summary presents information about each research group, such as names of principal investigators, number of persons in the collaboration, energy range, sensitivity, angular resolution, and surface area of detector. Similarly, a survey of gamma-ray telescopes is being prepared to provide a resource and reference which describes gamma-ray telescopes for investigating galactic diffuse gamma-ray flux currently observed in the GeV energy range, but is expected to extend into the TeV range. Two undergraduate students are compiling information about gamma-ray telescopes and high energy cosmic-ray observatories for these surveys. Funding for this project was provided by the Arkansas Space Grant Consortium. Also enclosed Appendix A, B, C, D

  14. Adapting a Planetary Science Observational Facility for Space Situational Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, P.; DFN Team

    2016-09-01

    The Desert Fireball Network (DFN) is designed to track meteoroids entering the atmosphere, determine pre-entry orbits (their origin in the solar system), and pinpoint fall positions for recovery by field teams. Fireball observatories are sited at remote dark-sky sites across Australia - logistics for power, sensor platforms, and data connection are in place. Each observatory is a fully autonomous unit, taking 36MP all-sky images (with fisheye lenses) throughout the night, capable of operating for 12 months in a harsh environment, and storing all imagery collected over that period. They are intelligent imaging systems, using neural network algorithms to recognize and report fireball events. An automated data reduction pipeline delivers orbital data and meteorite fall positions. Currently the DFN stands at 50 observing stations covering 2.5 million km2. A sub-set of the existing stations will be upgraded with a parallel camera package using 50mm prime lenses. Paired stations will allow triangulation. The high resolution array would deliver a Gpixel tiled image of the visible sky every 10 sec, at 20 arcsec resolution, with a limiting magnitude of 13 in a 10 sec snapshot. There are benefits in transient astronomy (optical flashes associated with gamma-ray bursts; flares from sources that generate ultra-high energy cosmic rays), and space situational awareness. The hardware upgrade would extend the resolution of the DFN into the V=11-12 magnitude range for objects in LEO, allowing us to observe significant activity during the terminator period. The result would be a wide field array, capable of triangulation, with a 3500km baseline enabling a larger terminator observing window.

  15. Five-Year Bibliometric Review of Genomic Nursing Science Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Janet K; Tripp-Reimer, Toni; Daack-Hirsch, Sandra; DeBerg, Jennifer

    2016-03-01

    This bibliometric review profiles the focus, dissemination, and impact of genomic nursing science articles from 2010 to 2014. Data-based genomic nursing articles by nursing authors and articles by non-nurse principal investigators funded by the National Institute of Nursing Research were categorized into the Genomic Nursing Science Blueprint nursing areas. Bibliometric content analysis was used. A total of 197 articles met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 60.3% were on biologic plausibility, 12.1% on client self-management, 11.1% on decision making or decision support, 8.1% on family, and 4.0% on communication, with the remaining 4.0% of articles focused on other topics. Few (11.6%) addressed healthcare disparities in the study purpose. Thirty-four references (17.2%) were cited 10 or more times. Research-based genomic nursing science articles are in the discovery phase of inquiry. All topics were investigated in more than one country. Healthcare disparities were addressed in few studies. Research findings from interdisciplinary teams were disseminated beyond nursing audiences, with findings addressing biologic discovery, decision making or support, and family being cited most frequently. Gaps in the reviewed articles included cross-cutting themes, ethics, and clinical utility. Interdisciplinary research is needed to document clinical and system outcomes of genomic nursing science implementation in health care. Although the review identifies areas that are encountered in clinical practice, relevance to practice will depend on evaluation of findings and subsequent development of clinical guidelines. © 2016 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  16. Space Weather Around the World: Using Educational Technology to Engage Teachers and Students in Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E.; Cline, T.; Thieman, J.

    2007-12-01

    The Space Weather Around the World Program uses NASA satellite data and education technology to provide a framework for students and teachers to study the effects of solar storms on the Earth and then report their results at their own school and to others around the world. Teachers and students are trained to create Space Weather Action Centers by building their own equipment to take data or using real satellite and/or ground-based data available through the internet to study and track the effects of solar storms. They can then predict "space weather" for our planet and what the effects might be on aurora, Earth-orbiting satellites, humans in space, etc. The results are presented via proven education technology techniques including weather broadcasts using green screen technology, podcasts, webcasts and distance learning events. Any one of these techniques can capture the attention of the audience, engage them in the science and spark an interest that will encourage continued participation. Space Weather Around the World uses all of these techniques to engage millions. We will share the techniques that can be applied to any subject area and will increase participation and interest in that content. The Space Weather program provides students and teachers with unique and compelling teaching and learning experiences that will help to improve science literacy, spark an interest in careers in Science, Technology, Engineeering, and Mathematics (STEM), and engage children and adults in shaping and sharing the experience of discovery and exploration.

  17. Science and Technology Review July/August 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bearinger, J P

    2009-06-29

    This month's issue has the following articles: (1) Game-Changing Science in the National Interest - Commentary by Tomas Diaz de la Rubia; (2) Preventing Close Encounters of the Orbiting Kind - The Testbed Environment for Space Situational Awareness is improving capabilities for monitoring and detecting threats to space operations; (3) A CAT Scanner for Nuclear Weapon Components - A new x-ray system images nuclear weapon components in three dimensions, promising unprecedented resolution and clarity; (4) Mass-Producing Positrons - Scientists reveal a new method for yielding a greater density of positrons at a much faster rate inside a laboratory setting; and (5) The Next Generation of Medical Diagnostic Devices - Portable medical diagnostic devices using ultrawideband technology help first responders evaluate injuries in emergency situations and could improve overall health care.

  18. Non-Quality Controlled Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on International Space Station (ISS) Science Data Vb0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Non-Quality Controlled Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on International Space Station (ISS) Science Data were collected by the LIS instrument on the ISS used to...

  19. Team science as interprofessional collaborative research practice: a systematic review of the science of team science literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Meg M; St Hill, Catherine A; Ware, Kenric B; Swanoski, Michael T; Chapman, Scott A; Lutfiyya, M Nawal; Cerra, Frank B

    2017-01-01

    The National Institute of Health's concept of team science is a means of addressing complex clinical problems by applying conceptual and methodological approaches from multiple disciplines and health professions. The ultimate goal is the improved quality of care of patients with an emphasis on better population health outcomes. Collaborative research practice occurs when researchers from >1 health-related profession engage in scientific inquiry to jointly create and disseminate new knowledge to clinical and research health professionals in order to provide the highest quality of patient care to improve population health outcomes. Training of clinicians and researchers is necessary to produce clinically relevant evidence upon which to base patient care for disease management and empirically guided team-based patient care. In this study, we hypothesized that team science is an example of effective and impactful interprofessional collaborative research practice. To assess this hypothesis, we examined the contemporary literature on the science of team science (SciTS) produced in the past 10 years (2005–2015) and related the SciTS to the overall field of interprofessional collaborative practice, of which collaborative research practice is a subset. A modified preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) approach was employed to analyze the SciTS literature in light of the general question: Is team science an example of interprofessional collaborative research practice? After completing a systematic review of the SciTS literature, the posed hypothesis was accepted, concluding that team science is a dimension of interprofessional collaborative practice. PMID:27619555

  20. S.m.a.r.t. Education and public outreach in earth &space science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V.; Carruthers, G.

    2003-04-01

    Science, Mathematics, Aerospace, Research, and Technology (S.M.A.R.T.), Inc. has a long history of supporting education and public outreach in the fields of Earth and Space Science, both on its own and through its membership in the DC Space Grant Consortium (DCSGC). Our activities include teacher training courses and informal workshops in Earth &Space Science; and a new curriculum in this topic area to be initiated at Howard University this fall (which will be open to undergraduate students majoring in science, engineering, or science education in all of the DCSGC-member universities). In addition, S.M.A.R.T. has participated, and plans to continue participating, in informal educational programs for pre-college students, parents, and teachers in the Washington, DC area. We worked with the Sun-Earth Connection EPO organization at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and Berkeley to support student and parent involvement in the Eclipse 2001 event (a Family Night at the S.M.A.R.T. Technology Learning Center, and a web-cast viewing of the eclipse at NASA GSFC). S.M.A.R.T. also participated in a similar activity for the 1999 solar eclipse. We are currently developing a series of videos, one for each of the four major themes of NASA's Office of Space Science (The Sun-Earth Connection, Solar System Exploration, Search for Origins and Planetary Systems, and Structure and Evolution of the Universe). These are intended for students at the middle school and high school levels. As in previous videos we have produced, these videos feature students and teachers as active participants. S.M.A.R.T.'s future plans include providing a Family Night for the Sun-Earth Day aurora activity and public viewing (jointly with Howard University's Dept. of Physics &Astronomy) of the June 8, 2004 Venus transit. A solar telescope and video camera that we developed as part of our SEC EPO activities will be used.

  1. Policy for Robust Space-based Earth Science, Technology and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly Elizabeth; Escobar, Vanessa Marie; Aschbacher, Josef; Milagro-Pérez, Maria Pilar; Doorn, Bradley; Macauley, Molly K.; Friedl, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing technology has contributed to the transformation of multiple earth science domains, putting space observations at the forefront of innovation in earth science. With new satellite missions being launched every year, new types of earth science data are being incorporated into science models and decision-making systems in a broad array of organizations. Policy guidance can influence the degree to which user needs influence mission design and when, and ensure that satellite missions serve both the scientific and user communities without becoming unfocused and overly expensive. By considering the needs of the user community early on in the mission-design process, agencies can ensure that satellites meet the needs of multiple constituencies. This paper describes the mission development process in NASA and ESA and compares and contrasts the successes and challenges faced by these agencies as they try to balance science and applications within their missions.

  2. Space Science Education and Public Outreach in the Washington, DC Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, G. R.; Washington, M. L.

    1999-05-01

    This paper reports on educational activities supported by the IDEAS program in the Washington, DC area. Here, we discuss activities which have been in progress over the last 5 years, which include the following: (1) development of a series of videos in space science, and associated "hands-on" activities, intended for pre-college students as supplements to their classroom education; (2) a summer teacher-training course, along the same topic outlines as (1); and (3) direct involvement of students in space science research at the Naval Research Laboratory and at Howard University's on-campus observatory. We have completed 5 chapters, with a total run time of more than 9 hours, of our proposed "Pyramids to Planets" video series in Earth and Space Science (totalling 16 chapters, of which only the space science portions are funded by IDEAS). We also plan a "stand-alone" video, "From Earth to Mars", which is a documentary of a crewed mission to Mars and return, using student "actors", which utilizes and conveys only factual information and realistic proposals for such a mission. We presented a 2-week, full-time course of study in Earth & Space Science for DC Public Schools science teachers during the summers of 1996 and 1997 (co-sponsored by the DC Space Grant Consortium). This course also introduced the teachers to the "hands-on" activities demonstrated by students in the videos. Students are directly involved, via after-school programs and summer internships, in space science activities at NRL. These include pre-launch instrument development and testing, post-launch data analysis, and education/public outreach activities for the Advanced Research and Global Observation Satellite (ARGOS) launched February 23, 1999. Students also participated in the development of two spectrographs planned for use on an existing telescope at Howard University's on-campus observatory. The facilities at this observatory are being made available for pre-college student and public use, as

  3. Strategy for implementing research in hydrology to promote space science among school children in Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabi, Omowumi O.

    2015-04-01

    This paper describes a proposed activity to introduce school children in Nigeria to research in hydrology through the public outreach coordinated by the United Nations affiliated African Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education in English (ARCSSTE-E). Over the years, ARCSSTE-E has established a vibrant relationship with Nigerian schools through periodic zonal and national space educational workshops organized for students and teachers. The enthusiasm displayed by the students, coupled with the brilliant performance in the evaluation tests, indicated that this method of informal education is suitable for stimulating the interest of Nigerian pre-collegiate youths in space science and technology, and also to inspire the young learners and develop their interest in the Sciences, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). Because only few representatives from each school can participate in these public outreach programs, it became expedient for the Centre to inaugurate space clubs in schools as a forum for students and teachers to meet regularly to discuss space related issues. Since the first space club was officially launched in 2007, the Centre has inaugurated over 300 space clubs in primary, secondary and tertiary institutions, strategically distributed over the six geopolitical zones of Nigeria. The presentation highlights a space club activity designed to introduce the students to precipitation data collection, with locally fabricated rain gauges. The paper also documents the proposed post-data collection activities in which ARCSSTE-E, acting as the coordinating Centre will collaborate with other national and international organizations to standardize and utilize the rainfall data collected by the students for ground validation of satellite data from the Global Precipitation Measurement. Key words: Public Outreach, Space Club, Human Capacity Development, Hydrologic Research, Global Precipitation Measurement.

  4. NATO RTO Space Science and Technology Advisory Group (SSTAG) Recommendations for Space Research Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    hundreds of parameters to optimize . At the moment there are no general ways of system design and evaluation. Therefore the optimization of space-based...functionalities, e.g. GPS, Galileo, Ikonos , QuickBird, SATCOM. Research must be carried out to harden satellite buses, to protect sensors and...navigation payload design and optimization • Ground versus airborne pseudolites, configuration management, synchronization • Near far effects

  5. The TXESS Revolution: A Partnership to Advance Earth and Space Science in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Olson, H. C.; Willis, M.

    2007-12-01

    The Texas State Board of Education voted in 2006 to require a fourth year of science for graduation from high school and to authorize the creation of a new senior level Earth Systems and Space Science course as an option to fulfill that requirement. The new Earth Systems and Space Science course will be a capstone course for which three required science courses(biology, chemistry and physics)are prerequisites. Here, we summarize the collective efforts of business leaders, scientists and educators who worked collaboratively for almost a decade to successfully reinstate Earth science as part of Texas' standard high school curriculum and describe a new project, the Texas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, a 5-year professional development program for 8th -12th grade minority and minority-serving science teachers and teacher mentors in Texas to help prepare them to teach the new capstone course. At the heart of TXESS Revolution is an extraordinary partnership, involving (1) two UT-Austin academic units, the Jackson School of Geosciences and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering; (2) TERC, a not-for-profit educational enterprise in Massachusetts with 30 years experience in designing science curriculum; (3) the University of South Florida; and (4) the Texas Regional Collaboratives for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching, a statewide network of teacher mentors and science teachers. With guidance from the Texas Education Agency, the state agency charged with overseeing education, the TXESS Revolution project will provide teachers with access to high quality materials and instruction aligned with the Texas educational standards for the new capstone course through: a program of eight different 3-day professional development academies offered to both teachers and teachers mentors; immersive summer institutes, field experiences, and a Petroleum Science and Technology Institute; training on how to implement Earth Science by Design, a teacher

  6. Middle School Teacher Misconceptions and Anxieties Concerning Space Science Disciplinary Core Ideas in NGSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Kristine

    2017-01-01

    The Disciplinary Core Ideas (DCI) of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) are grouped into the broad disciplinary areas of Physical Sciences, Life Sciences, Earth and Space Sciences, and Engineering, Technology and Application of Science, and feature learning progressions based on endpoint targets for each grade band. Since the Middle School DCIs build on the expected learning achievements to be reached by the end of Fifth Grade, and High School DCI similarly build on the expected learning achievements expected for the end of Eighth Grade, the Middle School grade band is of particular importance as the bridge between the Elementary and High School curriculum. In states where there is not a special Middle School Certification many of these science classes are taught by teachers prepared to teach at the Elementary level (and who may have limited content background). As a result, some pre-service and in-service teachers have expressed reduced self-confidence in both their own science content knowledge and their ability to apply it in the NGSS-based classroom, while decades of research has demonstrated the pervasiveness of science misconceptions among teachers. Thus the adoption of NGSS has the potential to drive talented teachers out of the profession who feel that they are ill-prepared for this sweeping transition. The key is providing rigorous education in both content and pedagogy for pre-service teachers and quality targeted professional development for in-service teachers. This report focuses on the Middle School Space Sciences grade band DCIs and presents research on specific difficulties, misconceptions and uncertainties with the material demonstrated by pre-service education students over the past four years in a required university science content course, as well as two year-long granted workshop series for current Middle School teachers. This information is relevant to the development of both new content courses aligned with NGSS for pre

  7. A brief review of augmented reality science learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalan, Valarmathie; Bakar, Juliana Aida Abu; Zulkifli, Abdul Nasir

    2017-10-01

    This paper reviews several literatures concerning the theories and model that could be applied for science motivation for upper secondary school learners (16-17 years old) in order to make the learning experience more amazing and useful. The embedment of AR in science could bring an awe-inspiring transformation on learners' viewpoint towards the respective subject matters. Augmented Reality is able to present the real and virtual learning experience with the addition of multiple media without replacing the real environment. Due to the unique feature of AR, it attracts the mass attention of researchers to implement AR in science learning. This impressive technology offers learners with the ultimate visualization and provides an astonishing and transparent learning experience by bringing to light the unseen perspective of the learning content. This paper will attract the attention of researchers in the related field as well as academicians in the related discipline. This paper aims to propose several related theoretical guidance that could be applied in science motivation to transform the learning in an effective way.

  8. Annual view (1999) - aeronautic relation/space relation. Space relation - space science/lunar excursion; Nenkan tenbo (1999) koku kankei uchu kankei. Uchu kagaku, tsuki tansa kanren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-05

    For the purpose of learning the technology required for a mission to sample rocks, soil, etc. from small planets or satellites and bring them back to the earth, the Institute of the Space and Astronautical Science has been proceeding with the development of No. 20 scientific satellite (MUSES-C) and conducted the technical development of the electric propulsion system, interplanetary self-contained navigation, sampling, reentry into the earth, recovery, etc. With the aim of acquiring data for survey of usability of the moon and developing science to study the origin and evolution of the moon, the Institute of the Space and Astronautical Science and National Space Development Agency of Japan are jointly carrying out the R and D of a selenological and engineering explorer (SELENE). The explorer is planned to be launched with H-II A rocket in 2004. No. 17 scientific satellite is now under development with the aim of elucidating the crustal structure and thermal structure inside the moon, but the plan for launching in summer 1999 was postponed because it takes time to develop the penetrator. The 5th X-ray astronomical satellite (ASTRO-E) of Japan is now in final inspection and service toward the launch in February 8, 2000. (NEDO)

  9. 2015 Space Human Factors Engineering Standing Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan

    2015-01-01

    The 2015 Space Human Factors Engineering (SHFE) Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on December 2 - 3, 2015. The SRP reviewed the updated research plans for the Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI Risk), the Risk of Inadequate Human-Computer Interaction (HCI Risk), and the Risk of Inadequate Mission, Process and Task Design (MPTask Risk). The SRP also received a status update on the Risk of Incompatible Vehicle/Habitat Design (Hab Risk) and the Risk of Performance Errors Due to Training Deficiencies (Train Risk). The SRP is pleased with the progress and responsiveness of the SHFE team. The presentations were much improved this year. The SRP is also pleased with the human-centered design approach. Below are some of the more extensive comments from the SRP. We have also made comments in each section concerning gaps/tasks in each. The comments below reflect more significant changes that impact more than just one particular section.

  10. Science and Technology Review April/May 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolic, R J

    2011-03-03

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the focus is on science and technology research to ensure the nation's security. That expertise is also applied to solve other important national problems in energy, bioscience, and the environment. Science & Technology Review is published eight time a year to communicate, to a broad audience, the Laboratory's scientific and technological accomplishments in fulfilling its primary missions. The publication's goal is to help readers understand these accomplishments and appreciate their value to the individual citizen, the nation, and the world. In this issue for April/May 2011, the features are 'Dealing with the Nonlinear Battlefield' and 'From Video to Knowledge.' Research highlights are 'Kinetic Models Predict Biofuel Efficiency,' Going Deep with MEGa-Rays' and 'Energy on Demand.'

  11. SSNTD applications in science and technology - A brief review

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, H A

    1999-01-01

    The technique of Solid State Nuclear Track Detection (SSNTD) has matured since long as a viable method of charged particle detection. The usage of this method has been successfully extended to neutron detection and gamma dose measurements as well. The etch-track mechanism has been further exploited to generate a major application area of nuclear track filters. In spite of the remarkable diversity of SSNTD applications that have emerged over the years in different fields, its potential is by no means saturated. In this article, a brief review of SSNTD applications is presented with reference to contemporary interests in science and technology. For convenience, the coverage of topics is organized under broad categories of Nuclear Physics, Materials Research, Geology, Environmental Science and allied technologies. While identifying high interest areas, those with limited but innovative applications are also mentioned. In some cases, the important results are quoted for the purpose of illustrating the strength of...

  12. NASA space station automation: AI-based technology review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firschein, O.; Georgeff, M. P.; Park, W.; Neumann, P.; Kautz, W. H.; Levitt, K. N.; Rom, R. J.; Poggio, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Research and Development projects in automation for the Space Station are discussed. Artificial Intelligence (AI) based automation technologies are planned to enhance crew safety through reduced need for EVA, increase crew productivity through the reduction of routine operations, increase space station autonomy, and augment space station capability through the use of teleoperation and robotics. AI technology will also be developed for the servicing of satellites at the Space Station, system monitoring and diagnosis, space manufacturing, and the assembly of large space structures.

  13. Science Mapping: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaomei Chen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We present a systematic review of the literature concerning major aspects of science mapping to serve two primary purposes: First, to demonstrate the use of a science mapping approach to perform the review so that researchers may apply the procedure to the review of a scientific domain of their own interest, and second, to identify major areas of research activities concerning science mapping, intellectual milestones in the development of key specialties, evolutionary stages of major specialties involved, and the dynamics of transitions from one specialty to another. Design/methodology/approach: We first introduce a theoretical framework of the evolution of a scientific specialty. Then we demonstrate a generic search strategy that can be used to construct a representative dataset of bibliographic records of a domain of research. Next, progressively synthesized co-citation networks are constructed and visualized to aid visual analytic studies of the domain’s structural and dynamic patterns and trends. Finally, trajectories of citations made by particular types of authors and articles are presented to illustrate the predictive potential of the analytic approach. Findings: The evolution of the science mapping research involves the development of a number of interrelated specialties. Four major specialties are discussed in detail in terms of four evolutionary stages: conceptualization, tool construction, application, and codification. Underlying connections between major specialties are also explored. The predictive analysis demonstrates citations trajectories of potentially transformative contributions. Research limitations: The systematic review is primarily guided by citation patterns in the dataset retrieved from the literature. The scope of the data is limited by the source of the retrieval, i.e. the Web of Science, and the composite query used. An iterative query refinement is possible if one would like to improve the data quality

  14. Technical Challenges and Opportunities of Centralizing Space Science Mission Operations (SSMO) at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, Haisam; Burns, Rich

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Goddard Space Science Mission Operations project (SSMO) is performing a technical cost-benefit analysis for centralizing and consolidating operations of a diverse set of missions into a unified and integrated technical infrastructure. The presentation will focus on the notion of normalizing spacecraft operations processes, workflows, and tools. It will also show the processes of creating a standardized open architecture, creating common security models and implementations, interfaces, services, automations, notifications, alerts, logging, publish, subscribe and middleware capabilities. The presentation will also discuss how to leverage traditional capabilities, along with virtualization, cloud computing services, control groups and containers, and possibly Big Data concepts.

  15. Climate Change Education Today in K-12: What's Happening in the Earth and Space Science Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, M. A.; National Earth Science Teachers Association

    2011-12-01

    Climate change is a highly interdisciplinary topic, involving not only multiple fields of science, but also social science and the humanities. There are many aspects of climate change science that make it particularly well-suited for exploration in the K-12 setting, including opportunities to explore the unifying processes of science such as complex systems, models, observations, change and evolution. Furthermore, this field of science offers the opportunity to observe the nature of science in action - including how scientists develop and improve their understanding through research and debate. Finally, climate change is inherently highly relevant to students - indeed, students today will need to deal with the consequences of the climate change. The science of climate change is clearly present in current science education standards, both at the National level as well as in the majority of states. Nonetheless, a significant number of teachers across the country report difficulties addressing climate change in the classroom. The National Earth Science Teachers Association has conducted several surveys of Earth and space science educators across the country over the past several years on a number of issues, including their needs and concerns, including their experience of external influences on what they teach. While the number of teachers that report external pressures to not teach climate change science are in the minority (and less than the pressure to not teach evolution and related topics), our results suggest that this pressure against climate change science in the K-12 classroom has grown over the past several years. Some teachers report being threatened by parents, being encouraged by administrators to not teach the subject, and a belief that the "two sides" of climate change should be taught. Survey results indicate that teachers in religious or politically-conservative districts are more likely to report difficulties in teaching about climate change than in

  16. A New Direction for NASA Materials Science Research Using the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagheck, Ronald; Trach, Brian; Geveden, Rex D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA recently created a fifth Strategic Enterprise, the Office of Biological and Physical Research (OBPR), to bring together physics, chemistry, biology, and engineering to foster interdisciplinary research. The Materials Science Program is one of five Microgravity Research disciplines within this new enterprise's Division of Physical Sciences Research. The Materials Science Program will participate within this new enterprise structure in order to facilitate effective use of ISS facilities, target scientific and technology questions and transfer scientific and technology results for Earth benefits. The Materials Science research will use a low gravity environment for flight and ground-based research in crystallization, fundamental processing, properties characterization, and biomaterials in order to obtain fundamental understanding of various phenomena effects and relationships to the structures, processing, and properties of materials. Completion of the International Space Station's (ISS) first major assembly, during the past year, provides new opportunities for on-orbit research and scientific utilization. Accommodations will support a variety of Materials Science payload hardware both in the US and international partner modules with emphasis on early use of Express Rack and Glovebox facilities. This paper addresses the current scope of the flight investigator program. These investigators will use the various capabilities of the ISS to achieve their research objectives. The type of research and classification of materials being studied will be addressed. This includes the recent emphasis being placed on nanomaterials and biomaterials type research. Materials Science Program will pursue a new, interdisciplinary approach, which contributes, to Human Space Flight Exploration research. The Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF) and other related American and International experiment modules will serve as the foundation for this research. Discussion will be

  17. The JOVE initiative - A NASA/university Joint Venture in space science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Six, F.; Chappell, R.

    1990-01-01

    The JOVE (NASA/university Joint Venture in space science) initiative is a point program between NASA and institutions of higher education whose aim is to bring about an extensive merger between these two communities. The project is discussed with emphasis on suggested contributions of partnership members, JOVE process timeline, and project schedules and costs. It is suggested that NASA provide a summer resident research associateship (one ten week stipend); scientific on-line data from space missions; an electronic network and work station, providing a link to the data base and to other scientists; matching student support, both undergraduate and graduate; matching summer salary for up to three faculty participants; and travel funds. The universities will be asked to provide research time for faculty participants, matching student support, matching summer salary for faculty participants, an instructional unit in space science, and an outreach program to pre-college students.

  18. A look towards the future in the handling of space science mission geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acton, Charles; Bachman, Nathaniel; Semenov, Boris; Wright, Edward

    2018-01-01

    The "SPICE" system has been widely used since the days of the Magellan mission to Venus as the method for scientists and engineers to access a variety of space mission geometry such as positions, velocities, directions, orientations, sizes and shapes, and field-of-view projections (Acton, 1996). While originally focused on supporting NASA's planetary missions, the use of SPICE has slowly grown to include most worldwide planetary missions, and it has also been finding application in heliophysics and other space science disciplines. This paper peeks under the covers to see what new capabilities are being developed or planned at SPICE headquarters to better support the future of space science. The SPICE system is implemented and maintained by NASA's Navigation and Ancillary Information Facility (NAIF) located at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California (http://naif.jpl.nasa.gov).

  19. USRA's NCSEFSE: a new National Center for Space, Earth, and Flight Sciences Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livengood, T. A.; Goldstein, J.; Vanhala, H.; Hamel, J.; Miller, E. A.; Pulkkinen, K.; Richards, S.

    2005-08-01

    A new National Center for Space, Earth, and Flight Sciences Education (NCSEFSE) has been created in the Washington, DC metropolitan area under the auspices of the Universities Space Research Association. The NCSEFSE provides education and public outreach services in the areas of NASA's research foci in programs of both national and local scope. Present NCSEFSE programs include: Journey through the Universe, which unites formal and informal education within communities and connects a nationally-distributed network of communities from Hilo, HI to Washington, DC with volunteer Visiting Researchers and thematic education modules; the Voyage Scale Model Solar System exhibition on the National Mall, a showcase for planetary science placed directly outside the National Air and Space Museum; educational module development and distribution for the MESSENGER mission to Mercury through a national cadre of MESSENGER Educator Fellows; Teachable Moments in the News, which capitalizes on current events in space, Earth, and flight sciences to teach the science that underlies students' natural interests; the Voyages Across the Universe Speakers' Bureau; and Family Science Night at the National Air and Space Museum, which reaches audiences of 2000--3000 each year, drawn from the Washington metropolitan area. Staff scientists of NCSEFSE maintain active research programs, presently in the areas of planetary atmospheric composition, structure, and dynamics, and in solar system formation. NCSEFSE scientists thus are able to act as authentic representatives of frontier scientific research, and ensure accuracy, relevance, and significance in educational products. NCSEFSE instructional designers and educators ensure pedagogic clarity and effectiveness, through a commitment to quantitative assessment.

  20. Discursive geographies in science: space, identity, and scientific discourse among indigenous women in higher education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Carol B.

    2008-09-01

    Despite completing undergraduate degrees in the life sciences, few Indigenous women choose to pursue careers in scientific research. To help us understand how American Indian students engage with science, this ethnographic research describes (1) how four Navajo women identified with science, and (2) the narratives they offered when we discussed their experiences with scientific discourse. Using intensive case studies to describe the experiences of these women, my research focused on their final year of undergraduate study in the life sciences at a university in southwestern US. I point to the processes by which the participants align themselves with ideas, practices, groups, or people in science. As each participant recounted her experiences with scientific discourse, they recreated for me a discursive geography of their lives on the reservation, at home, at community colleges (in some cases), and on the university campus. In the construction and analysis of the narratives for this research, mapping this geography was critical to understanding each participant's discursive relationship with science. In these discursive spaces, I observed productive "locations of possibility" in which students and their instructors: valued connected knowing; acknowledged each other's history, culture, and knowledge; began to speak to each other subject-to-subject; and challenged normative views of schooling. I argue that this space, as a location of possibility, has the power to transform the crushing impersonalized schooling that often characterizes "rigorous" scientific programs in a research institution.

  1. Assessment of Capacity Building by UN Centre For Space Science and Technology Education in Asia and Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukund, Rao; Deekshatulu, B. L.; Sundarramiah, V.; Kasturirangan, K.

    2002-01-01

    Space technology has introduced new dimensions into the study and understanding of Earth's processes and in improving the quality of life for the humanity. The benefits from the space technology are mostly confined to the space faring nations. United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UN-OOSA) has taken initiative to disseminate the scientific and technology knowledge to developing countries through the establishment of regional Centres mainly dedicated to the education, training and research. The establishment of the UN Centre for Space Science and Technology Education in Asia and the Pacific (UN CSSTE-AP), in 1995 in India, has opened up new vistas for sharing and learning from experiences and also in capacity building in the region. The Centre has education and research programmes in the field of Remote Sensing, Satellite Communications, Satellite Meteorology and Space Sciences. The education courses are comprising of two phases viz. Phase I, of 9 months duration and is a resident programme in India. The 9 months programme is modular in structure dealing with fundamentals, applications and pilot projects. The Phase II, of 12 months duration, concludes with the submission of a project work assignment in the home country institution. The research programmes are oriented towards carrying out advanced research and development in these fields and provides an opportunity to Asia Pacific students to build their academic capabilities. The education course curriculum is primarily aimed to disseminate the Space Science and Technology in the Asia Pacific region and draws on the experiences and needs of the region. The Centre also assists in research and consultancy in environmental analysis, monitoring, judicious exploitation, rural/urban communication, understanding weather system, conservation of natural resources and sustainable development. The issues are of utmost importance in the backdrop of high population density, unstable economic status, depleting natural

  2. Science with a vengeance: How the Military created the US Space Sciences after World War II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devorkin, David H.

    The exploration of the upper atmosphere was given a jump start in the United States by German V-2 rockets - Hitler's "vengeance weapon" - captured at the end of World War II. The science performed with these missiles was largely determined by the missile itself, such as learning more about the medium through which a ballistic missile travels. Groups rapidly formed within the military and military-funded university laboratories to build instruments to investigate the Earth's upper atmosphere and ionosphere, the nature of cosmic radiation, and the ultraviolet spectrum of the Sun. Few, if any, members of these research groups had prior experience or demonstrated interests in atmospheric, cosmic-ray, or solar physics. Although scientific agendas were at first centered on what could be done with missiles and how to make ballistic missile systems work, reports on techniques and results were widely publicized as the research groups and their patrons sought scientific legitimacy and learned how to make their science an integral part of the national security state. The process by which these groups gained scientific and institutional authority was far from straightforward and offers useful insight both for the historian and for the scientist concerned with how specialties born within the military services became part of post-war American science.

  3. Space life and biomedical sciences in support of the global exploration roadmap and societal development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evetts, S. N.

    2014-08-01

    The human exploration of space is pushing the boundaries of what is technically feasible. The space industry is preparing for the New Space era, the momentum for which will emanate from the commercial human spaceflight sector, and will be buttressed by international solar system exploration endeavours. With many distinctive technical challenges to be overcome, human spaceflight requires that numerous biological and physical systems be examined under exceptional circumstances for progress to be made. To effectively tackle such an undertaking significant intra- and international coordination and collaboration is required. Space life and biomedical science research and development (R & D) will support the Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) by enabling humans to 'endure' the extreme activity that is long duration human spaceflight. In so doing the field will discover solutions to some of our most difficult human health issues, and as a consequence benefit society as a whole. This space-specific R&D will drive a significant amount of terrestrial biomedical research and as a result the international community will not only gain benefits in the form of improved healthcare in space and on Earth, but also through the growth of its science base and industry.

  4. From Flapping Birds to Space Telescopes: The Modern Science of Origami (BNL Women in Science Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Robert J

    2010-06-24

    During the 1990s, the development and application of mathematical techniques to origami revolutionized this centuries-old Japanese art of paper folding. In his talk, Lang will describe how geometric concepts led to the solution of a broad class of origami-folding problems. Conversely, algorithms and theorems of origami design have shed light on long-standing mathematical questions and have solved practical engineering problems. Lang will discuss how origami has led to huge space telescopes, safer airbags, and more.

  5. AMTD: Update of Engineering Specifications Derived from Science Requirements for Future UVOIR Space Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, H. Philip; Postman, Marc; Mosier, Gary; Smith, W. Scott; Blaurock, Carl; Ha, Kong; Stark, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The Advance Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) project is in Phase 2 of a multiyear effort, initiated in FY12, to mature by at least a half TRL step six critical technologies required to enable 4 meter or larger UVOIR space telescope primary mirror assemblies for both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets. AMTD uses a science-driven systems engineering approach. We mature technologies required to enable the highest priority science AND provide a high-performance low-cost low-risk system. To give the science community options, we are pursuing multiple technology paths. A key task is deriving engineering specifications for advanced normal-incidence monolithic and segmented mirror systems needed to enable both general astrophysics and ultra-high contrast observations of exoplanets missions as a function of potential launch vehicles and their mass and volume constraints. A key finding of this effort is that the science requires an 8 meter or larger aperture telescope

  6. The Sharjah Center for Astronomy and Space Sciences (SCASS 2015): Concept and Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimiy, Hamid M. K. Al

    2015-08-01

    The Sharjah Center for Astronomy and Space Sciences (SCASS) was launched this year 2015 at the University of Sharjah in the UAE. The center will serve to enrich research in the fields of astronomy and space sciences, promote these fields at all educational levels, and encourage community involvement in these sciences. SCASS consists of:The Planetarium: Contains a semi-circle display screen (18 meters in diameter) installed at an angle of 10° which displays high-definition images using an advanced digital display system consisting of seven (7) high-performance light-display channels. The Planetarium Theatre offers a 200-seat capacity with seats placed at highly calculated angles. The Planetarium also contains an enormous star display (Star Ball - 10 million stars) located in the heart of the celestial dome theatre.The Sharjah Astronomy Observatory: A small optical observatory consisting of a reflector telescope 45 centimeters in diameter to observe the galaxies, stars and planets. Connected to it is a refractor telescope of 20 centimeters in diameter to observe the sun and moon with highly developed astronomical devices, including a digital camera (CCD) and a high-resolution Echelle Spectrograph with auto-giving and remote calibration ports.Astronomy, space and physics educational displays for various age groups include:An advanced space display that allows for viewing the universe during four (4) different time periods as seen by:1) The naked eye; 2) Galileo; 3) Spectrographic technology; and 4) The space technology of today.A space technology display that includes space discoveries since the launching of the first satellite in 1940s until now.The Design Concept for the Center (450,000 sq. meters) was originated by HH Sheikh Sultan bin Mohammed Al Qasimi, Ruler of Sharjah, and depicts the dome as representing the sun in the middle of the center surrounded by planetary bodies in orbit to form the solar system as seen in the sky.

  7. Review of New Concepts, Ideas and Innovations in Space Towers

    OpenAIRE

    Krinker, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Under Space Tower the author understands structures having height from 100 km to the geosynchronous orbit and supported by surface of Earths. The classical Space Elevator is not included in space towers. That has three main identifiers which distingue from Space Tower: Space Elevator has part over Geosynchronous Orbit (GSO) and all installation supported only the centrifugal force of Earth, immobile cable connected to surface of Earth, no pressure on the surface. A lot of new concepts, ideas ...

  8. How Far a Star. A Supplement in Space Oriented Concepts for Science and Mathematics Curricula for Intermediate Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maben, Jerrold William

    Space science-oriented concepts and suggested activities are presented for intermediate grade teachers of science and mathematics in a book designed to help bring applications of space-oriented mathematics into the classroom. Concepts and activities are considered in these areas: methods of keeping time (historically); measurement as related to…

  9. Supporting Ngss-Congruent Instruction in Earth & Space Science Through Educator Implementation and Feedback: Refining the Dig Texas Blueprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, B. E.; Bohls-Graham, C. E.; Ellins, K. K.; Riggs, E. M.; Serpa, L. F.; Stocks, E.; McIver, H.; Sergent, C.

    2015-12-01

    The development of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) as a framework around which to guide K-12 science instruction has generated a call for rigorous curricula that meets the demand for developing a workforce with expertise in tackling modern Earth science challenges. The Diversity and Innovation in Geosciences (DIG) Texas Blueprints project addresses this need for quality, aligned curricula with educator-vetted, freely available resources carefully selected and compiled into three week thematic units that have been aligned with the Earth Science Literacy Principles and the NGSS. These units can then be packaged into customized blueprints for a year-long Earth & Space Science course that engages students in the relevant disciplinary core ideas, crosscutting concepts and science and engineering practices. As part of supporting NGSS-congruent instruction, each unit has extensive scaffolding notes for the learning activities selected for that unit. Designed with both the new and veteran teacher in mind, these scaffolding notes yield information regarding advanced teacher preparation, student prerequisite skills, and potential challenges that might arise during classroom implementation. Feedback from Texas high school teachers implementing the DIG Texas Blueprints in the classroom, in addition to that of university secondary education majors in a preparation course utilizing the blueprints, instigated the most recent revisions to these scaffolding notes. The DIG Texas Blueprints Educator Intern Team charged with these revisions then determined which learning activities became candidates for either inclusion in the refined units, retention as an additional resource, or elimination from the blueprints. This presentation will focus on the development of these scaffolding notes and their role in supporting congruence with the NGSS. A review of the second year of implementation of the blueprints and the feedback that generated the final revisions will be shared

  10. Towards human exploration of space: The THESEUS review series on immunology research priorities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frippiat, Jean-Pol; Crucian, Brian E; de Quervain, Dominique J-F; Grimm, Daniela; Montano, Nicola; Praun, Siegfried; Roozendaal, Benno; Schelling, Gustav; Thiel, Manfred; Ullrich, Oliver; Choukèr, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the immune system occurs during spaceflight and may represent a crew health risk during exploration missions because astronauts are challenged by many stressors. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the biology of immune modulation under spaceflight conditions in order to be able to maintain immune homeostasis under such challenges. In the framework of the THESEUS project whose aim was to develop an integrated life sciences research roadmap regarding human space exploration, experts working in the field of space immunology, and related disciplines, established a questionnaire sent to scientists around the world. From the review of collected answers, they deduced a list of key issues and provided several recommendations such as a maximal exploitation of currently available resources on Earth and in space, and to increase increments duration for some ISS crew members to 12 months or longer. These recommendations should contribute to improve our knowledge about spaceflight effects on the immune system and the development of countermeasures that, beyond astronauts, could have a societal impact. PMID:28725745

  11. Earth and Space Science Ph.D. Class of 2003 Report released

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keelor, Brad

    AGU and the American Geological Institute (AGI) released on 26 July an employment study of 180 Earth and space science Ph.D. recipients who received degrees from U.S. universities in 2003. The AGU/AGI survey asked graduates about their education and employment, efforts to find their first job after graduation, and experiences in graduate school. Key results from the study include: The vast majority (87%) of 2003 graduates found work in the Earth and space sciences, earning salaries commensurate with or slightly higher than 2001 and 2002 salary averages. Most (64%) graduates were employed within academia (including postdoctoral appointments), with the remainder in government (19%), industry (10%), and other (7%) sectors. Most graduates were positive about their employment situation and found that their work was challenging, relevant, and appropriate for someone with a Ph.D. The percentage of Ph.D. recipients accepting postdoctoral positions (58%) increased slightly from 2002. In contrast, the fields of physics and chemistry showed significant increases in postdoctoral appointments for Ph.D.s during the same time period. As in previous years, recipients of Ph.D.s in the Earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences (median age of 32.7 years) are slightly older than Ph.D. recipients in most other natural sciences (except computer sciences), which is attributed to time taken off between undergraduate and graduate studies. Women in the Earth, atmospheric,and ocean sciences earned 33% of Ph.D.s in the class of 2003, surpassing the percentage of Ph.D.s earned by women in chemistry (32%) and well ahead of the percentage in computer sciences (20%), physics (19%), and engineering (17%). Participation of other underrepresented groups in the Earth, atmospheric, and ocean sciences remained extremely low.

  12. Hybrid Spaces in Art and Science Fiction from cyberspace to mobile interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana de Souza e Silva

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of real changes due to the emergence of ubiquitous computing and nomadic technology devices, which are responsible for creating a hybrid reality that merges physical and digital spaces, and creating a new articulation between real and imaginary. This paper addresses the evolution of virtual space from the perspective of arts and science fiction. The first section shows how the concept of virtual space as a mindspace has been developed. Also it presents how computers as simulation machines have played an important role in the construcion of digital space. Second, the paper argues that the concept of virtual space is changing, since it can no longer be considered disjoint from physical space. Finally, the movies The Thirteenth Floor (Rusnak, 1999 and The Matrix (Wachowski, 1999 are case studies that illustrate how the idea of inhabiting a virtual space changes to a hybrid space that is part of our lives. As a result, it amplifies the notion of what the real can be.

  13. 78 FR 15745 - Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... following Site Visit. Name: Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences, 10748. Date and Time...

  14. Book Review: Digital Crime and Forensic Science in Cyberspace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary C. Kessler

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Kanellis, P., Kiountouzis, E., Kolokotronis, N., & Martakos, D. (2006. Digital Crime and Forensic Science in Cyberspace. Hershey, PA: Idea Group Publishing, 357 pages, ISBN: 1-59140-873-3 (paper, US$79.95.Reviewed by Gary C. KesslerThis book, according to the preface, "is intended for those who are interested in a critical overview of what forensic science is, care about privacy issues, and wish to know what constitutes evidence for computer crime." It goes on to say that the specific audiences for which it was written are students in academia and professionals in the industry.If used carefully, this book does a good job at providing a snapshot of some of the current issues in digital forensics, although perhaps best aimed at information security professionals. It is a collection of 15 chapters written by authors from Greece, Italy, The Netherlands, South Africa, the U.K., and the U.S. The international flavor of the writing is also welcome in the field.(see PDF for full review

  15. Wildlife forensic science: A review of genetic geographic origin assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Rob; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-09-01

    Wildlife forensic science has become a key means of enforcing legislation surrounding the illegal trade in protected and endangered species. A relatively new dimension to this area of forensic science is to determine the geographic origin of a seized sample. This review focuses on DNA testing, which relies on assignment of an unknown sample to its genetic population of origin. Key examples of this are the trade in timber, fish and ivory and these are used only to illustrate the large number of species for which this type of testing is potentially available. The role of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers is discussed, alongside a comparison of neutral markers with those exhibiting signatures of selection, which potentially offer much higher levels of assignment power to address specific questions. A review of assignment tests is presented along with detailed methods for evaluating error rates and considerations for marker selection. The availability and quality of reference data are of paramount importance to support assignment applications and ensure reliability of any conclusions drawn. The genetic methods discussed have been developed initially as investigative tools but comment is made regarding their use in courts. The potential to compliment DNA markers with elemental assays for greater assignment power is considered and finally recommendations are made for the future of this type of testing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Workshop on Research for Space Exploration: Physical Sciences and Process Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Bhim S.

    1998-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a workshop sponsored by the Microgravity Research Division of NASA to define contributions the microgravity research community can provide to advance the human exploration of space. Invited speakers and attendees participated in an exchange of ideas to identify issues of interest in physical sciences and process technologies. This workshop was part of a continuing effort to broaden the contribution of the microgravity research community toward achieving the goals of the space agency in human exploration, as identified in the NASA Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) strategic plan. The Microgravity program is one of NASA'a major links to academic and industrial basic research in the physical and engineering sciences. At present, it supports close to 400 principal investigators, who represent many of the nation's leading researchers in the physical and engineering sciences and biotechnology. The intent of the workshop provided a dialogue between NASA and this large, influential research community, mission planners and industry technical experts with the goal of defining enabling research for the Human Exploration and Development of Space activities to which the microgravity research community can contribute.

  17. New FINESSE Faculty Institutes for NASA Earth and Space Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Timothy F.; Slater, Stephanie; Marshall, Sunette Sophia; Stork, Debra; Pomeroy, J. Richard R

    2014-06-01

    In a systematic effort to improve the preparation of future science teachers, scholars coordinated by the CAPER Center for Astronomy & Physics Education Research are providing a series of high-quality, 2-day professional development workshops, with year-round follow-up support, for college and university professors who prepare future science teachers to work with highly diverse student populations. These workshops focus on reforming and revitalizing undergraduate science teaching methods courses and Earth and Space science content courses that future teachers most often take to reflect contemporary pedagogies and data-rich problem-based learning approaches steeped in authentic scientific inquiry, which consistently demonstrate effectiveness with diverse students. Participants themselves conduct science data-rich research projects during the institutes using highly regarded approaches to inquiry using proven models. In addition, the Institute allocates significant time to illustrating best practices for working with diverse students. Moreover, participants leave with a well-formulated action plan to reform their courses targeting future teachers to include more data-rich scientific inquiry lessons and to be better focused on improving science education for a wide diversity of students. Through these workshops faculty use a backwards faded scaffolding mechanism for working inquiry into a deeper understanding of science by using existing on-line data to develop and research astronomy, progressing from creating a valid and easily testable question, to simple data analysis, arriving at a conclusion, and finally presenting and supporting that conclusion in the classroom. An updated schedule is available at FINESSEProgram.org

  18. Actions Needed to Ensure Scientific and Technical Information is Adequately Reviewed at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This audit was initiated in response to a hotline complaint regarding the review, approval, and release of scientific and technical information (STI) at Johnson Space Center. The complainant alleged that Johnson personnel conducting export control reviews of STI were not fully qualified to conduct those reviews and that the reviews often did not occur until after the STI had been publicly released. NASA guidance requires that STI, defined as the results of basic and applied scientific, technical, and related engineering research and development, undergo certain reviews prior to being released outside of NASA or to audiences that include foreign nationals. The process includes technical, national security, export control, copyright, and trade secret (e.g., proprietary data) reviews. The review process was designed to preclude the inappropriate dissemination of sensitive information while ensuring that NASA complies with a requirement of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (the Space Act)1 to provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information resulting from NASA research activities. We focused our audit on evaluating the STI review process: specifically, determining whether the roles and responsibilities for the review, approval, and release of STI were adequately defined and documented in NASA and Center-level guidance and whether that guidance was effectively implemented at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Johnson was included in the review because it was the source of the initial complaint, and Goddard, Langley, and Marshall were included because those Centers consistently produce significant amounts of STI.

  19. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula s "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA s National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA s SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT s experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  20. Postcolonial foldings of space and identity in science education : limits, transformations, prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zembylas, Michalinos; Avraamidou, Lucy

    2008-01-01

    The four essays reviewed here constitute a worthwhile attempt to discuss various aspects of postcolonial theory, and offer constructive ideas to ongoing academic as well as public conversations with respect to whether science education can meet the challenges of educating an increasingly diverse

  1. [Activities of Space Telescope Science Institute with the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Robert C.; Neff, James E.; Strassmeier, Klaus G.; Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    1998-01-01

    A number of studies, especially in recent years with the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST) Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS), have been presented on the UV line profiles of late-type stars. Generally, these consist of a few "snapshot" spectra of several different key diagnostic emission lines. From this it has become clear that many active stars possess non-gaussian line profiles. Unlike the case with AR Lac, observed with IUE, no assymetric profile has been clearly identified that results from an inhomogeneous surface temperature or density distribution. In 1993 we attempted to observe the RS CVn binary V711 Tau at several phases with the GHRS in a number of UV bandpasses in order to study profile variations as a function of phase. Unfortunately, scheduling problems, pointing errors, continuous flaring and the sparse and uneven phase sampling prevented us from achieving the primary goal. However, it is clear that a number of UV lines in the system, notably C IV, Si IV and Mg II show very extended emission out to several hundred km/s. The profiles were also clearly variable. Vilhu et al. (1997) and Walter et al. (1995) conducted a campaign on the rapidly rotating, single star AB Dor, where they observed C IV continuously for 14 hours. They found extended, non-gaussian emission in the C IV doublet and that Doppler images derived from these images were remarkably similar to the simultaneous spot-image. In a follow up study of V711 Tau we have observed another RS CVn with complete phase coverage in three key wavelength bandpasses, utilizing the ability of HST to observe some stars at high latitudes in uninterrupted fashion. Generally classified as an RS CVn, V824 Ara (HD 155555) consists of a G5 IV star in a short period orbit (P=ld.68) with a K0 V-IV companion. However, the system does not eclipse and therefore does not rigorously fit the Hall (1976) definition. There is also a visual M star companion (LDS587B) 33 arcsec away. The space velocities of the stars

  2. Defense Science Board Task Force Report on Defense Strategies for Ensuring the Resilience of National Space Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    Executive Summary is a product of the Defense Science Board (DSB). The DSB is a Federal Advisory Committee established to provide independent advice to the...Executive Summary Since 2000, when the Defense Science Board concluded space superiority was absolutely essential in achieving global awareness, information...Whelan Government Advisors Dr. Larry Gershwin – ODNI/NIM Science and Technology Executive Secretary Col Russell Teehan, USAF – AT&L/Space, Strategic

  3. 77 FR 24227 - Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting In accordance with the Federal... State University by the Division Social and Economic Sciences ( 10748). Dates & Times: May 2, 2012; 7 p...; Science, Technology and Society Program; Division of Social and Economic Sciences, Room 990, National...

  4. Challenges of Incorporating Earth and Space Sciences into Curricula Aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysession, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    The Next Generation Science Standards present a great opportunity for the increased exposure of contemporary geosciences into the K-12 curricula of most of the countries school. However, the manner by which the NGSS are being adopted by different schools and districts poses several challenges. So far, 13 states and Washington, D.C., have adopted the NGSS in full, accounting for about 30% of the nation's students. In addition, four states (Massachusetts, Oklahoma, South Dakota, and West Virginia), accounting for another 5% of U.S. students, have adopted new state science standards that are adapted from the NGSS, each in different ways. For West Virginia, language concerning climate change has been tempered. For Oklahoma and South Dakota, language concerning climate change has been nearly entirely removed. In addition, there are a large number of independent school districts, accounting for at least and additional 35% of the nation's students, that are in the process of designing curriculum aligned to some degree with the NGSS. These are in states that have either not yet adopted the NGSS or likely will never adopt the NGSS (at a state-wide level). This presents a challenge to the geosciences, because the level of geoscience content will greatly vary, state-to-state and district-to-district. The NGSS present the geosciences with a heavy emphasis on Earth Systems Science, particular as it relates to climate systems and human impacts on systems, but most K-12 teachers have not had exposure to the geosciences in these contexts, and will require significant professional development. In addition, the inclusion of a full year of geoscience content in high school (in addition to a year for middle school), presents another curricular challenge, as most schools have never taught this amount of geoscience to all of its students (the NGSS are designed to have all of its standards taught to all students). The NGSS also emphasizes learning through a set of 8 different practices

  5. The Science and Technology in Future Remote Sensing Space Missions of Alenia Aerospazio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angino, G.; Borgarelli, L.

    1999-12-01

    The Space Division of Alenia Aerospazio, a Finmeccanica company, is the major Italian space industry. It has, in seven plants, design facilities and laboratories for advanced technological research that are amongst the most modern and well equipped in Europe. With the co-ordinated companies Alenia Aerospazio is one of Europe's largest space industries. In the field of Remote Sensing, i.e. the acquisition of information about objects without being in physical contact with them, the Space Division has proven their capability to manage all of the techniques from space (ranging from active instruments as Synthetic Aperture Radar, Radar Altimeter, Scatterometer, etc… to passive ones as radiometer) in different programs with the main international industries and agencies. Space techniques both for Monitoring/Observation (i.e. operational applications) and Exploration (i.e. research for science demonstration) according to the most recent indication from international committees constitute guidelines. The first is devoted to market for giving innovation, added-value to services and, globally, enhancement of quality of life. The second has the basic purpose of pursuing the scientific knowledge. Advanced technology allows to design for multi-functions instruments (easy in configuration, adaptable to impredictable environment), to synthesise, apparently, opposite concepts (see for instance different requirement from military and civil applications). Space Division of Alenia Aerospazio has knowledge and capability to face the challenge of new millennium in space missions sector. In this paper, it will be described main remote sensing missions in which Space Division is involved both in terms of science and technology definition. Two main segments can be defined: Earth and interplanetary missions. To the first belong: ENVISAT (Earth surface), LIGHTSAR (Earth imaging), CRYOSAT (Earth ice) and to the second: CASSINI (study of Titan and icy satellites), MARS EXPRESS (detection

  6. Simulation of Cascaded Longitudinal-Space-Charge Amplifier at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (Fast) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [Northern Illinois U.; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.

    2015-12-01

    Cascaded Longitudinal Space Charge Amplifiers (LSCA) have been proposed as a mechanism to generate density modulation over a board spectral range. The scheme has been recently demonstrated in the optical regime and has confirmed the production of broadband optical radiation. In this paper we investigate, via numerical simulations, the performance of a cascaded LSCA beamline at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility to produce broadband ultraviolet radiation. Our studies are carried out using elegant with included tree-based grid-less space charge algorithm.

  7. Avenues for Scientist Involvement in Earth and Space Science Education and Public Outreach (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peticolas, L. M.; Gross, N. A.; Hsu, B. C.; Shipp, S. S.; Buxner, S.; Schwerin, T. G.; Smith, D.; Meinke, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Science Education and Public Outreach (E/PO) Forums are charged with engaging, extending, supporting, and coordinating the community of E/PO professionals and scientists involved in Earth and space science education activities. This work is undertaken to maximize the effectiveness and efficiency of the overall national NASA science education and outreach effort made up of individual efforts run by these education professionals. This includes facilitating scientist engagement in education and outreach. A number of resources and opportunities for involvement are available for scientists involved in - or interested in being involved in - education or outreach. The Forums provide opportunities for earth and space scientists to stay informed, communicate, collaborate, leverage existing programs and partnerships, and become more skilled education practitioners. Interested scientists can receive newsletters, participate in monthly calls, interact through an online community workspace, and attend E/PO strategic meetings. The Forums also provide professional development opportunities on a myriad of topics, from common pre-conceptions in science, to program evaluation, to delivering effective workshops. Thematic approaches, such as Earth Science Week (http://www.earthsciweek.org), and the Year of the Solar System (http://solarsystem.nasa.gov/yss) are coordinated by the Forums; through these efforts resources are presented topically, in a manner that can be easily ported into diverse learning environments. Information about the needs of audiences with which scientists interact - higher education, K-12 education, informal education, and public - are provided by SMD's Audience-Based Working Groups. Their findings and recommendations are made available to inform the activities and products of E/PO providers so they are able to better serve these audiences. Also available is a 'one-stop shop' of SMD E/PO products and resources that can be

  8. Invited review article: advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, W.H.; Beghuin, D.; Schwarz, C.J.; Jones, D.B.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Bereiter-Hahn, J.; Stelzer, E.H.K.

    2014-01-01

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as

  9. Invited Review Article: Advanced light microscopy for biological space research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, W.H.; Beghuin, D.; Schwarz, C.J.; Jones, D.B.; van Loon, J.J.W.A.; Bereiter-Hahn, J.; Stelzer, E.H.K.

    2014-01-01

    As commercial space flights have become feasible and long-term extraterrestrial missions are planned, it is imperative that the impact of space travel and the space environment on human physiology be thoroughly characterized. Scrutinizing the effects of potentially detrimental factors such as

  10. Science and the major racket sports: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lees, Adrian

    2003-09-01

    The major racket sports include badminton, squash, table tennis and tennis. The growth of sports science and the commercialization of racket sports in recent years have focused attention on improved performance and this has led to a more detailed study and understanding of all aspects of racket sports. The aim here, therefore, is to review recent developments of the application of science to racket sports. The scientific disciplines of sports physiology and nutrition, notational analysis, sports biomechanics, sports medicine, sports engineering, sports psychology and motor skills are briefly considered in turn. It is evident from these reviews that a great deal of scientific endeavour has been applied to racket sports, but this is variable across both the racket sports and the scientific disciplines. A scientific approach has helped to: implement training programmes to improve players' fitness; guide players in nutritional and psychological preparation for play; inform players of the strategy and tactics used by themselves and their opponents; provide insight into the technical performance of skills; understand the effect of equipment on play; and accelerate the recovery from racket-arm injuries. Racket sports have also posed a unique challenge to scientists and have provided vehicles for developing scientific methodology. Racket sports provide a good model for investigating the interplay between aerobic and anaerobic metabolism and the effect of nutrition, heat and fatigue on performance. They have driven the development of mathematical solutions for multi-segment interactions within the racket arm during the performance of shots, which have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms of both performance and injury. They have provided a unique challenge to sports engineers in relation to equipment performance and interaction with the player. Racket sports have encouraged developments in notational analysis both in terms of analytical procedures and the

  11. Proceedings of the Twentieth International Symposium on Space Technology and Science. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-31

    The 20th International Symposium on Space Technology and Science was held in Japan on May 19-25, 1996, and a lot of papers were made public. This proceedings has 252 papers of all the papers read in the symposium including the following: Computational fluid dynamics in the design of M-V rocket motors in the propulsion field; Joint structures of carbon-carbon composites in the field of materials and structures; On-orbit attitude control experiment of ETS-VI in the field of astrodynamics, navigation, guidance and control; Magnetic transport of bubbles in liquid in microgravity; The outline and development status of JEM-EF in the field of on-orbit and ground support systems. The proceedings also includes the papers titled Conceptual study of H-IIA rocket in the space transportation field; Microgravity research in the microgravity science field; `Project Genesys` in the field of satellite communications and broadcasting.

  12. Animated computer graphics models of space and earth sciences data generated via the massively parallel processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinish, Lloyd A.; Gough, Michael L.; Wildenhain, W. David

    1987-01-01

    The capability was developed of rapidly producing visual representations of large, complex, multi-dimensional space and earth sciences data sets via the implementation of computer graphics modeling techniques on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) by employing techniques recently developed for typically non-scientific applications. Such capabilities can provide a new and valuable tool for the understanding of complex scientific data, and a new application of parallel computing via the MPP. A prototype system with such capabilities was developed and integrated into the National Space Science Data Center's (NSSDC) Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS) data-independent environment for computer graphics data display to provide easy access to users. While developing these capabilities, several problems had to be solved independently of the actual use of the MPP, all of which are outlined.

  13. A Community Discussion about Sharing and Publishing Space Science Education Research and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Bartolone, L.; Fraknoi, A.; Plummer, J.; Brinkworth, C.; Schultz, G.

    2015-11-01

    There is ongoing concern in the community about the small number of space science education research articles being published. Additionally, there is a need to share evaluation results of our projects. This special interest group discussion brought together those interested in sharing results of their space science education and public outreach projects with those who actively publish in a variety of settings. The session introduced a set of concerns, generated during the previous ASP meeting including the lack of a central place to publish astronomy education research articles and the lack of resources that are readily available to the community of education and outreach professionals, for discussion. This session focused on sharing solutions to concerns and providing resources and opportunities to community members.

  14. On the evolving open peer review culture for chemical information science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, W Patrick; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Compared to the traditional anonymous peer review process, open post-publication peer review provides additional opportunities -and challenges- for reviewers to judge scientific studies. In this editorial, we comment on the open peer review culture and provide some guidance for reviewers of manuscripts submitted to the Chemical Information Science channel of F1000Research.

  15. Science Plan for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, B. H.; Bythrow, P. F.; Gatsonis, N. A.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    1993-06-01

    NEPSTP is an unclassified, international space mission sponsored by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) as a testbed for the development of Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technologies. The mission will utilize the Russian manufactured Topaz II thermionic nuclear reactor and a variety of advanced experimental electric thrusters from international sources. The NEPSTP Spacecraft will be inserted into a nuclear safe circular orbit, and the electric thrusters will be utilized to drive the spacecraft in a spiral pattern to high earth orbit. This paper gives an overview of the Science Plan for the NEPSTP mission. The science activities discussed incude: (1) Evaluation of the performance of the Topaz II reactor in orbit; (2) Evaluation of the performances and degradations of the electric thrusters; (3) Evaluation of the so-called 'induced environment' around the NEPSTP Spacecraft; and, (4) Science of opportunity consistent with (1), (2), and (3). With regard to the third goal, the environment induced in the vicinity of an NEP driven spacecraft is unique, and its severity may degrade the performances of advanced sensors and some spacecraft subsystems. Thus, NEPSTP has an aggressive program to diagnose induced environment effects and develop predictive understanding of that environment for future systems. The Science Plan includes: (A) The utilization on the spacecraft of suite of science instruments, a science boom, and other spacecraft liens; (B) A data analysis and evaluation plan; (C) Various operational experiments; and, (D) The development of theoretical and empirical models.

  16. Surveys of current status in biomedical science grant review: funding organisations' and grant reviewers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroter, Sara; Groves, Trish; Højgaard, Liselotte

    2010-10-20

    biomedical proposals that is getting harder to peer review. Just under half of grant reviewers take part for the good of science and professional development, but many report lack of academic and practical support and clear guidance. Around two-thirds of funders supported the development of uniform requirements for the format and peer review of proposals to help ease the current situation.

  17. Reaching for the Stars: NASA Space Science for Girl Scouts (Girl Scout Stars)

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, E. K.; Harman, P. K.; Berg, J.; Friedman, W.; Fahy, J.; Henricks, J.; Chin, W.; Hudson, A.; Grissom, C.; Lebofsky, L. A.; McCarthy, D.; Gurton, S. P.; White, V.; Summer, T.; Mayo, L.; Patel, R.; Bass, K.

    2016-12-01

    Girl Scout Stars aims to enhance science, technology, engineering and mathermatics (STEM) experiences for Girl Scouts in grades K-12 through the national Girl Scout Leadership Experience. New space science badges are being created for every Girl Scout level. Using best practices, we engage girls and volunteers with the fundamental STEM concepts that underpin our human quest to explore the universe. Through early and sustained exposure to the people and assets of NASA and the excitement of NASA's Mission, they explore STEM content, discoveries, and careers. Today's tech savvy Girl Scout volunteers prefer just-in-time materials and asynchronous learning. The Girl Scout Volunteer Tool Kit taps into the wealth of online materials provided by NASA for the new space science badges. Training volunteers supports troop activities for the younger girls. For older girls, we enhance Girl Scout summer camp activities, support in-depth experiences at University of Arizona's Astronomy Camp, and "Destination" events for the 2017 total solar eclipse. We partner with the Night Sky Network to engage amateur astronomers with Girl Scouts. Univeristy of Arizona also leads Astronomy Camp for Girl Scout volunteers. Aires Scientific leads eclipse preparation and summer sessions at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for teams of volunteers, amateur astronomers and older Girl Scouts. There are 1,900,000 Girl Scouts and 800,000 volunteers in the USA. During development, we work with the Girl Scouts of Northern California (50,000 girl members and 31,000 volunteers) and expand across the USA to 121 Girl Scout councils over five years. SETI Institute leads the experienced space science educators and scientists at Astronomical Society of the Pacific, University of Arizona, and Aires Scientific. Girl Scouts of the USA leads dissemination of Girl Scout Stars to Councils across the USA with support of Girl Scouts of Northern California. Through professional development of Girl Scout volunteers, Girl

  18. Mashup of Geo and Space Science Data Provided via Relational Databases in the Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritschel, B.; Seelus, C.; Neher, G.; Iyemori, T.; Koyama, Y.; Yatagai, A. I.; Murayama, Y.; King, T. A.; Hughes, J. S.; Fung, S. F.; Galkin, I. A.; Hapgood, M. A.; Belehaki, A.

    2014-12-01

    The use of RDBMS for the storage and management of geo and space science data and/or metadata is very common. Although the information stored in tables is based on a data model and therefore well organized and structured, a direct mashup with RDF based data stored in triple stores is not possible. One solution of the problem consists in the transformation of the whole content into RDF structures and storage in triple stores. Another interesting way is the use of a specific system/service, such as e.g. D2RQ, for the access to relational database content as virtual, read only RDF graphs. The Semantic Web based -proof of concept- GFZ ISDC uses the triple store Virtuoso for the storage of general context information/metadata to geo and space science satellite and ground station data. There is information about projects, platforms, instruments, persons, product types, etc. available but no detailed metadata about the data granuals itself. Such important information, as e.g. start or end time or the detailed spatial coverage of a single measurement is stored in RDBMS tables of the ISDC catalog system only. In order to provide a seamless access to all available information about the granuals/data products a mashup of the different data resources (triple store and RDBMS) is necessary. This paper describes the use of D2RQ for a Semantic Web/SPARQL based mashup of relational databases used for ISDC data server but also for the access to IUGONET and/or ESPAS and further geo and space science data resources. RDBMS Relational Database Management System RDF Resource Description Framework SPARQL SPARQL Protocol And RDF Query Language D2RQ Accessing Relational Databases as Virtual RDF Graphs GFZ ISDC German Research Centre for Geosciences Information System and Data Center IUGONET Inter-university Upper Atmosphere Global Observation Network (Japanese project) ESPAS Near earth space data infrastructure for e-science (European Union funded project)

  19. Lightning Observations from the International Space Station (ISS) for Science Research and Operational Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J.; Mach, D. M.; Buechler, D. E.; Koshak, W. J.; Walker, T. D.; Bateman, M.; Stewart, M. F.; O'Brien, S.; Wilson, T.; hide

    2015-01-01

    There exist several core science applications of LIS lightning observations, that range from weather and climate to atmospheric chemistry and lightning physics due to strong quantitative connections that can be made between lightning and other geophysical processes of interest. The space-base vantage point, such as provided by ISS LIS, still remains an ideal location to obtain total lightning observations on a global basis.

  20. Progressing science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in North Dakota with near-space ballooning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Marissa Elizabeth

    The United States must provide quality science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education in order to maintain a leading role in the global economy. Numerous initiatives have been established across the United States that promote and encourage STEM education within the middle school curriculum. Integrating active learning pedagogy into instructors' lesson plans will prepare the students to think critically - a necessary skill for the twenty first century. This study integrated a three-week long Near Space Balloon project into six eighth grade Earth Science classes from Valley Middle School in Grand Forks, North Dakota. It was hypothesized that after the students designed, constructed, launched, and analyzed their payload experiments, they would have an increased affinity for high school science and math classes. A pre- and post-survey was distributed to the students (n=124), before and after the project to analyze how effective this engineering and space mission was regarding high school STEM interests. The surveys were statistically analyzed, comparing means by the Student's t-Test, specifically the Welch-Satterthwaite test. Female students displayed a 57.1% increase in math and a 63.6% increase in science; male students displayed a 46.6% increase in science and 0% increase in math. Most Likert-scale survey questions experienced no statistically significant change, supporting the null hypothesis. The only survey question that supported the hypothesis was, "I Think Engineers Work Alone," which experienced a 0.24% decrease in student understanding. The results suggest that integrating a three-week long Near Space Balloon project into middle school curricula will not directly influence the students' excitement to pursue STEM subjects and careers. An extensive, yearlong ballooning mission is recommended so that it can be integrated with multiple core subjects. Using such an innovative pedagogy method as with this balloon launch will help students master the

  1. Fostering Diversity in the Earth and Space Sciences: The Role of AGU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, J. T.; Johnson, R. M.; Hall, F. R.

    2002-12-01

    In May 2002, AGU's Committee on Education and Human Resources (CEHR) approved a new Diversity Plan, developed in collaboration with the CEHR Subcommittee on Diversity. Efforts to develop a diversity plan for AGU were motivated by the recognition that the present Earth and space science community poorly represents the true diversity of our society. Failure to recruit a diverse scientific workforce in an era of rapidly shifting demographics could have severe impact on the health of our profession. The traditional base of Earth and space scientists in the US (white males) has been shrinking during the past two decades, but women, racial and ethnic minorities, and persons with disabilities are not compensating for this loss. The potential ramifications of this situation - for investigators seeking to fill classes and recruit graduate students, for institutions looking to replace faculty and researchers, and for the larger community seeking continued public support of research funding - could be crippling. AGU's new Diversity Plan proposes a long-term strategy for addressing the lack of diversity in the Earth and space sciences with the ultimate vision of reflecting diversity in all of AGU's activities and programs. Four key goals have been identified: 1) Educate and involve the AGU membership in diversity issues; 2) Enhance and foster the participation of Earth and space scientists, educators and students from underrepresented groups in AGU activities; 3) Increase the visibility of the Earth and space sciences and foster awareness of career opportunities in these fields for underrepresented populations; and 4) Promote changes in the academic culture that both remove barriers and disincentives for increasing diversity in the student and faculty populations and reward member faculty wishing to pursue these goals. A detailed implementation plan that utilizes all of AGU's resources is currently under development in CEHR. Supportive participation by AGU members and

  2. Regional centres for space science and technology education affiliated to the United Nations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadimova, Sharafat

    Capacity-building efforts in space science and technology are a major focus of the activities of the Office of Outer Space Affairs. Such efforts include providing support to the regional centres for space science and technology education, affiliated to the United Nations, whose goal is to develop, through in-depth education, an indigenous capability for research and applications in the core disciplines of: (a) remote sensing and geographical information systems; (b) satellite communications; (c) satellite meteorology and global climate; and (d) space and atmospheric sciences and data management. The regional centres are located in Morocco and Nigeria for Africa, in Brazil and Mexico for Latin America and the Caribbean and in India for Asia and the Pacific. The overall policy-making body of each Centre is its Governing Board and consists of member States (within the region where the Centre is located), that have agreed, through their endorsement of the Centre's agreement, to the goals and objectives of the Centre. The United Nations Programme on Space Applications, with the support of prominent educators, has developed standard education curricula, which were adopted by the Centres for teaching each of the four core disciplines. Within the framework of the International Committee on global navigation satellite systems (ICG), which is established as an informal body for the purpose of promoting the use and application of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) on a global basis, the Regional Centres will also be acting as the ICG Information Centres. The ICG Information Centres aim to foster a more structured approach to information exchange in order to fulfil the reciprocal expectations of a network between ICG and Regional Centres.

  3. Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets: Space Science Applications of Physics and Chemistry for High School and College Classes: Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Tobola, K. W.; Stocco, K.; Henry, M.; Allen, J. S.; McReynolds, Julie; Porter, T. Todd; Veile, Jeri

    2004-01-01

    As the scientific community studies Mars remotely for signs of life and uses Martian meteorites as its only available samples, teachers, students, and the general public continue to ask, How do we know these meteorites are from Mars? This question sets the stage for a six-lesson instructional package Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets. Expanding on the short answer It s the chemistry of the rock , students are introduced to the research that reveals the true identities of the rocks. Since few high school or beginning college students have the opportunity to participate in this level of research, a slide presentation introduces them to the labs, samples, and people involved with the research. As they work through the lessons and interpret authentic data, students realize that the research is an application of two basic science concepts taught in the classroom, the electromagnetic spectrum and isotopes.

  4. Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets: Space Science Applications of Physics and Chemistry for High School and College Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Tobola, K. W.; Stocco, K.; Henry, M.; Allen, J. S.

    2003-01-01

    As the scientific community studies Mars remotely for signs of life and uses Martian meteorites as its only available samples, teachers, students, and the general public continue to ask, "How do we know these meteorites are from Mars?" This question sets the stage for a three-lesson instructional package Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets. Expanding on the short answer "It's the chemistry of the rock", students are introduced to the research that reveals the true identities of the rocks. Since few high school or beginning college students have the opportunity to participate in this level of research, a slide presentation introduces them to the labs, samples, and people involved with the research. As they work through the lessons and interpret real data, students realize that the research is an application of basic science concepts they should know, the electromagnetic spectrum and isotopes. They can understand the results without knowing how to do the research or operate the instruments.

  5. Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets: Space Science Applications of Physics and Chemistry for High School and College Classes. Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindstrom, M. M.; Tobola, K. W.; Allen, J. S.; Stocco, K.; Henry, M.; Allen, J. S.; McReynolds, Julie; Porter, T. Todd; Veile, Jeri

    2005-01-01

    As the scientific community studies Mars remotely for signs of life and uses Martian meteorites as its only available samples, teachers, students, and the general public continue to ask, "How do we know these meteorites are from Mars?" This question sets the stage for a six-lesson instructional package Space Rocks Tell Their Secrets. Expanding on the short answer "It's the chemistry of the rock", students are introduced to the research that reveals the true identities of the rocks. Since few high school or beginning college students have the opportunity to participate in this level of research, a slide presentation introduces them to the labs, samples, and people involved with the research. As they work through the lessons and interpret authentic data, students realize that the research is an application of two basic science concepts taught in the classroom, the electromagnetic spectrum and isotopes. Additional information is included in the original extended abstract.

  6. Materials Science Research Rack Onboard the International Space Station Hardware and Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, John R.; Frazier, Natalie C.; Johnson, Jimmie

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Science Research Rack (MSRR) is a research facility developed under a cooperative research agreement between NASA and ESA for materials science investigations on the International Space Station (ISS). MSRR was launched on STS-128 in August 2009, and is currently installed in the U.S. Destiny Laboratory Module. Since that time, MSRR has performed virtually flawlessly, logging more than 620 hours of operating time. The MSRR accommodates advanced investigations in the microgravity environment on the ISS for basic materials science research in areas such as solidification of metals and alloys. The purpose is to advance the scientific understanding of materials processing as affected by microgravity and to gain insight into the physical behavior of materials processing. MSRR allows for the study of a variety of materials including metals, ceramics, semiconductor crystals, and glasses. Materials science research benefits from the microgravity environment of space, where the researcher can better isolate chemical and thermal properties of materials from the effects of gravity. With this knowledge, reliable predictions can be made about the conditions required on Earth to achieve improved materials. MSRR is a highly automated facility with a modular design capable of supporting multiple types of investigations. Currently the NASA-provided Rack Support Subsystem provides services (power, thermal control, vacuum access, and command and data handling) to the ESA developed Materials Science Laboratory (MSL) which accommodates interchangeable Furnace Inserts (FI). Two ESA-developed FIs are presently available on the ISS: the Low Gradient Furnace (LGF) and the Solidification and Quenching Furnace (SQF). Sample-Cartridge Assemblies (SCAs), each containing one or more material samples, are installed in the FI by the crew and can be processed at temperatures up to 1400 C. Once an SCA is installed, the experiment can be run by automatic command or science conducted via

  7. Modeling Ships and Space Craft The Science and Art of Mastering the Oceans and Sky

    CERN Document Server

    Hagler, Gina

    2013-01-01

    Modeling Ships and Space Craft: The Science and Art of Mastering the Oceans and Sky begins with the theories of Aristotle and Archimedes, moving on to examine the work of Froude and Taylor, the early aviators and the Wright Brothers, Goddard and the other rocket men, and the computational fluid dynamic models of our time. It examines the ways each used fluid dynamic principles in the design of their vessels. In the process, this book covers the history of hydrodynamic (aero and fluid) theory and its progression – with some very accessible science examples – including seminal theories. Hydrodynamic principles in action are also explored with examples from nature and the works of man. This is a book for anyone interested in the history of technology – specifically the methods and science behind the use of scale models and hydrodynamic principles in the marine and aeronautical designs of today.

  8. Training Informal Educators Provides Leverage for Space Science Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, J. S.; Tobola, K. W.; Betrue, R.

    2004-01-01

    How do we reach the public with the exciting story of Solar System Exploration? How do we encourage girls to think about careers in science, math, engineering and technology? Why should NASA scientists make an effort to reach the public and informal education settings to tell the Solar System Exploration story? These are questions that the Solar System Exploration Forum, a part of the NASA Office of Space Science Education (SSE) and Public Outreach network, has tackled over the past few years. The SSE Forum is a group of education teams and scientists who work to share the excitement of solar system exploration with colleagues, formal educators, and informal educators like museums and youth groups. One major area of the SSE Forum outreach supports the training of Girl Scouts of the USA (GS) leaders and trainers in a suite of activities that reflect NASA missions and science research. Youth groups like Girl Scouts structure their activities as informal education.

  9. Meeting Classroom Needs: Designing Space Physics Educational Outreach for Science Education Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urquhart, M. L.; Hairston, M.

    2008-12-01

    As with all NASA missions, the Coupled Ion Neutral Dynamics Investigation (CINDI) is required to have an education and public outreach program (E/PO). Through our partnership between the University of Texas at Dallas William B. Hanson Center for Space Sciences and Department of Science/Mathematics Education, the decision was made early on to design our educational outreach around the needs of teachers. In the era of high-stakes testing and No Child Left Behind, materials that do not meet the content and process standards teachers must teach cannot be expected to be integrated into classroom instruction. Science standards, both state and National, were the fundamental drivers behind the designs of our curricular materials, professional development opportunities for teachers, our target grade levels, and even our popular informal educational resource, the "Cindi in Space" comic book. The National Science Education Standards include much more than content standards, and our E/PO program was designed with this knowledge in mind as well. In our presentation we will describe how we came to our approach for CINDI E/PO, and how we have been successful in our efforts to have CINDI materials and key concepts make the transition into middle school classrooms. We will also present on our newest materials and high school physics students and professional development for their teachers.

  10. Science and Technology Review July/August 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budil, K.

    2002-07-01

    This Science and Technology Review has the following stories: (1) Integration is Key to Understanding Climate Change; (2) The Outlook is for Warming, with Measurable Local Effects--Livermore climate models are zeroing in on the effects of human activities on global climate, representing them in simulations with the finest resolution ever; (2) How Metals Fail--experiments are guiding the development of codes that predict how metals react to high explosives; (4) Converting Data to Decisions--a new statistical method executed on supercomputers is bridging the gap between complex data and usable information; (5) Knowing the Enemy, Anticipating the Threat--The Laboratory's charter to counter the nuclear threat has evolved over the years and now includes intelligence analysis and technology to understand and counter biological and chemical threats.

  11. 77 FR 24228 - Proposal Review Panel for Social and Economic Sciences; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... following meeting: Name: Site visit review of the Nanoscale Science and Engineering Center (NSEC) at... proprietary or confidential nature, including technical information; financial data, such as salaries and...

  12. In-Space Propulsion Technology Products for NASA's Future Science and Exploration Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David J.; Pencil, Eric; Peterson, Todd; Dankanich, John; Munk, Michelle M.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2001, the In-Space Propulsion Technology (ISPT) project has been developing and delivering in-space propulsion technologies that will enable or enhance NASA robotic science missions. These in-space propulsion technologies are applicable, and potentially enabling, for future NASA flagship and sample return missions currently being considered, as well as having broad applicability to future competed mission solicitations. The high-temperature Advanced Material Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine providing higher performance for lower cost was completed in 2009. Two other ISPT technologies are nearing completion of their technology development phase: 1) NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system, a 0.6-7 kW throttle-able gridded ion system; and 2) Aerocapture technology development with investments in a family of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and structures; guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) models of blunt-body rigid aeroshells; aerothermal effect models: and atmospheric models for Earth, Titan, Mars and Venus. This paper provides status of the technology development, applicability, and availability of in-space propulsion technologies that have recently completed their technology development and will be ready for infusion into NASA s Discovery, New Frontiers, Science Mission Directorate (SMD) Flagship, and Exploration technology demonstration missions

  13. Low Cost Electric Propulsion Thruster for Deep Space Robotic Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzella, David

    2008-01-01

    Electric Propulsion (EP) has found widespread acceptance by commercial satellite providers for on-orbit station keeping due to the total life cycle cost advantages these systems offer. NASA has also sought to benefit from the use of EP for primary propulsion onboard the Deep Space-1 and DAWN spacecraft. These applications utilized EP systems based on gridded ion thrusters, which offer performance unequaled by other electric propulsion thrusters. Through the In-Space Propulsion Project, a lower cost thruster technology is currently under development designed to make electric propulsion intended for primary propulsion applications cost competitive with chemical propulsion systems. The basis for this new technology is a very reliable electric propulsion thruster called the Hall thruster. Hall thrusters, which have been flown by the Russians dating back to the 1970s, have been used by the Europeans on the SMART-1 lunar orbiter and currently employed by 15 other geostationary spacecraft. Since the inception of the Hall thruster, over 100 of these devices have been used with no known failures. This paper describes the latest accomplishments of a development task that seeks to improve Hall thruster technology by increasing its specific impulse, throttle-ability, and lifetime to make this type of electric propulsion thruster applicable to NASA deep space science missions. In addition to discussing recent progress on this task, this paper describes the performance and cost benefits projected to result from the use of advanced Hall thrusters for deep space science missions.

  14. An urban area minority outreach program for K-6 children in space science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, P.; Garza, O.; Lindstrom, M.; Allen, J.; Wooten, J.; Sumners, C.; Obot, V.

    The Houston area has minority populations with significant school dropout rates. This is similar to other major cities in the United States and elsewhere in the world where there are significant minority populations from rural areas. The student dropout rates are associated in many instances with the absence of educational support opportuni- ties either from the school and/or from the family. This is exacerbated if the student has poor English language skills. To address this issue, a NASA minority university initiative enabled us to develop a broad-based outreach program that includes younger children and their parents at a primarily Hispanic inner city charter school. The pro- gram at the charter school was initiated by teaching computer skills to the older chil- dren, who in turn taught parents. The older children were subsequently asked to help teach a computer literacy class for mothers with 4-5 year old children. The computers initially intimidated the mothers as most had limited educational backgrounds and En- glish language skills. To practice their newly acquired computer skills and learn about space science, the mothers and their children were asked to pick a space project and investigate it using their computer skills. The mothers and their children decided to learn about black holes. The project included designing space suits for their children so that they could travel through space and observe black holes from a closer proxim- ity. The children and their mothers learned about computers and how to use them for educational purposes. In addition, they learned about black holes and the importance of space suits in protecting astronauts as they investigated space. The parents are proud of their children and their achievements. By including the parents in the program, they have a greater understanding of the importance of their children staying in school and the opportunities for careers in space science and technology. For more information on our overall

  15. Application of X-ray topography to USSR and Russian space materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shul'pina, I L; Prokhorov, I A; Serebryakov, Yu A; Bezbakh, I Zh

    2016-05-01

    The authors' experience of the application of X-ray diffraction imaging in carrying out space technological experiments on semiconductor crystal growth for the former USSR and for Russia is reported, from the Apollo-Soyuz programme (1975) up to the present day. X-ray topography was applied to examine defects in crystals in order to obtain information on the crystallization conditions and also on their changes under the influence of factors of orbital flight in space vehicles. The data obtained have promoted a deeper understanding of the conditions and mechanisms of crystallization under both microgravity and terrestrial conditions, and have enabled the elaboration of terrestrial methods of highly perfect crystal growth. The use of X-ray topography in space materials science has enriched its methods in the field of digital image processing of growth striations and expanded its possibilities in investigating the inhomogeneity of crystals.

  16. Servicing Mission 4 and the Extraordinary Science of the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.

    2012-01-01

    Just two years ago, NASA astronauts performed a challenging and flawless final Space Shuttle servicing mission to the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. With science instruments repaired on board and two new ones installed, the observatory. is more powerful now than ever before. I will show the dramatic highlights of the servicing mission and present some of the early scientific results from the refurbished telescope. Its high sensitivity and multi-wavelength capabilities are revealing the highest redshift galaxies ever seen, as well as details of the cosmic web of intergalactic medium, large scale structure formation, solar system bodies, and stellar evolution. Enlightening studies of dark matter, dark energy, and exoplanet atmospheres add to the profound contributions to astrophysics that are being made with Hubble, setting a critical stage for future observatories such as the James Webb Space Telescope.

  17. Space Focus Lead Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, Geoffrey D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-10

    The Space Focus team is tasked with the definition of the Space Focused Science Topics, and with the review and ranking of the CSES proposals received in all the program areas. This is achieved by dedicated meetings or a series of informal discussions and/or e-mail reviews.

  18. Green Space, Violence, and Crime: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogar, Sandra; Beyer, Kirsten M

    2016-04-01

    To determine the state of evidence on relationships among urban green space, violence, and crime in the United States. Major bibliographic databases were searched for studies meeting inclusion criteria. Additional studies were culled from study references and authors' personal collections. Comparison among studies was limited by variations in study design and measurement and results were mixed. However, more evidence supports the positive impact of green space on violence and crime, indicating great potential for green space to shape health-promoting environments. Numerous factors influence the relationships among green space, crime, and violence. Additional research and standardization among research studies are needed to better understand these relationships. © The Author(s) 2015.

  19. Student Voice in Work Integrated Learning Scholarship: A Review of Teacher Education and Geographical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Eileen Thomson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Work integrated learning is an umbrella term that refers to the opportunities provided to university students to integrate knowledge of theory and practice as part of their degree program. As the role of students in higher education is evolving, we sought to develop our understanding of the role of students in the work integrated learning (WIL space through exploring current literature on student voice. In this paper, we consider what has been reported about WIL in relation to student voice, how it has been represented, and how this has influenced practice. We undertook a systematic literature review for two different disciplines, one which represented an example of a professionally accredited undergraduate degree program (teacher education, and the other an example of a program with no professional accreditation (geographical sciences. The teacher education literature demonstrated more clearly the use of student voice to inform WIL within curriculum design. However, the geographical sciences literature did include examples of student voice being incorporated within the design of collaborative community-based forms of WIL. A role for students as researchers, who lead research and initiate curriculum change into WIL, was noticeably absent in both disciplinary sets of literature. The lack of evidence of the inclusion of students in the design, conduct, and analysis of WIL provides an invitation for SoTL scholars to redefine the role of students in this space.

  20. Overview of Human-Centric Space Situational Awareness (SSA) Science and Technology (S&T)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianni, J.; Aleva, D.; Ellis, S.

    2012-09-01

    A number of organizations, within the government, industry, and academia, are researching ways to help humans understand and react to events in space. The problem is both helped and complicated by the fact that there are numerous data sources that need to be planned (i.e., tasked), collected, processed, analyzed, and disseminated. A large part of the research is in support of the Joint Space Operational Center (JSpOC), National Air and Space Intelligence Center (NASIC), and similar organizations. Much recent research has been specifically targeting the JSpOC Mission System (JMS) which has provided a unifying software architecture. This paper will first outline areas of science and technology (S&T) related to human-centric space situational awareness (SSA) and space command and control (C2) including: 1. Object visualization - especially data fused from disparate sources. Also satellite catalog visualizations that convey the physical relationships between space objects. 2. Data visualization - improve data trend analysis as in visual analytics and interactive visualization; e.g., satellite anomaly trends over time, space weather visualization, dynamic visualizations 3. Workflow support - human-computer interfaces that encapsulate multiple computer services (i.e., algorithms, programs, applications) into a 4. Command and control - e.g., tools that support course of action (COA) development and selection, tasking for satellites and sensors, etc. 5. Collaboration - improve individuals or teams ability to work with others; e.g., video teleconferencing, shared virtual spaces, file sharing, virtual white-boards, chat, and knowledge search. 6. Hardware/facilities - e.g., optimal layouts for operations centers, ergonomic workstations, immersive displays, interaction technologies, and mobile computing. Secondly we will provide a survey of organizations working these areas and suggest where more attention may be needed. Although no detailed master plan exists for human