WorldWideScience

Sample records for space group p1

  1. From spin groups and modular P1CT symmetry to covariant representations and the spin-statistics theorem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzen, R.

    2007-03-01

    Starting from the assumption of modular P 1 CT symmetry in quantum field theory a representation of the universal covering of the Poincar'e group is constructed in terms of pairs of modular conjugations. The modular conjugations are associated with field algebras of unbounded operators localised in wedge regions. It turns out that an essential step consists in characterising the universal covering group of the Lorentz group by pairs of wedge regions, in conjunction with an analysis of its geometrical properties. In this thesis two approaches to this problem are developed in four spacetime dimensions. First a realisation of the universal covering as the quotient space over the set of pairs of wedge regions is presented. In spite of the intuitive definition, the necessary properties of a covering space are not straightforward to prove. But the geometrical properties are easy to handle. The second approach takes advantage of the well-known features of spin groups, given as subgroups of Clifford algebras. Characterising elements of spin groups by pairs of wedge regions is possible in an elegant manner. The geometrical analysis is performed by means of the results achieved in the first approach. These geometrical properties allow for constructing a representation of the universal cover of the Lorentz group in terms of pairs of modular conjugations. For this representation the derivation of the spin-statistics theorem is straightforward, and a PCT operator can be defined. Furthermore, it is possible to transfer the results to nets of field algebras in algebraic quantum field theory with ease. Many of the usual assumptions in quantum field theory like the spectrum condition or the existence of a covariant unitary representation, as well as the assumption on the quantum field to have only finitely many components, are not required. For the standard axioms, the crucial assumption of modular P 1 CT symmetry constitutes no loss of generality because it is a consequence of

  2. Space dependent neutron slowing and thermalization in monatomic hydrogen gas in the P-1 approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musazay, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    A solution to the space and energy dependent neutron transport equation in the framework of the consistent P-1 approximation is sought. The transport equation for thermal neutrons in a moderator of 1/v absorption and constant scattering cross section is changed into a set of coupled partial differential equations. The space dependent part is removed by assuming a cosine shaped flux due to a cosine shaped source at a very high energy. The resulting set of strongly coupled ordinary differential equations is decoupled by assuming expansion of collision density in the powers of a leakage parameter whose coefficients are energy and absorption dependent. These energy dependent coefficients are solutions of a set of weakly coupled differential equations. Series solutions to these differential equations in powers of epsilon and 1/epsilon, where epsilon = E/kT, E being the neutron energy and kT the moderator temperature in units of energy, are found. The properties of these solutions are studied extensively. Absorption appears as a parameter in the coefficients of the series. The difficulties arising in choosing the correct form of the asymptotic solutions are resolved by comparing slowing and thermalization. The limitations on the size of the slab and on the range of absorption are included in the analysis

  3. Genotyping of Mycoplasma pneumoniae clinical isolates reveals eight P1 subtypes within two genomic groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorigo-Zetsma, J. W.; Dankert, J.; Zaat, S. A.

    2000-01-01

    Three methods for genotyping of Mycoplasma pneumoniae clinical isolates were applied to 2 reference strains and 21 clinical isolates. By a modified restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of PCR products of the M. pneumoniae cytadhesin P1 gene, 5 subtypes were discriminated among 13

  4. Hazy spaces, tangent spaces, manifolds and groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodson, C.T.J.

    1977-03-01

    The results on hazy spaces and the developments leading to hazy manifolds and groups are summarized. Proofs have appeared elsewhere so here examples are considered and some motivation for definitions and constructions in the theorems is analyzed. It is shown that quite simple ideas, intuitively acceptable, lead to remarkable similarity with the theory of differentiable manifolds. Hazy n manifolds have tangent bundles that are hazy 2n manifolds and there are hazy manifold structures for groups. Products and submanifolds are easily constructed and in particular the hazy n-sphere manifolds as submanifolds of the standard hazy manifold Zsup(n+1)

  5. Group 5 allergens of timothy grass (Phl p 5) bear cross-reacting T cell epitopes with group 1 allergens of rye grass (Lol p 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, W D; Karamfilov, T; Bufe, A; Fahlbush, B; Wolf, I; Jäger, L

    1996-04-01

    Selected human T cell clones reactive with group 5 allergens of timothy grass (Phl p 5) were cross-stimulated in specific proliferation assays with group 1 allergens of rye grass (Lol p 1). Such interspecies cross-reactivities result obviously from structural motifs presented on defined Phl p 5 fragments as shown with recombinant Phl p 5 products.

  6. Space Interferometry Science Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.

    1992-12-01

    Decisions taken by the astronomy and astrophysics survey committee and the interferometry panel which lead to the formation of the Space Interferometry Science Working Group (SISWG) are outlined. The SISWG was formed by the NASA astrophysics division to provide scientific and technical input from the community in planning for space interferometry and in support of an Astrometric Interferometry Mission (AIM). The AIM program hopes to measure the positions of astronomical objects with a precision of a few millionths of an arcsecond. The SISWG science and technical teams are described and the outcomes of its first meeting are given.

  7. Blood Group Antigens C, Lub and P1 May Have a Role in HIV Infection in Africans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motswaledi, Modisa Sekhamo; Kasvosve, Ishmael; Oguntibeju, Oluwafemi Omoniyi

    2016-01-01

    Botswana is among the world's countries with the highest rates of HIV infection. It is not known whether or not this susceptibility to infection is due to genetic factors in the population. Accumulating evidence, however, points to the role of erythrocytes as potential mediators of infection. We therefore sought to establish the role, if any, of some erythrocyte antigens in HIV infection in a cross-section of the population. 348 (346 HIV-negative and 2 HIV-positive) samples were obtained from the National Blood Transfusion Service as residual samples, while 194 HIV-positive samples were obtained from the Botswana-Harvard HIV Reference Laboratory. Samples were grouped for twenty three antigens. Chi-square or Fischer Exact analyses were used to compare the frequencies of the antigens in the two groups. A stepwise, binary logistic regression was used to study the interaction of the various antigens in the light of HIV-status. The Rh antigens C and E were associated with HIV-negative status, while blood group Jka, P1 and Lub were associated with HIV-positive status. A stepwise binary logistic regression analysis yielded group C as the most significant protective blood group while Lub and P1 were associated with significantly higher odds ratio in favor of HIV-infection. The lower-risk-associated group C was significantly lower in Africans compared to published data for Caucasians and might partially explain the difference in susceptibility to HIV-1. The most influential antigen C, which also appears to be protective, is significantly lower in Africans than published data for Caucasians or Asians. On the other hand, there appear to be multiple antigens associated with increased risk that may override the protective role of C. A study of the distribution of these antigens in other populations may shed light on their roles in the HIV pandemic.

  8. Functional characterization of replication and stability factors of an incompatibility group P-1 plasmid from Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Min Woo; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Stenger, Drake C

    2010-12-01

    Xylella fastidiosa strain riv11 harbors a 25-kbp plasmid (pXF-RIV11) belonging to the IncP-1 incompatibility group. Replication and stability factors of pXF-RIV11 were identified and used to construct plasmids able to replicate in X. fastidiosa and Escherichia coli. Replication in X. fastidiosa required a 1.4-kbp region from pXF-RIV11 containing a replication initiation gene (trfA) and the adjacent origin of DNA replication (oriV). Constructs containing trfA and oriV from pVEIS01, a related IncP-1 plasmid of the earthworm symbiont Verminephrobacter eiseniae, also were competent for replication in X. fastidiosa. Constructs derived from pXF-RIV11 but not pVEIS01 replicated in Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Xanthomonas campestris, and Pseudomonas syringae. Although plasmids bearing replication elements from pXF-RIV11 or pVEIS01 could be maintained in X. fastidiosa under antibiotic selection, removal of selection resulted in plasmid extinction after 3 weekly passages. Addition of a toxin-antitoxin addiction system (pemI/pemK) from pXF-RIV11 improved plasmid stability such that >80 to 90% of X. fastidiosa cells retained plasmid after 5 weekly passages in the absence of antibiotic selection. Expression of PemK in E. coli was toxic for cell growth, but toxicity was nullified by coexpression of PemI antitoxin. Deletion of N-terminal sequences of PemK containing the conserved motif RGD abolished toxicity. In vitro assays revealed a direct interaction of PemI with PemK, suggesting that antitoxin activity of PemI is mediated by toxin sequestration. IncP-1 plasmid replication and stability factors were added to an E. coli cloning vector to constitute a stable 6.0-kbp shuttle vector (pXF20-PEMIK) suitable for use in X. fastidiosa.

  9. Twistor space, Minkowski space and the conformal group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broek, P.M. van den

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the conformal group of compactified Minkowski space is isomorphic to a group of rays of semilinear transformations of twistor space. The action of the conformal group on twistor space is given by an explicit realisation of this isomorphism. In this way we determine the transformation of twistor space under space inversion and time inversion. (orig.)

  10. Twistor space, Minkowski space and the conformal group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, P.M.

    1983-01-01

    It is shown that the conformal group of compactified Minkowski space is isomorphic to a group of rays of semilinear transformations of twistor space. The action of the conformal group on twistor space is given by an explicit realisation of this isomorphism. In this way we determine the

  11. On functional bases of the first-order differential invariants for non-conjugate subgroups of the Poincaré group $P(1,4$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Fedorchuk

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available It is established which functional bases of the first-order differential invariants of the splitting and non-splitting subgroups of the Poincaré group $P(1,4$ are invariant under the subgroups of the extended Galilei group $widetilde G(1,3 subset P(1,4$. The obtained sets of functional bases are classified according to dimensions.

  12. Mapping spaces and automorphism groups of toric noncommutative spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Gwendolyn E.; Schenkel, Alexander; Szabo, Richard J.

    2017-09-01

    We develop a sheaf theory approach to toric noncommutative geometry which allows us to formalize the concept of mapping spaces between two toric noncommutative spaces. As an application, we study the `internalized' automorphism group of a toric noncommutative space and show that its Lie algebra has an elementary description in terms of braided derivations.

  13. Noncommutative phase spaces on Aristotle group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ancille Ngendakumana

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We realize noncommutative phase spaces as coadjoint orbits of extensions of the Aristotle group in a two dimensional space. Through these constructions the momenta of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of a naturally introduced magnetic eld. These cases correspond to the minimal coupling of the momentum with a magnetic potential.

  14. Simple derivation of magnetic space groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertaut, E.F.; CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38

    1975-01-01

    The magnetic translation lattices can be described by invariant wave vectors k. Advantages of the wave vector notation over the notations used by Belov et al. and Opechowski et al. are pointed out. In a one-dimensional real representation a space group element (α/tau(1)) has either the character +1 (symmetry element) or -1 (antisymmetry element). Thus the square of any space group operation must have the character +1 in a one-dimensional real representation. This simple ''square criterion'' is used to limit the admissible k-vectors and to derive the family of magnetic space groups, i.e. the set of all possible magnetic space groups, belonging to the same crystallographic space group. In the discussion some useful side results are obtained. Not only the real one-dimensional representations of point groups are connected to real one-dimensional representations of space groups, but a direct connection is shown to exist between one-dimensional complex representations of the point groups 3, 4 and 6 and one-dimensional real representations, belonging to P[001/2]=Psub(2c)(Psub(c))-lattices with screw axes 3 1 , 3 2 , 4 2 , 6 2 and 6 4 . Rules are derived for finding the Belov symbol when the Opechowski-Guccione symbol of the magnetic space group is known and this opportunity is used for correcting errors in the Opechowski-Guccione tables [fr

  15. Space groups for solid state scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Glazer, Michael; Glazer, Alexander N

    2014-01-01

    This Second Edition provides solid state scientists, who are not necessarily experts in crystallography, with an understandable and comprehensive guide to the new International Tables for Crystallography. The basic ideas of symmetry, lattices, point groups, and space groups are explained in a clear and detailed manner. Notation is introduced in a step-by-step way so that the reader is supplied with the tools necessary to derive and apply space group information. Of particular interest in this second edition are the discussions of space groups application to such timely topics as high-te

  16. Space-Time Crystal and Space-Time Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shenglong; Wu, Congjun

    2018-03-02

    Crystal structures and the Bloch theorem play a fundamental role in condensed matter physics. We extend the static crystal to the dynamic "space-time" crystal characterized by the general intertwined space-time periodicities in D+1 dimensions, which include both the static crystal and the Floquet crystal as special cases. A new group structure dubbed a "space-time" group is constructed to describe the discrete symmetries of a space-time crystal. Compared to space and magnetic groups, the space-time group is augmented by "time-screw" rotations and "time-glide" reflections involving fractional translations along the time direction. A complete classification of the 13 space-time groups in one-plus-one dimensions (1+1D) is performed. The Kramers-type degeneracy can arise from the glide time-reversal symmetry without the half-integer spinor structure, which constrains the winding number patterns of spectral dispersions. In 2+1D, nonsymmorphic space-time symmetries enforce spectral degeneracies, leading to protected Floquet semimetal states. We provide a general framework for further studying topological properties of the (D+1)-dimensional space-time crystal.

  17. Quantum group gauge theory on quantum spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brzezinski, T.; Majid, S.

    1993-01-01

    We construct quantum group-valued canonical connections on quantum homogeneous spaces, including a q-deformed Dirac monopole on the quantum sphere of Podles quantum differential coming from the 3-D calculus of Woronowicz on SU q (2). The construction is presented within the setting of a general theory of quantum principal bundles with quantum group (Hopf algebra) fiber, associated quantum vector bundles and connection one-forms. Both the base space (spacetime) and the total space are non-commutative algebras (quantum spaces). (orig.)

  18. Student Facebook groups as a third space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Janus Holst; Dalsgaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    -institutional, personal space of the Facebook network. The main study of the article examines six student-managed Facebook groups and provides an analysis of a total of 2247 posts and 12,217 comments. Furthermore, the study draws on group interviews with students from 17 Danish upper secondary schools and a survey......The paper examines educational potentials of Facebook groups that are created and managed by students without any involvement from teachers. The objective is to study student-managed Facebook groups as a ‘third space' between the institutional space of teacher-managed Facebook groups and the non...... answered by 932 students from 25 schools. Based on the survey and interviews, the paper concludes that Facebook is an important educational tool for students in Danish upper secondary schools to receive help on homework and assignments. Furthermore, on the basis of the analysis of Facebook groups...

  19. String cohomology groups of complex projective spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, Iver; Bökstedt, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    Let X be a space and write LX for its free loop space equipped with the action of the circle group T given by dilation. The equivariant cohomology H*(LXhT;Z/p) is a module over H*(BT;Z/p). We give a computation of this module when X=CPr for any positive integer r and any prime number p. The compu......Let X be a space and write LX for its free loop space equipped with the action of the circle group T given by dilation. The equivariant cohomology H*(LXhT;Z/p) is a module over H*(BT;Z/p). We give a computation of this module when X=CPr for any positive integer r and any prime number p...

  20. Quantum groups and quantum homogeneous spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulish, P.P.

    1994-01-01

    The usefulness of the R-matrix formalism and the reflection equations is demonstrated on examples of the quantum group covariant algebras (quantum homogeneous spaces): quantum Minkowski space-time, quantum sphere and super-sphere. The irreducible representations of some covariant algebras are constructed. The generalization of the reflection equation to super case is given and the existence of the quasiclassical limits is pointed out. (orig.)

  1. NASA's Internal Space Weather Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Cyr, O. C.; Guhathakurta, M.; Bell, H.; Niemeyer, L.; Allen, J.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements from many of NASA's scientific spacecraft are used routinely by space weather forecasters, both in the U.S. and internationally. ACE, SOHO (an ESA/NASA collaboration), STEREO, and SDO provide images and in situ measurements that are assimilated into models and cited in alerts and warnings. A number of years ago, the Space Weather laboratory was established at NASA-Goddard, along with the Community Coordinated Modeling Center. Within that organization, a space weather service center has begun issuing alerts for NASA's operational users. NASA's operational user community includes flight operations for human and robotic explorers; atmospheric drag concerns for low-Earth orbit; interplanetary navigation and communication; and the fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles, high altitude aircraft, and launch vehicles. Over the past three years we have identified internal stakeholders within NASA and formed a Working Group to better coordinate their expertise and their needs. In this presentation we will describe this activity and some of the challenges in forming a diverse working group.

  2. International Space Station Earth Observations Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, William L.; Oikawa, Koki

    2015-01-01

    The multilateral Earth Observations Working Group (EOWG) was chartered in May 2012 in order to improve coordination and collaboration of Earth observing payloads, research, and applications on the International Space Station (ISS). The EOWG derives its authority from the ISS Program Science Forum, and a NASA representative serves as a permanent co-chair. A rotating co-chair position can be occupied by any of the international partners, following concurrence by the other partners; a JAXA representative is the current co-chair. Primary functions of the EOWG include, 1) the exchange of information on plans for payloads, from science and application objectives to instrument development, data collection, distribution and research; 2) recognition and facilitation of opportunities for international collaboration in order to optimize benefits from different instruments; and 3) provide a formal ISS Program interface for collection and application of remotely sensed data collected in response to natural disasters through the International Charter, Space and Major Disasters. Recent examples of EOWG activities include coordination of bilateral data sharing protocols between NASA and TsNIIMash for use of crew time and instruments in support of ATV5 reentry imaging activities; discussion of continued use and support of the Nightpod camera mount system by NASA and ESA; and review and revision of international partner contributions on Earth observations to the ISS Program Benefits to Humanity publication.

  3. Groups on transformations in Finslerian spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    The article first appeared in the Internal Reports of the ICTP in 1981. Since then the topic has attracted a large number of authors and several contributions have been made thereafter. Thus, a previous work of the author is revised and up-dated here including the post-1981 contributions in the field. Infinitesimal transformations defining motions, affine motions, projective motions, conformal transformations and curvature collineations in various types of Finslerian spaces are discussed here. The notation and symbolism used in the paper is mainly based on the author's works. (author). 72 refs

  4. Retabulation of space group extinctions for electron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.; Tanaka, M.

    1989-01-01

    The space group tables previously published by one of the authors and others are here presented in a revised and compacted form designed to make for compatability with existing tables for X-ray diffraction. 136 of the 230 space groups are subject to dynamic extinctions due to glide planes and screw axes, and the observables from these space groups in specific settings are tabulated. Tabs

  5. Symmetries of quantum spaces. Subgroups and quotient spaces of quantum SU(2) and SO(3) groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Podles, P.

    1995-01-01

    We prove that each action of a compact matrix quantum group on a compact quantum space can be decomposed into irreducible representations of the group. We give the formula for the corresponding multiplicities in the case of the quotient quantum spaces. We describe the subgroups and the quotient spaces of quantum SU(2) and SO(3) groups. (orig.)

  6. Projective unitary-antiunitary representations of the Shubnikov space groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broek, P.M. van den.

    1979-01-01

    Some mathematical aspects of the symmetry of a physical system in quantum mechanics are examined with special emphasis on the symmetry groups of charged particles in crystalline solids, the Shuknikov space groups. (Auth.)

  7. The International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ronald J.; Rabin, Robert; Lujan, Barbara F.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout the 1980s, ESA and the space agencies of Canada, Germany, France, Japan, and the U.S. have pursued cooperative projects bilaterally and multilaterally to prepare for, and to respond to, opportunities in space life sciences research previously unapproachable in scale and sophistication. To cope effectively with likely future space research opportunities, broad, multilateral, coordinated strategic planning is required. Thus, life scientists from these agencies have allied to form the International Space Life Sciences Strategic Planning Working Group. This Group is formally organized under a charter that specifies the purpose of the Working Group as the development of an international strategic plan for the space life sciences, with periodic revisions as needed to keep the plan current. The plan will be policy-, not operations-oriented. The Working Group also may establish specific implementation teams to coordinate multilateral science policy in specific areas; such teams have been established for space station utilization, and for sharing of flight equipment.

  8. Professional Discussion Groups: Informal Learning in a Third Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    In this ethnographic study, I explored two discussion groups and discovered Third Space elements such as cultural hybridity, counterscript, and sharing of experiences and resources contributed to a safe learning environment existing at the boundaries between participant personal and professional spaces. The groups operated under the auspices of a…

  9. A primer on Hilbert space theory linear spaces, topological spaces, metric spaces, normed spaces, and topological groups

    CERN Document Server

    Alabiso, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theory of Hilbert space, a fundamental tool for non-relativistic quantum mechanics. Linear, topological, metric, and normed spaces are all addressed in detail, in a rigorous but reader-friendly fashion. The rationale for an introduction to the theory of Hilbert space, rather than a detailed study of Hilbert space theory itself, resides in the very high mathematical difficulty of even the simplest physical case. Within an ordinary graduate course in physics there is insufficient time to cover the theory of Hilbert spaces and operators, as well as distribution theory, with sufficient mathematical rigor. Compromises must be found between full rigor and practical use of the instruments. The book is based on the author's lessons on functional analysis for graduate students in physics. It will equip the reader to approach Hilbert space and, subsequently, rigged Hilbert space, with a more practical attitude. With respect to the original lectures, the mathematical flavor in all sub...

  10. Renormalization group in statistical physics - momentum and real spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukalov, V.I.

    1988-01-01

    Two variants of the renormalization group approach in statistical physics are considered, the renormalization group in the momentum and the renormalization group in the real spaces. Common properties of these methods and their differences are cleared up. A simple model for investigating the crossover between different universality classes is suggested. 27 refs

  11. On the Chabauty space of locally compact abelian groups

    OpenAIRE

    Cornulier, Yves

    2010-01-01

    This paper contains several results about the Chabauty space of a general locally compact abelian group. Notably, we determine its topological dimension, we characterize when it is totally disconnected or connected; we characterize isolated points.

  12. Group theoretical construction of planar noncommutative phase spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngendakumana, Ancille, E-mail: nancille@yahoo.fr; Todjihoundé, Leonard, E-mail: leonardt@imsp.uac.org [Institut de Mathématiques et des Sciences Physiques (IMSP), Porto-Novo (Benin); Nzotungicimpaye, Joachim, E-mail: kimpaye@kie.ac.rw [Kigali Institute of Education (KIE), Kigali (Rwanda)

    2014-01-15

    Noncommutative phase spaces are generated and classified in the framework of centrally extended anisotropic planar kinematical Lie groups as well as in the framework of noncentrally abelian extended planar absolute time Lie groups. Through these constructions the coordinates of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of naturally introduced fields giving rise to minimal couplings. By symplectic realizations methods, physical interpretations of generators coming from the obtained structures are given.

  13. Group theoretical construction of planar noncommutative phase spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngendakumana, Ancille; Todjihoundé, Leonard; Nzotungicimpaye, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Noncommutative phase spaces are generated and classified in the framework of centrally extended anisotropic planar kinematical Lie groups as well as in the framework of noncentrally abelian extended planar absolute time Lie groups. Through these constructions the coordinates of the phase spaces do not commute due to the presence of naturally introduced fields giving rise to minimal couplings. By symplectic realizations methods, physical interpretations of generators coming from the obtained structures are given

  14. Group structure and group process for effective space station astronaut teams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, J. M.; Kagan, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Space Station crews will encounter new problems, many derived from the social interaction of groups working in space for extended durations. Solutions to these problems must focus on the structure of groups and the interaction of individuals. A model of intervention is proposed to address problems of interpersonal relationships and emotional stress, and improve the morale, cohesiveness, and productivity of astronaut teams.

  15. Non-Supramenable Groups Acting on Locally Compact Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kellerhals, Julian; Monod, Nicolas; Rørdam, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Supramenability of groups is characterised in terms of invariant measures on locally compact spaces. This opens the door to constructing interesting crossed product $C^*$-algebras for non-supramenable groups. In particular, stable Kirchberg algebras in the UCT class are constructed using crossed ...

  16. Sobolev Spaces on Locally Compact Abelian Groups: Compact Embeddings and Local Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Górka

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We continue our research on Sobolev spaces on locally compact abelian (LCA groups motivated by our work on equations with infinitely many derivatives of interest for string theory and cosmology. In this paper, we focus on compact embedding results and we prove an analog for LCA groups of the classical Rellich lemma and of the Rellich-Kondrachov compactness theorem. Furthermore, we introduce Sobolev spaces on subsets of LCA groups and study its main properties, including the existence of compact embeddings into Lp-spaces.

  17. Differential calculus on quantum spaces and quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zumino, B.

    1992-01-01

    A review of recent developments in the quantum differential calculus. The quantum group GL q (n) is treated by considering it as a particular quantum space. Functions on SL q (n) are defined as a subclass of functions on GL q (n). The case of SO q (n) is also briefly considered. These notes cover part of a lecture given at the XIX International Conference on Group Theoretic Methods in Physics, Salamanca, Spain 1992

  18. The crystallographic space groups and Heterotic string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naschie, M.S.

    2009-01-01

    While the 17 planar crystallographic groups were shown to correspond to 17 two and three Stein spaces with a total dimension equal to DimE12=5α-bar o ≅685, the present work reveals that the corresponding 219 three dimensional groups leads to a total dimensionality equal to N o ≅8872 which happens to be the exact total number of massless states of the transfinite version of Heterotic super string spectrum.

  19. Real-space renormalization group approach to driven diffusive systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanney, T [SUPA and School of Physics, University of Edinburgh, Mayfield Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom); Stinchcombe, R B [Theoretical Physics, 1 Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-24

    We introduce a real-space renormalization group procedure for driven diffusive systems which predicts both steady state and dynamic properties. We apply the method to the boundary driven asymmetric simple exclusion process and recover exact results for the steady state phase diagram, as well as the crossovers in the relaxation dynamics for each phase.

  20. Real-space renormalization group approach to driven diffusive systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanney, T; Stinchcombe, R B

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a real-space renormalization group procedure for driven diffusive systems which predicts both steady state and dynamic properties. We apply the method to the boundary driven asymmetric simple exclusion process and recover exact results for the steady state phase diagram, as well as the crossovers in the relaxation dynamics for each phase

  1. Canadian space agency discipline working group for space dosimetry and radiation science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waker, Anthony; Waller, Edward; Lewis, Brent; Bennett, Leslie; Conroy, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Full text: One of the great technical challenges in the human and robotic exploration of space is the deleterious effect of radiation on humans and physical systems. The magnitude of this challenge is broadly understood in terms of the sources of radiation, however, a great deal remains to be done in the development of instrumentation, suitable for the space environment, which can provide real-time monitoring of the complex radiation fields encountered in space and a quantitative measure of potential biological risk. In order to meet these research requirements collaboration is needed between experimental nuclear instrumentation scientists, theoretical scientists working on numerical modeling techniques and radiation biologists. Under the auspices of the Canadian Space Agency such a collaborative body has been established as one of a number of Discipline Working Groups. Members of the Space Dosimetry and Radiation Science working group form a collaborative network across Canada including universities, government laboratories and the industrial sector. Three central activities form the core of the Space Dosimetry and Radiation Science DWG. An instrument sub-group is engaged in the development of instruments capable of gamma ray, energetic charged particle and neutron dosimetry including the ability to provide dosimetric information in real-time. A second sub-group is focused on computer modeling of space radiation fields in order to assess the performance of conceptual designs of detectors and dosimeters or the impact of radiation on cellular and sub-cellular biological targets and a third sub-group is engaged in the study of the biological effects of space radiation and the potential of biomarkers as a method of assessing radiation impact on humans. Many working group members are active in more than one sub-group facilitating communication throughout the whole network. A summary progress-report will be given of the activities of the Discipline Working Group and the

  2. The space shuttle payload planning working groups: Volume 9: Materials processing and space manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Materials Processing and Space Manufacturing group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The effects of weightlessness on the levitation processes, mixture stability, and control over heat and mass transport in fluids are considered for investigation. The research and development projects include: (1) metallurgical processes, (2) electronic materials, (3) biological applications, and (4)nonmetallic materials and processes. Additional recommendations are provided concerning the allocation of payload space, acceptance of experiments for flight, flight qualification, and private use of the space shuttle.

  3. Trimesic acid dimethyl sulfoxide solvate: space group revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Bernès

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The structure of the title solvate, C9H6O6·C2H6OS, was determined 30 years ago [Herbstein, Kapon & Wasserman (1978. Acta Cryst. B34, 1613–1617], with data collected at room temperature, and refined in the space group P21. The present redetermination, based on high-resolution diffraction data, shows that the actual space group is more likely to be P21/m. The crystal structure contains layers of trimesic acid molecules lying on mirror planes. A mirror plane also passes through the S and O atoms of the solvent molecule. The molecules in each layer are interconnected through strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming a two-dimensional supramolecular network within each layer. The donor groups are the hydroxyls of the trimesic acid molecules, while the acceptors are the carbonyl or the sulfoxide O atoms.

  4. Optical Fiber Assemblies for Space Flight from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Photonics Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Thoma, William Joe; LaRocca, Frank; Chuska, Richard; Switzer, Robert; Day, Lance

    2009-01-01

    The Photonics Group at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in the Electrical Engineering Division of the Advanced Engineering and Technologies Directorate has been involved in the design, development, characterization, qualification, manufacturing, integration and anomaly analysis of optical fiber subsystems for over a decade. The group supports a variety of instrumentation across NASA and outside entities that build flight systems. Among the projects currently supported are: The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, the Mars Science Laboratory, the James Webb Space Telescope, the Express Logistics Carrier for the International Space Station and the NASA Electronic Parts. and Packaging Program. A collection of the most pertinent information gathered during project support over the past year in regards to space flight performance of optical fiber components is presented here. The objective is to provide guidance for future space flight designs of instrumentation and communication systems.

  5. Winter School on Operator Spaces, Noncommutative Probability and Quantum Groups

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    Providing an introduction to current research topics in functional analysis and its applications to quantum physics, this book presents three lectures surveying recent progress and open problems.  A special focus is given to the role of symmetry in non-commutative probability, in the theory of quantum groups, and in quantum physics. The first lecture presents the close connection between distributional symmetries and independence properties. The second introduces many structures (graphs, C*-algebras, discrete groups) whose quantum symmetries are much richer than their classical symmetry groups, and describes the associated quantum symmetry groups. The last lecture shows how functional analytic and geometric ideas can be used to detect and to quantify entanglement in high dimensions.  The book will allow graduate students and young researchers to gain a better understanding of free probability, the theory of compact quantum groups, and applications of the theory of Banach spaces to quantum information. The l...

  6. A geometric renormalization group in discrete quantum space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Requardt, Manfred

    2003-01-01

    We model quantum space-time on the Planck scale as dynamical networks of elementary relations or time dependent random graphs, the time dependence being an effect of the underlying dynamical network laws. We formulate a kind of geometric renormalization group on these (random) networks leading to a hierarchy of increasingly coarse-grained networks of overlapping lumps. We provide arguments that this process may generate a fixed limit phase, representing our continuous space-time on a mesoscopic or macroscopic scale, provided that the underlying discrete geometry is critical in a specific sense (geometric long range order). Our point of view is corroborated by a series of analytic and numerical results, which allow us to keep track of the geometric changes, taking place on the various scales of the resolution of space-time. Of particular conceptual importance are the notions of dimension of such random systems on the various scales and the notion of geometric criticality

  7. System theory on group manifolds and coset spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockett, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to study questions regarding controllability, observability, and realization theory for a particular class of systems for which the state space is a differentiable manifold which is simultaneously a group or, more generally, a coset space. We show that it is possible to give rather explicit expressions for the reachable set and the set of indistinguishable states in the case of autonomous systems. We also establish a type of state space isomorphism theorem. Our objective is to reduce all questions about the system to questions about Lie algebras generated from the coefficient matrices entering in the description of the system and in that way arrive at conditions which are easily visualized and tested.

  8. Real space renormalization group for spectra and density of states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiecko, C.; Roman, E.

    1984-09-01

    We discuss the implementation of the Real Space Renormalization Group Decimation Technique for 1-d tight-binding models with long range interactions with or without disorder and for the 2-d regular square lattice. The procedure follows the ideas developed by Southern et al. Some new explicit formulae are included. The purpose of this study is to calculate spectra and densities of states following the procedure developed in our previous work. (author)

  9. The dual algebra of the Poincare group on Fock space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klink, W.H.; Iowa Univ., Iowa City, IA

    1989-01-01

    The Lie algebra of operators commuting with the Poincare group on the Fock space appropriate for a massive spinless particle is constructed in terms of raising and lowering operators indexed by a Lorentz invariant function. From the assumption that the phase operator is an element of this Lie algebra, it is shown that the scattering operator can be written as a unitary representation operator of the group associated with the Lie algebra. A simple choice of the phase operator shows that the Lorentz invariant function can be interpreted as a basic scattering amplitude, in the sense that all multiparticle scattering amplitudes can be written in terms of this basic scattering amplitude. (orig.)

  10. Group quantization on configuration space: Gauge symmetries and linear fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro, M.; Aldaya, V.; Calixto, M.

    1997-01-01

    A new, configuration-space picture of a formalism of group quantization, the GAQ formalism, is presented in the context of a previous algebraic generalization. This presentation serves to make a comprehensive discussion in which other extensions of the formalism, principally to incorporate gauge symmetries, are developed as well. Both images are combined in order to analyze, in a systematic manner and with complete generality, the case of linear fields (Abelian current groups). To illustrate these developments we particularize them for several fields and, in particular, we carry out the quantization of the Abelian Chern endash Simons models over an arbitrary closed surface in detail. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  11. Arithmetically Cohen-Macaulay sets of points in P^1 x P^1

    CERN Document Server

    Guardo, Elena

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents a solution to the interpolation problem for arithmetically Cohen-Macaulay (ACM) sets of points in the multiprojective space P^1 x P^1.  It collects the various current threads in the literature on this topic with the aim of providing a self-contained, unified introduction while also advancing some new ideas.  The relevant constructions related to multiprojective spaces are reviewed first, followed by the basic properties of points in P^1 x P^1, the bigraded Hilbert function, and ACM sets of points.  The authors then show how, using a combinatorial description of ACM points in P^1 x P^1, the bigraded Hilbert function can be computed and, as a result, solve the interpolation problem.  In subsequent chapters, they consider fat points and double points in P^1 x P^1 and demonstrate how to use their results to answer questions and problems of interest in commutative algebra.  Throughout the book, chapters end with a brief historical overview, citations of related results, and, where relevan...

  12. Groups, matrices, and vector spaces a group theoretic approach to linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Carrell, James B

    2017-01-01

    This unique text provides a geometric approach to group theory and linear algebra, bringing to light the interesting ways in which these subjects interact. Requiring few prerequisites beyond understanding the notion of a proof, the text aims to give students a strong foundation in both geometry and algebra. Starting with preliminaries (relations, elementary combinatorics, and induction), the book then proceeds to the core topics: the elements of the theory of groups and fields (Lagrange's Theorem, cosets, the complex numbers and the prime fields), matrix theory and matrix groups, determinants, vector spaces, linear mappings, eigentheory and diagonalization, Jordan decomposition and normal form, normal matrices, and quadratic forms. The final two chapters consist of a more intensive look at group theory, emphasizing orbit stabilizer methods, and an introduction to linear algebraic groups, which enriches the notion of a matrix group. Applications involving symm etry groups, determinants, linear coding theory ...

  13. Working Group 2 summary: Space charge effects in bending systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohn, C.L.; Emma, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    At the start of the Workshop, the authors asked the Working Group 2 participants to concentrate on three basic goals: (1) survey the status of how comprehensively the physics concerning space-charge effects in bends is understood and how complete is the available ensemble of analytic and computational tools; (2) guided by data from experiments and operational experience, identify sources of, and cures for, beam degradation; and (3) review space-charge physics in rings and the limitations it introduces. As the Workshop unfolded, the third goal naturally folded into the other two goals, and these goals, they believe, were fulfilled in that the Working Group was able to compile an end product consisting of a set of recommendations for potentially fruitful future work. This summary constitutes an overview of the deliberations of the Working Group, and it is their hope that the summary clarifies the motivation for the recommended work listed at the end. The summary is organized according to the two aforementioned goals, and the prime topics of discussion appear as subsections under these goals

  14. Irreducible quantum group modules with finite dimensional weight spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dennis Hasselstrøm

    a finitely generated U q -module which has finite dimensional weight spaces and is a sum of those. Our approach follows the procedures used by S. Fernando and O. Mathieu to solve the corresponding problem for semisimple complex Lie algebra modules. To achieve this we have to overcome a number of obstacles...... not present in the classical case. In the process we also construct twisting functors rigerously for quantum group modules, study twisted Verma modules and show that these admit a Jantzen filtration with corresponding Jantzen sum formula....

  15. The birth of NASA the work of the Space Task Group, America's first true space pioneers

    CERN Document Server

    von Ehrenfried, Dutch

    2016-01-01

    This is the story of the work of the original NASA space pioneers; men and women who were suddenly organized in 1958 from the then National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics (NACA) into the Space Task Group. A relatively small group, they developed the initial mission concept plans and procedures for the U. S. space program. Then they boldly built hardware and facilities to accomplish those missions. The group existed only three years before they were transferred to the Manned Spacecraft Center in Houston, Texas, in 1962, but their organization left a large mark on what would follow. Von Ehrenfried's personal experience with the STG at Langley uniquely positions him to describe the way the group was structured and how it reacted to the new demands of a post-Sputnik era. He artfully analyzes how the growing space program was managed and what techniques enabled it to develop so quickly from an operations perspective. The result is a fascinating window into history, amply backed up by first person documentation ...

  16. Generalized 2-vector spaces and general linear 2-groups

    OpenAIRE

    Elgueta, Josep

    2008-01-01

    In this paper a notion of {\\it generalized 2-vector space} is introduced which includes Kapranov and Voevodsky 2-vector spaces. Various kinds of generalized 2-vector spaces are considered and examples are given. The existence of non free generalized 2-vector spaces and of generalized 2-vector spaces which are non Karoubian (hence, non abelian) categories is discussed, and it is shown how any generalized 2-vector space can be identified with a full subcategory of an (abelian) functor category ...

  17. R-102, 1 Group Space-Independent Inverse Reactor Kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaganove, J.J.

    1966-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: Given the space-independent, one energy group reactor kinetics equations and the initial conditions, this program determines the time variation of reactivity required to produce the given input of flux-time data. 2 - Method of solution: Time derivatives of neutron density are obtained by application of (a) five-point quartic, (b) three-point parabolic, (c) five-point least-mean-square cubic, (d) five-point least-mean-square parabolic, or (e) five-point least-mean-square linear formulae to the neutron density or to the natural logarithm of the neutron density. Between each data point the neutron density is assumed to be (a) exponential*(third-order polynomial), (b) exponential, or (c) linear. Changes in reactivity between data points are obtained algebraically from the kinetics equations, neutron density derivatives, and the algebraic representation of neutron density. First and second time derivatives of the reactivity are obtained by use of any of the formulae applicable to the neutron density. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Maxima of - 50 delay groups; 1000 data points; 99 data blocks (A data block is a sequence of input points characterized by a fixed time-interval between points, a smoothing option, and a number of repetitions of the smoothing option)

  18. KENO, Multigroup P1 Scattering Monte-Carlo Transport Calculation for Criticality, Keff, Flux in 3-D. KENO-5, SCALE-1 Module with Pn Scattering, Super-grouping, Diffusion Albedo Reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.

    2001-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: KENO is a multigroup, Monte Carlo criticality code containing a special geometry package which allows easy description of systems composed of cylinders, spheres, and cuboids (rectangular parallelepipeds) arranged in any order with only one restriction. They cannot be rotated or translated. Each geometrical region must be described as completely enclosing all regions interior to it. For systems not describable using this special geometry package, the program can use the generalized geometry package (GEOM) developed for the O5R Monte Carlo code. It allows any system that can be described by a collection of planes and/or quadratic surfaces, arbitrarily oriented and intersecting in arbitrary fashion. The entire problem can be mocked up in generalized geometry, or one generalized geometry unit or box type can be used alone or in combination with standard KENO units or box types. Rectangular arrays of fissile units are allowed with or without external reflector regions. Output from KENO consists of k eff for the system plus an estimate of its standard deviation and the leakage, absorption, and fissions for each energy group plus the totals for all groups. Flux as a function of energy group and region and fission densities as a function of region are optional output. KENO-4: Added features include a neutron balance edit, PICTURE routines to check the input geometry, and a random number sequencing subroutine written in FORTRAN-4. 2 - Method of solution: The scattering treatment used in KENO assumes that the differential neutron scattering cross section can be represented by a P1 Legendre polynomial. Absorption of neutrons in KENO is not allowed. Instead, at each collision point of a neutron tracking history the weight of the neutron is reduced by the absorption probability. When the neutron weight has been reduced below a specified point for the region in which the collision occurs, Russian roulette is played to determine if the

  19. Space Weather Activities of IONOLAB Group: IONOLAB-TEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikan, F.; Sezen, U.; Arikan, O.; Ugurlu, O.; Nayir, H.

    2009-04-01

    Space Weather (SW) is the concept of changing environmental conditions in outer space and affect Earth and its technological systems. SW is a consequence of the solar activities and the coupling of solar energy on Earth's atmosphere due to the Earth's magnetic field. The monitoring and prediction of SW has utmost importance for HF communication, Satellite communication, navigation and guidance systems, Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite systems, Space Craft exit and entry into the atmosphere. Ionosphere is the plasma layer of the atmosphere that is ionized by solar radiation and it is a key player of SW. Ionosphere is a temporally and spatially varying, dispersive, anisotropic and inhomogeneous medium that is characterized primarily by its electron density distribution. IONOLAB is a group of researchers of various disciplines, getting together to handle challenges of the Earth's ionosphere. The team has researchers from Hacettepe University and Bilkent University, Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering and General Command of Mapping of Turkish Army. One of the most important contributions of IONOLAB group is the automated web-based computation service for Total Electron Content (TEC). TEC corresponds to the line integral of electron density distribution on a given path. TEC can also be expressed as the amount of free electrons within 1 m2 cross-sectional area of the cylinder on the ray path. Global Position System (GPS) provides a cost-effective medium for monitoring of ionosphere using the signals recorded by stationary GPS receivers in estimating TEC. IONOLAB group has developed IONOLAB-TEC for reliable and robust estimates for all latitudes and both calm and disturbed days by using RINEX, IONEX and satellite ephemeris data provided from the IGS centers. IONOLAB-TEC consists of a regularized signal estimation algorithm which combines signals from all GPS satellites for a given instant and a given receiver, for a desired time period or for 24 hours

  20. Co-Higgs bundles on P^1

    OpenAIRE

    Rayan, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Co-Higgs bundles are Higgs bundles in the sense of Simpson, but with Higgs fields that take values in the tangent bundle instead of the cotangent bundle. Given a vector bundle on P^1, we find necessary and sufficient conditions on its Grothendieck splitting for it to admit a stable Higgs field. We characterize the rank-2, odd-degree moduli space as a universal elliptic curve with a globally-defined equation. For ranks r=2,3,4, we explicitly verify the conjectural Betti numbers emerging from t...

  1. Space, time and group identity in Jubilees 8-9

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    p1243322

    This paper investigates this change in communication strategy and ... his orientation towards and organisation of space, as revealed in his ideas ..... two versions of the same tradition or the parallel development of an older, .... In the case of Numbers Israel ... with its chronological system of jubilees and heavenly space.

  2. Classifying spaces with virtually cyclic stabilizers for linear groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degrijse, Dieter Dries; Köhl, Ralf; Petrosyan, Nansen

    2015-01-01

    We show that every discrete subgroup of GL(n, ℝ) admits a finite-dimensional classifying space with virtually cyclic stabilizers. Applying our methods to SL(3, ℤ), we obtain a four-dimensional classifying space with virtually cyclic stabilizers and a decomposition of the algebraic K-theory of its...

  3. Mapping Spaces, Centralizers, and p-Local Finite Groups of Lie Type

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laude, Isabelle

    We study the space of maps from the classifying space of a finite p-group to theBorel construction of a finite group of Lie type G in characteristic p acting on itsbuilding. The first main result is a description of the homology with Fp-coefficients,showing that the mapping space, up to p...... between a finite p-group and theuncompleted classifying space of the p-local finite group coming from a finite groupof Lie type in characteristic p, providing some of the first results in this uncompletedsetting.......-completion, is a disjoint union indexedover the group homomorphism up to conjugation of classifying spaces of centralizersof p-subgroups in the underlying group G. We complement this description bydetermining the actual homotopy groups of the mapping space. These resultstranslate to descriptions of the space of maps...

  4. The group approach to AdS space propagators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, Thorsten; Manvelyan, Ruben; Ruehl, Werner

    2003-01-01

    We show that AdS two-point functions can be obtained by connecting two points in the interior of AdS space with one point on its boundary by a dual pair of Dobrev's boundary-to-bulk intertwiners and integrating over the boundary point

  5. Student "Facebook" Groups as a Third Space: Between Social Life and Schoolwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaen, Janus; Dalsgaard, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The paper examines educational potentials of "Facebook" groups that are created and managed by students without any involvement from teachers. The objective is to study student-managed "Facebook" groups as a "third space" between the institutional space of teacher-managed "Facebook" groups and the…

  6. On determining the isometry group of a Riemannian space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlhede, A.; Maccallum, M.A.H.

    1982-01-01

    An extension of the recently discussed algorithm for deciding the equivalence problem for Riemannian metrics is presented. The extension determines the structure constants of the isometry group and enables us to obtain some information about its orbits, including the form of the Killing vectors in canonical coordinates. (author)

  7. Brauer groups and obstruction problems moduli spaces and arithmetic

    CERN Document Server

    Hassett, Brendan; Várilly-Alvarado, Anthony; Viray, Bianca

    2017-01-01

    The contributions in this book explore various contexts in which the derived category of coherent sheaves on a variety determines some of its arithmetic. This setting provides new geometric tools for interpreting elements of the Brauer group. With a view towards future arithmetic applications, the book extends a number of powerful tools for analyzing rational points on elliptic curves, e.g., isogenies among curves, torsion points, modular curves, and the resulting descent techniques, as well as higher-dimensional varieties like K3 surfaces. Inspired by the rapid recent advances in our understanding of K3 surfaces, the book is intended to foster cross-pollination between the fields of complex algebraic geometry and number theory. Contributors: · Nicolas Addington · Benjamin Antieau · Kenneth Ascher · Asher Auel · Fedor Bogomolov · Jean-Louis Colliot-Thélène · Krishna Dasaratha · Brendan Hassett · Colin Ingalls · Martí Lahoz · Emanuele Macrì · Kelly McKinnie · Andrew Obus · Ekin Ozman · Raman...

  8. COSTANZA, 1-D 2 Group Space-Dependent Reactor Dynamics of Spatial Reactor with 1 Group Delayed Neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agazzi, A.; Gavazzi, C.; Vincenti, E.; Monterosso, R.

    1964-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: The programme studies the spatial dynamics of reactor TESI, in the two group and one space dimension approximation. Only one group of delayed neutrons is considered. The programme simulates the vertical movement of the control rods according to any given movement law. The programme calculates the evolution of the fluxes and temperature and precursor concentration in space and time during the power excursion. 2 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The maximum number of lattice points is 100

  9. Representation of SO(4,1) group and Hawking effect in the de-Sitter space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogush, A.A.; Otchik, V.S.

    1983-01-01

    Expression relating the solution of the equation for particles with spin 1/2 to matrix elements of group SO(4, 1), is obtained. When using the relation of the Dirac equation solutions in the de Sitter space with matrix elements of representations of group SO(4, 1) the presence of the Hawking effect in the space is established. The de Sitter space is considered as 4-dimensional hyperboloid, inserted into 5-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean space. It is established, that the average number of emitted spinor particles obeys the Fermi-Dirac distribution

  10. Derivation of space groups in mm2, 222 and mmm crystal classes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nigam, G.D.

    1987-08-01

    An algebraic approach is developed to derive space groups using 4x4 Seitz matrices for the crystal classes mm2, 222 and mmm in the orthorhombic system. The advantage of the present method is that it is relatively simple and can be adapted to introduce space groups to beginners. One of the advantages of the present method is that it admits a geometrical visualization of the symmetry elements of space group. The method can easily be extended to other crystal classes in a straightforward way. 16 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs

  11. Positive-definite functions and unitary representations of locally compact groups in a Hilbert space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gali, I.M.; Okb el-Bab, A.S.; Hassan, H.M.

    1977-08-01

    It is proved that the necessary and sufficient condition for the existence of an integral representation of a group of unitary operators in a Hilbert space is that it is positive-definite and continuous in some topology

  12. User's manual for THYDE-P1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asahi, Yoshiro

    1982-04-01

    THYDE-P1 is a computer code applicable to LWR (light water reactor) plant dynamics in response to various disturbances. This work is the user's mannual of THYDE-P1 (version SV02L03). The input requirements, steady state adjustment, execution of runs and output specifications are described. (author)

  13. Challenges in Teaching Space Physics to Different Target Groups From Space Weather Forecasters to Heavy-weight Theorists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskinen, H. E.

    2008-12-01

    Plasma physics as the backbone of space physics is difficult and thus the space physics students need to have strong foundations in general physics, in particular in classical electrodynamics and thermodynamics, and master the basic mathematical tools for physicists. In many universities the number of students specializing in space physics at Master's and Doctoral levels is rather small and the students may have quite different preferences ranging from experimental approach to hard-core space plasma theory. This poses challenges in building up a study program that has both the variety and depth needed to motivate the best students to choose this field. At the University of Helsinki we require all beginning space physics students, regardless whether they enter the field as Master's or Doctoral degree students, to take a one-semester package consisting of plasma physics and its space applications. However, some compromises are necessary. For example, it is not at all clear, how thoroughly Landau damping should be taught at the first run or how deeply should the intricacies of collisionless reconnection be discussed. In both cases we have left the details to an optional course in advanced space physics, even with the risk that the student's appreciation of, e.g., reconnection may remain at the level of a magic wand. For learning experimental work, data analysis or computer simulations we have actively pursued arrangements for the Master's degree students to get a summer employments in active research groups, which usually lead to the Master's theses. All doctoral students are members of research groups and participate in experimental work, data analysis, simulation studies or theory development, or any combination of these. We emphasize strongly "learning by doing" all the way from the weekly home exercises during the lecture courses to the PhD theses which in Finland consist typically of 4-6 peer-reviewed articles with a comprehensive introductory part.

  14. Implementation of small group discussion as a teaching method in earth and space science subject

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryani, N. P.; Supriyadi

    2018-03-01

    In Physics Department Universitas Negeri Semarang, Earth and Space Science subject is included in the curriculum of the third year of physics education students. There are various models of teaching earth and space science subject such as textbook method, lecturer, demonstrations, study tours, problem-solving method, etc. Lectures method is the most commonly used of teaching earth and space science subject. The disadvantage of this method is the lack of two ways interaction between lecturers and students. This research used small group discussion as a teaching method in Earth and Space science. The purpose of this study is to identify the conditions under which an efficient discussion may be initiated and maintained while students are investigating properties of earth and space science subjects. The results of this research show that there is an increase in student’s understanding of earth and space science subject proven through the evaluation results. In addition, during the learning process, student’s activeness also increase.

  15. Description of symmetry of magnetic structures by representations of space groups. [Tables, projecton operator methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, W

    1974-10-15

    A description of magnetic structures based on the use of representations of space groups is given. Representations of the space groups were established for each compound on the basis of experimental data by the method of projection operators. The compounds contained in the list are collected according to crystal systems, alphabetically within each system. The description of each compound consists of the four parts. The first part contain the chemical symbol of the compound, the second its space group. The next part contains the chemical symbol of the magnetic atom and its positions in Wychoff notation with the number of equivalent positions in the crystal unit cell. The main description of a compound magnetic structure is given in the fourth part. It contains: K vector defined in the reciprocal space, the representation according to which a magnetic structure is transformed and the axial vector function S which describes the magnetic structure.

  16. Fundamental group of dual graphs and applications to quantum space time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nada, S.I.; Hamouda, E.H.

    2009-01-01

    Let G be a connected planar graph with n vertices and m edges. It is known that the fundamental group of G has 1 -(n - m) generators. In this paper, we show that if G is a self-dual graph, then its fundamental group has (n - 1) generators. We indicate that these results are relevant to quantum space time.

  17. Space-time versus world-sheet renormalization group equation in string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brustein, R.; Roland, K.

    1991-05-01

    We discuss the relation between space-time renormalization group equation for closed string field theory and world-sheet renormalization group equation for first-quantized strings. Restricting our attention to massless states we argue that there is a one-to-one correspondence between the fixed point solutions of the two renormalization group equations. In particular, we show how to extract the Fischler-Susskind mechanism from the string field theory equation in the case of the bosonic string. (orig.)

  18. Group-velocity dispersion effects on quantum noise of a fiber optical soliton in phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Heongkyu; Lee, Euncheol

    2010-01-01

    Group-velocity dispersion (GVD) effects on quantum noise of ultrashort pulsed light are theoretically investigated at the soliton energy level, using Gaussian-weighted pseudo-random distribution of phasors in phase space for the modeling of quantum noise properties including phase noise, photon number noise, and quantum noise shape in phase space. We present the effects of GVD that mixes the different spectral components in time, on the self-phase modulation(SPM)-induced quantum noise properties in phase space such as quadrature squeezing, photon-number noise, and tilting/distortion of quantum noise shape in phase space, for the soliton that propagates a distance of the nonlinear length η NL = 1/( γP 0 ) (P 0 is the pulse peak power and γ is the SPM parameter). The propagation dependence of phase space quantum noise properties for an optical soliton is also provided.

  19. The Lp Spectrum of Locally Symmetric Spaces with Small Fundamental Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    We determine the L p spectrum of the Laplace-Beltrami operator on certain complete locally symmetric spaces M whose universal covering X is a symmetric space of non-compact type with rank one. More precisely, we show that the L p spectra of M and X coincide if the fundamental group of M is small and if the injectivity radius of M is bounded away from zero. In the L 2 case, the restriction on the injectivity radius is not needed

  20. The homology groups of moduli spaces on non-classical Klein surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaw, Myint

    2001-08-01

    We describe the moduli space M-vector±(g,c) of non-classical directed Klein surfaces of genus g=h-c-1 with c≥0 distinguished points as a configuration space B ± (h,c) of classes h-slit pairs in C. Based on this model, we prove that M-vector ± (g,c) is non-orientable for any g and c and we compute the homology groups of the moduli spaces M-vector ± (g,c) for g≤2. (author)

  1. Generation of symmetry coordinates for crystals using multiplier representations of the space groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1978-01-01

    Symmetry coordinates play an important role in the normal-mode calculations of crystals. It is therefore of great importance to have a general method, which may be applied for any crystal at any wave vector, to generate these. The multiplier representations of the space groups as given by Kovalev...... and the projection-operator technique provide a basis for such a method. The method is illustrated for the nonsymmorphic D36 space group, and the theoretical background for the representations of space groups in general is reviewed and illustrated on the example above. It is desirable to perform the projection...... of symmetry coordinates in such a way that they may be used for as many wave vectors as possible. We discuss how to achieve this goal. The detailed illustrations should make it simple to apply the theory in any other case....

  2. An introduction to Lie groups and the geometry of homogeneous spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Arvanitoyeorgos, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    It is remarkable that so much about Lie groups could be packed into this small book. But after reading it, students will be well-prepared to continue with more advanced, graduate-level topics in differential geometry or the theory of Lie groups. The theory of Lie groups involves many areas of mathematics. In this book, Arvanitoyeorgos outlines enough of the prerequisites to get the reader started. He then chooses a path through this rich and diverse theory that aims for an understanding of the geometry of Lie groups and homogeneous spaces. In this way, he avoids the extra detail needed for a thorough discussion of other topics. Lie groups and homogeneous spaces are especially useful to study in geometry, as they provide excellent examples where quantities (such as curvature) are easier to compute. A good understanding of them provides lasting intuition, especially in differential geometry. The book is suitable for advanced undergraduates, graduate students, and research mathematicians interested in differenti...

  3. Selenomethionine substitution of orotidine-5-monophosphate decarboxylase causes a change in crystal contacts and space group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Harris, Pernille; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2001-01-01

    with the inhibitor 1-(5'-phospho- -D-ribofuranosyl)barbituric acid crystallizes under similar conditions as the native enzyme. In contrast to the native enzyme, where the crystals belong to the orthorhombic space group P212121, the SeMet-substituted enzyme crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21......-wavelength anomalous dispersion technique, both native and SeMet-substituted proteins have been produced and purified. During the production of SeMet ODCase, it was observed that SeMet was the only amino acid that it was necessary to add to the defined medium during expression. SeMet-substituted ODCase in complex...

  4. The Picard group of the moduli space of r-Spin Riemann surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Randal-Williams, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    An r-Spin Riemann surface is a Riemann surface equipped with a choice of rth root of the (co)tangent bundle. We give a careful construction of the moduli space (orbifold) of r-Spin Riemann surfaces, and explain how to establish a Madsen–Weiss theorem for it. This allows us to prove the “Mumford...... conjecture” for these moduli spaces, but more interestingly allows us to compute their algebraic Picard groups (for g≥10, or g≥9 in the 2-Spin case). We give a complete description of these Picard groups, in terms of explicitly constructed line bundles....

  5. Johnson Space Center's Risk and Reliability Analysis Group 2008 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Mark; Boyer, Roger; Cross, Bob; Hamlin, Teri; Roelant, Henk; Stewart, Mike; Bigler, Mark; Winter, Scott; Reistle, Bruce; Heydorn,Dick

    2009-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center (JSC) Safety & Mission Assurance (S&MA) Directorate s Risk and Reliability Analysis Group provides both mathematical and engineering analysis expertise in the areas of Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA), Reliability and Maintainability (R&M) analysis, and data collection and analysis. The fundamental goal of this group is to provide National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) decisionmakers with the necessary information to make informed decisions when evaluating personnel, flight hardware, and public safety concerns associated with current operating systems as well as with any future systems. The Analysis Group includes a staff of statistical and reliability experts with valuable backgrounds in the statistical, reliability, and engineering fields. This group includes JSC S&MA Analysis Branch personnel as well as S&MA support services contractors, such as Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) and SoHaR. The Analysis Group s experience base includes nuclear power (both commercial and navy), manufacturing, Department of Defense, chemical, and shipping industries, as well as significant aerospace experience specifically in the Shuttle, International Space Station (ISS), and Constellation Programs. The Analysis Group partners with project and program offices, other NASA centers, NASA contractors, and universities to provide additional resources or information to the group when performing various analysis tasks. The JSC S&MA Analysis Group is recognized as a leader in risk and reliability analysis within the NASA community. Therefore, the Analysis Group is in high demand to help the Space Shuttle Program (SSP) continue to fly safely, assist in designing the next generation spacecraft for the Constellation Program (CxP), and promote advanced analytical techniques. The Analysis Section s tasks include teaching classes and instituting personnel qualification processes to enhance the professional abilities of our analysts

  6. An introduction to data reduction: space-group determination, scaling and intensity statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Philip R

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of how to run the CCP4 programs for data reduction (SCALA, POINTLESS and CTRUNCATE) through the CCP4 graphical interface ccp4i and points out some issues that need to be considered, together with a few examples. It covers determination of the point-group symmetry of the diffraction data (the Laue group), which is required for the subsequent scaling step, examination of systematic absences, which in many cases will allow inference of the space group, putting multiple data sets on a common indexing system when there are alternatives, the scaling step itself, which produces a large set of data-quality indicators, estimation of |F| from intensity and finally examination of intensity statistics to detect crystal pathologies such as twinning. An appendix outlines the scoring schemes used by the program POINTLESS to assign probabilities to possible Laue and space groups.

  7. Future In-Space Operations (FISO): A Working Group and Community Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thronson, Harley; Lester, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Long-duration human capabilities beyond low Earth orbit (LEO), either in support of or as an alternative to lunar surface operations, have been assessed at least since the late 1960s. Over the next few months, we will present short histories of concepts for long-duration, free-space human habitation beyond LEO from the end of the Apollo program to the Decadal Planning Team (DPT)/NASA Exploration Team (NExT), which was active in 1999 2000 (see Forging a vision: NASA s Decadal Planning Team and the origins of the Vision for Space Exploration , The Space Review, December 19, 2005). Here we summarize the brief existence of the Future In-Space Operations (FISO) working group in 2005 2006 and its successor, a telecon-based colloquium series, which we co-moderate.

  8. Response to the Comment by G. Emch on projective group representations in quaternionic Hilbert space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adler, S.L.

    1996-01-01

    We discuss the differing definitions of complex and quaternionic projective group representations employed by us and by Emch. The definition of Emch (termed here a strong projective representation) is too restrictive to accommodate quaternionic Hilbert space embeddings of complex projective representations. Our definition (termed here a weak projective representation) encompasses such embeddings, and leads to a detailed theory of quaternionic, as well as complex, projective group representations. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  9. Realization of vector fields for quantum groups as pseudodifferential operators on quantum spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Chong-Sun; Zumino, B.

    1995-01-01

    The vector fields of the quantum Lie algebra are described for the quantum groups GL q (n), SL q (N) and SO q (N) as pseudodifferential operators on the linear quantum spaces covariant under the corresponding quantum group. Their expressions are simple and compact. It is pointed out that these vector fields satisfy certain characteristic polynomial identities. The real forms SU q (N) and SO q (N,R) are discussed in detail

  10. Lie groups and symmetric spaces in memory of F. I. Karpelevich

    CERN Document Server

    Gindikin, S G

    2003-01-01

    The book contains survey and research articles devoted mainly to geometry and harmonic analysis of symmetric spaces and to corresponding aspects of group representation theory. The volume is dedicated to the memory of Russian mathematician F. I. Karpelevich (1927-2000).

  11. Torelli groups, extended Johnson homomorphisms, and new cycles on the moduli space of curves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morita, Shigeyuki; Penner, Robert

    modulo N are derived for all N. Furthermore, the first Johnson homomorphism, which is defined from the classical Torelli group to the third exterior power of the homology of the surface, is shown to lift to an explicit canonical 1-cocycle of the Teichmueller space. The main tool for these results...... cocycle lifts of the higher Johnson homomorphisms....

  12. Disintegration of positive isometric group representations on L^p-spaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeu, de M.F.E.; Rozendaal, J.

    2017-01-01

    Let G be a Polish locally compact group acting on a Polish space X" role="presentation">X with a G-invariant probability measure μ" role="presentation">μ. We factorize the integral with respect to μ" role="presentation">μ in terms of the integrals with respect to the ergodic measures on X, and show

  13. Fourier-space TEM reconstructions with symmetry adapted functions for all rotational point groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapani, Stefano; Navaza, Jorge

    2013-05-01

    A general-purpose and simple expression for the coefficients of symmetry adapted functions referred to conveniently oriented symmetry axes is given for all rotational point groups. The expression involves the computation of reduced Wigner-matrix elements corresponding to an angle specific to each group and has the computational advantage of leading to Fourier-space TEM (transmission electron microscopy) reconstruction procedures involving only real valued unknowns. Using this expression, a protocol for ab initio view and center assignment and reconstruction so far used for icosahedral particles has been tested with experimental data in other point groups. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Determining sociability, social space, and social presence in (a)synchronous collaborative groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreijns, Karel; Kirschner, Paul A; Jochems, Wim; Van Buuren, Hans

    2004-04-01

    The effectiveness of group learning in asynchronous distributed learning groups depends on the social interaction that takes place. This social interaction affects both cognitive and socioemotional processes that take place during learning, group forming, establishment of group structures, and group dynamics. Though now known to be important, this aspect is often ignored, denied or forgotten by educators and researchers who tend to concentrate on cognitive processes and on-task contexts. This "one-sided" educational focus largely determines the set of requirements in the design of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments resulting in functional CSCL environments. In contrast, our research is aimed at the design and implementation of sociable CSCL environments which may increase the likelihood that a sound social space will emerge. We use a theoretical framework that is based upon an ecological approach to social interaction, centering on the concept of social affordances, the concept of the sociability of CSCL environments, and social presence theory. The hypothesis is that the higher the sociability, the more likely that social interaction will take place or will increase, and the more likely that this will result in an emerging sound social space. In the present research, the variables of interest are sociability, social space, and social presence. This study deals with the construction and validation of three instruments to determine sociability, social space, and social presence in (a)synchronous collaborating groups. The findings suggest that the instruments have potential to be useful as measures for the respective variables. However, it must be realized that these measures are "first steps."

  15. Planning and managing future space facility projects. [management by objectives and group dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, J. E.; Wilhelm, J. A.; Tanner, T. A.; Helmreich, R. L.; Burgenbauch, S. F.

    1979-01-01

    To learn how ground-based personnel of a space project plan and organize their work and how such planning and organizing relate to work outcomes, longitudinal study of the management and execution of the Space Lab Mission Development Test 3 (SMD 3) was performed at NASA Ames Research Center. A view of the problems likely to arise in organizations and some methods of coping with these problems are presented as well as the conclusions and recommendations that pertain strictly to SMD 3 management. Emphasis is placed on the broader context of future space facility projects and additional problems that may be anticipated. A model of management that may be used to facilitate problem solving and communication - management by objectives (MBO) is presented. Some problems of communication and emotion management that MBO does not address directly are considered. Models for promoting mature, constructive and satisfying emotional relationships among group members are discussed.

  16. Extended system of space-time coordinates and generalized translation group of transformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaleev, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    A method of extending space-time is considered. In the nonrelativistic case extending goes by joining a scalar to the 3-dimensional radius-vector, completing this to a quaternion. The interpretation of scalar obtained as a parameter of scale transfornation of the generalized translation of group of transformations is given. Some basic expressions of nonrelativistic classical mechanics in the quaternion representation are given. In the relativistic case space-time is constructed from two quaternions: the first one consists of a pair scalar-3-dimensional radius-vector; the second one, of a pair-time-scalar-3-dimensional time-vector. Time and space coordinates, enter into the expression with the opposite signature. The introduction of a time-vector as well as of a new scalar is stipulated by the requirement of the principle of conforming quantum mechanics of the 1/2 spin to classical mechanics [ru

  17. METHOD OF GROUP OBJECTS FORMING FOR SPACE-BASED REMOTE SENSING OF THE EARTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Grigoriev

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Subject of Research. Research findings of the specific application of space-based optical-electronic and radar means for the Earth remote sensing are considered. The subject matter of the study is the current planning of objects survey on the underlying surface in order to increase the effectiveness of sensing system due to the rational use of its resources. Method. New concept of a group object, stochastic swath and stochastic length of the route is introduced. The overview of models for single, group objects and their parameters is given. The criterion for the existence of the group object based on two single objects is formulated. The method for group objects formation while current survey planning has been developed and its description is presented. The method comprises several processing stages for data about objects with the calculation of new parameters, the stochastic characteristics of space means and validates the spatial size of the object value of the stochastic swath and stochastic length of the route. The strict mathematical description of techniques for model creation of a group object based on data about a single object and onboard special complex facilities in difficult conditions of registration of spatial data is given. Main Results. The developed method is implemented on the basis of modern geographic information system in the form of a software tool layout with advanced tools of processing and analysis of spatial data in vector format. Experimental studies of the forming method for the group of objects were carried out on a different real object environment using the parameters of modern national systems of the Earth remote sensing detailed observation Canopus-B and Resurs-P. Practical Relevance. The proposed models and method are focused on practical implementation using vector spatial data models and modern geoinformation technologies. Practical value lies in the reduction in the amount of consumable resources by means of

  18. Loop space representation of quantum general relativity and the group of loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambini, R.

    1991-01-01

    The action of the constraints of quantum general relativity on a general state in the loop representation is coded in terms of loop derivatives. These differential operators are related to the infinitesimal generators of the group of loops and generalize the area derivative first considered by Mandelstam. A new sector of solutions of the physical states space of nonperturbative quantum general relativity is found. (orig.)

  19. Location preferences of groups in public leisure spaces: the case of Likya Cafe in Ankara

    OpenAIRE

    Altay, Can

    1999-01-01

    Ankara : Department of Interior Architecture and Environmental Design and Institute of Economics and Social Sciences, Bilkent Univ., 1999. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 1999. Includes bibliographical references. In this study, public leisure spaces are examined considering the social and spatial behavior of occupant groups. After an introduction to the concepts of leisure, its types, its relations with public life and cultural concepts, the study discusses leisure ...

  20. Moduli space of self-dual connections in dimension greater than four for abelian Gauge groups

    OpenAIRE

    Cappelle, Natacha

    2018-01-01

    In 1954, C. Yang and R. Mills created a Gauge Theory for strong interaction of Elementary Particles. More generally, they proved that it is possible to define a Gauge Theory with an arbitrary compact Lie group as Gauge group. Within this context, it is interesting to find critical values of a functional defined on the space of connections: the Yang-Mills functional. If the based manifold is four dimensional, there exists a natural notion of (anti-)self-dual 2-form, which gives a natural notio...

  1. Grouped fuzzy SVM with EM-based partition of sample space for clustered microcalcification detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiya; Feng, Jun; Wang, Hongyu

    2017-07-20

    Detection of clustered microcalcification (MC) from mammograms plays essential roles in computer-aided diagnosis for early stage breast cancer. To tackle problems associated with the diversity of data structures of MC lesions and the variability of normal breast tissues, multi-pattern sample space learning is required. In this paper, a novel grouped fuzzy Support Vector Machine (SVM) algorithm with sample space partition based on Expectation-Maximization (EM) (called G-FSVM) is proposed for clustered MC detection. The diversified pattern of training data is partitioned into several groups based on EM algorithm. Then a series of fuzzy SVM are integrated for classification with each group of samples from the MC lesions and normal breast tissues. From DDSM database, a total of 1,064 suspicious regions are selected from 239 mammography, and the measurement of Accuracy, True Positive Rate (TPR), False Positive Rate (FPR) and EVL = TPR* 1-FPR are 0.82, 0.78, 0.14 and 0.72, respectively. The proposed method incorporates the merits of fuzzy SVM and multi-pattern sample space learning, decomposing the MC detection problem into serial simple two-class classification. Experimental results from synthetic data and DDSM database demonstrate that our integrated classification framework reduces the false positive rate significantly while maintaining the true positive rate.

  2. Toward a standardized structural-functional group connectome in MNI space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Andreas; Blankenburg, Felix

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the structural architecture of the human brain in terms of connectivity between its subregions has provided profound insights into its underlying functional organization and has coined the concept of the "connectome", a structural description of the elements forming the human brain and the connections among them. Here, as a proof of concept, we introduce a novel group connectome in standard space based on a large sample of 169 subjects from the Enhanced Nathan Kline Institute-Rockland Sample (eNKI-RS). Whole brain structural connectomes of each subject were estimated with a global tracking approach, and the resulting fiber tracts were warped into standard stereotactic (MNI) space using DARTEL. Employing this group connectome, the results of published tracking studies (i.e., the JHU white matter and Oxford thalamic connectivity atlas) could be largely reproduced directly within MNI space. In a second analysis, a study that examined structural connectivity between regions of a functional network, namely the default mode network, was reproduced. Voxel-wise structural centrality was then calculated and compared to others' findings. Furthermore, including additional resting-state fMRI data from the same subjects, structural and functional connectivity matrices between approximately forty thousand nodes of the brain were calculated. This was done to estimate structure-function agreement indices of voxel-wise whole brain connectivity. Taken together, the combination of a novel whole brain fiber tracking approach and an advanced normalization method led to a group connectome that allowed (at least heuristically) performing fiber tracking directly within MNI space. Such an approach may be used for various purposes like the analysis of structural connectivity and modeling experiments that aim at studying the structure-function relationship of the human connectome. Moreover, it may even represent a first step toward a standard DTI template of the human brain

  3. Assessment of space plasma effectsfor satellite applications:Working Group 2 overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jakowski

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available An important part of the tasks of Working Group 2 of the COST Action 271 «Assessment of space plasma effect for satellites applications» is the assessment of novel data sources for information about the state of ionisation of the ionosphere. This report deals with those aspects which are not represented adequately in the scientific papers in this issue. Here emphasis is given to the product aspect (data and model collections, descriptions of methods and algorithms, availability of products, expected future developments and the links between the past COST Actions 238 and 251 with the present Action 271 and with possible future cooperations. Working Group 2 was leading in the transionospheric propagation aspects of possible products for the International Telecommunication Union?s Radiocommunication (ITU-R Study Group 3. This report gives a short overview emphasizing future developments.

  4. The Group Evacuation Behavior Based on Fire Effect in the Complicated Three-Dimensional Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to effectively depict the group evacuation behavior in the complicated three-dimensional space, a novel pedestrian flow model is proposed with three-dimensional cellular automata. In this model the calculation methods of floor field and fire gain are elaborated at first, and the transition gain of target position at the next moment is defined. Then, in consideration of pedestrian intimacy and velocity change, the group evacuation strategy and evolution rules are given. Finally, the experiments were conducted with the simulation platform to study the relationships of evacuation time, pedestrian density, average system velocity, and smoke spreading velocity. The results had shown that large-scale group evacuation should be avoided, and in case of large pedestrian density, the shortest route of evacuation strategy would extend system evacuation time.

  5. Topological and homological properties of the orbit space of a compact linear Lie group with commutative connected component

    OpenAIRE

    Styrt, O. G.

    2016-01-01

    The problem in question is whether the quotient space of a compact linear group is a topological manifold and whether it is a homological manifold. In the paper, the case of an infinite group with commutative connected component is considered.

  6. The Community-based Organizations Working Group of the Space Science Education Support Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, J. H.; Lowes, L. L.; Asplund, S.

    2004-12-01

    The NASA Space Science Support Network Community-based Organizations Working Group (CBOWG) has been working for the past two years on issues surrounding afterschool programs and programs for youth (e.g., Girl Scouts, Boy Scouts, Boys and Girls Clubs, 4-H, summer camps, afterschool and weekend programs for various ages, programs with emphases on minority youth). In this session the co-leaders of the CBOWG will discuss the challenges of working with community-based organizations on a regional or national level. We will highlight some ties that we have forged with the National Institute for Out of School Time (NIOST) and the National Afterschool Association (NAA). We will also talk about efforts to coordinate how various entities within NASA cooperate with community-based organizations to serve the best interests of these groups. We will give a couple of examples of how NASA space science organizations have partnered with community-based organizations. The session will include some handouts of information and resources that the CBOWG has found useful in developing an understanding of this segment of informal education groups. We would like to thank NASA for providing resources to support the work of the CBOWG.

  7. Independence of automorphism group, center, and state space of quantum logics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navara, M.

    1992-01-01

    We prove that quantum logics (-orthomodular posets) admit full independence of the attributes important within the foundations of quantum mechanics. Namely, we present the construction of quantum logics with given sublogics (=physical subsystems), automorphism groups, centers (=open-quotes classical partsclose quotes of the systems), and state spaces. Thus, all these open-quotes parametersclose quotes are independent. Our result is rooted in the line of investigation carried out by Greechie; Kallus and Trnkova; Kalmbach; and Navara and Ptak; and considerably enriches the known algebraic methods in orthomodular posets. 19 refs., 1 fig

  8. Representation theory of 2-groups on finite dimensional 2-vector spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Elgueta, Josep

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, the 2-category $\\mathfrak{Rep}_{{\\bf 2Mat}_{\\mathbb{C}}}(\\mathbb{G})$ of (weak) representations of an arbitrary (weak) 2-group $\\mathbb{G}$ on (some version of) Kapranov and Voevodsky's 2-category of (complex) 2-vector spaces is studied. In particular, the set of equivalence classes of representations is computed in terms of the invariants $\\pi_0(\\mathbb{G})$, $\\pi_1(\\mathbb{G})$ and $[\\alpha]\\in H^3(\\pi_0(\\mathbb{G}),\\pi_1(\\mathbb{G}))$ classifying $\\mathbb{G}$. Also the categ...

  9. A Phase Transformation with no Change in Space Group Symmetry: Octafluoronaphtalene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawley, G. S.; Dietrich, O. W.

    1975-01-01

    A solid-state phase transformation in octafluoronaphthalene has been discovered at 266.5K on cooling, and at 15K higher on heating. The symmetry of both phases is found to be the same, namely monoclinic with space group P21/c. The unit cell parameters change by up to 10%, but the integrity...... of a single crystal, which shatters on cooling, is good enough for a single-crystal structure determination. This has been done in both phases to a sufficient accuracy that a mechanism for the transformation can be proposed. Molecules which lie parallel to one another shear to a new parallel position...

  10. Gauge fields in nonlinear group realizations involving two-dimensional space-time symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machacek, M.E.; McCliment, E.R.

    1975-01-01

    It is shown that gauge fields may be consistently introduced into a model Lagrangian previously considered by the authors. The model is suggested by the spontaneous breaking of a Lorentz-type group into a quasiphysical two-dimensional space-time and one internal degree of freedom, loosely associated with charge. The introduction of zero-mass gauge fields makes possible the absorption via the Higgs mechanism of the Goldstone fields that appear in the model despite the fact that the Goldstone fields do not transform as scalars. Specifically, gauge invariance of the Yang-Mills type requires the introduction of two sets of massless gauge fields. The transformation properties in two-dimensional space-time suggest that one set is analogous to a charge doublet that behaves like a second-rank tensor in real four-dimensional space time. The other set suggests a spin-one-like charge triplet. Via the Higgs mechanism, the first set absorbs the Goldstone fields and acquires mass. The second set remains massless. If massive gauge fields are introduced, the associated currents are not conserved and the Higgs mechanism is no longer fully operative. The Goldstone fields are not eliminated, but coupling between the Goldstone fields and the gauge fields does shift the mass of the antisymmetric second-rank-tensor gauge field components

  11. Quantum spaces, central extensions of Lie groups and related quantum field theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Timothé; Wallet, Jean-Christophe

    2018-02-01

    Quantum spaces with su(2) noncommutativity can be modelled by using a family of SO(3)-equivariant differential *-representations. The quantization maps are determined from the combination of the Wigner theorem for SU(2) with the polar decomposition of the quantized plane waves. A tracial star-product, equivalent to the Kontsevich product for the Poisson manifold dual to su(2) is obtained from a subfamily of differential *-representations. Noncommutative (scalar) field theories free from UV/IR mixing and whose commutative limit coincides with the usual ϕ 4 theory on ℛ3 are presented. A generalization of the construction to semi-simple possibly non simply connected Lie groups based on their central extensions by suitable abelian Lie groups is discussed. Based on a talk presented by Poulain T at the XXVth International Conference on Integrable Systems and Quantum symmetries (ISQS-25), Prague, June 6-10 2017.

  12. Analysis of Adult Female Mouse (Mus musculus) Group Behavior on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomides, P.; Moyer, E. L.; Talyansky, Y.; Choi, S.; Gong, C.; Globus, R. K.; Ronca, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    As interest in long duration effects of space habitation increases, understanding the behavior of model organisms living within the habitats engineered to fly them is vital for designing, validating, and interpreting future spaceflight studies. A handful of papers have previously reported behavior of mice and rats in the weightless environment of space. The Rodent Research Hardware and Operations Validation (Rodent Research-1; RR1) utilized the Rodent Habitat (RH) developed at NASA Ames Research Center to fly mice on the ISS (International Space Station). Ten adult (16-week-old) female C57BL/6 mice were launched on September 21st, 2014 in an unmanned Dragon Capsule, and spent 37 days in microgravity. Here we report group behavioral phenotypes of the RR1 Flight (FLT) and environment-matched Ground Control (GC) mice in the Rodent Habitat (RH) during this long-duration flight. Video was recorded for 33 days on the ISS, permitting daily assessments of overall health and well-being of the mice, and providing a valuable repository for detailed behavioral analysis. We previously reported that, as compared to GC mice, RR1 FLT mice exhibited the same range of behaviors, including eating, drinking, exploration, self- and allo-grooming, and social interactions at similar or greater levels of occurrence. Overall activity was greater in FLT as compared to GC mice, with spontaneous ambulatory behavior, including organized 'circling' or 'race-tracking' behavior that emerged within the first few days of flight following a common developmental sequence, and comprised the primary dark cycle activity persisting throughout the remainder of the experiment. Participation by individual mice increased dramatically over the course of the flight. Here we present a detailed analysis of 'race-tracking' behavior in which we quantified: (1) Complete lap rotations by individual mice; (2) Numbers of collisions between circling mice; (3) Lap directionality; and (4) Recruitment of mice into a group

  13. Knot wormholes and the dimensional invariant of exceptional Lie groups and Stein space hierarchies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elokaby, Ayman

    2009-01-01

    The present short note points out a most interesting and quite unexpected connection between the number of distinct knot as a function of their crossing number and exceptional Lie groups and Stein space hierarchies. It is found that the crossing number 7 plays the role of threshold similar to 4 and 5 in E-infinity theory and for the 11 crossing the number of distinct knots is very close to 4α-bar 0 +1=548+1=549, where α-bar 0 =137 is the inverse integer electromagnetic fine structure constant. This is particularly intriguing in view of a similar relation pertinent to the 17 two and three Stein spaces where the total dimension is Σ 1 17 Stein=5α-bar 0 +1=685+1=686, as well as the sum of the eight exceptional Lie symmetry groups Σ i=1 8 |E i |=4α-bar 0 =548. The slight discrepancy of one is explained in both cases by the inclusion of El Naschie's transfinite corrections leading to Σ i=1 8 |E i |=(4)(137+k 0 )=548.328157 and Σ i=1 17 Stein=(5)(137+k 0 )=685.41097, where k o = φ 5 (1 - φ 5 ) and φ=(√(5)-1)/2.

  14. On the Lie symmetry group for classical fields in noncommutative space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Ricardo Martinho Lima Santiago [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), BA (Brazil); Instituto Federal da Bahia (IFBA), BA (Brazil); Ressureicao, Caio G. da [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), BA (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Vianna, Jose David M. [Universidade Federal da Bahia (UFBA), BA (Brazil); Universidade de Brasilia (UnB), DF (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text: An alternative way to include effects of noncommutative geometries in field theory is based on the concept of noncommutativity among degrees of freedom of the studied system. In this context it is reasonable to consider that, in the multiparticle noncommutative quantum mechanics (NCQM), the noncommutativity among degrees of freedom to discrete system with N particles is also verified. Further, an analysis of the classical limit of the single particle NCQM leads to a deformed Newtonian mechanics where the Newton's second law is modified in order to include the noncommutative parameter {theta}{sub {iota}j} and, for a one-dimensional discrete system with N particles, the dynamical evolution of each particle is given by this modified Newton's second law. Hence, applying the continuous limit to this multiparticle classical system it is possible to obtain a noncommutative extension of two -dimensional field theory in a noncommutative space. In the present communication we consider a noncommutative extension of the scalar field obtained from this approach and we analyze the Lie symmetries in order to compare the Lie group of this field with the usual scalar field in the commutative space. (author)

  15. "Friends" and "Foes" in the Social Space of the Tatar Ethnic Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia O. Khazieva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The history of the World Culture is a demonstration of the "war" between the two opposites: on the one hand, we see a trend towards unification of all aspects of life on a global scale, and on the other, there is a clear confrontation between different groups of mankind. Of the many causes of the disunity of the people, the authors' focus at the opposition "friend – foe" as a metaphysical principle of formation of social space wasn't chosen by accident. The fact is that any culture, in principle, is dichotomous, and the opposition "friend – foe" is the fullest incarnation of this dichotomy. As a universal principle of the formation and functioning of the cultures, it originally manifests itself in every one of them. And, as the authors of the study suggest: this opposition could either "work" in general on the cross-cultural cooperation and unity or be one of the confrontation sources. The main result of the study is that history has prepared and put forward the Tartars for carrying out a special mission, to unite peoples and cultures. But the revolutionary social upheavals that take place in the modern world pose a threat (in the circumstances of forced migration of peoples, the growth of national consciousness of the former Soviet Union space, and especially in the face of Islamic fundamentalism on fulfilling this function.

  16. Real-space renormalization group; application to site percolation in square lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.; Schwachheim, G.

    1978-05-01

    The real-space renormalization group proposed by Reynolds, Klein and Stanley 1977 to treat the site percolation is analysed and extended . The best among 3 possible definitions of 'percolating' configurations and among 5 possible methods to weight these configurations, are established for percolation in square lattices. The use of n xn square clusters leads, for n = 2 (RKS), n = 3 and n = 4, to √ sub (p) approximately equal to 1.635, √ sub(p) approximately equal to 1.533 and √ sub(p) approximately equal to 1.498, and also to P sub(c) approximately equal to 0.382, P sub(c) approximately equal to 0.388 and P sub(c) approximately equal to 0.398, exhibiting in this way the correct (but slow) tendency towards the best up to date values [pt

  17. Fisher's Zeros as the Boundary of Renormalization Group Flows in Complex Coupling Spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denbleyker, A.; Du Daping; Liu Yuzhi; Meurice, Y.; Zou Haiyuan

    2010-01-01

    We propose new methods to extend the renormalization group transformation to complex coupling spaces. We argue that Fisher's zeros are located at the boundary of the complex basin of attraction of infrared fixed points. We support this picture with numerical calculations at finite volume for two-dimensional O(N) models in the large-N limit and the hierarchical Ising model. We present numerical evidence that, as the volume increases, the Fisher's zeros of four-dimensional pure gauge SU(2) lattice gauge theory with a Wilson action stabilize at a distance larger than 0.15 from the real axis in the complex β=4/g 2 plane. We discuss the implications for proofs of confinement and searches for nontrivial infrared fixed points in models beyond the standard model.

  18. Space-group approach to two-electron states in unconventional superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarzhemsky, V. G.

    2008-01-01

    The direct application of the space-group representation theory, makes possible to obtain limitations for the symmetry of SOP on lines and planes of symmetry in one-electron Brillouin zone. In the case of highly symmetric UPt 3 only theoretical nodal structure of IR E 2u is in agreement with all the experimental results. On the other hand, in the case of high-T c superconductors the two electron description of Cooper pairs in D 2h symmetry is not sufficient to describe experimental nodal structure. It was shown that in this case, the nodal structure is the result of underlying interactions between two-electron states and hidden symmetry D-4 h . (author)

  19. Nuclear safety policy working group recommendations on nuclear propulsion safety for the space exploration initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Albert C.; Lee, James H.; Mcculloch, William H.; Sawyer, J. Charles, Jr.; Bari, Robert A.; Cullingford, Hatice S.; Hardy, Alva C.; Niederauer, George F.; Remp, Kerry; Rice, John W.

    1993-01-01

    An interagency Nuclear Safety Working Group (NSPWG) was chartered to recommend nuclear safety policy, requirements, and guidelines for the Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) nuclear propulsion program. These recommendations, which are contained in this report, should facilitate the implementation of mission planning and conceptual design studies. The NSPWG has recommended a top-level policy to provide the guiding principles for the development and implementation of the SEI nuclear propulsion safety program. In addition, the NSPWG has reviewed safety issues for nuclear propulsion and recommended top-level safety requirements and guidelines to address these issues. These recommendations should be useful for the development of the program's top-level requirements for safety functions (referred to as Safety Functional Requirements). The safety requirements and guidelines address the following topics: reactor start-up, inadvertent criticality, radiological release and exposure, disposal, entry, safeguards, risk/reliability, operational safety, ground testing, and other considerations.

  20. Quantum groups, roots of unity and particles on quantized Anti-de Sitter space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinacker, H.

    1997-01-01

    Quantum groups in general and the quantum Anti-de Sitter group U q (so(2,3)) in particular are studied from the point of view of quantum field theory. The author shows that if q is a suitable root of unity, there exist finite-dimensional, unitary representations corresponding to essentially all the classical one-particle representations with (half) integer spin, with the same structure at low energies as in the classical case. In the massless case for spin ≥ 1, open-quotes naiveclose quotes representations are unitarizable only after factoring out a subspace of open-quotes pure gaugesclose quotes, as classically. Unitary many-particle representations are defined, with the correct classical limit. Furthermore, the author identifies a remarkable element Q in the center of U q (g), which plays the role of a BRST operator in the case of U q (so(2,3)) at roots of unity, for any spin ≥ 1. The associated ghosts are an intrinsic part of the indecomposable representations. The author shows how to define an involution on algebras of creation and anihilation operators at roots of unity, in an example corresponding to non-identical particles. It is shown how nonabelian gauge fields appear naturally in this framework, without having to define connections on fiber bundles. Integration on Quantum Euclidean space and sphere and on Anti-de Sitter space is studied as well. The author gives a conjecture how Q can be used in general to analyze the structure of indecomposable representations, and to define a new, completely reducible associative (tensor) product of representations at roots of unity, which generalizes the standard open-quotes truncatedclose quotes tensor product as well as many-particle representations

  1. Quantum groups, roots of unity and particles on quantized Anti-de Sitter space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinacker, Harold [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1997-05-23

    Quantum groups in general and the quantum Anti-de Sitter group Uq(so(2,3)) in particular are studied from the point of view of quantum field theory. The author shows that if q is a suitable root of unity, there exist finite-dimensional, unitary representations corresponding to essentially all the classical one-particle representations with (half) integer spin, with the same structure at low energies as in the classical case. In the massless case for spin ≥ 1, "naive" representations are unitarizable only after factoring out a subspace of "pure gauges", as classically. Unitary many-particle representations are defined, with the correct classical limit. Furthermore, the author identifies a remarkable element Q in the center of Uq(g), which plays the role of a BRST operator in the case of Uq(so(2,3)) at roots of unity, for any spin ≥ 1. The associated ghosts are an intrinsic part of the indecomposable representations. The author shows how to define an involution on algebras of creation and anihilation operators at roots of unity, in an example corresponding to non-identical particles. It is shown how nonabelian gauge fields appear naturally in this framework, without having to define connections on fiber bundles. Integration on Quantum Euclidean space and sphere and on Anti-de Sitter space is studied as well. The author gives a conjecture how Q can be used in general to analyze the structure of indecomposable representations, and to define a new, completely reducible associative (tensor) product of representations at roots of unity, which generalizes the standard "truncated" tensor product as well as many-particle representations.

  2. Holomorphic representation of constant mean curvature surfaces in Minkowski space: Consequences of non-compactness in loop group methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brander, David; Rossman, Wayne; Schmitt, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    We give an infinite dimensional generalized Weierstrass representation for spacelike constant mean curvature (CMC) surfaces in Minkowski 3-space $\\R^{2,1}$. The formulation is analogous to that given by Dorfmeister, Pedit and Wu for CMC surfaces in Euclidean space, replacing the group $SU_2$ with...

  3. Convergent-beam electron diffraction study of incommensurately modulated crystals. Pt. 2. (3 + 1)-dimensional space groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terauchi, Masami; Takahashi, Mariko; Tanaka, Michiyoshi

    1994-01-01

    The convergent-beam electron diffraction (CBED) method for determining three-dimensional space groups is extended to the determination of the (3 + 1)-dimensional space groups for one-dimensional incommensurately modulated crystals. It is clarified than an approximate dynamical extinction line appears in the CBED discs of the reflections caused by an incommensurate modulation. The extinction enables the space-group determination of the (3 + 1)-dimensional crystals or the one-dimensional incommensurately modulated crystals. An example of the dynamical extinction line is shown using an incommensurately modulated crystal of Sr 2 Nb 2 O 7 . Tables of the dynamical extinction lines appearing in CBED patterns are given for all the (3 + 1)-dimensional space groups of the incommensurately modulated crystal. (orig.)

  4. CfDS attends the first meeting of the All-Party Parliamentary Astronomy and Space Environment Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizon, B.

    1999-06-01

    This group first met on March 11th, 1999, as 'a forum for discussion to further parliamentary interest in astronomy and the space environment affecting terrestrial life and its climate; and to increase awareness of the social, political and philosophical implications of present and future space technologies connected with exploring and understanding the cosmos'. CfDS coordinator Bob Mizon attended the first meeting of the group.

  5. Consciousness viewed in the framework of brain phase space dynamics, criticality, and the Renormalization Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, Gerhard

    2013-01-01

    The topic of this paper will be addressed in three stages: I will first review currently prominent theoretical conceptualizations of the neurobiology of consciousness and, where appropriate, identify ill-advised and flawed notions in theoretical neuroscience that may impede viewing consciousness as a phenomenon in the physics of brain. In this context, I will also introduce relevant facts that tend not to receive adequate attention in much of the current consciousness discourse. Next, I will review the evidence that accrued in the last decade that identifies the resting brain as being in a state of criticality. In the framework of state phase dynamics of statistical physics, this observational evidence also entails that the resting brain is poised at the brink of a second order phase transition. On this basis, I will in the third stage propose applying the framework of the Renormalization Group to viewing consciousness as a phenomenon in statistical physics. In physics, concepts of phase space transitions and the Renormalization Group are powerful tools for interpreting phenomena involving many scales of length and time in complex systems. The significance of these concepts lies in their accounting for the emergence of different levels of new collective behaviors in complex systems, each level with its distinct macroscopic physics, organization, and laws, as a new pattern of reality. In this framework, I propose to view subjectivity as the symbolic description of the physical brain state of consciousness that emerges as one of the levels of phase transitions of the brain-body-environment system, along the trajectory of Renormalization Group Transformations

  6. Mathematical aspects of molecular replacement. III. Properties of space groups preferred by proteins in the Protein Data Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirikjian, G; Sajjadi, S; Toptygin, D; Yan, Y

    2015-03-01

    The main goal of molecular replacement in macromolecular crystallography is to find the appropriate rigid-body transformations that situate identical copies of model proteins in the crystallographic unit cell. The search for such transformations can be thought of as taking place in the coset space Γ\\G where Γ is the Sohncke group of the macromolecular crystal and G is the continuous group of rigid-body motions in Euclidean space. This paper, the third in a series, is concerned with viewing nonsymmorphic Γ in a new way. These space groups, rather than symmorphic ones, are the most common ones for protein crystals. Moreover, their properties impact the structure of the space Γ\\G. In particular, nonsymmorphic space groups contain both Bieberbach subgroups and symmorphic subgroups. A number of new theorems focusing on these subgroups are proven, and it is shown that these concepts are related to the preferences that proteins have for crystallizing in different space groups, as observed in the Protein Data Bank.

  7. Determining sociability, social space, and social presence in (A)synchronous collaborative groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreijns, K.; Kirschner, P.A.; Jochems, W.; Buuren, H. van

    2004-01-01

    The effectiveness of group learning in asynchronous distributed learning groups depends on the social interaction that takes place. This social interaction affects both cognitive and socioemotional processes that take place during learning, group forming, establishment of group structures, and group

  8. Determining sociability, social space, and social presence in (a)synchronous collaborating groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreijns, C.J.; Kirschner, P.A.; Jochems, W.M.G.; Buuren, van H.

    2004-01-01

    The effectiveness of group learning in asynchronous distributed learning groups depends on the social interaction that takes place. This social interaction affects both cognitive and socioemotional processes that take place during learning, group forming, establishment of group structures, and group

  9. Hunt for the 11P1 bound state of charmonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, F.C.

    1982-02-01

    Using the Crystal Ball detector at SPEAR, we have looked for evidence of the isospin-violating decay psi' → π 01 P 1 , where 1 P 1 is the predicted spin-singlet p-wave bound state of charmonium. For a 1 P 1 state at the predicted mass (approx. 3520 MeV), we obtain the 95% confidence level limits: BR(psi' → π 01 P 1 ) 01 P 1 )BR( 1 P 1 → γn/sub c/ < 0.14%. These limits are compared with simple theoretical predictions

  10. The bicovariant differential calculus on the κ-Poincare group and on the κ-Minkowski space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosinski, P.; Maslanka, P.; Sobczyk, J.

    1996-01-01

    The bicovariant differential calculus on the four-dimensional κ-Poincare group and the corresponding Lie-algebra-like structure are described. The differential calculus on the n-dimensional κ-Minkowski space covariant under the action of the κ-Poincare group was constructed. 5 refs

  11. Transformation of Air Quality Monitor Data from the International Space Station into Toxicological Effect Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.; Zalesak, Selina M.

    2011-01-01

    The primary reason for monitoring air quality aboard the International Space Station (ISS) is to determine whether air pollutants have collectively reached a concentration where the crew could experience adverse health effects. These effects could be near-real-time (e.g. headache, respiratory irritation) or occur late in the mission or even years later (e.g. cancer, liver toxicity). Secondary purposes for monitoring include discovery that a potentially harmful compound has leaked into the atmosphere or that air revitalization system performance has diminished. Typical ISS atmospheric trace pollutants consist of alcohols, aldehydes, aromatic compounds, halo-carbons, siloxanes, and silanols. Rarely, sulfur-containing compounds and alkanes are found at trace levels. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) have been set in cooperation with a subcommittee of the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology. For each compound and time of exposure, the limiting adverse effect(s) has been identified. By factoring the analytical data from the Air Quality Monitor (AQM), which is in use as a prototype instrument aboard the ISS, through the array of compounds and SMACs, the risk of 16 specific adverse effects can be estimated. Within each adverse-effect group, we have used an additive model proportioned to each applicable 180-day SMAC to estimate risk. In the recent past this conversion has been performed using archival data, which can be delayed for months after an air sample is taken because it must be returned to earth for analysis. But with the AQM gathering in situ data each week, NASA is in a position to follow toxic-effect groups and correlate these with any reported crew symptoms. The AQM data are supplemented with data from real-time CO2 instruments aboard the ISS and from archival measurements of formaldehyde, which the AQM cannot detect.

  12. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE SNAPSHOT SEARCH FOR PLANETARY NEBULAE IN GLOBULAR CLUSTERS OF THE LOCAL GROUP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bond, Howard E., E-mail: heb11@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Single stars in ancient globular clusters (GCs) are believed incapable of producing planetary nebulae (PNs), because their post-asymptotic-giant-branch evolutionary timescales are slower than the dissipation timescales for PNs. Nevertheless, four PNs are known in Galactic GCs. Their existence likely requires more exotic evolutionary channels, including stellar mergers and common-envelope binary interactions. I carried out a snapshot imaging search with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) for PNs in bright Local Group GCs outside the Milky Way. I used a filter covering the 5007 Å nebular emission line of [O iii], and another one in the nearby continuum, to image 66 GCs. Inclusion of archival HST frames brought the total number of extragalactic GCs imaged at 5007 Å to 75, whose total luminosity slightly exceeds that of the entire Galactic GC system. I found no convincing PNs in these clusters, aside from one PN in a young M31 cluster misclassified as a GC, and two PNs at such large angular separations from an M31 GC that membership is doubtful. In a ground-based spectroscopic survey of 274 old GCs in M31, Jacoby et al. found three candidate PNs. My HST images of one of them suggest that the [O iii] emission actually arises from ambient interstellar medium rather than a PN; for the other two candidates, there are broadband archival UV HST images that show bright, blue point sources that are probably the PNs. In a literature search, I also identified five further PN candidates lying near old GCs in M31, for which follow-up observations are necessary to confirm their membership. The rates of incidence of PNs are similar, and small but nonzero, throughout the GCs of the Local Group.

  13. Effects of incentives on psychosocial performances in simulated space-dwelling groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hienz, Robert D.; Brady, Joseph V.; Hursh, Steven R.; Gasior, Eric D.; Spence, Kevin R.; Emurian, Henry H.

    Prior research with individually isolated 3-person crews in a distributed, interactive, planetary exploration simulation examined the effects of communication constraints and crew configuration changes on crew performance and psychosocial self-report measures. The present report extends these findings to a model of performance maintenance that operationalizes conditions under which disruptive affective responses by crew participants might be anticipated to emerge. Experiments evaluated the effects of changes in incentive conditions on crew performance and self-report measures in simulated space-dwelling groups. Crews participated in a simulated planetary exploration mission that required identification, collection, and analysis of geologic samples. Results showed that crew performance effectiveness was unaffected by either positive or negative incentive conditions, while self-report measures were differentially affected—negative incentive conditions produced pronounced increases in negative self-report ratings and decreases in positive self-report ratings, while positive incentive conditions produced increased positive self-report ratings only. Thus, incentive conditions associated with simulated spaceflight missions can significantly affect psychosocial adaptation without compromising task performance effectiveness in trained and experienced crews.

  14. A generalized Wigner function on the space of irreducible representations of the Weyl-Heisenberg group and its transformation properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibort, A; Man'ko, V I; Marmo, G; Simoni, A; Ventriglia, F

    2009-01-01

    A natural extension of the Wigner function to the space of irreducible unitary representations of the Weyl-Heisenberg group is discussed. The action of the automorphisms group of the Weyl-Heisenberg group onto Wigner functions and their generalizations and onto symplectic tomograms is elucidated. Some examples of physical systems are considered to illustrate some aspects of the characterization of the Wigner functions as solutions of differential equations

  15. Extreme covariant quantum observables in the case of an Abelian symmetry group and a transitive value space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haapasalo, Erkka Theodor; Pellonpaeae, Juha-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    We represent quantum observables as normalized positive operator valued measures and consider convex sets of observables which are covariant with respect to a unitary representation of a locally compact Abelian symmetry group G. The value space of such observables is a transitive G-space. We characterize the extreme points of covariant observables and also determine the covariant extreme points of the larger set of all quantum observables. The results are applied to position, position difference, and time observables.

  16. Responding to the Concerns of Student Cultural Groups: Redesigning Spaces for Cultural Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Anise Mazone; Higbee, Jeanne L.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the engagement of a student committee in redesigning an entire floor of a university union to accommodate student cultural centers and provide space in a fair and equitable manner. The reorganization focused on the process as well as the task of allocating space, with an emphasis on the opportunity to foster the development of…

  17. Group vector space method for estimating enthalpy of vaporization of organic compounds at the normal boiling point.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenying, Wei; Jinyu, Han; Wen, Xu

    2004-01-01

    The specific position of a group in the molecule has been considered, and a group vector space method for estimating enthalpy of vaporization at the normal boiling point of organic compounds has been developed. Expression for enthalpy of vaporization Delta(vap)H(T(b)) has been established and numerical values of relative group parameters obtained. The average percent deviation of estimation of Delta(vap)H(T(b)) is 1.16, which show that the present method demonstrates significant improvement in applicability to predict the enthalpy of vaporization at the normal boiling point, compared the conventional group methods.

  18. The cohomology of orbit spaces of certain free circle group actions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Suppose that G = S1 acts freely on a finitistic space X whose (mod p) cohomology ring is isomorphic to that of a lens space L2m−1(p;q1,...,qm) or S1 ×. CPm−1. The mod p index of the action is defined to be the largest integer n such that αn = 0, where α ϵ H2(X/G; Zp) is the nonzero characteristic class of the S1-.

  19. Biochemical and immunological characterization of recombinant allergen Lol p 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, E; Faccini, S; Lidholm, J; Svensson, M; Brandazza, A; Longhi, R; Groenlund, H; Sidoli, A; Arosio, P

    1997-11-01

    Pollen from perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne), a major cause of type-I allergy worldwide, contains a complex mixture of allergenic proteins among which Lol p 1 is one of the most important. We describe the expression, purification and characterization of a recombinant Lol p 1 overproduced in Escherichia coli. The recombinant allergen, expressed in high yields and purified in milligram amounts, bound to specific IgE antibodies from human sera, induced histamine release from sensitized human basophils, and elicited rabbit antisera that recognize specifically recombinant Lol p 1 and natural Lol p 1 of pollen extract. Recombinant Lol p 1 was used to develop ImmunoCAP assays for analysis of 150 sera that were Radioallergosorbent test positive to L. perenne pollen. In 130 of them (87%) the assay detected a significant level of IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, reaching on average 37% of the level obtained with a test for IgE to the whole grass pollen extract. To map epitopes on Lol p 1, we produced three deletion mutants [des-(116-240)-Lol p 1, des-(1-88)-Lol p 1 and des-(133-189)-Lol p 1], which were efficiently expressed in bacteria. These all showed a strong reactivity with the specific rabbit IgG antibodies, but lacked most or all the allergenic properties of recombinant Lol p 1. A study of the antigenic structure of Lol p 1 was performed using the three deletion mutants and a set of 17-18-residue overlapping synthetic peptides covering the whole allergen sequence. The results indicate that human IgE and rabbit IgG antibodies bind to distinct regions of Lol p 1, and that at least some important IgE epitopes are mainly conformational. The findings suggest that recombinant allergens constitute useful reagents for further development of serological diagnosis of allergy, and that it should be possible to produce immunogenic fragments of allergenic proteins without allergenic properties.

  20. Determining sociability, social space, and social presence in (A)synchronous collaborative groups

    OpenAIRE

    Kreijns, K.; Kirschner, P.A.; Jochems, W.; Buuren, H. van

    2004-01-01

    The effectiveness of group learning in asynchronous distributed learning groups depends on the social interaction that takes place. This social interaction affects both cognitive and socioemotional processes that take place during learning, group forming, establishment of group structures, and group dynamics. Though now known to be important, this aspect is often ignored, denied or forgotten by educators and researchers who tend to concentrate on cognitive processes and on-task contexts. This...

  1. El Naschie's Cantorian space-time and general relativity by means of Barbilian's group. A Cantorian fractal axiomatic model of space-time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gottlieb, I.; Agop, M.; Jarcau, M.

    2004-01-01

    One builds the vacuum metrics of the stationary electromagnetic field through the complex potential model. There are thus emphasized both a variational principle, independent on the Ricci tensor, and some internal symmetries of the vacuum solutions. One shows that similar results may be obtained using the Barbiliant's group. By analytical continuation of a Barbilian transformation the link between the fixed points of the modular groups of the vacuum and the golden mean PHI=(1/(1+PHI))=(√5-1)/2 of ε (∞) space-time is established. Finally, a Cantorian fractal axiomatic model of the space-time is presented. The model is explained using a set of coupled equations which may describe the self organizing processes at the solid-liquid, plasma-plasma, and superconductor-superconductor interfaces

  2. Canonical Groups for Quantization on the Two-Dimensional Sphere and One-Dimensional Complex Projective Space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumadi A H A; H, Zainuddin

    2014-01-01

    Using Isham's group-theoretic quantization scheme, we construct the canonical groups of the systems on the two-dimensional sphere and one-dimensional complex projective space, which are homeomorphic. In the first case, we take SO(3) as the natural canonical Lie group of rotations of the two-sphere and find all the possible Hamiltonian vector fields, and followed by verifying the commutator and Poisson bracket algebra correspondences with the Lie algebra of the group. In the second case, the same technique is resumed to define the Lie group, in this case SU (2), of CP'.We show that one can simply use a coordinate transformation from S 2 to CP 1 to obtain all the Hamiltonian vector fields of CP 1 . We explicitly show that the Lie algebra structures of both canonical groups are locally homomorphic. On the other hand, globally their corresponding canonical groups are acting on different geometries, the latter of which is almost complex. Thus the canonical group for CP 1 is the double-covering group of SO(3), namely SU(2). The relevance of the proposed formalism is to understand the idea of CP 1 as a space of where the qubit lives which is known as a Bloch sphere

  3. Compactness of the automorphism group of a topological parallelism on real projective 3-space: The disconnected case

    OpenAIRE

    Rainer, Löwen

    2017-01-01

    We prove that the automorphism group of a topological parallelism on real projective 3-space is compact. In a preceding article it was proved that at least the connected component of the identity is compact. The present proof does not depend on that earlier result.

  4. Cubic scattering amplitudes for all massless representations of the Poincare group in any space-time dimension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fradkin, E.S.; Metsaev, R.R.

    1996-02-01

    Using the language of highest weight representations and the light cone formalism we construct a full list of cubic amplitudes of scattering for all bosonic massless representations of the Poincare group in any even space-time dimension. (author). 29 refs

  5. Immunological and biological properties of recombinant Lol p 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutin, Y; Lamontagne, P; Boulanger, J; Brunet, C; Hébert, J

    1997-03-01

    Current forms of allergy diagnosis and therapies are based on the use of natural allergenic extracts. Despite strong evidence that higher therapeutic efficacy may be achieved with purified allergens, the purification of multiple allergic components from extracts is a fastidious and sometimes an impossible task. However, the use of recombinant allergens may be an alternative to overcome this problem. In this study, we compared the immunological properties of recombinant (r) Lol p 1 with those of the natural protein. We cloned directly the gene encoding Lol p 1 from genomic DNA of ryegrass pollen. This gene was subcloned into the expression vector pMAL-c and expressed as fusion protein. Subsequently, rLol p 1 was cleaved from maltose-binding protein using factor Xa. Using binding inhibition and proliferative assays, we assessed the immunological properties of the recombinant allergens. The capacity of rLol p 1 to trigger basophil histamine release and to elicit a skin reaction was also assessed and compared to those of its natural counterpart. We found that the Lol p 1 gene has no introns since we amplified this gene directly from genomic DNA. We demonstrated that the binding sites of anti-Lol p 1 monoclonal antibody, specific human IgG and IgE antibody are well conserved on rLol p 1 as no difference in the binding inhibition profile was observed when using either natural or recombinant protein. At the T-cell level, rLol p 1 elicited a T-cell response in mice comparable to that observed with the natural protein. In addition, we demonstrated that the biological characteristics of rLol p 1 were comparable to those of the natural counterpart, in that rLol p 1 elicited a skin wheal reaction and induced basophil histamine release in grass-allergic patients only. The data indicate that natural Lol p 1 and rLol p 1 shared identical immunological and biological properties.

  6. Evaluating a Safe Space Training for School Counselors and Trainees Using a Randomized Control Group Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, Rebekah; Hays, Danica G.

    2014-01-01

    School counselors need to advocate and act as an ally for all students. Safe Space, a training designed to facilitate competency for working with and serving LGBTQ youth (i.e., LGBTQ competency), has received increased attention in the field of school counseling. However, limited empirical support exists for training interventions such as Safe…

  7. Space, time and group identity in Jubilees 8-9 | Venter | HTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jubilees 8-9 is a rewriting of Genesis 10. It changed a depiction of Israel's identity in genealogical terms into one using spatial terms. This ideological construct was based on a Noah tradition and on Biblical texts describing the ideal borders of the land allotted to. Israel. Using a triad of space, time and identity the author of ...

  8. Group Dynamics as a Critical Component of Successful Space Exploration: Conceptual Theory and Insights from the Biosphere 2 Closure Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Allen, John P.

    As space exploration and eventually habitation achieves longer durations, successfully managing group dynamics of small, physically isolated groups will become vital. The paper summarizes important underlying research and conceptual theory and how these manifested in a well-documented example: the closure experiments of Biosphere 2. Key research breakthroughs in discerning the operation of small human groups comes from the pioneering work of W.R. Bion. He discovered two competing modalities of behavior. The first is the “task-oriented” or work group governed by shared acceptance of goals, reality-thinking in relation to time, resources and rational, and intelligent management of challenges presented. The opposing, usually unconscious, modality is what Bion called the “basic-assumption” group and alternates between three “group animal” groups: dependency/kill the leader; fight/flight and pairing. If not dealt with, these dynamics work to undermine and defeat the conscious task group’s goal achievement. The paper discusses crew training and selection, various approaches to structuring the work and hierarchy of the group, the importance of contact with a larger population through electronic communication and dealing with the “us-them” syndrome frequently observed between crew and Mission Control. The experience of the first two year closure of Biosphere 2 is drawn on in new ways to illustrate vicissitudes and management of group dynamics especially as both the inside team of biospherians and key members of Mission Control had training in working with group dynamics. Insights from that experience may help mission planning so that future groups in space cope successfully with inherent group dynamics challenges that arise.

  9. A summary of activities of the US/Soviet-Russian joint working group on space biology and medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doarn, Charles R.; Nicogossian, Arnauld E.; Grigoriev, Anatoly I.; Tverskaya, Galina; Orlov, Oleg I.; Ilyin, Eugene A.; Souza, Kenneth A.

    2010-10-01

    The very foundation of cooperation between the United States (US) and Russia (former Soviet Union) in space exploration is a direct result of the mutual desire for scientific understanding and the creation of a collaborative mechanism—the Joint Working Group (JWG) on Space Biology and Medicine. From the dawn of the space age, it has been the quest of humankind to understand its place in the universe. While nations can and do solve problems independently, it takes nations, working together, to accomplish great things. The formation of the JWG provided an opportunity for the opening of a series of productive relationships between the superpowers, the US and the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR); and served as a justification for continued relationship for medical assistance in spaceflight, and to showcase Earth benefits from space medicine research. This relationship has been played out on an international scale with the construction and operation of the International Space Station. The fundamental reason for this successful endeavor is a direct result of the spirit and perseverance of the men and women who have worked diligently side-by-side to promote science and move our understanding of space forward. This manuscript provides a historical perspective of the JWG; how it came about; its evolution; what it accomplished; and what impact it has had and continues to have in the 21st century with regard to human spaceflight and space life sciences research. It captures the spirit of this group, which has been in continuous existence for over 40 years, and provides a never before reported summary of its activities.

  10. Group dynamics in a long-term blind endeavor on Earth: An analog for space missions (Lewis & Clark Expedition group dynamic analysis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allner, M.; Rygalov, V.

    2008-12-01

    suggested distinguishable mission phase model, the Lewis and Clark Expedition will be analyzed for similarities to these space findings. Factors of consideration in support of this analysis involve an understanding of the leadership qualities of Lewis and Clark (and relations established and maintained with one another), the selection and diversity of their crew, and the group dynamics that were developed and maintained so carefully during the expedition. With this knowledge and understanding one can gain enormous insights useful in the planning and preparation for future long-duration space exploratory missions with high level of autonomy, mobility, minimal primary life support supply and high dependence on material re-circulation and In-Situ Resource Utilization approach.

  11. Kinematic algebras, groups for elementary particles, and the geometry of momentum space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izmest'ev, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that to each n-dimensional (n≥2) homogeneous isotropic Riemannian momentum (coordinate) space there corresponds a definite kinematic local algebra of operators N/sub a/, M/sub a//sub b/, P/sub a//sub ,/ ω(a,b = 1,2,...,n). In the three-dimensional case this gives the possibility of classifying particles in accordance with the algebras of the types of momentum space. The approach developed also makes it possible to obtain generalized equations describing particles of the different types. The operators under consideration satisfy not only the relevant algebra but also relations independent of the algebra that coincide in form with the Maxwell equations

  12. Grouping horses according to gender-Effects on aggression, spacing and injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meisfjord Jørgensen, Grete Helen; Borsheim, Linn; Mejdell, Cecilie Marie

    2009-01-01

    Many horse owners tend to group horses according to gender, in an attempt to reduce aggressive interactions and the risk of injuries. The aim of our experiment was to test the effects of such gender separation on injuries, social interactions and individual distance in domestic horses. A total...... of 66 horses were recruited from 4 different farms in Norway and Denmark and divided into six batches. Within each batch, horses were allotted into one mare group, one gelding group and one mixed gender group, with most groups consisting of three or four animals. After 4-6 weeks of acclimatisation......, a trained observer recorded all social interactions using direct, continuous observation 1 h in the morning and 1 h in the afternoon for three consecutive days. Recordings of the nearest neighbour of each horse were performed using instantaneous sampling every 10 min. The horses were inspected for injuries...

  13. Distributed Model Predictive Control over Multiple Groups of Vehicles in Highway Intelligent Space for Large Scale System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the three time warning distances for solving the large scale system of multiple groups of vehicles safety driving characteristics towards highway tunnel environment based on distributed model prediction control approach. Generally speaking, the system includes two parts. First, multiple vehicles are divided into multiple groups. Meanwhile, the distributed model predictive control approach is proposed to calculate the information framework of each group. Each group of optimization performance considers the local optimization and the neighboring subgroup of optimization characteristics, which could ensure the global optimization performance. Second, the three time warning distances are studied based on the basic principles used for highway intelligent space (HIS and the information framework concept is proposed according to the multiple groups of vehicles. The math model is built to avoid the chain avoidance of vehicles. The results demonstrate that the proposed highway intelligent space method could effectively ensure driving safety of multiple groups of vehicles under the environment of fog, rain, or snow.

  14. Innovation in the teaching of astrophysics and space science - spacecraft design group study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castelli, C

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes how the design of a scientific satellite can be used to provide both a stimulating and effective subject for a physics based group study. The group study divides the satellite into distinct subsystems and small teams of two or three students carry out the detailed design of each subsystem. The aim is to produce a complete satellite system design along with the choice of launch vehicle, orbit and communications system so that all the mission requirements can be met. An important feature of the group study is that it is a student led activity with staff acting as mentors. The development of key skills and important learning outcomes from the group study is discussed along with the method for assessment, structuring and resourcing the study

  15. Group Analysis in FieldTrip of Time-Frequency Responses: A Pipeline for Reproducibility at Every Step of Processing, Going From Individual Sensor Space Representations to an Across-Group Source Space Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau M. Andersen

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available An important aim of an analysis pipeline for magnetoencephalographic (MEG data is that it allows for the researcher spending maximal effort on making the statistical comparisons that will answer his or her questions. The example question being answered here is whether the so-called beta rebound differs between novel and repeated stimulations. Two analyses are presented: going from individual sensor space representations to, respectively, an across-group sensor space representation and an across-group source space representation. The data analyzed are neural responses to tactile stimulations of the right index finger in a group of 20 healthy participants acquired from an Elekta Neuromag System. The processing steps covered for the first analysis are MaxFiltering the raw data, defining, preprocessing and epoching the data, cleaning the data, finding and removing independent components related to eye blinks, eye movements and heart beats, calculating participants' individual evoked responses by averaging over epoched data and subsequently removing the average response from single epochs, calculating a time-frequency representation and baselining it with non-stimulation trials and finally calculating a grand average, an across-group sensor space representation. The second analysis starts from the grand average sensor space representation and after identification of the beta rebound the neural origin is imaged using beamformer source reconstruction. This analysis covers reading in co-registered magnetic resonance images, segmenting the data, creating a volume conductor, creating a forward model, cutting out MEG data of interest in the time and frequency domains, getting Fourier transforms and estimating source activity with a beamformer model where power is expressed relative to MEG data measured during periods of non-stimulation. Finally, morphing the source estimates onto a common template and performing group-level statistics on the data are

  16. Two-Dimensional Space-Time Dependent Multi-group Diffusion Equation with SLOR Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yulianti, Y.; Su'ud, Z.; Waris, A.; Khotimah, S. N.

    2010-01-01

    The research of two-dimensional space-time diffusion equations with SLOR (Successive-Line Over Relaxation) has been done. SLOR method is chosen because this method is one of iterative methods that does not required to defined whole element matrix. The research is divided in two cases, homogeneous case and heterogeneous case. Homogeneous case has been inserted by step reactivity. Heterogeneous case has been inserted by step reactivity and ramp reactivity. In general, the results of simulations are agreement, even in some points there are differences.

  17. Mixed-symmetry fields in de Sitter space: a group theoretical glance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basile, Thomas [Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique, Unité Mixte de Recherche 7350 du CNRS,Fédération de Recherche 2964 Denis Poisson, Université François Rabelais,Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Groupe de Mécanique et Gravitation, Service de Physique Théorique et Mathématique,Université de Mons - UMONS,20 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons, Belgique (Belgium); Bekaert, Xavier [Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique, Unité Mixte de Recherche 7350 du CNRS,Fédération de Recherche 2964 Denis Poisson, Université François Rabelais,Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); B.W. Lee Center for Fields, Gravity and Strings, Institute for Basic Science,Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Boulanger, Nicolas [Groupe de Mécanique et Gravitation, Service de Physique Théorique et Mathématique,Université de Mons - UMONS,20 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons, Belgique (Belgium)

    2017-05-15

    We derive the characters of all unitary irreducible representations of the (d+1)-dimensional de Sitter spacetime isometry algebra so(1,d+1), and propose a dictionary between those representations and massive or (partially) massless fields on de Sitter spacetime. We propose a way of taking the flat limit of representations in (anti-) de Sitter spaces in terms of these characters, and conjecture the spectrum resulting from taking the flat limit of mixed-symmetry fields in de Sitter spacetime. We identify the equivalent of the scalar singleton for the de Sitter (dS) spacetime.

  18. Validation of missed space-group symmetry in X-ray powder diffraction structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hempler, Daniela; Schmidt, Martin U; van de Streek, Jacco

    2017-08-01

    More than 600 molecular crystal structures with correct, incorrect and uncertain space-group symmetry were energy-minimized with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D, PBE-D3). For the purpose of determining the correct space-group symmetry the required tolerance on the atomic coordinates of all non-H atoms is established to be 0.2 Å. For 98.5% of 200 molecular crystal structures published with missed symmetry, the correct space group is identified; there are no false positives. Very small, very symmetrical molecules can end up in artificially high space groups upon energy minimization, although this is easily detected through visual inspection. If the space group of a crystal structure determined from powder diffraction data is ambiguous, energy minimization with DFT-D provides a fast and reliable method to select the correct space group.

  19. Comparison of the Cc and R3c space groups for the superlattice phase of Pb(Zr0.52Ti0.48)O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranjan, Rajeev; Singh, Akhilesh Kumar; Ragini; Pandey, Dhananjai

    2005-01-01

    Recent controversy about the space group of the low temperature superlattice phase of Pb(Zr 0.52 Ti 0.48 )O 3 is settled. It is shown that the R3c space group for the superlattice phase cannot correctly account for the peak positions of the superlattice reflections present in the neutron diffraction patterns. The correct space group is reconfirmed to be Cc. A comparison of the atomic coordinates of Cc and Cm space groups is also presented to show that in the absence of superlattice reflections, as is the case with x-ray diffraction data, one would land up in the Cm space group. This superlattice phase is found to coexist with another monoclinic phase of the Cm space group

  20. Adjoint P1 equations solution for neutron slowing down

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da

    2002-01-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. The direct and adjoint neutron fluxes resulting from the solution of P 1 equations were used to three different weighting processes, to obtain the macrogroup macroscopic cross sections. It was found out noticeable differences among them. (author)

  1. Creating social spaces to tackle AIDS-related stigma: reviewing the role of church groups in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, C; Skovdal, M; Gibbs, A

    2011-08-01

    An expanding body of literature explores the role of African church groups in facilitating or hindering the support of people living with AIDS and challenging or contributing to HIV/AIDS-related stigma. Treating church groups as social spaces in which HIV/AIDS-related stigma may potentially be challenged, we systematically review this literature, identifying five themes that highlight the complex and contradictory role of the church as a potential agent of health-enhancing social change. In many ways the church perpetuates HIV/AIDS-related stigma through (i) moralistic attitudes and (ii) its reinforcement of conservative gender ideologies. However some churches have managed move towards action that makes a more positive contribution to HIV/AIDS management through (iii) promoting various forms of social control for HIV prevention, (iv) contributing to the care and support of the AIDS-affected and (v) providing social spaces for challenging stigmatising ideas and practices. We conclude that church groups, including church leadership, can play a key role in facilitating or hindering the creation of supportive social spaces to challenge stigma. Much work remains to be done in developing deeper understandings of the multi-layered factors that enable some churches, but not others, to respond effectively to HIV/AIDS.

  2. Validation of missed space-group symmetry in X-ray powder diffraction structures with dispersion-corrected density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hempler, Daniela; Schmidt, Martin U.; Van De Streek, Jacco

    2017-01-01

    More than 600 molecular crystal structures with correct, incorrect and uncertain space-group symmetry were energy-minimized with dispersion-corrected density functional theory (DFT-D, PBE-D3). For the purpose of determining the correct space-group symmetry the required tolerance on the atomic...... with missed symmetry were investigated by dispersion-corrected density functional theory. In 98.5% of the cases the correct space group is found....

  3. A Topic Space Oriented User Group Discovering Scheme in Social Network: A Trust Chain Based Interest Measuring Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, user group has become an effective platform for information sharing and communicating among users in social network sites. In present work, we propose a single topic user group discovering scheme, which includes three phases: topic impact evaluation, interest degree measurement, and trust chain based discovering, to enable selecting influential topic and discovering users into a topic oriented group. Our main works include (1 an overview of proposed scheme and its related definitions; (2 topic space construction method based on topic relatedness clustering and its impact (influence degree and popularity degree evaluation; (3 a trust chain model to take user relation network topological information into account with a strength classification perspective; (4 an interest degree (user explicit and implicit interest degree evaluation method based on trust chain among users; and (5 a topic space oriented user group discovering method to group core users according to their explicit interest degrees and to predict ordinary users under implicit interest and user trust chain. Finally, experimental results are given to explain effectiveness and feasibility of our scheme.

  4. Social organization and space use of a wild mandrill (Mandrillus sphinx) group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockmeyer, Timo; Kappeler, Peter M; Willaume, Eric; Benoit, Laure; Mboumba, Sylvère; Charpentier, Marie J E

    2015-10-01

    Mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) are enigmatic Old World primates whose social organization and ecology remain poorly known. Previous studies indicated, for example, that groups are composed of only adult females and their young or that several units composed of one adult male and several females make up larger permanent social units. Here, we present the first data on group composition and male ranging patterns from the only habituated wild mandrill group and examine how home range size and daily path length varied with environmental and demographic factors over a 15-month period. Our study site is located in southern Gabon where we followed the group on a daily basis, collecting data on presence, ranging, behavior, and parasite load of its individual members. Throughout the study, the group was made up of about 120 individuals, including several non-natal and natal adult and sub-adult males. One-male units were never observed. The mandrills traveled an estimated 0.44-6.50 km/day in a home range area of 866.7 ha. Exploratory analyses revealed that precipitation, the number of adult males present, and the richness of protozoan parasites were all positively correlated with daily path length. These results clarify the social system of mandrills and provide first insights into the factors that shape their ranging patterns. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Group Analysis in MNE-Python of Evoked Responses from a Tactile Stimulation Paradigm: A Pipeline for Reproducibility at Every Step of Processing, Going from Individual Sensor Space Representations to an across-Group Source Space Representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Lau M

    2018-01-01

    An important aim of an analysis pipeline for magnetoencephalographic data is that it allows for the researcher spending maximal effort on making the statistical comparisons that will answer the questions of the researcher, while in turn spending minimal effort on the intricacies and machinery of the pipeline. I here present a set of functions and scripts that allow for setting up a clear, reproducible structure for separating raw and processed data into folders and files such that minimal effort can be spend on: (1) double-checking that the right input goes into the right functions; (2) making sure that output and intermediate steps can be accessed meaningfully; (3) applying operations efficiently across groups of subjects; (4) re-processing data if changes to any intermediate step are desirable. Applying the scripts requires only general knowledge about the Python language. The data analyses are neural responses to tactile stimulations of the right index finger in a group of 20 healthy participants acquired from an Elekta Neuromag System. Two analyses are presented: going from individual sensor space representations to, respectively, an across-group sensor space representation and an across-group source space representation. The processing steps covered for the first analysis are filtering the raw data, finding events of interest in the data, epoching data, finding and removing independent components related to eye blinks and heart beats, calculating participants' individual evoked responses by averaging over epoched data and calculating a grand average sensor space representation over participants. The second analysis starts from the participants' individual evoked responses and covers: estimating noise covariance, creating a forward model, creating an inverse operator, estimating distributed source activity on the cortical surface using a minimum norm procedure, morphing those estimates onto a common cortical template and calculating the patterns of activity

  6. Group Analysis in MNE-Python of Evoked Responses from a Tactile Stimulation Paradigm: A Pipeline for Reproducibility at Every Step of Processing, Going from Individual Sensor Space Representations to an across-Group Source Space Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lau M. Andersen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An important aim of an analysis pipeline for magnetoencephalographic data is that it allows for the researcher spending maximal effort on making the statistical comparisons that will answer the questions of the researcher, while in turn spending minimal effort on the intricacies and machinery of the pipeline. I here present a set of functions and scripts that allow for setting up a clear, reproducible structure for separating raw and processed data into folders and files such that minimal effort can be spend on: (1 double-checking that the right input goes into the right functions; (2 making sure that output and intermediate steps can be accessed meaningfully; (3 applying operations efficiently across groups of subjects; (4 re-processing data if changes to any intermediate step are desirable. Applying the scripts requires only general knowledge about the Python language. The data analyses are neural responses to tactile stimulations of the right index finger in a group of 20 healthy participants acquired from an Elekta Neuromag System. Two analyses are presented: going from individual sensor space representations to, respectively, an across-group sensor space representation and an across-group source space representation. The processing steps covered for the first analysis are filtering the raw data, finding events of interest in the data, epoching data, finding and removing independent components related to eye blinks and heart beats, calculating participants' individual evoked responses by averaging over epoched data and calculating a grand average sensor space representation over participants. The second analysis starts from the participants' individual evoked responses and covers: estimating noise covariance, creating a forward model, creating an inverse operator, estimating distributed source activity on the cortical surface using a minimum norm procedure, morphing those estimates onto a common cortical template and calculating the patterns

  7. System of adjoint P1 equations for neutron moderation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos

    2000-01-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, this procedure is questioned and the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. (author)

  8. Two-group neutron transport theory in adjacent space with lineary anisotropic scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maiorino, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    A solution method for two-group neutron transport theory with anisotropic scattering is introduced by the combination of case method (expansion method of self singular function) and the invariant imbedding (invariance principle). The numerical results for the Milne problem in light water and borated water is presented to demonstrate the avalibility of the method [pt

  9. Smile attractiveness related to buccal corridor space in 3 different facial types: A perception of 3 ethnic groups of Malaysians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimbalkar, Smita; Oh, Yih Y; Mok, Reei Y; Tioh, Jing Y; Yew, Kai J; Patil, Pravinkumar G

    2018-03-16

    Buccal corridor space and its variations greatly influence smile attractiveness. Facial types are different for different ethnic populations, and so is smile attractiveness. The subjective perception of smile attractiveness of different populations may vary in regard to different buccal corridor spaces and facial patterns. The purpose of this study was to determine esthetic perceptions of the Malaysian population regarding the width of buccal corridor spaces and their effect on smile esthetics in individuals with short, normal, and long faces. The image of a smiling individual with a mesofacial face was modified to create 2 different facial types (brachyfacial and dolicofacial). Each face form was further modified into 5 different buccal corridors (2%, 10%, 15%, 22%, and 28%). The images were submitted to 3 different ethnic groups of evaluators (Chinese, Malay, Indian; 100 each), ranging between 17 and 21 years of age. A visual analog scale (50 mm in length) was used for assessment. The scores given to each image were compared with the Kruskal-Wallis test, and pairwise comparison was performed using the Mann-Whitney U test (α=.05). All 3 groups of evaluators could distinguish gradations of dark spaces in the buccal corridor at 2%, 10%, and 28%. Statistically significant differences were observed among 3 groups of evaluators in esthetic perception when pairwise comparisons were performed. A 15% buccal corridor was found to score esthetically equally within 3 face types by all 3 groups of evaluators. The Indian population was more critical in evaluation than the Chinese or Malay populations. In a pairwise comparison, more significant differences were found between long and short faces and the normal face; the normal face was compared with long and short faces separately. The width of the buccal corridor space influences smile attractiveness in different facial types. A medium buccal corridor (15%) is the esthetic characteristic preferred by all groups of evaluators

  10. Implementation of rigorous renormalization group method for ground space and low-energy states of local Hamiltonians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Brenden; Vidick, Thomas; Motrunich, Olexei I.

    2017-12-01

    The success of polynomial-time tensor network methods for computing ground states of certain quantum local Hamiltonians has recently been given a sound theoretical basis by Arad et al. [Math. Phys. 356, 65 (2017), 10.1007/s00220-017-2973-z]. The convergence proof, however, relies on "rigorous renormalization group" (RRG) techniques which differ fundamentally from existing algorithms. We introduce a practical adaptation of the RRG procedure which, while no longer theoretically guaranteed to converge, finds matrix product state ansatz approximations to the ground spaces and low-lying excited spectra of local Hamiltonians in realistic situations. In contrast to other schemes, RRG does not utilize variational methods on tensor networks. Rather, it operates on subsets of the system Hilbert space by constructing approximations to the global ground space in a treelike manner. We evaluate the algorithm numerically, finding similar performance to density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) in the case of a gapped nondegenerate Hamiltonian. Even in challenging situations of criticality, large ground-state degeneracy, or long-range entanglement, RRG remains able to identify candidate states having large overlap with ground and low-energy eigenstates, outperforming DMRG in some cases.

  11. System of adjoint P1 equations for neutron moderation; Sistema de equacoes P1 adjuntas para a moderacao de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2000-07-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, this procedure is questioned and the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. (author)

  12. Behavioral and biological effects of autonomous versus scheduled mission management in simulated space-dwelling groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma, Peter G.; Hursh, Steven R.; Hienz, Robert D.; Emurian, Henry H.; Gasior, Eric D.; Brinson, Zabecca S.; Brady, Joseph V.

    2011-05-01

    Logistical constraints during long-duration space expeditions will limit the ability of Earth-based mission control personnel to manage their astronaut crews and will thus increase the prevalence of autonomous operations. Despite this inevitability, little research exists regarding crew performance and psychosocial adaptation under such autonomous conditions. To this end, a newly-initiated study on crew management systems was conducted to assess crew performance effectiveness under rigid schedule-based management of crew activities by Mission Control versus more flexible, autonomous management of activities by the crews themselves. Nine volunteers formed three long-term crews and were extensively trained in a simulated planetary geological exploration task over the course of several months. Each crew then embarked on two separate 3-4 h missions in a counterbalanced sequence: Scheduled, in which the crews were directed by Mission Control according to a strict topographic and temporal region-searching sequence, and Autonomous, in which the well-trained crews received equivalent baseline support from Mission Control but were free to explore the planetary surface as they saw fit. Under the autonomous missions, performance in all three crews improved (more high-valued geologic samples were retrieved), subjective self-reports of negative emotional states decreased, unstructured debriefing logs contained fewer references to negative emotions and greater use of socially-referent language, and salivary cortisol output across the missions was attenuated. The present study provides evidence that crew autonomy may improve performance and help sustain if not enhance psychosocial adaptation and biobehavioral health. These controlled experimental data contribute to an emerging empirical database on crew autonomy which the international astronautics community may build upon for future research and ultimately draw upon when designing and managing missions.

  13. Communication constraints, indexical countermeasures, and crew configuration effects in simulated space-dwelling groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hienz, Robert D.; Brady, Joseph V.; Hursh, Steven R.; Banner, Michele J.; Gasior, Eric D.; Spence, Kevin R.

    2007-02-01

    Previous research with groups of individually isolated crews communicating and problem-solving in a distributed interactive simulation environment has shown that the functional interchangeability of available communication channels can serve as an effective countermeasure to communication constraints. The present report extends these findings by investigating crew performance effects and psychosocial adaptation following: (1) the loss of all communication channels, and (2) changes in crew configuration. Three-person crews participated in a simulated planetary exploration mission that required identification, collection, and analysis of geologic samples. Results showed that crews developed and employed discrete navigation system operations that served as functionally effective communication signals (i.e., “indexical” or “deictic” cues) in generating appropriate crewmember responses and maintaining performance effectiveness in the absence of normal communication channels. Additionally, changes in crew configuration impacted both performance effectiveness and psychosocial adaptation.

  14. Truncation of a P1 leader proteinase facilitates potyvirus replication in a non-permissive host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Hongying; Pasin, Fabio; Tzanetakis, Ioannis E; Simón-Mateo, Carmen; García, Juan Antonio; Rodamilans, Bernardo

    2017-11-08

    The Potyviridae family is a major group of plant viruses that includes c. 200 species, most of which have narrow host ranges. The potyvirid P1 leader proteinase self-cleaves from the remainder of the viral polyprotein and shows large sequence variability linked to host adaptation. P1 proteins can be classified as Type A or Type B on the basis, amongst other things, of their dependence or not on a host factor to develop their protease activity. In this work, we studied Type A proteases from the Potyviridae family, characterizing their host factor requirements. Our in vitro cleavage analyses of potyvirid P1 proteases showed that the N-terminal domain is relevant for host factor interaction and suggested that the C-terminal domain is also involved. In the absence of plant factors, the N-terminal end of Plum pox virus P1 antagonizes protease self-processing. We performed extended deletion mutagenesis analysis to define the N-terminal antagonistic domain of P1. In viral infections, removal of the P1 protease antagonistic domain led to a gain-of-function phenotype, strongly increasing local infection in a non-permissive host. Altogether, our results shed new insights into the adaptation and evolution of potyvirids. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  15. Conjugation of nitrated acetaminophen to Der p1 amplifies peripheral blood monocyte response to Der p1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan G Thomas

    Full Text Available An association of acetaminophen use and asthma was observed in the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood study. However there are no clear mechanisms to explain an association between acetaminophen use and immunologic pathology. In acidic conditions like those in the stomach and inflamed airway, tyrosine residues are nitrated by nitrous and peroxynitrous acids. The resulting nitrotyrosine is structurally similar to 2,4-dinitrophenol and 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, known haptens that enhance immune responses by covalently binding proteins. Nitrated acetaminophen shares similar molecular structure.We hypothesized the acetaminophen phenol ring undergoes nitration under acidic conditions, producing 3-nitro-acetaminophen which augments allergic responses by acting as a hapten for environmental allergens.3-nitro-acetaminophen was formed from acetaminophen in the presence of acidified nitrite, purified by high performance liquid chromatography, and assayed by gas-chromatography mass spectrometry. Purified 3-nitro-acetaminophen was reacted with Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Der p1 and analyzed by mass spectrometry to identify the modification site. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation response was measured in response to 3-nitro-acetaminophen and to 3-nitro-acetaminophen-modified Der p1.Acetaminophen was modified by nitrous acid forming 3-nitro-acetaminophen over a range of different acidic conditions consistent with airway inflammation and stomach acidity. The Der p1 protein-hapten adduct creation was confirmed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry proteomics modifying cysteine 132. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to 3-nitro-acetaminophen-modified Der p1 had increased proliferation and cytokine production compared to acetaminophen and Der p1 alone (n = 7; p < 0.05.These data suggests 3-nitro-acetaminophen formation and reaction with Der p1 provides a mechanism by which stomach acid or infection

  16. Between-group behaviour in health care: gaps, edges, boundaries, disconnections, weak ties, spaces and holes. A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braithwaite Jeffrey

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gaps are typically regarded as a problem to be solved. People are stimulated to close or plug them. Researchers are moved to fill deficits in the literature in order to realise a more complete knowledge base, health authorities want to bridge policy-practice disconnections, managers to secure resources to remedy shortfalls between poor and idealised care, and clinicians to provide services to patients across the divides of organisational silos. Despite practical and policy work in many health systems to bridge gaps, it is valuable to study research examining them for the insights provided. Structural holes, spaces between social clusters and weak or absent ties represent fissures in networks, located in less densely populated parts of otherwise closely connected social structures. Such gaps are useful as they illustrate how communication potentially breaks down or interactivity fails. This paper discusses empirical and theoretical work on this phenomenon with the aim of analysing a specific exemplar, the structures of silos within health care organisations. Methods The research literature on social spaces, holes, gaps, boundaries and edges was searched systematically, and separated into health [n = 13] and non-health [n = 55] samples. The health literature was reviewed and synthesised in order to understand the circumstances between stakeholders and stakeholder groups that both provide threats to networked interactions and opportunities to strengthen the fabric of organisational and institutional inter-relationships. Results The research examples illuminate various network structure characteristics and group interactions. They explicate a range of opportunities for improved social and professional relations that understanding structural holes, social spaces and absent ties affords. A principal finding is that these kinds of gaps illustrate the conditions under which connections are strained or have been severed, where the

  17. Comparative analysis between P1 and B1 equations for neutron moderation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos

    2000-01-01

    In order to calculate the neutron flux in nuclear reactors, B1 or P1 equations are solved by numerical methods for several groups of energy. The neutron fluxes obtained from the solutions of the B1 and P1 equations are similar when they are applied to large nuclear power reactors. However, an important difference between the two fluxes is that the system of P1 equations uses one more approximation than the B1 system and then, its flux is less precise. The present work shows the relations between both equations and analyzes for what conditions the two equations systems are equivalent. Furthermore, this equations are numerically solved in 54 groups of energy for a quadrangular arrange. (author)

  18. Group theoretical approach to quantum fields in de Sitter space II. The complementary and discrete series

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joung, Euihun; Mourad, Jihad; Parentani, Renaud

    2007-01-01

    We use an algebraic approach based on representations of de Sitter group to construct covariant quantum fields in arbitrary dimensions. We study the complementary and the discrete series which correspond to light and massless fields and which lead new feature with respect to the massive principal series we previously studied (hep-th/0606119). When considering the complementary series, we make use of a non-trivial scalar product in order to get local expressions in the position representation. Based on these, we construct a family of covariant canonical fields parametrized by SU(1, 1)/U(1). Each of these correspond to the dS invariant alpha-vacua. The behavior of the modes at asymptotic times brings another difficulty as it is incompatible with the usual definition of the in and out vacua. We propose a generalized notion of these vacua which reduces to the usual conformal vacuum in the conformally massless limit. When considering the massless discrete series we find that no covariant field obeys the canonical commutation relations. To further analyze this singular case, we consider the massless limit of the complementary scalar fields we previously found. We obtain canonical fields with a deformed representation by zero modes. The zero modes have a dS invariant vacuum with singular norm. We propose a regularization by a compactification of the scalar field and a dS invariant definition of the vertex operators. The resulting two-point functions are dS invariant and have a universal logarithmic infrared divergence

  19. From condensed matter to Higgs physics. Solving functional renormalization group equations globally in field space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borchardt, Julia

    2017-02-07

    By means of the functional renormalization group (FRG), systems can be described in a nonperturbative way. The derived flow equations are solved via pseudo-spectral methods. As they allow to resolve the full field dependence of the effective potential and provide highly accurate results, these numerical methods are very powerful but have hardly been used in the FRG context. We show their benefits using several examples. Moreover, we apply the pseudo-spectral methods to explore the phase diagram of a bosonic model with two coupled order parameters and to clarify the nature of a possible metastability of the Higgs-Yukawa potential.In the phase diagram of systems with two competing order parameters, fixed points govern multicritical behavior. Such systems are often discussed in the context of condensed matter. Considering the phase diagram of the bosonic model between two and three dimensions, we discover additional fixed points besides the well-known ones from studies in three dimensions. Interestingly, our findings suggest that in certain regions of the phase diagram, two universality classes coexist. To our knowledge, this is the first bosonic model where coexisting (multi-)criticalities are found. Also, the absence of nontrivial fixed points can have a physical meaning, such as in the electroweak sector of the standard model which suffers from the triviality problem. The electroweak transition giving rise to the Higgs mechanism is dominated by the Gaussian fixed point. Due to the low Higgs mass, perturbative calculations suggest a metastable potential. However, the existence of the lower Higgs-mass bound eventually is interrelated with the maximal ultraviolet extension of the standard model. A relaxation of the lower bound would mean that the standard model may be still valid to even higher scales. Within a simple Higgs-Yukawa model, we discuss the origin of metastabilities and mechanisms, which relax the Higgs-mass bound, including higher field operators.

  20. Potential relationships between morphological differentiation and mutants with high nuclease P1 production of Penicillium citrinum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xinle, Liang; Qian, Shou; Hong, Zhang; Min, Chen [Department of Biotechnology, Zhejiang Gongshang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang (China); Xuan, Liu [Beihai Institute of Environmental Science, Beihai, Guangxi (China)

    2009-08-15

    Diversification of colony characteristics of mutants derived from Penicillium citrinum CICC 4011 treated with {sup 60}Co {gamma}-irradiation and protoplast fusion were analyzed. There were distinct differences among mutants with different nuclease P1 activity, especially in pigment productivity. Color of colony was changed from the original green to white, grey-green, or yellow-green etc., while the nuclease P1 activity would be fluctuated with the color change. The hypothesis was suggested that there would be a relationship between pigments and nuclease P1 production. Mutants with grey-green colony would give out high nuclease P1 outputs in a high probability such as mutant J1Y6 (nuclease P1 activity, 167.3U/ml) and fusant F-13 (nuclease P1 activity, 568.7U/ml), while others with deep-green colony observed low nuclease outputs. Four variation strains didn't show any significant difference in growth rate. Broom branches of conidiophore stem in J1Y6 and F-13 were obviously reduced, conidiophores productivity reduced, but hyphae growth haled. These suggested that nuclease P1 production was associated with growth phase, but pigment synthesis course wasn't. RAPD from 6 randomly selected primers was used to analyze the polymorphic rich of the four strains, the results showed that there were 70 percent polymorphism detection rate among those. UPGMA cluster analysis and genetic map constructed by NTSYS-PC software, which showed that J1Y6 and F-14 were clustered as one group at similar coefficient 0.9, where there was an appear distance from the group of 4011 and F-R-33 strains (similar coefficient 0.8). (authors)

  1. Potential relationships between morphological differentiation and mutants with high nuclease P1 production of Penicillium citrinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xinle; Shou Qian; Zhang Hong; Chen Min; Liu Xuan

    2009-01-01

    Diversification of colony characteristics of mutants derived from Penicillium citrinum CICC 4011 treated with 60 Co γ-irradiation and protoplast fusion were analyzed. There were distinct differences among mutants with different nuclease P1 activity, especially in pigment productivity. Color of colony was changed from the original green to white, grey-green, or yellow-green etc., while the nuclease P1 activity would be fluctuated with the color change. The hypothesis was suggested that there would be a relationship between pigments and nuclease P1 production. Mutants with grey-green colony would give out high nuclease P1 outputs in a high probability such as mutant J1Y6( nuclease P1 activity, 167.3U/ml) and fusant F-13 (nuclease P1 activity, 568.7U/ml), while others with deep-green colony observed low nuclease outputs. Four variation strains didn't show any significant difference in growth rate. Broom branches of conidiophore stem in J1Y6 and F-13 were obviously reduced, conidiophores productivity reduced, but hyphae growth haled. These suggested that nuclease P1 production was associated with growth phase, but pigment synthesis course wasn't. RAPD from 6 randomly selected primers was used to analyze the polymorphic rich of the four strains, the results showed that there were 70 percent polymorphism detection rate among those. UPGMA cluster analysis and genetic map constructed by NTSYS-PC software, which showed that J1Y6 and F-14 were clustered as one group at similar coefficient 0.9, where there was an appear distance from the group of 4011 and F-R-33 strains (similar coefficient 0.8). (authors)

  2. Creating space for citizenship: The impact of group structure on validating the voices of people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Elaine C; O'Connor, Deborah L; Loiselle, Lisa; Hickman, Kathy; Heibein, Bill; Hounam, Brenda; Mann, Jim

    2016-05-01

    Recently, there has been increasing attention given to finding ways to help people diagnosed with dementia 'live well' with their condition. Frequently however, the attention has been placed on the family care partner as the foundation for creating a context that supports the person with dementia to live well. A recent participatory action research (PAR) study highlighted the importance of beginning to challenge some of the assumptions around how best to include family, especially within a context of supporting citizenship. Three advisory groups consisting of 20 people with dementia, 13 care partners, and three service providers, were set up in three locations across Canada to help develop a self-management program for people with dementia. The hubs met monthly for up to two years. One of the topics that emerged as extremely important to consider in the structuring of the program revolved around whether or not these groups should be segregated to include only people with dementia. A thematic analysis of these ongoing discussions coalesced around four inter-related themes: creating safe spaces; maintaining voice and being heard; managing the balancing act; and the importance of solidarity Underpinning these discussions was the fifth theme, recognition that 'one size doesn't fit all'. Overall an important finding was that the presence of family care-partners could have unintended consequences in relation to creating the space for active citizenship to occur in small groups of people with dementia although it could also offer some opportunities. The involvement of care partners in groups with people with dementia is clearly one that is complex without an obvious answer and dependent on a variety of factors to inform a solution, which can and should be questioned and revisited. © The Author(s) 2016.

  3. Adjoint P1 equations solution for neutron slowing down; Solucao das equacoes P1 adjuntas para moderacao de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos; Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2002-07-01

    In some applications of perturbation theory, it is necessary know the adjoint neutron flux, which is obtained by the solution of adjoint neutron diffusion equation. However, the multigroup constants used for this are weighted in only the direct neutron flux, from the solution of direct P1 equations. In this work, the adjoint P1 equations are derived by the neutron transport equation, the reversion operators rules and analogies between direct and adjoint parameters. The direct and adjoint neutron fluxes resulting from the solution of P{sub 1} equations were used to three different weighting processes, to obtain the macrogroup macroscopic cross sections. It was found out noticeable differences among them. (author)

  4. Increasing synthetic serum substitute (SSS) concentrations in P1 glucose/phosphate-free medium improves implantation rate: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Yosef, D; Yovel, I; Schwartz, T; Azem, F; Lessing, J B; Amit, A

    2001-11-01

    To assess the comparative efficacy of IVF medium (MediCult, with 5.2 mM glucose) and a glucose/phosphate-free medium, P1 (Irvine Scientific), and to investigate the influence of increasing the serum supplementation (synthetic serum substitute; SSS; Irvine Scientific) to P1 on embryo development and implantation. Patients were randomly assigned to IVF medium (Group 1, cycles n = 172) or P1 supplemented with 10% SSS (Group 2, cycles n = 229) according to the medium scheduled for use on the day of oocyte retrieval. Another 555 IVF consequent cycles (Group 3) were performed using increased SSS concentrations (20%) in P1 medium. In this large series of IVF cycles, we herein demonstrate that significantly higher pregnancy and implantation rates were found when embryos were cultured in glucose/phosphate-free medium P1 supplemented with 20% SSS compared to supplementation with the lower SSS concentration and with IVF medium.

  5. The fundamental groupoid of the quotient of a Hausdorff space by a discontinuous action of a discrete group is the orbit groupoid of the induced action

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Ronald; Higgins, Philip J.

    2002-01-01

    The main result is that the fundamental groupoid of the orbit space of a discontinuous action of a discrete group on a Hausdorff space which admits a universal cover is the orbit groupoid of the fundamental groupoid of the space. We also describe work of Higgins and of Taylor which makes this result usable for calculations. As an example, we compute the fundamental group of the symmetric square of a space. The main result, which is related to work of Armstrong, is due to Brown and Higgins in ...

  6. INFLUENCE OF ECOLOGICAL GROUP COMPOSITION, PLANTATION SPACING AND ARRANGEMENT IN THE RESTORATION OF RIPARIAN FOREST ON RESERVOIR SHORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro Augusto Vieira Soares

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to assess the effect of spacing, arrangement and ecological group composition of planted seedlings on the restoration process of artificial reservoir shores in southeastern Brazil. The assessments were performed 12 years after the settlement of the experiment in which five mixed stand models were tested. First, a general evaluation of the stand was performed when we surveyed the overstory and understory, seed bank and soil for chemical analysis.Then, the restoration indicators survival of planted trees, basal area and density of the tree community, litter accumulated on the soil and canopy closure index were utilized to compare the plantation models and to assess the influence the experimental factors on these parameters. In the general analysis, we found that the studied stand presents low diversity, poor regeneration, and seed bank dominated mostly by one planted exotic tree species and weeds, which may jeopardize the self- maintenance of the stand in the future. The factor that most influenced the models was the ecological group composition with the best performance found for models in which both pioneer and non-pioneer groups were used. Probably, the plantation arrangement and spacing did not have greater influence due to both plant mortality and natural regeneration that has developed to this age. Hence, it is not recommended the use of only pioneer species in the implantation of riparian forest and the proportion of 50% pioneers and 50% non-pioneers using as much species as possible is indicated for areas that might present constraints for the natural regeneration.

  7. Magnetocaloric effects in Mn1.35Fe0.65P1−xSix compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Yao-Xiang; Tegus O; Bi Li-Ge

    2012-01-01

    The structural and magnetocaloric properties of Mn 1.35 Fe 0.65 P 1−x Si x compounds are investigated. The Si-substituted compounds, Mn 1.35 Fe 0.65 P 1−x Si x with x = 0.52, 0.54, 0.55, 0.56, and 0.57, are prepared by high-energy ball milling and the solid-state reaction. The X-ray diffraction shows that the compounds crystallize into the Fe 2 P-type hexagonal structure with space group P6-bar2m. The magnetic measurements show that the Curie temperature of the compound increases from 253 K for x = 0.52 to 296 K for x = 0.56. The isothermal magnetic-entropy change of the Mn 1.35 Fe 0.65 P 1−x Si x compound decreases with the Si content increasing. The maximal value of the magnetic-entropy change is about 7.0 J/kg·K in the Mn 1.35 Fe 0.65 P 0.48 Si 0.52 compound with a field change of 1.5 T. The compound quenched in water possesses a larger magnetic entropy change and a smaller thermal hysteresis than the non-quenched samples. The thermal hysteresis of the compound is less than 3.5 K. The maximum adiabatic temperature change is about 1.4 K in the Mn 1.35 Fe 0.65 P 0.45 Si 0.55 compound with a field change of 1.48 T. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  8. Observation of the 1P1 state of charmonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, T.A.; Bettoni, D.; Bharadwaj, V.; Biino, C.; Borreani, G.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Buzzo, A.; Calabrese, R.; Ceccucci, A.; Cester, R.; Church, M.; Dalpiaz, P.; Dalpiaz, P.F.; Dibenedetto, R.; Dimitroyannis, D.; Fabbri, M.G.; Fast, J.; Gianoli, A.; Ginsburg, C.M.; Gollwitzer, K.; Hahn, A.; Hasan, M.; Hsueh, S.; Lewis, R.; Luppi, E.; Macri, M.; Majewska, A.M.; Mandelkern, M.; Marchetto, F.; Marinelli, M.; Marques, J.; Marsh, W.; Martini, M.; Masuzawa, M.; Menichetti, E.; Migliori, A.; Mussa, R.; Palestini, S.; Pallavicini, M.; Pastrone, N.; Patrignani, C.; Peoples, J. Jr.; Pesando, L.; Petrucci, F.; Pia, M.G.; Pordes, S.; Rapidis, P.; Ray, R.; Reid, J.; Rinaudo, G.; Roccuzzo, B.; Rosen, J.; Santroni, A.; Sarmiento, M.; Savrie, M.; Scalisi, A.; Schultz, J.; Seth, K.K.; Smith, A.; Smith, G.A.; Sozzi, M.; Trokenheim, S.; Weber, M.F.; Werkema, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, J.; Zioulas, G.

    1992-01-01

    We have performed a search for the 1 P 1 state of charmonium resonantly formed in bar pp annihilations, close to the center of gravity of the 3 P J states. We report results from the study of the J/ψ+π 0 and J/ψ+2π final states. We have observed a statistically significant enhancement in the bar p+p→J/ψ+π 0 cross section at √s congruent 3526.2 MeV. This enhancement has the characteristics of a narrow resonance of mass, total width, and production cross section consistent with what is expected for the 1 P 1 state. In our search we have found no candidates for the reactions bar p+p→J/ψ+π 0 +π 0 and bar p+p→J/ψ+π + +π -

  9. The P1approximation in the transport of beta rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legarda, F.; Idoeta, R.; Herranz, M.

    1994-01-01

    A validation test for the p1 approximation to the linear transport of electrons in planar geometry has been performed. The p1 approximation is shown to be a good option for the description of the transport of beta rays with endpoint energies between 400kev and 3.5Mev through aluminium foils . This approximation together with the use of only elastic interactions of electrons with atoms has found good agreement with experimental results . A calculation has been made of the fraction of transmitted electrons through foils, solving the transport equation for planar geometry in the p1 approximation and assuming that only elastic scattering processes take place. The boundary condition at the entrance of the foil was a collimated beta source, while at the end of the foil has been adopted a vaccum boundary condition.Sources considered are those for which experimental and calculated spectrum shapes are known to agree. The calculated fractional transmission through different absorber thicknesses is found to have an exponential shape . Besides this fact the attenuation coefficients found ,when compared with those empirically obtained, agree to within 5%. 1 fig.; 4 refs. (author)

  10. The third spatial dimension risk approach for individual risk and group risk in multiple use of space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suddle, Shahid; Ale, Ben

    2005-01-01

    Buildings above roads and railways are examples of multiple use of space. Safety is one of the critical issues for such projects. Risk analyses can be undertaken to investigate what safety measures that are required to realise these projects. The results of these analyses can also be compared to risk acceptance criteria, if they are applicable. In The Netherlands, there are explicit criteria for acceptability of individual risk and societal risk. Traditionally calculations of individual risk result in contours of equal risk on a map and thus are considered in two-dimensional space only. However, when different functions are layered the third spatial dimension, height, becomes an important parameter. The various activities and structures above and below each other impose mutual risks. There are no explicit norms or policies about how to deal with the individual or group risk approach in the third dimension. This paper proposes an approach for these problems and gives some examples. Finally, the third dimension risk approach is applied in a case study of Bos en Lommer, Amsterdam

  11. Renormalization group flows and fixed points for a scalar field in curved space with nonminimal F (ϕ )R coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merzlikin, Boris S.; Shapiro, Ilya L.; Wipf, Andreas; Zanusso, Omar

    2017-12-01

    Using covariant methods, we construct and explore the Wetterich equation for a nonminimal coupling F (ϕ )R of a quantized scalar field to the Ricci scalar of a prescribed curved space. This includes the often considered nonminimal coupling ξ ϕ2R as a special case. We consider the truncations without and with scale- and field-dependent wave-function renormalization in dimensions between four and two. Thereby the main emphasis is on analytic and numerical solutions of the fixed point equations and the behavior in the vicinity of the corresponding fixed points. We determine the nonminimal coupling in the symmetric and spontaneously broken phases with vanishing and nonvanishing average fields, respectively. Using functional perturbative renormalization group methods, we discuss the leading universal contributions to the RG flow below the upper critical dimension d =4 .

  12. Critical Dynamics of the Xy-Model on the One-Dimensional Superlattice by Position Space Renormalization Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, J. P. De; Gonçalves, L. L.

    The critical dynamics of the isotropic XY-model on the one-dimensional superlattice is considered in the framework of the position space renormalization group theory. The decimation transformation is introduced by considering the equations of motion of the operators associated to the excitations of the system, and it corresponds to an extension of the procedure introduced by Stinchcombe and dos Santos (J. Phys. A18, L597 (1985)) for the homogeneous lattice. The dispersion relation is obtained exactly and the static and dynamic scaling forms are explicitly determined. The dynamic critical exponent is also obtained and it is shown that it is identical to the one of the XY-model on the homogeneous chain.

  13. Duality and free measures in vector spaces, the spectral theory of actions of non-locally compact groups

    OpenAIRE

    Vershik, A.

    2017-01-01

    The paper presents a general duality theory for vector measure spaces taking its origin in the author's papers written in the 1960s. The main result establishes a direct correspondence between the geometry of a measure in a vector space and the properties of the space of measurable linear functionals on this space regarded as closed subspaces of an abstract space of measurable functions. An example of useful new features of this theory is the notion of a free measure and its applications.

  14. Plasmid P1 replication: negative control by repeated DNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chattoraj, D; Cordes, K; Abeles, A

    1984-01-01

    The incompatibility locus, incA, of the unit-copy plasmid P1 is contained within a fragment that is essentially a set of nine 19-base-pair repeats. One or more copies of the fragment destabilizes the plasmid when present in trans. Here we show that extra copies of incA interfere with plasmid DNA replication and that a deletion of most of incA increases plasmid copy number. Thus, incA is not essential for replication but is required for its control. When cloned in a high-copy-number vector, pi...

  15. Does the Health Impact of Exposure to Neighbourhood Green Space Differ between Population Groups? An Explorative Study in Four European Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijsbroek, Annemarie; Droomers, Mariël; Kruize, Hanneke; van Kempen, Elise; Gidlow, Christopher J.; Hurst, Gemma; Andrusaityte, Sandra; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J.; Maas, Jolanda; Hardyns, Wim; Stronks, Karien; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2017-01-01

    It has been suggested that certain residents, such as those with a low socioeconomic status, the elderly, and women, may benefit more from the presence of neighbourhood green space than others. We tested this hypothesis for age, gender, educational level, and employment status in four European cities. Data were collected in Barcelona (Spain; n = 1002), Kaunas (Lithuania; n = 989), Doetinchem (The Netherlands; n = 847), and Stoke-on-Trent (UK; n = 933) as part of the EU-funded PHENOTYPE project. Surveys were used to measure mental and general health, individual characteristics, and perceived neighbourhood green space. Additionally, we used audit data about neighbourhood green space. In Barcelona, there were positive associations between neighbourhood green space and general health among low-educated residents. In the other cities and for the other population groups, there was little evidence that the association between health and neighbourhood green space differed between population groups. Overall, our study does not support the assumption that the elderly, women, and residents who are not employed full-time benefit more from neighbourhood green space than others. Only in the highly urbanised city of Barcelona did the low-educated group benefit from neighbourhood green spaces. Perhaps neighbourhood green spaces are more important for the health of low-educated residents in particularly highly urbanised areas. PMID:28594390

  16. Does the Health Impact of Exposure to Neighbourhood Green Space Differ between Population Groups? An Explorative Study in Four European Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruijsbroek, Annemarie; Droomers, Mariël; Kruize, Hanneke; van Kempen, Elise; Gidlow, Christopher J; Hurst, Gemma; Andrusaityte, Sandra; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark J; Maas, Jolanda; Hardyns, Wim; Stronks, Karien; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2017-06-08

    It has been suggested that certain residents, such as those with a low socioeconomic status, the elderly, and women, may benefit more from the presence of neighbourhood green space than others. We tested this hypothesis for age, gender, educational level, and employment status in four European cities. Data were collected in Barcelona (Spain; n = 1002), Kaunas (Lithuania; n = 989), Doetinchem (The Netherlands; n = 847), and Stoke-on-Trent (UK; n = 933) as part of the EU-funded PHENOTYPE project. Surveys were used to measure mental and general health, individual characteristics, and perceived neighbourhood green space. Additionally, we used audit data about neighbourhood green space. In Barcelona, there were positive associations between neighbourhood green space and general health among low-educated residents. In the other cities and for the other population groups, there was little evidence that the association between health and neighbourhood green space differed between population groups. Overall, our study does not support the assumption that the elderly, women, and residents who are not employed full-time benefit more from neighbourhood green space than others. Only in the highly urbanised city of Barcelona did the low-educated group benefit from neighbourhood green spaces. Perhaps neighbourhood green spaces are more important for the health of low-educated residents in particularly highly urbanised areas.

  17. Does the Health Impact of Exposure to Neighbourhood Green Space Differ between Population Groups? An Explorative Study in Four European Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie Ruijsbroek

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that certain residents, such as those with a low socioeconomic status, the elderly, and women, may benefit more from the presence of neighbourhood green space than others. We tested this hypothesis for age, gender, educational level, and employment status in four European cities. Data were collected in Barcelona (Spain; n = 1002, Kaunas (Lithuania; n = 989, Doetinchem (The Netherlands; n = 847, and Stoke-on-Trent (UK; n = 933 as part of the EU-funded PHENOTYPE project. Surveys were used to measure mental and general health, individual characteristics, and perceived neighbourhood green space. Additionally, we used audit data about neighbourhood green space. In Barcelona, there were positive associations between neighbourhood green space and general health among low-educated residents. In the other cities and for the other population groups, there was little evidence that the association between health and neighbourhood green space differed between population groups. Overall, our study does not support the assumption that the elderly, women, and residents who are not employed full-time benefit more from neighbourhood green space than others. Only in the highly urbanised city of Barcelona did the low-educated group benefit from neighbourhood green spaces. Perhaps neighbourhood green spaces are more important for the health of low-educated residents in particularly highly urbanised areas.

  18. PODAAC-AQR50-3P1CS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Aquarius Level 3 sea surface spiciness standard mapped image data contains gridded 1 degree spatial resolution spice data averaged over daily, 7 day, monthly, and...

  19. “Here is the knowledge-where should I put it?” Findings from a study of how knowledge spaces are used within a support group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, P. H.; Snis, U.

    1999-01-01

    In order to design useful knowledge media spaces for knowledge workers it is essential that we understand the nature of the work conducted and the knowledge applied in real settings. The paper reports from a study of how a group of quality assurance specialists in the pharmaceutical industry gather......, structure and distribute information and knowledge. Based on the findings, a number of overall requirements for knowledge media spaces are identified and discussed. The essential findings were that information and knowledge are created and handled in many different ways and have many different forms....... The core issues of our lessons learned so far are that we carefully need to consider knowledge media spaces both in terms of communication channels and knowledge archives. Knowledge media spaces should be seen as spaces in which knowledge and information is exchanged, filed, retrieved, presented...

  20. Study of TiO2(1 1 0)-p(1x1), p(1x2) and p(1x3) surface structures by impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asari, E.; Souda, R.

    2000-01-01

    The surface structure of TiO 2 (1 1 0)-p(1x1), p(1x2) and p(1x3) were studied using impact collision ion scattering spectroscopy (ICISS). We found that (i) the height of bridging oxygen for the p(1x1) is comparative to that of bulk structure, (ii) the p(1x2) surface has the added Ti 2 O 3 unit rows proposed by Onishi et al. and also the oxygen atoms rows between Ti 2 O 3 unit rows and (iii) the p(1x3) surface is constructed with the same added Ti 2 O 3 unit rows as that in the p(1x2) surface, but the bridging oxygen rows exist between the Ti 2 O 3 unit rows

  1. S-Nitrosation destabilizes glutathione transferase P1-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balchin, David; Stoychev, Stoyan H; Dirr, Heini W

    2013-12-23

    Protein S-nitrosation is a post-translational modification that regulates the function of more than 500 human proteins. Despite its apparent physiological significance, S-nitrosation is poorly understood at a molecular level. Here, we investigated the effect of S-nitrosation on the activity, structure, stability, and dynamics of human glutathione transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1), an important detoxification enzyme ubiquitous in aerobes. S-Nitrosation at Cys47 and Cys101 reduces the activity of the enzyme by 94%. Circular dichroism spectroscopy, acrylamide quenching, and amide hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry experiments indicate that the loss of activity is caused by the introduction of local disorder at the active site of GSTP1-1. Furthermore, the modification destabilizes domain 1 of GSTP1-1 against denaturation, smoothing the unfolding energy landscape of the protein and introducing a refolding defect. In contrast, S-nitrosation at Cys101 alone introduces a refolding defect in domain 1 but compensates by stabilizing the domain kinetically. These data elucidate the physical basis for the regulation of GSTP1-1 by S-nitrosation and provide general insight into the consequences of S-nitrosation on protein stability and dynamics.

  2. Active living : the impact of renovating urban open spaces on increasing the level of physical activity among social groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers, Hiske; Shokoohi, Roya

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The provision of active parks/public open space is the key factor in promoting active living, because people and specially low-income and elderlies are being more interested in doing non-organized/informal, and no-cost sports/physical activities in outdoor spaces in recent decades

  3. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. I. Hubble space telescope/wide field planetary camera 2 observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisz, Daniel R. [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, 1151 East Hermans Road, Tucson, AZ 85756 (United States); Skillman, Evan D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Holtzman, Jon [Department of Astronomy, New Mexico State University, Box 30001, 1320 Frenger Street, Las Cruces, NM 88003 (United States); Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F., E-mail: drw@ucsc.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Box 351580, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with τ ∼ 5 Gyr; (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (τ ∼ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 10{sup 5} M{sub ☉} to 30% for galaxies with M > 10{sup 7} M{sub ☉}) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between 'ultra-faint' and 'classical' dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community.

  4. The star formation histories of local group dwarf galaxies. I. Hubble space telescope/wide field planetary camera 2 observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weisz, Daniel R.; Dolphin, Andrew E.; Skillman, Evan D.; Holtzman, Jon; Gilbert, Karoline M.; Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Williams, Benjamin F.

    2014-01-01

    We present uniformly measured star formation histories (SFHs) of 40 Local Group (LG) dwarf galaxies based on color-magnitude diagram (CMD) analysis from archival Hubble Space Telescope imaging. We demonstrate that accurate SFHs can be recovered from CMDs that do not reach the oldest main sequence turn-off (MSTO), but emphasize that the oldest MSTO is critical for precisely constraining the earliest epochs of star formation. We find that: (1) the average lifetime SFHs of dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) can be approximated by an exponentially declining SFH with τ ∼ 5 Gyr; (2) lower luminosity dSphs are less likely to have extended SFHs than more luminous dSphs; (3) the average SFHs of dwarf irregulars (dIrrs), transition dwarfs, and dwarf ellipticals can be approximated by the combination of an exponentially declining SFH (τ ∼ 3-4 Gyr) for lookback ages >10-12 Gyr ago and a constant SFH thereafter; (4) the observed fraction of stellar mass formed prior to z = 2 ranges considerably (80% for galaxies with M < 10 5 M ☉ to 30% for galaxies with M > 10 7 M ☉ ) and is largely explained by environment; (5) the distinction between 'ultra-faint' and 'classical' dSphs is arbitrary; (6) LG dIrrs formed a significantly higher fraction of stellar mass prior to z = 2 than the Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies from Leitner and the SFHs from the abundance matching models of Behroozi et al. This may indicate higher than expected star formation efficiencies at early times in low mass galaxies. Finally, we provide all the SFHs in tabulated electronic format for use by the community.

  5. D-Side: A Facility and Workforce Planning Group Multi-criteria Decision Support System for Johnson Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, Madjid

    2005-01-01

    "To understand and protect our home planet, to explore the universe and search for life, and to inspire the next generation of explorers" is NASA's mission. The Systems Management Office at Johnson Space Center (JSC) is searching for methods to effectively manage the Center's resources to meet NASA's mission. D-Side is a group multi-criteria decision support system (GMDSS) developed to support facility decisions at JSC. D-Side uses a series of sequential and structured processes to plot facilities in a three-dimensional (3-D) graph on the basis of each facility alignment with NASA's mission and goals, the extent to which other facilities are dependent on the facility, and the dollar value of capital investments that have been postponed at the facility relative to the facility replacement value. A similarity factor rank orders facilities based on their Euclidean distance from Ideal and Nadir points. These similarity factors are then used to allocate capital improvement resources across facilities. We also present a parallel model that can be used to support decisions concerning allocation of human resources investments across workforce units. Finally, we present results from a pilot study where 12 experienced facility managers from NASA used D-Side and the organization's current approach to rank order and allocate funds for capital improvement across 20 facilities. Users evaluated D-Side favorably in terms of ease of use, the quality of the decision-making process, decision quality, and overall value-added. Their evaluations of D-Side were significantly more favorable than their evaluations of the current approach. Keywords: NASA, Multi-Criteria Decision Making, Decision Support System, AHP, Euclidean Distance, 3-D Modeling, Facility Planning, Workforce Planning.

  6. Contribution of on-site Coulomb repulsion energy to structural, electronic and magnetic properties of SrCoO3 for different space groups: first-principles study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammady Shibghatullah

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report structural, electronic, and magnetic properties of SrCoO3 in Pm3̅m and P4/mbm space groups, which are calculated by using generalized gradient approximation corrected with on-site Coulomb repulsion U and exchange energies J. The cubic lattice parameter a and local magnetic moments of Co (μCo are optimized by varying U at Co 3d site. Employing ultrasoft pseudopotential, the values of U = 8 eV and J = 0.75 eV are the best choice for Pm3̅m space group. We found the value of μCo = 2.56 μB, which is consistent with the previous results. It was also found that Co 3d, hybridized with O 2p, is the main contributor to ferromagnetic metallic properties. Besides, norm-conserving pseudopotential promotes a, which is in good agreement with experimental result. However, it is not suitable for P4/mbm space group. By using ultrasoft pseudopotential, the value of U = 3 eV (J = 0.75 is the most suitable for P4/mbm group. Ferromagnetic metallic properties, Jahn-Teller distortion, and reasonable lattice parameters have been obtained. This study shows that U has significant contribution to the calculated properties and also points out that P4/mbm space group with US-PP is suitable to describe experimental results.

  7. Expression of flavonoid 3’-hydroxylase is controlled by P1, the regulator of 3-deoxyflavonoid biosynthesis in maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The maize (Zea mays) red aleurone1 (pr1) encodes a CYP450-dependent flavonoid 3’-hydroxylase (ZmF3’H1) required for the biosynthesis of purple and red anthocyanin pigments. We previously showed that Zmf3’h1 is regulated by C1 (Colorless1) and R1 (Red1) transcription factors. The current study demonstrates that, in addition to its role in anthocyanin biosynthesis, the Zmf3’h1 gene also participates in the biosynthesis of 3-deoxyflavonoids and phlobaphenes that accumulate in maize pericarps, cob glumes, and silks. Biosynthesis of 3-deoxyflavonoids is regulated by P1 (Pericarp color1) and is independent from the action of C1 and R1 transcription factors. Results In maize, apiforol and luteoforol are the precursors of condensed phlobaphenes. Maize lines with functional alleles of pr1 and p1 (Pr1;P1) accumulate luteoforol, while null pr1 lines with a functional or non-functional p1 allele (pr1;P1 or pr1;p1) accumulate apiforol. Apiforol lacks a hydroxyl group at the 3’-position of the flavylium B-ring, while luteoforol has this hydroxyl group. Our biochemical analysis of accumulated compounds in different pr1 genotypes showed that the pr1 encoded ZmF3’H1 has a role in the conversion of mono-hydroxylated to bi-hydroxylated compounds in the B-ring. Steady state RNA analyses demonstrated that Zmf3’h1 mRNA accumulation requires a functional p1 allele. Using a combination of EMSA and ChIP experiments, we established that the Zmf3’h1 gene is a direct target of P1. Highlighting the significance of the Zmf3’h1 gene for resistance against biotic stress, we also show here that the p1 controlled 3-deoxyanthocyanidin and C-glycosyl flavone (maysin) defence compounds accumulate at significantly higher levels in Pr1 silks as compared to pr1 silks. By virtue of increased maysin synthesis in Pr1 plants, corn ear worm larvae fed on Pr1; P1 silks showed slower growth as compared to pr1; P1 silks. Conclusions Our results show that the Zmf3’h1 gene

  8. Expression of flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase is controlled by P1, the regulator of 3-deoxyflavonoid biosynthesis in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mandeep; Chai, Chenglin; Morohashi, Kengo; Grotewold, Erich; Snook, Maurice E; Chopra, Surinder

    2012-11-01

    The maize (Zea mays) red aleurone1 (pr1) encodes a CYP450-dependent flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (ZmF3'H1) required for the biosynthesis of purple and red anthocyanin pigments. We previously showed that Zmf3'h1 is regulated by C1 (Colorless1) and R1 (Red1) transcription factors. The current study demonstrates that, in addition to its role in anthocyanin biosynthesis, the Zmf3'h1 gene also participates in the biosynthesis of 3-deoxyflavonoids and phlobaphenes that accumulate in maize pericarps, cob glumes, and silks. Biosynthesis of 3-deoxyflavonoids is regulated by P1 (Pericarp color1) and is independent from the action of C1 and R1 transcription factors. In maize, apiforol and luteoforol are the precursors of condensed phlobaphenes. Maize lines with functional alleles of pr1 and p1 (Pr1;P1) accumulate luteoforol, while null pr1 lines with a functional or non-functional p1 allele (pr1;P1 or pr1;p1) accumulate apiforol. Apiforol lacks a hydroxyl group at the 3'-position of the flavylium B-ring, while luteoforol has this hydroxyl group. Our biochemical analysis of accumulated compounds in different pr1 genotypes showed that the pr1 encoded ZmF3'H1 has a role in the conversion of mono-hydroxylated to bi-hydroxylated compounds in the B-ring. Steady state RNA analyses demonstrated that Zmf3'h1 mRNA accumulation requires a functional p1 allele. Using a combination of EMSA and ChIP experiments, we established that the Zmf3'h1 gene is a direct target of P1. Highlighting the significance of the Zmf3'h1 gene for resistance against biotic stress, we also show here that the p1 controlled 3-deoxyanthocyanidin and C-glycosyl flavone (maysin) defence compounds accumulate at significantly higher levels in Pr1 silks as compared to pr1 silks. By virtue of increased maysin synthesis in Pr1 plants, corn ear worm larvae fed on Pr1; P1 silks showed slower growth as compared to pr1; P1 silks. Our results show that the Zmf3'h1 gene participates in the biosynthesis of phlobaphenes and

  9. Expression of flavonoid 3’-hydroxylase is controlled by P1, the regulator of 3-deoxyflavonoid biosynthesis in maize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Mandeep

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The maize (Zea mays red aleurone1 (pr1 encodes a CYP450-dependent flavonoid 3’-hydroxylase (ZmF3’H1 required for the biosynthesis of purple and red anthocyanin pigments. We previously showed that Zmf3’h1 is regulated by C1 (Colorless1 and R1 (Red1 transcription factors. The current study demonstrates that, in addition to its role in anthocyanin biosynthesis, the Zmf3’h1 gene also participates in the biosynthesis of 3-deoxyflavonoids and phlobaphenes that accumulate in maize pericarps, cob glumes, and silks. Biosynthesis of 3-deoxyflavonoids is regulated by P1 (Pericarp color1 and is independent from the action of C1 and R1 transcription factors. Results In maize, apiforol and luteoforol are the precursors of condensed phlobaphenes. Maize lines with functional alleles of pr1 and p1 (Pr1;P1 accumulate luteoforol, while null pr1 lines with a functional or non-functional p1 allele (pr1;P1 or pr1;p1 accumulate apiforol. Apiforol lacks a hydroxyl group at the 3’-position of the flavylium B-ring, while luteoforol has this hydroxyl group. Our biochemical analysis of accumulated compounds in different pr1 genotypes showed that the pr1 encoded ZmF3’H1 has a role in the conversion of mono-hydroxylated to bi-hydroxylated compounds in the B-ring. Steady state RNA analyses demonstrated that Zmf3’h1 mRNA accumulation requires a functional p1 allele. Using a combination of EMSA and ChIP experiments, we established that the Zmf3’h1 gene is a direct target of P1. Highlighting the significance of the Zmf3’h1 gene for resistance against biotic stress, we also show here that the p1 controlled 3-deoxyanthocyanidin and C-glycosyl flavone (maysin defence compounds accumulate at significantly higher levels in Pr1 silks as compared to pr1 silks. By virtue of increased maysin synthesis in Pr1 plants, corn ear worm larvae fed on Pr1; P1 silks showed slower growth as compared to pr1; P1 silks. Conclusions Our results show that the Zmf3

  10. 64Cu-Labeled LyP-1-Dendrimer for PET-CT Imaging of Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The ability to detect and quantify macrophage accumulation can provide important diagnostic and prognostic information for atherosclerotic plaque. We have previously shown that LyP-1, a cyclic 9-amino acid peptide, binds to p32 proteins on activated macrophages, facilitating the visualization of atherosclerotic plaque with PET. Yet, the in vivo plaque accumulation of monomeric [18F]FBA-LyP-1 was low (0.31 ± 0.05%ID/g). To increase the avidity of LyP-1 constructs to p32, we synthesized a dendritic form of LyP-1 on solid phase using lysine as the core structural element. Imaging probes (FAM or 6-BAT) were conjugated to a lysine or cysteine on the dendrimer for optical and PET studies. The N-terminus of the dendrimer was further modified with an aminooxy group in order to conjugate LyP-1 and ARAL peptides bearing a ketone. Oxime ligation of peptides to both dendrimers resulted in (LyP-1)4- and (ARAL)4-dendrimers with optical (FAM) and PET probes (6-BAT). For PET-CT studies, (LyP-1)4- and (ARAL)4-dendrimer-6-BAT were labeled with 64Cu (t1/2 = 12.7 h) and intravenously injected into the atherosclerotic (ApoE–/–) mice. After two hours of circulation, PET-CT coregistered images demonstrated greater uptake of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-64Cu than the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-64Cu in the aortic root and descending aorta. Ex vivo images and the biodistribution acquired at three hours after injection also demonstrated a significantly higher uptake of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-64Cu (1.1 ± 0.26%ID/g) than the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-64Cu (0.22 ± 0.05%ID/g) in the aorta. Similarly, subcutaneous injection of the LyP-1-dendrimeric carriers resulted in preferential accumulation in plaque-containing regions over 24 h. In the same model system, ex vivo fluorescence images within aortic plaque depict an increased accumulation and penetration of the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer-FAM as compared to the (ARAL)4-dendrimer-FAM. Taken together, the results suggest that the (LyP-1)4-dendrimer can be applied for in

  11. The association between glutathione S-transferase P1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Asthma is an inflammatory airways disease caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and a diverse group of environmental factors. The GSTP1 Ile105Val polymorphism has been associated with asthma in several studies. Objective: To examine the hypothesis that polymorphism in the GSTP1 ...

  12. "Con Café, Compañerismo, y Calidad": Latina Women Fashioning a Writing Group into a Space of Praxis and Belonging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtig, Janise

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the spatial practices through which a group of Mexican immigrant women, participants in a school-based writing workshop I facilitated for four years, molded and gave meaning to our weekly writing routine to foster inclusivity as the basis for collective teaching and learning--creating what I refer to as a space of praxis and…

  13. Blocking S1P interaction with S1P1 receptor by a novel competitive S1P1-selective antagonist inhibits angiogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Yasuyuki; Ueda, Yasuji; Ohtake, Hidenori; Ono, Naoya; Takayama, Tetsuo; Nakazawa, Kiyoshi; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Goitsuka, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effect of a newly developed S1P 1 -selective antagonist on angiogenic responses. ► S1P 1 is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses. ► S1P 1 -selective antagonist showed in vitro activity to inhibit angiogenesis. ► S1P 1 -selective antagonist showed in vivo activity to inhibit angiogenesis. ► The efficacy of S1P 1 -selective antagonist for anti-cancer therapies. -- Abstract: Sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor type 1 (S1P 1 ) was shown to be essential for vascular maturation during embryonic development and it has been demonstrated that substantial crosstalk exists between S1P 1 and other pro-angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor. We developed a novel S1P 1 -selective antagonist, TASP0277308, which is structurally unrelated to S1P as well as previously described S1P 1 antagonists. TASP0277308 inhibited S1P- as well as VEGF-induced cellular responses, including migration and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Furthermore, TASP0277308 effectively blocked a VEGF-induced tube formation in vitro and significantly suppressed tumor cell-induced angiogenesis in vivo. These findings revealed that S1P 1 is a critical component of VEGF-related angiogenic responses and also provide evidence for the efficacy of TASP0277308 for anti-cancer therapies.

  14. Activity budget, diet, and use of space by two groups of squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) in eastern Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Tatyana; Ferrari, Stephen F; Lopes, Maria Aparecida

    2013-07-01

    Squirrel monkeys (Saimiri spp.) are widely distributed in the Amazon basin. This study describes the ecological and behavioral patterns of two social groups of S. sciureus in forests adjacent to the Tucuruí hydroelectric reservoir in eastern Amazonia, including range size, activity budgets, and composition of the diet. The groups were monitored at Base 4 (group B4) and Germoplasma Island (group GI). Quantitative behavioral data were collected using instantaneous scan sampling to record behavior, substrate use, and height. Home ranges were delimited using a GPS to determine group position after each 50 m of movement. Home ranges were 75.0 ha for group B4 (39 members) and 77.5 ha for group GI (32 members). The use of vertical strata was well defined, with a marked preference for the middle and lower levels of the canopy. The activity budgets of both groups were typical of those of other squirrel monkeys and were dominated by foraging (B4 = 48.7 %; GI = 49.6 %), moving (both groups 28.9 %), and feeding (B4 = 14.6 %; GI = 12.4 %). Resting was rare (B4 = 3.5 %; GI = 2.6 %) and less common than social behavior (B4 = 4.3 %; GI = 6.4 %). The diet of both groups was dominated by plant material (B4 = 70.7 % of feeding records; GI = 71.4 %), which is in contrast with the more insectivorous diets recorded for Saimiri at other sites. Group GI spent more time foraging during the dry season, whereas group B4 spent more time in the rainy season when the consumption of fruit increased (significantly, in the case of group GI). The less insectivorous diet of these groups may be due to a number of factors, including the unique habitat configuration at the site and reduced hydrological stress due to the proximity of the reservoir.

  15. Enveloping algebra-valued gauge transformations for non-abelian gauge groups on non-commutative spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurco, B.; Schraml, S.; Schupp, P.; Wess, J.

    2000-11-01

    An enveloping algebra-valued gauge field is constructed, its components are functions of the Lie algebra-valued gauge field and can be constructed with the Seiberg-Witten map. This allows the formulation of a dynamics for a finite number of gauge field components on non-commutative spaces.

  16. Enveloping algebra-valued gauge transformations for non-abelian gauge groups on non-commutative spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurco, B.; Schraml, S.; Wess, J.; Schupp, P.

    2000-01-01

    An enveloping algebra-valued gauge field is constructed, its components are functions of the Lie algebra-valued gauge field and can be constructed with the Seiberg-Witten map. This allows the formulation of a dynamics for a finite number of gauge field components on non-commutative spaces. (orig.)

  17. Enveloping algebra-valued gauge transformations for non-abelian gauge groups on non-commutative spaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jurco, B. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Mathematik, Bonn (Germany); Schraml, S.; Wess, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Foehringer Ring 6, 80805 Muenchen (Germany); Sektion Physik, Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Muenchen (Germany); Schupp, P. [Sektion Physik, Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Muenchen (Germany)

    2000-11-01

    An enveloping algebra-valued gauge field is constructed, its components are functions of the Lie algebra-valued gauge field and can be constructed with the Seiberg-Witten map. This allows the formulation of a dynamics for a finite number of gauge field components on non-commutative spaces. (orig.)

  18. Representations of classical groups on the lattice and its application to the field theory on discrete space-time

    OpenAIRE

    Lorente, M.

    2003-01-01

    We explore the mathematical consequences of the assumption of a discrete space-time. The fundamental laws of physics have to be translated into the language of discrete mathematics. We find integral transformations that leave the lattice of any dimension invariant and apply these transformations to field equations.

  19. Talk in Blended-Space Speech Communities: An Exploration of Discursive Practices of a Professional Development Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvin, Tabitha Ann

    2011-01-01

    This study is an exploration of alternative teacher professional development. While using symbolic interactionism for a research lens, it characterizes the discursive practices commonly found in formal, informal, and blended-space speech communities based on the talk within a leadership-development program comprised of five female, church-based…

  20. 107 Range Commanders Council Meteorology Group Meeting (RCC-MG): NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Range Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2016-01-01

    The following is a summary of the major meteorological/atmospheric projects and research that have been or currently are being accomplished at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Listed below are highlights of work done during the past 6 months in the Engineering Directorate (ED) and in the Science and Mission Systems Office (ZP).

  1. 108 Range Commanders Council Meteorology Group Meeting (RCC-MG) NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Range Report - April 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2017-01-01

    The following is a summary of the major meteorological/atmospheric projects and research that have been or currently are being accomplished at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Listed below are highlights of work done during the past 6 months in the Engineering Directorate (ED) and in the Science and Technology Office (ST).

  2. Comparative analysis between P1 and B1 equations for neutron moderation; Analise comparativa entre os metodos de obtencao e das solucoes das equacoes P1 e B1 para moderacao de neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2000-07-01

    In order to calculate the neutron flux in nuclear reactors, B1 or P1 equations are solved by numerical methods for several groups of energy. The neutron fluxes obtained from the solutions of the B1 and P1 equations are similar when they are applied to large nuclear power reactors. However, an important difference between the two fluxes is that the system of P1 equations uses one more approximation than the B1 system and then, its flux is less precise. The present work shows the relations between both equations and analyzes for what conditions the two equations systems are equivalent. Furthermore, this equations are numerically solved in 54 groups of energy for a quadrangular arrange. (author)

  3. The dynamical groups SO0(3.2) and SO0(4.2) as space-time groups of elementary particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidenreich, W.

    1981-01-01

    Elementary particles are described by representations of SO 0 (4.2) and SO 0 (3.2). An S-matrix invariant under the corresponding group constrains the possible scattering channels. The simptest used representations have each one gauge freedom, the physical significance of which is discussed. 'Higher' representations can be constructed from the simplest by means of the tensor product; the same is true for the corresponding particles. The simplest objects of the SO 0 (3.2) theory, the SO 0 (3.2) theory, the Dirac singletons correspond to the states of a 2-dimensional harmonic oscillator. The basic states of this are interpreted as urs in the sense of von Weizsaecker. (orig./HSI) [de

  4. The P1-approximation for the Distribution of Neutrons from a Pulsed Source in Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claesson, A.

    1963-12-01

    The asymptotic distribution of neutrons from a pulsed, high energy source in an infinite moderator has been obtained earlier in a 'diffusion' approximation. In that paper the cross section was assumed to be constant over the whole energy region and the time derivative of the first moment was disregarded. Here, first, an analytic expression is obtained for the density in a P 1 -approximation. However, the result is very complicated, and it is shown that an asymptotic solution can be found in a simpler way. By taking into account the low hydrogen scattering cross section at the source energy it follows that the space dependence of the distribution is less than that obtained earlier. The importance of keeping the time derivative of the first moment is further shown in a perturbation approximation

  5. Neutron wave reflexions in interface media with transport equation P1 approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira Vellozo, S. de.

    1977-01-01

    The propagation of neutron waves in non multiplying media is investigated employing the Telegrapher's equation obtained from the P 1 approximation of the time, space and energy dependent Boltzmann equation. Solution of the problem of propagation of sinusoidally modulated source incident on one face of the medium is obtained by analysing the Fourier component of a pulsed source introduced, for the corresponding frequency. The amplitude and the phase of the flux are computed as a function of frequency in media consisting of one, two and three regions in order to study the effects of reflection at the interfaces. The results are compared with those from the Diffusion approximation obtained by neglecting the term involving the second order time derivative. (author)

  6. A scientific program for infrared, submillimeter and radio astronomy from space: A report by the Management Operations Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    Important and fundamental scientific progress can be attained through space observations in the wavelengths longward of 1 micron. The formation of galaxies, stars, and planets, the origin of quasars and the nature of active galactic nuclei, the large scale structure of the Universe, and the problem of the missing mass, are among the major scientific issues that can be addressed by these observations. Significant advances in many areas of astrophysics can be made over the next 20 years by implementing the outlined program. This program combines large observatories with smaller projects to create an overall scheme that emphasized complementarity and synergy, advanced technology, community support and development, and the training of the next generation of scientists. Key aspects of the program include: the Space Infrared Telescope Facility; the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy; a robust program of small missions; and the creation of the technology base for future major observatories.

  7. Space space space

    CERN Document Server

    Trembach, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Space is an introduction to the mysteries of the Universe. Included are Task Cards for independent learning, Journal Word Cards for creative writing, and Hands-On Activities for reinforcing skills in Math and Language Arts. Space is a perfect introduction to further research of the Solar System.

  8. A "safe space" for learning and reflection: one school's design for continuity with a peer group across clinical clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Calvin L; Johnston, C Bree; Singh, Bobby; Garber, Jonathan D; Kaplan, Elizabeth; Lee, Kewchang; Teherani, Arianne

    2011-12-01

    The value of continuity in medical education, particularly during clerkships, is increasingly recognized. Previous clerkship-based models have described changes that emphasize continuity in patient care, learner supervision, and curriculum. The creation of continuous student peer groups can foster interactions that enhance mutual support through uncomfortable professional transitions during the clerkship years. Here, the authors describe a third-year clerkship model based at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center called VA Longitudinal Rotations (VALOR), designed explicitly to establish a supportive learning environment for small peer groups.Seven groups of medical students (42 total) completed VALOR across three academic years between 2007 and 2009. On clerkships during VALOR, one hour per week was designated for faculty-facilitated sessions amongst peer groups. Students' perceptions of peer group support and overall program satisfaction were determined with immediate post surveys and focus groups at the end of VALOR, and with follow-up surveys 5 to 27 months after completing VALOR. Students strongly valued several elements of VALOR peer groups, including support through clerkship challenges, meeting for facilitated reflection, and appreciating patient experiences across the continuum of care. Students' appreciation for their peer group experiences persisted well after the conclusion of VALOR. VALOR students performed the same as or better than traditional clerkship students on knowledge and skill-based outcomes. The authors demonstrate that their third-year clerkship program using peer groups has built supportive learning networks and facilitated reflection, allowing students to develop critical professional skills. Student communication around patient care was also feasible and highly valued.

  9. Female Leadership in Public Religious Space : An Alternative Group of Women in Tablighi Jamaat in Bangladesh

    OpenAIRE

    Begum, Momotaj

    2016-01-01

    The worldwide trend of emerging women-led religious reformist movements create the opportunity for Muslim women to emerge as religious leaders, the positions that have historically been held by men. This study has focused on a women’s group, named the Group of Four Companions (GFC), working for renewal of faith among the Muslim women in a community in Bangladesh. The group claims a wing of Tablighi Jamaat (TJ)―an Islamic missionary movement originated in the 1920s, the largest Islamic piety m...

  10. Computer program /P1-GAS/ calculates the P-0 and P-1 transfer matrices for neutron moderation in a monatomic gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, G.; Gibson, G.

    1968-01-01

    FORTRAN 4 program /P1-GAS/ calculates the P-O and P-1 transfer matrices for neutron moderation in a monatomic gas. The equations used are based on the conditions that there is isotropic scattering in the center-of-mass coordinate system, the scattering cross section is constant, and the target nuclear velocities satisfy a Maxwellian distribution.

  11. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States); Smith, Adam N. [University of Florida, Department of Chemistry, College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (United States); Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine, E-mail: jbrady@dental.ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Oral Biology, College of Dentistry (United States); Long, Joanna R., E-mail: jrlong@ufl.edu [University of Florida, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, College of Medicine (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ∼57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin.

  12. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni; Smith, Adam N.; Crowley, Paula J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Long, Joanna R.

    2016-01-01

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ∼57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin

  13. Specific binding of a naturally occurring amyloidogenic fragment of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 to intact P1 on the cell surface characterized by solid state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Wenxing; Bhatt, Avni; Smith, Adam N; Crowley, Paula J; Brady, L Jeannine; Long, Joanna R

    2016-02-01

    The P1 adhesin (aka Antigen I/II or PAc) of the cariogenic bacterium Streptococcus mutans is a cell surface-localized protein involved in sucrose-independent adhesion and colonization of the tooth surface. The immunoreactive and adhesive properties of S. mutans suggest an unusual functional quaternary ultrastructure comprised of intact P1 covalently attached to the cell wall and interacting with non-covalently associated proteolytic fragments thereof, particularly the ~57-kDa C-terminal fragment C123 previously identified as Antigen II. S. mutans is capable of amyloid formation when grown in a biofilm and P1 is among its amyloidogenic proteins. The C123 fragment of P1 readily forms amyloid fibers in vitro suggesting it may play a role in the formation of functional amyloid during biofilm development. Using wild-type and P1-deficient strains of S. mutans, we demonstrate that solid state NMR (ssNMR) spectroscopy can be used to (1) globally characterize cell walls isolated from a Gram-positive bacterium and (2) characterize the specific binding of heterologously expressed, isotopically-enriched C123 to cell wall-anchored P1. Our results lay the groundwork for future high-resolution characterization of the C123/P1 ultrastructure and subsequent steps in biofilm formation via ssNMR spectroscopy, and they support an emerging model of S. mutans colonization whereby quaternary P1-C123 interactions confer adhesive properties important to binding to immobilized human salivary agglutinin.

  14. P1 epigenetic regulation in leaves of high altitude maize landraces: effect of UV-B radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pablo Rius

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available P1 is a R2R3-MYB transcription factor that regulates the accumulation of a specific group of flavonoids in maize floral tissues, such as flavones and phlobaphenes. P1 is also highly expressed in leaves of maize landraces adapted to high altitudes and higher levels of UV-B radiation. In this work, we analyzed the epigenetic regulation of the P1 gene by UV-B in leaves of different maize landraces. Our results demonstrate that DNA methylation in the P1 proximal promoter, intron1 and intron2 is decreased by UV-B in all lines analyzed; however, the basal DNA methylation levels are lower in the landraces than in B73, a low altitude inbred line. DNA demethylation by UV-B is accompanied by a decrease in H3 methylation at Lys 9 and 27, and by an increase in H3 acetylation. smRNAs complementary to specific regions of the proximal promoter and of intron 2 3' end are also decreased by UV-B; interestingly, P1 smRNA levels are lower in the landraces than in B73 both under control conditions and after UV-B exposure, suggesting that smRNAs regulate P1 expression by UV-B in maize leaves. Finally, we investigated if different P1 targets in flower tissues are also regulated by this transcription factor in response to UV-B. Some targets analyzed show an induction in maize landraces in response to UV-B, with higher basal expression levels in the landraces than in B73; however, not all the transcripts analyzed were found to be regulated by UV-B in leaves.

  15. 基于MUSIC-Group Delay算法的相邻相干信号源定位%Closely spaced coherent-source localization based on MUSIC-group delay algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑家芝

    2016-01-01

    为了准确的进行相邻的相干信号源定位,提出了一种基于多重信号分类群延迟(MUSIC-group delay)的改进算法。首先,将空间平滑技术引入到波达方向(DoA)估计当中去除部分相干信号。由于在信号源相邻的情况下子空间算法的性能降低,就结合了 MUSIC-Group Delay算法来区分相邻的信号源,这种方法因为自身的加和性通过 MUSIC 相位谱来计算群延迟函数,从而能估计出相邻的信号源。理论分析和仿真结果表明提出的方法估计相邻的相干信号源比子空间算法更精确,分辨率更高。%In this paper,the closely spaced coherent-source localization is considered,and an improved method based on the group delay of Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC)is presented.Firstly,we introduce the spatial smoothing technique into direction of arrival (DoA)estimation to get rid of the coherent part of signals.Due to the degraded per-formance of sub-space based methods on the condition of nearby sources,we then utilize the MUSIC-Group Delay algo-rithm to distinguish the closely spaced sources,which can resolve spatially close sources by the use of the group delay function computed from the MUSIC phase spectrum for efficient DoA estimation owing to its spatial additive property. Theoretical analysis and simulation results demonstrate that the proposed approach can estimate the DoA of the coherent close signal sources more precisely and have higher resolution compared with sub-space based methods.

  16. The calculation of oscillator strengths for the 5s21S0→5s5p1,3P1 transitions in Cd-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guangyuan

    1998-01-01

    The screened hydrogenic model is employed to calculate the oscillator strength of the 5s 2 1 S 0 -5s5p 1 P 1 resonance transition in Cd-like ions (Z = 48 -74). The expression for the oscillator strength of the 5s 2 1 S 0 -5s5p 3 P1 is given, with the introduction of the correctional coefficient K and the mixing angle in jj-coupling. The results are compared with that of other authors, and some discussions are also given

  17. Auditing Consistency and Usefulness of LOINC Use among Three Large Institutions - Using Version Spaces for Grouping LOINC Codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, M.C.; Vreeman, D.J.; Huff, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives We wanted to develop a method for evaluating the consistency and usefulness of LOINC code use across different institutions, and to evaluate the degree of interoperability that can be attained when using LOINC codes for laboratory data exchange. Our specific goals were to: 1) Determine if any contradictory knowledge exists in LOINC. 2) Determine how many LOINC codes were used in a truly interoperable fashion between systems. 3) Provide suggestions for improving the semantic interoperability of LOINC. Methods We collected Extensional Definitions (EDs) of LOINC usage from three institutions. The version space approach was used to divide LOINC codes into small sets, which made auditing of LOINC use across the institutions feasible. We then compared pairings of LOINC codes from the three institutions for consistency and usefulness. Results The number of LOINC codes evaluated were 1,917, 1,267 and 1,693 as obtained from ARUP, Intermountain and Regenstrief respectively. There were 2,022, 2,030, and 2,301 version spaces among ARUP & Intermountain, Intermountain & Regenstrief and ARUP & Regenstrief respectively. Using the EDs as the gold standard, there were 104, 109 and 112 pairs containing contradictory knowledge and there were 1,165, 765 and 1,121 semantically interoperable pairs. The interoperable pairs were classified into three levels: 1) Level I – No loss of meaning, complete information was exchanged by identical codes. 2) Level II – No loss of meaning, but processing of data was needed to make the data completely comparable. 3) Level III – Some loss of meaning. For example, tests with a specific ‘method’ could be rolled-up with tests that were ‘methodless’. Conclusions There are variations in the way LOINC is used for data exchange that result in some data not being truly interoperable across different enterprises. To improve its semantic interoperability, we need to detect and correct any contradictory knowledge within LOINC and add

  18. Ongoing Analyses of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes (FDNS) code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco analysis was a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  19. Ongoing Analysis of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, Joseph; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco engine analysis is a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  20. Porcine Circovirus-Like Virus P1 Inhibits Wnt Signaling Pathway in Vivo and in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuejiao; Wen, Libin; Sheng, Shaoyang; Wang, Wei; Xiao, Qi; Qu, Meng; Hu, Yiyi; Liu, Chuanmin; He, Kongwang

    2018-01-01

    Porcine circovirus-like virus P1 is an important pathogen of the current pig industry, the infection mechanism is not entirely clear. Wnt signaling pathway plays an important role in the growth of young animals and infection of some viruses. This study was designed to demonstrate the effects of P1 infection on the Wnt signaling pathway. In vivo experiments, we demonstrated the down-regulatory effects of P1 infection in piglets and mice on the downstream components expression levels of Wnt signaling pathway, and the effects of Wnt signaling pathway activation on the pathogenesis of P1. In vitro studies, we found P1 infection down-regulated protein level of β-catenin and mRNA level of mmp2, prevented the β-catenin from entering into nucleus, abolished the TCF/LEF promoter activity, proved that P1 could inhibit the activation of Wnt signaling pathway in vitro . Finally, we found that VP1 of P1 virus also had the inhibitory effects on Wnt signaling pathway in vitro , elucidated the mechanism of P1's inhibitory effects on the Wnt signaling pathway and offered the possibility that the suppression of Wnt signaling pathway was involved in the post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS), laying a foundation for elucidating the pathogenesis of P1.

  1. Porcine Circovirus-Like Virus P1 Inhibits Wnt Signaling Pathway in Vivo and in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejiao Zhu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Porcine circovirus-like virus P1 is an important pathogen of the current pig industry, the infection mechanism is not entirely clear. Wnt signaling pathway plays an important role in the growth of young animals and infection of some viruses. This study was designed to demonstrate the effects of P1 infection on the Wnt signaling pathway. In vivo experiments, we demonstrated the down-regulatory effects of P1 infection in piglets and mice on the downstream components expression levels of Wnt signaling pathway, and the effects of Wnt signaling pathway activation on the pathogenesis of P1. In vitro studies, we found P1 infection down-regulated protein level of β-catenin and mRNA level of mmp2, prevented the β-catenin from entering into nucleus, abolished the TCF/LEF promoter activity, proved that P1 could inhibit the activation of Wnt signaling pathway in vitro. Finally, we found that VP1 of P1 virus also had the inhibitory effects on Wnt signaling pathway in vitro, elucidated the mechanism of P1’s inhibitory effects on the Wnt signaling pathway and offered the possibility that the suppression of Wnt signaling pathway was involved in the post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS, laying a foundation for elucidating the pathogenesis of P1.

  2. Tobacco etch virus protein P1 traffics to the nucleolus and associates with the host 60S ribosomal subunits during infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Fernando; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2014-09-01

    The genus Potyvirus comprises a large group of positive-strand RNA plant viruses whose genome encodes a large polyprotein processed by three viral proteinases. P1 protein, the most amino-terminal product of the polyprotein, is an accessory factor stimulating viral genome amplification whose role during infection is not well understood. We infected plants with Tobacco etch virus (TEV; genus Potyvirus) clones in which P1 was tagged with a fluorescent protein to track its expression and subcellular localization or with an affinity tag to identify host proteins involved in complexes in which P1 also takes part during infection. Our results showed that TEV P1 exclusively accumulates in infected cells at an early stage of infection and that the protein displays a dynamic subcellular localization, trafficking in and out of the nucleus and nucleolus during infection. Inside the nucleolus, P1 particularly targets the dense granular component. Consistently, we found functional nucleolar localization and nuclear export signals in TEV P1 sequence. Our results also indicated that TEV P1 physically interacts with the host 80S cytoplasmic ribosomes and specifically binds to the 60S ribosomal subunits during infection. In vitro translation assays of reporter proteins suggested that TEV P1 stimulates protein translation, particularly when driven from the TEV internal ribosome entry site. These in vitro assays also suggested that TEV helper-component proteinase (HC-Pro) inhibits protein translation. Based on these findings, we propose that TEV P1 stimulates translation of viral proteins in infected cells. In this work, we researched the role during infection of tobacco etch virus P1 protease. P1 is the most mysterious protein of potyviruses, a relevant group of RNA viruses infecting plants. Our experiments showed that the viral P1 protein exclusively accumulates in infected cells at an early stage of infection and moves in and out of the nucleus of infected cells, particularly

  3. Including an Exam P/1 Prep Course in a Growing Actuarial Science Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Thomas P.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the actuarial science program at our university and the development of a course to enhance students' problem solving skills while preparing them for Exam P/1 of the Society of Actuaries (SOA) and the Casualty Actuary Society (CAS). The Exam P/1 prep course, formally titled Mathematical Foundations of…

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium populi P-1M, Isolated from Pink-Pigmented Household Biofilm

    OpenAIRE

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2016-01-01

    Methylobacterium populi P-1M is isolated from the pink-pigmented household biofilm. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of P-1M, consisting of one chromosome of 5,705,640?bp and five plasmids of 64,864?bp, 59,879?bp, 42,569?bp, 41,417?bp, and 29,506?bp.

  5. Interaction between the P1 protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and receptors on HEp-2 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drasbek, Mette; Christiansen, Gunna; Drasbek, Kim Ryun

    2007-01-01

    The human pathogen Mycoplasma pneumoniae can cause atypical pneumonia through adherence to epithelial cells in the respiratory tract. The major immunogenic protein, P1, participates in the attachment of the bacteria to the host cells. To investigate the adhesion properties of P1, a recombinant...... protein (rP1-II) covering amino acids 1107-1518 of the P1 protein was produced. This protein inhibited the adhesion of M. pneumoniae to human HEp-2 cells, as visualized in a competitive-binding assay using immunofluorescence microscopy. Previous studies have shown that mAbs that recognize two epitopes...... overlapping synthetic peptides covering the whole of rP1-II were evaluated in the competitive-binding assay using immunofluorescence microscopy. A reduction in the number of M. pneumoniae microcolonies was seen, which was confirmed for five peptides using a POLARstar OPTIMA reader to measure fluorescence...

  6. Pathophysiological Consequences of a Break in S1P1-Dependent Homeostasis of Vascular Permeability Revealed by S1P1 Competitive Antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigaud, Marc; Dincer, Zuhal; Bollbuck, Birgit; Dawson, Janet; Beckmann, Nicolau; Beerli, Christian; Fishli-Cavelti, Gina; Nahler, Michaela; Angst, Daniela; Janser, Philipp; Otto, Heike; Rosner, Elisabeth; Hersperger, Rene; Bruns, Christian; Quancard, Jean

    2016-01-01

    Homeostasis of vascular barriers depends upon sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) signaling via the S1P1 receptor. Accordingly, S1P1 competitive antagonism is known to reduce vascular barrier integrity with still unclear pathophysiological consequences. This was explored in the present study using NIBR-0213, a potent and selective S1P1 competitive antagonist. NIBR-0213 was tolerated at the efficacious oral dose of 30 mg/kg BID in the rat adjuvant-induced arthritis (AiA) model, with no sign of labored breathing. However, it induced dose-dependent acute vascular pulmonary leakage and pleural effusion that fully resolved within 3-4 days, as evidenced by MRI monitoring. At the supra-maximal oral dose of 300 mg/kg QD, NIBR-0213 impaired lung function (with increased breathing rate and reduced tidal volume) within the first 24 hrs. Two weeks of NIBR-0213 oral dosing at 30, 100 and 300 mg/kg QD induced moderate pulmonary changes, characterized by alveolar wall thickening, macrophage accumulation, fibrosis, micro-hemorrhage, edema and necrosis. In addition to this picture of chronic inflammation, perivascular edema and myofiber degeneration observed in the heart were also indicative of vascular leakage and its consequences. Overall, these observations suggest that, in the rat, the lung is the main target organ for the S1P1 competitive antagonism-induced acute vascular leakage, which appears first as transient and asymptomatic but could lead, upon chronic dosing, to lung remodeling with functional impairments. Hence, this not only raises the question of organ specificity in the homeostasis of vascular barriers, but also provides insight into the pre-clinical evaluation of a potential safety window for S1P1 competitive antagonists as drug candidates.

  7. Genealogical electronic coupling procedure incorporating the Hartree--Fock interacting space and suitable for degenerate point groups. Application to excited states of BH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swope, W.C.; Schaefer, H.F. III; Yarkony, D.R.

    1980-01-01

    The use of Clebsch--Gordan-type coupling coefficients for finite point groups is applied to the problem of constructing symmetrized N-electron wave functions (configurations) for use by the Hartree--Fock SCF and CI methods of determining electronic wave functions for molecular systems. The configurations are eigenfunctions of electronic spin operators, and transform according to a particular irreducible representation of the relevant group of spatial operations which leave the Born--Oppenheimer Hamiltonian invariant. The method proposed for constructing the configurations involves a genealogical coupling procedure. It is particularly useful for studies of molecules which belong to a group which has multiply degenerate irreducible representations. The advantage of the method is that it results in configurations which are real linear combinations of determinants of real symmetry orbitals. This procedure for constructing configurations also allows for the identification of configurations which have no matrix element of the Hamiltonian with a reference configuration. It is therefore possible to construct a Hartree--Fock interacting space of configurations which can speed the convergence of a CI wave function. The coupling method is applied to a study of the ground and two excited electronic states of BH 3 in its D/sub 3h/ geometry. The theoretical approach involved Hartree--Fock SCF calculations followed by single and double substitution CI calculations, both of which employed double-zeta plus polarization quality basis sets

  8. Target-space duality between simple compact Lie groups and Lie algebras under the Hamiltonian formalism. Pt. 1. Remnants of duality at the classic level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, O.; Liu Chienhao

    1996-01-01

    It has been suggested that a possible classical remnant of the phenomenon of target-space duality (T-duality) would be the equivalence of the classical string Hamiltonian systems. Given a simple compact Lie group G with a bi-invariant metric and a generating function Γ suggested in the physics literature, we follow the above line of thought and work out the canonical transformation Φ generated by Γ together with an Ad-invariant metric and a B-field on the associated Lie algebra g of G so that G and g form a string target-space dual pair at the classical level under the Hamiltonian formalism. In this article, some general features of this Hamiltonian setting are discussed. We study properties of the canonical transformation Φ including a careful analysis of its domain and image. The geometry of the T-dual structure on g is lightly touched. We leave the task of tracing back the Hamiltonian formalism at the quantum level to the sequel of this paper. (orig.). With 4 figs

  9. Structural Analysis of Der p 1–Antibody Complexes and Comparison with Complexes of Proteins or Peptides with Monoclonal Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osinski, Tomasz; Pomés, Anna; Majorek, Karolina A.; Glesner, Jill; Offermann, Lesa R.; Vailes, Lisa D.; Chapman, Martin D.; Minor, Wladek; Chruszcz, Maksymilian (INDOOR); (UV); (SC)

    2015-05-29

    Der p 1 is a major allergen from the house dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, that belongs to the papain-like cysteine protease family. To investigate the antigenic determinants of Der p 1, we determined two crystal structures of Der p 1 in complex with the Fab fragments of mAbs 5H8 or 10B9. Epitopes for these two Der p 1–specific Abs are located in different, nonoverlapping parts of the Der p 1 molecule. Nevertheless, surface area and identity of the amino acid residues involved in hydrogen bonds between allergen and Ab are similar. The epitope for mAb 10B9 only showed a partial overlap with the previously reported epitope for mAb 4C1, a cross-reactive mAb that binds Der p 1 and its homolog Der f 1 from Dermatophagoides farinae. Upon binding to Der p 1, the Fab fragment of mAb 10B9 was found to form a very rare α helix in its third CDR of the H chain. To provide an overview of the surface properties of the interfaces formed by the complexes of Der p 1–10B9 and Der p 1–5H8, along with the complexes of 4C1 with Der p 1 and Der f 1, a broad analysis of the surfaces and hydrogen bonds of all complexes of Fab–protein or Fab–peptide was performed. This work provides detailed insight into the cross-reactive and specific allergen–Ab interactions in group 1 mite allergens. The surface data of Fab–protein and Fab–peptide interfaces can be used in the design of conformational epitopes with reduced Ab binding for immunotherapy.

  10. Quantum isometry groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jyotishman Bhowmick

    2015-11-07

    Nov 7, 2015 ... Classical. Quantum. Background. Compact Hausdorff space. Unital C∗ algebra. Gelfand-Naimark. Compact Group. Compact Quantum Group. Woronowicz. Group Action. Coaction. Woronowicz. Riemannian manifold. Spectral triple. Connes. Isometry group. Quantum Isometry Group. To be discussed.

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Pepper Genes Interacting with the CMV-P1 Helicase Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoomi Choi

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is a destructive pathogen affecting Capsicum annuum (pepper production. The pepper Cmr1 gene confers resistance to most CMV strains, but is overcome by CMV-P1 in a process dependent on the CMV-P1 RNA1 helicase domain (P1 helicase. Here, to identify host factors involved in CMV-P1 infection in pepper, a yeast two-hybrid library derived from a C. annuum 'Bukang' cDNA library was screened, producing a total of 76 potential clones interacting with the P1 helicase. Beta-galactosidase filter lift assay, PCR screening, and sequencing analysis narrowed the candidates to 10 genes putatively involved in virus infection. The candidate host genes were silenced in Nicotiana benthamiana plants that were then inoculated with CMV-P1 tagged with the green fluorescent protein (GFP. Plants silenced for seven of the genes showed development comparable to N. benthamiana wild type, whereas plants silenced for the other three genes showed developmental defects including stunting and severe distortion. Silencing formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor led to reduced virus accumulation. Formate dehydrogenase-silenced plants showed local infection in inoculated leaves, but not in upper (systemic leaves. In the calreticulin-3 precursor-silenced plants, infection was not observed in either the inoculated or the upper leaves. Our results demonstrate that formate dehydrogenase and calreticulin-3 precursor are required for CMV-P1 infection.

  12. Broad-Host-Range IncP-1 plasmids and their resistance potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena ePopowska

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The plasmids of the incompatibility group IncP-1, also called IncP, as extrachromosomal genetic elements can transfer and replicate virtually in all Gram-negative bacteria. They are composed of backbone genes that encode a variety of essential functions and accessory genes that have implications for human health and environmental bioremediation. Broad-host-range IncP plasmids are known to spread genes between distinct phylogenetic groups of bacteria. These genes often code for resistances to a broad spectrum of antibiotics, heavy metals and quaternary ammonium compounds used as disinfectants. The backbone of these plasmids carries modules that enable them to effectively replicate, move to a new host via conjugative transfer and to be stably maintained in bacterial cells. The adaptive, resistance and virulence genes are mainly located on mobile genetic elements integrated between the functional plasmid backbone modules. Environmental studies have demonstrated the wide distribution of IncP-like replicons in manure, soils and wastewater treatment plants. They also are present in strains of pathogenic or opportunistic bacteria, which can be a cause for concern, because they may encode multiresistance. Their broad distribution suggests that IncP plasmids play a crucial role in bacterial adaptation by utilizing horizontal gene transfer. This review summarizes the variety of genetic information and physiological functions carried by IncP plasmids, which can contribute to the spread of antibiotic and heavy metal resistance while also mediating the process of bioremediation of pollutants. Due to the location of the resistance genes on plasmids with a broad host range and the presence of transposons carrying these genes it seems that the spread of these genes would be possible and quite hazardous in infection control. Future studies are required to determine the level of risk of the spread of resistance genes located on these plasmids.

  13. Wavelengths of the Ni-like 4d1S0 - 4p1P1 x-ray laser line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.; Nilsen, J.; Dunn, J.; Osterheld, A.L.; Ryabtsev, A.; Churilov, S.

    1998-01-01

    We measure the wavelengths of the Ni-like 3d 9 4d 1 S 0 - 3d 9 4p 1 P 1 x-ray laser line in several low-Z Ni-like ions ranging from Y (Z=39) to Cd (Z=48). These wavelengths are compared with optimized level calculations using a multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock code. With the help of these results, we identify this line to very high accuracy in nonlasing plasmas from As (Z=33) to Mo (Z=42). Accurate values of these wavelengths are essential for performing plasma imaging and interferometry experiments with multilayer optics that use the x-ray laser to backlight other plasmas. These results also provide important atomic data that are currently missing about the energy of the 4d 1 S 0 level in the NiI sequence. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  14. Alignment creation in atomic ensembles by elastic electron scattering; the case of 138Ba(...6s6p 1P1) atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trajmar, S.; Kanik, I.; LeClair, L.R.; Khakoo, M.A.; Bray, I.; Fursa, D.; Csanak, G.

    1998-01-01

    We describe some of our results from a joint experimental and theoretical program concerning elastic electron scattering by 138 Ba(...6s6p 1 P 1 ) atoms. From the experimental results, we derived various scattering parameters and magnetic sublevel specific differential elastic scattering cross sections at impact energy (E 0 ) of 20.0 eV and at scattering angles (θ) of 10deg, 15deg, and 20deg. The same parameters and cross sections were calculated by the convergent close coupling (CCC) approximation and compared to the experimental results. An excellent agreement, found for the two sets of data, gave us confidence in the CCC method and allowed us to extend the angular and energy ranges for the purpose of generating integral elastic scattering cross sections needed for the deduction of the alignment creation cross sections. (J.P.N.)

  15. Solutions of system of P1 equations without use of auxiliary differential equations coupled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos

    2000-01-01

    The system of P1 equations is composed by two equations coupled itself one for the neutron flux and other for the current. Usually this system is solved by definitions of two integrals parameters, which are named slowing down densities of the flux and the current. Hence, the system P1 can be change from integral to only two differential equations. However, there are two new differentials equations that may be solved with the initial system. The present work analyzes this procedure and studies a method, which solve the P1 equations directly, without definitions of slowing down densities. (author)

  16. Phylogenetic and functional analysis of the bacteriophage P1 single-stranded DNA-binding protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Nilsson, A.S.; Lehnherr, H.

    2002-01-01

    and does not represent a recent acquirement of the phage. The P1 and E. coli SSB proteins are fully functionally interchangeable. SSB-P1 is nonessential for phage growth in an exponentially growing E. coli host, and it is sufficient to promote bacterial growth in the absence of the E. coli SSB protein....... Expression studies showed that the P1 ssb gene is transcribed only, in an rpoS-independent fashion, during stationary-phase growth in E. coli. Mixed infection experiments demonstrated that a wild-type phage has a selective advantage over an ssb-null mutant when exposed to a bacterial host in the stationary...

  17. Continuous wave protocol for simultaneous polarization and optical detection of P1-center electron spin resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, E. J.; Carvajal, B.; Samarth, N.

    2018-01-01

    The ready optical detection and manipulation of bright nitrogen vacancy center spins in diamond plays a key role in contemporary quantum information science and quantum metrology. Other optically dark defects such as substitutional nitrogen atoms (`P1 centers') could also become potentially useful in this context if they could be as easily optically detected and manipulated. We develop a relatively straightforward continuous wave protocol that takes advantage of the dipolar coupling between nitrogen vacancy and P1 centers in type 1b diamond to detect and polarize the dark P1 spins. By combining mutual spin flip transitions with radio frequency driving, we demonstrate the simultaneous optical polarization and detection of the electron spin resonance of the P1 center. This technique should be applicable to detecting and manipulating a broad range of dark spin populations that couple to the nitrogen vacancy center via dipolar fields, allowing for quantum metrology using these spin populations.

  18. Suppression of Zeeman relaxation in cold collisions of 2P1/2 atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tscherbul, T. V.; Dalgarno, A.; Buchachenko, A. A.; Lu, M.-J.; Weinstein, J. D.

    2009-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study of angular momentum depolarization in cold collisions of 2 P atoms in the presence of an external magnetic field. We show that collision-induced Zeeman relaxation of Ga( 2 P 1/2 ) and In( 2 P 1/2 ) atoms in cold 4 He gas is dramatically suppressed compared to atoms in 2 P 3/2 states. Using rigorous quantum-scattering calculations based on ab initio interaction potentials, we demonstrate that Zeeman transitions in collisions of atoms in 2 P 1/2 electronic states occur via couplings to the 2 P 3/2 state induced by the anisotropy of the interaction potential. Our results suggest the feasibility of sympathetic cooling and magnetic trapping of 2 P 1/2 -state atoms, such as halogens, thereby opening up exciting areas of research in precision spectroscopy and cold-controlled chemistry.

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Methylobacterium populi P-1M, Isolated from Pink-Pigmented Household Biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohoshi, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Tsukasa

    2016-06-16

    Methylobacterium populi P-1M is isolated from the pink-pigmented household biofilm. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of P-1M, consisting of one chromosome of 5,705,640 bp and five plasmids of 64,864 bp, 59,879 bp, 42,569 bp, 41,417 bp, and 29,506 bp. Copyright © 2016 Morohoshi and Ikeda.

  20. Organizational requirements of the SaeR binding sites for a functional P1 promoter of the sae operon in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hoonsik; Jeong, Do-Won; Li, Chunling; Bae, Taeok

    2012-06-01

    In Staphylococcus aureus, the SaeRS two-component system controls the expression of multiple virulence factors. Of the two promoters in the sae operon, P1 is autoinduced and has two binding sites for the response regulator SaeR. In this study, we examined the organizational requirements of the SaeR binding sites in P1 for transcription activation. Mutational studies showed that both binding sites are essential for binding to phosphorylated SaeR (P-SaeR) and transcription activation. When the 21-bp distance between the centers of the two SaeR binding sites was altered to 26 bp, 31 bp, 36 bp, or 41 bp, only the 31-bp mutant retained approximately 40% of the original promoter activity. When the -1-bp spacing (i.e.,1-bp overlap) between the primary SaeR binding site and the -35 promoter region was altered, all mutant P1 promoters failed to initiate transcription; however, when the first nucleotide of the -35 region was changed from A to T, the mutants with 0-bp or 22-bp spacing showed detectable promoter activity. Although P-SaeR was essential for the binding of RNA polymerase to P1, it was not essential for the binding of the enzyme to the alpha-hemolysin promoter. When the nonoptimal spacing between promoter elements in P1 or the coagulase promoter was altered to the optimal spacing of 17 bp, both promoters failed to initiate transcription. These results suggest that SaeR binding sites are under rather strict organizational restrictions and provide clues for understanding the molecular mechanism of sae-mediated transcription activation.

  1. Only Acyl Carrier Protein 1 (AcpP1 Functions in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Fatty Acid Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Cheng Ma

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The genome of Pseudomonas aeruginosa contains three open reading frames, PA2966, PA1869, and PA3334, which encode putative acyl carrier proteins, AcpP1, AcpP2, and AcpP3, respectively. In this study, we found that, although these apo-ACPs were successfully phosphopantetheinylated by P. aeruginosa phosphopantetheinyl transferase (PcpS and all holo-forms of these proteins could be acylated by Vibrio harveyi acyl-ACP synthetase (AasS, only AcpP1 could be used as a substrate for the synthesis of fatty acids, catalyzed by P. aeruginosa cell free extracts in vitro, and only acpP1 gene could restore growth in the Escherichia coliacpP mutant strain CY1877. And P. aeruginosaacpP1 could not be deleted, while disruption of acpP2 or acpP3 in the P. aeruginosa genome allowed mutant strains to grow as well as the wild type strain. These findings confirmed that only P. aeruginosa AcpP1 functions in fatty acid biosynthesis, and that acpP2 and acpP3 do not play roles in the fatty acid synthetic pathway. Moreover, disruption of acpP2 and acpP3 did not affect the ability of P. aeruginosa to produce N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHL, but replacement of P. aeruginosaacpP1 with E. coliacpP caused P. aeruginosa to reduce the production of AHL molecules, which indicated that neither P. aeruginosa AcpP2 nor AcpP3 can act as a substrate for synthesis of AHL molecules in vivo. Furthermore, replacement of acpP1 with E. coliacpP reduced the ability of P. aeruginosa to produce some exo-products and abolished swarming motility in P. aeruginosa.

  2. P1 interneurons promote a persistent internal state that enhances inter-male aggression in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopfer, Eric D; Jung, Yonil; Inagaki, Hidehiko K; Rubin, Gerald M; Anderson, David J

    2015-01-01

    How brains are hardwired to produce aggressive behavior, and how aggression circuits are related to those that mediate courtship, is not well understood. A large-scale screen for aggression-promoting neurons in Drosophila identified several independent hits that enhanced both inter-male aggression and courtship. Genetic intersections revealed that 8-10 P1 interneurons, previously thought to exclusively control male courtship, were sufficient to promote fighting. Optogenetic experiments indicated that P1 activation could promote aggression at a threshold below that required for wing extension. P1 activation in the absence of wing extension triggered persistent aggression via an internal state that could endure for minutes. High-frequency P1 activation promoted wing extension and suppressed aggression during photostimulation, whereas aggression resumed and wing extension was inhibited following photostimulation offset. Thus, P1 neuron activation promotes a latent, internal state that facilitates aggression and courtship, and controls the overt expression of these social behaviors in a threshold-dependent, inverse manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11346.001 PMID:26714106

  3. House dust mite allergen Der p 1 effects on sinonasal epithelial tight junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, Oswaldo A; Den Beste, Kyle; Hoddeson, Elizabeth K; Parkos, Charles A; Nusrat, Asma; Wise, Sarah K

    2013-08-01

    Epithelial permeability is highly dependent upon the integrity of tight junctions, which are cell-cell adhesion complexes located at the apical aspect of the lateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells. We hypothesize that sinonasal epithelial exposure to Der p 1 house dust mite antigen decreases expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs), representing a potential mechanism for increased permeability and presentation of antigens across the sinonasal epithelial layer. Confluent cultured primary human sinonasal epithelial cells were exposed to recombinant Der p 1 antigen vs control, and transepithelial resistance measurements were performed over 24 hours. Antibody staining for a panel of TJPs was examined with immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy and Western blotting. Tissue for these experiments was obtained from 4 patients total. Der p 1 exposed sinonasal cells showed a marked decrease in transepithelial resistance when compared to control cells. In addition, results of Western immunoblot and immunofluorescent labeling demonstrated decreased expression of TJPs claudin-1 and junction adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) in Der p 1-exposed cultured sinonasal cells vs controls. Der p 1 antigen exposure decreases sinonasal epithelium TJP expression, most notably seen in JAM-A and claudin-1 in these preliminary experiments. This decreased TJP expression likely contributes to increased epithelial permeability and represents a potential mechanism for transepithelial antigen exposure in allergic rhinitis. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  4. House Dust Mite Der p 1 Effects on Sinonasal Epithelial Tight Junctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, Oswaldo A.; Beste, Kyle Den; Hoddeson, Elizabeth K.; Parkos, Charles A.; Nusrat, Asma; Wise, Sarah K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Epithelial permeability is highly dependent upon the integrity of tight junctions, cell-cell adhesion complexes located at the apical aspect of the lateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells. We hypothesize that sinonasal epithelial exposure to Der p 1 house dust mite antigen decreases expression of tight junction proteins (TJPs), representing a potential mechanism for increased permeability and presentation of antigens across the sinonasal epithelial layer. Methods Confluent cultured primary human sinonasal epithelial cells were exposed to recombinant Der p 1 antigen versus control, and transepithelial resistance measurements were performed over 24 hours. Antibody staining for a panel of tight junction proteins was examined with immunofluorescence/confocal microscopy and Western blotting. Tissue for these experiments was obtained from 4 patients total. Results Der p 1 exposed sinonasal cells showed a marked decrease in transepithelial resistance when compared to control cells. In addition, results of Western immunoblot and immunofluorescent labeling demonstrated decreased expression of TJPs claudin-1 and junction adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) in Der p 1 exposed cultured sinonasal cells versus controls. Conclusion Der p 1 antigen exposure decreases sinonasal epithelium TJP expression, most notably seen in JAM-A and claudin-1 in these preliminary experiments. This decreased TJP expression likely contributes to increased epithelial permeability and represents a potential mechanism for transepithelial antigen exposure in allergic rhinitis. PMID:23592402

  5. P1 and N170 components distinguish human-like and animal-like makeup stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuwei; Luo, Wenbo; He, Weiqi; Chen, Xu; Luo, Yuejia

    2013-06-19

    This study used event-related potentials to investigate the sensitivity of P1 and N170 components to human-like and animal-like makeup stimuli, which were derived from pictures of Peking opera characters. As predicted, human-like makeup stimuli elicited larger P1 and N170 amplitudes than did animal-like makeup stimuli. Interestingly, a right hemisphere advantage was observed for human-like but not for animal-like makeup stimuli. Dipole source analyses of 130-200-ms window showed that the bilateral fusiform face area may contribute to the differential sensitivity of the N170 component in response to human-like and animal-like makeup stimuli. The present study suggests that the amplitudes of both the P1 and the N170 are sensitive for the mouth component of face-like stimuli.

  6. Nature of the fundamental band gap in GaNxP1-x alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shan, W.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K. M.; Wu, J.; Ager, J. W. III; Haller, E. E.; Xin, H. P.; Tu, C. W.

    2000-01-01

    The optical properties of GaN x P 1-x alloys (0.007≤x≤0.031) grown by gas-source molecular-beam epitaxy have been studied. An absorption edge appears in GaN x P 1-x at energy below the indirect Γ V -X C transition in GaP, and the absorption edge shifts to lower energy with increasing N concentration. Strong photomodulation signals associated with the absorption edges in GaN x P 1-x indicate that a direct fundamental optical transition is taking place, revealing that the fundamental band gap has changed from indirect to direct. This N-induced transformation from indirect to direct band gap is explained in terms of an interaction between the highly localized nitrogen states and the extended states at the Γ conduction-band minimum. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  7. BEAM EXTRACTION FROM THE RECYCLER RING TO P1 LINE AT FERMILAB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, M. [Fermilab; Capista, D. [Fermilab; Adams, P. [Fermilab; Morris, D. [Fermilab; Yang, M. J. [Fermilab; Hazewood, K. [Fermilab

    2016-10-03

    The transfer line for beam extraction from the Recycler ring to P1 line provides a way to deliver 8 GeV kinetic energy protons from the Booster to the Delivery ring, via the Recycler, using existing beam transport lines, and without the need for new civil construction. It was designed in 2012. The kicker magnets at RR520 and the lambertson magnet at RR522 in the RR were installed in 2014 Summer Shutdown, the elements of RR to P1 Stub (permanent quads, trim quads, correctors, BPMs, the toroid at 703 and vertical bending dipole at V703 (ADCW) were installed in 2015 Summer Shutdown. On Tuesday, June 21, 2016, beam line from the Recycler Ring to P1 line was commissioned. The detailed results will be presented in this report.

  8. Fourier analysis of a new P1 synthetic acceleration for Sn transport equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turcksin, B.; Ragusa, J. C.

    2010-10-01

    In this work, is derived a new P1 synthetic acceleration scheme (P1SA) for the S N transport equation and analyze its convergence properties through the means of a Fourier analysis. The Fourier analysis is carried out for both continuous (i.e., not spatially discretized) S N equations and linear discontinuous Fem discretization. We show, thanks to the continuous analysis, that the scheme is unstable when the anisotropy is important (μ - >0.5). However, the discrete analysis shows that when cells are large in comparison to the mean free path, the spectral radius decreases and the acceleration scheme becomes effective, even for highly anisotropic scattering. In charged particles transport, scattering is highly anisotropic and mean free paths are very small and, thus, this scheme could be of interest. To use the P1SA when cells are small and anisotropy is important, the scheme is modified by altering the update of the accelerated flux or by using either K transport sweeps before the application of P1SA. The update scheme performs well as long as μ - - ≥0.9, the modified update scheme is unstable. The multiple transport sweeps scheme is convergent with an arbitrary μ - but the spectral radius increases when scattering is isotropic. When anisotropic increases, the frequency of use of the acceleration scheme needs to be decreased. Even if the P1SA is used less often, the spectral radius is significantly smaller when compared with a method that does not use it for high anisotropy (μ - ≥0.5). It is interesting to notice that using P1SA every two iterations gives the same spectral radius than the update method when μ - ≥0.5 but it is much less efficient when μ - <0.5. (Author)

  9. Oceanographic Observations North Pacific Ocean Station VICTOR Standard Section P1 Terminal Report 1964-1972,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    temperature (*C) for occupation of P1-15, USCG4C MINNETONKA, 27-30 March 1971. 31 34. 8 STATION 16 15 14 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 * ~󈧦 7: 400 3: 27001 3a...Profile of sigma-t (g cm-2 ) for occupation of P1-16, USCGC TANEY, 16-21 April 1971. 36 142*W 144’ 146* 1480 ISO * 152’ 154* 1560 158’ 1600 162’ 164

  10. Tracking the potyviral P1 protein in Nicotiana benthamiana plants during plum pox virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozárová, Z; Glasa, M; Šubr, Z W

    The P1 protein is derived from the N terminus of potyvirus-coded polyprotein. In addition to the proteolytic activity essential for its maturation, it probably participates in suppression of host defense and/or in virus replication. Clear validation of the P1 in vivo function(s), however, is not yet available. We applied an infectious cDNA clone of plum pox virus (PPV), where the P1 was N-fused with a hexahistidine tag, to trace this protein in Nicotiana benthamiana plants during the PPV infection. Immunoblot analysis with the anti-his antibody showed a diffuse band corresponding to the molecular weight about 70-80 kDa (about twice larger than expected) in the root samples from early stage of infection. This signal culminated on the sixth day post inoculation, later it rapidly disappeared. Sample denaturation by boiling in SDS before centrifugal clarification was essential, indicating strong affinity of P1-his to some plant compound sedimenting with the tissue and cell debris.

  11. Hilbert scheme of points on cyclic quotient singularities of type (p,1)

    OpenAIRE

    Gyenge, Ádám

    2016-01-01

    In this note we investigate the generating series of the Euler characteristics of Hilbert scheme of points on cyclic quotient singularities of type (p,1). We link the appearing combinatorics to p-fountains, a generalization of the notion of fountain of coins. We obtain a representation of the generating series as coefficient of a two variable generating series.

  12. Hydrothermal conversion of South African coal fly ash into pure phase Zeolite Na-P1

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Gitari, MW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available South African coal combustion power utilities generate huge amounts of coal fly ash that can be beneficiated into zeolitic products. This chapter reports on the optimization of the presynthesis and synthesis conditions for a pure-phase zeolite Na-P1...

  13. Choline Modulation of the Aβ P1-40 Channel Reconstituted into a Model Lipid Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Meleleo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs, implicated in memory and learning, in subjects affected by Alzheimer's disease result altered. Stimulation of α7-nAChRs inhibits amyloid plaques and increases ACh release. β-amyloid peptide (AβP forms ion channels in the cell and model phospholipid membranes that are retained responsible in Alzheimer disease. We tested if choline, precursor of ACh, could affect the AβP1-40 channels in oxidized cholesterol (OxCh and in palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC:Ch lipid bilayers. Choline concentrations of 5 × 10−11 M–1.5 × 10−8 M added to the cis- or trans-side of membrane quickly increased AβP1-40 ion channel frequency (events/min and ion conductance in OxCh membranes, but not in POPC:Ch membranes. Circular Dichroism (CD spectroscopy shows that after 24 and 48 hours of incubation with AβP1-40, choline stabilizes the random coil conformation of the peptide, making it less prone to fibrillate. These actions seem to be specific in that ACh is ineffective either in solution or on AβP1-40 channel incorporated into PLMs.

  14. Radiative E1-decay of charmonium 1P1 level within sum rules of quantum chromodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, A.P.

    1991-01-01

    Analysis of radiative decay of 1 P 1 → 1 S 0 + γ charmonium within sum rules of quantum chromodynamics was conducted. The sum rule, taking account of gluon exponential correction, was obtained, and width of Χ → η c + γ decay was calculated

  15. Airborne study of grass allergen (Lol p 1) in different-sized particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Linares, C; Díaz de la Guardia, C; Nieto Lugilde, D; Alba, F

    2010-01-01

    The Poaceae family is considered one of the main causes of pollen allergy in industrialized countries. The aim of this study is to establish the dynamics of the Poaceae allergens and determine their distribution in the different-sized particles in the atmosphere. The air of Granada (southern Spain) was sampled during the pollination period of Poaceae using a cascade impactor and a Hirst-type volumetric collector simultaneously. The sampled airborne allergens were analyzed by indirect ELISA and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Airborne pollen was evaluated with the Spanish Aerobiological Network methodology. Poaceae pollen and allergenic activity have parallel dynamics during the period of maximum pollination, which is reflected in the positive correlations between the 2 variables. In addition, the highest Lol p 1 concentrations were recorded in particle sizes lower than 3.3 mum (stage 4-F). The Spearman correlation test showed that airborne allergens are not dependent on meteorological factors, such as humidity, wind direction or sunshine, however, Lol p 1 allergen correlated positively with Poaceae pollen. The results of the present study confirm that the Lol p 1 allergen is detected more frequently with pollutants than with coarse particles with similar dynamics and a positive correlation between airborne pollen and aeroallergens. Moreover, Lol p 1 is released in stable weather conditions without large changes in humidity or temperature. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. LMFBR transducer performance in SLSF tests P1 and P2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    English, J.J.; Anderson, T.T.; Kuzay, T.M.; Wilson, R.E.; Pedersen, D.R.; Kaiser, W.C.; Klingler, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    The reliability and problem areas of sodium-immersed thermocouples, pressure transducers and flowmeters are presented for experiments P1 and P2 of the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF). The SLSF is a doubly-contained sodium loop situated in a core position of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

  17. Heterogeneity of Human Neutrophil CD177 Expression Results from CD177P1 Pseudogene Conversion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuopeng Wu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Most humans harbor both CD177neg and CD177pos neutrophils but 1-10% of people are CD177null, placing them at risk for formation of anti-neutrophil antibodies that can cause transfusion-related acute lung injury and neonatal alloimmune neutropenia. By deep sequencing the CD177 locus, we catalogued CD177 single nucleotide variants and identified a novel stop codon in CD177null individuals arising from a single base substitution in exon 7. This is not a mutation in CD177 itself, rather the CD177null phenotype arises when exon 7 of CD177 is supplied entirely by the CD177 pseudogene (CD177P1, which appears to have resulted from allelic gene conversion. In CD177 expressing individuals the CD177 locus contains both CD177P1 and CD177 sequences. The proportion of CD177hi neutrophils in the blood is a heritable trait. Abundance of CD177hi neutrophils correlates with homozygosity for CD177 reference allele, while heterozygosity for ectopic CD177P1 gene conversion correlates with increased CD177neg neutrophils, in which both CD177P1 partially incorporated allele and paired intact CD177 allele are transcribed. Human neutrophil heterogeneity for CD177 expression arises by ectopic allelic conversion. Resolution of the genetic basis of CD177null phenotype identifies a method for screening for individuals at risk of CD177 isoimmunisation.

  18. 1P1 heavy quarkonia production in hadron-hadron collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alanakyan, R.A.; Dul'yan, L.S.; Grigoryan, S.G.; Matinyan, S.G.

    1987-01-01

    The production of 1 P 1 -quarkonia (charmonium, bottomonium and toponium) with large transverse momenta is studied in collisions of ultrahigh-energy pp and pp-bar beams. The analysis was carried out in the framework of gluon-gluon fusion mechanism and nonrelativistic quarkonium model

  19. Analysis of glutathione S-transferase (M1, T1 and P1) gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutathione S-transferase enzymes are active in detoxifying a wide number of endogenous and exogenous chemical carcinogens and subsequently, are crucial in protecting the DNA. Several studies show some differences in association of glutathione S-transferase M1, T1 and P1 genetic polymorphisms with the risk of ...

  20. Mechanical response of FFTF reference and P1 cladding tubes under transient heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngahl, C.A.; Ariman, T.; Lepacek, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Burst tests of Type 316 stainless steel cladding tube samples subjected to increasing temperature and relatively constant internal pressure were conducted to assist in the pretest analysis of the P1 experiment performed in the Sodium Loop Safety Facility. This paper reports and analyzes the burst test results and those of subsequent transient heating work. The use of a modified extensometer in obtaining mechanical response data for stainless steel in the high temperature range is illustrated, some of such data is provided, and the potential of further experiments and analysis is indicated. Tubing of the same design as Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) cladding (20% cold worked, 0.230 in. OD, 15 mil wall) was tested as-received and after annealing or electrolytic thinning. P1 tubing (38% cold worked, 0.230 in. OD, 10 mil wall) was tested before and after aging under conditions anticipated in the P1 reactor experiment. The P1 cladding was designed to simulate FFTF tubing that had experienced irradiation embrittlement and attack by cesium oxide and sodium impurities

  1. [Role and related mechanism of S1P/S1P1 signal pathway during post conditioning of hypertrophic cardiomyocytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X H; Li, H X; Tao, J; Li, X M; Yang, Y N; Ma, Y T; Chen, B D

    2016-05-24

    To study the role and mechanism of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)/ sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1(S1P1) signal pathway during post conditioning of hypertrophic cardiomyocytes. Neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were isolated and cultured, then stimulated by norepinephrine (NE) to induce cardiomyocytes hypertrophy. Using tri-gas incubator to create hypoxia and reoxygenation enviroment to mimic ischemia-reperfusion and postconditioning. Hypertrophic cardiomyoctyes were divided into five groups according to the presence or absence of various drugs and postconditiong and relevant signal pathways changes were detected: (1) IPost group (hypoxia+ postconditioning); (2) IPost+ S1P group (cells were pretreated with S1P (1 μmol/L) for 2 h before IPost); (3) IPost+ W-146+ S1P group (cells in IPost+ W-146+ S1P group were pretreated with S1P1 inhibitor W-146 (0.4 μmol/L) for 20 min); (4) IPost+ PD98059+ S1P group (cells in IPost+ S1P group were pretreated with MAPK antagonist PD98059 (125 μmol/L) for 20 min); (5) IPost+ LY-294002+ S1P group (cells in IPost+ S1P group were pretreated with PI3K antagonist LY294002 (0.1 μmol/L) for 20 min). Apoptosis was detected by flow cytometry and protein expression of relevant signal pathways were detected by Western blot. (1)Apoptosis rate was significantly increased in hypoxia/reoxygenation (27.90±4.49)% group compared with normal control group (7.97±2.18)%, which could be significantly reduced in IPost group (15.90±1.77)% (all PS1P and IPost+ S1P+ LY-294002 groups than in IPost and IPost+ S1P+ W-146 and IPost+ S1P+ PD98059 group (all PS1P and IPost+ S1P+ LY-294002 group than in IPost and IPost+ S1P+ W-146 group and IPost+ S1P+ PD98059 group (all PS1P+ W-146 and IPost+ S1P+ PD98059 groups. p-ERK1/2 and p-Akt levels in IPost+ S1P+ W-146 group and IPost+ S1P+ PD98059 were similar as in IPost group. S1P can play protective role on NE induced cardiomyocytes hypertrophy during post conditioning through downregulating caspase-3 expression and

  2. WORKSHOP: Inner space - outer space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    During the first week of May, the Fermilab theoretical astrophysics group hosted an international conference on science at the interface of particle physics and cosmology/astrophysics. The conference (Inner Space-Outer Space) was attended by a very diverse group of more than 200 physical scientists, including astronomers, astrophysicists, cosmologists, low-temperature physicists, and elementary particle theorists and experimentalists. The common interest which brought this diverse group to gether is the connection between physics on the smallest scale probed by man - the realm of elementary particle physics - and physics on the largest scale imaginable (the entire Universe) - the realm of cosmology

  3. WORKSHOP: Inner space - outer space

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1984-09-15

    During the first week of May, the Fermilab theoretical astrophysics group hosted an international conference on science at the interface of particle physics and cosmology/astrophysics. The conference (Inner Space-Outer Space) was attended by a very diverse group of more than 200 physical scientists, including astronomers, astrophysicists, cosmologists, low-temperature physicists, and elementary particle theorists and experimentalists. The common interest which brought this diverse group to gether is the connection between physics on the smallest scale probed by man - the realm of elementary particle physics - and physics on the largest scale imaginable (the entire Universe) - the realm of cosmology.

  4. The Proteolytic Fraction from Latex of Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis (P1G10) Enhances Wound Healing of Diabetic Foot Ulcers: A Double-Blind Randomized Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonaco, Luís A B; Gomes, Flavia L; Velasquez-Melendez, Gustavo; Lopes, Miriam T P; Salas, Carlos E

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the role of the proteolytic fraction from Vasconcellea cundinamarcensis, designated as P1G10, on the healing of chronic foot ulcers in neuropathic patients with diabetes 2. Fifty patients were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, double-blind trial, to verify the efficacy and safety of a topical dressing formulated with 0.1% P1G10, intended for wound healing, versus a hydrogel (control) protocol. Upon completion of the intervention, the outcome evaluated the number of patients attaining full epithelization (100%), or at least 80% healing. Statistical analysis compared the data on each group for the significance of the differences. Collection of data was finished in week 16, and the results were analyzed by intention to treat. The results showed that, in the control group, 5 patients attained 100% ulcer healing, 3 patients ≥ 80% healing and 11 experienced ulcer changes ≤ 80%, and the remainder showed no changes or their wounds became worse. Meanwhile, in the P1G10 group, 11 patients experienced full healing, 4 had healing ≥ 80% and 5 had ulcer changes ≤ lower than 80%, and the remainder showed no changes or their wounds became worse. The healing incidence for the first endpoint (100% healing) showed that the P1G10 group was 2.95-fold more efficacious than the control group (CI 95%) and 2.52-fold (CI, 95%) higher than its control for the second endpoint (80% healing). These data support the hypothesis that topical application of the proteolytic fraction identified as P1G10 significantly enhances foot ulcer healing compared to hydrogel treatment.

  5. Spectral intensities: The emission spectra for the Cs2NaScCl6: MoCl63- system in the Fm3m space group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acevedo, R.; Meruane, T.; Navarro, G.

    2000-01-01

    Taking advantage of the data reported by Flint and Paulusz, we have undertaken a theoretical investigation of the intensity mechanism for the various emissions; Γ 8 ( 2 T 2g ) → Γ 8 ( 4 A 2g ), Γ 8 ( 2 E g ), Γ 8 ( 2 T 1g ), Γ 6 ( 2 T 1g ) for the Cs 2 NaScCl 6 :MoCl 6 3- system in the Fm3m-space group. The experimental data reported by these authors, refer to the visible and near infrared luminescence spectra of MoCl 3- 6 complex ion in different host, such as Cs 2 NaMCl 6 (M = Sc, Y, In), measured between 15,000 cm -1 and 3,000 cm -1 at liquid helium temperatures. At least, five luminescence transitions have been identified and assigned and each of them show extensive vibronic structure, which was analyzed to yield the vibrational frequencies of the MoX 3- 6 (X -1 = Cl -1 Br -1 ) ion in each excitation. A careful analysis of the experimental data reported shows that for the various observed electronic transitions, the vibration frequencies do change only slightly, and therefore there is no indication that the system undergoes a Jahn-Teller distortion (along an active coordinate) of some importance to be taken into account in the current work. There is, though clear evidence that for the chloro-elpasolites, there is a strong resonance interaction between ν 3 (τ 1u : stretching) of the MoX 6 3- , complex ion and that of the host when M = In, Y. Thus for M = Sc, the slighter higher host ν 3 , wavenumber is likely to minimizes the effect of this coupling. This experimental evidence, will allow us for the Cs 2 NaScCl 6 3- system to neglect to first order approximation, the coupling among the internal and the external vibrations and to proceed using a both a molecular model and the independent system model (ISM)

  6. Product Plan of New Generation System Camera "OLYMPUS PEN E-P1"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Haruo

    "OLYMPUS PEN E-P1", which is new generation system camera, is the first product of Olympus which is new standard "Micro Four-thirds System" for high-resolution mirror-less cameras. It continues good sales by the concept of "small and stylish design, easy operation and SLR image quality" since release on July 3, 2009. On the other hand, the half-size film camera "OLYMPUS PEN" was popular by the concept "small and stylish design and original mechanism" since the first product in 1959 and recorded sale number more than 17 million with 17 models. By the 50th anniversary topic and emotional value of the Olympus pen, Olympus pen E-P1 became big sales. I would like to explain the way of thinking of the product plan that included not only the simple functional value but also emotional value on planning the first product of "Micro Four-thirds System".

  7. Development of Quasi-3DOF upper limb rehabilitation system using ER brake: PLEMO-P1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikuchi, T; Fukushima, K; Furusho, J; Ozawa, T

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, many researchers have studied the potential of using robotics technology to assist and quantify the motor functions for neuron-rehabilitation. Some kinds of haptic devices have been developed and evaluated its efficiency with clinical tests, for example, upper limb training for patients with spasticity after stroke. However, almost all the devices are active-type (motor-driven) haptic devices and they basically require high-cost safety system compared to passive-type (brake-based) devices. In this study, we developed a new practical haptic device 'PLEMO-P1'; this system adopted ER brakes as its force generators. In this paper, the mechanism of PLEMO-P1 and its software for a reaching rehabilitation are described.

  8. Development of Quasi-3DOF upper limb rehabilitation system using ER brake: PLEMO-P1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kikuchi, T; Fukushima, K; Furusho, J; Ozawa, T [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)], E-mail: kikuchi@mech.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, many researchers have studied the potential of using robotics technology to assist and quantify the motor functions for neuron-rehabilitation. Some kinds of haptic devices have been developed and evaluated its efficiency with clinical tests, for example, upper limb training for patients with spasticity after stroke. However, almost all the devices are active-type (motor-driven) haptic devices and they basically require high-cost safety system compared to passive-type (brake-based) devices. In this study, we developed a new practical haptic device 'PLEMO-P1'; this system adopted ER brakes as its force generators. In this paper, the mechanism of PLEMO-P1 and its software for a reaching rehabilitation are described.

  9. Complexity and diversity of the NKR-P1:Clr (Klrb1:Clec2 recognition systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Kirkham

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The NKR-P1 receptors were identified as prototypical natural killer (NK cell surface antigens and later shown to be conserved from rodents to humans on NK cells and subsets of T cells. C-type lectin-like in nature, they were originally shown to be capable of activating NK cell function and to recognize ligands on tumour cells. However, certain family members have subsequently been shown to be capable of inhibiting NK cell activity, and to recognize proteins encoded by a family of genetically linked C-type lectin-related (Clr ligands. Some of these ligands are expressed by normal, healthy cells, and modulated during transformation, infection, and cellular stress, while other ligands are upregulated during the immune response and during pathological circumstances. Here, we discuss historical and recent developments in NKR-P1 biology that demonstrate this NK receptor-ligand system to be far more complex and diverse than originally anticipated.

  10. Structure of the conserved hypothetical protein MAL13P1.257 from Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, Margaret A.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Mehlin, Christopher; Boni, Erica; Earnest, Thomas N.; DeTitta, George; Luft, Joseph; Lauricella, Angela; Anderson, Lori; Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr; Zucker, Frank; Schoenfeld, Lori W.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A.

    2006-01-01

    The crystal structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, MAL13P1.257 from P. falciparum, has been determined at 2.17 Å resolution. The structure represents a new protein fold and is the first structural representative for Pfam sequence family PF05907. The structure of a conserved hypothetical protein, PlasmoDB sequence MAL13P1.257 from Plasmodium falciparum, Pfam sequence family PF05907, has been determined as part of the structural genomics effort of the Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa consortium. The structure was determined by multiple-wavelength anomalous dispersion at 2.17 Å resolution. The structure is almost entirely β-sheet; it consists of 15 β-strands and one short 3 10 -helix and represents a new protein fold. The packing of the two monomers in the asymmetric unit indicates that the biological unit may be a dimer.

  11. Space dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corno, S.E.

    1995-01-01

    Analytical methods for Space Dynamics of fission reactors, are presented. It is shown how a few sample problems in space dynamics can be solved, within the one and two group diffusion model, by purely analytical tools, essentially based on Laplace transform and complex Green function techniques. A quite suggestive generalization of this approach, applicable to the fluid core reactors, whose fuel is undergoing a violent mixing, is reported and briefly discussed. (author)

  12. TRIMARAN: a three dimensional multigroup P1 Monte Carlo code for criticality studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermumcu, G.; Gonnord, J.; Nimal, J.C.

    1980-01-01

    TRIMARAN is developed for safety analysis of nuclear components containing fissionable materials: shipping casks, storage and cooling pools, manufacture and reprocessing plants. It solves the transport equation by Monte Carlo method, in general three dimensional geometry with multigroup P1 approximation. A special representation of cross sections and numbers has been developed in order to reduce considerably the computing cost and allow this three dimensional code to compete with standard numerical program used in parametric studies

  13. TRIMARAN: a three dimensional multigroup P1 Monte Carlo code for criticallity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermuncu, G.; Gonnord, J.; Nimal, J.C.

    1980-04-01

    TRIMARAN is developed for safety analysis of nuclar components containing fissionnable materials: shipping casks, storage and cooling pools, manufacture and reprocessing plants. It solves the transport equation by Monte Carlo method in general three dimensional geometry with multigroup P1 approximation. A special representation of cross sections and numbers has been developed in order to reduce considerably the computing cost and allow this three dimensional code to compete with standard numerical program used in parametric studies

  14. Calculations of Edwards' pipe blowdown tests using the code TRAC P1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Mahoney, R.

    1979-05-01

    The paper describes the results obtained using the non-thermal equilibrium LOCA code TRAC-P1 for two of a series of Pipe Blowdown Tests. Comparisons are made with the experimental values and RELAP-UK Mark IV predictions. Some discrepancies between prediction and experiment are observed, and certain aspects of the model are considered to warrant possible further attention. (U.K.)

  15. Characterization of P1 promoter activity of the β-galactoside α2,6 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-04-05

    Apr 5, 2012 ... The level of β-galactoside α2,6-sialyltransferase I (ST6Gal I) mRNA, encoded by the gene siat1, is increased in malignant tissues. Expression is regulated by different promoters – P1, P2 and P3 – generating three mRNA isoforms. H, X and YZ. In cervical cancer tissue the mRNA isoform H, which results ...

  16. Electron-impact coherence parameters for 41 P 1 excitation of zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwiński, Mariusz; Kłosowski, Łukasz; Chwirot, Stanisław; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor; Das, Tapasi; Srivastava, Rajesh

    2018-04-01

    We present electron-impact coherence parameters (EICP) for electron-impact excitation of 41 P 1 state of zinc atoms for collision energies 40 eV and 60 eV. The experimental results are presented together with convergent close-coupling and relativistic distorted-wave approximation theoretical predictions. The results are compared and discussed with EICP data for collision energies 80 eV and 100 eV.

  17. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins P1 and P2 interact and colocalize at the vacuolar membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijden, van der M.W.; Carette, J.E.; Reinhoud, P.J.; Haegi, A.; Bol, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Replication of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNAs depends on the virus-encoded proteins P1 and P2. P1 contains methyltransferase- and helicase-like domains, and P2 contains a polymerase-like domain. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed an interaction between in vitro translated-P1 and P2 and

  18. Lateral supraorbital approach to ipsilateral PCA-P1 and ICA-PCoA aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goehre, Felix; Jahromi, Behnam Rezai; Elsharkawy, Ahmed; Lehto, Hanna; Shekhtman, Oleg; Andrade-Barazarte, Hugo; Munoz, Francisco; Hijazy, Ferzat; Makhkamov, Makhkam; Hernesniemi, Juha

    2015-01-01

    Aneurysms of the posterior cerebral artery (PCA) are rare and often associated with anterior circulation aneurysms. The lateral supraorbital approach allows for a very fast and safe approach to the ipsilateral lesions Circle of Willis. A technical note on the successful clip occlusion of two aneurysms in the anterior and posterior Circle of Willis via this less invasive approach has not been published before. The objective of this technical note is to describe the simultaneous microsurgical clip occlusion of an ipsilateral PCA-P1 and an internal carotid artery - posterior communicating artery (ICA-PCoA) aneurysm via the lateral supraorbital approach. The authors present a technical report of successful clip occlusions of ipsilateral located PCA-P1 and ICA-PCoA aneurysms. A 59-year-old female patient was diagnosed with a PCA-P1 and an ipsilateral ICA-PCoA aneurysm by computed tomography angiography (CTA) after an ischemic stroke secondary to a contralateral ICA dissection. The patient underwent microsurgical clipping after a lateral supraorbital craniotomy. The intraoperative indocyanine green (ICG) videoangiography and the postoperative CTA showed a complete occlusion of both aneurysms; the parent vessels (ICA and PCA) were patent. The patient presents postoperative no new neurologic deficit. The lateral supraorbital approach is suitable for the simultaneous microsurgical treatment of proximal anterior circulation and ipsilateral proximal PCA aneurysms. Compared to endovascular treatment, direct visual control of brainstem perforators is possible.

  19. Sim@P1: Using Cloudscheduler for offline processing on the ATLAS HLT farm

    CERN Document Server

    Berghaus, Frank; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    The Simulation at Point1 (Sim@P1) project was built in 2013 to take advantage of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition High Level Trigger (HLT) farm. The HLT farm provides more than 2,000 compute nodes, which are critical to ATLAS during data taking. When ATLAS is not recording data, this large compute resource is used to generate and process simulation data for the experiment. The Sim@P1 system uses virtual machines, deployed by OpenStack, in order to isolate the resources from the ATLAS technical and control network. During the upcoming long shutdown in 2019 (LS2), the HLT farm including the Sim@P1 infrastructure will be upgraded. A previous paper on the project emphasized the need for “simple, reliable, and efficient tools” to quickly switch between data acquisition operation and offline processing.In this contribution we assess various options for updating and simplifying the provisional tools. Cloudscheduler is a tool for provisioning cloud resources for batch computing that has been managing cloud ...

  20. Realizing spaces as path-component spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Banakh, Taras; Brazas, Jeremy

    2018-01-01

    The path component space of a topological space $X$ is the quotient space $\\pi_0(X)$ whose points are the path components of $X$. We show that every Tychonoff space $X$ is the path-component space of a Tychonoff space $Y$ of weight $w(Y)=w(X)$ such that the natural quotient map $Y\\to \\pi_0(Y)=X$ is a perfect map. Hence, many topological properties of $X$ transfer to $Y$. We apply this result to construct a compact space $X\\subset \\mathbb{R}^3$ for which the fundamental group $\\pi_1(X,x_0)$ is...

  1. Acoustic detection of boiling in the Sodium Loop Safety Facility in-reactor experiment P1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carey, W.M.; Anderson, T.T.; Bobis, J.P.

    1976-06-01

    Acoustic data were obtained from two high-temperature lithium niobate microphones on the loop background noise and transient pressure pulses during the Sodium Loop Safety Facility (SLSF) P1 in-reactor experiment. This experiment simulated an LMFBR loss-of-piping-integrity (LOPI) transient on a nineteen element, end-of-life, enriched-UO 2 fuel assembly. The microphones were exposed to liquid sodium at a distance 4.85 meters above the reactor core at temperatures between 315 0 and 590 0 C. The distance and location of the microphones in the P1 Test Train provided an attenuative transmission path which was undesirable for optimum acoustic detection of sodium boiling and fuel failure. The data gathered on the loop background noise was observed to be dominated by pump and electrical noise at frequencies below 1.5 KHz and appeared to be dominated by flow induced local turbulence noise at higher frequencies. During the period of time that the sodium in the fuel assembly was at its saturation temperature 943 0 C (1730 0 F), as indicated by the wire wrap thermocouples, several discrete pulses were observed with peak-to-peak pressure between 3.3 kPa and 7.9 kPa and center frequencies between 360 and 550 Hz. The pulses occurred at two separate gradually increasing repetition rates. These observations appear to be consistent with the result of an impulsive forcing function interacting with a band passed Helmholtz resonator. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that sodium boiling occurred in the P1 fuel assembly, resulting in the formation of individual voids that collapsed upon reaching the subcooled sodium. These data provide pertinent information regarding the feasibility of sodium boiling detection and may provide additional insight into the dynamics of the void behavior

  2. P1 plasmid replication: initiator sequestration is inadequate to explain control by initiator-binding sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Pal, S K; Chattoraj, D K

    1988-01-01

    The unit-copy plasmid replicon mini-P1 consists of an origin, a gene for an initiator protein, RepA, and a control locus, incA. Both the origin and the incA locus contain repeat sequences that bind RepA. It has been proposed that the incA repeats control replication by sequestering the rate-limiting RepA initiator protein. Here we show that when the concentration of RepA was increased about fourfold beyond its normal physiological level from an inducible source in trans, the copy number of a ...

  3. Doc of prophage P1 is inhibited by its antitoxin partner Phd through fold complementation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Pino, Abel; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Wyns, Lode

    2008-01-01

    Prokaryotic toxin-antitoxin modules are involved in major physiological events set in motion under stress conditions. The toxin Doc (death on curing) from the phd/doc module on phage P1 hosts the C-terminal domain of its antitoxin partner Phd (prevents host death) through fold complementation....... This Phd domain is intrinsically disordered in solution and folds into an alpha-helix upon binding to Doc. The details of the interactions reveal the molecular basis for the inhibitory action of the antitoxin. The complex resembles the Fic (filamentation induced by cAMP) proteins and suggests a possible......-antitoxin locus for its action in vivo....

  4. Electronic Structures of Strained InAs x P1-x by Density Functional Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Mi; Kim, Min-Young; Kim, Young Heon

    2018-09-01

    We investigated the effects of strain on the electronic structures of InAsxP1-x using quantum mechanical density functional theory calculations. The electronic band gap and electron effective mass decreased with the increase of the uniaxial tensile strain along the [0001] direction of wurtzite InAs0.75P0.25. Therefore, faster electron movements are expected. These theoretical results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements of InAs0.75P0.25 nanowire.

  5. U P1, an example for advanced techniques applied to high level activity dismantling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michel-Noel, M.; Calixte, O.; Blanchard, S.; Bani, J.; Girones, P.; Moitrier, C.; Terry, G.; Bourdy, R.

    2014-01-01

    The U P1 plant on the CEA Marcoule site was dedicated to the processing of spend fuels from the G1, G2 and G3 plutonium-producing reactors. This plant represents 20.000 m 2 of workshops housing about 1000 hot cells. In 1998, a huge program for the dismantling and cleaning-up of the UP1 plant was launched. CEA has developed new techniques to face the complexity of the dismantling operations. These techniques include immersive virtual reality, laser cutting, a specific manipulator arm called MAESTRO and remote handling. (A.C.)

  6. The Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford Phase Spaces with a Lower and Upper Length Scales and Clifford Group Geometric Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, C

    2004-01-01

    We construct the Extended Relativity Theory in Born-Clifford-Phase spaces with an upper and lower length scales (infrared/ultraviolet cutoff). The invariance symmetry leads naturally to the real Clifford algebra Cl (2, 6, R ) and complexified Clifford Cl_C ( 4 ) algebra related to Twistors. We proceed with an extensive review of Smith's 8D model based on the Clifford algebra Cl ( 1 ,7) that reproduces at low energies the physics of the Standard Model and Gravity; including the derivation of all the coupling constants, particle masses, mixing angles, ....with high precision. Further results by Smith are discussed pertaining the interplay among Clifford, Jordan, Division and Exceptional Lie algebras within the hierarchy of dimensions D = 26, 27, 28 related to bosonic string, M, F theory. Two Geometric actions are presented like the Clifford-Space extension of Maxwell's Electrodynamics, Brandt's action related the 8D spacetime tangent-bundle involving coordinates and velocities (Finsler geometries) followed by a...

  7. The normal holonomy group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olmos, C.

    1990-05-01

    The restricted holonomy group of a Riemannian manifold is a compact Lie group and its representation on the tangent space is a product of irreducible representations and a trivial one. Each one of the non-trivial factors is either an orthogonal representation of a connected compact Lie group which acts transitively on the unit sphere or it is the isotropy representation of a single Riemannian symmetric space of rank ≥ 2. We prove that, all these properties are also true for the representation on the normal space of the restricted normal holonomy group of any submanifold of a space of constant curvature. 4 refs

  8. Group Dynamics in Long -term blind endeavors on Earth as an analog for Remote Space Missions (Lewis & Clark Expedition, 1803 - 1806, Dynamic Analysis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allner, M.; Rygalov, V.; Reilly, J.

    In 1803 President Thomas Jefferson set fourth a military expedition led by Captains newline M Lewis and W Clark L C Expedition on an exploration to learn more about the large territory of land the U S had just purchased from France Cavan 1991 Their mission was to find a direct water route to the Pacific Ocean for the purpose of commerce and further industrial development Edwards 1999 Looking back at the events of this exploration there are many similarities to the experiences future human space explorers will face as we look to colonize the Moon and travel to Mars and beyond NASA Vision for Space Exploration 2004 - The L C Expedition lasted almost three years and involved a crew of 43 men traveling up the Missouri River to explore the unknown lands and a possible water route to the Pacific Ocean newline - The expedition took place far away from customary comfortable environments known to European settlers in early 18th century newline - The expedition involved a remotely confined high-perceived risk environment with high levels of uncertainty providing stresses and every day challenges for the crew newline - Supplies brought on the mission were limited mainly a mass weight issue rather than cost therefore the discovery and use of environmental resources In-Situ Resource Utilization approach including info-resources to mitigate uncertainty was necessary for crew survival The environments astronauts will encounter in space and on the Moon and Mars due to high risk and uncertainty will be in many aspects similar

  9. Geometric group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Druţu, Cornelia

    2018-01-01

    The key idea in geometric group theory is to study infinite groups by endowing them with a metric and treating them as geometric spaces. This applies to many groups naturally appearing in topology, geometry, and algebra, such as fundamental groups of manifolds, groups of matrices with integer coefficients, etc. The primary focus of this book is to cover the foundations of geometric group theory, including coarse topology, ultralimits and asymptotic cones, hyperbolic groups, isoperimetric inequalities, growth of groups, amenability, Kazhdan's Property (T) and the Haagerup property, as well as their characterizations in terms of group actions on median spaces and spaces with walls. The book contains proofs of several fundamental results of geometric group theory, such as Gromov's theorem on groups of polynomial growth, Tits's alternative, Stallings's theorem on ends of groups, Dunwoody's accessibility theorem, the Mostow Rigidity Theorem, and quasiisometric rigidity theorems of Tukia and Schwartz. This is the f...

  10. FURTHER CONSTRAINTS ON THE OPTICAL TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF HAT-P-1b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montalto, M.; Santos, N. C.; Martins, J. H. C.; Figueira, P.; Alonso, R.; Iro, N.; Desidera, S.

    2015-01-01

    We report on novel observations of HAT-P-1 aimed at constraining the optical transmission spectrum of the atmosphere of its transiting hot-Jupiter exoplanet. Ground-based differential spectrophotometry was performed over two transit windows using the DOLORES spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Our measurements imply an average planet to star radius ratio equal to R p /R * = (0.1159 ± 0.0005). This result is consistent with the value obtained from recent near-infrared measurements of this object, but differs from previously reported optical measurements, being lower by around 4.4 exoplanet scale heights. Analyzing the data over five different spectral bins of ∼600 Å wide, we observed a single peaked spectrum (3.7 σ level) with a blue cutoff corresponding to the blue edge of the broad absorption wing of sodium and an increased absorption in the region in-between 6180 and 7400 Å. We also infer that the width of the broad absorption wings due to alkali metals is likely narrower than the one implied by solar abundance clear atmospheric models. We interpret the result as evidence that HAT-P-1b has a partially clear atmosphere at optical wavelengths with a more modest contribution from an optical absorber than previously reported

  11. FURTHER CONSTRAINTS ON THE OPTICAL TRANSMISSION SPECTRUM OF HAT-P-1b

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montalto, M.; Santos, N. C.; Martins, J. H. C.; Figueira, P.; Alonso, R. [Instituto de Astrofísica e Ciências do Espaço, Universidade do Porto, CAUP, Rua das Estrelas, PT4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Iro, N. [Theoretical Meteorology Group Klimacampus, University of Hamburg Grindelberg 5, D-20144, Hamburg (Germany); Desidera, S., E-mail: Marco.Montalto@astro.up.pt [INAF—Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Vicolo dellOsservatorio 5, Padova, I-35122 (Italy)

    2015-09-20

    We report on novel observations of HAT-P-1 aimed at constraining the optical transmission spectrum of the atmosphere of its transiting hot-Jupiter exoplanet. Ground-based differential spectrophotometry was performed over two transit windows using the DOLORES spectrograph at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Our measurements imply an average planet to star radius ratio equal to R{sub p}/R{sub *} = (0.1159 ± 0.0005). This result is consistent with the value obtained from recent near-infrared measurements of this object, but differs from previously reported optical measurements, being lower by around 4.4 exoplanet scale heights. Analyzing the data over five different spectral bins of ∼600 Å wide, we observed a single peaked spectrum (3.7 σ level) with a blue cutoff corresponding to the blue edge of the broad absorption wing of sodium and an increased absorption in the region in-between 6180 and 7400 Å. We also infer that the width of the broad absorption wings due to alkali metals is likely narrower than the one implied by solar abundance clear atmospheric models. We interpret the result as evidence that HAT-P-1b has a partially clear atmosphere at optical wavelengths with a more modest contribution from an optical absorber than previously reported.

  12. Optimization of nonribosomal peptides production by a psychrotrophic fungus: Trichoderma velutinum ACR-P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Singh, Varun P; Singh, Deepika; Yusuf, Farnaz; Kumar, Anil; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Chaubey, Asha

    2016-11-01

    Trichoderma is an anamorphic filamentous fungal genus with immense potential for production of small valuable secondary metabolites with indispensable biological activities. Microbial dynamics of a psychrotrophic strain Trichoderma velutinum ACR-P1, isolated from unexplored niches of the Shiwalik region, bestowed with rich biodiversity of microflora, was investigated for production of nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) by metabolite profiling by intact-cell mass spectrometry (ICMS) employing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer. Being the first report on NRPs production by T. velutinum, studies on optimization of growth conditions by Response Surface Methodology (RSM) for production of NRPs by ACR-P1 was carried out strategically. Multifold enhancement in the yield of NRPs belonging to subfamily SF4 with medium chain of amino acid residues having m/z 1437.9, 1453.9, and 1452.0 at pH 5.9 at 20 °C and of subfamily SF1 with long-chain amino acid residues having m/z 1770.2, 1784.2, 1800.1, 1802.1, and 1815.1 was achieved at pH 7.0 at 25 °C. Complexities of natural mixtures were thus considerably reduced under respective optimized culture conditions accelerating the production of novel microbial natural products by saving time and resources.

  13. Quenching of I(2P1/2) by O3 and O(3P).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azyazov, Valeriy N; Antonov, Ivan O; Heaven, Michael C

    2007-04-26

    Oxygen-iodine lasers that utilize electrical or microwave discharges to produce singlet oxygen are currently being developed. The discharge generators differ from conventional chemical singlet oxygen generators in that they produce significant amounts of atomic oxygen. Post-discharge chemistry includes channels that lead to the formation of ozone. Consequently, removal of I(2P1/2) by O atoms and O3 may impact the efficiency of discharge driven iodine lasers. In the present study, we have measured the rate constants for quenching of I(2P1/2) by O(3P) atoms and O3 using pulsed laser photolysis techniques. The rate constant for quenching by O3, (1.8 +/- 0.4) x 10(-12) cm3 s-1, was found to be a factor of 5 smaller than the literature value. The rate constant for quenching by O(3P) was (1.2 +/- 0.2) x 10(-11) cm3 s-1.

  14. THE PLASMA ENVIRONMENT IN COMETS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF HELIOCENTRIC DISTANCES: APPLICATION TO COMET C/2006 P1 (MCNAUGHT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shou, Y.; Combi, M.; Gombosi, T.; Toth, G. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Jia, Y.-D. [IGPP, and EPSS, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Rubin, M. [Physikalisches Institut, University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse. 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2015-08-20

    On 2007 January 12, comet C/2006 P1 (McNaught) passed its perihelion at 0.17 AU. Abundant remote observations offer plenty of information on the neutral composition and neutral velocities within 1 million kilometers of the comet nucleus. In early February, the Ulysses spacecraft made an in situ measurement of the ion composition, plasma velocity, and magnetic field when passing through the distant ion tail and the ambient solar wind. The measurement by Ulysses was made when the comet was at around 0.8 AU. With the constraints provided by remote and in situ observations, we simulated the plasma environment of Comet C/2006 P1 (McNaught) using a multi-species comet MHD model over a wide range of heliocentric distances from 0.17 to 1.75 AU. The solar wind interaction of the comet at various locations is characterized and typical subsolar standoff distances of the bow shock and contact surface are presented and compared to analytic solutions. We find the variation in the bow shock standoff distances at different heliocentric distances is smaller than the contact surface. In addition, we modified the multi-species model for the case when the comet was at 0.7 AU and achieved comparable water group ion abundances, proton densities, plasma velocities, and plasma temperatures to the Ulysses/SWICS and SWOOPS observations. We discuss the dominating chemical reactions throughout the comet-solar wind interaction region and demonstrate the link between the ion composition near the comet and in the distant tail as measured by Ulysses.

  15. THE PLASMA ENVIRONMENT IN COMETS OVER A WIDE RANGE OF HELIOCENTRIC DISTANCES: APPLICATION TO COMET C/2006 P1 (MCNAUGHT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shou, Y.; Combi, M.; Gombosi, T.; Toth, G.; Jia, Y.-D.; Rubin, M.

    2015-01-01

    On 2007 January 12, comet C/2006 P1 (McNaught) passed its perihelion at 0.17 AU. Abundant remote observations offer plenty of information on the neutral composition and neutral velocities within 1 million kilometers of the comet nucleus. In early February, the Ulysses spacecraft made an in situ measurement of the ion composition, plasma velocity, and magnetic field when passing through the distant ion tail and the ambient solar wind. The measurement by Ulysses was made when the comet was at around 0.8 AU. With the constraints provided by remote and in situ observations, we simulated the plasma environment of Comet C/2006 P1 (McNaught) using a multi-species comet MHD model over a wide range of heliocentric distances from 0.17 to 1.75 AU. The solar wind interaction of the comet at various locations is characterized and typical subsolar standoff distances of the bow shock and contact surface are presented and compared to analytic solutions. We find the variation in the bow shock standoff distances at different heliocentric distances is smaller than the contact surface. In addition, we modified the multi-species model for the case when the comet was at 0.7 AU and achieved comparable water group ion abundances, proton densities, plasma velocities, and plasma temperatures to the Ulysses/SWICS and SWOOPS observations. We discuss the dominating chemical reactions throughout the comet-solar wind interaction region and demonstrate the link between the ion composition near the comet and in the distant tail as measured by Ulysses

  16. Studies of social group dynamics under isolated conditions. Objective summary of the literature as it relates to potential problems of long duration space flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinograd, S. P.

    1974-01-01

    Scientific literature which deals with the study of human behavior and crew interaction in situations simulating long term space flight is summarized and organized. A bibliography of all the pertinent U.S. literature available is included, along with definitions of the behavioral characteristics terms employed. The summarized studies are analyzed according to behavioral factors and environmental conditions. The analysis consist of two matrices. (1) The matrix of factors studied correlates each research study area and individual study with the behavioral factors that were investigated in the study. (2) The matrix of conclusions identifies those studies whose investigators appeared to draw specific conclusions concerning questions of importance to NASA.

  17. The Split Nucleus of Comet Wilson (C/1986 P1 = 1987 VII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, Karen J.; Knopp, Graham P.; Farnham, Tony L.; Green, Daniel

    1995-07-01

    We present CCD observations of Comet Wilson (C/1986 P1 = 1987 VII) from 26 nights during the time period 1986 October to 1991 February, which brackets perihelion, During the observing run of 1988 February, the comet was observed to have split into two fragments. Our broadband CCD photometry, along with photometry from the International Cometary Quarterly, shows a steady decline in brightness of Comet Wilson post-perihelion, with an outburst between heliocentric distances r = 2.8 and 3.3 AU during 1987 October and November. By r ≈ 7 AU, the fragment had faded with respect to the parent and was no longer centrally condensed. A brightness limit of mR ≈ 25, when the comet was at r = 12.65 AU, constrains the primary nucleus to have a maximum radius between 5 and 7 km, assuming an albedo of 0.04. The accuracy of direct orbital solutions for the parent body and fragment to determine the time of splitting was limited by the presence of significant nongravitational forces and the limited fragment orbital coverage. We used the relative position of the fragment with respect to the parent to calculate a time of splitting which was consistent with the time of the observed outburst. We discuss the possible causes of the splitting. The coma of Comet Wilson was observed to have a surface-brightness profile which fell off as p-1 (characteristic of a canonical steady-state coma under the influence of radiation pressure) for all of the data with the exception of the data taken during 1987 November when the gradient was p-1.3 . This steeper slope was probably caused by the injection of new material into the coma during the outburst. During 1986 October, there was a break in the surface-brightness profile slope which may be interpreted as the distance at which grains are swept into the tail. The profiles suggested grain velocities of a few x 10 2 to 10 m sec -1 for grains between 1 and a few hundred micrometers. Finson-Probstein dust modeling showed that ejection of grains began

  18. SCOTCH: a program for solution of the one-dimensional, two-group, space-time neutron diffusion equations with temperature feedback of multi-channel fluid dynamics for HTGR cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ezaki, Masahiro; Mitake, Susumu; Ozawa, Tamotsu

    1979-06-01

    The SCOTCH program solves the one-dimensional (R or Z), two-group reactor kinetics equations with multi-channel temperature transients and fluid dynamics. Sub-program SCOTCH-RX simulates the space-time neutron diffusion in radial direction, and sub-program SCOTCH-AX simulates the same in axial direction. The program has about 8,000 steps of FORTRAN statement and requires about 102 kilo-words of computer memory. (author)

  19. Second order time evolution of the multigroup diffusion and P1 equations for radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, Gordon L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → An existing multigroup transport algorithm is extended to be second-order in time. → A new algorithm is presented that does not require a grey acceleration solution. → The two algorithms are tested with 2D, multi-material problems. → The two algorithms have comparable computational requirements. - Abstract: An existing solution method for solving the multigroup radiation equations, linear multifrequency-grey acceleration, is here extended to be second order in time. This method works for simple diffusion and for flux-limited diffusion, with or without material conduction. A new method is developed that does not require the solution of an averaged grey transport equation. It is effective solving both the diffusion and P 1 forms of the transport equation. Two dimensional, multi-material test problems are used to compare the solution methods.

  20. Comment on the search for the charmonium 1P1 and its theoretical interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, F. C.

    1984-10-01

    We comment on a recent paper which discusses the theoretical implications of the Crystal Ball search for the 1P1 state of charmonium. On behalf of the Crystal Ball collaboration: California Institute of Technology - C. Edwards, R. Partridge, C. Peck, F. Porter; Harvard University - D. Antreasyan, Y.F. Gu, K. Strauch, K. Wacker, A. Weinstein; Princeton University - D. Aschman, M. Cavalli-Sforza, D. Coyne, C. Newman-Holmes, H. Sadrozinski; Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - E. Bloom, F. Bulos, G. Godfrey, C. Kiesling, W. Lockman, M. Oreglia; Stanford University - D. Gelphman, R. Hofstadter, R. Horisberger, I. Kirkbride, H. Kolanoski, K. Königsmann, R. Lee, A. Osterheld, B. Pollock and J. Tompkins.

  1. An electron diffraction and bond valence sum study of the space group symmetries and structures of the photocatalytic 1:1 ordered A2InNbO6 double perovskites (A=Ca2+, Sr2+, Ba2+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ting, V.; Liu, Y.; Withers, R.L.; Krausz, E.

    2004-01-01

    A careful investigation has been carried out into the space group symmetries, structures and crystal chemistries of the 1:1 B-site ordered double perovskites A 2 InNbO 6 (A=Ca 2+ , Sr 2+ , Ba 2+ ) using a combination of bond valence sum calculations, powder XRD and electron diffraction. A recent investigation of these compounds by Yin et al. reported a random distribution of In 3+ and Nb 5+ ions onto the perovskite B-site positions of these compounds and hence Pm3-barm (a=a p , subscript p for parent perovskite sub-structure) space group symmetry for the A=Ba and Sr compounds and Pnma (a=a p +b p , b=-a p +b p , c=2c p ) space group symmetry for the A=Ca compound. A careful electron diffraction study, however, shows that both the A=Ca and Sr compounds occur at room temperature in P12 1 /n1 (a=a p +b p , b=-a p +b p , c=2c p ) perovskite-related superstructure phases while the A=Ba compound occurs in the Fm3-barm, a=2a p , elpasolite structure type. Bond valence sum calculations are used to explain why this should be so as well as to provide a useful first-order approximation to the structures of each of the compounds

  2. SPITZER IRAC SECONDARY ECLIPSE PHOTOMETRY OF THE TRANSITING EXTRASOLAR PLANET HAT-P-1b

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, Kamen; Deming, Drake; Harrington, Jospeph; Stevenson, Kevin B.; Bowman, William C.; Nymeyer, Sarah; Fortney, Jonathan J.; Bakos, Gaspar A.

    2010-01-01

    We report Spitzer/IRAC photometry of the transiting giant exoplanet HAT-P-1b during its secondary eclipse. This planet lies near the postulated boundary between the pM and pL-class of hot Jupiters, and is important as a test of models for temperature inversions in hot Jupiter atmospheres. We derive eclipse depths for HAT-P-1b, in units of the stellar flux, that are: 0.080% ± 0.008% [3.6 μm], 0.135% ± 0.022% [4.5 μm], 0.203% ± 0.031% [5.8 μm], and 0.238% ± 0.040% [8.0 μm]. These values are best fit using an atmosphere with a modest temperature inversion, intermediate between the archetype inverted atmosphere (HD 209458b) and a model without an inversion. The observations also suggest that this planet is radiating a large fraction of the available stellar irradiance on its dayside, with little available for redistribution by circulation. This planet has sometimes been speculated to be inflated by tidal dissipation, based on its large radius in discovery observations, and on a non-zero orbital eccentricity allowed by the radial velocity data. The timing of the secondary eclipse is very sensitive to orbital eccentricity, and we find that the central phase of the eclipse is 0.4999 ± 0.0005. The difference between the expected and observed phase indicates that the orbit is close to circular, with a 3σ limit of |e cos ω| < 0.002.

  3. Space Robotics Challenge

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Space Robotics Challenge seeks to infuse robot autonomy from the best and brightest research groups in the robotics community into NASA robots for future...

  4. The Hutsul Ethnicity (Ethnic Group with Medieval Origins in the Romanian Space. The Transfer of Hutsul Households in the National Village Museum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Dumitrache

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Along with the ethnographic natives, the attention of the Village Museum in Bucharest was focused, from the outset, on minority representation in the Romanian space, with their traits of life and the evolution of their material culture, spiritual experiences and last, but not least, with links regarding mutual cultural connections with the native population and other inhabitant minorities. Although a modest share and a hard custom culture, Guzuls’ ethnicity is real from a historical and folkloric point of view that could not be ignored by specialized museums and research institutes in history. The motivation for this research has been undertaken in Northern Moldavia, an area where the minority has been most present, the results of this research can be pursued today in exhibitions open in our museum and in specialized publications.

  5. EOS Aqua: Mission Status at the Earth Science Constellation (ESC) Mission Operations Working Group (MOWG) Meeting at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guit, Bill

    2017-01-01

    This presentation at the Earth Science Constellation Mission Operations Working Group meeting at KSC in December 2017 to discuss EOS (Earth Observing System) Aqua Earth Science Constellation status. Reviewed and approved by Eric Moyer, ESMO (Earth Science Mission Operations) Deputy Project Manager.

  6. Large-scale parallel configuration interaction. II. Two- and four-component double-group general active space implementation with application to BiH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Stefan; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aagaard; Fleig, Timo

    2010-01-01

    We present a parallel implementation of a large-scale relativistic double-group configuration interaction CIprogram. It is applicable with a large variety of two- and four-component Hamiltonians. The parallel algorithm is based on a distributed data model in combination with a static load balanci...

  7. Analysis of mechanism of PM2.5 and house dust mite antigen Der p1 in attack stage of child asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Q; Yang, C-Y; Guo, B-Y; Wei, X; Liu, M

    2017-05-01

    We analyzed the influence of PM2.5 and house dust mite antigen Der p1 on the treatment of child asthma attack. A total of 96 children with asthma attack were included into the study. The patients were randomly divided into the PM2.5 group, the house dust mite antigen group, the synergistic group and the control group (n= 24 in each group). The PM2.5 concentration in the PM2.5 group was twice higher than standard level (≤ the average value of PM2.5 in local air). All cases were given with same treatment, and the treatment effects were compared and analyzed. It was found that the asthma control rate in the control group was significantly higher than that in the PM2.5 group and the house dust mite antigen group, and the synergistic group was the lowest. The control time in the synergistic group was significantly longest, followed by the PM2.5 group and the house dust mite antigen group, and the control group was significantly short (pasthma attack by an inflammatory reaction and oxidative stress.

  8. Expression analysis of the speech-related genes FoxP1 and FoxP2 and their relation to singing behavior in two songbird species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qianqian; Heston, Jonathan B.; Burkett, Zachary D.; White, Stephanie A.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Humans and songbirds are among the rare animal groups that exhibit socially learned vocalizations: speech and song, respectively. These vocal-learning capacities share a reliance on audition and cortico-basal ganglia circuitry, as well as neurogenetic mechanisms. Notably, the transcription factors Forkhead box proteins 1 and 2 (FoxP1, FoxP2) exhibit similar expression patterns in the cortex and basal ganglia of humans and the zebra finch species of songbird, among other brain regions. Mutations in either gene are associated with language disorders in humans. Experimental knock-down of FoxP2 in the basal ganglia song control region Area X during song development leads to imprecise copying of tutor songs. Moreover, FoxP2 levels decrease naturally within Area X when zebra finches sing. Here, we examined neural expression patterns of FoxP1 and FoxP2 mRNA in adult Bengalese finches, a songbird species whose songs exhibit greater sequence complexity and increased reliance on audition for maintaining their quality. We found that FoxP1 and FoxP2 expression in Bengalese finches is similar to that in zebra finches, including strong mRNA signals for both factors in multiple song control nuclei and enhancement of FoxP1 in these regions relative to surrounding brain tissue. As with zebra finches, when Bengalese finches sing, FoxP2 is behaviorally downregulated within basal ganglia Area X over a similar time course, and expression negatively correlates with the amount of singing. This study confirms that in multiple songbird species, FoxP1 expression highlights song control regions, and regulation of FoxP2 is associated with motor control of song. PMID:24006346

  9. Abundance of Jackfruit ( Artocarpus heterophyllus) Affects Group Characteristics and Use of Space by Golden-Headed Lion Tamarins ( Leontopithecus chrysomelas) in Cabruca Agroforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Leonardo C.; Neves, Leonardo G.; Raboy, Becky E.; Dietz, James M.

    2011-08-01

    Cabruca is an agroforest of cacao trees shaded by native forest trees. It is the predominant vegetation type throughout eastern part of the range of the golden-headed lion tamarins, Leontopithecus chrysomelas, an endangered primate endemic to Atlantic Forest. Understanding how lion tamarins use this agroforest is a conservation priority. To address this question, we documented the diet, home range size, group sizes and composition, density, number of litters and body condition of lion tamarins living in cabruca, and other habitats. Jackfruit, Artocarpus heterophyllus, was the most used species used by lion tamarins in cabruca and was widely available and used throughout the year. In cabruca, home range size was the smallest (22-28 ha) and density of lion tamarins was the highest (1.7 ind/ha) reported for the species. Group size averaged 7.4 individuals and was not significantly different among the vegetation types. In cabruca, groups produced one or two litters a year, and all litters were twins. Adult males in cabruca were significantly heavier than males in primary forest. Our study is the first to demonstrate that breeding groups of golden-headed lion tamarins can survive and reproduce entirely within cabruca agroforest. Jackfruit proved to be a keystone resource for lion tamarins in cabruca, and bromeliads were important as an animal prey foraging microhabitat. In cases where cabruca contains concentrated resources, such as jackfruit and bromeliads, lion tamarins may not only survive and reproduce but may fare better than in other forest types, at least for body condition and reproduction.

  10. Solutions of system of P1 equations without use of auxiliary differential equations coupled; Solucoes do sistema de equacoes P1 sem o uso de equacoes diferenciais auxiliares acopladas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Aquilino Senra; Silva, Fernando Carvalho da; Cardoso, Carlos Eduardo Santos [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2000-07-01

    The system of P1 equations is composed by two equations coupled itself one for the neutron flux and other for the current. Usually this system is solved by definitions of two integrals parameters, which are named slowing down densities of the flux and the current. Hence, the system P1 can be change from integral to only two differential equations. However, there are two new differentials equations that may be solved with the initial system. The present work analyzes this procedure and studies a method, which solve the P1 equations directly, without definitions of slowing down densities. (author)

  11. Variational P1 approximations of general-geometry multigroup transport problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rulko, R.P.; Tomasevic, D.; Larsen, E.W.

    1995-01-01

    A variational approximation is developed for general-geometry multigroup transport problems with arbitrary anisotropic scattering. The variational principle is based on a functional that approximates a reaction rate in a subdomain of the system. In principle, approximations that result from this functional ''optimally'' determine such reaction rates. The functional contains an arbitrary parameter α and requires the approximate solutions of a forward and an adjoint transport problem. If the basis functions for the forward and adjoint solutions are chosen to be linear functions of the angular variable Ω, the functional yields the familiar multigroup P 1 equations for all values of α. However, the boundary conditions that result from the functional depend on α. In particular, for problems with vacuum boundaries, one obtains the conventional mixed boundary condition, but with an extrapolation distance that depends continuously on α. The choice α = 0 yields a generalization of boundary conditions derived earlier by Federighi and Pomraning for a more limited class of problems. The choice α = 1 yields a generalization of boundary conditions derived previously by Davis for monoenergetic problems. Other boundary conditions are obtained by choosing different values of α. The authors discuss this indeterminancy of α in conjunction with numerical experiments

  12. The Properties of Sintered Calcium Phosphate with [Ca]/[P] = 1.50

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moo-Chin Wang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to obtain the properties of the sintered as-dried calcium phosphate with [Ca]/[P] = 1.50, the characteristics of sintered pellets have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS, Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR spectra, Vickers hardness indentation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. When the pellet samples were sintered between 700 °C and 1200 °C for 4 h, the hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO46(OH2, HA still maintained the major phase, accompanied with the rhenanite (NaCaPO4 as the secondary phase and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-Ca3(PO42, β-TCP as the minor phases. In addition, the HA partially transformed to α-tricalcium phosphate (α-Ca3(PO42, α-TCP and tetracalcium phosphate (Ca4(PO42O, TTCP, when the pellet samples were sintered at 1300 °C and 1400 °C, respectively, for 4 h. The maximum density and Vickers Hardness (HV of sintered pellet samples were 2.85 g/cm3 (90.18% theoretical density (T.D. and 407, which appeared at 1200 °C and 900 °C, respectively.

  13. Pressure effects on the magnetocaloric properties of MnFeP1-x As x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueck, E.; Kamarad, J.; Sechovsky, V.; Arnold, Z.; Tegus, O.; Boer, F.R. de

    2007-01-01

    We studied the effect of hydrostatic pressure on the magnetic and magnetocaloric properties of the potential magnetic-refrigerant materials MnFeP 1- x As x with x=0.35 and 0.55. While applied pressure reduces both the Curie temperature and magnetic moment of the former compound, the Curie temperature of the latter is increased whereas the moment is hardly affected by pressure. The same trends are seen in the magnetocaloric properties. These results indicate a different character of the magnetism in these two materials. While the compound with x=0.35 exhibits a volume instability like a weak itinerant ferromagnet, whereas the one with x=0.55 behaves as a strong itinerant ferromagnet. An alternative scenario may be formulated within the localized-moment picture. One may interpret the effect of pressure on the compound with x=0.35 as an indication of pressure-induced enhancement of antiferromagnetic interactions. This latter interpretation is offered by a pronounced enhancement of the high-field susceptibility under pressure

  14. Understanding the Biocompatibility of Sintered Calcium Phosphate with Ratio of [Ca]/[P] = 1.50

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Lin Yen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Biocompatibility of sintered calcium phosphate pellets with [Ca]/[P] = 1.50 was determined in this study. Calcium pyrophosphate (CPP phase formed on the sintered pellets immersed in a normal saline solution for 14 d at 37∘C. The intensities of hydroxyapatite (HA reflections in the X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns of the pellets were retrieved to as-sintered state. The pellet surface morphology shows that CPP crystallites were clearly present and make an amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP to discriminate against become to the area of slice join together. In addition, the intensities of the CPP reflections in the XRD patterns were the highest when the pellets were immersed for 28 d. When the CPP powders were extracted from the pellets after immersion in the solution for 14 d, the viability of 3T3 cells remained above 90% for culture times from 1 to 4 d. The pellet surface morphology observed using optical microscopy showed that the cells did not adhere to the bottom of the sintered pellets when cultured for 4 d; however, some CPP phase precipitates were formed, as confirmed by XRD. In consequence, the results suggest that the sintered HA powders are good materials for use in biomedical applications because of their good biocompatibility.

  15. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ponesimod, a selective S1P1 receptor modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Andreas; Brossard, Patrick; D'Ambrosio, Daniele; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2014-06-01

    Ponesimod (ACT-128800), a reversible, orally active, selective S1P1 receptor modulator, prevents the egress of lymphocytes from the lymph node into the systemic circulation. It is currently in clinical development for the treatment of relapsing multiple sclerosis. Modulation of circulating lymphocytes serves as biomarker of efficacy and safety, such that the quantitative characterization of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationship guides the clinical development of the compound. The availability of a variety of doses, dosing regimens, and treatment durations permitted estimation of the pharmacokinetics characterized by an absorption lag time followed by a sequential zero/first-order absorption and two compartments with first-order elimination. The PD are modeled as an indirect-effect model with rates of appearance and disappearance of lymphocytes in blood with a circadian rhythm and a drug effect on the rate of appearance. The model suggests a circadian variation of 9% and a maximum inhibition of 86% of total lymphocyte count with high doses at steady state. It was instrumental for the selection of doses for subsequent studies that confirmed the effect plateau in total lymphocyte count at approximately 0.5 × 10(9) counts/L.

  16. public spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this issue is PUBLIC SPACES. It is familiar and clear to every citizen. The streets and courtyards as childhood experiences remain with us forever. And these are the places where we come with our parents at weekends, where we meet friends, where we have dates and where we already come for a walk with our children.The history of public spaces is long and captivating. It was the main city squares where the most important events took place in history. The Agoras of Ancient Greece and the Roman Forums, the squares of Vatican, Paris and London, Moscow and Saint Petersburg… Greve, Trafalgar, Senate, Palace, Red, Bolotnaya – behind every name there is life of capitals, countries and nations.Public spaces, their shapes, image and development greatly influence the perception of the city as a whole. Both visitors and inhabitants can see in public spaces not only the visage but the heart, the soul and the mind of the city.Unfortunately, sometimes we have to prove the value of public spaces and defend them from those who consider them nothing but a blank space, nobody’s land destined for barbarous development.What should happen to make citizens perceive public spaces as their own and to make authorities consider development and maintenance of squares and parks their priority task against the  background of increasing competition between cities and the fight for human capital? Lately they more often say about “a high-quality human capital”. And now, when they say “the city should be liveable” they add “for all groups of citizens, including the creative class”.

  17. Bactericide, Immunomodulating, and Wound Healing Properties of Transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin P1 In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Lebedeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Procedure of manufacturing K. pinnata water extracts containing cecropin P1 (CecP1 from the formerly described transgenic plants is established. It included incubation of leaves at +4°C for 7 days, mechanical homogenization of leaves using water as extraction solvent, and heating at +70°C for inactivating plant enzymes. Yield of CecP1 (after heating and sterilizing filtration was 0.3% of total protein in the extract. The water extract of K. pinnata + CecP1 exhibits favorable effect on healing of wounds infected with S. aureus (equal to Cefazolin and with a combination of S. aureus with P. aeruginosa (better than Cefazolin. Wild-type K. pinnata extract exhibited evident microbicide activity against S. aureus with P. aeruginosa but it was substantially strengthened in K. pinnata + CecP1 extract. K. pinnata extracts (both wild-type and transgenic did not exhibit general toxicity and accelerated wound recovery. Due to immunomodulating activity, wild-type K. pinnata extract accelerated granulation of the wound bed and marginal epithelialization even better than K. pinnata + CecP1 extract. Immunomodulating and microbicide activity of K. pinnata synergizes with microbicide activity of CecP1 accelerating elimination of bacteria.

  18. The amino terminal end determines the stability and assembling capacity of eukaryotic ribosomal stalk proteins P1 and P2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Hendricka; Nusspaumer, Gretel; Abia, David; Briceño, Verónica; Remacha, Miguel; Ballesta, Juan P G

    2011-05-01

    The eukaryotic ribosomal proteins P1 and P2 bind to protein P0 through their N-terminal domain to form the essential ribosomal stalk. A mutational analysis points to amino acids at positions 2 and 3 as determinants for the drastic difference of Saccharomyces cerevisiae P1 and P2 half-life, and suggest different degradation mechanisms for each protein type. Moreover, the capacity to form P1/P2 heterodimers is drastically affected by mutations in the P2β four initial amino acids, while these mutations have no effect on P1β. Binding of P2β and, to a lesser extent, P1β to the ribosome is also seriously affected showing the high relevance of the amino acids in the first turn of the NTD α-helix 1 for the stalk assembly. The negative effect of some mutations on ribosome binding can be reversed by the presence of the second P1/P2 couple in the ribosome, indicating a stabilizing structural influence between the two heterodimers. Unexpectedly, some mutations totally abolish heterodimer formation but allow significant ribosome binding and, therefore, a previous P1 and P2 association seems not to be an absolute requirement for stalk assembly. Homology modeling of the protein complexes suggests that the mutated residues can affect the overall protein conformation. © The Author(s) 2011. Published by Oxford University Press.

  19. Immunomodulating and Revascularizing Activity of Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Fungicide Activity of Biogenic Peptide Cecropin P1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. S. Zakharchenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previously transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata plants producing an antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (CecP1 have been reported. Now we report biological testing K. pinnata extracts containing CecP1 as a candidate drug for treatment of wounds infected with Candida albicans. The drug constitutes the whole juice from K. pinnata leaves (not ethanol extract sterilized with nanofiltration. A microbicide activity of CecP1 against an animal fungal pathogen in vivo was demonstrated for the first time. However, a favorable therapeutic effect of the transgenic K. pinnata extract was attributed to a synergism between the fungicide activity of CecP1 and wound healing (antiscar, revascularizing, and immunomodulating effect of natural biologically active components of K. pinnata. A commercial fungicide preparation clotrimazole eliminated C. albicans cells within infected wounds in rats with efficiency comparable to CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extract. But in contrast to K. pinnata extract, clotrimazole did not exhibit neither wound healing activity nor remodeling of the scar matrix. Taken together, our results allow assumption that CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extracts should be considered as a candidate drug for treatment of dermatomycoses, wounds infected with fungi, and bedsores.

  20. Bactericide, Immunomodulating, and Wound Healing Properties of Transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin P1 In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedeva, A A; Zakharchenko, N S; Trubnikova, E V; Medvedeva, O A; Kuznetsova, T V; Masgutova, G A; Zylkova, M V; Buryanov, Y I; Belous, A S

    2017-01-01

    Procedure of manufacturing K. pinnata water extracts containing cecropin P1 (CecP1) from the formerly described transgenic plants is established. It included incubation of leaves at +4°C for 7 days, mechanical homogenization of leaves using water as extraction solvent, and heating at +70°C for inactivating plant enzymes. Yield of CecP1 (after heating and sterilizing filtration) was 0.3% of total protein in the extract. The water extract of K. pinnata + CecP1 exhibits favorable effect on healing of wounds infected with S. aureus (equal to Cefazolin) and with a combination of S. aureus with P. aeruginosa (better than Cefazolin). Wild-type K. pinnata extract exhibited evident microbicide activity against S. aureus with P. aeruginosa but it was substantially strengthened in K. pinnata + CecP1 extract. K. pinnata extracts (both wild-type and transgenic) did not exhibit general toxicity and accelerated wound recovery. Due to immunomodulating activity, wild-type K. pinnata extract accelerated granulation of the wound bed and marginal epithelialization even better than K. pinnata + CecP1 extract. Immunomodulating and microbicide activity of K. pinnata synergizes with microbicide activity of CecP1 accelerating elimination of bacteria.

  1. Immunomodulating and Revascularizing Activity of Kalanchoe pinnata Synergize with Fungicide Activity of Biogenic Peptide Cecropin P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenko, N S; Belous, A S; Biryukova, Y K; Medvedeva, O A; Belyakova, A V; Masgutova, G A; Trubnikova, E V; Buryanov, Y I; Lebedeva, A A

    2017-01-01

    Previously transgenic Kalanchoe pinnata plants producing an antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (CecP1) have been reported. Now we report biological testing K. pinnata extracts containing CecP1 as a candidate drug for treatment of wounds infected with Candida albicans. The drug constitutes the whole juice from K. pinnata leaves (not ethanol extract) sterilized with nanofiltration. A microbicide activity of CecP1 against an animal fungal pathogen in vivo was demonstrated for the first time. However, a favorable therapeutic effect of the transgenic K. pinnata extract was attributed to a synergism between the fungicide activity of CecP1 and wound healing (antiscar), revascularizing, and immunomodulating effect of natural biologically active components of K. pinnata . A commercial fungicide preparation clotrimazole eliminated C. albicans cells within infected wounds in rats with efficiency comparable to CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extract. But in contrast to K. pinnata extract, clotrimazole did not exhibit neither wound healing activity nor remodeling of the scar matrix. Taken together, our results allow assumption that CecP1-enriched K. pinnata extracts should be considered as a candidate drug for treatment of dermatomycoses, wounds infected with fungi, and bedsores.

  2. Contribution of Arginine 13 to the Catalytic Activity of Human Class Pi Glutathione Transferase P1-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, Ji Na; Jo, Dong Hyeon; Do, Hyun Dong; Lee, Jin Ju; Kong, Kwang Hoon

    2010-01-01

    Arg13 is a conserved active-site residue in all known Pi class glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) and in most Alpha class GSTs. To evaluate its contribution to substrate binding and catalysis of this residue, three mutants (R13A, R13K, and R13L) were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by GSH affinity chromatography. The substitutions of Arg13 significantly affected GSH-conjugation activity, while scarcely affecting glutathione peroxidase or steroid isomerase activities. Mutation of Arg13 into Ala largely reduced the GSH-conjugation activity by approximately 85 - 95%, whereas substitutions by Lys and Leu barely affected activity. These results suggest that, in the GSH-conjugation activity of hGST P1-1, the contribution of Arg13 toward catalytic activity is highly dependent on substrate specificities and the size of the side chain at position 13. From the kinetic parameters, introduction of larger side chains at position 13 results in stronger affinity (Leu > Lys, Arg > Ala) towards GSH. The substitutions of Arg13 with alanine and leucine significantly affected k cat , whereas substitution with Lys was similar to that of the wild type, indicating the significance of a positively charged residue at position 13. From the plots of log (k cat /K m CDNB ) against pH, the pK a values of the thiol group of GSH bound in R13A, R13K, and R13L were estimated to be 1.8, 1.4, and 1.8 pK units higher than the pK a value of the wildtype enzyme, demonstrating the contribution of the Arg13 guanidinium group to the electrostatic field in the active site. From these results, we suggest that contribution of Arg13 in substrate binding is highly dependent on the nature of the electrophilic substrates, while in the catalytic mechanism, it stabilizes the GSH thiolate through hydrogen bonding

  3. Secreted Klotho Attenuates Inflammation-Associated Aortic Valve Fibrosis in Senescence-Accelerated Mice P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jianglei; Fan, Jun; Wang, Shirley; Sun, Zhongjie

    2018-05-01

    Senescence-accelerated mice P1 (SAMP1) is an aging model characterized by shortened lifespan and early signs of senescence. Klotho is an aging-suppressor gene. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether in vivo expression of secreted klotho ( Skl ) gene attenuates aortic valve fibrosis in SAMP1 mice. SAMP1 mice and age-matched (AKR/J) control mice were used. SAMP1 mice developed obvious fibrosis in aortic valves, namely fibrotic aortic valve disease. Serum level of Skl was decreased drastically in SAMP1 mice. Expression of MCP-1 (monocyte chemoattractant protein 1), ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule 1), F4/80, and CD68 was increased in aortic valves of SAMP1 mice, indicating inflammation. An increase in expression of α-smooth muscle actin (myofibroblast marker), transforming growth factorβ-1, and scleraxis (a transcription factor of collagen synthesis) was also found in aortic valves of SAMP1 mice, suggesting that accelerated aging is associated with myofibroblast transition and collagen gene activation. We constructed adeno-associated virus 2 carrying mouse Skl cDNA for in vivo expression of Skl. Skl gene delivery effectively increased serum Skl of SAMP1 mice to the control level. Skl gene delivery inhibited inflammation and myofibroblastic transition in aortic valves and attenuated fibrotic aortic valve disease in SAMP1 mice. It is concluded that senescence-related fibrotic aortic valve disease in SAMP1 mice is associated with a decrease in serum klotho leading to inflammation, including macrophage infiltration and transforming growth factorβ-1/scleraxis-driven myofibroblast differentiation in aortic valves. Restoration of serum Skl levels by adeno-associated virus 2 carrying mouse Skl cDNA effectively suppresses inflammation and myofibroblastic transition and attenuates aortic valve fibrosis. Skl may be a potential therapeutic target for fibrotic aortic valve disease. © 2018 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. The effect of chemical carcinogenesis on rat glutathione S-transferase P1 gene transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D; Liao, M; Zuo, J; Henner, W D; Fan, F

    2001-03-01

    To investigate mechanisms of rat glutathione S-transferase P1 gene (rGSTP1) expression regulation during chemical carcinogenesis. we studied enhancer elements located in the region between -2.5 kb to -2.2 kb. The region was upstream from the start site of transcription and was divided into two major fragments, GPEI and GPEII. The GPEII fragment was further divided into two smaller fragments, GPEII- I and GPEII-2. Using a luciferase reporter system, we identified a strong enhancer of GPEI and a weak enhancer of GPEII in HeLa and a rat hepatoma cell line CBRH79 19 cell. The enhancer of GPEII was located within the GPEII-I region. Chemical stimulation by glycidyl methatylate (GMA) and phorbol 12-o-tetradecanoate 13-acetate (TPA) analysis revealed that induction of rGSTP1 expression was mainly through GPEI. Although H2O2 could enhance GPEII enhancer activity, the enhancement is not mediated by the NF-kappaB factor that bound the NF-kappaB site in GPEII. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA) and the UV cross-linking assays, we found that HeLa and CBRH7919 cells had proteins that specifically bound GPEI core sequence and a 64 kDa protein that interacted with GPEII-1. The cells from normal rat liver did not express the binding proteins. Therefore, the trans-acting factors seem to be closely related to GPEI, GPEII enhancer activities and may play an important role in high expression of rGSTPI gene.

  5. The quiver at the bottom of the twisted nilpotent cone on $\\mathbb P^1$

    OpenAIRE

    Rayan, Steven

    2016-01-01

    For the moduli space of Higgs bundles on a Riemann surface of positive genus, critical points of the natural Morse-Bott function lie along the nilpotent cone of the Hitchin fibration and are representations of $\\mbox{A}$-type quivers in a twisted category of holomorphic bundles. The critical points that globally minimize the function are representations of $\\mbox{A}_1$. For twisted Higgs bundles on the projective line, the quiver describing the bottom of the cone is more complicated. We deter...

  6. Arthrotomography of the normal temporo-mandibular joint. Anatomy, technique and complications. P. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katzberg, R.W.; Burgener, F.A.

    1984-02-01

    Most abnormalities in the T.M. joint are due to pathological processes in the meniscus or joint capsule. They usually manifest themselves as an anterior luxation of the meniscus, which cannot be demonstrated by conventional radiological examination, even including tomography. In order to evaluate the meniscus, it is necessary to perform a contrast examination of the inferior joint space. The technique has proved valuable in 280 patients (308 arthrograms). The method is described and radiological anatomy is discussed. There were no significant complications in our series.

  7. A computationally efficient P_1 radiation model for modern combustion systems utilizing pre-conditioned conjugate gradient methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Gautham

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The P_1 radiation model was interfaced with high performance linear solvers. • Pre-conditioned conjugate gradient (PC CG) method improved convergence by 50% • PC CG was more than 30 times faster than classical iterative methods. • The time to solution scaled linearly with increase in problem size employing PC CG. • Employing WSGGM with P_1 model compared reasonably well against benchmark data. - Abstract: The iterative convergence of the P_1 radiation model can be slow in optically thin scenarios when employing classical iterative methods. In order to remedy this shortcoming, an in-house P_1 radiation model was interfaced with high performance, scalable, linear solver libraries. Next, the accuracies of P_1 radiation model calculations was assessed by comparing its predictions against discrete ordinates (DO) model calculations for prototypical problems representative of modern combustion systems. Corresponding benchmark results were also included for comparison. Utilizing Pre-Conditioners (PC) to the Conjugate Gradients (CG) method, the convergence time of the P_1 radiation model reduced by a factor of 30 for modest problem sizes and a factor of 70 for larger sized problems when compared against classical Gauss Seidel sweeps. Further, PC provided 50% computational savings compared to employing CG in a standalone mode. The P_1 model calculation times were about 25–30% of the DO model calculation time. The time to solution also scaled linearly with an increase in problem size. The weighted sum of gray gases model employed in this study in conjunction with the P_1 model provided good agreement against benchmark data with L_2 error norms (defined relative to corresponding DO calculations) improving when isotropic intensities were prevalent.

  8. Closed expressions for $\\int_{0}^{1} t^{-1} log^{n-1}t log^{p}(1 - t) dt$

    CERN Document Server

    Kölbig, Kurt Siegfried

    1982-01-01

    Closed expressions for the integral integral /sub 0//sup 1/ t/sup -1/ log/sup n-1/t log/sup p/(1-t)dt, whose general form is given elsewhere, are listed for n=1(1)9, p=1(1)9. A formula is derived which allows an easy evaluation of these expressions by formula manipulation on a computer. The majority of the above expressions are given in a microfiche supplement to the paper.

  9. Stability of period-one (P1) oscillations generated by semiconductor lasers subject to optical injection or optical feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lyu-Chih; Liu, Ssu-Hsin; Lin, Fan-Yi

    2017-10-16

    We study the stability of period-one (P1) oscillations experimentally generated by semiconductor lasers subject to optical injection (OI) and by those subject to optical feedback (OF). With unique advantages of broad frequency tuning range and large sideband rejection ratio, P1 oscillations can be useful in applications such as photonic microwave generation, radio-over-fiber communication, and laser Doppler velocimeter. The stability of the P1 oscillations is critical for these applications, which can be affected by spontaneous emission and fluctuations in both temperature and injection current. Although linewidths of P1 oscillations generated by various schemes have been reported, the mechanisms and roles which each of the OI and the OF play have however not been investigated in detail. To characterize the stability of the P1 oscillations generated by the OI and the OF schemes, we measure the linewidths and linewidth reduction ratios (LRRs) of the P1 oscillations. The OF scheme has a narrowest linewidth of 0.21 ± 0.03 MHz compared to 4.7 ± 0.6 MHz in the OI scheme. In the OF scheme, a much larger region of LRRs higher than 90% is also found. The superior stability of the OF scheme is benefited by the fact that the P1 oscillations in the OF scheme are originated from the undamped relaxation oscillation of a single laser and can be phase-locked to one of its external cavity modes, whereas those in the OI scheme come from two independent lasers which bear no phase relation. Moreover, excess P1 linewidth broadening in the OI scheme caused by fluctuation in injection parameters associated with frequency jitter and relative intensity noise (RIN) is also minimized in the OF scheme.

  10. Direct regulatory immune activity of lactic acid bacteria on Der p 1-pulsed dendritic cells from allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pochard, Pierre; Hammad, Hamida; Ratajczak, Céline; Charbonnier-Hatzfeld, Anne-Sophie; Just, Nicolas; Tonnel, André-Bernard; Pestel, Joël

    2005-07-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are suggested to play a regulatory role in the development of allergic reactions. However, their potential effects on dendritic cells (DCs) directing the immune polarization remain unclear. The immunologic effect of Lactobacillus plantarum NCIMB 8826 (LAB1) on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs) from patients allergic to house dust mite was evaluated. MD-DCs were stimulated for 24 hours with the related allergen Der p 1 in the presence or absence of LAB1. Cell-surface markers were assessed by means of FACS analysis, and the key polarizing cytokines IL-12 and IL-10 were quantified. The subsequent regulatory effect of pulsed MD-DCs on naive or memory T cells was evaluated by determining the T-cell cytokine profile. LAB1 induced the maturation of MD-DCs, even if pulsed with Der p 1. Interestingly, after incubation with LAB1 and Der p 1, MD-DCs produced higher amounts of IL-12 than Der p 1-pulsed DCs. Indeed, the T H 2 cytokine (IL-4 and IL-5) production observed when naive or memory autologous T cells were cocultured with Der p 1-pulsed MD-DCs was highly reduced in the presence of LAB1. Finally, in contrast to naive or memory T cells exposed once to Der p 1-pulsed DCs, T cells stimulated by MD-DCs pulsed with Der p 1 and LAB1 failed to produce T H 2 cytokines in response to a new stimulation with Der p 1-pulsed DCs. Thus in the presence of LAB1, MD-DCs from allergic patients tend to reorientate the T-cell response toward a beneficial T H 1 profile.

  11. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Amr; Hutchens, Heather M.; Howard Berg, R.; Sue Loesch-Fries, L.

    2012-01-01

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  12. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Amr [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Present address: Genomics Facility, Agricultural Genetic Engineering Research Institute, Agricultural Research Center, Giza 12619 (Egypt); Hutchens, Heather M. [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Howard Berg, R. [Integrated Microscopy Facility, Donald Danforth Plant Science Center, Saint Louis, MO 63132 (United States); Sue Loesch-Fries, L., E-mail: loeschfr@purdue.edu [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  13. ON THE FAMILY OF ELLIPTIC CURVES y2 = x3 − m2x + p 1 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    12

    Tadić applied the results of [13] to prove the existence of two more families; ... [1, 4] is the source of inspiration for the problem of the presented work and methodology ... related material from [8] that includes some basic concepts of elliptic curves ... Fundamental Mordell Theorem [11] says that the group E(Q) of all rational ...

  14. Factorizable sheaves and quantum groups

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukavnikov, Roman; Schechtman, Vadim

    1998-01-01

    The book is devoted to the geometrical construction of the representations of Lusztig's small quantum groups at roots of unity. These representations are realized as some spaces of vanishing cycles of perverse sheaves over configuration spaces. As an application, the bundles of conformal blocks over the moduli spaces of curves are studied. The book is intended for specialists in group representations and algebraic geometry.

  15. P1-18: The Effect of Background Music on Working Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Ding-Hao Liu; Yi-Fang Shih; Pei-Jin Yang; Mei-Nian Lu; Yi-shan Su; Shiiau-hua Liu

    2012-01-01

    Many studies do visual working memory research under sundry sound conditions (Alley & Greene, 2008 Current Psychology 27 277–289; Iwanaga & Ito, 2002 Perceptual Motor Skills 94 1251–1258; Pring & Walker, 1994 Current Psychology 13 165–171). In order to understand more about background music, we modified previous studies to examine how the performance of working memory is affected by four different music conditions. Participants were randomly assigned into two groups to listen to two different...

  16. Potent, selective, orally bioavailable inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme (TACE): discovery of indole, benzofuran, imidazopyridine and pyrazolopyridine P1' substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhonghui; Ott, Gregory R; Anand, Rajan; Liu, Rui-Qin; Covington, Maryanne B; Vaddi, Krishna; Qian, Mingxin; Newton, Robert C; Christ, David D; Trzaskos, James; Duan, James J-W

    2008-03-15

    Potent and selective inhibitors of tumor necrosis factor-alpha converting enzyme (TACE) were discovered with several new heterocyclic P1' groups in conjunction with cyclic beta-amino hydroxamic acid scaffolds. Among them, the pyrazolopyridine provided the best overall profile when combined with tetrahydropyran beta-amino hydroxamic acid scaffold. Specifically, inhibitor 49 showed IC(50) value of 1 nM against porcine TACE and 170 nM in the suppression of LPS-induced TNF-alpha of human whole blood. Compound 49 also displayed excellent selectivity over a wide panel of MMPs as well as excellent oral bioavailability (F%>90%) in rat n-in-1 PK studies.

  17. Identification of a Supramolecular Functional Architecture of Streptococcus mutans Adhesin P1 on the Bacterial Cell Surface*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Kyle P.; Sullan, Ruby May A.; Crowley, Paula J.; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Tang, Wenxing; Besingi, Richard; Dufrene, Yves F.; Brady, L. Jeannine

    2015-01-01

    P1 (antigen I/II) is a sucrose-independent adhesin of Streptococcus mutans whose functional architecture on the cell surface is not fully understood. S. mutans cells subjected to mechanical extraction were significantly diminished in adherence to immobilized salivary agglutinin but remained immunoreactive and were readily aggregated by fluid-phase salivary agglutinin. Bacterial adherence was restored by incubation of postextracted cells with P1 fragments that contain each of the two known adhesive domains. In contrast to untreated cells, glutaraldehyde-treated bacteria gained reactivity with anti-C-terminal monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), whereas epitopes recognized by mAbs against other portions of the molecule were masked. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the ability of apical and C-terminal fragments of P1 to interact. Binding of several different anti-P1 mAbs to unfixed cells triggered release of a C-terminal fragment from the bacterial surface, suggesting a novel mechanism of action of certain adherence-inhibiting antibodies. We also used atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy with tips bearing various mAbs to elucidate the spatial organization and orientation of P1 on living bacteria. The similar rupture lengths detected using mAbs against the head and C-terminal regions, which are widely separated in the tertiary structure, suggest a higher order architecture in which these domains are in close proximity on the cell surface. Taken together, our results suggest a supramolecular organization in which additional P1 polypeptides, including the C-terminal segment originally identified as antigen II, associate with covalently attached P1 to form the functional adhesive layer. PMID:25666624

  18. Identification of a supramolecular functional architecture of Streptococcus mutans adhesin P1 on the bacterial cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heim, Kyle P; Sullan, Ruby May A; Crowley, Paula J; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Tang, Wenxing; Besingi, Richard; Dufrene, Yves F; Brady, L Jeannine

    2015-04-03

    P1 (antigen I/II) is a sucrose-independent adhesin of Streptococcus mutans whose functional architecture on the cell surface is not fully understood. S. mutans cells subjected to mechanical extraction were significantly diminished in adherence to immobilized salivary agglutinin but remained immunoreactive and were readily aggregated by fluid-phase salivary agglutinin. Bacterial adherence was restored by incubation of postextracted cells with P1 fragments that contain each of the two known adhesive domains. In contrast to untreated cells, glutaraldehyde-treated bacteria gained reactivity with anti-C-terminal monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), whereas epitopes recognized by mAbs against other portions of the molecule were masked. Surface plasmon resonance experiments demonstrated the ability of apical and C-terminal fragments of P1 to interact. Binding of several different anti-P1 mAbs to unfixed cells triggered release of a C-terminal fragment from the bacterial surface, suggesting a novel mechanism of action of certain adherence-inhibiting antibodies. We also used atomic force microscopy-based single molecule force spectroscopy with tips bearing various mAbs to elucidate the spatial organization and orientation of P1 on living bacteria. The similar rupture lengths detected using mAbs against the head and C-terminal regions, which are widely separated in the tertiary structure, suggest a higher order architecture in which these domains are in close proximity on the cell surface. Taken together, our results suggest a supramolecular organization in which additional P1 polypeptides, including the C-terminal segment originally identified as antigen II, associate with covalently attached P1 to form the functional adhesive layer. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. The past and space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Christian

    2013-01-01

    of legitimate forms of land control, complex combinations of claims emerge. The ubiquity of ‘the past’ in African politics and the increasing competition over space suggest that the naturalness with which some refer to the past and others conceive of space should be under constant scrutiny. Based on work...... that competing social elite groups instrumentalize. Each group sees its interests best served by a particular reading of the past and a particular conception of space....

  20. Communication spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coiera, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Annotations to physical workspaces such as signs and notes are ubiquitous. When densely annotated, work areas become communication spaces. This study aims to characterize the types and purpose of such annotations. A qualitative observational study was undertaken in two wards and the radiology department of a 440-bed metropolitan teaching hospital. Images were purposefully sampled; 39 were analyzed after excluding inferior images. Annotation functions included signaling identity, location, capability, status, availability, and operation. They encoded data, rules or procedural descriptions. Most aggregated into groups that either created a workflow by referencing each other, supported a common workflow without reference to each other, or were heterogeneous, referring to many workflows. Higher-level assemblies of such groupings were also observed. Annotations make visible the gap between work done and the capability of a space to support work. Annotations are repairs of an environment, improving fitness for purpose, fixing inadequacy in design, or meeting emergent needs. Annotations thus record the missing information needed to undertake tasks, typically added post-implemented. Measuring annotation levels post-implementation could help assess the fit of technology to task. Physical and digital spaces could meet broader user needs by formally supporting user customization, 'programming through annotation'. Augmented reality systems could also directly support annotation, addressing existing information gaps, and enhancing work with context sensitive annotation. Communication spaces offer a model of how work unfolds. Annotations make visible local adaptation that makes technology fit for purpose post-implementation and suggest an important role for annotatable information systems and digital augmentation of the physical environment.

  1. P1-24: Neural Representation of Gloss in the Macaque Inferior Temporal Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiko Nishio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The variation of the appearance such as gloss provides one of the most important information for object recognition. However, little is known about the neural mechanisms related to the perception of gloss. We examined whether the neurons in the inferior temporal (IT cortex of the monkeys are coding gloss of objects. We made visual stimuli which have various surface reflectance properties, and tested responses of IT neurons to these stimuli while a monkey was performing a visual fixation task. We found that there exist neurons in the lower bank of the superior temporal sulcus that selectively responded to specific stimuli. The selectivity was largely maintained when the object shape or illumination condition was changed. In contrast, neural selectivity was lost when the pixels of objects were randomly rearranged. In the former manipulation of the stimuli, gloss perceptions were maintained, whereas in the latter manipulation, gloss perception was dramatically changed. These results indicate that these IT neurons selectively responded to gloss, not to the irrelevant local image features or average luminance or color. Next, to understand how the responses of gloss selective neurons are related to perceived gloss, responses of gloss selective neurons were mapped in perceptual gloss space in which glossiness changes uniformly. I found that responses of most gloss selective neurons can be explained by linear combinations of two parameters that are shown to be important for gloss perception. This result suggests that the responses of gloss selective neurons of IT cortex are closely related to gloss perception.

  2. The deexcitation of the Ar (3P2, 3p1 and 1P1) states as measured by absorption both in pure argon and in the presence of additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutuit, Odile

    1974-01-01

    The de-excitation of the 3 P 2 , 3 p 1 and 1 P 1 states of argon was studied in pure argon between 10 and 200 torr and in Ar + CO and Ar + H 2 mixtures. These states are populated after excitation of the gas by a short (20 ns) pulse of 500 keV electrons (FEBETRON). Under our experimental conditions, the relation between the measured optical density of the lines studied and the concentration of absorbing species was found to be: DO = log I 0 /I ∝ (lC) n with n = 0,4. The three body rate constants k 2 were measured for the two resonant states 3 p 1 (k 2 = (1,65 ± 0,3) x 10 -32 cm 6 s -1 ) and 1 P 1 (k 2 = (1,0 ± 0,2) x 10 -32 cm 6 s -1 ); they had not been considered in previous low pressure studies. For the metastable state 3 P 2 , the measured value of k 2 ((1,6 ± 0,3) x 10 -32 cm 6 s -1 ) is in good agreement with those found in the literature. However, our two body rate constant k 1 is about ten times higher than that found in measurements at low pressure. This difference could be due to a collision-induced emission process at high pressure. The rate constants for the quenching by CO and H 2 were measured for the metastable state 3 P 2 (1,85 and 10,5 x 10 -11 cm 3 s -1 ) and for the resonant states 3 P 1 (4,5 and 20 x 10 -11 cm 3 s -1 ) and 1 P 1 (8,5 and 33 X 10 -11 cm 3 s -1 ). Comparison of the de-excitation cross sections of resonant and metastable states should lead to a better understanding of energy transfer processes from these latter. (author) [fr

  3. Summary of Research 1997, Interdisciplinary Academic Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boger, Dan

    1999-01-01

    This report contains information of research projects in the interdisciplinary groups, Command, Control, and Communications Academic Group, Information Warfare Academic Group, Space Systems Academic...

  4. Energy-Transfer Kinetics for Xe (6p[1/2]0) Atoms in Kr, Ar, Ne, and He.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Liu, Dong; Li, Xueyang; Chu, Junzhi; Guo, Jingwei; Liu, Jinbo; Hu, Shu; Sang, Fengting; Jin, Yuqi

    2018-06-11

    The kinetic processes for the Xe (6p[1/2] 0 ) atoms in Kr, Ar, Ne, and He buffer gases were studied. We found that Kr, Ar, and Ne atoms can be used to switch the amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) channel from 3408 nm (6p[1/2] 0 -6s'[1/2] 1 ) to 3680 nm (5d[1/2] 1 -6p[1/2] 1 ), while Xe and He atoms do not show such a phenomenon. This ASE channel switch is mainly ascribed to the fast transfer of 6p[1/2] 0 → 5d[1/2] 1 . On the basis of the rate equations for two-state coupling (energy-transfer processes between the two states are very rapid), the reason why the ASE channel switch effect normally coincides with a double exponential decay of the spontaneous emission at 828 nm (6p[1/2] 0 -6s[3/2] 1 ) is explained. The actual situations in Xe, Ar, Ne, and He follow this rule. However, the strictly single exponential decay of the spontaneous emission at 828 nm and strong ASE channel switch effect simultaneously emerge in Kr. This indicates that the transfer of 6p[1/2] 0 → 5d[1/2] 1 in Kr does not occur via two-state coupling, but via two steps of near-resonance collision through the 5s[3/2] 2 (Kr) state as the intermediate state (6p[1/2] 0 → 5s[3/2] 2 (Kr) → 5d[1/2] 1 ). In addition, we found Xe (6p[1/2] 0 ) atoms strongly tend to reach the 6p[3/2] 2 , 6p[3/2] 1 , and 6p[5/2] 2 states through the 5s[3/2] 2 (Kr) state as the intermediate state in Kr. The 5s[3/2] 2 (Kr) state plays a very important role in the energy-transfer kinetics for the Xe (6p[1/2] 0 ) atoms. Kr is probably an excellent buffer gas for laser systems based on Xe.

  5. Behavior of the P1.HTR mastocytoma cell line implanted in the chorioallantoic membrane of chick embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.F. Avram

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The P1.HTR cell line includes highly transfectable cells derived from P815 mastocytoma cells originating from mouse breast tissue. Despite its widespread use in immunogenic studies, no data are available about the behavior of P1.HTR cells in the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane model. The objective of the present investigation was to study the effects of P1.HTR cells implanted on the chorioallantoic membrane of chick embryos. We inoculated P1.HTR cells into the previously prepared chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane and observed the early and late effects of these cells by stereomicroscopy, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. A highly angiotropic and angiogenic effect occurred early after inoculation and a tumorigenic potential with the development of mastocytoma keeping well mast cells immunophenotype was detected later during the development. The P1.HTR mastocytoma cell line is a good tool for the development of the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane mastocytoma model and also for other studies concerning the involvement of blood vessels. The chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane model of mastocytoma retains the mast cell immunophenotype under experimental conditions and could be used as an experimental tool for in vivo preliminary testing of antitumor and antivascular drugs.

  6. Exploration and pharmacokinetic profiling of phenylalanine based carbamates as novel substance p 1-7 analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fransson, Rebecca; Nordvall, Gunnar; Bylund, Johan; Carlsson-Jonsson, Anna; Kratz, Jadel M; Svensson, Richard; Artursson, Per; Hallberg, Mathias; Sandström, Anja

    2014-12-11

    The bioactive metabolite of Substance P, the heptapeptide SP1-7 (H-Arg-Pro-Lys-Pro-Gln-Gln-Phe-OH), has been shown to attenuate signs of hyperalgesia in diabetic mice, which indicate a possible use of compounds targeting the SP1-7 binding site as analgesics for neuropathic pain. Aiming at the development of drug-like SP1-7 peptidomimetics we have previously reported on the discovery of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 as a high affinity lead compound. Unfortunately, the pharmacophore of this compound was accompanied by a poor pharmacokinetic (PK) profile. Herein, further lead optimization of H-Phe-Phe-NH2 by substituting the N-terminal phenylalanine for a benzylcarbamate group giving a new type of SP1-7 analogues with good binding affinities is reported. Extensive in vitro as well as in vivo PK characterization is presented for this compound. Evaluation of different C-terminal functional groups, i.e., hydroxamic acid, acyl sulfonamide, acyl cyanamide, acyl hydrazine, and oxadiazole, suggested hydroxamic acid as a bioisosteric replacement for the original primary amide.

  7. Space groups for solid state scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Glazer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This comprehensively revised - essentially rewritten - new edition of the 1990 edition (described as ""extremely useful"" by MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS and as ""understandable and comprehensive"" by Scitech) guides readers through the dense array of mathematical information in the International Tables Volume A. Thus, most scientists seeking to understand a crystal structure publication can do this from this book without necessarily having to consult the International Tables themselves. This remains the only book aimed at non-crystallographers devoted to teaching them about crystallogr

  8. Some incorrect space groups: an update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, R.E. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena); Schomaker, V.

    1981-01-01

    This update covers Nb/sub 2/Br/sub 6/ (SC/sub 4/H/sub 8/)/sub 3/, Ta/sub 2/Br/sub 6/ (SC/sub 4/H/sub 8/)/sub 3/, (Ru/sub 2/(O/sub 2/CCH/sub 3/)/sub 4/(H/sub 2/O)/sub 2/) BF/sub 4/, Ru/sub 2/O/sub 2/(CC/sub 2/H/sub 5/)/sub 4/Cl, and catena-bis (..mu..-N-methylpiperidinium-4-thiolato))-cadmium (II) perchlorate dihydrate.

  9. The inhibitory NKR-P1B:Clr-b recognition axis facilitates detection of oncogenic transformation and cancer immunosurveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanaka, M; Fine, Jason; Kirkham, Christina

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express receptors specific for MHC class I (MHC-I) molecules involved in "missing-self" recognition of cancer and virus-infected cells. Here we elucidate the role of MHC-I-independent NKR-P1B:Clr-b interactions in the detection of oncogenic transformation by NK cells. Ras......-b protein, in turn promoting missing-self recognition via the NKR-P1B inhibitory receptor. Both Ras- and c-Myc-mediated Clr-b loss selectively augmented cytotoxicity of oncogene-transformed leukemia cells by NKR-P1B+ NK cells in vitro and enhanced rejection by WT mice in vivo. Interestingly, genetic...

  10. First reported cases of human adenovirus serotype 14p1 infection, Ireland, October 2009 to July 2010.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Flanagan, D

    2011-02-01

    We report the first nine confirmed cases of human adenovirus 14p1 infection (HAdV-14p1), identified at different locations in Ireland between October 2009 and July 2010. These were the first notifications in Ireland and all were sporadic cases. Following these notifications, the Health Protection Surveillance Centre set up an enhanced surveillance system for HAdV-14p1 infection. Seven cases were male and five were aged less than one year. Three patients died, giving a case fatality rate of 33%. It should be noted that cases presented here were diagnosed on presentation to hospital and may represent the severe end of the spectrum of HAdV 14 disease in Ireland.

  11. Major grass pollen allergen Lol p 1 binds to diesel exhaust particles: implications for asthma and air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, R B; Suphioglu, C; Taylor, P; Desai, R; Watson, H C; Peng, J L; Bursill, L A

    1997-03-01

    Grass pollen allergens are known to be present in the atmosphere in a range of particle sizes from whole pollen grains (approx. 20 to 55 microns in diameter) to smaller size fractions Lol p 1, immunogold labelling with specific monoclonal antibodies and a high voltage transmission electron-microscopic imaging technique. DECP are visualized as small carbon spheres, each 30-60 nm in diameter, forming fractal aggregates about 1-2 microns in diameter. Here we test our hypothesis and show by in vitro experiments that the major grass pollen allergen, Lol p 1, binds to one defined class of fine particles, DECP. DECP are in the respirable size range, can bind to the major grass pollen allergen Lol p 1 under in vitro conditions and represent a possible mechanism by which allergens can become concentrated in polluted air and thus trigger attacks of asthma.

  12. Biotransformation of Pueraria lobata Extract with Lactobacillus rhamnosus vitaP1 Enhances Anti-Melanogenic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jeong Eun; Lee, Jin Woo; Park, Yuna; Sohn, Eun-Hwa; Choung, Eui Su; Jang, Seon-A; Kim, Inhye; Lee, Da Eun; Koo, Hyun Jung; Bak, Jong Phil; Lee, Sung Ryul; Kang, Se Chan

    2018-01-28

    Isoflavone itself is less available in the body without the aid of intestinal bacteria. In this study, we searched for isoflavone-transforming bacteria from human fecal specimens ( n = 14) using differential selection media. Isoflavone-transforming activity as the production of dihydrogenistein and dihydrodaidzein was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography and we found Lactobacillus rhamnosus , named L. rhamnosus vitaP1, through 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Extract from Pueraria lobata (EPL) and soy hypocotyl extract were fermented with L. rhamnosus vitaP1 for 24 and 48 h at 37°C. Fermented EPL (FEPL) showed enhanced anti-tyrosinase activity and antioxidant capacities, important suppressors of the pigmentation process, compared with that of EPL ( p Lactobacillus rhamnosus vitaP1 was found to be able to biotransform isoflavones in EPL. FEPL showed augmented anti-melanogenic potential.

  13. Magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effects in Mn1.2Fe0.8P1-xGex compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ou, Z Q; Wang, G F; Lin Song; Tegus, O; Brueck, E; Buschow, K H J

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the magnetic properties and magnetocaloric effects in the Mn 1.2 Fe 0.8 P 1-x Ge x compounds with x = 0.2, 0.22, 0.3, 0.4 and 0.5. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the Mn 1.2 Fe 0.8 P 1-x Ge x compounds crystallize in the hexagonal Fe 2 P-type crystal structure. The magnetic moments of the Mn 1.2 Fe 0.8 P 1-x Ge x compounds measured at 5 K and 5 T increase with increasing Ge content. The Curie temperature increases strongly and the magnetic entropy change has a maximum around 233 K for the compound with x = 0.22, which is about 19 and 31 J kg -1 K -1 for a field change of 2 and 5 T, respectively

  14. The Cucumber vein yellowing virus silencing suppressor P1b can functionally replace HCPro in Plum pox virus infection in a host-specific manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonell, Alberto; Dujovny, Gabriela; García, Juan Antonio; Valli, Adrian

    2012-02-01

    Plant viruses of the genera Potyvirus and Ipomovirus (Potyviridae family) use unrelated RNA silencing suppressors (RSS) to counteract antiviral RNA silencing responses. HCPro is the RSS of Potyvirus spp., and its activity is enhanced by the upstream P1 protein. Distinctively, the ipomovirus Cucumber vein yellowing virus (CVYV) lacks HCPro but contains two P1 copies in tandem (P1aP1b), the second of which functions as RSS. Using chimeras based on the potyvirus Plum pox virus (PPV), we found that P1b can functionally replace HCPro in potyviral infections of Nicotiana plants. Interestingly, P1a, the CVYV protein homologous to potyviral P1, disrupted the silencing suppression activity of P1b and reduced the infection efficiency of PPV in Nicotiana benthamiana. Testing the influence of RSS in host specificity, we found that a P1b-expressing chimera poorly infected PPV's natural host, Prunus persica. Conversely, P1b conferred on PPV chimeras the ability to replicate locally in cucumber, CVYV's natural host. The deleterious effect of P1a on PPV infection is host dependent, because the P1aP1b-expressing PPV chimera accumulated in cucumber to higher levels than PPV expressing P1b alone. These results demonstrate that a potyvirus can use different RSS, and that particular RSS and upstream P1-like proteins contribute to defining the virus host range.

  15. Randomized Phase I: Safety, Immunogenicity and Mucosal Antiviral Activity in Young Healthy Women Vaccinated with HIV-1 Gp41 P1 Peptide on Virosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geert Leroux-Roels

    Full Text Available Mucosal antibodies harboring various antiviral activities may best protect mucosal surfaces against early HIV-1 entry at mucosal sites and they should be ideally induced by prophylactic HIV-1 vaccines for optimal prevention of sexually transmitted HIV-1. A phase I, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in twenty-four healthy HIV-uninfected young women. The study objectives were to assess the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of virosomes harboring surface HIV-1 gp41-derived P1 lipidated peptides (MYM-V101. Participants received placebo or MYM-V101 vaccine at 10 μg/dose or 50 μg/dose intramuscularly at week 0 and 8, and intranasally at week 16 and 24. MYM-V101 was safe and well-tolerated at both doses administered by the intramuscular and intranasal routes, with the majority of subjects remaining free of local and general symptoms. P1-specific serum IgGs and IgAs were induced in all high dose recipients after the first injection. After the last vaccination, vaginal and rectal P1-specific IgGs could be detected in all high dose recipients. Approximately 63% and 43% of the low and high dose recipients were respectively tested positive for vaginal P1-IgAs, while 29% of the subjects from the high dose group tested positive for rectal IgAs. Serum samples had total specific IgG and IgA antibody concentrations ≥ 0.4 μg/mL, while mucosal samples were usually below 0.01 μg/mL. Vaginal secretions from MYM-V101 vaccinated subjects were inhibiting HIV-1 transcytosis but had no detectable neutralizing activity. P1-specific Th1 responses could not be detected on PBMC. This study demonstrates the excellent safety and tolerability of MYM-V101, eliciting systemic and mucosal antibodies in the majority of subjects. Vaccine-induced mucosal anti-gp41 antibodies toward conserved gp41 motifs were harboring HIV-1 transcytosis inhibition activity and may contribute to reduce sexually-transmitted HIV-1.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01084343.

  16. Evaluation of the Eological Management and Enhancement Alernative for Remediation of the K1007-P1 Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, M.J.

    2005-10-31

    An evaluation of the human and ecological risks associated with the P1 Pond and surrounding environs was conducted as part of the ETTP Site-Wide Remedial Investigation. The RI provides the basis for the focus on PCBs as the most important unacceptable risk to human and ecological health in the pond. Other P1 contaminants, media, or pathways of risk to receptors are identified in the RI, but are not addressed as a major risk reduction goal for the ETTP Site-Wide Feasibility Study. Therefore, the goal of the Ecological Management alternative is to reduce unacceptable risks associated with PCBs in fish. Many of the actions proposed for this alternative, however, are likely to reduce risks associated with other contaminants and their pathways. The high PCB concentrations in fish from the P1 Pond are most certainly due in part to the current ecological condition of the pond that maximizes PCB biomagnification. This basic assumption and the factors contributing to it were evaluated by conducting an intensive field study of the P1 Pond in the summer of 2004 (for a thorough presentation of current P1 Pond biological conditions, see Peterson et al. 2005). Major hypotheses regarding the P1 Pond's current fish community, PCB fate and transport processes, pond vegetation, and limnological conditions that contribute to the high PCB levels in fish were validated by the study (Appendix A), The results of the 2004 ecological assessment, in concert with long-term datasets obtained as part of the ETTP Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) and recent abiotic sampling for the RI, provide the basis for the assessment of current conditions.

  17. Comparison of two automated assays of BTM (CTX and P1NP) and reference intervals in a Danish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, N R; Møllehave, L T; Hansen, Y B L

    2017-01-01

    the agreement on the two platforms. METHODS: Fasting sera from 2308 individuals (1250 males and 1058 females, age range 24-76 years) participating in the Health2006 study were analyzed for CTX and P1NP using the automated IDS-iSYS analyzer and the automated Cobas e411 analyzer. Participants in anti......-osteoporotic treatment were excluded, while subjects on hormonal contraceptives were included. RESULTS: There was significant disagreement between both the two P1NP assays with a mean difference of -3 μg/L (LoA -19 to 14) (p

  18. Boro-norleucine as a P1 residue for the design of selective and potent DPP7 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shreder, Kevin R; Wong, Melissa S; Corral, Sergio; Yu, Zhizhou; Winn, David T; Wu, Min; Hu, Yi; Nomanbhoy, Tyzoon; Alemayehu, Senaiet; Fuller, Stacy R; Rosenblum, Jonathan S; Kozarich, John W

    2005-10-01

    Dipeptide-based inhibitors with C-substituted (alkyl or aminoalkyl) alpha-amino acids in the P2 position and boro-norleucine (boro-Nle) in the P1 position were synthesized. Relative to boro-proline, boro-Nle as a P1 residue was shown able to significantly dial out DPP4, FAP, DPP8, and DPP9 activity. Dab-boro-Nle (4g) proved to be the most selective and potent DPP7 inhibitor with a DPP7 IC50 value of 480 pM.

  19. [The obtainment and characteristics of Kalanchoe pinnata L. plants expressing the artificial gene of the cecropin P1 antimicrobial peptide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharchenko, N S; Rukavtsova, E B; Shevchuk, T V; Furs, O V; Pigoleva, S V; Lebedeva, A A; Chulina, I A; Baidakova, L K; Bur'yanov, Ya I

    2016-01-01

    Kalanchoe pinnata L. plants bearing an artificial CP1 gene encoding the cecropin P1 antimicrobial peptide have been obtained. The presence of the CP1 gene in the plant genome has been confirmed by PCR. Cecropin P1 synthesis in transgenic plants has been shown by MALDI mass spectrometry and Western blotting. The obtained plants have been highly resistant to bacterial and fungal phytopathogens, and their extracts have demonstrated antimicrobial activity towards human and animal pathogens. It has been shown that transgenic plants bearing the CP1 gene can be colonized by the beneficial associative microorganisms Methylovorus mays.

  20. Lost P1 allele in sh2 sweet corn: quantitative effects of p1 and a1 genes on concentrations of maysin, apimaysin, methoxymaysin, and chlorogenic acid in maize silk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, B Z; Zhang, Z J; Butrón, A; Widstrom, N W; Snook, M E; Lynch, R E; Plaisted, D

    2004-12-01

    In the United States, insecticide is used extensively in the production of sweet corn due to consumer demand for zero damage to ears and to a sweet corn genetic base with little or no resistance to ear-feeding insects. Growers in the southern United States depend on scheduled pesticide applications to control ear-feeding insects. In a study of quantitative genetic control over silk maysin, AM-maysin (apimaysin and methoxymaysin), and chlorogenic acid contents in an F2 population derived from GE37 (dent corn, P1A1) and 565 (sh2 sweet corn, p1a1), we demonstrate that the P1 allele from field corn, which was selected against in the development of sweet corn, has a strong epistatic interaction with the a1 allele in sh2 sweet corn. We detected that the p1 gene has significant effects (P silk maysin concentrations but also on AM-maysin, and chlorogenic acid concentrations. The a1 gene also has significant (P silk antibiotic chemicals. Successful selection from the fourth and fifth selfed backcrosses for high-maysin individuals of sweet corn homozygous for the recessive a1 allele (tightly linked to sh2) and the dominant P1 allele has been demonstrated. These selected lines have much higher (2 to 3 times) concentrations of silk maysin and other chemicals (AM-maysin and chlorogenic acid) than the donor parent GE37 and could enhance sweet corn resistance to corn earworm and reduce the number of applications of insecticide required to produce sweet corn.

  1. P1-18: The Effect of Background Music on Working Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding-Hao Liu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Many studies do visual working memory research under sundry sound conditions (Alley & Greene, 2008 Current Psychology 27 277–289; Iwanaga & Ito, 2002 Perceptual Motor Skills 94 1251–1258; Pring & Walker, 1994 Current Psychology 13 165–171. In order to understand more about background music, we modified previous studies to examine how the performance of working memory is affected by four different music conditions. Participants were randomly assigned into two groups to listen to two different pop songs to see if they have the similar effect on the performance of working memory. They were required to do six trials of digit span tasks under each music condition (silence, classical music, non-vocal music, vocal music. After being shown ten digits, each for 800 ms, participants were asked to recall and write down the digits in the correct order within 20 s. The results showed that there was no significant difference between two pop songs. Therefore, data were pooled for further analysis and indicated that there are significant differences and correlations in working memory among the four music conditions. The finding that the effect of non-vocal music affects working memory is greater in this study than in that of western films (Alley & Greene, 2008; Pring & Walker, 1994, which is consistent with the previous study in Japan (Iwanaga & Ito, 2002. The application of this study will be discussed in detail.

  2. Causal symmetric spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Olafsson, Gestur; Helgason, Sigurdur

    1996-01-01

    This book is intended to introduce researchers and graduate students to the concepts of causal symmetric spaces. To date, results of recent studies considered standard by specialists have not been widely published. This book seeks to bring this information to students and researchers in geometry and analysis on causal symmetric spaces.Includes the newest results in harmonic analysis including Spherical functions on ordered symmetric space and the holmorphic discrete series and Hardy spaces on compactly casual symmetric spacesDeals with the infinitesimal situation, coverings of symmetric spaces, classification of causal symmetric pairs and invariant cone fieldsPresents basic geometric properties of semi-simple symmetric spacesIncludes appendices on Lie algebras and Lie groups, Bounded symmetric domains (Cayley transforms), Antiholomorphic Involutions on Bounded Domains and Para-Hermitian Symmetric Spaces

  3. P1-11: Visual Function and Neurotoxic Symptoms Related to Exposure to Organic Solvents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Jimenez Barbosa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Exposure to Perchloroethylene (PERC, a solvent used in dry-cleaning, is associated with neurotoxicity and changes in colour vision (CV and contrast sensitivity (CS. However, PERCs' impact on other aspects of visual function (VF such as chromatic contrast sensitivity (CCS, glass pattern detection (GPP, visual search (VS, and global motion sensitivity (GMS remains unclear. This study compared VF and neurotoxicity in two populations at risk, dry-cleaners (cases from Colombia and Australia. Control groups of people with community levels of exposure to PERC were also assessed. Methods: A case-control study of VF in people who are working in the dry-cleaning industry for at least 1 year (n = 40 Colombia; n= 34 Australia with controls (n = 35 each site. VF measures assessed were CSF, CCS, the FM Hue 100 test, VS, GPP, and GMS. Neurotoxic symptoms were assessed using the Q16 modified version questionnaire. Results: Cases had poorer CCS, hue discrimination, GPP, GMS, and higher Q16 scores than controls (p < .05. There was no effect of country. CS function was poorer than controls (p < .05 for spatial frequencies≥0.50 cpd for Australian cases but for ≥1.0 cpd for Colombian cases. There were no significant differences between cases and controls for serial and parallel VS. Conclusion: Our CSF and CV findings indicate that the CS deficit extends to lower spatial frequencies. Furthermore we report a reduction in the detection of form, motion, and CCS. These deficits were associated with neurotoxic symptoms. Because VS was unaffected, it suggests that PERC affects lower order visual functions more severely than higher level cognition.

  4. Role of PTHrP(1-34) Pulse Frequency Versus Pulse Duration to Enhance Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jennifer; Ortel, Marlen; Hagmann, Sebastien; Hoeflich, Andreas; Richter, Wiltrud

    2016-12-01

    Generation of phenotypically stable, articular chondrocytes from mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) is still an unaccomplished task, with formation of abundant, hyaline extracellular matrix, and avoidance of hypertrophy being prime challenges. We recently demonstrated that parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is a promising factor to direct chondrogenesis of MSCs towards an articular phenotype, since intermittent PTHrP application stimulated cartilage matrix production and reduced undesired hypertrophy. We here investigated the role of frequency, pulse duration, total exposure time, and underlying mechanisms in order to unlock the full potential of PTHrP actions. Human MSC subjected to in vitro chondrogenesis for six weeks were exposed to 2.5 nM PTHrP(1-34) pulses from days 7 to 42. Application frequency was increased from three times weekly (3 × 6 h/week) to daily maintaining either the duration of individual pulses (6 h/day) or total exposure time (18 h/week; 2.6 h/day). Daily PTHrP treatment significantly increased extracellular matrix deposition regardless of pulse duration and suppressed alkaline-phosphatase activity by 87%. High total exposure time significantly reduced cell proliferation at day 14. Pulse duration was critically important to significantly reduce IHH expression, but irrelevant for PTHrP-induced suppression of the hypertrophic markers MEF2C and IBSP. COL10A1, RUNX2, and MMP13 expression remained unaltered. Decreased IGFBP-2, -3, and -6 expression suggested modulated IGF-I availability in PTHrP groups, while drop of SOX9 protein levels during the PTHrP-pulse may delay chondroblast formation and hypertrophy. Overall, the significantly optimized timing of PTHrP-pulses demonstrated a vast potential to enhance chondrogenesis of MSC and suppress hypertrophy possibly via superior balancing of IGF- and SOX9-related mechanisms. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2673-2681, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Transferable antibiotic resistance plasmids from biogas plant digestates often belong to the IncP-1 epsilon subgroup

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wolters, B.; Kyselková, Martina; Krögerrecklenfort, E.; Kreuzig, R.; Smalla, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 5, January (2015), Article 765 ISSN 1664-302X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : IncP-1 epsilon plasmid * class 1 integrons * biogas plant digestate * antibiotic resistance * exogenous plasmid isolation Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 4.165, year: 2015

  6. The crystal structure of recombinant proDer p 1, a major house dust mite proteolytic allergen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meno, Kåre; Thorsted, Peter B; Ipsen, Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Allergy to house dust mite is among the most prevalent allergic diseases worldwide. Most house dust mite allergic patients react to Der p 1 from Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus, which is a cysteine protease. To avoid heterogeneity in the sample used for crystallization, a modified recombinant...

  7. Immune response to Mycoplasma pneumoniae P1 and P116 in patients with atypical pneumonia analyzed by ELISA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkelund Svend

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serology is often used for the diagnosis of Mycoplasma pneumoniae. It is important to identify specific antigens that can distinguish between the presence or absence of antibodies against M. pneumoniae. The two proteins, P116 and P1, are found to be immunogenic. By using these in ELISA it is possible to identify an immune response against M. pneumoniae in serum samples. Results A recombinant protein derived from the P116 protein and one from the P1 protein were used in two ELISA tests, rP116-ELISA and rP1-ELISA. Human serum samples from patients with atypical pneumonia were tested and compared to the results of the complement fixation test. There was a good agreement between the two tests but the rP1-ELISA showed the best discrimination between positive and negative samples. Conclusion Two ELISA tests based on recombinant proteins have been analysed and compared to the complement fixation test results. The two ELISA tests were found suitable for use in serodiagnostics of M. pneumoniae infections. The use of specific antigens eliminates the risk of cross reaction to an immune response against other bacteria.

  8. The subcellular distribution of the human ribosomal "stalk" components: P1, P2 and P0 proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tchórzewski, Marek; Krokowski, Dawid; Rzeski, Wojciech

    2003-01-01

    The ribosomal "stalk" structure is a distinct lateral protuberance located on the large ribosomal subunit in prokaryotic, as well as in eukaryotic cells. In eukaryotes, this ribosomal structure is composed of the acidic ribosomal P proteins, forming two hetero-dimers (P1/P2) attached...

  9. Wavelength tunable InAs/InP(1 0 0) quantum dots in 1.55-µm telecom devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anantathanasarn, S.; Barbarin, Y.; Cade, N.I.; Veldhoven, van P.J.; Bente, E.A.J.M.; Oei, Y.S.; Kamada, H.; Smit, M.K.; Nötzel, R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the growth, characterization and device applications of self-assembled InAs/InP(1 0 0) quantum dots (QDs) formed by MOVPE. The problematic As/P exchange reaction during QD growth is suppressed by the insertion of a GaAs interlayer together with optimum growth conditions. This

  10. Ba3(P1−xMnxO4)2 : Blue/green inorganic materials based on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ‡Chemical Science and Technology Division, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Science and Technology ... We describe a blue/green inorganic material, Ba3(P1−xMnxO4)2 (I) based on tetrahedral MnO3−. 4 .... the synthesis at 600–950.

  11. Space Station Habitability Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearwater, Yvonne A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose and scope of the Habitability Research Group within the Space Human Factors Office at the NASA/Ames Research Center is described. Both near-term and long-term research objectives in the space human factors program pertaining to the U.S. manned Space Station are introduced. The concept of habitability and its relevancy to the U.S. space program is defined within a historical context. The relationship of habitability research to the optimization of environmental and operational determinants of productivity is discussed. Ongoing habitability research efforts pertaining to living and working on the Space Station are described.

  12. Characterization of a broad host-spectrum virulent Salmonella bacteriophage fmb-p1 and its application on duck meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changbao; Chen, Qiming; Zhang, Chong; Yang, Jie; Lu, Zhaoxin; Lu, Fengxia; Bie, Xiaomei

    2017-05-15

    The aim of this study was to find a virulent bacteriophage for the biocontrol of Salmonella in duck meat. A broad host-spectrum virulent phage, fmb-p1, was isolated and purified from an duck farm, and its host range was determined to include S. Typhimurium, S. Enteritidis, S. Saintpaul, S. Agona, S. Miami, S. Anatum, S. Heidelberg and S. Paratyphi-C. Electron microscopy and genome sequencing showed that fmb-p1 belongs to the family Siphoviridae. The genome of fmb-p1 is composed of a 43,327-bp double-stranded DNA molecule with 60 open reading frames and a total G+C content of 46.09%. There are no deleterious sequences or genes encoding known harmful products in the phage fmb-p1 genome. Phage fmb-p1 was stable under different temperature (40-75°C), pH (4-10) and NaCl solutions (1-11%). The phage treatment (9.9×10 9 PFU/cm 2 ) caused a peak reduction in S. Typhimurium of 4.52 log CFU/cm 2 in ready-to-eat (RTE) duck meat, whereas potassium sorbate treatment (PS, 2mg/cm 2 ) resulted in a 0.05-0.12 log reduction. Compared to PS treatment, there was significant difference in the S. Typhimurium reduction (P˂0.05) by phage treatment at both 4°C and 25°C. The results suggested that phage could be applied to reduce Salmonella, on commercial poultry products. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Introduction to quantum groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudbery, A.

    1996-01-01

    These pedagogical lectures contain some motivation for the study of quantum groups; a definition of ''quasi triangular Hopf algebra'' with explanations of all the concepts required to build it up; descriptions of quantised universal enveloping algebras and the quantum double; and an account of quantised function algebras and the action of quantum groups on quantum spaces. (author)

  14. Spectroscopic constants and the potential energy curve of the iodine weakly bound 0+g state correlating with the I(2P1/2) + I(2P1/2) dissociation limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akopyan, M E; Baturo, V V; Lukashov, S S; Poretsky, S A; Pravilov, A M

    2013-01-01

    The stepwise three-step three-colour aser excitation scheme and rotational as well as rovibrational energy transfer processes in the 0 + g state induced by collisions with He and Ar atoms are used for determination of rovibronic level energies of the weakly bound 0 + g state correlating with the I( 2 P 1/2 ) + I( 2 P 1/2 ) dissociation limit. Dunham coefficients of the state, Y i0 (i = 0–3), Y i1 (i = 0–3) and Y 02 for the v 0 g + = 0–16 and J 0 g + ≈ 14–135 ranges as well as the dissociation energy of the state, D e , and equilibrium I–I distance of the state, R e , are determined. The potential energy curve of the state constructed using these constants is also reported. (paper)

  15. Photoluminescence of heterostructures with GaP1−xNx and GaP1−x−yNxAsy layers grown on GaP and Si substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarenko, A. A.; Nikitina, E. V.; Sobolev, M. S.; Pirogov, E. V.; Denisov, D. V.; Egorov, A. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of heterostructures containing GaP 1−x N x ternary and GaP 1−x−y N x As y quaternary alloy layers are discussed. The heterostructures are grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaP and Si substrates. The structures are studied by the high-resolution X-ray diffraction technique and photoluminescence measurements in a wide temperature range from 10 to 300 K. In the low-temperature photoluminescence spectra of the alloys with a low nitrogen fraction (x < 0.007), two clearly resolved narrow lines attributed to the localized states of nitrogen pairs and the phonon replicas of these lines are observed

  16. Symmetry and group theory in chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, M

    1998-01-01

    A comprehensive discussion of group theory in the context of molecular and crystal symmetry, this book covers both point-group and space-group symmetries.Provides a comprehensive discussion of group theory in the context of molecular and crystal symmetryCovers both point-group and space-group symmetriesIncludes tutorial solutions

  17. Effect of orbital alignment on the forward and reverse electronic energy transfer Ca(4s5p 1P1)+Marrow-right-leftCa(4s5p 3P/sub J/)+M with rare gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussert, W.; Neuschaefer, D.; Leone, S.R.; Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0440)

    1987-01-01

    Effects of orbital alignment on the relative cross sections for electronic energy transfer are determined for the near resonant transfer between Ca(4s5p 1 P 1 ) and Ca(4s5p 3 P/sub J/) states with rare gas collision partners. The experiments are carried out by pulsed laser excitation in a crossed beam. The results for the forward direction, 1 P to 3 P, formulated in terms of the ratio of the maximum to minimum transfer probability are: 3 He 1.61 +- 0.05; He 1.60 +- 0.03; Ne 1.55 +- 0.10; Ar 1.52 +- 0.21; for Kr, transfer occurs, but no preference is distinguishable within 1 +- 0.2; Xe 1.44 +- 0.06. The results for He, Ne, and Ar indicate a clear preference in the transfer for the initially prepared molecular Pi state. For Xe the molecular Σ state is dominant. The energy transfer is also carried out in the reverse direction, 3 P 1 to 1 P, for He and Xe, obtaining 1.65 +- 0.10 and 1.94 +- 0.22, respectively. Analysis of the state preparation suggests that the reverse direction favors the asymptotic molecular Σ state for He and the molecular Pi state for Xe. These alignment results provide a first experimental determination of the dominant electronic states involved in a collisional energy transfer process

  18. Safety analysis report: packages. Argonne National Laboratory SLSF test train shipping container, P-1 shipment. Fissile material. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, C.A.

    1975-06-01

    The package is used to ship an instrumented test fuel bundle (test train) containing fissile material. The package assembly is Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Model R1010-0032. The shipment is fissile class III. The packaging consists of an outer carbon steel container into which an inner container is placed; the inner container is separated from the outer container by urethane foam cushioning material. The test train is supported in the inner container by a series of transverse supports spaced along the length of the test train. Both the inner and outer containers are closed with bolted covers. The covers do not seal the containers in a leaktight manner. The gross weight of the shipment is about 8350 lb. The unirradiated fissile material content is less than 3 kg of UO 2 of up to 93.2 percent enrichment. This is a Type A quantity (transport group III and less than 3 curies) of radioactive material which does not require shielding, cooling or heating, or neutron absorption or moderation functions in its packaging. The maximum exterior dimensions of the container are 37 ft 11 in. long, 24 1 / 2 in. wide, and 19 3 / 4 in. high

  19. Nuclear power in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aftergood, S.; Hafemeister, D.W.; Prilutsky, O.F.; Rodionov, S.N.; Primack, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear reactors have provided energy for satellites-with nearly disastrous results. Now the US government is proposing to build nuclear-powered boosters to launch Star Wars defenses. These authors represent scientific groups that are opposed to the use of nuclear power in near space. The authors feel that the best course for space-borne reactors is to ban them from Earth orbit and use them in deep space

  20. Engraftment and bone mass are enhanced by PTHrP 1-34 in ectopically transplanted vertebrae (vossicle model) and can be non-invasively monitored with bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Blake Eason; Williams, Michelle M; Dembek, Katarzyna A; Hernon, Krista M; Rosol, Thomas J; Toribio, Ramiro E

    2015-12-01

    Evidence exists that parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) 1-34 may be more anabolic in bone than parathyroid hormone 1-34. While optical imaging is growing in popularity, scant information exists on the relationships between traditional bone imaging and histology and bioluminescence (BLI) and fluorescence (FLI) imaging. We aimed to evaluate the effects of PTHrP 1-34 on bone mass and determine if relationships existed between radiographic and histologic findings in bone and BLI and FLI indices. Vertebrae (vossicles) from mice coexpressing luciferase and green fluorescent protein were implanted subcutaneously into allogenic nude mice. Transplant recipients were treated daily with saline or PTHrP 1-34 for 4 weeks. BLI, FLI, radiography, histology, and µCT of the vossicles were performed over time. PTHrP 1-34 increased bioluminescence the most after 2 weeks, fluorescence at all time points, and decreased the time to peak bioluminescence at 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.027), the latter of which suggesting enhanced engraftment. PTHrP 1-34 maximized vertebral body volume at 4 weeks (P bone observed histologically increased in both groups at 2 and 4 weeks (P ≤ 0.002); however, PTHrP 1-34 exceeded time-matched controls (P ≤ 0.044). A positive linear relationship existed between the percentage of trabecular bone and (1) total bioluminescence (r = 0.595; P = 0.019); (2) total fluorescence (r = 0.474; P = 0.074); and (3) max fluorescence (r = 0.587; P = 0.021). In conclusion, PTHrP 1-34 enhances engraftment and bone mass, which can be monitored non-invasively by BLI and FLI.

  1. An interesting charmonium state formation and decay: p p-bar → 1 D2 → 1 P1γ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anselmino, M.; Caruso, F.; Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ; Murgia, F.; Negrao, M.R.

    1994-01-01

    Massless perturbative QCD forbids, at leading order, the exclusive annihilation of proton-antiproton into some charmonium states, which however, have been observed in the pp channel, indicating the significance of higher order and non perturbative effects in the few GeV energy region. The most well known cases are those of the 1 S 0 (η c ) and the 1 P 1 . The case of the 1 D 2 is considered here and a way of detecting such a state through its typical angular distribution in the radiative decay 1 D 2 -> 1 D 2 -> 1 P 1 γ is suggested. Estimates of the branching ratio BR( 1 D 2 ->pp), as given by a quark-diquark model of the nucleon, mass corrections and an instanton induced process are presented. (author). 15 refs

  2. The structure of the mite allergen Blo t 1 explains the limited antibody cross-reactivity to Der p 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meno, Kåre H; Kastrup, Jette S; Kuo, I-Chun

    2017-01-01

    , recombinant proBlo t 1 (rproBlo t 1), determined at 2.1 Å resolution. Overall, the fold of rproBlo t 1 is characteristic for the pro-form of cysteine proteases from the C1A class. Structural comparison of experimentally mapped Der f 1/Der p1 IgG epitopes to the same surface patch on Blo t 1, as well...... as of sequence identity of surface exposed residues, suggests limited cross-reactivity between these allergens and Blo t 1. This is in agreement with ELISA inhibition results showing that, although cross-reactive human IgE epitopes exist, there are unique IgE epitopes for both Blo t 1 and Der p 1. This article...

  3. The Level of Mite Dermatophagoides’ Allergens (Der-p 1 and Der-f 1 in Birjand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Fereidouni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: House dust mite allergens especially pyroglyphid species are among the most important indoor allergens and have an important role in development of asthma and allergies. Materials and Methods: In current study, the level of two main allergens from mites including Der-p1 and Der-f 1 in dust of 28 homes in Birjand city was measured by ELISA method. Results: All samples were negative for Der-p1. Low leverl of Der-f 1 was detected in one sample. Prevalence of asthma, rhinitis and rhinoconjunctivitis was 2%, 28% and 15% respectively. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that House dust mites could not grow in Birjand climate.

  4. Small organic compounds enhance antigen loading of class II major histocompatibility complex proteins by targeting the polymorphic P1 pocket

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höpner, Sabine; Dickhaut, Katharina; Hofstätter, Maria

    2006-01-01

    the peptide loading rate. The effect was evident only for an allelic subset and strictly correlated with the presence of glycine at the dimorphic position beta86 of the HLA-DR molecule. The residue forms the floor of the conserved pocket P1, located in the peptide binding site of MHC molecule. Apparently......, transient occupation of this pocket by the organic compound stabilizes the peptide-receptive conformation permitting rapid antigen loading. This interaction appeared restricted to the larger Gly(beta86) pocket and allowed striking enhancements of T cell responses for antigens presented by these "adamantyl......-susceptible" MHC molecules. As catalysts of antigen loading, compounds targeting P1 may be useful molecular tools to amplify the immune response. The observation, however, that the ligand repertoire can be affected through polymorphic sites form the outside may also imply that environmental factors could induce...

  5. Material properties and modeling characteristics for MnFeP1-xAsx materials for application in magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrecht, Kurt; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, Christian R.H.

    2013-01-01

    and thermal hysteresis, and it is not well understood how the hysteresis will affect performance in a practical AMR device. The amount of hysteresis shown by a material can be controlled to an extent by tuning the processing conditions used during material synthesis; therefore, knowledge of the practical......Compounds of MnFeP1-xAsx have received attention recently for their use in active magnetic regenerators (AMR) because of their relatively high isothermal entropy change and adiabatic temperature change with magnetization. However, the materials also generally exhibit a significant magnetic...... impact of hysteresis is a key element to guide successful material development and synthesis. The properties of a magnetocaloric MnFeP1-xAsx compound are characterized as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field, and the results are used to assess the effects of hysteresis on magnetocaloric...

  6. Space for Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mariane Ellen; Folmer, Mette Blicher; Mullins, Michael

    SPACE FOR INTERACTION QUALIFYING GROUP TREATMENT FOR PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC PAIN THROUGH OPTIMIZATION(?) OF SPACE. A RANDOMIZED PILOT STUDY. In a Ph-D. Mariane Ellen Jørgensen / Nurse + psykoterapist / maej@rn.dk / Pain Center / Aalborg University Hospital / Denmark / Mette Blicher Folmer / Archit...

  7. A lifetime measurement of the 1s2p 3P1 level in helium-like Mg and Al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armour, I.A.; Silver, J.D.; Traebert, E.; Oxford Univ.

    1981-01-01

    The lifetimes of the 1s2p 3 P 1 levels of helium-like magnesium and aluminium have been measured by the beam-foil decay curve technique. The 1s 2 -1s2p transitions were observed with a curved-crystal x-ray spectrometer. Decay curves taken under systematically varied conditions have been evaluated using several techniques including a cascade model. The results are in agreement with most of the theoretical predictions. (author)

  8. Characterization of the human T cell response to rye grass pollen allergens Lol p 1 and Lol p 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, M D; Papalia, L; Eusebius, N P; O'Hehir, R E; Rolland, J M

    2002-12-01

    Knowledge of dominant T cell epitopes of major allergens recognized by allergic individuals is required to improve efficacy and safety of allergen immunotherapy. Rye grass pollen (RGP) is the most important source of seasonal aeroallergens in temperate climates and Lol p 1 and Lol p 5 are the two major IgE-reactive allergens. This study aimed to characterize the T cell response to these allergens using a large panel of RGP-sensitive individuals. Short-term RGP-specific T cell lines (TCL) were generated from 38 RGP-sensitive subjects and stimulated with Lol p 1 and/or Lol p 5 allergens and synthetic 20-mer peptides. Proliferative responses were determined by 3H-thymidine uptake and IL-5 and IFN-gamma in culture supernatants analysed by ELISA. Of 17 subjects tested for reactivity to both allergens 16 (94%) responded to Lol p 1 and/or Lol p 5, establishing these as major T cell-reactive allergens. Sites of T cell reactivity were spread throughout the allergen molecules but regions of high reactivity were found. For Lol p 1 these spanned residues 19-38, 109-128, 154-173, 190-209, and for Lol p 5 37-56, 100-119, 145-164, 154-173, 190-209, 217-236 and 226-245. IL-5 and IFN-gamma were produced by T cells cultured with proliferation-inducing peptides. T cell responses to RGP major allergens have been extensively characterized, providing fundamental information for developing T cell-targeted immunotherapy for RGP allergy.

  9. Filled and empty states of Zn-TPP films deposited on Fe(001-p(1×1O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianlorenzo Bussetti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Zn-tetraphenylporphyrin (Zn-TPP was deposited on a single layer of metal oxide, namely an Fe(001-p(1×1O surface. The filled and empty electronic states were measured by means of UV photoemission and inverse photoemission spectroscopy on a single monolayer and a 20 monolayer thick film. The ionization energy and the electron affinity of the organic film were deduced and the interface dipole was determined and compared with data available in the literature.

  10. Different Interfacial Behaviors of N- and C-Terminus Cysteine-Modified Cecropin P1 Chemically Immobilized onto Polymer Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    Anderson, G. P.; Ligler, F. S.; Shaffer, K. M.; Taitt, C. R. Antimicrobial peptides: New recognition molecules for detecting botulinum toxins ...as a biosensor for rapid detection of pathogens and toxins . Lab. Invest. 2007, 88 (2), 196−206. (20) Jonkheijm, P.; Weinrich, D.; Schröder, H...optics; Wiley-Interscience: New York, 1984; Vol. 575, p 1. (43) Shen, Y. R. Surface properties probed by second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation

  11. Crystal structure of an Anti-meningococcal subtype P1.4 PorA antibody provides basis for peptide-vaccine design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, Clasien J.; Hoogerhout, Peter; Kuipers, Betsy; Vidarsson, Gestur; van Alphen, Loek; Gros, Piet

    2005-01-01

    In various western countries, subtype P1.4 of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B causes the greatest incidence of meningococcal disease. To investigate the molecular recognition of this subtype, we crystallised a peptide (P1HVVVNNKVATH(P11)), corresponding to the subtype P1.4 epitope sequence of

  12. The 2s1/2 → 2p1/2 + one photon transition in hydrogen and hydrogenlike ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelsey, E.J.

    1977-01-01

    The 2s 1 / 2 → 2p 1 / 2 + one photon transition rate is calculated and discussed for hydrogen and hydrogenlike ions. It is noted that the induced transition rather than the spontaneous transition is of primary importance since it is the basis of many of the precision Lamb-shift measurements. The lack of a calculation of the transition rate other than a heuristic nonrelativistic derivation which requires a nontrivial assumption motivates the calculation presented here based on the external field approximation to quantum electrodynamics. It is found that the heuristic answer is correct in lowest order. In this derivation we see that the 2s 1 / 2 → 2p 1 / 2 + one photon transition gives an apparent contradiction to the often-stated remark that for the electric dipole matrix element there exist three equivalent representations, the ''length,'' ''velocity,'' and ''acceleration'' forms. The difficulties of an experimental determination of this transition rate using induced transitions in hydrogenlike ions are briefly noted as well as the somewhat different case of heavy muonic atoms where the spontaneous 2s 1 / 2 → 2p 1 / 2 + one photon transition has been observed

  13. A through calculation of 1,100 MWe PWR large break LOCA by THYDE-P1 EM model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Masayuki; Asahi, Yoshiro; Hirano, Masashi

    1984-07-01

    THYDE-P1 is a code to analyze both the blowdown and refill-reflood phases of loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Up to now, THYDE-P1 has been applied to various experiment analyses, which show its high capability to analyze LOCAs as a best estimate (BE) calculation code. In this report, evaluation model (EM) calculation method, especialy in the blowdown and refill phases, is established equivalently to WREM/J2 which is regarded as appropriate for an EM calculation code, and the results of them are compared and discussed. The present calculation was the first executed by THYDE-P1-EM, and was performed as Sample Calculation Run 80 which was a part of a series of THYDE-P sample calculations. The calculation was carried out from the LOCA initiation till 400 seconds for a guillotine break at the cold leg of a commercial 1,100 MWe PWR plant. The calculated results agreed well to that of the WREM/J2 code. (author)

  14. Neighborhood spaces

    OpenAIRE

    D. C. Kent; Won Keun Min

    2002-01-01

    Neighborhood spaces, pretopological spaces, and closure spaces are topological space generalizations which can be characterized by means of their associated interior (or closure) operators. The category NBD of neighborhood spaces and continuous maps contains PRTOP as a bicoreflective subcategory and CLS as a bireflective subcategory, whereas TOP is bireflectively embedded in PRTOP and bicoreflectively embedded in CLS. Initial and final structures are described in these categories, and it is s...

  15. SpaceTech—Postgraduate space education

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bruijn, Ferdi J.; Ashford, Edward W.; Larson, Wiley J.

    2008-07-01

    , Interpersonal Skills, Telecommunications, Earth Observation and Navigation. A group CCP, a major asset of this unique program, is a focused project, aimed at the formation of a credible virtual commercial space-related business. Participants exercise space systems engineering fundamentals as well as marketing and business engineering tools, with the goal of creating a financially viable business opportunity. They then present the result, in the form of an unsolicited proposal to potential investors, as well as a varied group of engineers, managers and executives from the space community. During the CCP, participants learn the ties between mission and system design and the potential return to investors. They develop an instinct for the technical concepts and which of the parameters to adjust to make their newly conceived business more effective and profitable.

  16. Esrange Space Center, a Gate to Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widell, Ola

    Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) is operating the Esrange Space Center in northern Sweden. Space operations have been performed for more than 40 years. We have a unique combination of maintaining balloon and rocket launch operations, and building payloads, providing space vehicles and service systems. Sub-orbital rocket flights with land recovery and short to long duration balloon flights up to weeks are offered. The geographical location, land recovery area and the long term experience makes Swedish Space Corporation and Esrange to an ideal gate for space activities. Stratospheric balloons are primarily used in supporting atmospheric research, validation of satellites and testing of space systems. Balloon operations have been carried out at Esrange since 1974. A large number of balloon flights are yearly launched in cooperation with CNES, France. Since 2005 NASA/CSBF and Esrange provide long duration balloon flights to North America. Flight durations up to 5 days with giant balloons (1.2 Million cubic metres) carrying heavy payload (up to 2500kg) with astronomical instruments has been performed. Balloons are also used as a crane for lifting space vehicles or parachute systems to be dropped and tested from high altitude. Many scientific groups both in US, Europe and Japan have indicated a great need of long duration balloon flights. Esrange will perform a technical polar circum balloon flight during the summer 2008 testing balloon systems and flight technique. We are also working on a permission giving us the opportunity on a circular stratospheric balloon flight around the North Pole.

  17. Clifford algebras, spinors, spin groups and covering groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magneville, C.; Pansart, J.P.

    1991-03-01

    The Dirac equation uses matrices named Υ matrices which are representations of general algebraic structures associated with a metric space. These algebras are the Clifford algebras. In the first past, these algebras are studied. Then the notion of spinor is developed. It is shown that Majorana and Weyl spinors only exist for some particular metric space. In the second part, Clifford and spinor groups are studied. They may be interpreted as the extension of the notion of orthogonal group for Clifford algebras and their spaces for representation. The rotation of a spinor is computed. In the last part, the connexion between the spinor groups and the Universal Covering Groups is presented [fr

  18. Sacred Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, Pamela

    2018-01-01

    A space can be sacred, providing those who inhabit a particular space with sense of transcendence-being connected to something greater than oneself. The sacredness may be inherent in the space, as for a religious institution or a serene place outdoors. Alternatively, a space may be made sacred by the people within it and events that occur there. As medical providers, we have the opportunity to create sacred space in our examination rooms and with our patient interactions. This sacred space can be healing to our patients and can bring us providers opportunities for increased connection, joy, and gratitude in our daily work.

  19. Sobolev spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Robert A

    2003-01-01

    Sobolev Spaces presents an introduction to the theory of Sobolev Spaces and other related spaces of function, also to the imbedding characteristics of these spaces. This theory is widely used in pure and Applied Mathematics and in the Physical Sciences.This second edition of Adam''s ''classic'' reference text contains many additions and much modernizing and refining of material. The basic premise of the book remains unchanged: Sobolev Spaces is intended to provide a solid foundation in these spaces for graduate students and researchers alike.* Self-contained and accessible for readers in other disciplines.* Written at elementary level making it accessible to graduate students.

  20. Managing the space sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    In April 1994 the National Research Council received a request from NASA that the NRC's Space Studies Board provide guidance on questions relating to the management of NASA's programs in the space sciences. The issues raised in the request closely reflect questions posed in the agency's fiscal year 1994 Senate appropriations report. These questions included the following: Should all the NASA space science programs be gathered into a 'National Institute for Space Science'? What other organizational changes might be made to improve the coordination and oversight of NASA space science programs? What processes should be used for establishing interdisciplinary science priorities based on scientific merit and other criteria, while ensuring opportunities for newer fields and disciplines to emerge? And what steps could be taken to improve utilization of advanced technologies in future space scienc missions? This report details the findings of the Committee on the Future of Space Science (FOSS) and its three task groups: the Task Group on Alternative Organizations, Task Group on Research Prioritization, and the Task Group on Technology.

  1. q-deformed Minkowski space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogievetsky, O.; Pillin, M.; Schmidke, W.B.; Wess, J.; Zumino, B.

    1993-01-01

    In this lecture I discuss the algebraic structure of a q-deformed four-vector space. It serves as a good example of quantizing Minkowski space. To give a physical interpretation of such a quantized Minkowski space we construct the Hilbert space representation and find that the relevant time and space operators have a discrete spectrum. Thus the q-deformed Minkowski space has a lattice structure. Nevertheless this lattice structure is compatible with the operation of q-deformed Lorentz transformations. The generators of the q-deformed Lorentz group can be represented as linear operators in the same Hilbert space. (orig.)

  2. Quantum symmetries of classical spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bhowmick, Jyotishman; Goswami, Debashish; Roy, Subrata Shyam

    2009-01-01

    We give a general scheme for constructing faithful actions of genuine (noncommutative as $C^*$ algebra) compact quantum groups on classical topological spaces. Using this, we show that: (i) a compact connected classical space can have a faithful action by a genuine compact quantum group, and (ii) there exists a spectral triple on a classical connected compact space for which the quantum group of orientation and volume preserving isometries (in the sense of \\cite{qorient}) is a genuine quantum...

  3. Unitary Representations of Gauge Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerfano, Ruth Stella

    I generalize to the case of gauge groups over non-trivial principal bundles representations that I. M. Gelfand, M. I. Graev and A. M. Versik constructed for current groups. The gauge group of the principal G-bundle P over M, (G a Lie group with an euclidean structure, M a compact, connected and oriented manifold), as the smooth sections of the associated group bundle is presented and studied in chapter I. Chapter II describes the symmetric algebra associated to a Hilbert space, its Hilbert structure, a convenient exponential and a total set that later play a key role in the construction of the representation. Chapter III is concerned with the calculus needed to make the space of Lie algebra valued 1-forms a Gaussian L^2-space. This is accomplished by studying general projective systems of finitely measurable spaces and the corresponding systems of sigma -additive measures, all of these leading to the description of a promeasure, a concept modeled after Bourbaki and classical measure theory. In the case of a locally convex vector space E, the corresponding Fourier transform, family of characters and the existence of a promeasure for every quadratic form on E^' are established, so the Gaussian L^2-space associated to a real Hilbert space is constructed. Chapter III finishes by exhibiting the explicit Hilbert space isomorphism between the Gaussian L ^2-space associated to a real Hilbert space and the complexification of its symmetric algebra. In chapter IV taking as a Hilbert space H the L^2-space of the Lie algebra valued 1-forms on P, the gauge group acts on the motion group of H defining in an straight forward fashion the representation desired.

  4. O1, P1, N2 models of the global ocean tide on an elastic earth plus surface potential and spherical harmonic decompositions for M2, S2, and K1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parke, M. E.

    1982-01-01

    The models of M2, S2, and K1 presented in Parke and Hendershott (1980) are supplemented with models of O1, P1, and N2. The models satisfy specified elevation boundary conditions and are generated by fighting a small number of test functions to island data. Maps are presented of the geocentric tide, the induced free space potential, the induced vertical component of the solid earth tide, and the induced vertical component of the gravitational field for each new component. Maps of the tidal potential seen by an observer fixed to the surface of the solid earth are also presented for all six constituents. Spherical harmonic coefficients up to order four and the rms magnitude of the coefficients to order fifteen are presented for each constituent. The rms magnitudes of the P1 and K1 coefficients normalized by their respective equilibrium amplitudes are compared to determine the effect of the diurnal core resonance.

  5. Late-stage optimization of a tercyclic class of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horan, Joshua C; Kuzmich, Daniel; Liu, Pingrong; DiSalvo, Darren; Lord, John; Mao, Can; Hopkins, Tamara D; Yu, Hui; Harcken, Christian; Betageri, Raj; Hill-Drzewi, Melissa; Patenaude, Lori; Patel, Monica; Fletcher, Kimberly; Terenzzio, Donna; Linehan, Brian; Xia, Heather; Patel, Mita; Studwell, Debbie; Miller, Craig; Hickey, Eugene; Levin, Jeremy I; Smith, Dustin; Kemper, Raymond A; Modis, Louise K; Bannen, Lynne C; Chan, Diva S; Mac, Morrison B; Ng, Stephanie; Wang, Yong; Xu, Wei; Lemieux, René M

    2016-01-15

    Poor solubility and cationic amphiphilic drug-likeness were liabilities identified for a lead series of S1P3-sparing, S1P1 agonists originally developed from a high-throughput screening campaign. This work describes the subsequent optimization of these leads by balancing potency, selectivity, solubility and overall molecular charge. Focused SAR studies revealed favorable structural modifications that, when combined, produced compounds with overall balanced profiles. The low brain exposure observed in rat suggests that these compounds would be best suited for the potential treatment of peripheral autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. SHADOK-3-6, Transport Equation with Anisotropic Diffusion in P1 Approximation for Spherical and Cylindrical Geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ligou, J.; Thomi, P.A.

    1973-01-01

    1 - Nature of physical problem solved: Integral transport equation, anisotropy of diffusion in P1 approximation. SHADOK3 - cylindrical geometry; direct solution of the linear system. SHADOK4 - cylindrical geometry; Thermalization iteration; solution of the linear system with inverse matrix calculation. SHADOK5 - like SHADOK3 for spherical geometry. SHADOK6 - like SHADOK4 for spherical geometry. 2 - Method of solution: Analysis in terms of annuli for each of which polynomial approximation is applied. Dynamic allocation (for formulas see report TM(10)). 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Relative accuracy of the Bickley functions about 1.0E-13

  7. Effect of rapid thermal annealing on InP1−xBix grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, X Y; Wang, K; Pan, W W; Wang, P; Li, Y Y; Song, Y X; Gu, Y; Yue, L; Xu, H; Zhang, Z P; Cui, J; Gong, Q; Wang, S M

    2015-01-01

    The effect of post-growth rapid thermal annealing on structural and optical properties of InP 1−x Bi x thin films was investigated. InPBi shows good thermal stability up to 500 °C and a modest improvement in photoluminescence (PL) intensity with an unchanged PL spectral feature. Bismuth outdiffusion from InPBi and strain relaxation are observed at about 600 °C. The InPBi sample annealed at 800 °C shows an unexpected PL spectrum with different energy transitions. (paper)

  8. J{sup P} = (1)/(2){sup +}, (3)/(2){sup +} masses in the statistical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Amanpreet; Upadhyay, Alka [Thapar University, School of Physics and Materials Science, Patiala (India)

    2016-11-15

    The mass formulae for the baryon octet and decuplet are calculated. These formulae are function of constituent quark masses and spin-spin interaction terms for the quarks inside the baryons. The coefficients in the mass formulae are estimated by the statistical model for J{sup P} = 1/2{sup +}, 3/2{sup +}, incorporating the contributions from the ''sea'' containing u anti u, d anti d, s anti s pairs and gluons. The measured masses are presented and found to be matching well with some of the experimental and theoretical data. (orig.)

  9. A Space Apart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Lynch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines how the preschool child is enabled to withdraw from the peer group and create a private, individual space within the institutional collective. The question under consideration is, “What factors are necessary to enable a child to create and maintain a withdrawal space in the preschool?” Data were collected through ethnographic fieldwork at two Montessori schools in the south of Sweden. Analysis of the results reveals that a child is enabled through a combination of two elements: a level of opportunity to create a space and a level of defense of a created space. These two factors are dependent on the teachers’ ability to correctly identify space creation, alongside their desire for the child’s space creation effort to be successful.

  10. Elementary particles in curved spaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazanu, I.

    2004-01-01

    The theories in particle physics are developed currently, in Minkowski space-time starting from the Poincare group. A physical theory in flat space can be seen as the limit of a more general physical theory in a curved space. At the present time, a theory of particles in curved space does not exist, and thus the only possibility is to extend the existent theories in these spaces. A formidable obstacle to the extension of physical models is the absence of groups of motion in more general Riemann spaces. A space of constant curvature has a group of motion that, although differs from that of a flat space, has the same number of parameters and could permit some generalisations. In this contribution we try to investigate some physical implications of the presumable existence of elementary particles in curved space. In de Sitter space (dS) the invariant rest mass is a combination of the Poincare rest mass and the generalised angular momentum of a particle and it permits to establish a correlation with the vacuum energy and with the cosmological constant. The consequences are significant because in an experiment the local structure of space-time departs from the Minkowski space and becomes a dS or AdS space-time. Discrete symmetry characteristics of the dS/AdS group suggest some arguments for the possible existence of the 'mirror matter'. (author)

  11. Group X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  12. Response surface optimization of carbon and nitrogen sources for nuclease P1 production by Penicillium citrinum F-5-5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Xinle; Huang Yingying; Zhang Hong; Chen Min; Liu Xuan

    2011-01-01

    Penicillium citrinum F-5-5, a nuclease P1 high-producing strain with 978.6 U/ml in potato glucose medium, was derived from the original Penicillium citrinum CICC 4011 with 60 Co γ-rays irradiation mutation and then protoplasts fusion treatment. Culture components were optimized for the nuclease P1 production, and response surface methodology was applied for the critical medium components(carbon and nitrogen sources) which were preselected by Plackett-Burman design approach. Glucose, soluble starch and corn steep powder showed significant effects on production of nuclease. Central composite design was used for the optimization levels by software Minitab 15, and it showed that, the optimal values for the concentration of glucose, soluble starch and corn steep powder were 30.89, 42.46 and 11.60 g/L, respectively. With this medium,an enzyme activity of 1687.16 U/ml could be obtained theoretically. Using this optimized medium, an experimental enzyme activity of 1672.6 U/ml was reached. (authors)

  13. AtHMA3, a P1B-ATPase allowing Cd/Zn/Co/Pb vacuolar storage in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morel, Mélanie; Crouzet, Jérôme; Gravot, Antoine; Auroy, Pascaline; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Vavasseur, Alain; Richaud, Pierre

    2009-02-01

    The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Heavy Metal Associated3 (AtHMA3) protein belongs to the P1B-2 subgroup of the P-type ATPase family, which is involved in heavy metal transport. In a previous study, we have shown, using heterologous expression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, that in the presence of toxic metals, AtHMA3 was able to phenotypically complement the cadmium/lead (Cd/Pb)-hypersensitive strain ycf1 but not the zinc (Zn)-hypersensitive strain zrc1. In this study, we demonstrate that AtHMA3 in planta is located in the vacuolar membrane, with a high expression level in guard cells, hydathodes, vascular tissues, and the root apex. Confocal imaging in the presence of the Zn/Cd fluorescent probe BTC-5N revealed that AtHMA3 participates in the vacuolar storage of Cd. A T-DNA insertional mutant was found more sensitive to Zn and Cd. Conversely, ectopic overexpression of AtHMA3 improved plant tolerance to Cd, cobalt, Pb, and Zn; Cd accumulation increased by about 2- to 3-fold in plants overexpressing AtHMA3 compared with wild-type plants. Thus, AtHMA3 likely plays a role in the detoxification of biological (Zn) and nonbiological (Cd, cobalt, and Pb) heavy metals by participating in their vacuolar sequestration, an original function for a P1B-2 ATPase in a multicellular eukaryote.

  14. Univariate Lp and ɭ p Averaging, 0 < p < 1, in Polynomial Time by Utilization of Statistical Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Lavery

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present evidence that one can calculate generically combinatorially expensive Lp and lp averages, 0 < p < 1, in polynomial time by restricting the data to come from a wide class of statistical distributions. Our approach differs from the approaches in the previous literature, which are based on a priori sparsity requirements or on accepting a local minimum as a replacement for a global minimum. The functionals by which Lp averages are calculated are not convex but are radially monotonic and the functionals by which lp averages are calculated are nearly so, which are the keys to solvability in polynomial time. Analytical results for symmetric, radially monotonic univariate distributions are presented. An algorithm for univariate lp averaging is presented. Computational results for a Gaussian distribution, a class of symmetric heavy-tailed distributions and a class of asymmetric heavy-tailed distributions are presented. Many phenomena in human-based areas are increasingly known to be represented by data that have large numbers of outliers and belong to very heavy-tailed distributions. When tails of distributions are so heavy that even medians (L1 and l1 averages do not exist, one needs to consider using lp minimization principles with 0 < p < 1.

  15. Band gap calculations of the semiconductor BNxP1−x using modified Becke–Johnson approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benkraouda, M.; Amrane, N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► The Modified Becke–Johnson scheme gives a very accurate band gap. ► We have shown the invalidity of Vegard’s linear rule for BN x P 1−x . ► The band gap changes with alloy concentration are important in band gap engineering. - Abstract: In this work, the electronic properties of BN, BP and BN x P 1−x compounds have been investigated by means of first-principles density-functional total-energy calculation using the all-electron full potential linear augmented plane-wave method (FP-LAPW). The (FP-LAPW) method was used within the density functional theory (DFT) along with the Engel–Vosko and Becke–Johnson exchange correlation potential. The energy bands along high symmetry directions, the density of states and bowing distributions are calculated. The results have been discussed in terms of previously existing experimental and theoretical data, and comparisons with similar compounds have been made. Analysis of band structure suggests direct and pseudo-direct band gaps for both compounds.

  16. Evidence of the 2s2p(1P) doubly excited state in the harmonic generation spectrum of helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngoko Djiokap, J. M.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2011-01-01

    By solving the two-active-electron time-dependent Schroedinger equation in an intense, ultrashort laser field, we investigate evidence of electron correlations in the high-order harmonic generation spectrum of helium. As the frequency of the driving laser pulse varies from 4.6 to 6.6 eV, the 13th, 11th, and 9th harmonics sequentially become resonant with the transition between the ground state and the isolated 2s2p( 1 P) autoionizing state of helium, which dramatically enhances these harmonics and changes their profiles. When each of the 9th and 13th harmonics are in resonance with this autoionizing state, there is also a low-order multiphoton resonance with a Rydberg state, resulting in a particularly large enhancement of these harmonics relative to neighboring harmonics. When the 11th harmonic is in resonance with the 2s2p( 1 P) autoionizing state, the 13th harmonic is simultaneously in resonance with numerous higher-energy autoionizing states, resulting in a competition between these two harmonics for intensity. These results demonstrate that even electron correlations occurring over a narrow energy interval can have a significant effect on strong-field processes such as harmonic generation.

  17. Group Flow and Group Genius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Keith Sawyer views the spontaneous collaboration of group creativity and improvisation actions as "group flow," which organizations can use to function at optimum levels. Sawyer establishes ideal conditions for group flow: group goals, close listening, complete concentration, being in control, blending egos, equal participation, knowing…

  18. Groups, rings, modules

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  19. Topological transformation groups and Dugundji compacta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, Konstantin L; Chatyrko, Vitalii A

    2010-01-01

    The presence of an algebraic structure on a space, which is compatible with its topology, in many cases imposes very strong restrictions on the properties of the space itself. Conditions are found which must be satisfied by the actions in order for the phase space to be a d-space (Dugundji compactum). This investigation allows the range of G-spaces that are d-spaces (Dugundji compacta) to be substantially widened. It is shown that all the cases known to the authors where a G-space (a topological group, one of its quotient spaces) is a d-space can be realized using equivariant maps. Bibliography: 39 titles.

  20. Interactions between the cyclic AMP receptor protein and the alpha subunit of RNA polymerase at the Escherichia coli galactose operon P1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attey, A; Belyaeva, T; Savery, N; Hoggett, J; Fujita, N; Ishihama, A; Busby, S

    1994-10-25

    DNAase I footprinting has been used to study open complexes between Escherichia coli RNA polymerase and the galactose operon P1 promoter, both in the absence and the presence of CRP (the cyclic AMP receptor protein, a transcription activator). From the effects of deletion of the C-terminal part of the RNA polymerase alpha subunit, we deduce that alpha binds at the upstream end of both the binary RNA polymerase-galP1 and ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-galP1 complexes. Disruption of the alpha-upstream contact suppresses open complex formation at galP1 at lower temperatures. In ternary RNA polymerase-CRP-galP1 complexes, alpha appears to make direct contact with Activating Region 1 in CRP. DNAase I footprinting has been used to detect and quantify interactions between purified alpha and CRP bound at galP1.

  1. Design spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Digital technologies and media are becoming increasingly embodied and entangled in the spaces and places at work and at home. However, our material environment is more than a geometric abstractions of space: it contains familiar places, social arenas for human action. For designers, the integration...... of digital technology with space poses new challenges that call for new approaches. Creative alternatives to traditional systems methodologies are called for when designers use digital media to create new possibilities for action in space. Design Spaces explores how design and media art can provide creative...... alternatives for integrating digital technology with space. Connecting practical design work with conceptual development and theorizing, art with technology, and usesr-centered methods with social sciences, Design Spaces provides a useful research paradigm for designing ubiquitous computing. This book...

  2. Permutation groups

    CERN Document Server

    Passman, Donald S

    2012-01-01

    This volume by a prominent authority on permutation groups consists of lecture notes that provide a self-contained account of distinct classification theorems. A ready source of frequently quoted but usually inaccessible theorems, it is ideally suited for professional group theorists as well as students with a solid background in modern algebra.The three-part treatment begins with an introductory chapter and advances to an economical development of the tools of basic group theory, including group extensions, transfer theorems, and group representations and characters. The final chapter feature

  3. 35S Promoter Methylation in Kanamycin-Resistant Kalanchoe (Kalanchoe pinnata L.) Plants Expressing the Antimicrobial Peptide Cecropin P1 Transgene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchuk, T V; Zakharchenko, N S; Tarlachkov, S V; Furs, O V; Dyachenko, O V; Buryanov, Y I

    2016-09-01

    Transgenic kalanchoe plants (Kalanchoe pinnata L.) expressing the antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 gene (cecP1) under the control of the 35S cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and the selective neomycin phosphotransferase II (nptII) gene under the control of the nopaline synthase gene promoter were studied. The 35S promoter methylation and the cecropin P1 biosynthesis levels were compared in plants growing on media with and without kanamycin. The low level of active 35S promoter methylation further decreases upon cultivation on kanamycin-containing medium, while cecropin P1 synthesis increases.

  4. Space Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Gary L.

    2011-01-01

    A robust and competitive commercial space sector is vital to continued progress in space. The United States is committed to encouraging and facilitating the growth of a U.S. commercial space sector that supports U.S. needs, is globally competitive, and advances U.S. leadership in the generation of new markets and innovation-driven entrepreneurship. Energize competitive domestic industries to participate in global markets and advance the development of: satellite manufacturing; satellite-based services; space launch; terrestrial applications; and increased entrepreneurship. Purchase and use commercial space capabilities and services to the maximum practical extent Actively explore the use of inventive, nontraditional arrangements for acquiring commercial space goods and services to meet United States Government requirements, including measures such as public-private partnerships, . Refrain from conducting United States Government space activities that preclude, discourage, or compete with U.S. commercial space activities. Pursue potential opportunities for transferring routine, operational space functions to the commercial space sector where beneficial and cost-effective.

  5. Vapour liquid equilibria of monocaprylin plus palmitic acid or methyl stearate at P = (1.20 and 2.50) kPa by using DSC technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunico, Larissa P.; Damaceno, Daniela S.; Matricarde Falleiro, Rafael M.; Sarup, Bent; Abildskov, Jens; Ceriani, Roberta; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Novel VLE data for binary mixtures involving a partial acylglycerol (monocaprylin). • Use of a promising technique for measuring VLE/vapour pressure data (DSC technique). • The consistency of experimental data is analysed by a proposed methodology. • Regressed parameters are given for excess Gibbs thermodynamic models. • New regressed parameters are presented for UNIFAC to account for nonidealities. - Abstract: The Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) technique is used for measuring isobaric (vapour + liquid) equilibria for two binary mixtures: {monocaprylin + palmitic acid (system 1) or methyl stearate (system 2)} at two different pressures P = (1.20 and 2.50) kPa. The obtained PTx data are correlated by Wilson, NRTL and UNIQUAC models. The original UNIFAC group contribution method is also considered and new binary interaction parameters for the main groups CH 2 , CCOO, OH and COOH are regressed, to account for the non-idealities found in these lipid systems. Established thermodynamic consistency tests are applied and attest the quality of the measured data. In terms of relevance of the selected components, system 1 can be found in the purification and deodorization steps during the production of edible oils, while, system 2 can be found in the purification steps of biodiesel. It should be noted that no such data could be found in the open literature, not only for the specific components selected but also for the combination of the classes of components considered; that is, acylglycerol plus fatty acid or fatty ester.

  6. Synthesis of diadenosine 5', 5'''-P1, P4-tetraphosphate (AP4A) in sea urchin embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morioka, Mizue; Shimada, Hiraku

    1984-01-01

    Sea urchin embryos were labeled with ( 3 H)adenosine at two developmental stages (morula and prism) and the labeled acid-soluble nucleotides were fractionated successively by column chromatography with DEAE-Sephadex and DEAE-cellulose, and by thin-layer chromatography on a PEI-cellulose plate. Significant radioactivity was detected on the PEI-cellulose plate at the region of diadenosine 5', 5'''-P 1 , P 4 -tetraphosphate (AP 4 A). After treatment of this fraction with phosphodiesterase, the radioactivity was all recovered in the AMP region, while alkaline phosphatase had no effect on the AP 4 A fraction. The present result suggests that AP 4 A is actively synthesized in the sea urchin embryos. (author)

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance study of reaction of p-(1,1', 3,3'-tetramethylbutyl)phenol with phosphoric pentoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didi, Mohamed Amine; Elias Abdelhamid

    1998-12-01

    Some aspects dealing with the mechanisms and the kinetics of the reaction between phosphorus pentoxide and p-(1,1',3,3'-tetramethylbutyl)phenol were investigated, by means of the 31P nmr technique . The kinetic model considered showed that only the time and, to a lesser extent, the temperature of the reaction seem to the yield. The reactant mode ratio does not exhibit any effect upon the MOPPA DOPPA ratio. A series of adequate experiments based on the 2 factorial 3 plane method allowed to confirm these results. The tripyroesters were identified as being the longest intermediates detected by nmr. In the reaction mixture no traces of phosphoric triester (t- TOPPA) were detected

  8. Doubly excited 2s2p 1,3Po resonance states of helium in dense plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kar, Sabyasachi; Ho, Y.K.

    2005-01-01

    We have made an investigation on the 2s2p 1,3 P o resonance states of helium embedded in dense plasma environments. A screened Coulomb potential obtained from the Debye model is used to represent the interaction between the charge particles. A correlated wave function consisting of a generalized exponential expansion has been used to represent the correlation effect. Resonance energies and widths for the doubly excited He embedded in plasmas with various Debye lengths are determined using the stabilization method by calculating the density of resonance states. The resonance energies and widths for various Debye parameters ranging from infinity to a small value for the lowest 1,3 P o resonance states are reported

  9. A model description of the first-order phase transition in MnFeP1-x As x

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegus, O.; Lin, G.X.; Dagula, W.; Fuquan, B.; Zhang, L.; Brueck, E.; Boer, F.R. de; Buschow, K.H.J.

    2005-01-01

    We present a description of the critical behavior at the first-order phase transition in MnFeP 1- x As x system in terms of the Bean-Rodbell model. Within the molecular-field approximation, the Gibbs free energy of the system is expressed in terms of the exchange interaction, the elastic energy, the entropy term, the pressure term and the Zeeman energy. A magnetic-state equation has been obtained by minimizing the Gibbs free energy with respect to the volume and the magnetization. The characteristic parameters for the phase transition observed in this system have been obtained by fitting our experimental data. The results show that the magnetoelastic coupling plays a very important role in the mechanism of the phase transition

  10. Form factors and transition charge densities for the quadrupole and hexadecupole electroexcitation of some 2p-1f shell nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, P.K.; Sharma, S.K.

    1986-12-01

    A microscopic description of the recent data on the inelastic electron scattering form factors for the O + → 2 + as well as O + → 4 + transitions in some doubly even Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni and Zn isotopes is attempted in terms of the projected Hartree-Fock-Bogolubov wave functions resulting from realistic effective interactions operating in the 2p-1f shell. It turns out that the available form factor data out to about 2.5fm -1 can be reproduced in most of the cases in a fairly satisfactory manner in terms of reasonable values of effective charges. It is seen that the empirical transition charge densities in Ni and Zn isotopes extracted from the form factor data via the Fourier-Bessel analysis play a decisive role vis-a-vis the choice of a model of core-polarization contributions. (author). 28 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  11. Geometric group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bestvina, Mladen; Vogtmann, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Geometric group theory refers to the study of discrete groups using tools from topology, geometry, dynamics and analysis. The field is evolving very rapidly and the present volume provides an introduction to and overview of various topics which have played critical roles in this evolution. The book contains lecture notes from courses given at the Park City Math Institute on Geometric Group Theory. The institute consists of a set of intensive short courses offered by leaders in the field, designed to introduce students to exciting, current research in mathematics. These lectures do not duplicate standard courses available elsewhere. The courses begin at an introductory level suitable for graduate students and lead up to currently active topics of research. The articles in this volume include introductions to CAT(0) cube complexes and groups, to modern small cancellation theory, to isometry groups of general CAT(0) spaces, and a discussion of nilpotent genus in the context of mapping class groups and CAT(0) gro...

  12. Invariant subspaces in some function spaces on symmetric spaces. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, S S

    1998-01-01

    Let G be a semisimple connected Lie group with finite centre, K a maximal compact subgroup of G, and M=G/K a Riemannian symmetric space of non-compact type. We study the problem of describing the structure of closed linear subspaces in various function spaces on M that are invariant under the quasiregular representation of the group G. We consider the case when M is a symplectic symmetric space of rank 1

  13. Intermittent PTHrP(1–34) Exposure Augments Chondrogenesis and Reduces Hypertrophy of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Jennifer; Aulmann, Antje; Dexheimer, Verena; Grossner, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Phenotype instability and premature hypertrophy prevent the use of human mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) for cartilage regeneration. Aim of this study was to investigate whether intermittent supplementation of parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), as opposed to constant treatment, can beneficially influence MSC chondrogenesis and to explore molecular mechanisms below catabolic and anabolic responses. Human MSCs subjected to chondrogenic induction in high-density culture received PTHrP(1–34), forskolin, dbcAMP, or PTHrP(7–34) either constantly or via 6-h pulses (three times weekly), before proteoglycan, collagen type II, and X deposition; gene expression; and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were assessed. While constant application of PTHrP(1–34) suppressed chondrogenesis of MSCs, pulsed application significantly increased collagen type 2 (COL2A1) gene expression and the collagen type II, proteoglycan, and DNA content of pellets after 6 weeks. Collagen type 10 (COL10A1) gene expression was little affected but Indian hedgehog (IHH) expression and ALP activity were significantly downregulated by pulsed PTHrP. A faster response to PTHrP exposure was recorded for ALP activity over COL2A1 regulation, suggesting that signal duration is critical for catabolic versus anabolic reactions. Stimulation of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling by forskolin reproduced major effects of both treatment modes, whereas application of PTHrP(7–34) capable of protein kinase C (PKC) signaling was ineffective. Pulsed PTHrP exposure of MSCs stimulated chondrogenesis and reduced endochondral differentiation apparently uncoupling chondrogenic matrix deposition from hypertrophic marker expression. cAMP/PKA was the major signaling pathway triggering the opposing effects of both treatment modes. Intermittent application of PTHrP represents an important novel means to improve chondrogenesis of MSCs and may be considered as a supporting clinical

  14. Measurement of IgE antibodies against purified grass pollen allergens (Lol p 1, 2, 3 and 5) during immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ree, R; Van Leeuwen, W A; Dieges, P H; Van Wijk, R G; De Jong, N; Brewczyski, P Z; Kroon, A M; Schilte, P P; Tan, K Y; Simon-Licht, I F; Roberts, A M; Stapel, S O; Aalberse, R C

    1997-01-01

    IgE titres tend to rise early after the start of immunotherapy, followed by a decline to pre-immunotherapy levels or lower. We were interested to know whether the early increase in IgE antibodies includes new specificities of IgE, and whether these responses persist. Sera of 64 patients undergoing grass pollen immunotherapy were tested for IgE against four purified grass pollen allergens: Lol p 1, 2, 3, and 5. At least two serum samples were taken, one before the start of therapy and one between 5 and 18 months after the first immunization (mean: 10 months). The mean IgE responses to Lol p 1, 2 and 3 showed a moderate but not significant increase. In contrast, the mean IgE response to Lol p 5 showed a significant decrease of > 30%. IgE against total Lohum perenne pollen extract moderately increased (> 20%), showing that a RAST for total pollen is not always indicative for the development of IgE against its major allergens. For > 40% of the patients it was found that IgE against one or more of the four allergens increased, while IgE against the remaining allergen(s) decreased. For 10 sera the ratio of IgE titres against at least two allergens changed by at least a factor of 5. The changes in specific IgE also included conversions from negative (< 0.1 RU) to positive (0.6 to 5.0 RU) for five patients. For two patients, the induction of these 'new' IgE antibodies against major allergens was shown to result in a response that was persistent over several years. Although active induction of new IgE specificities by immunotherapy was not really proven, the observations in this study indicate that monitoring of IgE against purified (major) allergens is necessary to evaluate changes in specific IgE in a reliable way.

  15. Structure determination of Ga As (110) p (1 x 1) - Sb using scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ascolani, H.; Asensio, M.C.; Fritzsche, W.

    1996-01-01

    Photoelectron diffraction (PD) in the scanned-energy mode has proven to be a powerfull tool for structural determination of the first few surface layers. The scanned-energy mode involves the measurement of the intensity of photoelectrons emitted from a core level as a function of the incident photon energy for different emission directions. The atom specificity of PD allows the investigation of the local structure of adsorbed atoms without interference of the substrate. In addition, if a measurable chemical shift exists, this technique is also able to discriminate between atoms of the same species adsorbed in inequivalent sites. The Ga As (110) p (1x1)-Sb (1 ML) surface represents a prototype system to study atom adsorption on III-V semiconductors. The epitaxial continued layer structure (ECLS) is generally accepted as the geometry corresponding to this surface, although some authors have claimed that the p 3 model forms a stable geometry equivalent to the ECLS, and that it provides an equally good description of their experimental results. So far, the conclusions about the atomic structure of this surface had been derived on the basis of indirect methods. This work exploits to the utmost the possibilities of analysis offered by the scanned-energy PD technique, namely, chemical shift analysis and direct inversion. The energy spectrum of Sb-4d photoelectrons emitted from the Ga As (110)-p (1x1) Sb surface has two chemically-shifted components. We have inverted the scanned-energy photoelectron diffraction data corresponding to these two components to obtain the positions of the Ga and As atoms which are nearest neighbors of two inequivalent Sb atoms. Our results contradict various models proposed for this surface and are consistent only with the ECLS. For a more detailed atomic structure determination, the best fit between experiment and multiple-scattering calculations was determined by a trial-and-error procedure. (author)

  16. Group devaluation and group identification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leach, C.W.; Rodriguez Mosquera, P.M.; Vliek, M.L.W.; Hirt, E.

    2010-01-01

    In three studies, we showed that increased in-group identification after (perceived or actual) group devaluation is an assertion of a (preexisting) positive social identity that counters the negative social identity implied in societal devaluation. Two studies with real-world groups used order

  17. Lie groups and algebraic groups

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We give an exposition of certain topics in Lie groups and algebraic groups. This is not a complete ... of a polynomial equation is equivalent to the solva- bility of the equation ..... to a subgroup of the group of roots of unity in k (in particular, it is a ...

  18. Introduction to quantum groups

    CERN Document Server

    Chaichian, Masud

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade there has been an extemely rapid growth in the interest and development of quantum group theory.This book provides students and researchers with a practical introduction to the principal ideas of quantum groups theory and its applications to quantum mechanical and modern field theory problems. It begins with a review of, and introduction to, the mathematical aspects of quantum deformation of classical groups, Lie algebras and related objects (algebras of functions on spaces, differential and integral calculi). In the subsequent chapters the richness of mathematical structure

  19. Space Resources Roundtable 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatiev, A.

    2000-01-01

    Contents include following: Developing Technologies for Space Resource Utilization - Concept for a Planetary Engineering Research Institute. Results of a Conceptual Systems Analysis of Systems for 200 m Deep Sampling of the Martian Subsurface. The Role of Near-Earth Asteroids in Long-Term Platinum Supply. Core Drilling for Extra-Terrestrial Mining. Recommendations by the "LSP and Manufacturing" Group to the NSF-NASA Workshop on Autonomous Construction and Manufacturing for Space Electrical Power Systems. Plasma Processing of Lunar and Planetary Materials. Percussive Force Magnitude in Permafrost. Summary of the Issues Regarding the Martian Subsurface Explorer. A Costing Strategy for Manufacturing in Orbit Using Extraterrestrial Resources. Mine Planning for Asteroid Orebodies. Organic-based Dissolution of Silicates: A New Approach to Element Extraction from LunarRegohth. Historic Frontier Processes Active in Future Space-based Mineral Extraction. The Near-Earth Space Surveillance (NIESS) Mission: Discovery, Tracking, and Characterization of Asteroids, Comets, and Artificial Satellites with a microsatellite. Privatized Space Resource Property Ownership. The Fabrication of Silicon Solar Cells on the Moon Using In-Situ Resources. A New Strategy for Exploration Technology Development: The Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Exploratiori/Commercialization Technology Initiative. Space Resources for Space Tourism. Recovery of Volatiles from the Moon and Associated Issues. Preliminary Analysis of a Small Robot for Martian Regolith Excavation. The Registration of Space-based Property. Continuous Processing with Mars Gases. Drilling and Logging in Space; An Oil-Well Perspective. LORPEX for Power Surges: Drilling, Rock Crushing. An End-To-End Near-Earth Asteroid Resource Exploitation Plan. An Engineering and Cost Model for Human Space Settlement Architectures: Focus on Space Hotels and Moon/Mars Exploration. The Development and Realization of a Silicon-60-based

  20. Learning Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Falmagne, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    Learning spaces offer a rigorous mathematical foundation for practical systems of educational technology. Learning spaces generalize partially ordered sets and are special cases of knowledge spaces. The various structures are investigated from the standpoints of combinatorial properties and stochastic processes. Leaning spaces have become the essential structures to be used in assessing students' competence of various topics. A practical example is offered by ALEKS, a Web-based, artificially intelligent assessment and learning system in mathematics and other scholarly fields. At the heart of A

  1. Group Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kristy J.; Brickman, Peggy; Brame, Cynthia J.

    2018-01-01

    Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics faculty are increasingly incorporating both formal and informal group work in their courses. Implementing group work can be improved by an understanding of the extensive body of educational research studies on this topic. This essay describes an online, evidence-based teaching guide published by…

  2. Reflection groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eggermont, G.

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, PISA organised proactive meetings of reflection groups on involvement in decision making, expert culture and ethical aspects of radiation protection.All reflection group meetings address particular targeted audiences while the output publication in book form is put forward

  3. Medium optimization for nuclease P1 production by Penicillium citrinum in solid-state fermentation using polyurethane foam as inert carrier

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Y.; Knol, W.; Smits, J.P.; Bol, J.

    1996-01-01

    A solid-state fermentation system, using polyurethane foam as an inert carrier, was used for the production of nuclease P1 by Penicillium citrinum. Optimization of nuclease P1 production was carried out using a synthetic liquid medium. After a two-step medium optimization using a fractional

  4. Group covariance and metrical theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halpern, L.

    1983-01-01

    The a priori introduction of a Lie group of transformations into a physical theory has often proved to be useful; it usually serves to describe special simplified conditions before a general theory can be worked out. Newton's assumptions of absolute space and time are examples where the Euclidian group and translation group have been introduced. These groups were extended to the Galilei group and modified in the special theory of relativity to the Poincare group to describe physics under the given conditions covariantly in the simplest way. The criticism of the a priori character leads to the formulation of the general theory of relativity. The general metric theory does not really give preference to a particular invariance group - even the principle of equivalence can be adapted to a whole family of groups. The physical laws covariantly inserted into the metric space are however adapted to the Poincare group. 8 references

  5. Evolution of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A capsid coding (P1) region on a timescale of three decades in an endemic context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Biswajit; Mohapatra, Jajati K; Pande, Veena; Subramaniam, Saravanan; Sanyal, Aniket

    2016-07-01

    Three decades-long (1977-2013) evolutionary trend of the capsid coding (P1) region of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype A isolated in India was analysed. The exclusive presence of genotype 18 since 2001 and the dominance of the VP3(59)-deletion group of genotype 18 was evident in the recent years. Clade 18c was found to be currently the only active one among the three clades (18a, 18b and 18c) identified in the deletion group. The rate of evolution of the Indian isolates at the capsid region was found to be 4.96×10(-3)substitutions/site/year. The timescale analysis predicted the most recent common ancestor to have existed during 1962 for Indian FMDV serotype A and around 1998 for the deletion group. The evolutionary pattern of serotype A in India appears to be homogeneous as no spatial or temporal structure was observed. Bayesian skyline plots indicate a sharp decline in the effective number of infections after 2008, which might be a result of mass vaccination or inherent loss of virus fitness. Analyses of variability at 38 known antigenically critical positions in a countrywide longitudinal data set suggested that the substitutions neither followed any specific trend nor remained fixed for a long period since frequent reversions and convergence was noticed. A maximum of 6 different amino acid residues was seen in the gene pool at any antigenically critical site over the decades, suggesting a limited combination of residues being responsible for the observed antigenic variation. Evidence of positive selection at some of the antigenically critical residues and the structurally proximal positions suggest a possible role of pre-existing immunity in the host population in driving evolution. The VP1 C-terminus neither revealed variability nor positive selection, suggesting the possibility that this stretch does not contribute to the antigenic variation and adaptation under immune selection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Space Microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horneck, Gerda; Klaus, David M.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: The responses of microorganisms (viruses, bacterial cells, bacterial and fungal spores, and lichens) to selected factors of space (microgravity, galactic cosmic radiation, solar UV radiation, and space vacuum) were determined in space and laboratory simulation experiments. In general, microorganisms tend to thrive in the space flight environment in terms of enhanced growth parameters and a demonstrated ability to proliferate in the presence of normally inhibitory levels of antibiotics. The mechanisms responsible for the observed biological responses, however, are not yet fully understood. A hypothesized interaction of microgravity with radiation-induced DNA repair processes was experimentally refuted. The survival of microorganisms in outer space was investigated to tackle questions on the upper boundary of the biosphere and on the likelihood of interplanetary transport of microorganisms. It was found that extraterrestrial solar UV radiation was the most deleterious factor of space. Among all organisms tested, only lichens (Rhizocarpon geographicum and Xanthoria elegans) maintained full viability after 2 weeks in outer space, whereas all other test systems were inactivated by orders of magnitude. Using optical filters and spores of Bacillus subtilis as a biological UV dosimeter, it was found that the current ozone layer reduces the biological effectiveness of solar UV by 3 orders of magnitude. If shielded against solar UV, spores of B. subtilis were capable of surviving in space for up to 6 years, especially if embedded in clay or meteorite powder (artificial meteorites). The data support the likelihood of interplanetary transfer of microorganisms within meteorites, the so-called lithopanspermia hypothesis. PMID:20197502

  7. Space psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parin, V. V.; Gorbov, F. D.; Kosmolinskiy, F. P.

    1974-01-01

    Psychological selection of astronauts considers mental responses and adaptation to the following space flight stress factors: (1) confinement in a small space; (2) changes in three dimensional orientation; (3) effects of altered gravity and weightlessness; (4) decrease in afferent nerve pulses; (5) a sensation of novelty and danger; and (6) a sense of separation from earth.

  8. Borel Spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Berberian, S K

    2002-01-01

    A detailed exposition of G.W. Mackey's theory of Borel spaces (standard, substandard, analytic), based on results in Chapter 9 of Bourbaki's General Topology. Appended are five informal lectures on the subject (given at the CIMPA/ICPAM Summer School, Nice, 1986), sketching the connection between Borel spaces and representations of operator algebras.

  9. Error-prone bypass of O6-methylguanine by DNA polymerase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage PaP1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Shiling; Xiong, Jingyuan; Shi, Ying; You, Jia; Zou, Zhenyu; Liu, Xiaoying; Zhang, Huidong

    2017-09-01

    O 6 -Methylguanine (O 6 -MeG) is highly mutagenic and is commonly found in DNA exposed to methylating agents, generally leads to G:C to A:T mutagenesis. To study DNA replication encountering O 6 -MeG by the DNA polymerase (gp90) of P. aeruginosa phage PaP1, we analyzed steady-state and pre-steady-state kinetics of nucleotide incorporation opposite O 6 -MeG by gp90 exo - . O 6 -MeG partially inhibited full-length extension by gp90 exo - . O 6 -MeG greatly reduces dNTP incorporation efficiency, resulting in 67-fold preferential error-prone incorporation of dTTP than dCTP. Gp90 exo - extends beyond T:O 6 -MeG 2-fold more efficiently than C:O 6 -MeG. Incorporation of dCTP opposite G and incorporation of dCTP or dTTP opposite O 6 -MeG show fast burst phases. The pre-steady-state incorporation efficiency (k pol /K d,dNTP ) is decreased in the order of dCTP:G>dTTP:O 6 -MeG>dCTP:O 6 -MeG. The presence of O 6 -MeG at template does not affect the binding affinity of polymerase to DNA but it weakened their binding in the presence of dCTP and Mg 2+ . Misincorporation of dTTP opposite O 6 -MeG further weakens the binding affinity of polymerase to DNA. The priority of dTTP incorporation opposite O 6 -MeG is originated from the fact that dTTP can induce a faster conformational change step and a faster chemical step than dCTP. This study reveals that gp90 bypasses O 6 -MeG in an error-prone manner and provides further understanding in DNA replication encountering mutagenic alkylation DNA damage for P. aeruginosa phage PaP1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Cognitive Neuroscience in Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel G. De la Torre

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Humans are the most adaptable species on this planet, able to live in vastly different environments on Earth. Space represents the ultimate frontier and a true challenge to human adaptive capabilities. As a group, astronauts and cosmonauts are selected for their ability to work in the highly perilous environment of space, giving their best. Terrestrial research has shown that human cognitive and perceptual motor performances deteriorate under stress. We would expect to observe these effects in space, which currently represents an exceptionally stressful environment for humans. Understanding the neurocognitive and neuropsychological parameters influencing space flight is of high relevance to neuroscientists, as well as psychologists. Many of the environmental characteristics specific to space missions, some of which are also present in space flight simulations, may affect neurocognitive performance. Previous work in space has shown that various psychomotor functions degrade during space flight, including central postural functions, the speed and accuracy of aimed movements, internal timekeeping, attentional processes, sensing of limb position and the central management of concurrent tasks. Other factors that might affect neurocognitive performance in space are illness, injury, toxic exposure, decompression accidents, medication side effects and excessive exposure to radiation. Different tools have been developed to assess and counteract these deficits and problems, including computerized tests and physical exercise devices. It is yet unknown how the brain will adapt to long-term space travel to the asteroids, Mars and beyond. This work represents a comprehensive review of the current knowledge and future challenges of cognitive neuroscience in space from simulations and analog missions to low Earth orbit and beyond.

  11. Space engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Harold L.

    1991-01-01

    Human productivity was studied for extravehicular tasks performed in microgravity, particularly including in-space assembly of truss structures and other large objects. Human factors research probed the anthropometric constraints imposed on microgravity task performance and the associated workstation design requirements. Anthropometric experiments included reach envelope tests conducted using the 3-D Acoustic Positioning System (3DAPS), which permitted measuring the range of reach possible for persons using foot restraints in neutral buoyancy, both with and without space suits. Much neutral buoyancy research was conducted using the support of water to simulate the weightlessness environment of space. It became clear over time that the anticipated EVA requirement associated with the Space Station and with in-space construction of interplanetary probes would heavily burden astronauts, and remotely operated robots (teleoperators) were increasingly considered to absorb the workload. Experience in human EVA productivity led naturally to teleoperation research into the remote performance of tasks through human controlled robots.

  12. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induces Dose-Dependent Chemotaxis or Fugetaxis of T-ALL Blasts through S1P1 Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, Carolina V.; Santana-Van-Vliet, Eliane; Lemos, Julia P.; Moreira, Otacilio C.; Cotta-de-Almeida, Vinicius; Savino, Wilson; Mendes-da-Cruz, Daniella Arêas

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in several physiological processes including cell migration and differentiation. S1P signaling is mediated through five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5). S1P1 is crucial to the exit of T-lymphocytes from the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs through a gradient of S1P. We have previously observed that T-ALL and T-LBL blasts express S1P1. Herein we analyzed the role of S1P receptors in the migratory pattern of human T-cell neoplastic blasts. S1P-triggered cell migration was directly related to S1P1 expression. T-ALL blasts expressing low levels of S1P1 mRNA (HPB-ALL) did not migrate toward S1P, whereas those expressing higher levels of S1P1 (MOLT-4, JURKAT and CEM) did migrate. The S1P ligand induced T-ALL cells chemotaxis in concentrations up to 500 nM and induced fugetaxis in higher concentrations (1000–10000 nM) through interactions with S1P1. When S1P1 was specifically blocked by the W146 compound, S1P-induced migration at lower concentrations was reduced, whereas higher concentrations induced cell migration. Furthermore, we observed that S1P/S1P1 interactions induced ERK and AKT phosphorylation, and modulation of Rac1 activity. Responding T-ALL blasts also expressed S1P3 mRNA but blockage of this receptor did not modify migratory responses. Our results indicate that S1P is involved in the migration of T-ALL/LBL blasts, which is dependent on S1P1 expression. Moreover, S1P concentrations in the given microenvironment might induce dose-dependent chemotaxis or fugetaxis of T-ALL blasts. PMID:26824863

  13. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Induces Dose-Dependent Chemotaxis or Fugetaxis of T-ALL Blasts through S1P1 Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina V Messias

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a bioactive sphingolipid involved in several physiological processes including cell migration and differentiation. S1P signaling is mediated through five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5. S1P1 is crucial to the exit of T-lymphocytes from the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs through a gradient of S1P. We have previously observed that T-ALL and T-LBL blasts express S1P1. Herein we analyzed the role of S1P receptors in the migratory pattern of human T-cell neoplastic blasts. S1P-triggered cell migration was directly related to S1P1 expression. T-ALL blasts expressing low levels of S1P1 mRNA (HPB-ALL did not migrate toward S1P, whereas those expressing higher levels of S1P1 (MOLT-4, JURKAT and CEM did migrate. The S1P ligand induced T-ALL cells chemotaxis in concentrations up to 500 nM and induced fugetaxis in higher concentrations (1000-10000 nM through interactions with S1P1. When S1P1 was specifically blocked by the W146 compound, S1P-induced migration at lower concentrations was reduced, whereas higher concentrations induced cell migration. Furthermore, we observed that S1P/S1P1 interactions induced ERK and AKT phosphorylation, and modulation of Rac1 activity. Responding T-ALL blasts also expressed S1P3 mRNA but blockage of this receptor did not modify migratory responses. Our results indicate that S1P is involved in the migration of T-ALL/LBL blasts, which is dependent on S1P1 expression. Moreover, S1P concentrations in the given microenvironment might induce dose-dependent chemotaxis or fugetaxis of T-ALL blasts.

  14. Group theory

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, W R

    2010-01-01

    Here is a clear, well-organized coverage of the most standard theorems, including isomorphism theorems, transformations and subgroups, direct sums, abelian groups, and more. This undergraduate-level text features more than 500 exercises.

  15. Group Grammar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In this article Karen Adams demonstrates how to incorporate group grammar techniques into a classroom activity. In the activity, students practice using the target grammar to do something they naturally enjoy: learning about each other.

  16. Computer group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, H.; Black, I.; Heusler, A.; Hoeptner, G.; Krafft, F.; Lang, R.; Moellenkamp, R.; Mueller, W.; Mueller, W.F.; Schati, C.; Schmidt, A.; Schwind, D.; Weber, G.

    1983-01-01

    The computer groups has been reorganized to take charge for the general purpose computers DEC10 and VAX and the computer network (Dataswitch, DECnet, IBM - connections to GSI and IPP, preparation for Datex-P). (orig.)

  17. Group learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pimentel, Ricardo; Noguira, Eloy Eros da Silva; Elkjær, Bente

    The article presents a study that aims at the apprehension of the group learning in a top management team composed by teachers in a Brazilian Waldorf school whose management is collective. After deciding to extend the school, they had problems recruiting teachers who were already trained based...... on the Steiner´s ideas, which created practical problems for conducting management activities. The research seeks to understand how that group of teachers collectively manage the school, facing the lack of resources, a significant heterogeneity in the relationships, and the conflicts and contradictions......, and they are interrelated to the group learning as the construction, maintenance and reconstruction of the intelligibility of practices. From this perspective, it can be said that learning is a practice and not an exceptional phenomenon. Building, maintaining and rebuilding the intelligibility is the group learning...

  18. Group technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  19. Factor VIII S373L: mutation at P1' site confers thrombin cleavage resistance, causing mild haemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D J; Pemberton, S; Acquila, M; Mori, P G; Tuddenham, E G; O'Brien, D P

    1994-04-01

    A novel CRM+ mutation, factor VIII position 373 serine to leucine substitution (FVIII 373-Leu) was identified during a survey of Factor VIII (FVIII) mutations. We have purified the variant protein from the patient's plasma in order to allow further characterisation of the molecule. The CRM+ plasma contained 120% Factor VIII antigen (FVIII:Ag) and 6% Factor VIII coagulant activity (FVIII:C). After purification the mutant FVIII was subjected to thrombin proteolysis, and was thereby activated 5.6-fold compared with 7-fold for wild type molecule. Subsequently, spontaneous inactivation of the mutant was much slower than noted for wild type FVIII. Western blot analysis using monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that thrombin cleavage of FVIII 373-Leu at positions 740 and 1689 were normal but that cleavage at position 372 was completely absent. Crystallographic coordinates of the active site of thrombin complexed to fibrinopeptide A were used to explore possible mechanistic reasons for the failure of thrombin to cleave the mutant FVIII at position 372. Steric hindrance between the mutant side chain and the side chain of the P1 residue was apparent. We conclude that the functional defect of FVIII 373-Leu results from the inability of thrombin to cleave the mutant at position 372-373, and propose that this is due to steric hindrance by the side chain of leucine 373, preventing correct formation of the enzyme substrate complex.

  20. Bragg gravity-gradiometer using the 1S0–3P1 intercombination transition of 88Sr

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Aguila, R. P.; Mazzoni, T.; Hu, L.; Salvi, L.; Tino, G. M.; Poli, N.

    2018-04-01

    We present a gradiometer based on matter-wave interference of alkaline-earth-metal atoms, namely 88Sr. The coherent manipulation of the atomic external degrees of freedom is obtained by large-momentum-transfer Bragg diffraction, driven by laser fields detuned away from the narrow 1S0–3P1 intercombination transition. We use a well-controlled artificial gradient, realized by changing the relative frequencies of the Bragg pulses during the interferometer sequence, in order to characterize the sensitivity of the gradiometer. The sensitivity reaches 1.5 × 10‑5 s‑2 for an interferometer time of 20 ms, limited only by geometrical constraints. We observed extremely low sensitivity of the gradiometric phase to magnetic field gradients, approaching a value 104 times lower than the sensitivity of alkali-atom based gradiometers, limited by the interferometer sensitivity. An efficient double-launch technique employing accelerated red vertical lattices from a single magneto-optical trap cloud is also demonstrated. These results highlight strontium as an ideal candidate for precision measurements of gravity gradients, with potential application in future precision tests of fundamental physics.

  1. Preliminary Data on the Effects of Inlet Pressure Distortions on the J57-P-1 Turbojet Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Lewis E.; Lubick, Robert J.; Einstein, Thomas H.

    1954-01-01

    An investigation to determine the steady-state and surge characteristics of the J57-P-1 two-spool turbojet engine with various inlet air-flow distortions was conducted in the altitude wind tunnel at the NACA Lewis laboratory. Along with a uniform inlet total-pressure distribution, one circumferential and three radial pressure distortions were investigated. Data were obtained over a complete range of compressor speeds both with and without intercompressor air bleed at a flight Mach number of 0.8 and at altitudes of 35,000 and 50,000 feet. Total-pressure distortions of the magnitudes investigated had very little effect on the steady-state operating line for either the outer or inner compressor. The small radial distortions investigated also had engine over that obtained with the uniform inlet pressure distribution. The circumferential distortion, however, raised the minimum speed at which the engine could operate without encountering surge when the intercompressor bleeds were closed. This increase in minimum speed resulted in a substantial reduction in the operable speed range accompanied by a reduction in the altitude operating limit.

  2. Modeling Tolerance Development for the Effect on Heart Rate of the Selective S1P1 Receptor Modulator Ponesimod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Dominik; Lehr, Thorsten; Dingemanse, Jasper; Krause, Andreas

    2017-09-15

    Ponesimod is a selective sphingosine-1-phosphate-1 (S1P 1 ) receptor modulator currently under investigation for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. S1P receptor modulators reduce heart rate following treatment initiation. This effect disappears with repeated dosing, enabling development of innovative uptitration regimens to optimize patient safety. There are currently no published pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic models describing the heart rate reduction of S1P receptor modulators in humans. The model developed here provides quantification of this effect for ponesimod. A direct-effect I max model with estimated maximum reduction of 45%, tolerance development, and circadian variation best described this effect. The pooled data from nine clinical studies enabled characterization of interindividual variability. The model was used to simulate different treatment regimens to compare the effect of high initial doses vs. gradual uptitration with respect to the occurrence of bradycardia. The results indicate a better safety profile when using gradual uptitration. The model allows studying dosing regimens not clinically tested in silico. © 2017 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  3. Effective inhibition of lytic development of bacteriophages λ, P1 and T4 by starvation of their host, Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn Alicja

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophage infections of bacterial cultures cause serious problems in genetic engineering and biotechnology. They are dangerous not only because of direct effects on the currently infected cultures, i.e. their devastation, but also due to a high probability of spreading the phage progeny throughout a whole laboratory or plant, which causes a real danger for further cultivations. Therefore, a simple method for quick inhibition of phage development after detection of bacterial culture infection should be very useful. Results Here, we demonstrate that depletion of a carbon source from the culture medium, which provokes starvation of bacterial cells, results in rapid inhibition of lytic development of three Escherichia coli phages, λ, P1 and T4. Since the effect was similar for three different phages, it seems that it may be a general phenomenon. Moreover, similar effects were observed in flask cultures and in chemostats. Conclusion Bacteriophage lytic development can be inhibited efficiently by carbon source limitation in bacterial cultures. Thus, if bacteriophage contamination is detected, starvation procedures may be recommended to alleviate deleterious effects of phage infection on the culture. We believe that this strategy, in combination with the use of automated and sensitive bacteriophage biosensors, may be employed in the fermentation laboratory practice to control phage outbreaks in bioprocesses more effectively.

  4. Computer group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, I.; Heusler, A.; Hoeptner, G.; Krafft, F.; Lang, R.; Moellenkamp, R.; Mueller, W.; Mueller, W.F.; Schmidt, A.; Schwind, D.; Weber, G.

    1989-01-01

    The VAX-8650 has been running with no idle time during more than 98% of the time. Early in 1988 it became the boot member of a local area VAX cluster. Up to five satellites (mikroVAX II and VAXstation2000) joined the cluster building a pool of 22 disk drives. Experimences with the cluster system have shown a way to expand the capacity: Early in 1989, a second boot member (VAX3000) and several VAXstations (VAXstation2000 and VAXstation3200) will be added with additional disk space. (orig.)

  5. Abelian groups

    CERN Document Server

    Fuchs, László

    2015-01-01

    Written by one of the subject’s foremost experts, this book focuses on the central developments and modern methods of the advanced theory of abelian groups, while remaining accessible, as an introduction and reference, to the non-specialist. It provides a coherent source for results scattered throughout the research literature with lots of new proofs. The presentation highlights major trends that have radically changed the modern character of the subject, in particular, the use of homological methods in the structure theory of various classes of abelian groups, and the use of advanced set-theoretical methods in the study of undecidability problems. The treatment of the latter trend includes Shelah’s seminal work on the undecidability in ZFC of Whitehead’s Problem; while the treatment of the former trend includes an extensive (but non-exhaustive) study of p-groups, torsion-free groups, mixed groups, and important classes of groups arising from ring theory. To prepare the reader to tackle these topics, th...

  6. Space polypropulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, B. J.; Griffin, D. K.; Bingham, R.; Campbell, R. N.; Forbes, A.; Michaelis, M. M.

    2008-05-01

    Hybrid space propulsion has been a feature of most space missions. Only the very early rocket propulsion experiments like the V2, employed a single form of propulsion. By the late fifties multi-staging was routine and the Space Shuttle employs three different kinds of fuel and rocket engines. During the development of chemical rockets, other forms of propulsion were being slowly tested, both theoretically and, relatively slowly, in practice. Rail and gas guns, ion engines, "slingshot" gravity assist, nuclear and solar power, tethers, solar sails have all seen some real applications. Yet the earliest type of non-chemical space propulsion to be thought of has never been attempted in space: laser and photon propulsion. The ideas of Eugen Saenger, Georgii Marx, Arthur Kantrowitz, Leik Myrabo, Claude Phipps and Robert Forward remain Earth-bound. In this paper we summarize the various forms of nonchemical propulsion and their results. We point out that missions beyond Saturn would benefit from a change of attitude to laser-propulsion as well as consideration of hybrid "polypropulsion" - which is to say using all the rocket "tools" available rather than possibly not the most appropriate. We conclude with three practical examples, two for the next decades and one for the next century; disposal of nuclear waste in space; a grand tour of the Jovian and Saturnian moons - with Huygens or Lunoxod type, landers; and eventually mankind's greatest space dream: robotic exploration of neighbouring planetary systems.

  7. Geometric modular action and transformation groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Summers, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    We study a weak form of geometric modular action, which is naturally associated with transformation groups of partially ordered sets and which provides these groups with projective representations. Under suitable conditions it is shown that these groups are implemented by point transformations of topological spaces serving as models for space-times, leading to groups which may be interpreted as symmetry groups of the space-times. As concrete examples, it is shown that the Poincare group and the de Sitter group can be derived from this condition of geometric modular action. Further consequences and examples are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Knowledge spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Doignon, Jean-Paul

    1999-01-01

    Knowledge spaces offer a rigorous mathematical foundation for various practical systems of knowledge assessment. An example is offered by the ALEKS system (Assessment and LEarning in Knowledge Spaces), a software for the assessment of mathematical knowledge. From a mathematical standpoint, knowledge spaces generalize partially ordered sets. They are investigated both from a combinatorial and a stochastic viewpoint. The results are applied to real and simulated data. The book gives a systematic presentation of research and extends the results to new situations. It is of interest to mathematically oriented readers in education, computer science and combinatorics at research and graduate levels. The text contains numerous examples and exercises and an extensive bibliography.

  9. Space Bugz!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birke, Alexander; Schoenau-Fog, Henrik; Reng, Lars

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents Space Bugz! - a novel crowd game for large venues or cinemas that utilises the audience's smartphones as controllers for the game. This paper explains what crowd gaming is and describes how the approach used in Space Bugz! enables more advanced gameplay concepts and individual...... player control than current technologies allow. The gameplay of Space Bugz! is then explained along with the technical architecture of the game. After this, the iterative design process used to create the game is described together with future perspectives. The article concludes with links to a video...

  10. P1 promoter-driven HNF4α isoforms are specifically repressed by β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babeu, Jean-Philippe; Jones, Christine; Geha, Sameh; Carrier, Julie C; Boudreau, François

    2018-06-13

    HNF4α is a key nuclear receptor for regulating gene expression in the gut. While both P1 and P2 isoform classes of HNF4α are expressed in colonic epithelium, specific inhibition of P1 isoforms is commonly found in colorectal cancer. Previous studies have suggested that P1 and P2 isoforms may regulate different cellular functions. Despite these advances, it remains unclear whether these isoform classes are functionally divergent in the context of human biology. Here, the consequences of specific inhibition of P1 or P2 isoform expression was measured in a human colorectal cancer cell transcriptome. Results indicate that P1 isoforms were specifically associated with the control of cell metabolism while P2 isoforms globally supported aberrant oncogenic signalization, promoting cancer cell survival and progression. P1 promoter-driven isoform expression was found to be repressed by β-catenin, one of the earliest oncogenic pathways to be activated during colon tumorigenesis. These findings identify a novel cascade by which the expression of P1 isoforms are rapidly shut down in the early stages of colon tumorigenesis, allowing a change in HNF4α-dependent transcriptome thereby promoting colorectal cancer progression. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  11. Activation of mas-related G-protein-coupled receptors by the house dust mite cysteine protease Der p1 provides a new mechanism linking allergy and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vemuri B; Lerner, Ethan A

    2017-10-20

    Cysteine and serine proteases function via protease-activated and mas-related G-protein-coupled receptors (Mrgprs) to contribute to allergy and inflammation. Der p1 is a cysteine protease and major allergen from the house dust mite and is associated with allergic rhinitis and allergic asthma. Der p1 activates protease-activated receptor 2 and induces the release of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6 from cells. However, the possibility that Der p1 acts on Mrgprs has not been considered. We report here that ratiometric calcium imaging reveals that Der p1 activates the human receptor MRGPRX1 and the mouse homolog MrgprC11, implicated previously in itch. Der p1 cleavage of N-terminal receptor peptides followed by site-directed mutagenesis of the cleavage sites links receptor activation to specific amino acid residues. Der p1 also induced the release of IL-6 from heterologous cells expressing MRGPRX1. In summary, activation of Mrgprs by the allergen Der p1 may contribute to inflammation. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Group dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scandiffio, A L

    1990-12-01

    Group dynamics play a significant role within any organization, culture, or unit. The important thing to remember with any of these structures is that they are made up of people--people with different ideas, motivations, background, and sometimes different agendas. Most groups, formal or informal, look for a leader in an effort to maintain cohesiveness of the unit. At times, that cultural bond must be developed; once developed, it must be nurtured. There are also times that one of the group no longer finds the culture comfortable and begins to act out behaviorally. It is these times that become trying for the leader as she or he attempts to remain objective when that which was once in the building phase of group cohesiveness starts to fall apart. At all times, the manager must continue to view the employee creating the disturbance as an integral part of the group. It is at this time that it is beneficial to perceive the employee exhibiting problem behaviors as a special employee, as one who needs the benefit of your experience and skills, as one who is still part of the group. It is also during this time that the manager should focus upon her or his own views in the area of power, communication, and the corporate culture of the unit that one has established before attempting to understand another's point of view. Once we understand our own motivation and accept ourselves, it is then that we may move on to offer assistance to another. Once we understand our insecurities recognizing staff dysfunction as a symptom of system dysfunction will not be so threatening to the concept of the manager that we perceive ourselves to be. It takes a secure person to admit that she or he favors staff before deciding to do something to change things. The important thing to know is that it can be done. The favored staff can find a new way of relating to others, the special employee can find new modes of behavior (and even find self-esteem in the process), the group can find new ways

  13. Decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) in radiation-induced mouse hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teishima, Jun [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    2002-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein-1 (IGFBP-rP1) is a member of the IGFBP family, which was called IGFBP-7 or mac25 previously. Decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 has been shown in breast cancer and prostatic cancer, and tumor suppressive effects of IGFBP-rP1 have been reported in prostatic cancer and osteosarcoma cell lines. In the present study, we investigated whether expression levels of IGFBP-rP1 were related to the development and the growth of radiation-induced hepatomas of B6C3F1 mice. In northern blot analysis, decreased expressions of IGFBP-rP1 gene were shown in radiation-induced mouse hepatomas compared to normal livers. In hepatoma cell lines established from these hepatomas, decreased expressions of IGFBP-rP1 were strongly related to the grade of anchorage-independent growth. In cell lines which were transfected with IGFBP-rP1cDNA, the doubling time of cell growth was increased, and the number and the size of colony formation in soft agar culture were decreased. In tumor formation assay by injecting these cells to B6C3F1 mice subcutaneously, the volume of tumors were decreased. Furthermore, the decreased expression of IGFBP-rP1 gene was observed in human hepatomas by northern blot analysis. These results may suggest that the suppression of IGFBP-rP1 is related to development and progression of mouse and human hepatomas. (author)

  14. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) displays sustained S1P1 receptor agonism and signaling through S1P lyase-dependent receptor recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatfield, John; Monnier, Lucile; Studer, Rolf; Bolli, Martin H; Steiner, Beat; Nayler, Oliver

    2014-07-01

    The sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) type 1 receptor (S1P1R) is a novel therapeutic target in lymphocyte-mediated autoimmune diseases. S1P1 receptor desensitization caused by synthetic S1P1 receptor agonists prevents T-lymphocyte egress from secondary lymphoid organs into the circulation. The selective S1P1 receptor agonist ponesimod, which is in development for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, efficiently reduces peripheral lymphocyte counts and displays efficacy in animal models of autoimmune disease. Using ponesimod and the natural ligand S1P, we investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to different signaling, desensitization and trafficking behavior of S1P1 receptors. In recombinant S1P1 receptor-expressing cells, ponesimod and S1P triggered Gαi protein-mediated signaling and β-arrestin recruitment with comparable potency and efficiency, but only ponesimod efficiently induced intracellular receptor accumulation. In human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), ponesimod and S1P triggered translocation of the endogenous S1P1 receptor to the Golgi compartment. However, only ponesimod treatment caused efficient surface receptor depletion, receptor accumulation in the Golgi and degradation. Impedance measurements in HUVEC showed that ponesimod induced only short-lived Gαi protein-mediated signaling followed by resistance to further stimulation, whereas S1P induced sustained Gαi protein-mediated signaling without desensitization. Inhibition of S1P lyase activity in HUVEC rendered S1P an efficient S1P1 receptor internalizing compound and abrogated S1P-mediated sustained signaling. This suggests that S1P lyase - by facilitating S1P1 receptor recycling - is essential for S1P-mediated sustained signaling, and that synthetic agonists are functional antagonists because they are not S1P lyase substrates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quasi quantum group covariant q-oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schomerus, V.

    1992-05-01

    If q is a p-th root of unity there exists a quasi-co-associative truncated quantum group algebra U T q (sl 2 ) whose indecomposable representations are the physical representations of U q (sl 2 ), whose co-product yields the truneated tensor product of physical representations of U q (sl 2 ), and whose R-matrix satisfies quasi Yang Baxter equations. For primitive p-th roots q, we consider a 2-dimensional q-oscillator which admits U T q (sl 2 ) as a symmetry algebra. Its wave functions lie in a space F T q of 'functions on the truncated quantum plane', i.e. of polynomials in noncommuting complex coordinate functions z a , on which multiplication operators Z a and the elements of U T q (sl 2 ) can act. This illustrates the concept of quasi quantum planes. Due to the truncation, the Hilbert space of states is finite dimensional. The subspaces F T(n) of monomials in x a of n-th degree vanish for n ≥ p-1, and F T(n) carries the 2J+1 dimensional irreducible representation of U T q (sl 2 ) if n=2J, J=0, 1/2, ... 1/2(p-2). Partial derivatives δ a are introduced. We find a *-operation on the algebra of multiplication operators Z i and derivatives δ b such that the adjoints Z * a act as differentiation on the truncated quantum plane. Multiplication operators Z a ('creation operators') and their adjoints ('annihilation operators') obey q -1/2 -commutation relations. The *-operation is used to determine a positive definite scalar product on the truncated quantum plane F T q . Some natural candidates of Hamiltonians for the q-oscillators are determined. (orig./HSI)

  16. Space 2000 Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the Space 2000 Symposium is to present the creativity and achievements of key figures of the 20th century. It offers a retrospective discussion on space exploration. It considers the future of the enterprise, and the legacy that will be left for future generations. The symposium includes panel discussions, smaller session meetings with some panelists, exhibits, and displays. The first session entitled "From Science Fiction to Science Facts" commences after a brief overview of the symposium. The panel discussions include talks on space exploration over many decades, and the missions of the millennium to search for life on Mars. The second session, "Risks and Rewards of Human Space Exploration," focuses on the training and health risks that astronauts face on their exploratory mission to space. Session three, "Messages and Messengers Informing and Inspire Space Exploration and the Public," focuses on the use of TV medium by educators and actors to inform and inspire a wide variety of audiences with adventures of space exploration. Session four, "The Legacy of Carl Sagan," discusses the influences made by Sagan to scientific research and the general public. In session five, "Space Exploration for a new Generation," two student speakers and the NASA Administrator Daniel S. Goldin address the group. Session six, "Destiny or Delusion? -- Humankind's Place in the Cosmos," ends the symposium with issues of space exploration and some thought provoking questions. Some of these issues and questions are: what will be the societal implications if we discover the origin of the universe, stars, or life; what will be the impact if scientists find clear evidence of life outside the domains of the Earth; should there be limits to what humans can or should learn; and what visionary steps should space-faring people take now for future generations.

  17. Group representations

    CERN Document Server

    Karpilovsky, G

    1994-01-01

    This third volume can be roughly divided into two parts. The first part is devoted to the investigation of various properties of projective characters. Special attention is drawn to spin representations and their character tables and to various correspondences for projective characters. Among other topics, projective Schur index and projective representations of abelian groups are covered. The last topic is investigated by introducing a symplectic geometry on finite abelian groups. The second part is devoted to Clifford theory for graded algebras and its application to the corresponding theory

  18. Lego Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller Larsen, Marcus; Pedersen, Torben; Slepniov, Dmitrij

    2010-01-01

    The last years’ rather adventurous journey from 2004 to 2009 had taught the fifth-largest toy-maker in the world - the LEGO Group - the importance of managing the global supply chain effectively. In order to survive the largest internal financial crisis in its roughly 70 years of existence......, the management had, among many initiatives, decided to offshore and outsource a major chunk of its production to Flextronics. In this pursuit of rapid cost-cutting sourcing advantages, the LEGO Group planned to license out as much as 80 per cent of its production besides closing down major parts...

  19. Three different up-titration regimens of ponesimod, an S1P1 receptor modulator, in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherz, Michael W; Brossard, Patrick; D'Ambrosio, Daniele; Ipek, Murat; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2015-06-01

    Ponesimod is a selective S1P1 receptor modulator, and induces dose-dependent reduction of circulating lymphocytes upon oral dosing. Previous studies showed that single doses up to 75 mg or multiple doses up to 40 mg once daily are well tolerated, and heart rate (HR) reduction and atrio-ventricular conduction delays upon treatment initiation are reduced by gradual up-titration to the maintenance dose. This single-center, open-label, randomized, multiple-dose, 3-treatment, 3-way crossover study compared the tolerability, safety, pharmacokinetics, cardiodynamics, and effects on lymphocytes of 3 different up-titration regimens of ponesimod in healthy male and female subjects. Up-titration regimens comprised escalating periods of b.i.d. dosing (2.5 or 5 mg) and q.d. dosing (10 or 20 mg or both). After the third up-titration period a variable-duration washout period of 1-3 days was followed by re-challenge with a single 20-mg dose of ponesimod. Adverse events were transient and mild to moderate in intensity, not different between regimens. HR decrease after the first dose was greater than after all subsequent doses, including up-titration doses. Little or no HR change was observed with morning doses of b.i.d. regimens, suggesting that 2.5 and 5 mg b.i.d. are sufficient to sustain cardiac desensitization for the 12-hours dosing interval. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  20. Human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 functions as an estrogen receptor α signaling modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiyuan [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Byoung Ha [Department of Food and Nutrition, College of Life Science, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Min Jung; Park, Jong Hoon [Department of Biological Science, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Young Sook [Department of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Minsun, E-mail: minsunchang@sm.ac.kr [Department of Medical and Pharmaceutical Science, College of Science, Sookmyung Women’s University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • GSTP induces the classical ERα signaling event. • The functional GSTP is a prerequisite for GSTP-induced ERα transcription activity. • The expression of RIP140, a transcription cofactor, was inhibited by GSTP protein. • We propose the novel non-enzymatic role of GSTP. - Abstract: Estrogen receptor α (ERα) plays a crucial role in estrogen-mediated signaling pathways and exerts its action as a nuclear transcription factor. Binding of the ligand-activated ERα to the estrogen response element (ERE) is a central part of ERα-associated signal transduction pathways and its aberrant modulation is associated with many disease conditions. Human glutathione S-transferase P1-1 (GSTP) functions as an enzyme in conjugation reactions in drug metabolism and as a regulator of kinase signaling pathways. It is overexpressed in tumors following chemotherapy and has been associated with a poor prognosis in breast cancer. In this study, a novel regulatory function of GSTP has been proposed in which GSTP modulates ERE-mediated ERα signaling events. Ectopic expression of GSTP was able to induce the ERα and ERE-mediated transcriptional activities in ERα-positive but GSTP-negative MCF7 human breast cancer cells. This inductive effect of GSTP on the ERE-transcription activity was diminished when the cells express a mutated form of the enzyme or are treated with a GSTP-specific chemical inhibitor. It was found that GSTP inhibited the expression of the receptor interacting protein 140 (RIP140), a negative regulator of ERα transcription, at both mRNA and protein levels. Our study suggests a novel non-enzymatic role of GSTP which plays a significant role in regulating the classical ERα signaling pathways via modification of transcription cofactors such as RIP140.