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Sample records for southampton oceanography centre

  1. CMEMS (Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service) In Situ Thematic Assembly Centre: A service for operational Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano Muñoz, Fernando; Pouliquen, Sylvie; Petit de la Villeon, Loic; Carval, Thierry; Loubrieu, Thomas; Wedhe, Henning; Sjur Ringheim, Lid; Hammarklint, Thomas; Tamm, Susanne; De Alfonso, Marta; Perivoliotis, Leonidas; Chalkiopoulos, Antonis; Marinova, Veselka; Tintore, Joaquin; Troupin, Charles

    2016-04-01

    Copernicus, previously known as GMES (Global Monitoring for Environment and Security), is the European Programme for the establishment of a European capacity for Earth Observation and Monitoring. Copernicus aims to provide a sustainable service for Ocean Monitoring and Forecasting validated and commissioned by users. From May 2015, the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) is working on an operational mode through a contract with services engagement (result is regular data provision). Within CMEMS, the In Situ Thematic Assembly Centre (INSTAC) distributed service integrates in situ data from different sources for operational oceanography needs. CMEMS INSTAC is collecting and carrying out quality control in a homogeneous manner on data from providers outside Copernicus (national and international networks), to fit the needs of internal and external users. CMEMS INSTAC has been organized in 7 regional Dissemination Units (DUs) to rely on the EuroGOOS ROOSes. Each DU aggregates data and metadata provided by a series of Production Units (PUs) acting as an interface for providers. Homogeneity and standardization are key features to ensure coherent and efficient service. All DUs provide data in the OceanSITES NetCDF format 1.2 (based on NetCDF 3.6), which is CF compliant, relies on SeaDataNet vocabularies and is able to handle profile and time-series measurements. All the products, both near real-time (NRT) and multi-year (REP), are available online for every CMEMS registered user through an FTP service. On top of the FTP service, INSTAC products are available through Oceanotron, an open-source data server dedicated to marine observations dissemination. It provides services such as aggregation on spatio-temporal coordinates and observed parameters, and subsetting on observed parameters and metadata. The accuracy of the data is checked on various levels. Quality control procedures are applied for the validity of the data and correctness tests for the

  2. Chemical oceanography

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Millero, F.J

    1996-01-01

    Chemical Oceanography presents a comprehensive examination of the chemistry of oceans through discussions of such topics as descriptive physical oceanography, the composition of seawater and the major...

  3. Temperatures kept cool in Southampton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Katey

    2010-03-01

    According to Digitron, hospitals countrywide are seeing the benefits of DigiTrak, the company's automatic wireless temperature monitoring system. Katey McDonald, the company's marketing manager, outlines how the system replaces traditional methods of data collection by providing a single networked package, and describes its use at Southampton General Hospital for blood monitoring, with the help of advanced biomedical scientist and quality officer there Marie Cundall.

  4. Technology tug-of-war : Statoil v. University of Southampton

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2006-12-15

    Statoil is in a legal dispute with the University of Southampton over ownership of a breakthrough technology expected to save the oil and gas industry millions of dollars. Called seabed logging, the technology uses a new electromagnetic imaging technique that allows explorers to confirm the existence of hydrocarbons in deep undersea reservoirs. Statoil has maintained that its staff members originated the technology at a research centre in Norway. Southampton has countered that the university's expertise advanced the technology and made it viable. The method uses electromagnetic signals rather than seismic sound waves to survey subsea sediments, which rapidly attenuate the signal, while hydrocarbon-filled reservoirs attenuate less due to their higher resistivity. Research into the method began in Norway in 1997. Southampton became involved with the research, supplying a deep-towed active source instrument, as well as the necessary receivers. Tests conducted by the university showed strong responses for inline configurations of source and receiver. The Patent Office concluded that all the elements of the concept were invented by Statoil researchers, despite the fact that Southampton applied for the patent before them. However, the Offshore Hydrocarbon Mapping (OHM) plc, a spinoff from the University of Southampton, continues to use the technology, which they claim has been modified in such a way that it no longer resembles the original patent. OHM has had consistent results with the technology, which is being used by oil and gas companies of all sizes. However, Statoil has now launched proceedings against OHM for infringement of one the patents related to seabed logging, claiming that OHM is using the technology in regions in which thy have confirmed patents. 1 fig.

  5. Using Oceanography to Support Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byfield, V.

    2012-04-01

    Teachers are always on the lookout for material to give their brightest students, in order to keep them occupied, stimulated and challenged, while the teacher gets on with helping the rest. They are also looking for material that can inspire and enthuse those who think that school is 'just boring!' Oceanography, well presented, has the capacity to do both. As a relatively young science, oceanography is not a core curriculum subject (possibly an advantage), but it draws on the traditional sciences of biology, chemistry, physic and geology, and can provide wonderful examples for teaching concepts in school sciences. It can also give good reasons for learning science, maths and technology. Exciting expeditions (research cruises) to far-flung places; opportunities to explore new worlds, a different angle on topical debates such as climate change, pollution, or conservation can bring a new life to old subjects. Access to 'real' data from satellites or Argo floats can be used to develop analytical and problem solving skills. The challenge is to make all this available in a form that can easily be used by teachers and students to enhance the learning experience. We learn by doing. Active teaching methods require students to develop their own concepts of what they are learning. This stimulates new neural connections in the brain - the physical manifestation of learning. There is a large body of evidence to show that active learning is much better remembered and understood. Active learning develops thinking skills through analysis, problem solving, and evaluation. It helps learners to use their knowledge in realistic and useful ways, and see its importance and relevance. Most importantly, properly used, active learning is fun. This paper presents experiences from a number of education outreach projects that have involved the National Oceanography Centre in Southampton, UK. All contain some element of active learning - from quizzes and puzzles to analysis of real data from

  6. Physical oceanography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, C.S.; Murty, V.S.N.

    The chapter on physical oceanography of the Indian Ocean is written keeping in mind the graduate students and researchers. It starts with a brief introduction (citing latest expeditions) followed by the coastal and near processes (wave climate...

  7. Meteorology/Oceanography Help - Naval Oceanography Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    section Advanced Search... Sections Home Time Earth Orientation Astronomy Meteorology Oceanography Ice You are here: Home › Help › Meteorology/Oceanography Help USNO Logo USNO Info Meteorology/Oceanography Help Send an e-mail regarding meteorology or oceanography products. Privacy Advisory Your E-Mail

  8. Southampton uni's computer whizzes develop "mini" grid

    CERN Multimedia

    Sherriff, Lucy

    2006-01-01

    "In a bid to help its students explore the potential of grid computing, the University of Southampton's Computer Science department has developed what it calls a "lightweight grid". The system has been designed to allow students to experiment with grid technology without the complexity of inherent security concerns of the real thing. (1 page)

  9. Carbonate and carbon fluctuations in the Eastern Arabian Sea over 140 ka: Implications on productivity changes?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Guptha, M.V.S.; Naidu, P.D.; Haake, B.G.; Schiebel, R.

    , University of Hamburg, Grabenstr. 27, 20357 Hamburg, Germany c School of Ocean and Earth Science, University of Southampton, Southampton Oceanography Centre, European Way, Southampton, SO14 3ZH, UK Received25April2003;accepted21May2005 Abstract Biological...

  10. Careers in Oceanography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollister, Charles D., Ed.

    This booklet was prepared by practicing oceanographers to help college students in their search for professional direction. The booklet: (1) points out some frontiers of current research; (2) describes five major subfields of oceanography (marine geology and geophysics, oceanographic engineering, physical oceanography, chemical oceanography, and…

  11. The Southampton Cauchy-characteristic matching project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Inverno, R.

    2001-01-01

    The Southampton Numerical Relativity Group have set up a long term project concerned with investigating Cauchy-characteristic matching (CCM) codes in numerical relativity. The CCM approach has two distinct features. Firstly, it dispenses with an outer boundary condition and replaces this with matching conditions at an interface residing in the vacuum between the Cauchy and characteristic regions. A successful CCM code leads to a transparent interface and so avoids the spurious reflections which plague most codes employing outer boundary conditions. Secondly, by employing a compactified coordinate, it proves possible to generate global solutions. This means that gravitational waves can be identified unambiguously at future null infinity. To date, cylindrical codes have been developed which have been checked against the exact solutions of Weber-Wheeler, Safier-Stark-Piran and Xanthopoulos. In addition, a cylindrical code has been constructed for investigating dynamic cosmic strings. Recently a master vacuum axi-symmetric CCM code has been completed which consists of four independent modules comprising an interior Cauchy code, an exterior characteristic code together with injection and extraction codes. The main goal of this work is to construct a 3 dimensional code possessing the characteristic, injection and extraction modules which can be attached to an interior code based on a finite grid. Such a code should lead to the construction of more accurate templates which are needed in the search for gravitational waves. (author)

  12. The Evolution of Digital Chemistry at Southampton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Colin; Coles, Simon J; Frey, Jeremy G

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we take a historical view of e-Science and e-Research developments within the Chemical Sciences at the University of Southampton, showing the development of several stages of the evolving data ecosystem as Chemistry moves into the digital age of the 21(st) Century. We cover our research on aspects of the representation of chemical information in the context of the world wide web (WWW) and its semantic enhancement (the Semantic Web) and illustrate this with the example of the representation of quantities and units within the Semantic Web. We explore the changing nature of laboratories as computing power becomes increasing powerful and pervasive and specifically look at the function and role of electronic or digital notebooks. Having focussed on the creation of chemical data and information in context, we finish the paper by following the use and reuse of this data as facilitated by the features provided by digital repositories and their importance in facilitating the exchange of chemical information touching on the issues of open and or intelligent access to the data. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  13. Introduction to fisheries oceanography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sumitra-Vijayaraghavan

    Fisheries oceanography can be applied to fisheries ecology, fisheries management and practical fishing. Physico-chemical parameters of the environment (temperature, currents, waves, light, oxygen and salinity) have profound effect on fish...

  14. Oceanography Branch Hydrographic Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Oceanography group maintains and provides Conductivity/Temperature/Depth (CTD) instruments to all Center cruises for measuring water column profiles of...

  15. Mass spectrometry in oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aggarwal, Suresh K.

    2000-01-01

    Mass spectrometry plays an important role in oceanography for various applications. Different types of inorganic as well as organic mass spectrometric techniques are being exploited world-wide to understand the different aspects of marine science, for palaeogeography, palaeoclimatology and palaeoecology, for isotopic composition and concentrations of different elements as well as for speciation studies. The present paper reviews some of the applications of atomic mass spectrometric techniques in the area of oceanography

  16. Alternative designs of a superconducting synchronous generator: the Southampton approach

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, K.F.; Lukasik, B.; Sykulski, J.K.

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes various designs undertaken at the University of Southampton for building both cored and coreless superconducting synchronous generators using high temperature superconducting (HTS) tapes. An overview of electromagnetic and mechanical design issues is presented and scalability is considered. Results are included for the full (original) size machine and extended to a double size unit.

  17. Oceanography of the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, B.N.

    This volume is an outcome of the presentation of selected 74 papers at the International Symposium on the Oceanography of the Indian Ocean held at National Institute of Oceanography during January 1991. The unique physical setting of the northern...

  18. The development of labour politics in Southampton 1890 - 1945

    OpenAIRE

    Heaney, G.P.

    2000-01-01

    The debate on the development of Labour politics has become more complex and it is accepted that local economic, social and political experiences are crucial to an understanding of the growth of Labour and the decline of the Liberals. The majority of regional and local studies have concentrated on the north or London. This study tries to redress the balance by looking at how and why Labour politics developed in Southampton. The economic background is considered including ...

  19. Basic concepts in oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small, L.F.

    1997-01-01

    Basic concepts in oceanography include major wind patterns that drive ocean currents, and the effects that the earth's rotation, positions of land masses, and temperature and salinity have on oceanic circulation and hence global distribution of radioactivity. Special attention is given to coastal and near-coastal processes such as upwelling, tidal effects, and small-scale processes, as radionuclide distributions are currently most associated with coastal regions. (author)

  20. Connecting Oceanography and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beauregard, J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Capturing and retaining the interest of non-science majors in science classes can be difficult, no matter what type of science. At Berklee College of Music, this challenge is especially significant, as all students are music majors. In my Introductory Oceanography course, I use a final project as a way for the students to link class material with their own interests. The students may choose any format to present their projects to the class; however, many students write and perform original music. The performances of ocean-themed music have become a huge draw of the Introductory Oceanography course. In an effort to expand the reach of this music, several colleagues and I organized the first Earth Day event at Berklee, `Earthapalooza 2015.' This event included performances of music originally written for the final projects, as well as other musical performances, poetry readings, guest talks, and information booths. Although the idea of an Earth Day event is not new, this event is unique in that student performances really resonate with the student audience. Additionally, since many of these students will enter professional careers in the performance and recording industries, the potential exists for them to expose large audiences to the issues of oceanography through music. In this presentation, I will play examples of original student compositions and show video of the live student performances. I will also discuss the benefits and challenges of the final projects and the Earth Day event. Finally, I will highlight the future plans to continue ocean-themed music at Berklee.

  1. Meteorology Products - Naval Oceanography Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    section Advanced Search... Sections Home Time Earth Orientation Astronomy Meteorology Oceanography Ice You are here: Home › FNMOC › Meteorology Products FNMOC Logo FNMOC Navigation Meteorology Products Oceanography Products Tropical Applications Climatology and Archived Data Info Meteorology Products Global

  2. Exposure of Polish children to Southampton food colours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda-Wyrębek, J; Kuźma, K; Świtka, A; Jarecka, J; Beresińska, M; Postupolski, J

    2017-01-01

    A study published in 2007 showed that the intake of six food colours (the so-called 'Southampton colours') may have an adverse effect on activity and attention in children. The present study set out to assess the exposure of Polish children (3 and 8-9 years old, n = 149) to six of the target colours. Two methods were used to evaluate colour consumption by children: scenario 1 using the maximum permitted levels (MPLs) and actual food consumption data; and scenario 2 using the actual levels in food and actual food consumption data. The data on the actual consumption of food containing the colours was collected using a 7-day questionnaire survey. The results of laboratory analysis of food consumed by children provided data on the actual levels of the colours in food. Consumption of the colours estimated by scenario 1 in any case did not exceed the acceptable daily intakes (ADIs) of the colours in both age groups of children. For more refined colour intake (scenario 2), isolated cases exceeding the ADI were recorded for four colours, but assuming that manufacturers comply with the current legislation on MPL of colours in food, the intake of the colours assessed in scenario 2 should not be a reason for exceeding of ADIs for the target food colours.

  3. Mentoring Women in Physical Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Lisa M.; Lozier, M. Susan

    2010-08-01

    MPOWIR Pattullo Conference; Charleston, South Carolina, 23-26 May 2010; Initiated in 2004, Mentoring Physical Oceanography Women to Increase Retention (MPOWIR) is a community-initiated and community-led program aimed at providing mentoring to junior women in physical oceanography to improve their retention in the field. The centerpiece of the MPOWIR program is the Pattullo Conference, a two-and-a-half-day mentoring event held biannually. The second conference was held in South Carolina. The conference is named for June Pattullo, the first woman to receive a Ph.D. in physical oceanography. The goals of the Pattullo Conference are to build community networks among junior and senior scientists, to provide junior scientists with feedback on their current and planned research projects, to provide advice to junior scientists on their career goals, to introduce both senior and junior scientists to aspects of professional development, and to raise awareness of issues confronting junior women among the senior scientist community.

  4. Surface freshwater from Bay of Bengal runoff and Indonesian throughflow in the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sengupta, D.; Raj, B.; Shenoi, S.S.C.

    ]); monthly evaporation from the Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) data (Josey et al. [1998]), and monthly 2openbulletby 2openbulletsurface currents in the tropical Indian Ocean, based on 1985-2002 trajecto- ries of drogued WOCE drifters (Shenoi et al..., Deep-Sea Re- search II, 50, 2111?2127, 2003. Josey, S. A., E. C. Kent, and P. K. Taylor, The Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) Ocean - Atmosphere Heat, Mo- mentum and Freshwater Flux Atlas, Tech. Rep. 6, Southamp- ton Oceanography Centre, 1998...

  5. A Source Book for Teaching Chemical Oceanography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loder, Theodore C.; Glibert, Patricia M.

    Chemical oceanography or marine chemistry are taught in many colleges and universities. This publication provides sources for instructors of such courses. The first section of this report is a detailed composite outline of a course in chemical oceanography. It includes fundamental topics taught in many chemical oceanography classes. The outline…

  6. Key Concepts in Microbial Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; Achilles, K.; Walker, G.; Weersing, K.; Team, A

    2008-12-01

    The Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) is a multi-institution Science and Technology Center, established by the National Science Foundation in 2006. C-MORE's research mission is to facilitate a more comprehensive understanding of the diverse assemblages of microorganisms in the sea, ranging from the genetic basis of marine microbial biogeochemistry including the metabolic regulation and environmental controls of gene expression, to the processes that underpin the fluxes of carbon, related bioelements, and energy in the marine environment. The C-MORE education and outreach program is focused on increasing scientific literacy in microbial oceanography among students, educators, and the general public. A first step toward this goal is defining the key concepts that constitute microbial oceanography. After lengthy discussions with scientists and educators, both within and outside C-MORE, we have arrived at six key concepts: 1) Marine microbes are very small and have been around for a long time; 2) Life on Earth could not exist without microbes; 3) Most marine microbes are beneficial; 4) Microbes are everywhere: they are extremely abundant and diverse; 5) Microbes significantly impact our global climate; and 6) There are new discoveries every day in the field of microbial oceanography. A C-MORE-produced brochure on these six key concepts will be distributed at the meeting. Advanced copies may be requested by email or downloaded from the C-MORE web site(http://cmore.soest.hawaii.edu/downloads/MO_key_concepts_hi-res.pdf). This brochure also includes information on career pathways in microbial oceanography, with the aim of broadening participation in the field. C-MORE is eager to work in partnership to incorporate these key concepts into other science literacy publications, particularly those involving ocean and climate literacy. We thank the following contributors and reviewers: P Chisholm, A Dolberry, and A Thompson (MIT); N Lawrence

  7. Southampton: A Case Study on Why Academies Are Not the Answer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The author recounts the arrival of two Oasis Community Learning Academies in Southampton through a process of failed political courage to continue supporting the Local Authority. He tells of the subsequent impact when children and parents react against the regime in one of the Academies. In conclusion he challenges the Labour Government over the…

  8. A Cenozoic record of the equatorial Pacific carbonate compensation depth

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Palike, H.; Lyle, M.W.; Nishi, H.; Raffi, I.; Ridgwell, A.; Gamage, K.; Klaus, A.; Acton, G.; Anderson, L.; Backman, J.; Baldauf, J.; Beltran, C.; Bohaty, S.M.; Bown, P.; Busch, W.; Channell, J.E.T.; Chun, C.O.J.; Delaney, M.; Dewangan, P.; et al.

    A. Wilson 1, Yuhji Yamamoto 49, Shinya Yamamoto 50, Toshitsugu Yamazaki 51 & Richard E. Zeebe 52       1 Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, University of Southampton, Waterfront Campus, European Way, Southampton, SO... revision 7491). Scenarios were investigated as open system runs and with enabled climate feedback (temperature responsive to greenhouse gas forcing) until steady state conditions were achieved (~150 kyr). Ensembles were run on the Southampton high...

  9. Population Ecology of Caribou Populations without Predators: Southampton and Coats Island Herds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Quellet

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of the ecology of two caribou populations inhabiting predator-free northern islands, Coats and Southampton Island. Findings are analyzed in light of the hypothesis that in absence of prédation or high human harvest, food competition results in delayed puberty, reduced calf production, increased winter starvation of caribou and regulates populations at high densities (>2 km-2. Caribou were hunted to extinction on Southampton Island (Northwest Territories, Canada by mid-century. In 1967, 48 caribou were captured on neighbouring Coats Island and released on Southampton Island. Southampton Island is characterized by a high per capita winter food availability in summer and in winter. The population on Southampton Island has been increasing at a rapid rate of growth since re-introduction (Lamba=1.27. Fast population growth was possible because females invested early in reproduction and over winter survival rate was high. The population on Coats Island is also characterized by high per capita food availability in summer but low food availability in winter. The population size has undergone some marked fluctuations, abrupt declines followed by relatively rapid recovery and, contrary to predictions, densities were always less than 1 km-2. Low population densities on Coats Island result primarily from low food availability. This review suggests that in the absence of prédation or high human harvest competition for food regulates caribou population abundance. However, caribou numbers can fluctuate markedly among years because inter-annual variation of weather conditions affects forage accessibility in winter. This review also emphasizes the importance of distinguishing between factors that determine absolute population density and variation in density among years (in our case probably plant production and winter weather conditions which influence forage accessibility from the regulatory factors, processes that stop population

  10. Estuarine Oceanography. CEGS Programs Publication Number 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, F. F.

    Estuarine Oceanography is one in a series of single-topic problem modules intended for use in undergraduate and earth science courses. Designed for those interested in coastal oceanography or limnology, the module is structured as a laboratory supplement for undergraduate college classes but should be useful at all levels. The module has two…

  11. Reconstructing historical trends in metal input in heavily-disturbed, contaminated estuaries: studies from Bilbao, Southampton Water and Sicily

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cundy, A.B.; Croudace, I.W.; Cearreta, A.; Irabien, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Estuaries may be important reservoirs for contaminants as they tend to act as sinks for fine, contaminant-reactive sediments, and, historically, they have acted as centres for industrial and urban development. Analysis of dated sediment cores from these areas may allow historical trends in heavy metal input to be reconstructed, and recent and historical inputs of metal contaminants to be compared. Undisturbed saltmarsh settings have been used widely in the reconstruction of historical trends in metal input as saltmarshes provide a stable, vegetated substrate of dominantly fine sediments, and are less prone to erosion and reworking than adjacent mudflat areas. In comparison, much less research on historical pollution trends has been undertaken at estuarine sites which are prone to severe local disturbance, such as intertidal areas which are routinely dredged or where sedimentary processes have been modified by human activities such as shipping, salt working, port activities, land claim etc. This paper assesses the usefulness of 210 Pb and 137 Cs dating, combined with geochemical studies, in reconstructing historical trends in heavy metal input and sediment accretion in 3 heavily-modified, industrialised estuarine areas in Europe: the Bilbao estuary (Spain), Southampton Water (UK), and the Mulinello estuary (Sicily). Of these sites, only a salt marsh core from the Mulinello estuary provides a high-resolution record of recent heavy metal inputs. In Southampton Water only a partial record of changing metal inputs over time is retained due to land-claim and possible early-diagenetic remobilisation, while at Bilbao the vertical distribution of heavy metals in intertidal flats is mainly controlled by input on reworked sediment particles and variations in sediment composition. Where 137 Cs and 210 Pb distributions with depth allow a chronology of sediment deposition to be established, and early-diagenetic remobilisation has been minimal, mudflat and saltmarsh cores from

  12. The wine trade, piracy and maritime contract law in late medieval Southampton

    OpenAIRE

    Pamuk, Fatih

    2014-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of History, İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2014. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2014. Includes bibliographical references leaves 102-105. In late medieval Southampton, wine was a commodity, which was extensively traded, and quite precious to the pirates of the English Channel because it was easy to sell and the vessels loaded with wine had less protection than the ships of precious metals. Therefore, increase of wine trade in the late m...

  13. The Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC) - Naval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteorology Oceanography Ice You are here: Home › FNMOC FNMOC Logo FNMOC Navigation Meteorology Products Oceanography Products Tropical Applications Climatology and Archived Data Info The Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC) The Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC

  14. Fundamentals of estuarine physical oceanography

    CERN Document Server

    Bruner de Miranda, Luiz; Kjerfve, Björn; Castro Filho, Belmiro Mendes de

    2017-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the complex system functions, variability and human interference in ecosystem between the continent and the ocean. It focuses on circulation, transport and mixing of estuarine and coastal water masses, which is ultimately related to an understanding of the hydrographic and hydrodynamic characteristics (salinity, temperature, density and circulation), mixing processes (advection and diffusion), transport timescales such as the residence time and the exposure time. In the area of physical oceanography, experiments using these water bodies as a natural laboratory and interpreting their circulation and mixing processes using theoretical and semi-theoretical knowledge are of fundamental importance. Small-scale physical models may also be used together with analytical and numerical models. The book highlights the fact that research and theory are interactive, and the results provide the fundamentals for the development of the estuarine research.

  15. Oceanography Information System of Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tello, Olvido; Gómez, María; González, Sonsoles

    2016-04-01

    Since 1914, the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO) performs multidisciplinary studies of the marine environment. In same case are systematic studies and in others are specific studies for special requirements (El Hierro submarine volcanic episode, spill Prestige, others.). Different methodologies and data acquisition techniques are used depending on studies aims. The acquired data are stored and presented in different formats. The information is organized into different databases according to the subject and the variables represented (geology, fisheries, aquaculture, pollution, habitats, etc.). Related to physical and chemical oceanography data, in 1964 was created the DATA CENTER of IEO (CEDO), in order to organize the data about physical and chemical variables, to standardize this information and to serve the international data network SeaDataNet. www.seadatanet.org. This database integrates data about temperature, salinity, nutrients, and tidal data. CEDO allows consult and download the data. http://indamar.ieo.es On the other hand, related to data about marine species in 1999 was developed SIRENO DATABASE. All data about species collected in oceanographic surveys carried out by researches of IEO, and data from observers on fishing vessels are incorporated in SIRENO database. In this database is stored catch data, biomass, abundance, etc. This system is based on architecture ORACLE. Due to the large amount of information collected over the 100 years of IEO history, there is a clear need to organize, standardize, integrate and relate the different databases and information, and to provide interoperability and access to the information. Consequently, in 2000 it emerged the first initiative to organize the IEO spatial information in an Oceanography Information System, based on a Geographical Information System (GIS). The GIS was consolidated as IEO institutional GIS and was created the Spatial Data Infrastructure of IEO (IDEO) following trend of INSPIRE. All

  16. Chemical Oceanography and the Marine Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Steven; Hedges, John

    The principles of chemical oceanography provide insight into the processes regulating the marine carbon cycle. The text offers a background in chemical oceanography and a description of how chemical elements in seawater and ocean sediments are used as tracers of physical, biological, chemical and geological processes in the ocean. The first seven chapters present basic topics of thermodynamics, isotope systematics and carbonate chemistry, and explain the influence of life on ocean chemistry and how it has evolved in the recent (glacial-interglacial) past. This is followed by topics essential to understanding the carbon cycle, including organic geochemistry, air-sea gas exchange, diffusion and reaction kinetics, the marine and atmosphere carbon cycle and diagenesis in marine sediments. Figures are available to download from www.cambridge.org/9780521833134. Ideal as a textbook for upper-level undergraduates and graduates in oceanography, environmental chemistry, geochemistry and earth science and a valuable reference for researchers in oceanography.

  17. History of oceanography of the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sengupta, R.

    This paper highlights history of the oceanography of the Indian Ocean. Oceanographic activities during Ancient period, Medieval period, British period, Post-Independence period are briefly discussed. The role of the IIOE, IOC, UNESCO are also...

  18. CSIR-National Institute of Oceanography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tapaswi, M.P.

    CSIR-National Institute of Oceanography being one of its kind in the country The article describes the on-going researches and projects in contributing to the science in the field of Marine science....

  19. Oceanography of the Chilean Patagonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, Silvio; Luis Iriarte, José; Daneri, Giovanni

    2011-03-01

    Chilean Patagonia is one of the most extended fjord regions in the world that covers nearly 240,000 km 2 with an extremely complex coastline and topography in one of the least densely populated areas of the country (1-8 inhabitants every 10 km 2). In recent years, the area has been undergoing somewhat intense pressure since several commercial projects in hydroelectricity, tourism, and commercial salmon and mytilid cultures have been developed, or are in progress. Concomitantly, several large research programs have been devised to study the physical, chemical, and biological environment of Patagonia, such as the CIMAR FIORDO, and recently COPAS Sur-Austral based at Universidad de Concepcion, that attempts to close the bridge between oceanographic knowledge and its use by society. In this introductory article we summarize the collection of papers comprising this Special Issue of Continental Shelf Research. These papers deal with aspects of regional oceanography and geology, inorganic and organic geochemistry, ecology of pelagic and benthic organisms, and past changes in productivity.

  20. Seasonal variability of the mixed layer in the central Bay of Bengal and associated changes in nutrients and chlorophyll

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narvekar, J.; PrasannaKumar, S.

    Indian Ocean during 1977 and 1979 summer monsoon seasons, Indian Journal of Marine Sciences 17, 258-264. Josey, S. A., Kent, E. C. and Taylor, P. K., 1998. The Southampton Oceanography Centre (SOC) Ocean - Atmosphere Heat, Momentum... and Freshwater Flux Atlas, Southampton Oceanography Centre Report No. 6, 30 pp. plus figs. Levitus, S., 1982. Climatological Atlas of the World Ocean, NOAA Professional paper 13, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Rockville Md, 173...

  1. Women and children first? The administration of Titanic relief in Southampton, 1912–59.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    One of the principal narratives woven around the 1912 sinking of the Titanic is that the tragedy united people around the world in a shared sense of horror and grief. This study examines the administration of the relief fund collected for victims and questions the established image of social unity and collective suffering. The records of the Southampton Titanic Relief Fund reveal welfare processes imbued with class and gender prejudices that consigned many of the relatives of victims to poverty-stricken lives, despite the massive fund collected in their names.

  2. Macroecology: A Primer for Biological Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W. K. W.

    2016-02-01

    Macroecology is the study of ecological patterns discerned at a spatial, temporal, or organization scale higher than that at which the focal entities interact. Such patterns are statistical or emergent manifestations arising from the ensemble of component entities. Although macroecology is a neologism largely based in terrestrial and avian ecology, macroscopic patterns have long been recognised in biological oceanography. Familiar examples include Redfield elemental stoichiometry, Elton trophic pyramids, Sheldon biomass spectrum, and Margalef life-forms mandala. Macroecological regularities can often be found along various continua, such as along body size in power-law scaling or along habitat temperature in metabolic theory. Uniquely in oceanography, a partition of the world ocean continuum into Longhurst biogeochemical provinces provides a spatial organization well-suited for macroecological investigations. In this rational discrete approach, fundamental processes in physical and biological oceanography that differentiate a set of non-overlapping ocean regions also appear to shape the macroecological structure of phytoplankton communities.

  3. Crucial times for Spanish physical oceanography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep L. Pelegrí

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The field of physical oceanography has undergone exponential growth in Spain during the last few decades. From a handful of self-taught researchers in the late 1960s there are now several hundred physical oceanographers distributed in some 20 Spanish institutions, and many more working overseas. The First Spanish Physical Oceanography Meeting (EOF1, held in Barcelona in October 2010, was a good example of the high quality and large variety of this research. The facilities and human resources are excellent but the alarming decrease in public investment in science due to the economic crisis must lead the Spanish physical oceanography community to define its current priorities. In this introductory paper to EOF1 we revise our history and where we are now, and suggest that progress in the near future will rely on our intelligence to sustain and enhance human capital, partnership and society-oriented research.

  4. Secretary of the Navy Professor of Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA; 5-10 June 2011 Attended: Algae + Fish = Ocean Mixing? Conference, La Jolla, CA; 5-6 July 2011 Attended: JASON Summer...the scientific work of Klaus Hasselmann at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology; Hamburg , Germany; 09 November 2011 Keynote Address: Nansen

  5. Oceanography for Landlocked Classrooms. Monograph V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madrazo, Gerry M., Jr., Ed.; Hounshell, Paul B., Ed.

    This monograph attempts to show the importance of bringing marine biology into science classrooms, discusses what makes the ocean so important and explains why oceanography should be included in the science curriculum regardless of where students live. Section I, "Getting Started," includes discussions on the following: (1) "Why Marine Biology?";…

  6. High angle of attack position sensing for the Southampton University magnetic suspension and balance system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, David H.

    1987-01-01

    An all digital five channel position detection system is to be installed in the Southampton University Magnetic Suspension and Balance System (SUMSBS). The system is intended to monitor a much larger range of model pitch attitudes than has been possible hitherto, up to a maximum of a 90 degree angle of attack. It is based on the use of self-scanning photodiode arrays and illuminating laser light beams, together with purpose built processing electronics. The principles behind the design of the system are discussed, together with the results of testing one channel of the system which was used to control the axial position of a magnetically suspended model in SUMSBS. The removal of optically coupled heave position information from the axial position sensing channel is described.

  7. Sea level changes induced by local winds on the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mehra, P.; Tsimplis, M.N.; Desai, R.G.P.; Joseph, A.; Shaw, A.G.P.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Cipollini, P.

    1 National Institute of Oceanography, Goa, India 2 National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK # [Corresponding author: pmehra@nio.org] Abstract The contribution of atmospheric pressure and wind to sea level variability at Goa (West...), Southampton under an Indian Ocean Tsunami Warning System (IOWTS) fellowship-2008-2009. We are all grateful to the International Oceanographic Commission for providing us with the opportunity of working together. 17 R: Correlation coefficient between sea...

  8. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit entrance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    StenniSphere at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., invites visitors to discover why America comes to Stennis Space Center before going into space. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center.

  9. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  10. SWOT Oceanography and Hydrology Data Product Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peral, Eva; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Fernandez, Daniel Esteban; Johnson, Michael P.; Blumstein, Denis

    2013-01-01

    The proposed Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission would demonstrate a new measurement technique using radar interferometry to obtain wide-swath measurements of water elevation at high resolution over ocean and land, addressing the needs of both the hydrology and oceanography science communities. To accurately evaluate the performance of the proposed SWOT mission, we have developed several data product simulators at different levels of fidelity and complexity.

  11. Occupational physical activities, working hours and outcome of pregnancy: findings from the Southampton Women's Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonzini, M; Coggon, D; Godfrey, K; Inskip, H; Crozier, S; Palmer, K T

    2009-10-01

    To investigate risks of physical activity at work by pregnancy trimester, including the effects on head and abdominal circumference. At 34 weeks of gestation we interviewed 1327 mothers from the prospective Southampton Women's Survey (SWS); we asked about their activities (working hours, standing/walking, kneeling/squatting, trunk bending, lifting and night shifts) in jobs held at each of 11, 19 and 34 weeks of gestation, and subsequently ascertained four birth outcomes (preterm delivery, small for gestational age (SGA) and reduced head or abdominal circumference) blinded to employment history. Risk of preterm delivery was elevated nearly threefold in women whose work at 34 weeks entailed trunk bending for >1 h/day. Small head circumference was more common in babies born to women who worked for >40 h/week. However, no statistically significant associations were found with SGA or small abdominal circumference, and preterm delivery showed little association with long working hours, lifting, standing or shift work. There is a need for more research on trunk bending late in pregnancy, and on the relationship of work to reduced head circumference. Our findings on several other occupational exposures common among pregnant workers are reassuring.

  12. Ferromanganese nodules and their associated sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Rare earth element geochemistry

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Pattan, J.N.; Rao, Ch.M.; Migdisov, A.A.; Colley, S.; Higgs, N.C.; Demidenko, L.

    FerromanganeseNodulesandtheirAssociatedSedimentsfromtheCentralIndianOceanBasin:RareEarthElementGeochemistry J.N.PATTANCH.M.RAONationalInstituteofOceanography,DonaPaula Goa,IndiaA.A.MIGDISOV InstituteofGeochemistry,RussianAcademyofSciencesMoscow,Russia S.COLLEY,N.C.HIGGSSouthamptonOceanographyCentre,EmpressDockSouthampton...

  13. Potential diagenetic and detrital sources for calcareous sediments from the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Valsangkar, A.B.; Borole, D.V.; Shejwalkar, A.S.; Kalangutkar, N.G.; Fernandes, N.O.; Dias, C.C.

    ., Cruise report of RSS Charles Darwin (CD-149) (18 July–6 August 2003), Southampton Oceanography Centre, UK, p. 3. 11. Anon, Cruise report of ORV Sagar Kanya (SK-207) (13 July–19 August 2004), National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa, p. 27...

  14. Tracing the strength of the southwest monsoon using boron isotopes in the eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.; Foster, G.L.; Martínez-Boti, M.A.

    . Foster and Miguel A. Martínez-Botí Ocean and Earth Science, National Oceanography Centre Southampton, University of Southampton, SO14 3ZH,UK Corresponding author: S. S. Naik, CSIR-National Institute of Oceanography, Goa 403004, India (sushant... of the foraminifers was determined at the University of Southampton on a Thermo Scientific Neptune MC-ICPMS [see Foster, 2008 and Henehan et al., 2013]. External reproducibility of the MC-ICPMS δ11B data is determined from a relationship between the reproducibility...

  15. Counsellors in primary care in Southampton: a questionnaire survey of their qualifications, working arrangements, and casemix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, A; Hook, J; Stein, K

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: There has been an upsurge of interest in counselling in primary care over the past five years. This has been stimulated by a growing demand for non-drug treatment of emotional disorders and by the extension of reimbursement for the costs of counsellors. Continued calls for careful evaluation have been largely unheeded in the face of heady growth. AIM: To establish the prevalence of counselling services in the 67 general practices in the Southampton and South West Hampshire Health District, and to describe in detail their qualifications, working arrangements, and casemix. METHOD: A questionnaire enquiring about counselling services was sent to all the general practices in the district. A second questionnaire was then posted to all the counsellors identified as working in these practices. RESULTS: Twenty-six (39%) practices employed one or more counsellors. Fundholding practices were four times more likely than non-fundholders to employ a counsellor. Most of the counselling work was short term (4-20 sessions). The most common presenting complaints were relationship problems, depression, anxiety, and bereavement. CONCLUSION: This descriptive study highlights the wide variation in the qualifications and training of counsellors. Until the issue of effectiveness is resolved through further research, the best safeguard of quality is to ensure that counsellors meet the appropriate training standards laid down by the British Association of Counsellors. Monitoring standards is a legitimate task for those commissioning health care who are increasingly responsible for reimbursement of a counsellor's salary. Counsellors who meet appropriate training criteria should be encouraged to pursue accreditation with the British Association of Counsellors. Those who do not meet these criteria should be encouraged to undergo additional training. PMID:9474822

  16. From satellite altimetry to Argo and operational oceanography: three revolutions in oceanography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Y. Le Traon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The launch of the French/US mission Topex/Poseidon (T/P (CNES/NASA in August 1992 was the start of a revolution in oceanography. For the first time, a very precise altimeter system optimized for large-scale sea level and ocean circulation observations was flying. T/P alone could not observe the mesoscale circulation. In the 1990s, the ESA satellites ERS-1/2 were flying simultaneously with T/P. Together with my CLS colleagues, we demonstrated that we could use T/P as a reference mission for ERS-1/2 and bring the ERS-1/2 data to an accuracy level comparable to T/P. Near-real-time high-resolution global sea level anomaly maps were then derived. These maps have been operationally produced as part of the SSALTO/DUACS system for the last 15 yr. They are now widely used by the oceanographic community and have contributed to a much better understanding and recognition of the role and importance of mesoscale dynamics. Altimetry needs to be complemented with global in situ observations. At the end of the 90s, a major international initiative was launched to develop Argo, the global array of profiling floats. This has been an outstanding success. Argo floats now provide the most important in situ observations to monitor and understand the role of the ocean on the earth climate and for operational oceanography. This is a second revolution in oceanography. The unique capability of satellite altimetry to observe the global ocean in near-real-time at high resolution and the development of Argo were essential for the development of global operational oceanography, the third revolution in oceanography. The Global Ocean Data Assimilation Experiment (GODAE was instrumental in the development of the required capabilities. This paper provides an historical perspective on the development of these three revolutions in oceanography which are very much interlinked. This is not an exhaustive review and I will mainly focus on the contributions we made together with many

  17. Oceanography related to deep sea waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    In connection with studies on the feasibility of the safe disposal of radioactive waste, from a large scale nuclear power programme, either on the bed of the deep ocean or within the deep ocean bed, preparation of the present document was commissioned by the (United Kingdom) Department of the Environment. It attempts (a) to summarize the present state of knowledge of the deep ocean environment relevant to the disposal options and assess the processes which could aid or hinder dispersal of material released from its container; (b) to identify areas of research in which more work is needed before the safety of disposal on, or beneath, the ocean bed can be assessed; and (c) to indicate which areas of research can or should be undertaken by British scientists. The programmes of international cooperation in this field are discussed. The report is divided into four chapters dealing respectively with geology and geophysics, geochemistry, physical oceanography and marine biology. (U.K.)

  18. Argo workstation: a key component of operational oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Mingmei; Xu, Shanshan; Miao, Qingsheng; Yue, Xinyang; Lu, Jiawei; Yang, Yang

    2018-02-01

    Operational oceanography requires the quantity, quality, and availability of data set and the timeliness and effectiveness of data products. Without steady and strong operational system supporting, operational oceanography will never be proceeded far. In this paper we describe an integrated platform named Argo Workstation. It operates as a data processing and management system, capable of data collection, automatic data quality control, visualized data check, statistical data search and data service. After it is set up, Argo workstation provides global high quality Argo data to users every day timely and effectively. It has not only played a key role in operational oceanography but also set up an example for operational system.

  19. Data bases and management in oceanography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhargava, R.M.S.; Sarupria, J.S.

    The data center at NIO, Goa, India has been recognized as the Indian National Oceanographic Data Centre. In this paper, the sources and data available at INODC, the data bases created and under operation, the activities of the data centre and some...

  20. Scripps Institution of Oceanography Ferromanganese Nodule Analysis File - IDOE Portion

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) compiled data on the geochemistry of marine ferromanganese nodules, funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation...

  1. Physical oceanography of the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Varkey, M.J.; Murty, V.S.N.; Suryanarayana, A.

    Physical oceanography of the Bay of Bengal and Andaman Sea is reviewed for the first time. All available information for over 50 years is consolidated in this review. To begin with, information on peripheral or related aspects of climate...

  2. Other relevant papers in physical oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nyffeler, F.

    1989-01-01

    During the past few years, significant progress has occurred in the field of physical oceanography partly as a consequence of developing cooperation and international participation in well-coordinated ocean research programmes. Although these programs were not designed specifically to address CRESP problems, many have proved to be directly relevant to CRESP objectives. For example, MODE, POLYMODE, and Tourbillon were intensive site-specific experiments that included studies of dispersion processes throughout the water column. NOAMP and GME were also site specific, involved the entire water column, and even stressed near-bottom and suspended-sediment processes. Others, (e.g., WOCE) are larger in scope and include extensive observations of the general circulation of entire ocean basins. As a whole, they contribute immensely to improving the data base for exchange and transport processes and thereby for the verification and validation of both regional-scale and general-circulation ocean models. That, in turn, is directly relevant to radiological assessments. Selected papers deriving from experiments such as these are discussed and referenced below

  3. CALL in a Climate of Change: Adapting to Turbulent Global Conditions. Short Papers from EUROCALL 2017 (25th, Southampton, United Kingdom, August 23-26, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Kate, Ed.; Bradley, Linda, Ed.; Thouësny, Sylvie, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    The 25th European Association of Computer-Assisted Language Learning (EUROCALL) conference was hosted by Modern Languages and Linguistics at the University of Southampton, in the United Kingdom, from the 23rd to the 26th of August 2017. The theme of the conference was "CALL in a climate of change." The theme encompassed the notion of how…

  4. Environmental impact of early Sadlermiut settlements at Native Point (Southampton Island, Nunavut, Canada) before the Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viehberg, Finn; Pienitz, Reinhard; Plessen, Birgit; Muir, Derek; Wang, Xiaowa

    2017-04-01

    Several Thule forager groups settled successfully in the Hudson Bay region of the Canadian Arctic starting at ca. AD 1050. First evidence of settlements at Native Point on Southampton Island dates prior to AD 1400 by Sadlermiuts. The village consisted of numerous sod and winter houses which framed a small shallow freshwater body (ca. 20,000 m2). Numerous butchered carcasses of mainly walrus, seal, bowhead whales and caribou remained in the pond and further decayed in the water. Here, we present first results from three short sediment cores taken from the bottom of the settlement pond. Sedimentological, geochemical and micropaleontological analyses show an abrupt change at ca. AD 1500 from pristine aquatic environments to eutrophic conditions. Variation in d15N and d13C of the organic matter suggest that this shift is related to the first butchering activity of Sadlermiuts in the area.

  5. What drives the biological productivity of the northern Indian Ocean?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Narvekar, J.; Nuncio, M.; Gauns, M.; Sardessai, S.

    Silva et al., 1994], while the net heat flux was taken from the National Oceanography Centre 1.1 (formerly Southampton Oceanog- raphy Centre) Air-Sea Flux Climatology (1980–1993) [Josey et al., 1998]. The spatial resolution of both freshwater flux...

  6. Ocean for all, a different way to see oceanography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Ramos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Oceanography as a science is still not very widespread in Brazilian society, making it difficult to strengthen the ties between society and the ocean. Thus, the creation of methodologies associated with new teaching techniques, improved with the help of technology, may build a more inclusive society and provide the experience of oceanographic phenomena for all. The extension project "Ocean for all", executed between March and July of 2016, performed an experience in oceanography to the elderly members of the Associação Catarinense para Integração do Cego (ACIC in Florianópolis (SC. In order to do so, a methodology was created to pass on knowledge about oceanography in its biological, geological, chemical and physical aspects to the visually impaired. During the execution of the experience, as well as the development of the methodology, problems in the coastal marine environment with anthropological origin were presented.

  7. An oceanography summer school in Ghana, West Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbic, B. K.; Ansong, J. K.; Johnson, W.; Nyadjro, E. S.; Nyarko, E.

    2016-02-01

    Because oceanography is a global science, it clearly benefits from the existence of a world-wide network of oceanographers. As with most STEM disciplines, sub-Saharan Africa is not as well represented in the field of oceanography as it should be, given its large population. The need for oceanographers in sub-Saharan Africa is great, due to a long list of ocean-related issues affecting African development, including but not limited to fishing, oil drilling, sea level rise, coastal erosion, shipping, and piracy. We view this as an opportunity as well as a challenge. Many of the world's fastest growing economies are in sub-Saharan Africa, and STEM capacity building could further fuel this growth. With support from the US National Science Foundation, we ran an oceanography summer school from August 24-27, 2015, at the Regional Maritime University (RMU) in Ghana, West Africa. This first summer school was lecture-based, with a focus on basic chemical oceanography, basic physical oceanography, ocean modeling, and satellite oceanography. About 35 participants came to almost every lecture, and about 20 other participants came to some of the lectures as their time permitted. The participants included RMU faculty, 12 students from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, one Associate Oceanographer from the University of Ghana, and some participants from private sector companies and Ghanaian governmental agencies. There were long and lively discussions at the end of each lecture, and there was a lengthy discussion at the conclusion of the school on how to improve future summer schools. In 2016 and 2017, we plan to divide into smaller groups so that participants can pursue their particular interests in greater depth, and to allow time for student presentations. We also plan to begin exploring the potential for research partnerships, and to utilize distance learning to involve more faculty and students from locations throughout Ghana and perhaps from even other

  8. Dissertations Initiative for the Advancement of Limnology and Oceanography (DIALOG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The DIALOG Program was founded by the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography (ASLO), in order to reduce the historical, institutional and philosophical barriers that limit the exchange of information between limnologists and oceanographers, and to foster interdisciplinary and inter-institutional research. This was achieved by targeting a recent cohort of Ph.D. recipients whose work included a biological component of limnology or oceanography. The program included: (1) publication of the submitted Ph.D. dissertation abstracts; (2) a symposium to facilitate exchange across institutions and disciplines; and (3) establishment of a centralized data base for applicant characterization and tracking.

  9. Oceanography in the formal and informal classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, A.; Jasnow, M.; Srinivasan, M.; Rosmorduc, V.; Blanc, F.

    2002-01-01

    The TOPEX/Poseidon and Jason-1 ocean altimeter missions offer the educator in the middle school or informal education venue a unique opportunity for reinforcing ocean science studies. An educational poster from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and France's Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales provide teachers and students a tool to examine topics such as the dynamics of ocean circulation, ocean research, and the oceans' role in climate.

  10. Biological oceanography of the red oceanic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theil, Hjalmar; Weikert, Horst

    1. In 1977, 1979 and 1980-81, investigations were carried out which aimed at evaluating the potential risks from mining metalliferous muds precipating in the Atlantis II Deep of the central Red Sea. This environmental research was initiated by the Saudi Sudanese Red Sea Joint Commission in order to avoid any danger for the Red Sea ecosystem. The broad environmental research programme coherent studies in physical, chemical, biological, and geological oceanography as well as toxicological investigations in the oceanic and in reef zones. We summarise the results from our biological fiels studies in the open sea. 2. The biological investigations were concentrated on the area of the Atlantis II Deep. Benthos was sampled between 700-2000m. For comparison a few samples were also taken further north in the central Red Sea, and to east and west along the flanking deep terraces (500-1000m). Plankton studies covered the total water column above the Deep, and were extended along the axial through to north and south. 3. Benthos sampling was carried out using a heavy closing trawl, a large box grab (box size 50 × 50 cm), Van Veen grabs and traps; photographic surveys were made a phototrap and a photosled. Community respiration was measured with a ship-board method using grab subsamples. Nutrient concentrations, seston and phytoplankton standing stocks as well as in situ primary production were determined from hydrocast samples. Data on zooplankton and micronekton composition and standing stock were obtained from samples collected using different multiple opening-and-closing nets equipped with 100 μm, 300 μm, and 1000 μm mesh sizes. Daily and ontogenetical vertical migration patterns were studied by comparisons of data from midday and midnight tows. 4. Throughout the whole area the sediment is a pteropod ooze containing low contentrations of organic matter; measured organic carbon and nitrogen contents were 0.5 and 0.05% respectively, and chloroplastic pigment equivalents

  11. Sailing for Science: on board experiences for transferring knowledge on Historical Oceanography for Future Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvani, Sara; Carmisciano, Cosmo; Locritani, Marina; Grossi, Luigi; Mori, Anna; Stroobant, Mascha; Schierano, Erika; De Strobel, Federico; Manzella, Giuseppe; Muzi, Enrico; Leccese, Dario; Sinapi, Luigi; Morellato, Claudio; La Tassa, Hebert; Talamoni, Roberta; Coelho, Emanuel; Nacini, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    Smart, sustainable and inclusive Blue Growth means also knowing past technology and the paths followed by ancients in order to understand and monitor marine environments. In general, history of Science is a matter that is not enough explored and explained or promoted in high schools or university official programmes, and, usually, scientist do not consider it as an important part of their curricula. However, bad or good ideas, abandoned or forgotten beliefs, concepts, opinions, do still have a great potential for inspiring present and future scientists, no matter in which historical period they may have been formulated: they should be always be taken into consideration, critically examined and observed by a very close point of view, not just as part of the intellectual framework of some obsolete 'Cabinet of Curiosities' with limited access except for the chosen few. Moreover, history of Science should be transmitted in a more practical way, with hands-on labs showing the limits and challenges that prior generations of ocean explorers, investigators and seafarers had to face in order to answer to crucial questions as self-orientation in open sea, understanding main currents and waves, predicting meteorological conditions for a safe navigation. Oceanography is a relatively young branch of science, and still needs further approvals and knowledge (National Science Foundation, 2000). The Scientific Dissemination Group (SDG) "La Spezia Gulf of Science" - made up by Research Centres, Schools and Cultural associations located in La Spezia (Liguria, Italy) - has a decadal experience in initiatives aimed at people and groups of people of all ages, who are keen on science or who can be guided in any case to take an interest in scientific matters (Locritani et al., 2015). Amongst the SDG activities, the tight relationship with the Historical Oceanography Society, the Italian Navy and the Naval Technical Museum (that collects a rich heritage of civilization, technology and

  12. Oceanography: 1998 Paris Meeting Abstracts: Coastal and Marginal Seas. Volume 11, Number 2

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rhodes, Judith

    1998-01-01

    This grant supported a successful international multidisciplinary scientific meeting addressing the topic "Coastal and Marginal Seas," hosted by The Oceanography Society and UNESCO's Intergovernmental...

  13. Operationele Oceanografie en Rapid Environmental Assessment (Operational Oceanography and Rapid Environmental Assessment)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    te Raa, L. A; Lam, F. P; Schouten, M. W

    2008-01-01

    .... Possible applications of operational oceanography in REA include improved sonar performance predictions with three-dimensional sound speed forecasts, support of AUV mission planning with the help...

  14. Manche centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-05-01

    After a general presentation of radioactivity and radioactive wastes and of the French national agency for the management of radioactive wastes (ANDRA), this brochure gives a general overview of the Manche low- and medium-level radioactive waste disposal centre: principles of storage safety, waste containers (first confinement barrier), storage facility and cover (second confinement barrier), the underground (third confinement barrier), the impact of the centre on its environment, and the control of radioactivity in the vicinity of the centre. (J.S.)

  15. Diploma of Higher Studies in Oceanography. Red Sea & Gulf of Aden Programme (PERSGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This document presents four courses for the diploma of higher studies in oceanography conducted by the Department of Oceanography, Faculty of Science, University of Alexandria, Egypt. These courses are organized by the Arab League Educational, Cultural and Scientific Organization (ALECSO). Each course is designed to be taught in one academic year…

  16. Reducing hospital admissions and improving the diagnosis of COPD in Southampton City: methods and results of a 12-month service improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Tom; North, Mal; Bourne, Simon C

    2014-08-21

    The British Lung Foundation highlighted Southampton City as a hotspot for patients at future risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations due to severe deprivation levels and a high undiagnosed level of disease based on health economic modelling. We developed a strategy spanning primary and secondary care to reduce emergency admissions of patients with acute exacerbations of COPD and increase the diagnosed prevalence of COPD on general practitioner (GP) registers closer to that predicted from local modelling. A comprehensive 3-year audit of admissions was performed. Patients who had been admitted with an exacerbation to University Hospital Southampton three or more times in the previous 12 months were cohorted and cared for in a consultant-led, but community based, COPD service. Within primary care, a programme of education and case-based finding was delivered to most practices within the city. Thirty-four patients were found to be responsible for 176 admissions (22% of total COPD admissions) to the hospital. These 34 patients required 185 active interventions during the 12-month period but only 39 hospital admissions. The 30-day readmission rate dropped from 13.4 to 1.9% (Pmodel.

  17. Effective, Active Learning Strategies for the Oceanography Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, J. E.; Marinov, I.

    2014-12-01

    A decline in enrollment in STEM fields at the university level has prompted extensive research on alternative ways of teaching and learning science. Inquiry-based learning as well as the related "flipped" or "active" lectures, and similar teaching methods and philosophies have been proposed as more effective ways to disseminate knowledge in science classes than the traditional lecture. We will provide a synopsis of our experiences in implementing some of these practices into our Introductory Oceanography, Global Climate Change, and Ocean Atmosphere Dynamics undergraduate courses at the University of Pennsylvania, with both smaller and larger enrollments. By implementing tools such as at-home modules; computer labs; incorporation of current research; pre- and post-lecture quizzes; reflective, qualitative writing assignments; peer review; and a variety of in-class learning strategies, we aim to increase the science literacy of the student population and help students gain a more comprehensive knowledge of the topic, enhance their critical thinking skills, and correct misconceptions. While implementing these teaching techniques with college students is not without complications, we argue that a blended class that flexibly and creatively accounts for class size and science level improves the learning experience and the acquired knowledge. We will present examples of student assignments and activities as well as describe the lessons we have learned, and propose ideas for moving forward to best utilize innovative teaching tools in order to increase science literacy in oceanography and other climate-related courses.

  18. The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Groman, R. C.; Wiebe, P. H.; Glover, D. M.; Gegg, S. R.

    2011-12-01

    Oceanography and marine ecosystem research are inherently interdisciplinary fields of study that generate and require access to a wide variety of measurements. In late 2006 the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections of the National Science Foundation (NSF) Geosciences Directorate Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE) funded the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO). In late 2010 additional funding was contributed to support management of research data from the NSF Office of Polar Programs Antarctic Organisms & Ecosystems Program. The BCO-DMO is recognized in the 2011 Division of Ocean Sciences Sample and Data Policy as one of several program specific data offices that support NSF OCE funded researchers. BCO-DMO staff members offer data management support throughout the project life cycle to investigators from large national programs and medium-sized collaborative research projects, as well as researchers from single investigator awards. The office manages and serves all types of oceanographic data and information generated during the research process and contributed by the originating investigators. BCO-DMO has built a data system that includes the legacy data from several large ocean research programs (e.g. United States Joint Global Ocean Flux Study and United States GLOBal Ocean ECosystems Dynamics), to which data have been contributed from recently granted NSF OCE and OPP awards. The BCO-DMO data system can accommodate many different types of data including: in situ and experimental biological, chemical, and physical measurements; modeling results and synthesis data products. The system enables reuse of oceanographic data for new research endeavors, supports synthesis and modeling activities, provides availability of "real data" for K-12 and college level use, and provides decision-support field data for policy-relevant investigations. We will present an overview of the data management system capabilities including: map

  19. The oceanography programme of the Federal German Government

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The oceanography programme of the Federal German Government has the following general aims: 1. To lay the foundation for better understanding of the role of the ocean as a climate factor and repercussions on the ocean from climate change as a basis for future preventive and protective action. 2. Identification of natural and anthropogenous factors of stress to the coastal seas, the coastal regions and the open ocean, research into their dynamics and impact, and development of bases, methods and concepts for describing and evaluating the condition of the coastal seas, coastal regions and open ocean and for projecting and/or remedying relative changes. 3. Development of methods and techniques for climate and environment-related research into and monitoring of the oceans and for careful exploitation of living and non-living resources. (orig.) [de

  20. JARE-43 Tangaroa marine science cruise report (Physical oceanography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigeru Aoki

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available To understand the seasonal variation of biological and biogeochemical cycles in the seasonal ice zone in the Southern Ocean, the cruise of JARE-STAGE (Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition-Studies on Antarctic Ocean and Global Environment was conducted in February 2002 with R/V Tangaroa. Physical oceanography implementations of the cruise are described. The results of the manufacturers' CTD conductivity calibrations were consistent between before and after the cruise, and the difference in salinity estimate was expected to be within 0.0014. Two casts were made to validate the XCTD accuracy and comparisons with the CTD are discussed. Generally, it is concluded that reasonably accurate observations were completed in this cruise.

  1. IEOOS: the Spanish Institute of Oceanography Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tel, E.; Balbin, R.; Cabanas, J. M.; Garcia, M. J.; Garcia-Martinez, M. C.; Gonzalez-Pola, C.; Lavin, A.; Lopez-Jurado, J. L.; Rodriguez, C.; Ruiz-Villarreal, M.; Sanchez-Leal, R. F.; Vargas-Yanez, M.; Velez-Belchi, P.

    2015-10-01

    Since its foundation, 100 years ago, the Spanish Institute of Oceanography (IEO) has been observing and measuring the ocean characteristics. Here is a summary of the initiatives of the IEO in the field of the operational oceanography (OO). Some systems like the tide gauges network has been working for more than 70 years. The IEO standard sections began at different moments depending on the local projects, and nowadays there are more than 180 coastal stations and deep-sea ones that are systematically sampled, obtaining physical and biochemical measurements. At this moment, the IEO Observing System (IEOOS) includes 6 permanent moorings equipped with currentmeters, an open-sea ocean-meteorological buoy offshore Santander and an SST satellital image reception station. It also supports the Spanish contribution to the ARGO international program with 47 deployed profilers, and continuous monitoring thermosalinometers, meteorological stations and ADCP onboard the IEO research vessels. The system is completed with the IEO contribution to the RAIA and Gibraltar observatories, and the development of regional prediction models. All these systematic measurements allow the IEO to give responses to ocean research activities, official agencies requirements and industrial and main society demands as navigation, resource management, risks management, recreation, etc, as well as for management development pollution-related economic activities or marine ecosystems. All these networks are linked to international initiatives, framed largely in supranational programs Earth observation sponsored by the United Nations or the European Union. The synchronic observation system permits following spatio-temporal description of some events, as new deep water formation in the Mediterranean Sea and the injection of heat to intermediate waters in the Bay of Biscay after some colder northern storms in winter 2005.

  2. NSF-Sponsored Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, M. D.; Chandler, C. L.; Copley, N.; Galvarino, C.; Gegg, S. R.; Glover, D. M.; Groman, R. C.; Wiebe, P. H.; Work, T. T.; Biological; Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office

    2010-12-01

    Ocean biogeochemistry and marine ecosystem research projects are inherently interdisciplinary and benefit from improved access to well-documented data. Improved data sharing practices are important to the continued exploration of research themes that are a central focus of the ocean science community and are essential to interdisciplinary and international collaborations that address complex, global research themes. In 2006, the National Science Foundation Division of Ocean Sciences (NSF OCE) funded the Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) to serve the data management requirements of scientific investigators funded by the National Science Foundation’s Biological and Chemical Oceanography Sections. BCO-DMO staff members work with investigators to manage marine biogeochemical, ecological, and oceanographic data and information developed in the course of scientific research. These valuable data sets are documented, stored, disseminated, and protected over short and intermediate time frames. One of the goals of the BCO-DMO is to facilitate regional, national, and international data and information exchange through improved data discovery, access, display, downloading, and interoperability. In May 2010, NSF released a statement to the effect that in October 2010, it is planning to require that all proposals include a data management plan in the form of a two-page supplementary document. The data management plan would be an element of the merit review process. NSF has long been committed to making data from NSF-funded research publicly available and the new policy will strengthen this commitment. BCO-DMO is poised to assist in creating the data management plans and in ultimately serving the data and information resulting from NSF OCE funded research. We will present an overview of the data management system capabilities including: geospatial and text-based data discovery and access systems; recent enhancements to data search tools; data

  3. Physical oceanography - Developing end-to-end models of the California Current Large Marine Ecosystem

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of this project is to develop spatially discrete end-to-end models of the California Current LME, linking oceanography, biogeochemistry, food web...

  4. Ranking serials in oceanography: An analysis based on the Indian contributions and their citations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tapaswi, M.P.; Maheswarappa, B.S.

    An analysis of serials preferred and cited in various communications by the Indian oceanographers during 1963 to 1992 is presented. A shift in preference of serials from general sciences to oceanography (interdisciplinary) and to core subject...

  5. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) Geological Collections

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The University of California San Diego (UCSD) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) is a partner in the Index to Marine and Lacustrine Geological Samples (IMLGS)...

  6. A New Data Management System for Biological and Chemical Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groman, R. C.; Chandler, C.; Allison, D.; Glover, D. M.; Wiebe, P. H.

    2007-12-01

    The Biological and Chemical Oceanography Data Management Office (BCO-DMO) was created to serve PIs principally funded by NSF to conduct marine chemical and ecological research. The new office is dedicated to providing open access to data and information developed in the course of scientific research on short and intermediate time-frames. The data management system developed in support of U.S. JGOFS and U.S. GLOBEC programs is being modified to support the larger scope of the BCO-DMO effort, which includes ultimately providing a way to exchange data with other data systems. The open access system is based on a philosophy of data stewardship, support for existing and evolving data standards, and use of public domain software. The DMO staff work closely with originating PIs to manage data gathered as part of their individual programs. In the new BCO-DMO data system, project and data set metadata records designed to support re-use of the data are stored in a relational database (MySQL) and the data are stored in or made accessible by the JGOFS/GLOBEC object- oriented, relational, data management system. Data access will be provided via any standard Web browser client user interface through a GIS application (Open Source, OGC-compliant MapServer), a directory listing from the data holdings catalog, or a custom search engine that facilitates data discovery. In an effort to maximize data system interoperability, data will also be available via Web Services; and data set descriptions will be generated to comply with a variety of metadata content standards. The office is located at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution and web access is via http://www.bco-dmo.org.

  7. Tactile Digital Video Globes: a New Way to Outreach Oceanography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteau, A.; Claustre, H.; Scheurle, C.; Jessin, T.; Fontana, C.

    2016-02-01

    One objective of the "Ocean Autonomous Observation" team of the Laboratory of Oceanography of Villefranche-sur-mer is to develop new means to outreach our science activities to various audiences. Besides the scientific community, this includes students and targets the general public, school pupils, and stakeholders. In this context, we have acquired a digital video globe with tactile capabilities and we will present here the various applications that we have been developing. A first type of products concerns the visualization of oceanic properties (SST, salinity, density, Chla, O2, NO3, irradiance) by diving from the surface (generally from satellite data) into the Ocean interior (through the use of global data bases, Argo, WOA). In second place, specific applications deal with surface animations allowing highlighting the seasonality of some properties (Chla, SST, ice cover, currents; based on satellite as well as modeling outputs). Finally, we show a variety of applications developed using the tactile functionality of the spherical display. In particular real-time vertical profiles acquired by Bio-Argo floats become directly accessible for the entire open ocean. Such a new tool plus its novel applications has been presented to school children, and to the wider public (at the so-called "fête de la science") as well as to potential sponsors of our science-outreach activities. Their feedback has always been highly positive and encouraging in terms of impact. From the scientists point of view, the use of this new support can easily compete with the classical PowerPoint, is much more attractive and fun and undeniably helps to outreach the various aspects of our pluridisciplinary science.

  8. Enhancing Oceanography Classrooms with "Captive and Cultured" Ocean Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macko, S. A.; Tuite, M.; O'Connell, M.

    2012-04-01

    Students in oceanography classes often request more direct exposure to actual ocean situations or field trips. During regular session (13 week) or shorter term (4 week) summer classes such long trips are logistically difficult owing to large numbers of students involved or timing. This new approach to such a course supplement addresses the requests by utilizing local resources and short field trips for a limited number of students (20) to locations in which Ocean experiences are available, and are often supported through education and outreach components. The vision of the class was a mixture of classroom time, readings, along with paper and actual laboratories. In addition short day-long trips to locations where the ocean was "captured" were also used to supplement the experience as well as speakers involved with aquaculture ("cultivated") . Central Virginia is a fortunate location for such a class, with close access for "day travel" to the Chesapeake Bay and numerous field stations, museums with ocean-based exhibits (the Smithsonian and National Zoo) that address both extant and extinct Earth history, as well as national/state aquaria in Baltimore, Washington and Virginia Beach. Furthermore, visits to local seafood markets at local grocery stores, or larger city markets) enhance the exposure to productivity in the ocean, and viability of the fisheries sustainability. The course could then address not only the particulars of the marine science, but also aspects of ethics, including keeping animals in captivity or overfishing of particular species and the special difficulties that arise from captive or culturing ocean populations. In addition, the class was encouraged to post web-based journals of experiences in order to share opinions of observations in each of the settings.

  9. Habitat heterogeneity and its influence on benthic biodiversity in oxygen minimum zones

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gooday, A.J.; Bett, B.J.; Escobar, E.; Ingole, B.S.; Levin, L.A.; Neira, C.; Raman, A.V.; Sellanes, J.

    National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, Empress Dock, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK 2 Instituto de Ciencias del Mar y Limnología, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 70-305 Ciudad Universitaria Coyoacan, 04510 Mexico, D.F., Mexico... is mirrored in the change in assemblage composition on the Pakistan Margin, as represented in plots of MDSx versus depth and oxygen (Fig. 7). In samples taken along the axis of the Gulf of California (Mexico), between 740 and 2250 m, the rate of polychaete...

  10. A Retrospective Self-Assessment of the SURFO Summer Internship Program in Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pockalny, R. A.; Donohue, K. A.; Fliegler, J.

    2009-12-01

    The Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowships in Oceanography (SURFO) program at the Graduate School of Oceanography/University of Rhode Island is an NSF-funded Research Experience for Undergraduates site program with a programmatic research niche focused on quantitative aspects of Oceanography. Each summer-cohort includes 9-12 participants (rising seniors) who are paired with a primary research advisor and often with a graduate student mentor. The primary components of the 10-week program include a 4-week introductory phase and a 6-week core research phase. A retrospective self-assessment instrument gauged the confidence, attitude and comfort level of participants with; 1) core math and science subjects, 2) oceanography-related subjects, 3) research skills, and 4) SURFO and GSO staff. SURFO participants evaluated themselves at the start of the program, after the introductory phase, and at the end of the program. Participants were also asked to reassess their initial evaluations and provide an updated score. The pre-assessment results indicate that the program recruits students from the target group (e.g., strong physics and math backgrounds, but with limited exposure to oceanography). The results also indicate that the students are initially comfortable with their advising team, but not so comfortable with their research topic and research skills. The post-introductory phase results indicate large increases in comfort level with the advising team and the local research community yet little or no change is indicated for research skills. The final assessments show large changes in oceanography-content knowledge, research topic, and research skills. The retrospective reassessment indicates an initial overconfidence in most categories. Overall, the largest changes occurred during the core research portion of the program. These results reinforce the importance/effectiveness of authentic, hands-on, inquiry-based research for higher learning and training the next

  11. Utilizing social media for informal ocean conservation and education: The BioOceanography Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payette, J.

    2016-02-01

    Science communication through the use of social media is a rapidly evolving and growing pursuit in academic and scientific circles. Online tools and social media are being used in not only scientific communication but also scientific publication, education, and outreach. Standards and usage of social media as well as other online tools for communication, networking, outreach, and publication are always in development. Caution and a conservative attitude towards these novel "Science 2.0" tools is understandable because of their rapidly changing nature and the lack of professional standards for using them. However there are some key benefits and unique ways social media, online systems, and other Open or Open Source technologies, software, and "Science 2.0" tools can be utilized for academic purposes such as education and outreach. Diverse efforts for ocean conservation and education will continue to utilize social media for a variety of purposes. The BioOceanography project is an informal communication, education, outreach, and conservation initiative created for enhancing knowledge related to Oceanography and Marine Science with an unbiased yet conservation-minded approach and in an Open Source format. The BioOceanography project is ongoing and still evolving, but has already contributed to ocean education and conservation communication in key ways through a concerted web presence since 2013, including a curated Twitter account @_Oceanography and BioOceanography blog style website. Social media tools like those used in this project, if used properly can be highly effective and valuable for encouraging students, networking with researchers, and educating the general public in Oceanography.

  12. Strategies for Assessing Learning Outcomes in an Online Oceanography Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D. L.

    2003-12-01

    All general education courses at the San Jose State University, including those in the sciences, must present a detailed assessment plan of student learning, prior to certification for offering. The assessment plan must state a clear methodology for acquiring data on student achievement of the learning outcomes for the specific course category, as well as demonstrate how students fulfill a strong writing requirement. For example, an online course in oceanography falls into the Area R category, the Earth and Environment, through which a student should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the methods and limits of scientific investigation; distinguish science from pseudo-science; and apply a scientific approach to answer questions about the Earth and environment. The desired learning outcomes are shared with students at the beginning of the course and subsequent assessments on achieving each outcome are embedded in the graded assignments, which include a critical thinking essay, mid-term exam, poster presentation in a symposium-style format, portfolio of web-based work, weekly discussions on an electronic bulletin board, and a take-home final exam, consisting of an original research grant proposal. The diverse nature of the graded assignments assures a comprehensive assessment of student learning from a variety of perspectives, such as quantitative, qualitative, and analytical. Formative assessment is also leveraged into learning opportunities, which students use to identify the acquisition of knowledge. For example, pre-tests are used to highlight preconceptions at the beginning of specific field studies and post-testing encourages students to present the results of small research projects. On a broader scale, the assessment results contradict common misperceptions of online and hybrid courses. Student demand for online courses is very high due to the self-paced nature of learning. Rates of enrollment attrition match those of classroom sections, if students

  13. Bottom friction. A practical approach to modelling coastal oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolanos, Rodolfo; Jensen, Palle; Kofoed-Hansen, Henrik; Tornsfeldt Sørensen, Jacob

    2017-04-01

    Coastal processes imply the interaction of the atmosphere, the sea, the coastline and the bottom. The spatial gradients in this area are normally large, induced by orographic and bathymetric features. Although nowadays it is possible to obtain high-resolution bathymetry, the details of the seabed, e.g. sediment type, presence of biological material and living organisms are not available. Additionally, these properties as well as bathymetry can also be highly dynamic. These bottom characteristics are very important to describe the boundary layer of currents and waves and control to a large degree the dissipation of flows. The bottom friction is thus typically a calibration parameter in numerical modelling of coastal processes. In this work, we assess this process and put it into context of other physical processes uncertainties influencing wind-waves and currents in the coastal areas. A case study in the North Sea is used, particularly the west coast of Denmark, where water depth of less than 30 m cover a wide fringe along the coast, where several offshore wind farm developments are being carried out. We use the hydrodynamic model MIKE 21 HD and the spectral wave model MIKE 21 SW to simulate atmosphere and tidal induced flows and the wind wave generation and propagation. Both models represent state of the art and have been developed for flexible meshes, ideal for coastal oceanography as they can better represent coastlines and allow a variable spatial resolution within the domain. Sensitivity tests to bottom friction formulations are carried out into context of other processes (e.g. model forcing uncertainties, wind and wave interactions, wind drag coefficient). Additionally, a map of varying bottom properties is generated based on a literature survey to explore the impact of the spatial variability. Assessment of different approaches is made in order to establish a best practice regarding bottom friction and coastal oceanographic modelling. Its contribution is also

  14. Data analysis methods in physical oceanography. By Emery, W.J. and Thomson, R.E.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.

    . 729-730 September 1999 Book Reviews DATA ANALYSIS METHODS IN PHYSICAL O~EAN~GRAFWY. By Wil- liam J. Emery and Richard E. Thomson. PERGAMON Else&r Sci- ence. 1998. 400 p. U.S. $112 / NLG 177.00. The book Data Analysis Methods in Physical... Oceanography pro- vides a comprehensive and practical compilation of the essential information and analysis techniques required for the advanced processing and interpretation of digital spat&temporal data in physical oceanography, as well as in other...

  15. Data analysis methods in physical oceanography. By Emery, W.J. and Thomson, R.E.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, M.R.

    in Physical Oceanography. Page 1 of 1 file://C:\\My Documents\\articles30.htm 2/11/05 William J. Emery and Richard E. Thomson. Pergamon Elsevier Science. 1998. hardbound. 400 pp. ISBN: 0-08-031434-1. Price: US$ 112/NLG 177.00 This book provides a comprehensive... and practical compilation of the essential information and analysis techniques required for the advanced processing and interpretation of digital spatio-temporal data in physical oceanography, as well as in other branches of the geophysical sciences. The book...

  16. Shedding Light on the Sea: André Morel's Legacy to Optical Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, David; Babin, Marcel; Berthon, Jean-François; Bricaud, Annick; Gentili, Bernard; Loisel, Hubert; Maritorena, Stéphane; Stramski, Dariusz

    2014-01-01

    André Morel (1933-2012) was a prominent pioneer of modern optical oceanography, enabling significant advances in this field. Through his forward thinking and research over more than 40 years, he made key contributions that this field needed to grow and to reach its current status. This article first summarizes his career and then successively covers different aspects of optical oceanography where he made significant contributions, from fundamental work on optical properties of water and particles to global oceanographic applications using satellite ocean color observations. At the end, we share our views on André's legacy to our research field and scientific community.

  17. Research and Teaching: Implementation of Interactive Engagement Teaching Methods in a Physical Oceanography Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiner, Louis E.; Gilman, Craig

    2015-01-01

    This study measures the effects of increased faculty-student engagement on student learning, success rates, and perceptions in a Physical Oceanography course. The study separately implemented two teaching methods that had been shown to be successful in a different discipline, introductory physics. These methods were the use of interactive…

  18. Short Training Course in Oceanography. Red Sea & Gulf of Aden Programme (PERSGA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arab Organization for Education and Science, Cairo (Egypt).

    This document presents a training course in oceanography intended for Junior Bachelor of Science (B.S.) graduates in physics, mathematics, chemistry, zoology, botany or geology to give them the minimum qualifications required to work in any of the marine science stations. This 14-week course, organized by the Arab League Educational, Cultural and…

  19. The Indigo V Indian Ocean Expedition: a prototype for citizen microbial oceanography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauro, Frederico; Senstius, Svend Jacob; Cullen, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Microbial Oceanography has long been an extremely expensive discipline, requiring ship time for sample collection and thereby economically constraining the number of samples collected. This is especially true for under-sampled water bodies such as the Indian Ocean. Specialised scientific equipmen...

  20. Syllabus for an Associate Degree Program in Applied Marine Biology and Oceanography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Tapan

    Included is a detailed outline of the content of each course required or offered as an elective in the associate degree program. With an 18 or 19 unit load each semester the program requires two years, and includes 64 hours at sea every semester. In addition to chemistry, physics, biology, and oceanography courses, there is a required course in…

  1. Integration of a Miniaturized Conductivity Sensor into an Animal-Borne Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    an Animal -Borne Instrument Lars Boehme Sea Mammal Research Unit Scottish Oceans Institute University of St Andrews St Andrews, KY16 8LB United... Kingdom phone: +44 1334-462677 fax: +44 1334-463443 email: lb284@st-andrews.ac.uk Robin Pascal Sensors Development Group National...Oceanography Centre Southampton, SO14 3ZY United Kingdom phone: +44 2380-596138 fax: +44 2380-593029 email: rwp@nerc.ac.uk Phil Lovell

  2. Autonomous Underwater Gliders

    OpenAIRE

    Wood,; Stephen,

    2009-01-01

    Autonomous Underwater Vehicles are only now being marketed as robust commercial vehicles for many industries, and of these vehicles underwater gliders are becoming the new tool for oceanographers. Satellites have provided scientists and marine specialists with measurements of the sea surface such as temperature since the late 1970s, and data via subsurface oceanographic moorings since the 1950's. As stated by David Smeed of the National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, England, that "gliders...

  3. Adaptação transcultural e análise da confiabilidade do Southampton Assessment of Mobility para avaliar a mobilidade de idosos brasileiros com demência Cross-cultural adaptation and reliability analyses of the Southampton Assessment of Mobility to assess mobility of Brazilian elderly with dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leani Souza Máximo Pereira

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi adaptar transculturalmente o instrumento Southampton Assessment of Mobility e testar sua confiabilidade intra e interexaminadores para idosos brasileiros da comunidade, com demência, classificados quanto à gravidade pelo Clinical Dementia Rating. O instrumento adaptado foi aplicado em uma amostra de 107 idosos (76,26 anos ± 7,59; 27,1% homens, 72,9% mulheres com diagnóstico clínico de demência dado pelo serviço de geriatria do Centro de Referência em Atenção ao Idoso Professor Caio Benjamin Dias, do Estado de Minas Gerais, Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Minas Gerais, Brasil. Dentre os avaliados, 39 (76,85 anos ± 7,75; 23,1% homens, 76,9% mulheres foram aleatorizados para avaliação da confiabilidade. A ferramenta estatística foi o teste kappa. Os resultados mostraram que a confiabilidade intra e interexaminadores foram, respectivamente: demência leve 0,89-0,86; moderada 0,79-0,85 e grave 0,53-0,49. O instrumento adaptado demonstrou ser aplicável à população alvo e demonstrou ter confiabilidade "quase perfeita" para demência leve e moderada. Para a demência grave os índices de confiabilidade foram "moderados".The objective was to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the Southampton Assessment of Mobility and test its intra- and inter-examiner reliability for Brazilian elderly living in the community and diagnosed with dementia, with severity classified according to the Clinical Dementia Rating. The instrument was applied to 107 elderly (76.26 years ± 7.59; 27.1% males, 72.9% females diagnosed with dementia by the geriatric clinic at the university hospital of the Federal University in Minas Gerais. From the initial group, a randomized sample of 39 elderly (76.85 years ± 7.75; 23.1% males, 76.9% females was selected for the reliability tests. The statistical tool was the kappa test. The respective reliability indices were: mild dementia ­ 0.89-0.86; moderate

  4. Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center support for GODAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriou, D.; Sharfstein, P.; Ignaszewski, M.; Clancy, M.

    2003-04-01

    The U.S. Navy's Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC; see http://www.fnmoc.navy.mil/), located in Monterey, CA, is the lead activity within the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) for numerical weather prediction and coupled air-sea modeling. FNMOC fulfills this role through means of a suite of sophisticated global and regional meteorological and oceanographic (METOC) models, extending from the top of the atmosphere to the bottom of the ocean, which is supported by one of the world's most complete real-time METOC databases. Fleet Numerical operates around-the-clock, 365 days per year and distributes METOC products to military and civilian users around the world, both ashore and afloat, through a variety of means, including a rapidly growing and innovative use of Web technology. FNMOC's customers include all branches of the Department of Defense (DoD), other government organizations such as the National Weather Service, private companies such as the Weather Channel, a number of colleges and universities, and the general public. FNMOC acquires and processes over 6 million METOC observations per day—creating one of the world's most comprehensive real-time databases of meteorological and oceanographic observations for assimilation into its models. FNMOC employs three primary models, the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS), the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS), and the WaveWatch III model (WW3), along with a number of specialized models and related applications. NOGAPS is a global weather model, driving nearly all other FNMOC models and applications in some fashion. COAMPS is a high-resolution regional model that has proved to be particularly valuable for forecasting weather and ocean conditions in highly complex coastal areas. WW3 is a state-of-the-art ocean wave model that is employed both globally and regionally in support of a wide variety of naval operations. Specialized models support and

  5. Teaching Databases at Southampton University

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Ken

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe some of the issues faced when designing a database systems course that will be a compulsory component for second year undergraduates in computer science. The main goal is to give an overview of database systems starting from Codd’s classical paper through to practical implementation using a SQL server (MySQL) For conceptual modelling, we chose UML because of the prior knowledge of the target class. The logical model is derived from the conceptual model and we place ...

  6. 1960-69 Cumulative Index of Articles Related to Oceanography and Limnology Education in The Science Teacher.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Maxwell

    Indexed are articles relating to oceanography and limnology published in "The Science Teacher" between 1960 and 1969. Articles are indexed under title, author, and topic. Topics include background information, course descriptions, and laboratory equipment and techniques. (EB)

  7. Detailed molecular epidemiology of Chlamydia trachomatis in the population of Southampton attending the genitourinary medicine clinic in 2012-13 reveals the presence of long established genotypes and transitory sexual networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiran, Clare; Rowen, David; Clarke, Ian Nicholas; Marsh, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the most common sexually transmitted infection (STI) in England. Our objective was to perform a detailed survey of the molecular epidemiology of C. trachomatis in the population of Southampton UK attending the genitourinary medicine clinic (GUM) to seek evidence of sexual network activity. Our hypothesis was that certain genotypes can be associated with specific demographic determinants. 380 positive samples were collected from 375 C. trachomatis positive GUM attendees out of the 3118 who consented to be part of the survey. 302 of the positive samples were fully genotyped. All six of the predominant genotypes possessed ompA locus type E. One ward of Southampton known to contain a large proportion of students had a different profile of genotypes compared to other areas of the city. Some genotypes appeared embedded in the city population whilst others appeared transient. Predominant circulating genotypes remain stable within a city population whereas others are sporadic. Sexual networks could be inferred but not conclusively identified using the data from this survey.

  8. The Pale Blue Dot: Utilizing Real World Globes in High School and Undergraduate Oceanography Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, D. B.

    2017-12-01

    Geoscience classrooms have benefitted greatly from the use of interactive, dry-erasable globes to supplement instruction on topics that require three-dimensional visualization, such as seismic wave propagation and the large-scale movements of tectonic plates. Indeed, research by Bamford (2013) demonstrates that using three-dimensional visualization to illustrate complex processes enhances student comprehension. While some geoscience courses tend to bake-in lessons on visualization, other disciplines of earth science that require three-dimensional visualization, such as oceanography, tend to rely on students' prior spatial abilities. In addition to spatial intelligence, education on the three-dimensional structure of the ocean requires knowledge of the external processes govern the behavior of the ocean, as well as the vertical and lateral distribution of water properties around the globe. Presented here are two oceanographic activities that utilize RealWorldGlobes' dry-erase globes to supplement traditional oceanography lessons on thermohaline and surface ocean circulation. While simultaneously promoting basic plotting techniques, mathematical calculations, and unit conversions, these activities touch on the processes that govern global ocean circulation, the principles of radiocarbon dating, and the various patterns exhibited by surface ocean currents. These activities challenge students to recognize inherent patterns within their data and synthesize explanations for their occurrence. Spatial visualization and critical thinking are integral to any geoscience education, and the combination of these abilities with engaging hands-on activities has the potential to greatly enhance oceanography education in both secondary and postsecondary settings

  9. Human-centred Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bason, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Design approaches are now being applied all over the world as a powerful approach to innovating public policies and services. Christian Bason, author of Leading public design: Discovering human-centred governance, argues that by bringing design methods into play, public managers can lead change...... with citizens at the centre, and discover a new model for steering public organisations: human-centred governance....

  10. The Search for Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, April

    2006-01-01

    This paper acknowledges the importance of a dancer's centre but likewise highlights the problematic nature of the communication of this concept from dance teacher to student. After a brief introduction of orthodox approaches in finding centre, this paper suggests a method of locating centre through the ancient somatic technique.

  11. Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre annual report 1987-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre (SURRC) provides facilities for research in isotopic, nuclear and earth sciences and collaborates with Scottish University departments on a wide range of research topics. One of its main areas of work is the Isotope Geology Unit. This has worked with the Nuclear Medicine Unit on the application of enriched stable isotope tracers in the biological and clinical sciences. The measurement of radioactive isomers is applied to quaternary geology, archaeology, nuclear medicine, health physics, oceanography, atomospheric sciences, environmental chemistry, nuclear waste disposal and mathematical modelling of the environment. There are also radiocarbon dating facilities. The facilities and the research undertaken at the Centre in the year 1987-1988, the Centre's twenty-fifth year are summarized in this report. (U.K.)

  12. CMS Centre at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    A new "CMS Centre" is being established on the CERN Meyrin site by the CMS collaboration. It will be a focal point for communications, where physicists will work together on data quality monitoring, detector calibration, offline analysis of physics events, and CMS computing operations. Construction of the CMS Centre begins in the historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room. The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room, Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. TThe LHC@FNAL Centre, in operation at Fermilab in the US, will work very closely with the CMS Centre, as well as the CERN Control Centre. (Photo Fermilab)The historic Proton Synchrotron (PS) control room is about to start a new life. Opened by Niels Bohr in 1960, the room will be reused by CMS to built its control centre. When finished, it will resemble the CERN Contro...

  13. In the Footsteps of Roger Revelle: Seagoing Oceanography for Middle School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brice, D.; Foley, S.; Knox, R. A.; Mauricio, P.

    2007-12-01

    Now in its fourth year, "In the Footsteps of Roger Revelle" (IFRR) is a middle school science education program that draws student interest, scientific content and coherence with National Science Standards from real-time research at sea in fields of physical science. As a successful collaboration involving Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO), Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Office of Naval Research (ONR), National Science Foundation (NSF), San Diego County Office of Education (SDCOE), and San Marcos Middle School (SMMS), IFRR brings physical oceanography and related sciences to students at the San Marcos Middle School in real-time from research vessels at sea using SIO's HiSeasNet satellite communication system. With their science teacher on the ship as an education outreach specialist or ashore guiding students in their interactions with selected scientists at sea, students observe shipboard research being carried out live via videoconference, daily e-mails, interviews, digital whiteboard sessions, and web interaction. Students then research, design, develop, deploy, and field-test their own data-collecting physical oceanography instruments in their classroom. The online interactive curriculum encourages active inquiry with intellectually stimulating problem-solving, enabling students to gain critical insight and skill while investigating some of the most provocative questions of our time, and seeing scientists as role- models. Recent science test scores with IFRR students have shown significant increases in classes where this curriculum has been implemented as compared to other classes where the traditional curriculum has been used. IFRR has provided students in the San Diego area with a unique opportunity for learning about oceanographic research, which could inspire students to become oceanographers or at least scientifically literate citizens - a benefit for a country that depends

  14. SAP Nuclear Competence Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrlova, Z.

    2009-01-01

    In this issue we continue and introduce the SAP Nuclear Competence Centre and its head Mr. Igor Dzama. SAP Nuclear Competence Centrum is one of the fi rst competence centres outside ENEL headquarters. It should operate in Slovakia and should have competencies within the whole Enel group. We are currently dealing with the issues of organisation and funding. We are trying to balance the accountability to the NPP directors and to the management of the competence centres at Enel headquarters; we are looking at the relations between the competence centres within the group and defining the services that we will provide for the NPPs. author)

  15. Canadian Irradiation Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-05-01

    The Canadian Irradiation Centre is a non-profit cooperative project between Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Radiochemical Company and Universite du Quebec, Institut Armand-Frappier, Centre for Applied Research in Food Science. The Centre's objectives are to develop, demonstrate and promote Canada's radiation processing technology and its applications by conducting applied research; training technical, professional and scientific personnel; educating industry and government; demonstrating operational and scientific procedures; developing processing procedures and standards, and performing product and market acceptance trials. This pamphlet outlines the history of radoation technology and the services offered by the Canadian Irradiation Centre

  16. Active faulting on the Ninetyeast Ridge and its relation to deformation of the Indo-Australian plate

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sager, W.W.; Bull, J.M.; Krishna, K.S.

    Southampton, University of Southampton, Southampton SO14 3ZH, UK , bull@noc.soton.ac.uk 4CSIR - National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, Goa 403004, India, krishna@nio.org Abstract The ~4500 km-long Ninetyeast Ridge (NER) in the northeastern...

  17. Client Centred Desing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Nielsen, Janni; Levinsen, Karin

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we argue for the use of Client Centred preparation phases when designing complex systems. Through Client Centred Design human computer interaction can extend the focus on end-users to alse encompass the client's needs, context and resources....

  18. Chemical oceanography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    biogeochemical conditions affect the cycling of climatically important gases viz. carbon dioxide (CO sub(2)), nitrous oxide (N sub(2)O) and methane. Surface waters are normally supersaturated with CO sub(2) in the Arabian Sea and undersaturated in some parts...

  19. The International System of Units (SI) in Oceanography. Report of IAPSO Working Group on Symbols, Units and Nomenclature in Physical Oceanography (SUN). Unesco Technical Papers in Marine Science 45. IAPSO Publication Scientifique No. 32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Paris (France). Div. of Marine Sciences.

    This report introduces oceanographers to the International System of Units (SI) in physical oceanography. The SI constitutes a universal language, designed to be understood by all scientists. It facilitates their mutual comprehension and exchange of views and results of their work. The first part of the report is devoted to physical quantities,…

  20. Science requirements for free-flying imaging radar (FIREX) experiment for sea ice, renewable resources, nonrenewable resources and oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsey, F.

    1982-01-01

    A future bilateral SAR program was studied. The requirements supporting a SAR mission posed by science and operations in sea-ice-covered waters, oceanography, renewable resources, and nonrenewable resources are addressed. The instrument, mission, and program parameters were discussed. Research investigations supporting a SAR flight and the subsequent overall mission requirements and tradeoffs are summarized.

  1. The ARMADA Project: Bringing Oceanography and the Arctic to the Midwest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazol, J.

    2010-12-01

    In the fall of 2009, I spent 6 weeks aboard the Coast Guard Icebreaker Healy on a mapping expedition in the Arctic Ocean, through participation in the University of Rhode Island's ARMADA Project. Because I grew up in the Midwest, went to college here, and teach in the Chicago suburbs, I had limited first-hand experience in oceanography, as did most of my students. During my time aboard the ship, I primarily served as a member of the mapping team, collecting bathymetric and seismic data. My other science activities included aiding geologists and acoustic engineers in dredging projects and deployment of under-ice recording devices. I collected water data, sent off weather balloons, and assisted marine mammal observers. For the ARMADA Project I kept an on-line journal, which had a far-reaching impact. Students in many schools kept track of my activities and communicated with me via e-mail. Colleagues and friends shared the journal through other media, such as Facebook. Several of my entries were published in blogs belonging to NOAA and the USGS. I received a grant for renting a satellite phone, and through it was able to make "Live from the Arctic" phone calls. After introductory PowerPoints I communicated with more than 420 students in 5 schools in 3 states. When I returned, I made a series of presentations about the Arctic and my adventures to hundreds of people and was featured in an educational magazine with a circulation of more than 90,000. I also participated in an in-depth mentoring program with a new teacher to help her succeed during the first years of her career. The results: My students and I now have a direct connection to the Arctic and to the fields of oceanography, acoustic engineering, and geology. On their own initiative, students have developed individual projects exploring aspects of my research. They have attended presentations from the Extreme Ice Center and have become involved in drilling issues in the Chukchi Sea. A group of students is

  2. The Bruce Energy Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.I.

    1982-06-01

    The Bruce Energy Centre Development Corporation is a joint venture of the Ontario Energy Corporation and 6 private companies formed to market surplus steam from the Bruce Nuclear Power Development. The corporation will also sell or lease land near Bruce NPD. The Bruce Energy Centre has an energy output of 900 BTU per day per dollar invested. Potential customers include greenhouse operators, aquaculturalists, food and beverage manufacturers, and traditional manufacturers

  3. The Aube centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-07-01

    This educational booklet is devoted to a general presentation of the Aube radioactive wastes storage centre. After a short presentation of the Andra, the French national agency for the management of radioactive wastes, it gives some general information about radioactive wastes (origin, classification), containers (quality assurance and different types), wastes transportation (planning, safety), and about the Aube centre itself: description, treatment and conditioning of drums (compacting and injection), storage facilities, geological situation of the site, and environmental controls. (J.S.)

  4. CENTRE FOR GEOMETRICAL METROLOGY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Chiffre, Leonardo

    The objective of this Annual Report is to give a general introduction to CGM as well as to give an account of the tasks carried out using the facilities of CGM's Instrument Centre during 1998 and 1999.......The objective of this Annual Report is to give a general introduction to CGM as well as to give an account of the tasks carried out using the facilities of CGM's Instrument Centre during 1998 and 1999....

  5. The status of coastal oceanography in heavily impacted Yellow and East China Sea: Past trends, progress, and possible futures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao Hua; Cho, Yang-Ki; Guo, Xinyu; Wu, Chau-Ron; Zhou, Junliang

    2015-09-01

    Coastal environments are a key location for transport, commercial, residential and defence infrastructure, and have provided conditions suitable for economic growth. They also fulfil important cultural, recreational and aesthetic needs; have intrinsic ecosystem service values; and provide essential biogeochemical functions such as primary productivity, nutrient cycling and water filtration. The rapid expansion in economic development and anticipated growth of the population in the coastal zones along the Yellow and East China Sea basin has placed this region under intense multiple stresses. Here we aim to: 1) synthesize the new knowledge/science in coastal oceanography since 2010 within the context of the scientific literature published in English; 2) report on a citation analysis that assesses whether new research topics have emerged and integrated over time, indicate the location of modelling and field-based studies; and 3) suggest where the new research should develop for heavily impacted estuaries and coastal seas of East Asia. The conclusions of the synthesis include: 1) China has emerged as a dominant force in the region in producing scientific literature in coastal oceanography, although the area of publications has shifted from its traditional fields such as physical oceanography; 2) there has been an increasing number of publications with cross-disciplinary themes between physical oceanography and other fields of the biological, chemical, and geological disciplines, but vigorous and systematic funding mechanisms are still lacking to ensure the viability of large scale multi-disciplinary teams and projects in order to support trans-disciplinary research and newly emerging fields; 3) coastal oceanography is responding to new challenges, with many papers studying the impacts of human activities on marine environment and ecology, but so far very few studying management and conservation strategies or offering policy solutions.

  6. Teaching Introductory Oceanography through Case Studies: Project based approach for general education students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, K. L.; House, M.; Hovan, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    A recent workshop sponsored by SERC-On the Cutting Edge brought together science educators from a range of schools across the country to discuss new approaches in teaching oceanography. In discussing student interest in our classes, we were struck by the fact that students are drawn to emotional or controversial topics such as whale hunting and tsunami hazard and that these kinds of topics are a great vehicle for introducing more complex concepts such as wave propagation, ocean upwelling and marine chemistry. Thus, we have developed an approach to introductory oceanography that presents students with real-world issues in the ocean sciences and requires them to explore the science behind them in order to improve overall ocean science literacy among non-majors and majors at 2 and 4 year colleges. We have designed a project-based curriculum built around topics that include, but are not limited to: tsunami hazard, whale migration, ocean fertilization, ocean territorial claims, rapid climate change, the pacific trash patch, overfishing, and ocean acidification. Each case study or project consists of three weeks of class time and is structured around three elements: 1) a media analysis; 2) the role of ocean science in addressing the issue; 3) human impact/response. Content resources range from textbook readings, popular or current print news, documentary film and television, and data available on the world wide web from a range of sources. We employ a variety of formative assessments for each case study in order to monitor student access and understanding of content and include a significant component of in-class student discussion and brainstorming guided by faculty input to develop the case study. Each study culminates in summative assessments ranging from exams to student posters to presentations, depending on the class size and environment. We envision this approach for a range of classroom environments including large group face-to-face instruction as well as hybrid

  7. High-precision GPS autonomous platforms for sea ice dynamics and physical oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elosegui, P.; Wilkinson, J.; Olsson, M.; Rodwell, S.; James, A.; Hagan, B.; Hwang, B.; Forsberg, R.; Gerdes, R.; Johannessen, J.; Wadhams, P.; Nettles, M.; Padman, L.

    2012-12-01

    Project "Arctic Ocean sea ice and ocean circulation using satellite methods" (SATICE), is the first high-rate, high-precision, continuous GPS positioning experiment on sea ice in the Arctic Ocean. The SATICE systems collect continuous, dual-frequency carrier-phase GPS data while drifting on sea ice. Additional geophysical measurements also collected include ocean water pressure, ocean surface salinity, atmospheric pressure, snow-depth, air-ice-ocean temperature profiles, photographic imagery, and others, enabling sea ice drift, freeboard, weather, ice mass balance, and sea-level height determination. Relatively large volumes of data from each buoy are streamed over a satellite link to a central computer on the Internet in near real time, where they are processed to estimate the time-varying buoy positions. SATICE system obtains continuous GPS data at sub-minute intervals with a positioning precision of a few centimetres in all three dimensions. Although monitoring of sea ice motions goes back to the early days of satellite observations, these autonomous platforms bring out a level of spatio-temporal detail that has never been seen before, especially in the vertical axis. These high-resolution data allows us to address new polar science questions and challenge our present understanding of both sea ice dynamics and Arctic oceanography. We will describe the technology behind this new autonomous platform, which could also be adapted to other applications that require high resolution positioning information with sustained operations and observations in the polar marine environment, and present results pertaining to sea ice dynamics and physical oceanography.

  8. Dynamic oceanography determines fine scale foraging behavior of Masked Boobies in the Gulf of Mexico.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline L Poli

    Full Text Available During breeding, foraging marine birds are under biological, geographic, and temporal constraints. These contraints require foraging birds to efficiently process environmental cues derived from physical habitat features that occur at nested spatial scales. Mesoscale oceanography in particular may change rapidly within and between breeding seasons, and findings from well-studied systems that relate oceanography to seabird foraging may transfer poorly to regions with substantially different oceanographic conditions. Our objective was to examine foraging behavior of a pan-tropical seabird, the Masked Booby (Sula dactylatra, in the understudied Caribbean province, a moderately productive region driven by highly dynamic currents and fronts. We tracked 135 individuals with GPS units during May 2013, November 2013, and December 2014 at a regionally important breeding colony in the southern Gulf of Mexico. We measured foraging behavior using characteristics of foraging trips and used area restricted search as a proxy for foraging events. Among individual attributes, nest stage contributed to differences in foraging behavior whereas sex did not. Birds searched for prey at nested hierarchical scales ranging from 200 m-35 km. Large-scale coastal and shelf-slope fronts shifted position between sampling periods and overlapped geographically with overall foraging locations. At small scales (at the prey patch level, the specific relationship between environmental variables and foraging behavior was highly variable among individuals but general patterns emerged. Sea surface height anomaly and velocity of water were the strongest predictors of area restricted search behavior in random forest models, a finding that is consistent with the characterization of the Gulf of Mexico as an energetic system strongly influenced by currents and eddies. Our data may be combined with tracking efforts in the Caribbean province and across tropical regions to advance

  9. Dynamic oceanography determines fine scale foraging behavior of Masked Boobies in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Caroline L.; Harrison, Autumn-Lynn; Vallarino, Adriana; Gerard, Patrick D.; Jodice, Patrick G.R.

    2017-01-01

    During breeding, foraging marine birds are under biological, geographic, and temporal constraints. These contraints require foraging birds to efficiently process environmental cues derived from physical habitat features that occur at nested spatial scales. Mesoscale oceanography in particular may change rapidly within and between breeding seasons, and findings from well-studied systems that relate oceanography to seabird foraging may transfer poorly to regions with substantially different oceanographic conditions. Our objective was to examine foraging behavior of a pan-tropical seabird, the Masked Booby (Sula dactylatra), in the understudied Caribbean province, a moderately productive region driven by highly dynamic currents and fronts. We tracked 135 individuals with GPS units during May 2013, November 2013, and December 2014 at a regionally important breeding colony in the southern Gulf of Mexico. We measured foraging behavior using characteristics of foraging trips and used area restricted search as a proxy for foraging events. Among individual attributes, nest stage contributed to differences in foraging behavior whereas sex did not. Birds searched for prey at nested hierarchical scales ranging from 200 m—35 km. Large-scale coastal and shelf-slope fronts shifted position between sampling periods and overlapped geographically with overall foraging locations. At small scales (at the prey patch level), the specific relationship between environmental variables and foraging behavior was highly variable among individuals but general patterns emerged. Sea surface height anomaly and velocity of water were the strongest predictors of area restricted search behavior in random forest models, a finding that is consistent with the characterization of the Gulf of Mexico as an energetic system strongly influenced by currents and eddies. Our data may be combined with tracking efforts in the Caribbean province and across tropical regions to advance understanding of seabird

  10. Energy centre microgrid model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasonen, R.

    2011-09-15

    A simulation model of Energy centre microgrid made with PSCAD simulation software version 4.2.1 has been built in SGEM Smart Grids and Energy Markets (SGEM) work package 6.6. Microgrid is an autonomous electric power system which can operate separate from common distribution system. The idea of energy centre microgrid concept was considered in Master of Science thesis 'Community Microgrid - A Building block of Finnish Smart Grid'. The name of energy centre microgrid comes from a fact that production and storage units are concentrated into a single location, an energy centre. This centre feeds the loads which can be households or industrial loads. Power direction flow on the demand side remains same compared to the current distribution system and allows to the use of standard fuse protection in the system. The model consists of photovoltaic solar array, battery unit, variable frequency boost converter, inverter, isolation transformer and demand side (load) model. The model is capable to automatically switch to islanded mode when there is a fault in outside grid and back to parallel operation mode when fault is removed. The modelled system responses well to load changes and total harmonic distortion related to 50Hz base frequency is kept under 1.5% while operating and feeding passive load. (orig.)

  11. The ideal Atomic Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mas, R.

    1965-01-01

    The author presents considerations which should prove to be of interest to all those who have to design, to construct and to operate a nuclear research centre. A large number of the ideas presented can also be applied to non-nuclear scientific research centres. In his report the author reviews: various problems with which the constructor is faced: ground-plan, infrastructure, buildings and the large units of scientific equipment in the centre, and those problems facing the director: maintenance, production, supplies, security. The author stresses the relationship which ought to exist between the research workers and the management. With this aim in view he proposes the creation of National School for Administration in Research which would train administrative executives for public or private organisations; they would be specialised in the fields of fundamental or applied research. (author) [fr

  12. Netherlands Reactor Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Briefly reviews the last year's work of the twenty year old Netherlands Reactor Centre (RCN) in the fields of reactor safety, fissile material, nuclear fission, non-nuclear energy systems and overseas co-operation. The annual report thus summarised is the last one to appear under the name of RCN. The terms of reference of the organisation having been broadened to include research into energy supply in general, it is to be known in future as the Netherlands Energy Research Centre (ECN). (D.J.B.)

  13. The Structural Integrity Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomkins, B.

    1987-01-01

    The paper concerns the development and work of the Structural Integrity Centre (SIC) at Risley Nuclear Laboratories, United Kingdom. The centre was set up to provide authoritative advice to plant designers and operators on the integrity and life assessment of structures and components across the reactor projects in the United Kingdom. A description is given of the structure and role of the SIC, as well as the Structural Integrity Assessment work. The assessment methods are described for thermally loaded structures and welded structures. Finally, defect significance assessment and environmental effects are outlined. (U.K.)

  14. NODC Standard Product: Climatic atlas of the Arctic Seas 2004 - Database of the Barents, Kara, Laptev, and White Seas - Oceanography and marine biology (NODC Accession 0098061)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Atlas presents primary data on meteorology, oceanography, and hydrobiology from the Barents, Kara, Laptev, and White Seas, which were collected during the...

  15. Meteorology, physical oceanography, transport of water, biogeochemistry, and other parameters collected at fixed locations in the open ocean from the OceanSITES network

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection comprises data covering meteorology, physical oceanography, transport of water, biogeochemistry, and parameters relevant to the carbon cycle, ocean...

  16. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Rhode Island (URI) Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Geological Samples Laboratory (MGSL) of the Graduate School of Oceanography (GSO), University of Rhode Island is a partner in the Index to Marine and...

  17. International research centre launched

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    Full text: The first scientific research and educational institution to be set up on a completely international basis was officially inaugurated in Trieste on 5 October 1964 by the Director General of IAEA, Dr. Sigvard Eklund, when he opened the first seminar of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics. As evidence of the international nature of the institution he noted that the scientists who would work and teach there during the first year represented sixteen different countries. By the end of 1964, the Centre building was nearing completion and three of the five floors were occupied. A successful symposium had been held on the subject of plasma physics, and a score of professors and fellows were at work, from Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Greece, India, Japan, Jordan, the Netherlands, Norway, Pakistan, Poland, the United Kingdom, and the United States. A dozen scientific papers had been issued as preprints. The main purpose of the Centre is to foster the advancement of theoretical physics through training and research; at first the chief subject will be high-energy and elementary particle physics. Plasma physics, low energy physics and solid-state physics will also be dealt with. Special attention is paid to the needs of the developing countries. Of the 25 fellows selected for the academic year 1964-65, more than half are from South America, Africa and Asia. In conjunction with the Research Centre, there is an Advanced School for theoretical Physics to provide graduate training for fellows who need such preparation before they embark upon research. The Centre works under the guidance of a Scientific Council comprising the president, Prof. M. Sandoval-Vallarta (Nuclear Energy Commission of Mexico); Prof. A. Abragam (Saclay, France); Prof. R. Oppenheimer (Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, USA); Dr. V. Soloviev (Dubna, USSR); Prof V.F. Weiskopf (Director General, CERN) ; Prof Abdus Salam (Imperial College, London) ; Prof. P. Budini (University of Trieste

  18. Centre for Political and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    and definitions will be published and the data translated into the official ... The Centre provides a terminological and subject-related service to lecturers and ... postgraduate students in international politics, political studies and .... obtain financial contributions (cf. .... making of authoritative and enforceable rules (laws) for.

  19. Implementing Responsibility Centre Budgeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonasek, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Recently, institutes of higher education (universities) have shown a renewed interest in organisational structures and operating methodologies that generate productivity and innovation; responsibility centre budgeting (RCB) is one such process. This paper describes the underlying principles constituting RCB, its origin and structural elements, and…

  20. Fuel cycle centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, M.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of co-locating and integrating fuel cycle facilities at one site is discussed. This concept offers considerable advantages, especially in minimizing the amount of radioactive material to be transported on public roads. Safeguards and physical protection as relating to such an integrated system of facilities are analysed in detail, also industrial and commercial questions. An overall risk-benefit evaluation turns out to be in favour of fuel cycle centres. These centres seem to be specifically attractive with regard to the back end of the fuel cycle, including on-site disposal of radioactive wastes. The respective German approach is presented as an example. Special emphasis is given to the site selection procedures in this case. Time scale and cost for the implementation of this concept are important factors to be looked at. Since participation of governmental institutions in these centres seems to be indispensable their respective roles as compared to industry must be clearly defined. The idea of adjusting fuel cycle centres to regional rather than national use might be an attractive option, depending on the specific parameters in the region, though results of existing multinational ventures are inconclusive in this respect. Major difficulties might be expected e.g. because of different national safety regulations and standards as well as commercial conditions among partner countries. Public acceptance in the host country seems to be another stumbling block for the realization of this type of multinational facilities

  1. Budapest Training Technology Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budapest Training Technology Centre (Hungary).

    The Budapest Training Technology Centre (BTTC) grew out of a 1990 agreement calling for Great Britain to help Hungary develop and implement open and flexible training methods and technology-based training to support the labor force development and vocational training needs resulting from Hungary's transition to a market economy. The BTTC would be…

  2. Official Centre Hospitality

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sylvain Dufour

    Approved by the Management Executive Committee. - 1 -. Version 3.1.0 effective 2017-06-28. Official Centre Hospitality. 1. Objective. 2. Application. 3. Definitions. 4. Roles and Responsibilities. 5. Authorization. 6. Consultants and Contractors. 7. Reimbursement. 1. Objective. To define the circumstances under which ...

  3. Academic Drug Discovery Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirkegaard, Henriette Schultz; Valentin, Finn

    2014-01-01

    Academic drug discovery centres (ADDCs) are seen as one of the solutions to fill the innovation gap in early drug discovery, which has proven challenging for previous organisational models. Prior studies of ADDCs have identified the need to analyse them from the angle of their economic...

  4. ATLAS Visitors Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    claudia Marcelloni

    2009-01-01

    ATLAS Visitors Centre has opened its shiny new doors to the public. Officially launched on Monday February 23rd, 2009, the permanent exhibition at Point 1 was conceived as a tour resource for ATLAS guides, and as a way to preserve the public’s opportunity to get a close-up look at the experiment in action when the cavern is sealed.

  5. Hydrology and Oceanography Analysis Regarding The NPP Site Screening Process at Banten Province

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yarianto-S-Budi-Susilo

    2007-01-01

    Regarding the NPP development in the future, it is needed to make inventory of potential site in the Java Island as well as in the outside Java Island. The NPP site inventory availability is to answer the energy demand challenge. Site screening process should be performed in accordance with the IAEA safety standard regarding the site selection, investigating several aspects related to the NPP safety (exclusion, safety and suitability factor) in the large area to obtain potential site candidates. For the site survey stage of hydrology and oceanography aspects, the analysis are more focused on the tidal phenomena along the north coastline, bathymetry, water resource, and hydrology system in the Banten Province. The method used are secondary data collection, field confirmation and internet searching. The result of the study showed that Tanjung Pujut and Tanjung Pasir are suitable based on the bathymetry and water intake facility consideration. Meanwhile Tanjung Kait and Tanjung Pasir more suitable considering tsunami aspects that may be generated by Krakatau Volcano. (author)

  6. The ecology of plankton in biological oceanography: a tribute to Marta Estrada’s task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Solé

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Plankton ecology has been the object of intense research and progress in the last few decades. This has been partly due to technological advances that have facilitated the multidisciplinary and high-resolution sampling of ecosystems and improved experimentation and analytical methodologies, and to sophisticated modelling. In addition, exceptional researchers have had the vision to integrate all these innovative tools to form a solid theoretical background in ecology. Here we provide an overview of the outstanding research work conducted by Professor Marta Estrada and her pioneering contribution to different areas of research in the last four decades. Her research in biological oceanography has mainly focussed on phytoplankton ecology, taxonomy and physiology, the functional structure of plankton communities, and physical and biological interactions in marine ecosystems. She has combined a variety of field and laboratory approaches and methodologies, from microscopy to satellite observations, including in-depth statistical data analysis and modelling. She has been a reference for scientists all over the world. Here, her contributions to plankton ecology are summarized by some of her students and closest collaborators, who had the privilege to share their science and everyday experiences with her.

  7. Use of ERTS-1 pictures in coastal oceanography in British Columbia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, J. F. R.

    1973-01-01

    The ERTS-1 color composite picture of the Vancouver-Victoria region illustrates the value of ERTS data for coastal oceanography. The water of the Fraser River plume which is so clearly visible in the center of the scene has been of interest to oceanographers on the west coast of Canada for a long time as an easily visible tracer of surface water circulation in the strait of Georgia. Maps of the plume at different states of the tide and with different river flow and weather were compiled from oblique aerial photographs in 1950 and used in the siting of sewage and other outfalls in the Vancouver area. More recently high level aerial photomosaics have been used to map the plume area, but the plume can spread over distances of 30 to 40 miles and many photographs, with the uneven illumination inherent in wide angle coverage, are needed for the mosaic. The ERTS satellite gives the first complete view of the plume area. Electronic enhancement of the images shows that the satellite's narrow angle coverage allows very weak surface turbidity features to be made visible to give information on surface currents over a wide area.

  8. The application of standard definitions of sound to the fields of underwater acoustics and acoustical oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, William M.

    2004-05-01

    Recent societal concerns have focused attention on the use of sound as a probe to investigate the oceans and its use in naval sonar applications. The concern is the impact the use of sound may have on marine mammals and fishes. The focus has changed the fields of acoustical oceanography (AO) and underwater acoustics (UW) because of the requirement to communicate between disciplines. Multiple National Research Council publications, Dept. of Navy reports, and several monographs have been written on this subject, and each reveals the importance as well as the misapplication of ASA standards. The ANSI-ASA standards are comprehensive, however not widely applied. The clear definition of standards and recommendations of their use is needed for both scientists and government agencies. Traditionally the U.S. Navy has been responsible for UW standards and calibration; the ANSI-ASA standards have been essential. However, recent changes in the Navy and its laboratory structure may necessitate a more formal recognition of ANSI-ASA standards and perhaps incorporation of UW-AO in the Bureau of Standards. A separate standard for acoustical terminology, reference levels, and notation used in the UW-AO is required. Since the problem is global, a standard should be compatible and cross referenced with the International Standard (CEI/IEC 27-3).

  9. Experiences of ocean literacy with different users of operational oceanography services and with high school students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, Paola; Coppini, Giovanni; Martinelli, Sara; Bonarelli, Roberto; Lecci, Rita; Pinardi, Nadia; Cretì, Sergio; Turrisi, Giuseppe; Ciliberti, Stefania Angela; Federico, Ivan; Mannarini, Gianandrea; Verri, Giorgia; Jansen, Eric; Lusito, Letizia; Macchia, Francesca; Montagna, Fabio; Buonocore, Mauro; Marra, Palmalisa; Tedesco, Luca; Cavallo, Arturo

    2017-04-01

    According to a common definition, ocean literacy is an understanding of the ocean's influence on people and people influence on the ocean. An ocean-literate person is able to make informed and responsible decisions regarding the ocean and its resources. To this aim, this paper presents operational oceanographic tools developed to meet the needs of different users, and activities performed in collaboration with high school students to support new developments of the same tools. Operational oceanography allows to deal with societal challenges such as maritime safety, coastal and marine environment management, climate change assessment and marine resources management. Oceanographic products from the European Copernicus Marine Monitoring Service - CMEMS are transformed and communicated to public and stakeholders through adding-value chains (downstreaming), which consider advanced visualization, usage of multi-channels technological platforms and specific models and algorithms. Sea Situational Awareness is strategically important for management and safety purposes of any marine domain and, in particular, the Mediterranean Sea and its coastal areas. Examples of applications for sea situational awareness and maritime safety are here presented, through user-friendly products available both by web and mobile channels (that already reach more than 100.000 users in the Mediterranean area). Further examples of ocean literacy are web bulletins used to communicate the technical contents and information related to oceanographic forecasts to a wide public. They are the result of a collaboration with high school students, with whom also other activities on improving products visualization and online communication have been performed.

  10. An electronic atlas on the oceanography of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostov, I. D.; Moroz, V. V.; Rudykh, N. I.; Rostov, V. I.

    2009-12-01

    The digital atlas on CD ROM includes a set of generalized data on the South China Sea oceanography. The data is presented in the form of spreadsheets, graphics, and text. The atlas contains a brief annotated description of the main physical-geographical characteristics and the particularities of the hydrological regime, water masses, tidal phenomena, and water mass circulation. The atlas is an interactive information-reference system including elements of dynamic data visualization. It contains a body of data on the long-term observations of the temperature and salinity; gridded blocks of the average annual, seasonal, and monthly data at the standard depth horizons; and data on the hydrochemical characteristics and water currents obtained by automatic buoy stations (ABS). A list of existing open access data bases and web sites is given where additional online and archived information on a range of special issues and problems related to regional studies and exploitation is provided. The system allows for fast access to specifically selected online or generalized reference information (via the Internet) and for its imaging.

  11. Elderly Care Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagiman, Aliani; Haja Bava Mohidin, Hazrina; Ismail, Alice Sabrina

    2016-02-01

    The demand for elderly centre has increased tremendously abreast with the world demographic change as the number of senior citizens rose in the 21st century. This has become one of the most crucial problems of today's era. As the world progress into modernity, more and more people are occupied with daily work causing the senior citizens to lose the care that they actually need. This paper seeks to elucidate the best possible design of an elderly care centre with new approach in order to provide the best service for them by analysing their needs and suitable activities that could elevate their quality of life. All these findings will then be incorporated into design solutions so as to enhance the living environment for the elderly especially in Malaysian context.

  12. Desafíos en la creación, desarrollo e implementación de los MOOC: El curso de Web Science en la Universidad de Southampton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Mar Sánchez Vera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available El carácter masivo es una de las peculiaridades de los MOOC, que lo diferencian de otro tipo de experiencias de aprendizaje en red. Este hecho configura una serie de posibilidades, pero también una serie de retos que hay que tener en cuenta a la hora de diseñar e implementar un curso masivo en red, en relación, por ejemplo, a los contenidos, el proceso de trabajo, las actividades, la evaluación y el feed-back. Este trabajo presenta un análisis de las ventajas y desventajas del carácter masivo de los MOOC y concretamente describe la experiencia de creación de un MOOC sobre Web Science desarrollada en la Universidad de Southampton (Reino Unido en la plataforma FutureLearn durante el otoño de 2013. Se analiza la importancia del estudio de la rama de Web Science y cómo se originó esta experiencia. También describen las decisiones y el proceso de trabajo desarrollado para la creación e implementación del MOOC en concreto. Se termina este trabajo analizando alguno de los datos que se han obtenido, como el índice de participación (ligeramente elevado respecto a la media de los MOOC, los comentarios de los participantes, la manera de gestionar la facilitación del curso y algunos de los retos que nos encontramos a la hora de gestionar un MOOC, que se relacionan con el diseño del curso, la plataforma que se utiliza y cómo se organiza la facilitación del curso.

  13. International Data Centre (IDC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, P.

    2002-01-01

    The presentation outlines the International Data Centre (Indc) mission, objective and historical background. The Indc progressive commissioning and organizational plans are presented on charts. The IMS stations providing data to Indc operations and the global communication infrastructure are plotted on world maps. The various types of IMS data are thus listed as seismic, hydroacoustic, infrasound and radionuclide. Finally Indc products and services together with its main achievements are listed

  14. Historical centres: changing definitions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Lazzarotti

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the end of the Second World War, the architectural and planning culture has been showing a fluctuating attention to the theme of historical centres and their enhancement. First of all this uneven progress explains the difficulty to reach a homogeneous definition and this is still lacking. During a long phase of this period, the historical parts of the town were considered as objects to be preserved in an integral way, as urban monuments. This is mostly due to the high symbolic value of these settlements, that represent fundamental landmarks. Identity building and empowerment of local communities are indispensable conditions for any development programme, especially in the case of centres or other historic environments at risk of abandonment. The progressive evolution of this concept brings awareness of the impossibility of separating – either in analytical or in planning terms ­ historical centres from their urban and territorial contexts, which are linked by mutual, deep relationships. This article attempts to retrace the steps signaled by the publication of international documents and conventions, from the Charter of Gubbio (1960 to the Charter of Krakow and the European Landscape Convention (2000; they obviously represent particular points of view, not exhaustive of the richness of the positions in the debate, but extremely significant in terms of diffusion and consensus.

  15. DGNB certified Healthcare Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunsgaard, Camilla; Larsen, Tine Steen

    2015-01-01

    for sustainability and wants a certification. This research investigates the decision‐making and design process (DMaDP) behind four DGNB certified Healthcare Centres (HCC) in Northern Jutland in Denmark. In general, knowledge about the DMaDP is important. However it is important to know what part DGNB plays...... a dialog about DGNB and energy concept is important even before anyone start sketching. Experiences with the different approaches will be further outlined in the paper.Future research has the intention to collect further knowledge about DGNB and DMaDP in practise. This project was limited to Healthcare...

  16. Town Centre Redevelopment Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vagnby, Bo Hellisen

    After many years of urban growth Danish downtowns are facing some important choices. Shall the stake one-sidedly be on the town centres as driving forces for growth and 'city marketing', or do they still have a role to play in a broader socio-economic context? In the paper we look back on eight...... as slum clearence and urban renewal. To a certain extent parallels are drawn to international experiences, especially where these are of such a nature that they can be assumed transferred to Danish connctions. Conclusively, the strategies are discussed in the light of the turn of Danish urban planning...

  17. The challenges of coastal oceanography. Prediction limits and new applications based on Sentinel data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; Carniel, Sandro; Badger, Merete; Bidlot, Jean; Boye Hansen, Lars; Bolaños-Sanchez, Rodolfo; Cipollini, Paolo; Espino, Manuel; Marcello Miglietta, Mario; Saulter, Andy; Staneva, Joanna

    2017-04-01

    The increasing quality and quantity (resolution in space, coverage in time, combinations of sensors in the Sentinel family) of information provided by Copernicus offer the possibility to analyse and predict coastal meteo-oceanography at an unprecedented level. This is a unique opportunity to develop the Copernicus coastal dimension to tackle the pressures of increasing population and activities. The combination of ocean/atmosphere/land observations from the Sentinel (S) 1/2/3, aligned with the availability of an increasing number of high-resolution numerical simulations (e.g. wave and current fields) in the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) catalogue, should allow users to access proven representations of the coastal environment at a new level of understanding (e.g. wave diffraction at coastal "obstacles"), coupling (e.g. incorporating the land discharge into the coastal sea) and reliability for applications (e.g. hazards for coastal navigation). By adding periodic bathymetric up-dating and incorporating new assimilation routines it will be possible to achieve a new level of analysis for coastal seas. In the paper we shall present the CEASELESS project that addresses the multiple scales coexisting in littoral areas by developing new shallow water parameterizations, introducing them into coupled model suites (wind-wave-surge-current-land discharge) and producing new standards for coastal simulations and analyses. This will demonstrate the technical feasibility of an operational coastal service. The set of derived products will be ingested into the users' work routines, proving the economic feasibility of such a coastal extension. The level of conflicts in squeezed coastal zones, expected to grow in the face of climate change, will, thus, benefit directly from CEASELESS, establishing tangible contributions for a wide range of economic sectors. The mutual validation of satellite data, numerical results and in-situ observations will generate

  18. Mochovce waste treatment centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedliak, D.; Endrody, J.

    2000-01-01

    The first unit of the Mochovce NPP (WWER 440 MW) was put in a test operation in October 1998. The second unit with the same power output was put in the test operation in March 2000. The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic in its Decision No. 318/98 of 28 October 1998, by which an agreement with the operation of the Unit 1 of the Mochovce. Nuclear Power Plant was issued, requires to start the construction of the Liquid Radioactive Waste Treatment Centre until January 2004. The subject of this presentation is a system description of the Liquid Radioactive Waste (LRW) management in the Mochovce NPP. The initial part is dedicated to a short description of the radioactive waste management legislation requirements. Then the presentation continues with an information about the LRW production in the Mochovce NPP, LRW sources, chemical and radiochemical attributes, description of storage. The presentation also provides real values of its production in a comparison with the design data. The LRW production minimization principles are also mentioned there. Another part deals with the basic requirements for the technology proposal of the liquid RW treatment, especially concerning the acceptance criteria at the Republic RW Repository Mochovce. The final part is devoted to a short description of the investment procedure principles - design preparation levels and a proposed construction schedule of the centre. (authors)

  19. Call Centre- Computer Telephone Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Kovačević

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Call centre largely came into being as a result of consumerneeds converging with enabling technology- and by the companiesrecognising the revenue opportunities generated by meetingthose needs thereby increasing customer satisfaction. Regardlessof the specific application or activity of a Call centre, customersatisfaction with the interaction is critical to the revenuegenerated or protected by the Call centre. Physical(v, Call centreset up is a place that includes computer, telephone and supervisorstation. Call centre can be available 24 hours a day - whenthe customer wants to make a purchase, needs information, orsimply wishes to register a complaint.

  20. Perspectives on chemical oceanography in the 21st century: Participants of the COME ABOARD Meeting examine aspects of the field in the context of 40 years of DISCO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassbender, Andrea J.; Palevsky, Hilary I.; Martz, Todd R.; Ingalls, Anitra E.; Gledhill, Martha; Fawcett, Sarah E.; Brandes, Jay; Aluwihare, Lihini; Anderson, Robert M.; Bender, Sara; Boyle, Ed; Bronk, Debbie; Buesseler, Ken; Burdige, David J.; Casciotti, Karen; Close, Hilary; Conte, Maureen; Cutter, Greg; Estapa, Meg; Fennel, Katja; Ferron, Sara; Glazer, Brian; Goni, Miguel; Grand, Max; Guay, Chris; Hatta, Mariko; Hayes, Chris; Horner, Tristan; Ingall, Ellery; Johnson, Kenneth G.; Juranek, Laurie; Knapp, Angela; Lam, Phoebe; Luther, George; Matrai, Paty; Nicholson, David; Paytan, Adina; Pellenbarg, Robert; Popendorf, Kim; Reddy, Christopher M.; Ruttenberg, Kathleen; Sabine, Chris; Sansone, Frank; Shaltout, Nayrah; Sikes, Liz; Sundquist, Eric T.; Valentine, David; Wang, Zhao (Aleck); Wilson, Sam; Barrett, Pamela; Behrens, Melanie; Belcher, Anna; Biermann, Lauren; Boiteau, Rene; Clarke, Jennifer; Collins, Jamie; Coppola, Alysha; Ebling, Alina M.; Garcia-Tigreros, Fenix; Goldman, Johanna; Guallart, Elisa F.; Haskell, William; Hurley, Sarah; Janssen, David; Johnson, Winn; Lennhartz, Sinikka; Liu, Shuting; Rahman, Shaily; Ray, Daisy; Sarkar, Amit; Steiner, Zvika; Widner, Brittany; Yang, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The questions that chemical oceanographers prioritize over the coming decades, and the methods we use to address these questions, will define our field's contribution to 21st century science. In recognition of this, the U.S. National Science Foundation and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration galvanized a community effort (the Chemical Oceanography MEeting: A BOttom-up Approach to Research Directions, or COME ABOARD) to synthesize bottom-up perspectives on selected areas of research in Chemical Oceanography. Representing only a small subset of the community, COME ABOARD participants did not attempt to identify targeted research directions for the field. Instead, we focused on how best to foster diverse research in Chemical Oceanography, placing emphasis on the following themes: strengthening our core chemical skillset; expanding our tools through collaboration with chemists, engineers, and computer scientists; considering new roles for large programs; enhancing interface research through interdisciplinary collaboration; and expanding ocean literacy by engaging with the public. For each theme, COME ABOARD participants reflected on the present state of Chemical Oceanography, where the community hopes to go and why, and actionable pathways to get there. A unifying concept among the discussions was that dissimilar funding structures and metrics of success may be required to accommodate the various levels of readiness and stages of knowledge development found throughout our community. In addition to the science, participants of the concurrent Dissertations Symposium in Chemical Oceanography (DISCO) XXV, a meeting of recent and forthcoming Ph.D. graduates in Chemical Oceanography, provided perspectives on how our field could show leadership in addressing long-standing diversity and early-career challenges that are pervasive throughout science. Here we summarize the COME ABOARD Meeting discussions, providing a synthesis of reflections and perspectives on the

  1. Oceanography in Second Life: Use of a Virtual Reality to Enhance Undergraduate Education in Marine Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villareal, T. A.; Jarmon, L.; Triggs, R.

    2009-12-01

    Shipboard research is a fundamental part of oceanography, but has numerous legal and practical constraints virtually eliminate it as a regular part of large-enrollment programs in marine science. The cost of a properly equipped research vessel alone can prevent student access. While much can be learned by active exploration of archived data by students, the limitations placed on real oceanographic programs by distance, vessel speed, and time are difficult to reproduce in exercises. Pre-cruise planning and collaboration between investigators are likewise a challenge to incorporate. We have used design students in the College of Liberal Arts to construct a oceanographic expedition in Second Life for use in a marine science course (Fall 2009). Second Life is a highly collaborative environment with a variety of tools that allow users to create their own environment and interact with it. Second LIfe is free, highly portable, and inherently amenable to distance or remote teaching. In our application, the research vessel exists as an moving platform with sampling abilities. Software code queries an external MySQL database that contains information from the World Ocean Atlas for the entire ocean, and returns strings of data from standard depths. Students must plan the cruise track to test hypothesis about the ocean, collaborate with other teams to develop the big picture and use standard oceanographic software (Ocean Data Viewer; ODV) to analyze the data. Access to the entire database in ODV then allows comparison to the actual properties and distributions. The effectiveness of this approach is being evaluated by a pre- and post-class surveys and post semester focus group interviews. Similar surveys of the design students that created the environment noted that use of Second Life created a learning experience that was both more immersive and process oriented than traditional college courses. Initial impressions in the marine science class indicate that the strong social

  2. Fisheries Oceanography in the Virgin Islands: Preliminary Results from a Collaborative Research Endeavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R. H.; Gerard, T. L.; Johns, E. M.; Lamkin, J. T.

    2008-05-01

    economically important species were recovered at the near-shore sites, south of St. Thomas, St. John, and British Virgin Islands and not on the reef /shelf-break sites as expected. Concurrent Lagrangian drifter trajectories and shipboard ADCP measurements showed a high degree of variability in regional surface water flow. Possible transport pathways as related to the spatial distribution of the larvae collected and the physical oceanography observed will be discussed.

  3. Designing and Implementing Service Learning Projects in an Introductory Oceanography Course Using the ``8-Block Model''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, E. P.; Field, C.

    2010-12-01

    The Campus Compact for New Hampshire (Gordon, 2003) introduced a practical model for designing service-learning exercises or components for new or existing courses. They divided the design and implementation process into eight concrete areas, the “8-Block Model”. Their goal was to demystify the design process of service learning courses by breaking it down into interconnected components. These components include: project design, community partner relations, the problem statement, building community in the classroom, building student capacity, project management, assessment of learning, and reflection and connections. The project design component of the “8-Block Model” asks that the service performed be consistent with the learning goals of the course. For science courses students carry out their work as a way of learning science and the process of science, not solely for the sake of service. Their work supports the goals of a community partner and the community partner poses research problems for the class in a letter on their letterhead. Linking student work to important problems in the community effectively engages students and encourages them to work at more sophisticated levels than usually seen in introductory science classes. Using team-building techniques, the classroom becomes a safe, secure learning environment that encourages sharing and experimentation. Targeted lectures, labs, and demonstrations build the capacity of students to do their research. Behind the scenes project management ensures student success. Learning is assessed using a variety of tools, including graded classroom presentations, poster sessions, and presentations and reports to community partners. Finally, students reflect upon their work and make connections between their research and its importance to the well being of the community. Over the past 10 years, we have used this approach to design and continually modify an introductory oceanography course for majors and non

  4. Transition of R&D into Operations at Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, R. M.

    2006-12-01

    The U.S. Navy's Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC) plays a significant role in the National capability for operational weather and ocean prediction through its operation of sophisticated global and regional meteorological and oceanographic models, extending from the top of the atmosphere to the bottom of the ocean. FNMOC uniquely satisfies the military's requirement for a global operational weather prediction capability based on software certified to DoD Information Assurance standards and operated in a secure classified computer environment protected from outside intrusion by DoD certified firewalls. FNMOC operates around-the-clock, 365 days per year and distributes products to military and civilian users around the world, both ashore and afloat, through a variety of means. FNMOC's customers include all branches of the Department of Defense, other government organizations such as the National Weather Service, private companies, a number of colleges and universities, and the general public. FNMOC employs three primary models, the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS), the Coupled Ocean/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS), and the WaveWatch III model (WW3), along with a number of specialized models and related applications. NOGAPS is a global weather model, driving nearly all other FNMOC models and applications in some fashion. COAMPS is a high- resolution regional model that has proved to be particularly valuable for forecasting weather and ocean conditions in highly complex coastal areas. WW3 is a state-of-the-art ocean wave model that is employed both globally and regionally in support of a wide variety of naval operations. Other models support and supplement the main models with predictions of ocean thermal structure, ocean currents, sea-ice characteristics, and other data. Fleet Numerical operates at the leading edge of science and technology, and benefits greatly from collocation with its supporting

  5. Using Geophysical Data in the Texas High School Course, Geology, Meteorology, and Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K.; Olson, H.; Pulliam, J.; Schott, M. J.

    2002-12-01

    Science educators working directly with scientists to develop inquiry-based instructional materials in Earth science yield some of the best results. The TEXTEAMS (Texas Teachers Empowered for Achievement in Mathematics and Science) Leadership Training for the Texas high school science course, Geology, Meteorology and Oceanography (GMO) is one example of a successful program that provides high-quality training to master teachers using geophysical data collected by scientists at The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG). TEXTEAMS is a certification program of professional development and leadership training sponsored by the National Science Foundation that is part of the Texas Statewide Systemic Initiative. UTIG scientists teamed with science educators at the Charles A. Dana Center for Mathematics and Science Education at UT and the Texas Education Agency to develop inquiry-based instructional materials for eight GMO modules. Our learning activities help students and teachers understand how Earth scientists interpret the natural world and test their hypotheses, and provide opportunities for the use of technology in classroom science learning; they are aligned with national and state teaching standards. Examples of TEXTEAMS GMO learning activities that use geophysical data. 1. Neotectonics: radiocarbon dates and elevation above current sea level of raised coral reefs in the New Georgia Islands are used to calculate rates of tectonic uplift and as a basis for the development of a conceptual model to explain the pattern of uplift that emerges from the data. 2. Large Igneous Provinces:geophysical logging data collected on ODP Leg 183 (Kerguelen Plateau) are analyzed to identify the transition from sediment to basement rock. 3. The Search for Black Gold: petroleum exploration requires the integration of geology, geophysics, petrophysics and geochemistry. Knowledge gained in previous GMO modules is combined with fundamental knowledge about economics to

  6. Assessment of the U.S. outer continental shelf environmental studies program. 1. Physical oceanography. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Federal responsibility for oil and gas development on the U.S. outer continental shelf (OCS) resides with the Minerals Management Service (MMS) of the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI). The DOI's Environmental Studies Program (ESP) is the program through which MMS conducts environmental studies on the OCS and collects information to prepare environmental impact statements (EISs). It appeared to MMS in 1986 that the time was ripe to assess the status of the present program and to explore the needs for future studies. MMS requested an evaluation of the adequacy and applicability of ESP studies, a review of the general state of knowledge in the appropriate disciplines, and recommendations for future studies. Three panels were established, one of which, the Physical Oceanography Panel, investigated the physical oceanographic aspects of the ESP, the subject of the report, which is the first of three in a series. In reviewing the ESP's physical oceanography program, the panel evaluated the quality and relevance of studies carried out in waters under federal control, which extend from the limits of state jurisdictions (3-12 miles offshore) and include the central and outer continental shelf waters and the continental slope

  7. Current and future prospects for the application of systematic theoretical methods to the study of problems in physical oceanography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, A., E-mail: adrian.constantin@kcl.ac.uk [Department of Mathematics, King' s College London, Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom); Faculty of Mathematics, University of Vienna, Oskar-Morgenstern-Platz 1, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Johnson, R.S., E-mail: r.s.johnson@ncl.ac.uk [School of Mathematics & Statistics, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-07

    Highlights: • Systematic theoretical methods in studies of equatorial ocean dynamics. • Linear wave-current interactions in stratified flows. • Exact solutions – Kelvin waves, azimuthal non-uniform currents. • Three-dimensional nonlinear currents. • Hamiltonian formulation for the governing equations and for structure-preserving/enhancing approximations. - Abstract: This essay is a commentary on the pivotal role of systematic theoretical methods in physical oceanography. At some level, there will always be a conflict between theory and experiment/data collection: Which is pre-eminent? Which should come first? This issue appears to be particularly marked in physical oceanography, to the extreme detriment of the development of the subject. It is our contention that the classical theory of fluids, coupled with methods from the theory of differential equations, can play a significant role in carrying the subject, and our understanding, forward. We outline the philosophy behind a systematic theoretical approach, highlighting some aspects of equatorial ocean dynamics where these methods have already been successful, paving the way for much more in the future and leading, we expect, to the better understanding of this and many other types of ocean flow. We believe that the ideas described here promise to reveal a rich and beautiful dynamical structure.

  8. Putting the Deep Biosphere on the Map for Oceanography Courses: Gas Hydrates As a Case Study for the Deep Biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, J. J.; Briggs, B. R.

    2014-12-01

    The ocean is essential for life on our planet. It covers 71% of the Earth's surface, is the source of the water we drink, the air we breathe, and the food we eat. Yet, the exponential growth in human population is putting the ocean and thus life on our planet at risk. However, based on student evaluations from our introductory oceanography course it is clear that our students have deficiencies in ocean literacy that impact their ability to recognize that the ocean and humans are inextricably connected. Furthermore, life present in deep subsurface marine environments is also interconnected to the study of the ocean, yet the deep biosphere is not typically covered in undergraduate oceanography courses. In an effort to improve student ocean literacy we developed an instructional module on the deep biosphere focused on gas hydrate deposits. Specifically, our module utilizes Google Earth and cutting edge research about microbial life in the ocean to support three inquiry-based activities that each explore different facets of gas hydrates (i.e. environmental controls, biologic controls, and societal implications). The relevant nature of the proposed module also makes it possible for instructors of introductory geology courses to modify module components to discuss related topics, such as climate, energy, and geologic hazards. This work, which will be available online as a free download, is a solid contribution toward increasing the available teaching resources focused on the deep biosphere for geoscience educators.

  9. Patient-centred performance monitoring systems and multi-agency care provision: a case study using a stakeholder participative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, N A; Goddard, A R; Philp, I; Bray, J

    1998-05-01

    We describe the processes involved in the development of an information system which can assess how care given by a number of agencies could be monitored by those agencies. In particular, it addresses the problem of sharing information as the boundaries of each agency are crossed. It focuses on the care of one specific patient group--the rehabilitation of elderly patients in the community, which provided an ideal multi-agency setting. It also describes: how a stakeholder participative approach to information system development was undertaken, based in part on the Soft Systems Methodology (SSM) approach (Checkland, 1981, 1990); some of the difficulties encountered in using such an approach; and the ways in which these were addressed. The paper goes on to describe an assessment tool called SCARS (the Southampton Community Ability Rating Scale). It concludes by reflecting on the management lessons arising from this project. It also observes, inter alia, how stakeholders have a strong preference for simpler, non-IT based systems, and comments on the difficulties encountered by stakeholders in attempting to reconcile their perceptions of the needs of their discipline or specialty with a more patient-centred approach of an integrated system.

  10. The social oceanography of top oceanic predators and the decline of sharks: A call for a new field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Peter J.

    2010-07-01

    The decline of top oceanic predators (TOPs), such as great sharks, and worldwide erosion of the marine food web is among the most important functional changes in marine systems. Yet, even though human pressures on sharks are one of the most important factors in the collapse of TOPs, the social science of shark fishing has not kept pace with the biophysical science. Such a gap highlights the need for a marine social science, and this paper uses the case of sharks to illustrate some advances that a coherent marine social science community could bring to science and sustainability, and calls for the development of this new field. Social oceanography is proposed as a “discursive space” that will allow multiple social science and humanities disciplines to holistically study and bring insight to a diverse but essential community. Such a community will not provide answers for the physical sciences, but it will add a new understanding of the contingencies that riddle social behavior that ultimately interact with marine systems. Such a field should reflect the broad and diverse approaches, epistemologies, philosophies of science and foci that are in the human disciplines themselves. Social oceanography would complete the triumvirate of biological and physical oceanography where human systems profoundly impact these other areas. This paper tests the theory that institutional rules are contingent on social priorities and paradigms. I used content analysis of all available (1995-2006) State of the World Fisheries and Aquaculture (SOFIA) reports from the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) to measure the symbolic behavior-i.e., what they say-as an indication of the value of sharks in world fisheries. Similar tests were also performed for marine journals and the Convention on Migratory Species of Wild Animals to corroborate these findings. Then, I present an institutional analysis of all international capacity building and regulatory institutions as they

  11. Council celebrates CERN Control Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    With the unveiling of its new sign, the CERN Control Centre was officially inaugurated on Thursday 16 March. To celebrate its startup, CERN Council members visited the sleek centre, a futuristic-looking room filled with a multitude of monitoring screens.

  12. The Aube centre. 1997 statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    Since January 1992 the Aube centre ensures the storage of 90% of the short life radioactive wastes produced in France. This educational booklet describes the organization of the activities in the centre from the storage of wastes to the radioactivity surveillance of the environment (air, surface and ground waters, river sediments, plants and milk). (J.S.)

  13. CANDU 9 Control Centre Mockup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webster, A.; Macbeth, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the design process being followed, the benefits of applying a systematic design using human factors engineering, presents an overview of the CANDU 9 control centre mockup facility, illustrates the control centre mockup with photographs of the 3D CADD model and the full scale mockup, and provides an update on the current status of the project. (author)

  14. RTEMS CENTRE- RTEMS Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Helder; Constantino, Alexandre; Freitas, Daniel; Coutinho, Manuel; Faustino, Sergio; Sousa, Jose; Dias, Luis; Zulianello, Marco

    2010-08-01

    During the last two years, EDISOFT's RTEMS CENTRE team [1], jointly with the European Space Agency and with the support of the worldwide RTEMS community [2], have been developing an activity to facilitate the qualification of the real-time operating system RTEMS (Real-Time Operating System for Multiprocessor Systems). This paper intends to give a high level visibility of the progress and the results obtained in the RTEMS Improvement [3] activity. The primary objective [4] of the project is to improve the RTEMS product, its documentation and to facilitate the qualification of RTEMS for future space missions, taking into consideration the specific operational requirements. The sections below provide a brief overview of the RTEMS operating system and the activities performed in the RTEMS Improvement project, which includes the selection of API managers to be qualified, the tailoring process, the requirements analysis, the reverse engineering and design of the RTEMS, the quality assurance process, the ISVV activities, the test campaign, the results obtained, the criticality analysis and the facilitation of qualification process.

  15. Thailand's nuclear research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamkate, P.

    2001-01-01

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Thailand, is charged with three main tasks, namely, Nuclear Energy development Plan, Utilization of Nuclear Based technology Plan and Science and Technology Plan. Its activities are centred around the research reactor TRR-1/M1. The main areas of contribution include improvement in agricultural production, nuclear medicine and nuclear oncology, health care and nutrition, increasing industrial productivity and efficiency and, development of cadre competent in nuclear science and technology. The office also has the responsibility of ensuring nuclear safety, radiation safety and nuclear waste management. The office has started a new project in 1997 under which a 10 MWt research reactor, an isotope production facility and a waste processing and storage facility would be set up by General Atomic of USA. OAEP has a strong linkage with the IAEA and has been an active participant in RCA programmes. In the future OAEP will enhance its present capabilities in the use of radioisotopes and radiation and look into the possibility of using nuclear energy as an alternative energy resource. (author)

  16. The Adult Education Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Drofenik

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The Adult Education Centre has drafted the professional foundations for the Master Plan for Adult Education which, according to the provisions stipulated in the Adult Education Act, will be adopted by the Parliament. The Master Plan specifies the goals, priority target groups, priority areas and a draft financial projection. The professional foundations include the ratings of adult education in studies about adult education trends in Slovenia and abroad. The paper presents research results relevant to the Master Plan and documents issued by international organizations, including research into the Decisive Global Factors of EC Development after 1992, the Report of Ministers of the OECD, and the Economic Development Strategy of Slovenia . All the above-mentioned documents emphasize the importance of life­long learning in achieving a more fulfilling personal life, faster economic growth and maintenance of social ties. In principle, the same views are shared in Slovenia. However, in practice the "multi-dimensional" nature of adult education often gives way to "education for production". This is why we especially stress the importance of adult education in the social and cultural context.

  17. An Assessment of Student Learning in an Online Oceanography Course: Five Years After Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, D. L.

    2002-12-01

    The results of assessing student learning in an online oceanography class offered over the past five years are compiled to reveal several general trends. In order to understand the context of these trends, it is important to first note that SJSU has a two-tiered general education program consisting of a category of core courses for frosh and sophomores and an advanced category for juniors and seniors, most of whom are community college transfers. The course described in this study is in the latter category and therefore composed largely of seniors. Enrollments in the course have exploded from 6 students in a pilot section offered during the 1998 fall semester to over 170 students in the summer semester of 2002. The course is now offered in both semesters of the academic year with four sections offered during 2002 summer session as part of a system-wide conversion to year-round operation. No other course, be it classroom, hybrid or online, in the general education category has experienced the level of student demand as this online course. All sections of the online course reach enrollment limits in the first days of registration with an equal or greater number of students turned away each semester. More female, students of color, returning students and K-12 in-service teachers enroll in the online sections than in the equivalent classroom sections of the course. Students enroll in the online section for the convenience of self-paced learning since attending a classroom section is not a viable option. Enrollments in concurrent classroom sections have not been negatively impacted by the addition of online sections. Enrollment attrition is higher in the first few days of the online course, but similar to that experienced in the classroom sections, once the class is underway. However, student requests for incompletes tend to be somewhat higher in the online course, especially during the summer offerings. Learning outcomes are reviewed at the beginning of the course and

  18. The Aube centre; Le Centre de l`Aube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This educational booklet is devoted to a general presentation of the Aube radioactive wastes storage centre. After a short presentation of the Andra, the French national agency for the management of radioactive wastes, it gives some general information about radioactive wastes (origin, classification), containers (quality assurance and different types), wastes transportation (planning, safety), and about the Aube centre itself: description, treatment and conditioning of drums (compacting and injection), storage facilities, geological situation of the site, and environmental controls. (J.S.)

  19. Introducing the PET Centre Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belohlavek, O.

    2001-01-01

    The PET Centre Prague (www.homolka.cz/nm) was established in 1999 as the outcome of a joint project of the public Na Homolce Hospital and the Nuclear Research Institute Rez, plc, the Czech radiopharmaceutical producer. Technical and financial assistance was provided by the International Atomic Energy Agency, which perceived the Centre as its model project that could serve as a guide for the development of PET centres in countries sharing a comparable level of development with the Czech Republic. The article maps the history of the project, its design, workplace lay-out and equipment, radiation protection arrangements and spectrum of the first approx. 3000 investigations. (author)

  20. Why is the Bay of Bengal less productive during summer monsoon compared to the Arabian Sea?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrasannaKumar, S.; Muraleedharan, P.M.; Prasad, T.G.; Gauns, M.; Ramaiah, N.; DeSouza, S.N.; Sardessai, S.; Madhupratap, M.

    the European Center for Medium Weather Forecast (ECMWF) and surface fluxes from the Southampton Oceanography Climatology (SOC). The model vertical resolution is 1m with 200 levels. Model integration is started during April (using Levitus temperature...

  1. Seasonal variability of upper-layer geostrophic transport in the tropical Indian Ocean during 1992-1996 along TOGA-I XBT tracklines

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Sarma, M.S.S.; Lambata, B.P.; Gopalakrishna, V.V.; Pednekar, S.M.; Rao, A.S.; Luis, A.J.; Kaka, A.R.; Rao, L.V.G.

    (2000) 1569}1582 1581 Subrahmanyam, B., 1998. A study of the Indian Ocean Circulation using satellite observations and model simulations. Ph.D. Thesis. University of Southampton, Department of Oceanography, UK., p. 251, unpublished. Suryanarayana, A...

  2. The centre of the action

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The CERN Control Centre (CCC) has all the ingredients of an action movie control room: hundreds of screens, technicians buzzing in and out, huge floor-to-ceiling windows revealing the looming vista of a mountain range, flashing lights, microphones… This is the place where not just the LHC, but the whole of CERN’s accelerator complex and technical support is based - truly the centre of the action at CERN.

  3. Training centres - organization and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovar, P.

    1986-01-01

    In the lecture 'Training centres - organization and management' some principles and requirements which influence the organization, management and activity pattern of nuclear training centres, are briefly introduced. It is demonstrated, step by step, how these general principles are implemented in the development of the Czechoslovak nuclear power programme, it means, how the training of the NPP personnel proceeds in Czechoslovak nuclear training centres. General principles which are selected: a connection between the capacity of the training centre and the scope and needs of the nuclear power programme, a position of the training center within the institutional set-up, a structure and organization of the training system which complies with the system of NPP construction, reflect the pattern and the activity of the nuclear training centre and nuclear power technical level, a research group of workers in the nuclear training centre, main tasks and technical facilities, management of the training process and a transfer of knowledge and research results into the training process. The lecture is supplemented by pictures and slides. (orig.)

  4. RTEMS Centre - Support and Maintenance Centre to RTEMS Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, H.; Constantino, A.; Freitas, D.; Coutinho, M.; Faustino, S.; Mota, M.; Colaço, P.; Sousa, J.; Dias, L.; Damjanovic, B.; Zulianello, M.; Rufino, J.

    2009-05-01

    RTEMS CENTRE - Support and Maintenance Centre to RTEMS Operating System is a joint ESA/Portuguese Task Force initiative to develop a support and maintenance centre to the Real-Time Executive for Multiprocessor Systems (RTEMS). This paper gives a high level visibility of the progress, the results obtained and the future work in the RTEMS CENTRE [6] and in the RTEMS Improvement [7] projects. RTEMS CENTRE started officially in November 2006, with the RTEMS 4.6.99.2 version. A full analysis of RTEMS operating system was produced. The architecture was analysed in terms of conceptual, organizational and operational concepts. The original objectives [1] of the centre were primarily to create and maintain technical expertise and competences in this RTOS, to develop a website to provide the European Space Community an entry point for obtaining support (http://rtemscentre.edisoft.pt), to design, develop, maintain and integrate some RTEMS support tools (Timeline Tool, Configuration and Management Tools), to maintain flight libraries and Board Support Packages, to develop a strong relationship with the World RTEMS Community and finally to produce some considerations in ARINC-653, DO-178B and ECSS E-40 standards. RTEMS Improvement is the continuation of the RTEMS CENTRE. Currently the RTEMS, version 4.8.0, is being facilitated for a future qualification. In this work, the validation material is being produced following the Galileo Software Standards Development Assurance Level B [5]. RTEMS is being completely tested, errors analysed, dead and deactivated code removed and tests produced to achieve 100% statement and decision coverage of source code [2]. The SW to exploit the LEON Memory Management Unit (MMU) hardware will be also added. A brief description of the expected implementations will be given.

  5. Applications of 14C-AMS on archaeology, climate, environment, geology, oceanography and biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomes, P.R.S.; Anjos, R.M.; Macario, K.D.; Santos, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    The first experiment discusses the chronology of prehistoric settlements of the central-south Brazilian coast. In the southern Brazilian coast there is a high density of these shellmounds, dated in general between 6,000 and 2,000 BP. A charcoal sample from a coastal shellmound of Rio de Janeiro State was dated by 14 C-AMS to 7,860±80 years BP. This is an unexpected result that pulls back by some two thousand years the antiquity consensually accepted for the settlement of that region. We performed an experiment concerning the isotopic signature of the local waters of an important Brazilian coastal upwelling, located in Arraial do Cabo, R.J., with applications in the fields of Oceanography and Marine Ecology. We assess the contribution of the wind-driven coastal upwelling of Arraial do Cabo to the local biological production. The variation of the carbon isotopic compositions was investigated in a population of a seaweed. Upwelling events were simulated in the laboratory, in order to study three regimes: total upwelling (SACW), partial upwelling (mixed water) and no-upwelling (TW). Water samples were collected at 70 m depth (SACW) and at 10 m (TW). The seaweed was cultivated during seven days, in controlled conditions, into the three mentioned types of water. The results of 14 C-AMS measurements in the seaweed tissue show a clear indication of difference in the isotopic signature of the water sources, allowing to infer the differences of the water sources. We believe that the present results contribute to opening new perspectives for the use of 14 C as a tracer of the biological production in upwelling areas all over the world. The next reported experiment is on climate at the Amazon region. An increase in the Hg flux is a strong indicator of disturbance in a forest ecosystem related to abrupt changes in the water balance, and its changes reflect changes in the ocean and average regional temperatures. In regions where the geological background of mercury is

  6. The ideal Atomic Centre; Le Centre Atomique ideal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mas, R [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1965-07-01

    The author presents considerations which should prove to be of interest to all those who have to design, to construct and to operate a nuclear research centre. A large number of the ideas presented can also be applied to non-nuclear scientific research centres. In his report the author reviews: various problems with which the constructor is faced: ground-plan, infrastructure, buildings and the large units of scientific equipment in the centre, and those problems facing the director: maintenance, production, supplies, security. The author stresses the relationship which ought to exist between the research workers and the management. With this aim in view he proposes the creation of National School for Administration in Research which would train administrative executives for public or private organisations; they would be specialised in the fields of fundamental or applied research. (author) [French] L'auteur propose une base de reflexions a tous ceux qui doivent concevoir, realiser et faire vivre un Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires. Un grand nombre des idees exprimees peut d'ailleurs s'appliquer a un Centre d'Etudes Scientifiques non nucleaires. Dans son ouvrage, l'auteur passe en revue les differents problemes qui se posent au constructeur: plan, masse, infrastructure, batiments et grands appareils du Centre, et ceux qu'a a resoudre le directeur: entretien, fabrication, approvisionnements, securite. L'auteur insiste sur l'aspect des rapports qui doivent exister entre les chercheurs et ceux qui les administrent. Il propose a cette fin la creation d'une Ecole Nationale d'Administration de la Recherche qui formerait des cadres administratifs pour les organismes publics ou prives, specialises dans la Recherche fondamentale ou appliquee. (auteur)

  7. Temperature, salinity, chlorophyll pigments, nutrients and other parameters as part of the ECOHAB-GOM: The Ecology and Oceanography of Toxic Alexandrium Blooms in the Gulf of Maine project (NODC Accession 0064309)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The subproject described here is one of several components of ECOHAB-GOM: The Ecology and Oceanography of Toxic Alexandrium Blooms in the Gulf of Maine, a multi-PI,...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-11-05 to 2016-02-18 (NCEI Accession 0145664)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-03-10 to 2016-06-28 (NCEI Accession 0155280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp064 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-05-17 to 2016-08-23 (NCEI Accession 0156410)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp050 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2016-03-30 to 2016-07-20 (NCEI Accession 0155979)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp064 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-10-30 to 2016-02-03 (NCEI Accession 0145715)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-09-13 to 2016-12-14 (NCEI Accession 0157580)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp056 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2017-03-29 to 2017-07-01 (NCEI Accession 0164292)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp039 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-01-22 to 2015-07-16 (NCEI Accession 0138033)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp030 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-01-09 to 2015-04-27 (NCEI Accession 0137984)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp035 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-03-31 to 2015-07-16 (NCEI Accession 0138032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  18. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-05-01 to 2014-08-13 (NCEI Accession 0137974)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  19. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp001 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2015-01-12 to 2015-04-08 (NCEI Accession 0137973)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp063 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-02-03 to 2016-05-17 (NCEI Accession 0153552)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp063 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-09-15 to 2014-11-04 (NCEI Accession 0137991)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp052 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-08-14 to 2015-01-09 (NCEI Accession 0137990)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp050 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2015-02-06 to 2015-05-14 (NCEI Accession 0137988)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp018 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2014-06-10 to 2014-09-21 (NCEI Accession 0138030)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp053 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2015-08-29 to 2015-12-13 (NCEI Accession 0145713)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-11-30 to 2017-03-14 (NCEI Accession 0162197)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp028 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-08-17 to 2016-09-16 (NCEI Accession 0156601)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp031 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2015-09-10 to 2015-12-16 (NCEI Accession 0145667)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-11-25 to 2014-11-27 (NCEI Accession 0137979)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp039 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-02-18 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0156570)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp028 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-11-24 to 2016-03-10 (NCEI Accession 0145666)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp028 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-06-28 to 2016-08-23 (NCEI Accession 0156400)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-08-13 to 2015-11-18 (NCEI Accession 0145665)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-06-11 to 2014-09-15 (NCEI Accession 0137978)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp053 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2016-07-20 to 2016-10-20 (NCEI Accession 0156796)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp041 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-09-08 to 2016-12-14 (NCEI Accession 0157607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp042 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2016-11-04 to 2017-02-23 (NCEI Accession 0161310)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  18. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp052 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-07-28 to 2016-02-18 (NCEI Accession 0145670)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  19. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp064 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the |Coastal Waters of California from 2016-12-14 to 2017-03-29 (NCEI Accession 0162258)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp024 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2017-01-30 to 2017-05-08 (NCEI Accession 0162888)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp028 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-12-14 to 2017-03-28 (NCEI Accession 0162257)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp001 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2016-08-15 to 2016-11-16 (NCEI Accession 0157002)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp026 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2017-04-20 to 2017-07-31 (NCEI Accession 0164709)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp054 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-03-17 to 2016-10-11 (NCEI Accession 0156772)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp030 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-02-18 to 2016-06-02 (NCEI Accession 0153551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp055 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2017-03-14 to 2017-06-28 (NCEI Accession 0163867)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp052 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-09-06 to 2017-03-14 (NCEI Accession 0162198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp030 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2017-04-05 to 2017-07-11 (NCEI Accession 0164208)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2017-03-28 to 2017-07-11 (NCEI Accession 0164207)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp049 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2017-05-18 to 2017-08-24 (NCEI Accession 0165396)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group. (This deployment supported by NOAA.) The National Centers for...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp030 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-09-06 to 2016-11-30 (NCEI Accession 0157115)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  12. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-06-02 to 2016-09-06 (NCEI Accession 0156569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  13. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp006 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2015-12-14 to 2016-03-30 (NCEI Accession 0153787)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  14. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp028 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-06-05 to 2014-09-05 (NCEI Accession 0137981)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  15. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp047 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-08-27 to 2016-03-17 (NCEI Accession 0145668)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  16. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp027 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2015-06-16 to 2015-09-23 (NCEI Accession 0145712)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  17. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-09-23 to 2015-01-09 (NCEI Accession 0137975)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  18. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp063 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-08-23 to 2016-08-28 (NCEI Accession 0156530)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  19. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp011 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-04-27 to 2015-08-13 (NCEI Accession 0137976)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  20. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp030 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-08-13 to 2014-11-25 (NCEI Accession 0137983)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  1. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp040 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-04-09 to 2015-07-14 (NCEI Accession 0138034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  2. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp051 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-11-12 to 2015-01-08 (NCEI Accession 0137989)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  3. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp020 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2015-12-16 to 2016-03-30 (NCEI Accession 0153550)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  4. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp048 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-01-27 to 2015-08-27 (NCEI Accession 0145669)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  5. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp025 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2015-01-08 to 2015-04-09 (NCEI Accession 0137980)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  6. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp048 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-01-16 to 2014-07-29 (NCEI Accession 0138035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  7. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp047 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2014-06-23 to 2015-01-22 (NCEI Accession 0137987)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  8. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp020 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2014-08-03 to 2014-12-12 (NCEI Accession 0137977)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  9. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp031 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean from 2014-04-12 to 2014-08-02 (NCEI Accession 0138031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  10. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp018 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Solomon Sea from 2016-02-18 to 2016-05-28 (NCEI Accession 0153549)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  11. Physical trajectory profile data from glider sp049 deployed by University of California - San Diego; Scripps Institution of Oceanography in the Coastal Waters of California from 2016-04-05 to 2016-06-02 (NCEI Accession 0153788)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Spray glider profile data from Scripps Institution of Oceanography Instrument Development Group (supported by NOAA). The National Centers for Environmental...

  12. The Belgian nuclear research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moons, F.

    2001-01-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre is almost exclusively devoted to nuclear R and D and services and is able to generate 50% of its resources (out of 75 million Euro) by contract work and services. The main areas of research include nuclear reactor safety, radioactive waste management, radiation protection and safeguards. The high flux reactor BR2 is extensively used to test fuel and structural materials. PWR-plant BR3 is devoted to the scientific analysis of decommissioning problems. The Centre has a strong programme on the applications of radioisotopes and radiation in medicine and industry. The centre has plans to develop an accelerator driven spallation neutron source for various applications. It has initiated programmes to disseminate correct information on issues of nuclear energy production and non-energy nuclear applications to different target groups. It has strong linkages with the IAEA, OECD-NEA and the Euratom. (author)

  13. Technical support and emergency centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohun, L.; Kapisovsk y, M.

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents technical support and emergency management center which will be on two places: Mochovce NPP Emergency Centre (Technical support center and Support working center) and Reserve Emergency Centre in Levice (Reserve emergency center and Environmental Evaluation Center). The main aims of the emergency management centers are: the management and coordination of all persons and organisations; provision of the all information needed to evaluation of the accident and its mitigation; continuous evaluation of the potential or real radiological consequences; taking measure for an early notification of the governmental bodies and the organizations, warning and protection of the public; and other aims. In the next part the data for technical support and emergency centre are discussed

  14. Presentation of TVO's visitor's centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aemmaelae, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    There are four nuclear power plant units in Finland, two of which are PWR's owned by Imatran Voima Oy. The two BWR units are located at Olkiluoto and owned by Teollisuuden Voima Oy. This presentation tells about TVO's concept of informing the visitors at Olkiluoto. At the site there are located, in addition to the two nuclear power plant units, the intermediate storage for spent fuel, the repository for low and medium-active waste as well as the training centre. At the Olkiluoto Visitor's Centre all the activities of the company are presented using varied audio-visual aids. The centre has several exhibits and there are also different installations to show how the plant works. (author)

  15. International Development Research Centre Act Loi sur le Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    1 juin 2009 ... research includes any scientific or technical inquiry or experimentation that is .... data centres and facilities for research and other activ- ities;. (b) initiate and ..... Loi sur la pension de la fonction publique ne s'applique pas aux ...

  16. Scheduling participants of Assessment Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysgaard, Jens; Løber, Janni

      Assessment Centres are used as a tool for psychologists and coaches to observe a number of dimensions in a person's behaviour and test his/her potential within a number of chosen focus areas. This is done in an intense course, with a number of different exercises which expose each participant...... Centres usually last two days and involve 3-6 psychologists or trained coaches as assessors. An entire course is composed of a number of rounds, with each round having its individual duration. In each round, the participants are divided into a number of groups with prespecifed pairing of group sizes...

  17. Training centres in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-04-15

    Early 1958 the Brazilian representative on the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency - supported by the Governors from Argentina and Guatemala -proposed that a study should be made of the possibility of setting up one or more atomic energy training centres in Latin America. On the Board's recommendation, the Director General of the Agency appointed a fact-finding team to make anon-the-spot study. In drafting this report the team was invited to consider the following points: (a) The need for establishing one or more regional training centres; (b) Existing facilities that are being or could be used for training, together with technical data concerning them; (c) The general scientific technological and industrial conditions of the countries visited insofar as they have a bearing on their training needs and capabilities. The authors of the report conclude that 'a training centre in radio-botany should provide vitally needed knowledge and vitally needed specialists to all the agricultural installations in Latin America. A training centre like this might provide an excellent model upon which to base training centres in other areas'. The report recommends that: 1. The Agency should meet the requests of Latin American universities by, for example, supplying equipment and sending experts; 2. At least one specialized training centre should be established as soon as possible. Taking as an example the field of radio-botany, such a centre would provide trained specialists in radio-botany to agricultural institutions throughout Latin America and also provide basic research results vital to agriculture. The cost of new facilities might be of the order of $7 500 000, with an annual budget of approximately $650 000. Staff required: 40 scientists and 175 employees; 3. Whenever it appears feasible to gather necessary staff of high creative ability and established productivity and when funds can be made available for facilities, equipment and operating costs, at

  18. Training centres in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    Early 1958 the Brazilian representative on the Board of Governors of the International Atomic Energy Agency - supported by the Governors from Argentina and Guatemala -proposed that a study should be made of the possibility of setting up one or more atomic energy training centres in Latin America. On the Board's recommendation, the Director General of the Agency appointed a fact-finding team to make anon-the-spot study. In drafting this report the team was invited to consider the following points: (a) The need for establishing one or more regional training centres; (b) Existing facilities that are being or could be used for training, together with technical data concerning them; (c) The general scientific technological and industrial conditions of the countries visited insofar as they have a bearing on their training needs and capabilities. The authors of the report conclude that 'a training centre in radio-botany should provide vitally needed knowledge and vitally needed specialists to all the agricultural installations in Latin America. A training centre like this might provide an excellent model upon which to base training centres in other areas'. The report recommends that: 1. The Agency should meet the requests of Latin American universities by, for example, supplying equipment and sending experts; 2. At least one specialized training centre should be established as soon as possible. Taking as an example the field of radio-botany, such a centre would provide trained specialists in radio-botany to agricultural institutions throughout Latin America and also provide basic research results vital to agriculture. The cost of new facilities might be of the order of $7 500 000, with an annual budget of approximately $650 000. Staff required: 40 scientists and 175 employees; 3. Whenever it appears feasible to gather necessary staff of high creative ability and established productivity and when funds can be made available for facilities, equipment and operating costs, at

  19. Logistics centres development in Latvia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kabashkin

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the situation where a large increase in trade and freight transport volumes in the Baltic Sea region (BSR is expected and in which the BSR is facing a major economic restructuring, eff orts to achieve more integrated and sustainable transport and communication links within the BSR are needed. One of these eff orts is the development of logistics centres (LCs and their networking, which will continue to have an impact on improving communication links, spatial planning practices and approaches, logistics chain development and the promotion of sustainable transport modes. These factors will refl ect on logistics processes both in major gateway cities and in remote BSR areas. The importance of logistics systems as a whole is not seen clearly enough. Logistics actors see that logistics operations are not appreciated as much as other fi elds of activity. In addition, logistics centres and the importance of logistics activities to the business life of areas and the employment rate should be brought up better. In the paper main goal and tasks of national approach to LCs development are discussed. Strategic focus of new activities in this area is on the integration of various networks within and between logistics centres in order to improve and develop the quality of logistics networks as well as to spatially widen the networking activities. The key objectives are to integrate the links between logistics centres, ports and other logistics operators in a functional and sustainable way, to promote spatial integration by creating sustainable and integrated approaches to spatial planning of logistics centres and transport infrastructure, to improve ICT-based networking and communication practices of the fi elds of transport and logistics and to increase the competence of logistics centres and associated actors by organising educational and training events. The current activities include, for example, the creation of measures for transport networking and

  20. Topex/Poseidon: A United States/France mission. Oceanography from space: The oceans and climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The TOPEX/POSEIDON space mission, sponsored by NASA and France's space agency, the Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales (CNES), will give new observations of the Earth from space to gain a quantitative understanding of the role of ocean currents in climate change. Rising atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other 'greenhouse gases' produced as a result of human activities could generate a global warming, followed by an associated rise in sea level. The satellite will use radar altimetry to measure sea-surface height and will be tracked by three independent systems to yield accurate topographic maps over the dimensions of entire ocean basins. The satellite data, together with the Tropical Ocean and Global Atmosphere (TOGA) program and the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) measurements, will be analyzed by an international scientific team. By merging the satellite observations with TOGA and WOCE findings, the scientists will establish the extensive data base needed for the quantitative description and computer modeling of ocean circulation. The ocean models will eventually be coupled with atmospheric models to lay the foundation for predictions of global climate change.

  1. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume IV. Bibliography and supporting data for physical oceanography. Final report. [421 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Volume IV contains the following: bibliography; appendices for supporting data for physical oceanography, and summary of the physical oceanography along the western Louisiana coast.

  2. Cumulative and Synergistic Effects of Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use Physical Oceanography Component: Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can We Listen for Open Water?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Physical, Biological, and Acoustic Signals on Marine Mammal Habitat Use Physical Oceanography Component: Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can we listen for... Soundscapes Under Sea Ice: Can we listen for open water? 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...the source. These different sounds can be described as “ soundscapes ”, and graphically represented by comparing two or more features of the sound

  3. Formaldehyde in the Galactic Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, R.J.; Few, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Formaldehyde 6-cm absorption in the direction of the Galactic Centre has been surveyed using the Jodrell Bank MK II radio telescope (beam-width 10 x 9 arcmin). The observations sample the region - 2 0 = 0 and - 0 0 .5 = 0 .5, with a velocity range of 620 km s -1 , a velocity resolution of 2.1 km s -1 and an rms noise level of approximately 0.03 K. The data are presented as contour maps showing line temperature as a function of latitude and velocity (b-V maps) and as a function of longitude and velocity (l-V maps). Similar maps of the line-to-continuum ratio are also presented. The radial distribution of formaldehyde (H 2 CO) in the Galactic Centre region is derived using two different kinematic models which give similar results. Formaldehyde is strongly concentrated in the Galactic Centre in a layer of latitude extent approximately 0 0 .5 and longitude extent approximately 4 0 which contains one quarter of all the H 2 CO in the Galaxy. The distribution is centred on l approximately 1 0 . The individual H 2 CO features are described in detail. (author)

  4. The DEMETER Science Mission Centre

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lagoutte, D.; Brochot, J.; Y.; de Carvalho, D.; Elie, F.; Harivelo, F.; Hobara, Y.; Madrias, L.; Parrot, M.; Pincon, J. L.; Berthelier, J. J.; Peschard, D.; Seran, E.; Gangloff, M.; Sauvaud, J. A.; Lebreton, J. P.; Štverák, Štěpán; Trávníček, Pavel M.; Grygorczuk, J.; Slominski, J.; Wronowski, R.; Barbier, S.; Bernard, P.; Gaboriaud, A.; Wallut, J. M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 5 (2006), s. 428-440 ISSN 0032-0633 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : Mission Centre * Data processing Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.509, year: 2006

  5. CENTRE OF THE MAIN INTERESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIANA DELEANU

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The centre of the main interests of the debtor is a legal tool meant to settle conflicts that can arise between jurisdictions in cross-border insolvencies, based on the principles of mutual recognition and co-operation.

  6. Oceanography and Geoscience Scholars at Texas A&M University Funded through the NSF S-STEM (Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, M. J.; Gardner, W. D.

    2016-02-01

    Over the last seven years we have led the creation and implementation of the Oceanography and Geoscience Scholars programs at Texas A&M University. Through these programs we have been able to provide scholarship support for 92 undergraduates in Geosciences and 29 graduate students in Oceanography. Fifty-seven undergraduate scholars have graduated in Geosciences: 30 undergraduate students in Meteorology, 7 in Geology, and 20 in Environmental Geosciences. Two students have graduated in other STEM disciplines. Twenty-four students are in the process of completing their undergraduate degrees in STEM disciplines. Twenty-three students have graduated with MS or PhD degrees in Oceanography and five PhD students are completing their dissertations. As specified in the program solicitation all of the scholars are academically talented students with demonstrated financial need as defined by the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid). We have endeavored to recruit students from underrepresented groups. One-third of the undergraduate scholars were from underrepresented groups; 28% of the graduate students. We will present the challenges and successes of these programs.

  7. The CCCB is a cultural centre, not a tourist centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Xirau

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Last February, Barcelona's Centre of Contemporary Culture (CCCB celebrated its first ten years in existence. During this time, this institution has looked to be a showcase to the most modern and innovative cultural expressions focused on reflecting on the concept of the city. In this interview, Josep Ramoneda offers his personal view, as the CCCB's director. He talks of how this cultural project was born, of how the concept of the institution took shape in the CCCB, of its relations with Barcelona's Strategic Plan, of how the project has evolved, of the architectural remodelling of the Casa de la Caritat building for its conversion into a cultural centre, of the relations with other institutions and its future.

  8. Gestion du Centre | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le Comité de gestion du Centre (CGC) est composé des membres de la haute direction du CRDI, notamment les directeurs de nos quatre bureaux régionaux et de nos principaux secteurs de programme. Le CGC travaille en collaboration avec le président afin de soutenir la recherche pour le développement, lui fournissant ...

  9. Proceedings of a workshop on physical oceanography related to the subseabed disposal of high-level nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marietta, M.G.

    1981-04-01

    At this workshop a group of expert scientists: (1) assessed the current state of knowledge with regard to the physical oceanographic questions that must be answered generally if high level nuclear waste is to be disposed of on or under the seabed; (2) discussed physical oceanographic science necessarily related to the US Subseabed Disposal Program; (3) recommended necessary research; and (4) identified other ongoing programs with which important liaisons should be made and continued. This report is a collection of workshop presentations, and recommendations, and a synthesis of topical group recommendations into a unified statement of research needs. The US Seabed Disposal Program is described. The goal is to assess the technical, environmental and engineering feasibility of seabed disposal. The environmental studies program will assess possible ecosystem and health effects from radionuclides which may be released due to accidental leakage. Discussion on the following topics are also included: bottom boundary layer; mixing across isopycnal surfaces; circulation modeling; mesoscale dispersion; deep circulation of the Pacific Ocean; vertical transport at edges; instrumentation; chemical oceanography; plutonium distribution in the Pacific; biology report; chemical dumping report; and low-level waste report

  10. Oceanography at coastal scales: Introduction to the special issue on results from the EU FP7 FIELD_AC project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Arcilla, Agustín; Wolf, Judith; Monbaliu, Jaak

    2014-09-01

    The high-resolution and coupled forecasting of wind, waves and currents, in restricted coastal domains, offer a number of important challenges; these limit the quality of predictions, in the present state-of-the-art. This paper presents the main results obtained for such coastal domains, with reference to a variety of modelling suites and observing networks for: a) Liverpool Bay; b) German Bight; c) Gulf of Venice; and d) the Catalan coast. All of these areas are restricted domains, where boundary effects play a significant role in the resulting inner dynamics. This contribution addresses also the themes of the other papers in this Special Issue, ranging from observations to simulations. Emphasis is placed upon the physics controlling such restricted areas. The text deals also with the transfer to end-users and other interested parties, since the requirements on resolution, accuracy and robustness must be linked to their applications. Finally, some remarks are included on the way forward for coastal oceanography and the synergetic combination of in-situ and remote measurements, with high-resolution 3D simulations.

  11. Late quaternary palaeo-oceanography and palaeo-climatology from sediment cores of the eastern Arctic Ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pagels, U.; Koehler, S.

    1991-01-01

    Box cores recovered along a N-S transect in the Eurasian Basin allow the establishment of a time scale for the Late Quaternary history of the Arctic Ocean, based on stable oxygen isotope stratigraphy and AMS 14 C dating of planktonic foraminifers (N. pachyderma I.c.). This high resolution stratigraphy, in combination with sedimentological investigations (e.g. coarse fraction analysis, carbonate content, productivity of foraminifers), was carried out to reconstruct the glacial and inter-glacial Arctic Ocean palaeo-environment The sediment cores, which can be correlated throughout the sampling area in the Eastern Arctic Ocean, were dated as representing oxygen isotope stages 1 to 4/5. The sedimentation rates varied between a few mm/ka in glacials and approximately one cm/ka during the Holocene. The sediments allow a detailed sedimentological description of the depositional regime and the palaeo-oceanography of the Eastern Arctic Ocean. Changing ratios of biogenic and lithogenic components in the sediments reflect variations in the oceanographic circulation pattern in the Eurasian Basin during the Late Quaternary. Carbonate content (1-9wt.%), productivity of foraminifers (high in interglacial, low in glacial stages) and the terrigenous components are in good correlation with glacial and inter-glacial climatic fluctuations

  12. RTEMS CENTRE- Support and Maintenance CENTRE to RTEMS Operating System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, H.; Constantino, A.; Coutunho, M.; Freitas, D.; Faustino, S.; Mota, M.; Colaço, P.; Zulianello, M.

    2008-08-01

    RTEMS stands for Real-Time Operating System for Multiprocessor Systems. It is a full featured Real Time Operating System that supports a variety of open APIs and interface standards. It provides a high performance environment for embedded applications, including a fixed-priority preemptive/non-preemptive scheduler, a comprehensive set of multitasking operations and a large range of supported architectures. Support and maintenance CENTRE to RTEMS operating system (RTEMS CENTRE) is a joint initiative of ESA-Portugal Task force, aiming to build a strong technical competence in the space flight (on- board) software, to offer support, maintenance and improvements to RTEMS. This paper provides a high level description of the current and future activities of the RTEMS CENTRE. It presents a brief description of the RTEMS operating system, a description of the tools developed and distributed to the community [1] and the improvements to be made to the operating system, including facilitation for the qualification of RTEMS (4.8.0) [2] for the space missions.

  13. Neighbourhood Centres – Organisation, Management and Finance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jacob Norvig

    to identify different financial models and analyse economic sustainability. As regards organisational and management models data were collected through documentary sources and by means of personal interviews and field visits to ten centres. Even within the analysed limited population of centres economic...... public subsidy. Some of the centres have high number of users on a daily basis, whereas others are only rarely used. It is explored how organisation, management and financial set-up differs among the centres. Quantitative data on financial issues and annual accounts of fifteen centres were analysed...... and institutional sustainability varies significantly. In organisational terms centres range from fully-integrated in the municipal administration to independent voluntary managed centres. In terms of financial, or economic, models variation is less pronounced as all centres to some degree are dependent on current...

  14. Institutional Support : Centre for Research and Technology ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    year-old science and technology research centre at Maseno University in western Kenya. The Centre focuses on science and technology research to influence both national policies and development practices at the community level. Currently ...

  15. Japanese maintenance centres strive for greater realism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedderman, J.

    1987-01-01

    Japanese utilities have devoted considerable efforts to ensuring that realistic plant conditions are simulated at their maintenance centres. In some centres, eg that of Kansai Electric Power Co, realism extends to difficult access, limited lighting and restricted ventilation. (author)

  16. Report: Cultural Research Centre (CRC)

    OpenAIRE

    Cross-Cultural Foundation of Uganda

    2010-01-01

    This report arises from research carried out in Iganga and Namutumba districts in late 2006/early 2007 by the Cultural Research Centre (CRC), based in Jinja. Our research focus was to gauge the impact of using Lusoga as a medium of instruction (since 2005 in "pilot" lower primary classes) within and outside the classroom. This initiative was in response to a new set of circumstances in the education sector in Uganda, especially the introduction by Government of teaching in local languages in ...

  17. Radwaste Treatment Centre Jaslovske Bohunice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In this leaflet the Bohunice Radwaste Treatment Centre (BSC RAO) is presented. BSC RAO is designed to process and treat liquid and solid radwaste, arising from the NPP A-1 decommissioning, from NPPs V-1, V-2, and Mochovce operations, as well as institutional radwaste of diverse institutional (hospitals, research institutes) in the Slovak Republic. Transport, sorting, incineration, compacting, concentration and cementation of radwaste as well as monitoring of emission are described

  18. Family-centred care delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo-Bruinsma, Liesha; Hogg, William; Taljaard, Monica; Dahrouge, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine whether models of primary care service delivery differ in their provision of family-centred care (FCC) and to identify practice characteristics associated with FCC. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Primary care practices in Ontario (ie, 35 salaried community health centres, 35 fee-for-service practices, 32 capitation-based health service organizations, and 35 blended remuneration family health networks) that belong to 4 models of primary care service delivery. Participants A total of 137 practices, 363 providers, and 5144 patients. Main outcome measures Measures of FCC in patient and provider surveys were based on the Primary Care Assessment Tool. Statistical analyses were conducted using linear mixed regression models and generalized estimating equations. Results Patient-reported FCC scores were high and did not vary significantly by primary care model. Larger panel size in a practice was associated with lower odds of patients reporting FCC. Provider-reported FCC scores were significantly higher in community health centres than in family health networks (P = .035). A larger number of nurse practitioners and clinical services on-site were both associated with higher FCC scores, while scores decreased as the number of family physicians in a practice increased and if practices were more rural. Conclusion Based on provider and patient reports, primary care reform strategies that encourage larger practices and more patients per family physician might compromise the provision of FCC, while strategies that encourage multidisciplinary practices and a range of services might increase FCC. PMID:24235195

  19. Proposal for the establishment of an International Centre for Resource Management (ICRM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, S.

    1999-01-01

    Energy and physical resources are necessary for development. These resources are not scarce. What is scarce is Technology. Technology is not only machines, it is also knowledge to run these machines. Most of the developing countries waste whatever resources they do have because of a lack of scientists, technologists and modern management. The main reason for underdevelopment of the poor countries is their weak linkage to modern science and technology. The scientists in the developing countries are isolated. Science cannot survive, let alone flourish, in isolation. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy (ICTP) was established to end scientific isolation and to stop brain drain. The centre was established in 1964 under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Now the centre's Management is run by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), ICTP in Trieste started in 1964 with a budget of US$ 355,000. The building was donated by the Government of Italy. Now its budget is about US$ 20 million (90 per cent from Italy). About 4,000 scientists visit the centre every year. Since its establishment about 40,000 scientists from developing countries and 20,000 from developed countries have visited ICTP. The principal purpose of the proposed International Centre for Resource Management will be to foster through seminars, conferences, teaching and research the advancement of better resource utilization and environmental protection in the less developed countries. An international teaching and research institute dealing in energy policy, research and project management, electronic communication, hydrology, water resource management, soil science, climatology, meteorology, oceanography and desertification will provide the developing countries with expertise needed for successful development policy. Since it happens that the major advance in these fields have relevance for development, aid giving

  20. The Aube storage centre: Annual report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    After a presentation of the Aube storage centre, a storage centre for low and intermediate activity nuclear wastes, this report gives an overview of measures related to nuclear security, to radioprotection and to nuclear safety. It indicates the incidents and accidents which occurred in 2010, describes how the centre's wastes are managed, and indicates the actions performed in terms of public information

  1. The DIY Digital Medical Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmis, James Kenneth; Timmis, Kenneth

    2017-09-01

    Healthcare systems worldwide are confronted with major economic, organizational and logistical challenges. Historic evolution of health care has led to significant healthcare sector fragmentation, resulting in systemic inefficiencies and suboptimal resource exploitation. To attain a sustainable healthcare model, fundamental, system-wide improvements that effectively network, and ensure fulfilment of potential synergies between sectors, and include and facilitate coherent strategic planning and organisation of healthcare infrastructure are needed. Critically, they must be specifically designed to sustainably achieve peak performance within the current policy environment for cost-control, and efficiency and quality improvement for service delivery. We propose creation of a new healthcare cluster, to be embedded in existing healthcare systems. It consists of (i) local 24/7 walk-in virtually autonomous do-it-yourself Digital Medical Centres performing routine diagnosis, monitoring, prevention, treatment and standardized documentation and health outcome assessment/reporting, which are online interfaced with (ii) regional 24/7 eClinician Centres providing on-demand clinical supervision/assistance to Digital Medical Centre patients. Both of these are, in turn, online interfaced with (iii) the National Clinical Informatics Centre, which houses the national patient data centre (cloud) and data analysis units that conduct patient- and population-level, personalized and predictive(-medicine) intervention optimization analyses. The National Clinical Informatics Centre also interfaces with biomedical research and prioritizes and accelerates the translation of new discoveries into clinical practice. The associated Health Policy Innovation and Evaluation Centre rapidly integrates new findings with health policy/regulatory discussions. This new cluster would synergistically link all health system components in a circular format, enable not only access by all arms of the health

  2. Advances in limnological and oceanographic research in Italy: the history of the Italian Association of Limnology and Oceanography (AIOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Pusceddu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available On the occasion of the 35th year from the publication of the first issue of the Proceedings of the Italian Association of Limnology and Oceanography (AIOL we present here the results of a meta-analysis of all of the material included in the AIOL Proceedings, with the aim of analysing the last 30 years history of aquatic science in Italy as mirrored by the science presented by the AIOL members. The results of this meta-analysis were presented in September 2006 in Paris, on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of the ‘Institut oce´anographique, fondation Albert Ier, prince de Monaco’. We have screened the 17 volumes of the Proceedings and classified the articles into papers dealing with: (i Biology and Ecology; (ii Chemistry; (iii Physics, and (iv Geology, which represent the most relevant ‘disciplines’ of the AIOL. The articles were also classified as ‘oceanographic’ or ‘limnological’ papers, including all marine and freshwater aspects, respectively. Articles were finally classified on the basis of the environment where the studies were carried out: the water column or the benthic environment. The results of this analysis highlight the presence of wide fluctuations in the number of publications produced by the AIOL scientific community during more then three decades of the activity of the association in Italy. We also show that these fluctuations were associated with variable fluctuations in the availability of funding for aquatic research. The overall picture of the scientific outputs of the AIOL members as revealed by the analysis of the papers published on the AIOL Proceedings indicates that the Association had a fruitful activity during the last part of the past century, but experienced a major flaw during the first years of this century. Only in the last few years such activity restarted, thus giving rise to a possible new deal in the development of aquatic science in Italy.

  3. From Proposal Writing to Data Collection to Presentation: Physical Oceanography Laboratory Class Students Explore the Fundamentals of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijsman, M. C.; Church, I.; Haydel, J.; Martin, K. M.; Shiller, A. M.; Wallace, D. J.; Blancher, J.; Foltz, A.; Griffis, A. M.; Kosciuch, T. J.; Kincketootle, A.; Pierce, E.; Young, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    To better prepare first-year Department of Marine Science MSc students of the University of Southern Mississippi for their science careers, we plan to execute a semester-long Physical Oceanography laboratory class that exposes the enrolled students to all aspects of interdisciplinary research: writing a proposal, planning a cruise, collecting and analyzing data, and presenting their results. Although some of these aspects may be taught in any such class, the incorporation of all these aspects makes this class unique.The fieldwork will be conducted by boat in the Rigolets in Louisiana, a 13-km long tidal strait up to 1 km wide connecting the Mississippi Sound with Lake Pontchartrain. The students have the opportunity to collect ADCP, CTD, multibeam sonar, sediment and water samples.A second novel characteristic of this class is that the instructor partnered with the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, a not for profit environmental advocacy group. The foundation will give an hour-long seminar on the natural history of the study area and its environmental problems. This information provides context for the students' research proposals and allows them to formulate research questions and hypotheses that connect their research objectives to societally relevant issues, such as coastal erosion, salt water intrusion, and water quality. The proposal writing and cruise planning is done in the first month of the 3.5-month long semester. In the second month two surveys are conducted. The remainder of the semester is spent on analysis and reporting. Whenever possible we teach Matlab for the students to use in their data analysis. In this presentation, we will report on the successes and difficulties associated with teaching such a multi-faceted class.

  4. Discussion on 'Centres of excellence' in Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riad, S.

    1999-01-01

    In Africa, Centres of Excellence should be oriented to build up scientific and technological capacity in the four topics of international Monitoring System related technologies, namely, seismic monitoring, hydro acoustic monitoring, infrasound monitoring and radionuclides monitoring. Training programs on these topics should be a major objective. A network of such centres should be established in a number of African countries. Centres should be equipped with means and materials for on-line course dispatch to interested training centres or research institutions. African centres should develop strong relationship among themselves through information and data exchange and sharing, harmonization of training programs. National data centres may be established as a component of the African Centre of Excellence. States Signatories may authorize the establishment of a specific fund to support the activities of the African center

  5. The emergence of urban centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazaro, Evelyn; Agergaard, Jytte; Larsen, Marianne Nylandsted

    by Tanzanian market liberalizations and its long term effects on private enterprise. The paper is based on a study of four EUCs in Tanzania (Ilula, Igowole, Madizini and Kibaigwa) and seeks to answer three research questions: 1) What economic and spatial trends, including national policies, have formed...... the pathway for rural transformation and early densification towards the emergence of urban centres in Tanzania? 2) What characterize the relationship between value chain dynamics and rural densification? 3) How do migration and investments contribute to the consolidation of EUCs as places of attraction...

  6. Centre for nuclear engineering University of Toronto annual report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-12-01

    The annual report of the Centre for Nuclear Engineering, University of Toronto covers the following subjects: message from the Dean; Chairman's message; origins of the centre; formation of the centre; new nuclear appointments; and activities of the centre, 1984

  7. The new AMS control centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    Construction work for the future AMS control room began in November 2010 and should be finished this June. The new building, which will have been completed in record time thanks to the professionalism of the project team, will soon be ready to receive the initial data from the AMS experiment.     Luigi Scibile and Michael Poehler, from the GS department, at the AMS control centre construction site.   The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is due to wing its way towards the International Space Station (ISS) on board the shuttle Discovery in April. Mainly intended for research on antimatter and dark matter, the data collected by AMS will be sent to Houston in the United States and then directly to CERN’s new Building 946. Construction work for the AMS control centre building on the Route Gentner at CERN’s Prévessin site started in November 2010 and must be completed in time to receive the first data from the spectrometer in June. “It normall...

  8. Center of Microbial Oceanography Research and Education (C-MORE) Initiatives Toward Promoting Diversity in the Ocean Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.

    2007-05-01

    The ocean sciences suffer from a lack of diversity, particularly among indigenous peoples, despite the fact that indigenous peoples often have deep, cultural knowledge about the marine environment. Nowhere is this inequity more glaring than in Hawaii. Traditional knowledge in marine science enabled Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) to become world leaders in transpacific canoe voyaging, aquaculture, and fisheries. Yet today, NHPI are severely underrepresented in the ocean sciences (and in STEM fields in general) at all levels of education and employment. When compared to other ethnic and racial groups in Hawaii, NHPI students as a group have among the poorest educational performance, indicated in part by underrepresentation in college enrolment and pre-college gifted and talented programs, as well as overrepresentation in eligibility for special education and free and reduced lunch programs. The Center of Microbial Oceanography Research and Education (C-MORE), a NSF-funded, multi-institutional Science and Technology Center based at the University of Hawai (UH), is determined to address this inequity. C- MORE is committed to increasing diversity in the ocean sciences, particularly among NHPI, at all levels of education and research. Our approach is to work with existing programs with a track record of increasing diversity among NHPI. We are currently developing culturally relevant materials including educational games for K-12 students, mentorships for high school and community college students, and laboratory and shipboard experiences for teachers and undergraduates in partnership with minority-serving organizations. Some of our main partners are EPSCoR (Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research), Ka `Imi `Ike (an NSF- funded program to recruit and retain NHPI undergraduates in geosciences), Upward Bound (an enrichment program for economically disadvantaged high school students which includes intensive summer courses), the UH Center on

  9. Smart work centres in rural areas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorentzen, Anne Birte

    This paper discusses the establishment of telework centres as an element in local development strategies in rural areas, with a particular view to two new telework centres in region North Denmark. The paper argues that telework centres do not represent an easy solution to problems of local...... development and environmental sustainability, and further, that technology may not even be the most important feature needed to make them function as such....

  10. Elm Farm Organic Research Centre December 2006

    OpenAIRE

    Sanders, Richard; Whiltley, Andrew; Haigh, Zoe; Clarke, Sarah; Hitchings, Roger; O'Brien, Josie

    2006-01-01

    The Organic Research Centre. Elm Farm Research Centre Bulletin with Technical Updates from The Organic Advisory Service is a regular publication from The Organic Research Centre. The current issue covers: Report from 2006 Cirencester Conference; Quest for more home produced organic food; in a world where bread matters; Improving wheat with plenty of parents; Unlocking the secrets of the ancient (cereal varieties); Brain food- a good read; Not to late to protect the future: The organic...

  11. Powering the Future Data Centre

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhe

    2010-01-01

    of the characteristics of these two power sources: long warm-up stage and low dynamics for fuel cell, and variable terminal voltage for supercapacitors. The motivation for this project was to find ways which can overcome those limitations to integrate fuel cells and supercapcitors to the system with high efficiency......The extended run Uninterruptible Power Supply system (UPSs) which powered by fuel cells and supercapcitors, is a promising solution for future data centre to obtain environmentfriendly energy efficient and cost effective. There are many challenges in power electronic interface circuits, because......: • Optimized design method for dual active bridge (DAB) converter and its derived circuits; • A novel hybrid dc-dc converter and its corresponding optimal design method are proposed; • An improved dual input current-fed DC-DC converter with bidirectional power conversion ability is investigated; • Extend...

  12. Preparation of emergency care centre exercises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnadt, H.; Miska, H.

    2011-01-01

    Setup and operation of emergency care centres (sometimes also addressed as emergency reception centres) are part of emergency response in the environs of nuclear power plants. The preparation of an exercise scenario for such a centre is very demanding on the responsible agency. Therefore, a computer code has been developed which helps to translate the exercise objectives into instructions for figurants which simulate the affected population. These instructions are intended to steer a determined flow of people through the emergency care centre by providing fictitious radiological readings and by injecting the demand for additional actions of response personnel by statements and questions. (orig.)

  13. Large-scale fuel cycle centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smiley, S.H.; Black, K.M.

    1977-01-01

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has considered the nuclear energy centre concept for fuel cycle plants in the Nuclear Energy Centre Site Survey 1975 (NECSS-75) Rep. No. NUREG-0001, an important study mandated by the US Congress in the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 which created the NRC. For this study, the NRC defined fuel cycle centres as consisting of fuel reprocessing and mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plants, and optional high-level waste and transuranic waste management facilities. A range of fuel cycle centre sizes corresponded to the fuel throughput of power plants with a total capacity of 50,000-300,000MW(e). The types of fuel cycle facilities located at the fuel cycle centre permit the assessment of the role of fuel cycle centres in enhancing the safeguard of strategic special nuclear materials - plutonium and mixed oxides. Siting fuel cycle centres presents a smaller problem than siting reactors. A single reprocessing plant of the scale projected for use in the USA (1500-2000t/a) can reprocess fuel from reactors producing 50,000-65,000MW(e). Only two or three fuel cycle centres of the upper limit size considered in the NECSS-75 would be required in the USA by the year 2000. The NECSS-75 fuel cycle centre evaluation showed that large-scale fuel cycle centres present no real technical siting difficulties from a radiological effluent and safety standpoint. Some construction economies may be achievable with fuel cycle centres, which offer opportunities to improve waste-management systems. Combined centres consisting of reactors and fuel reprocessing and mixed-oxide fuel fabrication plants were also studied in the NECSS. Such centres can eliminate shipment not only of Pu but also mixed-oxide fuel. Increased fuel cycle costs result from implementation of combined centres unless the fuel reprocessing plants are commercial-sized. Development of Pu-burning reactors could reduce any economic penalties of combined centres. The need for effective fissile

  14. Oceanography Branch Plankton Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shelf-wide Research Vessel Surveys are conducted 4-8 times per year over the continental shelf from Cape Hatteras, North Carolina to Cape Sable, Nova Scotia, using...

  15. Atlantic Oceanography. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    on the effect of environmental characteristics upon the encrusting calcareous-tube-making polychaete worm Hydroides dianthus has been begun, and it is...B. eb!Lineus. In spring 1978, work uas initiated on rearing the larvae of the calcareous encrusting tube worm Hydroides dianthus . Preliminary...larvae belonging to the coastal species, Balanus amphitrite and Hydroides dianthus and the estuarine barnacle, BaZanus ebur-neus. Some of the difficulties

  16. Comparative Magma Oceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. H.

    1999-01-01

    The question of whether the Earth ever passed through a magma ocean stage is of considerable interest. Geochemical evidence strongly suggests that the Moon had a magma ocean and the evidence is mounting that the same was true for Mars. Analyses of martian (SNC) meteorites have yielded insights into the differentiation history of Mars, and consequently, it is interesting to compare that planet to the Earth. Three primary features of Mars contrast strongly to those of the Earth: (i) the extremely ancient ages of the martian core, mantle, and crust (about 4.55 b.y.); (ii) the highly depleted nature of the martian mantle; and (iii) the extreme ranges of Nd isotopic compositions that arise within the crust and depleted mantle. The easiest way to explain the ages and diverse isotopic compositions of martian basalts is to postulate that Mars had an early magma ocean. Cumulates of this magma ocean were later remelted to form the SNC meteorite suite and some of these melts assimilated crustal materials enriched in incompatible elements. The REE pattern of the crust assimilated by these SNC magmas was LREE enriched. If this pattern is typical of the crust as a whole, the martian crust is probably similar in composition to melts generated by small degrees of partial melting (about 5%) of a primitive source. Higher degrees of partial melting would cause the crustal LREE pattern to be essentially flat. In the context of a magma ocean model, where large degrees of partial melting presumably prevailed, the crust would have to be dominated by late-stage, LREE-enriched residual liquids. Regardless of the exact physical setting, Nd and W isotopic evidence indicates that martian geochemical reservoirs must have formed early and that they have not been efficiently remixed since. The important point is that in both the Moon and Mars we see evidence of a magma ocean phase and that we recognize it as such. Several lines of theoretical inference point to an early Earth that was also hot and, perhaps, mostly molten. The Giant Impact hypothesis for the origin of the Moon offers a tremendous input of thermal energy and the same could be true for core formation. And current solar system models favor the formation of a limited number of large (about 1000 km) planetesimals that, upon accreting to Earth, would cause great heating, being lesser versions of the Giant Impact. Several lines of geochemical evidence do not favor this hot early Earth scenario. (i) Terrestrial man-tle xenoliths are sometimes nearly chondritic in their major element compositions, suggesting that these rocks have never been much molten. Large degrees of partial melting probably promote differentiation rather than homogenization. (ii) Unlike the case of Mars, the continental crust probably did not form as a highly fractionated residual liquid from a magma ocean (about 99% crystallization), but, rather, formed in multiple steps. [The simplest model for the formation of continental crust is complicated: (a) about 10% melting of a primitive mantle, making basalt; (b) hydrothermal alteration of that basalt, converting it to greenstone; and (c) 10% partial melting of that greenstone, producing tonalite.] This model is reinforced by the recent observation from old (about 4.1 b.y.) zircons that the early crust formed from an undepleted mantle having a chondritic Lu/Hf ratio. (iii) If the mantle were once differentiated by a magma ocean, the mantle xenolith suite requires that it subsequently be homogenized. The Os isotopic compositions of fertile spinel lherzolites place constraints on the timing of that homogenization. The Os isotopic composition of spinel lherzolites approaches that of chondrites and correlates with elements such as Lu and Al. As Lu and Al concentrations approach those of the primitive mantle, Os isotopic compositions approach chondritic. The Re and Os in these xenoliths were probably added as a late veneer. Thus, the mantle that received the late veneer must have been nearly chondritic in terms of its major elements (excluding Fe). If the mantle that the veneer was mixed into was not al-ready homogenized, then Os isotopes should not correlate with incompatible elements such as Al. Consequently, either early differentiation of the mantle did not occur or the homogenization of this differentiation must have occurred before the late veneer was added. The timing of the late veneer is itself uncertain but presumably postdated core formation at about 4.45 b.y. and did not postdate the 3.8-3.9 b.y. late bombardment of the Moon. This timing based on siderophile elements is consistent with the Hf isotopic evidence cited above. If the Earth, Moon and Mars had magma oceans, the Earth subsequently rehomogenized whereas the Moon and Mars did not. The simplest solution to this observation is that homogenization of igneous differentiates was never necessary on Earth, either because the hypothetical magma ocean never occurred or because this event did not produce mantle differentiation.

  17. REMOTE SENSING IN OCEANOGRAPHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    remote sensing from satellites. Sensing of oceanographic variables from aircraft began with the photographing of waves and ice. Since then remote measurement of sea surface temperatures and wave heights have become routine. Sensors tested for oceanographic applications include multi-band color cameras, radar scatterometers, infrared spectrometers and scanners, passive microwave radiometers, and radar imagers. Remote sensing has found its greatest application in providing rapid coverage of large oceanographic areas for synoptic and analysis and

  18. Software - Naval Oceanography Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    are here: Home › USNO › Earth Orientation › Software USNO Logo USNO Navigation Earth Orientation Products GPS-based Products VLBI-based Products EO Information Center Publications about Products Software Search databases Auxiliary Software Supporting Software Form Folder Earth Orientation Matrix Calculator

  19. Oceanography of marginal seas

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.

    in the first two shallow seas are driven by surface densification following evaporation that in the latter is largely influenced by freshwater discharge from Irrawaddy and inflows across the Andaman Ridge from east Bay of Bengal. Biological productivity...

  20. EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION CENTRES- A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    centres in South Africa revealed that some field .... psychomotor goals suitable for each age group? * Did the officer have a proper ..... education centres, spending two to four weeks at a ... you must be willing to suspend judgement, to hold in ...

  1. Australian International Food Security Research Centre | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Australian International Food Security Research Centre. Australian International Food Security Research Centre. http://aciar.gov.au/AIFSC. Cultivate Africa's Future. The Cultivate Africa's Future research partnership is designed to support applied research to combat hunger in sub-Saharan Africa by harnessing the potential ...

  2. Communications strategy for the Chernobyl Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurilchik, Mykola; Green, Len

    2000-01-01

    This Communications Strategy was developed for the International Chernobyl Centre (ICC) as part of a joint UK/Ukraine project, sponsored by the Department of Trade and Industry and NNC Limited. The Plan was developed during four weeks of workshop discussions in the UK between staff from the centre and experienced PR Professionals from NNC Limited. The requirements for a sustained communications activity at the ICC go much further than simply enhancing or promoting the Centre's scientific and technical activities. Raising sufficient awareness of the Centre among potential funding agents and commercial partners is critical to its future development as a major centre for international co-operation and research. It is only through establishing and developing effective communications that the Centre will become well enough known and understood both within the Ukraine, and internationally, to secure its long term future. However, as the workshop programme unfolded, it also became clear that communications was in itself a legitimate and necessary function of the Centre, and part of the foundations of its existence. The Centre has a fundamental role as an 'information exchange', collecting and communicating information from within the Ukraine to the rest of the world, and interpreting world interest and attitudes to the Ukraine Government and nuclear industry. As such compliments the efforts of individual power plant and corporate PR functions within the Ukraine nuclear energy sector

  3. Centre for urban ecotechnology in ``Oeksnehallen``

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Lord Mayor`s Department of the municipality of Copenhagen, Denmark, has with support from this project made a proposal for the establishment of the Centre for Urban Ecotechnology in ``Oeksnehallen``, located in the Vesterbro area of the city. The centre should contribute to the dissemination of knowledge on ecological techniques (regarding passive solar energy etc.) to the inhabitants of Vesterbro and other citizens of Copenhagen, and also serve as a centre in an European context. The ecological demonstration centre will cover an area of two thousand square meters and will also include a cafe, a room for showing coloured slides, facilities for exhibitions created by the center and interested firms etc. The centre should play an important role as part of the ecological concept of urban renewal in Vesterbro. (author).

  4. The role of the sexual assault centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Eogan, Maeve

    2013-02-01

    Sexual Assault Centres provide multidisciplinary care for men and women who have experienced sexual crime. These centres enable provision of medical, forensic, psychological support and follow-up care, even if patients chose not to report the incident to the police service. Sexual Support Centres need to provide a ring-fenced, forensically clean environment. They need to be appropriately staffed and available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week to allow prompt provision of medical and supportive care and collection of forensic evidence. Sexual Assault Centres work best within the context of a core agreed model of care, which includes defined multi-agency guidelines and care pathways, close links with forensic science and police services, and designated and sustainable funding arrangements. Additionally, Sexual Assault Centres also participate in patient, staff and community education and risk reduction. Furthermore, they contribute to the development, evaluation and implementation of national strategies on domestic, sexual and gender-based violence.

  5. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy: Single centre experience.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Farrell, N J

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is an attractive alternative to the traditional open approach in the surgical excision of an adrenal gland. It has replaced open adrenalectomy in our institution and we review our experience to date. METHODS: All cases of laparoscopic adrenalectomies in our hospital over eight years (from 2001 to May 2009) were retrospectively reviewed. Patient demographics, diagnosis, length of hospital stay, histology and all operative and post-operative details were evaluated. RESULTS: Fifty-five laparoscopic adrenalectomies (LA) were performed on 51 patients over eight years. The mean age was 48 years (Range 16-86 years) with the male: female ratio 1:2. Twenty-three cases had a right adrenalectomy, 24 had a left adrenalectomy and the remaining four patients had bilateral adrenalectomies. 91% were successfully completed laparoscopically with five converted to an open approach. Adenomas (functional and non functional) were the leading indication for LA, followed by phaeochromocytomas. Other indications for LA included Cushing\\'s disease, adrenal malignancies and rarer pathologies. There was one mortality from necrotising pancreatitis following a left adrenalectomy for severe Cushing\\'s disease, with subsequent death 10 days later. CONCLUSION: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is effective for the treatment of adrenal tumours, fulfilling the criteria for the ideal minimally invasive procedure. It has replaced the traditional open approach in our centre and is a safe and effective alternative. However, in the case of severe Cushing\\'s disease, laparoscopic adrenalectomy has the potential for significant adverse outcomes and mortality.

  6. CAPTURING REALITY AT CENTRE BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Boulanger

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Centre Block of Canada’s Parliament buildings, National Historic Site of Canada is set to undergo a major rehabilitation project that will take approximately 10 years to complete. In preparation for this work, Heritage Conservation Services (HCS of Public Services and Procurement Canada has been completing heritage documentation of the entire site which includes laser scanning of all interior rooms and accessible confined spaces such as attics and other similar areas. Other documentation completed includes detailed photogrammetric documentation of rooms and areas of high heritage value. Some of these high heritage value spaces present certain challenges such as accessibility due to the height and the size of the spaces. Another challenge is the poor lighting conditions, requiring the use of flash or strobe lighting to either compliment or completely eliminate the available ambient lighting. All the spaces captured at this higher level of detail were also captured with laser scanning. This allowed the team to validate the information and conduct a quality review of the photogrammetric data. As a result of this exercise, the team realized that in most, if not all cases, the photogrammetric data was more detailed and at a higher quality then the terrestrial laser scanning data. The purpose and motivation of this paper is to present these findings, as well provide the advantages and disadvantages of the two methods and data sets.

  7. Capturing Reality at Centre Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulanger, C.; Ouimet, C.; Yeomans, N.

    2017-08-01

    The Centre Block of Canada's Parliament buildings, National Historic Site of Canada is set to undergo a major rehabilitation project that will take approximately 10 years to complete. In preparation for this work, Heritage Conservation Services (HCS) of Public Services and Procurement Canada has been completing heritage documentation of the entire site which includes laser scanning of all interior rooms and accessible confined spaces such as attics and other similar areas. Other documentation completed includes detailed photogrammetric documentation of rooms and areas of high heritage value. Some of these high heritage value spaces present certain challenges such as accessibility due to the height and the size of the spaces. Another challenge is the poor lighting conditions, requiring the use of flash or strobe lighting to either compliment or completely eliminate the available ambient lighting. All the spaces captured at this higher level of detail were also captured with laser scanning. This allowed the team to validate the information and conduct a quality review of the photogrammetric data. As a result of this exercise, the team realized that in most, if not all cases, the photogrammetric data was more detailed and at a higher quality then the terrestrial laser scanning data. The purpose and motivation of this paper is to present these findings, as well provide the advantages and disadvantages of the two methods and data sets.

  8. Birth centre confinement at the Queen Victoria Medical Centre. I. Obstetric and neonatal outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J; Hudson, H; Lumley, J; Morris, N; Rao, J; Spensley, J

    1981-10-03

    A review of hte first 175 confinements at the Queen Victoria Medical Centre Birth Centre is presented. The design, structure and function of hte Birth Centre is described and the safety of the programme demonstrated. Seventy-four pregnancies (42%) accepted for Birth Centre confinement required transfer because of antepartum or intrapartum complications. There were satisfactory obstetric and neonatal outcomes in all pregnancies. The first year's experience has allowed a reassessment of the risk factors, which will permit greater use of the Birth Centre without any increases risk to mothers or babies.

  9. SFB 754 - Managing a large interdisciplinary collaborative research centre: what matters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schelten, Christiane; Antia, Avan; Braker, Gesche; Kamm, Ruth; Mehrtens, Hela

    2016-04-01

    The German Research Foundation (DFG) funds Collaborative Research Centres (CRCs - in German: Sonderforschungsbereiche SFBs) that are generally applied for by one university, but may also incorporate neighbouring universities or non-university research institutions. SFBs are crossing the boundaries of disciplines, as well as faculties, departments, institutions and institutes. The funding of an SFB can be up to 12 years (3 x 4 years). Kiel University and GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel received funding for the SFB 754 'Climate-biogeochemical interactions in the tropical ocean' in 2008. Currently, the centre is in its third phase comprising 17 scientific subprojects, one outreach project, a central coordination and management subproject and a subproject covering the research expeditions with a total project budget of 12 Mio Euro. Around 100 scientists of interdisciplinary research fields (e.g. physical oceanography, micro-biology, palaeontology, chemistry, modelling) are actively involved. Besides generating high profile research, gender equality, early career support and data management are complementary goals of SFBs requested by the DFG. Within the SFB 754 the scientific coordination office is responsible for developing concepts and strategies to cover these additional requirements and over the past eight years the SFB 754 has been successful in setting up profound programmes and various measures. Some of the SFB 754 practices have been taken up by other projects, and hence allowed the SFB 754 to serve as a role model for 'best practice' within marine sciences in Kiel. A main reason for the success of the SFB 754 to work towards the additional goals set out in the DFGs SFB programme is that the project is well tied into existing structures and builds upon outstanding management expertise available in Kiel. Three examples are highlighted here: • young scientists programme (closely linked to a graduate school (Integrated School of Marine Sciences

  10. FUNCTIONS OF A NEUROMUSCULAR CENTRE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janez Zidar

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Main functions of a neuromuscular (NM centre are making diagnosis, treatment and counselling. Some other functions, e. g. forming a register and epidemiological endeavours, could be added. All these activities are expected to be achieved by multidisciplinary approach with the idea that members use the same guidelines and share the same knowledge.NM diseases affect lower levels of the nervous system that is motor units (motor cells in the brainstem and spinal cord, nerve roots, cranial and peripheral nerves, neuromuscular junction, and muscles. There are many such diseases; a few are more common others are rare.Rational approach in making a diagnosis can be divided into several steps. The process begins with a person with clinical symptoms and signs which raise the suspicion of NM disease. The first step is the description of the predominant pattern of muscular wasting and weakness (e. g. limb-girdle, distal, ocular, facio-scapulo-humeral. Each of these syndromes require a differential diagnosis within the motor unit territory what is achieved by means of EMG and muscle biopsy. The latter is even more important to define the nature of the abnormality. Disease nature can also be determined biochemically and, as NM disorders are commonly genetically determined, at the molecular genetic level. Treatment modalities include drugs (causative and symptomatic and other measures such as promoting and maintaining good general health, preventing skeletal deformities, physiotherapy, orthoses, surgery, and prevention of respiratory and cardiac functions. Counselling is mainly by social workers that focus on the practical aspects of coping with illness and disability and by genetic counsellors who gave advise on family planning.

  11. Big Surveys, Big Data Centres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, D.

    2016-06-01

    Well-designed astronomical surveys are powerful and have consistently been keystones of scientific progress. The Byurakan Surveys using a Schmidt telescope with an objective prism produced a list of about 3000 UV-excess Markarian galaxies but these objects have stimulated an enormous amount of further study and appear in over 16,000 publications. The CFHT Legacy Surveys used a wide-field imager to cover thousands of square degrees and those surveys are mentioned in over 1100 publications since 2002. Both ground and space-based astronomy have been increasing their investments in survey work. Survey instrumentation strives toward fair samples and large sky coverage and therefore strives to produce massive datasets. Thus we are faced with the "big data" problem in astronomy. Survey datasets require specialized approaches to data management. Big data places additional challenging requirements for data management. If the term "big data" is defined as data collections that are too large to move then there are profound implications for the infrastructure that supports big data science. The current model of data centres is obsolete. In the era of big data the central problem is how to create architectures that effectively manage the relationship between data collections, networks, processing capabilities, and software, given the science requirements of the projects that need to be executed. A stand alone data silo cannot support big data science. I'll describe the current efforts of the Canadian community to deal with this situation and our successes and failures. I'll talk about how we are planning in the next decade to try to create a workable and adaptable solution to support big data science.

  12. IDRANAP - European Centre of Excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzatu, Florin D.

    2003-01-01

    Selected by the European Commission (EC) experts out of 185 proposals from 11 countries, IDRANAP (Inter-Disciplinary Research and Applications based on Nuclear and Atomic Physics) is the only EC Centre of Excellence in nuclear physics. The project, initiated and developed by a remarkable team from our institute, researchers with a recognized international scientific level, has as main objectives: - promotion in Romania and in the region of modern applications derived from basic and applied research in nuclear and atomic physics; - disciplinary research in ecology, health, biology, science of materials; - specific nuclear and atomic physics research aimed to open new possibilities for applications; - to ensure stimulative conditions for PhD students from Romania and other EC candidate countries to improve their knowledge and experience by joining scientific activities in the region, a fact that might counteract their tendency to migrate to Western countries. The high scientific level of researchers, their access to national and international facilities as well as the link with prestigious laboratories abroad and the socio-economic demand motivated the development of the project. Among expected results, we mention: improving and spreading the scientific knowledge by publications; producing new facilities, devices and instruments; application of nuclear methods in industry, health-care and environment protection, and training of young researchers. The project consists of 18 workpackages structured in 5 distinct areas: - Determining environmental pollution; - Nuclear methods in biology and medicine; - Radionuclide metrology; - Analysis and characterization of materials; - Nuclei far from stability, decay modes, cosmic rays, and facilities.We make an up-to-date presentation of obtained results and activities performed within IDRANAP project, as well as a short overview of our institute. (author)

  13. The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Nicholas M.; Schade, D.; Astronomy Data Centre, Canadian

    2011-01-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre (CADC) is the world's largest astronomical data center, holding over 0.5 Petabytes of information, and serving nearly 3000 astronomers worldwide. Its current data collections include BLAST, CFHT, CGPS, FUSE, Gemini, HST, JCMT, MACHO, MOST, and numerous other archives and services. It provides extensive data archiving, curation, and processing expertise, via projects such as MegaPipe, and enables substantial day-to-day collaboration between resident astronomers and computer specialists. It is a stable, powerful, persistent, and properly supported environment for the storage and processing of large volumes of data, a condition that is now absolutely vital for their science potential to be exploited by the community. Through initiatives such as the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM), the Canadian Virtual Observatory (CVO), and the Canadian Advanced Network for Astronomical Research (CANFAR), the CADC is at the global forefront of advancing astronomical research through improved data services. The CAOM aims to provide homogeneous data access, and hence viable interoperability between a potentially unlimited number of different data collections, at many wavelengths. It is active in the definition of numerous emerging standards within the International Virtual Observatory, and several datasets are already available. The CANFAR project is an initiative to make cloud computing for storage and data-intensive processing available to the community. It does this via a Virtual Machine environment that is equivalent to managing a local desktop. Several groups are already processing science data. CADC is also at the forefront of advanced astronomical data analysis, driven by the science requirements of astronomers both locally and further afield. The emergence of 'Astroinformatics' promises to provide not only utility items like object classifications, but to directly enable new science by accessing previously undiscovered or intractable

  14. The politics of patient-centred care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreindler, Sara A

    2015-10-01

    Despite widespread belief in the importance of patient-centred care, it remains difficult to create a system in which all groups work together for the good of the patient. Part of the problem may be that the issue of patient-centred care itself can be used to prosecute intergroup conflict. This qualitative study of texts examined the presence and nature of intergroup language within the discourse on patient-centred care. A systematic SCOPUS and Google search identified 85 peer-reviewed and grey literature reports that engaged with the concept of patient-centred care. Discourse analysis, informed by the social identity approach, examined how writers defined and portrayed various groups. Managers, physicians and nurses all used the discourse of patient-centred care to imply that their own group was patient centred while other group(s) were not. Patient organizations tended to downplay or even deny the role of managers and providers in promoting patient centredness, and some used the concept to advocate for controversial health policies. Intergroup themes were even more obvious in the rhetoric of political groups across the ideological spectrum. In contrast to accounts that juxtaposed in-groups and out-groups, those from reportedly patient-centred organizations defined a 'mosaic' in-group that encompassed managers, providers and patients. The seemingly benign concept of patient-centred care can easily become a weapon on an intergroup battlefield. Understanding this dimension may help organizations resolve the intergroup tensions that prevent collective achievement of a patient-centred system. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, P; Bell, T; Van Eldik, J; McCance, G; Panzer-Steindel, B; Coelho dos Santos, M; Traylen and, S; Schwickerath, U

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project's motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  16. Attitude of Farmers towards Kisan Call Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shely Mary Koshy

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to measure the attitude of farmers in Kerala, India towards Kisan Call Centre (KCC. Kisan Call Centre provides free agricultural advisory services to every citizen involved in agriculture through a toll free number. One hundred and fifty farmers who have utilized the Kisan Call Centre service were selected from the database of KCC. The results showed that the respondents had moderately favourable attitude towards KCC followed by highly favourable attitude. The variables digital divide, temporal awareness on KCC, satisfaction towards KCC and utilization of KCC were found to have a positive correlation with the attitude of respondents towards KCC.

  17. Nuclear Power Plant Temelin Technical Support Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krizek, K.

    2000-01-01

    The erection of the Technical Support Centre for the Nuclear Power Plant Temelin has been a relatively sophisticated and costly issue. It was by proper use of the existing systems, as e.g. I and C, ISE and other systems, that a robust system has been created that is able to meet any requirements laid on the performance of the Technical Support Centre. The decision of the utility CEZ, a.s. that made it possible to establish the Technical Support Centre at the Nuclear Power Plant Temelin has been a right step which shows the level of safety culture within the utility. (author)

  18. Associating science and development - the Trieste Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamende, A.

    1982-01-01

    The International Centre for Theoretical Physics, located in Trieste, Italy, is supported by income from the Italian Government, from UNESCO and from the IAEA. The Centre organizes research sessions, workshops and extended courses on advanced topics in the physical and mathematical sciences and encourages scientists, especially from developing countries, to visit the ICTP for extended periods. With the aim of facilitating the transfer of knowledge to scientists from developing countries, the Centre's current scientific programme is divided up into five major disciplines: physics and energy; physics and frontiers of knowledge; physics and technology; physics and the environment and natural resources; applicable mathematics

  19. International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Naohiko; Dunaeva, Svetlana

    2010-11-01

    The activities of fourteen nuclear data centres are summarized, and their cooperation under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency is described. Each of the centres provides coverage for different geographical zones and/or specific types of nuclear data, thus together providing a complete service for users worldwide. The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) was established with the objective of providing nuclear physics databases that are required for nuclear technology (encompassing energy and non-energy applications) by coordinating the collection, compilation and dissemination of nuclear data on an international scale. (author)

  20. The Manche Storage Centre: 2009 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    After a brief presentation of the ANDRA (the French national agency for the management of radioactive wastes), this report presents the CSM installations (CSM stands for Centre de Stockage de la Manche, the Manche storage centre), recalls results and actions in the field of nuclear safety and in the field of radioprotection. It indicates incidents and accidents which occurred in the installations, presents data about the Centre's releases. It presents the waste management and evokes other pollution. It indicates the various actions undertaken for information transparency

  1. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Andrade, P; van Eldik, J; McCance, G; Panzer-Steindel, B; Coelho dos Santos, M; Traylen, S; Schwickerath, U

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project’s motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  2. Conceptual design and equipment of visitor centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huettinger, K.

    1993-01-01

    Discussing the needs to be met by a visitor centre, the author develops the strategies to be adopted and defines the items to be included in the information program. The procedure in preparing the layout and design are explained and the media available to provide various levels of information are listed. Principles of selecting and mixing the media are discussed and the functions of the various sections of the centre described. Also included are examples of the costs and time requirements for the establishment of a typical centre. The importance of regular maintenance and updating is emphasized. (author)

  3. Visitor centres at nuclear facility sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Communications strategies in the nuclear field are often based on the creation of visitor centres at nuclear facility sites. Today, the design, as well as the realization and management of such centres has become a specialized function, and its role is very complementary to the nuclear operator's. It also uses the latest technology in the field of audio-visual, experiment and interactivity. This publication contains the proceedings of an international seminar organized by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency on the role of visitor centres at nuclear facility sites. It includes the main papers presented at this Seminar

  4. Subseabed Disposal Project annual report, FY85 to termination of project: Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry Studies, October 1984 through May 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kupferman, S.L. (ed.)

    1987-05-01

    This report covers the work of the Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry (POWCG) Studies Group of the Subseabed Disposal Project (SDP) from October 1984 to termination of the project in May 1986. The overview of the work includes an introduction, general descriptions of the activities, and a summary. Detailed discussions are included as appendices. During the period of this report the POWCG Studies Group held a meeting to develop a long-term research plan for the Nares Abyssal Plain, which was recently designated as a study area for the Environmental Study Group of the SDP. The POWCG Studies Group has also planned and participated in two interdisciplinary oceanographic missions to the Nares which have resulted in the acquisition of data and samples which can be used to begin to understand the workings of the ecosystem at the site, and for developing a preliminary site assessment. The papers in the appendices have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  5. West Hackberry Strategic Petroleum Reserve site brine-disposal monitoring, Year I report. Volume II. Physical and chemical oceanography. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C.; Lascara, V.J. (eds.)

    1983-02-01

    This project centers around the Strategic Petroleum Site (SPR) known as the West Hackberry salt dome which is located in southwestern Louisiana, and which is designed to store 241 million barrels of crude oil. Oil storage caverns are formed by injecting water into salt deposits, and pumping out the resulting brine. Studies described in this report were designed as follow-on studies to three months of pre-discharge characterization work, and include data collected during the first year of brine leaching operations. The objectives were to: (1) characterize the environment in terms of physical, chemical and biological attributes; (2) determine if significant adverse changes in ecosystem productivity and stability of the biological community are occurring as a result of brine discharge; and (3) determine the magnitude of any change observed. Contents of Volume II include: introduction; physical oceanography; estuarine hydrology and hydrography; analysis of discharge plume; and water and sediment quality.

  6. Subseabed Disposal Project annual report, FY85 to termination of project: Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry Studies, October 1984 through May 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kupferman, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    This report covers the work of the Physical Oceanography and Water Column Geochemistry (POWCG) Studies Group of the Subseabed Disposal Project (SDP) from October 1984 to termination of the project in May 1986. The overview of the work includes an introduction, general descriptions of the activities, and a summary. Detailed discussions are included as appendices. During the period of this report the POWCG Studies Group held a meeting to develop a long-term research plan for the Nares Abyssal Plain, which was recently designated as a study area for the Environmental Study Group of the SDP. The POWCG Studies Group has also planned and participated in two interdisciplinary oceanographic missions to the Nares which have resulted in the acquisition of data and samples which can be used to begin to understand the workings of the ecosystem at the site, and for developing a preliminary site assessment. The papers in the appendices have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base

  7. Educational Experiences in Oceanography through Hands-On Involvement with Surface Drifters: an Introduction to Ocean Currents, Engineering, Data Collection, and Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Northeast Fisheries Science Center's (NEFSC) Student Drifters Program is providing education opportunities for students of all ages. Using GPS-tracked ocean drifters, various educational institutions can provide students with hands-on experience in physical oceanography, engineering, and computer science. In building drifters many high school and undergraduate students may focus on drifter construction, sometimes designing their own drifter or attempting to improve current NEFSC models. While learning basic oceanography younger students can build drifters with the help of an educator and directions available on the studentdrifters.org website. Once drifters are deployed, often by a local mariner or oceanographic partner, drifter tracks can be visualised on maps provided at http://nefsc.noaa.gov/drifter. With the lesson plans available for those interested in computer science, students may download, process, and plot the drifter position data with basic Python code provided. Drifter tracks help students to visualize ocean currents, and also allow them to understand real particle tracking applications such as in search and rescue, oil spill dispersion, larval transport, and the movement of injured sea animals. Additionally, ocean circulation modelers can use student drifter paths to validate their models. The Student Drifters Program has worked with over 100 schools, several of them having deployed drifters on the West Coast. Funding for the program often comes from individual schools and small grants but in the future will preferably come from larger government grants. NSF, Sea-Grant, NOAA, and EPA are all possible sources of funding, especially with the support of multiple schools and large marine education associations. The Student Drifters Program is a unique resource for educators, students, and scientists alike.

  8. The Central Role of the Mississippi River and its Delta in the Oceanography, Ecology and Economy of the Gulf of Mexico: A Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolker, A.; Chu, P. Y.; Taylor, C.; Roberts, B. J.; Renfro, A. A.; Peyronnin, N.; Fitzpatrick, C.

    2017-12-01

    While it has long been recognized that the Mississippi River is the largest source of freshwater, nutrients and sediments to the Gulf of Mexico, many questions remain unanswered about the impacts of the material on oceanography of the system. Here we report on the results of a regional synthesis study that examined how the Mississippi River and its delta influence the oceanography, ecology and the economy of the Gulf of Mexico. By employing a series of expert-opinion working groups, and using multi-dimensional numerical physical oceanographic models coupled to in-situ environmental data, this project is working to quantify how variability in discharge, meteorological forcings, and seasonal conditions influence the spatial distribution of the Mississippi River plume and its influence. Results collected to date indicate that the dimensions of the river plume are closely coupled to discharge, but in a non-linear fashion, that incorporates fluxes, flow distributions, offshore and meteorological forcings in the context of the local bathymetry. Ongoing research is using these human and numerical tools to help further elucidate the impacts of this river on the biogeochemistry of the region, and the distribution of key macrofauna. Further work by this team is examining how the delta's impacts on the ecology of the region, and the role that the delta plays as both a source of material for key offshore fauna, and a barrier to dispersal. This information is being used to help further the development of a research agenda for the northern Gulf of Mexico that will be useful through the mid-21st century.

  9. Nganyi Community Resource Centre: Community radio station ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-04

    May 4, 2016 ... To mark World Meteorological Day on March 23, 2015, the Kenya Meteorological Services (KMS) launched a resource centre and radio station in western Kenya to disseminate weather and climate information.

  10. Social innovation for People-Centred Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars; P.K., Shajahan

    2013-01-01

    Social innovation is closely related to the people-centred development (PCD) framework of knowledge production. The discussion of PCD in this chapter particularly expands on the feature of empowerment and socio-political mobilization of people in social innovation...

  11. The nuclear research centre at Bariloche, Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abriata, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The nuclear research centre at Bariloche (CAB) is one of the four centres under the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina (CNEA). The research programme of CAB addresses various issues like nuclear reactor development, nuclear fuel and fuel cycle, applications of radioisotopes and radiation, and waste management. There is also a basic nuclear science component. The human resource development in the areas of physics and nuclear engineering is done in an associated Balseiro Institute which has undergraduate and graduate programmes as well as doctoral and postdoctoral research. The Centre interacts well with the society and provides services in the nuclear area. It has a close interaction with the nuclear sector of Argentina as also with many international organisations. Regulatory control over the Centre is carried out by the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina. (author)

  12. International Development Research Centre Governor Travel Policy

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    André Lavoie

    business. Governors are required to travel to conduct IDRC business, attend ... of Governors, liaise with Centre management, and perform specific representational functions on ..... Travel between Points of Origin and Destination - Air Travel.

  13. Haiti | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... for the environment, reduced spending on food, increased self-esteem, and stronger ... The consortium acts as a knowledge centre and explores communication ... train teachers and researchers in high-quality science and technology skills ...

  14. Bulletin #112 | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... to support training of African mathematical scientists on climate change solutions ... significant support following UN meeting on refugees and migrants ... for Urban Equity at India's Centre for Environmental Planning and Technology, this ...

  15. President | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    International Development Research Centre Selection Criteria Education A ... or an acceptable combination of education, job-related training and/or experience. ... Knowledge of current corporate governance and human resource issues; ...

  16. Potential of Natural Ventilation in Shopping Centres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diederichsen, Alice; Friis, Kristina; Brohus, Henrik

    2008-01-01

    The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a fundamental requirement for a well performing shopping centre. This paper contains a pilot study of the potential of using hybrid ventilation (a combination of automatically controlled natural and mechanical ventilation - respectively NV and MV) in shop......The indoor environmental quality (IEQ) is a fundamental requirement for a well performing shopping centre. This paper contains a pilot study of the potential of using hybrid ventilation (a combination of automatically controlled natural and mechanical ventilation - respectively NV and MV......) in shopping centres with focus on both the achieved IEQ and energy consumptions for air movement. By thermal building simulations it is found that there exists an interesting potential for hybrid ventilation of shopping centres, which can lead to great savings in the electrical energy consumptions...

  17. Product Lifecycle Management Centre of Technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Barnard, Rentia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available - Rentia Barnard.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 Interactive activities Contents Product Lifecycle Management Centre of Technology Rentia Barnard National Industrialisation Support Initiative (NISI) 3 Initiative (NISI...

  18. Towards Human-Centred Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannon, Liam J.

    The field of HCI has evolved and expanded dramatically since its origin in the early 1980’s. The HCI community embraces a large community of researchers and practitioners around the world, from a variety of disciplinary backgrounds in the human and social sciences, engineering and informatics, and more recently, the arts and design disciplines. This kaleidoscope of cultures and disciplines as seen at INTERACT Conferences provides a rich pool of resources for examining our field. Applications are increasingly exploring our full range of sensory modalities, and merging the digital and physical worlds. WiFi has opened up a huge design space for mobile applications. A focus on usability of products and services has been complemented by an emphasis on engagement, enjoyment and experience. With the advent of ubiquitous computing, and the emergence of “The Internet of Things”, new kinds of more open infrastructures make possible radically new kinds of applications. The sources of innovation have also broadened, to include human and social actors outside of the computing and design organizations. The question is to what extent is our mainstream thinking in the HCI field ready for the challenges of this Brave New World? Do the technological and social innovations that we see emerging require us to re-shape, or even, re-create, our field, or is it a case of a more gradual evolution and development of that which we already know? In this closing Keynote, I will provide a perspective on the evolution and development of the HCI field, looking backwards as well as forwards, in order to determine what are some of the changes of significance in the field. This “broad-brush” approach to what I term “ human-centred design” will be complemented by the examination of specific projects and applications, to help anchor some of the discussion. Areas such as user-centred design, participatory design, computer-supported cooperative work and learning, and interaction design, in

  19. Nuclear research centres - The Egyptian experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelrazek, I.D.

    2001-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt has four research centres located at two sites. Its research reactors are devoted to the production of isotopes, neutron beam experiments, activation analysis and materials research. The accelerators are devoted to the production of short lived isotopes for medical applications and materials R and D. Irradiation technology is used for sterilization of medical supplies and food preservation. High level of expertise in those centres is also useful for other developmental activities in Egypt. (author)

  20. White-centred retinal haemorrhages (Roth spots).

    OpenAIRE

    Ling, R.; James, B.

    1998-01-01

    Roth spots (white-centred retinal haemorrhages) were classically described as septic emboli lodged in the retina of patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Indeed many have considered Roth spots pathognomonic for this condition. More recent histological evidence suggests, however, that they are not foci of bacterial abscess. Instead, they are nonspecific and may be found in many other diseases. A review of the histology and the pathogenesis of these white-centred haemorrhages will be p...

  1. Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre. Programme budget 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Following a general survey of tasks, planned activities and developmental trends of the nuclear research centre, the report gives an account of the activities to be performed in the subject fields of main interest, showing the budgeting figures for annual expenditure (for personnel, investments, operating costs) up to the year 1991. Further information explains the infrastructure of the centre and the distribution of overall expenditure as well as the budgetary planning. (UA) [de

  2. The CSN's Information Centre: a necessary venture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calvo, A.

    1999-01-01

    Every year, around 10,000 pupils will visit the CSN's Information Centre, an exposition area which was created with the intention of explaining simply but strictly, what radiations are, for what they are used, what risks they hold and how they are controlled. Opened in October, 1998, encouraged by Parliamentary urging, the Centre is a path to CSN Information for citizens to use. (Author)

  3. User-Centred BCI Videogame Design

    OpenAIRE

    Loup-Escande , Emilie; Lotte , Fabien; Loup , Guillaume; Lécuyer , Anatole

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This chapter aims to offer a user-centred methodological framework to guide the design and evaluation of Brain-Computer Interface videogames. This framework is based on the contributions of ergonomics to ensure these games are well suited for their users (i.e., players). It provides methods, criteria and metrics to complete the different phases required by ae human-centred design process. This aims to understand the context of use, specify the user needs and evaluate t...

  4. Joint Research Centre. Ispra establishment-Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelini, Antonio

    1976-01-01

    A comprehensive review of the work carried out during 1974 and 1975 in the Ispra establishment of the Joint Research Centre is presented. A description of the activity carried out within the context of the running programmes is given. Some of the most relevant scientific and technical achievement are described from the viewpoints of the Scientific Departments of the Centre. The technical and administrative support activities are also presented. A list of publications issued by the Ispra Scientific staff is given

  5. Automatic centring and bonding of lenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krey, Stefan; Heinisch, J.; Dumitrescu, E.

    2007-05-01

    We present an automatic bonding station which is able to center and bond individual lenses or doublets to a barrel with sub micron centring accuracy. The complete manufacturing cycle includes the glue dispensing and UV curing. During the process the state of centring is continuously controlled by the vision software, and the final result is recorded to a file for process statistics. Simple pass or fail results are displayed to the operator at the end of the process.

  6. Building an applied activation analysis centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartosek, J.; Kasparec, I.; Masek, J.

    1972-01-01

    Requirements are defined and all available background material is reported and discussed for the building up of a centre of applied activation analysis in Czechoslovakia. A detailed analysis of potential users and the centre's envisaged availability is also presented as part of the submitted study. A brief economic analysis is annexed. The study covers the situation up to the end of 1972. (J.K.)

  7. The Imperial College Thermophysical Properties Data Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angus, S.; Cole, W. A.; Craven, R.; de Reuck, K. M.; Trengove, R. D.; Wakeham, W. A.

    1986-07-01

    The IUPAC Thermodynamic Tables Project Centre in London has at its disposal considerable expertise on the production and utilization of high-accuracy equations of state which represent the thermodynamic properties of substances. For some years they have been content to propagate this information by the traditional method of book production, but the increasing use of the computer in industry for process design has shown that an additional method was needed. The setting up of the IUPAC Transport Properties Project Centre, also at Imperial College, whose products would also be in demand by industry, afforded the occasion for a new look at the problem. The solution has been to set up the Imperial College Thermophysical Properties Data Centre, which embraces the two IUPAC Project Centres, and for it to establish a link with the existing Physical Properties Data Service of the Institution of Chemical Engineers, thus providing for the dissemination of the available information without involving the Centres in problems such as those of marketing and advertising. This paper outlines the activities of the Centres and discusses the problems in bringing their products to the attention of industry in suitable form.

  8. Visits to Tier-1 Computing Centres

    CERN Multimedia

    Dario Barberis

    At the beginning of 2007 it became clear that an enhanced level of communication is needed between the ATLAS computing organisation and the Tier-1 centres. Most usual meetings are ATLAS-centric and cannot address the issues of each Tier-1; therefore we decided to organise a series of visits to the Tier-1 centres and focus on site issues. For us, ATLAS computing management, it is most useful to realize how each Tier-1 centre is organised, and its relation to the associated Tier-2s; indeed their presence at these visits is also very useful. We hope it is also useful for sites... at least, we are told so! The usual participation includes, from the ATLAS side: computing management, operations, data placement, resources, accounting and database deployment coordinators; and from the Tier-1 side: computer centre management, system managers, Grid infrastructure people, network, storage and database experts, local ATLAS liaison people and representatives of the associated Tier-2s. Visiting Tier-1 centres (1-4). ...

  9. Scavenger hunt in the CERN Computing Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    Hidden among the racks of servers and disks in the CERN Computing Centre, you’ll find Hawaiian dancers, space aliens, gorillas… all LEGO® figurines! These characters were placed about the Centre for the arrival of Google’s Street View team for the world to discover.   PLEASE NOTE THAT THE COMPETITION IS OVER. ONLY FOR REFERENCE, HERE IS THE ORIGINAL ARTICLE. We’re pleased to announce our first global scavenger hunt! Spot three LEGO® figurines using Google’s Street View and you’ll be entered to win a gift of your choice from our CERN Gift Guide. A LEGO® figurine in the CERN Computing Centre, as seen on Google Street View. Here are the details: Find at least three LEGO® figurines hidden around the CERN Computing Centre using Google Street View.   Take screencaps of the figurines and e-mail the pictures to TreasureHunt-ComputingCentre@cern.ch. This email is no longer active.   The...

  10. A reference regional nuclear fuel centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear fuel centre groups the facilities for spent fuel reprocessing, plutonium fuel fabrication, waste conditioning, and interim storage on a single site. The technical aspects of safety and protection, and the socio-economic consequences of two types of centre have been studied. The reference centre has an initial reprocessing capacity of 1500 tonnes. This capacity is quadrupled by the construction of two new units in 15 years. The other centre considered is a quarter of this size. A description is given of the processes used, the personal and capital requirements for construction and operation of the plant, the transport of radioactive waste and products, and the quantities involved. The local radiological impact is low and could be further reduced to a level well below that of natural radioactivity. The resulting increase in economic activity, employment, income redistribution and the new infrastructure requirements are estimated for a rural or semi-rural region. Measures to prevent tension are proposed. The impact of the host country's balance of payments, finances, employment situation and technological knowhow is evaluated. The original centre is compared with equivalent facilities scattered geographically

  11. How European centres diagnose, treat, and prevent CIED infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Marinskis, Germanas; Lip, Gregory Y H

    2012-01-01

    in most centres and is substantially under 2% in the majority of centres interviewed. However, there are still differences in terms of prophylactic antibiotic therapy: 8.9% of the centres administer oxacillin as preoperative treatment, 4.4% of them do not give any antibiotic therapy, all centres use some...

  12. 78 FR 58458 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Quogue Canal, Southampton, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: If you have questions on this rule, call or email Ms. Judy Leung-Yee, Project Officer, First Coast Guard District, telephone (212) 668-7165, email [email protected] . If you have...

  13. Information Centre Radioactivity Switzerland; Beratungsstelle Radioaktivitaet Schweiz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosimann, N.; Balsiger, B.; Burger, M. [Bundesamt fuer Bevoelkerungsschutz (Switzerland). LABOR SPIEZ

    2016-07-01

    The Information Centre Radioactivity Switzerland is meant to assess the radiological condition and serves for psychological-medical care of affected members of the Swiss public following an event of increased radioactivity in the environment. The Centre is structured in a modular way consisting of the following modules: ''Entry Measurement'': The visitors are registered and measured for contamination, ''Decontamination'': Contaminated visitors are decontaminated, ''Additional Measurements'': If required, thyroid and whole body measurements are performed, ''Information'': The visitors are informed about radioactivity, radiation protection, the current situation and their individual next steps, ''Exit'': Administrative release from the Information Centre.

  14. The EPFL Plasma Physics Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Plasma Physics Research Centre (CRPP) is a non-departmental unit of the EPFL, and currently employs about 130 people, about 105 on the EPFL site and the rest at the Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, in Villigen, Switzerland. The CRPP is a National Competence Centre in the field of Plasma Physics. In addition to plasma physics teaching, its missions are primarily the pursuit of scientific research in the field of controlled fusion within the framework of the EURATOM-Swiss Confederation Association and the development of its expertise as well as technology transfer in the field of materials research. As the body responsible for all scientific work on controlled fusion in Switzerland, the CRPP plays a national role of international significance. This document of 6 pages presents the explanation of the Plasma Physics Research Centre' activities (CRPP). (author)

  15. Effluent treatment plant and decontamination centre, Trombay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaushik, C.P.; Agarwal, K.

    2017-01-01

    The Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, has a number of plants and laboratories, which generate Radioactive Liquid Waste and Protective Wears. Two facilities have been established in late 1960s to cater to this requirement. The Centre, on the average generates about 50,000 m"3 of active liquid effluents of varying specific activities. The Effluent Treatment Plant was setup to receive and process radioactive liquids generated by various facilities of BARC in Trombay. It also serves a single-point discharge facility to enable monitoring of radioactive effluents discharged from the Trombay site. About 120-150 Te of protective wears and inactive apparel are generated annually from various radioactive facilities and laboratories of BARC. In addition, contaminated fuel assembly components are generated by DHRUVA and formerly by CIRUS. These components require decontamination before its recycle to the fuel assembly process. The Decontamination Centre, setup in late 1960s, is mandated to carry out the above mentioned decontamination activities

  16. Colour centre-free perovskite single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, Pierre-Olivier; Petit, Johan; Goldner, Philippe; Viana, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Yb 3+ :YAlO 3 (YAP) and Yb 3+ :GdAlO 3 (GAP) are interesting 1 μm high-power laser media thanks to their very good thermo-mechanical properties. However, as-grown perovskite single crystals exhibit colour centres. Parasitic thermal load generated by these centres is deleterious for high-power laser action and can lead to crystal damages. Moreover these defects decrease Yb 3+ lifetime. They are related to trapped holes on the oxygen network. In the present work, several schemes to remove colour centres are presented. Attention is focused on cerium codoping, thermal annealing under reducing atmosphere and growth of non-stoechiometric compounds.

  17. Medical applications in a nuclear research centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, F.; Eggermont, G.

    2001-01-01

    In these days of public aversion to nuclear power, it can be important to point at the medical applications of ionising radiation. Not only the general public, but also the authorities and research centres have to be aware of these medical applications, which are not without risk for public health. Now that funding for nuclear research is declining, an opening to the medical world can give new opportunities to a nuclear research centre. A lot of research could be done where the tools developed for the nuclear power world are very useful. Even new applications for the research reactors like BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy) can be envisaged for the near future. In this contribution an overview will be given of the different techniques used in the medical world with ionising radiation. The specific example of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre will be given where the mission statement was changed to include a certain number of medical research topics. (authors)

  18. A day in the CERN Control Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Rosaria Marraffino

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Control Centre (CCC) is the nerve centre of the CERN beam systems. From this room, the experts prepare, monitor, adjust, and control the particle beams that circulate throughout the accelerator complex while ensuring that the services and the technical infrastructure work flawlessly. Buttons, screens, telephones, lights (but no sound): in the CCC, everything is ready to make it possible for the LHC to reach the unprecedented energies expected at Run 2.   Seen from above, the CERN Control Centre resembles the shape of a quadrupole magnet. The consoles are distributed in four circles, called “islands”, dedicated to the LHC, the SPS, the PS Complex and the Technical Infrastructure (TI) respectively. Spread between TI and LHC are the Cryogenics consoles. Being in the same room allows the 24h-manned islands to be constantly in touch with one another, thus ensuring the best performance of the machines. At the LHC island, operators are currently busy training the magnet...

  19. Occupational deprivation in an asylum centre:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morville, Anne-Le; Erlandsson, Lena-Karin

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a study of three asylum-seeking men from Iran and Afghanistan. It aimed to explore how and if they experienced occupations as occupations in a Danish asylum centre and how their life experience shaped their choice and value of current occupations. In-depth narrative interviews...... explored the participants’ occupational history and its influence on their occupations in the asylum centre. A thematic analysis showed that the participants had been subjected to occupational disruption and deprivation by politically oppressive systems even before their flight. Their occupations...... in Denmark were to a certain extent influenced by their earlier occupations and the current occupational deprivation they all experienced was due to limited possibilities in the centre. Although they tried their best to fill their days and create structure, there was a loss of valued occupations...

  20. Optimizing Data Centre Energy and Environmental Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikema, David Hendrik

    Data centres use an estimated 2% of US electrical power which accounts for much of their total cost of ownership. This consumption continues to grow, further straining power grids attempting to integrate more renewable energy. This dissertation focuses on assessing and reducing data centre environmental and financial costs. Emissions of projects undertaken to lower the data centre environmental footprints can be assessed and the emission reduction projects compared using an ISO-14064-2-compliant greenhouse gas reduction protocol outlined herein. I was closely involved with the development of the protocol. Full lifecycle analysis and verifying that projects exceed business-as-usual expectations are addressed, and a test project is described. Consuming power when it is low cost or when renewable energy is available can be used to reduce the financial and environmental costs of computing. Adaptation based on the power price showed 10--50% potential savings in typical cases, and local renewable energy use could be increased by 10--80%. Allowing a fraction of high-priority tasks to proceed unimpeded still allows significant savings. Power grid operators use mechanisms called ancillary services to address variation and system failures, paying organizations to alter power consumption on request. By bidding to offer these services, data centres may be able to lower their energy costs while reducing their environmental impact. If providing contingency reserves which require only infrequent action, savings of up to 12% were seen in simulations. Greater power cost savings are possible for those ceding more control to the power grid operator. Coordinating multiple data centres adds overhead, and altering at which data centre requests are processed based on changes in the financial or environmental costs of power is likely to increase this overhead. Tests of virtual machine migrations showed that in some cases there was no visible increase in power use while in others power use

  1. THE ELUSIVENESS OF LEARNER-CENTRED TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ervin Kovačević

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This research will explore teaching styles of university professors. Teaching style is an umbrella term for teaching decisions made during the entire teaching process – planning, delivery, and evaluation. Contemporary university teachers are advised to adopt the learner-centred teaching style which is assumed to produce remarkable possibilities. In the Fall Semester 2015 fifty-two respondents in different faculties of International University of Sarajevo were surveyed using The Principles of Adult Learning Scale inventory designed by Gary J. Conti. Inventory scores were calculated according to guidelines suggested by the author of the inventory. The scores revealed that majority of respondents strongly supported teacher-centred rather than learner-centred styles of instruction. Scores were analysed on gender lines and across three different faculties, namely: Arts and Social Sciences; Business and Administration; Engineering and Natural Sciences. In all five groups none of the seven teaching style indicators was found to conform with the learner-centred teaching criteria. There was no statistically significant difference between the two genders’ preference for a teaching style. And there was no statistically significant difference between teaching style preference across the three different faculties.The results of this research imply that the learner-centred style of instruction is not frequently implemented. Secondly, the results indicate that the requirements necessary for proper application of the learner-centred teaching style are not easy to meet in current written and unwritten norms. Finally, the results show that traditional teaching styles, which have been preserved in different scientific fields, still predominate in universities.

  2. Review of CERN Computer Centre Infrastructure

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    The CERN Computer Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure in the future, and in the likely scenario that any extension will be remote from CERN, and in the light of the way other large facilities are today being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote computer centres. This presentation will give the details on the project’s motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  3. White-centred retinal haemorrhages (Roth spots).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, R; James, B

    1998-10-01

    Roth spots (white-centred retinal haemorrhages) were classically described as septic emboli lodged in the retina of patients with subacute bacterial endocarditis. Indeed many have considered Roth spots pathognomonic for this condition. More recent histological evidence suggests, however, that they are not foci of bacterial abscess. Instead, they are nonspecific and may be found in many other diseases. A review of the histology and the pathogenesis of these white-centred haemorrhages will be provided, along with the work-up of the differential diagnosis.

  4. Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre - preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, L H; Roed-Petersen, J; Menné, T

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anaphylactoid reactions in anaesthesia are rare and should ideally be investigated in specialist centres. At Gentofte University Hospital, we established such a centre in 1998 as a joint venture between the Departments of Anaesthesiology and Dermatology. We present the methodology...... for chlorhexidine. Only one patient has tested positive to a neuromuscular blocking drug (NMBD) so far. DISCUSSION: Our preliminary results appear to differ in two ways from results usually found in this field. Firstly, only one patient has tested positive for a NMBD and secondly, we have had four patients...

  5. Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory as Cultural Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.

    2017-07-01

    NAS RA V. Ambartsumian Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory is presented as a cultural centre for Armenia and the Armenian nation in general. Besides being scientific and educational centre, the Observatory is famous for its unique architectural ensemble, rich botanical garden and world of birds, as well as it is one of the most frequently visited sightseeing of Armenia. In recent years, the Observatory has also taken the initiative of the coordination of the Cultural Astronomy in Armenia and in this field, unites the astronomers, historians, archaeologists, ethnographers, culturologists, literary critics, linguists, art historians and other experts. Keywords: Byurakan Astrophysical Observatory, architecture, botanic garden, tourism, Cultural Astronomy.

  6. Imperial College Reactor Centre annual report. 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The following new equipment is noted; for atomic absorption spectrometry to supplement the neutron activation analysis, and an additional nuclear data analysis system to improve the quality and speed of the service to users of the Centre's facilities. Users include undergraduates from the University of London, outside bodies such as the British Musueum, as well as departments of Colleges of the University of London. The reactor lost only three days through failures or faults. Two replacement fuel elements were put into the reactor during the year. The report contains brief accounts of 34 research programmes at the Centre. (U.K.)

  7. Bureaucracy, professionalization and school centred innovation strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul

    1990-03-01

    This paper examines an attempt to promote a school centred innovation strategy within a highly centralized educational system. The School Based Curriculum Project Scheme, which was introduced into Hong Kong in 1988, is analysed in terms of a professional-bureaucratic dichotomy. It is argued that the operational details of the scheme are designed to satisfy a range of bureaucratic concerns and these are not conducive to promoting the professional work ethic which is required for school centred innovation. Finally the paper identifies the implications which arise for policies designed to promote curriculum innovation.

  8. Description of the Nuclear Training Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagadarikar, V.K.

    1974-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy, Government of India has developed an on-going programme for constructing and operating heavy water moderated, natural uranium fuelled power stations of the CANDU-type. With the view to train personnel required for operation and maintenance of these stations, a Nuclear Training Centre has been set up at the site of the Rajasthan Atomic Power Station. A description of the nuclear training centre with its facilities is given. The training programme for engineers, operators, mechanical, electrical and control maintainers etc. is given in detail, along with the actual syllabi for respective courses. Examples of the typical field check list are provided. (K.B.)

  9. Pickering education centre aids nuclear acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    Activities at the new education centre at Pickering are described. The opening of the Nuclear Communications Centre, in 1978, resulting from a search for an effective means of maintaining public acceptance of Ontario Hydro's extensive nuclear power programme. Activities include participation in the interactive computer games, guided tours of educational exhibits including a model of Pickering A generating station, and displays depicting the Candu fuel cycle, outdoor exhibits of renewable energy sources, and tours of the plant. Outside activities include lectures to schools and citizen, business, or professional groups. (U.K.)

  10. Interaction of centres on nucleate boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chekanov, V.V.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental set-up is described which enables to analyse the growth of a bubble on a heater, the frequency of succession of the bubbles, etc., by the change in the electric signal from a photomultiplier, onto whose photocathode the bubble is projected. The change in the first moments of the statistical distribution of the corresponding parameters (growth time, frequency of succession, and so on) is adopted as the measure of the external effect on the vapour formation centre. It is shown that for single-bubble boiling the greatest effect is exerted by the acoustic waves produced by the bubble in the growth period; during developed boiling one observes mutual suppression of centres spaced at a distance of the order of the detachment diameter. As the heat flux increases, the correlation of the motion of the interface over the heater surface increases as well. When the correlation radius becomes equal to the centre-to-centre distance, the first crisis sets in. It is suggested that heaters with a variable coefficient of temperature conductance along the heat-releasing surface must withstand high subcritical heat fluxes

  11. Enhancing person-centred communication in NICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weis, Janne; Zoffmann, Vibeke; Egerod, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    Aims of this article were (a) to explore how parents of premature infants experience guided family-centred care (GFCC), and (b) to compare how parents receiving GFCC versus standard care (SC) describe nurse-parent communication in the neonatal intensive care unit....

  12. The young centre of the Earth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uggerhoj, U. I.; Mikkelsen, R. E.; Faye, J.

    2016-01-01

    We treat, as an illustrative example of gravitational time dilation in relativity, the observation that the centre of the Earth is younger than the surface by an appreciable amount. Richard Feynman first made this insightful point and presented an estimate of the size of the effect in a talk...

  13. Uganda | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Our funding helped develop the Uganda Health Information Network, an electronic ... Hand-held computers, mobile caching services, and mobile telephones enable ... Now used in hundreds of health centres, the technology has enhanced healthcare ... promote land policies that are fair to women; stimulate high-quality, ...

  14. Specification of data centre power management strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postema, Björn F.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.

    2017-01-01

    In recent work, we proposed a flexible simulation framework (using AnyLogic) for the trade-off. analysis of power and performance in data centres. We now extend this framework with a versatile module to study the effect of advanced power management strategies based on both power and performance

  15. Frequency selectivity at very low centre frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orellana, Carlos Andrés Jurado; Pedersen, Christian Sejer; Marquardt, Torsten

    2010-01-01

    measurements based on OAE suppression techniques and notched-noise masking data psychophysically measured for centre frequencies in the range 50-125 Hz, this study examines how individual differences in frequency selectivity, as well as in masking, may occur at very low CFs due to individual differences...

  16. Egypt | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Our research support in Egypt has shifted focus with the country's changing needs. ... With support from IDRC and other partners, the university established the Alexandria Research Centre for ... stimulate technology start ups; prepare youth for in high-demand jobs in retail, hospitality, ... Careers · Contact Us · Site map.

  17. Maintenance training centre at NPP Paks, Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babos, K.

    1996-01-01

    The lecture shows the feature of WWER-440/213 units maintenance, the existing maintenance training system, the necessity of the change in maintenance training system at NPP Paks. The author introduces the would-be maintenance training centre, the training facilities and the main tasks related to the maintenance training. (author)

  18. Kathryn Toure | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Kathryn Toure started her career in New York City in refugee resettlement before working for the Centre for International and Comparative Studies at the University of Iowa. She moved to West Africa where she worked with Africa Online, the Educational Research Network for West and Central Africa, and eventually as ...

  19. Radiological work in a university centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westerman, B.

    1982-01-01

    In this paper the author outlines the problems of the industrial doctor's tasks in a university centre with physics laboratories and a hospital with medical laboratories. An inventory of problems is presented. The solutions are not easy because of the interdependence of medical, physical and technical inspectors. The health hazards appear to be low. (Auth.)

  20. International Development Research Centre - Special Examination ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    OAG-BVG

    2008-03-27

    Mar 27, 2008 ... The government's attention to these matters is needed. .... that they can identify problems and make decisions that promote ... Canadian resources for research for development by creating, .... effect on the Centre's mandate and strategic objectives. ...... between fresh perspectives and corporate memory.

  1. the Avian Park Service Learning Centre story

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Ukwanda Centre for Rural Health (UCRH) opened in 2001, followed 10 years later by the establishment of the Ukwanda Rural Clinical School in one of the rural health districts of the Western Cape. This paper relates the journey of the Faculty with the underserviced community of Avian Park through the provision of ...

  2. Copyright | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Where copyright is held by IDRC Unless otherwise stated, the copyright to material on this website is held by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC). IDRC permits reading, downloading, copying, redistributing, printing, linking and searching, for non-commercial or academic purposes, of any of its content, ...

  3. Legal Counsel | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Legal Counsel assists the Corporate Secretary and General Counsel in advising, and providing support to, Centre management and the Board of Governors on ... This involves providing strategic and tactical advice to, and working as an integral member of, IDRC negotiating teams on particular transactions towards:.

  4. National Centre for Radioactive Ion Beams (NCRIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    Radioactive Ion (nuclear) Beams have become prolific recently. Nuclear physics and associated subjects have staged a comeback to almost the beginning with the advent of RIB. A dedicated National Centre for RIB (NCRIB) proposed, discussed at several forums and under serious consideration is described

  5. National Centre for Radioactive Ion Beams (NCRIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chintalapudi, S.N.

    1999-01-01

    A dedicated National Centre for RIB (NCRIB) proposed discussed at several forums is presented. The production of (RIB) radioactive ion beams and applications of beams leading to competitive studies in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, condensed matter, bio-science and radioactive isotope production etc. are mentioned

  6. Myanmar: The Community Learning Centre Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelborg, Jorn; Duvieusart, Baudouin, Ed.

    A community learning centre (CLC) is a local educational institution outside the formal education system, usually set up and managed by local people. CLCs were first introduced in Myanmar in 1994, and by 2001 there were 71 CLCs in 11 townships. The townships are characterized by remoteness, landlessness, unemployment, dependency on one cash crop,…

  7. CAESAREAN SECTION RATE AT FEDERAL MEDICAL CENTRE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EagleMarkRes

    Materials and Method: A three year retrospective study from January 2010 to December 2012 involving all women who had caesarean delivery at the Federal Medical ... knowledge of women and increase safety about the procedure; the CS rate .... centres in Nigeria, where resident doctors on training are allowed to perform ...

  8. Search Results | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-05-04

    Results 1 - 10 of 8531 ... IDRC's Board of Governors congratulates Jean Lebel on his appointment as President and CEO and welcomes Governors Akwasi Aidoo, Alex Awiti, Shainoor Khoja, Purnima Mane, Gilles Rivard, and Stephen Toope to the Centre. Published date. May 4, 2018. News. Science and Technology Gender ...

  9. RESOURCE CENTRE AT THE SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ciunl ictlt.P cnnipc;. Material from other museums. Worksheets, activity books, guides, pamp~lets and other educational material from museums 1n Southern. Africa and overseas are kept in the museum education section of the Resource Centre. General infonnation on museums and museum technology are also collected.

  10. Renovation of the CERN Computer Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The Computer Centre at CERN is seen after half of the equipment is the large ground floor room has been removed. A large-scale spring-cleaning operation took place before renovation work for the new CERN Grid system began. Fifteen kilometres of cables that were no longer needed were removed from the cavity floor for recycling.

  11. Centring the Subject in Order to Educate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, R. Scott

    2007-01-01

    It is important for educators to recognise that the various calls to decentre the subject--or self--should not be interpreted as necessarily requiring the removal of the subject altogether. Through the individualism of the Enlightenment the self was centred. This highly individualistic notion of the sovereign self has now been decentred especially…

  12. Proposal for an ecoradiological centre model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perovic, S.M.; Zunic, Z.; Demajo, M.; Konjevic, N.

    1998-01-01

    The problem of establishing an optimal Ecoradiological Centre Model is studied in some detail for the town of Kotor which is under the protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage. The proposed structure of the Centre is analyzed from the view of Engineering, Education and Scientific parameters. This Model is suitable for implementation as a network Centre Model for the state of Montenegro. Further, the modelling strategy of the ecoradiological condition control of natural, construction, bio and technological systems is elaborated. The proposal includes the ecoradiological monitoring, radioactive and electromagnetic radiation processing and protection for different natural zones as well as their different geostructures, aerial and hydrogeological conditions. The programme also includes all housing objects (hotels, flats, houses, office premises etc.). Here will also be presented the radiation protection and recommendations for the implementation of Title VII of the European Basic Safety Standards Directive (BSS), concerning significant increase in exposure due to natural radiation sources. Also, the proposal of Local Radiation Protection for the town of Kotor is presented. Our proposal for an Ecoradiological Centre Model presented here is in a form of a pilot programme, applicable also for other towns and states. (author)

  13. Environmental monitoring of the Cea Valduc centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guetat, Ph.; Jaskula, L.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the main features of the environmental control in the vicinity of the CEA Valduc centre, explains the site specific characteristics, the surveillance policy, and some historical elements about tritium atmospheric release. Some levels of activities are given, corresponding to an exposure level below 0.02% of natural irradiation. (author)

  14. Canada helps build food irradiation centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.

    1990-01-01

    In a project backed by the Canadian International Development Agency, Nordion has built a new food irradiation research and development centre in Thailand, and trained Thai personnel in its operation. Consumer market tests of suitably labelled Thai irradiated foods are planned in Canada, once regulatory approval is obtained. Papayas, mangoes and shrimp are of particular interest

  15. User account | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Log in(active tab) · Request new password. Username *. Enter your IDRC - International Development Research Centre username. Password *. Enter the password that accompanies your username. IDRC Login (for IDRC staff / team members only) · What we do · Funding · Resources · About IDRC. Knowledge. Innovation.

  16. Flexible Processes in Project-Centred Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceri, Stefano; Matera, Maristella; Raffio, Alessandro; Spoelstra, Howard

    2007-01-01

    Ceri, S., Matera, M., Raffio, A. & Spoelstra, H. (2007). Flexible Processes in Project-Centred Learning. In E. Duval, R. Klamma, and M. Wolpers (Eds.), European Conference on Technology Enhanced Learning, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 4753, pp. 463-468. Berlin Heidelberg: Springer-Verlag

  17. Sarwat Salem | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Two years later he moved to the Centre's Regional Office of East and Central Africa, where he served for 10 years before returning to the Cairo office. Sarwat has extensive finance, administrative, and management experience. He is a member of the Order of Chartered Professional Accountants of Quebec and he holds a ...

  18. The Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, L.C.

    1994-01-01

    The Australian Centre for Minesite Rehabilitation Research (ACMRR) is a joint venture between the Australian mining industry through the Australian Mineral Industries Research Association Ltd. (AMIRA) and three of the organizations working most actively in this area in Australia: CSIRO Minesite Rehabilitation Research Program; University of Queensland Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation; and Curtin University Mulga Research Centre. The ACMRR was established in July 1993 to provide a national framework to conduct Strategic Research into minesite rehabilitation. It is an industry led and funded initiative. The Goals of the Centre include: to conduct strategic research into minesite rehabilitation to provide sustainable environmental solutions which are acceptable to industry, government and the community; to be recognized as a center of excellence undertaking commissioned research on minesite rehabilitation in an independent and thorough manner; to provide scientific and technological foundations to facilitate industry and government in setting acceptable standards; to act as networking and communications focus; and to enhance education and training in minesite rehabilitation. Strategic Research Programs in: Water Systems--downstream surface and groundwater quality; Land--the long-term behavior and stability of constructed landforms; Ecosystems--the long-term sustainability of constructed landforms; Waste--the long-term treatment and disposal of waste products; will allow the ACMRR to achieve these goals through specific research projects in these areas, developed with industry sponsors. This paper will discuss their progress to date, research projects underway, and plans for the future

  19. Birth centre confinement at the Queen Victoria Medical Centre: four years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, N; Campbell, J; Biro, M A; Lumley, J; Rao, J; Spensley, J

    1986-06-09

    A review of the first four years of the functioning of the birth centre at the Queen Victoria Medical Centre is presented. In that time, 1040 pregnant women were accepted for confinement there. Of these, 52 withdrew for non-obstetric reasons, while 470 were transferred to alternative obstetrical care--274 because of antepartum complications and 196 because of intrapartum problems. Therefore, 518 women were delivered in the birth centre. The care of the women is entrusted almost entirely to a team of midwives and this review demonstrates an enviable safety record.

  20. Development of krypton-85 measurement in ocean samples by beta counting and use of the krypton-85 as a tracer in oceanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ternon, Jean-Francois

    1990-01-01

    Krypton-85 present in the environment has essentially an anthropogenic origin, and the knowledge of the evolution of its concentration in the atmosphere, and of its mode of penetration in the ocean by gaseous exchange at the surface, and its bio-geochemical stability in the environment make it a potential tool to trace movements of water masses in the ocean. This research thesis aims at being a contribution to the implementation of an experimental device which would allow very low concentrations of krypton-85 in the ocean to be measured. After a presentation of the general context, the author reports the development of the two last steps of krypton-85 measurement: the separation of krypton by gas chromatography, and the measurement of krypton-85 by low-level radioactive counting. Then, the author reports the study of the use of krypton-85 as a tracer in oceanography, and notably highlights its similarities with CFC which are widely used to study ocean circulation [fr

  1. Person-centred care in nursing documentation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Broderick, Margaret C

    2012-12-07

    BACKGROUND: Documentation is an essential part of nursing. It provides evidence that care has been carried out and contains important information to enhance the quality and continuity of care. Person-centred care (PCC) is an approach to care that is underpinned by mutual respect and the development of a therapeutic relationship between the patient and nurse. It is a core principle in standards for residential care settings for older people and is beneficial for both patients and staff (International Practice Development in Nursing and Healthcare, Chichester, Blackwell, 2008 and The Implementation of a Model of Person-Centred Practice in Older Person Settings, Dublin, Health Service Executive, 2010a). However, the literature suggests a lack of person-centredness within nursing documentation (International Journal of Older People Nursing 2, 2007, 263 and The Implementation of a Model of Person-Centred Practice in Older Person Settings, Dublin, Health Service Executive, 2010a). AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore nursing documentation in long-term care, to determine whether it reflected a person-centred approach to care and to describe aspects of PCC as they appeared in nursing records. METHOD: A qualitative descriptive study using the PCN framework (Person-centred Nursing; Theory and Practice, Oxford, Wiley-Blackwell, 2010) as the context through which nursing assessments and care plans were explored. RESULTS: Findings indicated that many nursing records were incomplete, and information regarding psychosocial aspects of care was infrequent. There was evidence that nurses engaged with residents and worked with their beliefs and values. However, nursing documentation was not completed in consultation with the patient, and there was little to suggest that patients were involved in decisions relating to their care. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The structure of nursing documentation can be a major obstacle to the recording of PCC and appropriate care planning. Documentation

  2. Nuclear Electric Visitor Centres - Innovation and inspiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenton, Bob

    1998-01-01

    Full text: This eight minute video demonstrates the approach taken by Nuclear Electric to exhibitions that are open to the public. The information is given both visually - with excerpts from some of the attractions on display at the centres - and in comments from interviews with visitors, the centre guides and the man responsible for many of the exhibits featured in the video. on one side are the schoolchildren who are visiting the exhibition and are seen both playing and learning as they press buttons, watch videos, 'meet' Michael Faraday, and learn about radiation - its disposal and its safe transportation. The headmaster of the school is interviewed and explains that the exhibition is helping his children understand the importance of electricity to their world. on the other side is Jackie Lucas, the visitor centre manager, explaining what the public make of the exhibition. We see her staff greeting the children and helping them to understand the show. The designer of the exhibition, Len Upton explains how you go about making an exhibition such as this both informative and fun. Also interviewed is the man behind many of the exhibitions featured at Nuclear Electric's visitor centres up and down the country, Nicholas Mullane. He explains the purpose of the exhibition and what messages it imparts. The video is presented in split-screen or composite format, whereby the interviewee and children are often presented together. Excerpts from the various videos on display are presented as both how they are seen from the floor, as well as the full screen effect of the various programmes. The video gives much of the feeling of fun to be gained at the exhibition, as well as showing the educational benefits to be gained from a couple of hours at one of Nuclear Electric's visitor centres. Copies of the video can be obtained from Bob Fenton at Nuclear Electric. (Fax: ++44 1 452 652 443). (author)

  3. The centre of mass of a triangular plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sluesarenko, Viktor; Rojas, Roberto; Fuster, Gonzalo

    2008-01-01

    We present a derivation for the coordinates of the centre of mass-or centre of gravity-of a homogeneous triangular plate by using scaling and symmetry. We scale the triangular plate by a factor of 2 and divide its area into four plates identical to the original. By symmetry, we assert that the centre of mass of two identical masses lies at the midpoint of the line joining their centres of mass. By relating the centres of mass of the original to those of the scaled plates, we find the coordinates of the centre of mass as the solution of an algebraic equation

  4. Les télécentres, centres de communications polyvalents | CRDI ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    12 juil. 2011 ... ... la raison de leur absence et beaucoup répondent qu'ils ont eu une ... fournisseur de service Internet du télécentre, qui se trouve à Maputo ... Le télécentre s'est révélé être un fournisseur de services utile et recherché par les ...

  5. HISTORIC CENTRE(S OF BARCELONA: PRACTICAL AND SYMBOLIC ELEMENTS IN TRADITIONAL URBAN SPACE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Martínez Robles

    2007-09-01

    The model of compact city that Barcelona aims, has required the renewal of its historical areas, and in order to improve their level of centrality, taking into account, that in addition of its historical centre “Ciutat Vella”, Barcelona contains diverse traditional neighborhoods each of them having their own historical centre. The difference centre‐periphery should also be perceived among these other historical centers. Integration should not be confused with standardization, neither differentiation with segregation.

  6. Effects of unstratified and centre-stratified randomization in multi-centre clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anisimov, Vladimir V

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the analysis of randomization effects in multi-centre clinical trials. The two randomization schemes most often used in clinical trials are considered: unstratified and centre-stratified block-permuted randomization. The prediction of the number of patients randomized to different treatment arms in different regions during the recruitment period accounting for the stochastic nature of the recruitment and effects of multiple centres is investigated. A new analytic approach using a Poisson-gamma patient recruitment model (patients arrive at different centres according to Poisson processes with rates sampled from a gamma distributed population) and its further extensions is proposed. Closed-form expressions for corresponding distributions of the predicted number of the patients randomized in different regions are derived. In the case of two treatments, the properties of the total imbalance in the number of patients on treatment arms caused by using centre-stratified randomization are investigated and for a large number of centres a normal approximation of imbalance is proved. The impact of imbalance on the power of the study is considered. It is shown that the loss of statistical power is practically negligible and can be compensated by a minor increase in sample size. The influence of patient dropout is also investigated. The impact of randomization on predicted drug supply overage is discussed. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. IAEA To Launch Centre On Ocean Acidification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is to launch a new centre this summer to address the growing problem of ocean acidification. Operated by the Agency's Monaco Environmental Laboratories, the Ocean Acidification International Coordination Centre will serve the scientific community - as well as policymakers, universities, media and the general public - by facilitating, promoting and communicating global actions on ocean acidification. Growing amounts of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere are being absorbed in the planet's oceans which increases their acidity. According to the experts, ocean acidification may render most regions of the ocean inhospitable to coral reefs by 2050 if atmospheric carbon dioxide levels continue to increase. This could lead to substantial changes in commercial fish stocks, threatening food security for millions of people as well as the multi-billion dollar fishing industry. International scientists have been studying the effect and possible responses, and the new centre will help coordinate their efforts. ''During the past five years, numerous multinational and national research projects on ocean acidification have emerged and significant research advances have been made,'' said Daud bin Mohamad, IAEA Deputy Director General for Nuclear Sciences and Applications. ''The time is now ripe to provide international coordination to gain the greatest value from national efforts and research investments.'' The centre will be supported by several IAEA Member States and through the Peaceful Uses Initiative, and it will be overseen by an Advisory Board consisting of leading institutions, including the U.N. Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization, the Fondation Prince Albert II de Monaco, the OA-Reference User Group, as well as leading scientists and economists in the field. The new centre will focus on international

  8. JOB CENTRE FOR DOMESTIC STAFF IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service; http://www.cern.ch/relations/

    2001-01-01

    The Permanent mission of Switzerland to the International Organisations in Geneva has informed CERN that the Geneva Welcome Centre has set up an employment registration desk for the domestic staff of international civil servants. The aim of this pilot project is, on the one hand, to help international civil servants find domestic staff and, on the other hand, to help domestic staff holding an 'F'-type carte de légitimation find employment within 30 days after the expiry of a contract. For more information, please contact the Geneva Welcome Centre, La Pastorale, 106, route de Ferney, Case postale 103, 1211 Genève 20, tel. (+41.22) 918 02 70, fax (+41.22) 918 02 79), http://geneva-international.org/Welcome.E.html.

  9. Institutional profile: the London Centre for Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, David; Bontoux, Thierry

    2009-12-01

    Located in the London neighborhoods of Bloomsbury and South Kensington, the London Centre for Nanotechnology is a UK-based multidisciplinary research center that operates at the forefront of science and technology. It is a joint venture between two of the world's leading institutions, UCL and Imperial College London, uniting their strong capabilities in the disciplines that underpin nanotechnology: engineering, the physical sciences and biomedicine. The London Centre for Nanotechnology has a unique operating model that accesses and focuses the combined skills of the Departments of Chemistry, Physics, Materials, Medicine, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Biochemical Engineering and Earth Sciences across the two universities. It aims to provide the nanoscience and nanotechnology required to solve major problems in healthcare, information processing, energy and the environment.

  10. Engineering NV centres in Synthetic Diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthew Markham

    2014-01-01

    The quantum properties of the nitrogen vacancy (NV) centre in diamond has prompted rapid growth in diamond research. This initial growth was driven by the fact the NV centre provides an 'easy' to manipulate quantum system along with opening up the possibility of a new material to deliver a solid state quantum computer. The NV defect is now moving from a quantum curiosity to a commercial development platform for a range of application such as as gyroscopes, timing and magnetometry as well as the more traditional quantum technologies such as quantum encryption and quantum simulation. These technologies are pushing the development needs of the material, and the processing of that material. The paper will describes the advances in CVD diamond synthesis with special attention to getting NV defects close to the surface of the diamond and how to process the material for diamond quantum optical applications. (author)

  11. Progress report: Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This volume of the progress report brings out the scientific and technical activities of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta during the year 1999. This includes brief review of the various R and D activities of the Centre and outside users of the cyclotron from the universities and other research institutes. The operational activities of the cyclotron with ECR ion sources, accelerator oriented research activities, activities on detector, target and electronics are reported. The activities of the Computer and Informatics group are described. The status report of the ongoing projects is also provided. The main activities of the superconducting cyclotron project, radioactive ion beam project, heavy ion experimental facility, advanced computational facility, recovery and analysis of helium from hot springs and material science research are described

  12. It's all change at the Computer Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Laëtitia Pedroso

    2011-01-01

    The IT and EN Departments are modernising the infrastructure of the Computer Centre to improve the conditions in which the equipment has to operate and to increase capacity. The construction work has already begun and is due to be completed in October 2012.   Every year CERN experiences around ten power cuts lasting from less than a second to several hours. In most cases the two protection systems - the UPS* and the diesel generators – are able to ensure that the operation of the Computer Centre is not affected. As Vincent Doré, the project leader for the IT Department, and Paul Pepinster, the EN Department's technical coordinator in charge of modernising the infrastructure, explains: "Building 513 has two types of computing facilities – the "non-critical" ones, such as the servers for "off-line" computing, which have UPS systems ensuring that they can operate for 10 minutes after a power cut, and the "critical&...

  13. CMS Centres Worldwide - a New Collaborative Infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Lucas

    2011-01-01

    The CMS Experiment at the LHC has established a network of more than fifty inter-connected 'CMS Centres' at CERN and in institutes in the Americas, Asia, Australasia, and Europe. These facilities are used by people doing CMS detector and computing grid operations, remote shifts, data quality monitoring and analysis, as well as education and outreach. We present the computing, software, and collaborative tools and videoconferencing systems. These include permanently running 'telepresence' video links (hardware-based H.323, EVO and Vidyo), Webcasts, and generic Web tools such as CMS-TV for broadcasting live monitoring and outreach information. Being Web-based and experiment-independent, these systems could easily be extended to other organizations. We describe the experiences of using CMS Centres Worldwide in the CMS data-taking operations as well as for major media events with several hundred TV channels, radio stations, and many more press journalists simultaneously around the world.

  14. Danish Anaesthesia Allergy Centre - preliminary results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garvey, L H; Roed-Petersen, J; Menné, T

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anaphylactoid reactions in anaesthesia are rare and should ideally be investigated in specialist centres. At Gentofte University Hospital, we established such a centre in 1998 as a joint venture between the Departments of Anaesthesiology and Dermatology. We present the methodology...... of in vitro testing and skin testing. Blood samples for tryptase analysis are taken at the time of reaction and a control sample is taken together with samples for specific IgE analysis 2-4 weeks after the reaction. Subsequent skin testing comprises both prick tests and intradermal tests in most cases...... for chlorhexidine. Only one patient has tested positive to a neuromuscular blocking drug (NMBD) so far. DISCUSSION: Our preliminary results appear to differ in two ways from results usually found in this field. Firstly, only one patient has tested positive for a NMBD and secondly, we have had four patients...

  15. Addressing the challenges of patient-centred design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen LaBat

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Patient-centred design is a relatively new term, but a longstanding concept in clinical practice. This discussion looks at patient-centred design and explores the relationships of patient-centred design to universal design, user-centred design and the newer human-centred design. It also explores why interdisciplinary approaches are needed for patient-centred design and how interdisciplinary collaboration works to address the challenges of patient centred design. Successful patient-centred solutions can grow from collaborations which include shared visions, understanding of both the nature and degree of variation in the patient,materials, and the designed solution, clear regular communication among all parties with careful definition of terms, and respect for the inherent cultures of all disciplines involved.

  16. TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Economic Policy Research Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    TTI Phase 2 Institutional Support: Economic Policy Research Centre ... the Economic Policy Research Centre's (EPRC) role as a credible public policy institution in ... IWRA/IDRC webinar on climate change and adaptive water management.

  17. A herpetological reconnaissance of Mpala Research Centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... located in semi¬-arid savannah on the Laikipia Plateau of central Kenya, at 1650 m elevation at 0.293° N and 36.899° E. An intensive survey was undertaken 5-7 July 1998, supplemented by incidental sampling on other occasions. A total of 17 species are known from Mpala Research Centre: 4 toads and frogs, 1 tortoise, ...

  18. Enhancing Safety at Airline Operations Control Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukáš Řasa

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years a new term of Safety Management System (SMS has been introduced into aviation legislation. This system is being adopted by airline operators. One of the groundbased actors of everyday operations is Operations Control Centre (OCC. The goal of this article has been to identify and assess risks and dangers which occur at OCC and create a template for OCC implementation into SMS.

  19. Imperial College Reactor Centre annual report. 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    It is reported that the reactor operated reliably during the year with less than half a day of operating time lost by faults or failures. Brief accounts of the 34 research projects at the Centre are given, and a list of teaching experiments or visits is included. These include undergraduate and post-graduate teaching. Commercial requests for irradiations and neutron activation analysis are reported as increasing. (U.K.)

  20. Swasti: An International Health Resource Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, N.S.

    2013-01-01

    Swasti, an International Health Resource Centre was established in 2002 in India. The objective was to enhance the health and well-being of communities, particularly the marginalized. Swasti’s main focus lies in the areas of primary health, sexual and reproductive health including HIV, communicable and non-communicable diseases, water, sanitation and hygiene and gender based violence. The organization, during the last decade has grown in leaps and bounds reaching out to the most affected comm...

  1. Coordonnateur, Gestion des documents | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Classifier, indexer, faire des références croisées et identifier les documents relatifs aux projets et aux activités administratives du CRDI en attribuant, conformément au plan de classification des documents du Centre, le numéro de dossier et le titre appropriés de chaque dossier et les mots-clés servant à la recherche;.

  2. CMS Centres Worldwide - a New Collaborative Infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Lucas

    2011-01-01

    Webcasts, and generic Web tools such as CMS-TV for broadcasting live monitoring and outreach information. Being Web-based and experiment-independent, these systems could easily be extended to other organizations. We describe the experiences of using CMS Centres Worldwide in the CMS data-taking operations as well as for major media events with several hundred TV channels, radio stations, and many more press journalists simultaneously around the world.

  3. Birth of a science centre. Italian phenomenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Rodari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In May 2004 the Balì Museum, Planetarium and interactive science museum, was opened to the public in Italy: 35 hands-on exhibits designed according to the interactive tradition of the Exploratorium in San Francisco, an astronomic observatory for educational activities, a Planetarium with 70 places. With a total investment of about three million euros, about two thirds of which were spent on restructuring the splendid eighteenth-century villa in which it is housed, the undertaking may be considered a small one in comparison with other European science centres. Three million euros: perhaps enough to cover the cost of only the splendid circular access ramp to the brand-new Cosmocaixa in Barcelona, an investment of one hundred million euros. But the interesting aspect of the story of the Balì Museum (but also of other Italian stories, as we shall see lies in the fact that this lively and advanced science centre stands in the bucolic region of the Marches, next to a small town of only 800 inhabitants (Saltara, in the Province of Pesaro and Urbino, in a municipal territory that has a total of 5000. Whereas in Italy the projects for science centres comparable with the Catalan one, for example projects for Rome and Turin, never get off the ground, smaller ones are opening in small and medium-sized towns: why is this? And what does the unusual location of the centres entail for science communication in Italy? This Focus does not claim to tell the whole truth about Italian interactive museums, but it does offer some phenomenological cues to open a debate on the cultural, economic and political premises that favour their lives.

  4. The Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Root, J., E-mail: John.Root@usask.ca [Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation, Inc., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation (CCNI) was incorporated on December 20, 2011, to help place Saskatchewan among global leaders of nuclear research, development and training, through investment in partnerships with academia and industry for maximum societal and economic benefit. As the CCNI builds a community of participants in the nuclear sector, the province of Saskatchewan expects to see positive impacts in nuclear medicine, materials research, nuclear energy, environmental responsibility and the quality of social policy related to nuclear science and technology. (author)

  5. La cardiomyopathie dilatee au centre hospitalier Universitaire ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    But : Afin d'améliorer la prise en charge, d'éviter l'évolution rapide vers une insuffisance cardiaque réfractaire au traitement, nous avons entrepris cette étude en milieu hospitalier. Méthode : il s'est agi d'une étude rétrospective et descriptive dans le service de cardiologie du Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Tokoin de Lomé.

  6. Studies of the CNESTEN's Nuclear Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alami, R.

    1988-11-01

    The different steps of the methodology applied to the site selection of Maamora's Nuclear Research Centre, within a 20 km wide coastal band preliminarily fixed between Kenitra and Casablanca cities, are outlined: delimitation of potential zones, identification of potential sites, selection of preferred sites. A particular attention is given to the criterium of the methodology applied to the preferred sites classifying. 1 map, 2 tabs, 2 refs. (F.M.)

  7. A new visitor centre for CMS

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    At the inauguration of the new CMS visitor centre. The CMS experiment inaugurated a new visitor centre at its Cessy site on 14 June. This will allow the thousands of people who come to CERN each year to follow the construction of one the Laboratory's flagship experiments first-hand. CERN receives over 20,000 visitors each year. Until recently, many of them were taken on a guided tour of one of the LEP experiments. With the closure of LEP, however, trips underground are no longer possible, and the Visits' Service has put in place a number of other itineraries (Bulletin 46/2000). Since the CMS detector will be almost entirely constructed in a surface hall, it is now taking a big share of the limelight. The CMS visitor centre has been built on a platform overlooking CMS construction. It contains a set of clear descriptive posters describing the experiment, along with a video projection showing animations and movies about CMS construction. In the coming weeks, a display of CMS detector elements will be added, as...

  8. Upcoming opening of CERN's new Mobility Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    On 29 February, CERN’s brand new Mobility Centre opened in the Globe car park. The Centre has been created to cater to the transport needs of everyone at CERN, to simplify procedures and to centralise all the transport services on offer: the rental of CERN bikes and cars, the CERN car-sharing scheme and SIXT car rental.   From 29 February onwards, the Mobility Centre in the Globe car park will be the place to go for all your duty travel needs: rental of CERN cars (with or without the CERN logo), SIXT car rental, CERN bike rental, distribution of cards allowing the use of CERN’s self-service bike- and car-sharing schemes. That same day, the premises currently housing the Car Pool in Building 130 will become the CERN garage, responsible for: upkeep and repairs on CERN bikes, minor maintenance work on CERN vehicles (e.g. replacing windscreen wipers, bulbs and fuses, refilling windscreen washer fluid, pumping up tyres, etc.), arranging and following up the repair and maintenan...

  9. Muonium and hydrogen defect centres in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, S.F.J.

    1990-12-01

    Hydrogen and its light isotope, muonium, may both be observed in insulating crystals as trapped interstitial atoms. Their difference in mass gives rise to a small dynamic isotope effect in hyperfine coupling constant and a large difference in diffusive behaviour - muonium showing in some lattices a striking minimum in mobility versus temperature. Muonium may still be detected as isolated paramagnetic centres in the semiconductors whereas information on hydrogen in these materials is restricted to diamagnetic states in association with other impurities. Arguably one of the most significant findings of the muonium spin rotation technique is the coexistence of two distinct types of muonium centre in many of the tetrahedrally co-ordinated lattices. In literature spanning more than a decade, the isotropic state was described as ''normal'' muonium and assigned to the tetrahedral interstitial site, while the nature of the ''anomalous'' anisotropic state remained a puzzle. Within the last few years the situation has entirely reversed: the anisotropic state has been recognised as the more stable of the two and its electronic structure and (bond-centre) location have been well established, whereas the precise location of the isotropic state and the nature of its metastability have become open questions. (author)

  10. TEMS: results of a specialist centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flexer, S M; Durham-Hall, A C; Steward, M A; Robinson, J M

    2014-06-01

    Transanal endoscopic microsurgery (TEMS) is becoming more widespread due to the increasing body of evidence to support its role. Previous published data has reported recurrence rates in excess of 10% for benign polyps after TEMS. Bradford Royal Infirmary is a tertiary referral centre for TEMS and early rectal cancer in the UK. Data for all TEMS operations were entered into a prospective database over a 7-year period. Demographic data, complications and recurrence rates were recorded. Both benign adenomas and malignant lesions were included. A total of 164 patients (65% male), with a mean age of 68 years were included; 114 (70%) of the lesions resected were benign adenomas, and 50 (30%) were malignant lesions. Median polyp size was 4 (range 0.6-14.5) cm. Mean length of operation was 55 (range 10-120) min. There were no recurrences in any patients with a benign adenoma resected; two patients with malignant lesions developed recurrences. Three intra-operative complications were recorded, two rectal perforations (repaired primarily, one requiring defunctioning stoma), and a further patient suffered a blood loss of >300 ml requiring transfusion. Six patients developed strictures requiring dilation either endoscopically or under anaesthetic in the post-operative period. We have demonstrated that TEMS procedures performed in a specialist centre provide low rates of both recurrence and complication. Within a specialist centre, TEMS surgery should be offered to all patients for rectal lesions, both benign and malignant, that are amenable to TEMS.

  11. Tax haven or international financial centre? The case of Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Waris, Attiya

    2014-01-01

    International financial centres are geared to provide optimal conditions for the financial services industry. They encourage activities that can improve a country’s economy, but they may also facilitate money laundering, tax evasion, tax avoidance, and other harmful practices. The Nairobi International Financial Centre and similar centres in Africa can foster development, but also pose significant challenges. Legal and regulatory arrangements determine what types of capital a financial centr...

  12. Optimal catchment area and primary PCI centre volume revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Mikkel Malby; Pedersen, Frants; Holmvang, Lene

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The currently stated optimal catchment population for a pPCI centre is 300,000-1,100,000, resulting in 200-800 procedures/year. pPCI centres are increasing in number even within small geographic areas. We describe the organisation and quality of care after merging two high-volume centres...

  13. Centre of the Cell: Science Comes to Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkwill, Frances; Chambers, Katie

    2015-01-01

    Centre of the Cell is a unique biomedical science education centre, a widening participation and outreach project in London's East End. This article describes Centre of the Cell's first five years of operation, the evolution of the project in response to audience demand, and the impact of siting a major public engagement project within a research laboratory.

  14. Tele-centres as a way of achieving universal access

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falch, Morten; Anyimadu, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The success of tele-centres in Ghana is discussed. The tele-centres offer a low cost opportunity to empower local communities in developed and developing countries to meet the challenges of the information society. The tele-centres can also contribute more directly to the supply of non-commercial...

  15. Documentation Centre of the Association of African Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chateh, Peter

    This report presents the results of a study of the Documentation Centre of the Association of African Universities (AAU) undertaken to work out proposals for the rational organization of the Centre, and to explore the possibility of computerizing the Centre and linking it with other centers which provide automated documentation services. The…

  16. Person-centred healthcare research: a personal influence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    * Corresponding author: University of Windesheim, Zwolle, The Netherlands Email: am.vandenberg@windesheim.nl Submitted for publication: 3rd November 2017 Accepted for publication: 12th March 2018 Published: 16th May 2018 https://doi.org/10.19043/ipdj.81.011 Abstract Context: This critical reflection is about the positive effects for educational and research settings of participation in a two-day programme entitled ‘Using participatory action research and appreciative inquiry to research healthcare practice’. Aims: To reflect on the journey of positive developments in research and education that started with participation in this programme. Using Caring Conversations (Dewar, 2011 as a reflective framework of questions, this article discusses the journey in order to encourage others to consider the approach of appreciative inquiry to bring to life the concept of co-creation in research and education. Conclusions and implications for practice: Participation in this programme has led to the implementation of a variety of actions in educational and research settings. Central to all these actions is an appreciative approach to co-creation as a counterpart to today’s prevailing problem-based viewpoint. A possible factor behind these developments was the power of vulnerability experienced during the programme, a shared process of transformational learning. Implications for practice: This critical reflection: Provides an invitation to shift from a problem-based focus to a positive revolution Provides an appreciative reflective story about the power of vulnerability as an inspiration for others to move out of their comfort zone and seek to discover their own exceptionality Supports a shift from a facilitator-led to a co-creation approach in doing research and teaching with older adults Keywords: Emotional touchpoints, appreciative inquiry, Caring Conversations, practice development, co-creation, transformational learning theory   IDEAS AND INFLUENCES Person-centred healthcare research: a personal influence Hazel M. Chapman

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This commentary assesses the contribution made by the person-centred healthcare research of McCormack et al (2017 to research methodology and our ability to evaluate an organisation’s claims to be person-centred. It discusses the importance of person-centred ethical approaches within rigorous research methodologies.

  17. IAEA establishes International Seismic Safety Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The IAEA today officially inaugurated an international centre to coordinate efforts for protecting nuclear installations against the effects of earthquakes. The International Seismic Safety Centre (ISSC), which has been established within the IAEA's Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, will serve as a focal point on seismic safety for nuclear installations worldwide. ISSC will assist countries on the assessment of seismic hazards of nuclear facilities to mitigate the consequences of strong earthquakes. 'With safety as our first priority, it is vital that we pool all expert knowledge available worldwide to assist nuclear operators and regulators to be well prepared for coping with major seismic events,' said Antonio Godoy, Acting Head of the IAEA's Engineering Safety Section and leader of the ISSC. 'The creation of the ISSC represents the culmination of three decades of the IAEA's active and recognized involvement in this matter through the development of an updated set of safety standards and the assistance to Member States for their application.' To further seismic safety at nuclear installations worldwide, the ISSC will: - Promote knowledge sharing among the international community in order to avoid or mitigate the consequences of extreme seismic events on nuclear installations; - Support countries through advisory services and training courses; and - Enhance seismic safety by utilizing experience gained from previous seismic events in member states. The centre is supported by a scientific committee of high-level experts from academic, industrial and nuclear safety authorities that will advise the ISSC on implementation of its programme. Experts have been nominated from seven specialized areas, including geology and tectonics, seismology, seismic hazard, geotechnical engineering, structural engineering, equipment, and seismic risk. Japan and the United States have both contributed initial funds for creation of the centre, which will be based at

  18. Addiction research centres and the nurturing of creativity The Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research (SERAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramness, Jørgen G; Clausen, Thomas; Duckert, Fanny; Ravndal, Edle; Waal, Helge

    2011-08-01

    The Norwegian Centre for Addiction Research (SERAF) at the University of Oslo is a newly established, clinical addiction research centre. It is located at the Oslo University Hospital and has a major focus on opioid dependency, investigating Norwegian opioid maintenance treatment (OMT), with special interest in OMT during pregnancy, mortality, morbidity and criminality before, during and after OMT and alternatives to OMT, such as the use of naltrexone implants. The well-developed health registries of Norway are core assets that also allow the opportunity for other types of substance abuse research. This research includes health services, abuse of prescription drugs and drugs of abuse in connection with traffic. The centre also focuses upon comorbidity, investigating the usefulness and limitations of psychometric instruments, drug abuse in different psychiatric treatment settings and internet-based interventions for hazardous alcohol consumption. © 2010 The Authors, Addiction © 2010 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  19. Human-centred approaches in slipperiness measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönqvist, Raoul; Abeysekera, John; Gard, Gunvor; Hsiang, Simon M.; Leamon, Tom B.; Newman, Dava J.; Gielo-Perczak, Krystyna; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Pai, Clive Y.-C.

    2010-01-01

    A number of human-centred methodologies—subjective, objective, and combined—are used for slipperiness measurement. They comprise a variety of approaches from biomechanically-oriented experiments to psychophysical tests and subjective evaluations. The objective of this paper is to review some of the research done in the field, including such topics as awareness and perception of slipperiness, postural and balance control, rating scales for balance, adaptation to slippery conditions, measurement of unexpected movements, kinematics of slipping, and protective movements during falling. The role of human factors in slips and falls will be discussed. Strengths and weaknesses of human-centred approaches in relation to mechanical slip test methodologies are considered. Current friction-based criteria and thresholds for walking without slipping are reviewed for a number of work tasks. These include activities such as walking on a level or an inclined surface, running, stopping and jumping, as well as stair ascent and descent, manual exertion (pushing and pulling, load carrying, lifting) and particular concerns of the elderly and mobility disabled persons. Some future directions for slipperiness measurement and research in the field of slips and falls are outlined. Human-centred approaches for slipperiness measurement do have many applications. First, they are utilized to develop research hypotheses and models to predict workplace risks caused by slipping. Second, they are important alternatives to apparatus-based friction measurements and are used to validate such methodologies. Third, they are used as practical tools for evaluating and monitoring slip resistance properties of foot wear, anti-skid devices and floor surfaces. PMID:11794763

  20. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre: annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The research and development (R and D) work carried out in the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay during 1988 is summarised and presented in the sections entitled Physical Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Materials and Materials Science, Radioisotopes, Reactors, Fuel cycle, Radiological Safety and Protection, Electronics and Instrumentation, Engineering Services, Life Sciences and General. At the end of each section a list of publications is also given. The R and D work of the outstation units of BARC, namely, Nuclear Research Laboratory, Srinagar; High Altitute Research Laboratory, Gulmarg and Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta are also described in this report. Some of the highlights of the work during the year are: (1) Medium Energy Heavy Ion Accelerator (MEHIA) facility set up jointly by BARC and the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR) at TIFR premises became fully operational in September 1988. A number of new compositions of high temperature supconducting materials were synthesized. The highest transition temperature achieved was 125 K. Research work to improve the quality of sintered uranium oxide pellets achieved the purpose. Nuclear fuels were fabricated by using sol-gel process. R and D work for 235 MWe and 500 MWe PHWR type reactors is continuing. Conceptual design of the fuel handling system for the prototype fast breeder reactor was finalised. 233 U+Al alloy fuel for Kamini reactor was fabricated. Progress has been made in industrial applications of enzymes. Various applications of radioisotopes are being continued. Certain technologies and processes developed in the Centre were transferred to commercial agencies for large scale exploitation. (M.G.B.)

  1. Low energy use at Vaestervik sports centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-05-15

    Vaestervik, in south Sweden, has saved both energy and money since modern energy efficiency equipment was installed in its swimming pool and bowling alley. Energy use in the sports centre has so far fallen by around 830 MWh/year, and operating costs have been reduced by efficient heat recovery. Energy efficiency at the Vaestervik sports centre is a good example of how a local authority can save energy and money by installing modern equipment for ventilation and heat recovery in a facility with high energy consumption. The well-used sports centre, including a swimming pool and bowling alley, is in central Vaestervik. In 1999 the Municipality received grants from the local investment programme (LIP) to improve the facility's energy efficiency. An efficient ventilation system with a dehumidifier and heat exchanger was installed at the swimming pool, reducing the need to introduce cold air. In addition the bowling alley, which did not have heat recovery, was given a modern heat-recovery plant. - Lower operating costs due to efficient heat recovery. - Reduced energy use (electricity and district heating) for the plant at around 830 MWh/year. The modern and highly efficient units for heat recovery, dehumidification and heat exchange result in lower operating costs and reduced energy use, which means that the Municipality of Vaestervik saves energy and money. Installation at the swimming pool resulted in slightly higher air humidity, but a relative humidity of 60% is common in swimming pools and difficult to reduce without inconveniencing bathers. A new fan room installed in the roof contributed to higher than anticipated costs, but the financial and economic gains outweigh these. New frequency-controlled circulation pumps for the pool water were installed in 2007. They are to have occupancy control capability, giving a further improvement of energy saving and heat recovery

  2. Learning Resource Centre in a Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Pokovec

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available In the conditions of growing competition people are becoming the essential competitive advantage. Because of too much work, stress, too many responsibilities and other factors, employees are often unmotivated. Everyday self-study is the best way that leads to excellence. In order to enable self-study for all employees, the organisation should organise their own learning resource centre that includes: educational videoprogrammes, audio tapes, books and e-learning programmes. All educational programmes should cover business and personal topics.

  3. A disposal centre for immobilized nuclear waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This report describes a conceptual design of a disposal centre for immobilized nuclear waste. The surface facilities consist of plants for the preparation of steel cylinders containing nuclear waste immobilized in glass, shaft headframe buildings and all necessary support facilities. The underground disposal vault is located on one level at a depth of 1000 m. The waste cylinders are emplaced into boreholes in the tunnel floors. All surface and subsurface facilities are described, operations and schedules are summarized, and cost estimates and manpower requirements are given. (auth)

  4. The INTEGRAL science data centre (ISDC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Courvoisier, T.J.L.; Walter, Rasmus; Beckmann, V.

    2003-01-01

    The INTEGRAL Science Data Centre (ISDC) provides the INTEGRAL data and means to analyse them to the scientific community. The ISDC runs a gamma ray burst alert system that provides the position of gamma ray bursts on the sky within seconds to the community. It operates a quick-look analysis...... of the data within few hours that detects new and unexpected sources as well as it monitors the instruments. The ISDC processes the data through a standard analysis the results of which are provided to the observers together with their data....

  5. Two centre problems in relativistic atomic physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McConnell, Sean R.

    2013-01-09

    The work contained within this thesis is concerned with the explanation and usage of a set of theoretical procedures for the study of static and dynamic two-centre problems in the relativistic framework of Dirac's equation. Two distinctly different theories for handling time-dependent atomic interactions are reviewed, namely semi-classical perturbation theory and a non-perturbative numerical technique based on the coupled channel equation to directly solve the time-dependent, two-centre Dirac equation. The non-perturbative numerical technique has been developed independently and the calculations performed with it are entirely new. Calculations for ionisation cross sections and state occupancies are conducted for both these methods. The non-perturbative technique for relativistic two-centre problems is extensively explained and, given its novelty, a probity test is conducted between this technique and that of the well established perturbation theory in calculating K-and L-shell ionisation cross sections for the alpha decay of initially Hydrogen-like Polonium. To that end, an in depth outline of the perturbative technique is also made for both collision and decay processes. As well as the comparison test mentioned, this technique is also applied to the analysis of cross sections of the promotion of a single electron into the positive continuum from either a K- or L-shell due to the alpha decay of heavy, neutral nuclei (Gadolinium, Polonium and Thorium). Dirac-Coulomb eigenfunctions centred on the parent nucleus of the decay pair are taken as the basis for use in the cross section calculations utilising first order, semi-classical pertubation theory. The excellent congruence between both techniques justifies the usage of the non-perturbative algorithms in the subsequent analysis of collisions between very heavy, highly charged ions. As such, a set of calculations are performed examining the bound and continuum state occupancy of the electronic levels during a

  6. NNC's engineering development centre at Risley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnsey, R.

    1994-01-01

    NNC's Engineering Development Centre (EDC) provides specialist engineering, manufacturing and development support to customers. EDC is located at Risley, near Warrington, but its operation are closely integrated into the Company's overall business activities based at its headquarters in Knutsford, Cheshire, fifteen miles away. EDC's facilities and expertise were originally developed to support the UK's nuclear power station construction programme. However, EDC professionals have since applied their specialist expertise to the benefit of new customers in line with the Company's diversification and a large and growing proportion of work is now in support of the defence and process industries. (author)

  7. Hunting for hardware changes in data centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coelho dos Santos, M; Steers, I; Szebenyi, I; Xafi, A; Barring, O; Bonfillou, E

    2012-01-01

    With many servers and server parts the environment of warehouse sized data centres is increasingly complex. Server life-cycle management and hardware failures are responsible for frequent changes that need to be managed. To manage these changes better a project codenamed “hardware hound” focusing on hardware failure trending and hardware inventory has been started at CERN. By creating and using a hardware oriented data set - the inventory - with detailed information on servers and their parts as well as tracking changes to this inventory, the project aims at, for example, being able to discover trends in hardware failure rates.

  8. Inspection Qualification Centre in NPP 'Kozloduy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhovski, M.

    2000-01-01

    In May 1999 according to the working plan of the IAEA project RER 4/020 and the decision of the NPP the Inspection Qualification Centre (IQC) has been established in order to provide examination services in the NPP. During year 1999 IVC (AEA Technology) in the framework of the DTI project provides consulting and technical assistance to the NPP, IQC, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences and Regulatory Authorities in setting up the IQC infrastructure. Now IQC work as an independent inspection body B type. The IQC activities for the period 1999-2000 are presented and further tasks are outlined

  9. going for the centre of the world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses Iten

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available “He wants to go to the centre!” exclaims the man I’ve just asked for directions, winking to his friends. They are laying a cement foundation for a house, amongst wooden huts with dirt floors. An upgrade. They giggle and wave for me to continue along the only road. At each house - spaced fifty metres from each other - I keep asking for the same directions. “El Centro?” a lady asks me at one of the many wooden kiosks, that all seem to sell the same few things, “bueno, just take a left at the next crossing.”

  10. The Australian centre for RF bioeffects research (ACRBR) - an NHMRC centre of research excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wood, A.; Croft, R.; Abramson, M.; Anderson, V.; Cosic, I.; Finnie, J.; McKenzie, R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The Australian Centre for Radiofrequency Bioeffects Research (ACRBR) is a newly established multi-institutional research centre which seeks to research questions pertaining to possible health effects of exposure to radiofrequency devices, such as mobile phones and which is funded under the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Centres of Research Excellence funding program. The Centre of Research Excellence in Electromagnetic Energy is combining the efforts of engineers, epidemiologists, physicists, psychophysiologists and veterinary pathologists from RMIT University, the Institute of Medical and Veterinary Science in South Australia (IMVS), Monash University, Swinburne University of Technology and Telstra Research Laboratories (TRL). The centre is funded at $2.5 M over five years and will undertake a program of research to address the issue of exposure to radiofrequency (RF) devices and health. It will also train new scientists, keep the community informed of ongoing developments and help the development of government policies in this area of considerable public concern. The 5-year program has the following components: Neurobiology: One important area where there is a perceived research gap is in the area of potential neurological effects, which will hence be a major focus of this Centre. The proposed studies range from in vitro and in vivo research studies of RF effects on neuron and neural system functioning in rodents, to that of RF effects on simple neural function, cognition and subjective report in humans. The latter series of studies have been developed to account for the consensus view that more emphasis needs to be placed on possible differences in RF population sensitivity (e.g. youth versus aged, and ' electromagnetic hypersensitives'). Epidemiological studies are an important tool in studying the impact on public health from exposure of whole populations to modern radio technologies. Cancer outcomes in this area of

  11. Evaluation of health centre community nurse team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, P N; Trounson, E

    1969-02-01

    This report gives an account of the work during six months of a community nurse team attached to the doctors working from a new health centre. The team consisted of two community nurses, who had both health visiting and Queen's nursing qualifications, and a State-enrolled nurse. The community nurses, in addition to undertaking all the health visiting for the population at risk, assessed the social and nursing needs of patients at the request of the general practitioners and ensured that these needs were met. When necessary they undertook practical nursing tasks in the home and in the health centre, but most of the bedside nursing in the home was done by the State-enrolled nurse.The needs of the population at risk were such that only one State-enrolled nurse could usefully be employed, and this proved to be a considerable disadvantage. Despite this, the experimental work pattern held advantages to patients, doctors, and nurses, and is potentially capable of providing a satisfying and economic division of responsibilities, with different tasks being carried out by the individual most appropriately qualified.

  12. WISB: Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology Centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, John

    2016-06-15

    Synthetic biology promises to create high-impact solutions to challenges in the areas of biotechnology, human/animal health, the environment, energy, materials and food security. Equally, synthetic biologists create tools and strategies that have the potential to help us answer important fundamental questions in biology. Warwick Integrative Synthetic Biology (WISB) pursues both of these mutually complementary 'build to apply' and 'build to understand' approaches. This is reflected in our research structure, in which a core theme on predictive biosystems engineering develops underpinning understanding as well as next-generation experimental/theoretical tools, and these are then incorporated into three applied themes in which we engineer biosynthetic pathways, microbial communities and microbial effector systems in plants. WISB takes a comprehensive approach to training, education and outreach. For example, WISB is a partner in the EPSRC/BBSRC-funded U.K. Doctoral Training Centre in synthetic biology, we have developed a new undergraduate module in the subject, and we have established five WISB Research Career Development Fellowships to support young group leaders. Research in Ethical, Legal and Societal Aspects (ELSA) of synthetic biology is embedded in our centre activities. WISB has been highly proactive in building an international research and training network that includes partners in Barcelona, Boston, Copenhagen, Madrid, Marburg, São Paulo, Tartu and Valencia. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. The role of public information centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Miranda, A.

    1993-01-01

    Information centres are nothing more, nor less, than a practical way of providing direct information with a view to dissipating the aura of mystery and mistrust that surrounds nuclear power plants in the mind of the average member of the public. Having said this, it should be made clear that the valuable and indispensable contribution made by such centres should always go hand in hand with a well organized visit to the accessible parts of the plant itself. Contact with the people working at the plant, even if only temporary, realization that theirs is a routine activity carried out within an atmosphere of normality, is a psychological factor achieved only through seeing with one's own eyes. With regard to Spain, the recent report by UNESA (association of electricity companies) on the operation of the country's nuclear plants during the first half of 1992 mentions the figure of 33000 visitors, to which should be added the increasing tendency among the members of spanish society to become 'nuclear visitors'

  14. Activities of Yugoslav INIS Centre in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinkovic, N.

    1997-01-01

    Acting as decentralised information system, INIS (International Nuclear Information System), publishes yearly production statistics which describes in detail the activities of all the member states and organisations which contribute to the INIS Data Base. It includes: number of records arranged by country, time lag for records arranged by country, time lag for type of literature arranged by country, number of records subdivided by subject categories, year of publication arranged by country, journal titles yielding 10 or more articles arranged alphabetically and by subject categories, journal titles yielding 1 or more articles arranged by country and by frequency. Production statistics for 1997 shows that the activity of Yugoslav INIS Centre could be estimated as rather successful, having in mind not only the number of arranged records but the number of articles relevant for INIS that were published in our country during recent few years. Among 88 member states and organisations, Yugoslav INIS Centre is in 38 place with 194 arranged records published from 1994-1997. (author). 2 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  15. Enhancing Communication in an Egyptian Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morsy, S.W.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a proposed attempt to enhance communication in a research centre in Egypt. The currently Nuclear and Radiological Regulatory Authority (NRRA) which formerly was the National Centre for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control (NCNSRC) is housed in a nine-storey building with a straight double loaded corridor architectural plan. Syntactic axial analysis showed high integration for each floor plan individually which means that the floor plan is not to be blamed for lack of communication among floor inhabitants; other means must be attempted. But global axial integration (for the whole building) proved to be poor. A problem of communication among floors was identified. Means for enhancing communication were introduced: The lecture hall, the cafe and meeting rooms can play an important role in enhancing global communication among NRRA inhabitants. Besides a questionnaire was designed and distributed on all inhabitants and its feedback came up with ideas which if implemented could result in enhancing the level of communication between the inhabitants of the building thus overcoming spatial hindrances.

  16. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre annual report : 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The main thrust of the various research and development (R and D) activities of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC), Bombay, is towards the implementation of India's nuclear power programme. To that end, its R and D activities cover the entire nuclear fuel cycle, reactor technology; applications of radioisotopes and radiations in agriculture, medicine and industries; and radiation protection in nuclear installations. The report presents in summarised form the R and D activities carried out during 1989 in the chapters entitled: Physical Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Materials and Materials Sciences, Radioisotopes, Reactors, Fuel Cycle, Radiological Safety and Protection, Electronics and Instrumentation, Engineering Services, Life Sciences and General. At the end of each chapter, a list of publications by the staff scientists in the corresponding subject field is given. The list includes published journal articles and technical reports, and papers presented at conferences, symposia etc. The report also covers the R and D activities of the outstation units of BARC, namely, Nuclear Research Laboratory, Srinagar; High Altitude Research Laboratory, Gulmarg; and Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, Calcutta. BARC is also engaged in basic an applied research in frontier areas of science such as plasma and fusion physics, accelerators and lasers, high temperature superconductivity, condensed matter physics, high pressure physics, high resolution spectroscopy, chemical reaction dynamics and laser induced chemistry, electronics and robotics: radiation biology, and genetic engineering. Report is illustrated with a number of figures, graphs, and coloured pictures. (M.G.B.) figs., refs

  17. KNMI Data Centre: Easy access for all

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vegte, John; Som de Cerff, Wim; Plieger, Maarten; de Vreede, Ernst; Sluiter, Raymond; Willem Noteboom, Jan; van der Neut, Ian; Verhoef, Hans; van Versendaal, Robert; van Binnendijk, Martin; Kalle, Henk; Knopper, Arthur; Spit, Jasper; Mastop, Joeri; Klos, Olaf; Calis, Gijs; Ha, Siu-Siu; van Moosel, Wim; Klein Ikkink, Henk-Jan; Tosun, Tuncay

    2013-04-01

    KNMI is the Dutch institute for weather, climate research and seismology. It disseminates weather information to the public at large, the government, aviation and the shipping industry in the interest of safety, the economy and a sustainable environment. To gain insight into long-term developments KNMI conducts research on climate change. Making the knowledge, data and information on hand at KNMI accessible is one core activity. A huge part of the KNMI information is from numerical models, insitu sensor networks and remote sensing satellites. This digital collection is mostly internal only available and is a collection of non searchable , non standardized file formats, lacking documentation and has no references to scientific publications. With the KNMI Data Centre (KDC) project these issues are tackled. In the project a user driven development approach with SCRUM was chosen to get maximum user involvement in a relative short development timeframe. Building on open standards and proven open source technology (which includes in-house developed software like ADAGUC WMS and Portal) resulted in a first release in December 2012 This presentation will focus on the aspects of KDC relating to its technical challenges, the development strategy and the initial usage results of the data centre.

  18. CMS tracker slides into centre stage

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    As preparations for the magnet test and cosmic challenge get underway, a prototype tracker has been carefully inserted into the centre of CMS. The tracker, in its special platform, is slowly inserted into the centre of CMS. The CMS prototype tracker to be used for the magnet test and cosmic challenge coming up this summer has the same dimensions -2.5 m in diameter and 6 m in length- as the real one and tooling exactly like it. However, the support tube is only about 1% equipped, with 2 m2 of silicon detectors installed out of the total 200 m2. This is already more than any LEP experiment ever used and indicates the great care needed to be taken by engineers and technicians as these fragile detectors were installed and transported to Point 5. Sixteen thousand silicon detectors with a total of about 10 million strips will make up the full tracker. So far, 140 modules with about 100 000 strips have been implanted into the prototype tracker. These silicon strips will provide precision tracking for cosmic muon...

  19. ALICE opens its new nerve centre

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    Twenty-nine fully equipped and ergonomic workstations, one meeting area and 11 large format screens in a completely refurbished room: the ALICE Run Control Centre (ARC) implements the best and newest solutions for its shift workers and expert operators, including access for persons with reduced mobility and very soon a magic window for Point 2 visitors.   The ALICE Run Control Centre. “Our initial intention was just to optimise the old layout,” says Federico Ronchetti from Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (Italy), a CERN scientific associate currently appointed as ALICE Run Coordinator and person in charge of the ALICE Consolidation Task Force. “However, during the review process, we carried out a study of all the existing control rooms at CERN and became aware we needed a radical change. Hence we started planning a complete redesign of the workspace.” Designed and equipped over many years, the old ALICE control room did not have enough space to fit al...

  20. New Cyber Policy Centres for the Global South | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    13 avr. 2018 ... The Cyber Policy Centres initiative was established in 2017 to strengthen independent policy research institutions in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and Latin America by providing support and mentorship to build research and policy capacity in the key areas of digital rights, cybersecurity, and innovation policy.

  1. Politique sociale en Afrique de l'Ouest et du Centre | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Initiative Think tank - Fondation Hewlett. Le CRDI et la Fondation William et Flora Hewlett unissent leurs efforts dans le cadre d'une nouvelle initiative destinée à renforcer les groupes de réflexion et centres de recherche sur les... Voir davantageInitiative Think tank - Fondation Hewlett ...

  2. Thermoluminescence of Z1 centres in Sr-doped KCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamavisdar, V.S.; Moholkar, S.C.; Deshmukh, B.T.

    1980-01-01

    It is well known for alkali halides doped with divalent metal impurities that exposure to high energetic radiation and subsequent F band bleaching leads to the formation of Z 1 centres. Optical absorption measurements have shown that a low concentration of Z 1 centres is produced along with F centres during irradiation without any optical bleaching. Now the question is whether Z 1 centres are really formed along with F centres during irradiation. The aim of the present paper was to study the formation of a small amount of Z 1 centres during irradiation with the help of optical absorption and thermoluminescence measurements. The crystals of KCl:Sr were exposed to γ-rays for different doses. The TL curve for the crystal exposed to a minimum dose of γ-rays shows a TL peak at 457 K and a weak shoulder in the region 400 K to 408 K. The TL curve of the crystal exposed to maximum dose of rays shows the peak at 408 K with a greater intensity. Upon F band bleaching 408 K peak increases in intensity and optical absorption is also broadened. It is shown that the peak at 457 K is due to F centres and the peak at 408 K is due to Z 1 centres. These results clearly show that a small anount of Z 1 centres is really formed along with F centres during irradiation. (author)

  3. The role of sedimentology, oceanography, and alteration on the δ56Fe value of the Sokoman Iron Formation, Labrador Trough, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raye, Urmidola; Pufahl, Peir K.; Kyser, T. Kurtis; Ricard, Estelle; Hiatt, Eric E.

    2015-09-01

    The Sokoman Formation is a ca. 100-m-thick succession of interbedded iron formation and fine-grained siliciclastics deposited at 1.88 Ga. Accumulation occurred on a dynamic paleoshelf where oxygen stratification, coastal upwelling of hydrothermally derived Fe and Si, microbial processes, tide and storm currents, diagenesis, and low-grade prehnite-pumpellyite metamorphism controlled lithofacies character and produced complex associations of multigenerational chert, hematite, magnetite, greenalite, stilpnomelane and Fe carbonate. Hematite-rich facies were deposited along suboxic segments of the coastline where photosynthetic oxygen oases impinged on the seafloor. Hematitic, cross-stratified grainstones were formed by winnowing and reworking of freshly precipitated Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide and opal-A by waves and currents into subaqueous dunes. Magnetite-rich facies contain varying proportions of greenalite and stilpnomelane and record deposition in anoxic middle shelf environments beneath an oxygen chemocline. Minor negative Ce anomalies in hematitic facies, but prominent positive Ce and Eu anomalies and high LREE/HREE ratios in magnetite-rich facies imply the existence of a weakly oxygenated surface ocean above anoxic bottom waters. The Fe isotopic composition of 31 whole rock (-0.46 ⩽ δ56Fe ⩽ 0.47‰) and 21 magnetite samples (-0.29 ⩽ δ56Fe ⩽ 0.22‰) from suboxic and anoxic lithofacies was controlled primarily by the physical oceanography of the paleoshelf. Despite low-grade metamorphism recorded by the δ18O values of paragenetically related quartz and magnetite, the Sokoman Formation preserves a robust primary Fe isotopic signal. Coastal upwelling is interpreted to have affected the isotopic equilibria between Fe2+aq and Fe-(oxyhydr)oxide in open marine versus coastal environments, which controlled the Fe isotopic composition of lithofacies. Unlike previous work that focuses on microbial and abiotic fractionation processes with little regard for

  4. Colour centres in germanosilicate glass and optical fibres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neustruev, V.B.

    1994-01-01

    This review presents the state of the art of the study of germanium-related colour centres in silica glass and silica-based fibres. Most attention is concentrated on the dominant colour centres such as the Ge-related oxygen-deficient centres and paramagnetic Ge(n) centres, all of them having ultraviolet absorption bands. The hypothetical models and formation mechanisms proposed so far for these colour centres are discussed in detail. The origins of the models and formation mechanisms and their weak and strong points are analysed. The origin of the less well studied Ge-related colour centres in the visible spectral range (GeH, GeX, drawing-dependent defects) is also discussed. (author)

  5. Adjoint administratif (h/f) - Politiques et planification | CRDI - Centre ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    à‑d. les informer au sujet des programmes et des procédures du Centre, des systèmes et des programmes informatiques, organiser des rendez-vous avec des membres clés du personnel du Centre, réacheminer les questions aux personnes-ressources compétentes au Centre, et organiser la création de comptes de ...

  6. The Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Centre is being re-equipped

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, H.; Koerting, K.; Huncke, W.; Knapp, W.

    1986-01-01

    The Nuclear Research Centre in Karlsruhe was established over 25 years ago for the express purpose of studying nuclear engineering and its peaceful use. This goal has been achieved - what now. For some time a change has been taking place at the Research Centre: in the direction of man and environmental engineering. 'Bild der Wwissenschaft' has talked to Professor Horst Boehm, the chairman of the Nuclear Centre, about this change and the new areas of research to be concentrated on. (orig.) [de

  7. Medical applications of accelerators at Tata Memorial Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinshaw, K.A.

    2003-01-01

    The Tata Memorial Centre constitutes the national comprehensive cancer centre for the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and research on cancer. It is well equipped with sophisticated state-of-the-art equipment capable of delivering External Beam Radiotherapy (Ebert) and Brachytherapy. Nearly 400 patients receive Ebert daily at the institute from a team of highly skilled and dedicated radiation oncologists, medical physicists and technologists, making it one of the busiest centres in the country

  8. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste Scientific activities in 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    The document contains three parts. Part 1 is a general review of the scientific activities of the Centre in 1991, including a statistical digest. Part II presents the scientific programme of the Centre in the following fields: Fundamental Physics, Condensed Matter Physics, Mathematics, Physics and Energy, Physics and Environment, Applied Physics, Adriatico Research Conferences, as well as other aspects of the Centre activities in 1991. Part III lists the publications issued in 1991. Tabs

  9. International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste. Scientific activities in 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    The document contains three parts: Part I is a general review of the scientific activities of the Centre in 1990, including a statistical digest. Part II describes the scientific programme of the Centre in the following fields: Fundamental physics, condensed nuclear physics, mathematics, physics and energy, physics and environment, physics of the living state, applied physics Adriatico research conferences and other aspects of the Centre activities. Part III lists the publications issued in 1990

  10. The Future of Leisure Time Centres in Decin

    OpenAIRE

    Hochwalderová, Světluše

    2014-01-01

    This Bachelor thesis deals with the issue of extracurricular education in Decin. The goal of the thesis is to find out whether the conditions for providing extracurricular education in leisure time centres and basic schools can influence the future of leisure time centres. Another goal of the thesis is to map and analyse the offer ot extracurricular activities in leisrue time centres and basic schools. The theoretical part is based on literature, laws, regulations and available resources. The...

  11. Contextualisation of patient-centred care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Annemarie; Kristiansen, Maria; Andreassen Rix, Bo

    2018-01-01

    . In this qualitative comparative study, we explore the influence of medical contexts in three Danish hospital wards, haematology, oncological gynaecology and neuro-intensive care, on communication with patients about their children. In exploring the degree to which the inclusion of children in clinical encounters......Patients' family relations play an important part in the provision of patient-centred cancer care, not least when healthcare professionals encounter seriously ill patients with dependent children. Little is known about how children are perceived and dealt with in clinical encounters....... The thematic analysis was based on Bateson's conceptualisation of communication. We found that healthcare professionals' approach to children in clinical encounters and the ways in which children were positioned on each ward were influenced by aspects specific to the ward, including the diagnosis...

  12. Launch of the London Centre for Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeppli, Gabriel; Pankhurst, Quentin

    2006-12-01

    Is nanomedicine an area with the promise that its proponents claim? Professors Gabriel Aeppli and Quentin Pankhurst explore the issues in light of the new London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN)--a joint enterprise between Imperial College and University College London--opened on November 7, 2006. The center is a multidisciplinary research initiative that aims to bridge the physical, engineering and biomedical sciences. In this interview, Professor Gabriel Aeppli, LCN co-Director, and Deputy Director Professor Quentin Pankhurst discuss the advent and future role of the LCN with Nanomedicine's Morag Robertson. Professor Aeppli was formerly with NEC, Bell Laboratories and MIT and has more than 15 years' experience in the computer and telecommunications industry. Professor Pankhurst is a physicist with more than 20 years' experience of working with magnetic materials and nanoparticles, who now works closely with clinicians and medics on innovative healthcare applications. He also recently formed the new start-up company Endomagnetics Inc.

  13. Project for a renewable energy research centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Giachetta

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In Liguria, where sustainable approaches to the design, construction and management of buildings enjoy scant currency, the idea of a company from Milan (FERA s.r.l. setting up a research centre for studies into renewable energy resources, could well open up very interesting development opportunities.The project includes: environmental rehabilitation (restoration projects; strategies for the protection of water resources and waste management systems; passive and active solar systems (solar thermal and experiments with thermodynamic solar energy; hyperinsulation systems, passive cooling of buildings; use of natural materials; bio-climatic use of vegetation. The author describes the project content within the context of the multidisciplinary work that has gone into it.

  14. Bhabha Atomic Research Centre : annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Research and development (R and D) activities of the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC) carried out during 1990 are reported. The main thrust of the R and D activities of BARC is on : (1)providing support to the nuclear power programme, (2)designing, building and utilising research reactors, (3)working in related frontline technologies, and also (4)basic research in frontier areas of science. These activities are described in brief under the chapters entitled : (1)Physical Sciences (2)Chemical Sciences (3)Materials and Material Science (4)Radioisotopes (5)Reactions (6)Fuel Cycle (7)Radiological Safety and Protection (8)Electronics and Instrumentation (9)Engineering Services (10)Life Sciences and (11)General. At the end of each chapter a list of papers and reports published in the subject field indicated by the title of the chapter is given. (N.B.). figs., tabs

  15. Searching for City Centre of Stalowa Wola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciepiela, Agnieszka

    2017-10-01

    In cities that have historic urban layout, with a clearly separated main representative space - the main square, or the main street (a pedestrian area), specifying the location of the centre is not difficult neither for residents nor for people from the “outside". Interesting is a situation in which, in the structure of the city there is no clearly designated main public space equipped with all the necessary services, and the period of location and development of urban system falls on the twentieth century. One example of such city in Poland is Stalowa Wola - founded in 1938 as part of the Central Industrial District. The city was located not far away from Rozwadów town, which, because of the development of Stalowa Wola, was absorbed by the new structure and became a district of the bigger city.

  16. Annual report 1992 - Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillebrand, G.

    1994-01-01

    This is a non-technical progress report (in English) of the activities of the Research Centre Seibersdorf in the fields of energy and safety, materials research, isotope and radiation techniques, environment protection, health and food and industrial consulting. Within other non nuclear related highlights the newly built radio-pharmaceutical laboratory is described, which will guarantee the reliable supply of products and develop new diagnostic and therapeutic preparations. A newly developed whole-body counter for measuring internal radiation is in use in the Vienna General Hospital to obtain better information of the patient's metabolism and can thus assess the efficiency of pharmaceuticals. The research in the field of toxicology and carcinogenicity was intensified. Geological dating was performed for the 'Continental Deep-Drilling Programme' on behalf of the Max Planck Institute. Environmental data acquisition was mainly conducted in the field of ozone, water quality, air pollution and electro-smog (quittner, rieger)

  17. Personal dosimetry in the PET Centre Prague

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janeba, D.; Belohlavek, O.; Hermanska, J.

    2001-01-01

    This work is focused on radiation protection in the PET Centre Prague. The personal year dose equivalents of physicians, technologists and labtechnologists in the period 1997-2000 are presented. Dose equivalents are listed for each group as collective, mean and maximum dose equivalents and number of people in the evaluated group. There is an increase in the dose equivalents in 1999 when the PET scanner was installed. Later on, when personnel was trained and better local shielding was used, the increase is not much higher even though the number of patients investigated per day doubled. The radiation field measurements showed that the radiation dose equivalent rate outside the controlled area is on the background level of about 0.17-0.18 mSv/hour. (author)

  18. Children's Centre "3 in 1 - together"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gancheva, Hristina

    2013-04-01

    "There are only two ways to life your live. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle." Albert Einstein Children's Centre "3 in 1" is an extracurricular unit linked to the High School of Zlatartitsa, St. Cyril and St. Methodius, accomplished with the help of the municipality and many volunteers from the local community. With its activity it forms in children patriotic spirit, love for nature, active citizenship, and an impulse for a healthy life through communication with nature, saving the traditions and history, insurance of equality of the kids of the local five ethnicities and participation in activities in the sphere of science, art, sport and tourism. The educational work is mainly directed towards kids with difficulties with communication, hyperactivity, aggression, problems in their families, or those deprived of parental care. For a few years in the Children's Centre there have been clubs of interests: "Gardeners" - kids cultivate a garden. They plow, dig, plant, put in, irrigate and weed under the watch of Ms Stafka Nikolova, parents, and volunteers of the local community. The ecologically clean products - vegetables and fruits, kids use to cook delicious meals, sell, or give away. Weeds are also utilized; they are making herbarium out of them. "Cooks" - "What to have for lunch, when mom is out?". One can learn a lot of wonderful recipes from the club "Cooks". Products are own made, raised with love. In 2010, on the on the annual traditional holiday of the garden soup in Zlataritsa, the little cooks won third prize for making a delicious vegetable soup. On the same day, the 26 years old Nadezhda Savova, Cultural and Social Anthropology PhD in Princeton, founded the second community bakery in Bulgaria in Children's Centre "3 in1". Nadezhda Savova was declared traveler of 2012 by National Geographic. After the baking house in Gabrovo and Zlataritsa, Nadezhda also founded such projects in Sofia, Varna and Ruse

  19. Nuclear Research Centre of Maamora Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marfak, T.; Boufraqech, A.

    2010-01-01

    Morocco has a long and rich history in nuclear technology which began in the 1950s with the development of nuclear techniques in several important socio-economic fields such as medicine, agriculture and industrial applications. The development of nuclear technology evolved over various organizations, primarily within the Ministry of Education. However, with the formation of the National Centre for Nuclear Energy and Technology (CNESTEN) the development of nuclear technology in Morocco has been reinforced. Morocco is looking forward and actively pursuing alternative sources of energy and has a very strong interest in nuclear power generation and associated technologies such as nuclear desalination. Entry into these new technologies is required since there are no natural sources of energy, Morocco currently imports most of its energy needs from abroad and has a rapidly expanding energy need. In this paper, we present CNESTEN and its main facilities, missions, research programmes, human resources, training, education, national and international cooperation, etc

  20. Basic data of emergency response centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenieek, O.

    1995-01-01

    Emergency Response Centre (ERC) of Czech Republic is a highly specialized institution belonging to Nuclear Safety State Administration (SONS), which assures its activities both organizationally and technically. Main function of the ERC in the case of nuclear emergency is to fulfil the needs of SONS, Governmental Committee for Nuclear Emergencies in ER (GCNE ER) and the regional organs of State Authorities concerning the emergency planning and preparedness, evaluation of nuclear emergency consequences, including the emergency management and response. In the case of major failure or accident on NPP, the ERC carries out the performance analysis and review of a given NPP. It also monitors the dosimetric situation and transfers the recommendation to GCNE ER, Regional Emergency Management Committees and to NPP

  1. Patient-centred Prevention among PAD Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pii, Kathrine Hoffmann

    2015-01-01

    Intro: This paper discusses a central professional dilemma in patient-centred education: on one hand the concern for ensuring patients autonomy and right to make their own decisions regarding their treatment and, on the other hand, a concern for getting patients to make the “right” decisions......-centredness is thus promoted as a way to organize health more effectively (in terms of cost and treatment outcomes) and as a way to ensure patients’ autonomy and fundamental right to make their own decisions regarding their treatment. Critical voices within social and nursing theory have however argued....... The paper shows that the programme’s attempt to facilitate that patients make their “own” decision is challenged by patients who understand the preventive programme in relational terms and even demand more intervention from the professionals in terms of expert advice, involvement, and discipline. Conclusion...

  2. Achieving competences in patient-centred care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomborg, Kirsten; Nielsen, Else Skånning; Jensen, Annesofie Lunde

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To document the efficacy of a training programme in patient-centred care in which the nursing staff was trained to involve chronic obstructive pulmonary patients in assisted personal body care (APBC). The objectives were to describe the programme and uncover the outcomes. Background: Chronic....... In order to achieve such competences in nursing staff, we developed, implemented and evaluated a training programme. Design: A qualitative outcome analysis was conducted in order to explore the dynamics of the training programme process and the outcome. patients to be more active, as was common practice...... prior to the training. According to the staff, there was no actual change in the patients’ level of activity. The training was time-consuming. Methods: Seven nurses and six nursing assistants from three hospital units were divided into two groups in which training and evaluation took place. The content...

  3. Annual report 1992 - Austrian Research Centre Seibersdorf

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillebrand, G.

    1994-01-01

    This is a non-technical progress report (in German) of the activities of the Research Centre Seibersdorf in the fields of energy and safety, materials research, isotope and radiation techniques, environment protection, health and food and industrial consulting. Within other non nuclear related highlights the newly built radio-pharmaceutical laboratory is described, which will guarantee the reliable supply of products and develop new diagnostic and therapeutic preparations. A newly developed whole-body counter for measuring internal radiation is in use in the Vienna General Hospital to obtain better information of the patient's metabolism and can thus assess the efficiency of pharmaceuticals. The research in the field of toxicology and carcinogenicity was intensified. Geological dating was performed for the 'Continental Deep-Drilling Programme' on behalf of the Max Planck Institute. Environmental data acquisition was mainly conducted in the field of ozone, water quality, air pollution and electro-smog (quittner, rieger)

  4. Communications Centre Model in Insurance Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijel Bara

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to define a communications centre model in an insurance company that essentially has two objectives. The first objective is focused on providing quality support with the sales process thereby creating a strategic advantage over the competition while the second objective is focused on improving the link between internal organizational units whose behaviour can often render decision-making at all levels difficult. The function of sales is fundamental for an insurance company. Whether an insurance company will fulfil its basic function, which is transfer of risk from the insured party to the insurer who agrees tonreimburse incidental damages to the damaged party and distribute them among all members of the risk group on the principles of reciprocity and solidarity, depends on successful sales and billing (Andrijašević & Petranović, 1999. For an insurance company to operate successfully in a demanding market, it is necessary to meet the needs of potential clients who then must be at the centre of all the activities of the insurer. A satisfied policy holder, who is respected by the insurer as a partner, is a guarantee that the sales of insurance services will be successful and that the insured party will come back to the same insurance company. In the era of globalization and all-pervading new technologies and modes of communication, policy holders need to be able to communicate with insurance company employees. Quality communication is a good foundation for a sales conversation. A fast flow of all types of information within an organisation using a single communication module makes decision-making at all levels quicker and easier.

  5. Defining and describing birth centres in the Netherlands - a component study of the Dutch Birth Centre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermus, M A A; Boesveld, I C; Hitzert, M; Franx, A; de Graaf, J P; Steegers, E A P; Wiegers, T A; van der Pal-de Bruin, K M

    2017-07-03

    During the last decade, a rapid increase of birth locations for low-risk births, other than conventional obstetric units, has been seen in the Netherlands. Internationally some of such locations are called birth centres. The varying international definitions for birth centres are not directly applicable for use within the Dutch obstetric system. A standard definition for a birth centre in the Netherlands is lacking. This study aimed to develop a definition of birth centres for use in the Netherlands, to identify these centres and to describe their characteristics. International definitions of birth centres were analysed to find common descriptions. In July 2013 the Dutch Birth Centre Questionnaire was sent to 46 selected Dutch birth locations that might qualify as birth centre. Questions included: location, reason for establishment, women served, philosophies, facilities that support physiological birth, hotel-facilities, management, environment and transfer procedures in case of referral. Birth centres were visited to confirm the findings from the Dutch Birth Centre Questionnaire and to measure distance and time in case of referral to obstetric care. From all 46 birth locations the questionnaires were received. Based on this information a Dutch definition of a birth centre was constructed. This definition reads: "Birth centres are midwifery-managed locations that offer care to low risk women during labour and birth. They have a homelike environment and provide facilities to support physiological birth. Community midwives take primary professional responsibility for care. In case of referral the obstetric caregiver takes over the professional responsibility of care." Of the 46 selected birth locations 23 fulfilled this definition. Three types of birth centres were distinguished based on their location in relation to the nearest obstetric unit: freestanding (n = 3), alongside (n = 14) and on-site (n = 6). Transfer in case of referral was necessary for all

  6. Leveraging management information in improving call centre productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manthisana Mosese

    2016-04-01

    Objectives: This research explored the use of management information and its impact on two fundamental functions namely, improving productivity without compromising the quality of service, in the call centre of a well-known South African fashion retailer, Edcon. Following the implementation of the call centre technology project the research set out to determine how Edcon can transform their call centre to improve productivity and customer service through effective utilisation of their management information. Method: Internal documents and reports were analysed to provide the basis of evaluation between the measures of productivity prior to and post the implementation of a technology project at Edcon’s call centre. Semi-structured in-depth and group interviews were conducted to establish the importance and use of management information in improving productivity and customer service. Results: The results indicated that the availability of management information has indeed contributed to improved efficiency at the Edcon call centre. Although literature claims that there is a correlation between a call centre technology upgrade and improvement in performance, evident in the return on investment being realised within a year or two of implementation, it fell beyond the scope of this study to investigate the return on investment for Edcon’s call centre. Conclusion: Although Edcon has begun realising benefits in improved productivity in their call centre from their available management information, information will continue to play a crucial role in supporting management with informed decisions that will improve the call centre operations. [pdf to follow

  7. Crystalline roof glazing - Westside shopping centre, Berne; Kristalline Dachverglasungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enkerli, W.

    2009-07-01

    This illustrated article takes a look at the new shopping and leisure centre on the western outskirts of Berne, Switzerland. In particular, the roof of this unusual building over the motorway with its sloping walls and zig-zag design is looked at. The centre's shopping mall, adventure baths and spa, a multiplex cinema, an old peoples' home and a hotel are briefly discussed, as is the embedding of the centre in its suburban environment. The roof construction with its crystalline skylights is examined and discussed in detail. The centre's building technical services are also briefly commented on.

  8. Ordinance on the Finnish Centre of Radiation and Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This Ordinance was adopted in implementation of the 1983 Act setting up the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety and the 1987 Nuclear Energy Act and entered into force on 1 November 1990. The Ordinance specifies the tasks of the Centre, as provided under both Acts, and gives it several supplementary responsibilities. In addition to its overall competence in respect of radiation safety, the Centre will carry out research into and supervise the health effects of radiation and maintain a laboratory for national measurements in that field. The Ordinance also sets out the Centre's organisation chart and the staff duties [fr

  9. Fabrication of single optical centres in diamond-a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orwa, J.O.; Greentree, A.D.; Aharonovich, I.; Alves, A.D.C.; Van Donkelaar, J.; Stacey, A.; Prawer, S.

    2010-01-01

    Colour centres in diamond are rapidly becoming one of the leading platforms for solid-state quantum information processing applications. This is due in large part to the remarkable properties of the nitrogen-vacancy colour centre. From initial demonstrations of room-temperature single photon generation and spin single spin readout and quantum control, diamond nanocrystals are also finding application in magnetometry and biosensing. This review discusses the state of the art in the creation of isolated and small ensembles of optically active diamond defect centres, including nitrogen and nickel-related centres.

  10. Arabian Sea oceanography and fisheries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Nair, K.N.V.; Venugopal, P.; Gauns, M.; Haridas, P.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Nair, K.K.C.

    The physical and chemical forcing which drive the Arabian production is now fairly well understood. The main attributes, which contribute to the productivity are (1) the boundary processes which manifest as upwelling during summer monsoon and (2...

  11. CSIR - National Institute of Oceanography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.

    weather stations, tide gauges, an autonomous underwater vehicle and an autonomous vertical profiler. The multidisciplinary expertise developed within the Institute enabled CSIR-NIO to help numerous industries in coastal area. It has been offering services... remarkable service to the nation for nearly two decades. With the establishment of the Department of Ocean Development (now the Ministry of Earth Sciences), additional seagoing infrastructure was created by the Government of India through acquisition of O R V...

  12. Software Products - Naval Oceanography Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    are here: Home › USNO › Astronomical Applications › Software Products USNO Logo USNO Navigation Data Services Astronomical Information Center Almanacs and Other Publications Software Products For DoD Users Info Software Products MICA - Multiyear Interactive Computer Almanac MICA CDROM (thumb) MICA is an

  13. Collaborative Oceanography and Virtual Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Observing Laboratory ( EOL ), but also contains an internal architecture which will allow it to evolve into a collaborative communication tool...an additional 50,988 "common" products were generated (241 plot types), along with 47,600 overlays (101 plot types). From 52 non- EOL sources...24,471 products were collected, and from 1486 EOL data collections, 643,263 "federated" products were indexed and made available through itop.org

  14. The UK Centre for Astrobiology: A Virtual Astrobiology Centre. Accomplishments and Lessons Learned, 2011–2016

    OpenAIRE

    Cockell, Charles S.; Biller, Beth; Bryce, Casey; Cousins, Claire; Direito, Susana; Forgan, Duncan; Fox-Powell, Mark; Harrison, Jesse; Landenmark, Hanna; Nixon, Sophie; Payler, Samuel J.; Rice, Ken; Samuels, Toby; Schwendner, Petra; Stevens, Adam

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The UK Centre for Astrobiology (UKCA) was set up in 2011 as a virtual center to contribute to astrobiology research, education, and outreach. After 5 years, we describe this center and its work in each of these areas. Its research has focused on studying life in extreme environments, the limits of life on Earth, and implications for habitability elsewhere. Among its research infrastructure projects, UKCA has assembled an underground astrobiology laboratory that has hosted a deep subs...

  15. The Centres for Environment-friendly Energy Research (FME)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    High expectations for Norway's Centres for Environment-friendly Energy Research (FME).The FME centres address a broad range of areas, allcentral to developing the energy sector of the future. The activities of the eight centres established in 2009 focus on renewable energy, raising energy efficiency, energy planning, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). In 2011 three new FME centres were established which focus on social science-related energy research. The FME scheme is a direct follow-up of the broad-based political agreement on climate policy achieved in the Storting in January 2008, and of the national RandD Energi21 strategy submitted in February 2008 to the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. In April 2008 the Research Council of Norway's Executive Board decided to launch a process to establish centres for environment-friendly energy research, and a funding announcement was issued that same year. In 2010 it was decided that additional FME centres would be established in the field of social science-related energy research. After a thorough assessment of each project (based on feasibility, scientific merit, potential to generate value creation and innovation, and composition of the consortium) eight applicants were selected to become FME centres in February 2009. A new call for proposals was issued in 2010, and three more centres were awarded FME status in February 2011. The objective of the FME scheme is to establish time-limited research centres which conduct concentrated, focused and long-term research of high international calibre in order to solve specific challenges in the energy sphere. The selected centres must exhibit higher goals, a longer-term perspective and a more concentrated focus than is required under other funding instruments for the same scientific area. The make-up of the centres is critical to achieving this objective. The centres bring together Norway's leading research institutions and key players in private enterprise, the

  16. Establishing a National Nuclear Security Support Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-02-01

    The responsibility for creating and sustaining a nuclear security regime for the protection of nuclear and other radiological material clearly belongs to the State. The nuclear security regime resembles the layers of an onion, with the equipment and personnel securing the borders and ports representing the outer layer, and nuclear power, research reactors and nuclear medicine facilities representing the inner layers, and the actual target material representing the core. Components of any nuclear security regime include not only technological systems, but the human resources needed to manage, operate, administer and maintain equipment, including hardware and software. This publication provides practical guidance on the establishment and maintenance of a national nuclear security support centre (NSSC) as a means to ensure nuclear security sustainability in a State. An NSSC's basic purpose is to provide a national focal point for passing ownership of nuclear security knowledge and associated technical skills to the competent authorities involved in nuclear security. It describes processes and methodologies that can be used by a State to analyse the essential elements of information in a manner that allows several aspects of long term, systemic sustainability of nuclear security to be addressed. Processes such as the systematic approach to training, sometimes referred to as instructional system design, are the cornerstone of the NSSC concept. Proper analysis can provide States with data on the number of personnel requiring training and instructors needed, scale and scope of training, technical and scientific support venues, and details on the type and number of training aids or simulators required so that operational systems are not compromised in any way. Specific regulatory guidance, equipment or technology lists, or specifications/design of protection systems are not included in this publication. For such details, the following IAEA publications should be consulted

  17. Human-centred automation: an explorative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollnagel, Erik; Miberg, Ann Britt

    1999-05-01

    The purpose of the programme activity on human-centred automation at the HRP is to develop knowledge (in the form of models and theories) and tools (in the form of techniques and simulators) to support design of automation that ensures effective human performance and comprehension. This report presents the work done on both the analytical and experimental side of this project. The analytical work has surveyed common definitions of automation and traditional design principles. A general finding is that human-centred automation usually is defined in terms of what it is not. This is partly due to a lack of adequate models and of human-automation interaction. Another result is a clarification of the consequences of automation, in particular with regard to situation awareness and workload. The experimental work has taken place as an explorative experiment in HAMMLAB in collaboration with IPSN (France). The purpose of this experiment was to increase the understanding of how automation influences operator performance in NPP control rooms. Two different types of automation (extensive and limited) were considered in scenarios having two different degrees of complexity (high and low), and involving diagnostic and procedural tasks. Six licensed NPP crews from the NPP at Loviisa, Finland, participated in the experiment. The dependent variables applied were plant performance, operator performance, self-rated crew performance, situation awareness, workload, and operator trust in the automation. The results from the diagnostic scenarios indicated that operators' judgement of crew efficiency was related to their level of trust in the automation, and further that operators trusted automation least and rated crew performance lowest in situations where crew performance was efficient and vice versa. The results from procedural scenarios indicated that extensive automation efficiently supported operators' performance, and further that operator' judgement of crew performance efficiency

  18. Thyroid cancer: experiences at the Regional Cancer Centre, Trivandrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradeep, V.M.; Gangadharan, P.; Nair, Krishnan M.

    1999-01-01

    Above 300 thyroid cancers are seen at the Regional Cancer Centre annually. There has been an increase in the number of TC registered over the years. This is at least partly due to improved diagnostic services and availability of 131 I therapy. Almost 90 % of the cases seen at the Centre are well-differentiated cancers

  19. A national benchmarking survey of student counselling centres/units ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study further found that the majority of counselling centres/units had one or more staff members with specialised training in areas such as HIV/AIDS counselling, sexual abuse counselling and multicultural counselling. In 2007, these counselling centres/units saw on average 18 per cent of enrolled students as ...

  20. Research Informed Science Enrichment Programs at the Gravity Discovery Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venville, Grady; Blair, David; Coward, David; Deshon, Fred; Gargano, Mark; Gondwe, Mzamose; Heary, Auriol; Longnecker, Nancy; Pitts, Marina; Zadnik, Marjan

    2012-01-01

    Excursions to museums and science centres generally are great fun for students and teachers. The potential educational benefits beyond enjoyment, however, are rarely realised or analysed for their efficacy. The purpose of this paper is to describe four educational enrichment programs delivered at the Gravity Discovery Centre (GDC), near Gingin,…