WorldWideScience

Sample records for south chamorro seamount

  1. Ultramafic clasts from the South Chamorro serpentine mud volcano reveal a polyphase serpentinization history of the Mariana forearc mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Jöns, Niels; Bach, Wolfgang; Klein, Frieder; Alt, Jeffrey C.

    2015-06-01

    Serpentine seamounts located on the outer half of the pervasively fractured Mariana forearc provide an excellent window into the forearc devolatilization processes, which can strongly influence the cycling of volatiles and trace elements in subduction zones. Serpentinized ultramafic clasts recovered from an active mud volcano in the Mariana forearc reveal microstructures, mineral assemblages and compositions that are indicative of a complex polyphase alteration history. Petrologic phase relations and oxygen isotopes suggest that ultramafic clasts were serpentinized at temperatures below 200 °C. Several successive serpentinization events represented by different vein generations with distinct trace element contents can be recognized. Measured in situ Rb/Cs ratios are fairly uniform ranging between 1 and 10, which is consistent with Cs mobilization from sediments at lower temperatures and lends further credence to the low-temperature conditions proposed in models of the thermal structure in forearc settings. Late veins show lower fluid mobile element (FME) concentrations than early veins, suggesting a decreasing influence of fluid discharge from the subducting slab on the composition of the serpentinizing fluids. The continuous microfabric and mineral chemical evolution observed in the ultramafic clasts may have implications as to the origin and nature of the serpentinizing fluids. We hypothesize that opal and smectite dehydration produce quartz-saturated fluids with high FME contents and Rb/Cs between 1 and 4 that cause the early pervasive serpentinization. The partially serpentinized material may then be eroded from the basal plane of the suprasubduction mantle wedge. Serpentinization continued but the interacting fluids did not carry a pronounced sedimentary signature, either because FMEs were no longer released from the slab, or due to an en route loss of FMEs. Late chrysotile veins that document the increased access of fluids in a now fluid-dominated regime are

  2. Mesozooplankton respiration and community structure in a seamount region of the eastern South Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Leissing; Escribano, Ruben; Morales, Carmen E.; Hormazabal, Samuel; Medellín-Mora, Johanna

    2018-05-01

    Seamounts in the Juan Fernandez Ridge, as well as in other seamount regions in the eastern South Pacific and in the world oceans, remain poorly studied ecosystems in terms of structure and functioning. Here, community respiration by epipelagic mesozooplankton in three seamounts of the Juan Fernandez Ridge, including the O`Higgins Seamount close to the coastal upwelling zone and two oceanic seamounts near the Juan Fernandez Archipelago ( 33°S-78°W), was assessed. Oxygen consumption by mixed assemblages was estimated using continuous measurements of dissolved oxygen concentration under controlled temperature during onboard, short-term incubations (2-4 h). Mesozooplankton composition was analyzed with a ZooScan device and expressed in terms of community normalized size spectra, and taxa and size diversity (Shannon-Wiener index). Carbon-specific community respiration rates in the upper 100 m layer were in the range of 0.3-1.9 mg O2 m-2 d-1, indicating that up to 3.1% of the mesozooplankton biomass can be respired on a daily basis. The mesozooplankton community was dominated by small-size copepods but the proportions of small copepods, large copepods, and gelatinous zooplankton (mostly salps) changed between the seamounts, in association with modifications in taxa composition, size diversity, and the slope of the size spectrum. Community respiration was significantly correlated to these community descriptors, suggesting the composition of the pelagic community has a direct impact on the total amount of respired-C. Connectivity between the coastal upwelling zone and the Juan Fernandez Ridge region mediated by mesoscale activity, interacting with the seamounts, is suggested as a most important process in controlling zooplankton community structure and in turn community metabolism.

  3. Petrology and Geochemistry of Serpentinized Peridotites from a Bonin Fore-arc Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, L.; Tuoyu, W.; Dong, Y. H.; Gao, J.; Wu, S.

    2016-12-01

    Serpentinites, which contain up to 13 wt.% of water, are an important reservoir for chemical recycling in subduction zones. During the last two decades, many observations documented the occurrence of fore-arc mantle serpentinites in different locations. Here, we present petrology and whole rock chemistry for serpentinized peridotites dredged from the Hahajima Seamount, which is located 20-60 km west of the junction of the Bonin Trench and the Mariana Trench. Combined with published geochemical data of serpentinites from the Torishima Seamount, Conical Seamount and South Chamorro Seamount in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore-arc region, it will allow us to better understand the average composition of serpentinized fore-arc mantle overlying the subducting slab and the role of serpentinized mantle playing in the subduction zone geochemical cycle. The studied ultramafic rocks from the Hahajima Seamount are extensively serpentinized and hydrated (73 to 83%), with loss of ignition values ranging between 13 and 15 wt.%. Our results show that the serpentinized peridotites have Mg number from 88 to 90, and the average MgO/SiO2 is 0.93. The average Al2O3 (0.48 wt.%) and CaO (0.23 wt.%) contents are very low, consistent with low clinopyroxene abundances, and the overall depleted character of the mantle harzburgite protoliths. The serpentinized peridotites from the Hahajima Seamount exhibit similar "U" shape rare earth element (REE) patterns ([La/Sm]N = 3.1-3.6), at higher overall abundances, to the Conical and South Chamorro Seamount suites. One exceptional sample shows the similar REE pattern as serpentinized peridotites from the Torishima Seamount, with depleted light REE concentration ([La/Sm]N =0.7). All the serpentinized peridotites from these four fore-arc seamounts show strong enrichment in fluid-mobile and lithophile elements (U, Pb, Sr and Li). The geochemical signature of the serpentinized peridotites from the seamounts in the Izu-Bonin-Mariana fore-arc region could be

  4. Pelagic communities of the South West Indian Ocean seamounts: R/V Dr Fridtjof Nansen Cruise 2009-410

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A. D.; Alvheim, O.; Bemanaja, E.; Benivary, D.; Boersch-Supan, P.; Bornman, T. G.; Cedras, R.; Du Plessis, N.; Gotheil, S.; Høines, A.; Kemp, K.; Kristiansen, J.; Letessier, T.; Mangar, V.; Mazungula, N.; Mørk, T.; Pinet, P.; Pollard, R.; Read, J.; Sonnekus, T.

    2017-02-01

    The seamounts of the southern Indian Ocean remain some of the most poorly studied globally and yet have been subject to deep-sea fishing for decades and may face new exploitation through mining of seabed massive sulphides in the future. As an attempt to redress the knowledge deficit on deep-sea benthic and pelagic communities associated mainly with the seamounts of the South West Indian Ridge two cruises were undertaken to explore the pelagic and benthic ecology in 2009 and 2011 respectively. In this volume are presented studies on pelagic ecosystems around six seamounts, five on the South West Indian Ridge, including Atlantis Bank, Sapmer Seamount, Middle of What Seamount, Melville Bank and Coral Seamount and one un-named seamount on the Madagascar Ridge. In this paper, existing knowledge on the seamounts of the southwestern Indian Ocean is presented to provide context for the studies presented in this volume. An account of the overall aims, approaches and methods used primarily on the 2009 cruise are presented including metadata associated with sampling and some of the limitations of the study. Sampling during this cruise included physical oceanographic measurements, multibeam bathymetry, biological acoustics, and net sampling of phytoplankton, macrozooplankton and micronekton/nekton. The studies that follow reveal new data on the physical oceanography of this dynamic region of the oceans, and the important influence of water masses on the pelagic ecology associated with the seamounts of the South West Indian Ridge. New information on the pelagic fauna of the region fills an important biogeographic gap for the mid- to high-latitudes of the oceans of the southern hemisphere.

  5. Magmatic evolution of the Easter microplate-Crough Seamount region (South East Pacific)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hekinian, R.; Stoffers, P.; Akermand, D.; Binard, N.; Francheteau, Jean; Devey, C.; Garbe-Schonberg, D.

    1995-01-01

    The Easter microplate-Crough Seamount region located between 25?? S-116?? W and 25?? S-122?? W consists of a chain of seamounts forming isolated volcanoes and elongated (100-200 km in length) en echelon volcanic ridges oriented obliquely NE (N 065??), to the present day general spreading direction (N 100??) of the Pacific-Nazca plates. The extension of this seamount chain into the southwestern edge of the Easter microplate near 26??30??? S-115?? W was surveyed and sampled. The southern boundary including the Orongo fracture zone and other shallow ridges ( 0.25) MORBs which are similar in composition to other more recent basalts from the Southwest and East Rifts spreading axes of the Easter microplate. Incompatible element ratios normalized to chondrite values [(Ce/Yb)N = 1-2.5}, {(La/Sm)N = 0.4-1.2} and {(Zr/Y)N = 0.7-2.5} of the basalts are also similar to present day volcanism found in the Easter microplate. The volcanics from the Easter microplate-Crough region are unrelated to other known South Pacific intraplate magmatism (i.e. Society, Pitcairn, and Salas y Gomez Islands). Instead their range in incompatible element ratios is comparable to the submarine basalts from the recently investigated Ahu and Umu volcanic field (Easter hotspot) (Scientific Party SO80, 1993) and centered at about 80 km west of Easter Island. The oblique ridges and their associated seamounts are likely to represent ancient leaky transform faults created during the initial stage of the Easter microplate formation (??? 5 Ma). It appears that volcanic activity on seamounts overlying the oblique volcanic ridges has continued during their westward drift from the microplate as shown by the presence of relatively fresh lava observed on one of these structures, namely the first Oblique Volcanic Ridge near 25?? S-118?? W at about 160 km west of the Easter microplate West Rift. Based on a reconstruction of the Easter microplate, it is suggested that the Crough seamount (Easter Island. ?? 1995

  6. Reproductive patterns of blacktail comber ( Serranus atricauda, Serranidae) from south-west Portugal seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Ana; Sequeira, Vera; Paiva, Rafaela Barros; Vieira, Ana Rita; Gordo, Leonel Serrano

    2014-03-01

    The knowledge of the reproductive strategy is essential for the comprehensive understanding of the population dynamics of any fish species. This study intends to define the spawning season, verify the type of fecundity regulation and estimate relative annual fecundity for Serranus atricauda inhabiting the south-west of Portugal seamounts (Gorringe, Ampère and Lion). Monthly samples, between September 2010 and December 2011, were obtained from commercial vessels. This species is synchronously hermaphroditic, and mature individuals were found all year round, with gonadosomatic index peak from February to September. No clear relation between hepatosomatic index and Fulton's condition factor and gonadal development was found, and therefore, it is probable that reproductive success depends more on environmental conditions and food availability during the spawning season than on body energy reserves. No gap exists between pre-vitellogenic and vitellogenic oocytes and the oocyte size-frequency distribution during the main spawning season show no dominant cohort progressing through time. The number of standing stock of advanced vitellogenic oocytes showed an increase trend along the spawning season decreasing only at its end and the relative intensity of α-atresia was always low throughout this period with an increase towards the end. All these criteria corroborate the indeterminate fecundity type assigned to S. atricauda in previous studies. Mean relative annual fecundity estimated was 5,655 ± 4,321 oocytes per gram of gutted weight.

  7. Promoting Breast Cancer Screening through Storytelling by Chamorro Cancer Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manglona, Rosa Duenas; Robert, Suzanne; Isaacson, Lucy San Nicolas; Garrido, Marie; Henrich, Faye Babauta; Santos, Lola Sablan; Le, Daisy; Peters, Ruth

    2017-01-01

    The largest Chamorro population outside of Guam and the Mariana Islands reside in California. Cancer health disparities disproportionally affect Pacific Islander communities, including the Chamorro, and breast cancer is the most common cancer affecting women. To address health concerns such as cancer, Pacific Islander women frequently utilize storytelling to initiate conversations about health and to address sensitive topics such as breast health and cancer. One form of storytelling used in San Diego is a play that conveys the message of breast cancer screening to the community in a culturally and linguistically appropriate way. This play, Nan Nena’s Mammogram, tells the story of an older woman in the community who learns about breast cancer screening from her young niece. The story builds upon the underpinnings of Chamorro culture - family, community, support, and humor - to portray discussing breast health, getting support for breast screening, and visiting the doctor. The story of Nan Nena’s Mammogram reflects the willingness of a few pioneering Chamorro women to use their personal experiences of cancer survivorship to promote screening for others. Through the support of a Chamorro community-based organization, these Chamorro breast cancer survivors have used the success of Nan Nena’s Mammogram to expand their education activities and to form a new cancer survivor organization for Chamorro women in San Diego.

  8. Voluminous lava flow from Axial Seamount's south rift constrains extension rate on northern Vance Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Saout, M.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.

    2017-12-01

    Axial Seamount is characterized by a robust magma supply resulting from the interaction between the Cobb hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge. During the last two decades, magmatic activity was focused within the summit caldera and upper and middle portions of the two rift zones, with eruptions in 1998, 2011, and 2015. However, the distal ends of both rift zones have experienced numerous eruptions in the past. The most voluminous flows are located near the extreme ends, greater than 40 kilometers from the caldera. Where Axial's South Rift Zone overlaps with the Vance Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the 2015 MBARI expedition mapped 16 km2 of the seafloor with our AUV, and collected 33 rocks and 33 sediment cores during two ROV dives. The data were used to confirm the boundaries of an extensive flow tentatively identified using modern ship based bathymetry. This flow is 18 km wide and 6 km long for a total surface area of 63 km2. The flow is modified by superficial ( 5 m deep) and deep (25 to 45 m deep) subsidence pits, with the deepest pits giving an indication of the minimum thickness of the flow. The maximum thickness of 100 m is measured at the margins of the flow. We thus estimate a volume between 2.5 and 6 km3, making this flow the most voluminous known on the global mid ocean ridge system. The minimum volume is equivalent to the present volume of the summit caldera. Radiocarbon ages of foraminifera from the basal sections of sediment cores suggest that this flow is 1000 years old. This flow travelled east and partially filled the axial valley of the adjacent Vance Segment. Since emplacement, this part of the flow has experienced deformation by fissures and faults aligned with the trend of the Vance Segment. The horizontal extension across these features allows us to estimate a local deformation rate of 3 cm/yr of tectonic extension on the northern end of Vance Segment during the last 1000 years.

  9. Sedimentation in a Submarine Seamount Apron at Site U1431, International Ocean Discovery Program Expedition 349, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadd, K. A.; Clift, P. D.; Hyun, S.; Jiang, T.; Liu, Z.

    2014-12-01

    International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 349 Site U1431 is located near the relict spreading ridge in the East Subbasin of the South China Sea. Holes at this site were drilled close to seamounts and intersected the volcaniclastic apron. Volcaniclastic breccia and sandstone at Site U1431 are dated as late middle Miocene to early late Miocene (~8-13 Ma), suggesting a 5 m.y. duration of seamount volcanism. The apron is approximately 200 m thick and is sandwiched between non-volcaniclastic units that represent the background sedimentation. These comprise dark greenish gray clay, silt, and nannofossil ooze interpreted as turbidite and hemipelagic deposits that accumulated at abyssal water depths. At its base, the seamount sequence begins with dark greenish gray sandstone, siltstone, and claystone in upward fining sequences interpreted as turbidites intercalated with minor intervals of volcaniclastic breccia. Upsection the number and thickness of breccia layers increases with some beds up to 4.8 m and possibly 14.5 m thick. The breccia is typically massive, ungraded, and poorly sorted with angular to subangular basaltic clasts, as well as minor reworked subrounded calcareous mudstone, mudstone, and sandstone clasts. Basaltic clasts include nonvesicular aphyric basalt, sparsely vesicular aphyric basalt, highly vesicular aphyric basalt, and nonvesicular glassy basalt. Mudstone clasts are clay rich and contain foraminifer fossils. The matrix comprises up to 40% of the breccia beds and is a mix of clay, finer grained altered basalt clasts, and mafic vitroclasts with rare foraminifer fossils. Some layers have calcite cement between clasts. Volcaniclastic sandstone and claystone cycles interbedded with the breccia layers have current ripples and parallel laminations indicative of high-energy flow conditions during sedimentation. The breccia beds were most likely deposited as a series of debris flows or grain flows. This interpretation is supported by their

  10. Recycled Archean sulfur in the mantle wedge of the Mariana Forearc and microbial sulfate reduction within an extremely alkaline serpentine seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Shinnosuke; Nishizawa, Manabu; Miyazaki, Junichi; Shibuya, Takazo; Ueno, Yuichiro; Takai, Ken

    2018-06-01

    The identification of microbial activity under extreme conditions is important to define potential boundaries of the habitable and uninhabitable zones of terrestrial and extraterrestrial living forms. The subseafloor regimes of serpentinite seamounts in the Mariana Forearc are among the most extreme environments for life on earth owing to the widespread presence of highly alkaline fluids with pH values greater than 12. The potential activity of sulfate-reducing microorganisms has been suggested within the South Chamorro serpentinite seamounts on the basis of depletion of sulfate and enrichment of dissolved sulfide in pore water. However, the vertical distribution of sulfate-reducing microorganisms and the origin of sulfate are still uncertain. To address these issues, we analyzed quadruple sulfur isotopes of sulfide minerals and pore water sulfate in the upper 56 m of sedimentary sequences at the summit of the S. Chamorro Seamount and those of dissolved sulfate in upwelling fluids collected as deep as 202 mbsf (meters below the seafloor) in a cased hole near the summit of the same seamount. The depth profiles of the concentrations and the δ34S and Δ33S‧ values of sulfide minerals and pore water sulfate indicate microbial sulfate reduction as deep as 30 mbsf. Further, apparent isotopic fractionations (34ε) and exponents of mass dependent relationships (33λ) during sulfate reduction are estimated to be 62 ± 14‰ and 0.512 ± 0.002, respectively. The upwelling fluids show both the chlorine depletion relative to seawater and the negative δ15N values of ammonia (-4‰). Although these signatures point to dehydration of the subducting oceanic plate, the negative Δ33S‧ values of sulfate (-0.16‰ to -0.26‰ with analytical errors of ±0.01‰) are unlikely to originate from surrounding modern crusts. Instead, sulfate in the upwelling fluid likely possess non-mass-dependent (NMD) sulfur. Because NMD sulfur was produced primarily in the Archean atmosphere, our

  11. Pelagic ecology of the South West Indian Ocean Ridge seamounts: Introduction and overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, A. D.

    2017-02-01

    of globally significant areas of seamounts, submarine plateaus, continental and island slopes.

  12. Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling of socio-cultural constructs among chamorro and non-chamorro micronesian betel nut chewers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kelle L; Liu, Min; Herzog, Thaddeus A

    2017-07-05

    Betel nut chewing is embedded within the cultures of South Asia, and Southeast Asia, and the Western Pacific. The determinants of betel nut consumption are complex. Ongoing consumption of betel nut is affected by cultural, social, and drug-specific effects (i.e. dependence). This study's first objective was to assess the psychometric properties (i.e. reliability and validity) of the socio-cultural constructs in a survey developed for betel nut chewers. The study's second objective was to investigate the influence of socio-cultural variables on betel nut chewing behaviors among Chamorro and non-Chamorro Micronesians in Guam. The current study was a secondary analysis of a larger study (N = 600; n = 375 chewers and n = 225 former chewers) that examined socio-cultural factors that influence why chewers chew betel nut, along with assessing chewing behaviors, perceptions of risks, probability of changing behaviors, and methods that could be used to reduce use or quit. The socio-cultural constructs of the survey were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling. The socio-cultural factors were a sufficient fit with data and the instrument is reliable and valid, as indicated by various model fit indices (χ 2 (13) = 18.49 with p = .14, TLI = .99, CFI = 1.00, SRMR = .02, RMSEA = .03 with 90% CIs [.00,.07]). Cronbach's alpha, the sign and magnitude of the factor loadings, the inter-factor correlations, and the large proportion of variance extracted for each factor, all indicate that the instrument is reliable and valid. Additionally, multivariate analyses showed that socio-cultural reasons were important contributing or chewing betel nut. Participants cited chewing because their friends and family members chewed, the behavior is embedded within their culture, and it would be considered rude and disrespectful to not chew. Based on the findings, this study provides important implications pertaining to

  13. Seamount physiography and biology in the north-east Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Morato

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This work aims at characterising the seamount physiography and biology in the OSPAR Convention limits (north-east Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea. We first inferred potential abundance, location and morphological characteristics of seamounts, and secondly, summarized the existing biological, geological and oceanographic in situ research, identifying examples of well-studied seamounts. Our study showed that the seamount population in the OSPAR area (north-east Atlantic and in the Mediterranean Sea is large with around 557 and 101 seamount-like features, respectively. Similarly, seamounts occupy large areas of about 616 000 km2 in the OSPAR region and of about 89 500 km2 in the Mediterranean Sea. The presence of seamounts in the north-east Atlantic has been known since the late 19th century, but overall knowledge regarding seamount ecology and geology is still relatively poor. Only 37 seamounts in the OSPAR area (3.5% of all seamounts in the region, 22 in the Mediterranean Sea (9.2% of all seamounts in the region and 25 in the north-east Atlantic south of the OSPAR area have in situ information. Seamounts mapped in both areas are in general very heterogeneous, showing diverse geophysical characteristics. These differences will likely affect the biological diversity and production of resident and associated organisms.

  14. HARP MHI- Cross Seamount

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — PIFSC and Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) conducted passive acoustic monitoring for cetaceans at Cross Seamount in 2005 and 2006 using a High-Frequency...

  15. Pacific seamount volcanism in space and time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, J. K.

    2007-02-01

    Seamounts constitute some of the most direct evidence about intraplate volcanism. As such, when seamounts formed and into which tectonic setting they erupted (i.e. on-ridge or off-ridge) are a useful reflection of how the properties of the lithosphere interact with magma generation in the fluid mantle beneath. Proportionately few seamounts are radiometrically dated however, and these tend to be recently active. In order to more representatively sample and better understand Pacific seamount volcanism this paper estimates the eruption ages (tvolc) of 2706 volcanoes via automated estimates of lithospheric strength. Lithospheric strength (GTRrel) is deduced from the ratio of gravity to topography above the summits of volcanoes, and is shown to correlate with seafloor age at the time of volcanic loading (Δt) at 61 sites where radiometric constraints upon Δt exist. A trend of fits data for these 61, and with seafloor age (tsf) known, can date the 2706 volcanoes; tvolc = tsf - Δt. Widespread recurrences of volcanism proximal to older features (e.g. the Cook-Austral alignment in French Polynesia) suggest that the lithosphere exerts a significant element of control upon the location of volcanism, and that magmatic throughput leaves the lithosphere more susceptible to the passage of future melts. Observations also prompt speculation that: the Tavara seamounts share morphological characteristics and isostatic compensation state with the Musicians, and probably formed similarly; the Easter Island chain may be a modern analogy to the Cross-Lines; a Musicians - South Hawaiian seamounts alignment may be deflecting the Hawaiian hotspot trace.

  16. The Effects of Seamounts on Sound Propagation in Deep Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Wen; Li Zheng-Lin; Zhang Ren-He; Qin Ji-Xing; Li Jun; Nan Ming-Xing

    2015-01-01

    A propagation experiment was conducted in the South China Sea in 2014 with a flat bottom and seamounts respectively by using explosive sources. The effects of seamounts on sound propagation are analyzed by using the broadband signals. It is observed that the transmission loss (TL) decreases up to 7 dB for the signals in the first shadow zone due to the seamount reflection. Moreover, the TL might increase more than 30 dB in the converge zone due to the shadowing by seamounts. Abnormal TLs and pulse arrival structures at different ranges are explained by using the ray and wave theory. The experimental TLs and arrival pulses are compared with the numerical results and found to be in good agreement. (paper)

  17. Paleomagnetic modeling of seamounts near the Hawaiian Emperor bend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, William W.; Lamarche, Amy J.; Kopp, Christian

    2005-08-01

    The Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount chain records the motion of the Pacific Plate relative to the Hawaiian mantle hotspot for ˜80 m.y. A notable feature of the chain is the pronounced bend at its middle. This bend had been widely credited to a change in plate motion, but recent research suggests a change in hotspot motion as an alternative. Existing paleomagnetic data from the Emperor Chain suggest that the hotspot moved south during the Late Cretaceous and Early Tertiary, but reached its current latitude by the age of the bend. Thus, data from area of the bend are important for understanding changes in plume latitude. In this study, we analyze the magnetic anomalies of five seamounts (Annei, Daikakuji-W, Daikakuji- E, Abbott, and Colahan) in the region of the bend. These particular seamounts were chosen because they have been recently surveyed to collect multibeam bathymetry and magnetic data positioned with GPS navigation. Inversions of the magnetic and bathymetric data were performed to determine the mean magnetization of each seamount and from these results, paleomagnetic poles and paleolatitudes were calculated. Three of the five seamounts have reversed magnetic polarities (two are normal) and four contain a small volume of magnetic polarity opposite to the main body, consistent with formation during the Early Cenozoic, a time of geomagnetic field reversals. Although magnetization inhomogene ties can degrade the accuracy of paleomagnetic poles calculated from such models, the seamounts give results consistent with one another and with other Pacific paleomagnetic data of approximately the same age. Seamount paleolatitudes range from 13.7 to 23.7, with an average of 19.4 ± 7.4 (2σ). These values are indistinguishable from the present-day paleolatitude of the Hawaiian hotspot. Together with other paleomagnetic and geologic evidence, these data imply that the Hawaiian hotspot has moved little in latitude during the past ˜45 m.y.

  18. An osteobiography of a remarkable protohistoric Chamorro man from Taga, Tinian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawa, V.J.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work offers skeletal evidence-based interpretations of the life of a 16th–17th century Chamorro man, designated Taotao Tagga', who was buried on the island of Tinian. We focus on osteological changes that illuminate chapters of his life history, and additionally examine these changes in relation to his society and culture. An eventful, arduous, traumatic yet fortunate life is revealed by his physical remains. During the span of the late 17th century Spanish-Chamorro Wars, or perhaps an earlier period of inter-village skirmishing, he suffered a serious penetrating wound to his face, but complete healing of this wound suggests that he benefitted from effective traditional medical interventions, of which we suggest a few. We advance the proposition that work activities, likely initiated at a young age and focusing on megalithic stone processing and building, produced many of the activity-related changes to his skeleton, including the development of posterior cranial superstructures, adaptive remodeling and enthesopathic changes at tendon and ligament attachment sites on his appendicular skeleton, arthritic changes to his joints, and the development of extremely robust long bones, especially those of the upper limb. An index of his humeral robusticity, and related musculo-skeletal strength, is close the upper end of the range of known variation for modern and archaic humans. As Taotao Tagga' was part of a cohort of other Chamorro “strong men,” we examine the quality of life and evolutionary underpinnings of their large body size and great strength. Additionally, we consider how and why Taotao Tagga'’s skeletal changes may bear the signature of a semi-specialist stoneworker and builder, reflecting demographic and socio-political trends during his life, in his home district in Tinian.

  19. Growth constraints of the Indian Ocean seamounts

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Khadge, N.H.

    lineaments and is infested with about 800 seamounts of various height ranging from 50 m to 1250 m. Statistical analysis suggests that summit height, flatness and volume primarily control shape of seamounts. The remarkable similarity in distribution, flow line...

  20. Enigmatic cranial superstructures among Chamorro ancestors from the Mariana Islands: gross anatomy and microanatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, Gary M; Bromage, Timothy G; Sava, Vincent J; Hanson, Douglas B; Anderson, Bruce E

    2014-06-01

    This study focuses on the gross anatomy, anatomic relations, microanatomy, and the meaning of three enigmatic, geographically patterned, and quasi-continuous superstructures of the posterior cranium. Collectively known as occipital superstructures (OSSs), these traits are the occipital torus tubercle (TOT), retromastoid process (PR), and posterior supramastoid tubercle (TSP). When present, TOT, PR, and TSP develop at posterior cranial attachment sites of the upper trapezius, superior oblique, and sternocleidomastoid muscles, respectively. Marked expression and co-occurrence of these OSSs are virtually circumscribed within Oceania and reach highest recorded frequencies in protohistoric Chamorros (CHamoru) of the Mariana Islands. Prior to undertaking scanning electron microscopy (SEM) work, our working multifactorial model for OSS development was that early-onset, long-term, and chronic activity-related microtrauma at enthesis sites led to exuberant reactive or reparative responses in a substantial minority of genetically predisposed (and mostly male) individuals. SEM imaging, however, reveals topographic patterning that questions, but does not negate, activity induction of these superstructures. Although OSSs appear macroscopically as relatively large and discrete phenomena, SEM findings reveal a unique, widespread, and seemingly systemic distribution of structures over the occipital surface that have the appearance of OSS microforms. Nevertheless, apparent genetic underpinnings, anatomic relationships with muscle entheses, and positive correlation of OSS development with humeral robusticity continue to suggest that these superstructures have potential to at once bear witness to Chamorro population history and inform osteobiographical constructions of chronic activity patterns in individuals bearing them. Further work is outlined that would illuminate the proximate and ultimate meanings of OSS. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. CRED 5m Gridded bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Northeast Bank (sometimes called "Muli" Seamount), American Samoa (NetCDF Format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded (5 m cell size) bathymetry of the banktop and slope environments of Northeast Bank (sometimes called "Muli" Seamount), American Samoa, South Pacific. Almost...

  2. The ecology of seamounts: structure, function, and human impacts.

    OpenAIRE

    Clark, MR; Rowden, AA; Schlacher, T; Williams, A; Consalvey, M; Stocks, KI; Rogers, AD; O'Hara, TD; White, M; Shank, TM; Hall-Spencer, JM

    2010-01-01

    In this review of seamount ecology, we address a number of key scientific issues concerning the structure and function of benthic communities, human impacts, and seamount management and conservation. We consider whether community composition and diversity differ between seamounts and continental slopes, how important dispersal capabilities are in seamount connectivity, what environmental factors drive species composition and diversity, whether seamounts are centers of enhanced biological prod...

  3. Seamounts - windows of opportunities and the Indian scenario

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Das, P.; Kalangutkar, N.G.; Mehta, C.M.

    , flow rate, gravity pull) of the magma. Commonly, seamounts have steep outer slopes, flat or nearly flat, circular, summit areas, calderas and craters 4,7,23 . Morphologically, seamounts of variable sizes resemble sub-aerial volcanoes. Small, young...

  4. The Ecology of Seamounts: Structure, Function, and Human Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Malcolm R.; Rowden, Ashley A.; Schlacher, Thomas; Williams, Alan; Consalvey, Mireille; Stocks, Karen I.; Rogers, Alex D.; O'Hara, Timothy D.; White, Martin; Shank, Timothy M.; Hall-Spencer, Jason M.

    2010-01-01

    In this review of seamount ecology, we address a number of key scientific issues concerning the structure and function of benthic communities, human impacts, and seamount management and conservation. We consider whether community composition and diversity differ between seamounts and continental slopes, how important dispersal capabilities are in seamount connectivity, what environmental factors drive species composition and diversity, whether seamounts are centers of enhanced biological productivity, and whether they have unique trophic architecture. We discuss how vulnerable seamount communities are to fishing and mining, and how we can balance exploitation of resources and conservation of habitat. Despite considerable advances in recent years, there remain many questions about seamount ecosystems that need closer integration of molecular, oceanographic, and ecological research.

  5. Science priorities for seamounts: research links to conservation and management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm R Clark

    Full Text Available Seamounts shape the topography of all ocean basins and can be hotspots of biological activity in the deep sea. The Census of Marine Life on Seamounts (CenSeam was a field program that examined seamounts as part of the global Census of Marine Life (CoML initiative from 2005 to 2010. CenSeam progressed seamount science by collating historical data, collecting new data, undertaking regional and global analyses of seamount biodiversity, mapping species and habitat distributions, challenging established paradigms of seamount ecology, developing new hypotheses, and documenting the impacts of human activities on seamounts. However, because of the large number of seamounts globally, much about the structure, function and connectivity of seamount ecosystems remains unexplored and unknown. Continual, and potentially increasing, threats to seamount resources from fishing and seabed mining are creating a pressing demand for research to inform conservation and management strategies. To meet this need, intensive science effort in the following areas will be needed: 1 Improved physical and biological data; of particular importance is information on seamount location, physical characteristics (e.g. habitat heterogeneity and complexity, more complete and intensive biodiversity inventories, and increased understanding of seamount connectivity and faunal dispersal; 2 New human impact data; these shall encompass better studies on the effects of human activities on seamount ecosystems, as well as monitoring long-term changes in seamount assemblages following impacts (e.g. recovery; 3 Global data repositories; there is a pressing need for more comprehensive fisheries catch and effort data, especially on the high seas, and compilation or maintenance of geological and biodiversity databases that underpin regional and global analyses; 4 Application of support tools in a data-poor environment; conservation and management will have to increasingly rely on predictive

  6. Science priorities for seamounts: research links to conservation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Malcolm R; Schlacher, Thomas A; Rowden, Ashley A; Stocks, Karen I; Consalvey, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Seamounts shape the topography of all ocean basins and can be hotspots of biological activity in the deep sea. The Census of Marine Life on Seamounts (CenSeam) was a field program that examined seamounts as part of the global Census of Marine Life (CoML) initiative from 2005 to 2010. CenSeam progressed seamount science by collating historical data, collecting new data, undertaking regional and global analyses of seamount biodiversity, mapping species and habitat distributions, challenging established paradigms of seamount ecology, developing new hypotheses, and documenting the impacts of human activities on seamounts. However, because of the large number of seamounts globally, much about the structure, function and connectivity of seamount ecosystems remains unexplored and unknown. Continual, and potentially increasing, threats to seamount resources from fishing and seabed mining are creating a pressing demand for research to inform conservation and management strategies. To meet this need, intensive science effort in the following areas will be needed: 1) Improved physical and biological data; of particular importance is information on seamount location, physical characteristics (e.g. habitat heterogeneity and complexity), more complete and intensive biodiversity inventories, and increased understanding of seamount connectivity and faunal dispersal; 2) New human impact data; these shall encompass better studies on the effects of human activities on seamount ecosystems, as well as monitoring long-term changes in seamount assemblages following impacts (e.g. recovery); 3) Global data repositories; there is a pressing need for more comprehensive fisheries catch and effort data, especially on the high seas, and compilation or maintenance of geological and biodiversity databases that underpin regional and global analyses; 4) Application of support tools in a data-poor environment; conservation and management will have to increasingly rely on predictive modelling

  7. Science Priorities for Seamounts: Research Links to Conservation and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Malcolm R.; Schlacher, Thomas A.; Rowden, Ashley A.; Stocks, Karen I.; Consalvey, Mireille

    2012-01-01

    Seamounts shape the topography of all ocean basins and can be hotspots of biological activity in the deep sea. The Census of Marine Life on Seamounts (CenSeam) was a field program that examined seamounts as part of the global Census of Marine Life (CoML) initiative from 2005 to 2010. CenSeam progressed seamount science by collating historical data, collecting new data, undertaking regional and global analyses of seamount biodiversity, mapping species and habitat distributions, challenging established paradigms of seamount ecology, developing new hypotheses, and documenting the impacts of human activities on seamounts. However, because of the large number of seamounts globally, much about the structure, function and connectivity of seamount ecosystems remains unexplored and unknown. Continual, and potentially increasing, threats to seamount resources from fishing and seabed mining are creating a pressing demand for research to inform conservation and management strategies. To meet this need, intensive science effort in the following areas will be needed: 1) Improved physical and biological data; of particular importance is information on seamount location, physical characteristics (e.g. habitat heterogeneity and complexity), more complete and intensive biodiversity inventories, and increased understanding of seamount connectivity and faunal dispersal; 2) New human impact data; these shall encompass better studies on the effects of human activities on seamount ecosystems, as well as monitoring long-term changes in seamount assemblages following impacts (e.g. recovery); 3) Global data repositories; there is a pressing need for more comprehensive fisheries catch and effort data, especially on the high seas, and compilation or maintenance of geological and biodiversity databases that underpin regional and global analyses; 4) Application of support tools in a data-poor environment; conservation and management will have to increasingly rely on predictive modelling

  8. Aeromagnetic Detection and Definition of Seamounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    airborne gravimetry may be feasible, al- though further testing is necessary. A possible difficulty may result from the problem of obtaining useful data on...high calcium precipitation . Hopefully, the curves will increase the "safety factor" by an under-estimation of seamount peak depths. Another problem

  9. Deepwater ichthyofauna communities of two seamounts from the eastern Atlantic Ocean: results from exploratory surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Pedro Vieira

    2015-11-01

    Demersal fishes from Ampère Seamount, located between Madeira and the Portuguese mainland, were sampled during the P384 cruise of R.V. Poseidon in May 2009 and the M83/2 cruise of R.V. Meteor in November/December 2010, covering water depths from 60 to 4,400 m. A total of 239 fishes were collected; three chondrichthyan species and 31 teleosts in 21 families were identified. The assemblages showed a vertical zonation with little overlap, but indications for an affinity of species to certain water masses were only vague. Although most of the species present new records for Ampère Seamount, all of them have been known for the NE Atlantic and endemic species were not found. Senghor Seamount is an important fishing ground around the Cape Verde archipelago in the central eastern Atlantic. During the cruises M79/3 of R.V. Meteor in September/October 2009 and P423 of R.V. Poseidon in December 2011, a total of 106 deep-sea fishes of 28 species belonging to 18 families were caught on the seamount summit, along the slopes and on the adjacent abyssal plane. We accounted 6 new records for the Cape Verde deep-sea fish fauna. Most species have been known from other areas of the Atlantic Ocean, but these findings are an important contribution to our understanding of the distribution of deepwater fish species. The co-occurrence of northern and southern fish species at Senghor Seamount, or the Cape Verde area in general, can be attributed to the large-scale hydrographic regime with two water masses merging at the Cape Verde Frontal Zone, the North Atlantic Central Water and the South Atlantic Central Water. In general, differences between the adjacent abyssal plain and seamount slopes and summit point to the role of substrate type and habitat complexity in shaping community composition. Additionally, similarities between the fish fauna associated to other Atlantic seamounts supports the hypothesized key role of these physiographic features for species dispersion.

  10. Morphology and distribution of seamounts surrounding Easter Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rappaport, Y.; Naar, D.F.; Barton, C.C.; Liu, Z.-J.; Hey, R.N.

    1997-01-01

    We investigate the morphology and distribution of a seamount population on a section of seafloor influenced by both superfast seafloor spreading and hotspot volcanism. The population under investigation is part of a broad chain of seamounts extending eastward from the East Pacific Rise, near Easter Island. In order to define the morphological variability of the seamounts, basal shape, cross-sectional area, volume, flatness, and flank slope are plotted against height for 383 seamounts with heights greater than 200 m, based on bathymetry data collected by GLORI-B and SeaBeam 2000, during three cruises onboard the R/V Melville in the spring of 1993. Nearly complete swath mapping coverage of the seamounts is available for the analysis of size and shape distribution. We quantitatively describe the seamount population of this active region, in which seamounts cover ???27% of the seafloor, and account for ???4.2% of the total crustal volume. Over 50% of the total volume (61,000 km3) of seamounts used in this study is made up by the 14 largest seamounts, and the remaining volume is made up by the 369 smaller seamounts (>200 m in height). Our analysis indicates there are at least two seamount populations in the Easter Island-Salas y Gomez Island (25??-29??S, 113??-104??W) study area. One population of seamounts is composed of short seamounts (1200 m), shield-like, pointy cones (flatness ???1200 m) originate exclusively from a hotspot source, but only a portion of the smaller volcanoes (

  11. Hyperquenched hyaloclastites from Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zezin, D.; Helo, C.; Richard, D.; Clague, D. A.; Dingwell, D. B.; Stix, J.

    2009-12-01

    -induced excess enthalpy. It could reveal certain aspects of the mechanical history of the fragments, and may imply flow at the onset of the viscoelastic regime in order to allow for stress-accumulation. The quench rates of the investigated hyaloclastites slightly exceed the limits of hyperquenched glass documented form Loihi Seamount, and are significantly higher than those of glassy pillow or sheet lava rims. Such short cooling timescales may only be achieved by fragmentation-coupled quenching, which allows for efficient heat conduction. This range of cooling rates spanning several orders of magnitude points towards a dynamic eruption environment with the possibility of multiple processes influencing cooling rates. The two types of glass shards may have experienced slightly different mechanical histories prior to quenching. Based on an interpretation of stress accumulation, strain rates are close to those necessary for the onset of non-Newtonian behaviour. To match the requirements of a dynamic environment with efficient fragmentation, rapid cooling, and high strain rates, we propose that the hyaloclastites are products of an explosive eruption environment.

  12. Seamounts - characteristics, formation, mineral deposits and biodiversity

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Iyer, S.D.; Mehta, C.M.; Das, P.; Kalangutkar, N.G.

    t a , V o l . 1 0 , N º 3 , S e p t e m b e r 2 0 1 2 , 2 9 5 - 3 0 8 D O I : 1 0 . 1 3 4 4 / 1 0 5 . 0 0 0 0 0 1 7 5 8 A v a i l a b l e o n l i n e a t w w w. g e o l o g i c a - a c t a . c o m Seamounts – characteristics, formation... and phenomena such as seismicity, hydrothermal deposits, biodiversity and possibly atmospheric oxygen (Iyer, 2009). Review works pertaining to seamounts independently concern the geological, biological or physical 1 2 1 1 S . D . I Y E R e t a l . G e o...

  13. Morphology of an uncharted seamount from Central Indian Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kodagali, V.N.

    The morphology of a seamount at 12 degrees 35'S and 76 degrees 16'E is studied. This conical seamount has a maximum height of 1275 m (water depth 4135 m) and covers an area of about 189 sq km. The maximum basal extension is about 24 km. The mount...

  14. The Seamount Catalog in EarthRef.org

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotberg, N. K.; Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.; Perez, J.

    2004-12-01

    Seamounts are important to research and education in many scientific fields, providing a wide range of data on physical, chemical, biological and geological processes. In order to make a diverse set of seamount data accessible we have developed the Seamount Catalog in EarthRef.org, available through the http://earthref.org/databases/SC/. The primary goal of the Seamount Catalog is to provide access to digital data files on a large assortment of interdisciplinary seamount research. The catalog can be searched at a variety of ability or expert levels allowing it to be used from basic education to advanced research. Each seamount is described in terms of its location, height, volume, elongation, azimuth, irregularity, rifts, morphological classification and relation to other features. GEBCO (General Bathymetric Chart of the Ocean) gazetteer data (2002; 2003) is included in the database in order to provide information on the history, discovery and names of the seamounts. Screen-optimized bathymetry maps, grid files and the original multibeam data files are available for online viewing with higher resolution downloadable versions (AI, PS, PDF) also offered. The data files for each seamount include a map made from the multibeam data only, a map made from Smith and Sandwell's (1996) predicted bathymetry, a merged map incorporating both data sets, and a map showing the differences between the two data sets. We are working towards expanding the Seamount Catalog by integrating bathymetry data from various sources, developing and linking disciplinary reference models, and integrating information from multiple disciplines and from the literature. We hope to create a data integrative environment that provides access to seamount data and the tools needed for working with that data.

  15. Oceanic sharks clean at coastal seamount.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon P Oliver

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between pelagic thresher sharks (Alopias pelagicus and cleaner wrasse were investigated at a seamount in the Philippines. Cleaning associations between sharks and teleosts are poorly understood, but the observable interactions seen at this site may explain why these mainly oceanic sharks regularly venture into shallow coastal waters where they are vulnerable to disturbance from human activity. From 1,230 hours of observations recorded by remote video camera between July 2005 and December 2009, 97 cleaner-thresher shark events were analyzed, 19 of which were interrupted. Observations of pelagic thresher sharks interacting with cleaners at the seamount were recorded at all times of day but their frequency declined gradually from morning until evening. Cleaners showed preferences for foraging on specific areas of a thresher shark's body. For all events combined, cleaners were observed to conduct 2,757 inspections, of which 33.9% took place on the shark's pelvis, 23.3% on the pectoral fins, 22.3% on the caudal fin, 8.6% on the body, 8.3% on the head, 2.1% on the dorsal fin, and 1.5% on the gills respectively. Cleaners did not preferentially inspect thresher sharks by time of day or by shark sex, but there was a direct correlation between the amount of time a thresher shark spent at a cleaning station and the number of inspections it received. Thresher shark clients modified their behavior by "circular-stance-swimming," presumably to facilitate cleaner inspections. The cleaner-thresher shark association reflected some of the known behavioral trends in the cleaner-reef teleost system since cleaners appeared to forage selectively on shark clients. Evidence is mounting that in addition to acting as social refuges and foraging grounds for large visiting marine predators, seamounts may also support pelagic ecology by functioning as cleaning stations for oceanic sharks and rays.

  16. Seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity in the open ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morato, Telmo; Hoyle, Simon D; Allain, Valerie; Nicol, Simon J

    2010-05-25

    The identification of biodiversity hotspots and their management for conservation have been hypothesized as effective ways to protect many species. There has been a significant effort to identify and map these areas at a global scale, but the coarse resolution of most datasets masks the small-scale patterns associated with coastal habitats or seamounts. Here we used tuna longline observer data to investigate the role of seamounts in aggregating large pelagic biodiversity and to identify which pelagic species are associated with seamounts. Our analysis indicates that seamounts are hotspots of pelagic biodiversity. Higher species richness was detected in association with seamounts than with coastal or oceanic areas. Seamounts were found to have higher species diversity within 30-40 km of the summit, whereas for sets close to coastal habitat the diversity was lower and fairly constant with distance. Higher probability of capture and higher number of fish caught were detected for some shark, billfish, tuna, and other by-catch species. The study supports hypotheses that seamounts may be areas of special interest for management for marine pelagic predators.

  17. Modeling internal wave generation by seamounts in oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Buijsman, M. C.; Comino, E. L.; Swinney, H.

    2017-12-01

    Recent global bathymetric data at 30 arc-sec resolution has revealed that there are 33,452 seamounts and 138,412 knolls in the oceans. To develop an estimate for the energy converted from tidal flow to internal gravity waves, we have conducted numerical simulations using the Massachusetts Institute of Technology circulation model (MITgcm) to compute the energy conversion by randomly distributed Gaussian-shaped seamounts. We find that for an isolated axisymmetric seamount of height 1100 m and radius 1600 m, which corresponds to the Wessel height-to-radius ratio 0.69, the conversion rate is 100 kW, assuming a tidal speed amplitude 1 cm/s, buoyancy frequency 1e-3 rad/s, and circularly polarized tidal motion, and taking into account the earth's rotation. The 100 kW estimate is about 60% less than the 3-D linear theory prediction because fluid goes around a seamount instead of over it. Our estimate accounts the suppression of energy conversion due to wave interference at the generation site of closely spaced seamounts. We conclude that for randomly distributed Gaussian seamounts of varying widths and separations, separated on average by 18 km as in the oceans, wave interference reduces the energy conversion by seamounts by only about 16%. This result complements previous studies of wave interference for 2-D ridges.

  18. A new species of Nidalia Gray, 1835 from Mid-Atlantic seamounts (Octocorallia, Alcyonacea, Nidaliidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-González, Pablo J.; Gili, Josep-Maria

    2008-12-01

    A new soft coral species of the genus Nidalia, from seamounts to the south of the Azores Archipelago is described. The main features of Nidalia aurantia n. sp. are as following: colony torch-like, a capitulum light orange in colour, not laterally flattened, dome-shaped and not distinctly projecting beyond the stalk, an introvert with sparse sclerites transversally placed, and an anthocodial crown with 13 17 sclerite rows. The new species is compared with its closest congeners. This is the first time that a species of Nidalia has been located in the Mid-Atlantic Ocean.

  19. Basinal seamounts and seamount chains of the Central Indian Ocean: Probable near-axis origin from a fast-spreading ridge

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Batiza, R.

    Hydrosweep mapping of crust in the Central Indian Ocean Basin reveals abundant volcanoes occurring both as isolated seamounts and linear seamount chains parallel to flow lines. Their shapes, sizes and overall style of occurrence...

  20. Arago Seamount: The missing hotspot found in the Austral Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Alain; Le Suavé, Raymond; Audin, Laurence; Clouard, Valérie; Dosso, Laure; Yves Gillot, Pierre; Janney, Philip; Jordahl, Kelsey; Maamaatuaiahutapu, Keitapu

    2002-11-01

    The Austral archipelago, on the western side of the South Pacific superswell, is composed of several volcanic chains, corresponding to distinct events from 35 Ma to the present, and lies on oceanic crust created between 60 and 85 Ma. In 1982, Turner and Jarrard proposed that the two distinct volcanic stages found on Rurutu Island and dated as 12 Ma and 1 Ma could be due to two different hotspots, but no evidence of any recent aerial or submarine volcanic source has ever been found. In July 1999, expedition ZEPOLYF2 aboard the R/V L'Atalante conducted a geophysical survey of the northern part of the Austral volcanic archipelago. Thirty seamounts were mapped for the first time, including a very shallow one (French Navy ship that discovered its summit in 1993, is the missing hotspot in the Cook-Austral history. This interpretation adds a new hotspot to the already complicated geologic history of this region. We suggest that several hotspots have been active simultaneously on a region of the seafloor that does not exceed 2000 km in diameter and that each of them had a short lifetime (<20 m.y.). These short-lived and closely spaced hotspots cannot be the result of discrete deep-mantle plumes and are likely due to more local upwelling in the upper mantle strongly influenced by weaknesses in the lithosphere.

  1. Otolith chemistry reveals seamount fidelity in a deepwater fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, Thomas; Augley, Julian; Devalla, Sandhya; Robinson, Craig D.; Wright, Peter J.; Neat, Francis C.

    2017-03-01

    There are thousands of seamounts (underwater mountains) throughout the world's deep oceans, many of which support diverse faunal communities and valuable fish stocks. Although seamounts are often geographically and bathymetrically isolated from one another, it is not clear how biologically isolated they are from one another. We analysed the chemical signature of the otoliths of a deepwater fish, the roundnose grenadier (Coryphaenoides rupestris) to test the null hypothesis that there is random exchange between individuals from a seamount and other adjacent areas. The fish were sampled on the Scottish west coast, from the Rosemary Bank seamount and two adjacent locations of similar depth, in the same year at roughly the same time of year. We used flow-injection inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to measure trace element concentrations from micro-milled portions of the otolith corresponding to adult and juvenile life history stages. The elemental signatures of the fish from the seamount were distinguishable from the fish from the two other areas during both the juvenile and adult life-history phase. We infer that once juveniles settle on the seamount they remain there for the rest of their lives. Evidence for population structure should be factored into exploitation strategies to prevent local depletion and is an important consideration with respect to Rosemary bank being included in a network of Marine Protected Areas around Scotland.

  2. Seamount Hydrothermal Systems as Analogies for Ocean Worlds: Reaction Paths Throughout the Lo'ihi Seamount (Hawaii Archipelago)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milesi, V.; Shock, E.

    2018-05-01

    Thermodynamic modeling is performed to investigate the possible reaction paths of sea water throughout the Lo'ihi seamount and the associated geochemical supplies of energy that can support autotrophic microbial communities.

  3. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology and volume estimates of the Tasmantid Seamounts: Support for a change in the motion of the Australian plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossingham, Tracey J.; Vasconcelos, Paulo M.; Cunningham, Toby; Knesel, Kurt M.

    2017-09-01

    New volume estimates and 40Ar/39Ar ages for the Tasmantid Seamounts are reported to investigate the origin of volcanism and potential links between volcanism and changes in the speed and direction of migration of the Australian plate during the Cenozoic. The results show that the average extrusive volume of individual volcanoes along the seamount chain is 2587 ± 3078 km3 (1 s), and that volumes generally increase towards the south. An exception, the Britannia Guyot, located in the middle of the seamount chain, is the most voluminous (11,374 km3). Nineteen new 40Ar/39Ar ages, from Wreck to Gascoyne, show that the emplacement of the Tasmantid Seamounts occurred between 33.2 ± 1.5 and 6.5 ± 0.6 Ma. A single linear regression applied to the age versus latitude data, assuming volcanism to be caused by plate migration over a stationary hotspot, reveals a plate migration rate of 62 ± 2 kmMa- 1 (R2 = 0.97; n = 27) between 33 and 6 Ma. However, the bend in the seamount track, corresponding with the period of largest eruptive volumes, suggests three distinct segments in the Tasmantid age versus latitude data. The northern segment is consistent with a plate migration rate of 75 ± 10 kmMa- 1 (R2 = 0.88; n = 10) and the southern segment reveals a plate migration rate of 64 ± 4 kmMa- 1 (R2 = 0.94; n = 17). The period between these two segments, from 25 to 19 Ma, overlaps with the period of slow migration and change in the direction of the Australian plate derived from the age versus latitude distribution of continental central volcanoes. The new Tasmantid Seamount results support the interpretation that there were changes in the velocity and direction to Australia's northward trajectory, possibly resulting from a series of collisional events.

  4. A pair of seamount chains in the Central Indian Basin, identified from multibeam mapping

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kodagali, V.N.

    Seamounts are major physiographic features on the ocean floor. Their study is important to the understanding of the tectonic history of the seafloor. Over 150 seamounts were identified during the multibeam (Hydrosweep system) mapping of the Central...

  5. Petrology of seamounts in the Central Indian Ocean Basin: Evidence for near-axis origin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Batiza, R.; Iyer, S.D.

    Previous studies on the distribution and morphology of ancient seamount chains (>50 Ma) in the Central Indian Ocean basin (CIOB) indicated their generation from the fast spreading Southeast Indian Ridge. The petrology of some of these seamounts...

  6. Ferromanganese oxides from Mid-Indian ridge, seamounts and abyssal plains from the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, P.S.; Pattan, J.N.

    .47%) in the seamount crusts. The ferromanganese oxides from the Mid-Indian Ridge, seamount crusts and abyssal nodules appear to be of hydrothermal, hydrogenous and early-diagenetic in origin respectively...

  7. A note on the morphology and tectonics of Kainan Maru Seamount, East Antarctica

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kodagali, V.N.; Hagen, R.; Schenke, H.W.

    channels cut the northern and eastern flanks of the seamount, whereas the western side shows evidence of large sediment slides and is more gently sloping. The morphology of the seamount, as observed in the bathymetry and satellite gravity data, suggests...

  8. Geochemical Evolution of the Louisville Seamount Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderkluysen, L.; Mahoney, J. J.; Koppers, A. A.; Lonsdale, P. F.

    2007-12-01

    The Louisville seamount chain is a 4300 km long chain of submarine volcanoes in the southwestern Pacific that is commonly thought to represent a hotspot track. It spans an ~80 Myr age range, comparable to that of the Hawaiian-Emperor chain (Koppers et al., G-cubed, 5 (6), 2004). The few previously dredged igneous samples are dominantly basaltic and alkalic, and have been inferred to represent post-shield volcanism (Hawkins et al., AGU Monograph, 43, 235, 1987). Their isotope and trace element signatures suggest an unusually homogenous mantle source (Cheng et al., AGU Monograph, 43, 283, 1987). Dredging in 2006, during the AMAT02RR cruise of the R.V. Revelle, was carried out in the hope of recovering both shield and post-shield samples and of exploring the geochemical evolution of the chain. Igneous rocks were recovered from 33 stations on 23 seamounts covering some 47 Myr of the chain's history. Our study, focusing on the major and trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic characteristics of these samples, shows that all are alkalic basalts, basanites and tephrites containing normative nepheline. Variations in major and trace elements appear to be controlled predominantly by variable extents of melting and fractional crystallization, with little influence from mantle source heterogeneity. Indeed, age-corrected isotopic values define only a narrow range, in agreement with long-term source homogeneity relative to the scale of melting; e.g., ɛNd varies from +4.1 to +5.7, 206Pb/204Pb from 19.048 to 19.281, and 87Sr/86Sr from 0.70362 to 0.70398. These values broadly fall within the fields of the proposed "C" or "FOZO" mantle end-members. However, small variations are present, with less radiogenic Nd and Pb isotope ratios at the older, western end of the chain, defining a trend toward a broadly EM2-like composition. Although some workers have postulated that the Louisville hotspot was the source of the ~120 Myr Ontong Java Plateau, our samples are isotopically distinct

  9. The Census of Marine Life on Seamounts: results from a global science program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocks, K.; Clark, M.; Rowden, A.; Consalvey, M.

    2010-12-01

    CenSeam (a Global Census of Marine Life on Seamounts) is a network of more than 500 scientists, policy makers and conservationists around the world. These participants are collaborating to increase our understanding of the factors driving seamount community composition and diversity, such that we can better understand and manage the effects of human activities. The major scientific outcomes of the CenSeam community include the findings that 1) Seamount community composition is often similar to surrounding habitats; however, community structure can be different. 2) Contrary to conventional wisdom, few seamounts follow island biogeography predictions. 3) Seamounts can support a higher benthic biomass than surrounding habitats. 4) Seamounts can support species and communities new to science, and represent range extensions for known species, which are being described from CenSeam voyages. 5) For the first time, the extent of the vulnerability and risk to seamount benthic communities from fishing has been quantified. 6) Whilst long assumed, CenSeam researchers have demonstrated that seamount communities are disturbed by fishing and are slow to recover. And 7) Seamounts might act as repositories of biodiversity during future periods of extreme environmental change, as they have likely done in the past. The major products of Censeam include 1) a book synthesizing seamount knowledge: Seamounts: Ecology, Fisheries and Conservation (from Blackwell Publishing); 2) a recent review of the structure and function of seamount benthic communities, human impacts, and seamount management and conservation (Ann Rev Mar Sci); 3) hundreds of scientific publications, including Special Issues in Marine Ecology and Oceanography (in collaboration with the Seamount Biogeogsciences Network), and a Special Collection in PLoSONE; 4) guidance documents and formal advising for seamount management communities, including the United Nations Environment Program, International Seabed Authority

  10. Seamount physiography and biology in the north-east Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Morato, T.; Kvile, K. Ø.; Taranto, G. H.; Tempera, F.; Narayanaswamy, B. E.; Hebbeln, D.; Menezes, G. M.; Wienberg, C.; Santos, R. S.; Pitcher, T. J.

    2013-01-01

    This work aims at characterising the seamount physiography and biology in the OSPAR Convention limits (north-east Atlantic Ocean) and Mediterranean Sea. We first inferred potential abundance, location and morphological characteristics of seamounts, and secondly, summarized the existing biological, geological and oceanographic in situ research, identifying examples of well-studied seamounts. Our study showed that the seamount population in the OSPAR area (north-east Atlantic) and in the Medite...

  11. Seamount physiography and biology in North-East Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea

    OpenAIRE

    T. Morato; K. Ø. Kvile; G. H. Taranto; F. Tempera; B. E. Narayanaswamy; D. Hebbeln; G. Menezes; C. Wienberg; R. S. Santos; T. J. Pitcher

    2012-01-01

    This work aims at characterising the seamount physiography and biology in the OSPAR Convention limits (North-East Atlantic Ocean) and Mediterranean Sea. We first inferred potential abundance, location and morphological characteristics of seamounts, and secondly, summarized the existing biological, geological and oceanographic in-situ research, identifying examples of well-studied seamounts. Our study showed that the seamount population in the OSPAR area (North-East Atlantic) and in Mediterran...

  12. A perspective on the importance of oceanic fronts in promoting aggregation of visitors to seamounts

    OpenAIRE

    Morato, T; Miller, PI; Dunn, DC; Nicol, SJ; Bowcott, J; Halpin, PN

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that not all seamounts are areas where productivity, biomass and biodiversity of marine life thrive. Therefore, understanding the drivers and mechanisms underlying seamount productivity is a major challenge in today's seamount research. Incorporating oceanographic data in future analyses has been suggested to be of paramount importance to unveil many of the seamount ecology paradigms. Persistent hydrographic features, such as oceanic fronts, have been recogniz...

  13. Formation of forearc basins by collision between seamounts and accretionary wedges: an example from the New Hebrides subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collot, J.-Y.; Fisher, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    Seabeam data reveal two deep subcircular reentrants in the lower arc slope of the New Hebrides island arc that may illustrate two stages in the development of a novel type of forearc basin. The Malekula reentrant lies just south of the partly subducted Bougainville seamount. This proximity, as well as the similarity in morphology between the reentrant and an indentation in the lower arc slope off Japan, suggests that the Malekula reentrant formed by the collision of a seamount with the arc. An arcuate fold-thrust belt has formed across the mouth of the reentrant, forming the toe of a new accretionary wedge. The Efate reentrant may show the next stage in basin development. This reentrant lies landward of a lower-slope ridge that may have begun to form as an arcuate fold-thrust belt across the mouth of a reentrant. This belt may have grown by continued accretion at the toe of the wedge, by underplating beneath the reentrant, and by trapping of sediment shed from the island arc. These processes could result in a roughly circular forearc basin. Basins that may have formed by seamount collision lie within the accretionary wedge adjacent to the Aleutian trenches. -Authors

  14. Petrology of basalts from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, James; Melchior, John

    1983-12-01

    Loihi Seamount is the southeasternmost active volcano of the Emperor-Hawaii linear volcanic chain. It comprises a spectrum of basalt compositional varieties including basanite, alkali basalt, transitional basalt and tholeiite. Samples from four dredge collections made on Scripps Institution of Oceanography Benthic Expedition in October 1982 are tholeiite. The samples include highly vesicular, olivine-rich basalt and dense glass-rich pillow fragments containing olivine and augite phenocrysts. Both quartz-normative and olivine-normative tholeiites are present. Minor and trace element data indicate relatively high abundances of low partition coefficient elements (e.g., Ti, K, P. Rb, Ba, Zr) and suggest that the samples were derived by relatively small to moderate extent of partial melting, of an undepleted mantle source. Olivine composition, MgO, Cr and Ni abundances, and Mg/(Mg+Fe), are typical of moderately fractionated to relatively unfractionated "primary" magmas. The variations in chemistry between samples cannot be adequately explained by low-pressure fractional crystallization but can be satisfied by minor variations in extent of melting if a homogeneous source is postulated. Alternatively, a heterogeneous source with variable abundances of certain trace elements, or mixing of liquids, may have been involved. Data for 3He/ 4He, presented in a separate paper, implies a mantle plume origin for the helium composition of the Loihi samples. There is little variation in the helium isotope ratio for samples having different compositions and textures. The helium data are not distinctive enough to unequivocally separate the magma sources for the tholeiitic rocks from the other rock types such as Loihi alkalic basalts and the whole source region for Loihi may have a nearly uniform helium compositions even though other element abundances may be variable. Complex petrologic processes including variable melting, fractional crystallization and magma mixing may have blurred

  15. Endemicity, biogeograhy, composition, and community structure on a northeast pacific seamount.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craig R McClain

    Full Text Available The deep ocean greater than 1 km covers the majority of the earth's surface. Interspersed on the abyssal plains and continental slope are an estimated 14000 seamounts, topographic features extending 1000 m off the seafloor. A variety of hypotheses are posited that suggest the ecological, evolutionary, and oceanographic processes on seamounts differ from those governing the surrounding deep sea. The most prominent and oldest of these hypotheses, the seamount endemicity hypothesis (SMEH, states that seamounts possess a set of isolating mechanisms that produce highly endemic faunas. Here, we constructed a faunal inventory for Davidson Seamount, the first bathymetric feature to be characterized as a 'seamount', residing 120 km off the central California coast in approximately 3600 m of water (Fig 1. We find little support for the SMEH among megafauna of a Northeast Pacific seamount; instead, finding an assemblage of species that also occurs on adjacent continental margins. A large percentage of these species are also cosmopolitan with ranges extending over much of the Pacific Ocean Basin. Despite the similarity in composition between the seamount and non-seamount communities, we provide preliminary evidence that seamount communities may be structured differently and potentially serve as source of larvae for suboptimal, non-seamount habitats.

  16. Mesobathic chondrichthyes of the Juan Fernández seamounts: are they different from those of the central Chilean continental slope?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Andrade

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available We compared the geographic distribution of groups of chondrychthid fishes of two physically proximal, although geographically different, regions that include the Juan Fernández seamounts and the central Chilean continental slope, both sampled at mesopelagic and mesobenthonic depths. The ridge is in the Nazca Plate, while the slope region in on the South American Plate, and is closer to the South American continent. We found six species of Chondrichthyes for the seamounts (four orders, four families. The slope sampling produced ten species of Chondrichthyes, of which Torpedo tremens De Buen 1959, was the only species in common with the Juan Fernández area. There are clear differences between the Chondrichthyes of the two regions. These fisheries require adequate administrative modes. Rev. Biol. Trop. 56 (1: 181-190. Epub 2008 March 31.

  17. Rapid fish stock depletion in previously unexploited seamounts: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rapid fish stock depletion in previously unexploited seamounts: the case of Beryx splendens from the Sierra Leone Rise (Gulf of Guinea) ... A spectral analysis and red-noise spectra procedure (REDFIT) algorithm was used to identify the red-noise spectrum from the gaps in the observed time-series of catch per unit effort by ...

  18. Quantifying the direct use value of Condor seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressurreição, Adriana; Giacomello, Eva

    2013-12-01

    Seamounts often satisfy numerous uses and interests. Multiple uses can generate multiple benefits but also conflicts and impacts, calling, therefore, for integrated and sustainable management. To assist in developing comprehensive management strategies, policymakers recognise the need to include measures of socioeconomic analysis alongside ecological data so that practical compromises can be made. This study assessed the direct output impact (DOI) of the relevant marine activities operating at Condor seamount (Azores, central northeast Atlantic) as proxies of the direct use values provided by the resource system. Results demonstrated that Condor seamount supported a wide range of uses yielding distinct economic outputs. Demersal fisheries, scientific research and shark diving were the top-three activities generating the highest revenues, while tuna fisheries, whale watching and scuba-diving had marginal economic significance. Results also indicated that the economic importance of non-extractive uses of Condor is considerable, highlighting the importance of these uses as alternative income-generating opportunities for local communities. It is hoped that quantifying the direct use values provided by Condor seamount will contribute to the decision making process towards its long-term conservation and sustainable use.

  19. Surprising discovery of high-grade pelitic schist on Cavalli Seamount, offshore Northland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortimer, N.; Walker, N.H.; Herzer, R.H.; Calvert, A.; Seward, D.

    1999-01-01

    Serendipity waits in the world's unexplored places. In March 1999, GNS's ONSIDE expedition to the South Fiji Basin made two dredge hauls on Cavalli seamount expecting to recover Miocene oceanic volcanic rocks. Instead dredge DIA recored 1 kg of 10 cm slickensided and chloritised schist pieces and dredge DIB, which was 1.1 km distant, 100 kg of well-foliated biotite schist, mainly in the form of two large subangular boulders. The presence of calsilicate bands initially suggested a correlation with Buller or Takaka Terranes, but whole rock chemical composition of the schist is more consistent with Murihiku, Waipapa or Pahau Terranes. U-Pb TIMS gheochronometry of individual detrital zircons indicates a maximum 170Ma depositional age for the schist protolith, thus clearly ruling out a Buller or Takaka correlation. Rb-Sr whole rock data suggest a young (Cenozoic?) metamorphic age. (author)

  20. Seismic constraints on caldera dynamics from the 2015 Axial Seamount eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcock, William S D; Tolstoy, Maya; Waldhauser, Felix; Garcia, Charles; Tan, Yen Joe; Bohnenstiehl, DelWayne R; Caplan-Auerbach, Jacqueline; Dziak, Robert P; Arnulf, Adrien F; Mann, M Everett

    2016-12-16

    Seismic observations in volcanically active calderas are challenging. A new cabled observatory atop Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca ridge allows unprecedented real-time monitoring of a submarine caldera. Beginning on 24 April 2015, the seismic network captured an eruption that culminated in explosive acoustic signals where lava erupted on the seafloor. Extensive seismic activity preceding the eruption shows that inflation is accommodated by the reactivation of an outward-dipping caldera ring fault, with strong tidal triggering indicating a critically stressed system. The ring fault accommodated deflation during the eruption and provided a pathway for a dike that propagated south and north beneath the caldera's east wall. Once north of the caldera, the eruption stepped westward, and a dike propagated along the extensional north rift. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. Diversity, ecological distribution and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria inhabiting seamounts and non-seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Ettoumi, Besma; Chouchane, Habib; Guesmi, Amel; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Neifar, Mohamed; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the ecological distribution of marine Actinobacteria isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations in the Tyrrhenian Sea was investigated. A collection of 110 isolates was analyzed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives for each ARISA haplotype (n = 49). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences showed a wide diversity of marine isolates and clustered the strains into 11 different genera, Janibacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Dietzia, Curtobacterium, Micrococcus, Citricoccus, Brevibacterium, Brachybacterium and Nocardioides. Interestingly, Janibacter limosus was the most encountered species particularly in seamounts stations, suggesting that it represents an endemic species of this particular ecosystem. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting on J. limosus sub-collection (n = 22), allowed their separation into seven distinct BOX-genotypes suggesting a high intraspecific microdiversity among the collection. Furthermore, by screening the biotechnological potential of selected actinobacterial strains, J. limosus was shown to exhibit the most important biosurfactant activity. Our overall data indicates that Janibacter is a major and active component of seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea adapted to low nutrient ecological niche.

  2. Diversity, ecological distribution and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria inhabiting seamounts and non-seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Ettoumi, Besma

    2016-04-01

    In the present study, the ecological distribution of marine Actinobacteria isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations in the Tyrrhenian Sea was investigated. A collection of 110 isolates was analyzed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives for each ARISA haplotype (n = 49). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences showed a wide diversity of marine isolates and clustered the strains into 11 different genera, Janibacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Dietzia, Curtobacterium, Micrococcus, Citricoccus, Brevibacterium, Brachybacterium and Nocardioides. Interestingly, Janibacter limosus was the most encountered species particularly in seamounts stations, suggesting that it represents an endemic species of this particular ecosystem. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting on J. limosus sub-collection (n = 22), allowed their separation into seven distinct BOX-genotypes suggesting a high intraspecific microdiversity among the collection. Furthermore, by screening the biotechnological potential of selected actinobacterial strains, J. limosus was shown to exhibit the most important biosurfactant activity. Our overall data indicates that Janibacter is a major and active component of seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea adapted to low nutrient ecological niche.

  3. Diversity, ecological distribution and biotechnological potential of Actinobacteria inhabiting seamounts and non-seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettoumi, Besma; Chouchane, Habib; Guesmi, Amel; Mahjoubi, Mouna; Brusetti, Lorenzo; Neifar, Mohamed; Borin, Sara; Daffonchio, Daniele; Cherif, Ameur

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, the ecological distribution of marine Actinobacteria isolated from seamount and non-seamount stations in the Tyrrhenian Sea was investigated. A collection of 110 isolates was analyzed by Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Spacer Analysis (ARISA) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing of representatives for each ARISA haplotype (n=49). Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA sequences showed a wide diversity of marine isolates and clustered the strains into 11 different genera, Janibacter, Rhodococcus, Arthrobacter, Kocuria, Dietzia, Curtobacterium, Micrococcus, Citricoccus, Brevibacterium, Brachybacterium and Nocardioides. Interestingly, Janibacter limosus was the most encountered species particularly in seamounts stations, suggesting that it represents an endemic species of this particular ecosystem. The application of BOX-PCR fingerprinting on J. limosus sub-collection (n=22), allowed their separation into seven distinct BOX-genotypes suggesting a high intraspecific microdiversity among the collection. Furthermore, by screening the biotechnological potential of selected actinobacterial strains, J. limosus was shown to exhibit the most important biosurfactant activity. Our overall data indicates that Janibacter is a major and active component of seamounts in the Tyrrhenian Sea adapted to low nutrient ecological niche. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  4. Diffuse Volcanism at the Young End of the Walvis Ridge - Tristan - Gough Seamount Province: Geochemical Sampling and Constraints on Plume Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Class, C.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Sager, W. W.; Schnur, S.

    2014-12-01

    The Walvis Ridge-Tristan/Gough seamount province in the South Atlantic represents 130 Myr of continuous intra-plate volcanism that can be connected to the once conjunct Parana-Etendeka flood basalt province. With this it represents one of the few primary hotspots consistent with the thermal plume model. However, around 60 Ma, the morphological expression of the Walvis Ridge changed drastically from a robust 200 km wide aseismic ridge into a 400 km wide region of diffuse and diminished volcanism. As a result, this part of the plume trail has been described by two subtracks, one ending at Tristan da Cunha and another at Gough Island more than 400 km to the SSE. Where the Walvis Ridge forks into these two tracks there is a center prong. There is also the 39.5°S lineament of seamounts between, but oblique to, the two subtracks, which is parallel to the local fracture zone directions. All these features are at odds with the classical definition of a narrow hotspot track although Rohde et al. (2013) showed that the Tristan and Gough subtracks retain a distinct geochemical signature over 70 Myr and are consistent with a zoned, deep-seated plume. The first Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic and trace element analyses from the detailed dredge sampling cruise MV1203 show that samples from two prominent seamounts at the western end of the 39.5°S lineament have a Gough-type signature, which makes an upper mantle source for this lineament unlikely but rather indicates that the Gough-type source stretches some 200 km NNW from Gough. Tristan track seamount samples are comparable with published data, however, one new sample has a Gough-type composition suggesting leakage of this component into the Tristan-type plume zone. Seamounts on the middle prong of the Walvis Ridge fork have compositions intermediate to Gough and Tristan domains, suggesting mixing between sources or melts of the two domains. Thus, the Gough-component in the last 60 Myr of plume activity is volumetrically much more

  5. Seamount ecology and dynamics: A multidisciplinary data set from repeated surveys at different seamounts in the Northeast Atlantic and Mediterranean (2003 - 2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, C.; Christiansen, B.; Denda, A.; George, K. H.; Kaufmann, M.; Maranhão, M.; Martin, B.; Metzger, T.; Peine, F.; Schuster, A.; Springer, B.; Stefanowitsch, B.; Turnewitsch, R.; Wehrmann, H.

    2016-02-01

    Seamounts are amongst the most common physiographic open ocean systems, but remoteness and geographic complexity have limited the number of integrated and multidisciplinary seamount surveys in the past. As a consequence, important aspects of seamount ecology and dynamics remain poorly studied. Here we present a multi-parameter data set from individual and repeated seamount surveys conducted at different sites in the Northeast Atlantic and Eastern Mediterranean between 2003 and 2013. The main objective of these surveys was to establish a collection of ecosystem relevant descriptors and to develop a better understanding of seamount ecosystem composition and variability in different dynamical and bio-geographic environments. Measurements were conducted at four seamounts in the Northeast Atlantic (Ampère, Sedlo, Seine, Senghor) and two seamounts in the Eastern Mediterranean (Anaximenes, Eratosthenes). The data set comprises records from a total number of 11 cruises including physical oceanography (temperature, salinity, pressure, currents), biology (phytoplankton, zooplankton, fish, benthos) and biogeochemistry (sedimentary particle dynamics, carbon flux). The resulting multi-disciplinary data collection provides a unique opportunity for comparative studies of seamount ecosystem structure and dynamics between different physical, biological and biogeochemical regimes

  6. Non-Hawaiian lithostratigraphy of Louisville seamounts and the formation of high-latitude oceanic islands and guyots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchs, David M.; Williams, Rebecca; Sano, Shin-ichi; Wright, V. Paul

    2018-05-01

    Guyots are large seamounts with a flat summit that is generally believed to form due to constructional biogenic and/or erosional processes during the formation of volcanic islands. However, despite their large abundance in the oceans, there are still very few direct constraints on the nature and formation of guyots, in particular those formed at high latitude that lack a thick cap of shallow-marine carbonate rocks. It is largely accepted based on geophysical constraints and surficial observations/sampling that the summit platform of these guyots is shaped by wave abrasion during post-volcanic subsidence of volcanic islands. Here we provide novel constraints on this hypothesis and the summit geology of guyots with a lithostratigraphic analysis of cores from three Louisville seamounts (South Pacific) collected during Expedition 330 of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP). Thirteen lithofacies of sedimentary and volcanic deposits are described, which include facies not previously recognized on the top of guyots, and offer a new insight into the formation of high-latitude oceanic islands on a fast-moving plate. Our results reveal that the lithostratigraphy of Louisville seamounts preserves a very consistent record of the formation and drowning of volcanic islands, with from bottom to top: (i) volcaniclastic sequences with abundant lava-fed delta deposits, (ii) submarine to subaerial shield lava flows, (iii) post-volcanic shallow to deeper marine sedimentary rocks lacking thick reef deposits, (iv) post-erosional rejuvenated volcanic rocks, and (v) pelagic sediments. Recognition of erosional boundaries between subaerial lava flows and shallow-marine sedimentary rocks provides novel support for post-volcanic wave planation of guyots. However, the summit geology of Louisville seamounts is dissimilar to that of high-latitude Hawaiian-Emperor guyots that have emplaced in a similar tectonic and environmental setting and that include thicker lava stacks with apparently

  7. BIOMETORE Project - Studying the Biodiversity in the Northeastern Atlantic Seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, A.; Biscoito, M.; Campos, A.; Tuaty Guerra, M.; Meneses, G.; Santos, A. M. P. A.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the deep-sea ecosystem functioning is a key issue in the study of ocean sciences. Bringing together researchers from several scientific domains, the BIOMETORE project aims to the increase knowledge on deep-sea ecosystems and biodiversity at the Atlantic seamounts of the Madeira-Tore and Great Meteor geological complexes. The project outputs will provide important information for the understanding and sustainable management of the target seamount ecosystems, thus contributing to fulfill knowledge gaps on their biodiversity, from bacteria to mammals, and food webs, as well as to promote future sustainable fisheries and sea-floor integrity. The plan includes the realization of eight multidisciplinary surveys, four done during the summer of 2015 and another four planned for the same season of 2016, in target seamounts: the Gorringe bank, the Josephine, and others in the Madeira-Tore, and selected ones in the Greta Meteor (northeastern Atlantic Ocean). The surveys cover a number of scientific areas in the domains of oceanography, ecology, integrative taxonomy, geology, fisheries and spatial mapping. We present and discuss BIOMETORE developments, the preliminary results from the four 2015 summer surveys, and the planning of the next four surveys.

  8. Three-Dimensional Dynamics of Baroclinic Tides Over a Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasenko, Vasiliy; Stashchuk, Nataliya; Nimmo-Smith, W. Alex M.

    2018-02-01

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model is used for the analysis of baroclinic tides over Anton Dohrn Seamount (ADS), in the North Atlantic. The model output is validated against in situ data collected during the 136th cruise of the RRS "James Cook" in May-June 2016. The observational data set includes velocity time series recorded at two moorings as well as temperature, salinity, and velocity profiles collected at 22 hydrological stations. Synthesis of observational and model data enabled the reconstruction of the details of baroclinic tidal dynamics over ADS. It was found that the baroclinic tidal waves are generated in the form of tidal beams radiating from the ADS periphery to its center, focusing tidal energy in a surface layer over the seamount's summit. This energy focusing enhances subsurface water mixing and the local generation of internal waves. The tidal beams interacting with the seasonal pycnocline generate short-scale internal waves radiating from the ADS center. An important ecological outcome from this study concerns the pattern of residual currents generated by tides. The rectified flows over ADS have the form of a pair of dipoles, cyclonic and anticyclonic eddies located at the seamount's periphery. These eddies are potentially an important factor in local larvae dispersion and their escape from ADS.

  9. Seamounts an additional tool to confirm the nature of the crust and to locate possible mineral resources for dredging

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarma, K.V.L.N.S.; Ramana, M.V.; Subrahmanyam, V.; Krishna, K.S.; Ramprasad, T.; Desa, M.

    Crust with reversed polarity. The seamounts studied provide an environment for possible locations of polymetallic encrustations. Morphology of the seamounts depends on several factors, including physical and chemical composition of the magma, eruption...

  10. The genetic link between the Azores Archipelago and the Southern Azores Seamount Chain (SASC): The elemental, isotopic and chronological evidences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Luisa Pinto; Martins, Sofia; Hildenbrand, Anthony; Madureira, Pedro; Mata, João

    2017-12-01

    New geochemical, isotopic (Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb) and K-Ar data, are presented here on samples from the Southern Azores Seamount Chain (SASC) located south of the Azores Plateau. The SASC also includes the Great Meteor, Small Meteor and Closs seamounts, morphologically connected by a saddle at - 4100 m deep. We conclude that the SASC are characterized by a narrow isotopic variability that falls within the Azores isotopic field. Although each seamount has its own isotopic signature, their mantle source must comprise four local mantle end-members, three of which are common to the Azores, e.g. Plato isotopic signature results from the mixing between HIMU and N-MORB while Great Meteor signature results from this mix with the Azores Common Component (AzCC). A fourth end-member with high 208Pb/204Pb and decoupled Th/U ratios (Δ8/4 up to 59.2) is identified on Great Meteor northern flank. New K-Ar ages on Plato (33.4 ± 0.5 Ma) and Small Hyeres (31.6 ± 0.4 Ma) show nearly coeval volcanism, which is contemporaneous with the E-MORBs erupted at the MAR, drilled on oceanic crust with 30-34 Ma (DSDP82). This study endorses the genetic link between the Azores Archipelago and the SASC to the long-term activity of the Azores plume and the large-scale ridge-hotspot interaction, contributing to better constrain the temporal-spatial evolution of this region of the North Atlantic.

  11. Organic matter composition and macrofaunal diversity in sediments of the Condor Seamount (Azores, NE Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiorni, Lucia; Ravara, Ascensão; Parretti, Paola; Santos, Ricardo S.; Rodrigues, Clara F.; Amaro, Teresa; Cunha, Marina R.

    2013-12-01

    In recent years increasing knowledge has been accumulated on seamounts ecology; however their sedimentary environments and associated biological communities remain largely understudied. In this study we investigated quantity and biochemical composition of organic matter and macrofaunal diversity in sediments of the Condor Seamount (NE Atlantic, Azores). In order to test the effect of the seamount on organic matter distribution, sediment samples were collected in 6 areas: the summit, the northern and southern flanks and bases, and in an external far field site. Macrofauna abundance and diversity were investigated on the summit, the southern flank and in the far field site. The organic matter distribution reflected the complex hydrodynamic conditions occurring on the Condor. Concentrations of organic matter compounds were generally lower on the whole seamount than in the far field site and on the seamount summit compared to flanks and bases. A clear difference was also evident between the northern and southern slopes of the Condor, suggesting a role of the seamount in conditioning sedimentation processes and distribution of food resources for benthic consumers. Macrofauna assemblages changed significantly among the three sampling sites. High abundance and dominance, accompanied by low biodiversity, characterized the macrofauna community on the Condor summit, while low dominance and high biodiversity were observed at the flank. Our results, although limited to five samples on the seamount and two off the seamount, do not necessarily support the paradigm that seamounts are more biodiverse than the surrounding seafloor. However, the abundance (and biomass), functional diversity and taxonomical distinctiveness of the macrofaunal assemblages from the Condor Seamount suggest that seamounts habitats may play a relevant role in adding to the regional biodiversity.

  12. Structure and Evolution of Hawaii's Loihi Seamount from High-resolution Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Moyer, C. L.; Glazer, B. T.; Caress, D. W.; Yoerger, D.; Kaiser, C. L.

    2016-12-01

    Loihi Seamount has been mapped repeatedly using shipboard multibeam sonars with improving resolution over time. Simrad EM302 data with 25m resolution at the 950m summit and 90m at the 5000m base of the volcano were collected from Schmidt Ocean Institute's R/V Falkor in 2014. A contracted multibeam survey in 1997 employing a deep-towed vehicle has 7m resolution for the summit and upper north and south rift zones, but suffered from poor navigation. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution's AUV Sentry surveyed most of the summit and low-T hydrothermal vents on the base of the south rift in 2013 and 2014. The 2m resolution of most data is more precise than the navigation. The 6 summit surveys were reprocessed using MB-System to remove abundant bad bottom picks and adjust the navigation to produce a spatially accurate map. The 3 summit pits, including Pele's Pit that formed in 1996, are complex collapse structures and nested inside a larger caldera that was modified by large landslides on the east and west summit flanks. The pits cut low shields that once formed a complex of overlapping summit shields, similar to Kilauea before the current caldera formed 1500 to 1790 CE. An 11m section of ash deposits crops out on the east rim of the summit along a caldera-bounding fault and is analogous to Kilauea where the caldera-bounding faults expose ash erupted as the present caldera formed. Most of the Loihi ash section is 3300 to 5880 yr BP, indicating that the larger caldera structure at Loihi is younger than 3300 yr BP. The landslides on the east and west edges of the summit are therefore younger 3300 yr BP. The uppermost south rift has several small pit craters between cones and pillow ridges, also analogous to Kilauea. Two cones near the deep low-T vents are steep pillow mounds with slopes of talus. High-resolution mapping reveals, for the first time, the many similarities between the structure and evolution of submarine Loihi Seamount and subaerial Kilauea Volcano.

  13. Petrologic Aspects of Seamount and Guyot Volcanism on the Ancestral Mesozoic Pacific Plate: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natland, J. H.

    2007-12-01

    Hundreds of large seamounts and guyots are widely scattered almost in a "shotgun-blast" arrangement in an area about the size of the United States west of the Mississippi River on the Mesozoic Pacific plate between the Mariana Trench and the Gilbert Islands. Most of these formed between ~160-100 Ma while the Pacific plate was surrounded by spreading ridges and growing outward in all directions. There is little to no indication that the seamounts and guyots formed along linear seamount chains; existing radiometric-age data show no age progressions. The volcanoes appear to have formed in response to a uniform stress configuration across the plate, which was either not moving or moving very slowly at the time (1, 2), much like the modern Antarctic plate. When the growing plate started to encounter subduction systems in the western Pacific at ~90 Ma, consistent stress patterns began to develop, and the broad linear Gilbert and Line volcanic ridge systems began to form. Even then, however, considerable overlapping of volcanism occurred, and only the most general age progressions are evident in existing data. Petrologic data from samples obtained from dozens of volcanic summits by dredging and beneath several carbonate platforms by drilling reveal considerable diversity in development of differentiated alkalic magmatic lineages rooted in diverse parental basaltic rocks. These include transitional, alkalic and basanitic compositions, with differentiates of hawaiite, mugearite, trachyte and one phonolite. Many of the basaltic rocks are partly to significantly transformed by alteration under oxidative conditions (dredged rocks) and both oxidative and non-oxidative conditions (drilled rocks). This can make estimations of mantle geochemical provenance difficult. Nevertheless, the province has been linked by backtracking techniques to the modern SOPITA region of the South Pacific (3), and its rocks show enrichments in trace elements and isotopic characteristics similar to

  14. Numerical simulation of faulting in the Sunda Trench shows that seamounts may generate megathrust earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, L.; Chan, C. H.; Tapponnier, P.

    2017-12-01

    The role of seamounts in generating earthquakes has been debated, with some studies suggesting that seamounts could be truncated to generate megathrust events, while other studies indicate that the maximum size of megathrust earthquakes could be reduced as subducting seamounts could lead to segmentation. The debate is highly relevant for the seamounts discovered along the Mentawai patch of the Sunda Trench, where previous studies have suggested that a megathrust earthquake will likely occur within decades. In order to model the dynamic behavior of the Mentawai patch, we simulated forearc faulting caused by seamount subducting using the Discrete Element Method. Our models show that rupture behavior in the subduction system is dominated by stiffness of the overriding plate. When stiffness is low, a seamount can be a barrier to rupture propagation, resulting in several smaller (M≤8.0) events. If, however, stiffness is high, a seamount can cause a megathrust earthquake (M8 class). In addition, we show that a splay fault in the subduction environment could only develop when a seamount is present, and a larger offset along a splay fault is expected when stiffness of the overriding plate is higher. Our dynamic models are not only consistent with previous findings from seismic profiles and earthquake activities, but the models also better constrain the rupture behavior of the Mentawai patch, thus contributing to subsequent seismic hazard assessment.

  15. Tectonic and volcanic implications of a cratered seamount off Nicobar Island, Andaman Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    KameshRaju, K.A.; Ray, D.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Murty, G.P.S.; Gahalaut, V.K.; Samudrala, K.; Paropkari, A.L.; Ramachandran, R.; SuryaPrakash, L.

    seamount with well-developed crater at the summit was discovered near to the center of the Nicobar swarm. Rock samples collected by TV-guided grab from the seamount crater are dacite, rhyolite and andesite type with a veneer of ferromanganese oxide coating...

  16. Geophysical study of a seamount located on the continental margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattacharya, G.C.; Subrahmanyam, V.

    Bathymetric, magnetic, and gravity data obtained over a 2,464 m high seamount located in the Arabian Sea indicate that the seamount (inferred mean density = 2.65 gm/cc) extends for 1 km beneath the seafloor and is locally isostatically compensated...

  17. Fish biodiversity of the Vitória-Trindade Seamount Chain, southwestern Atlantic: an updated database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson T Pinheiro

    Full Text Available Despite a strong increase in research on seamounts and oceanic islands ecology and biogeography, many basic aspects of their biodiversity are still unknown. In the southwestern Atlantic, the Vitória-Trindade Seamount Chain (VTC extends ca. 1,200 km offshore the Brazilian continental shelf, from the Vitória seamount to the oceanic islands of Trindade and Martin Vaz. For a long time, most of the biological information available regarded its islands. Our study presents and analyzes an extensive database on the VTC fish biodiversity, built on data compiled from literature and recent scientific expeditions that assessed both shallow to mesophotic environments. A total of 273 species were recorded, 211 of which occur on seamounts and 173 at the islands. New records for seamounts or islands include 191 reef fish species and 64 depth range extensions. The structure of fish assemblages was similar between islands and seamounts, not differing in species geographic distribution, trophic composition, or spawning strategies. Main differences were related to endemism, higher at the islands, and to the number of endangered species, higher at the seamounts. Since unregulated fishing activities are common in the region, and mining activities are expected to drastically increase in the near future (carbonates on seamount summits and metals on slopes, this unique biodiversity needs urgent attention and management.

  18. Hydrothermal activity on the summit of Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, H; Tsubota, H; Nakai, T; Ishibashi, J; Akagi, T; Gamo, T; Tilbrook, B; Igarashi, G; Kodera, M; Shitashima, K

    1987-01-01

    Loihi Seamount is located about 30km southeast of the Island of Hawaii; it rises from the sea floor at a depth of 4000m and reaches a maximum elevation of 1000m blow sea level. Oceanographic studies including CTD survey of warm sites and bottom photography confirmed several hydrothermal fields on the summit of the seamount. The summit is covered with hydrothermal plumes which are extremely rich in methane, helium, carbon dioxide, iron and manganese; the maximum concentration of helium is 91.8 n1/1, the highest so far reported for open-ocean water. The /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio of helium injected into seawater is 14 times the atmospheric level. The 3He/heat and CO/sub 2//heat ratios in the plumes are one to two orders of magnitude greater than those at oceanic spreading centers, implying a more primitive source region for hotspot volcanism. The plumes also show negative pH anomalies up to half a pH unit from ambient owing to the high injection rate of CO/sub 2/. (4 figs, 3 photos, 1 tab, 31 refs)

  19. On the interaction between ocean surface waves and seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Jeison; Cavaleri, Luigi; Portilla-Yandún, Jesús

    2017-12-01

    Of the many topographic features, more specifically seamounts, that are ubiquitous in the ocean floor, we focus our attention on those with relatively shallow summits that can interact with wind-generated surface waves. Among these, especially relatively long waves crossing the oceans (swells) and stormy seas are able to affect the water column up to a considerable depth and therefore interact with these deep-sea features. We quantify this interaction through numerical experiments using a numerical wave model (SWAN), in which a simply shaped seamount is exposed to waves of different length. The results show a strong interaction that leads to significant changes in the wave field, creating wake zones and regions of large wave amplification. This is then exemplified in a practical case where we analyze the interaction of more realistic sea conditions with a very shallow rock in the Yellow Sea. Potentially important for navigation and erosion processes, mutatis mutandis, these results are also indicative of possible interactions with emerged islands and sand banks in shelf seas.

  20. Seamounts along the Iberian continental margins; Los montes submarinos en los margenes continentales de Iberia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, J. T.; Alonso, B.; Fernandez-Puga, M. C.; Gomez-Ballesteros, M.; Iglesias, J.; Palomino, D.; Roque, C.; Ercilla, G.; Diaz-del-Rio, V.

    2015-07-01

    Seamounts are first-order morphological elements on continental margins and in oceanic domains, which have been extensively researched over recent decades in all branches of oceanography. These features favour the development of several geological processes, and their study gives us a better understanding of their geological and morphological domains. The seamounts around Iberia are numerous and provide excellent examples of the geo diversity of these morphological elements. Here we present a compilation of 15 seamounts around the Iberian Peninsula. These seamounts have different origins related to the geodynamic evolution (volcanism, extensional or compressive tectonics, and diapirism) of the domains where they are located. The current configuration of their relief has been influenced by Neogene-Quaternary tectonics. Their positioning controls the current morpho-sedimentary processes in the basins and on the margins, and high- lights the fact that downslope processes on seamount flanks (mass flows, turbidite flows, and landslides) and processes parallel to seamounts (contouritic currents) correspond to the major geological features they are associated with them. Biogenic structures commonly develop on the tops of seamounts where occasionally isolated shelves form that have carbonate-dominated sedimentation. (Author)

  1. Seasonal changes in fish assemblage structure at a shallow seamount in the Gulf of California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Salvador J; Klimley, A Peter; Muhlia-Melo, Arturo; Morgan, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Seamounts have generally been identified as locations that can promote elevated productivity, biomass and predator biodiversity. These properties attract seamount-associated fisheries where elevated harvests can be obtained relative to surrounding areas. There exists large variation in the geological and oceanographic environment among the thousands of locations that fall within the broad definition of seamount. Global seamount surveys have revealed that not all seamounts are hotspots of biodiversity, and there remains a strong need to understand the mechanisms that underlie variation in species richness observed. We examined the process of fish species assembly at El Bajo Espiritu Santo (EBES) seamount in the Gulf of California over a five-year study period. To effectively quantify the relative abundance of fast-moving and schooling fishes in a 'blue water' habitat, we developed a simplified underwater visual census (UVC) methodology and analysis framework suitable for this setting and applicable to future studies in similar environments. We found correlations between seasonally changing community structure and variability in oceanographic conditions. Individual species responses to thermal habitat at EBES revealed three distinct assemblages, a 'fall assemblage' tracking warmer overall temperature, a 'spring assemblage' correlated with cooler temperature, and a 'year-round assemblage' with no significant response to temperature. Species richness was greatest in spring, when cool and warm water masses stratified the water column and a greater number of species from all three assemblages co-occurred. We discuss our findings in the context of potential mechanisms that could account for predator biodiversity at shallow seamounts.

  2. Fractures, not Plumes, Have Controlled Major Seamount Volcanism in the Pacific over 170 Million Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natland, J. H.; Winterer, E. L.

    2003-12-01

    The distribution of guyots and atolls and large volcanic islands on the Pacific plate can be used to outline the likely connection between stresses acting on the plate and the gradual development of large, linear volcanic chains over the past 170 Ma. We construe three general periods with different stress regimes in the history of the Pacific plate. 1) During the Jurassic and Early Cretaceous, the Pacific plate was surrounded by ridge segments and there were no major stress alignments within it. Within-plate volcanism thus assumed the scattered arrangement for the condition of no tectonic stress (1), and the large Magellan and Wake seamount clusters formed. Near the eastern boundaries of the plate, complex and shifting patterns of ridge reorganization dictated formation of very long, splayed, near-axis ridges such as Horizon Guyot and Necker Ridge. 2) At about 90 Ma, the growing middle-aged Pacific plate achieved its first persistent stress regime with the formation of subduction boundaries along its western or northwestern margin. The plate was no longer static but began to move over the asthenosphere and into the mantle. Subduction boundaries and the overall direction of subduction are uncertain, but this imparted a general yet not fully stable component of tension across the plate, producing the NNW Gilbert-Marshall, Line and Emperor Seamount ridges, generally orthogonal to the overall direction of least principal stress. The Line Island seamount chain, being near ridge axes, sustained a variable stress regime. It thus has no age progression of rocks dated between 70-90 Ma (2), great width, and a dual orientations of ridges. 3) By 47 Ma, nearly half of the boundaries of the Pacific plate now were trenches spanning from the Aleutians to New Zealand. In addition, northward migration of the Indian plate and Australia caught a major portion of the westerly moving Pacific plate between the northeast corner of the Tonga Trench and the Aleutians. The plate could not

  3. Compositional variation and genesis of ferromanganese crusts of the Afanasiy-Nikitin Seamount, Equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rajani, R.P.; Banakar, V.K.; Parthiban, G.; Mudholkar, A.V.; Chodankar, A.R.

    Eight ferromanganese crusts (Fe-Mn crusts) with igneous and sedimentary substrates collected at different water depths from the Afanasiy-Nikitin Seamount are studied for their bulk major, minor and rare earth element composition. The Mn/Fe ratios...

  4. Bacterial Diversity in Deep-Sea Sediments from Afanasy Nikitin Seamount, Equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Khandeparker, R.; Meena, R.M.; Deobagkar, D.D.

    Deep-sea sediments can reveal much about the last 200 million years of Earth history, including the history of ocean life and climate. Microbial diversity in Afanasy Nikitin seamount located at Equatorial East Indian Ocean (EEIO) was investigated...

  5. Microtopographic analysis of cobalt-rich manganese deposits on a mid-Pacific seamount

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Yamazaki, T.; Sharma, R.; Tsurusaki, K.

    Evaluation of stereo photographs and video data shows a variety of surface features associated with the crusts and nodules across a mid-pacific seamount. The differences in the coverage, distribution and relief are used to classify the surface...

  6. CRED Gridded Bathymetry near Northampton Seamounts (100-004), Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — File 100-004b is a 60-m ASCII grid of depth data collected near Northampton Seamounts in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands as of May 2003. This grid has been...

  7. Oceanographic Survey of Cross Seamount and Control Sites (SE0803, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goals of the cruise were to collect acoustic backscatter and oceanographic data at Cross Seamount (18?43.285? N, longitude 158? 15.710? W) and at control sites...

  8. Oceanographic Survey of Cross Seamount and Control Sites (OES0703L1, EK60)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The goals of the cruise were to collect acoustic backscatter and oceanographic data at Cross Seamount (18?43.285? N, longitude 158? 15.710? W), with an approximately...

  9. Hyperiid amphipods around the seamounts and islands off northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Sampaio de Souza

    Full Text Available Abstract Data collected on large-scale surveys around the seamounts and islands off northeastern Brazil provide information on the hyperiid amphipod populations. Thirty-six species were identified. Most of the species belong to the Infraorder Physocephalata, representing 21 genera and 13 families. Thirteen species (Vibilia australis, L. latissimus, L. macrophthalmus, L. schizogeneios, Phronima atlantica, Phrosina semilunata, Primno brevidens, Eupronoe minuta, Oxycephalus clause, Rhabdosoma whitei, Amphithyrus bispinosus, Leptocotis tenuirostris and Tetrathyrus forcipatus have not previously been recorded in this region. The spatial distribution of the hyperiid amphipods was very patchy. Each area of these amounts and islands off northeastern Brazil has different oceanographic features and can be characterised by a clearly defined group of most abundant species.

  10. Paleocommunity turnover in an Early Pliocene seamount from southeastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ramos, Diego Antonio; Zuschin, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Seamounts are topographic elevations under the sea, regardless of their size and relief. They support rich living communities and are important biodiversity hotspots, but many of the fundamental ecological processes that maintain seamount communities remain poorly understood. In contrast to snapshot observations conducted on extant seamounts, fossil examples may provide the opportunity to assess how temporal changes in physico-chemical parameters relate to paleocommunity turnovers in these particular biotopes. Here we deal with an Early Pliocene (Zanclean) small seamount in southeastern Spain. This classic locality is extremely rich in fossil macroinvertebrates and was subject to studies of some taxonomic groups in the late seventies. However, the detailed stratigraphy is herein outlined for the first time. The overall feature is a shallowing upward succession about 35 m thick which onlaps a Miocene volcanic ridge. The occurrence of the planktonic foraminifera Globorotalia margaritae and G. puncticulata allow attribution to the MPl3 biozone of the Mediterranean Pliocene. We measured two sections that can be divided in a lower interval of fine-grained bryozoan-rich deposits and a upper interval of biocalcarenite increasingly rich in rhodoliths upsection. The whole series is bioturbated, with Thalassinoides traces being more common upsection. Biofabrics comprise mostly densely-packed suites of disarticulated and fragmented shells of calcitic fauna (large oysters are often bioeroded by clionid sponges), suggesting relatively low sedimentation rates and reworking by storms (e.g., channelized shell-beds, tubular tempestites). The prevailing taxonomic groups are cheilostome bryozoans, oysters, brachiopods, pectinids, echinoderms, cirripedes and corals. The lower interval contains octocoral internodes (Isididae) (only recorded at the base of the section). Scleratinians like Balanophyllia? decrease in abundance upsection. Bryozoans are extremely abundant and diverse, with

  11. Caldera formation and varied eruption styles on North Pacific seamounts: the clastic lithofacies record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portner, Ryan A.; Clague, Dave A.; Paduan, Jennifer B.

    2014-08-01

    Detailed examination of volcaniclastic and sedimentary rocks collected from the Taney (30 Ma), President Jackson (4 Ma), Vance (3 Ma) and Alarcon (2 Ma) near-ridge seamount chains of the North Pacific reveals seven clastic lithofacies that record various modes of eruption, magma fragmentation, and particle dispersal. Lithofacies are distinguished by differences in lithology, bedding habit, compositional heterogeneity, and relationship to volcanic landforms. Breccia lithofacies were produced through mechanical fragmentation during caldera collapse (polymict) or effusive eruptions onto steep slopes (monomict). Rare globular lapilli mudstone lithofacies contain clasts with morphologies formed by magma-sediment mingling processes (peperite). Seamount summit pyroclastic deposits include proximal lapilli tuff with vesicular pyroclasts, and more distal limu o Pele tuff lithofacies. Much finer-grained hydrothermal mudstone/tuff lithofacies occurs around caldera rims and contains greenschist minerals, hydrothermal clays and basaltic ash that record subsurface phreatomagmatic fragmentation processes. Very fine-grained ash is transported to distal regions by oceanic currents and hydrothermal plumes, and is a component of the regional pelagic sediment budget. Pyroclastic lithofacies only occur on seamount summits suggesting formation during the latter stages of seamount evolution. As a seamount drifts away from an adjacent ridge axis and associated heat source, its magma supply is reduced allowing for magmatic gas buildup and mild explosive eruptions. During this stage, the diminished melt supply under the seamount is unable to fully compensate for extension along the ridge axis and vertical seamount growth. Lateral intrusion into spreading-related structures in this stage causes magma withdrawal and caldera formation. Formation of caldera ring faults also promotes seawater ingress into subseafloor hydrothermal cells, which interact with magma conduits causing phreatomagmatic

  12. Cascadia Seismicity Related to Seamount Subduction as detected by the Cascadia Initiative Amphibious Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, E.; Bilek, S. L.; Rowe, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    Unlike other subduction zones, the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) is notable for the absence of detected and located small and moderate magnitude interplate earthquakes, despite the presence of recurring episodic tremor and slip (ETS) downdip and evidence of pre-historic great earthquakes. Thermal and geodetic models indicate that the seismogenic zone exists primarily, if not entirely, offshore; therefore the perceived unusual seismic quiescence may be a consequence of seismic source location in relation to land based seismometers. The Cascadia Initiative (CI) amphibious community seismic experiment includes ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) deployed directly above the presumed locked seismogenic zone. We use the CI dataset to search for small magnitude interplate earthquakes previously undetected using the on-land sensors alone. We implement subspace detection to search for small earthquakes. We build our subspace with template events from existing earthquake catalogs that appear to have occurred on the plate interface, windowing waveforms on CI OBS and land seismometers. Although our efforts will target the entire CSZ margin and full 4-year CI deployment, here we focus on a previously identified cluster off the coast of Oregon, related to a subducting seamount. During the first year of CI deployment, this target area yields 293 unique detections with 86 well-located events. Thirty-two of these events occurred within the seamount cluster, and 13 events were located in another cluster to the northwest of the seamount. Events within the seamount cluster are separated into those whose depths place them on the plate interface, and a shallower set ( 5 km depth). These separate event groups track together temporally, and seem to agree with a model of seamount subduction that creates extensive fracturing around the seamount, rather than stress concentrated at the seamount-plate boundary. During CI year 2, this target area yields >1000 additional event detections.

  13. Past plate and mantle motion from new ages for the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, John; Steinberger, Bernhard; Regelous, Marcel; Koppers, Anthony; Wijbrans, Jan; Haase, Karsten; Stoffers, Peter; Jokat, Wilfried; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.-Dieter

    2014-05-01

    Estimates of the relative motion between the Hawaiian and Louisville hotspots have consequences for understanding the role and character of deep Pacific-mantle return flow. The relative motion between these primary hotspots can be inferred by comparing the age records for their seamount trails. Our new 40Ar/39Ar ages for 18 lavas from 10 seamounts along the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain (HESC) show that volcanism started in the sharp portion of the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend (HEB) at ≥47.5 Ma and continued for ≥5 Myr (O'Connor et al., 2013). The slope of the along-track distance from the currently active Hawaiian hotspot plotted versus age is remarkably linear between ~57 and 25 Ma in the central ˜1900 km of the seamount chain, including the HEB. This model predicts an age for the oldest Emperor Seamounts that matches published ages, implying that a linear age-distance relationship might extend back to at least 82 Ma. In contrast, Hawaiian age progression was much faster since at least ~15 Ma and possibly as early as ~27 Ma. Linear age-distance relations for the Hawaii-Emperor and Louisville seamount chains predict ~300 km overall hotspot relative motion between 80 and 47.5 Ma, in broad agreement with numerical models of plumes in a convecting mantle, and paleomagnetic data. We show that a change in hotspot relative motion may also have occurred between ~55 Ma and ~50 Ma. We interpret this change in hotspot motion as evidence that the HEB reflects a combination of hotspot and plate motion changes driven by the same plate/mantle reorganization. O'Connor et al. (2013), Constraints on past plate and mantle motion from new ages for the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 14, 4564-4584, doi:10.1002/ggge.20267.

  14. Seasonal changes in fish assemblage structure at a shallow seamount in the Gulf of California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador J. Jorgensen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Seamounts have generally been identified as locations that can promote elevated productivity, biomass and predator biodiversity. These properties attract seamount-associated fisheries where elevated harvests can be obtained relative to surrounding areas. There exists large variation in the geological and oceanographic environment among the thousands of locations that fall within the broad definition of seamount. Global seamount surveys have revealed that not all seamounts are hotspots of biodiversity, and there remains a strong need to understand the mechanisms that underlie variation in species richness observed. We examined the process of fish species assembly at El Bajo Espiritu Santo (EBES seamount in the Gulf of California over a five-year study period. To effectively quantify the relative abundance of fast-moving and schooling fishes in a ‘blue water’ habitat, we developed a simplified underwater visual census (UVC methodology and analysis framework suitable for this setting and applicable to future studies in similar environments. We found correlations between seasonally changing community structure and variability in oceanographic conditions. Individual species responses to thermal habitat at EBES revealed three distinct assemblages, a ‘fall assemblage’ tracking warmer overall temperature, a ‘spring assemblage’ correlated with cooler temperature, and a ‘year-round assemblage’ with no significant response to temperature. Species richness was greatest in spring, when cool and warm water masses stratified the water column and a greater number of species from all three assemblages co-occurred. We discuss our findings in the context of potential mechanisms that could account for predator biodiversity at shallow seamounts.

  15. Three-dimensional S-wave tomography under Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baillard, C.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Arnulf, A. F.; Tolstoy, M.; Waldhauser, F.

    2017-12-01

    Axial Seamount is a submarine volcano located at the intersection of the Juande Fuca Ridge and the Cobb-Eickelberg hotspot 500 km off the coast of thenorthwestern United States. The seamount, which rises 1 km above the seafloor, ischaracterized by a shallow caldera that is elongated in the N-S direction, measure 8km by 3 km and sits on top of a 14 km by 3 km magma reservoir. Two eruptive eventsin 1998 and 2011 motivated the deployment in 2014 of a real time cabled observatorywithin the Axial caldera, as part of the Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI).Theobservatory includes a network of seven seismometers that span the southern half ofthe caldera. Five months after the observatory came on-line in November 2014, thevolcano erupted on April 24, 2015. Well over 100,000 events were located in thevicinity of the caldera, delineating an outward dipping ring fault that extends fromnear the surface to the magma body at 2 km depth and which accommodatesinflation and deflation of the volcano.The initial earthquake locations have beenobtained with a one-dimensional velocity model but the travel time residuals suggeststrong heterogeneities. A three-dimensional P-wave velocity model, obtained bycombining multichannel and ocean bottom seismometer refraction data, is being usedto refine locations but the three-dimensional S-wave structure is presently unknown.In most mid-ocean ridge settings, the distribution of earthquakes is not conducive forjoint inversions for S-wave velocity and hypocentral parameters because there are fewcrossing ray paths but at Axial the presence of a ring fault that is seismically active atall depths on both the east and west side of the caldera, provides a reasonablegeometry for such efforts. We will present the results of joint inversions that assumethe existing three-dimensional P wave velocity model and solve for VP/VS structure andhypocentral parameters using LOTOS, an algorithm that solves the forward problemusing ray bending.The resulting model

  16. Morphometry of Concepcion Bank: Evidence of Geological and Biological Processes on a Large Volcanic Seamount of the Canary Islands Seamount Province.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesus Rivera

    Full Text Available Concepcion Bank is the largest seamount in the Canary Islands Seamount Province (CISP, an oceanic area off NW Africa including 16 main seamounts, the Canaries archipelago and the Selvagens subarchipelago. The Bank is located 90 km northeast of Lanzarote Island and has been identified as a candidate Marine Protected Area (MPA to be included in the Natura 2000 network. A compilation of complementary datasets consisting of multibeam bathymetry, TOPAS seismic reflection profiles, side scan sonar sonographs, Remotely Operated Vehicle video records and seafloor samples allowed describing in detail and ground truthing the submarine landforms and bioconstructions exhibited by the bank. The Concepcion Bank presently rises up to 2,433 m above the adjacent seafloor and exhibits two main domains: an extensive summit plateau and steep flanks. The sub-round summit plateau is 50km by 45 km and ranges from 158 to 1,485 m depth. The steep flanks that bound it descend to depths ranging between 1,700 and 2,500 m and define a seamount base that is 66km by 53 km. This morphology is the result of constructive and erosive processes involving different time scales, volumes of material and rates of change. The volcanic emplacement phase probably lasted 25-30 million years and was likely responsible for most of the 2,730 km3 of material that presently form the seamount. Subsequently, marine abrasion and, possibly, subaerial erosion modulated by global sea level oscillations, levelled the formerly emerging seamount summit plateau, in particular its shallower (<400 m, flatter (<0.5° eastern half. Subsidence associated to the crustal cooling that followed the emplacement phase further contributed the current depth range of the seamount. The deeper and steeper (2.3° western half of Concepcion Bank may result from tectonic tilting normal to a NNE-SSW fracture line. This fracture may still be expressed on the seafloor surface at some scarps detected on the seamount's summit

  17. Morphometry of Concepcion Bank: Evidence of Geological and Biological Processes on a Large Volcanic Seamount of the Canary Islands Seamount Province.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Jesus; Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic; Hermida, Nuria; Amblas, David; Arrese, Beatriz; Martín-Sosa, Pablo; Acosta, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Concepcion Bank is the largest seamount in the Canary Islands Seamount Province (CISP), an oceanic area off NW Africa including 16 main seamounts, the Canaries archipelago and the Selvagens subarchipelago. The Bank is located 90 km northeast of Lanzarote Island and has been identified as a candidate Marine Protected Area (MPA) to be included in the Natura 2000 network. A compilation of complementary datasets consisting of multibeam bathymetry, TOPAS seismic reflection profiles, side scan sonar sonographs, Remotely Operated Vehicle video records and seafloor samples allowed describing in detail and ground truthing the submarine landforms and bioconstructions exhibited by the bank. The Concepcion Bank presently rises up to 2,433 m above the adjacent seafloor and exhibits two main domains: an extensive summit plateau and steep flanks. The sub-round summit plateau is 50km by 45 km and ranges from 158 to 1,485 m depth. The steep flanks that bound it descend to depths ranging between 1,700 and 2,500 m and define a seamount base that is 66km by 53 km. This morphology is the result of constructive and erosive processes involving different time scales, volumes of material and rates of change. The volcanic emplacement phase probably lasted 25-30 million years and was likely responsible for most of the 2,730 km3 of material that presently form the seamount. Subsequently, marine abrasion and, possibly, subaerial erosion modulated by global sea level oscillations, levelled the formerly emerging seamount summit plateau, in particular its shallower (<400 m), flatter (<0.5°) eastern half. Subsidence associated to the crustal cooling that followed the emplacement phase further contributed the current depth range of the seamount. The deeper and steeper (2.3°) western half of Concepcion Bank may result from tectonic tilting normal to a NNE-SSW fracture line. This fracture may still be expressed on the seafloor surface at some scarps detected on the seamount's summit. Sediment waves

  18. Benthic Macrofaunal Communities at Newly Explored Caribbean Seamounts in the Greater/Lesser Antilles Transition Zone and a Comparison to Nearby Habitats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demopoulos, A. W.; Bourque, J. R.; Cordes, E. E.; Chaytor, J. D.; Quattrini, A.

    2016-02-01

    Seamounts are topographically and oceanographically complex features with environmental characteristics, including substrate types, carbon flux, and current patterns, that vary greatly within and among seamounts. While seamounts are reputed to be oases and biodiversity hotspots, comparisons across multiple spatial scales of a seamount chain have yet to be explored. Along the margins of the Caribbean Sea basin, numerous seamounts punctuate the seafloor. In 2013 and 2014, we investigated the deep-sea benthic community ecology at Noroît, Dog, and Conrad Seamounts and nearby ridge, bank, and rift environments at depths ranging from 630 to 2930 m. Sediment push cores were collected to quantify macrofaunal (> 300 μm) density, diversity, community composition, grain size, and organic content. In addition, environmental data collected from CTDs and extracted from high resolution multibeam mapping efforts (e.g. slope, rugosity, roughness, slope orientation), allowed us to evaluate the role of microhabitats in structuring these communities. Preliminary results indicate that macrofaunal density across all sites decreased with depth in both seamount and non-seamount sediments, with the highest densities occurring in non-seamount environments. However, macrofaunal density patterns varied on individual seamounts. Macrofaunal densities on shallow seamounts (Conrad and Dog) increased with depth, whereas densities decreased with depth on the deeper Noroît seamount. The relationship between environmental parameters and macrofaunal community structure and biodiversity varied among seamounts and non-seamount environments. This study represents the first investigation of seamount infauna in the region and places this baseline information on seamount faunal biodiversity, spatial distribution of taxa, and overall ecology into a broader biogeographic context.

  19. Macrobiotic Communities of Vailulu'u Seamount, Samoan Archipelago

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C. M.; Lee, R. W.; Pile, A. J.; Hudson, I. R.; Brooke, S. D.; Ted, P.; Staudigel, H.; Hart, S.; Bailey, B. E.; Haucke, L.; Koppers, A.; Konter, J.; Templeton, A.; Tebo, B.

    2005-12-01

    Vailulu'u, the active seamount on the hotspot at the Eastern end of the Samoan volcanic chain, was the focus of two research cruises in April and June 2005 using the Pisces V submersible. Warm-water vents on the summit of a newly formed volcanic cone in the crater supported a low-diversity community dominated by thick microbial mats and the synaphobranchid eel Dysommina rugosa. Isotope and gut analyses indicated that the eels feed not on the mats but on planktonic crustaceans imported to the system from the overlying water column. The microbial mat exhibited isotopic signatures consistent with local chemosynthesis, but not methane-based chemosynthesis; Anutrition from microbes of vent origin, while those on the outside feed on oceanic plankton. The background megafauna of the outer flank was dominated by octocorals and hexactinellid sponges, with occasional asteroids, ophiuroids and crinoids. Most megafaunal organisms collected from the outer flanks were isotopically heavy, with isotope values similar to those of non-vent deep-sea animals. However, the octocoral Anthomastis collected from low-elevation breaches on the cauldera summit were intermediate in isotopic composition, indicating that they may consume particulate material derived from vent C and N.

  20. Ocean currents and acoustic backscatter data from shipboard ADCP measurements at three North Atlantic seamounts between 2004 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Christian; Denda, Anneke; Christiansen, Svenja; Kaufmann, Manfred; Peine, Florian; Springer, Barbara; Turnewitsch, Robert; Christiansen, Bernd

    2018-04-01

    Seamounts are amongst the most common physiographic structures of the deep-ocean landscape, but remoteness and geographic complexity have limited the systematic collection of integrated and multidisciplinary data in the past. Consequently, important aspects of seamount ecology and dynamics remain poorly studied. We present a data collection of ocean currents and raw acoustic backscatter from shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements during six cruises between 2004 and 2015 in the tropical and subtropical Northeast Atlantic to narrow this gap. Measurements were conducted at seamount locations between the island of Madeira and the Portuguese mainland (Ampère, Seine Seamount), as well as east of the Cape Verde archipelago (Senghor Seamount). The dataset includes two-minute ensemble averaged continuous velocity and backscatter profiles, supplemented by spatially gridded maps for each velocity component, error velocity and local bathymetry. The dataset is freely available from the digital data library PANGAEA at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.883193.

  1. Morphometry of Concepcion Bank: Evidence of Geological and Biological Processes on a Large Volcanic Seamount of the Canary Islands Seamount Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Miquel; Lastras, Galderic; Hermida, Nuria; Amblas, David; Arrese, Beatriz; Martín-Sosa, Pablo; Acosta, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Concepcion Bank is the largest seamount in the Canary Islands Seamount Province (CISP), an oceanic area off NW Africa including 16 main seamounts, the Canaries archipelago and the Selvagens subarchipelago. The Bank is located 90 km northeast of Lanzarote Island and has been identified as a candidate Marine Protected Area (MPA) to be included in the Natura 2000 network. A compilation of complementary datasets consisting of multibeam bathymetry, TOPAS seismic reflection profiles, side scan sonar sonographs, Remotely Operated Vehicle video records and seafloor samples allowed describing in detail and ground truthing the submarine landforms and bioconstructions exhibited by the bank. The Concepcion Bank presently rises up to 2,433 m above the adjacent seafloor and exhibits two main domains: an extensive summit plateau and steep flanks. The sub-round summit plateau is 50km by 45 km and ranges from 158 to 1,485 m depth. The steep flanks that bound it descend to depths ranging between 1,700 and 2,500 m and define a seamount base that is 66km by 53 km. This morphology is the result of constructive and erosive processes involving different time scales, volumes of material and rates of change. The volcanic emplacement phase probably lasted 25–30 million years and was likely responsible for most of the 2,730 km3 of material that presently form the seamount. Subsequently, marine abrasion and, possibly, subaerial erosion modulated by global sea level oscillations, levelled the formerly emerging seamount summit plateau, in particular its shallower (current depth range of the seamount. The deeper and steeper (2.3°) western half of Concepcion Bank may result from tectonic tilting normal to a NNE-SSW fracture line. This fracture may still be expressed on the seafloor surface at some scarps detected on the seamount’s summit. Sediment waves and cold-water coral (CWC) mounds on the bank summit plateau are the youngest features contributing to its final shaping, and may be

  2. Structural evolution of preexisting oceanic crust through intraplate igneous activities in the Marcus-Wake seamount chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Kentaro; Kodaira, Shuichi; Nishizawa, Azusa; Morishita, Taisei; Takahashi, Narumi

    2010-10-01

    Multichannel seismic reflection studies and seismic refraction surveys with ocean bottom seismographs in the Marcus-Wake seamount chain in the northwestern Pacific Ocean reveal P wave velocity structures of hot spot-origin seamounts and adjacent oceanic crust. Inside the seamounts are central high-velocity (>6.5 km/s) structures extending nearly to the top that may indicate intrusive cores. Thick sediment layers (up to 4 km) with P wave velocities of 4-5 km/s have accumulated on seafloor that predates seamount formation. Downward crustal thickening of up to 2 km was documented beneath a large seamount cluster, but thickening was not confirmed below a small seamount cluster. Volume ratios of an intrusive core to a seamount body are 15-20%, indicating that most of the supplied magma was consumed in forming the thick sedimentary and volcaniclastic layer constituting the seamount flanks. Underplating and downward crustal thickening may tend to occur when second or later intrusive cores are formed in a seamount. P wave velocities in the lowest crust and in the uppermost mantle below the seamount chain are 0.1-0.2 km/s higher and 0.3-0.5 km/s lower, respectively, than velocities below oceanic crust. We explain this difference as a result of sill-like intrusion of magma into the lower crust and uppermost mantle. Reflected waves observed at offsets >200 km are from mantle reflectors at depths of 30-45 km and 55-70 km. The shallower reflectors may indicate structures formed by intraplate igneous activities, and the deeper reflectors may correspond to the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary.

  3. Formation and evolution of the near axis 8˚20'N seamount chain: Evidences from the geophysical data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, V.; Gregg, P. M.; Zhan, Y.; Fornari, D. J.; Perfit, M. R.; Battaglia, M.

    2017-12-01

    The OASIS (Off-Axis Seamount Investigations at Siqueiros) expedition is a multidisciplinary effort to systematically investigate the 8˚20'N Seamount Chain to better understand the melting processes in the southern portion of the 9-10˚N segment of the East Pacific Rise (EPR). The 8˚20'N Seamount Chain extends 160 km west from its initiation, 15km northwest of the EPR-Siqueiros ridge transform intersection (RTI). To investigate the emplacement of the 8˚20'N Seamounts, shipboard EM-122 multibeam, BGM-3 gravity, and towed magnetometer data were collected using the R/V Atlantis in November 2016. Multibeam data show that the seamount chain is characterized by discrete seamounts in the distal portion of the chain, while east of 105˚20' W, the chain is a nearly-continuous volcanic ridge comprised of small cones and coalesced edifices. Free Air Anomalies are used to calculate isostatic anomalies along several profiles crossing the main edifices of the seamount chain, and indicate that the seamounts formed within 100 km of the EPR ridge axis. Excess crustal thickness variations of 0.5 to 1 km, derived from the Residual Mantle Bouguer Anomaly, suggest an increase in melt flux eastward along the chain. Consistently high emplacement volumes are observed east of -105 ˚20' W, 130 km from the ridge axis corresponding with lithosphere younger than 2 Myr. Inverted three-dimensional magnetization data indicate that the seamounts have recorded a series of magnetic reversals along the chain, which correlate to reversals recorded in the surrounding seafloor upon which the seamounts were built. However, reversals along the eastern portion of the chain appear skewed to the west indicating that seamount formation is likely long-lived. While the geophysical observations indicate that the overall seamount chain is age progressive, they suggest coeval volcanism in a region 15-100km from the EPR. The seamounts do not follow absolute plate motions, but are located consistently 15-20 km

  4. Heck and Heckle Seamounts, northeast Pacific Ocean: High extrusion rates of primitive and highly depleted mid-ocean ridge basalt on off-ridge seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leybourne, M. I.; van Wagoner, N. A.

    1991-09-01

    We analyzed, petrographically and chemically, basalt from eight dredge hauls from the Heck and Heckle seamounts, northeast Pacific Ocean. Major elements were determined for mineral, glass, and whole rock samples, and trace and rare earth elements were determined for glass and whole rock samples. The dredge hauls included hyaloclastites and fragments from sheet flows and pillows. The clinkery fragments are interpreted to be deformed sheet flow tops, characteristic of high effusion rates. The hyaloclastites recovered are reworked deposits, as indicated by the wide compositional range of the glass shards, abundance of clay and calcite matrix, and bedding. Most rocks are aphyric, but the analyzed plagioclase and olivine phenocrysts and microcrysts are equilibrium compositions and show minor compositional zonation (up to 7.5% An, chains have a limited range of incompatible element ratios, whereas the adjacent West Valley Segment of the Juan de Fuca Ridge is highly heterogeneous. In contrast, lavas from the East Pacific near-ridge seamounts exhibit a wider range of incompatible element ratios than do the adjacent East Pacific Rise basalts. On the West Valley Segment, magma supply is less robust associated with lower spreading rates compared to the East Pacific Rise at 10°N. In contrast, at fast spreading centers robust melting produces a mixed mantle signature in axial lavas, while suppressed melting at the seamounts reveals the heterogeneities. We suggest that at some spreading ridges, more fertile portions of the mantle are preferentially melted such that the outwelled portions of the mantle tapped by the seamounts are more depleted.

  5. 76 FR 8330 - Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; Modification to Advance Notification Period...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-14

    .... 101210611-1080-02] RIN 0648-BA58 Hawaii Bottomfish and Seamount Groundfish Fisheries; Modification to... State of Hawaii monitor progress towards the TAC based on commercial bottomfish landings data submitted..., NMFS, the State of Hawaii, and the Council meet to determine the specified date the TAC is projected to...

  6. Characteristics of the mesophotic megabenthic assemblages of the vercelli seamount (north tyrrhenian sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Bo

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The biodiversity of the megabenthic assemblages of the mesophotic zone of a Tyrrhenian seamount (Vercelli Seamount is described using Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV video imaging from 100 m depth to the top of the mount around 61 m depth. This pinnacle hosts a rich coralligenous community characterized by three different assemblages: (i the top shows a dense covering of the kelp Laminaria rodriguezii; (ii the southern side biocoenosis is mainly dominated by the octocorals Paramuricea clavata and Eunicella cavolinii; while (iii the northern side of the seamount assemblage is colonized by active filter-feeding organisms such as sponges (sometimes covering 100% of the surface with numerous colonies of the ascidian Diazona violacea, and the polychaete Sabella pavonina. This study highlights, also for a Mediterranean seamount, the potential role of an isolated rocky peak penetrating the euphotic zone, to work as an aggregating structure, hosting abundant benthic communities dominated by suspension feeders, whose distribution may vary in accordance to the geomorphology of the area and the different local hydrodynamic conditions.

  7. Influence of seamount topography on the local facies variation in ferromanganese deposits in the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mukhopadhyay, R.; Nath, B.N.

    surfaces, have lowest oxide/nucleus (O/N) ratios, and contain low values of Mn/Fe, Ni and Cu. In contrast, nodules from plains at the base of the seamount show greater abundance, are more spherical, have rougher surfaces, register high O/N ratios...

  8. Swath bathymetric investigation of the seamounts located in the Laxmi Basin, eastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhattacharya, G.C.; Murty, G.P.S.; Srinivas, K.; Chaubey, A.K.; Sudhakar, T.; Nair, R.R.

    Multibeam (hydrosweep) swath bathymetric investigations revealed the presence of a NNW trending linear seamount chain along the axial part of the Laxmi Basin in the eastern Arabian Sea, between 15~'N, 70~'15'E and 17~'20'N, 69~'E. This chain...

  9. Distribution and origin of seamounts in the central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, P.; Iyer, S.D.; Kodagali, V.N.; Krishna, K.S.

    Approximately 200 seamounts of different dimensions have been identified, from multibeam bathymetry maps of the Central Indian Ocean Basin (CIOB) (9 degrees S to 16 degrees S and 72 degrees E to 80 degrees E), of which 61% form eight chains...

  10. A new carnivorous sponge, Chondrocladia robertballardi sp. nov. (Porifera: Cladorhizidae) from two Northeast Atlantic seamounts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cristobo, J.; Rios, P.; Pomponi, S.A.; Xavier, J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Carnivorous sponges (Porifera: Cladorhizidae) are a particularly interesting group of species typically occurring in deep-sea habitats. In this study a new species, Chondrocladia (Chondrocladia) robertballardi sp. nov., is described from specimens collected on two large north-east Atlantic seamounts

  11. CRED Gridded Bathymetry of East Necker Seamount (100-023) in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — File 100-023b is a 60-m ASCII grid of depth data collected near E. Necker Seamount in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands as of May 2003. This grid has been produced...

  12. Collision-induced post-plateau volcanism: Evidence from a seamount on Ontong Java Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanyu, Takeshi; Tejada, Maria Luisa G.; Shimizu, Kenji; Ishizuka, Osamu; Fujii, Toshiyuki; Kimura, Jun-Ichi; Chang, Qing; Senda, Ryoko; Miyazaki, Takashi; Hirahara, Yuka; Vaglarov, Bogdan S.; Goto, Kosuke T.; Ishikawa, Akira

    2017-12-01

    Many seamounts on the Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) occur near the Stewart Arch, a topographic high that extends parallel to the North Solomon Trench along the southern margins of the plateau. Despite the thick sediment cover, several volcanic cones with strong acoustic reflection were discovered on the submarine flank of the Nuugurigia Seamount. From such volcanic cones, basalts were successfully sampled by dredging. Radiometric dating of basalts and ferromanganese encrustation indicate eruption age of 20-25 Ma, significantly younger than the 122 Ma main OJP plateau and post-plateau basalts. The age range coincides with the collision of the OJP with the Solomon Arc. The Nuugurigia basalts geochemically differ from any other rocks sampled on the OJP so far. They are alkali basalts with elevated Sr, low Zr and Hf, and Enriched Mantle-I (EMI)-like isotopic composition. Parental magmas of these alkali basalts may have formed by small-degree melting of peridotitic mantle impregnated with recycled pyroxenite material having enriched geochemical composition in the OJP's mantle root. We conclude that small-volume alkali basalts from the enriched mantle root migrated through faults or fractures caused by the collision along the Stewart Arch to form the seamount. Our results suggest that the collision of the OJP with the Solomon arc played an important role in the origin of similar post-plateau seamounts along the Stewart Arch.

  13. Subseafloor nitrogen redox processes at Loihi Seamount, Hawai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankel, S. D.; Sylvan, J. B.; LaRowe, D.; Huber, J. A.; Moyer, C. L.; Edwards, K. J.

    2014-12-01

    Loihi seamount is a mid-plate hotspot volcano located 30 kilometers off the southeast corner of the Big Island of Hawai'i. We measured temperature, concentrations of nitrate + nitrite (NOx), ammonium (NH4+), nitrite (NO2-) and dissolved silica (dSi), as well as the stable N and O isotopic composition of nitrate (δ15N and δ18O) in end-member hydrothermal fluids and microbial mats during three cruises in 2008, 2009 and 2013. We also sequenced 16S rRNA from archaea and bacteria from the same sites during 2006. NH4+ ranged ~0.71-7.5 μM, was positively correlated to dSi and negatively correlated to NOx. NO2- ranged from below detection to 0.49 μM and was not correlated to NOx, dSi or NH4+. In the microbial mats found at the Ula Nui site at 5000 m, NO2-, dSi and NH4+ all increase with depth in the mat, creating a vertical zonation of niches within these mounds. Measured δ15N and δ18O of nitrate suggest biological production and reduction of nitrate are both occurring. Analysis of δ15N-NH4+ is underway and will help constrain the relative magnitude of nitrification to NO2- and the potential for N-fixation. Using the measured concentrations of NOx, NO2- and NH4+ and other published data from Loihi, Gibbs energy calculations reveal that several catabolic strategies involving the reduction of NO3- and NO2- could provide energy to microbes in Loihi fluids. Thermodynamically feasible electron donors including HS-, CH4, Fe2+ and NH4+, and the amount of energy available, in units of Joules per kg H2O, varies by orders of magnitude from one sample site to the next. Pyrosequencing of the V6 region of bacterial and archaeal 16S rRNA from four sites at Loihi detected groups known to participate in denitrification, N-fixation and NO2- oxidation. Among these, the most abundant putative N-reducing microbes include Caldithrix, Epsilonproteobacteria, Thiohalophilus and members of the SAR324 clade. Putative N-fixers detected include members of the bacterial order Chlorobiales and

  14. Deepwater fish assemblages at Isla del Coco National Park and Las Gemelas Seamount, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Starr

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The deepwater faunas of oceanic islands and seamounts of the Eastern Tropical Pacific are poorly known. From 11-22 September 2009 we conducted an exploration of the deepwater areas of the Isla del Coco Marine Conservation Area, Costa Rica and a nearby seamount using a manned submersible. The goal of the exploration was to characterize the habitats and biota, and conduct quantitative surveys of the deepwater portions of Isla del Coco National Park and Las Gemelas Seamount, located about 50km southwest of Isla del Coco. We completed a total of 22 submersible dives, spanning more than 80hr underwater, and collected a total of 36hr of video. We surveyed habitats from 50-402m and observed more than 45 species of fishes, some of which have not yet been described and are likely new to science. The diversity of fish species in deep water at Isla del Coco National Park was lower than the diversity of fishes in shallow water, and eight species groups accounted for more than 95% of the total fish biomass. The combined density of all fish species was higher at Las Gemelas Seamount (253 fishes/100m² than at Isla del Coco National Park (138 fishes/100m². The combined density of fishes in habitats comprised primarily of bedrock or large boulders outcrops was more than three times as high at Las Gemelas Seamount as it was at Isla del Coco National Park. This discrepancy was caused by the extremely high concentration of Anthiinae fishes in rocky habitats at Las Gemelas Seamount. Densities of fishes in the other habitats were similar between the two sites. Similarly, when estimates of fish density were plotted by slope categories the density was much greater on steep slopes, which were usually comprised of rock habitats. Also, the density of fishes was greatest on high rugosity habitats. Results of these submersible surveys indicate that seamounts in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean may be an important source of biodiversity and that more quantitative surveys

  15. Swimming depth of migrating silver eels Anguilla japonica released at seamounts of the West Mariana Ridge, their estimated spawning sites

    OpenAIRE

    Aoyama, J.; Hissmann, Karen; Yoshinaga, T.; Sasai, S.; Uto, T.; Ueda, H.

    1999-01-01

    Five hormone-treated female Japanese silver eels Anguilla japonica were tagged with ultrasonic transmitters and released by submersible in the West Pacific at seamounts of the West Mariana Ridge, their supposed spawning grounds. Four eels were tracked for 60 to 423 min in the vicinity of the seamounts. They did not settle at the seamounts but swam at a mean speed of 0.37 m s-1 into open water above deep ground. Their mean swimming depth ranged from 81 to 172 m. Experiments suggest that pre-ma...

  16. Demersal fish assemblages on seamounts and other rugged features in the northeastern Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quattrini, Andrea M.; Demopoulos, Amanda W. J.; Singer, Randal; Roa-Varon, Adela; Chaytor, Jason D.

    2017-05-01

    Recent investigations of demersal fish communities in deepwater (>50 m) habitats have considerably increased our knowledge of the factors that influence the assemblage structure of fishes across mesophotic to deep-sea depths. While different habitat types influence deepwater fish distribution, whether different types of rugged seafloor features provide functionally equivalent habitat for fishes is poorly understood. In the northeastern Caribbean, different types of rugged features (e.g., seamounts, banks, canyons) punctuate insular margins, and thus create a remarkable setting in which to compare demersal fish communities across various features. Concurrently, several water masses are vertically layered in the water column, creating strong stratification layers corresponding to specific abiotic conditions. In this study, we examined differences among fish assemblages across different features (e.g., seamount, canyon, bank/ridge) and water masses at depths ranging from 98 to 4060 m in the northeastern Caribbean. We conducted 26 remotely operated vehicle dives across 18 sites, identifying 156 species of which 42% of had not been previously recorded from particular depths or localities in the region. While rarefaction curves indicated fewer species at seamounts than at other features in the NE Caribbean, assemblage structure was similar among the different types of features. Thus, similar to seamount studies in other regions, seamounts in the Anegada Passage do not harbor distinct communities from other types of rugged features. Species assemblages, however, differed among depths, with zonation generally corresponding to water mass boundaries in the region. High species turnover occurred at depths <1200 m, and may be driven by changes in water mass characteristics including temperature (4.8-24.4 °C) and dissolved oxygen (2.2-9.5 mg per l). Our study suggests the importance of water masses in influencing community structure of benthic fauna, while considerably adding

  17. Constraints from Seamounts on Pacific Plate or Plume Motion Prior to 80 Ma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konter, J. G.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Jackson, M. G.; Finlayson, V.; Konrad, K.

    2015-12-01

    The Hawaii-Emperor and Louisville hotspot tracks have long dominated the data set constraining absolute plate motion models. However, prior to ~80 Ma, multiple shorter, discontinuous hotspot trails and oceanic plateaus have been used to constrain absolute plate motion. Based on this earlier work, a clear Hawaii-Emperor style bend seems apparent around 100 Ma in the West Pacific Seamount Province (WPSP). More importantly, the ongoing debate on a plate versus plume motion origin for the Hawaii-Emperor Bend is applicable here, as the ~100 Ma bend may correspond to a global plate reorganization (Matthews et al., EPSL, 2012). Data for a comparison of bends comes from three groups with similar geographic patterns: 1) Mid-Pacific Mountains, Line Islands; 2) Shatsky Rise, Hess Rise, Musician and Wentworth Seamounts; and 3) Wake Seamounts, Marshall Islands, Magellan Seamounts. Both groups 1 and 2 feature a large igneous province (LIP) at their oldest end: Shatsky Rise and the Mid-Pacific Mountains. According to plate reconstructions these LIPs were constructed near all-ridge triple junctions, thus potential plume-ridge interactions need to be clarified before these LIPs can be used to define an absolute mantle reference frame. In contrast, the volcanoes of the third group (Wake, Marshall, Magellan) did erupt truly intra-plate and we therefore argue that this group provides a constraint on plate motion beyond 80 Ma that is independent of plume-ridge interactions. Since the volcanoes in this group are part of the WPSP, which is densely populated with seamounts, a combination of 40Ar/39Ar ages and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes is needed to distinguish different hotspot tracks in this region. Backtracking each volcano through its age to its original eruptive location and using compositional color-coding, reveals groupings and patterns that vary by plate motion model, while the temporal patterns of backtracked locations inform us about potential plume motions.

  18. Relationship between spatial distribution of chaetognaths and hydrographic conditions around seamounts and islands of the tropical southwestern Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Christiane S de; Luz, Joana A G; Mafalda, Paulo O

    2014-09-01

    Relationship between spatial distribution of chaetognaths and hydrographic conditions around seamounts and islands off Northeastern Brazil were analyzed from 133 oceanographic stations during the months of January - April of 1997 and April - July of 1998. Oblique zooplankton tows, using 50 cm diameter Bongo nets with 500µm mesh with a flowmeter to determine the filtered volume, were carried out to a maximum of 200m depth. The Superficial Equatorial Water, which had a salinity > 36 PSU and temperature > 20°C, occupied the top 80 to 200m depth. Below this water mass was the South Atlantic Central Water with salinity ranging from 34.5 to 36 PSU and temperature from 6 to 20°C. The community of chaetognaths showed six species: Pterosagitta draco, Flaccisagitta enflata, Flaccisagitta hexaptera, Pseudosagitta lyra, Serratosagitta serratodentata, and Sagitta helenae. Of these species, F. enflata was the most abundant (32.05% in 1997 and 42.18% in 1998) and the most frequent (87.88% in 1997 and 95% in 1998) during both periods. A mesopelagic specie was identified (P. lyra). This specie was more abundant in 1997 (3.42%), when the upwelling was more intense. P. lyra occurred in 22% of the samples during 1997. The abundance of F. enflata, an epiplanktonic species, increased, associated with greater water-column stability.

  19. Relationship between spatial distribution of chaetognaths and hydrographic conditions around seamounts and islands of the tropical southwestern Atlantic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHRISTIANE S. DE SOUZA

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Relationship between spatial distribution of chaetognaths and hydrographic conditions around seamounts and islands off Northeastern Brazil were analyzed from 133 oceanographic stations during the months of January – April of 1997 and April – July of 1998. Oblique zooplankton tows, using 50 cm diameter Bongo nets with 500µm mesh with a flowmeter to determine the filtered volume, were carried out to a maximum of 200m depth. The Superficial Equatorial Water, which had a salinity > 36 PSU and temperature > 20°C, occupied the top 80 to 200m depth. Below this water mass was the South Atlantic Central Water with salinity ranging from 34.5 to 36 PSU and temperature from 6 to 20°C. The community of chaetognaths showed six species: Pterosagitta draco, Flaccisagitta enflata, Flaccisagitta hexaptera, Pseudosagitta lyra, Serratosagitta serratodentata, and Sagitta helenae. Of these species, F. enflata was the most abundant (32.05% in 1997 and 42.18% in 1998 and the most frequent (87.88% in 1997 and 95% in 1998 during both periods. A mesopelagic specie was identified (P. lyra. This specie was more abundant in 1997 (3.42%, when the upwelling was more intense. P. lyra occurred in 22% of the samples during 1997. The abundance of F. enflata, an epiplanktonic species, increased, associated with greater water-column stability.

  20. Growth of alfonsino Beryx splendens Lowe 1834 in the South-West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age and growth of alfonsino Beryx splendens from South-West Indian Ocean seamounts were studied based on whole otolith readings. Ages of the fish under study ranged between one year and 14 years (15.5–43.5cm fork length). Age distribution was related to depth. The von Bertalanffy growth parameters for males were ...

  1. Exploration of Caribbean Seamounts within the Greater and Lesser Antilles Transition Zone: Characterization of the Benthic Ecology and Geology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Within the Caribbean region, numerous unexplored seamounts punctuate the seafloor holding records of geologic, biologic and oceanographic processes over different...

  2. Exploring Alaska's Seamounts on RV Atlantis in North Pacific Ocean and Gulf of Alaska between 20040730 and 20040823

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Five seamounts (Denson, Dickins, Pratt, Welker and Giacomini) in the Gulf of Alaska that had not previously been observed by manned submersible or ROV were...

  3. Palaeoceanographic conditions during the formation of ferromanganese crust from the Afanasiy Nikitin seamount, north central Indian Ocean: geochemical evidence

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.; Pattan, J.N.; Mudholkar, A.V.

    A ferromanganese crust dredged from the summit of the Afanasiy-Nikitin seamount in the composed of fresh-water phreatic calcite cement, Terebratulinae casts, rounded and ferruginised basalt clasts and weathered coralline algal fragments suggesting...

  4. Structure and evolution of the Afanasy Nikitin seamount, buried hills and 85 degrees E Ridge in the northeastern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.

    Geophysical data of the Afanasy Nikitin seamount (ANS), partly buried hills and 85 degrees E Ridge in the northeastern Indian Ocean were studied together with published seismic refraction results to understand genesis and evolution of the structures...

  5. Geochemistry of axial seamount lavas: Magmatic relationship between the Cobb Hotspot and the Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, J. M.; Morgan, C.; Liias, R. A.

    1990-08-01

    Axial Seamount, located along the central portion of the Juan de Fuca Ridge axis and at the eastern end of the Cobb-Eickelberg Seamount Chain, is the current center of the Cobb Hotspot. The Axial Seamount lavas are transitional between N-type and E-type mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), characteristics that they share with lavas along the rest of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. There are, however, subtle, but distinct, differences between the seamount lavas and those of the adjoining ridge segments. These include higher Na2O, CaO, and Sr at a given MgO content and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas as compared with the ridge lavas. Lava chemistry and bathymetry indicate that Axial Seamount is a discrete volcanic unit, with a more productive shallow magmatic plumbing system separate from the adjacent ridge segments. These high magma supply rates have sustained a continuously replenished, steady state magma reservoir that has erupted remarkably homogeneous lavas over a long time period. Despite this classic association of spreading center and hotspot volcanic activity, there is no evidence in the lavas for geochemical or isotopic enrichment typical of hotspot or mantle plume activity. The differences in composition between the Axial Seamount lavas and the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas are attributed to melting processes rather than to any fundamental differences in their mantle source compositions. The higher magma production rates, higher Sr, and lower silica saturation in the seamount lavas relative to the ridge lavas are thought to be a consequence of melt initiation at greater depths. The melting column producing the seamount lavas is thought to be initiated in the stability field of spinel peridotite, whereas the ridge lavas are produced from a melting column initiated at shallower levels, possibly within or close to the stability field of plagioclase peridotite. Implicit in this interpretation is the conclusion that the Juan de Fuca Ridge lavas, and by analogy most

  6. Resolving the Subsidence Anomaly of the East Tasman Plateau Using New Insights from the Cascade Seamount, Southwest Tasman Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorsanger, S. L.; Scher, H.; Johnson, S.; Mundana, R.; Sauermilch, I.; Duggan, B.; Whittaker, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Cascade Seamount is a wave-planated feature located on the microcontinent of the East Tasman Plateau (ETP). The minimum subsidence rate of the Seamount and the ETP can be estimated by dividing the present-day depth of the wave-cut surface (640 m) by the age of Cascade Seamount basalts as determined by potassium-argon (K-Ar) dating (33.4 and 36 Ma). This approach yields a subsidence rate of 18 m/Myr. However, significantly more rapid subsidence rates of the East Tasman Plateau (ETP) — upon which the Cascade Seamount rests — since the Eocene-Oligocene transition have been proposed utilizing a nearby sediment core, Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 1172. Late Eocene paleodepths determined by Stickley et al. (2004) using sedimentological and biostratigraphic techniques, indicate a subsidence rate of 85 m/Myr for the ETP. These two results present a paradox, which implies that the ETP subsided at a rate greater than the Seamount itself, over the same time interval. It also implies that the seamount formed above sea level. The subsidence ambiguity may be attributed to the presence of a turbidity current deposit in the sediment core, or uncertainty in the age and/or location of the K-Ar dated basalts of the Cascade Seamount. Statistical analysis of the published grain size measurements will be used to test for the presence of a turbidity current deposit in ODP Site 1172. We will also measure 87Sr/86Sr ratios of marine carbonate samples from conglomerates obtained from the Cascade Seamount during the August 2016 RV Investigator voyage (IN2016_E01) to confirm the age of the wave planated surfaces by Strontium Isotope Stratigraphy. This will allow for a more robust calculation for the subsidence of the ETP which was a critical barrier in the Tasmanian Gateway that allowed for the formation of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

  7. Megafaunal community structure of Andaman seamounts including the back-arc basin - A quantitative exploration from the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sautya, S.; Ingole, B.S.; Ray, D.; Stohr, S.; Samudrala, K.; KameshRaju, K.A.; Mudholkar, A.V.

    seamount fauna in the southwest Pacific. Nature 405: 944–947. 4. McClain C (2007) Seamounts: identity crisis or split personality? Journal of Biogeography 34: 2001–2008. 5. Clark MR, Rowden AA, Schlacher T, Williams A, Consalvey M, et al. (2010) The ecology.... 19. Pielou EC (1966) Species diversity and pattern diversity in the study of ecological succession. Journal of Theoretical Biology 10: 372–383. 20. Shannon CE, Weaver W (1963) The Mathematical Theory of Communication. Urbana, Illinois: University...

  8. RRS "Discovery" Cruise 282, 30 Jun - 01 Aug 2003. The environment and ecology of Seine and Sedlo Seamounts, NE Atlantic

    OpenAIRE

    Bett, B.J.

    2004-01-01

    The general aim of the cruise is to undertake a range of physical, chemical and biological investigations on and around Seine and Sedlo Seamounts. Specific objectives for the cruise included: a) the recovery of two current meter moorings from Seine Seamount (originally deployed from FS Poseidon in March 2004); b) to make underway observations of upper water column currents and zooplankton migrations (using ADCPs and 10 kHz echosounder); c) to assess water column hydrography, primary productio...

  9. Ocean currents and acoustic backscatter data from shipboard ADCP measurements at three North Atlantic seamounts between 2004 and 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Mohn, Christian; Denda, Anneke; Christiansen, Svenja; Kaufmann, Manfred; Peine, Florian; Springer, Barbara; Turnewitsch, Robert; Christiansen, Bernd

    2018-01-01

    Seamounts are amongst the most common physiographic structures of the deep-ocean landscape, but remoteness and geographic complexity have limited the systematic collection of integrated and multidisciplinary data in the past. Consequently, important aspects of seamount ecology and dynamics remain poorly studied. We present a data collection of ocean currents and raw acoustic backscatter from shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements during six cruises between 2004 and 20...

  10. Ocean currents and acoustic backscatter data from shipboard ADCP measurements at three North Atlantic seamounts between 2004 and 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mohn

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Seamounts are amongst the most common physiographic structures of the deep-ocean landscape, but remoteness and geographic complexity have limited the systematic collection of integrated and multidisciplinary data in the past. Consequently, important aspects of seamount ecology and dynamics remain poorly studied. We present a data collection of ocean currents and raw acoustic backscatter from shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP measurements during six cruises between 2004 and 2015 in the tropical and subtropical Northeast Atlantic to narrow this gap. Measurements were conducted at seamount locations between the island of Madeira and the Portuguese mainland (Ampère, Seine Seamount, as well as east of the Cape Verde archipelago (Senghor Seamount. The dataset includes two-minute ensemble averaged continuous velocity and backscatter profiles, supplemented by spatially gridded maps for each velocity component, error velocity and local bathymetry. The dataset is freely available from the digital data library PANGAEA at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.883193. Keywords: Seamounts, Northeast Atlantic, Shipboard ADCP, CODAS processing, DIVA gridding

  11. Bacterial Community Sstructure and Novel Species of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Sediments from a Seamount in the Mariana Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    PAN, H.; LIU, J.; Zhang, W.; Xiao, T.; Wu, L. F.

    2017-12-01

    Seamounts are unique ecosystems where undersea mountains rise abruptly from the sea floor and interact dynamically with underwater currents, creating peculiar biological habitats with various microbial community structures. Certain bacteria associated with seamounts form conspicuous extracellular iron oxide structures, including encrusted stalks, flattened bifurcating tubes, and filamentous sheaths. To extend knowledge of seamount microorganisms we performed a systematic analysis of the population composition and occurrence of live magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) in sediments of a seamount in the Mariana volcanic arc. Proteobacteria dominated at 13 stations, and were the second in abundance to members of the Firmicutes at a deep station on a steep slope facing the Yap-Mariana trench. We found MTB that synthesize intracellular iron-oxide nanocrystals in biogenic sediments at all 14 stations, at seawater depths ranging from 238 to 2023 m. A novel flagellar apparatus, and the most complex yet reported, was observed in magnetotactic cocci; it comprises one or two bundles of 19 flagella arranged in a 3:4:5:4:3 array. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences identified 16 novel species of MTB specific to this seamount. The geographic properties at the various stations on the seamount appear to be important in shaping the microbial community structure.

  12. New 40Ar/39Ar age and geochemical data from seamounts in the Canary and Madeira volcanic provinces: support for the mantle plume hypothesis

    OpenAIRE

    Geldmacher, Jörg; Hoernle, Kaj; van den Bogaard, Paul; Duggen, Svend; Werner, Reinhard

    2005-01-01

    The role of mantleplumes in the formation of intraplate volcanic islands and seamount chains is being increasingly questioned. Particular examples are the abundant and somewhat irregularly distributed island and seamount volcanoes off the coast of northwest Africa. New40Ar / 39Ar ages and Sr–Nd–Pb isotope geochemistry of volcanic rocks from seamounts northeast of the Madeira Islands (Seine and Unicorn) and northeast of the Canary Islands (Dacia and Anika), however, provide support for the plu...

  13. Chinstrap penguin foraging area associated with a seamount in Bransfield Strait, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubun, Nobuo; Lee, Won Young; Kim, Jeong-Hoon; Takahashi, Akinori

    2015-12-01

    Identifying marine features that support high foraging performance of predators is useful to determine areas of ecological importance. This study aimed to identify marine features that are important for foraging of chinstrap penguins (Pygoscelis antarcticus), an abundant upper-trophic level predator in the Antarctic Peninsula region. We investigated the foraging locations of penguins breeding on King George Island using GPS-depth loggers. Tracking data from 18 birds (4232 dives), 11 birds (2095 dives), and 19 birds (3947 dives) were obtained in 2007, 2010, and 2015, respectively. In all three years, penguins frequently visited an area near a seamount (Orca Seamount) in Bransfield Strait. The percentage of dives (27.8% in 2007, 36.1% in 2010, and 19.1% in 2015) and depth wiggles (27.1% in 2007, 37.2% in 2010, and 22.3% in 2015) performed in this area was higher than that expected from the size of the area and distance from the colony (8.4% for 2007, 14.7% for 2010, and 6.3% for 2015). Stomach content analysis showed that the penguins fed mainly on Antarctic krill. These results suggest that the seamount provided a favorable foraging area for breeding chinstrap penguins, with high availability of Antarctic krill, possibly related to local upwelling.

  14. Variability of zooplankton communities at Condor seamount and surrounding areas, Azores (NE Atlantic)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Vanda; Santos, Mariana; Menezes, Gui M.; Loureiro, Clara M.; Lambardi, Paolo; Martins, Ana

    2013-12-01

    Seamounts are common topographic features around the Azores archipelago (NE Atlantic). Recently there has been increasing research effort devoted to the ecology of these ecosystems. In the Azores, the mesozooplankon is poorly studied, particularly in relation to these seafloor elevations. In this study, zooplankton communities in the Condor seamount area (Azores) were investigated during March, July and September 2010. Samples were taken during both day and night with a Bongo net of 200 µm mesh that towed obliquely within the first 100 m of the water column. Total abundance, biomass and chlorophyll a concentrations did not vary with sampling site or within the diel cycle but significant seasonal variation was observed. Moreover, zooplankton community composition showed the same strong seasonal pattern regardless of spatial or daily variability. Despite seasonal differences, the zooplankton community structure remained similar for the duration of this study. Seasonal variability better explained our results than mesoscale spatial variability. Spatial homogeneity is probably related with island proximity and local dynamics over Condor seamount. Zooplankton literature for the region is sparse, therefore a short review of the most important zooplankton studies from the Azores is also presented.

  15. Constraints on Past Plate and Mantle Motion from New Ages for the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, J. M.; Steinberger, B. M.; Regelous, M.; Koppers, A. A.; Wijbrans, J. R.; Haase, K. M.; Stoffers, P.; Jokat, W.; Garbe-Schoenberg, C.

    2013-12-01

    Estimates of the relative motion between the Hawaiian and Louisville hotspots have consequences for understanding the role and character of deep Pacific-mantle return flow. The relative motion between these primary hotspots can be inferred by comparing the age records for their seamount trails. Our new 40Ar/39Ar ages for 18 lavas from 10 seamounts along the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain (HESC) show that volcanism started in the sharp portion of the Hawaiian-Emperor Bend (HEB) at ≥47.5 Ma and continued for ≥5 Myr (O'Connor et al., 2013). The slope of the along-track distance from the currently active Hawaiian hotspot plotted versus age is remarkably linear between ~57 and 25 Ma in the central ˜1900 km of the seamount chain, including the HEB. This model predicts an age for the oldest Emperor Seamounts that matches published ages, implying that a linear age-distance relationship might extend back to at least 82 Ma. In contrast, Hawaiian age progression was much faster since at least ~15 Ma and possibly as early as ~27 Ma. Linear age-distance relations for the Hawaii-Emperor and Louisville seamount chains predict ~300 km overall hotspot relative motion between 80 and 47.5 Ma, in broad agreement with numerical models of plumes in a convecting mantle, and paleomagnetic data. We show that a change in hotspot relative motion may also have occurred between ~55 Ma and ~50 Ma. We interpret this change in hotspot motion as evidence that the HEB reflects a combination of hotspot and plate motion changes driven by the same plate/mantle reorganization. O'Connor et al. (2013), Constraints on past plate and mantle motion from new ages for the Hawaiian-Emperor Seamount Chain. Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., in press.

  16. Oceanographic data collected during the Davidson Seamount 2002 expedition on the RV Western Flyer, in the North Pacific Ocean, southwest of Monterey, California from May 17, 2002 - May 24, 2002 (NODC Accession 0072306)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This spring, scientists explored the first "undersea island" to be called a seamount. Davidson seamount, located 120 km Southwest of Monterey, California, is one of...

  17. Characterization of deepwater invertebrates at Isla del Coco National Park and Las Gemelas Seamount, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Starr

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The deepwater faunas of oceanic islands and seamounts of the Eastern Tropical Pacific are poorly known. From 11-22 September 2009, we conducted an exploration of the deepwater areas around Isla del Coco National Park and Las Gemelas Seamount, located about 50km southwest of Isla del Coco, Costa Rica using a manned submersible to survey the seafloor habitats. The goal of the exploration was to characterize the habitats and biota, and conduct quantitative surveys of the deepwater portions of Isla del Coco National Park and Las Gemelas. We completed a total of 22 successful submersible dives, spanning more than 80hr underwater, and collected a total of 36hr of video. With respect to invertebrates, our objectives were to gather quantitative information on species composition, density, distribution and habitat associations as well as to compare the invertebrate communities between the two sites. A total of 7 172 invertebrates were counted from analysis of the video collected on this project. Larger organisms were counted and placed into 27 taxonomic groups to characterize the deepwater invertebrate fauna of Las Gemelas Seamount and Isla del Coco National Park. The Shannon-Weiner Index for biodiversity (H’ was calculated to be 0.14 ± 0.02 for Isla del Coco and 0.07 ± 0.03 for Las Gemelas surveys. Although richness was fairly equal between the two sites, evenness was greater at Isla del Coco (J = 0.04 ± 0.006 when compared to Las Gemelas (J = 0.02 ± 0.01. This lower level of evenness in the community at Las Gemelas was a result of high densities of a few dominant species groups, specifically sea urchins and black corals. We also evaluated invertebrate percent cover at both Isla del Coco and Las Gemelas Seamount with respect to habitat type, slope and rugosity. Results indicated that highly rugose habitats contained the highest frequencies of all invertebrates at both sites, with the exception of glass sponges and polychaetes at Isla del Coco

  18. Geochemical and iron isotopic insights into hydrothermal iron oxyhydroxide deposit formation at Loihi Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouxel, Olivier; Toner, Brandy; Germain, Yoan; Glazer, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Low-temperature hydrothermal vents, such as those encountered at Loihi Seamount, harbor abundant microbial communities and provide ideal systems to test hypotheses on biotic versus abiotic formation of hydrous ferric oxide (FeOx) deposits at the seafloor. Hydrothermal activity at Loihi Seamount produces abundant microbial mats associated with rust-colored FeOx deposits and variably encrusted with Mn-oxyhydroxides. Here, we applied Fe isotope systematics together with major and trace element geochemistry to study the formation mechanisms and preservation of such mineralized microbial mats. Iron isotope composition of warm (oxidation of Fe(II) during mixing of the hydrothermal fluid with seawater. By comparing the results with experimentally determined Fe isotope fractionation factors, we determined that less than 20% of Fe(II) is oxidized within active microbial mats, although this number may reach 80% in aged or less active deposits. These results are consistent with Fe(II) oxidation mediated by microbial processes considering the expected slow kinetics of abiotic Fe oxidation in low oxygen bottom water at Loihi Seamount. In contrast, FeOx deposits recovered at extinct sites have distinctly negative Fe-isotope values down to -1.77‰ together with significant enrichment in Mn and occurrence of negative Ce anomalies. These results are best explained by the near-complete oxidation of an isotopically light Fe(II) source produced during the waning stage of hydrothermal activity under more oxidizing conditions. Light Fe isotope values of FeOx are therefore generated by subsurface precipitation of isotopically heavy Fe-oxides rather than by the activity of dissimilatory Fe reduction in the subsurface. Overall, Fe-isotope compositions of microbial mats at Loihi Seamount display a remarkable range between -1.2‰ and +1.6‰ which indicate that Fe isotope compositions of hydrothermal Fe-oxide precipitates are particularly sensitive to local environmental conditions where

  19. Categorizing vitric lithofacies on seamounts: implications for recognizing deep-marine pyroclastic deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portner, R. A.; Clague, D. A.

    2011-12-01

    Glassy fragmental deposits commonly found capping seamounts have been variably interpreted as the products of quench-fragmentation (hyaloclastite), suppressed steam expansion, and/or explosive fire-fountains (pyroclastite). To better understand these vitriclastic deposits we use a multidisciplinary approach that outlines six lithofacies based on textures, sedimentary structures, geochemical diversity, and associations with seamount landforms. All seamounts studied yield MORB compositions and formed on or near mid-ocean ridge axes of the northeast Pacific Ocean. Consolidated deposits were sampled from the Taney (~29 Ma), President Jackson (~3 Ma), and Vance (~2 Ma) seamounts using ROV manipulator arms and dredge hauls. Unconsolidated deposits from the currently active Axial Seamount of the Juan de Fuca Ridge were sampled using ROV push core and vacuum techniques. Lithofacies occur with talus breccias and pillow basalt on steeply dipping outer flanks and caldera walls, and with pillow and sheet flows on subhorizontal rims and nested caldera floors of the seamounts. Vitric lithofacies within or near steeply dipping regions have very angular textures, coarse grain-sizes and abundant crystalline basalt fragments. Jig-saw fit texture is common in units with monomict geochemistry and closely associated with adjacent pillow basalt, suggesting in-situ fragmentation akin to pillow breccia. Similar units bearing polymodal geochemistry are generally associated with talus breccias along caldera walls and basal slopes, and are interpreted as fault-scarp derived debrites. Laterally these lithofacies abruptly grade into bottom-current reworked lithofacies on flat caldera floors. Reworked lithofacies have >40% muddy matrix with abundant angular mineral fragments, biogenic grains and minor devitrified glass shards. They typically exhibit well-defined planar lamination and locally show sinusoidal ripple forms. Horizontal burrows including Planolites are common. Locally this

  20. Deepwater fish assemblages at Isla del Coco National Park and Las Gemelas Seamount, Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Starr

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The deepwater faunas of oceanic islands and seamounts of the Eastern Tropical Pacific are poorly known. From 11-22 September 2009 we conducted an exploration of the deepwater areas of the Isla del Coco Marine Conservation Area, Costa Rica and a nearby seamount using a manned submersible. The goal of the exploration was to characterize the habitats and biota, and conduct quantitative surveys of the deepwater portions of Isla del Coco National Park and Las Gemelas Seamount, located about 50km southwest of Isla del Coco. We completed a total of 22 submersible dives, spanning more than 80hr underwater, and collected a total of 36hr of video. We surveyed habitats from 50-402m and observed more than 45 species of fishes, some of which have not yet been described and are likely new to science. The diversity of fish species in deep water at Isla del Coco National Park was lower than the diversity of fishes in shallow water, and eight species groups accounted for more than 95% of the total fish biomass. The combined density of all fish species was higher at Las Gemelas Seamount (253 fishes/100m² than at Isla del Coco National Park (138 fishes/100m². The combined density of fishes in habitats comprised primarily of bedrock or large boulders outcrops was more than three times as high at Las Gemelas Seamount as it was at Isla del Coco National Park. This discrepancy was caused by the extremely high concentration of Anthiinae fishes in rocky habitats at Las Gemelas Seamount. Densities of fishes in the other habitats were similar between the two sites. Similarly, when estimates of fish density were plotted by slope categories the density was much greater on steep slopes, which were usually comprised of rock habitats. Also, the density of fishes was greatest on high rugosity habitats. Results of these submersible surveys indicate that seamounts in the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean may be an important source of biodiversity and that more quantitative surveys

  1. Progressive enrichment of arc magmas caused by the subduction of seamounts under Nishinoshima volcano, Izu-Bonin Arc, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Takashi; Shirao, Motomaro; Tani, Kenichiro; Tsutsumi, Yukiyasu; Kiyokawa, Shoichi; Fujii, Toshitsugu

    2016-06-01

    The chemical composition of intraplate seamounts is distinct from normal seafloor material, meaning that the subduction of seamounts at a convergent margin can cause a change in the chemistry of the mantle wedge and associated arc magmas. Nishinoshima, a volcanic island in the Izu-Bonin Arc of Japan, has been erupting continuously over the past 2 years, providing an ideal opportunity to examine the effect of seamount subduction on the chemistry of arc magmas. Our research is based on the whole-rock geochemistry and the chemistry of minerals within lavas and air-fall scoria from Nishinoshima that were erupted before 1702, in 1973-1974, and in 2014. The mineral phases within the analyzed samples crystallized under hydrous conditions (H2O = 3-4 wt.%) at temperatures of 970 °C-990 °C in a shallow (3-6 km depth) magma chamber. Trace element data indicate that the recently erupted Nishinoshima volcanics are much less depleted in the high field strength elements (Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf) than other volcanics within the Izu-Bonin Arc. In addition, the level of enrichment in the Nishinoshima magmas has increased in recent years, probably due to the addition of material from HIMU-enriched (i.e., high Nb/Zr and Ta/Hf) seamounts on the Pacific Plate, which is being subducted westwards beneath the Philippine Sea Plate. This suggests that the chemistry of scoria from Nishinoshima volcano records the progressive addition of components derived from subducted seamounts.

  2. Relationship between viral and prokaryotic abundance on the Bajo O’Higgins 1 Seamount (Humboldt Current System off Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar E. Chiang

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available There is little known about the ecology of microbial communities living in the water column over seamounts. Here, for the first time, the spatial distribution and abundance of virus-like particles (VLP are described over a seamount. The association between VLP distribution, prokaryotic abundance, and environmental variables is also analyzed. Sampling was conducted in December 2004 on the Bajo O’Higgins 1 seamount (32°54’S, 73°53’W located in the Humboldt Current System off Chile. A oxygen minimum layer (OMZ was clearly present between 130 and 280 m in the water column over the seamount. Water samples were taken with Niskin bottles at 10 oceanographic stations over the seamount at depths of 5, 20, 50, 75, 100, and 150 m and at the benthic boundary layer (BBL; 5-12 m over the sediments. Temperature, salinity, oxygen, chlorophyll , and phaeopigments were measured at each station. Viral and prokaryotic abundances were determined with fluorochrome SYBR Green I. Viral abundance ranged from 1.53 x 109 VLP L-1 - 16.48 x 109 VLP L-1, whereas prokaryotic abundance ranged from 1.78 x 10 8 cell L-1 - 14.91 x 108 cell L-1. The virus-like particle/prokaryote ratio varied widely among the analyzed layers (i.e. surface, OMZ, and BBL, probably due to the presence of different prokaryotic and viral assemblages in each layer. Our results indicate that the environmental conditions, mainly the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the water column over Bajo O’Higgins 1 seamount, shape the association between viral and prokaryotic abundance.

  3. Residency and spatial use by reef sharks of an isolated seamount and its implications for conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Adam; Abrantes, Kátya G; Seymour, Jamie; Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Although marine protected areas (MPAs) are a common conservation strategy, these areas are often designed with little prior knowledge of the spatial behaviour of the species they are designed to protect. Currently, the Coral Sea area and its seamounts (north-east Australia) are under review to determine if MPAs are warranted. The protection of sharks at these seamounts should be an integral component of conservation plans. Therefore, knowledge on the spatial ecology of sharks at the Coral Sea seamounts is essential for the appropriate implementation of management and conservation plans. Acoustic telemetry was used to determine residency, site fidelity and spatial use of three shark species at Osprey Reef: whitetip reef sharks Triaenodon obesus, grey reef sharks Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos and silvertip sharks Carcharhinus albimarginatus. Most individuals showed year round residency at Osprey Reef, although five of the 49 individuals tagged moved to the neighbouring Shark Reef (~14 km away) and one grey reef shark completed a round trip of ~250 km to the Great Barrier Reef. Additionally, individuals of white tip and grey reef sharks showed strong site fidelity to the areas they were tagged, and there was low spatial overlap between groups of sharks tagged at different locations. Spatial use at Osprey Reef by adult sharks is generally restricted to the north-west corner. The high residency and limited spatial use of Osprey Reef suggests that reef sharks would be highly vulnerable to targeted fishing pressure and that MPAs incorporating no-take of sharks would be effective in protecting reef shark populations at Osprey and Shark Reef.

  4. Linking environmental forcing and trophic supply to benthic communities in the Vercelli Seamount area (Tyrrhenian Sea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabella Covazzi Harriague

    Full Text Available Seamounts and their influence on the surrounding environment are currently being extensively debated but, surprisingly, scant information is available for the Mediterranean area. Furthermore, although the deep Tyrrhenian Sea is characterised by a complex bottom morphology and peculiar hydrodynamic features, which would suggest a variable influence on the benthic domain, few studies have been carried out there, especially for soft-bottom macrofaunal assemblages. In order to fill this gap, the structure of the meio-and macrofaunal assemblages of the Vercelli Seamount and the surrounding deep area (northern Tyrrhenian Sea - western Mediterranean were studied in relation to environmental features. Sediment was collected with a box-corer from the seamount summit and flanks and at two far-field sites in spring 2009, in order to analyse the metazoan communities, the sediment texture and the sedimentary organic matter. At the summit station, the heterogeneity of the habitat, the shallowness of the site and the higher trophic supply (water column phytopigments and macroalgal detritus, for instance supported a very rich macrofaunal community, with high abundance, biomass and diversity. In fact, its trophic features resembled those observed in coastal environments next to seagrass meadows. At the flank and far-field stations, sediment heterogeneity and depth especially influenced the meiofaunal distribution. From a trophic point of view, the low content of the valuable sedimentary proteins that was found confirmed the general oligotrophy of the Tyrrhenian Sea, and exerted a limiting influence on the abundance and biomass of the assemblages. In this scenario, the rather refractory sedimentary carbohydrates became a food source for metazoans, which increased their abundance and biomass at the stations where the hydrolytic-enzyme-mediated turnover of carbohydrates was faster, highlighting high lability.

  5. Residency and spatial use by reef sharks of an isolated seamount and its implications for conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Barnett

    Full Text Available Although marine protected areas (MPAs are a common conservation strategy, these areas are often designed with little prior knowledge of the spatial behaviour of the species they are designed to protect. Currently, the Coral Sea area and its seamounts (north-east Australia are under review to determine if MPAs are warranted. The protection of sharks at these seamounts should be an integral component of conservation plans. Therefore, knowledge on the spatial ecology of sharks at the Coral Sea seamounts is essential for the appropriate implementation of management and conservation plans. Acoustic telemetry was used to determine residency, site fidelity and spatial use of three shark species at Osprey Reef: whitetip reef sharks Triaenodon obesus, grey reef sharks Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos and silvertip sharks Carcharhinus albimarginatus. Most individuals showed year round residency at Osprey Reef, although five of the 49 individuals tagged moved to the neighbouring Shark Reef (~14 km away and one grey reef shark completed a round trip of ~250 km to the Great Barrier Reef. Additionally, individuals of white tip and grey reef sharks showed strong site fidelity to the areas they were tagged, and there was low spatial overlap between groups of sharks tagged at different locations. Spatial use at Osprey Reef by adult sharks is generally restricted to the north-west corner. The high residency and limited spatial use of Osprey Reef suggests that reef sharks would be highly vulnerable to targeted fishing pressure and that MPAs incorporating no-take of sharks would be effective in protecting reef shark populations at Osprey and Shark Reef.

  6. Residency and Spatial Use by Reef Sharks of an Isolated Seamount and Its Implications for Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Adam; Abrantes, Kátya G.; Seymour, Jamie; Fitzpatrick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Although marine protected areas (MPAs) are a common conservation strategy, these areas are often designed with little prior knowledge of the spatial behaviour of the species they are designed to protect. Currently, the Coral Sea area and its seamounts (north-east Australia) are under review to determine if MPAs are warranted. The protection of sharks at these seamounts should be an integral component of conservation plans. Therefore, knowledge on the spatial ecology of sharks at the Coral Sea seamounts is essential for the appropriate implementation of management and conservation plans. Acoustic telemetry was used to determine residency, site fidelity and spatial use of three shark species at Osprey Reef: whitetip reef sharks Triaenodon obesus, grey reef sharks Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos and silvertip sharks Carcharhinus albimarginatus. Most individuals showed year round residency at Osprey Reef, although five of the 49 individuals tagged moved to the neighbouring Shark Reef (∼14 km away) and one grey reef shark completed a round trip of ∼250 km to the Great Barrier Reef. Additionally, individuals of white tip and grey reef sharks showed strong site fidelity to the areas they were tagged, and there was low spatial overlap between groups of sharks tagged at different locations. Spatial use at Osprey Reef by adult sharks is generally restricted to the north-west corner. The high residency and limited spatial use of Osprey Reef suggests that reef sharks would be highly vulnerable to targeted fishing pressure and that MPAs incorporating no-take of sharks would be effective in protecting reef shark populations at Osprey and Shark Reef. PMID:22615782

  7. Pito Seamount revisited: the discovery and mapping of new black smoker vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheadle, M. J.; John, B. E.; German, C. R.; Gee, J. S.; Coogan, L. A.; Gillis, K. M.; Swapp, S.

    2017-12-01

    In February 2017, the RV Atlantis PMaG (PaleoMagnetism and Gabbro) cruise re-visited a black smoker site originally discovered 24 years ago on Pito Seamount, by the submersible Nautile during the French Pito expedition (1993). Pito Seamount (111.639oW, 23.333oS) marks the northern tip of the propagating East Pacific Rise, bounding the east side of the Easter Microplate. There the seafloor rises to 2250mbsl and has a 900m wide, 50m deep axial valley, which hosts at least two separate fields of active hydrothermal vents. AUV Sentry mapping of the summit of Pito seamount (0.5-1m resolution) highlights over 50 active and inactive chimneys amid recent basaltic sheet flows, pillow mounds and ponded lava. The vents occur in two fields/sub-fields; the first covers an area of 800 x 200m, and lies parallel to the ridge axis, along incipient faults forming on the northeastern flank of the axial valley. The second field occurs in a 250m diameter area in the centre of the axial valley. Jason II dive 961 visited, sampled, measured vent orifice temperatures, and acquired 4k video of the chimneys, and re-discovered the active (Magnificent Village) vent first found by Nautile, in the now named Nautile vent field, together with five additional active hydrothermal vents (Jason, Medea, Sentry, Abe and Scotty's Castle). The Magnificent Village, the largest active vent, is 25m tall and has multiple active spires in three main groups surrounding a hollow amphitheater. Measured vent orifice temperatures ranged from 338oC (Magnificent Village) to 370oC (Jason). The vents host a fauna of alvinellid worms, bythograidid crabs, alvincardid shrimps, phymorhynchus gastropods, Corallimorphid anenomes and bathymodiolid mussels, but no vestimentiferan worms. Brisingid brittle stars colonize inactive chimneys.

  8. Chemical composition of hydrothermal ores from Mid-Okinawa trough and Suiyo Seamount determined by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Takuroh; Taira, Naoto; Oomori, Tamotsu; Taira, Hatsuo; Tanahara, Akira; Takada, Jitsuya

    2007-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis of 13 hydrothermal ore samples (70 subsamples) collected from the Mid-Okinawa Trough and Suiyo Seamount revealed higher contents of precious metal such as Au and Ag, and those of As, Sb, Ga, and Hg than those from mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Mid-Okinawa Trough samples were richer in Ag and Sb than those from the Suiyo Seamount. The geochemical differences among these hydrothermal ore deposits are regarded as reflecting both differences in the chemical composition of the hosted magma of hydrothermal system and the abundance of sediments that is reacted with hydrothermal fluids. (author)

  9. Two major Cenozoic episodes of phosphogenesis recorded in equatorial Pacific seamount deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, J.R.; Hsueh-Wen, Yeh; Gunn, S.H.; Sliter, W.V.; Benninger, L.M.; Chung-Ho, Wang

    1993-01-01

    The phosphorites occur in a wide variety of forms, but most commonly carbonate fluorapatite (CFA) replaced middle Eocene and older carbonate sediment in a deep water environment (>1000 m). Element ratios distinguish seamount phosphorites from continental margin, plateau, and insular phosphorites. Uranium and thorium contents are low and total rare earch element (REE) contents are generally high. The paleoceanographic conditions initiated and sustained development of phosphorite by accumulation of dissolved phosphorus in the deep sea during relatively stable climatic conditions when oceanic circulation was sluggish. Fluctuations in climate, sealevel, and upwelling that accompanied the climate transitions may have driven cycles of enrichment and depletion of the deep-sea phosphorus reservoir. -from Authors

  10. Impact of Intrathermocline eddies on seamount and oceanic island off Central Chile: Observation and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormazabal, Samuel; Morales, Carmen; Cornejo, Marcela; Bento, Joaquim; Valencia, Luis; Auger, Pierre; Rodriguez, Angel; Correa, Marco; Anabalón, Valeria; Silva, Nelson

    2016-04-01

    In the Southeast Pacific, oceanographic processes that sustain the biological production necessary to maintain the ecosystems associated to seamounts and oceanic islands are still poorly understood. Recent studies suggest that the interaction of mesoscale and submesoescale eddies with oceanic islands and seamounts could be playing an important role in the time-space variability of primary production. In this work, research cruises, satellite data and Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) results have been used to describe the main characteristics of intrathermocline eddies (ITE) and their impact on the Juan Fernández archipelago (JFA), off central Chile. The JFA is located off the coast of central Chile (33°S), and is composed of three main islands: Robinson Crusoe (RC), Alejandro Selkirk (AS) and Santa Clara (SC). Between the RC and AS are located the westernmost seamounts (JF6 and JF5) of the Juan Fernández archipelago. Satellite altimetry data (sea surface height from AVISO) were used to detect and track mesoscale eddies through eddy-tracking algorithm. Physical, chemical and biological parameters as temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen and fluorescence were measured in the water column at JF5 and JF6, and along the coast off central Chile (30-40°S). Results from the research cruise exhibit the interaction between an ITE and the seamount JF6. Eddy-tracking results showed that the ITE observed at the JF6 was formed at the coast off central-southern Chile, traveled ~900 km seaward and after ~9 months reached the JF5 and JF6 region. Observations along the Chilean coast confirmed that the coast corresponds to the formation area of the observed ITE. In this region, ITEs are represented by subsurface lenses (~100 km diameter; 400 m thickness) of homogeneous salinity, nutrient rich and oxygen-poor equatorial subsurface water mass (ESSW) which is transported poleward by the Peru-Chile undercurrent in the coastal band and seaward by ITEs. The effect of ITEs on the

  11. Geophysical investigations of the Southeast Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy): high resolution DTM of the Marsili seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milano, G.; Passaro, S.; Marsella, E.

    2009-04-01

    The Tyrrhenian Sea is the small extensional back-arc basin in the Central Mediterranean Sea characterized by a peculiar volcanic activity due to the presence of two sub-basin: Vavilov and Marsili. The central sector of the Marsili sub-basin, younger than the Valilov, is occupied by the Marsili Volcano. On November 2007, a geophysical survey was carried out by IAMC-CNR research institute (Naples, Italy) in the southeastern Tyrrhenian Sea within the "Aeolian_2007" cruise onboard the Urania oceanographic vessel. During the second Leg of the survey, detailed multibeam data acquisition was carried out in order to obtain high resolution DTM of the major Seamounts of the southeast Tyrrhenian Sea. Here, we report a new, very high resolution Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of the summit area of the Marsili Seamount. Multibeam data acquisition was carried out with the use of the Reson Seabat 8160 multibeam sonar system, which properly works in the 50-3500 m depth range. The system, interfaced with a Differential Global Positioning System, is mounted on keel of the R/V Urania and is composed of a ping source of 50 KHz, 150° degree for the whole opening of the transmitted pulse and a 126 beams-receiver. The whole dataset has been processed with the use of the PDS2000 swath editor tool, in accordance with the International Hydrographic Organization standard, and subsequently reorganized in an MXN matrix (Digital Terrain Model, DTM) of 25X25 m of grid cell size. The total amount of area coverage consists in more than 500 squared Km of multibeam sonar data. The Marsili volcano shows a global sigmoidal trend extending for about 55 km in the N10°E direction. Both the eastern and the western sides shows equal average slopes. Throughout the framework, crater-like morphologies are not clearly visible. The western side of the seamount reveals furrowed channels showing peculiar rounded sections. The northern sector morphologically differs from the rest of the seamount and seems separated

  12. Morphological characteristics and emplacement mechanism of the seamounts in the Central Indian Ocean Basin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Das, P.; Iyer, S.D.; Kodagali, V.N.

    Minimum elevation High E values characterize a broad somewhat level surface with occasional presence of depressions while low values typify a terrain with isolated relief features standing above extensive level surfaces. The average elevation relief ratio... of 0.788 indicates the region to have a fair number of depressions and highs. We defined the lower cutoff height of 100 m for the seamounts and divided them into three groups: large (N800 m), medium (N400 to 800 m) and small (100 to≤400m...

  13. The Marsili Volcanic Seamount (Southern Tyrrhenian Sea: A Potential Offshore Geothermal Resource

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Italiano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Italy has a strong geothermal potential for power generation, although, at present, the only two geothermal fields being exploited are Larderello-Travale/Radicondoli and Mt. Amiata in the Tyrrhenian pre-Apennine volcanic district of Southern Tuscany. A new target for geothermal exploration and exploitation in Italy is represented by the Southern Tyrrhenian submarine volcanic district, a geologically young basin (Upper Pliocene-Pleistocene characterised by tectonic extension where many seamounts have developed. Heat-flow data from that area show significant anomalies comparable to those of onshore geothermal fields. Fractured basaltic rocks facilitate seawater infiltration and circulation of hot water chemically altered by rock/water interactions, as shown by the widespread presence of hydrothermal deposits. The persistence of active hydrothermal activity is consistently shown by many different sources of evidence, including: heat-flow data, gravity and magnetic anomalies, widespread presence of hydrothermal-derived gases (CO2, CO, CH4, 3He/4He isotopic ratios, as well as broadband OBS/H seismological information, which demonstrates persistence of volcano-tectonic events and High Frequency Tremor (HFT. The Marsili and Tyrrhenian seamounts are thus an important—and likely long-lasting-renewable energy resource. This raises the possibility of future development of the world’s first offshore geothermal power plant.

  14. Seamount egg-laying grounds of the deep-water skate Bathyraja richardsoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, L-A; Stehmann, M F W; De Clippele, L; Findlay, H S; Golding, N; Roberts, J M

    2016-08-01

    Highly localized concentrations of elasmobranch egg capsules of the deep-water skate Bathyraja richardsoni were discovered during the first remotely operated vehicle (ROV) survey of the Hebrides Terrace Seamount in the Rockall Trough, north-east Atlantic Ocean. Conductivity-temperature-depth profiling indicated that the eggs were bathed in a specific environmental niche of well-oxygenated waters between 4·20 and 4·55° C, and salinity 34·95-35·06, on a coarse to fine-grained sandy seabed on the seamount's eastern flank, whereas a second type of egg capsule (possibly belonging to the skate Dipturus sp.) was recorded exclusively amongst the reef-building stony coral Solenosmilia variabilis. The depths of both egg-laying habitats (1489-1580 m) provide a de facto refuge from fisheries mortality for younger life stages of these skates. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Fish Biology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Fisheries Society of the British Isles.

  15. Pseudofaults and associated seamounts in the conjugate Arabian and Eastern Somali basins, NW Indian Ocean - New constraints from high-resolution satellite-derived gravity data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreejith, K. M.; Chaubey, A. K.; Mishra, Akhil; Kumar, Shravan; Rajawat, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Marine gravity data derived from satellite altimeters are effective tools in mapping fine-scale tectonic features of the ocean basins such as pseudofaults, fracture zones and seamounts, particularly when the ocean basins are carpeted with thick sediments. We use high-resolution satellite-generated gravity and seismic reflection data to map boundaries of pseudofaults and transferred crust related to the Paleocene spreading ridge propagation in the Arabian and its conjugate Eastern Somali basins. The study has provided refinement in the position of previously reported pseudofaults and their spatial extensions in the conjugate basins. It is observed that the transferred crustal block bounded by inner pseudofault and failed spreading ridge is characterized by a gravity low and rugged basement. The refined satellite gravity image of the Arabian Basin also revealed three seamounts in close proximity to the pseudofaults, which were not reported earlier. In the Eastern Somali Basin, seamounts are aligned along NE-SW direction forming ∼300 km long seamount chain. Admittance analysis and Flexural model studies indicated that the seamount chain is isostatically compensated locally with Effective Elastic Thickness (Te) of 3-4 km. Based on the present results and published plate tectonic models, we interpret that the seamounts in the Arabian Basin are formed by spreading ridge propagation and are associated with pseudofaults, whereas the seamount chain in the Eastern Somali Basin might have probably originated due to melting and upwelling of upper mantle heterogeneities in advance of migrating/propagating paleo Carlsberg Ridge.

  16. Fossilized microorganisms from the Emperor Seamounts: implications for the search for a subsurface fossil record on Earth and Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivarsson, M; Lausmaa, J; Lindblom, S; Broman, C; Holm, N G

    2008-12-01

    We have observed filamentous carbon-rich structures in samples drilled at 3 different seamounts that belong to the Emperor Seamounts in the Pacific Ocean: Detroit (81 Ma), Nintoku (56 Ma), and Koko Seamounts (48 Ma). The samples consist of low-temperature altered basalts recovered from all 3 seamounts. The maximum depth from which the samples were retrieved was 954 meters below seafloor (mbsf). The filamentous structures occur in veins and fractures in the basalts, where they are attached to the vein walls and embedded in vein-filling minerals like calcite, aragonite, and gypsum. The filaments were studied with a combination of optical microscopy, environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM), Raman spectroscopy, and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). Minerals were identified by a combination of optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrometry, and energy dispersive spectrometry on an environmental scanning electron microscope. Carbon content of the filaments ranges between approximately 10 wt % and approximately 50 wt % and is not associated with carbonates. These results indicate an organic origin of the carbon. The presence of C(2)H(4), phosphate, and lipid-like molecules in the filaments further supports a biogenic origin. We also found microchannels in volcanic glass enriched in carbon (approximately 10-40 wt %) compatible with putative microbial activity. Our findings suggest new niches for life in subseafloor environments and have implications for further exploration of the subseafloor biosphere on Earth and beyond.

  17. Platinum group elements and gold in ferromanganese crusts from Afanasiy-Nikitin seamount, equatorial Indian Ocean: Sources and fractionation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Banakar, V.K.; Hein, J.R.; Rajani, R.P.; Chodankar, A.R.

    The major element relationships in ferromanganese (Fe–Mn) crusts from Afanasiy–Nikitin seamount (ANS), eastern equatorial Indian Ocean, appear to be atypical. High positive correlations (r = 0.99) between Mn/Co and Fe/Co ratios, and lack...

  18. Diffusive transfer of oxygen from seamount basaltic crust into overlying sediments: An example from the Clarion–Clipperton Fracture Zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mewes, K.; Mogollón, J.M.; Picard, A.; Rühlemann, C.; Eisenhauer, A.; Kuhn, T.; Ziebis, W.; Kasten, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Clarion–Clipperton Fracture Zone (CCFZ) in the Pacific Ocean is characterized by organic carbon-starved sediments and meter-scale oxygen penetration into the sediment. Furthermore, numerous seamounts occur throughout its deep-sea plain, which may serve as conduits for low-temperature

  19. Recovery of Seamount Precious Coral Beds From Heavy Trawling Disturbance with Links to Carbonate Chemistry Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roark, E. B.; Baco-Taylor, A.; Morgan, N. B.; Shamberger, K.; Miller, K.; Brooks, J.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing anthropogenic impacts in the deep sea make studies of resilience and recovery time critical, with deep-sea hard-substrate habitats and large-scale disturbances having received little attention. Seamount hard-substrate habitats in particular are thought to have low resilience due to the slow growth rates and recruitment limitations of key structure-forming taxa. Seamounts of the far Northwestern Hawaiian Islands and Emperor Chain have had some of the heaviest trawl impacts in the world, from both fish and precious coral fisheries, and include sites that are still trawled and recovering ones that have been protected since establishment of the EEZ in 1977. To test the hypothesis of low resilience we compare these impacted seamounts to untrawled sites. We used the AUV Sentry in 2014 and 2015 to image nine features (three per "treatment") and analyze for substrate and visible megafauna. Sites in the "still trawled" treatment were characterized by extensive areas of bare substrate with abundant trawl scars. Sites in the "recovering" and "never trawled" locations had abundant megafauna in hard substrate areas. Initial comparisons of transects at 700m depth for three sites indicate that Yuryaku in the "still trawled" treatment had lower diversity and abundance of megafauna compared to the "recovering" and "never trawled" locations with a dominance of sea urchins. The "recovering" and "never trawled" sites were dominated by cnidarians, fishes, and echinoderms, but differed in dominant species, diversity, abundances and occurrence of dead coral skeletons. These preliminary results suggest that the recovering sites have not returned to a pre-impact community type in the 38 years since they were trawled. The megafauna distribution, in particular that of deep-sea corals, was compared to environmental water column variables at the study sites across the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. Deep-sea corals with calcium carbonate skeletons were found living below the

  20. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Northampton Seamounts to Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Northampton Seamounts to Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Hawaii,...

  1. Geomorphological features in the southern Canary Island Volcanic Province: The importance of volcanic processes and massive slope instabilities associated with seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Desirée; Vázquez, Juan-Tomás; Somoza, Luis; León, Ricardo; López-González, Nieves; Medialdea, Teresa; Fernández-Salas, Luis-Miguel; González, Francisco-Javier; Rengel, Juan Antonio

    2016-02-01

    The margin of the continental slope of the Volcanic Province of Canary Islands is characterised by seamounts, submarine hills and large landslides. The seabed morphology including detailed morphology of the seamounts and hills was analysed using multibeam bathymetry and backscatter data, and very high resolution seismic profiles. Some of the elevation data are reported here for the first time. The shape and distribution of characteristics features such as volcanic cones, ridges, slides scars, gullies and channels indicate evolutionary differences. Special attention was paid to recent geological processes that influenced the seamounts. We defined various morpho-sedimentary units, which are mainly due to massive slope instability that disrupt the pelagic sedimentary cover. We also studied other processes such as the role of deep bottom currents in determining sediment distribution. The sediments are interpreted as the result of a complex mixture of material derived from a) slope failures on seamounts and submarine hills; and b) slides and slumps on the continental slope.

  2. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of Northampton Seamounts to Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry and IKONOS estimated depths of the shelf and slope environments of Northampton Seamounts to Laysan Island, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Hawaii,...

  3. Seamount mineral deposits: A source of rare metals for high technology industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; Conrad, Tracey A.; Staudigel, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    The near exponential growth in Earth’s population and the global economy puts increasing constraints on our planet’s finite supply of natural metal resources, and, consequently, there is an increasing need for new sources to supply high-tech industries. To date, effectively all of our raw-metal resources are produced at land-based sites. Except for nearshore placer deposits, the marine environment has been largely excluded from metal mining due to technological difficulties, even though it covers more than 70% of the planet. The case can be made that deep-water seabed mining is inevitable in the future, owing to the critical and strategic metal needs for human society. In this paper, we evaluate the case that seamounts offer significant potential for mining.

  4. From the epipelagic zone to the abyss: Trophic structure at two seamounts in the subtropical and tropical Eastern Atlantic - Part I zooplankton and micronekton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denda, Anneke; Stefanowitsch, Benjamin; Christiansen, Bernd

    2017-12-01

    Specific mechanisms, driving trophic interactions within the pelagic community may be highly variable in different seamount systems. This study investigated the trophic structure of zooplankton and micronekton above and around Ampère and Senghor, two shallow seamounts in the subtropical and tropical Eastern Atlantic, and over the adjacent abyssal plains. For the identification of food sources and trophic positions stable isotope ratios (δ13C and δ15N) were used. δ13C ranged from -24.7‰ to -15.0‰ and δ15N covered a total range of 0.9-15.9‰. Based on epipelagic particulate organic matter, zooplankton and micronekton usually occupied the 1st-3rd trophic level, including herbivorous, omnivorous and carnivorous taxa. δ13C and δ15N values were generally lower in zooplankton and micronekton of the subtropical waters as compared to the tropical region, due to the differing nutrient availability and phytoplankton communities. Correlations between δ13C and δ15N values of particulate organic matter, zooplankton, micronekton and benthopelagic fishes suggest a linear food chain based on a single energy source from primary production for Ampère Seamount, but no evidence was found for an autochthonus seamount production as compared to the open ocean reference site. Between Senghor Seamount and the open ocean δ13C signatures indicate that hydrodynamic effects at seamounts may modify the energy supply at times, but evidence for a seamount effect on the trophic structure of the pelagic communities was weak, which supports the assumption that seamount communities rely to a large extent on advected food sources.

  5. New Age and Geochemical Data From Seamounts in the Canary and Madeira Volcanic Provinces: A Contribution to the "Great Plume Debate"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldmacher, J.; Hoernle, K.; van den Bogaard, P.; Duggen, S.; Werner, R.

    2004-12-01

    The role of hotspots (mantle plumes) in the formation of intraplate volcanic island and seamount groups is being increasingly questioned, in particular concerning the abundant and somewhat irregularly distributed island and seamount volcanoes off the coast of northwest Africa. However, new 40Ar/39Ar ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope geochemistry of volcanic rocks from two seamounts northeast of the Canary Islands and two northeast of the Madeira Islands provide new support for the plume hypothesis. The oldest ages of shield stage volcanism from seamounts and islands northeast of the Canary and Madeira Islands confirm progressions of increasing age to the northeast for both island/seamount chains consistent with northeast directed plate motion. Calculated angular velocities for the average movement of the African plate in both regions gave similar values of about 0.45\\deg plus/minus 0.05\\deg/Ma around a rotation pole located north of the Azores Islands. Furthermore, the curvature of the chains clearly deviates from the E-W orientation of fracture zones in the East Atlantic. A local control of surface volcanism by lithospheric zones of weakness, however, is likely for some E-W elongated seamounts and islands. The isotope geochemistry additionally confirms that the two volcanic provinces are derived from distinct sources, consistent with distinct mantle plumes having formed both volcanic groups. Conventional hotspot models, however, cannot easily explain the wide distribution of seamounts in the Canary region and the long history of volcanic activity at single volcanic centers (e.g. Dacia seamount, 47-4 Ma; Selvagen Islands, 30-3 Ma). A possible explanation could involve interaction of a Canary mantle plume with small-scale upper mantle processes such as edge driven convection at the edge of the NW African craton (e.g. King and Ritsema, 2000, Science 290, 1137-1140).

  6. Phosphatization Associated Features of Ferromanganese Crusts at Lemkein Seamount, Marshall Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Lee, I.; Park, B. K.; Kim, J.

    2014-12-01

    Old layers of ferromanganese crusts, especially in the Pacific Ocean, have been affected by phosphatization. Ferromanganese crusts on Lemkein seamount in Marshall Islands also are phosphatized (3.3 to 4.2 wt % of P concentration). Furthermore, they have characteristic features that are different from other ferromanganese crusts. These features occur near the phosphorite, which were thought to fill the pore spaces of ferromanganese crusts. Inside the features, ferromanganese crusts are botryoidally precipitated from the round-boundary. The features of the phosphatized lower crusts of Lemkein seamount are observed using microscope and SEM. Elemental compositions of the selected samples were analyzed by SEM-EDS. Based on the observation and analysis of samples, three characteristic structures are identified: (1) phosphate-filled circles, (2) tongue-shaped framboidal crust, and (3) massive framboidal crust. The phosphate-filled circles are mostly composed of phosphorite, and they include trace fossils such as foraminifera. Phosphatized ferromanganese crusts exist at the boundary of this structure. The tongue-shaped crust is connected with the lips downward, and ferromanganese crusts inside the tongue show distinct growth rim. The massive framboidal crust is located below the tongue. Ferromanganese crusts in the massive framboidal crust are enveloped by phosphate, and some of the crusts are phosphatized. Around the structures, Mn oxide phase is concentrated as a shape of corona on BSE image. All of the structures are in the phosphatized crusts that show columnar growth of ferromanganese crusts and have sub-parallel lamination. These observation and chemical analysis of the ferromanganese crusts can provide a clue of diagenetic processes during the formation of ferromanganese crusts.

  7. Detailed seamount-scale studies of ferromanganese crusts reveal new insights into their formation and resource assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murton, B. J.; Lusty, P.; Yeo, I. A.; Howarth, S.

    2017-12-01

    The seafloor hosts abundant mineral deposits critical for low-carbon economies and emerging technologies. These include ferromanganese crusts (FeMnC) that grow on seamounts. While the broad distribution of FeMnC is known, local controls on growth, composition and formation are not. Here, we describe a detailed study of a gyot in the NE Atlantic (Tropic Seamount) that explores the controls, from the surface to the seafloor, exerted on FeMnC growth from current energy, surface productivity, sediment distribution, seafloor morphology, substrate lithology, sediments mobility and thickness, and seamount subsidence. During cruise JC142 (2016), we mapped the seamount with EM120 multibeam, mapped the 400km2 summit with AUV multibeam, sidescan sonar, sub-bottom profiler and 361,644 photographs. During 28 ROV dives we drilled 58 core and collected 344 individual rock samples. We found FeMnC at all depths, with the thickest (nucleolus for crusts up to 10cm thick, with growth into the sediment. Many substrates are found to comprise semi-consolidated sediment. The presence of thick crusts at the base of the seamount contradicts accepted understanding of FeMnC deposition just below the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ). In areas on the eastern and western spurs, between 2500m and 1000m, where current energy is greatest, sessile fauna are most abundant. Dense coral debris at these locations appears to inhibit crust formation and coral and sponge `gardens' are frequent on near vertical cliffs. The observation that crusts have grown downwards into and over soft sediment is enigmatic since present understanding requires hard substrates to be exposed to seawater for crusts to grow, and any burial would inhibit such growth. Plume tracking shows reduction to background within 1000m. Our study challenges the view that ferromanganese crusts form at the base of the OMZ and grow upwards on solid substrates. Instead, we see an interplay between crust precipitation, the morphological evolution of

  8. Analysis of the archaeal sub-seafloor community at Suiyo Seamount on the Izu-Bonin Arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Kurt; Kakegawa, Takeshi; Yamashiro, Kan; Maruyama, Akihiko; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Marumo, Katsumi; Urabe, Tetsuro; Yamagishi, Akihiko

    2005-01-01

    A sub-surface archaeal community at the Suiyo Seamount in the Western Pacific Ocean was investigated by 16S rRNA gene sequence and whole-cell in situ hybridization analyses. In this study, we drilled and cased holes at the hydrothermal area of the seamount to minimize contamination of the hydrothermal fluid in the sub-seafloor by penetrating seawater. PCR clone analysis of the hydrothermal fluid samples collected from a cased hole indicated the presence of chemolithoautotrophic primary biomass producers of Archaeoglobales and the Methanococcales-related archaeal HTE1 group, both of which can utilize hydrogen as an electron donor. We discuss the implication of the microbial community on the early history of life and on the search for extraterrestrial life. c2005 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. New Cheilostomata (Bryozoa from NE Atlantic seamounts, islands, and the continental slope: evidence for deep-sea endemism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Berning

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Ten new species belonging to three new genera (Atlantisina gen. nov., Bathycyclopora gen. nov., Calvetopora gen. nov. of umbonulomorph bryozoans from northeastern Atlantic seamounts, islands, and the continental slope are introduced. We furthermore erect the new family Atlantisinidae fam. nov. for these genera. Eight new species belong to the new genus Atlantisina: Atlantisina atlantis gen. et sp. nov. (type species, A. acantha gen. et sp. nov., A. gorringensis gen. et sp. nov., A. inarmata gen. et sp. nov., A. lionensis gen. et sp. nov., A. meteor gen. et sp. nov., A. seinensis gen. et sp. nov., and A. tricornis gen. et sp. nov. The genus Bathycyclopora gen. nov. is introduced for ?Phylactella vibraculata Calvet from the Azores, and also includes Bathycyclopora suroiti gen. et sp. nov. The type species of Calvetopora gen. nov. is Lepralia inflata Calvet from the Gulf of Cadiz; this genus also includes Calvetopora otapostasis gen. et sp. nov. and another species left in open nomenclature. Of the 13 species described herein, 11 occur on seamounts and islands, and nine species are endemic to a single seamount, island or station. The present results show that bryozoans provide striking examples of the function of seamounts as areas of endemism, most likely intrinsically linked to the low dispersal abilities of bryozoan larvae.

  10. Seabed morphology and the bottom-current pathways around Rosemary Bank seamount, northern Rockall Trough, North Atlantic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, J.A. [Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Scottish Association for Marine Science, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Stoker, M.S.; Bulat, J. [British Geological Survey, Murchison House, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3LA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Masson, D.G. [Southampton Oceanography Centre, Empress Dock, European Way, Southampton SO14 3ZH (United Kingdom); Pudsey, C.J.; Morris, P.; Larter, R.D. [British Antarctic Survey, High Cross, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 OET (United Kingdom)

    2006-02-15

    Rosemary Bank is a broadly domed and elongate seamount with a diameter of 70km, occurring in water depths of between 300 and 2300m, 120km west of the UK mainland in the northern Rockall Trough. Recent multibeam bathymetry and sub-bottom profiles, together with pre-existing current meter and CTD data, seismic reflection profiles and seabed core samples were examined in order to evaluate past and present bottom-current pathways and processes. The multibeam data image volcanic parasitic cones, concave slide scars and the terraced slopes of the bank. Bottom-current sedimentation is interpreted as producing a drift-moat complex surrounding the entire seamount and including two sediment wave-fields, developed to the west and east of the bank in water depths of 1500-2000m. The western drift covers an area of over 1000km{sup 2}. Sediment waves to the west of the bank are up to 150m high with wave lengths of 1.5-2km. Four 100m deep, 3km wide, linear depressions, bisect the waves and are interpreted as 25-30km long extensions of the moat. Seismic reflection profiles show the main phase of drift construction was during the mid-Miocene to Pliocene with the Pliocene to Holocene being an interval of drift maintenance. Cores from sediments draping over and adjacent to the seamount contain sandy and gravelly contourites interbedded with hemipelagites of late Pleistocene to Holocene age. Current meter and CTD data from the western moat indicate Labrador Sea Water flowing northwest, in contrast to the previously assumed anticlockwise circulation pattern around the seamount. (author)

  11. Accreted seamounts in North Tianshan, NW China: Implications for the evolution of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gaoxue; Li, Yongjun; Kerr, Andrew C.; Tong, Lili

    2018-03-01

    The Carboniferous Bayingou ophiolitic mélange is exposed in the North Tianshan accretionary complex in the southwestern part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). The mélange is mainly composed of serpentinised ultramafic rocks (including harzburgite, lherzolite, pyroxenite, dunite and peridotite), pillowed and massive basalts, layered gabbros, radiolarian cherts, pelagic limestones, breccias and tuffs, and displays block-in-matrix structures. The blocks of ultramafic rocks, gabbros, basalts, cherts, and limestones are set in a matrix of serpentinised ultramafic rocks, massive basalts and tuffs. The basaltic rocks in the mélange show significant geochemical heterogeneity, and two compositional groups, one ocean island basalt-like, and the other mid-ocean ridge-like, can be distinguished on the basis of their isotopic compositions and immobile trace element contents (such as light rare earth element enrichment in the former, but depletion in the latter). The more-enriched basaltic rocks are interpreted as remnants/fragments of seamounts, derived from a deep mantle reservoir with low degrees (2-3%) of garnet lherzolite mantle melting. The depleted basalts most likely formed by melting of a shallower spinel lherzolite mantle source with ∼15% partial melting. It is probable that both groups owe their origin to melting of a mixture between plume and depleted MORB mantle. The results from this study, when integrated with previous work, indicate that the Junggar Ocean crust (comprising a significant number of seamounts) was likely to have been subducted southward beneath the Yili-Central Tianshan block in the Late Devonian-Early Carboniferous. The seamounts were scraped-off and accreted along with the oceanic crust in an accretionary wedge to form the Bayingou ophiolitic mélange. We present a model for the tectonomagmatic evolution of this portion of the CAOB involving prolonged intra-oceanic subduction with seamount accretion.

  12. Diversity of Zoanthids (Anthozoa: Hexacorallia) on Hawaiian Seamounts: Description of the Hawaiian Gold Coral and Additional Zoanthids

    OpenAIRE

    シニゲル, フレデリック; OCANA, Oscar; BACO, Amy; SINNIGER, Frederic; OCANA, Oscar; BACO, Amy

    2013-01-01

    The Hawaiian gold coral has a history of exploitation from the deep slopes and seamounts of the Hawaiian Islands as one of the precious corals commercialised in the jewellery industry. Due to its peculiar characteristic of building a scleroproteic skeleton, this zoanthid has been referred as Gerardia sp. (a junior synonym of Savalia Nardo, 1844) but never formally described or examined by taxonomists despite its commercial interest. While collection of Hawaiian gold coral is now regulated, gl...

  13. Diversity of zoanthids (anthozoa: hexacorallia) on Hawaiian seamounts: description of the Hawaiian gold coral and additional zoanthids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinniger, Frederic; Ocaña, Oscar V; Baco, Amy R

    2013-01-01

    The Hawaiian gold coral has a history of exploitation from the deep slopes and seamounts of the Hawaiian Islands as one of the precious corals commercialised in the jewellery industry. Due to its peculiar characteristic of building a scleroproteic skeleton, this zoanthid has been referred as Gerardia sp. (a junior synonym of Savalia Nardo, 1844) but never formally described or examined by taxonomists despite its commercial interest. While collection of Hawaiian gold coral is now regulated, globally seamounts habitats are increasingly threatened by a variety of anthropogenic impacts. However, impact assessment studies and conservation measures cannot be taken without consistent knowledge of the biodiversity of such environments. Recently, multiple samples of octocoral-associated zoanthids were collected from the deep slopes of the islands and seamounts of the Hawaiian Archipelago. The molecular and morphological examination of these zoanthids revealed the presence of at least five different species including the gold coral. Among these only the gold coral appeared to create its own skeleton, two other species are simply using the octocoral as substrate, and the situation is not clear for the final two species. Phylogenetically, all these species appear related to zoanthids of the genus Savalia as well as to the octocoral-associated zoanthid Corallizoanthus tsukaharai, suggesting a common ancestor to all octocoral-associated zoanthids. The diversity of zoanthids described or observed during this study is comparable to levels of diversity found in shallow water tropical coral reefs. Such unexpected species diversity is symptomatic of the lack of biological exploration and taxonomic studies of the diversity of seamount hexacorals.

  14. Diversity of zoanthids (anthozoa: hexacorallia on Hawaiian seamounts: description of the Hawaiian gold coral and additional zoanthids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederic Sinniger

    Full Text Available The Hawaiian gold coral has a history of exploitation from the deep slopes and seamounts of the Hawaiian Islands as one of the precious corals commercialised in the jewellery industry. Due to its peculiar characteristic of building a scleroproteic skeleton, this zoanthid has been referred as Gerardia sp. (a junior synonym of Savalia Nardo, 1844 but never formally described or examined by taxonomists despite its commercial interest. While collection of Hawaiian gold coral is now regulated, globally seamounts habitats are increasingly threatened by a variety of anthropogenic impacts. However, impact assessment studies and conservation measures cannot be taken without consistent knowledge of the biodiversity of such environments. Recently, multiple samples of octocoral-associated zoanthids were collected from the deep slopes of the islands and seamounts of the Hawaiian Archipelago. The molecular and morphological examination of these zoanthids revealed the presence of at least five different species including the gold coral. Among these only the gold coral appeared to create its own skeleton, two other species are simply using the octocoral as substrate, and the situation is not clear for the final two species. Phylogenetically, all these species appear related to zoanthids of the genus Savalia as well as to the octocoral-associated zoanthid Corallizoanthus tsukaharai, suggesting a common ancestor to all octocoral-associated zoanthids. The diversity of zoanthids described or observed during this study is comparable to levels of diversity found in shallow water tropical coral reefs. Such unexpected species diversity is symptomatic of the lack of biological exploration and taxonomic studies of the diversity of seamount hexacorals.

  15. Lava bubble-wall fragments formed by submarine hydrovolcanic explosions on Lo'ihi Seamount and Kilauea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, D.A.; Davis, A.S.; Bischoff, J.L.; Dixon, J.E.; Geyer, R.

    2000-01-01

    Glassy bubble-wall fragments, morphologically similar to littoral limu o Pele, have been found in volcanic sands erupted on Lo'ihi Seamount and along the submarine east rift zone of Kilauea Volcano. The limu o Pele fragments are undegassed with respect to H2O and S and formed by mild steam explosions. Angular glass sand fragments apparently form at similar, and greater, depths by cooling-contraction granulation. The limu o Pele fragments from Lo'ihi Seamount are dominantly tholeiitic basalt containing 6.25-7.25% MgO. None of the limu o Pele samples from Lo'ihi Seamount contains less than 5.57% MgO, suggesting that higher viscosity magmas do not form lava bubbles. The dissolved CO2 and H2O contents of 7 of the limu o Pele fragments indicate eruption at 1200??300 m depth (120??30 bar). These pressures exceed that generally thought to limit steam explosions. We conclude that hydrovolcanic eruptions are possible, with appropriate pre-mixing conditions, at pressures as great as 120 bar.

  16. A crab swarm at an ecological hotspot: patchiness and population density from AUV observations at a coastal, tropical seamount

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Pineda

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A research cruise to Hannibal Bank, a seamount and an ecological hotspot in the coastal eastern tropical Pacific Ocean off Panama, explored the zonation, biodiversity, and the ecological processes that contribute to the seamount’s elevated biomass. Here we describe the spatial structure of a benthic anomuran red crab population, using submarine video and autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV photographs. High density aggregations and a swarm of red crabs were associated with a dense turbid layer 4–10 m above the bottom. The high density aggregations were constrained to 355–385 m water depth over the Northwest flank of the seamount, although the crabs also occurred at lower densities in shallower waters (∼280 m and in another location of the seamount. The crab aggregations occurred in hypoxic water, with oxygen levels of 0.04 ml/l. Barcoding of Hannibal red crabs, and pelagic red crabs sampled in a mass stranding event in 2015 at a beach in San Diego, California, USA, revealed that the Panamanian and the Californian crabs are likely the same species, Pleuroncodes planipes, and these findings represent an extension of the southern endrange of this species. Measurements along a 1.6 km transect revealed three high density aggregations, with the highest density up to 78 crabs/m2, and that the crabs were patchily distributed. Crab density peaked in the middle of the patch, a density structure similar to that of swarming insects.

  17. Stable isotope compositions of serpentinite seamounts in the Mariana forearc: Serpentinization processes, fluid sources and sulfur metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2006-01-01

    The Mariana and Izu-Bonin arcs in the western Pacific are characterized by serpentinite seamounts in the forearc that provide unique windows into the mantle wedge. We present stable isotope (O, H, S, and C) data for serpentinites from Conical seamount in the Mariana forearc and S isotope data for Torishima seamount in the Izu-Bonin forearc in order to understand the compositions of fluids and temperatures of serpentinization in the mantle wedge, and to investigate the transport of sulfur from the slab to the mantle wedge. Six serpentine mineral separates have a restricted range of ??18O (6.5-8.5???). Antigorite separates have ??D values of -29.5??? to -45.5??? that reflect serpentinization within the mantle wedge whereas chrysotile has low ??D values (-51.8??? to -84.0???) as the result of re-equilibration with fluids at low temperatures. Fractionation of oxygen isotopes between serpentine and magnetite indicate serpentinization temperatures of 300-375 ??C. Two late cross-fiber chrysotile veins have higher ??18O values of 8.9??? to 10.8??? and formed at lower temperatures (as low as ???100 ??C). Aqueous fluids in equilibrium with serpentine at 300-375 ??C had ??18O = 6.5-9??? and ??D = -4??? to -26???, consistent with sediment dehydration reactions at temperatures arc lavas. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Contrasting styles of deep-marine pyroclastic eruptions revealed from Axial Seamount push core records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portner, Ryan A.; Clague, David A.; Helo, Christoph; Dreyer, Brian M.; Paduan, Jennifer B.

    2015-08-01

    A comprehensive understanding of explosive basaltic eruption processes in the deep-sea relies upon detailed analysis and comparison of the variety of volcaniclastic lithologies on the seafloor, which has been challenged by insufficient sample recovery. A dedicated ROV-based sampling approach using long push cores offers an unparalleled opportunity to fully characterize the diversity of unconsolidated volcaniclastic lithofacies on a recently active seamount. Lithofacies from Axial Seamount record two styles of pyroclastic eruptions, strombolian and phreatomagmatic, at 1.5 km water depth. Strombolian eruptions are represented by abundant fluidal and highly vesicular (up to 50%) vitriclasts within limu o Pele lapilli tuff and tuffaceous mud lithofacies. Lapilli-ash grain size, normal grading, good sorting, rip-up clasts and homogeneous glass geochemistry characterize individual limu o Pele lapilli tuff beds, and imply proximal deposition from a turbidity flow associated with a single eruption (i.e. event bed). Limu o Pele lapilli tuff beds are interbedded with poorly sorted, chemically heterogeneous and bioturbated tuffaceous mud units that preserve reworking and biologic habitation of more distal pyroclastic fallout and dilute turbidity flows. The phreatomagmatic eruption style is preserved by hydrothermal mineral-bearing muddy tuff that exhibits characteristics distinct from lapilli ash and tuffaceous mud lithofacies. Hydrothermal muddy tuff lithofacies are well-sorted and fine-grained with notable components of non-fluidal basaltic ash (∼45%), fluidal ash (∼30%) and accessory lithics (∼25%). Heterogeneous geochemistry of ash shards implies that juvenile components are minimal. The abundance, mineralogy and texture of lithic components (Fe-Mg clays, pyrite, epidote, actinolite, altered glass, basalt/diabase, hydrothermal breccia and agglutinate), and very fine-grain size of basaltic ash, are consistent with phreatomagmatic eruption deposits. A lack of

  19. The new Hamburg Ocean Bottom Tiltmeter: A First Deployment at Columbo Seamount (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensch, M.; Hort, M.; Dahm, T.; Winter, S.; Klawonn, M.

    2009-04-01

    Assessing the state of volcanic activity of seamounts is quite more complicated than for onshore volcanoes, due to the difficulty of deploying instruments. At land, various techniques are applied (seismic networks, deformation studies, gas measurements etc.). At sea, mainly seismological observations are used. However, especially onshore deformation studies using INSAR have proven to be valuable in determining recharge of magmatic systems. We therefore developed a free fall, self leveling Ocean Bottom Tiltmeter (OBT) to observe deformation on the seafloor, using a two component high resolution tilt sensor with a resolution of about 1nrad (0.15μ°) and a maximum signal of about 0.045rad (0.5°). It is mounted inside a 17" glass sphere on a levelling stage, which relevels the instrument between ± 5° down to an accuracy of 0.006°. During the measurement this leveling stage is standing on the bottom of the glass sphere. For releveling, the instrument is pulled up by thin nylon strings and then locked to a gimbal system in order to compensate for tilt >5°. This releveling procedure is done once every 48 hours. Data is recorded on an 18bit data logger at 50Hz sampling rate. Additionally to tilt and seismic signals (using a hydrophone), temperature, absolute pressure to measure uplift or subsidence, and orientation (electronic compass) are monitored. 4 OBT systems were deployed between June 2006 and March 2007 at Columbo seamount, a submarine volcano north-east of Santorini island, Aegean Sea, Greece, on a 3 km long profile perpendicular to the first principal stress axis of the regional stressfield. Three of the instruments operated the whole time, one shut down due to a short circuit. First data processing indicates that small regional earthquakes as well as major tectonic earthquakes are properly recorded by the system. We find small, but permanent short-period deformations associated with local earthquakes and also observe long-period deformation processes

  20. Subaqueous non-vesicular to poorly-vesicular shards: hydroclastic fragmentation on seamounts and summit calderas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, W. U.; Dingwell, D. B.; Downey, W. S.; Mastin, L. G.

    2008-12-01

    Recognizing pyroclastic deposits that originate directly from magmatic and phreatomagmatic explosions in a subaqueous setting is based upon sedimentary structures, such as massive, stratified, and graded beds as well as (pyro)clast size. Ideally such deposits form ordered fining-and thinning-upward sequences. Pumice, scoria, glass shards, euhedral and broken crystals, and lithic fragments are constituents that support an explosive heritage. Recent deep-sea ROV and submersible dives have retrieved non-vesicular to vesicle- poor, mm-scale, mafic shards in 5-15 cm-thick massive and/or graded (stratified) deposits, for which a subaqueous explosive origin has been inferred. These sheet hyaloclastites with variable shard shapes were first documented on Seamount 6 as deep-sea Limu O Pele at water depths > 1000 m. We identified in Seamount 6 samples equant to blocky shards with angular to subrounded terminations, but also subordinate hair-like and contorted glassy filaments, warped shards and irregular shards. Shards display internal laminations (flow-banding?) and have local perlitic fractures. Bubble wall shards derived from scoria burst were rare. In combination with all the above and a poor shard vesicularity (tubes and ponded magma in depths > 1000 m. We envision that hydrostatic pressure commensurate with water depth played a significant role. The deposits can be readily explained by a hydroclastic process whereby fragmentation occurred at the milli-second (Limu) to second scale (hyaloclastite). Hence, hyperquenched glass shards or thread-like glass filaments need not require magmatic explosivity. Constant surface interaction between aphyric, low-viscosity, high temperature, magma-lava at depth with seawater causes fragmentation (granulation) that can generate such delicate shards. The transfer of heat to the ambient medium, seawater, favours turbulent convection causing strong water movement that strips glassy rinds and lofts the fine-grained shards and Limu O Pele

  1. Coral Patch seamount (NE Atlantic – a sedimentological and megafaunal reconnaissance based on video and hydroacoustic surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Wienberg

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The present study provides new knowledge about the so far largely unexplored Coral Patch seamount which is located in the NE Atlantic Ocean half-way between the Iberian Peninsula and Madeira. For the first time a detailed hydroacoustic mapping (MBES in conjunction with video surveys (ROV, camera sled were performed to describe the sedimentological and biological characteristics of this sub-elliptical ENE-WSW elongated seamount. Video observations were restricted to the southwestern summit area of Coral Patch seamount (water depth: 560–760 m and revealed that this part of the summit is dominated by exposed hard substrate, whereas soft sediment is just a minor substrate component. Although exposed hardgrounds are dominant for this summit area and, thus, offer suitable habitat for settlement by benthic organisms, the benthic megafauna shows rather scarce occurrence. In particular, scleractinian framework-building cold-water corals are apparently rare with very few isolated and small-sized live occurrences of the species Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata. In contrast, dead coral framework and coral rubble are more frequent pointing to a higher abundance of cold-water corals on Coral Patch during the recent past. This is even supported by the observation of fishing lines that got entangled with rather fresh-looking coral frameworks. Overall, long lines and various species of commercially important fish were frequently observed emphasising the potential of Coral Patch as an important target for fisheries that may have impacted the entire benthic community. Hydroacoustic seabed classification covered the entire summit of Coral Patch and its northern and southern flanks (water depth: 560–2660 m and revealed extended areas dominated by mixed and soft sediments at the northern flank and to a minor degree at its easternmost summit and southern flank. Nevertheless, these data also predict most of the summit area to be dominated by exposed bedrock

  2. Deep-sea benthic habitats modeling and mapping in a NE Atlantic seamount (Galicia Bank)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, A.; González-Irusta, J. M.; Punzón, A.; García-Alegre, A.; Lourido, A.; Ríos, P.; Blanco, M.; Gómez-Ballesteros, M.; Druet, M.; Cristobo, J.; Cartes, J. E.

    2017-08-01

    This study presents the results of seafloor habitat identification and mapping of a NE Atlantic deep seamount. An ;assemble first, predict later; approach has been followed to identify and map the benthic habitats of the Galicia Bank (NW Iberian). Biotic patterns inferred from the survey data have been used to drive the definition of benthic assemblages using multivariate tools. Eight assemblages, four hard substrates and four sedimentary ones, have been described from a matrix of structural species. Distribution of these assemblages was correlated with environmental factors (multibeam and backscatter data) using binomial GAMs. Finally, the distribution model of each assemblage was applied to produce continuous maps and pooled in a final map with the distribution of the main benthic habitats. Depth and substrate type are key factors when determining soft bottom communities, whereas rocky habitat distribution is mainly explained by rock slope and orientation. Enrichment by northern water masses (LSW) arriving to GB and possible zooplankton biomass increase at vertical-steep walls by ;bottom trapping; can explain the higher diversity of habitat providing filter-feeders at slope rocky breaks. These results concerning vulnerable species and habitats, such as Lophelia and Madrepora communities and black and bamboo coral aggregations were the basis of the Spanish proposal of inclusion within the Natura 2000 network. The aim of the present study was to establish the scientific criteria needed for managing and protecting those environmental values.

  3. Epibenthic communities of sedimentary habitats in a NE Atlantic deep seamount (Galicia Bank)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, A.; Cartes, J. E.; Papiol, V.; Punzón, A.; García-Alegre, A.; Arronte, J. C.; Ríos, P.; Lourido, A.; Frutos, I.; Blanco, M.

    2017-12-01

    Galicia Bank is a deep seamount included as Site of Community Importance (SCI) in the Spanish Natura 2000 Network proposal. In the present study, epibenthic assemblages of sedimentary habitats have been described, together with the main environmental factor explaining species and communities distribution. Five epibenthic assemblages have been identified. Depth was the main factor explaining assemblage distribution, and the role of sediment type, water masses, and coral framework presence is also discussed. Three assemblages are located in the summit: the shallowest one (730-770 m), in the boundary between Eastern North Atlantic Central Water (ENACW) and Mediterranean Overflow Water (MOW) water masses is typified by ophiuroids and characterized by medium sands. The second assemblage (770-800 m) typified by the bivalve Limopsis minuta and the solitary coral Flabellum chunii correspond with medium sands and MOW core; and the third typified by the presence of cold-water coral communities dominated by Lophelia pertusa and Madrepora oculata, also on the MOW influence. In the border of the summit, in the bank break, an assemblage located in the range 1000-1200 m is dominated by the urchin Cidaris cidaris and the sponge Thenea muricata. In the flat flanks around the bank, the deepest assemblage (1400-1800 m) is dominated by the holothurian Benthogone rosea, in a depth range dominated by the Labrador water (LSW) and in fine sands with highest contents of organic matter. Most of species appeared in a depth range smaller than 25% of total depth range sampled and in bank.

  4. Explosive processes during the 2015 eruption of Axial Seamount, as recorded by seafloor hydrophones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Dziak, R. P.; Haxel, J.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.; Garcia, C.

    2017-04-01

    Following the installation of the Ocean Observatories Initiative cabled array, the 2015 eruption of Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca ridge, became the first submarine eruption to be captured in real time by seafloor seismic and acoustic instruments. This eruption also marked the first instance where the entire eruption cycle of a submarine volcano, from the previous eruption in 2011 to the end of the month-long 2015 event, was monitored continuously using autonomous ocean bottom hydrophones. Impulsive sounds associated with explosive lava-water interactions are identified within hydrophone records during both eruptions. Explosions within the caldera are acoustically distinguishable from those occurring in association with north rift lava flows erupting in 2015. Acoustic data also record a series of broadband diffuse events, occurring in the waning phase of the eruption, and are interpreted as submarine Hawaiian explosions. This transition from gas-poor to gas-rich eruptive activity coincides with an increase in water temperature within the caldera and with a decrease in the rate of deflation. The last recorded diffuse events coincide with the end of the eruption, represented by the onset of inflation. All the observed explosion signals couple strongly into the water column, and only weakly into the solid Earth, demonstrating the importance of hydroacoustic observations as a complement to seismic and geodetic studies of submarine eruptions.

  5. Environmental Impact of a Submarine Cable: Case Study of the Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC)/ Pioneer Seamount Cable

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, I.; Paull, C. K.; Kuhnz, L.; von Thun, S.; Burton, E.; Greene, H. G.; Barry, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    To better understand the potential impacts of the presence of cables on the seabed, a topic of interest for which little data is published or publicly available, a study of the environmental impacts of the ATOC/Pioneer Seamount cable was conducted. The 95 km long, submarine, coaxial cable extends between Pioneer Seamount and the Pillar Point Air Force Station in Half Moon Bay, California. Approximately two thirds of the cable lies within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The cable is permitted to NOAA- Oceanic and Atmospheric Research for transmitting data from a hydrophone array on Pioneer Seamount to shore. The cable was installed unburied on the seafloor in 1995. The cable path crosses the continental shelf, descends to a maximum depth of 1,933 m, and climbs back upslope to 998 m depth near the crest of Pioneer Seamount. A total of 42 hours of video and 152 push cores were collected in 10 stations along cable and control transects using the ROVs Ventana and Tiburon equipped with cable-tracking tools. The condition of the cable, its effect on the seafloor, and distribution of benthic megafauna and infauna were determined. Video data indicated the nature of interaction between the cable and the seafloor. Rocky nearshore areas, where wave energies are greatest, showed the clearest evidence of impact. Here, evidence of abrasion included frayed and unraveling portions of the cable's armor and vertical grooves in the rock apparently cut by the cable. The greatest incision and armor damage occurred on ledges between spans in irregular rock outcrop areas. Unlike the nearshore rocky region, neither the rocks nor the cable appeared damaged along outcrops on Pioneer Seamount. Multiple loops of slack cable added during a 1997 cable repair operation were found lying flat on the seafloor. Several sharp kinks in the cable were seen at 240 m water depths in an area subjected to intense trawling activity. Most of the cable has become buried with time in sediment

  6. Re-Os isotope and platinum group elements of a FOcal ZOne mantle source, Louisville Seamounts Chain, Pacific ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejada, Maria Luisa G.; Hanyu, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Akira; Senda, Ryoko; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Fitton, Godfrey; Williams, Rebecca

    2015-02-01

    The Louisville Seamount Chain (LSC) is, besides the Hawaiian-Emperor Chain, one of the longest-lived hotspot traces. We report here the first Re-Os isotope and platinum group element (PGE) data for Canopus, Rigil, and Burton Guyots along the chain, which were drilled during IODP Expedition 330. The LSC basalts possess (187Os/188Os)i = 0.1245-0.1314 that are remarkably homogeneous and do not vary with age. A Re-Os isochron age of 64.9 ± 3.2 Ma was obtained for Burton seamount (the youngest of the three seamounts drilled), consistent with 40Ar-39Ar data. Isochron-derived initial 187Os/188Os ratio of 0.1272 ± 0.0008, together with data for olivines (0.1271-0.1275), are within the estimated primitive mantle values. This (187Os/188Os)i range is similar to those of Rarotonga (0.124-0.139) and Samoan shield (0.1276-0.1313) basalts and lower than those of Cook-Austral (0.136-0.155) and Hawaiian shield (0.1283-0.1578) basalts, suggesting little or no recycled component in the LSC mantle source. The PGE data of LSC basalts are distinct from those of oceanic lower crust. Variation in PGE patterns can be largely explained by different low degrees of melting under sulfide-saturated conditions of the same relatively fertile mantle source, consistent with their primitive mantle-like Os and primordial Ne isotope signatures. The PGE patterns and the low 187Os/188Os composition of LSC basalts contrast with those of Ontong Java Plateau (OJP) tholeiites. We conclude that the Re-Os isotope and PGE composition of LSC basalts reflect a relatively pure deep-sourced common mantle sampled by some ocean island basalts but is not discernible in the composition of OJP tholeiites.

  7. HOBIT-The new Hamburg Ocean Bottom Tiltmeter: A First Deployment at Columbo Seamount, Aegean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hort, M.; Hensch, M.; Winter, S.; Dahm, T.

    2007-12-01

    Assessing the state of activity of subaerial volcanoes is already quite a difficult task, but assessing the activity of submarine seamounts is even more complicated due to the difficulty of deploying instruments. At land various techniques can be used including seismic networks, deformation studies, gas measurements and others. At sea, it is mainly seismological observations, which are used to assess volcanic activity safe for some measurements with tiltmeters. However, especially at land deformation studies using INSAR have proven to be very valuable in determining recharge of magmatic systems. We therefore developed a free fall, self leveling ocean bottom tiltmeter mounted in a 17 inch glass sphere to observe deformation on the ocean floor. For measuring tilt signals we use a two component high resolution tiltmeter manufactured by Lipmann Geophysikalische Messgeräte (www.l-gm.de). The instrument has a resolution of about 1nrad (0.15μ°) and a maximum signal of about 0.045 rad (0.5°) can be detected. It is mounted on a levelling stage, which can relevel the instrument between ± 5° down to an accuracy of 0.006°. During the measurement this leveling stage is standing on the bottom of the glass sphere. For releveling purposes the instrument can be pulled up by very thin nylon strings and then is looked to a gimbal system in order to compensate for tilt >5°. This releveling procedure is done once every 48 hours. The data are recorded on an 18bit (at 50Hz sampling rate) MLS Geolon logger (www.send.de). Once deployed the instruments sleeps for a prescribed amount of time before the first levelling procedure is initiated. In addition to the tiltmeter and a hydrophone for receiving seismic signals, temperature, absolute pressure (paroscientific pressure sensor) to measure possible uplift or subsidence, and orientation (electronic compass mounted to the system) are monitored. 4 HOBIT systems were deployed for ten months (Jun06-Mar07) at Columbo seamount, a submarine

  8. A new species of the sponge Raspailia (Raspaxilla) (Porifera: Demospongiae: Axinellida: Raspailiidae) from deep seamounts of the Western Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekins, Merrick; Debitus, CÉcile; Erpenbeck, Dirk; Hooper, John N A

    2018-04-17

    A new species of Raspailia (Raspaxilla) frondosa sp. nov. is described from the deep seamounts of the Norfolk and New Caledonia Ridges. The morphology of the species resembles that of a frond or a fern, and its unique highly compressed axial skeleton of interlaced spongin fibres without spicules in combination with a radial extra axial skeleton of a perpendicular palisade of spicules, differentiate it from all other species of the subgenus. This species is compared morphologically to all 18 other valid species described in Raspailia (Raspaxilla).

  9. Colonial life under the Humboldt Current System: deep-sea corals from O'Higgins I seamount

    OpenAIRE

    Cañete,Juan I; Haussermann,Verena

    2012-01-01

    A benthic community constituted by an assemblage of at least four species of deep-sea corals collected in only one trawl carried-out on the summit of the O'Higgins I seamount, central Chile. The corals were collected in only one trawl carried-out during a Chilean-Japanese cruise onboard the R/V" Koyo Maru" in December 29, 2004. Presence of oxygenated and cold Antarctic Intermediate Water (>400 m depth) on the plateau was recorded under of the Equatorial Subsurface Water associated to the o...

  10. In-situ petrophysical properties of hotspot volcanoes. Results from ODP Leg 197, Detroit Seamount and HSDP II borehole, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, I.; Pechnig, R.; Buysch, A.; Clauser, C.

    2003-04-01

    During ODP Leg 197 an extensive logging program was run on Site 1203, Detroit Seamount. This seamount is part of the Emperor seamount chain, a continuation of the Hawaiian volcanic chain. Standard ODP/LDEO logging tool strings were used to measure porosity, density, resistivity, p- and s-wave velocities and gamma ray activity. The FMS-tool yielded detailed high resolution resistivity images of the borehole wall. By interpretation and statistical analysis of the logging parameters a petrophysical classification of the drilled rock content could be derived. The pillow lava recovered in the cores exhibits low porosity, low resistivity and high density. This indicates no or very little vesicles in the non-fractured rock unit. Compared to the pillow basalts, subaerial basalts show increasing porosity, gamma ray and potassium content and decreasing density, resistivity and velocity. A basalt with no or little vesicles and a basalt with average or many vesicles can clearly be distinguished. The volcaniclastics show lower resistivity, lower sonic velocities, higher porosities and lower densities than the basalts. Three different rock types can be distinguished within the volcaniclastics: Tuffs, resedimented tephra and breccia. The tuff shows medium porosity and density, low gamma ray and potassium content. The log responses from the resedimented tephra suggest that the tephra is more easily altered than the tuff. The log responses from the breccia lie between the tuff and tephra log responses, but the breccia can clearly be identified in the FMS borehole images. A similar rock content was found in the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project borehole. Gamma ray activity, electrical resistivity and sonic velocity were measured down to 2700 mbsl.. Compared to the 72-76 Ma old Detroit seamount basalts, the HSDP subaerial and submarine lava flows show a significant lower gamma ray activity, while sonic velocity and electrical resistivity are comparable. Deviations between the

  11. Stable isotope compositions of serpentinite seamounts in the Mariana forearc: Serpentinization processes, fluid sources and sulfur metasomatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, J.C.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2006-01-01

    The Mariana and Izu-Bonin arcs in the western Pacific are characterized by serpentinite seamounts in the forearc that provide unique windows into the mantle wedge. We present stable isotope (O, H, S, and C) data for serpentinites from Conical seamount in the Mariana forearc and S isotope data for Torishima seamount in the Izu-Bonin forearc in order to understand the compositions of fluids and temperatures of serpentinization in the mantle wedge, and to investigate the transport of sulfur from the slab to the mantle wedge. Six serpentine mineral separates have a restricted range of ??18O (6.5-8.5???). Antigorite separates have ??D values of -29.5??? to -45.5??? that reflect serpentinization within the mantle wedge whereas chrysotile has low ??D values (-51.8??? to -84.0???) as the result of re-equilibration with fluids at low temperatures. Fractionation of oxygen isotopes between serpentine and magnetite indicate serpentinization temperatures of 300-375 ??C. Two late cross-fiber chrysotile veins have higher ??18O values of 8.9??? to 10.8??? and formed at lower temperatures (as low as ???100 ??C). Aqueous fluids in equilibrium with serpentine at 300-375 ??C had ??18O = 6.5-9??? and ??D = -4??? to -26???, consistent with sediment dehydration reactions at temperatures aragonite veins in metabasalt and siltstone clasts within the serpentinite flows have ??18O = 16.7-24.5???, consistent with the serpentinizing fluids at temperatures <250 ??C. ??13C values of 0.1-2.5??? suggest a source in subducting carbonate sediments. The ??34S values of sulfide in serpentinites on Conical Seamount (-6.7??? to 9.8???) result from metasomatism through variable reduction of aqueous sulfate (??34S = 14???) derived from slab sediments. Despite sulfur metasomatism, serpentinites have low sulfur contents (generally < 164 ppm) that reflect the highly depleted nature of the mantle wedge. The serpentinites are mostly enriched in 34S (median ??34Ssulfide = 4.5???), consistent with a 34S

  12. Growth of the Afanasy Nikitin seamount and its relationship with the 85 degree E Ridge, northeastern Indian Ocean.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Krishna, K.S.; Bull, J.M.; Ishizuka, O.; Scrutton, R.A.; Jaishankar, S.; Banakar, V.K.

    –Antarctica Ridge is invoked at a time between anomalies 31 and 25 in order to isolate the hotspot on the Antarc- tic plate. However, there is no evidence found in the linear magnetic anomaly pattern for such a ridge jump at this time, rather observed a con- tinuous... give no evidence for flex- ure of the oceanic basement towards the seamount that would be associated with substantial con- struction of the ANS in an intraplate setting, although small volcanic additions in an intraplate setting cannot be ruled out...

  13. Colonial life under the Humboldt Current System: deep-sea corals from O'Higgins I seamount

    OpenAIRE

    Cañete, Juan I; Haussermann, Verena

    2012-01-01

    A benthic community constituted by an assemblage of at least four species of deep-sea corals collected in only one trawl carried-out on the summit of the O'Higgins I seamount, central Chile. The corals were collected in only one trawl carried-out during a Chilean-Japanese cruise onboard the R/V" Koyo Maru" in December 29, 2004. Presence of oxygenated and cold Antarctic Intermediate Water (>400 m depth) on the plateau was recorded under of the Equatorial Subsurface Water associated to the oxyg...

  14. High and highly variable cooling rates during pyroclastic eruptions on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helo, Christoph; Clague, David A.; Dingwell, Donald B.; Stix, John

    2013-03-01

    We present a calorimetric analysis of pyroclastic glasses and glassy sheet lava flow crusts collected on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, NE Pacific Ocean, at a water depth of about 1400 m. The pyroclastic glasses, subdivided into thin limu o Pele fragments and angular, blocky clasts, were retrieved from various stratigraphic horizons of volcaniclastic deposits on the upper flanks of the volcanic edifice. Each analysed pyroclastic sample consists of a single type of fragment from one individual horizon. The heat capacity (cp) was measured via differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and analysed using relaxation geospeedometry to obtain the natural cooling rate across the glass transition. The limu o Pele samples (1 mm grain size fraction) and angular fragments (0.5 mm grain size fraction) exhibit cooling rates of 104.3 to 106.0 K s- 1 and 103.9 to 105.1 K s- 1, respectively. A coarser grain size fraction, 2 mm for limu o Pele and 1 mm for the angular clasts yields cooling rates at the order of 103.7 K s- 1. The range of cooling rates determined for the different pyroclastic deposits presumably relates to the size or intensity of the individual eruptions. The outer glassy crusts of the sheet lava flows were naturally quenched at rates between 63 K s- 1 and 103 K s- 1. By comparing our results with published data on the very slow quenching of lava flow crusts, we suggest that (1) fragmentation and cooling appear to be coupled dynamically and (2) ductile deformation upon the onset of cooling is restricted due to the rapid increase in viscosity. Lastly, we suggest that thermally buoyant plumes that may arise from rapid heat transfer efficiently separate clasts based on their capability to rise within the plume and as they subsequently settle from it.

  15. Using the OOI Cabled Array HD Camera to Explore Geophysical and Oceanographic Problems at Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crone, T. J.; Knuth, F.; Marburg, A.

    2016-12-01

    A broad array of Earth science problems can be investigated using high-definition video imagery from the seafloor, ranging from those that are geological and geophysical in nature, to those that are biological and water-column related. A high-definition video camera was installed as part of the Ocean Observatory Initiative's core instrument suite on the Cabled Array, a real-time fiber optic data and power system that stretches from the Oregon Coast to Axial Seamount on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. This camera runs a 14-minute pan-tilt-zoom routine 8 times per day, focusing on locations of scientific interest on and near the Mushroom vent in the ASHES hydrothermal field inside the Axial caldera. The system produces 13 GB of lossless HD video every 3 hours, and at the time of this writing it has generated 2100 recordings totaling 28.5 TB since it began streaming data into the OOI archive in August of 2015. Because of the large size of this dataset, downloading the entirety of the video for long timescale investigations is not practical. We are developing a set of user-side tools for downloading single frames and frame ranges from the OOI HD camera raw data archive to aid users interested in using these data for their research. We use these tools to download about one year's worth of partial frame sets to investigate several questions regarding the hydrothermal system at ASHES, including the variability of bacterial "floc" in the water-column, and changes in high temperature fluid fluxes using optical flow techniques. We show that while these user-side tools can facilitate rudimentary scientific investigations using the HD camera data, a server-side computing environment that allows users to explore this dataset without downloading any raw video will be required for more advanced investigations to flourish.

  16. Microbial Diversity in Hydrothermal Surface to Sub-surface Environment of Suiyo Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Y.; Sunamura, M.; Kitamura, K.; Kurusu, Y.; Nakamura, K.; Maruyama, A.

    2002-12-01

    After excavation trials to a hydrothermal subsurface biosphere of the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, microbial diversity was examined using samples collected from drilled boreholes and natural vents with an catheter-type in situ microbial entrapment/incubator. This instrument consisted of a heat-tolerant cylindrical pipe with entrapment of a titanium-mesh capsule, containing sterilized inorganic porous grains, on the tip. After 3-10 day deployment in venting fluids with the maximum temperatures from 156 to 305degC, Microbial DNA was extracted from the grains and a 16S rDNA region was amplified and sequenced. Through the phylogenetic analysis of total 72 Bacteria and 30 Archaea clones, we found three novel phylogenetic groups in this hydrothermal surface to subsurface biosphere. Some new clades within the epsilon-Proteobacteria, which seemed to be microaerophilic, moderate thermophilic, and/or sulfur oxidizing, were detected. Clones related to moderate thermophilic and photosynthetic microbes were found in grain-attached samples at collapsed borehole and natural vent sites. We also detected a new clade closely related to a hyperthermophilic Archaea, Methanococcus jannashii, which has the capability of growing autotrophically on hydrogen and producing methane. However, the later two phylogroups were estimated as below a detection limit in microscopic cell counting, i.e., fluorescence in situ hybridization and direct counting. Most of microbes in venting fluids were assigned to be Bacteria, but difficult in specifying them using any known probes. The environment must be notable in microbial and genetic resources, while the ecosystem seems to be mainly supported by chemosynthetic products through the microbial sulfur oxidation, as in most deep-sea hydrothermal systems.

  17. Microbiological characterization of post-eruption "snowblower" vents at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie L Meyer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Microbial processes within the subseafloor can be examined during the ephemeral and uncommonly observed phenomena known as snowblower venting. Snowblowers are characterized by the large quantity of white floc that is expelled from the seafloor following mid-ocean ridge eruptions. During these eruptions, rapidly cooling lava entrains seawater and hydrothermal fluids enriched in geochemical reactants, creating a natural bioreactor that supports a subseafloor microbial bloom. Previous studies hypothesized that the eruption-associated floc is made by sulfide-oxidizing bacteria; however, the microbes involved were never identified. Here we present the first molecular analysis combined with microscopy of microbial communities in snowblower vents from samples collected shortly after the 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano on the Juan de Fuca Ridge. We obtained fluid samples and white flocculent material from active snowblower vents as well as orange flocculent material found on top of newly formed lava flows. Both flocculent types revealed diverse cell types and particulates when examined by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy. Distinct archaeal and bacterial communities were detected in each sample type through Illumina tag sequencing of 16S rRNA genes and through sequencing of the sulfide oxidation gene, soxB. In fluids and white floc, the dominant bacteria were sulfur-oxidizing Epsilonproteobacteria and the dominant archaea were thermophilic Methanococcales. In contrast, the dominant organisms in the orange floc were Gammaproteobacteria and Thaumarchaeota Marine Group I. In all samples, bacteria greatly outnumbered archaea. The presence of anaerobic methanogens and microaerobic Epsilonproteobacteria in snowblower communities provides evidence that these blooms are seeded by subseafloor microbes, rather than from microbes in bottom seawater. These eruptive events thus provide a unique opportunity to observe subseafloor

  18. Internal waves and modern and ancient hiatuses in pelagic caps of Pacific guyots and seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Neil; Simmons, Harper; Lear, Carrie

    2013-04-01

    Locations of recent non-deposition and ancient hiatuses in the pelagic caps of guyots and seamounts are compared with paleotemperature and physiographic information to speculate on the character of internal tidal waves in the upper Pacific Ocean through the Cenozoic. Internal tidal waves are generated where the ocean barotropic tide passes over the Hawaiian and other major ridges in the Pacific basin. Drill core and geophysical evidence for sediment accumulation, non-deposition or erosion are used to classify broadly sites as either accumulating or eroding/non-depositing in the recent geological past. When these classified sites are compared against results of a numerical model of the internal tide field (Simmons, Ocean Mod. 2008), the sites accumulating particles over the past few million years are all found to lie away from beams of the modeled internal tide, while those that have not been accumulating are in areas of high internal wave energy. Given the correspondence to modern internal wave conditions, we examine whether internal tides can explain ancient hiatuses at the drill sites. For example, Late Cenozoic pelagic caps on guyots among the Marshall Islands contain two hiatuses of broadly similar age, but the dates of the first pelagic sediments deposited following each hiatus do not correlate between guyots, suggesting that they originate not from universal factors (e.g., water chemistry) but local, probably physical factors, such as internal tides. We investigate how changing boundary conditions such as ocean temperature and basin physiography may have affected the geometry and vigour of internal tides through the Cenozoic. Changes in the geometry of ridges underlying the Solomon, Bonin and Marianas Island chains caused by plate tectonics and subsidence may be responsible for sediment hiatuses at these far-field guyot sites.

  19. 3D-Reconstruction of recent volcanic activity from ROV-video, Charles Darwin Seamounts, Cape Verdes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Hansteen, T. H.; Kutterolf, S.; Freundt, A.; Devey, C. W.

    2011-12-01

    As well as providing well-localized samples, Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) produce huge quantities of visual data whose potential for geological data mining has seldom if ever been fully realized. We present a new workflow to derive essential results of field geology such as quantitative stratigraphy and tectonic surveying from ROV-based photo and video material. We demonstrate the procedure on the Charles Darwin Seamounts, a field of small hot spot volcanoes recently identified at a depth of ca. 3500m southwest of the island of Santo Antao in the Cape Verdes. The Charles Darwin Seamounts feature a wide spectrum of volcanic edifices with forms suggestive of scoria cones, lava domes, tuff rings and maar-type depressions, all of comparable dimensions. These forms, coupled with the highly fragmented volcaniclastic samples recovered by dredging, motivated surveying parts of some edifices down to centimeter scale. ROV-based surveys yielded volcaniclastic samples of key structures linked by extensive coverage of stereoscopic photographs and high-resolution video. Based upon the latter, we present our workflow to derive three-dimensional models of outcrops from a single-camera video sequence, allowing quantitative measurements of fault orientation, bedding structure, grain size distribution and photo mosaicking within a geo-referenced framework. With this information we can identify episodes of repetitive eruptive activity at individual volcanic centers and see changes in eruptive style over time, which, despite their proximity to each other, is highly variable.

  20. A comparison of genetic connectivity in two deep sea corals to examine whether seamounts are isolated islands or stepping stones for dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Karen J.; Gunasekera, Rasanthi M.

    2017-04-01

    Ecological processes in the deep sea are poorly understood due to the logistical constraints of sampling thousands of metres below the ocean’s surface and remote from most land masses. Under such circumstances, genetic data provides unparalleled insight into biological and ecological relationships. We use microsatellite DNA to compare the population structure, reproductive mode and dispersal capacity in two deep sea corals from seamounts in the Southern Ocean. The solitary coral Desmophyllum dianthus has widespread dispersal consistent with its global distribution and resilience to disturbance. In contrast, for the matrix-forming colonial coral Solenosmilia variabilis asexual reproduction is important and the dispersal of sexually produced larvae is negligible, resulting in isolated populations. Interestingly, despite the recognised impacts of fishing on seamount communities, genetic diversity on fished and unfished seamounts was similar for both species, suggesting that evolutionary resilience remains despite reductions in biomass. Our results provide empirical evidence that a group of seamounts can function either as isolated islands or stepping stones for dispersal for different taxa. Furthermore different strategies will be required to protect the two sympatric corals and consequently the recently declared marine reserves in this region may function as a network for D. dianthus, but not for S. variabilis.

  1. High-resolution AUV mapping of the 2015 flows at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paduan, J. B.; Chadwick, W. W., Jr.; Clague, D. A.; Le Saout, M.; Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H. J.; Yoerger, D.

    2016-12-01

    Lava flows erupted in April 2015 at Axial Seamount were mapped at 1-m resolution with the AUV Sentry in August 2015 and the MBARI Mapping AUVs in July 2016 and observed and sampled with ROVs on those same expeditions. Thirty percent of terrain covered by new flows had been mapped by the MBARI AUVs prior to the eruption. Differencing of before and after maps (using ship-collected bathymetry where the AUV had not mapped before) allows calculation of extents and volumes of flows and shows new fissures. The maps reveal unexpected fissure patterns and shifts in the style of flow emplacement through a single eruption. There were 11 separate flows totaling 1.48 x 108 m3 of lava erupted from numerous en echelon fissures over 19 km on the NE caldera floor, on the NE flank, and down the N rift zone. Flows in and around the caldera have maximum thicknesses of 5-19 m. Most erupted as sheet flows and spread along intricate channels that terminated in thin margins. Some utilized pre-existing fissures. Some flows erupted from short fissures, while at least two longer new fissures produced little or no lava. A flow on the upper N rift has a spectacular lava channel flanked by narrow lava pillars supporting a thin roof left after the flow drained. A shatter ring still emanating warm fluid is visible in the map as a 15-m wide low cone. Hundreds of exploded pillows were observed but are not discernable in the bathymetry. The northern-most three flows deep on the N rift are similar in area to the others but comprise the bulk of the eruption volume. Differencing of ship-based bathymetry shows only these flows. Near the eruptive fissures they are sheet flows, but as they flowed downslope they built complexes of coalesced pillow mounds up to 67-128 m thick. Changes in flow morphology occurred through the course of the eruption. Large pillow mounds had molten cores that deformed as the eruption progressed. One flow began as a thin, effusive sheet flow but as the eruption rate decreased, a

  2. High Resolution Seismic Images of Transition Zone Discontinuities beneath the Hawaii-Emperor Seamount Chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Q.; Wang, P.; van der Hilst, R. D.; Shim, S.

    2009-12-01

    Taking advantage of the abundance of natural sources (earthquakes) in western Pacific subduction zones and the many seismograph stations in the Americas, we use inverse scattering - a generalized Radon transform - of SS precursors to image the transition zone discontinuities underneath Hawaii and the Hawaii-Emperor seamount chain. The GRT makes use of scattering theory and extracts structural information from broad band data windows that include precursors to SS (which are the specular reflections at the discontinuities that form the main arrivals) as well as non-specular scattered energy (which is often discarded as noise). More than 150,000 seismograms (from the IRIS Data Management Center) are used to form a 3-D image of the transition zone discontinuities beneath the central Pacific. In addition to clear signals near 410, 520, and 660 km depth, the data also reveal scatter interfaces near 370 km dept and between 800-1000 km depth, which may be regional, laterally intermittent scatter horizons. Our images reveal a conspicuous uplift of the 660 discontinuity in a region of 800km in diameter to the west of the active volcanoes of Hawaii. No correspondent localized depression of the 410 discontinuity is found. Instead, we find a smaller scale anomaly suggesting that the 410 discontinuity is locally elevated in the same region. This may indicate the presence of melt or minor chemical constitutes. The lack of correlation between and differences in lateral length scale of the topographies of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities are also consistent with a deep-mantle plume impinging on the transition zone, creating a pond of hot material underneath 660 discontinuity, and with secondary plumes connecting to the present-day hotspot at Earth’s surface. Our observations suggest that more complicated plume morphology and plume dynamics within the Earth's mantle should be taken into account to describe the plumes and, in particular, mass transport across the transition zone

  3. Telepresence and real-time data transmission from Axial Seamount: implications for education and community engagement utilizing the OOI-RSN cabled observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fundis, A. T.; Kelley, D. S.; Sautter, L. R.; Proskurowski, G.; Kawka, O.; Delaney, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    Axial Seamount, the most robust volcanic system on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, is a future site of the cabled observatory component of the National Science Foundation's Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) (see Delaney et al; Proskurowski et al., this meeting). In 2014, high-bandwidth data, high-definition video and digital still imagery will be streamed live from the cable observatory at Axial Seamount via the Internet to researchers, educators, and the public. The real-time data and high-speed communications stream will open new approaches for the onshore public and scientists to experience and engage in sea-going research as it is happening. For the next 7 years, the University of Washington and the OOI will collaboratively support an annual multi-week cruise aboard the research vessel Thomas G. Thompson. These "VISIONS" cruises will include scientific and maintenance operations related to the cabled network, the OOI Regional Scale Nodes (RSN). Leading up to 2014, VISIONS cruises will also be used to engage students, educators, scientists and the public in science focused at Axial Seamount through avenues that will be adaptable for the live data stream via the OOI-RSN cable. Here we describe the education and outreach efforts employed during the VISIONS'11 cruise to Axial Seamount including: 1) a live HD video stream from the seafloor and the ship to onshore scientists, educators, and the public; 2) a pilot program to teach undergraduates from the ship via live and taped broadcasts; 3) utilizing social media from the ship to communicate with scientists, educators, and the public onshore; and 4) providing undergraduate and graduate students onboard immersion into sea-going research. The 2011 eruption at Axial Seamount (see Chadwick et al., this meeting) is a prime example of the potential behind having these effective tools in place to engage the scientific community, students, and the public when the OOI cabled observatory comes online in 2014.

  4. 40Ar-39Ar age clustering in the active phonolitic Cadamosto Seamount (Cape Verdes): Indications for periodic magmatic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samrock, L. K.; Hansteen, T. H.; Wartho, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Cape Verde archipelago is situated 400-800 km off the west coast of Africa and is comprised of a northern and southern chain of islands and seamounts. Morphological observations and previous radiometric dating of the islands indicate a slow age progression, over 22 Ma, from east to west (Holm et al. 2008). We present the first radiometric ages for Cadamosto Seamount, which is composed of complex evolved volcanics and is situated at the southwestern tip of the Cape Verde archipelago (e.g. Barker et al. 2012). We analyzed five different submarine phonolites that were sampled by remotely operated vehicles (ROV) Kiel 6000 and dredging during the RV Meteor (M80/3) and RV Poseidon (POS320/2) cruises. Fresh sanidine, nepheline, and biotite grains were selected and carefully prepared for 40Ar-39Ar single grain total fusion analysis. Sanidine single grain 40Ar-39Ar ages from 5 samples range from 11.5 ± 6.5 ka to 349.0 ± 20.4 ka (2σ errors), and cluster in several age groupings (using the decay constant and atmospheric air ratio of Steiger & Jäger (1977), and age standard TCS2 (27.87 ± 0.04 Ma; 1σ; M.A. Lanphere, pers. comm.)). Three age groups can be identified within the youngest (0-170 ka) sanidines, which are separated by periods of 52-54 ka. Nepheline grains from one sample yielded much older ages of 169.5 ± 16.5 ka to 1521.5 ± 8.3 ka (2σ). Our data suggests young ages for the Cadamosto Seamount, which is in accordance with recorded seismic activity (Grevemeyer et al. 2010), and its position adjacent to the recently active islands of Fogo (last eruption in 2014/2015) and Brava (recent seismic activity). The different sub-groups of sanidine 40Ar-39Ar ages can be used to identify different activity maxima corresponding to cycles of magmatic productivity in a long-lived magmatic system. Ongoing petrologic investigations will be used to identify the relative importance of processes such as mantle melting rates, magma replenishment and magma chamber processes

  5. Montes submarinos de Nazca y Salas y Gómez: una revisión para el manejo y conservación Seamounts of Nazca and Salas y Gómez: a review for management and conservation purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Gálvez-Larach

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Con motivo de la creciente preocupación internacional por el manejo y conservación de ecosistemas marinos vulnerables, entre los que se cuentan los montes submarinos y los corales de aguas frías de las cordilleras de Nazca y Salas y Gómez, y en vista de la inminente creación de la Organización Regional de Administración Pesquera del Pacifico Sur, se hace necesaria una revisión de los principales antecedentes científicos sobre estas cadenas montañosas como un insumo para la toma de decisiones. El presente documento atiende dicha necesidad considerando los aspectos geológicos, oceanógraficos, biológicos, ecológicos y pesqueros asociados a Nazca y, Salas y Gómez, junto con identificar las opciones de manejo. A pesar que los estudios en el área son escasos y fragmentados, se destaca su particularidad debido a los altos niveles de ende-mismo, alta diversidad de especies, alta concentración de montes submarinos, presencia de corales de aguas frías, mayor nivel de productividad en relación a las aguas circundantes y su potencialidad para actividades de océano-minería y pesca de fondo. Debido a la lejanía del área y los altos costos involucrados, una mayor cooperación internacional se requerirá para abordar futuros estudios, al tiempo que la creación de una red de Á-reas Marinas Protegidas se identifica como la mejor opción para el manejo y conservación.Due to growing international awareness of the importance of the conservation and management of vulnerable marine ecosystems - of which the seamounts and deep-sea corals of the Nazca and Salas y Gómez submarine ridges are examples - and taking into account the imminent establishment of a South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organization, a scientific review of this seamount chain is needed to provide input for decision-making processes. This paper provides such a review, considering geological, oceanographic, biological, ecological, and fisheries issues associated with

  6. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Northeast Reserve, Haystack Seamount, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents an 8 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a seamount/bank east of Fajardo, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  7. Oceanographic data collected during the Deep Water Corals of the Davidson Seamount 2006 expedition aboard the R/V WESTERN FLYER in the North Pacific from January 26, 2006 - February 4, 2006 (NODC Accession 0052881)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Building off the successes of an Office of Ocean Exploration (OE) expedition to Davidson Seamount in 2002, this project will focus on deep-water corals. The...

  8. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Escollo Grappler Seamount, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a seamount/bank East of Fajardo, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  9. NOAA TIFF Image - 4m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Escollo Grappler Seamount, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a seamount/bank East of Fajardo, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  10. Oceanographic data collected during the Mountains in the Sea: Exploring the New England Seamount Chain 2003 on RV Atlantis in North Atlantic Ocean from July 11, 2003 - July 19, 2003 (NODC Accession 0072308)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This summer, with the help of the Alvin submersible, a multidisciplinary team of scientists and educators visited several little known seamounts in the North...

  11. NOAA TIFF Image - 8m Backscatter Mosaic, Puerto Rico 2013, Northeast Reserve, Haystack Seamount, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents an 8 meter resolution backscatter mosaic of a seamount/bank east of Fajardo, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  12. Uranium series disequilibrium dating of coral and shell fragments dredged around islands and seamounts during the 1986 HMNZS Tui cruises

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, W.J.; Ditchburn, R.G.; Glasby, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Nine coral and two shell samples dredged from the flanks of various islands and seamounts in the subtropical SW Pacific were processed through the uranium series analysis system and ages calculated. Although there is a tendency for sample ages to increase with water depth, the presence of corals less than 1000 years old at water depths of 400 to almost 1100 m indicates the influence of recent slumping rather than crustal warping or eustatic changes as reasons for their present position. This phenomenon is related to mass wasting of material down slope. It is possible that samples collected systematically down the slopes of these islands would enable the frequency and times of slumping to be determined. (author). 7 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs

  13. Origin of seamount volcanism in northeast Indian Ocean with emphasis on Christmas Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taneja, R.; O'Neill, C.; Rushmer, T. A.; Jourdan, F.; Blichert-Toft, J.; Turner, S.; Lackie, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    east coast have 550 - 900 ppm Sr. Despite an age difference of more than 38 Ma, there is no significant difference between Hf, Nd and Pb isotopic signatures of the Upper Volcanic and Lower Volcanic series which show an enriched component, interpreted by Hoernle et.al (2011) to be due to contamination by continental material. This signifies a common homogenous source for a period of more than 40 Ma in contrast to many OIBs. Dale's do have a distinct isotopic character from the Lower Volcanic Series and this signature is still under study. These geochemical analyses from the island broadly lie within those sampled by Hoernle et al. (2011) from their regional study. Here, we are looking at the island in detail. We present geochronological, geophysical and geochemical data from the island which addresses this model using Christmas Island as an example. Ref: Hoernle et al., 2011, Origin of Indian Ocean Seamount Province by shallow recycling of continental lithosphere, Nature Geoscience 4: 883-887

  14. Insights From Magnesium Isotopic Compositions on the Oceanic Hydrothermal Circulation: Is Seamount Weathering the Solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galy, A.; Carder, E.; Elderfield, H.

    2006-12-01

    and concentration data are consistent with the preferential incorporation of heavy isotopes of Mg during the weathering and already similar to the mechanisms found in soil (Tipper et al., 2006a, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2006.04.033). The fractionation factor (α) is around 1.001 for the high-T° fluids, while the low temperature fluids, samples off axis during the ODP Leg 168 (Est of Juan de Fuca Ridge), requires a more variable and higher α of 1.001 to 1.003. At low temperature, the α is somehow greater that the estimate made from the soil formation but the T-α relationship is consistent with the expected behaviour for an equilibrium isotopic fractionation. However, such a large α implies that the significant flux of the low-T component of the hydrothermal circulation required to fulfil the heat budget of the oceanic lithosphere would buffer any isotopic mass balance calculation of the oceanic Mg to an unsustainable value (e.g. Tipper et al., 2006b, doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2006.07.037). Therefore, either the low-T hydrothermal circulation leaves the Mg unaffected, or the off axis fluids from the ODP Leg 168 are not representative of the global low-T hydrothermal circulation. Given that Mg gets significantly re-incorporated in soil processes, we favour the later hypothesis and propose that a significant part of the low-T hydrothermal circulation is occurring around relief of the oceanic floor, including seamounts, with a different residence-time and chemistry than what have been described in the ODP Leg 168 setting.

  15. A decade of volcanic construction and destruction at the summit of NW Rota-1 seamount: 2004-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnur, Susan R.; Chadwick, William W.; Embley, Robert W.; Ferrini, Vicki L.; de Ronde, Cornel E. J.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Deardorff, Nicholas D.; Merle, Susan G.; Dziak, Robert P.; Haxel, Joe H.; Matsumoto, Haru

    2017-03-01

    Arc volcanoes are important to our understanding of submarine volcanism because at some sites frequent eruptions cause them to grow and collapse on human timescales. This makes it possible to document volcanic processes. Active submarine eruptions have been observed at the summit of NW Rota-1 in the Mariana Arc. We use remotely operated vehicle videography and repeat high-resolution bathymetric surveys to construct geologic maps of the summit of NW Rota-1 in 2009 and 2010 and relate them to the geologic evolution of the summit area over a 10 year period (2004-2014). We find that 2009 and 2010 were characterized by different eruptive styles, which affected the type and distribution of eruptive deposits at the summit. Year 2009 was characterized by ultraslow extrusion and autobrecciation of lava at a single eruptive vent, producing a large cone of blocky lava debris. In 2010, higher-energy explosive eruptions occurred at multiple closely spaced vents, producing a thin blanket of pebble-sized tephra overlying lava flow outcrops. A landslide that occurred between 2009 and 2010 had a major effect on lithofacies distribution by removing the debris cone and other unconsolidated deposits, revealing steep massive flow cliffs. This relatively rapid alternation between construction and destruction forms one end of a seamount growth and mass wasting spectrum. Intraplate seamounts, which tend to grow larger than arc volcanoes, experience collapse events that are orders of magnitude larger and much less frequent than those occurring at subduction zone settings. Our results highlight the interrelated cyclicity of eruptive activity and mass wasting at submarine arc volcanoes.

  16. Age progressive volcanism opposite Nazca plate motion: Insights from seamounts on the northeastern margin of the Galapagos Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinton, Christopher W.; Hauff, Folkmar; Hoernle, Kaj; Werner, Reinhard

    2018-06-01

    We present new geochemical and 40Ar/39Ar analyses from seven seamounts located off the northeastern margin of the shallow Galápagos Platform. Initial volcanism at 5.2 Ma created a small island (Pico) over the current location of the hotspot with geochemically enriched lavas. There is no further record of magmatism in the study area until 3.8 to 2.5 Ma, during which four roughly conical volcanoes (Sunray, Grande, Fitzroy, and Beagle) formed through eruption of lavas derived from a depleted mantle source. Sunray, Fitzroy, and Grande were islands that existed for 3 m.y. ending with the submergence of Fitzroy at 0.5 Ma. The youngest seamounts, Largo and Iguana, do not appear to have been subaerial and were active at 1.3 Ma and 0.5 Ma, respectively, with the style of edifice changing from the previous large cones to E-W elongate, composite structures. The progression of magmatism suggests that Pico erupted near 91.5°W near the location of the Galápagos plume while the others formed well east of the plume center. If the locations of initial volcanism are calculated using the eastward velocity of the Nazca plate, there appears to be a progression of younger volcanism toward the east, opposite what would be expected from a fixed mantle plume source. The rate that initial volcanism moves eastward is close to the plate velocity. A combination of higher temperature and geochemical enrichment of the thickened lithosphere of the Galápagos platform could have provided a viscosity gradient at the boundary between the thick lithosphere and the thinner oceanic lithosphere to the northeast. As this boundary moved eastward with the Nazca plate, it progressively triggered shear-driven mantle upwelling and volcanism.

  17. Expansion of the South China Sea basin: Constraints from magnetic anomaly stripes, sea floor topography, satellite gravity and submarine geothermics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuezhong Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The widely distributed E–W-trending magnetic anomaly stripes in the central basin and the N–E-trending magnetic anomaly stripes in the southwest sub-basin provide the most important evidence for Neogene expansion of the South China Sea. The expansion mechanism remains, however, controversial because of the lack of direct drilling data, non-systematic marine magnetic survey data, and irregular magnetic anomaly stripes with two obvious directions. For example, researchers have inferred different ages and episodes of expansion for the central basin and southwest sub-basin. Major controversy centers on the order of basinal expansion and the mechanism of expansion for the entire South China Sea basin. This study attempts to constrain these problems from a comprehensive analysis of the seafloor topography, magnetic anomaly stripes, regional aeromagnetic data, satellite gravity, and submarine geothermics. The mapped seafloor terrain shows that the central basin is a north-south rectangle that is relatively shallow with many seamounts, whereas the southwest sub-basin is wide in northeast, gradually narrows to the southwest, and is relatively deeper with fewer seamounts. Many magnetic anomaly stripes are present in the central basin with variable dimensions and directions that are dominantly EW-trending, followed by the NE-, NW- and NS-trending. Conversely such stripes are few in the southwest sub-basin and mainly NE-trending. Regional magnetic data suggest that the NW-trending Ailaoshan-Red River fault extends into the South China Sea, links with the central fault zone in the South China Sea, which extends further southward to Reed Tablemount. Satellite gravity data show that both the central basin and southwest sub-basin are composed of oceanic crust. The Changlong seamount is particularly visible in the southwest sub-basin and extends eastward to the Zhenbei seamount. Also a low gravity anomaly zone coincides with the central fault zone in the sub

  18. Systematics of Alkali Metals in Pore Fluids from Serpentinite Mud Volcanoes: IODP Expedition 366

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, C. G.; Ryan, J.; Menzies, C. D.; Price, R. E.; Sissmann, O.

    2017-12-01

    IODP Expedition 366 focused, in part, on the study of geo­chemical cycling, matrix alteration, material and fluid transport, and deep biosphere processes within the subduction channel in the Mariana forearc. This was accomplished through integrated sampling of summit and flank regions of three active serpentinite mud volcanoes (Yinazao (Blue Moon), Asùt Tesoro (Big Blue), and Fantangisña (Celestial) Seamounts). These edifices present a transect of depths to the Pacific Plate, allowing one to characterize thermal, pressure and compositional effects on processes that are associated with the formation of serpentinite mud volcanoes and continued activity below and within them. Previous coring on ODP Legs 125 and 195 at two other serpentinite mud volcanoes (Conical and South Chamorro Seamounts) and piston, gravity, and push cores from several other Mariana serpentinite mud volcanoes add to this transect of sites where deep-sourced material is discharged at the seafloor. Pore waters (149 samples) were squeezed from serpentinite materials to determine the composition of deep-sourced fluid and to assess the character, extent, and effect of diagenetic reactions and mixing with seawater on the flanks of the seamounts as the serpentinite matrix weathers. In addition two Water Sampler Temperature Tool (WSTP) fluid samples were collected within two of the cased boreholes, each with at least 30 m of screened casing that allows formations fluids to discharge into the borehole. Shipboard results for Na and K record marked seamount-to-seamount differences in upwelling summit fluids, and complex systematics in fluids obtained from flank sites. Here we report new shore-based Rb and Cs measurements, two elements that have been used to constrain the temperature of the deep-sourced fluid. Data are consistent with earlier coring and drilling expeditions, resulting in systematic changes with depth (and by inference temperature) to the subduction channel.

  19. From the epipelagic zone to the abyss: Trophic structure at two seamounts in the subtropical and tropical Eastern Atlantic - Part II Benthopelagic fishes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denda, Anneke; Stefanowitsch, Benjamin; Christiansen, Bernd

    2017-12-01

    Specific mechanisms, driving trophic interactions between seamount associated fishes and the pelagic community may be highly variable in different seamount systems. This study investigated the trophic structure and the main prey of benthopelagic fishes from the summit and slope regions of Ampère and Senghor, two shallow seamounts in the subtropical and tropical NE Atlantic, and the adjacent deep-sea plains. For the identification of food sources and nutritional links to the pelagic realm a combination of stomach content and stable isotope ratio (δ13C and δ15N) analyses was used. δ13C ranged from -22.2‰ to -15.4‰ and δ15N covered a total range of 8.0-15.9‰. Feeding types of fish species comprised mainly zooplanktivores and mixed feeders, but also benthivores, piscivores, and predator-scavengers. Based on epipelagic particulate organic matter, they occupied trophic positions between the 2nd and 4th trophic level. Differences in stomach contents and stable isotope signatures indicate a resource partitioning among the benthopelagic fish fauna through distinct habitat choice, vertical feeding positions and prey selection. Topographic trapping of vertically migrating zooplankton on the summit seemed to be of minor importance for food supply of the resident near-bottom fishes, rather horizontal current-driven advection of the planktonic prey was assumed as major factor. Vertically migrating micronekton and mesopelagic fishes show up as key players within the food webs at Ampère and Senghor Seamounts and the adjacent deep-sea plains.

  20. New 40Ar / 39Ar age and geochemical data from seamounts in the Canary and Madeira volcanic provinces: Support for the mantle plume hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldmacher, J.; Hoernle, K.; Bogaard, P. v. d.; Duggen, S.; Werner, R.

    2005-08-01

    The role of mantle plumes in the formation of intraplate volcanic islands and seamount chains is being increasingly questioned. Particular examples are the abundant and somewhat irregularly distributed island and seamount volcanoes off the coast of northwest Africa. New 40Ar / 39Ar ages and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope geochemistry of volcanic rocks from seamounts northeast of the Madeira Islands (Seine and Unicorn) and northeast of the Canary Islands (Dacia and Anika), however, provide support for the plume hypothesis. The oldest ages of shield stage volcanism from Canary and Madeira volcanic provinces confirm progressions of increasing age to the northeast. Average volcanic age progression of ∼1.2 cm/a is consistent with rotation of the African plate at an angular velocity of ∼0.20° ± 0.05 /Ma around a common Euler pole at approximately 56° N, 45° W computed for the period of 0-35 Ma. A Euler pole at 35° N, 45° W is calculated for the time interval of 35-64 Ma. The isotope geochemistry further confirms that the Madeira and Canary provinces are derived from different sources, consistent with distinct plumes having formed each volcanic group. Conventional hotspot models, however, cannot easily explain the up to 40 m.y. long volcanic history at single volcanic centers, long gaps in volcanic activity, and the irregular distribution of islands and seamounts in the Canary province. A possible explanation could involve interaction of the Canary mantle plume with small-scale upper mantle processes such as edge-driven convection. Juxtaposition of plume and non-plume volcanism could also account for observed inconsistencies of the classical hotspot concept in other volcanic areas.

  1. Late Paleocene-middle Eocene benthic foraminifera on a Pacific seamount (Allison Guyot, ODP Site 865): Greenhouse climate and superimposed hyperthermal events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreguín-Rodríguez, Gabriela J.; Alegret, Laia; Thomas, Ellen

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the response of late Paleocene-middle Eocene (~60-37.5 Ma) benthic foraminiferal assemblages to long-term climate change and hyperthermal events including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) at Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 865 on Allison Guyot, a seamount in the Mid-Pacific Mountains. Seamounts are isolated deep-sea environments where enhanced current systems interrupt bentho-pelagic coupling, and fossil assemblages from such settings have been little evaluated. Assemblages at Site 865 are diverse and dominated by cylindrical calcareous taxa with complex apertures, an extinct group which probably lived infaunally. Dominance of an infaunal morphogroup is unexpected in a highly oligotrophic setting, but these forms may have been shallow infaunal suspension feeders, which were ecologically successful on the current-swept seamount. The magnitude of the PETM extinction at Site 865 was similar to other sites globally, but lower diversity postextinction faunas at this location were affected by ocean acidification as well as changes in current regime, which might have led to increased nutrient supply through trophic focusing. A minor hyperthermal saw less severe effects of changes in current regime, with no evidence for carbonate dissolution. Although the relative abundance of infaunal benthic foraminifera has been used as a proxy for surface productivity through bentho-pelagic coupling, we argue that this proxy can be used only in the absence of changes in carbonate saturation and current-driven biophysical linking.

  2. The new Hamburg Ocean-Bottom-Tiltmeter (OBT): A first deployment at Columbo Seamount (Aegean Sea, Greece)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huebscher, C.; Hensch, M.; Hort, M.; Dahm, T.; Klawonn, M.; Winter, S.

    2008-12-01

    Assessing the state of volcanic activity of seamounts is quite more complicated than for onshore volcanoes, due to the difficulty of deploying instruments. At land, various techniques are applied (seismic networks, deformation studies, gas measurements etc.). At sea, mainly seismological observations are used. However, especially onshore deformation studies using INSAR have proven to be valuable in determining recharge of magmatic systems. We therefore developed a free fall, self leveling Ocean Bottom Tiltmeter (OBT) to observe deformation on the seafloor, using a two component high resolution tilt sensor with a resolution of about 1nrad (0.15μ°) and a maximum signal of about 0.045rad (0.5°). It is mounted inside a 17~inch glass sphere on a levelling stage, which relevels the instrument between ± 5° down to an accuracy of 0.006°. During the measurement this leveling stage is standing on the bottom of the glass sphere. For releveling, the instrument is pulled up by thin nylon strings and then locked to a gimbal system in order to compensate for tilt. This releveling procedure is done once every 48 hours. Data is recorded on an 18bit data logger at 50Hz sampling rate. Additionally to tilt and seismic signals (using a hydrophone), temperature, absolute pressure to measure uplift or subsidence, and orientation (electronic compass) are monitored. 4 OBT systems were deployed between June 2006 - March 2007 at Columbo seamount, a submarine volcano north-east of Santorini island, Aegean Sea, Greece, on a 3 km long profile perpendicular to the first principal stress axis σ_1 of the regional stressfield. Three of the instruments operated the whole time, one shut down due to a short circuit. First data processing indicates that small regional earthquakes as well as major tectonic earthquakes are properly recorded by the system. We find small, but permanent short- period deformations associated with local earthquakes and also observe long-period deformation processes

  3. The isotope systematics of a juvenile intraplate volcano: Pb, Nd, and Srisotope ratios of basalts from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staudigel, H.; Zindler, A.; Leslie, T.

    1984-01-01

    Sr, Nd, and Pb isotope ratios for a representative suite of 15 basanites, alkali basalts, transitional basalts and tholeiites from Loihi Seamount, Hawaii, display unusually large variations for a single volcano, but lie within known ranges for Hawaiian basalts. Nd isotope ratios in alkali basalts show the largest relative variation (0.51291 - 0.51305), and include the nearly constant tholeiite value (approx.= 0.51297). Pb isotope ratios show similarly large ranges for tholeiites and alkali basalts and continue Tatsumoto's [31] 'Loa' trend towards higher 206 Pb/ 204 Pb, ratios, resulting in a substantial overlap with the 'Kea' trend. 206 Pb/ 204 Pb ratios for Loihi and other volcanoes along the Loa and Kea trends [31] are observed to correlate with the age of the underlying lithosphere suggesting lithosphere involvement in the formation of Hawaiian tholeiites. Loihi lavas display no correlation of Nd, Sr, or Pb isotope ratios with major element compositions or eruptive age, in contrast with observations of some other Hawaiian volcanoes. Isotope data for Loihi, as well as average values for Hawaiian volcanoes, are not adequately explained by previously proposed two-end-member models; new models for the origin and the development of Hawaiian volcanoes must include mixing of at least three geochemically distinct source regions and allow for the involvement of heterogeneous oceanic lithosphere. (orig.)

  4. Molecular biomineralization: toward an understanding of the biogenic origin of polymetallic nodules, seamount crusts, and hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; Wiens, Matthias; Schröder, Heinz C; Schloßmacher, Ute; Müller, Werner E G

    2011-01-01

    Polymetallic nodules and crusts, hydrothermal vents from the Deep Sea are economically interesting, since they contain alloying components, e.g., manganese or cobalt, that are used in the production of special steels; in addition, they contain rare metals applied for plasma screens, for magnets in hard disks, or in hybrid car motors. While hydrothermal vents can regenerate in weeks, polymetallic nodules and seamount crusts grow slowly. Even though the geochemical basis for the growth of the nodules and crusts has been well studied, the contribution of microorganisms to the formation of these minerals remained obscure. Recent HR-SEM (high-resolution scanning electron microscopy) analyses of nodules and crusts support their biogenic origin. Within the nodules, bacteria with surface S-layers are arranged on biofilm-like structures, around which Mn deposition starts. In crusts, coccoliths represent the dominant biologically formed structures that act as bio-seeds for an initial Mn deposition. In contrast, hydrothermal vents have apparently an abiogenic origin; however, their minerals are biogenically transformed by bacteria. In turn, strategies can now be developed for biotechnological enrichment as well as selective dissolution of metals from such concretions. We are convinced that the recent discoveries will considerably contribute to our understanding of the participation of organic matrices in the enrichment of those metals and will provide the basis for feasibility studies for biotechnological applications.

  5. Spatial and Temporal Changes in Fluid Chemistry and Microbial Community Diversity in Subseafloor Habitats at Axial Seamount Following the 1998 Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opatkiewicz, A. D.; Butterfield, D. A.; Baross, J. A.

    2006-12-01

    The subseafloor associated with hydrothermal vents has the potential to contribute significantly to primary production and biogeochemical cycling in the ocean. However, too little is known about the phylogenetic and physiological diversity of the microbial communities or their in situ activity to assess this potential. There are previous reports that subseafloor environments at active vent sites harbor a high diversity of microorganisms that include different thermal and metabolic groups of Bacteria and Archaea. However, little is known about how these communities change over time (minutes to years), at different vent sites, or in response to perturbations. In an effort to address these issues, the subseafloor microbial community diversity was examined from five diffuse-flow hydrothermal vent sites (distributed geographically over the seamount between three distinguishable vent fields) over the course of six years following the 1998 eruption at Axial Seamount (45° 58'N; 130° 00' W). PCR-based Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (TRFLP) analyses were used to follow changes in the microbial community structure. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis was used to identify the specific groups of Bacteria and Archaea from the TRFLP analyses. Deep-sea background seawater microorganisms were detected in hydrothermal fluid samples (Bacteria: Alpha and Gamma Proteobacteria, Archaea: Marine Group I Crenarchaeota and Marine Group II Euryarchaeota). The unique subseafloor phylotypes detected included Epsilon, Delta and Beta Proteobacteria, Methanococcales and thermophilic Euryarchaeota. Temperature and key chemical species, which indicate the degree of mixing of hydrothermal fluid with seawater in the subsurface, have been shown previously to be important in affecting the diversity of the microbial communities (Huber et al., 2003). This work substantiates these earlier findings and furthermore presents evidence that additional chemical species, distinguishing the

  6. Competing styles of deep-marine explosive eruptions revealed from Axial seamount and Juan De Fuca ridge push core records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portner, R. A.; Clague, D. A.; Paduan, J. B.; Martin, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    Pyroclastic lithofacies from Axial seamount record two distinct styles of deep-marine explosive eruption activity at 1.4-1.5 km water depth. The first style is preserved by limu o Pele-rich ash, which is widely distributed and thin bedded. Individual beds are normal to coarse-tail graded with increasing planar grain-fabric and decreasing limu o Pele thickness upward. Grain-size generally ranges from medium lapilli to medium ash, which is well to poorly sorted depending on the abundance of outsized fluidal shards. Fluidal shards include limu o Pele and Pele's hair, and lesser amounts of tendril-like tube pumice and droplet-like shards. Rare blocky to fluidal lapilli contain up to 70% vesicles. Angular plagioclase and basalt lithics occur in minor amounts (2-15%). Most beds display overall upward changes in particle morphology from dense blocky angular lapilli in their bases to fluidal ash in their tops. Shards are most equidimensional near the base, and most varied in the mid-upper parts of most beds where 4-8 mm size limu occur with 1-2 mm blocky shards. This outsized-component association results from drastically different settling speeds for the two morphologies. Outsized fluidal shards become abundant across a relatively sharp boundary in the middle to lower portions of most beds causing a seemingly double-graded appearance. These systematic changes in particle morphology and grain size suggest a cogenetic association of blocky and fluidal shards to the same depositional event and causative eruption. Fluidal-vesicular particle morphologies suggest that this lithofacies represents ash fall from magmatically explosive eruptions. Planar-grain fabric trends, absence of shard imbrication, and grading profiles suggest that beds were deposited via near-vertical suspension fall-out from weak turbidity flows. The second pyroclastic lithofacies is dominated by normal graded greenish grey ashy mud beds. Ash makes up 10-80% of individual beds, and is well-sorted, coarse- to

  7. Lessons from Suiyo Seamount studies, for understanding extreme (ancient?) microbial ecosystems in the deep-sea hydrothermal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, A.; Higashi, Y.; Sunamura, M.; Urabe, T.

    2004-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems are driven with various geo-thermally modified, mainly reduced, compounds delivered from extremely hot subsurface environments. To date, several unique microbes including thermophilic archaeons have been isolated from/around vent chimneys. However, there is little information about microbes in over-vent and sub-vent fields. Here, we report several new findings on microbial diversity and ecology of the Suiyo Seamount that locates on the Izu-Bonin Arc in the northwest Pacific Ocean, as a result of the Japanese Archaean Park project, with special concern to the sub-vent biosphere. At first, we succeeded to reveal a very unique microbial ecosystem in hydrothermal plume reserved within the outer rim of the seamount crater, that is, it consisted of almost all metabolically active microbes belonged to only two Bacteria phylotypes, probably of sulfur oxidizers. In the center of the caldera seafloor (ca. 1,388-m deep) consisted mainly of whitish sands and pumices, we found many small chimneys (ca. 5-10 cm) and bivalve colonies distributed looking like gray to black patches. These geo/ecological features of the seafloor were supposed to be from a complex mixing of hydrothermal venting and strong water current near the seafloor. Through quantitative FISH analysis for various environmental samples, one of the two representative groups in the plume was assessed to be from some of the bivalve colonies. Using the Benthic Multi-coring System (BMS), total 10 points were drilled and 6 boreholes were maintained with stainless or titanium casing pipes. In the following submersible surveys, newly developed catheter- and column-type in situ growth chambers were deployed in and on the boreholes, respectively, for collecting indigenous sub-vent microbes. Finally, we succeeded to detect several new phylotypes of microbes in these chamber samples, e.g., within epsilon-Proteobacteria, a photosynthetic group of alpha-Proteobacteria, and hyperthermophile

  8. 210Pb, 230Th, and 10Be in Central Indian Basin seamount sediments: Signatures of degassing and hydrothermal alteration of recent origin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Borole, D.V.; Aldahan, A.; Patil, S; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Possnert, G.; Ericsson, T.; Ramaswamy, V.; Gupta, S

    , 230 Th, and 10 Be in Central Indian Basin seamount sediments: Signatures of degassing and hydrothermal alteration of recent origin B. N. Nath, 1 D. V. Borole, 1 A. Aldahan, 2 S. K. Patil, 3 M. B. L. Mascarenhas-Pereira, 1 G. Possnert, 4 T. Ericsson, 2... V. Ramaswamy, 1 and S. M. Gupta 1 Received 4 March 2008; revised 17 March 2008; accepted 8 April 2008; published 14 May 2008. [1] Isotopic ( 210 Pb, 238 U- 230 Th, 10 Be), major and trace elements, and micromorphological and microchemical data, were...

  9. Microbial diversity in hydrothermal surface to subsurface environments of Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, using a catheter-type in situ growth chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Yowsuke; Sunamura, Michinari; Kitamura, Keiko; Nakamura, Ko-ichi; Kurusu, Yasurou; Ishibashi, Jun-ichiro; Urabe, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Akihiko

    2004-03-01

    After excavation using a portable submarine driller near deep-sea hydrothermal vents in the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, microbial diversity was examined in samples collected from inside the boreholes using an in situ growth chamber called a vent catheter. This instrument, which we devised for this study, consists of a heat-tolerant pipe tipped with a titanium mesh entrapment capsule that is packed with sterilized inorganic porous grains, which serve as an adhesion substrate. After this instrument was deployed inside each of the boreholes, as well as a natural vent, for 3-10 days in the vicinity of hot vent fluids (maxima: 156-305 degrees C), DNA was extracted from the adhesion grains, 16S rDNA was amplified, and randomly selected clones were sequenced. In phylogenetic analysis of more than 120 clones, several novel phylotypes were detected within the epsilon-Proteobacteria, photosynthetic bacteria (PSB)-related alpha-Proteobacteria, and Euryarchaeota clusters. Members of epsilon-Proteobacteria were frequently encountered. Half of these were classified between two known groups, Corre's B and D. The other half of the clones were assigned to new groups, SSSV-BE1 and SSSV-BE2 (Suiyo Seamount sub-vent origin, Bacteria domain, epsilon-Proteobacteria, groups 1 and 2). From this hydrothermal vent field, we detected a novel lineage within the PSB cluster, SSNV-BA1 (Suiyo Seamount natural vent origin, Bacteria domain, alpha-Proteobacteria, group 1), which is closely related to Rhodopila globiformis isolated from a hot spring. A number of archaeal clones were also detected from the borehole samples. These clones formed a novel monophyletic clade, SSSV-AE1 (Suiyo Seamount sub-vent origin, Archaea domain, Euryarchaeota, group 1), approximately between methanogenic hyperthermophilic members of Methanococcales and environmental clone members of DHVE Group II. Thus, this hydrothermal vent environment appears to be a noteworthy microbial and genetic resource. It is also

  10. Biodiversity and species-environment relationships of the demersal fish assemblage at the Great Meteor Seamount (subtropical NE Atlantic), sampled by different trawls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fock, H.; Uiblein, F.; Köster, Fritz

    2002-01-01

    , respectively, to 583.98 ind. m(-1) h(-1) in 1998. Gear effects and an effect of gear over time accounted for 47.1% and 20% of species variability. Further significant factors were time of day and habitat, while season was not significant. A total of 43 species was collected. Including supplementary species...... information, a grand total of 46 species was found associated with the Great Meteor Seamount. Diversity was higher in 1967 and 1970 (Shannon's diversity: H'=2.5 and 1.6) than in 1998 (H'=0.9). Species-environment relationships are discussed in terms of a sound-scattering layer-interception hypothesis, i...

  11. No depth limit to hydrovolcanic limu o Pele: analysis of limu from Lō`ihi Seamount, Hawai`i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, C. Ian; White, James D. L.

    2010-03-01

    Deep-sea limu o Pele are shards of basaltic glass commonly described as “bubble walls.” When first identified they were inferred to form in submarine fire fountains, but were then reinterpreted as the products of hydrovolcanic volcanism, formed when submarine lava flows entrapped and vaporised seawater. Limu discovered below the c 3 km critical depth of seawater, where superheated water exists as a supercritical fluid instead of a vapour, led to the hydrovolcanic model of limu o Pele formation being discarded in favour of a magmatic CO2-driven, “strombolian-like” model. This revised magmatic mechanism has been widely accepted by the scientific community. We describe a newly discovered limu o Pele-rich deposit at ~1,052 mbsl on the northeast summit plateau region of Lō`ihi Seamount, Hawai`i. The limu at this site is concentrated in a chemically monomict ash lens interbedded with thin lava sheets that are separated from overlying volcaniclastic material by a discontinuity. The geometry and geochemistry of the deposit provide compelling evidence for a hydrovolcanic, sheet flow-related origin. The exceptional abundance and preservation of limu at this site allows 4 morphologic subtypes of limu- thin film, plateau-border, convex film, and Pele’s hair- to be identified and linked to portions of the isolated rupturing bubbles from which they are derived. We extend our discussion to beyond this new Lō`ihi deposit, by including a review of limu o Pele occurrences and thermodynamic considerations that demonstrate the hydrovolcanic model of limu formation to be more tenable than the magmatic model at all depths, including below the critical depth of seawater.

  12. Spatiotemporal behavior of microearthquakes over an eruption cycle at 9°50'N East Pacific Rise and Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y. J.; Tolstoy, M.; Waldhauser, F.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Bohnenstiehl, D. R.

    2017-12-01

    We explore tidal triggering and other spatiotemporal behavior of microearthquakes as an indicator of the stress state at the mid-ocean ridge environment. Only two mid-ocean ridge sites have had ocean bottom seismic monitoring through an eruption cycle. At the East Pacific Rise (EPR), up to 12 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) were deployed and recovered approximately annually in a 4 x 4 km region from October 2003 to January 2007, encompassing an eruption in January 2006. 100,000 precisely located microearthquakes delineate an along-axis oriented hydrothermal circulation cell and mostly concentrate above the axial magma lens at 1.5 km depth (Tolstoy et. al., 2008; Waldhauser et. al., 2011). At Axial Seamount, a seismic network was installed as part of the Ocean Observatory Initiative Cabled Array that has been streaming live data since November 2014, encompassing an eruption in April-May of 2015. In the first year of operation, >100,000 precisely located microearthquakes delineate outward dipping ring faults inferred to have accommodated pre-eruptive inflation and syn-eruptive deflation (Wilcock et. al., 2016). At both EPR and Axial, earthquake timing strongly correlates with semidiurnal tides pre-eruption. This correlation with tides weakens significantly post-eruption. This suggests that in the mid-ocean ridge environment, temporal variation in tidal triggering strength may provide useful insight into the stress state of the system. The large number of earthquakes over an extended time period allows us to look at spatiotemporal variation in tidal triggering strength and microearthquake distribution to infer the stress state of the system with unprecedented temporal coverage and resolution. We will present comparisons of observations at the two sites.

  13. Food web functioning of the benthopelagic community in a deep-sea seamount based on diet and stable isotope analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preciado, Izaskun; Cartes, Joan E.; Punzón, Antonio; Frutos, Inmaculada; López-López, Lucía; Serrano, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    Trophic interactions in the deep-sea fish community of the Galicia Bank seamount (NE Atlantic) were inferred by using stomach contents analyses (SCA) and stable isotope analyses (SIA) of 27 fish species and their main prey items. Samples were collected during three surveys performed in 2009, 2010 and 2011 between 625 and 1800 m depth. Three main trophic guilds were determined using SCA data: pelagic, benthopelagic and benthic feeders, respectively. Vertically migrating macrozooplankton and meso-bathypelagic shrimps were identified to play a key role as pelagic prey for the deep sea fish community of the Galicia Bank. Habitat overlap was hardly detected; as a matter of fact, when species coexisted most of them evidenced a low dietary overlap, indicating a high degree of resource partitioning. A high potential competition, however, was observed among benthopelagic feeders, i.e.: Etmopterus spinax, Hoplostethus mediterraneus and Epigonus telescopus. A significant correlation was found between δ15N and δ13C for all the analysed species. When calculating Trophic Levels (TLs) for the main fish species, using both the SCA and SIA approaches, some discrepancies arose: TLs calculated from SIA were significantly higher than those obtained from SCA, probably indicating a higher consumption of benthic-suprabenthic prey in the previous months. During the summer, food web functioning in the Galicia Bank was more influenced by the assemblages dwelling in the water column than by deep-sea benthos, which was rather scarce in the summer samples. These discrepancies demonstrate the importance of using both approaches, SCA (snapshot of diet) and SIA (assimilated food in previous months), when attempting trophic studies, if an overview of food web dynamics in different compartments of the ecosystem is to be obtained.

  14. Seamounts in the southeastern Pacific Ocean and biodiversity on Juan Fernandez seamounts, Chile Montes submarinos en el océano Pacífico suroriental y biodiversidad en el cordón de Juan Fernández, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleuterio Yáñez

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Seamounts are vulnerable marine ecosystems. In Chile, information on these ecosystems is quite scarce; thus, a compilation of information on their geographical distribution and biodiversity is presented herein. A total of 118 seamounts distributed in the Chilean EEZ are identified and characterized. Additionally, an in situ assessment was carried out on the Juan Fernandez seamounts 1 and 2 (JF1 and JF2, which were also oceanographically characterized. Phytoplankton, zooplankton, and marine invertebrate samples were collected and an exploratory fishing survey was executed using different gears. According to the bibliographical review, a total of 82 species have been collected on the JF1 and JF2 seamounts, highlighting fmdings of black coral species caught in lobster traps at the Juan Fernandez Archipelago. Submarine images of the marine substrate at JF1 and JF2 reveal characteristics attributable to the impact of bottom dredges, coinciding with the information obtained from the trawling fleet. The fishing activity was carried out primarily at JF2 (4,667 km of trawling. The monthly fishing effort increased considerably in 2002, 2003, and 2005, reaching values above 500 km of trawling and, thus, modifying the spatial structure of the resource aggregates on the JF2 seamount.Los montes submarinos constituyen ecosistemas marinos vulnerables. Chile presenta una escasa información acerca de estos ecosistemas, por lo que este trabajo recopila información sobre distribución geográfica y biodiversidad. Se identifican y caracterizan 118 montes en la ZEE de Chile. Adicionalmente, una evaluación in situ se desarrolló sobre los montes Juan Fernández 1 y 2 (JF1, JF2, caracterizándolos oceanógraficamente. Se recolectaron muestras de fitoplancton, zooplancton e invertebrados marinos, y se realizó pesca exploratoria con diversos artes. La revisión bibliográfica establece que en JF1 y JF2, se han capturado un total de 82 especies, destacándose la

  15. South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, P.

    1990-01-01

    South Korea aspires to become a major nuclear supplier in the world nuclear market. There is no doubt that South Korea has great potential to fulfill these aspirations. South Korea is well positioned in terms of competitiveness, market relationships, institutional capability, ability to deliver, and commitment to nonproliferation values. As a mercantilist state, South Korea hopes to capitalize on its close relationships with transnational nuclear corporations in this endeavor. It hopes to participate in two- or three-way joint ventures---especially with the American firms that have traditionally predominated in the South Korean domestic nuclear business---to market their nuclear wares abroad. This paper is divided into four parts. The first section describes South Korea's intent to become a nuclear supplier in the 1990s. It delineates the networks of prior transactions and relationships that South Korea may use to penetrate export markets. The second section reviews South Korea's nuclear export potential, particularly its technological acquisitions from the domestic nuclear program. These capabilities will determine the rate at which South Korea can enter specific nuclear markets. The third section describes the institutional framework in South Korea for the review and approval of nuclear exports

  16. Miocene to recent tectonic and sedimentary evolution of the Anaximander Seamounts; eastern Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranshaw, Jennifer

    extends from the southern portion of the Rhodes Basin across the greater Anaximander Mountains into the western segment of the Antalya Basin, defining a major present-day tectonic element in the eastern Mediterranean Sea. The abrupt termination of the crustal-scale south verging thrust that carries the Anaximander Mountain at the large west-verging thrust that defines the boundary between the Anaximander Mountain and the western Sirri Erinc Plateau is interpreted as a major transfer fault. This thrust displays notable contractional overlap and may have considerable strike-slip component. Morphological similarities between the Isparta Angle of southwestern Turkey and the greater Anaximander Mountains are used to suggest similarities in the tectonic evolution of these two areas. Therefore, it is speculated that the Anaximander Mountains may be the offshore replication of the Isparta Angle trends, caused by similar mechanisms, but of younger age. If correct, during the Pliocene-Quaternary, the Anaximander and Anaximenes Mountains must have experienced a progressive counterclockwise rotation, while the Anaxagoras Mountain and the Florence Rise must have experienced a clockwise rotation. Thus, the present day arrow-head shaped morphology of the Anaximander Mountains (sensu lato) may be viewed as the new phase of the Isparta Angle.

  17. South-South Migration and Remittances

    OpenAIRE

    Ratha, Dilip; Shaw, William

    2007-01-01

    South-South Migration and Remittances reports on preliminary results from an ongoing effort to improve data on bilateral migration stocks. It sets out some working hypotheses on the determinants and socioeconomic implications of South-South migration. Contrary to popular perception that migration is mostly a South-North phenomenon, South-South migration is large. Available data from nation...

  18. Earlier history of the ≥70-Ma-old Canary hotspot based on the temporal and geochemical evolution of the Selvagen Archipelago and neighboring seamounts in the eastern North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geldmacher, Jörg; Hoernle, Kaj; van den Bogaard, Paul; Zankl, Goor; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2001-11-01

    Major element, trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data, combined with 40Ar/39Ar age determinations, of volcanic rocks from the Selvagen Islands and neighboring seamounts in the eastern North Atlantic reveal the earlier history of the ≥70 Ma old Canary hotspot. A basanitic to phonolitic late shield stage intrusive complex (29 Ma) is exposed on Selvagem Pequena. The evolution of Selvagem Grande can be divided into three magmatic phases: a tephritic to phonolitic late shield stage intrusive complex (24-26 Ma) and two rejuvenated or post-erosional stages (8-12 and 3.4 Ma) consisting of alkali basalt, basanite and rare phonolite. During the early to mid-Miocene volcanic hiatus (12-24 Ma), the top of the volcano was beneath sea level as evidenced by marine carbonate sediments (13-24 Ma, dated through correlation of 87Sr/86Sr with the seawater Sr isotope curve). The geochemistry of the shield stage lavas indicates that they derive from plume sources, whereas the post-erosional lavas are derived from metasomatized lithospheric sources. Five sampled seamounts to the east and northeast of the islands range in composition from alkali basalt and basanite to phonolite. Samples from Dacia, Conception Bank and Lars were dated at 9, 17 and 68 Ma, respectively. Geochemical data suggest that the dredged samples come from the post-erosional stage of volcanism, and therefore, the dates represent minimum ages for the seamount volcanoes. The elevation of erosional platforms formed at wave base decrease from Selvagen Grande (∼100 m above sea level) to Lars seamount (∼900 m below sea level), suggesting a southwest to northwest age progression and that all of these seamounts are older than the Selvagen Islands. Trace element and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic composition of the Selvagen Islands and neighboring seamounts are consistent with their origin from the Canary plume. Interaction of the weak Canary mantle plume with a slow moving plate appears to be responsible for generating a 450-km

  19. South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixen, Peter; Tarp, Finn

    1996-01-01

    This paper explores the macroeconomic situation and medium-term perspectives of the South African economy. Three fully quantified and internally consistent scenarios are presented. The projections demonstrate that there is room for increased public spending in real terms to help address South Afr...... macro-economic balance and avoid unsustainable public sector deficits...

  20. South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brixen, Peter; Tarp, Finn

    1996-01-01

    This paper explores the macroeconomic situation and medium-term perspectives of the South African economy. Three fully quantified and internally consistent scenarios are presented. The projections demonstrate that there is room for increased public spending in real terms to help address South Afr...... macro-economic balance and avoid unsustainable public sector deficits....

  1. NOAA TIFF Image - NF13_PR_Haystack_95khz_bathy_4m.tif, Puerto Rico 2013, Northeast Reserve, Haystack Seamount, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4 meter resolution interpolated bathymetric grid of a seamount East of Fajardo, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  2. NOAA TIFF Image - NF13_PR_Haystack_95khz_bathy_4m.tif, Puerto Rico 2013, Northeast Reserve, Haystack Seamount, Seafloor Characterization of the US Caribbean - Nancy Foster - NF-13-2 USVI (2013), UTM 20N NAD83 (NCEI Accession 0131855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This image represents a 4 meter resolution interpolated bathymetric grid of a seamount East of Fajardo, Puerto Rico. NOAA's NOS/NCCOS/CCMA Biogeography Team, in...

  3. Dinoflagellate cyst assemblages from two contrasting sites in the Azores (Portugal) - Horta Bay and D. João de Castro Seamount

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribeiro, Sofia; Amorim, Ana

    , to prevent cyst germination. Laboratory procedures involved wet sieving of ca. 20ml of sediment per site and concentration by centrifugation using a heavy-liquid, to maximize the recovery of the cyst fraction. Permanent slides were mounted with aliquots of the rich cyst fraction and examined under the light...... belonging to 15 different taxa were recovered. The 2 sites had a similar species richness (S=11) but different trophic and taxa composition. The embayment sample (Horta Harbour) was rich in Protoperidinium and Scrippsiella-like cysts (with no and -like cysts (with no calcareous walls probably due...... observed Protoceratium reticulatum maximum abundances in maximum abundances in shelf and slope-rise zone sediments. The fact that D. João de Castro Bank was dominated by recently formed cysts of this species suggests that this seamount constitutes an ecological niche which favours coastal...

  4. The underwater acoustic environment at SGaan Kinghlas-Bowie Seamount Marine Protected Area: Characterizing vessel traffic and associated noise using satellite AIS and acoustic datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Ainsley S; Yurk, Harald; Vagle, Svein; Pilkington, James; Canessa, Rosaline

    2018-03-01

    Vessel traffic is one of the most wide-spread anthropogenic contributors to ocean noise worldwide and has the potential to alter ecosystems upon which cetaceans and other acoustically sensitive marine organisms rely. Canada's SGaan Kinghlas-Bowie Seamount Marine Protected Area (SK-B MPA) is one such area whose productive ecosystem could benefit from greater monitoring of human induced threats in order to inform management. Despite earning official designation as a Marine Protected Area under the Oceans Act in 2008, little remains known about vessel traffic in the region and the associated potential impacts on vulnerable marine species. Therefore, to increase our understanding of vessel traffic and accompanying noise at SK-B MPA, satellite AIS and acoustic data were investigated. The results of this study suggest that variations in ambient sound levels in the region are driven by near and distant shipping events, thus having implications for future management of the MPA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. South Africa

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Cathy Egan

    prompted in part by the growth of the anti-apartheid movement. ... showing a new degree of organizational capacity and power in South Africa and among .... leading institutions in the generation and application of new knowledge to meet.

  6. Ocean Observing at Axial Seamount: Details of the Current OOI-RSN Design Within the Context of the April 2011 Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskurowski, G.; Kelley, D. S.; Fundis, A. T.; Kawka, O.; Denny, G. F.; Delaney, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    In 2013, the NSF's Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) will deploy 22 instrument suites within the caldera of Axial Seamount as part of the cabled observatory component implemented by the Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) at the University of Washington. The cabled infrastructure will initially provide Axial caldera with a total of 8kW of power and 11Gbps of data bandwidth. Only an approximate 20% fraction will be used by "core instrumentation"-instrumentation supported and maintained by OOI-RSN. Thus, the OOI provided infrastructure is highly, and readily, expandable to include community-generated instrumention once the system is commissioned and begins operations in early 2015. Here we present the details of the current design of the cabled observatory at Axial Seamount, including locations of instruments, data products, and sampling rates placed in the context of meter scale resolution bathymetry and down-looking photomosaics of the experimental sites. The April 2011 Axial eruption is a demonstration of the importance of transmitting seismic, video, and vent fluid chemistry information in real-time. The eruptive event, or series of events, in April 2011 went undetected until a series of ROV/AUV cruises, planned separately and years in advance, made observations to discover, confirm, and detail the transformation to Axial (see Chadwick et al., this session). What transpired during, and shortly after, the eruption will remain largely unknown, as the initial extraordinary fluxes of heat, chemistry and biology will have decayed in the intervening three and a half months. Here we detail the response capabilities of the OOI-RSN cabled observatory to a future eruptive event under two scenarios-as built, and an expanded version using existing technology.

  7. Constraining Seasonal and Vertical Distributions of Planktonic Foraminifera for Paleoclimate Reconstruction Since MIS3 at the Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S. L.; Ravelo, A. C.; Clague, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The California Current is an upwelling region with dynamic interactions between circulation, biological productivity and ecology. A 77 cm piston push core was taken from the Juan de Fuca Ridge Axial Seamount using a Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) (2213m, 45.55º N, 130.08º W), an active submarine volcano ~480 km off Oregon's coast. Five radiocarbon dates indicate that the sediment ranges from 42.6 ka at 77 cm to 17.6 ka at 15 cm, with an average sediment accumulation rate of 2.47 cm/ka from 77-15 cm, and an average rate of 0.85 cm/ka during the postglacial period (the core representing subtropical, subartic, and arctic fauna have been used to constrain changes in vertical and seasonal temperature since Marine Isotope Stage 3 (MIS3). Measurements of δ18O of the upwelling species Globigerina bulloides, the thermocline dwelling species Neogloboquadrina dutertrei, and the warm mixed-layer species Orbulina universa are offset from each other, reflecting vertical and seasonal variation among the planktonic foraminifera. Of the three species, G. bulloides shows the least variation in δ18O, possibly indicating that marked changes in temperature are masking changes in the δ18O of seawater due to global ice volume changes. G. bulloides and O. universa δ18O values are similar in MIS 3 and diverge with time, indicating the development of strong seasonal succession of species, since the last glacial maximum. Bulk nitrogen isotopes and nitrogen flux provide additional constraints on upwelling strength and insight into local biological productivity and nutrient dynamics. Obtaining Mg/Ca data will clarify the δ 18O interpretation except deep in the core where metal-bearing authigenic precipitates affect Mg concentrations. These climatic proxies together provide insight into how global climate change and local seamount volcanism impacts regional productivity in the California Current.

  8. South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports that South Africa's main reason for entering the international nuclear market is, and always has been, to sell its uranium abroad. From 1939-45 South Africa took part in the war against Nazi Germany, and the South African government of the time sought to help the Allied war effort in all ways that were practical. Later, during the Cold War, it tried to help build up the West's nuclear arsenal. In 1944, the British government secretly asked General Smuts---prime minister of South Africa since 1939 and a member of Churchill's War Cabinet---to survey South Africa's deposits of uranium. The survey, carried out with U.S. and British help, showed that the deposits were large, generally low-grade, but, in most cases, associated with gold and therefore could be profitably mined. In 1951, South Africa became a significant producer, with lucrative contracts for the sale of all its output to the U.S.-U.K.-Canada Joint Development Agency and one of the three main suppliers to the U.S. nuclear weapons program. In time, government controls eased and uranium production and marketing became a purely commercial operation

  9. Deep-sea seamount fisheries: a review of global status and future prospects Pesquerías de aguas profundas realizadas en montes submarinos: revision global de su estado y perspectivas futuras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm R Clark

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Seamounts support a large number and wide diversity of fish species. A number of these spe-cies can form aggregations for spawning or feeding and are the target of large-scale trawl fisheries. Since the 1970s, seamounts throughout the worlds' oceans have been explored for commercial resources, starting with efforts by the Soviet Union and Japan, which deployed distant water fleets around the world. Since then, a large number of countries have pursued fisheries on seamounts, especially in the deep sea. The total cumula-tive catch from seamount trawl fisheries exceeds two million tonnes. Catch histories for many deep-sea species show rapidly declining landings, and careful management is required to increase the chances of sustain-able fisheries. The low productivity of many seamount species limits the prospects for the large-scale exploita-tion of fish and invertebrate resources on seamounts.Los montes submarinos constituyen el habitat de una vasta y amplia variedad de especies ícticas. Parte de estas especies pueden formar agregaciones reproductivas o alimenticias, siendo objeto de importantes pesquerías de arrastre. A partir de la década de los 70' los montes submarinos en los diversos océanos fueron explorados en busca de recursos comerciales, labores que se iniciaron con la expansion de flotas de aguas distantes de la Unión Soviética y Japón alrededor del mundo. Desde ese momento, un gran número de otros países ha desarrollado pesquerías en montes submarinos, especialmente en aguas profundas. La captura total acumulada que se ha extraído en los montes submarinos excede a dos millones de toneladas. La historia de las faenas pesqueras realizadas en numerosas especies de aguas profundas muestra una rápida disminución en los desembarques, razón por la cual requieren de un cuidadoso manejo para incrementar la oportunidad de lograr la condición de pesquerías sustentables. La baja productividad observada en diversas especies indica

  10. Limestone and chert in tectonic blocks from the Esk Head subterrane, South Island, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberling, Norman J.; Nichols, K.M.; Bradshaw, J.D.; Blome, C.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Esk Head subterrane is a continuous belt, generally 10-20 km wide, of tectonic melange and broken formation on the South Island of New Zealand. This subterrane separates older and younger parts of the Torlesse terrane which is an extensive accretionary prism composed mostly of quartzo-feldspathic, submarine-fan deposits ranging from Permian to Early Cretaceous in age. The Esk Head subterrane of the Torlesse is especially informative because it includes within it conspicuous tectonic blocks of submarine basalt and a variety of basalt-associated seamount and sea-floor limestones and cherty rocks thought to be representative of the subducted plate. Paleogeographic inferences drawn from megafossils, bioclasts, and radiolarians, as well as from carbonate cements, indicate deposition of the oceanic sedimentary rocks at paleolatitudes somewhat lower than that of the New Zealand part of the Gondwana margin, but higher than paleoequatorial latitudes. -Authors

  11. Structures within the oceanic crust of the central South China Sea basin and their implications for oceanic accretionary processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Weiwei; Sun, Zhen; Dadd, Kelsie; Fang, Yinxia; Li, Jiabiao

    2018-04-01

    Internal structures in mature oceanic crust can elucidate understanding of the processes and mechanism of crustal accretion. In this study, we present two multi-channel seismic (MCS) transects across the northern flank of the South China Sea basin to reveal the internal structures related to Cenozoic tectono-magmatic processes during seafloor spreading. Bright reflectors within the oceanic crust, including the Moho, upper crustal reflectors, and lower crustal reflectors, are clearly imaged in these two transects. The Moho reflection displays varied character in continuity, shape and amplitude from the continental slope area to the abyssal basin, and becomes absent in the central part of the basin where abundant seamounts and seamount chains formed after the cessation of seafloor spreading. Dipping reflectors are distinct in most parts of the MCS data but generally confined to the lower crust above the Moho reflection. These lower crustal reflectors merge downward into the Moho without offsetting it, probably arising from shear zones between the crust and mantle characterized by interstitial melt, although we cannot exclude other possibilities such as brittle faulting or magmatic layering in the local area. A notable feature of these lower crustal reflector events is their opposite inclinations. We suggest the two groups of conjugate lower crustal reflector events observed between magnetic anomalies C11 and C8 were associated with two unusual accretionary processes arising from plate reorganizations with southward ridge jumps.

  12. Major and trace element and volatile constraints on magma systematics of seamounts and axial ridge glasses from the East Pacific Rise between 8°N and 12°N

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytle, M. L.; Kelley, K. A.; Wanless, V. D.; Hauri, E. H.

    2017-12-01

    The East Pacific Rise is a fast spreading mid-ocean ridge system (6-16cm/yr) consisting of many spreading ridges and transform faults. Focusing on a well-studied segment between 8-12°N, we present new SIMS measurements of magmatic volatiles (H2O, CO2, S, Cl, F) and new LA-ICP-MS trace element data in both on-axis and off-axis glasses, coupled with previously published data and use these data to relate melt composition to crystallization and melting processes. The seamounts range in composition from evolved (MgO = 5.54 wt%) to fairly primitive (MgO = 9.70 wt%), whereas on-axis samples have a narrower range of MgO (5.85 - 8.83 wt%). Seamounts span a wide range of enrichment in trace element compositions (La/Sm 0.45 - 4.63; Th/La 0.02 - 0.14; K/Ti 0.02 - 0.66), whereas on-axis glasses reflect NMORB compositions (La/Sm 0.5 - 1; Th/La 0.035 - 0.07; K/Ti 0.05 - 0.15). Light rare earth elements in the seamounts vary from depleted to enriched and have variable Eu anomalies (0.79 - 1.10), while on-axis samples have NMORB patterns with more negative Eu anomalies (0.74 - 1.00). The H2O content of the seamounts ranges from dry (0.05 wt%) to fairly wet (0.96 wt%), whereas on-axis samples have a narrower range (0.15 - 0.31 wt%). Cl contents show variable mixing between seawater and a magmatic component, with seamounts assimilating more seawater. Magmatic liquid lines of descent (LLD), recorded in glass, reflect fractional crystallization of olivine, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene, consistent with modal phenocryst abundances of the rocks. A multi-element approach (e.g., MgO vs. Al2O3, CaO, CaO/Al2O3), constrains LLDs, providing fractionation slopes, allowing mafic basalt compositions to be accurately corrected back to primary melts in equilibrium with Fo90. Using these melts, pressures and temperatures of melt equilibration can be constrained using melt thermobarometry. On-axis samples reflect higher PT conditions (1371°C; 1.37 GPa), although within error of seamounts (1340

  13. Opening of the South China Sea and Upwelling of the Hainan Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Mengming; Yan, Yi; Huang, Chi-Yue; Zhang, Xinchang; Tian, Zhixian; Chen, Wen-Huang; Santosh, M.

    2018-03-01

    Opening of the South China Sea and upwelling of the Hainan Plume are among the most challenging issues related to the tectonic evolution of East Asia. However, when and how the Hainan Plume affected the opening of the South China Sea remains unclear. Here we investigate the geochemical and isotopic features of the 25 Ma mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB) in the Kenting Mélange, southern Taiwan, 16 Ma MORB drilled by the IODP Expedition 349, and 9 Ma ocean island basalt-type dredged seamount basalt. The 25 Ma MORBs reveal a less metasomatic depleted MORB mantle-like source. In contrast, the Miocene samples record progressive mantle enrichment and possibly signal the contribution of the Hainan Plume. We speculate that MORBs of the South China Sea which could have recorded plume-ridge source mixing perhaps appear since 23.8 Ma. On the contrary, the Paleocene-Eocene ocean island basalt-type intraplate volcanism of the South China continental margin is correlated to decompression melting of a passively upwelling fertile asthenosphere due to continental rifting.

  14. Post-rift magmatism in the Pearl River Mouth Basin, northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Zhao, F.; Xia, S.; Sun, J.; Fan, C.

    2017-12-01

    Multi-beam, 2D seismic reflection and borehole data reveal that post-rift magmatism are widespread in the northern margin of South China Sea. A large-scale volcanic complex was identified at water depths of 500 to 3000 m, covering an area of ca. 8000 km2. This volcanic complex includes seamounts, igneous sills, dykes and intruded volcanic bodies. Combining data from exploration wells BY7-1 and BY2 with published seismic stratigraphic data, we can highlight multiple extrusive events from the Early Oligocene to Early Miocene, reflecting progressive continental breakup in the South China Sea. Most intruded magma through the continental crust also uplifted sediments up to the T6 unconformity. Given the evidence in this work that Early Miocene magmatic bodies were developed above or along faults, we suggest that post-rift magmatism in the northern margin of the South China Sea was largely controlled by the faults. Reactivation events in the faults are suggested to have generated preferential vertical pathways for the ascent of magma within a context of progressive continental breakup and thinned continental crust, as the South China Sea was being formed.

  15. Chemistry and Isotopic Composition of Slab-Derived Fluids from Serpentine Mud Volcanoes in the Mariana Forearc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.; Menzies, C. D.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Price, R. E.; Sissmann, O.; Wheat, C. G.; Boyce, A.

    2017-12-01

    Geological processes at subduction zone margins control seismicity, plutonism/ volcanism, and geochemical cycling between the oceans, crust, and mantle. The down-going plate experiences dehydration, and associated metamorphism alters the physical properties of the plate interface and mantle wedge. The Mariana convergent margin is non-accretionary, and serpentinite mud volcanoes in the pervasively faulted forearc mark loci of fluid and material egress from the subducting slab and forearc mantle. IODP Expedition 366 drilled into three serpentinite mud volcanoes: Yinazao (13 km depth-to-slab); Fantangisña (14 km) and Asùt Tesoru (18 km), allowing comparison with the previously drilled South Chamorro (18 km) and Conical (19 km) Seamounts. We use the changes in chemistry and isotopic composition of porefluids between seamounts to trace the evolution of the downgoing slab and water-rock interactions in the overlying mantle wedge. Boron isotopes allow investigation of the processes governing prograde metamorphism in the downgoing slab, and combined with O, D/H and Sr isotopes are used to assess the balance between seawater and dehydration fluids during mantle wedge serpentinization. The shallowest depth-to-slab seamounts, Yinazao and Fantangisña, are associated with Ca and Sr-enriched, but otherwise solute poor, low alkalinity fluids of pH 11. In contrast, the Asùt Tesoru seamount fluids are markedly higher in Na and Cl, as well as in tracers like B and K, which are associated with the breakdown of slab sheet silicate phases, and are depleted in Ca and Sr compared to seawater. Higher DIC at this site is attributed to slab carbonate decomposition. The elevated pH ( 12.5) is likely due to Fe2+ oxidation, producing H2 and OH- during serpentinization. Asùt Tesoru porefluids are similar to those studied at South Charmorro and Conical Seamounts that have similar depths to slab, although those sites have distinctly lower Na and Cl, but 3-4 times higher B concentrations

  16. South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    This true-color image of South Africa was acquired on May 14, 2000, by NASA's Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, or MODIS. The image was produced using a combination of the sensor's 250-m and 500-m resolution visible wavelength bands. As part of the opening ceremony to begin the joint U.S.-South Africa SAFARI Field Experiment, NASA presented print copies of this image as GIFts to Dr. Ben Ngubane, Minister of Arts, Science and Technology, and Honorable Advocate Ngoaka Ramathlodi, Premier of the Northern Province, South Africa. The area shown in this image encompasses seven capital cities and a number of the region's distinctive geological features can be seen clearly. Toward the northern (top) central part of the image, the browns and tans comprise the Kalahari Desert of southern Botswana. The Tropic of Capricorn runs right through the heart of the Kalahari and the Botswanan capital city of Gaborone sits on the Limpopo River, southeast of the Kalahari. Along the western coastline of the continent is the country of Namibia, where the Namib Desert is framed against the sea by the Kaokoveld Mountains. The Namibian capital of Windhoek is obscured by clouds. Looking closely in the center of the image, the Orange River can be seen running from east to west, demarcating the boundary between Namibia and South Africa. On the southwestern corner of the continent is the hook-like Cape of Good Hope peninsula and Cape Town, the parliamentary capital of South Africa. Running west to east away from Cape Town are the Great Karroo Mountains. The shadow in this image conveys a sense of the very steep grade of the cliffs along the southern coast of South Africa. Port Elizabeth sits on the southeasternmost point of South Africa, and a large phytoplankton bloom can be seen in the water about 100 miles east of there. Moving northward along the east coast, the Drakensberg Mountains are visible. The two small nations of Lesotho and Swaziland are in this region, completely

  17. Field Validation of Habitat Suitability Models for Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems in the South Pacific Ocean: Implications for the use of Broad-scale Models in Fisheries Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, O. F.; Guinotte, J. M.; Clark, M. R.; Rowden, A. A.; Mormede, S.; Davies, A. J.; Bowden, D.

    2016-02-01

    Spatial management of vulnerable marine ecosystems requires accurate knowledge of their distribution. Predictive habitat suitability modelling, using species presence data and a suite of environmental predictor variables, has emerged as a useful tool for inferring distributions outside of known areas. However, validation of model predictions is typically performed with non-independent data. In this study, we describe the results of habitat suitability models constructed for four deep-sea reef-forming coral species across a large region of the South Pacific Ocean using MaxEnt and Boosted Regression Tree modelling approaches. In order to validate model predictions we conducted a photographic survey on a set of seamounts in an un-sampled area east of New Zealand. The likelihood of habitat suitable for reef forming corals on these seamounts was predicted to be variable, but very high in some regions, particularly where levels of aragonite saturation, dissolved oxygen, and particulate organic carbon were optimal. However, the observed frequency of coral occurrence in analyses of survey photographic data was much lower than expected, and patterns of observed versus predicted coral distribution were not highly correlated. The poor performance of these broad-scale models is attributed to lack of recorded species absences to inform the models, low precision of global bathymetry models, and lack of data on the geomorphology and substrate of the seamounts at scales appropriate to the modelled taxa. This demonstrates the need to use caution when interpreting and applying broad-scale, presence-only model results for fisheries management and conservation planning in data poor areas of the deep sea. Future improvements in the predictive performance of broad-scale models will rely on the continued advancement in modelling of environmental predictor variables, refinements in modelling approaches to deal with missing or biased inputs, and incorporation of true absence data.

  18. South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document provides information on the status of institutional and financial arrangements in South Africa for the long term management of HLW and SNF, It includes the following elements: A consistent set of requirements for the technical and legal infrastructure including: funding, liability, institutional control, records management, and research activities; An organizational structure with clearly defined responsibilities; and Provisions for participation by interested parties in decisions and outcomes

  19. Morphology and molecular phylogeny of Paragorgia rubra sp. nov. (Cnidaria: Octocorallia), a new bubblegum coral species from a seamount in the tropical Western Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Zhan, Zifeng; Xu, Kuidong

    2017-07-01

    A new species of bubblegum coral, Paragorgia rubra sp. nov., discovered from a seamount at a water depth of 373 m near the Yap Trench is studied using morphological and molecular approaches. Paragorgia rubra sp. nov. is the fourth species of the genus found in the tropical Western Pacific. The new gorgonian is red-colored, uniplanar, and measures approximately 530 mm high and 440 mm wide, with autozooids distributed only on one side of the colony. Paragorgia rubra sp. nov. is most similar to P. kaupeka Sánchez, 2005, but differs distinctly in the polyp ovals with large and compound protuberances (vs. small and simple conical protuberances) and the medullar spindles possessing simple conical protuberances (vs. compound protuberances). Moreover, P. rubra sp. nov. differs from P. kaupeka in the smaller length/width ratio of surface radiates (1.53 vs. 1.75). The genetic distance of the mtMutS gene between P. rubra sp. nov. and P. kaupeka is 0.66%, while the intraspecific distances within Paragorgia Milne-Edwards & Haime, 1857 except the species P. regalis complex are no more than 0.5%, further supporting the establishment of the new species. Furthermore, the ITS2 secondary structure of P. rubra sp. nov. is also different from those of congeners. Phylogenetic analyses indicate Paragorgia rubra sp. nov. and P. kaupeka form a clade, which branched early within Paragorgia and diversified approximately 15 Mya.

  20. Seafloor Tectonic Fault Fabric and the Evolution of the Walvis Ridge-Rio Grande Rise Hot Spot Twins in the South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sager, W. W.; Engfer, D.; Thoram, S.; Koppers, A. A. P.; Class, C.

    2015-12-01

    for South America - Africa shifted. Finally, after ~60 Ma, volcanism emplaced seamounts mainly on the African plate and hot spot volcanism at the MAR was greatly reduced. Results from the present study augment recently published findings of a strong link between the formation of the RGR-WR LIP and spreading ridge tectonics.

  1. Deep water characteristics and circulation in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Aimei; Du, Yan; Peng, Shiqiu; Liu, Kexiu; Huang, Rui Xin

    2018-04-01

    This study investigates the deep circulation in the South China Sea (SCS) using oceanographic observations combined with results from a bottom layer reduced gravity model. The SCS water, 2000 m below the surface, is quite different from that in the adjacent Pacific Ocean, and it is characterized by its low dissolved oxygen (DO), high temperature and low salinity. The horizontal distribution of deep water properties indicates a basin-scale cyclonic circulation driven by the Luzon overflow. The results of the bottom layer reduced gravity model are consistent with the existence of the cyclonic circulation in the deep SCS. The circulation is stronger at the northern/western boundary. After overflowing the sill of the Luzon Strait, the deep water moves broadly southwestward, constrained by the 3500 m isobath. The broadening of the southward flow is induced by the downwelling velocity in the interior of the deep basin. The main deep circulation bifurcates into two branches after the Zhongsha Islands. The southward branch continues flowing along the 3500 m isobath, and the eastward branch forms the sub-basin scale cyclonic circulation around the seamounts in the central deep SCS. The returning flow along the east boundary is fairly weak. The numerical experiments of the bottom layer reduced gravity model reveal the important roles of topography, bottom friction, and the upwelling/downwelling pattern in controlling the spatial structure, particularly the strong, deep western boundary current.

  2. South African Music Studies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAMUS: South African Music Studies is the official organ for the South African ... Shifty Records in Apartheid South Africa: Innovations in Independent Record ... Experiences of Belonging and Exclusion in the Production and Reception of ...

  3. Phylogenetic and Physiological Diversity of Subseafloor Microbial Communities at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge: Summary of Results From the New Millenium Observatory (NeMO), 1998-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baross, J. A.; Huber, J. A.; Mehta, M. P.; Opatkiewicz, A.; Bolton, S. A.; Butterfield, D. A.; Sogin, M. L.; Embley, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    Axial Seamount (45 ° 58' N; 130 ° 00' W) is an active submarine volcano located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, approximately 300 miles off the coast of Oregon. Lying at the intersection of a seamount chain and a spreading axis, Axial is a unique study site from both the geological and biological perspective. In January of 1998, Axial experienced a week-long series of earthquakes, and subsequent water column and seafloor observations on the southeast portion of the caldera found temperature and chemical anomalies, extensive new seafloor lava flows, large "snow blower" type vents, and other characteristics commonly associated with diking-eruptive events. Due to its high activity and close proximity to shore, Axial was chosen as a site for a multi-year observatory (New Millenium Observatory, NeMO) to document changes and interactions between geology, chemistry, and biology on the mid-ocean ridge system. From 1998 through 2004, we extensively sampled diffuse vents at Axial Seamount to determine the physiological and phylogenetic diversity of subseafloor microbial communities and their relationship to the geochemical environment. Here we present a summary of those studies, including molecular-based phylogenetic surveys of bacteria, archaea, and potential nitrogen-fixing organisms, culturing results of thermophiles and hyperthermophiles from over 20 sites, and the distribution of one particular group of hyperthermophiles at diffuse vents throughout the caldera and how that distribution may be linked to the geochemical habitat. Results indicate that Axial supports a diverse subseafloor microbial community, including hydrogen and sulfur oxidizers, hyperthermophilic methane producers and heterotrophs, and many organisms with the potential to fix nitrogen. In addition, we find that the species composition of the microbial community changes in response to changes in the physical and chemical conditions at each vent site. The extent of seawater mixing with hydrothermal fluids

  4. Rare earth element and strontium isotopic study of seamount-type limestones in Mesozoic accretionary complex of Southern Chichibu Terrane, central Japan. Implication for incorporation process of seawater REE into limestones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Miura, Noriko; Asahara, Yoshihiro; Kawabe, Iwao

    2003-01-01

    Ishimaki and Tahara limestones occur as exotic blocks juxtaposed in the Mesozoic (Jurassic) accretionary complex of Southern Chichibu Terrane in eastern Aichi Prefecture, central Japan. They are supposed to be of the seamount-type limestone, since they have no terrigenous materials and are intimately associated with greenstones. REE (rare earth elements) and Sr isotopic studies for the limestones have been made in order to know their geochemical characteristics, ages and origins. Their 87 Sr/ 86 Sr ratios, when referred to the seawater 87 Sr/ 86 Sr curve and relevant geological data, suggest that Ishimaki and Tahara limestones are the late Permian and the Carboniferous to the Early Permian, respectively. Two greenstone fragments found inside the Ishimaki limestone block and one greenstone sample associated with Tahara limestone block, resemble the Hawaiian alkali basalt in the their REE and Y patterns. This is supporting the idea that the limestone blocks may be parts of reef limestones on ancient volcanic seamounts. All the limestone samples, except three unusual Tahara ones, show seawater REE and Y signatures in their chondrite-normalized patterns. Their REE/Ca ratios, however, are 10 2 -10 4 times as high as those ratios of modern biogenic carbonates like corals and the seawater. Accordingly, seawater REE and Y were incorporated into the limestones, when originally biogenic carbonates transformed into inorganic calcite and its secondary growths occurred in diagenesis in contact with sufficient seawater. This view is favored by the reported REE partition experiment between calcite overgrowths and seawater solution. The seawater Ce anomaly as a function of water depth in the modern ocean is a key to infer the water depth of the REE and Y incorporation. The Ce anomalies given by log (Ce/Ce*) for about a half of Ishimaki samples and most of Tahara ones are between -0.5 and -0.2, which are compatible with the shallow water origin. Another half of Ishimaki samples

  5. Colonial life under the Humboldt Current System: deep-sea corals from O'Higgins I seamount La vida colonial bajo el sistema de la corriente de Humboldt: corales de aguas profundas en el monte submarino O'Higgins I

    OpenAIRE

    Juan I Cañete; Verena Haussermann

    2012-01-01

    A benthic community constituted by an assemblage of at least four species of deep-sea corals collected in only one trawl carried-out on the summit of the O'Higgins I seamount, central Chile. The corals were collected in only one trawl carried-out during a Chilean-Japanese cruise onboard the R/V" Koyo Maru" in December 29, 2004. Presence of oxygenated and cold Antarctic Intermediate Water (>400 m depth) on the plateau was recorded under of the Equatorial Subsurface Water associated to the oxyg...

  6. Archaeoglobus infectus sp. nov., a novel thermophilic, chemolithoheterotrophic archaeon isolated from a deep-sea rock collected at Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, western Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Koji; Maruyama, Akihiko; Urabe, Tetsuro; Suzuki, Ken-Ichiro; Hanada, Satoshi

    2008-04-01

    A novel thermophilic, strictly anaerobic archaeon, designated strain Arc51T, was isolated from a rock sample collected from a deep-sea hydrothermal field in Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, western Pacific Ocean. Cells of the isolate were irregular cocci with single flagella and exhibited blue-green fluorescence at 436 nm. The optimum temperature, pH and NaCl concentration for growth were 70 degrees C, pH 6.5 and 3 % (w/v), respectively. Strain Arc51T could grow on thiosulfate or sulfite as an electron acceptor in the presence of hydrogen. This strain required acetate as a carbon source for its growth, suggesting that the reductive acetyl CoA pathway for CO2 fixation was incomplete. In addition, coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid), which is a known methyl carrier in methanogenesis, was also a requirement for growth of the strain. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the isolate was similar to members of the genus Archaeoglobus, with sequence similarities of 93.6-97.2 %; the closest relative was Archaeoglobus veneficus. Phylogenetic analyses of the dsrAB and apsA genes, encoding the alpha and beta subunits of dissimilatory sulfite reductase and the alpha subunit of adenosine-5'-phosphosulfate reductase, respectively, produced results similar to those inferred from comparisons based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence. On the basis of phenotypic and phylogenetic data, strain Arc51T represents a novel species of the genus Archaeoglobus, for which the name Archaeoglobus infectus sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is Arc51T (=NBRC 100649T=DSM 18877T).

  7. Application of RNA Stable Isotope Probing (SIP) to Link Community Activity with Microorganisms Responsible for Autotrophy in the Subseafloor at Axial Seamount

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, J. A.; Fortunato, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    The global ocean comprises the Earth's largest biome, with microorganisms playing a dominant biogeochemical role. However, the potential for production of new microbial biomass within the subseafloor is rarely considered in traditional oceanographic paradigms of carbon cycling or microbial food webs. In this study, we used RNA Stable Isotope Probing (RNA SIP) to determine the microbial community composition and genetic repertoire of active subseafloor autotrophs in warm venting fluids from Axial Seamount. RNA is a responsive biomarker because it is a reflection of cellular activity independent of replication, and RNA SIP thus provides access to both the function of a microbial community and the phylogeny of the organisms accountable for key functions. Diffuse fluids were incubated shipboard at 30°C, 55°C, and 80°C with 13DIC and H2. Metatranscriptomic sequencing of both the enriched and non-enriched RNA was carried out from 13C and 12C controls. In addition, filtered fluid samples were preserved in situ for comparative meta -transcriptomic and -genomic analyses. Diverse lineages of bacteria and archaea and accompanying metabolisms were detected in situ, but RNA SIP results show dominance of three different groups of autotrophs active under each experimental condition. At 30°C, members of the Sulfurimonas genus dominated, with genes for hydrogen oxidation, nitrate reduction, and carbon fixation via the rTCA cycle highly expressed. At 55°C, both Caminibacter and Nautilia transcripts were detected for rTCA cycle, hydrogen oxidation, and nitrate reduction. At 80°C, transcripts for hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis mediated by members of Methanocaldococcus were detected. These results suggest the subseafloor hosts various anaerobic chemolithoautotrophs that span a wide temperature range, with hydrogen playing a key role in microbial metabolism. Complementary experiments are currently being carried out on the seafloor with a novel in situ incubator unit to provide

  8. Characterization of bacterial diversity associated with deep sea ferromanganese nodules from the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Chao; Liu, Yan-Xia; Li, Xin-Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Deep sea ferromanganese (FeMn) nodules contain metallic mineral resources and have great economic potential. In this study, a combination of culture-dependent and culture-independent (16S rRNA genes clone library and pyrosequencing) methods was used to investigate the bacterial diversity in FeMn nodules from Jiaolong Seamount, the South China Sea. Eleven bacterial strains including some moderate thermophiles were isolated. The majority of strains belonged to the phylum Proteobacteria; one isolate belonged to the phylum Firmicutes. A total of 259 near full-length bacterial 16S rRNA gene sequences in a clone library and 67,079 valid reads obtained using pyrosequencing indicated that members of the Gammaproteobacteria dominated, with the most abundant bacterial genera being Pseudomonas and Alteromonas. Sequence analysis indicated the presence of many organisms whose closest relatives are known manganese oxidizers, iron reducers, hydrogen-oxidizing bacteria and methylotrophs. This is the first reported investigation of bacterial diversity associated with deep sea FeMn nodules from the South China Sea.

  9. Observation and modeling of hydrothermal response to the 2015 eruption at Axial Seamount, Northeast Pacific: An OOI Cabled Observatory case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G.; Chadwick, W. W., Jr.; Wilcock, W. S. D.; Bemis, K. G.; Nooner, S. L.; Sasagawa, G. S.; Zumberge, M. A.; Delaney, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    The 2015 eruption at Axial Seamount, an active volcano at a depth of 1500 m in the Northeast Pacific, marked the first time a seafloor eruption was detected and monitored by a cabled observatory - the Cabled Array operated by Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI). Following the eruption, eight cabled and non-cabled instruments recorded a temperature increase across the southern half of the caldera and neighboring areas. These temperature signals were very different from those observed after the 2011 and 1998 Axial eruptions. The 2015 temperature increase occurred later (3.5 days after deflation started versus 6-18 hours) and had a larger amplitude ( 0.7°C versus 0.2-0.5°C), a much slower increase and decay and smaller short-term fluctuations. Most remarkably, the 2015 temperature signals were synchronous and uniform across the 3 x 4.5 km2 area covered by the eight instruments. We hypothesize that the eruption triggered the release of a hydrothermal brine stored in the crust. In this interpretation, the observed temperature increases were due to a dense, bottom-hugging layer of warm salty water that was created when hot brine in the crust was flushed out after the dike intersected the zone where the brine was stored. In the absence of near-bottom salinity observations, we test this hypothesis by using a numerical model of ocean flow and transport to simulate the thermal response within the vicinity of the caldera following a brine injection. We set up the model with realistic background flows, hydrography, and seafloor topography. We simulate brine release as seafloor heat and salt inputs at locations inferred from seismic and geologic observations. Comparison of model bottom temperature with measurements shows a reasonable match. If our interpretation is correct, this is the first time that the release of a hydrothermal brine has been observed due to a submarine eruption. Prior to the next eruption, the Cabled Array observatory should be enhanced to improve the

  10. Active Submarine Volcanoes and Electro-Optical Sensor Networks: The Potential of Capturing and Quantifying an Entire Eruptive Sequence at Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, J. R.; Kelley, D. S.; Proskurowski, G.; Fundis, A. T.; Kawka, O.

    2011-12-01

    The NE Pacific Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) component of the NSF Ocean Observatories Initiative is designed to provide unprecedented electrical power and bandwidth to the base and summit of Axial Seamount. The scientific community is engaged in identifying a host of existing and innovative observation and measurement techniques that utilize the high-power and bandwidth infrastructure and its real-time transmission capabilities. The cable, mooring, and sensor arrays will enable the first quantitative documentation of myriad processes leading up to, during, and following a submarine volcanic event. Currently planned RSN instrument arrays will provide important and concurrent spatial and temporal constraints on earthquake activity, melt migration, hydrothermal venting behavior and chemistry, ambient currents, microbial community structure, high-definition (HD) still images and HD video streaming from the vents, and water-column chemistry in the overlying ocean. Anticipated, but not yet funded, additions will include AUVs and gliders that continually document the spatial-temporal variations in the water column above the volcano and the distal zones. When an eruption appears imminent the frequency of sampling will be increased remotely, and the potential of repurposing the tracking capabilities of the mobile sensing platforms will be adapted to the spatial indicators of likely eruption activity. As the eruption begins mobile platforms will fully define the geometry, temperature, and chemical-microbial character of the volcanic plume as it rises into the thoroughly documented control volume above the volcano. Via the Internet the scientific community will be able to witness and direct adaptive sampling in response to changing conditions of plume formation. A major goal will be to document the eruptive volume and link the eruption duration to the volume of erupted magma. For the first time, it will be possible to begin to quantify the time-integrated output of an underwater

  11. Role of a unique population of lithotrophic, Fe-oxidizing bacteria in forming microbial Fe-mats at the Loihi Seamount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, D.; Rentz, J. A.; Moyer, C. L.

    2005-12-01

    The Loihi Seamount, located 30 km SE of the island of Hawai'i, is among the most active volcanos on Earth. The summit, at a depth of 1100m, includes a 250m deep caldera (Pele's Pit) formed by an eruption in 1996. The summit, and especially Pele's Pit, are the site of extensive low to intermediate temperature (10° to 65°C) hydrothermal venting, emanating both from diffuse fissures and orifices that have substantial flow rates. The vent fluid is characterized by a low sulfide content, high CO2 concentrations and Fe(II) amounts in the 10s to 100s of μM. Associated with all vents are extensive deposits of iron oxyhydroxides that typically have 107 to 108 bacterial cells/cc associated with them. The morphology of the Fe-oxides are indicative of biological origins. We have isolated microaerophilic, obligately lithotrophic Fe-oxidizing bacteria from Loihi and describe here `Mariprofundus ferroxydans' a unique bacterium that forms a filamentous iron oxide mineral. `M. ferroxydans' is the first cultured representative of a novel division of the Proteobacteria, known previously only from clones from different hydrothermal vent sites. Molecular evidence from Loihi mats based on clone libraries and terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicate that this lineage of Fe-oxidizing organisms are common inhabitants at Loihi. We speculate that this organism and its relatives form the basis of an active microbial mat community that owe their existence to the inherent gradients of Fe(II) and O2 that exist at the Loihi vents. In a geological context this is interesting because the Loihi summit and caldera are in an O2-minima zone; O2 concentrations in the bulk seawater are around 0.5 mg/l. In effect, Loihi could serve as a proxy for the late Archaean and early Proterozoic periods when the Earth's atmosphere went from reducing to oxidizing, and it is speculated that abundant Fe(II) in the Earth's oceans served as a major sink for O2 production

  12. The Tectonic Boundary Between Eastern Subbaisin and South-West Subbasin of the South China Sea Revealed from the Normalized Magnetic Source Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Meng, X.

    2014-12-01

    The South China Sea (SCS), surrounded by the Eurasia, Pacific and India-Australia plates, is one of the largest marginal seas in the Western Pacific. It was formed by the interaction of the three plates and the seafloor spreading during Late Oligocene time to Early Miocene time. The boundary between Eastern Subbaisin and South-west Subbasin of the SCS has long been debated in the literature. Refining the boundary is one of the crucial tasks for correctly understanding the seafloor spreading model of the SCS. Due to few drills on the deep ocean basin of the SCS, magnetic data become important information for refining the boundary. However, the interpretation of magnetic data in the SCS suffers from the remanent magnetization of ocean crust as well as igneous rock and seamounts. The conventional reduction-to-pole anomalies at low latitudes usually neglect the remanent magnetization, making the interpretation incorrect. Here, we assembled high-resolution total magnetic intensity (TMI) data around the ocean basin of the SCS, and then did a special transformation of the TMI anomalies with a varying magnetic inclinations algorithm to obtain the normalized source strength (NSS). The NSS has advantage of insensitivity to remanent magnetization, benefitting correct interpretation. The NSS presents discriminative features from east to west in the ocean basin. The boundary of the discriminative features is clear and just ranges from the northeastern edge of the Zhongsha Islands running in the southeast direction to the northeastern edge of the Reed Bank. These imply that magnetic structure and tectonic features in the crust are discriminative between both sides of this boundary. It can be deduced that this boundary is the tectonic boundary between Eastern Subbaisin and South-west Subbasin. We acknowledge the financial support of the National Natural Science Foundation of China (41374093) and the SinoProbe-01-05 project.

  13. South African Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Medical Journal is published by the South African Medical Association, which represents ... G Watermeyer, S Thomson, 399-402 ... Assessing the value of Western Cape Provincial Government health administrative data and ...

  14. An Osteobiography of a Remarkable Protohistoric Chamorro Man from Taga, Tinian

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    premolar positions (Figure 6), are adjacent and nearly confluent. Each was affected by bone destruction from chronic periodontal tissue inflammation...of chronic periodontal disease complicates interpretation, enough remodeled alveolar structure remains at the PM1 site to suggest that an acute...musculoskeletal strength and proposed chronic motor activity patterns of Taotao Tagga’ and some of his compatriots, preceding these discussions with

  15. Electricity in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, Mark; Steyn, Grove

    1998-09-01

    Contains Executive Summary and Chapters on: Introductory background; The South African energy sector; The development and regulation of the South African electricity supply industry; Electricity supply and demand; Eskom: South Africa's public utility; Electricity distribution; Household electrification; Regional integration and environmental issues; Regulation and emerging policies - pointers to the future. (Author)

  16. Orbital Forcing driving climate variability on Tropical South Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, A. S.; Baker, P. A.; Silva, C. G.; Dwyer, G. S.; Chiessi, C. M.; Rigsby, C. A.; Ferreira, F.

    2017-12-01

    Past research on climate response to orbital forcing in tropical South America has emphasized on high precession cycles influencing low latitude hydrologic cycles, and driving the meridional migration of Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ).However, marine proxy records from the tropical Pacific Ocean showed a strong 41-ka periodicities in Pleistocene seawater temperature and productivity related to fluctuations in Earth's obliquity. It Indicates that the western Pacific ITCZ migration was influenced by combined precession and obliquity changes. To reconstruct different climate regimes over the continent and understand the orbital cycle forcing over Tropical South America climate, hydrological reconstruction have been undertaken on sediment cores located on the Brazilian continental slope, representing the past 1.6 million years. Core CDH 79 site is located on a 2345 m deep seamount on the northern Brazilian continental slope (00° 39.6853' N, 44° 20.7723' W), 320 km from modern coastline of the Maranhão Gulf. High-resolution XRF analyses of Fe, Ti, K and Ca are used to define the changes in precipitation and sedimentary input history of Tropical South America. The response of the hydrology cycle to orbital forcing was studied using spectral analysis.The 1600 ka records of dry/wet conditions presented here indicates that orbital time-scale climate change has been a dominant feature of tropical climate. We conclude that the observed oscillation reflects variability in the ITCZ activity associated with the Earth's tilt. The prevalence of the eccentricity and obliquity signals in continental hydrology proxies (Ti/Ca and Fe/K) as implicated in our precipitation records, highlights that these orbital forcings play an important role in tropics hydrologic cycles. Throughout the Quaternary abrupt shifts of tropical variability are temporally correlated with abrupt climate changes and atmospheric reorganization during Mid-Pleistocene Transition and Mid-Brunhes Events

  17. Sound Propagation around Underwater Seamounts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    eikonal and first order transport equations; this is a high-frequency approximation method. These methods will be discussed futher in Section 2.4. A...2.9 and 2.10 can be substituted back into the Helmholtz equation. Separating terms of the same order Lw gives the following eikonal equation, of O(w 2...n= 1,2,... Ray trajectories can be computed by solving the eikonal equation, and ray amplitude can be computed with the first transport equation. 6

  18. Comparison between the shrimp species richness (Caridea and Dendrobranchiata, Decapoda, Crustacea of the south and north mid Atlantic ridge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Azevedo Cardoso

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Mid Atlantic Ridge (MAR is a seamount chain extending for 60.000 km, divided into south and north regions by the Equatorial Fracture which cuts across it. This latter has a maximum depth of 7,760 m and an average width of 19 km. In this study we include data from the two cruises of the international project MAR-ECO, undertaken, respectively, one on the north and the other on the south MAR. Our main objective is to compare the species richness and species composition of pelagic and benthic decapod shrimps of these two areas to observe the patterns of their latitudinal distribution along the MAR. Using rarefaction methods, we obtained interesting results: the pelagic samples curve of the northern MAR is almost an asymptote, so we concluded that we are close to the true number of pelagic shrimp species for this region. The pelagic samples curve of the southern MAR had the greatest slope, so our conclusion is that we are still far from the true number of species for this region. A comparison of species richness at 12 samples (the smallest number of samples shared by both the surveys revealed that the pelagic species richness was greater than the demersal, and that the northern MAR contained a larger number of species than the southern.

  19. Structural inversion in the northern South China Sea continental margin and its tectonic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Da Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The northern South China Sea (SCS continental margin was proposed to be an active margin during the Mesozoic. However, only a few papers discussed the Mesozoic structural evolution in this region. Here, we provide information based on the seismic profile interpretations with age control from biostratigraphic studies and detrital zircon U-Pb dates of well MZ-1-1 in the western Dongsha-Penghu Uplift of the northern SCS continental margin. The industrial seismic profiles reveal evidence for structural inversion as represented by folds and high-angle reverse faults, formed by reactivation of pre-existing normal faults. The inversion event likely started after the Early Cretaceous, and developed in Late Cretaceous, but ceased before the Cenozoic. The areal extent of the structural inversion was restricted in the western Dongsha-Penghu Uplift and was approximately 100 km in width. Based on the paleogeographic reconstruction of SCS, the structural inversion was likely formed by a collision between the seamount (volcanic islands swarm of the current North Palawan block (mainly the Calamian Islands and the northern SCS continental margin around Late Cretaceous.

  20. Terrorism in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Soon Joo; Choi, Jin Tae; Arnold, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    South Korea has experienced > 30 suspected terrorism-related events since 1958, including attacks against South Korean citizens in foreign countries. The most common types of terrorism used have included bombings, shootings, hijackings, and kidnappings. Prior to 1990, North Korea was responsible for almost all terrorism-related events inside of South Korea, including multiple assassination attempts on its presidents, regular kidnappings of South Korean fisherman, and several high-profile bombings. Since 1990, most of the terrorist attacks against South Korean citizens have occurred abroad and have been related to the emerging worldwide pattern of terrorism by international terrorist organizations or deranged individuals. The 1988 Seoul Olympic Games provided a major stimulus for South Korea to develop a national emergency response system for terrorism-related events based on the participation of multiple ministries. The 11 September 2001 World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks and the 2001 United States of America (US) anthrax letter attacks prompted South Korea to organize a new national system of emergency response for terrorism-related events. The system is based on five divisions for the response to specific types of terrorist events, involving conventional terrorism, bioterrorism, chemical terrorism, radiological terrorism, and cyber-terrorism. No terrorism-related events occurred during the 2002 World Cup and Asian Games held in South Korea. The emergency management of terrorism-related events in South Korea is adapting to the changing risk of terrorism in the new century.

  1. 40Ar/39Ar dating of oceanic plagiogranite: Constraints on the initiation of seafloor spreading in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li-Feng; Cai, Guan-Qiang; Koppers, Anthony A. P.; Xu, Yi-Gang; Xu, He-Hua; Gao, Hong-Fang; Xia, Bin

    2018-03-01

    The Cenozoic opening of the South China Sea was one of the most significant tectonic events in SE Asia, coinciding with complex regional rifting, subduction, terrane collision, and large-scale continental strike-slip faulting. The timing of the initiation of seafloor spreading in the South China Sea remains controversial due to a scarcity of incontrovertible age data. This work provides the first report of an oceanic plagiogranite from the Penglai Seamount, located on the 17°N fossil spreading center of the East Sub-basin of the South China Sea, near the Manila Trench. Pyroxene and whole-rock 40Ar/39Ar dating yields ages of 32.3 ± 0.5 Ma and 28.9 ± 1.9 Ma, respectively. The plagiogranite show trace element and isotopic composition similar to those of mid-oceanic ridge basalts (MORB), with 87Sr/86Sr(t) = 0.70394; εNd(t) = 8.21; 206Pb/204Pb = 17.9930, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.4839, 208Pb/204Pb = 37.8852; εHf(t) = 20.95; and γOs(t) = 15.89. It suggested that the rock formed due to differential cooling between adjacent layers of oceanic crust and asthenospheric shearing at the oceanic spreading ridge, resulting in the development of detachment faults. This triggered the subsequent ingress of seawater along the faults, which transformed into a hydrothermal fluid under the influence of shear and geothermal heating, altering the parent gabbro, and leading to the generation of the daughter plagiogranite by anatexis during the early Oligocene. This new geochronology also demonstrates that the initial opening of the South China Sea occurred before 32 Ma, thereby constraining the Cenozoic tectonic evolution of Southeast Asia.

  2. South African Gastroenterology Review

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Homepage Image. The South African Gastroenterology Reviewis written by specialists in the field. Its aim is to publish articles pertinent to the practising Gastroenterologist in South Africa. It is distributed to a broad spectrum of clinicians who have an interest in clinical gastroenterology and hepatology. Other websites ...

  3. South African Actuarial Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Actuarial Journalis published by the Actuarial Society of South Africa (ASSA). It is issued free to members of ASSA and will also be made available to them on the Society's website for access via the Internet. The focus of SAAJ is on actuarial research–particularly, but not exclusively, on research of relevance to ...

  4. South African Crime Quarterly

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Crime Quarterly is an inter-disciplinary peer-reviewed journal that promotes professional discourse and the publication of research on the subjects of crime, criminal justice, crime prevention, and related matters including state and non-state responses to crime and violence. South Africa is the primary focus for ...

  5. South Sudan Medical Journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The SSMJ is the a multi-professional journal in the South Sudan which caters for the needs of Doctors, Nurses, Midwives, Clinical Officers, Pharmacists and all other cadres in the health profession. Its vision is to see a well-trained, skilled professionals delivering high quality healthcare to the population of the South Sudan.

  6. South African Airborne Operations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa carried out numerous airborne operations during the latter part .... It was a lesson the French had learned and were learning in Indo-China and ..... South African government, concerned that the conflict would spill across their northern border, ...... the Super Frelon and it was an outstanding helicopter at sea level.

  7. in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    9 assistance from the National Olympic Committee of South. Africa (NOCSA), while an overwhelming proportion (89%) received no financial support. Of the 45 swimmers surveyed,. 8 respondents were financially supported by Swimming South. Africa, whilst 8 indicated that they were sponsored privately. Twenty-one of the ...

  8. South Africa comes clean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albright, D.

    1993-01-01

    South African President F. W. de Klerk made headlines on March 24 when he admitted to a joint session of parliament that South Africa had once had a supply of nuclear weapons; six of seven planned devices had been completed. South African spokesmen had previously said that Pretoria was capable of building weapons, but they had remained deliberately vague about whether or not any had been built. According to de Klerk, the weapons were dismantled before South Africa signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty on July 10, 1991. De Klerk's revelation came in response to charges by the African National Congress and U.S. government officials that South Africa had possibly hidden atomic bomb components and manufacturing plants and that it had been evasive about its stockpile of weapon-grade uranium. A more complete discussion of de Klerk's disclosure and events leading to the admission are explored in this article

  9. Recent Multidisciplinary Research Initiatives and IODP Drilling in the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J.; Li, C. F.; Wang, P.; Kulhanek, D. K.

    2016-12-01

    The South China Sea (SCS) is the largest low-latitude marginal sea in the world. Its formation and evolution are linked to the complex continental-oceanic tectonic interaction of the Eurasian, Pacific, and Indo-Australian plates. Despite its relatively small size and short history, the SCS has undergone nearly a complete Wilson cycle from continental break-up to seafloor spreading to subduction, serving as a natural laboratory for studying the linkages between tectonic, volcanic, and oceanic processes. The last several years have witnessed significant progress in investigation of the SCS through comprehensive research programs using multidisciplinary approaches and enhanced international collaboration. The International Ocean Discovery Program (IODP) Expedition 349 drilled and cored five sites in the SCS in 2014. The expedition successfully obtained the first basaltic rock samples of the SCS relict spreading center, discovered large and frequent deep-sea turbidity events, and sampled multiple seamount volcaniclastic layers. In addition, high-resolution near-seafloor magnetic surveys were conducted in the SCS with survey lines passing near some of the IODP drilling sites. Together the IODP drilling and deep-tow magnetic survey results confirmed, for the first time, that the entire SCS basin might have stopped seafloor spreading at similar ages in early Miocene, providing important constraints on marginal sea geodynamic models. In 2007, IODP Expeditions 367 and 368 will drill the northern margin of the SCS to investigate the mechanisms of rifting to spreading processes. Meanwhile, major progress in studying the SCS processes has also been made through comprehensive multidisciplinary programs, for example, the eight-year-long "South China Sea Deep" initiative, which also supports and encourages strong international collaboration. This presentation will highlight the recent multidisciplinary research initiatives in investigation of the SCS and the important role of

  10. Accretionary and collisional orogenesis in the south domain of the western Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Keda; Long, Xiaoping; Chen, Huayong; Sun, Min; Xiao, Wenjiao

    2018-03-01

    The Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) was the result of long-lived multi-stage tectonic evolution, including Proterozoic to Paleozoic accretion and collision, Mesozoic intracontinental modification, and Cenozoic rapid deformation and uplift. The accretionary and collisional orogenesis of its early history generated a huge orogenic collage consisting of diverse tectonic units including island arcs, ophiolites, accretionary prisms, seamounts, oceanic plateaus and micro-continents. These incorporated orogenic components preserved valuable detailed information on orogenic process and continental crust growth, which make the CAOB a key region to understanding of continental evolution, mantle-crust interaction and associated mineralization. The western CAOB refers to the west region in North Xinjiang of China and circum-Balkash of Kazakhstan, with occurrences of the spectacular Kazakhstan orocline and its surrounding mountain belts. Because orogenic fabrics of this part mostly preserve their original features caused by the interactions among the southern Siberian active margin in the north and the Tarim Craton in the south, the western CAOB can be regarded as an ideal region to study the processes of the accretionary and collisional orogenesis and associated mineralization. Since a large number of researchers have been working on this region, research advances bloom strikingly in a short-time period. Therefore, we, in this special issue, focus on these new study advances on the south domain of the western CAOB, including the Kazakhstan collage system, Tianshan orogenic belt and Beishan region, and it is anticipated that this issue can draw more attention from the international research groups to be interested in the studies on orogenesis of the CAOB.

  11. Neosporosis in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D P

    2005-01-20

    This work gathers reports about Neospora-infections in South America. Neospora-infections have been reported from Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Paraguay, Peru and Uruguay. Evidence of exposure to N. caninum was mentioned in cattle, goats, sheep, dogs, cats, water buffaloes, alpacas, llamas, South American opossums, wolves and other wild canids. No antibodies were found in horses. Interesting epidemiological and pathological data were described. Two isolations were performed from dogs, one from cattle, and recently five from water buffaloes. Since the cattle industry is important in South America and reproductive losses caused by Neospora-infection have been identified, more investigations are needed in order to understand its epidemiology and control the disease.

  12. South Africa PIMS

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — PIMS (SOL-674-12-000037) collects and provides information on activities, results, partners, and staff supported through PEPFAR funding in each sub-district of South...

  13. A South African Perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rbr

    ... subject-oriented terminography, translation-oriented terminography and linguistic .... The South African language policy promotes the equitable use of the offi- ... management, trade negotiations, provision of services, job security and institu-.

  14. South and Southwest HSRC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hazardous Substance Research Center/South and Southwest is a competitively awarded, peer-reviewed research consortium led by Louisiana State University with the...

  15. The South Asian genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C Chambers

    Full Text Available The genetic sequence variation of people from the Indian subcontinent who comprise one-quarter of the world's population, is not well described. We carried out whole genome sequencing of 168 South Asians, along with whole-exome sequencing of 147 South Asians to provide deeper characterisation of coding regions. We identify 12,962,155 autosomal sequence variants, including 2,946,861 new SNPs and 312,738 novel indels. This catalogue of SNPs and indels amongst South Asians provides the first comprehensive map of genetic variation in this major human population, and reveals evidence for selective pressures on genes involved in skin biology, metabolism, infection and immunity. Our results will accelerate the search for the genetic variants underlying susceptibility to disorders such as type-2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease which are highly prevalent amongst South Asians.

  16. IDRC in South Africa

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    challenges remain. ... such issues as environmental preserva- tion, new ... women's access to land. ... Youth in South Africa face many hurdles, ... works like family and friends to overcome chal- ... representatives, local businesses, and gov-.

  17. Cerro Largo South orientation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradier, B.

    1982-01-01

    This work is about Cerro Largo South orientation. The site is located in the northeast of Uruguay in the south of Melo city, Department of Cerro Largo. The study was carried out in the young edge socket in the East side of a small valley. This metamorphic socket constituted by gneisses and crystalline limestone are in contact with upper carboniferous formations and basal deposits composed by sandstones and conglomerates

  18. South China Sea Dispute

    OpenAIRE

    Tanderup, Kasper Buch; Grinderslev, Emil Juhler; Tønnesen-Højbjerg, Asser Laurits Svend

    2017-01-01

    China is rising rapidly in terms of economics, military spending, sphere of influence and claims to in their view former territory. This paper has aimed to discuss the latter through analysis of the present dispute concerning islands and maritime territory in the South China Sea. The Chinese have become increasingly assertive in their claims formulated through a U-shaped line entailing most of the area within the South China Sea. The claims are contested by Vietnam, the Philippines, Indonesia...

  19. South African drilling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    According to the president of the South African Drilling Association, the drilling industry is meeting head-on the challenges created by the worldwide recession. The paper is a synopsis of several of the papers presented at the SADA symposium and a look at several mining-related drilling projects in South Africa. These papers include grouting techniques, the use of impregnated bits in hard rock drilling, tunnel boring for mines, surveying improvement methods and the use of explosives to increase groundwater yield

  20. Enriched and depleted characters of the Amnay Ophiolite upper crustal section and the regionally heterogeneous nature of the South China Sea mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Americus d. C.; Faustino-Eslava, Decibel V.; Yumul, Graciano P.; Dimalanta, Carla B.; Tamayo, Rodolfo A.; Yang, Tsanyao Frank; Zhou, Mei-Fu

    2013-03-01

    The volcanic section of the Middle Oligocene Amnay Ophiolite in Mindoro, Philippines has previously been shown to be of normalmid-oceanic ridge basalt (NMORB) composition. Here we report for the first time an enriched mantle component that is additionally recorded in this crustal section. New whole rock major and trace element data are presented for nine mafic volcanic rocks from a section of the ophiolite that has not been previously examined. These moderately evolved tholeiitic basalts were found to have resulted from the bulk mixing of ˜10% ocean island basalt components with depleted mantle. Drawing together various geochemical characteristics reported for different rock suites taken as representatives of the South China Sea crust, including the enriched MORB (EMORB) and NMORB of the East Taiwan Ophiolite, the NMORB from previous studies of the Amnay Ophiolite and the younger ocean floor eruptives of the Scarborough Seamount-Reed Bank region, a veined mantle model is proposed for the South China Sea mantle. The NMORB magmatic products are suggested to have been derived from the more depleted portions of the mantle whereas the ocean island basalt (OIB) and EMORB-type materials from the mixing of depleted and veined/enriched mantle regions.

  1. South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Brian; Blackmore, Graham

    2001-01-01

    The South China Sea is poorly understood in terms of its marine biota, ecology and the human impacts upon it. What is known is most often contained in reports and workshop and conference documents that are not available to the wider scientific community. The South China Sea has an area of some 3.3 million km2 and depths range from the shallowest coastal fringe to 5377 m in the Manila Trench. It is also studded with numerous islets, atolls and reefs many of which are just awash at low tide. It is largely confined within the Tropic of Cancer and, therefore, experiences a monsoonal climate being influenced by the Southwest Monsoon in summer and the Northeast Monsoon in winter. The South China Sea is a marginal sea and, therefore, largely surrounded by land. Countries that have a major influence on and claims to the sea include China, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, although Thailand, Indonesia and Taiwan have some too. The coastal fringes of the South China Sea are home to about 270 million people that have had some of the fastest developing and most vibrant economies on the globe. Consequently, anthropogenic impacts, such as over-exploitation of resources and pollution, are anticipated to be huge although, in reality, relatively little is known about them. The Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province, at the centre of which the South China Sea lies, is probably the world's most diverse shallow-water marine area. Of the three major nearshore habitat types, i.e., coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, 45 mangrove species out of a global of 51, most of the currently recognised 70 coral genera and 20 of 50 known seagrass species have been recorded from the South China Sea. The island groups of the South China Sea are all disputed and sovereignty is claimed over them by a number of countries. Conflicts have in recent decades arisen over them because of perceived national rights. It is perhaps because of this that so little research has been undertaken on the South

  2. South China Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morton, Brian [Hong Kong Univ., Swire Inst. of Marine Science, Hong Kong (China); Hong Kong Univ., Dept. of Ecology and Biodiversity, Hong Kong (China); Blackmore, Graham [Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Biology, Hong Kong (China)

    2001-07-01

    The South China Sea is poorly understood in terms of its marine biota, ecology and the human impacts upon it. What is known is most often contained in reports and workshops and conference documents that are not available to the wider scientific community. The South China Sea has an area of some 3.3 million km{sup 2} and depths range from the shallowest coastal fringe to 5377m in the Manila Trench. It is also studded with numerous islets, atolls and reefs many of which are just awash at low tide. It is largely confined within the Tropic of Cancer and, therefore, experiences a monsoonal climate being influenced by the Southwest Monsoon in summer and the Northeast Monsoon in winter. The South China Sea is a marginal sea and, therefore, largely surrounded by land. Countries that have a major influence on and claims to the sea include China, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, although Thailand, Indonesia and Taiwan have some too. The coastal fringes of the South China Sea are home to about 270 million people that have had some of the fastest developing and most vibrant economics on the globe. Consequently, anthropogenic impacts, such as over-exploitation of resources and pollution, are anticipated to be huge although, in reality, relatively little is known about them. The Indo-West Pacific biogeographic province, at the centre of which the South China Sea lies, is probably the world's most diverse shallow-water marine area. Of three major nearshore habitat types, i.e., coral reefs, mangroves and seagrasses, 45 mangrove species out of a global total of 51, most of the currently recognised 70 coral genera and 20 of 50 known seagrass species have been recorded from the South China Sea. The island groups of the South China Sea are all disputed and sovereignty is claimed over them by a number of countries. Conflicts have in recent decades arisen over them because of perceived national rights. It is perhaps because of this that so little research has been undertaken

  3. North-south interdependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norse, D

    1979-01-01

    The sound eco-development of agriculture can help to establish a cooperative and harmonious north-south interdependence. The interdependence pattern is seen when the major agricultural suppliers (energy, fertilizers, and pesticides) are examined in the context of commodity transfers of grain and rubber. The consumers of either the north or south would be unable to find alternative sources without major production or social disruption. The Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) INTERFUTURES study examines the chain of dependencies between raw materials and markets and the implications for economic development, employment, and environmental hazards. If interdependence is to benefit both the north and the south, technological fixes will not be adequate or appropriate to deal with the potential hazards. (DCK)

  4. Nigeria-China Economic Relations Under the South-South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The defining characteristic of the South-South solidarity is cooperation among the ... relations which appear to be in great disequilibrium and to China's advantage. ... penetration of the Nigerian economy, observers of Nigeria's international ...

  5. Where are general surgeons located in South Africa? | Dell | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Surgery ... Methods: A descriptive analysis of the general surgical workforce in South Africa was performed. The total number of specialist and non-specialist general surgeons working in the public sector in South Africa was documented between the periods from the 1 October 2014 until 31 ...

  6. "South Park" vormistab roppused muusikalivormi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Animafilm "South Park : suurem, pikem ja lõikamata" ("South Park . Bigger, Longer & Uncut") : Stsenaristid Trey Parker, Matt Stone ja Pam Brady : režissöör Trey Parker : Ameerika Ühendriigid 1999

  7. South African Crime Quarterly 56

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edited by Chandré Gould and Andrew Faull

    SACQ). We believe ... justice and evolving forms of crime in South Africa, and the global South more broadly, complements the SACQ's ... These high-profile events, along with disruptions and conflict in Parliament, have served to create a political.

  8. Analysis of dissimilatory sulfite reductase and 16S rRNA gene fragments from deep-sea hydrothermal sites of the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Western Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Ishibashi, Jun-Ichiro; Maruyama, Akihiko; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Morimoto, Yusuke; Kimura, Hiroyuki; Urabe, Tetsuro; Fukui, Manabu

    2004-01-01

    This study describes the occurrence of unique dissimilatory sulfite reductase (DSR) genes at a depth of 1,380 m from the deep-sea hydrothermal vent field at the Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Western Pacific, Japan. The DSR genes were obtained from microbes that grew in a catheter-type in situ growth chamber deployed for 3 days on a vent and from the effluent water of drilled holes at 5 degrees C and natural vent fluids at 7 degrees C. DSR clones SUIYOdsr-A and SUIYOdsr-B were not closely related to cultivated species or environmental clones. Moreover, samples of microbial communities were examined by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. The sequence analysis of 16S rRNA gene fragments obtained from the vent catheter after a 3-day incubation revealed the occurrence of bacterial DGGE bands affiliated with the Aquificae and gamma- and epsilon-Proteobacteria as well as the occurrence of archaeal phylotypes affiliated with the Thermococcales and of a unique archaeon sequence that clustered with "Nanoarchaeota." The DGGE bands obtained from drilled holes and natural vent fluids from 7 to 300 degrees C were affiliated with the delta-Proteobacteria, genus Thiomicrospira, and Pelodictyon. The dominant DGGE bands retrieved from the effluent water of casing pipes at 3 and 4 degrees C were closely related to phylotypes obtained from the Arctic Ocean. Our results suggest the presence of microorganisms corresponding to a unique DSR lineage not detected previously from other geothermal environments.

  9. S- and Sr-isotopic compositions in barite-silica chimney from the Franklin Seamount, Woodlark Basin, Papua New Guinea: constraints on genesis and temporal variability of hydrothermal fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Durbar; Banerjee, Ranadip; Balakrishnan, S.; Paropkari, Anil L.; Mukhopadhyay, Subir

    2017-07-01

    Isotopic ratios of strontium and sulfur in six layers across a horizontal section of a hydrothermal barite-silica chimney from Franklin Seamount of western Woodlark Basin have been investigated. Sr-isotopic ratios in barite samples (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70478-0.70493) are less radiogenic than seawater (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70917) indicating that substantial leaching of sub-seafloor magma was involved in the genesis of hydrothermal fluid. The SO2 of magma likely contributed a considerable amount of lighter S-isotope in fluid and responsible for the formation of barite, which is isotopically lighter (δ34S = 19.4-20.5 ‰) than modern seawater (δ34S 21 ‰). The systematic changes in isotopic compositions across the chimney wall suggest temporal changes in the mode of mineral formation during the growth of the chimney. Enrichment of heavy S- and Sr-isotopes (δ34S = 20.58 ‰; 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70493) in the outermost periphery of the chimney indicates that, at the initial stage of chimney development, there was a significant contribution of seawater sulfate during barite mineralization. Thereafter, thickening of chimney wall occurred due to precipitation of fluid carrying more magmatic components relative to seawater. This led to a gradual enrichment of lighter isotopes (δ34S = 20.42-19.48 ‰; 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70491-0.704787) toward the inner portion of the chimney wall. In contrast, the innermost layer surrounding the fluid conduit is characterized by heavier and more radiogenic isotopes (δ34S = 20.3 ‰; 87Sr/86Sr = 0.7049). This suggests there was increasing influence of percolating seawater on the mineral paragenesis at the waning phase of the chimney development.

  10. Epilepsy in South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This was noted first in Tanzania in the 1960s, has been seen in Uganda, and many cases have been detected in South. Sudan (16). The disorder has not yet been satisfactorily classified. Some cases having nodding in isolation (possibly a form of tic rather than a seizure disorder) but in others there is a definite association ...

  11. South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice(SAFP) is a peer-reviewed scientific journal, which strives to ... The content of SAFP is designed to reflect and support further development of the broad ... Vol 60, No 2 (2018) ... of doctors and physiotherapists in the rehabilitation of people living with HIV · EMAIL ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  12. South African School Geography:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lorraine Innes

    Academic Associate, Department of Geography, University of South Africa, ... In conclusion, a case is made for enhancing the status of school Geography by making it a recommended subject for tertiary studies in university programs offering geospatial .... response to the education crisis of the 1970s and 1980s the Human ...

  13. IDRC in South Africa

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    To strengthen competition authorities in the region, IDRC supported the creation of the African Competition. Forum in 2010. IDRC-funded research also helped ... Saving lives, money, and ecosystems. Funding: $675,000. Duration: 2013–2016. Grantee: University of Pretoria,. South Africa. Environmental economists seek to ...

  14. South Dakota's forests 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald J. Piva; W. Keith Moser; Douglas D. Haugan; Gregory J. Josten; Gary J. Brand; Brett J. Butler; Susan J. Crocker; Mark H. Hansen; Dacia M. Meneguzzo; Charles H. Perry; Christopher W. Woodall

    2009-01-01

    The first completed annual inventory of South Dakota's forests reports almost 1.7 million acres of forest land. Softwood forests make up 74 percent of the total forest land area; the ponderosa pine forest type by itself accounts for 69 percent of the total.

  15. Teaching About South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schisgall, Jane

    1983-01-01

    Identifies reasons why social studies educators should improve their teaching about South Korea. Included in the list is the increasing numbers of Koreans being educated in the United States, the summer Olympics in 1988, and the use of Korean culture as a case study demonstrating the effects of cultural transmission and society in transition. (JDH)

  16. APARTHEID SOUTH AFRICA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conventions that are shared by a group of people, and that influence (but do not determine) ... Matsumoto Culture and Psychology 16: "…the set of attitudes, values, beliefs, and behaviors shared by a group of ... Chinese Association of South Africa v Minister of Labour (PHC) unreported case no 59521/2007 of 18 June 2008 ...

  17. in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    skills, talent identification, financial implications and sci- entific support for swimmers in South Africa. The top 45 swimmers ... potential, capacity and raw talent to compete at interna- tional leveL Scientific and medical support, administration ..... Human Kinstie811, 1999. 7-8. . 3 . Bruckner P, Khan K. Clinical Sport8 Medicine.

  18. South African Airborne Operations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    makes them suitable for a number of different and demanding roles. ... financial constraints make it generally impossible for rebel groupings and even national ... followed their chief by successfully parachuting as well.2. During the ... More than 60 South African officers and a handful of other ranks did serve on secondment.

  19. China, South Korea, Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    Intended for Canadian readers, this popular account was suggested by the Sixth Pacific Basin Nuclear Conference. Economic, political, geographic, sociological and historical aspects of the nuclear programmes of China, South Korea and Japan are discussed. The importance of past, present and future Canadian nuclear trade with the area is indicated

  20. Literacy in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    1991-01-01

    Literacy in South America must be understood in terms of the linguistic diversity there, where only 2 of 14 nations and territories are monolingual. Oral traditions, standardization of indigenous languages, nonstandard varieties of colonial languages, bilingual education and mother tongue literacy, literacy teaching, and politics are discussed.…

  1. Literacy in South Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, R. N.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the various facets and dimensions of literacy programs in South Asia indicates that literacy is viewed as a means of human resource development geared toward meaningful participation of all sectors in society, with individual programs varying according to the magnitude of illiteracy, national goals, linguistic setting, and regional…

  2. South African metropolis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa's formal employment growth rate has been declining steadily since the ... the institutions, political processes and social networks of society. Barriers to .... central business district, as well as to other white residential areas like Phillip .... during this time by maintaining frequent contact between field workers,.

  3. South Baltic Wind Atlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    A first version of a wind atlas for the South Baltic Sea has been developed using the WRF mesoscale model and verified by data from tall Danish and German masts. Six different boundary-layer parametrization schemes were evaluated by comparing the WRF results to the observed wind profiles at the m...

  4. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa.

  5. Country Energy Profile, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    This country energy profile provides energy and economic information about South Africa. Areas covered include: Economics, demographics, and environment; Energy situation; Energy structure; Energy investment opportunities; Department of Energy (DOE) programs in South Africa; and a listing of International aid to South Africa

  6. Selatan—Sur—South

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Campbell

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Kumpulan puisi dalam Bahasa Indonesia oleh IAN CAMPBELL/Poetry compilation in Indonesian by the Australian poet Ian Campbell. This collection of poems explores the notion of the 'south' from locations in Indonesia, Australia, Chile and Argentina, locations in which the poems were written. Explaining his topographical approach in these poems, Campbell says: "One of the poems, titled in the Indonesian original 'Lejano sur' (Ke Kejauhan Selatan, appears alongside an English version, called 'Further South.' This short poem takes Borges's short story 'Sur' and a reference to Avenida Rivadavia that he includes in 'Sur' as its starting point for crossing into 'the South' from the centre of Buenos Aires. I then explore ideas of southness - as paradoxically moving 'south' away from North into a region where 'the natural elements are supreme'. Recent Chilean poetry eg 'Despedidas Antárticas' by Julio Carrasco (2006 picks up this idea of 'towards the essence' better than recent Australian poetry. Only Tom Griffiths, the historian, has recently explored this in prose. There are Borgesian images of dust/lack of clarity, then we head into a region where eg Torre del Paine, admittedly on the Chilean side of the Andes, come to mind. The stress on the elements - stone, wind, fire - is an allusion to the way Indonesian poet, Acep Zamzam Noor, portrays these elements in a poem 'Batu dan Angin' (Stone and Wind which has strong sufi/meditative elements. We head into the polar area, which because of climate change, is now melting. But there is also an allusion to Douglas Stewart's play 'Fire on the Snow' about the 1911 Scott expedition and the value of 'human failure'. Even the 'essence' is melting and is no longer stable."

  7. Anaglyph, South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This anaglyph (stereoscopic view) of South America was generated with data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). It is best viewed at or near full resolution with anaglyph glasses. For this broad view the resolution of the data was first reduced to 30 arcseconds (about 928 meters north-south but variable east-west), matching the best previously existing global digital topographic data set called GTOPO30. The data were then resampled to a Mercator projection with approximately square pixels (about one kilometer, or 0.6 miles, on each side). Even at this decreased resolution the variety of landforms comprising the South American continent is readily apparent.Topographic relief in South America is dominated by the Andes Mountains, which extend all along the Pacific Coast. These mountains are created primarily by the convergence of the Nazca and South American tectonic plates. The Nazca Plate, which underlies the eastern Pacific Ocean, slides under western South America resulting in crustal thickening, uplift, and volcanism. Another zone of plate convergence occurs along the northwestern coast of South America where the Caribbean Plate also slides under the South American Plate and forms the northeastern extension of the Andes Mountains.East of the Andes, much of northern South America drains into the Amazon River, the world's largest river in terms of both watershed area and flow volume. Topographic relief is very low in much of the Amazon Basin but SRTM data provide an excellent detailed look at the basin's three-dimensional drainage pattern, including the geologic structural trough (syncline) that hosts the eastern river channel.North of the Amazon, the Guiana Highlands commonly stand in sharp contrast to the surrounding lowlands, indeed hosting the world's tallest waterfall, Angel Falls (979 meters or 3212 feet). Folded and fractured bedrock structures are distinctive in the topographic pattern.South of the Amazon, the Brazilian Highlands show a mix of

  8. South Australia, uranium enrichment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    The Report sets out the salient data relating to the establishment of a uranium processing centre at Redcliff in South Australia. It is conceived as a major development project for the Commonwealth, the South Australian Government and Australian Industry comprising the refining and enrichment of uranium produced from Australian mines. Using the data currently available in respect of markets, demand, technology and possible financial return from overseas sales, the project could be initiated immediately with hexafluoride production, followed rapidly in stages by enrichment production using the centrifuge process. A conceptual development plan is presented, involving a growth pattern that would be closely synchronised with the mining and production of yellowcake. The proposed development is presented in the form of an eight-and-half-year programme. Costs in this Report are based on 1975 values, unless otherwise stated. (Author)

  9. South Oregon Coast Reinforcement.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1998-05-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to build a transmission line to reinforce electrical service to the southern coast of Oregon. This FYI outlines the proposal, tells how one can learn more, and how one can share ideas and opinions. The project will reinforce Oregon`s south coast area and provide the necessary transmission for Nucor Corporation to build a new steel mill in the Coos Bay/North Bend area. The proposed plant, which would use mostly recycled scrap metal, would produce rolled steel products. The plant would require a large amount of electrical power to run the furnace used in its steel-making process. In addition to the potential steel mill, electrical loads in the south Oregon coast area are expected to continue to grow.

  10. Uranium in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, M.A.

    1993-01-01

    The history, sources, mineralogy, extraction metallurgy, conversion, and enrichment of uranium in South Africa is reviewed. Over the past 40 years extraction plants were built at 27 sites, and over 140 kt of uranium have been produced. Older plants have had to adapt to changing market conditions, no single technology has had the opportunity to become entrenched, and the costs have been reduced to a third of those of the original flowsheet. The research efforts aimed at developing the country's nuclear raw materials have been particularly rewarding, as they have enabled South Africa to become a world leader in the extraction of uranium from low-grade ores and to develop methods for uranium enrichment and the production of nuclear fuels. 43 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  11. South Africa's mineral industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-06-01

    The main aim of the Minerals Bureau in presenting this annual review is to provide an up-to-date reference document on the current state of the mineral industry in South Africa. This includes a brief look at the production, trade, economy, resources and deposits of precious metals and minerals, energy minerals, metallic minerals, and non-metallic minerals. One article discusses the production, trade, export, deposits and economy of uranium

  12. South Dakota geothermal handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    The sources of geothermal fluids in South Dakota are described and some of the problems that exist in utilization and materials selection are described. Methods of heat extraction and the environmental concerns that accompany geothermal fluid development are briefly described. Governmental rules, regulations and legislation are explained. The time and steps necessary to bring about the development of the geothermal resource are explained in detail. Some of the federal incentives that encourage the use of geothermal energy are summarized. (MHR)

  13. Photonics in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bollig, C

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available : photonics, ultrafast and ultra- intense laser science (Heinrich Schwoerer, University of Stellenbosch); quantum information processing and communication (Francesco Petruccione, University of KwaZulu-Natal); medicinal chemistry and nanotechnology... of experience in diamond research, where scientists are now turning their attention to diamond for photonic devices. �ere is an active community in South Africa studying the potential of diamond as a single-photon source for applications in quantum...

  14. Terrorism in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Campbell

    2003-01-01

    The Republic of South Africa lies at the southern tip of the African continent. The population encompasses a variety of races, ethnic groups, religions, and cultural identities. The country has had a turbulent history from early tribal conflicts, colonialisation, the apartheid period, and post-apartheid readjustment. Modern terrorism developed mainly during the apartheid period, both by activities of the state and by the liberation movements that continued to the time of the first democratic elections in 1994, which saw South Africa evolve into a fully representative democratic state with equal rights for all. Since 1994, terrorist acts have been criminal-based, evolving in the Cape Town area to political acts, largely laid at the feet of a predominantly Muslim organisation, People against Gangsterism and Drugs, a vigilant organisation allegedly infiltrated by Muslim fundamentalists. Along with this, has been terrorist activities, mainly bombings by disaffected members of white, right-wing groups. In the apartheid era, a Draconian series of laws was enacted to suppress liberation activities. After 1994, most of these were repealed and new legislation was enacted, particularly after the events of 11 September 2001; this legislation allows the government to act against terrorism within the constraints of a democratic system. Disaster management in South Africa has been largely local authority-based, with input from provincial authorities and Civil Defence. After 1994, attempts were made to improve this situation, and national direction was provided. After 11 September 2001, activity was increased and the Disaster Management Act 2002 was brought into effect. This standardized disaster management system at national, provincial, and local levels, also facilites risk assessment and limitation as well as disaster mitigation. The potential still exists for terrorism, mainly from right-wing and Muslim fundamentalist groups, but the new legislation should stimulate disaster

  15. South Polar Polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    4 July 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a polgyon-cracked surface, into which deep, somewhat kidney-bean-shaped pits have formed. These are landscapes of the martian south polar residual cap. This view was captured during May 2005. Location near: 86.9oS, 5.1oW Image width: 1.5 km (0.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season Southern Spring

  16. South African Astronomical Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Work at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) in recent years, by both staff and visitors, has made major contributions to the fields of astrophysics and astronomy. During 1986 the SAAO has been involved in studies of the following: galaxies; celestial x-ray sources; magellanic clouds; pulsating variables; galactic structure; binary star phenomena; nebulae and interstellar matter; stellar astrophysics; open clusters; globular clusters, and solar systems

  17. AIDS in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ijsselmuiden, C; Evian, C; Matjilla, J; Steinberg, M; Schneider, H

    1993-01-01

    The National AIDS Convention in South Africa (NACOSA) in October 1992 was the first real attempt to address HIV/AIDS. In Soweto, government, the African National Congress, nongovernmental organizations, and organized industry and labor representatives worked for 2 days to develop a national plan of action, but it did not result in a united effort to fight AIDS. The highest HIV infection rates in South Africa are among the KwaZulu in Natal, yet the Inkatha Freedom Party did not attend NACOSA. This episode exemplifies the key obstacles for South Africa to prevent and control AIDS. Inequality of access to health care may explain why health workers did not diagnose the first AIDS case in blacks until 1985. Migrant labor, Bantu education, and uprooted communities affect the epidemiology of HIV infection. Further, political and social polarization between blacks and whites contributes to a mindset that AIDS is limited to the other race which only diminishes the personal and collective sense of susceptibility and the volition and aptitude to act. The Department of National Health and Population Development's voluntary register of anonymously reported cases of AIDS specifies 1517 cumulative AIDS cases (October 1992), but this number is low. Seroprevalence studies show between 400,000-450,000 HIV positive cases. Public hospitals cannot give AIDS patients AZT and DDI. Few communities provided community-based care. Not all hospitals honor confidentiality and patients' need for autonomy. Even though HIV testing is not mandatory, it is required sometimes, e.g., HIV testing of immigrants. AIDS Training, Information and Counselling Centers are in urban areas, but not in poor areas where the need is most acute. The government just recently developed in AIDS education package for schools, but too many people consider it improper, so it is not being used. The poor quality education provided blacks would make it useless anyhow. Lifting of the academic boycott will allow South African

  18. Beyond rhetoric: South-South collaboration for REDD+

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nhantumbo, Isilda; MacQueen, Duncan

    2011-11-15

    Global debates about reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation, and promoting conservation, sustainable forest management and enhancement of forest carbon stocks (REDD+) emphasise the need for strategies to build on existing knowledge. In one example of South-South collaboration to do just this, IIED has helped facilitate a Mozambique-Brazil partnership to share expertise and create a unique REDD+ working group. The initiative provides key lessons for other countries contemplating South-South collaboration on REDD+, including the need for charismatic champions, continuity in government representation, and integration across sectors.

  19. Defining biological assemblages (biotopes) of conservation interest in the submarine canyons of the South West Approaches (offshore United Kingdom) for use in marine habitat mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jaime S.; Howell, Kerry L.; Stewart, Heather A.; Guinan, Janine; Golding, Neil

    2014-06-01

    In 2007, the upper part of a submarine canyon system located in water depths between 138 and 1165 m in the South West (SW) Approaches (North East Atlantic Ocean) was surveyed over a 2 week period. High-resolution multibeam echosounder data covering 1106 km2, and 44 ground-truthing video and image transects were acquired to characterise the biological assemblages of the canyons. The SW Approaches is an area of complex terrain, and intensive ground-truthing revealed the canyons to be dominated by soft sediment assemblages. A combination of multivariate analysis of seabed photographs (184-1059 m) and visual assessment of video ground-truthing identified 12 megabenthic assemblages (biotopes) at an appropriate scale to act as mapping units. Of these biotopes, 5 adhered to current definitions of habitats of conservation concern, 4 of which were classed as Vulnerable Marine Ecosystems. Some of the biotopes correspond to descriptions of communities from other megahabitat features (for example the continental shelf and seamounts), although it appears that the canyons host modified versions, possibly due to the inferred high rates of sedimentation in the canyons. Other biotopes described appear to be unique to canyon features, particularly the sea pen biotope consisting of Kophobelemnon stelliferum and cerianthids.

  20. Colonial life under the Humboldt Current System: deep-sea corals from O'Higgins I seamount La vida colonial bajo el sistema de la corriente de Humboldt: corales de aguas profundas en el monte submarino O'Higgins I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan I Cañete

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A benthic community constituted by an assemblage of at least four species of deep-sea corals collected in only one trawl carried-out on the summit of the O'Higgins I seamount, central Chile. The corals were collected in only one trawl carried-out during a Chilean-Japanese cruise onboard the R/V" Koyo Maru" in December 29, 2004. Presence of oxygenated and cold Antarctic Intermediate Water (>400 m depth on the plateau was recorded under of the Equatorial Subsurface Water associated to the oxygen-minimum zone (OMZ, Se describe una comunidad bentónica constituida por un ensamble de cuatro especies de corales de profundidad recolectados mediante un lance de arrastre efectuado sobre el margen de la meseta del monte submarino O'Higgins I, Chile central. Sobre la meseta se detectó la presencia de agua oxigenadas frías correspondientes al Agua Intermedia Antártica (>400 m de profundidad y sobre ésta, el Agua Ecuatorial Subsuperficial asociada a la zona de mínimo de oxígeno (OMZ, <1 mL O2 L-1. La fauna muestra un origen biogeográfico de tipo subantártico sumado a la presencia de fauna típica del margen continental de la zona central de Chile. Este ensamble está representado por dos especies de Antipataria (Leiopathes sp. y Chrysopathes sp., una especie no identificada de la familia Paragorgiidae y una especie perteneciente a la familia Isididae (Acanella chilensis. Este estudio muestra que este ensamble de corales de profundidad provee un hábitat crítico para el camarón nailon (Heterocarpus reedi, crustáceo de importancia pesquera. La presencia de este crustáceo más algunos peces como el alfonsino (Beryx splendens y orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus podrían atraer la atención de la industria sobre estas frágiles, singulares y escasamente conocidas comunidades bentónicas chilenas y por lo tanto se requiere con urgencia acciones para su conservación.

  1. South Korea's nuclear fuel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    March 1990 marked a major milestone for South Korea's nuclear power program, as the country became self-sufficient in nuclear fuel fabrication. The reconversion line (UF 6 to UO 2 ) came into full operation at the Korea Nuclear Fuel Company's fabrication plant, as the last step in South Korea's program, initiated in the mid-1970s, to localize fuel fabrication. Thus, South Korea now has the capability to produce both CANDU and pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies. This article covers the nuclear fuel industry in South Korea-how it is structures, its current capabilities, and its outlook for the future

  2. INTERNATIONALCAREEREXPERIENCESOFEXPATRIATEACADEMICS IN SOUTH AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashika Maharaj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available South Africais facingamajor staffing shortageinscarce skills disciplines.Expatriateacademics have been sourcedbyuniversities to run programmes inthese disciplinesto create ‘home grown’ talent tosolvethis problem.This study isbased on Lazarova, Westman and Shaffer’s(2010modelrelating to expatriatework and family performance.It seeksto examine the experiencesof academics atUKZN,as well as provide recommendationson howto improve theirexperience.The key question ofthepaper, deals with the how expatriate academics haveadjusted to their new environment based onjob andwork environment challenges,family and lifestyle challenges, organisational support and contextual challengesin the host country.The results showedthat the majorityof respondentsare welladjusted in terms of their relationships with their host country colleagues and theirrelationships with family and friendsin theirhomecountry,as well as in terms ofthe fulfilment of theirworkplaceexpectations.Their experience oforganisationalsupport couldhoweverbeimproved.It was found that theydidnot share closeties with other expatriates or local South Africansat the universityorintheircommunities.Thestudy is exploratory and involves a single professional group,as such the findings are not generalisable to other contexts or respondents.Adescriptive quantitative analysis of the career experiences of 83 expatriateacademics was done. Thestudywasuniquein that itexaminedall levels ofacademiain conjunction withmanagement and takes place in a South Africancontext.To improve organisational support,the institution should establishsupport systems forinternational facultyFurthermore, itwassuggestedin thestudy, thatthereshouldbe the creation of a mentorship or buddy programme bythe university to support the adjustment of newinternational staff. Universitymanagement should set up an international staff office similar to the InternationalStudent Office manned by dedicated staff who deal only with matters

  3. A South Korean perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seo-Hang

    1992-01-01

    Recognizing the recent changes in international environment security structures suited for specific situations should be conceived. In order to achieve the way to regional security in North-East Asia the outstanding issue left over from the cold war, divided Korean peninsula, and other subregional disputes have to be solved. In building confidence between the two countries the recently adopted security related accords ('The Agreement on Reconciliation, Non-aggression and Exchange and Cooperation between the South and the North' and the 'Joint declaration on the Denuclearization of the Korean peninsula') provide a framework for improvements of relations

  4. Communication for Policy Research (CPR) South-South | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... of telecom researchers : measures and messages relevant to CPRsouth. Download PDF. Reports. CPRafrica 2010-2012 : a comparative analysis vis-í -vis TPRC, EuroCPR, and CPRsouth/africa. Download PDF. Reports. Communication for Policy Research Africa (CPRafrica) (South-South in contract) : final technical and ...

  5. Smoking in urban pregnant women in South Africa | Steyn | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim. To estimate the exposure to active and passive smoking of pregnant women in South Africa and to determine their knowledge and behaviour with regard to smoking during pregnancy. Methods. A questionnaire was completed by pregnant women attending antenatal services in four South African cities. Questions were ...

  6. Public attitudes to organ donation in South Africa | Pike | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Public attitudes to organ donation may be influenced by cultural beliefs as well as racial prejudices and superstitions. In South Africa we are able to examine these issues from both a Firstand a Third-World perspective. In this study the attitudes of 1 299 urban white, 625 rural black and 826 urban black South Africans were ...

  7. Singing South Africanness: the construction of identity among South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Africa has a vibrant and well-developed choral music scene that incorporates many musical genres and is evident in most, if not all, sectors of South African society. In this pilot study, which focuses on the choir of the University of the Witwatersrand, I investigate the relationship between the identity that choristers ...

  8. South-South Cooperation in health professional education: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the literature on the evolution of funding approaches there is criticism of traditional funding strategies and the promotion of inclusive models, such as South-South Cooperation (SSC) and triangular models. The latter are felt to have a number of advantages. This article has four broad objectives: (i) to present a literature ...

  9. South-South cooperation as a mechanism to strengthen public ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South-South cooperation as a mechanism to strengthen public health services in Africa: ... PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Implementation of new models of development cooperation have been on the increase ... health system strengthening, aid effectiveness, sustainable development goals, Africa ...

  10. An inventory of the South african fitness industry | Draper | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The importance of education and training of staff was emphasised by respondents. Conclusions. This report highlights the widespread value of assessing the fitness industry, particularly within the context of the rise of chronic diseases in South Africa and government initiatives to promote healthy lifestyles. South African ...

  11. South-South Collaboration in Health Biotechnology: Growing ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-01-01

    Jan 1, 2012 ... South-South Collaboration in Health Biotechnology: Growing Partnerships amongst Developing ... the availability of more affordable health products and services. ... of Health Research, New Principal Investigator Award (2007-2012). ... water management: Innovative solutions from the Global South”.

  12. Malaria prophylaxis - the South African viewpoint | Baker | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A consensus meeting was held under the auspices of the Department of National Health and Population Development in September 1991 in order to establish local, current consensus on malaria prophylaxis for the South African traveller within South Africa and neighbouring African countries. The meeting was attended by ...

  13. Time activity patterns: a case of south Durban, South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Matooane, M

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure modelling in south Durban is constrained by a lack of population specific time-activity patterns data. We argue that the application of time-activity patterns from elsewhere in the world in exposure modelling in south Durban would...

  14. Crustal structure and inferred extension mode in the northern margin of the South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J.; Wu, S.; McIntosh, K. D.; Mi, L.; Spence, G.

    2016-12-01

    Combining multi-channel seismic reflection and satellite gravity data, this study has investigated the crustal structure and magmatic activities of the northern South China Sea (SCS) margin. Results show that a broad continent-ocean transition zone (COT) with more than 140 km wide is characterized by extensive igneous intrusion/extrusion and hyper-extended continental crust in the northeastern SCS margin, a broader COT with 220-265 km wide is characterized by crustal thinning, rift depression, structural highs with igneous rock and perhaps a volcanic zone or a zone of tilted fault blocks at the distal edge in the mid-northern SCS margin, and a narrow COT with 65 km wide bounded seawards by a volcanic buried seamount is characterized by extremely hyper-extended continental crust in the northwestern SCS margin, where the remnant crust with less than 3 km thick is bounded by basin-bounding faults corresponding to an aborted rift below the Xisha Trough with a sub-parallel fossil ridge in the adjacent Northwest Sub-basin. Results from gravity modeling and seismic refraction data show that a high velocity layer (HVL) is present in the outer shelf and slope below extended continental crust in the eastern portion of the northern SCS margin and is thickest (up to 10 km) in the Dongsha Uplift where the HVL gradually thins to east and west below the lower slope and finally terminates at the Manila Trench and Baiyun sag of the Pearl River Mouth Basin. The magmatic intrusions/extrusions and HVL may be related to partial melting caused by decompression of passive, upwelling asthenosphere which resulted primarily in post-rifting underplating and magmatic emplacement or modification of the crust. The northern SCS margin is closer to those of the magma-poor margins than those of volcanic margins, but the aborted rift near the northwestern continental margin shows that there may be no obvious detachment fault like that in the Iberia-Newfoundland type margin. The symmetric aborted

  15. URAT South Parallax Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Charlie T.; Zacharias, Norbert; Jao, Wei-Chun

    2018-04-01

    We present 916 trigonometric parallaxes and proper motions of newly discovered nearby stars from the United States Naval Observatory Robotic Astrometric Telescope (URAT). Observations were taken at the Cerro Tololo Interamerican Observatory over a 2-year period from 2015 to 2017 October covering the entire sky south of about +25° decl. SPM4 and UCAC4 early epoch catalog data were added to extend the temporal coverage for the parallax and proper motion fit up to 48 years. Using these new URAT parallaxes, optical and near-IR photometry from the AAVSO Photometric All-Sky Survey and Two Micron All-Sky Survey catalogs, we identify possible new nearby dwarfs, young stars, low-metallicity subdwarfs and white dwarfs. Comparison to known trigonometric parallaxes shows a high quality of the URAT-based results confirming the error in parallax of the URAT south parallaxes reported here to be between 2 and 13 mas. We also include additional 729 trigonometric parallaxes from the URAT north 25 pc sample published in Finch & Zacharias here after applying the same criterion as for the southern sample to have a complete URAT 25 pc sample presented in this paper.

  16. L'Escarpement de Malte, le mont Alfeo et les monts de Médine: marges anciennes du bassin Ionien (synthèse des données des campagnes a la mer Escarmed Malta Escarpment, Alfeo and Medina Seamounts: Former Margins of the Ionian Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groupe Escarmed

    2006-11-01

    caractéristiques, une forte déclivité et une couverture sédimentaire peu épaisse à une morphogénèse complexe car polyphasée. En effet, en plus du facteur lithologique (parois calcaires imposantes, il y a un facteur tectonique essentiel : l'évolution d'une marge continentale mésozoïque réactivée par des phases tectoniques plus récentes, essentiellement Miocène et Plio-Quaternaire. C'est cette originalité qui distingue l'escarpement de Malte et les monts de Médine des autres marges méditerranéennes occidentales et qui permet leur comparaison avec d'autres marges continentales, atlantiques par exemple. The Comité d'Etudes Pétrolières Marines (CEPM and the Centre National pour I'Exploitation des Océans (CNEXO have carried out a series of subsea surveys of Ionian escarpments to define their origin, age and evolution. The results given here concern the Malta escarpment, the Alfeo and Medina seamounts west and southwest of the deep Ionian basin. They include bathymetric data in the form of a 1:100,000th map accompanying the text, a morphological analysis of reliefs, stratigraphic determinations performed on samples gathered by dredging, coring or diving, a structural analysis from seismic-reflection profiles and dives, and a study of subsidence since the Upper Triassic from actual boreholes drilled in the Maltese shelf and fictitious boreholes on the edge of the Malta escarpment. The conclusions bring out:(a the existence of calcareous platform series of early Jurassic age for the Malta escarpment and the Alfeo seamount and of early Cretaceous age for the Medina seamounts;(b a major paleogeographic change starting in the late Jurassic for the Malta escarpment and in the Albian for the Medina seamounts;(c the development of condensed series dating from this paleogeographic change and the presence of constant erosion until the Present, an erosion in which the various processes have numerous consequences on the sedimentation of such reliefs;(d four main

  17. South African Journal of Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Journal of Surgery is published by the South African Medical Association and publishes papers related to surgery. Other websites related to this journal: http://www.sajs.org.za/index.php/sajs. Vol 56, No 1 (2018). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ...

  18. Fiji in the South Pacific.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Rosalind; Semaan, Leslie

    This text introduces Fiji and other island nations located in the Pacific, the world's largest ocean. Cut off from the world by vast expanses of water, these people developed a unique culture. Contents include: Teacher Overview, Geography of the South Pacific Islands, History of the South Pacific, Fiji, Traditional Village Life, Yaquna Ceremony,…

  19. Forests of South Dakota, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian F. Walters

    2016-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in South Dakota based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station (NRS) in cooperation with the South Dakota Department of Agriculture, Resource Conservation and Forestry Division. Estimates are based on field data...

  20. South Dakota's forest resources, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian F. Walters

    2013-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for South Dakota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program of the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. These estimates, along with Web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information regarding past inventory reports for South...

  1. Forests of South Dakota, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian F. Walters

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in South Dakota based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station (NRS) in cooperation with the South Dakota Department of Agriculture, Resource Conservation and Forestry Division. Estimates are based on field data...

  2. South Dakota's forest resources, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian F. Walters

    2012-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for South Dakota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program of the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information regarding past inventory reports for South...

  3. South Dakota's forest resources, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald J. Piva

    2010-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for South Dakota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program of the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information regarding past inventory reports for South...

  4. Forests of South Dakota, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian F. Walters

    2014-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in South Dakota based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Northern Research Station in cooperation with the South Dakota Department of Agriculture, Resource Conservation and Forestry Division. Estimates are based on field data collected...

  5. South Dakota's forest resources, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian F. Walters; Ronald J. Piva

    2011-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for South Dakota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program of the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information regarding past inventory reports for South...

  6. South Dakota's Forest Resources, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald J. Piva; Andrew J. Lister; Douglas Haugan

    2009-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for South Dakota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program of the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information regarding past inventory reports for South...

  7. South Dakota's forest resources, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronald J. Piva

    2010-01-01

    This publication provides an overview of forest resource attributes for South Dakota based on an annual inventory conducted by the Forest Inventory and Analysis program of the U.S. Forest Service, Northern Research Station. These estimates, along with web-posted core tables, will be updated annually. For more information regarding past inventory reports for South...

  8. African Journals Online: South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Sudan Medical Journal. The SSMJ is the a multi-professional journal in the South Sudan which caters for the needs of Doctors, Nurses, Midwives, Clinical Officers, Pharmacists and all other cadres in the health profession. Its vision is to see a well-trained, skilled professionals delivering high quality healthcare to the ...

  9. THE SOUTH 4.FRIC4.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a patently obvious need to analyze South African defence ... other than the American ones and can ... Scientia Militaria, South African Journal of Military Studies, Vol 9, Nr 1, 1979. ... tion to the transfer of professional skills, attitudes, ... Army: Its Contribution to the Development of a Nallon ..... self as Minister of External Affairs.

  10. South Africans are faily happy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Veenhoven (Ruut)

    2012-01-01

    textabstract“Zimbabwians even happier than South Afric ans” was in a headline on the front page of a major South Afric an newspaper in June 2012 2 . The article reported an international study according to which So uth Africans were the unhappiest people in the world and even unhappier than

  11. South African Music Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAMUS: South African Music Studies is accredited with the South African ... Only one submission at a time per author will be considered. 2. Articles ... The Editor reserves the right to make language and punctuation changes and other ... We may require a subvention (page fees) from authors of articles to cover printing costs.

  12. Africa (south of the Sahara)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorweg, J.C.; Sexton, V.S.; Msiak, H.

    1976-01-01

    This review of the development and current status of psychology in Africa focuses on Africa south of the Sahara, excluding South Africa. The author discusses the research topics which have attracted the attention of psychologists in Africa, including perception (illusions, pictorial representation

  13. South African Journal of Botany

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Journal of Botany, the official journal of the South African Association of Botanists publishes papers which make an original contribution to any field of Botany. Papers are accepted on the understanding that their contents have not been published, or submitted for publication, elsewhere. All submitted ...

  14. Polyphase serpentinization history of Mariana forearc mantle: observations on the microfabric of ultramafic clasts from ODP Leg 195, Site 1200

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Jöns, Niels; Bach, Wolfgang; Klein, Frieder

    2013-04-01

    In the forearc of the Mariana subduction zone system, a number of seamounts form from extrusion of blueschist and serpentine mud. Ocean Drilling Program Leg 195 drilled the South Chamorro seamount, where ultramafic clasts occur within the mud matrix. These clasts show a complex serpentinization history, which bears the potential for tracking the alteration history during uplift and cooling of mantle wedge rocks to the seafloor. Moreover, the microfabrics of the highly serpentinized harzburgite and dunite clasts exhibit evidence for multiple fracturing events in the forearc mantle. These, in turn, lead to fluid influx and varied styles of serpentinization of harzburgite and dunite. The serpentinized ultramafic clasts exhibit a variety of microfabrics that range from virtually undeformed to strongly deformed samples. Pervasively serpentinized harzburgites feature either an equigranular fabric of serpentinized olivine and orthopyroxene crystals, or different vein generations related to multiple stages of serpentinization. Several types of fluid pathways in harzburgites are present: (i) veins containing brucite and iron oxides, developed linearly without marked conformance with the rock fabric. In places, these veins developed mm-cm wide halos with finger-shaped serpentinization fronts. Veins of type (i) are either developed as syntaxial veins from a single crack-seal event with large magnetite crystals growing from one wall to the other (as confirmed with high-resolution X-ray microtomography), or formed by multiple fluid events. (ii) serpentine veins that encompass regions of marginally serpentinized, microgranular olivine and large orthopyroxene crystals. (iii) extensional serpentine veins (known as "Frankenstein" type). In the clasts studied, their occurrence is restricted to the halo region of type (i) veins. (iv) as a late-stage feature, extensional veins documenting multiple crack-seal events can be present in the serpentinites (either in undeformed regions with

  15. South African Gastroenterology Review: Journal Sponsorship

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Gastroenterology Review: Journal Sponsorship. Journal Home > About the Journal > South African Gastroenterology Review: Journal Sponsorship. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. South Pole rockets, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Iwane

    1977-01-01

    Wave-particle interaction was observed, using three rockets, S-210 JA-20, -21 and S-310 JA-2, launched from the South Pole into aurora. Electron density and temperature were measured with these rockets. Simultaneous observations of waves were also made from a satellite (ISIS-II) and at two ground bases (Showa base and Mizuho base). Observed data are presented in this paper. These include electron density and temperature in relation to altitude; variation of electron (60 - 80 keV) count rate with altitude; VLF spectra measured by the PWL of S-210 JA-20 and -21 rockets and the corresponding VLF spectra at the ground bases; low-energy (<10 keV) electron flux measured by S-310 JA-2 rocket; and VLF spectrum measured with S-310 JA-2 rocket. Scheduled measurements for the next project are also briefly described. (Aoki, K.)

  17. The Crustal Magnetization Mapping in the Ocean Basin of the South China Sea and its Tectonic Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Meng, X.

    2015-12-01

    The South China Sea (SCS), surrounded by the Eurasia, Pacific and India-Australia plates, was formed by the interaction of the three plates and the Cenozoic seafloor spreading. Magnetic data is the crucial data for understanding tectonic evolution and seafloor spreading model in the SCS. Magnetization intensity is related closely to rock type and tectonics. Through magnetization mapping, the distribution of apparent magnetization in the subsurface will be obtained, benefiting in lithologic classification and geological mapping. Due to strong remanence presented in the oceanic crust, magma and seamounts in the SCS, the magnetization directions are complex and heterogeneous, quite different from the modern geomagnetic field directions. However, the routine techniques for magnetization mapping are based on negligence of remanence. The normalized source strength (NSS), one quantity transformed from the magnetic anomalies, is insensitive to remanence and responds well to the true locations of magnetic sources. The magnetization mapping based on the NSS will effectively reduce effects of remanence, benefitting in better geological interpretation. Here, we assembled high-resolution total magnetic intensity (TMI) data around the ocean basin of the SCS, and then transformed them into the NSS. Then we did magnetization mapping based on the NSS to obtain the crustal magnetization distribution in the studied area. The results show that the magnetization distribution inside of each subbasin is relatively homogeneous, but that of eastern subbasin is mostly strong with amplitude of 0.2A/m~4.2A/m, while that of southwestern subbasin is weak with amplitude of 0.2A/m~1.1A/m. It implies that magnetic structure and tectonic features in the crust are discriminative between both subbasins, and the tectonic boundary between both subbasins is roughly ranges from the northeastern edge of the Zhongsha Islands running in the southeast direction to the northeastern edge of the Reed Bank.

  18. South Asian summer monsoon variability during the last ˜54 kyrs inferred from surface water salinity and river runoff proxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebregiorgis, D.; Hathorne, E. C.; Sijinkumar, A. V.; Nath, B. Nagender; Nürnberg, D.; Frank, M.

    2016-04-01

    The past variability of the South Asian Monsoon is mostly known from records of wind strength over the Arabian Sea while high-resolution paleorecords from regions of strong monsoon precipitation are still lacking. Here, we present records of past monsoon variability obtained from sediment core SK 168/GC-1, which was collected at the Alcock Seamount complex in the Andaman Sea. We utilize the ecological habitats of different planktic foraminiferal species to reconstruct freshwater-induced stratification based on paired Mg/Ca and δ18O analyses and to estimate seawater δ18O (δ18Osw). The difference between surface and thermocline temperatures (ΔT) and δ18Osw (Δδ18Osw) is used to investigate changes in upper ocean stratification. Additionally, Ba/Ca in G. sacculifer tests is used as a direct proxy for riverine runoff and sea surface salinity (SSS) changes related to monsoon precipitation on land. Our Δδ18Osw time series reveals that upper ocean salinity stratification did not change significantly throughout the last glacial suggesting little influence of NH insolation changes. The strongest increase in temperature gradients between the mixed layer and the thermocline is recorded for the mid-Holocene and indicate the presence of a significantly shallower thermocline. In line with previous work, the δ18Osw and Ba/Ca records demonstrate that monsoon climate during the LGM was characterized by a significantly weaker southwest monsoon circulation and strongly reduced runoff. Based on our data the South Asian Summer Monsoon (SAM) over the Irrawaddyy strengthened gradually after the LGM beginning at ∼18 ka. This is some 3 kyrs before an increase of the Ba/Ca record from the Arabian Sea and indicates that South Asian Monsoon climate dynamics are more complex than the simple N-S displacement of the ITCZ as generally described for other regions. Minimum δ18Osw values recorded during the mid-Holocene are in phase with Ba/Ca marking a stronger monsoon precipitation

  19. Clinical neuropsychology in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Sun; Chey, Jeanyung

    2016-11-01

    Clinical neuropsychology in South Korea, albeit its relatively short history, has advanced dramatically. We review a brief history and current status of clinical neuropsychology in South Korea. The history, the educational pathway, the training pathway, the certification process, and careers in clinical neuropsychology in South Korea are reviewed. We have reviewed the neuropsychological services, including assessment and treatment, research on neurological and psychiatric populations, and neuropsychology education and the requirements related to education, training, and board examinations of those providing neuropsychological services in South Korea. We also describe how the Korean Society for Neuropsychology Research, the first and only meeting for neuropsychologists in the country established in 1999, has played a major role in how clinical neuropsychology is practiced and developed as a professional field in South Korea. Clinical neuropsychology in South Korea has achieved major progress over just a quarter of a century, and its future is promising in light of the increasing demand for neuropsychological services and advances in neuroscience in the country. Challenges that the community of clinical neuropsychologists are currently facing in South Korea, including formalizing neuropsychological curriculum and training programs and developing advanced credentialing procedures, are discussed.

  20. Arbitration Foundation of South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir O. Kramarenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present article author explores the history and legal framework for the creation and operation of international commercial arbitration in South Africa. Author notes that South Africa is the most economically developed country in Africa, it is among dozens of major international organizations. From the point of view of the development of the system of law, legal proceedings and arbitration, South Africa is an attractive state for study. Author emphasizes that the South African Republic throughout its existence has been influenced by two legal families: Anglo-Saxon and Romano-Germanic. Therefore, it is important to note that South Africa refers to a mixed system of law. To date, South Africa has two international commercial arbitration: the Arbitration Foundation of South Africa and the Association of Arbitrators. In the conclusion author points out that the development and establishment of the centers of the arbitration fund continues: new centers are being established, and the system of procedures for dealing with cases in already established centers is being improved.

  1. A new species of the deep-sea spongicolid genus Spongicoloides (Crustacea, Decapoda, Stenopodidea) and a new species of the glass sponge genus Corbitella (Hexactinellida, Lyssacinosida, Euplectellidae) from a seamount near the Mariana Trench, with a novel commensal relationship between the two genera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kou, Qi; Gong, Lin; Li, Xinzheng

    2018-05-01

    A new species of the deep-sea spongicolid genus Spongicoloides Hansen, 1908 and a new species of the euplectellid genus Corbitella Gray, 1867 are described and illustrated based on the material recently collected by the remotely operated vehicle 'Faxian' at a seamount near the Mariana Trench. The new deep-sea spongicolid species can be distinguished from the congeneric species by a series of morphological features and the validity of the new species was supported by the molecular phylogenetic analysis. By means of the microscleres of regular hexasters and onychohexasters, the new sponge species can easily be distinguished from other Corbitella species. The new euplectellid sponge species is the host of the new spongicolid shrimp species: this is the first discovery of an association between Spongicoloides and Corbitella. The present study increases the species diversity of both genera as well as yielding new insight into the commensal relationships between spongicolid shrimps and their sponge hosts.

  2. Abstracts of articles in other South African journals | Rusconi | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Actuarial Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 17 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  3. Abstracts of Articles in Other South African Journals | Authors | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Actuarial Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 14 (2014) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  4. Communication received from South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    The document reproduces the press release with a statement by Dr. J.W.L. de Villiers, Executive Chairman of the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa Limited, issued on 31 January 1984 and included in the letter received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Resident Representative of South Africa to the Agency on 31 January 1984. This statement refers to the transfer of nuclear material equipment and technology by South Africa to other countries and the Non-Proliferation Treaty

  5. Energy integration in south cone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, M.A.K.

    1990-01-01

    The economic development of a geo-political region is directly related to the energy resources available to its productive system. The analysis carried out in this paper focus a region limited by Paraguay, Uruguay, the Argentina north and the Brazilian south, the core of the so called South Cone. The region has a diversified energy matrix that assures strong connections between the countries. The main resources available are hydroelectric but the approach gives a strong emphasis in coal and natural gas. The outlined model of a self sustained development of the region can be used as the foundation of the independent economic development of South America. (author)

  6. health services in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-06-03

    Jun 3, 2013 ... Health programming for men who have sex with men (MSM) in South ... and institutionalised stigma within the public healthcare ... reduction services for MSM who use drugs, or ... Screen and address mental health issues.

  7. South African Crime Quarterly 59

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Democratic Front] youth movements, where I fought to ... police into a democratic police service. That's ... affected office in finding solutions together. We ... In 2016 the South African Police Service announced that it was going 'Back-to-Basics'.

  8. Counselling Psychology in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country’s socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country’s mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country’s health care and education systems. PMID:27867261

  9. Environmental Info for South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains information about air and water in South Dakota, including state implementation programs (SIPs), air permitting, underground injection control (UIC) and National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES).

  10. South African Journal of Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Journal of Education (SAJE) publishes original research articles reporting on research ... professional scientist and which critically evaluate the research done in a specific field in education; ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  11. SOUTH AMERICA: Looking for partners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    A Regional Meeting on Fundamental Physics organized at the CIF International Physics Centre in Bogota, Colombia, in April, looked at future international collaboration possibilities for physicists from the South American Andean region in general, and from Colombia in particular

  12. South African Crime Quarterly 57

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Institute for Security Studies/UCT

    dream might be a nightmare to many others ... Of course not every day is like that. There are ... Public Prosecutions, Shaun Abrahams, to discuss life, presidents, politics and prosecutions in South ... the decisions we make as prosecutors affect.

  13. South African Crime Quarterly 56

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edited by Chandré Gould and Andrew Faull

    depth interviews is .... down manage the level of overcrowding to the extent that ... Self-medication was also common: I never got ..... knowledge, to access social media, particularly .... and AGrant, High tuberculosis prevalence in a South African.

  14. Counselling Psychology in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantjes, Jason; Kagee, Ashraf; Young, Charles

    The origin and development of counselling psychology in South Africa has been profoundly influenced by the country's socio-political history and the impact of apartheid. As a result of this, counselling psychologists in the country face a number of challenges and opportunities for the future. In this paper we provide a portrait of counselling psychology in South Africa by describing the current character of the specialty and the context in which South African psychologists work. We critically discuss the challenges that the specialty faces to meet the country's mental health care needs, contest the current Scope of Practice; affirm multiculturalism without essentializing or reifying race and ethnicity, and build an evidence base for community interventions in the country. We also consider how, in the future, counselling psychologists in South Africa may make a more meaningful contribution within public health and the country's health care and education systems.

  15. Bibliographic Control in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musiker, Reuben

    1972-01-01

    The author sets as his task the consideration of the present state of bibliographical control of South Africa's bookstock with special reference to centralization and decentralization. (20 references) (Author/SJ)

  16. South Africa and the BRICS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owiso, Michael; Schmidt, Johannes Dragsbæk

    South Africa and the BRICS: A critical appraisal Michael Omondi Owiso and Johannes Dragsbaek Schmidt Abstract The objective of the BRICS was originally supposed to merge economic synergies and create an alternative voice in the global governance system. Debates around the ability of the BRICS...... to acquire this clout continue to dominate academia and the global discourse. Although the alliance is still in its nascent stage, scholarly attention is increasingly looking at its internal dynamics. The inclusion of South Africa being the smallest economy in the BRICS was indeed an effort to consolidate...... its image and unleash the developmental potential for the rest of the African continent. Comparably, South Africa is probably the least influential member of the BRICS, and this raises the following questions. First, how does South Africa´s affiliation impact on the development and benefits regarding...

  17. Energy Crisis Racks South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verwijs, H.

    2008-01-01

    South Africa will struggle with energy capacity shortages until at least 2015. Giant coal-fired power plants are now being built to solve the problem - but they will not prevent the problem of climate change

  18. The South African astronomical observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feast, M.

    1985-01-01

    A few examples of the activities of the South African Astronomical Observatory are discussed. This includes the studying of stellar evolution, dust around stars, the determination of distances to galaxies and collaboration with space experiments

  19. Radioactivity standardization in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Simpson, BRS

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available South Africa's national radioactivity measurement standard is maintained at a satellite laboratory in Cape Town by the National Metrology Laboratory (NML) of the Council-for Scientific and Industrial Research. Standardizations are undertaken by a...

  20. The South Pole Telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruhl, J.E.; Ade, P.A.R.; Carlstrom, J.E.; Cho, H.M.; Crawford,T.; Dobbs, M.; Greer, C.H.; Halverson, N.W.; Holzapfel, W.L.; Lanting,T.M.; Lee, A.T.; Leitch, E.M.; Leong, J.; Lu, W.; Lueker, M.; Mehl, J.; Meyer, S.S.; Mohr, J.J.; Padin, S.; Plagge, T.; Pryke, C.; Runyan, M.C.; Schwan, D.; Sharp, M.K.; Spieler, H.; Staniszewski, Z.; Stark, A.A.

    2004-11-04

    A new 10 meter diameter telescope is being constructed for deployment at the NSF South Pole research station. The telescope is designed for conducting large-area millimeter and sub-millimeter wave surveys of faint, low contrast emission, as required to map primary and secondary anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background. To achieve the required sensitivity and resolution, the telescope design employs an off-axis primary with a 10 m diameter clear aperture. The full aperture and the associated optics will have a combined surface accuracy of better than 20 microns rms to allow precision operation in the submillimeter atmospheric windows. The telescope will be surrounded with a large reflecting ground screen to reduce sensitivity to thermal emission from the ground and local interference. The optics of the telescope will support a square degree field of view at 2mm wavelength and will feed a new 1000-element micro-lithographed planar bolometric array with superconducting transition-edge sensors and frequency-multiplexed readouts. The first key project will be to conduct a survey over 4000 degrees for galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect. This survey should find many thousands of clusters with a mass selection criteria that is remarkably uniform with redshift. Armed with redshifts obtained from optical and infrared follow-up observations, it is expected that the survey will enable significant constraints to be placed on the equation of state of the dark energy.

  1. South Korea - oil refining overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, D.

    1999-01-01

    Following the economic problems of the 1990s, the petroleum refining industry of South Korea underwent much involuntary restructuring in 1999 with respect to takeovers and mergers and these are discussed. The demand for petroleum has now pretty well recovered. The reasons for fluctuating prices in the 1990s, how the new structure should be cushioned against changes in the future, and the potential for South Korea to export refined petroleum, are all discussed

  2. Studentification in Bloemfontein, South Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann Anton; Visser Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Studentification is a global phenomenon that has been prominent in urban geographical discourse since the large-scale expansion of higher education in the early 1990s. In many developed and developing world countries, expansion in student enrolment has outstripped the ability of institutions of higher learning to provide adequate accommodation. Similar trends have been recorded in South Africa. The task of this paper is to investigate studentification as experienced in one of South Africa’s s...

  3. Gallbladder cancer: South American experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Gerardo F; Gentile, Alberto; Parada, Luis A

    2016-10-01

    Large differences in terms of incidence and mortality due to gallbladder cancer (GBC) have been reported worldwide. Moreover, it seems that GBC has unique characteristics in South America. We surveyed the literature looking for information about the epidemiology, basic and translational research, and clinical trials performed in South America in order to critically analyze the magnitude of this health problem in the region. Compared to other geographic areas, age-standardized mortality rates (ASMR) for GBC in women are very high, particularly in many western areas of South America. Genetic, as well as dietary and environmental factors likely contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease in the area. Compared to other regions the profile of abnormalities of key genes such as KRAS and TP53 in GBC seems to slightly differ in South America, while the clinical behavior appears to be similar with a median overall survival (OS) of 6.5 to 8 months in advanced GBC. In contrast to Europe and USA, prophylactic cholecystectomy is a common practice in western areas of South America. GBC particularly affects women in South America, and represents a significant public health problem. It appears to have peculiarities that pose an urgent need for additional research aimed to discover risk factors, molecular events associated with its development and new treatment options for this lethal disease.

  4. Nuclear program of South Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, D.S.; James, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    Slightly larger than Portugal, South Korea comprises the lower half on the Korean Peninsula, covering approximately 38 thousand square miles. the Republic of Korea (South Korea) was established in 1948, and until 1962 the country grew slowly. However, through a series of five-year economic plans initiated by South Korean President Park Ching Hee, South Korea has since created an export-oriented economy, which now plays a major role in regional as well as global trade. South Korea has been forced to constantly upgrade its power generation structure in order to sustain the explosive growth it has experienced. Nuclear power has been a major player in this expansion and is expected to play an ever-increasing role. The country presently operates nine nuclear reactors with a total net generating capacity of 7,266 MWe. By the year 2006, the nuclear program is scheduled to grow to 27 reactors, with a net generating capacity exceeding 23 thousand MWe. Once this goal is reached, nuclear-generated power would account for more than 40 percent of the country's total installed electrical capacity

  5. Angler satisfaction in South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Kjetil R.; Gigliotti, Larry M.

    2015-01-01

    Many industries use satisfaction measures to evaluate performance. The South Dakota Department of Game, Fish and Parks identified satisfaction as one of their performance measures for evaluating fishing in South Dakota. In fisheries management, the perspectives’ of license buyers are valuable to determine if management activities are providing the benefits anticipated by biologists. Surveys of South Dakota anglers are conducted to better understand licensees in order to promote satisfying angling experiences. Internet surveys were distributed to all license buyers providing email addresses in 2011 and 2012. Angler satisfaction was analyzed by angler type (demographics and fishing characteristics) to further clarify performance measures. Most anglers (> 70%) were satisfied with their angling experiences. Nonresidents expressed higher levels of satisfaction with fishing in South Dakota in 2011 and 2012 than residents. Anglers’ rating of fishing quality was more strongly correlated with satisfaction than their reported number of fish harvested, which suggests that strategies to influence angler perceptions and expectations can also be employed to influence satisfaction (in addition to techniques influencing fish populations). This research further integrates sociological data into South Dakota fisheries management processes.

  6. Administrative bias in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E S Nwauche

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the interpretation of section 6(2(aii of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act which makes an administrator “biased or reasonably suspected of bias” a ground of judicial review. In this regard, the paper reviews the determination of administrative bias in South Africa especially highlighting the concept of institutional bias. The paper notes that inspite of the formulation of the bias ground of review the test for administrative bias is the reasonable apprehension test laid down in the case of President of South Africa v South African Rugby Football Union(2 which on close examination is not the same thing. Accordingly the paper urges an alternative interpretation that is based on the reasonable suspicion test enunciated in BTR Industries South Africa (Pty Ltd v Metal and Allied Workers Union and R v Roberts. Within this context, the paper constructs a model for interpreting the bias ground of review that combines the reasonable suspicion test as interpreted in BTR Industries and R v Roberts, the possibility of the waiver of administrative bias, the curative mechanism of administrative appeal as well as some level of judicial review exemplified by the jurisprudence of article 6(1 of the European Convention of Human Rights, especially in the light of the contemplation of the South African Magistrate Court as a jurisdictional route of judicial review.

  7. Vaal Reefs South uranium plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    The Vaal Reefs mining complex, part of the Anglo American Corporation, is the largest gold and uranium producing complex in the world, being South Africa's principal producer, accounting for about a quarter of the country's uranium production. Vaal Reefs South uranium plant in the Orkney district was recently officially opened by Dr AJA Roux, the retiring president of the Atomic Energy Board and chairman of the Uranium Enrichment Corporation and will increase the country's uranium production. In the field of technology, and particularly processing technology, South Africa has shown the world unprecedented technology achievement in the field of uranium extraction from low grade ores and the development of the unique uranium enrichment process. New technical innovations that have been incorporated in this new plant are discussed

  8. Studentification in Bloemfontein, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Anton

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Studentification is a global phenomenon that has been prominent in urban geographical discourse since the large-scale expansion of higher education in the early 1990s. In many developed and developing world countries, expansion in student enrolment has outstripped the ability of institutions of higher learning to provide adequate accommodation. Similar trends have been recorded in South Africa. The task of this paper is to investigate studentification as experienced in one of South Africa’s secondary cities. The paper draws attention to the economic, socio-cultural, and physical characteristics of this form of student housing on host locations. It is argued that studentification holds both positive and negative impacts for the host communities of Bloemfontein. Finally, it is suggested that studentification in South Africa requires greater research attention.

  9. South African Homelands as Frontiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of frontier zones, the homelands emerge as areas in which the future of the South African postcolony is being renegotiated, contested and remade with hyper-real intensity. This is so because the many fault lines left over from apartheid (its loose ends, so to speak) – between white and black; between...... in these settings that the postcolonial promise of liberation and freedom must face its test. As such, the book offers highly nuanced and richly detailed analyses that go to the heart of the diverse dilemmas of post-apartheid South Africa as a whole, but simultaneously also provides in condensed form an extended...

  10. Power generation in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Walt, N.T.

    1976-01-01

    There have been extensive developments in the power supply industry in South Africa. The most evident of these has been the increase in the size of generating units. Escom has recently placed orders for 600 MW units. In South Africa, with its large indigenous reserves of cheap coal, there was no need to rush into a nuclear power programme before it would be economic and, accordingly the first serious study of nuclear power generation was not undertaken until 1966. A final aspect of power generation which is becoming very important is the control of pollution and protection of the environment

  11. South African cities and Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Céline Vacchiani-Marcuzzo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Illustration 1 – Centre des affaires, Le CapAuteur : Céline Vacchiani-Marcuzzo.Born with colonial settlement patterns, the South-African urban system has experienced half a century of Apartheid. Under the effects of globalization, this urban system evolves as more developed urban systems and mature settlement patterns. This urbanization process (in the limits of functional urban agglomeration makes South Africa one of the most advanced countries in Africa in terms of urban growth. The world-...

  12. The South African Astronomical Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The research work discussed in this report covers a wide range, from work on the nearest stars to studies of the distant quasars, and the astronomers who have carried out this work come from universities and observatories spread around the world as well as from South African universities and from the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) staff itself. A characteristic of much of this work has been its collaborative character. SAAO studies in 1989 included: supernovae 1987A; galaxies; ground-based observations of celestial x-ray sources; the Magellanic Clouds; pulsating variables; galactic structure; binary star phenomena; the provision of photometric standards; nebulous matter; stellar astrophysics, and astrometry

  13. Eradication of poliomyelitis in South Africa | Blecher | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 84, No 10 (1994) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  14. Eradication of poliomyelitis in South Africa | Blecher | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An international campaign under the leadership of the World Health Organisation is underway to eradicate polio from the world by the year 2000. South Africa may already be free of polio. However, to ensure eradication we need to move from a polio control programme to a polio eradication programme. This necessitates ...

  15. South African Hepatitis C management guidelines | Botha | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    JF Botha, C Kassianides, HR Schneider, E Song, CWN Spearman, SW van der Merwe. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Gastroenterology Review Vol. 3(1) 2005: 18-21. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sagr.v3i1.30725.

  16. Multiple sclerosis in South Africa | Modi | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Since there are no well-documented epidemiological studies on multiple sclerosis (MS) in South Africa, we devised a questionnaire to determine qualitative data. Responses were obtained from 430 patients: 91% had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, 64% had lumbar punctures and 49% had evoked potentials to ...

  17. Multiple sclerosis in South Africa | Modi | South African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 98, No 5 (2008) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  18. Spirometry of healthy adult South African men | Louw | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 86, No 7 (1996) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  19. Book Review:Victimology in South Africa | Hargovan | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Title: Victimology in South Africa, Author: Robert Peacock (Editor), Publisher: Van Schaik Publishers, Pages: 221, Price: R359, ISBN: 978-0627030208. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/sacq.v47i1.5 · AJOL African ...

  20. Eating disorders in black South African females | Szabo | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eating disorders are generally associated with westernised white populations. Isolated cases of anorexia nervosa have been described in blacks in Africa. A series of cases is presented documenting the existence of eating disorders in young black South African women. This has implications in terms of both conceptualising ...

  1. South Africa's growth traps | Smith | New Agenda: South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    New Agenda: South African Journal of Social and Economic Policy. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 61 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  2. Successfully controlling malaria in South Africa | Blumberg | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Following major successes in malaria control over the past 75 years, South Africa is now embarking on a malaria elimination campaign with the goal of zero local transmission by the year 2018. The key control elements have been intensive vector control, primarily through indoor residual spraying, case management based ...

  3. Eating disorders in black South African females | Szabo | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 85, No 6 (1995) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should ...

  4. Depression in the South African workplace | Stander | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Psychiatry. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 22, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected ...

  5. Haiti: The South African perspective | van Hoving | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... intelligence from the site, government facilitation, and working under the auspices of recognised organisations such as the United Nations and the World Health Organization. Conclusion. The proposed way forward for South African medical teams responding to disasters is to be unified under a leading academic body, ...

  6. Malaria vector control in South Africa | Brooke | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 103, No 10 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register · Download this PDF file. The PDF file you selected should load here if your ...

  7. Nigeria-China Economic Relations Under the South-South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    2013-09-28

    Sep 28, 2013 ... using the technology, experience and capital from the South. Regrettably, ... that these disparities actually account for the sharp differences in the outcomes of the .... for substantial Chinese investment in the Nigerian oil industry. As part of the ...... ing, information technology and other areas. China should ...

  8. Asbestos exposure and mesothelioma in South Africa | Rees | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. To describe the exposure experiences of South African mesothelioma cases, with emphasis on the contribution made to the caseload by different fibre types, the proportion of subjects with no recall of asbestos exposure and only environmental contact, and the importance of putative causes other than asbestos.

  9. Vitamin D status of older South Africans | Charlton | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To detennine the vitamin D status of older 'coloured' South Africans who had not sustained a fracture. Design: Cross-sectional analytic study. Methods: A random sample of 200 non-institutionalised subjects in Cape Town aged ≥65 years was drawn using a two-stage cluster design. Trained fieldworkers ...

  10. Reflections on educational research in South Africa | Kamper | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A definition of educational research is proposed: Educational research is a particular mode of social service, using rigorous scientific endeavours for the continuous improvement of educational practice. The key ... It is evident that educational research in South Africa has a noteworthy record of national and regional impact.

  11. Determinants and Economic Impacts of North-South and South-South FDI in ASEAN : Panel Regression Analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Peseth, Seng

    2015-01-01

    This paper uses panel data of 10 ASEAN countries from 1995 to 2008 and studies the cross-country and industrial distribution of North and South FDI, investigates host country-specific determinants of the inflows of total FDI, North FDI and South FDI, and also compares the effects of North and South FDI on economic and industrial growth in the region.

  12. Ethnopharmacology of human immunodeficiency virus in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2006-10-02

    Oct 2, 2006 ... This mini-review takes a look at the evaluations of South African medicinal plants to determine ... Key words: Human immunodeficiency virus, Medicinal plants, South Africa. ... The greatest degree of antiviral activity against.

  13. Bibliography of marine biology in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Darracott, DA

    1980-02-01

    Full Text Available This bibliography was sponsored by the Marine Biology Section of the South African National Committee for Oceanographic Research (SANCOR). It has been attempted to include all publications which appeared before the end of 1977, either in South...

  14. Archives: South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 53 ... Archives: South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Journal Home > Archives: South African Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  15. South African Journal of Cultural History

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Journal of Cultural History. ... attempt to change the Afrikaner's views of San rock art · EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT ... Two unknown music fragments in the Grey Collection of the South African Library, Cape Town ...

  16. The dynamics of EMS in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Tine Herreborg

    2003-01-01

    The paper presents some of the empirical findings of four companies in the automobile industry in South Africa.......The paper presents some of the empirical findings of four companies in the automobile industry in South Africa....

  17. South African red data book - fishes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Skelton, PH

    1977-07-01

    Full Text Available Data sheets are provided for 28 threatened South African fish species, of which five are considered to be endangered (Barbus trevelyani, Klegethon, Treurensis, Oveodaimon quathlambae and Clarias cavernicola), one to be endangered in South Africa...

  18. Cybershopping: concerns of the South African consumer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    view of the South African Internet user market will be provided ... Total South African Internet market by access method ... Internet could, for example, target customers by using the outlet .... The four least important considerations for the cyber-.

  19. South African Journal of Botany: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mailing Address. South African Journal of Botany Research Centre for Plant Growth and Development University of Natal Pietermaritzburg Private Bag X01 Scottsville 3209, South Africa Street address: Carbis Road, Scottsville, Pietermaritzburg 3201 ...

  20. South Africa : tous les projets | Page 3 | CRDI - Centre de ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Sujet: INTERNATIONAL FINANCE, INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MARKET, FINANCIAL POLICY, DEMOGRAPHY, DEMOGRAPHIC CHANGE, DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION. Région: Americas, Brazil, South America, Asia, China, Far East Asia, India, South and Central Asia, Global, Africa, South Africa, South of Sahara.

  1. Solar rises in the south

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chauveau, L.

    1996-01-01

    This autumn, Nice welcomed the thirteen European photovoltaic conference. It was the occasion for the world of solar energy to measure technical progress which were carried out and the market which are still to win. If developing countries are a reserve of new markets, they are not solvent and programmes depend on North/South negotiations. (N.C.)

  2. South African Journal of Geomatics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The South African Journal of Geomatics (SAJG) publishes peer-reviewed original papers within the broad discipline of Geomatics (including surveying techniques, technology and applications, mine surveying, hydrographic surveying, cadastral systems, land tenure, development planning, GIS, photogrammetry and remote ...

  3. Paediatric triage in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-05-07

    May 7, 2013 ... There has been a lot of interest and work in the field of triage of sick children in South Africa over the past few years. Despite this ... So opens the World Health Organization (WHO)'s Countdown to 2015, the .... walk as normal. 27 or more. 160 or more. Unrespon- sive. Reacts to. Pain ... Each time the IMCI or.

  4. Internal Waves, South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    Subsurface ocean currents, frequently referred to as internal waves, are frequently seen from space under the right lighting conditions when depth penetration can be achieved. These internal waves observed in the South China Sea off the SE coast of the island of Hainan (18.5N, 110.5E) visibly demonstrate turbidity in the ocean's depths at the confluence of conflicting currents.

  5. African Journals Online: South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 50 of 96 ... African Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology and Sport Facilitation ... continent of Africa, to contribute to developing home-grown (African) methods ... Envisaged readers are academic researchers, teachers and students and practitioners in the ... that have relevance to the South African educational context.

  6. Pioneers in South African Anaesthesia:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Heymie Samson (Figure 1) was born in Cape Town in. 1911, matriculated at the South African College School in. 1928, and studied medicine at London University. In 1938, he returned to general practice in Cape Town and married his wife, Phyllis. He volunteered for military service when war broke out in September ...

  7. South African Crime Quarterly 56

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Edited by Chandré Gould and Andrew Faull

    promote evidence-based crime and violence reduction policies and strategies. ... Current available crime data ... Figure 1: The ecological framework: WHO examples of multi-level risk factors. Source: ... murder are the South African Police Service's (SAPS) ..... crime: testing social disorganization theory, American Journal.

  8. Inclusive Education in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Wook

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine the current implementation of inclusive education in South Korea and discuss its challenges. The history of special education is first described followed by an introduction to policies relevant to special and inclusive education. Next, a critical discussion of the state of inclusive education follows built…

  9. South Texas Maquiladora Suppliers Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, J. Michael

    This project was undertaken to assist South Texas industries in improving export to nearby Mexican maquiladoras (factories). The maquiladora program is based on co-production by two plants under a single management, one on each side of the border. Activities addressed four objectives: (1) to determine the dollar value, quantity, and source of the…

  10. Young engineers of South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Beyers, R

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The Young Engineers of South Africa Programme (YESA) also endorses the e-Education and the Science and Technology White Papers. The main focus area will be on Information Communication Technologies (ICT) in education and the way that they can impact...

  11. Monitoring in South African grasslands

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mentis, MT

    1984-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this document is to propose how ecological monitoring might be developed in the Grassland Biome of South Africa. Monitoring is defined as the maintenance of regular surveillance to test the null hypothesis of no change...

  12. a South African case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    tions between mathematics as a discipline and application of mathematics in real ... In the South African school syllabus Calculus forms about 40% of Algebra, as seen in .... These notions helped us to devise a linear model, shown in Figure 1, ...

  13. Human fascioliasis in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, J; Ntusi, N; Stead, P; Mayosi, B; Mendelson, M

    2013-07-29

    Human fascioliasis has the widest latitudinal, longitudinal and altitudinal distribution of any vector-borne disease, yet only 3 cases have been reported from South Africa, the last in 1964. We report 2 cases from the same geographic area associated with local consumption of watercress, suggesting an endemic focus. 

  14. Nutrition in contemporary South Africa#

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1 Nutritional Intervention Research Unit, Medical Research Council, PO Box 19070, Tygerberg, 7505, South Africa. 2 Division ... based diet that is inadequate in energy and of low nutrient density. ..... Vitamin A deficiency impacts on mortality of women of ... increased risk of heavy metal (e.g. lead) poisoning in children;.

  15. Television, Censorship and South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffard, C. Anthony; Cohen, Lisa

    Network television news has often been accused of inciting and prolonging incidents of public violence, whether riots or terrorism, and in South Africa this type of thinking has led to increasingly stringent restrictions on both domestic and foreign media covering the violent unrest there. A study determined a chronology of events and analyzed the…

  16. Review of South American mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    A general overview is presented of the mining activity and plans for South America. The countries which are presented are Columbia, Argentina, Brazil, Venezuela, Chile, Peru, and Bolivia. The products of the mines include coal, bauxite, gold, iron, uranium, copper and numerous other minor materials. A discussion of current production, support and processing facilities, and mining strategies is also given

  17. Sedating children in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bRed Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa. cSedation and Pain ... As the authors indicate, there is increasing pressure from practitioners, funders and patients or parents for procedures to take place outside the ...

  18. ENSO forecasts in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The SST prediction systems currently being used at the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) and the South African Weather Service (SAWS) are presented. In particular, the skill of these systems to predict Niño3.4 SST and how...

  19. Life in South Korea Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew, Seok-Choon

    1988-01-01

    Characterizes the past 40 years in South Korea as a time of modernization, industrialization, urbanization, and internationalization. Discusses Korean religion and social values; family, kinship, and social life; education; housing, food, and clothing; leisure and sports; and the maintenance of national identity. Examines the Korean synthesis of…

  20. South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    The full text of the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty with its Annexes endorsed on 6 August 1985 by the South Pacific Forum (a body comprising the independent and self-governing countries of the South Pacific, namely Australia, the Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, New Zealand, Nive, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu and Western Samoa) is presented

  1. South African Music Studies: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SAMUS: South African Music Studies is the official organ for the South African Society for Research in Music (SASRIM). It gives priority to the publication of research on South African music, but continues to represent the wider field of research interests in the country and in the rest of Africa. The journal invites work from any ...

  2. South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    On 6 August 1985 the South Pacific Forum, a body comprising the independent and self-governing countries of the South Pacific (Australia, the Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, New Zealand, Niue, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu and Western Samoa), endorsed the text of the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty and opened it for signature [es

  3. Otosclerosis among South African indigenous blacks | Tshifularo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To report cases of clinical otosclerosis histologically confirmed among indigenous South African blacks. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: Referral tertiary center, MEDUNSA, Garankuwa Hospital, South Africa. Subjects: All fifteen indigenous South African blacks diagnosed with clinical otosclerosis at ...

  4. South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    On 6 August 1985 the South Pacific Forum, a body comprising the independent and self-governing countries of the South Pacific (Australia, the Cook Islands, Fiji, Kiribati, Nauru, New Zealand, Niue, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu and Western Samoa), endorsed the text of the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty and opened it for signature [ru

  5. Fishes of the Vitória-Trindade Chain: Biodiversity, Biogeography and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro, Hudson Tercio

    2016-01-01

    Studies on the ecology and biogeography of seamounts and oceanic islands have advanced substantially in the last 60 years. However, few seamounts have been scientifically characterized, with basic aspects of their biodiversity still unknown and many hypotheses not empirically tested. Consequently, the role of seamounts in the evolution for marine species is still unclear. In the south Atlantic, the Vitória-Trindade Chain (VTC) extends ca. 1,200 km offshore the Brazilian coast. For a long time...

  6. Uranium in South Africa: 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    South Africa's participation in the nuclear industry was limited to the production of uranium and research, with minor commercial activities. The commissioning of the Koeberg Nuclear power station in 1984 placed South Africa firmly on the path of commercial nuclear power generation. A unique, locally developed uranium enrichment process will enable South Africa to be self-sufficient in its nuclear-fuel needs. Uranium has always been of secondary importance to gold as a target commodity in the exploration of the quartz-pebble conglomerates. In the Witwatersrand Basin it is estimated that in excess of R100 million was spent on exploration during 1985. This was spent primarily in the search for gold but as many of the gold reefs are uraniferous, new uranium resources are being discovered concurrently with those of gold. Uranium mineralization is present in rocks which encompass almost the whole of the geological history of South Africa. Significant mineralization is restricted to five fairly well-defined time periods. Each period is characterized by a distinct type or combination of types of mineralization. Resource estimates are divided into separate categories that reflect different levels of confidence in the quantities reported. The resource categories are further separated into levels of exploitability based on the estimated cost of their exploitation. A major part (87%) of South Africa's uranium resources is present as a by-product of gold in the quartz-pebble conglomerates of the Witwatersrand Basin. The uranium resources in the reasonably assured resources (RAR) and estimated additional resources - category I (EAR-I) catogories were 483 300 t U. Production during 1985 was 4880 t U. Although a production peaking at over 1200 t U/a is theoretically attainable, it is considered, from market projections, that a production ceilling of 10 000 t U/a would be more realistic

  7. Uranium in South Africa: 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    South Africa's participation in the nuclear industry was limited to the production of uranium and research, with minor commercial activities. The commissioning of the Koeberg Nuclear power station in 1984 placed South Africa firmly on the path of commercial nuclear power generation. A unique locally developed uranium enrichment process wil enable South Africa to be self-sufficient in its nuclear-fuel needs. Uranium has always been of secondary importance to gold as a target commodity in the exploration of the quartz-pebble conglomerates. In the Witwatersrand Basin it is estimated that in excess of R300 million was spend on exploration during 1987. This was spend primarily in the search for gold but as many of the gold reefs are uraniferous, new uranium resources are being discovered concurrently with those of gold. Uranium mineralization is present in rocks which encompass almost the whole of the geological history of South Africa. Significant mineralization is restricted to five fairly well-defined time periods. Each period is characterized by a distinct type or combination of types of mineralization. Resource estimates are divided into separate categories that reflect different levels of confidence in the quantities reported. The resource categories are further separated into levels of exploitability based on the estimated cost of their exploitation. A major part (87%) of South Africa's uranium resources is present as a by-product of gold in the quartz-pebble conglomerates of the Witwatersrand Basin. The uranium resources in the RAR and EAR-I categories were 536 500 t u. Production during 1987 was 3963 t u. Although a production peaking at over 1100 t U/a is theoretically attainable, it is considered, from market projections, that a production ceiling of 10 000 t U/a would be more realistic

  8. Origin of a crustal splay fault and its relation to the seismogenic zone and underplating at the erosional north Ecuador-south Colombia oceanic margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collot, J.-Y.; Agudelo, W.; Ribodetti, A.; Marcaillou, B.

    2008-12-01

    Splay faults within accretionary complexes are commonly associated with the updip limit of the seismogenic zone. Prestack depth migration of a multichannel seismic line across the north Ecuador-south Colombia oceanic margin images a crustal splay fault that correlates with the seaward limit of the rupture zone of the 1958 (Mw 7.7) tsunamogenic subduction earthquake. The splay fault separates 5-6.6 km/s velocity, inner wedge basement rocks, which belong to the accreted Gorgona oceanic terrane, from 4 to 5 km/s velocity outer wedge rocks. The outer wedge is dominated by basal tectonic erosion. Despite a 3-km-thick trench fill, subduction of 2-km-high seamount prevented tectonic accretion and promotes basal tectonic erosion. The low-velocity and poorly reflective subduction channel that underlies the outer wedge is associated with the aseismic, décollement thrust. Subduction channel fluids are expected to migrate upward along splay faults and alter outer wedge rocks. Conversely, duplexes are interpreted to form from and above subducting sediment, at ˜14- to 15-km depths between the overlapping seismogenic part of the splay fault and the underlying aseismic décollement. Coeval basal erosion of the outer wedge and underplating beneath the apex of inner wedge control the margin mass budget, which comes out negative. Intraoceanic basement fossil listric normal faults and a rift zone inverted in a flower structure reflect the evolution of the Gorgona terrane from Cretaceous extension to likely Eocene oblique compression. The splay faults could have resulted from tectonic inversion of listric normal faults, thus showing how inherited structures may promote fluid flow across margin basement and control seismogenesis.

  9. Architecture and development of a multi-stage Baiyun submarine slide complex in the Pearl River Canyon, northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Wu, Shi-Guo; Li, Qing-Ping; Wang, Da-Wei; Fu, Shao-Ying

    2014-08-01

    The Baiyun submarine slide complex (BSSC) along the Pearl River Canyon of the northern South China Sea has been imaged by multibeam bathymetry and 2D/3D seismic data. By means of maximum likelihood classification with slope aspect and gradient as inputs, the BSSC is subdivided into four domains, denoted as slide area I, II, III and IV. Slide area I is surrounded by cliffs on three sides and has been intensely reshaped by turbidity currents generated by other kinds of mass movement outside the area; slide area II incorporates a shield volcano with a diameter of approximately 10 km and unconfined slides possibly resulting from the toe collapse of inter-canyon ridges; slide area III is dominated by repeated slides that mainly originated from cliffs constituting the eastern boundary of the BSSC; slide area IV is distinguished by a conical seamount with a diameter of 6.5 km and a height of 375 m, and two slides probably having a common source that are separated from each other by a suite of residual strata. The BSSC is interpreted to be composed of numerous slide events, which occurred in the period from 10.5 to 5.5 Ma BP. Six specific factors may have contributed to the development of the BSSC, i.e., gas hydrate dissociation, gas-bearing sediments, submarine volcanic activity, seismicity, sedimentation rate and seafloor geomorphology. A 2D conceptual geological model combining these factors is proposed as a plausible mechanism explaining the formation of the BSSC. However, the BSSC may also have been affected by the Dongsha event (10 Ma BP) as an overriding factor.

  10. Hydroacoustic, infrasonic and seismic monitoring of the submarine eruptive activity and sub-aerial plume generation at South Sarigan, May 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David N.; Evers, Läslo G.; Fee, David; Matoza, Robin S.; Snellen, Mirjam; Smets, Pieter; Simons, Dick

    2013-05-01

    Explosive submarine volcanic processes are poorly understood, due to the difficulties associated with both direct observation and continuous monitoring. In this study hydroacoustic, infrasound, and seismic signals recorded during the May 2010 submarine eruption of South Sarigan seamount, Marianas Arc, are used to construct a detailed event chronology. The signals were recorded on stations of the International Monitoring System, which is a component of the verification measures for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. Numerical hydroacoustic and infrasound propagation modelling confirms that viable propagation paths from the source to receivers exist, and provide traveltimes allowing signals recorded on the different technologies to be associated. The eruption occurred in three stages, separated by three-hour periods of quiescence. 1) A 46 h period during which broadband impulsive hydroacoustic signals were generated in clusters lasting between 2 and 13 min. 95% of the 7602 identified events could be classified into 4 groups based on their waveform similarity. The time interval between clusters decreased steadily from 80 to 25 min during this period. 2) A five-hour period of 10 Hz hydroacoustic tremor, interspersed with large-amplitude, broadband signals. Associated infrasound signals were also recorded at this time. 3) An hour-long period of transient broadband events culminated in two large-amplitude hydroacoustic events and one broadband infrasound signal. A speculative interpretation, consistent with the data, suggests that during phase (1) transitions between endogenous dome growth and phreatomagmatic explosions occurred with the magma ascent rate accelerating throughout the period; during phase (2) continuous venting of fragmented magma occurred, and was powerful enough to breach the sea surface. During the climactic phase (3) discrete powerful explosions occurred, and sufficient seawater was vaporised to produce the contemporaneous 12 km altitude steam

  11. South-South REDD: A Brazil-Mozambique initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacQueen, Duncan

    2011-06-15

    The South-South REDD initiative - that aims to help facilitate the development of a National Action Plan for REDD+ for Mozambique based on sound baselines and monitoring, reporting and verification (MRV), clear analysis of the causes of deforestation and degradation, and appropriate benefit sharing mechanisms in support of activities to address them - is now in its second year. Extensive national consultations have led to the development of a National Action Plan for REDD+ which is currently being used as the basis for developing the countries REDD-Readiness Preparation Proposal (R-PP) for submission to the World Bank Forest Carbon Partnership Facility (FCPF). The National Action Plan for REDD+ seeks to create favourable conditions for the progressive reduction of the current rate of deforestation (0.58%) to 0.21% by 2025 and ultimately to zero, simultaneously reducing the rate of degradation and encouraging forest restoration to sequester 30 million tonnes of carbon by 2025.

  12. South African energy - the way ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    South African energy - the way ahead was the theme of a conference organised by the South African National Committee of the World Energy Conference (SANCWEC). Papers were presented on the following topics: energy and coal; trends in world energy consumption; the role of nuclear energy in the supply of electricity in South Africa; synfuel; the government in energy affairs; the impact of energy on economic growth in South Africa; future energy demands, and the future of energy in South Africa. Separate abstracts were prepared for two of the papers presented. The remaining papers were considered outside the subject scope of INIS

  13. 75 FR 61699 - Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea, and Taiwan: Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-06

    ...-831, and A-583-830] Stainless Steel Plate in Coils From Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea, and... steel plate in coils (SSPC) from Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea, and Taiwan, pursuant to... sunset reviews of the antidumping duty orders on SSPC from Belgium, Italy, South Africa, South Korea, and...

  14. South Africa makes some decisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1996-08-01

    The potential heritage of apartheid still affects energy availability in South Africa. This article describes a new Energy Policy White paper, to be presented to Parliament, which will start to rectify current inequalities. Most of the black citizens have no access to electricity, while the affluent white minority have cheap electricity readily available to them. The complexities of funding necessary changes are addressed. South Africa`s low-cost coal reserves, mined from opencast pits next to power stations, are likely to continue to be exploited. As yet the country`s solar potential is unlikely to be developed because of the availability of coal. The production of electricity and the future of liquid fuel industries are likely to remain in crisis, even after the White Paper`s implementation. (UK)

  15. Metabolic syndrome in South Asians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushik Pandit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available South Asia is home to one of the largest population of people with metabolic syndrome (MetS. The prevalence of MetS in South Asians varies according to region, extent of urbanization, lifestyle patterns, and socioeconomic/cultural factors. Recent data show that about one-third of the urban population in large cities in India has the MetS. All classical risk factors comprising the MetS are prevalent in Asian Indians residing in India. The higher risk in this ethnic population necessitated a lowering of the cut-off values of the risk factors to identify and intervene for the MetS to prevent diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Some pharmacological and nonpharmacological interventions are underway in MetS to assess the efficacy in preventing the diabetes and cardiovascular disease in this ethnic population.

  16. South Asian Diaspora in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    2005-01-01

    and exclusion, individualization and interdependency, these relationships are delineated on the basis of two empirical projects, combined with an array of secondary sources. South Asian youth are becoming a part of the receiving society along with developing their complex diaspora identities through strategies...... like forming relationships across ethnic borders, youth organisations, and media consumption. Intergenerational relationships indicate negotiations for most, combining individualization with interdependency, but with serious conflicts for some. The conclusions pin point the challenges for Scandinavian...

  17. Radiation technology in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Plessis, T.A.

    1976-01-01

    A review is given of the relatively new field of radiation technology in South Africa. Attention is drawn particularly to the role which radioactive radiation can play in the spheres of medicine, polymer chemistry and agriculture. The possibilities inherent in ionizing radiation in the synthesis of chemicals and new synthetic materials, are dealt with briefly, and the promising results already achieved in the manufacture of polymer-wood are considered [af

  18. Sponsorship evaluation in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adele D. Berndt

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Sponsorships are regarded as a marketing communications activity. This is seem as an investment made by an organisation that need to be evaluated in terms of its return and contribution. Sport sponsorships have increased in South Africa since re-admittance to the international sports arena. There are various objectives for sponsorships. The identification of these objectives is important for the evaluation of sponsorships. The articles proposes some guidelines for the evaluation of sponsorships.

  19. The South African Astronomical Observatory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The geographical position, climate and equipment at the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO), together with the enthusiasm and efforts of SAAO scientific and technical staff and of visiting scientists, have enabled the Observatory to make a major contribution to the fields of astrophysics and cosmology. During 1987 the SAAO has been involved in studies of the following: supernovae; galaxies, including Seyfert galaxies; celestial x-ray sources; magellanic clouds; pulsating variables; galatic structure; binary star phenomena; nebulae; interstellar matter and stellar astrophysics

  20. The South African energy scene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, H.T.

    1983-01-01

    The basic objective of any energy policy is to ensure that the energy-economy of the country developes in accordance with the national interest and promotes national well-being. Energy policies are necessarily based on the tenet of adequate energy availability at acceptable cost levels. Energy policy will evolve in each country to suit the particular circumstances applicable to that country. The overriding aspect of the South African energy policy is the striving towards maximum energy self-sufficiency under secure conditions. This implies maximum reduction and replacement of imported crude oil within financial and manpower constraints. In South Africa energy is not only one of the most important production factors in national economy, but also an important catalyst and stimulus for economic growth and development. The controlled export of energy can be utilized to enhance foreign exchange earnings. The various energy carriers and elements of the South African energy economy can consequently be discussed and evaluated as they are affected by the energy policy guidelines and objectives

  1. Breaking away to South America

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    In December 2010, Peter Dreesen of CERN’s Technology Department (TE) returned from a long trip to South America. In four months he traversed the entire Andean range, from the equator to a latitude of 55 degrees south—on a bicycle!   Peter Dreesen on the Salar de Uyuni Lake, Bolivia. 11 000 kilometres is one long bike ride! And yet, that’s what Peter Dreesen did, travelling from Quito, Ecuador to Ushuaia, Argentina. Peter, an engineer in the TE Department, is no novice: the year before, he cycled from Paris to Peking, a distance of 13 500 kilometres, in just over four months. His latest voyage began last August, when he loaded his bicycle and boarded a plane for South America. In the saddle. After a week of acclimatisation at three thousand metres altitude, Peter left Quito on 6 August 2010. He arrived in Ushuaia (el fin del mundo, the end of the world, as it’s known in South America) on 12 December 2010. He recounts: “It was a bizarre sensation...

  2. Spain in South Ukraine NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibanez, M.

    1994-01-01

    A Technical Assistance Protocol was signed between the Governments of the GIS and the Commission of the European Union (CEU) on August 2, 1991 and this was the starting point of the TACIS program. In this article, the activities described are those related to the TACIS-92/93/94 on site technical assistance to South Ukraine NPP (SUK NPP). Within the scope of the TACIS 92 Program the CEU and the Ukrainian Authorities agreed a list of projects to be implemented at South Ukraine NPP with the aim to improve the operational safety of the plant. This part of the program is called TACIS 92 on-site activities. The total budget allocated to these projects is a MECU. The European Union ''utility'' selected to lead this program at South Ukraine NPP was UNESA and the first contract to cover our activities was signed in July 1993 between the CEU (Mr. Pablo Benavides) and UNESA (Mr. Pedro Rivero). The projects will be implemented at SUK NPP but according to the contract UNESA is ''The Consultant'' and GOSKOMATON (The Ukrainian Sate Committee on Nuclear Power Utilization) is the ''Recipient Institution''. (Author)

  3. Foreign workers in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-Jin Lim

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In today’s global age many people cross national borders in search of better work and more wages. According to IOM, more than 100 000 000 workers leave their homeland and migrate to another country for this reason. Europe and North America have already experienced increase in foreign labor for many decades but nowadays, it is very common to see foreign laborers in Asian countries. As the number of foreign laborers rapidly increased, however, so did many social problems in relation to these workers. No country is safe from or immune to such social problems in regards to the foreign workers especially with a much easier and more efficient transportation system. In case of South Korea, the history of foreign labor may not be as long as other nations but as of 2007, it boasts of more than 250 000 foreign laborers and is thus facing just as many social problems as well. In order to investigate such social issues, this article explores the history of foreign laborers and their current situation in South Korea. Furthermore, this artticle examines both internal and external factors which may have caused exponential growth of foreign labor market in South Korea in the past decade.

  4. CIVIL JUSTICE IN SOUTH AFRICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Van Loggerenberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The South African adversarial system of civil procedure in the High Court owes its origin to that of England. As with all civil procedural systems, the South African system is not stagnant. Its primary sources, namely Acts of Parliament and rules of court, are constantly amended in an attempt to meet the changing needs of society. Court delay and costinefficient procedural mechanisms, however, contribute to public dismay. The High Court, in the exercise of its inherent power to regulate its process, do so with the purpose of enhancing access to justice. The advantage of the system lies in the fact that it is not cast in stone but could, subject to the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, be developed to make it more accessible to the public whilst protecting the public’s fundamental rights entrenched in the Constitution and, in this regard, particularly the right to afair trial embedded in sec. 34 of the Constitution. This contribution gives an overview of the system with reference to the court structure, the judiciary, the process in the High Court and its underlying principles, appeals, class actions and alternative civil dispute resolution mechanisms.

  5. South-South Cooperation, North-South Aid and the Prospect of International Aid Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meibo Huang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available South-South Cooperation (SSC and North-South Aid (NSA arise from different historical conditions and there are great differences between their philosophies, principles and paradigms. Against the background of a changing global environment, developed countries realized that the original development aid architecture must be reformed on one hand, and that developing countries are increasingly important in the aid architecture on the other. Hence, Western donors began to rethink their aid principles and methods, and accepted the concept of development effectiveness gradually, an attempt to establish global development forum and global partnership including emerging donors, beneficiary countries, civil society and the private sector. Nevertheless, being developing countries themselves, emerging donors are faced with unsolved domestic poverty issues and imperfect aid management institutions, which means that the emerging donors are unable to take a dominant position in the current aid architecture. Hence, the future dialogue and cooperation between traditional and emerging donors should feature the principle that the responsibilities taken by each party are collective but not identical, with developing countries bearing the main responsibilities in promoting poverty reduction and economic development in developing countries. They should be mutually tolerant about the different philosophies and share useful experiences. Moreover, emerging donors should promote development capacity building in recipient countries through win-win cooperation and solve their domestic development issues at the same time.

  6. Uranium in a changing South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    In the early 1980s, the Republic of South Africa was the world's second-largest producer of uranium, and the country historically has been a major exporter of many other important mineral resources, including gold, platinum group metals, manganese, vanadium, and gem-quality diamonds. Yet political turbulence in the latter part of the decade caused economic stress on South Africa. Apartheid, the country's disenfranchisement of the black majority, put South Africa in the international spotlight. The world responded by implementing economic sanctions against South Africa, to pressure its government into change. In the past several years, South Africa has made significant progress toward ending apartheid. As a result, many US economic sanctions previously maintained against the country have been lifted. However, economic troubles continue to plague South Africa; repealing sanctions has done little to alleviate its economic and political challenges.

  7. Developing an ionospheric map for South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. I. Okoh

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The development of a map of the ionosphere over South Africa is presented in this paper. The International Reference Ionosphere (IRI model, South African Bottomside Ionospheric Model (SABIM, and measurements from ionosondes in the South African Ionosonde Network, were combined within their own limitations to develop an accurate representation of the South African ionosphere. The map is essentially in the form of a computer program that shows spatial and temporal representations of the South African ionosphere for a given set of geophysical parameters. A validation of the map is attempted using a comparison of Total Electron Content (TEC values derived from the map, from the IRI model, and from Global Positioning System (GPS measurements. It is foreseen that the final South African ionospheric map will be implemented as a Space Weather product of the African Space Weather Regional Warning Centre.

  8. Uranium in a changing South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    In the early 1980s, the Republic of South Africa was the world's second-largest producer of uranium, and the country historically has been a major exporter of many other important mineral resources, including gold, platinum group metals, manganese, vanadium, and gem-quality diamonds. Yet political turbulence in the latter part of the decade caused economic stress on South Africa. Apartheid, the country's disenfranchisement of the black majority, put South Africa in the international spotlight. The world responded by implementing economic sanctions against South Africa, to pressure its government into change. In the past several years, South Africa has made significant progress toward ending apartheid. As a result, many US economic sanctions previously maintained against the country have been lifted. However, economic troubles continue to plague South Africa; repealing sanctions has done little to alleviate its economic and political challenges

  9. Rural and urban suicide in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, B C Ben; Lester, David

    2012-10-01

    Suicide rates in 2005 in South Korea were higher in rural areas than in urban areas. Those in rural areas more often used pesticides and chemicals as a method for suicide, and there was a greater proportion of men and the elderly, both groups at higher risk for suicide in South Korea. These three factors may account for the high rural suicide rate in South Korea.

  10. United States interests in South Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-11

    Gulf of Malacca in the 10 Bhupinder Singh , ―The Indian Ocean and regional Security‖ (Punjab: B.C...Qaida in Afghanistan. Swati Parashar of the South Asian Analysis Group says that, US led anti terrorist operations cannot exclude South Asia...23 Swati Parashar, ―The U.S and South Asia: From Tactical Security Relationship Towards a Strategic Partnership,‖ 2006, http

  11. Distribution of lichen flora on South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Jae-Seoun; Harada, Hiroshi; Oh, Soon-Ok; Lim, Kwang-Mi; Kang, Eui-Sung; Lee, Seung Mi; Kahng, Hyung-Yeel; Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Jae-Sung; Koh, Young Jin

    2004-06-01

    After an overview on the temporary situation of the lichenology in South Korea, localities of 95 macrolichen taxa are reported for South Korea. In this revised lichen flora of South Korea, 16 species are apparently new to the territory. Voucher specimens have been deposited in the Korean Lichen Research Institute (KoLRI) at Sunchon National University in Korea, and duplicates have also been donated to the National History Museum and Institute, in Chiba, (CBM) Japan.

  12. South Africa : an opportunity for Western Europe ?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, D.

    1989-01-01

    Of the six threshold countries (Argentina, Brazil, India, Israel, Pakistan, and South Africa), South Africa is the only one that, by a judicious application of pressures and incentives might be induced to accede the Non-Proliferation Treaty. There are several reasons for this, which derive chiefly from South Africa's political isolation and economic vulnerability and the absence of any credible military threat from beyond the country's borders. (author)

  13. Tufa stromatolite ecosystems on the South African south coast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renzo Perissinotto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Following the first description of living marine stromatolites along the South African east coast, new investigations along the south coast have revealed the occurrence of extensive fields of actively calcifying stromatolites. These stromatolites have been recorded at regular distances along a 200-km stretch of coastline, from Cape Recife in the east to the Storms River mouth in the west, with the highest density found between Schoenmakerskop and the Maitland River mouth. All active stromatolites are associated with freshwater seepage streams flowing from the dune cordon, which form rimstone dams and other accretions capable of retaining water in the supratidal platform. Resulting pools can reach a maximum depth of about 1 m and constitute a unique ecosystem in which freshwater and marine organisms alternate their dominance in response to vertical mixing and the balance between freshwater versus marine inflow. Although the factors controlling stromatolite growth are yet to be determined, nitrogen appears to be supplied mainly via the dune seeps. The epibenthic algal community within stromatolite pools is generally co-dominated by cyanobacteria and chlorophytes, with minimal diatom contribution.

  14. Near East/South Asia Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    .... This report from Near East/South Asia, Algeria, Sudan, Iraq, Israel, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India, Iran, and Pakistan, contains articles on Economics, Political Science...

  15. Near East/South Asia Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    .... This report from Near East/South Asia, Egypt, Libya, Morocco, Tunisia, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, and Iran contains articles on Political Science, Economics, Regional...

  16. Near East/South Asia Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    .... This report from Near East/South Asia, Egypt, Libya, Tunisia, Israel, Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Iran, Iraq, and Pakistan contains articles on International, Regional, Political and Economic Issues...

  17. Near East/South Asia Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    .... This report from the Near East/South Asia, Algeria, Egypt, Tunisia, Israel, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan and Iran, contains articles on International Affairs, Politics...

  18. South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    On 8 August 1986 the Protocols to the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty were adopted by the South Pacific Forum at its 17 th session, in Suva. The attached texts of the Protocols were formally communicated to the Director General by the Director of the South Pacific Bureau for Economic Co-operation (SPEC) and are herewith being circulated to all Member States for their information pursuant to a request made by the Director of SPEC. Following the deposit of the eighth instrument of ratification, the South Pacific Nuclear Free Zone Treaty entered into force on 11 December 1986 [es

  19. Near East/South Asia Report

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1986-01-01

    .... This report contains articles on the Near East/South Asia, Egypt, Mauritania, Morocco, Tunisia, Israel, Jordan, Kuwait, Oman, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Afghanistan, Iran and Pakistan...

  20. Unsung heroes in the South.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    While recognizing the important role played by lesbian women in HIV/AIDS prevention in many countries, and as members of some gay organizations in the South, this article focuses only on gay men. Even though formidable societal proscriptions against homosexuality exist in many developing countries and Eastern European countries, gay men served duty on the front lines as AIDS educators and care givers. The threat of the AIDS crisis impelled some to openly acknowledge their sexuality in an effort to reach gay men at risk. In the West, gay organizations had already laid a 10 year foundation of organization and community trust, when the AIDS epidemic appeared in the public spot light. This fact allowed them to act as effective educators of their own gay communities. They were so effective that the number of new HIV cases has leveled off in the gay community. In Central and South America, gay movement cohered in 1976 and responded quickly to AIDS in 1983. In Africa, homosexuality is often considered a contamination of the West and national gay organizations (NGOs) have only recently been formed in Ghana, Tanzania, and Nigeria. The only AIDS services organizations (ASOs) for black men exist in Zimbabwe and South Africa. In Asia NGOs are a new phenomenon that exist only in Hong Kong, Indonesia, India, Malaysia, Singapore, Taiwan and Thailand. All NGOs have several things in common. Governments are rarely interested in working with NGOs so they are forced to find their own funding and develop their own education campaigns. Even in countries that recognize the implications and magnitude of the AIDS crisis, their education programs and policies are often homophobic or anti-gay. In the countries where the government is sympathetic to the gay community they rely upon NGOs to help them develop national education programs for both gays and the rest of the population.